Science.gov

Sample records for infected hip replacement

  1. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone from your hip joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts. A hip replacement can Relieve pain Help your hip joint work better Improve walking and other movements The ...

  2. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... replacement is an operation in which a damaged hip joint is removed and replaced with an artificial joint. ... are many medical conditions that can damage the hip joint. (Watch the video to learn about what goes ...

  3. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002975.htm Hip joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hip joint replacement is surgery to replace all or part ...

  4. Hip joint replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100006.htm Hip joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The hip joint is made up of two major parts: the ...

  5. Hip replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... a hip replacement and need antibiotics before any dental work. When to Call Your Doctor Call your health care provider if you have: A sudden increase in pain Chest pain or shortness of breath Frequent urination ...

  6. Increased risk of revision for infection in rheumatoid arthritis patients with total hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Fenstad, Anne M; Dale, Håvard; Havelin, Leif; Hallan, Geir; Overgaard, Søren; Pedersen, Alma B; Kärrholm, Johan; Garellick, Göran; Pulkkinen, Pekka; Eskelinen, Antti; Mäkelä, Keijo; Engesæter, Lars B; Fevang, Bjørg-Tilde

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Medical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, including immune modulation. We investigated the risk of revision for infection after primary total hip replacement (THR) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis over a 16-year period, and compared it with that in THR patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Patients and methods We identified 13,384 THRs in RA patients and 377,287 THRs in OA patients from 1995 through 2010 in a dataset from the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA). Kaplan-Meier survival curves, with revision for infection as the endpoint, were constructed. Cox regression analyses were performed to calculate the relative risk (RR) of revision for infection adjusted for age, sex, fixation technique, and year of primary surgery. Results RA patients had a 1.3 times (95% CI 1.0–1.6) higher risk of revision for infection. After 2001, this risk increased more for RA patients than for OA patients. During the first 3 months and from 8 years postoperatively, the risk of revision for infection was higher in RA patients with THRs fixated with antibiotic-loaded cement than in corresponding OA patients. Interpretation We found a slightly higher overall risk of revision for infection in RA patients than in OA patients, but this difference was only present after 2001. In THRs with antibiotic-loaded cement, the risk of very early and late infections leading to revision was higher in RA patients than in OA patients. PMID:25782042

  7. Modified Girdlestone arthroplasty and hip arthrodesis using the Ilizarov external fixator as a salvage method in the management of severely infected total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kliushin, Nikolai M; Ababkov, Yuri V; Ermakov, Artem M; Malkova, Tatiana A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resection arthroplasty or hip arthrodesis after total hip replacement (THR) can be used to salvage the limb in case with deep infection and severe bone loss. The Ilizarov fixator provides stability, axial correction, weight-bearing and good fusion rates. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively assessed the outcomes of 37 patients with severe periprosthetic infection after THR treated between 1999 and 2011. The treatment included implant removal, debridement and a modified Girdestone arthroplasty (29 cases) or hip arthrodesis (seven cases) using the Ilizarov fixator. The Ilizarov fixation continued from 45 to 50 days in the modified arthroplasty group and 90 days in the arthrodesis group. One case was treated using the conventional resection arthroplasty bilaterally. Results: Eighteen months after treatment, infection control was seen in 97.3% cases. Six hips were fused as one patient died in this group. Limb length discrepancy (LLD) averaged 5.5 cm. The Harris hip score ranged from 35 to 92 points. Hip joint motion ranged from 10° to 30° in the modified arthroplasty group. All subjects could walk independently or using support aids. No subluxation or LLD progression was observed. Conclusion: The modified Girdlestone arthroplasty and hip arthrodesis using the Ilizarov apparatus results in sufficient ability for ambulation and good infection control in cases of failed THR associated with severe infection. PMID:26955173

  8. Total hip replacement in dancers.

    PubMed

    Buyls, Inge R A E; Rietveld, A B M Boni; Ourila, Tiia; Emerton, Mark E; Bird, H A

    2013-04-01

    A case report of a professional contemporary dancer who successfully returned to the stage after bilateral total hip replacements (THR) for osteoarthritis is presented, together with her own commentary and a retrospective cohort study of total hip replacements in dancers. In the presented cohort, there were no post-operative dislocations or infections, the original pain had been relieved, rehabilitation was objectively normal and all resumed their dance (teaching) activities. Nevertheless, they were disappointed about the prolonged rehabilitation. Due to their high demands as professional dancers, post-operative expectations were too optimistic in view of the usual quick and favourable results of THR in the older and less physically active, general population. In all dancers with unilateral osteoarthritis, the left hip was involved, which may reflect the tendency to use the left leg as standing leg and be suggestive that strenuous physical activity may lead to osteoarthritis. Better rehabilitation guidelines are needed for dancer patients undergoing THR, especially drawing their attention to realistic post-operative expectations. PMID:23588878

  9. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  10. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Preventing venous thromboembolic disease in patients undergoing elective hip and knee arthopolasty: Evidence-based guideline and evidence report. American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2011. Harkess JW, Crockarell JR. Arthroplasty of ...

  11. Minimally invasive hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smits SA, Swinford RR, Bahamonde RE. A randomized, prospective study of 3 minimally invasive surgical approaches in total hip arthroplasty: comprehensive gait analysis. J Arthroplasty . 2008;23:68-73. PMID: 18722305 ...

  12. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... patientinstructions/000368.htm Deciding to have knee or hip replacement To use the sharing features on this page, ... make a decision. Who Benefits From Knee or hip Replacement Surgery? The most common reason to have a ...

  13. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is normal to lose blood during and after hip or knee replacement surgery. Some people need a blood transfusion during ... clot form are higher during and soon after hip or knee replacement surgery. Sitting or lying down for long periods ...

  14. Rationale for one stage exchange of infected hip replacement using uncemented implants and antibiotic impregnated bone graft

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Infection of a total hip replacement (THR) is considered a devastating complication, necessitating its complete removal and thorough debridement of the site. It is undoubted that one stage exchange, if successful, would provide the best benefit both for the patient and the society. Still the fear of re-infection dominates the surgeons´ decisions and in the majority of cases directs them to multiple stage protocols. However, there is no scientifically based argument for that practice. Successful eradication of infection with two stage procedures is reported to average 80% to 98%. On the other hand a literature review of Jackson and Schmalzried (CORR 2000) summarizing the results of 1,299 infected hip replacements treated with direct exchange (almost exclusively using antibiotic loaded cement), reports of 1,077 (83%) having been successful. The comparable results suggest, that the major factor for a successful outcome with traditional approaches may be found in the quality of surgical debridement and dead space management. Failures in all protocols seem to be caused by small fragments of bacterial colonies remaining after debridement, whereas neither systemic antibiotics nor antibiotic loaded bone cement (PMMA) have been able to improve the situation significantly. Reasons for failure may be found in the limited sensitivity of traditional bacterial culturing and reduced antibiotic susceptibility of involved pathogens, especially considering biofilm formation. Whenever a new prosthesis is implanted into a previously infected site the surgeon must be aware of increased risk of failure, both in single or two stage revisions. Eventual removal therefore should be easy with low risk of additional damage to the bony substance. On the other hand it should also have potential of a good long term result in case of success. Cemented revisions generally show inferior long term results compared to uncemented techniques; the addition of antibiotics to cement reduces its

  15. Renal function after elective total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Perregaard, Helene; Damholt, Mette B; Solgaard, Søren; Petersen, Morten B

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased short-term and long-term mortality in intensive care populations and in several surgical specialties, but there are very few data concerning orthopedic populations. We have studied the incidence of AKI and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in an elective population of orthopedic patients undergoing primary total hip replacement, hypothesizing that chronic kidney disease predisposes to AKI. Patients and methods - This was a single-center, population-based, retrospective, registry-based cohort study involving all primary elective total hip replacements performed from January 2003 through December 2012. Patient demographics and creatinine values were registered. We evaluated the presence of CKD and AKI according to the international guidelines for kidney disease (KDIGO Acute Kidney Injury Workgroup 2013 ). Results - 3,416 patients were included (2,064 females (60%)). AKI (according to KDIGO criteria) was seen in 75 patients (2.2%, 95% CI: 1.7-2.7) in the course of primary total hip replacement. Of these, 26 had pre-existing CKD of class 3-5. Pre-existing CKD of class 3-5, indicating moderately to severely reduced kidney function, was seen in 374 individuals (11%). Interpretation - Development of acute kidney injury appears to be a substantial problem compared to other complications related to elective total hip arthroplasty, i.e. luxation and infection. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease may be especially vulnerable. The clinical impact of acute kidney injury in an elective orthopedic population remains to be elucidated. PMID:26937782

  16. Renal function after elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Perregaard, Helene; Damholt, Mette B; Solgaard, Søren; Petersen, Morten B

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased short-term and long-term mortality in intensive care populations and in several surgical specialties, but there are very few data concerning orthopedic populations. We have studied the incidence of AKI and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in an elective population of orthopedic patients undergoing primary total hip replacement, hypothesizing that chronic kidney disease predisposes to AKI. Patients and methods This was a single-center, population-based, retrospective, registry-based cohort study involving all primary elective total hip replacements performed from January 2003 through December 2012. Patient demographics and creatinine values were registered. We evaluated the presence of CKD and AKI according to the international guidelines for kidney disease (KDIGO Acute Kidney Injury Workgroup 2013). Results 3,416 patients were included (2,064 females (60%)). AKI (according to KDIGO criteria) was seen in 75 patients (2.2%, 95% CI: 1.7–2.7) in the course of primary total hip replacement. Of these, 26 had pre-existing CKD of class 3–5. Pre-existing CKD of class 3–5, indicating moderately to severely reduced kidney function, was seen in 374 individuals (11%). Interpretation Development of acute kidney injury appears to be a substantial problem compared to other complications related to elective total hip arthroplasty, i.e. luxation and infection. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease may be especially vulnerable. The clinical impact of acute kidney injury in an elective orthopedic population remains to be elucidated. PMID:26937782

  17. Total hip replacement for developmental dysplasia of hip and postoperative nursing.

    PubMed

    Zong, S J; Wang, F; Hu, S L

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical effect of total hip replacement for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and analyze the postoperative nursing. Sixty patients (78 hips) aged 18-75 years (average 58.6±2.31 years) who received total hip replacement for treatment of DDH at the Zhengzhou People’s Hospital, Henan, China, from April 2013 to June 2016 were selected as research subjects. Twenty-four patients were male (30 hips) and 36 were female (48 hips). Of the 60 patients, according to Crowe typing, 24 were type I (30 hips), 26 were type II (34 hips), 6 were type III (8 hips) and 4 were type IV (6 hips). According to the Harris hip score system, the score of all hips was 39.46±3.56 points average (18-56 points) before treatment and resulted as 89.60±4.25 points (79-98 points) at the last follow-up, showing a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05). Complications such as wound infection, dislocation, fracture of femoral shaft, femoral nerve and injury of sciatic nerve were not found after treatment. A total of 48 cases (58 hips) obtained excellent curative results (93.33% recovery), 8 cases (14 hips) good (92.31% recovery), and 4 cases (6 hips) medium. Total hip replacement proved to be effective in treating DDH and secondary osteoarthritis. Moreover, soft tissue release and an optimum degree recovery of anatomic form and physiological function of the diseased hip is an important basis for reconstructing the acetabulum and stabilizing acetabulum prosthesis. PMID:27049089

  18. Hip joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip socket. The socket is usually made of metal. A liner that fits inside the socket. It ... usually plastic, but some surgeons use ceramic and metal. The liner allows the hip to move smoothly. ...

  19. Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 7. Read More Hip joint replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain ... joint replacement - discharge Taking care of your new hip joint Update Date 3/5/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  20. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 7. Read More Hip joint replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain ... joint replacement - discharge Taking care of your new hip joint Update Date 3/5/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  1. Hip or knee replacement - in the hospital after

    MedlinePlus

    Hip replacement surgery - after - self-care; Knee replacement surgery - after - self-care ... occupational therapist will teach people who have had hip replacement how to safely perform daily activities . All of ...

  2. Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Below are some questions you may want to ask your health care provider to help you take ... What to ask your doctor after hip or knee replacement; Hip replacement - after - what to ask your doctor; Knee replacement - after - ...

  3. Hip Abduction Can Prevent Posterior Edge Loading of Hip Replacements

    PubMed Central

    van Arkel, Richard J; Modenese, Luca; Phillips, Andrew TM; Jeffers, Jonathan RT

    2013-01-01

    Edge loading causes clinical problems for hard-on-hard hip replacements, and edge loading wear scars are present on the majority of retrieved components. We asked the question: are the lines of action of hip joint muscles such that edge loading can occur in a well-designed, well-positioned acetabular cup? A musculoskeletal model, based on cadaveric lower limb geometry, was used to calculate for each muscle, in every position within the complete range of motion, whether its contraction would safely pull the femoral head into the cup or contribute to edge loading. The results show that all the muscles that insert into the distal femur, patella, or tibia could cause edge loading of a well-positioned cup when the hip is in deep flexion. Patients frequently use distally inserting muscles for movements requiring deep hip flexion, such as sit-to-stand. Importantly, the results, which are supported by in vivo data and clinical findings, also show that risk of edge loading is dramatically reduced by combining deep hip flexion with hip abduction. Patients, including those with sub-optimally positioned cups, may be able to reduce the prevalence of edge loading by rising from chairs or stooping with the hip abducted. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 31:1172–1179, 2013. PMID:23575923

  4. Total hip replacement for high dislocated hips without femoral shortening osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Zhu, Z-A; Xie, Y-Z; Yu, B; Yu, D-G

    2011-09-01

    When performing total hip replacement (THR) in high dislocated hips, the presence of soft-tissue contractures means that most surgeons prefer to use a femoral shortening osteotomy in order to avoid the risk of neurovascular damage. However, this technique will sacrifice femoral length and reduce the extent of any leg-length equalisation. We report our experience of 74 THRs performed between 2000 and 2008 in 65 patients with a high dislocated hip without a femoral shortening osteotomy. The mean age of the patients was 55 years (46 to 72) and the mean follow-up was 42 months (12 to 78). All implants were cementless except for one resurfacing hip implant. We attempted to place the acetabular component in the anatomical position in each hip. The mean Harris hip score improved from 53 points (34 to 74) pre-operatively to 86 points (78 to 95) at final follow-up. The mean radiologically determined leg lengthening was 42 mm (30 to 66), and the mean leg-length discrepancy decreased from 36 mm (5 to 56) pre-operatively to 8.5 mm (0 to 18) postoperatively. Although there were four (5%) post-operative femoral nerve palsies, three had fully resolved by six months after the operation. No loosening of the implant was observed, and no dislocations or infections were encountered. Total hip replacement without a femoral shortening osteotomy proved to be a safe and effective surgical treatment for high dislocated hips. PMID:21911529

  5. Hip replacement by a minimal anterior approach.

    PubMed

    Paillard, P

    2007-08-01

    The mini-incision anterior approach in total hip replacement is not new, but uses a shorter incision than the traditional Hueter approach, typically only 6-8 cm in length. Despite its size, the single anterior incision allows good exposure. It is very atraumatic, preserves muscles and tendons, and allows the patient early mobilisation and fast postoperative recovery. Although, a special table (e.g., a Judet table) and specific tools (e.g., a curved reamer) are needed to perform hip replacement via the mini-anterior approach, any kind of hip prosthesis (cemented or uncemented) can be implanted. As there is a significant learning curve in mastering the mini-incision anterior approach, surgeons are advised to start with a longer incision and then to decrease its length with increasing experience. PMID:17657491

  6. Hip Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Hip Replacement - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional ( ...

  7. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... replace all or part of your hip or knee joint with an artificial device (a prosthesis). Below are some questions you may want to ask your health care provider to help you prepare for your hip or knee replacement.

  8. A cost-effectiveness modelling study of strategies to reduce risk of infection following primary hip replacement based on a systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Nicholas; Wloch, Catherine; Wilson, Jennie; Barnett, Adrian; Sutton, Alex; Cooper, Nicola; Merollini, Katharina; McCreanor, Victoria; Cheng, Qinglu; Burn, Edward; Lamagni, Theresa; Charlett, Andre

    2016-01-01

    123,788 total hip replacements (THRs) and nine infection control strategies, were identified. The quality of the evidence was judged against four categories developed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Methods for Development of NICE Public Health Guidance ( http://publications.nice.org.uk/methods-for-the-development-of-nice-public-health-guidance-third-edition-pmg4 ), accessed March 2012. All evidence was found to fit the two highest categories of 1 and 2. Nine competing infection control interventions [treatments (Ts) 1-9] were used in a cohort simulation model of 77,321 patients who had a primary THR in 2012. Predictions were made for cases of deep infection and total costs, and QALY outcomes. Compared with a baseline of T1 (no systemic antibiotics, plain cement and conventional ventilation) all other treatment strategies reduced risk. T6 was the most effective (systemic antibiotics, antibiotic-impregnated cement and conventional ventilation) and prevented a further 1481 cases of deep infection, and led to the largest annual cost savings and the greatest gains to QALYs. The additional uses of laminar airflow and body exhaust suits indicate higher costs and worse health outcomes. CONCLUSIONS T6 is an optimal strategy for reducing the risk of SSI following THA. The other strategies that are commonly used among NHS hospitals lead to higher cost and worse QALY outcomes. Policy-makers, therefore, have an opportunity to save resources and improve health outcomes. The effects of laminar air flow and body exhaust suits might be further studied if policy-makers are to consider disinvesting in these technologies. LIMITATIONS A wide range of evidence sources was synthesised and there is large uncertainty in the conclusions. FUNDING The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme and the Queensland Health Quality Improvement and Enhancement Programme (grant number 2008001769). PMID:27468732

  9. Patient injuries in primary total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Hirvensalo, Eero; Huhtala, Heini; Remes, Ville

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Although the results of primary total hip replacements (THRs) are generally excellent, sometimes serious complications arise. Some of these severe complications are considered to be patient injuries. We analyzed primary THR-related patient injuries in a nationwide setting. Patients and methods - We evaluated all the primary THR-related patient injury claims in Finland between 2008 and 2010. We used the original medical records and 2 nationwide registries, the Care Register for Social Welfare and Health Care and the Patient Injury Claim Register. Results - We identified 563 claims, 44% of which were compensated (n = 250). Of these 250 compensated claims, 79% were considered to be avoidable (treatment injuries) and 21% were severe unexpected infections (with a preoperative infection risk of less than 2%). The most common type of technical error was cup malposition (31%). High-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume ≥ 400) had a lower patient injury rate. In lower-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume of < 400), the relative risks (RRs) of patient injury for any reason, due to technical errors, or because of cup malposition were 2-fold (95% CI: 1.6-3.1), 4-fold (95% CI: 2.3-6.2), and 9-fold (95% CI: 3-28), respectively, compared to high-volume hospitals. Interpretation - Our study provides the first comprehensive nationwide data on THR-related patient injury types. Hospital volume was associated with the quality and quantity of errors detected. An annual hospital volume of ≥ 400 primary THRs was established as a protective factor against patient injuries. PMID:26808350

  10. Patient injuries in primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Hirvensalo, Eero; Huhtala, Heini; Remes, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Although the results of primary total hip replacements (THRs) are generally excellent, sometimes serious complications arise. Some of these severe complications are considered to be patient injuries. We analyzed primary THR-related patient injuries in a nationwide setting. Patients and methods We evaluated all the primary THR-related patient injury claims in Finland between 2008 and 2010. We used the original medical records and 2 nationwide registries, the Care Register for Social Welfare and Health Care and the Patient Injury Claim Register. Results We identified 563 claims, 44% of which were compensated (n = 250). Of these 250 compensated claims, 79% were considered to be avoidable (treatment injuries) and 21% were severe unexpected infections (with a preoperative infection risk of less than 2%). The most common type of technical error was cup malposition (31%). High-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume ≥ 400) had a lower patient injury rate. In lower-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume of < 400), the relative risks (RRs) of patient injury for any reason, due to technical errors, or because of cup malposition were 2-fold (95% CI: 1.6–3.1), 4-fold (95% CI: 2.3–6.2), and 9-fold (95% CI: 3–28), respectively, compared to high-volume hospitals. Interpretation Our study provides the first comprehensive nationwide data on THR-related patient injury types. Hospital volume was associated with the quality and quantity of errors detected. An annual hospital volume of ≥ 400 primary THRs was established as a protective factor against patient injuries. PMID:26808350

  11. The Anterior Approach for Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Hochfelder, Jason P; Davidovitch, Roy I

    2016-03-01

    The anterior approach for total hip replacements has recently gained popularity. Some authors report faster recoveries and decreased dislocation rated with no increased risk of complications. However others claim no difference in outcomes when compared to other approaches yet an increase in complication rates. This paper provides a brief history of the approach, discusses various indications and contraindications, preoperative considerations, surgical techniques, and postoperative protocols. PMID:26977549

  12. Hip Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Tagalog ( ... 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Portuguese (português) Total Hip Replacement Substituição total de quadril - português ( ...

  13. Total Hip Joint Replacement Biotelemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, J. F.; Postal, R. B.; Luntz, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a biotelemetry system that is hermetically sealed within a total hip replacement implant is reported. The telemetry system transmits six channels of stress data to reconstruct the major forces acting on the neck of the prosthesis and uses an induction power coupling technique to eliminate the need for internal batteries. The activities associated with the telemetry microminiaturization, data recovery console, hardware fabrications, power induction systems, electrical and mechanical testing and hermetic sealing test results are discussed.

  14. Mortality after total hip replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Berstock, J. R.; Beswick, A. D.; Lenguerrand, E.; Whitehouse, M. R.; Blom, A. W.

    2014-01-01

    Total hip replacement causes a short-term increase in the risk of mortality. It is important to quantify this and to identify modifiable risk factors so that the risk of post-operative mortality can be minimised. We performed a systematic review and critical evaluation of the current literature on the topic. We identified 32 studies published over the last 10 years which provide either 30-day or 90-day mortality data. We estimate the pooled incidence of mortality during the first 30 and 90 days following hip replacement to be 0.30% (95% CI 0.22 to 0.38) and 0.65% (95% CI 0.50 to 0.81), respectively. We found strong evidence of a temporal trend towards reducing mortality rates despite increasingly co-morbid patients. The risk factors for early mortality most commonly identified are increasing age, male gender and co-morbid conditions, particularly cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular complications appear to have overtaken fatal pulmonary emboli as the leading cause of death after hip replacement. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:175–82. PMID:24894596

  15. Patient-adapted treatment for prosthetic hip joint infection.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard P; Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Borens, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Hip joint replacement is 1 of the most successful surgical procedures of the last century and the number of replacements implanted is steadily growing. An infected hip arthroplasty is a disaster, it leads to patient suffering, surgeon's frustration and significant costs to the health system. The treatment of an infected hip replacement is challenging, healing rates can be low, functional results poor with decreased patient satisfaction. However, if a patient-adapted treatment of infected hip joints is used a success rate of above 90% can be obtained.Patient-adapted treatment is based on 5 important concepts: teamwork; understanding the biofilm; diagnostic accuracy; correct definition and classification of PJI; and patient-tailored treatment.This review presents a patient-adapted treatment strategy to prosthetic hip infection. It incorporates the best aspects of the single and staged surgical strategies and promotes the short interval philosophy for the 2-stage approach. PMID:26044528

  16. Uncoupling of bone turnover following hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Whitson, H; DeMarco, D; Reilly, D; Murphy, S; Yett, H S; Mattingly, D; Greenspan, S L

    2002-07-01

    Studies using total hip replacement surgery as a model for acute hip injury have shown that bone mineral density of the proximal femur decreases 6-18% in the 6 months following surgery. To examine the acute biochemical mechanism associated with bone loss, we measured two indicators of bone formation [serum osteocalcin (OC), serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP)], as well as two markers for bone resorption [urine and serum N-telopeptide cross-linked collagen type 1 (NTx)], in 20 patients (10 men, 10 women, mean age 59.4 years) prior to hip replacement and 1-2 days postsurgery. The average OC value (ng/ml) decreased by 57.3% following surgery (7.5 +/- 4.3 to 3.2 +/- 1.1, P <0.001), and the average BSAP level (U/L) decreased by 27.6% (19.9 +/- 5.6 to 14.4 +/- 3.7, P <0.001). In contrast, levels of urine NTx (nmol BCE/mmol Cr) did not change significantly after the surgery (73.9 +/- 47.2 to 70.1 +/- 29.7). In addition, there was no change in serum NTx (nmol BCE) after surgery (11.8 +/- 2.3 to 11.8 +/- 3.0). Six months after surgery, bone mass had not changed significantly from baseline. These findings suggest that there is an uncoupling of bone turnover following hip replacement surgery which is characterized by significant reductions in bone formation without compensatory decreases in bone resorption, potentially leading to bone loss. Longer periods of follow-up are needed to assess long-term bone mass changes. PMID:12200656

  17. Many Take Opioids Months After Hip, Knee Replacements

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159194.html Many Take Opioids Months After Hip, Knee Replacements Study findings highlight growing ... continue to take powerful prescription opioid painkillers many months after joint replacement surgery, a new study shows. ...

  18. Many Take Opioids Months After Hip, Knee Replacements

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_159194.html Many Take Opioids Months After Hip, Knee Replacements Study findings highlight growing ... continue to take powerful prescription opioid painkillers many months after joint replacement surgery, a new study shows. ...

  19. Unilateral total hip replacement patients with symptomatic leg length inequality have abnormal hip biomechanics during walking

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junyan; McWilliams, Anthony B.; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John; Stone, Martin H.; Redmond, Anthony C.; Stewart, Todd D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptomatic leg length inequality accounts for 8.7% of total hip replacement related claims made against the UK National Health Service Litigation authority. It has not been established whether symptomatic leg length inequality patients following total hip replacement have abnormal hip kinetics during gait. Methods Hip kinetics in 15 unilateral total hip replacement patients with symptomatic leg length inequality during gait was determined through multibody dynamics and compared to 15 native hip healthy controls and 15 ‘successful’ asymptomatic unilateral total hip replacement patients. Finding More significant differences from normal were found in symptomatic leg length inequality patients than in asymptomatic total hip replacement patients. The leg length inequality patients had altered functions defined by lower gait velocity, reduced stride length, reduced ground reaction force, decreased hip range of motion, reduced hip moment and less dynamic hip force with a 24% lower heel-strike peak, 66% higher mid-stance trough and 37% lower toe-off peak. Greater asymmetry in hip contact force was also observed in leg length inequality patients. Interpretation These gait adaptions may affect the function of the implant and other healthy joints in symptomatic leg length inequality patients. This study provides important information for the musculoskeletal function and rehabilitation of symptomatic leg length inequality patients. PMID:25900447

  20. Recent Patents and Designs on Hip Replacement Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Derar, H; Shahinpoor, M

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery has gone through tremendous evolution since the first procedure in 1840. In the past five decades the advances that have been made in technology, advanced and smart materials innovations, surgical techniques, robotic surgery and methods of fixations and sterilization, facilitated hip implants that undergo multiple design revolutions seeking the least problematic implants and a longer survivorship. Hip surgery has become a solution for many in need of hip joint remedy and replacement across the globe. Nevertheless, there are still long-term problems that are essential to search and resolve to find the optimum implant. This paper reviews several recent patents on hip replacement surgery. The patents present various designs of prostheses, different materials as well as methods of fixation. Each of the patents presents a new design as a solution to different issues ranging from the longevity of the hip prostheses to discomfort and inconvenience experienced by patients in the long-term. PMID:25893020

  1. Recent patents and designs on hip replacement prostheses.

    PubMed

    Derar, H; Shahinpoor, M

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery has gone through tremendous evolution since the first procedure in 1840. In the past five decades the advances that have been made in technology, advanced and smart materials innovations, surgical techniques, robotic surgery and methods of fixations and sterilization, facilitated hip implants that undergo multiple design revolutions seeking the least problematic implants and a longer survivorship. Hip surgery has become a solution for many in need of hip joint remedy and replacement across the globe. Nevertheless, there are still long-term problems that are essential to search and resolve to find the optimum implant. This paper reviews several recent patents on hip replacement surgery. The patents present various designs of prostheses, different materials as well as methods of fixation. Each of the patents presents a new design as a solution to different issues ranging from the longevity of the hip prostheses to discomfort and inconvenience experienced by patients in the long-term. PMID:25893020

  2. Primary total hip replacement versus hip resurfacing - hospital considerations.

    PubMed

    Ward, William G; Carter, Christina J; Barone, Marisa; Jinnah, Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors regarding surgical procedures and patient selection affect hospital staffing needs as well as hospital revenues. In order to better understand the potential impact on hospitals that hip arthroplasty device selection (standard total hip arthroplasty vs. resurfacing) creates, a review of all primary hip arthroplasties performed at one institution was designed to identify factors that impacted hospital staffing needs and revenue generation. All primary hip arthroplasties undertaken over three fiscal years (2008 to 2010) were reviewed, utilizing only hospital business office data and medical records data that had been previously extracted prior for billing purposes. Analysis confirmed differing demographics for two hip arthroplasty populations, with the resurfacing patients (compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty population) consisting of younger patients (mean age, 50 vs. 61 years), who were more often male (75% vs. 45%), were more likely to have osteoarthritis as their primary diagnosis (83 vs. 67%) and were more often covered by managed care or commercial insurance (83 vs. 34%). They also had shorter hospital stays (mean length of stay, 2.3 vs. 4.1 days) and consequently provided a more favorable financial revenue stream to the hospital on a per patient basis. Several trends appeared during the study periods. There was a steady increase in all procedures in all groups except for the resurfacings, which decreased 26% in males and 53% in females between 2009 and 2010. Differences were observed in the demographics of patients presenting for resurfacing, compared to those presenting for conventional total hip arthroplasty. In addition to the revenue stream considerations, institutions undertaking a resurfacing program must commit the resources and planning in order to rehabilitate these patients more expeditiously than is usually required with conventional hip arthroplasty patients. PMID:22035493

  3. Countrywise results of total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose An earlier Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) report on 280,201 total hip replacements (THRs) based on data from 1995–2006, from Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, was published in 2009. The present study assessed THR survival according to country, based on the NARA database with the Finnish data included. Material and methods 438,733 THRs performed during the period 1995–2011 in Sweden, Denmark, Norway, and Finland were included. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to calculate survival probabilities with 95% confidence interval (CI). Cox multiple regression, with adjustment for age, sex, and diagnosis, was used to analyze implant survival with revision for any reason as endpoint. Results The 15-year survival, with any revision as an endpoint, for all THRs was 86% (CI: 85.7–86.9) in Denmark, 88% (CI: 87.6–88.3) in Sweden, 87% (CI: 86.4–87.4) in Norway, and 84% (CI: 82.9–84.1) in Finland. Revision risk for all THRs was less in Sweden than in the 3 other countries during the first 5 years. However, revision risk for uncemented THR was less in Denmark than in Sweden during the sixth (HR = 0.53, CI: 0.34–0.82), seventh (HR = 0.60, CI: 0.37–0.97), and ninth (HR = 0.59, CI: 0.36–0.98) year of follow-up. Interpretation The differences in THR survival rates were considerable, with inferior results in Finland. Brand-level comparison of THRs in Nordic countries will be required. PMID:24650019

  4. After Hip Replacement, Therapy At Home May Be Enough

    MedlinePlus

    ... the formal [outpatient physical therapy]," said Dr. Wayne Johnson, an orthopedic surgeon in Lawton, Okla. He is ... in addition to the health-care cost savings," Johnson added. Traditionally, hip replacement patients have undergone 8 ...

  5. Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk Swedish study found that people with new knees had slight uptick in spinal fractures, too To use the sharing features on this ...

  6. NEW BEARING SURFACES IN TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is being increasingly indicated for younger and more active patients, in addition to a naturally growing demand for the procedure because of increasing life expectancy among patients. The high costs of this surgery and the controversies regarding implant performance have made this topic the subject of constant research, seeking new materials with better resistance to wear and better biocompatibility. The present article provides a review of new surfaces in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27042614

  7. Management of Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Dong; Prashant, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Total hip joint replacement offers dramatic improvement in the quality of life but periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the most devastating complication of this procedure. The infection threatens the function of the joint, the preservation of the limb, and occasionally even the life of the patient due to long term hospitalization and high cost. For the surgeon it is a disastrous burden, which requires repeated, complicated procedures to eradicate infection and to provide a mobile joint without pain. Yet in the absence of a true gold standard, the diagnosis of PJI can be elusive. Synovial fluid aspiration, diagnostic imaging, traditional culture, peripheral serum inflammatory markers, and intraoperative frozen sections each have their limitations but continue to be the mainstay for diagnosis of PJI. Treatment options mainly include thorough irrigation and debridement with prosthesis retention, or a two-stage prosthesis exchange with intervening placement of an antibiotic-loaded spacer. Success in treating PJI depends on extensive surgical debridement and adequate and effective antibiotic therapy. Treatment in two stages using a spacer is recommended for most chronic PJI. Debridement, antibiotics and implant retention is the obvious choice for treatment of acute PJI, with good success rates in selected patients. This article presents an overview of recent management concepts for PJI of the hip emphasizing diagnosis and the clinical approach, and also share own experience at our institution.

  8. Confronting Hip Resurfacing and Big Femoral Head Replacement Gait Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karampinas, Panagiotis K.; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios S.; Vlamis, John; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Korres, Dimitrios S.

    2014-01-01

    Improved hip kinematics and bone preservation have been reported after resurfacing total hip replacement (THRS). On the other hand, hip kinematics with standard total hip replacement (THR) is optimized with large diameter femoral heads (BFH-THR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional outcomes of THRS and BFH-THR and correlate these results to bone preservation or the large femoral heads. Thirty-one patients were included in the study. Gait speed, postural balance, proprioception and overall performance. Our results demonstrated a non-statistically significant improvement in gait, postural balance and proprioception in the THRS confronting to BFH-THR group. THRS provide identical outcomes to traditional BFH-THR. The THRS choice as bone preserving procedure in younger patients is still to be evaluated. PMID:24744841

  9. European experience with cementless total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Morscher, E W

    1983-01-01

    The differences between prostheses fixed with and without cement consist mainly of the design and the nature of the surface of the implant. The shapes of the sockets to be implanted without cement show a wide variety--cylinder, square, conus, ellipsoid with and without threads. The hemispherical shape, which was chosen for the acetabular component of the isoelastic hip joint, does not disturb the natural form and function of the hip joint since the outer surface is closely adapted to the original subchondral bone layer. Undesired stress concentrations therefore are eliminated. The fixation of the noncemented cup is secured by threads, pegs, screws, etc. and by ingrowth of bony tissue in the grooves of the surfaces. Except for some special forms, most of the stems are based on the self-locking principle. All prosthesis models show preparations that increase the surface area (ribs, wings, corrugations, or rims). PMID:6368478

  10. [Infection of a hip prosthesis after dry needling].

    PubMed

    Steentjes, Koen; de Vries, Lieke M A; Ridwan, Ben U; Wijgman, A J Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old patient presented to the orthopaedic department with hip pain 7 months after hip replacement and two weeks after dry needling by a physiotherapist. Dry needling is used by physiotherapists to treat pain and stiffness. In the Netherlands, there are no clear guidelines or contra-indications described for this treatment. The surgical scar of our patient showed signs of inflammation for which debridement and irrigation were performed. Tissue samples showed positive bacterial cultures and the patient was treated with antibiotics. One week after completing this treatment, the infection returned. Debridement and irrigation were repeated and antibiotic treatment was recommenced. Three months later, the patient showed no signs of infection with the prosthesis still in situ. Although there is no strong evidence for a causal relationship between dry needling and the infection, dry needling should be used carefully in patients with a joint replacement, due to the increased risk of infection. PMID:26786794

  11. Effects of preoperative physiotherapy in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Czyżewska, Anna; Walesiak, Katarzyna; Krawczak, Karolina; Cabaj, Dominika; Górecki, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization (WHO) claimed osteoarthritis as a civilization-related disease. The effectiveness of preoperative physiotherapy among patients suffering hip osteoarthritis (OA) at the end of their conservative treatment is rarely described in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life and musculoskeletal health status of patients who received preoperative physiotherapy before total hip replacement (THR) surgery within a year prior to admission for a scheduled THR and those who did not. Material and methods Forty-five patients, admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of Locomotor System for elective total hip replacement surgery, were recruited for this study. The assessment consisted of a detailed interview using various questionnaires: the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), as well as physical examination. Patients were assigned to groups based on their attendance of preoperative physiotherapy within a year prior to surgery. Results Among patients who received preoperative physiotherapy a significant improvement was found for pain, daily functioning, vitality, psychological health, social life, and (active and passive) internal rotation (p < 0.05). Conclusions Patients are not routinely referred to physiotherapy within a year before total hip replacement surgery. This study confirmed that pre-operative physiotherapy may have a positive influence on selected musculoskeletal system status indicators and quality of life in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting surgery. PMID:25395951

  12. Patient Blood Management in Hip Replacement Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative blood transfusions are common in total hip arthroplasty because of preoperative anemia and perioperative blood loss. Perioperative anemia and the need for allogeneic blood transfusion are related with increased morbidity. To reduce perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion, keeping the preoperative hemoglobin level above 12.0 g/dL is important in orthopedic patients. By using the anti-fibrinolytic agent or perioperative cell salvage, reduce intraoperative blood loss is very important for the reduction of perioperative blood loss. As a transfusion trigger, low hemoglobin is another important target to reduce the transfusion rate. Because blood management is closely connected with prognosis, it has become a new challenge in orthopedic surgery. PMID:27536627

  13. Wear testing of total hip replacements under severe conditions.

    PubMed

    Zietz, Carmen; Fabry, Christian; Reinders, Joern; Dammer, Rebecca; Kretzer, Jan Philippe; Bader, Rainer; Sonntag, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Controlled wear testing of total hip replacements in hip joint simulators is a well-established and powerful method, giving an extensive prediction of the long-term clinical performance. To understand the wear behavior of a bearing and its limits under in vivo conditions, testing scenarios should be designed as physiologically as possible. Currently, the ISO standard protocol 14242 is the most common preclinical testing procedure for total hip replacements, based on a simplified gait cycle for normal walking conditions. However, in recent years, wear patterns have increasingly been observed on retrievals that cannot be replicated by the current standard. The purpose of this study is to review the severe testing conditions that enable the generation of clinically relevant wear rates and phenomena. These conditions include changes in loading and activity, third-body wear, surface topography, edge wear and the role of aging of the bearing materials. PMID:26048088

  14. Early catastrophic acetabular failure in Furlong total hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Steven W.; Wardlaw, Douglas; Gibson, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    The use of uncemented hip arthroplasty prostheses with ceramic articulations are popular, especially in the young, because of a perceived reduction in wear. We highlight a complication of ceramic on polyethylene articulating couples not previously described in the Furlong replacement. Despite widespread metalosis and particulate debris, osteolysis was not initially seen. The contamination compromised subsequent revision. PMID:19384635

  15. Early catastrophic acetabular failure in Furlong total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Knox, David; Hamilton, Steven W; Wardlaw, Douglas; Gibson, Peter H

    2009-03-01

    The use of uncemented hip arthroplasty prostheses with ceramic articulations are popular, especially in the young, because of a perceived reduction in wear. We highlight a complication of ceramic on polyethylene articulating couples not previously described in the Furlong replacement. Despite widespread metalosis and particulate debris, osteolysis was not initially seen. The contamination compromised subsequent revision. PMID:19384635

  16. Physiotherapy Rehabilitation After Total Knee or Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy analysis was to determine, where, how, and when physiotherapy services are best delivered to optimize functional outcomes for patients after they undergo primary (first-time) total hip replacement or total knee replacement, and to determine the Ontario-specific economic impact of the best delivery strategy. The objectives of the systematic review were as follows: To determine the effectiveness of inpatient physiotherapy after discharge from an acute care hospital compared with outpatient physiotherapy delivered in either a clinic-based or home-based setting for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of outpatient physiotherapy delivered by a physiotherapist in either a clinic-based or home-based setting in addition to a home exercise program compared with a home exercise program alone for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of preoperative exercise for people who are scheduled to receive primary total knee or hip replacement surgery Clinical Need Total hip replacements and total knee replacements are among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in Ontario. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after first-time total hip or knee replacement surgery is accepted as the standard and essential treatment. The aim is to maximize a person’s functionality and independence and minimize complications such as hip dislocation (for hip replacements), wound infection, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. The Therapy The physiotherapy rehabilitation routine has 4 components: therapeutic exercise, transfer training, gait training, and instruction in the activities of daily living. Physiotherapy rehabilitation for people who have had total joint replacement surgery varies in where, how, and when it is delivered. In Ontario, after discharge from an acute care hospital, people who have had a primary total knee or hip replacement may

  17. CoCrMo Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yifeng; Hoffman, Emily; Wimmer, Markus; Fischer, Alfons; Jacobs, Joshua; Marks, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    After the rapid growth in the use of CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements since the second generation was introduced circa 1990, metal-on-metal hip replacements have experienced a sharp decline in the last two years due to biocompatibility issues related to wear and corrosion products. Despite some excellent clinical results, the release of wear and corrosion debris and the adverse response of local tissues have been of great concern. There are many unknowns regarding how CoCrMo metal bearings interact with the human body. This perspective article is intended to outline some recent progresses in understanding wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal hip replacement both in-vivo and in-vitro. The materials, mechanical deformation, corrosion, wear-assisted corrosion, and wear products will be discussed. Possible adverse health effects caused by wear products will be briefly addressed, as well as some of the many open questions such as the detailed chemistry of corrosion, tribochemical reactions and the formation of graphitic layers. Nowadays we design almost routinely for high performance materials and lubricants for automobiles; humans are at least as important. It is worth remembering that a hip implant is often the difference between walking and leading a relatively normal life, and a wheelchair. PMID:23196425

  18. CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yifeng; Hoffman, Emily; Wimmer, Markus; Fischer, Alfons; Jacobs, Joshua; Marks, Laurence

    2013-01-21

    After the rapid growth in the use of CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements since the second generation was introduced circa 1990, metal-on-metal hip replacements have experienced a sharp decline in the last two years due to biocompatibility issues related to wear and corrosion products. Despite some excellent clinical results, the release of wear and corrosion debris and the adverse response of local tissues have been of great concern. There are many unknowns regarding how CoCrMo metal bearings interact with the human body. This perspective article is intended to outline some recent progresses in understanding wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal hip replacement both in vivo and in vitro. The materials, mechanical deformation, corrosion, wear-assisted corrosion, and wear products will be discussed. Possible adverse health effects caused by wear products will be briefly addressed, as well as some of the many open questions such as the detailed chemistry of corrosion, tribochemical reactions and the formation of graphitic layers. Nowadays we design almost routinely for high performance materials and lubricants for automobiles; humans are at least as important. It is worth remembering that a hip implant is often the difference between walking and leading a relatively normal life, and a wheelchair. PMID:23196425

  19. Bilateral total hip replacement in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Dalton, David Michael; Magill, Paul; Mulhall, Kevin James

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a case of bilateral total hip replacements (THRs) in a 56-year-old patient with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). The considerations for the perioperative period and the outcome are discussed. Preoperative planning included an anaesthetic review and availability of fiberoptic intubation due to poor mouth opening. Perioperatively, contractures can make positioning and exposure difficult but in this case a standard posterior approach was taken. Particular attention was given to soft tissue balancing given the theoretical risk of dislocation. There were no perioperative complications. Postoperatively there has been improvement in pain and hip scores but the patient has failed to return to work. Objective improvements in range of motion (ROM) have not been made. This experience suggests THR is a safe and effective treatment for osteoarthritic hip pain in patients with AMC but patients should be informed that ROM is unlikely to improve. PMID:26607193

  20. Relative importance of gait vs. joint positioning on hip contact forces after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Kharma C; Hurwitz, Debra E; Wimmer, Markus A

    2009-12-01

    Implant loosening is a common indication for total hip replacement (THR) revision. High contact forces and implant twisting moments are thought to be associated with implant loosening. Relationships between joint positioning and hip forces, or outcomes, have been investigated through in vivo and in vitro modalities. Relationships between hip forces and gait are less understood, despite repeated findings that gait following a THR does not fully return to normal. We tested the hypothesis that gait parameters would be better predictors of implant force (peak contact forces and peak twisting moment during walking) than joint positioning parameters. Subjects underwent gait analysis, hip force modeling, and measurement of clinical radiographs 1 year after successful THR surgery. Gait parameters were consistently more influential in determining hip forces. Alone, gait explained as much as 67% of the variation in force, compared to a maximum of 33% by joint geometry. Combinations of gait and joint positioning parameters together explained up to 86% of the variation in hip force parameters. Results suggest that gait may provide a valuable postoperatively modifiable target to improve hip loads and potentially reduce the risk for implant loosening. PMID:19514072

  1. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. Material/Methods A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. Results A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). Conclusions 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  2. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. RESULTS A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  3. Basic Science Considerations in Primary Total Hip Replacement Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Saqeb B; Dunlop, Douglas G; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Naqvi, Syed G; Gangoo, Shafat; Salih, Saif

    2010-01-01

    Total Hip Replacement is one of the most common operations performed in the developed world today. An increasingly ageing population means that the numbers of people undergoing this operation is set to rise. There are a numerous number of prosthesis on the market and it is often difficult to choose between them. It is therefore necessary to have a good understanding of the basic scientific principles in Total Hip Replacement and the evidence base underpinning them. This paper reviews the relevant anatomical and biomechanical principles in THA. It goes on to elaborate on the structural properties of materials used in modern implants and looks at the evidence base for different types of fixation including cemented and uncemented components. Modern bearing surfaces are discussed in addition to the scientific basis of various surface engineering modifications in THA prostheses. The basic science considerations in component alignment and abductor tension are also discussed. A brief discussion on modular and custom designs of THR is also included. This article reviews basic science concepts and the rationale underpinning the use of the femoral and acetabular component in total hip replacement. PMID:20582240

  4. Articular capsule repair in initial artificial hip replacement via anterolateral approach to the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B L; Wang, F; Tian, M B; Yin, W L; You, X Y; Li, D; Ma, L G; Xing, L Q

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore articular capsule repair in first artificial hip replacement (AHR) via anterolateral approach and its influence on postoperative dislocation. A total of 292 patients who received AHR via anterolateral approach and had the articular capsule repaired in People’s Hospital of Zhengzhou (Henan, China) from February 2008 to February 2014 were selected and divided into total hip replacement (THR) group (group A1) and artificial femoral head replacement (AFHR) group (group A2). Five hundred and five cases in the control group treated using the same approach but receiving no articular capsule repair were divided into THR group (group B1) and AFHR group (group B2). Condition of postoperative dislocation was compared between the two groups. All cases were followed up for 6 months to 5 years (average: 3.75 years); it was noted that the difference in average age, gender, disease constitution and follow-up time in the two groups was not significant (P>0.05). Moreover, groups A1 and B1 were found with 1 case of early hip joint dislocation (0.73%) and 13 cases of hip joint dislocation (5.24%) respectively post-operatively, and the comparison between the two groups was statistically significant (P less than 0.05). One case of hip joint dislocation (0.65%) was found in group A2 and 5 cases (1.95%) in group B2 in early post operation and the difference between two groups had no statistical significance (P>0.05). Neither the repair group nor the control group developed late-onset dislocation after the operation. Thus, we can state that articular capsule repair is feasible during the first AHR via anterolateral approach, which decreases the occurrence of early hip joint dislocation after operation and proves that repairing articular capsule during AFHR via anterolateral approach is unnecessary. PMID:27358130

  5. Disc calibration for digital templating in hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, A; Partington, P; Kelly, D; Muller, S

    2008-12-01

    Digital radiography is becoming widespread. Accurate pre-operative templating of digital images of the hip traditionally involves positioning a calibration object at its centre. This can be difficult and cause embarrassment. We have devised a method whereby a planar disc placed on the radiographic cassette accounts for the expected magnification. Initial examination of 50 pelvic CT scans showed a mean hip centre distance of 117 mm (79 to 142) above the gluteal skin. Further calculations predicted that a disc of 37.17 mm diameter, placed on the cassette, would appear identical to a 30 mm sphere placed at the level of the centre of the hip as requested by our templating software. We assessed accuracy and reproducibility by 'reverse calibration' of 20 radiographs taken three months after hip replacement using simultaneous sphere and disc methods, and a further 20 with a precision disc of accurate size. Even when variations in patient size were ignored, the disc proved more accurate and reliable than the sphere. The technique is reliable, robust, cost effective and acceptable to patients and radiographers. It can easily be used in any radiography department after a few simple calculations and manufacture of appropriately-sized discs. PMID:19043135

  6. Successful staged hip replacement in septic hip osteoarthritis in osteopetrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopetrosis is a rare, inherited, bone disorder, characterized by osteosclerosis, obliteration of the medullary cavity and calcified cartilage. The autosomal dominant form is compatible with a normal life span, although fractures often result from minimal trauma, due to the pathologic nature of bone. Osteomyelitis is common in patients with osteopetrosis because of a reduced resistance to infection, attributed to the lack of marrow vascularity and impairment of white cell function. Only one case of osteomyelitis of the proximal third of the femur has been previously reported, treated with several repeated debridements and finally with femoral head resection. Here we present for the first time a case of a staged implant of a cementless total hip prosthesis for the treatment of a septic hip in femoral neck nonunion in osteopetrosis. Case presentation A 36-years-old woman, affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis was referred to our department because of a septic hip arthritis associated with femoral neck septic non-union, with draining fistulas. The infection occurred early after a plate osteosynthesis for a closed perthrocanteric fracture of the femur and persisted in spite of osteosynthesis removal, surgical debridement and external fixation. In our hospital the patient underwent accurate debridement, femoral head and greater trochanter resection, preparation of the diaphyseal intramedullary canal and implant of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. The spacer was exchanged after one month, due to infection recurrence and four months later, a cementless total hip arthroplasty was implanted, with no clinical and laboratory signs of infection recurrence at two years follow-up. Conclusions In case of hip septic arthritis and proximal femur septic non-union, femoral head resection may not be the only option available and staged total hip arthroplasty can be considered. PMID:22472060

  7. Mechanical properties of femoral cortical bone following cemented hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Ni, G X; Lu, W W; Chiu, P K Y; Wang, Y; Li, Z Y; Zhang, Y G; Xu, B; Deng, L F; Luk, K D K

    2007-11-01

    Femoral bone remodeling following total hip replacement is a big concern and has never been examined mechanically. In this study, six goats underwent unilateral cemented hip hemiarthroplasty with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. Nine months later animals were sacrificed, and the femoral cortical bone slices at different levels were analysed using microhardness testing and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) scanning. Implanted femurs were compared to contralateral nonimplanted femurs. Extensive bone remodeling was demonstrated at both the proximal and middle levels, but not at the distal level. Compared with the nonimplanted side, significant decreases were found in the implanted femur in cortical bone area, bone mineral density, and cortical bone hardness at the proximal level, as well as in bone mineral density and bone hardness at the middle level. However, no significant difference was observed in either variable for the distal level. In addition, similar proximal-to-distal gradient changes were revealed both in cortical bone microhardness and bone mineral density. From the mechanical point of view, the results of the present study suggested that stress shielding is an important mechanical factor associated with bone adaptation following total hip replacement. PMID:17506504

  8. Sexual Function before and after Total Hip Replacement: Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Meiri, Rotem; Rosenbaum, Talli Y; Kalichman, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Background More than 1 million total hip replacements (THRs) are performed every year worldwide. Achieving decreased pain, increased mobility, and improved quality of life (QoL) are key factors in the decision to undergo THR. Sexual activity is a valued component of QoL; however, little is known about how THR affects sexual functioning or the extent to which health care providers address sexuality in THR patients. Aim The aim of the study was to assess the literature regarding sexuality and sexual function in patients before and after THR. Methods PubMed, Google Scholar, and PEDro databases were searched without search limitations from inception until December 2013 for terms relating to sexual function and THR. Results Sexual activity before and after a THR is an important QoL issue. In patients with end-stage hip osteoarthritis, THR has been reported to have beneficial effects in restoring sexual satisfaction and performance. While research has recently been conducted to determine the range of motion of the hip joints necessary to execute certain sexual positions, there remains a lack of validated guidelines and the risks related to sexual activity after THR is rarely discussed between patients and medical staff. Conclusions The ability to move comfortably is included among the many physical and psychosocial factors influencing sexual functioning. Practitioners should be encouraged to question their THR patients about sexual concerns and to provide counseling related to physical and functional aspects of sexual activity. Rehabilitation that focuses specifically on activities of daily living of sex should include sexual counseling, therapeutic exercise, and advice regarding sexual positions. Rehabilitation provided by physical therapists may help decrease pain, and facilitate greater self-awareness, self-confidence, and improved body image, all of which encourage and affirm optimal sexual health. Meiri R, Rosenbaum TY, and Kalichman L. Sexual function before and

  9. Economics of thromboprophylaxis in total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J; Warwick, D J; Coast, J

    1997-07-01

    In 1997, 50,000 hip replacements will be performed in the UK, and over 1 million worldwide. Venous thromboembolism is the most frequent serious complication following joint replacement; its effective and economic management is essential. Antithrombotic prophylaxis can be used to reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolic disease, which presents as either deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. A number of published studies have shown that prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism is financially beneficial in terms of reduced diagnostic and treatment costs. Cost-effectiveness studies have provided a comparison of the costs and consequences resulting from alternative prophylactic programmes. This article reviews the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism after total hip replacement, prophylaxis against it and a model for cost-effectiveness analysis. Its aim is to highlight inadequacies in the available data and areas of uncertainty within the model that require further research. Pharmacoeconomic studies published to date have all used a similar framework to allow prophylactic options to be compared. However, assumptions made about the frequency of clinical disease have varied widely between studies. This degree of uncertainty calls into question the validity of reported incremental cost savings between treatments. Some studies have also failed to address the cost of complications resulting from the prophylactic method under consideration. Future studies must carefully consider the validity of their models, understand the limitations on current knowledge of outcome rates, and carefully consider all outcomes (both beneficial and detrimental) that result from the intervention. PMID:10169386

  10. Graphitic Tribological Layers in Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Pourzal, R.; Wimmer, M. A.; Jacobs, J. J.; Fischer, A.; Marks, L. D.

    2011-12-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, and when nonoperative methods have failed, a prosthetic implant is a cost-effective and clinically successful treatment. Metal-on-metal replacements are an attractive implant technology, a lower-wear alternative to metal-on-polyethylene devices. Relatively little is known about how sliding occurs in these implants, except that proteins play a critical role and that there is a tribological layer on the metal surface. We report evidence for graphitic material in the tribological layer in metal-on-metal hip replacements retrieved from patients. As graphite is a solid lubricant, its presence helps to explain why these components exhibit low wear and suggests methods of improving their performance; simultaneously, this raises the issue of the physiological effects of graphitic wear debris.

  11. Digital templating in hip replacement with and without radiological markers.

    PubMed

    Heinert, G; Hendricks, J; Loeffler, M D

    2009-04-01

    Digital templating in hip replacement is commonly performed with radiological markers to determine the magnification. The latter can also be determined by measuring the distance from the x-ray focal spot to the object and the distance from the x-ray focal spot to the radiological cassette or image receptor. We used post-operative radiographs of total hip replacements and hemiarthroplasties from 22 patients to calculate the magnification using both methods. The accuracy of each method was ascertained by measuring the size of the head of the implant projected on to the radiographs and comparing the result with the known size recorded in the medical records. The accuracy was found to be similar with a mean absolute measurement error of 2.6% (SD 1.4; 0.0% to 5.2%) for the radiological marker and 2.8% (sd 2.2; 0.4% to 10.1%) for the distance method (p = 0.75). The mean radiation dose for templating radiographs (pelvis and lateral of the hip) was similar when taken using a radiological marker (328 mSv SD 142) (n = 51) or using the distance measurement method (324 mSv SD 39) (n = 39) (p = 0.90). We conclude that the distance measuring method is as accurate as the radiological marker method, but may avoid some of the disadvantages such as misplacement of the marker or placement outside the radiological field. It may also be more acceptable to the patient and radiographer. PMID:19336804

  12. Hospitalization for total hip replacement among inpatients aged 45 and over: United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Wolford, Monica L; Palso, Kathleen; Bercovitz, Anita

    2015-02-01

     Total hip replacement, in which both the head of the femur and its socket are replaced, is done to restore movement to hips damaged by osteoarthritis, late-stage degenerative bone and cartilage disease, or other injuries and disease (1). The number of total hip replacements is expected to increase over the next few decades (2). National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data show trends and estimates of the number and rate of total hip replacements and average length of stay among inpatients aged 45 and over. PMID:25714040

  13. [Diagnosis of periprosthetic hip infections].

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, C M; Schütze, N; Rudert, M

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of periprosthetic infection requires a clear definition itself and structured procedure concerning anamnesis, clinical examination, laboratory findings, puncture and imaging diagnostics. The clinical presentation may vary considerable due to the time of their occurrence as early, delayed, or late infection. Recognition of risk factors and knowledge of differential diagnoses facilitate and confirm the diagnosis. The synovial fluid is assessed with regard to leukocyte count, protein content, and glucose. Intraoperative tissue specimen sampling has to be performed correctly; the histopathological and microbiological studies must be assessed using specific criteria. The examination and classification of periprosthetic membranes make discrimination of the causal pathological mechanism possible, especially distinction between septic and aseptic loosening. In this manner statements with regard to etiology and prosthesis durability are possible. Different causative microorganisms appear postoperatively at specific times. Pathogens that grow as biofilms are of great significance, as they may compound diagnosis and therapy. Early infections are often caused by virulent microorganisms (S. aureus) with acute onset. Delayed (low grade) infections are usually caused by less virulent microorganisms, such as S. epidermidis or coagulase-negative staphylococci. Many diagnostic imaging methods have been used in the assessment of periprosthetic infection: plain radiographs, arthrography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Nuclear medicine with bone scintigraphy or positron-emission tomography enhance diagnostic capabilities. Cultures of samples obtained by sonication of prostheses are more sensitive than conventional periprosthetic tissue culture. Multiplex PCR of sonication fluid is a promising test for diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection. The promising diagnostic accuracy for interleukin-6 and procalcitonin has yet not been

  14. Severity of Diabetes Mellitus and Total Hip or Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Nielen, Johannes T.H.; Emans, Pieter J.; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Boonen, Annelies; Lalmohamed, Arief; de Boer, Anthonius; van den Bemt, Bart J.F.; de Vries, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is generally thought that people with diabetes mellitus (DM) are more likely to suffer from osteoarthritis (OA) due to an increased body mass index (BMI), resulting in mechanical destruction of cartilage. However, previous studies have suggested a coexisting metabolic causality. To evaluate the risk of hip or knee replacement, as a proxy for severe OA, in patients with DM. We additionally evaluated the risk of total joint replacement (TJR) with various proxies for increased DM severity. A population-based case–control study was performed, using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Cases (n = 94,609) were defined as patients >18 years who had undergone TJR between 2000 and 2012. Controls were matched by age, gender, and general practice. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of total knee (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR) surgery associated with use of antidiabetic drugs (ADs). We additionally stratified current AD users by proxies for DM severity. Current AD use was significantly associated with a lower risk of TKR (OR = 0.86 (95% CI = 0.78–0.94)) and THR (OR = 0.90 (95% CI = 0.82–0.99)) compared to patients not using ADs. Moreover, risk of TKR and THR was decreased with increasing HbA1c. This study does not support the theory that DM patients are more likely to suffer from severe OA as compared to patients without diabetes. Moreover, risk of severe OA necessitating TJR decreases with increasing DM severity. This is possibly due to dissimilarities in methodology, a decrease in eligibility for surgery, or variability of OA phenotypes. PMID:27196498

  15. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient’s factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems. PMID:27134633

  16. Canine intersegmental hip joint forces and moments before and after cemented total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Dogan, S; Manley, P A; Vanderby, R; Kohles, S S; Hartman, L M; McBeath, A A

    1991-01-01

    Intersegmental forces and moments (i.e. resultant free body forces and moments computed at the joint centers) were studied in canine hindlimbs before and after cemented total hip replacement (THR). Five large, adult, mixed-breed dogs were selected. Their gait was recorded (while leash-walked) before surgery using high-speed cinematography and a force plate. Cemented total hip replacement was unilaterally performed on each dog. Gait was again recorded at one and four months after surgery. Segmental properties (mass, center of mass, and mass moment of inertia) of the hindlimbs were experimentally determined, and an inverse dynamics approach was used to compute intersegmental forces and moments in the sagittal plane. Significant reductions in intersegmental joint forces and moments were observed in the operated hindlimb one month after surgery, although kinematic gait parameters were unaltered. Decreases of 77.0% for vertical forces, 61.9% for craniocaudal forces, and 66.2% for extension moments were determined. Four months after surgery, the joint forces and moments had returned to their preoperative values. This experiment demonstrates that the dynamics of normal walking can be restored in a canine model by four months after THR. It also shows that kinetic (rather than kinematic) parameters are more descriptive of antalgic gait in the canine. PMID:1856240

  17. Hip replacement: landmark surgery in modern medical history.

    PubMed

    Mellon, Stephen J; Liddle, Alexander D; Pandit, Hemant

    2013-07-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) is most often performed to treat end-stage symptomatic osteoarthritis. Patients typically present with increasing pain, restricted mobility and stiffness. In this procedure, the femoral head and part of the femoral neck are excised. The acetabulum is enlarged and an acetabular cup is inserted. The femoral head is replaced by a femoral component, the stem of which is inserted into the medullary canal of the femur. The components can be either cemented in place or press-fit (cementless). The THR concept was popularised by Sir John Charnley in the 1960s and although, over half a century of development has resulted in incremental improvements, the procedure is not dramatically different from the one he described. However, over the last two decades there have been significant changes in the types of bearing surfaces used. Metal on polyethylene continues to be the workhorse for the majority of cases. In the young and active, bearing surfaces with low wear rate are increasingly used. Since the early 1960s, THR has played an important role in alleviating pain and restoring mobility to millions of people. The cost-effectiveness of THR in treating advanced osteoarthritis makes it one of the most successful of all surgical interventions. PMID:23693138

  18. Projections of total hip replacement in Sweden from 2013 to 2030

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Max; Rogmark, Cecilia; Rolfson, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose The continuously increasing demand for joint replacement surgery in the past decades imposes higher constraints on the budgets of hospitals and healthcare providers. We undertook an analysis of historical trends in total hip replacement performed in Sweden between 1968 and 2012 in order to provide projections of future demand. Data and methods We obtained data on total hip replacements registered every year and on the evolution of the Swedish population between 1968 and 2012. We assumed the existence of a maximum incidence. So we adopted a regression framework that assumes the existence of an upper limit of total hip replacement incidence. Results We found that the incidence of total hip replacement will continue to increase until a projected upper incidence level of about 400 total hip replacements per 105 Swedish residents aged 40 years and older will be reached around the year 2107. In 2020, the estimated incidence of total hip replacement will be 341 (95% prediction interval (PI): 302–375) and in 2030 it will be 358 (PI: 317–396). Using official forecasted population growth data, about 18,000 operations would be expected to be performed in 2020 and 20,000 would be expected to be performed in 2030. Interpretation Growing incidence, population growth, and increasing life expectancy will probably result in increased demand for hip replacement surgery. Our findings could serve as a basis for decision making. PMID:24758323

  19. Aprotinin and classic wound drainage are unnecessary in total hip replacement a prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Classic wound drainage is still common in hip replacement but its benefit is doubtful. The role of systemic administration of proteinase inhibitors like aprotinin to avoid perioperative blood loss is still unclear. Patients and Methods In a prospective randomized trial, the perioperative blood loss in alloplastic hip replacement under the influence of proteinase inhibitor (aprotinin, Trasylol®) using wound drainage as well as compression treatment alone were compared. 80 patients were prospectively randomized in 4 arms. Patients received either aprotinin or placebo during surgery as well as drainage or targeted external wound compression. Results Observing the "drug therapy" aprotinin had no effect on the intraor postoperative blood loss (p > 0.05), a trend to lower postoperative hemoglobin decline was found, but without significance. thrombosis occurred in neither the aprotinin nor in the placebo group. Two patients had a severe allergic drug reaction and were excluded from the study. Under "non drug therapy" with compression therapy and wound drainage a significant difference in blood loss was found (p < 0.001). The blood loss was higher under the wound drainage. There was no influence on the infection rate. Yet we could observe increased bruising under the sole external compression treatment. Conclusion The administration of aprotinin did not achieve the desired reduction of perioperative blood loss. Hence, costs and two severe allergic drug reactions in our study represent arguments against its use in regular treatment. Furthermore, it seems that wound drainage is neglectable in hip replacement and can be substituted by a sole compression treatment. PMID:21345766

  20. Probabilistic analysis of an uncemented total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Dopico-González, Carolina; New, Andrew M; Browne, Martin

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the application of probabilistic design methods to the analysis of the behaviour of an uncemented total hip replacement femoral component implanted in a proximal femur. Probabilistic methods allow variations in factors which control the behaviour of the implanted femur (the input parameters) to be taken into account in determining the performance of the construct. Monte Carlo sampling techniques were applied and the performance indicator was the maximum strain in the bone. The random input parameters were the joint load, the angle of the applied load and the material properties of the bone and the implant. Two Monte Carlo based simulations were applied, direct sampling and latin hypercube sampling. The results showed that the convergence of the mean value of the maximum strain improved gradually as a function of the number of simulations and it stabilised around a value of 0.008 after 6200 simulations. A similar trend was observed for the cumulative distribution function of the output. The strain output was most sensitive to the bone stiffness, followed very closely by the magnitude of the applied load. The application of latin hypercube sampling with 1000 simulations gave similar results to direct sampling with 10,000 simulations in a much reduced time. The results suggested that the number of simulations and the selection of parameters and models are important for the reliability of both the probability values and the sensitivity analyses. PMID:19217340

  1. Determinants of heterotopic ossification after total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Marlene; Neal, Bruce; Cameron, Ian D; Crawford, Ross; Tregonning, Garnet; Winstanley, Julie; Norton, Robyn

    2009-01-01

    The ability of various pre- or peri-operative variables to determine the risk of developing moderate to severe heterotopic ossification (HO) six to twelve months after surgery was investigated among 407 patients undergoing elective total hip replacement (THR) surgery and allocated to placebo in a randomised controlled trial evaluating NSA IDs-based prophylaxis for HO. Overall, 11 (30%) of the 37 patients undergoing revision surgery developed moderate to severe HO compared with 58 (16%) of the 370 patients undergoing primary THR; odds ratio (OR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1 to 4.9. Among patients undergoing primary THR , mutually adjusted analysis of collected independent risk factors demonstrated that receiving a transfusion of red cells or having general as well as epidural or spinal anaesthesia present as indicators of increased risk for developing moderate to severe HO. Patients who have undergone revision surgery have a significantly increased risk of clinically relevant ectopic bone, while among patients who have undergone primary THR surgery, those with indicators of excessive surgical bleeding are also at increased risk of clinically relevant HO. PMID:19455501

  2. Pharmacological thromboprophylaxis and total hip or knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Frostick, Simon

    Pharmacological and mechanical thromboprophylaxis reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients undergoing total knee/hip replacement (TKR/THR). Nurses play a key role in VTE prevention through clinical care, before and after discharge from hospital, and patient education. Conventional pharmacological agents for VTE prophylaxis include low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) and fondaparinux. However, parenteral administration, increased bleeding risk, and patient/physician non-adherence to treatment and guidelines, are important limitations. Three non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants--dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban and apixaban--are available in the UK for VTE prevention following THR/TKR. In common with LMWHs and fondaparinux, these offer rapid onset of action and fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. An agent for emergency reversal of dabigatran is in development, while there is no antidote for fondaparinux and LMWHs can be partially neutralised by protamine. Oral administration may result in better adherence to treatment and guidelines, reducing the nurse burden after discharge, and enhancing cost-effectiveness. PMID:26768045

  3. Novel Highly Porous Metal Technology in Artificial Hip and Knee Replacement: Processing Methodologies and Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, John; Poggie, Matthew; Kulesha, Gene; Michael Meneghini, R.

    2013-02-01

    Hip and knee replacement can dramatically improve a patient's quality of life through pain relief and restored function. Fixation of hip and knee replacement implants to bone is critical to the success of the procedure. A variety of roughened surfaces and three-dimensional porous surfaces have been used to enhance biological fixation on orthopedic implants. Recently, highly porous metals have emerged as versatile biomaterials that may enhance fixation to bone and are suitable to a number of applications in hip and knee replacement surgery. This article provides an overview of several processes used to create these implant surfaces.

  4. Mortality rates at 10 years after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing compared with total hip replacement in England: retrospective cohort analysis of hospital episode statistics

    PubMed Central

    Kendal, Adrian R; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Arden, Nigel K; Judge, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare 10 year mortality rates among patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and total hip replacement in England. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting English hospital episode statistics database linked to mortality records from the Office for National Statistics. Population All adults who underwent primary elective hip replacement for osteoarthritis from April 1999 to March 2012. The exposure of interest was prosthesis type: cemented total hip replacement, uncemented total hip replacement, and metal-on-metal hip resurfacing. Confounding variables included age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index, rurality, area deprivation, surgical volume, and year of operation. Main outcome measures All cause mortality. Propensity score matching was used to minimise confounding by indication. Kaplan-Meier plots estimated the probability of survival up to 10 years after surgery. Multilevel Cox regression modelling, stratified on matched sets, described the association between prosthesis type and time to death, accounting for variation across hospital trusts. Results 7437 patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing were matched to 22 311 undergoing cemented total hip replacement; 8101 patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing were matched to 24 303 undergoing uncemented total hip replacement. 10 year rates of cumulative mortality were 271 (3.6%) for metal-on-metal hip resurfacing versus 1363 (6.1%) for cemented total hip replacement, and 239 (3.0%) for metal-on-metal hip resurfacing versus 999 (4.1%) for uncemented total hip replacement. Patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing had an increased survival probability (hazard ratio 0.51 (95% confidence interval 0.45 to 0.59) for cemented hip replacement; 0.55 (0.47 to 0.65) for uncemented hip replacement). There was no evidence for an interaction with age or sex. Conclusions Patients with hip osteoarthritis undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing have reduced mortality in

  5. Revision total hip replacement using the cement-in-cement technique for the acetabular component: technique and results for 60 hips.

    PubMed

    Brogan, K; Charity, J; Sheeraz, A; Whitehouse, S L; Timperley, A J; Howell, J R; Hubble, M J W

    2012-11-01

    The technique of femoral cement-in-cement revision is well established, but there are no previous series reporting its use on the acetabular side at the time of revision total hip replacement. We describe the technique and report the outcome of 60 consecutive acetabular cement-in-cement revisions in 59 patients at a mean follow-up of 8.5 years (5 to 12). All had a radiologically and clinically well-fixed acetabular cement mantle at the time of revision. During the follow-up 29 patients died, but no hips were lost to follow-up. The two most common indications for acetabular revision were recurrent dislocation (46, 77%) and to complement femoral revision (12, 20%). Of the 60 hips, there were two cases of aseptic loosening of the acetabular component (3.3%) requiring re-revision. No other hip was clinically or radiologically loose (96.7%) at the latest follow-up. One hip was re-revised for infection, four for recurrent dislocation and one for disarticulation of a constrained component. At five years the Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 100% for aseptic loosening and 92.2% (95% CI 84.8 to 99.6), with revision for any cause as the endpoint. These results support the use of cement-in-cement revision on the acetabular side in appropriate cases. Theoretical advantages include preservation of bone stock, reduced operating time, reduced risk of complications and durable fixation. PMID:23109626

  6. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I–III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I–III). PMID:27512242

  7. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I-III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I-III). PMID:27512242

  8. A frictional study of total hip joint replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, S. C.; Unsworth, A.; Goldsmith, A. A. J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric wear debris produced by articulation of the femoral head against the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene socket of a total hip replacement has been implicated as the main cause of osteolysis and subsequent failure of these implants. Potential solutions to this problem are to employ hard bearing surface combinations such as metal-on-metal or ceramic-on-ceramic prostheses. The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in lubrication modes and friction of a range of material combinations using synthetic and biological fluids as the lubricants. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions of film thicknesses and lubrication modes. A strong correlation was observed between experiment and theory when employing carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) fluids as the lubricant. Under these conditions the ceramic-on-ceramic joints showed full fluid film lubrication while the metal-on-metal, metal-on-plastic, diamond-like carbon-coated stainless steel (DLC)-on-plastic and ceramic-on-plastic prostheses operated under a mixed lubrication regime. With bovine serum as the lubricant in the all ceramic joints, however, the full fluid film lubrication was inhibited due to adsorbed proteins. In the metal-on-metal joints this adsorbed protein layer acted to reduce the friction while in the ceramic coupling the friction was increased. The use of bovine serum as the lubricant also significantly increased the friction in both the metal-on-plastic and ceramic-on-plastic joints. The friction produced by the DLC-on-plastic joints depended on the quality of the coating. Those joints with a less consistent coating and therefore a higher surface roughness gave significantly higher friction than the smoother, more consistently coated heads.

  9. Sensitivity to implant materials in patients undergoing total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Granchi, Donatella; Cenni, Elisabetta; Trisolino, Giovanni; Giunti, Armando; Baldini, Nicola

    2006-05-01

    Sensitivity to implant materials is an unpredictable event, which may contribute to the process leading to the failure of the total hip replacement (THR). The aim of the current study was to investigate the informative power of skin testing in detecting the sensitization to the implant components in patients undergoing THR. A consecutive series of 223 patients was enrolled in the study, including 66 candidates to THR, 53 with stable implant, and 104 with THR loosening. The patch testing was performed by using the most relevant components of cobalt-based alloys (CoCrMo), Ti-based alloys (TiAlV), and bone cements. The frequency of positive patch testing in preimplant patients did not differ from that observed after THR. Patients with CoCrMo-failed implant showed a significant low frequency of nickel-positive skin reaction, while patients with TiAlV-THR had a high incidence of vanadium-positive patch testing. The panel of haptens showed a good performance in the identification of patients known to have a contact dermatitis. With regard to the THR outcome, patch testing was not able to discriminate between stable and failed implant. Sensitivity to at least one hapten, namely bone cement, as well as the positive medical history of hypersensitivity, influenced negatively the THR survival. Our results show the reliability of patch testing for investigating the sensitivity to implant components. The cause-effect relationship between sensitization and negative outcome cannot be established, but the shorter lifespan of THR in patients who have a positive patch testing supports the significant role of this event in contributing to the implant failure. PMID:16265661

  10. Outcome Analysis of Hemiarthroplasty vs. Total Hip Replacement in Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Bhanu; Kumar, Krishna; Kohli, Navneet; Katoch, Punit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Management of displaced fracture neck femur in the elderly population is frequently done by Hemiarthroplasty or Total Hip Replacement (THR). It avoids high rates of nonunion and avascular necrosis which usually occur after internal fixation of neck femur fractures in this age group. Aim The present study aimed to evaluate patient function and complications following hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement in elderly population with displaced femoral neck fractures. Materials and Methods Patients above 60 years of age with displaced fracture neck femur were studied over the period of four years. All the clinical parameters and co-morbid conditions were noted at the time of presentation. The patients associated with co-morbid conditions and underlying pathology were excluded from study. Garden’s classification was used for classification of neck femur fractures. After due informed consent patients of displaced fracture neck femur were randomized by simple randomization and allocated for hemiarthroplasty or THR. Antibiotics were given preoperatively at the time of induction and postoperatively for 5-7 days. Surgery was carried out by Modified Gibson approach. Any complications during pre and postoperative period were noted. Follow-up of patients was done 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year interval with the help of Harris hip score. Results Total 80 patients were enrolled in the study group, with 40 patients in each group. The mean age of patients was 73 years in hemiarthroplasty group and 78 years in THR group. Female to male ratio was 55:45. Mean operative time was 35 minutes in hemiarthroplasty group and 45 minutes in THR. Average intraoperative blood loss was 200cc and 300cc in hemiarthroplasty and THR respectively. The mean hospital stay was 14 days in both the groups. Superficial wound infection was noted in hemiarthroplasty group while in THR group deep wound infection (n=1) and prolonged ICU stay (n=1) were noted. The mean Harris hip score

  11. Bearing surfaces in hip replacement – Evolution and likely future

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narinder; Arora, Gen N.C.; Datta, Barun

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty has evolved from the first total hip arthroplasty in 1938, through the revolutionization of hip arthroplasty by principles of low friction arthroplasty introduced by Sir John Charnley in 1960s to the present state of the art implants and techniques. The main concern regarding failure of total hip arthroplasty has been the biological response to particulate polyethylene debris generated by conventional metal on polyethylene bearing surfaces leading to osteolysis and aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. Therefore, recent research has been focussing on alternative bearing surfaces to reduce the particulate debris generated. These bearing surfaces include ceramic-polyethylene, metal–metal as well as ceramic–ceramic articulations and have demonstrated lesser friction rates as well as significantly lower wear rates as compared to widely used metal on polyethylene surfaces. Clinical experience until now has shown that metal on metal articulations have significant safety concerns whereas metal-on-highly crosslinked polyethylene, ceramic on ceramic and ceramic on highly crosslinked polyethylene articulations have shown encouraging results to hold promise for wider use in younger and more active patients. This review article discusses positives and drawbacks of various bearing surfaces in current clinical use in total hip arthroplasty as well as briefly explores the newer technologies on the horizon which may even further decrease wear and improve total hip arthroplasty survivorship. PMID:25382913

  12. Diagnosis of infected total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Enayatollahi, Mohammad A; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Despite the battery of available tests, the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) remains a challenge. A comprehensive medical history and physical examination with appropriate radiographs followed by erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum C-reactive protein are the first-line screening test for patients with suspected hip PJI. The second line of investigation of patients with abnormal serology or a strong suspicion for PJI, is joint aspiration. Aspirates should be sent for assessment of white blood cell count, polymorphonuclear percentage, leukocyte esterase strip test, and microbiology. If the first attempt fails, the joint should be re-aspirated at a different time. The International Consensus recommends against infiltration of saline or other fluids into a "dry" joint. In patients not planned for surgery but need further evaluation for PJI, a nuclear imaging study may help. In others with a planned revision surgery, intraoperative samples for frozen section and culture study are the best measures available. Treatment strategies for PJI are well established in the literature. Poor surgical candidates receive oral suppressive antibiotic therapy alone. Acute PJI, presenting within 4 weeks of the index surgery, or as a result of bacteraemia, may be treated with irrigation and debridement and implant retention. Chronic PJI, occurring more than 4 weeks after initial surgery, is treated with 1-stage or 2-stage revision arthroplasty. In some persistent infections or patients who refuse to undergo revision surgery, salvage procedures may be needed. PMID:26044538

  13. Comparison of measures to assess outcomes in total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, J; Fitzpatrick, R; Murray, D; Carr, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To compare the performance of a disease specific and a general health questionnaire in assessing changes resulting from total hip replacement. DESIGN--Two stage prospective study of patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery involving an assessment at a clinic before and six months after surgery. 60(32%) patients were followed up by post. SETTING--Outpatient departments at a specialist orthopaedic hospital and peripheral clinics within Oxfordshire. PATIENTS--188 patients admitted for unilateral total hip replacement between February and mid-August 1994. MAIN MEASURES--Patients' self assessed scores with the 12 item Oxford hip score and SF-36 general health questionnaire together with surgeons' assessment with Charnley hip score obtained before and again at six months after surgery. RESULTS--186 patients were followed up six months after total hip replacement; a subsample (n=60) by post. Of the 60 postal patients, 59(98.3%) fully completed the Oxford hip score compared with 44(73.3%) who fully completed the SF-36. For the followup sample as a whole, post operative changes in scores produced a large effect size of 2.75 on the Oxford hip score, compared with -1.89 physical function (SF-36), -2.13 pain (SF-36). With the exception of physical function and role (physical), postoperative SF-36 scores were shown to be similar to or better than those found by two population surveys on patients of comparable age. The responsiveness of a disease specific questionnaire, the Oxford hip score, and relevant sections of a general questionnaire, SF-36, were found to be similar as assessed by three different criteria. CONCLUSIONS--A disease specific questionnaire, the Oxford hip score, and a general state of health questionnaire, SF-36, performed similarly in assessing outcomes of total hip replacement except that the disease specific questionnaire resulted in a higher completion rate and greater responsiveness in some sections. On the other hand the general

  14. Effects of Running and Walking on Osteoarthritis and Hip Replacement Risk

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Running and other strenuous sports activities are purported to increase osteoarthritis (OA) risk, more so than walking and less-strenuous activities. Analyses were therefore performed to test whether running, walking, and other exercise affect OA and hip replacement risk, and to assess BMI’s role in mediating these relationships. Methods Proportional hazards analyses of patients’ report of having physician-diagnosed OA and hip replacement vs. exercise energy expenditure (metabolic equivalents, METs). Results 74,752 runners reported 2004 OA and 259 hip replacements during 7.1-year follow-up, while the 14,625 walkers reported 695 OA and 114 hip replacements over 5.7 years. Compared to running <1.8 METhr/d, the risks for OA and hip replacement decreased: 1) 18.1% (P=0.01) and 35.1% (P=0.03), respectively, for 1.8 to 3.6 METhr/d run; 2) 16.1% (P=0.03) and 50.4% (P=0.002), respectively, for 3.6 to 5.4 METhr/d run; and 3) 15.6% (P=0.02) and 38.5% (P=0.01), respectively, for ≥5.4 METhr/d run, suggesting that the risk reduction mostly occurred by 1.8 METhr/d. Baseline BMI was strongly associated with both OA (5.0% increase per kg/m2, P=2x10−8) and hip replacement risks (9.8% increase per kg/m2, P=4.8x10−5), and adjustment for BMI substantially diminished the risk reduction from running ≥1.8 METhr/d for OA (from 16.5%, P=0.01 to 8.6%, P=0.21) and hip replacement (from 40.4%, P=0.005 to 28.5%, P=0.07). The reductions in OA and hip replacement risk by exceeding 1.8 METhr/d did not differ significantly between runners and walkers. Other (non-running) exercise increased the risk of OA by 2.4% (P=0.009) and hip replacement by 5.0% per METhr/d (P=0.02), independent of BMI. Conclusions Whereas other exercise increased OA and hip replacement risk, running significantly reduced their risk due, in part, to running’s association with lower BMI. PMID:23377837

  15. Evaluation of a Centers of Excellence Program for Knee and Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Ateev; Sloss, Elizabeth M.; Hussey, Peter S.; Adams, John L.; Lovejoy, Susan; SooHoo, Nelson F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Medicare and private plans are encouraging individuals to seek care at hospitals which are designated as centers of excellence. Few evaluations of such programs have been conducted. The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, whose member plans insure one in three Americans, has established an initiative to designate hospitals as centers of excellence for knee and hip replacement. Objective Comparison of outcomes and costs associated with knee and hip replacement at designated hospitals and other hospitals. Research design Retrospective claims analysis of approximately 54 million enrollees. Study population Individuals with Blue Cross Blue Shield insurance who underwent a primary knee or hip replacement in 2007-2009. Outcomes Primary outcomes were any complication within 30 days of discharge and costs within 90 days following the procedure. Results 80,931 patients had a knee replacement and 39,532 patients had a hip replacement of which 52.2% and 56.5%, respectively, were performed at a designated hospital. Designated hospitals had a larger number of beds and were more likely to be an academic center. Patients with a knee replacement at designated hospitals did not have a statistically significantly lower overall complication rate with an odds ratio of 0.90 (p=0.08). Patients with a hip replacement treated at designated hospitals had a statistically significantly lower risk of complications with an odds ratio of 0.80 (p=0.002). There was no significant difference in 90-day costs for either procedure. Conclusions Hospitals designated as joint replacement centers of excellence had lower rates of complications for hip replacement, but there was no statistically significant difference for knee replacement. It is important to validate the criteria used to designate centers of excellence. PMID:23222470

  16. One-stage revision in two cases of Salmonella prosthetic hip infection

    PubMed Central

    Jeroense, Kimberly TV; Kuiper, Jesse WP; Colen, Sascha; Schade, Rogier P; Saouti, Rachid

    2014-01-01

    We describe two cases of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) of the hip due to Salmonella. The first patient presented with an early infection 5 d after being discharged following a total hip replacement and the second patient presented at the emergency ward with a late infection, thirteen years following a total hip replacement. Both cases occurred within one month of each other at our institution and both were successfully treated with a one-stage revision. PJI caused by Salmonella species is very rare: so far only 20 Salmonella PJIs of the hip have been described. Therefore, full consensus on the best treatment approach has not yet been reached. An aggressive two-stage approach is advised because of the virulence of Salmonella, although a limited number of successful one-stage approaches have been described as well. According to the latest guidelines, one-stage revision has comparable success rates and less morbidity compared to two-stage treatment, when selecting the right patients. In our opinion, PJI caused by Salmonella should be treated just as PJI caused by other bacteria, with consideration of the selection criteria as mentioned in several treatment guidelines. As illustrated by these two cases, one-stage revision can be successful in both early and late Salmonella PJI of the hip. PMID:25032209

  17. Infection after primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lindeque, Bennie; Hartman, Zach; Noshchenko, Andriy; Cruse, Margaret

    2014-04-01

    The number of primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed in the United States each year continues to climb, as does the incidence of infectious complications. The changing profile of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has made preventing and treating primary THA infections increasingly complex. The goal of this review was to summarize (1) the published data concerning the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after primary THA by type of bacteria and (2) the effect of potentially modifying factors. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, EMBASE, Web of Science, and PubMed were searched. Studies dated between 2001 and 2011 examining primary THA in adults were included. Meta-analysis of the collected data was performed. The pooled SSI rate was 2.5% (95% confidence interval [Cl], 1.4%-4.4%; P<.001; n=28,883). The pooled deep prosthetic joint infection (PJI) rate was 0.9% (95% Cl, 0.4%-2.2%; P<.001; n=28,883). The pooled rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus SSI was 0.5% (95% Cl, 0.2%-1.5%; P<.001; n=26,703). This is approximately 20% of all SSI cases. The pooled rate of intraoperative bacterial wound contamination was 16.9% (95% Cl, 6.6%-36.8%; P=.003; n=2180). All these results had significant heterogeneity. The postoperative risk of SSI was significantly associated with intraoperative bacterial surgical wound contamination (pooled rate ratio, 2.5; 95% Cl, 1.4%-4.6%; P=.001; n=19,049). PMID:24762833

  18. Balancing innovation and medical device regulation: the case of modern metal-on-metal hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    Due to problems with wear particle generation and subsequent loosening using conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacements, there has been a shift toward alternative bearing systems, including metal-on-metal (MoM), for younger, more active patients with degenerative joint disease. Based on positive results from early short-term clinical studies, MoM hip replacements were readily adopted by orthopedic surgeons with thousands being implanted worldwide over the past decade. Unacceptably high revision rates reported by two national joint registries called into question the rigorousness of the regulatory approval process for these implants, particularly with respect to premarket data requirements to prove safety, effectiveness, and the appropriateness of the regulatory pathway chosen. The purpose of this review was to investigate the balance between facilitating the introduction of new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment. The case of MoM hip replacement devices was used to frame the investigation and subsequent discussions. The regulatory approval processes and post-market surveillance requirements associated with three common MoM hip replacements (two resurfacings: the Birmingham and articular surface replacement and the articular surface replacement XL total hip replacement) were investigated. With respect to modern MoM hip replacement devices, the balance between facilitating the introduction of these new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment was not achieved. The lessons learned from these experiences have application beyond joint replacements to the introduction of new medical technologies in general, particularly for those who have a significant potential for harm. In this regard, a series of recommendations have been developed to contribute to the evolution of the medical device regulatory process

  19. Balancing innovation and medical device regulation: the case of modern metal-on-metal hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    Due to problems with wear particle generation and subsequent loosening using conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacements, there has been a shift toward alternative bearing systems, including metal-on-metal (MoM), for younger, more active patients with degenerative joint disease. Based on positive results from early short-term clinical studies, MoM hip replacements were readily adopted by orthopedic surgeons with thousands being implanted worldwide over the past decade. Unacceptably high revision rates reported by two national joint registries called into question the rigorousness of the regulatory approval process for these implants, particularly with respect to premarket data requirements to prove safety, effectiveness, and the appropriateness of the regulatory pathway chosen. The purpose of this review was to investigate the balance between facilitating the introduction of new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment. The case of MoM hip replacement devices was used to frame the investigation and subsequent discussions. The regulatory approval processes and post-market surveillance requirements associated with three common MoM hip replacements (two resurfacings: the Birmingham and articular surface replacement and the articular surface replacement XL total hip replacement) were investigated. With respect to modern MoM hip replacement devices, the balance between facilitating the introduction of these new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment was not achieved. The lessons learned from these experiences have application beyond joint replacements to the introduction of new medical technologies in general, particularly for those who have a significant potential for harm. In this regard, a series of recommendations have been developed to contribute to the evolution of the medical device regulatory process

  20. Ureaplasma urealyticum infection in total hip arthroplasty leading to revision.

    PubMed

    Sköldenberg, Olof G; Rysinska, Agata D; Neander, Gustaf; Muren, Olle H; Ahl, Torbjörn E

    2010-10-01

    We describe an infection with Ureaplasma urealyticum causing rapid loosening of a cemented total hip arthroplasty. When reviewing the literature we found that no such case has been reported previously. Taking intraoperative cultures for U urealyticum during revision surgery is not a standard procedure. In cases with rapid, presumed aseptic, loosening of a total hip arthroplasty, an infection with U urealyticum should be considered. PMID:20705423

  1. The pathogenesis of osteolysis in two different cementless hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Learmonth, I D; Smith, E J; Cunningham, J L

    1997-01-01

    Wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene has been incriminated in the osteolysis associated with aseptic loosening of hip implants. A variety of different factors can contribute to accelerated patterns of polyethylene wear and subsequent osteolysis. This paper examines the incidence of osteolysis observed in two different well-matched cohorts of cementless total hip arthroplasties. The patterns of osteolysis observed, which are ascribed to the generation of polyethylene debris, are interpreted with reference to the design of the individual prostheses. PMID:9141891

  2. The Clinical Performance of Metal-on-Metal as an Articulation Surface in Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Long, William T

    2005-01-01

    The metal-on-metal articulations in total hip arthroplasty (THA) were widely used between 1960 and 1975. The McKee-Farrar and other first-generation prostheses failed at a high rate because impingement caused early component loosening. The problem of early component loosening was corrected by improved component design and better manufacturing quality. Second-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements have experienced short and medium-term success as assessed by Harris Hip Scores and patient selfassessment. The combined annual linear wear of the metal-on-metal femoral head and acetabular insert is less than 10 mm and osteolysis has only rarely been observed in association with well-fixed metal-on-metal total hip replacements. Hypersensitivity is not a common cause of loosening with second-generation hip replacements and remains to be proven as a definitive diagnosis in unusual cases of unexplained pain. More than 40 years of use has demonstrated no increase in the incidence of renal failure or cancer in patients with metal-on-metal total hip replacements. The scientific evidence of the results using the metal-on-metal articulations would recommend its continued use in any patient who does not have compromised renal function. PMID:16089065

  3. Mid-to long-term results of revision total hip replacement in patients aged 50 years or younger.

    PubMed

    Lee, P T H; Lakstein, D L; Lozano, B; Safir, O; Backstein, J; Gross, A E

    2014-08-01

    Revision total hip replacement (THR) for young patients is challenging because of technical complexity and the potential need for subsequent further revisions. We have assessed the survivorship, functional outcome and complications of this procedure in patients aged < 50 years through a large longitudinal series with consistent treatment algorithms. Of 132 consecutive patients (181 hips) who underwent revision THR, 102 patients (151 hips) with a mean age of 43 years (22 to 50) were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 11 years (2 to 26) post-operatively. We attempted to restore bone stock with allograft where indicated. Using further revision for any reason as an end point, the survival of the acetabular component was 71% (sd 4) and 54% (sd 7) at ten- and 20 years. The survival of the femoral component was 80% (sd 4) and 62% (sd 6) at ten- and 20 years. Complications included 11 dislocations (6.1%), ten periprosthetic fractures (5.5%), two deep infections (1.1%), four sciatic nerve palsies (2.2%; three resolved without intervention, one improved after exploration and freeing from adhesions) and one vascular injury (0.6%). The mean modified Harris Hip Score was 41 (10 to 82) pre-operatively, 77 (39 to 93) one year post-operatively and 77 (38 to 93) at the latest review. This overall perspective on the mid- to long-term results is valuable when advising young patients on the prospects of revision surgery at the time of primary replacement. PMID:25086120

  4. Cementless hemispheric acetabular component in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Weber, D; Schaper, L A; Pomeroy, D L; Badenhausen, W E; Curry, J I; Smith, M W; Suthers, K E

    2000-01-01

    A series of 198 total hip arthroplasties was performed using a porous-coated, hemispheric press-fit cup. One hundred and twenty-seven cups were available for clinical and radiological examination at mean follow-up of 10.6 years. The mean age at the index procedure was 61.2 years. The mean Harris hip score at final follow-up was 89.8. Three cups were revised for aseptic loosening and two liners were changed for eccentric wear and pelvic osteolysis. Nine additional patients showed mild or suspected osteolysis. Two cups were rated "fibrous" stable. There was no correlation between additional screw fixation of the press-fit cup and osteolysis or revision. PMID:10990381

  5. Total hip replacement in osteoarthritis: the role of bone metabolism and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Bottai, Vanna; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Celli, Fabio; Bugelli, Giulia; Cazzella, Niki; Cei, Elena; Guido, Giulio; Giannotti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoarthritis is one of the most common joint disorder. For treatment of hip symptomatic osteoarthritis, when conservative medical therapy has failed, total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a successful orthopaedic procedures that reduces pain and improves function and quality of life. Incidence of osteoarthritis is constantly increasing with raising life expectancy. This aging process also has led to an increasing number of patients with osteoporosis who need hip replacement for osteoarthritis. Osteoporosis have 3 major potential complications in total hip arthroplasty: perioperative fracture, an increased risk of periprosthetic fracture, and late aseptic loosening. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of osteoporosis on total hip replacement procedure outcome and highlight the importance of adequate study of calcium-phosphorus metabolism in patient candidate for hip surgery, and the need to start a suitable therapy to recover the bone mass before surgery. Bone quality of the hip joint has become an important risk factor limiting the durability of THA. PMID:26811704

  6. [Total hip replacement with isoelastic prosthesis in animals (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Muhr, O; Stockhusen, H; Müller, O

    1976-10-01

    Uncemented fixation and low-fraction materials are the basis of this experiment. Plastics with an elasticity similar to the bone ("isoelasticity") show very propitious material qualities. The direct cementless incorporation of test bodies must be checked. In 63 sheep isoelastic total hip joints were implanted. After 2 till 51 weeks the animals were sacrificed and 44 specimen of hips and organs were explored macroscopically, radiologically, spherimetrically and histologically. The result was: 1. Plastic hip prosthesis are incorporated in the bone, but the boundary layer is built by a collagenous fiber tissue. 2. Loosening brings resoption of the bone and expansion of the structural changed soft tissue. 3. The transformation of the femoral cortex to osteoporosis is considered possibly as the consequence of an insufficient biological transfer of the weight. 4. Fractures of the femoral prosthesis-stem could not be observed. 5. The radiology allows at the pelvis prosthesis a concret statement concerning stability, on the femoral part a probable one. 6. The abrasion is minimal, the tissue reaction to abrasion products is unessential. 7. Small abrasion particles are carried of by the lymph tract and stored in the first regional gland. A more distant spreading is not demonstrable. PMID:985179

  7. Musculoskeletal-based finite element analysis of femur after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Meena, Vijay K; Kumar, Mohit; Pundir, Amit; Singh, Suman; Goni, Vijay; Kalra, Parveen; Sinha, Ravindra K

    2016-06-01

    This article evaluates the effect of stress variation on adult femur following total hip replacement using musculoskeletal-based finite element analysis. The aim was to study the changes in stress distribution in the femur after total hip replacement by providing simulated in vivo loading and boundary conditions. The loading and boundary conditions were generated using a musculoskeletal modelling software 'AnyBody' and were applied on femur model, generated from the computed tomography (CT) scan data for standing posture of male patient. The results showed considerable variation in stress distribution pattern in the femur before and after total hip replacement, the metallic implant taking major loads of human body and transferring very less loads to the femur. PMID:27006421

  8. Wear of ceramic-on-carbon fiber-reinforced poly-ether ether ketone hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire L; John, Gemma; Williams, Sophie; Jin, Zhongmin; Isaac, Graham H; Fisher, John

    2012-08-01

    Total hip replacement has been a successful surgical intervention for over 50 years, with the majority of bearings using a polyethylene cup. Long-term failure due to osteolysis and loosening has been widely documented and alternative bearings have been sought. A novel carbon fiber-reinforced poly-ether ether ketone (CFR-PEEK) cup was investigated through experimental friction and wear studies. Friction studies demonstrated the bearings operated in a boundary lubrication condition, with friction factors higher than those for other hip replacement bearings. The wear study was conducted with 36 mm diameter bearings tested against Biolox Delta heads for a period of 10 million cycles. The mean volumetric wear rate was 0.3 mm(3)/Mc, indicating the ceramic-on-CFR-PEEK bearing to be a very low wearing option for total hip replacement. PMID:22454322

  9. Do financial incentives trump clinical guidance? Hip Replacement in England and Scotland.

    PubMed

    Papanicolas, Irene; McGuire, Alistair

    2015-12-01

    Following devolution in 1999 England and Scotland's National Health Services diverged, resulting in major differences in hospital payment. England introduced a case payment mechanism from 2003/4, while Scotland continued to pay through global budgets. We investigate the impact this change had on activity for Hip Replacement. We examine the financial reimbursement attached to uncemented Hip Replacement in England, which has been more generous than for its cemented counterpart, although clinical guidance from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence recommends the later. In Scotland this financial differential does not exist. We use a difference-in-difference estimator, using Scotland as a control, to test whether the change in reimbursement across the two countries had an influence on treatment. Our results indicate that financial incentives are directly linked to the faster uptake of the more expensive, uncemented Hip Replacement in England, which ran against the clinical guidance. PMID:26359587

  10. Tribological characteristics of a composite total-surface hip replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Roberts, J. C.; Ling, F. F.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous fiber, woven E glass composite femoral shells having the same elastic properties as bone were fabricated. The shells were then encrusted with filled epoxy wear resistant coatings and run dry against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in 42,000 and 250,000 cycle wear tests on a total hip simulator. The tribological characteristics of these continuous fiber particulate composite femoral shells articulating with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups were comparable to those of a vitallium ball articulating with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cup.

  11. Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... result of the knee replacement surgery," said Dr. Caroline Messer, who specializes in bone loss at Lenox ... is a risk factor for future fractures." SOURCES: Caroline Messer, M.D., director, Center for Pituitary and ...

  12. Predictors of mortality following primary hip and knee replacement in the aged

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose High age is associated with increased postoperative mortality, but the factors that predict mortality in older hip and knee replacement recipients are not known. Methods Preoperative clinical and operative data on 1,998 primary total hip and knee replacements performed for osteoarthritis in patients aged ≥ 75 years in a single institution were collected from a joint replacement database and compoared with mortality data. Average follow-up was 4.2 (2.2–7.6) years for the patients who survived. Factors associated with mortality were analyzed using Cox regression analysis, with adjustment for age, sex, operated joint, laterality, and anesthesiological risk score. Results Mortality was 0.15% at 30 days, 0.35% at 90 days, 1.60% at 1 year, 7.6% at 3 years, and 16% at 5 years, and was similar following hip and knee replacement. Higher age, male sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists risk score of > 2, use of walking aids, preoperative walking restriction (inability to walk or ability to walk indoors only, compared to ability to walk > 1 km), poor clinical condition preoperatively (based on clinical hip and knee scores or clinical severity of osteoarthritis), preoperative anemia, severe renal insufficiency, and use of blood transfusions were associated with higher mortality. High body mass index had a protective effect in patients after hip replacement. Interpretation Postoperative mortality is low in healthy old joint replacement recipients. Comorbidities and functional limitations preoperatively are associated with higher mortality and warrant careful consideration before proceeding with joint replacement surgery. PMID:23244785

  13. Contralateral ulnar neuropathy following total hip replacement and intraoperative positioning.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, S; Bennett, D; Spence, D J; Mawhinney, I; Beverland, D E

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a rare but important complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and has previously been reported in the ipsilateral arm and associated with inflammatory arthritis. The results of 7004 primary hip arthroplasties performed between January 1993 and February 2009 were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who reported ulnar neuropathy symptoms, with ten patients identified at mean follow-up of 57 months (range = 3-195 months). Eight patients experienced unilateral ulnar nerve symptoms in the contralateral upper limb post-surgery, one patient experienced symptoms in the ipsilateral upper limb and one patient experienced symptoms in both upper limbs. The incidence of post-THA ulnar neuropathy was 0.14%. All patients had a pre-operative diagnosis of osteoarthritis and none had diabetes, a previous history of neuropathy or inflammatory arthritis. All operations were primary arthroplasties and were performed under the care of a single surgeon in a single centre. Two of the ten patients (20%) had a general anaesthetic. The pattern of symptoms reported, i.e. mainly unilateral affecting the contralateral side with variable resolution, contrasts with previous studies and suggests that intraoperative patient positioning may be an important factor influencing ulnar neuropathy following THA. Attention to support and positioning of the contralateral arm may help reduce the incidence of this complication. PMID:26589446

  14. Pelvic irradiation does not increase the risk of hip replacement in patients with gynecological cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dybvik, Eva; Furnes, Ove; D. Fosså, Sophie; Trovik, Clement; Lie, Stein Atle

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — Long-term survivors of cancer can develop adverse effects of the treatment. 60% of cancer patients survive for at least 5 years after diagnosis. Pelvic irradiation can cause bone damage in these long-term survivors, with increased risk of fracture and degeneration of the hip. Patients and methods — Analyses were based on linkage between the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN) and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR). All women who had been exposed to radiation for curative radiotherapy of gynecological cancer (40–60 Gy for at least 28 days) were identified in the CRN. Radiotherapy had been given between 1998 and 2006 and only patients who were irradiated within 6 months of diagnosis were included. The control group contained women with breast cancer who had also undergone radiotherapy, but not to the pelvic area. Fine and Gray competing-risk analysis was used to calculate subhazard-rate ratios (subHRRs) and cumulative incidence functions (CIFs) for the risk of having a prosthesis accounting for differences in mortality. Results — Of 962 eligible patients with gynecological cancer, 26 (3%) had received a total hip replacement. In the control group without exposure, 253 (3%) of 7,545 patients with breast cancer had undergone total hip replacement. The 8-year CIF for receiving a total hip replacement was 2.7% (95% CI: 2.6–2.8) for gynecological cancer patients and 3.0% (95% CI: 2.95–3.03) for breast cancer patients; subHRR was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.53–1.22; p = 0.3). In both groups, the most common reason for hip replacement was idiopathic osteoarthritis. Interpretation — We did not find any statistically significantly higher risk of undergoing total hip replacement in patients with gynecological cancer who had had pelvic radiotherapy than in women with breast cancer who had not had pelvic radiotherapy. PMID:25238432

  15. Use of postoperative irradiation for the prevention of heterotopic bone formation after total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, J.E.; Greenberg, P.; Selch, M.T.; Thomas, B.J.; Amstutz, H.

    1988-03-01

    Formation of heterotopic bone (HTB) following total hip replacement may partially or completely ankylose the joint space, causing pain and/or limiting the range of motion. Patients at high risk for formation of HTB postoperatively include those with previous HTB formation, heterotopic osteoarthritis, and active rheumatoid spondylitis. Patients in these high risk groups have a 63-69% incidence of post-operative HTB formation, usually seen radiographically by 2 months post-operation. From 1980-1986 twenty-nine hips in 28 consecutively treated patients were irradiated post-operatively at the UCLA Center for the Health Sciences. The indication for irradiation was documented HTB formation previously in 26 of the 27 hips presented below. From 1980-1982 patients received 20 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions; from 1982-1986 the dose was reduced to 10 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. Twenty-seven hips in 26 patients completed therapy and were available for evaluation, with a minimum of 2 month follow-up, and a median follow-up of 12 months. Three of 27 hips developed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV) post-operatively, whereas 5 of 27 hips developed minor, nonsymptomatic HTB (Brooker grade I). When irradiation was begun by postoperative day 4, 0 of 17 hips formed significant HTB. If irradiation began after post-operative day 4, 3 of 10 hips formed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV). These 3 hips received doses of 10 Gy in one hip and 20 Gy in the other 2 hips. There were no differences in the incidence or severity of side effects in the 10 Gy vs. the 20 Gy treatment groups. Eighteen hips received 10 Gy, 8 hips 20 Gy and, 1 hip 12 Gy. In conclusion, 10 Gy in 5 fractions appears as effective as 20 Gy in 10 fractions at preventing post-operative formation of HTB. For optimal results, treatment should begin as early as possible prior to post-operative day 4.

  16. Compatibility of the totally replaced hip. Reduction of wear by amorphous diamond coating.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, Seppo

    2003-12-01

    Particulate wear debris in totally replaced hips causes adverse local host reactions. The extreme form of such a reaction, aggressive granulomatosis, was found to be a distinct condition and different from simple aseptic loosening. Reactive and adaptive tissues around the totally replaced hip were made of proliferation of local fibroblast like cells and activated macrophages. Methylmethacrylate and high-molecular-weight polyethylene were shown to be essentially immunologically inert implant materials, but in small particulate form functioned as cellular irritants initiating local biological reactions leading to loosening of the implants. Chromium-cobalt-molybdenum is the most popular metallic implant material; it is hard and tough, and the bearings of this metal are partially self-polishing. In total hip implants, prerequisites for longevity of the replaced hip are good biocompatibility of the materials and sufficient tribological properties of the bearings. The third key issue is that the bearing must minimize frictional shear at the prosthetic bone-implant interface to be compatible with long-term survival. Some of the approaches to meet these demands are alumina-on-alumina and metal-on-metal designs, as well as the use of highly crosslinked polyethylene for the acetabular component. In order to avoid the wear-based deleterious properties of the conventional total hip prosthesis materials or coatings, the present work included biological and tribological testing of amorphous diamond. Previous experiments had demonstrated that a high adhesion of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coatings to a substrate can be achieved by using mixing layers or interlayers. Amorphous diamond was found to be biologically inert, and simulator testing indicated excellent wear properties for conventional total hip prostheses, in which either the ball or both bearing surfaces were coated with hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous diamond films. Simulator testing with such total hip prostheses

  17. Impingement in Total Hip Replacement: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D.; Callaghan, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of total hip impingement, whether or not accompanied by frank dislocation, holds substantial untoward clinical consequences, especially as less-forgiving advanced bearing implant designs come into ever more widespread use. Biomechanical aspects of impingement and dislocation have historically received relatively little scientific attention, although that situation is now rapidly changing. The present article reviews contemporary laboratory and clinical research on the impingement/dislocation phenomena, focusing particularly on how implant design variables, surgical implantation factors and patient activity each act individually and in concert to pose impingement and dislocation challenges. In recent years, several powerful new research methodologies have emerged that have greatly expanded the scope for clinical translation of systematic laboratory study. Transferring the findings from such research into yet better implant designs, and even better surgical procedures, offers encouragement that the clinical impact of this troublesome complication can be further reduced. PMID:19956356

  18. Effect of strontium-containing hydroxyapatite bone cement on bone remodeling following hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Ni, Guo X; Lin, Jian H; Chiu, Peter K Y; Li, Zhao Y; Lu, William W

    2010-01-01

    It is uncertain whether the use of bioactive bone cement has any beneficial effect on local bone adaptation following hip replacement. In this study, twelve goats underwent cemented hip hemiarthroplasty unilaterally, with either PMMA bone cement or strontium-containing hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) bioactive bone cement. Nine months later, the femoral cortical bones at different levels were analyzed by microhardness testing and micro-CT scanning. Extensive bone remodeling was found at proximal and mid-levels in both PMMA and Sr-HA groups. However, with regard to the differences of bone mineral density, cortical bone area and bone hardness between implanted and non-implanted femur, less decreases were found in Sr-HA group than PMMA group at proximal and mid-levels, and significant differences were shown for bone area and hardness at proximal level. The results suggested that the use of Sr-HA cement might alleviate femoral bone remodeling after hip replacement. PMID:19728042

  19. Revision hip replacement for recurrent Hydatid disease of the pelvis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Neelapala, Venkata S S; Chandrasekar, Coonoor R; Grimer, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    A case of a large recurrent hydatid cyst involving the right ilium and right hip treated with excision of the cyst, Total hip replacement and revision of the acetabular component with a Tripolar articulation for cyst recurrence and acetabular component loosening is presented along with a review of the relevant literature. To our knowledge there is no reported case of Total Hip replacement and revision for hydatid disease involving the bony pelvis. PMID:20222941

  20. Adverse sequelae following revision of a total hip replacement for a fractured ceramic component: case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ling Hong; Langton, David; Green, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Revision total hip replacement following a fractured ceramic bearing component presents a challenge in the choice of the new bearing implant. A femoral head made of equal or harder material should be implanted to prevent catastrophic wear. Despite this, patients and surgeons must be wary of potential complications. PMID:27163083

  1. Adverse sequelae following revision of a total hip replacement for a fractured ceramic component: case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ling Hong; Langton, David; Green, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Revision total hip replacement following a fractured ceramic bearing component presents a challenge in the choice of the new bearing implant. A femoral head made of equal or harder material should be implanted to prevent catastrophic wear. Despite this, patients and surgeons must be wary of potential complications. PMID:27163083

  2. Abnormal bone marrow distribution following unsuccessful hip replacement: a potential confusion on white cell scanning.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, D A

    1991-01-01

    A case is presented in which a grossly abnormal distribution of bone marrow following failed hip replacement would have led to the false diagnosis of osteomyelitis. The value of combining bone marrow scanning with indium white cell scanning in possible osteomyelitis is emphasised. PMID:2019282

  3. Good outcome of total hip replacement in patients with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    King, Garry; Hunt, Linda P; Wilkinson, J Mark; Blom, Ashley W

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — People with cerebral palsy (CP) often have painful deformed hips, but they are seldom treated with hip replacement as the surgery is considered to be high risk. However, few data are available on the outcome of hip replacement in these patients. Patients and methods — We linked Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) records to the National Joint Registry for England and Wales to identify 389 patients with CP who had undergone hip replacement. Their treatment and outcomes were compared with those of 425,813 patients who did not have CP. Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated to describe implant survivorship and the curves were compared using log-rank tests, with further stratification for age and implant type. Reasons for revision were quantified as patient-time incidence rates (PTIRs). Nationally collected patient-reported outcomes (PROMS) before and 6 months after operation were compared if available. Cumulative mortality (Kaplan-Meier) was estimated at 90 days and at 1, 3, and 5 years. Results — The cumulative probability of revision at 5 years post-surgery was 6.4% (95% CI: 3.8–11) in the CP cohort as opposed to 2.9% (CI 2.9–3%) in the non-CP cohort (p < 0.001). Patient-reported outcomes showed that CP patients had worse pain and function preoperatively, but had equivalent postoperative improvement. The median improvement in Oxford hip score at 6 months was 23 (IQR: 14–28) in CP and it was 21 (14–28) in non-CP patients. 91% of CP patients reported good or excellent satisfaction with their outcome. The cumulative probability of mortality for CP up to 7 years was similar to that in the controls after stratification for age and sex. Interpretation — Hip replacement for cerebral palsy appears to be safe and effective, although implant revision rates are higher than those in patients without cerebral palsy. PMID:26863583

  4. Hip or knee replacement - in the hospital after

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may help speed your recovery and reduce pain, bleeding, and risk of infection. You will learn the proper positions for your legs and knees. Make sure you follow these guidelines. Improper positioning ...

  5. Dislodgement of a cemented exeter femoral stem during closed manipulative reduction of a dislocated total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Aysha; Mohamed, Abdalla; Shaikh, Mazharuddin; Banaszkiewicz, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of cemented femoral stem migration and dislodgement even though has been described is extremely unusual. There is a high chance of polished femoral stem displacement happening while trying to reduce a dislocated total hip replacement by closed measures. Presentation of the case A 73 year old lady who had an Exeter cemented total hip replacement about two weeks back was admitted from Accident and Emergency with a dislocation. During the closed manipulative reduction under general anaesthesia it was noted that the femoral stem has dislodged from the canal. She underwent revision of the total hip replacement with good outcome. Discussion Femoral stem dislodgement occurs in total hip replacement if polished stem or inadequate cementing of the collar is carried out. Conclusion Gentle manipulative reduction under general anaesthesia of dislocated total hip replacement should be carried out if the polished femoral stem is used. PMID:27060643

  6. Elevated risk of early reoperation in total hip replacement during the stage of unit closure.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Mikko; Malmivaara, Antti; Paavola, Mika; Seitsalo, Seppo

    2016-04-01

    Background and purpose - The effects of launch or closure of an entire arthroplasty unit on the first or last patients treated in these units have not been studied. Using a 3-year follow-up, we investigated whether patients who were treated at the launch or closure stage of an arthroplasty unit of a hospital would have a higher risk of reoperation than patients treated in-between at the same units. Patients and methods - From the Finnish Arthroplasty Register, we identified all the units that had performed total joint arthroplasty and the units that were launched or closed in Finland between 1998 and 2011. The risks of reoperation within 3 years for the 41,748 total hip and knee replacements performed due to osteoarthritis in these units were modeled with Cox proportional-hazards regression, separately for hip and knee and for the launch and the closure stage. Results - The unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for total hip and knee replacements performed in the initial stage of activity of the units that were launched were similar to the reoperation risks in patients who were operated in these units after the early stage of activity. The unadjusted and risk-adjusted HRs for early reoperation after total hip replacement (THR) were increased at the closure stage (adjusted HR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.8). The reoperation risk at the closure stage after total knee replacement (TKR) was not increased. Interpretation - The results indicate that closure of units performing total hip replacements poses an increased risk of reoperation. Closures need to be managed carefully to prevent the quality from deteriorating when performing the final arthroplasties. PMID:26541178

  7. Elevated risk of early reoperation in total hip replacement during the stage of unit closure

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Mikko; Malmivaara, Antti; Paavola, Mika; Seitsalo, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effects of launch or closure of an entire arthroplasty unit on the first or last patients treated in these units have not been studied. Using a 3-year follow-up, we investigated whether patients who were treated at the launch or closure stage of an arthroplasty unit of a hospital would have a higher risk of reoperation than patients treated in-between at the same units. Patients and methods — From the Finnish Arthroplasty Register, we identified all the units that had performed total joint arthroplasty and the units that were launched or closed in Finland between 1998 and 2011. The risks of reoperation within 3 years for the 41,748 total hip and knee replacements performed due to osteoarthritis in these units were modeled with Cox proportional-hazards regression, separately for hip and knee and for the launch and the closure stage. Results — The unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for total hip and knee replacements performed in the initial stage of activity of the units that were launched were similar to the reoperation risks in patients who were operated in these units after the early stage of activity. The unadjusted and risk-adjusted HRs for early reoperation after total hip replacement (THR) were increased at the closure stage (adjusted HR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2–2.8). The reoperation risk at the closure stage after total knee replacement (TKR) was not increased. Interpretation — The results indicate that closure of units performing total hip replacements poses an increased risk of reoperation. Closures need to be managed carefully to prevent the quality from deteriorating when performing the final arthroplasties. PMID:26541178

  8. Psoas muscle pyogenic abscess in association with infected hip arthroplasty: a rare case of simultaneous bilateral presentation.

    PubMed

    Volpin, Andrea; Kini, Sunil Gurpur; Berizzi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral presentation of psoas abscess with prosthetic joint involvement is extremely rare. A 68-year-old woman presented to us with bilateral dull aching groin pain of 6 months' duration, which flared up in the past month, associated with pyrexial symptoms. She had undergone bilateral hip replacements in the past with uneventful recovery. MRI showed bilateral psoas muscle collection in communication with the hip joints. Preoperative hip aspirate demonstrated frank pus with positivity on Gram stain and radiographs confirmed prosthetic loosening of bilateral hips. The patient subsequently underwent two-stage revision arthroplasty of both infected hip implants. At 5-year follow-up, the patient remains asymptomatic with good functional outcome and no recurrence on serial MRI. PMID:25994433

  9. Total hip replacement in two dogs with unsuccessful femoral head ostectomy

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Su-Young

    2015-01-01

    An English setter (case 1) and a Tibetan mastiff (case 2) presented with intermittent weight-bearing lameness on the right hind limb when trotting. The dogs had a history of femoral head and neck ostectomy (FHNO). Orthopedic examination revealed pain and crepitus on the right hip joint. The dogs underwent total hip replacement (THR). At the 2-year (case 1) and 1-year (case 2) follow-up, both dogs had resumed normal activity without lameness. The muscle mass and range of motion were significantly improved in the affected hind limb. In conclusion, FHNO with poor functional outcomes can be successfully ameliorated with THR. PMID:25269715

  10. Total hip replacement in two dogs with unsuccessful femoral head ostectomy.

    PubMed

    Heo, Su-Young; Seol, Jae-Won; Lee, Hae-Beom

    2015-01-01

    An English setter (case 1) and a Tibetan mastiff (case 2) presented with intermittent weight-bearing lameness on the right hind limb when trotting. The dogs had a history of femoral head and neck ostectomy (FHNO). Orthopedic examination revealed pain and crepitus on the right hip joint. The dogs underwent total hip replacement (THR). At the 2-year (case 1) and 1-year (case 2) follow-up, both dogs had resumed normal activity without lameness. The muscle mass and range of motion were significantly improved in the affected hind limb. In conclusion, FHNO with poor functional outcomes can be successfully ameliorated with THR. PMID:25269715

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging features of complications following hip replacement: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Pilania, Khushboo; Jankharia, Bhavin

    2016-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery helps millions of people worldwide walk painlessly each year. With increasing life spans and decreased clinical threshold for surgery, this number will continue to rise. With the increase in the number of surgeries and the longevity of implants, the need for early and prompt diagnosis of complications is also rising. This essay underlines the fact that magnetic resonance imaging on a 1.5T scanner with specialized metal artefact reduction sequences is a viable technique to image the post-arthroplasty hip and has vast potential in the prompt and early diagnosis of complications in these patients.

  12. Polyethylene wear with an entirely HA-coated total hip replacement: 79 hips followed for 5 years.

    PubMed

    Røkkum, M; Reigstad, A

    1998-06-01

    We measured the eccentricity of the femoral head in the metal backing annually during 5 years in 79 consecutive total hip replacements (73 patients). The mean age of the patients was 57 (32-73) years and the female/male ratio 63/22. The prostheses were entirely coated with hydroxyapatite. Modular 32 mm stainless steel heads and hemispherical, self-tapping screw cups with polyethylene liners were used. We found accelerating eccentricity throughout the observation period. The mean eccentricity at 5 years was 0.71 mm (95% CI 0.53-0.90), resulting in a mean eccentricity rate of 0.14 mm (0.11-0.18) per year. The 5-year eccentricity was 0.5 mm or less in 45 hips and more than 1.5 mm in 13 hips, 2 in the latter group apparently having worn through the polyethylene liner. The true wear may be twice as great. The use of 32 mm stainless steel heads and thin polyethylene inlays may have aggravated the wear problems. These HA-coated prostheses must all be checked regularly, so that cases with excessive polyethylene wear can be reoperated on before wear-through of the liner. PMID:9703398

  13. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chong, Elaine W; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Guymer, Robyn H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be

  14. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Elaine W.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D.; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A.; Giles, Graham G.; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M.; Guymer, Robyn H.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003–2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001–2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00–1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25–12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur

  15. Metastatic muscle abscesses complicating infected total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Balato, Giovanni; Ascione, Tiziana; Mariconda, Massimo; Pagliano, Pasquale

    2016-03-01

    A 73-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis presented to our institution with infection of her right total hip arthroplasty. On admission, a draining sinus tract over the hip and a palpable mass in the left lower posterior region of the neck were detected. The contrast CT scan showed a large abscess in the trapezius muscle and multiple abscesses involving muscle of the neck and right shoulder. Intraoperative specimens from the muscle abscess were positive for presumably the same methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus that sustained the prosthetic joint infection. Prolonged intravenous daptomycin led to remission of the muscle abscess and control of the prosthetic joint infection. The patient refused revision total hip arthroplasty and oral cotrimoxazole was prescribed for chronic suppression of the infection. Three years after the primary surgery there was stable remission of the prosthetic joint infection. This rare case demonstrates the severity of prosthetic joint infections sustained by multiresistant bacteria in immunocompromised hosts, which may result in their bacteraemic spread. PMID:27031898

  16. Trends in hip and knee joint replacement: socioeconomic inequalities and projections of need

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, T; Shaw, M; Ebrahim, S; Dieppe, P

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To examine trends in primary and revision joint (hip and knee) replacement in England between 1991 and 2000. Methods: Analysis of hospital episodes statistics between 1 April 1991 and 30 March 2001 for total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR). Descriptive statistics and regression modelling were used to summarise patients' demographic and clinical characteristics and to explore variations in joint surgery rates by age, sex, and deprivation. Results: Between 1991 and 2000, the incidence of primary THR increased by 18%, while the incidence of revision THR more than doubled. The incidence of primary TKR doubled, with revision TKR increasing by 300%. Over the 10 year period, the proportion of THR episodes that involved revision operations rose from 8% to 20%. Substantial variations in operation rates by socioeconomic status were seen, with the most deprived fifth of the population experiencing significantly lower rates. Projections estimate that primary THR numbers could rise by up to 22% by the year 2010, with primary TKR numbers rising by up to 63%. Conclusions: Provision of joint replacement surgery in English NHS hospitals has increased substantially over the past decade. Revision operations in particular have increased markedly. The growth in primary operations has mostly occurred among those aged 60 years and over; rates among young people have changed very little. There is a significant deprivation based gradient in rates. If current trends continue there would be almost 47 000 primary hip and 54 000 primary knee operations annually by 2010. PMID:15194578

  17. Meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee joint replacement due to osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is emerging evidence for a beneficial effect of meat consumption on the musculoskeletal system. However, whether it affects the risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis is unknown. We performed a prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis. Methods Eligible 35,331 participants were selected from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study recruited during 1990-1994. Consumption of fresh red meat, processed meat, chicken, and fish was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis during 2001-2005 was determined by linking the cohort records to the Australian National Joint Replacement Registry. Results There was a negative dose-response relationship between fresh red meat consumption and the risk of hip replacement (hazard ratio (HR) 0.94 per increase in intake of one time/week, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-0.98). In contrast, there was no association with knee replacement risk (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.02). Consumption of processed meat, chicken and fish were not associated with risk of hip or knee replacement. Conclusion A high level consumption of fresh red meat was associated with a decreased risk of hip, but not knee, joint replacement for osteoarthritis. One possible mechanism to explain these differential associations may be via an effect of meat intake on bone strength and hip shape. Further confirmatory studies are warranted. PMID:21235820

  18. Palacos compared to Palamed bone cement in total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Meinardi, Joris E; Valstar, Edward R; Van Der Voort, Paul; Kaptein, Bart L; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - Stability and survival of cemented total hip prostheses is dependent on a multitude of factors, including the type of cement that is used. Bone cements vary in viscosity, from low to medium and high. There have been few clinical RSA studies comparing the performance of low- and high-viscosity bone cements. We compared the migration behavior of the Stanmore hip stem cemented using novel low-viscosity Palamed bone cement with that of the same stem cemented with conventional high-viscosity Palacos bone cement. Patients and methods - We performed a randomized controlled study involving 39 patients (40 hips) undergoing primary total hip replacement for primary or secondary osteoarthritis. 22 patients (22 hips) were randomized to Palacos and 17 patients (18 hips) were randomized to Palamed. Migration was determined by RSA. Results - None of these 40 hips had been revised at the 10-year follow-up mark. To our knowledge, the patients who died before they reached the 10-year endpoint still had the implant in situ. No statistically significant or clinically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for mean translations, rotations, and maximum total-point motion (MTPM). Interpretation - We found similar migration of the Stanmore stem in the high-viscosity Palacos cement group and the low-viscosity Palamed cement group. We therefore expect that the risk of aseptic loosening with the new Palamed cement would be comparable to that with the conventional Palacos cement. The choice of which type of bone cement to use is therefore up to the surgeon's preference. PMID:27329869

  19. Comparison between 28 mm and 32 mm ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y K; Ha, Y C; Koo, K H

    2014-11-01

    Large femoral heads have become popular in total hip replacement (THR) as a method of reducing the risk of dislocation. However, if large heads are used in ceramic-on-ceramic THR, the liner must be thinner, which may increase the risk of fracture. To compare the rates of ceramic fracture and dislocation between 28 mm and 32 mm ceramic heads, 120 hips in 109 patients (51 men and 58 women, mean age 49.2 years) were randomised to THR with either a 28 mm or a 32 mm ceramic articulation. A total of 57/60 hips assigned to the 28 mm group and 55/60 hips assigned to the 32 mm group were followed for at least five years. No ceramic component fractures occured in any patient in either group. There was one dislocation in the 32 mm group and none in the 28 mm group (p = 0.464). No hip had detectable wear, focal osteolysis or prosthetic loosening. In our small study the 32 mm ceramic articulation appeared to be safe in terms of ceramic liner fracture. PMID:25371457

  20. Analysis of fluid film lubrication in artificial hip joint replacements with surfaces of high elastic modulus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z M; Dowson, D; Fisher, J

    1997-01-01

    Lubrication mechanisms and contact mechanics have been analysed for total hip joint replacements made from hard bearing surfaces such as metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic. A similar analysis for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against a hard bearing surface has also been carried out and used as a reference. The most important factor influencing the predicted lubrication film thickness has been found to be the radial clearance between the ball and the socket. Full fluid film lubrication may be achieved in these hard/hard bearings provided that the surface finish of the bearing surface and the radial clearance are chosen correctly and maintained. Furthermore, there is a close relation between the predicted contact half width and the predicted lubrication film thickness. Therefore, it is important to analyse the contact mechanics in artificial hip joint replacements. Practical considerations of manufacturing these bearing surfaces have also been discussed. PMID:9256001

  1. Online follow-up after total hip replacement: a first case

    PubMed Central

    Dexter, Caroline; Bradley, Benjamin; Williams, Daniel H

    2013-01-01

    With the current challenging financial climate in the NHS there is an increasing drive to reduce the number of postoperative follow-up appointments. We report on a patient who has successfully used a new online platform, www.myclinicaloutcomes.co.uk, to record condition-specific and generic wellbeing scores following total hip replacement. This case highlights the potential for remote follow-up of routine postoperative patients. PMID:23396931

  2. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  3. Dislocation of a dual mobility total hip replacement following fracture of the polyethylene liner.

    PubMed

    Vedrine, Bertrand; Guillaumot, Pierre; Chancrin, Jean-Luc

    2016-05-18

    An eight-year-old male English Setter was referred for management of a dislocation of a cemented dual mobility canine total hip prosthesis that occurred four months after the initial surgery. Revision surgery showed that the dislocation was associated with fracture of the ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene liner. The dislocation was successfully reduced after replacing the liner. A dual mobility acetabular component is composed of a mobile polyethylene liner inside a metallic cemented cup. Chronic wear of the components of a canine dual mobility total hip replacement has not been described previously. The use of this type of implant is fairly recent and limited long term follow-up of the implanted cases may be the explanation. Acute rupture of a polyethylene liner has never been described in humans, the only case of rupture of a polyethylene liner occurred 10 years after implantation. The case presented here of rupture of the polyethylene liner of a dual mobility total hip replacement is a hitherto unreported failure mode in this model of acetabular cup in the dog. PMID:26991949

  4. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  5. Prosthetic hip joint infection caused by Rothia dentocariosa

    PubMed Central

    Ozan, Fırat; Öncel, Eyyüp Sabri; Duygulu, Fuat; Çelik, İlhami; Altay, Taşkın

    2015-01-01

    Rothia dentocariosa is an aerobic, pleomorphic, catalase-positive, non-motile, gram-positive bacteria that is a part of the normal flora in the oral cavity and respiratory tract. Although it is a rare cause of systemic infection, it may be observed in immunosuppressed individuals. Here we report the case of an 85-year old man who developed prosthetic joint infection that was caused by R. dentocariosa after hemiarthroplasty. This is the first case report of a prosthetic hip joint infection caused by R. dentocariosa in the literature. PMID:26379996

  6. Outpatient Hip and Knee Replacement: The Experience From the First 15 Years.

    PubMed

    Berger, Richard A; Cross, Michael B; Sanders, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Rapid recovery and early discharge after total joint arthroplasty are becoming more common. To develop a successful, safe, outpatient arthroplasty practice, surgeons must have the support of a multidisciplinary team, which includes an orthopaedic surgeon, an anesthesiologist, nurses, physical therapists, and a discharge planner. The authors of this chapter recommend surgeons start with healthier, motivated patients and focus on total hip replacements and unicompartmental knee replacements in the learning curve phase of the transition to outpatient total joint arthroplasty. It is important for orthopaedic surgeons to establish an outpatient joint arthroplasty protocol as well as ways to avoid complications and delays in discharge. PMID:27049219

  7. Investigation of creep mechanical characteristics of femoral prostheses by simulated hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    LIU, GUANG-YAO; JIN, YAN; LI, PENG

    2013-01-01

    In order to provide creep mechanical parameters for the clinical application of both traditional and reserved anatomy femoral artificial joint replacements, simulated hip replacement femoral stress relaxation and creep experiments were performed. Twenty-four corpse femoral specimens were obtained, with 8 specimens being randomly assigned to the control group and 8 specimens being randomly assigned to the traditional prosthesis group. Our results showed that the retaining femoral neck prosthesis and traditional prosthesis groups have different stress relaxation and creep mechanical properties. PMID:23596489

  8. Accuracy of femoral templating in reproducing anatomical femoral offset in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Davies, H; Foote, J; Spencer, R F

    2007-01-01

    Restoration of hip biomechanics is a crucial component of successful total hip replacement. Preoperative templating is recommended to ensure that the size and orientation of implants is optimised. We studied how closely natural femoral offset could be reproduced using the manufacturers' templates for 10 femoral stems in common use in the UK. A series of 23 consecutive preoperative radiographs from patients who had undergone unilateral total hip replacement for unilateral osteoarthritis of the hip was employed. The change in offset between the templated position of the best-fitting template and the anatomical centre of the hip was measured. The templates were then ranked according to their ability to reproduce the normal anatomical offset. The most accurate was the CPS-Plus (Root Mean Square Error 2.0 mm) followed in rank order by: C stem (2.16), CPT (2.40), Exeter (3.23), Stanmore (3.28), Charnley (3.65), Corail (3.72), ABG II (4.30), Furlong HAC (5.08) and Furlong modular (7.14). A similar pattern of results was achieved when the standard error of variability of offset was analysed. We observed a wide variation in the ability of the femoral prosthesis templates to reproduce normal femoral offset. This variation was independent of the seniority of the observer. The templates of modern polished tapered stems with high modularity were best able to reproduce femoral offset. The current move towards digitisation of X-rays may offer manufacturers an opportunity to improve template designs in certain instances, and to develop appropriate computer software. PMID:19197861

  9. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery Follow the doctor’s instructions. Work with a physical therapist or other health care professional to rehabilitate your ... While you are still in the hospital, a physical therapist may teach you exercises such as contracting and ...

  10. Hip Joint Replacement Using Monofilament Polypropylene Surgical Mesh: An Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Białecki, Jacek; Klimowicz-Bodys, Małgorzata Dorota; Wierzchoś, Edward; Kołomecki, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint dysplasia is a deformation of the articular elements (pelvic acetabulum, head of the femur, and/or ligament of the head of the femur) leading to laxity of the hip components and dislocation of the femoral head from the pelvic acetabulum. Diagnosis is based on symptoms observed during clinical and radiological examinations. There are two treatment options: conservative and surgical. The classic surgical procedures are juvenile pubic symphysiodesis (JPS), triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO), total hip replacement (THR), and femoral head and neck resection (FHNE). The aim of this experiment was to present an original technique of filling the acetabulum with a polypropylene implant, resting the femoral neck directly on the mesh. The experiment was performed on eight sheep. The clinical value of the new surgical technique was evaluated using clinical, radiological, and histological methods. This technique helps decrease the loss of limb length by supporting the femoral neck on the mesh equivalent to the femoral head. It also reduces joint pain and leads to the formation of stable and mobile pseudarthrosis. The mesh manifested osteoprotective properties and enabled the formation of a stiff-elastic connection within the hip joint. The method is very cost-effective and the technique itself is simple to perform. PMID:24987672

  11. Hip joint replacement using monofilament polypropylene surgical mesh: an animal model.

    PubMed

    Białecki, Jacek; Majchrzycki, Marian; Szymczak, Antoni; Klimowicz-Bodys, Małgorzata Dorota; Wierzchoś, Edward; Kołomecki, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint dysplasia is a deformation of the articular elements (pelvic acetabulum, head of the femur, and/or ligament of the head of the femur) leading to laxity of the hip components and dislocation of the femoral head from the pelvic acetabulum. Diagnosis is based on symptoms observed during clinical and radiological examinations. There are two treatment options: conservative and surgical. The classic surgical procedures are juvenile pubic symphysiodesis (JPS), triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO), total hip replacement (THR), and femoral head and neck resection (FHNE). The aim of this experiment was to present an original technique of filling the acetabulum with a polypropylene implant, resting the femoral neck directly on the mesh. The experiment was performed on eight sheep. The clinical value of the new surgical technique was evaluated using clinical, radiological, and histological methods. This technique helps decrease the loss of limb length by supporting the femoral neck on the mesh equivalent to the femoral head. It also reduces joint pain and leads to the formation of stable and mobile pseudarthrosis. The mesh manifested osteoprotective properties and enabled the formation of a stiff-elastic connection within the hip joint. The method is very cost-effective and the technique itself is simple to perform. PMID:24987672

  12. Contact surface motion paths associated with leg length inequality following unilateral total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Budenberg, Sarah; Redmond, Anthony; White, Derek; Grainger, Andrew; O'Connor, Philip; Stone, Martin H; Stewart, Todd D

    2012-12-01

    In the past, there has been little research into leg length inequality (LLI) and its effect on hip arthroplasty bearing longevity. This investigation aimed to determine the effects of post-operative LLI on hip motions during gait and to postulate the subsequent influence on the wear of the artificial hip joint replacement. Motion data from a clinical gait analysis were processed with an in-house computational model to plot graphs showing the movement of loci of 20 points on the femoral head during one gait cycle for two cohorts: 19 LLI patients and 38 normal healthy patients. Loci paths were quantified by calculating the aspect ratio (AR) of the path shape. It was found that on average, LLI patients had a reduction in flexion/extension and abduction/adduction. Furthermore, the AR of LLI patients was found to be 8% smaller than the normal group. The shorter, more multidirectional, motion paths in LLI patients would suggest the potential for greater wear in a polyethylene bearing compared to an asymptomatic, non-LLI patient. The results have potential implications towards preclinical wear testing of joint replacements. PMID:23636960

  13. Diagnosis of Periprosthetic Joint Infection Following Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Javad; Fassihi, Safa Cyrus; Enayatollahi, Mohammad A

    2016-07-01

    The diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty has been one of the major challenges in orthopedic surgery. As there is no single absolute test for diagnosis of PJI, diagnostic criteria for PJI have been proposed that include using several diagnostic modalities. Focused history, physical examination, plain radiographs, and initial serologic tests should be followed by joint aspiration and synovial analysis. Newer diagnostic techniques, such as alpha-defensin and interleukin-6, hold great promise in the future diagnosis of equivocal infections. PMID:27241375

  14. The Symmetry of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions in Patients with Bilateral Simultaneous and Sequential ASR Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Madanat, Rami; Hussey, Daniel K; Donahue, Gabrielle S; Potter, Hollis G; Wallace, Robert; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Malchau, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether patients with bilateral metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements have symmetric adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) at follow-up. An MRI of both hips was performed at a mean time of six years after surgery in 43 patients. The prevalence and severity of ALTRs were found to be similar in simultaneous hips but differences were observed in sequential hips. The order and timing of sequential hip arthroplasties did not affect the severity of ALTRs. Thus, in addition to metal ion exposure from an earlier MoM implant other factors may also play a role in the progression of ALTRs. Bilateral implants should be given special consideration in risk stratification algorithms for management of patients with MoM hip arthroplasty. PMID:26055146

  15. The Norwich method of total hip replacement: development and main indications.

    PubMed

    McKee, G K

    1974-02-01

    The early experience with total prosthetic replacement of the hip from the making up of the first models in 1940 and the actual insertion of a small series in 1951 is described. The introduction of modified designs and the teething troubles experienced with them is dealt with, including the use of acrylic cement as a grouting agent in 1960 and finally the manufacture of a specially made femoral component in 1965. Since then minor improvements have been made in the design of the artificial hip joint itself, and also modifications in the operative technique. The main indications are shown from an analysis of a series of 300 cases in which this procedure has been used. As the success of the operation has become established the scope of the operation has been extended and the age group reduced. PMID:4594300

  16. The Norwich method of total hip replacement: development and main indications

    PubMed Central

    McKee, G K

    1974-01-01

    The early experience with total prosthetic replacement of the hip from the making up of the first models in 1940 and the actual insertion of a small series in 1951 is described. The introduction of modified designs and the teething troubles experienced with them is dealt with, including the use of acrylic cement as a grouting agent in 1960 and finally the manufacture of a specially made femoral component in 1965. Since then minor improvements have been made in the design of the artificial hip joint itself, and also modifications in the operative technique. The main indications are shown from an analysis of a series of 300 cases in which this procedure has been used. As the success of the operation has become established the scope of the operation has been extended and the age group reduced. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4594300

  17. Doxycycline inhibits bone resorption by human interface membrane cells from aseptically loose hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Ong, S M; Taylor, G J S

    2003-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) may have a role in the process of aseptic loosening. Doxycycline has been shown to inhibit MMPs. Our aim was to investigate the potential pharmacological effect of doxycycline on aseptic loosening. We used radiolabelled mouse calvariae cultured with human interface membrane cells from aseptically loosened hips. Bone resorption was confirmed in this model. The effect of doxycycline was assessed by culturing dead radiolabelled bone discs with cells from the interface membrane with doxycycline. The control group consisted of the same culture system without doxycycline. Supernatant 45calcium and the total 45calcium remaining in the bone discs at the completion of the culture were used to measure osteolysis. We found that doxycycline can inhibit osteolysis at the interface membrane of aseptically loosened hips. This may have therapeutic implications for the treatment of patients with aseptic loosening of total joint replacements. PMID:12729128

  18. Adherence to guidelines regarding total hip replacement for fractured neck of femur.

    PubMed

    Fishlock, A; Scarsbrook, C; Marsh, R

    2016-07-01

    Introduction In 2011 the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published guidelines suggesting that clinicians offer total hip replacement (THR) to patients with displaced intracapsular hip fractures who could walk independently outside with no aids or one stick, who are not cognitively impaired and are ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grade ≤2. They also stated that best practice is operating within 36 hours of presentation. This audit aimed to determine whether Scarborough Hospital was following these guidelines and compared the results with the national average. Methods Two years of data (January 2012 - December 2013) were collected retrospectively from Scarborough Hospital's hip fracture database on all patients presenting with an intracapsular hip fracture. Data were analysed to determine whether patients who had a THR fulfilled NICE criteria. Furthermore, patients with hemiarthroplasties who were eligible for THRs were identified. Finally, the time to surgery was calculated to examine whether patients receiving THRs waited longer than patients receiving hemiarthroplasties. Results In 2012, 48.6% of all eligible patients received a THR while in 2013 the figure was 55.9%. These percentages are much higher than the national average. However, 36 (53.7%) of the 67 patients who received a THR did not fulfil all the NICE criteria, mainly owing to high ASA grade. The mean time from presentation to theatre for THR was 8 hours and 37 minutes longer for THR patients than for hemiarthroplasty in 2012. This difference was reduced to 2 hours and 12 minutes in 2013. Conclusions Small general hospitals can meet and even exceed the standards regarding treatment strategies for hip factures. However, there is still room for improvement. Departmental training may be useful in achieving this aim. The anaesthetic team should be involved at the earliest opportunity, to help optimise patients preoperatively and determine whether patients listed for

  19. A Two Phase Treatment of an Infected Hip Endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ciriviri, Jasmin; Talevski, Darko; Nestorovski, Zoran; Vraniskoski, Tode; Mishevska-Perchinkova, Snežana

    2015-01-01

    The revision of the two phase treatment represents a golden standard in the treatment of infected endoprosthesis. Throughout this study, the results of 21 patients with an infected hip endoprosthesis treated in two phases have been processed, with the use of an antibiotic spacer, within the period of 2009 and 2012. Thereby, a unique protocol for diagnosis and treatment of infections has been applied to all the patients, which entails a preoperational x-ray image, laboratory findings (Se, CRP), as well as a puncture aspiration with a microbiological and biochemical examination of the aspirated fragments. The operational treatment consists of: taking a sample for microbiological and histopathological diagnosis, removal of the implanted endoprosthesis, excision of the avascular and necrotic tissue and installing an antibiotic spacer. Postoperatively, the patients are treated with a parenteral application of an antibiotics based on an antibiogram, throughout a period of two weeks, and later on an oral treatment, a combination of two antibiotics, depending on the antibiogram, within the following four to six weeks. After the appeasement of the local findings and the laboratory results, a revision with a removal of the antibiotic spacer and reimplantation of an endoprosthesis - revisional or primary has been conducted on the patients, depending on the bone deficit. The functionality of the joint is graded based on the Haris Hip Score. The patients are being observed postoperatively for a period of 12 to 36 months. A definite reimplantation has been applied to 20 patients, while one patient has been treated with a resection method. The Haris Hip Score was 45 preoperatively, and 80 postoperatively. The applied protocol of the treatment of infected endoprosthesis is effective in the eradication of the infection and the final reimplantation. PMID:27442385

  20. Prospective monitoring improves outcomes of primary total hip replacement: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Philipp N; Pachón, Marcela; Kerguelén, Carlos A; Navas, José; Portocarrero, Julio; Pesantez, Rodrigo F; Zayed, Gamal; Carrillo, Germán; Llinás, Adolfo M

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the past decade several studies have questioned current standards of patient safety in health care delivery. In response, our institution started a clinical pathway for total hip replacement in 1996. Prospective monitoring with regular feedback sessions to the individuals involved in patient care did however not start until 2003. The present study evaluates the effect of prospective monitoring on outcomes of total hip replacement. Methods Clinical records of patients undergoing primary elective total hip replacement between 1997 and 2004 were reviewed. Data on adverse events as well as adherence to protocols for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis were extracted retrospectively for the period 1997 to 2001 and prospectively from 2003 to 2004. Results were compared and analyzed in order to establish possible improvement in outcomes. Data was analyzed with Chi-square or Fisher's Exact test for categorical variables and Student's t-test for continuous variables. Alpha was set as less than 5% and analysis was performed with Stata 9.0 for Macintosh. Results Two-hundred and eighty-three patients were included from 1997 to 2001, and 62 from 2003 to 2004. Mean age, male to female ratio and initial diagnosis were similar in both groups. At least one adverse event occurred in 45% of patients in 1997–2001 and in 21% in 2003–2004 (p < 0.001). In-hospital hip dislocations occurred in 6% and 0% (p = 0.05), oliguria in 19% and 5% (p = 0.007), SSI and VTE in 3% and 0% (p = 0.37), adverse drug reactions in 11% and 13% (p = 0.66) and non-adherence to VTE prophylaxis protocols in 15% and 2% of cases respectively (p = 0.002). Conclusion Overall rate of adverse events as well as in-hospital hip dislocations, oliguria and non-adherence to VTE prophylaxis protocols were significantly reduced during the second period. We conclude that clinical pathways alone are insufficient to improve patient safety and require prospective monitoring and continuous feedback to health

  1. Novel chitosan/diclofenac coatings on medical grade stainless steel for hip replacement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finšgar, Matjaž; Uzunalić, Amra Perva; Stergar, Janja; Gradišnik, Lidija; Maver, Uroš

    2016-05-01

    Corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, improved osteointegration, as well the prevention of inflammation and pain are the most desired characteristics of hip replacement implants. In this study we introduce a novel multi-layered coating on AISI 316LVM stainless steel that shows promise with regard to all mentioned characteristics. The coating is prepared from alternating layers of the biocompatible polysaccharide chitosan and the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), diclofenac. Electrochemical methods were employed to characterize the corrosion behavior of coated and uncoated samples in physiological solution. It is shown that these coatings improve corrosion resistance. It was also found that these coatings release the incorporated drug in controlled, multi-mechanism manner. Adding additional layers on top of the as-prepared samples, has potential for further tailoring of the release profile and increasing the drug dose. Biocompatibility was proven on human-derived osteoblasts in several experiments. Only viable cells were found on the sample surface after incubation of the samples with the same cell line. This novel coating could prove important for prolongation of the application potential of steel-based hip replacements, which are these days often replaced by more expensive ceramic or other metal alloys.

  2. Novel chitosan/diclofenac coatings on medical grade stainless steel for hip replacement applications

    PubMed Central

    Finšgar, Matjaž; Uzunalić, Amra Perva; Stergar, Janja; Gradišnik, Lidija; Maver, Uroš

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, improved osteointegration, as well the prevention of inflammation and pain are the most desired characteristics of hip replacement implants. In this study we introduce a novel multi-layered coating on AISI 316LVM stainless steel that shows promise with regard to all mentioned characteristics. The coating is prepared from alternating layers of the biocompatible polysaccharide chitosan and the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), diclofenac. Electrochemical methods were employed to characterize the corrosion behavior of coated and uncoated samples in physiological solution. It is shown that these coatings improve corrosion resistance. It was also found that these coatings release the incorporated drug in controlled, multi-mechanism manner. Adding additional layers on top of the as-prepared samples, has potential for further tailoring of the release profile and increasing the drug dose. Biocompatibility was proven on human-derived osteoblasts in several experiments. Only viable cells were found on the sample surface after incubation of the samples with the same cell line. This novel coating could prove important for prolongation of the application potential of steel-based hip replacements, which are these days often replaced by more expensive ceramic or other metal alloys. PMID:27215333

  3. Novel chitosan/diclofenac coatings on medical grade stainless steel for hip replacement applications.

    PubMed

    Finšgar, Matjaž; Uzunalić, Amra Perva; Stergar, Janja; Gradišnik, Lidija; Maver, Uroš

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, improved osteointegration, as well the prevention of inflammation and pain are the most desired characteristics of hip replacement implants. In this study we introduce a novel multi-layered coating on AISI 316LVM stainless steel that shows promise with regard to all mentioned characteristics. The coating is prepared from alternating layers of the biocompatible polysaccharide chitosan and the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), diclofenac. Electrochemical methods were employed to characterize the corrosion behavior of coated and uncoated samples in physiological solution. It is shown that these coatings improve corrosion resistance. It was also found that these coatings release the incorporated drug in controlled, multi-mechanism manner. Adding additional layers on top of the as-prepared samples, has potential for further tailoring of the release profile and increasing the drug dose. Biocompatibility was proven on human-derived osteoblasts in several experiments. Only viable cells were found on the sample surface after incubation of the samples with the same cell line. This novel coating could prove important for prolongation of the application potential of steel-based hip replacements, which are these days often replaced by more expensive ceramic or other metal alloys. PMID:27215333

  4. Oral Antibiotics are Effective for Highly Resistant Hip Arthroplasty Infections

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Jaime; García-Cimbrelo, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Infected arthroplasties reportedly have a lower eradication rate when caused by highly resistant and/or polymicrobial isolates and in these patients most authors recommend intravenous antibiotics. We asked whether two-stage revision with interim oral antibiotics could eradicate these infections. We prospectively followed 36 patients (mean age, 71.8 years) with late hip arthroplasty infections. Combinations of oral antibiotics were prescribed according to cultures, biofilm, and intracellular effectiveness. The minimum followup was 1 year (mean, 4.4 years; range, 1–12 years). We presumed eradication in the absence of clinical, serologic, and radiographic signs of infection. Infection was eradicated in all 13 patients with highly resistant bacteria who completed a two-stage protocol (10 with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci) and in eight of 11 patients treated with only the first stage (and six of nine with methicillin-resistant Staphylococci). Infection was eradicated in six of six patients with polymicrobial isolates (of sensitive and/or resistant bacteria) who completed a two-stage protocol and in five of seven with polymicrobial isolates treated with only the first surgery. The Harris hip score averaged 88.1 (range, 70–98) in patients who underwent reimplantation and 56.8 (range, 32–76) in patients who underwent resection arthroplasty. Long cycles of combined oral antibiotics plus a two-stage surgical exchange appear a promising alternative for infections by highly resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, and polymicrobial infections. Level of Evidence: Level IV, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19333670

  5. Porous surface replacement of the hip with chamfered-cylinder component.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, H; Kilgus, D; Kabo, M; Dorey, F

    1988-01-01

    One hundred porous surface replacements (PSR) were performed in 92 patients (63 men and 29 women) with a mean age of 53 (range 17-76). Follow-up times range from 1 to 4 years, with 48 patients having a follow-up of at least 2 years. Preoperative diagnoses were osteoarthritis (OA) 63, osteonecrosis (ON) 13, dysplasia 9, rheumatoid-ankylosing spondylitis 6, and other 9. Seventeen hips had metal-backed acrylic-fixed THARIES acetabular sockets, nine hips had a porous cobalt chrome hemispheric beaded acetabular component with adjuvant fixation screws and externally protruding screw hubs, and 74 hips had a porous chamfered cylinder-design acetabulum. Pain relief had been immediate and more complete than with acrylic-fixed or biologic-ingrowth stem-type replacement with comparable walking and function improvements. There have been no major systemic complications, sepsis, or loosening. There have been two transient peroneal nerve palsies and three trochanteric fibrous unions. There have been three reoperations, one for subluxation, one for "metalosis" due to mesh pad loosening, and one femoral neck fracture. Examination of one removed femoral surface component which has been histologically sectioned revealed excellent (90%) bone in-growth. Circumferential progressive radiolucencies developed at the bone-cement interface by 1 year in all of the 17 acrylic-fixed acetabular components. Reaming or seating defects were noted in 25% of the ingrowth components on postoperative radiographs. Radiographic analysis of immediate postoperative films of the chamfered cylinder design acetabular components frequently demonstrated bone-component interface radiolucencies which represented component seating defects. These initial interface radiolucencies became progressively more narrow over the first six months postoperatively suggesting "healing" of the reamed bone-component interface with trabecular bone around the chamfered cylinder acetabular components. Partial healing of initial

  6. Relationship between body adiposity measures and risk of primary knee and hip replacement for osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Simpson, Julie Anne; Wluka, Anita E; Teichtahl, Andrew J; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Total joint replacement is considered a surrogate measure for symptomatic end-stage osteoarthritis. It is unknown whether the adipose mass and the distribution of adipose mass are associated with the risk of primary knee and hip replacement for osteoarthritis. The aim of the present investigation was to examine this in a cohort study. Methods A total of 39,023 healthy volunteers from Melbourne, Australia were recruited for a prospective cohort study during 1990 to 1994. Their body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio were obtained from direct anthropometric measurements. The fat mass and percentage fat were estimated from bioelectrical impedance analysis. Primary knee and hip replacements for osteoarthritis between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2005 were determined by data linkage to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for primary joint replacement associated with each adiposity measure. Results Comparing the fourth quartile with the first, there was a threefold to fourfold increased risk of primary joint replacement associated with body weight (HR = 3.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.83 to 4.18), body mass index (HR = 3.44, 95% CI = 2.80 to 4.22), fat mass (HR = 3.51, 95% CI = 2.87 to 4.30), and percentage fat (HR = 2.99, 95% CI = 2.46 to 3.63). The waist circumference (HR = 2.77, 95% CI = 2.26 to 3.39) and waist-to-hip ratio (HR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.21 to 1.76) were less strongly associated with the risk. Except for the waist-to-hip ratio, which was not significantly associated with hip replacement risk, all adiposity measures were associated with the risk of both knee and hip joint replacement, and were significantly stronger risk factors for knee. Conclusions Risk of primary knee and hip joint replacement for osteoarthritis relates to both adipose mass and central adiposity. This relationship

  7. OPTIMAL IMPROVEMENT IN FUNCTION AFTER TOTAL HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT: HOW DEEP DO YOU KNOW YOUR PATIENT’S MIND?

    PubMed

    De Caro, M F; Vicenti, G; Abate, A; Picca, G; Leoncini, V; Lomuscio, M; Casalino, A; Solarino, G; Moretti, B

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee causes pain and loss of joint mobility, leading to limitations in physical function. When conservative treatment fails total hip and knee replacement is a cost-effective surgical option. Patients have high expectations regarding functional outcome after these procedures. If such expectations are not met, they may still be dissatisfied with the outcome of a technically successful procedure. Recently, numerous studies reported that psychological factors can influence the outcome of total knee replacement (tkr) and total hip artrhoplasty with total hip replacement (thr). We conducted a prospective study on a consecutive sample of 280 patients affected by hip or knee OA who underwent total joint replacement. At patients’ admission, Harris Hip Score (HHS) and Knee Society Score (KSS) were used to assess pain and function. Furthermore, SF-36, Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R), Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (BRIEF-COPE) and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) were administered. Patients had clinical and radio graphical follow up at 1, 3 and 6 months post-operatively. The HHS and KSS values before surgery showed a linear correlation with both SCL-90-R and MMSE. None of the investigated variables influenced post-operative HHS and KSS scores; however, the improvement of functional scores resulted conditioned by SCL-90-R values, VAS score, schooling and MMSE. Psychological factors and mental status in primary total hip and knee replacement can affect outcome and patient satisfaction. Strategies focused on identification and facing of these conditions must be considered to improve outcome of total replacement. PMID:26652495

  8. CLINICAL OUTCOME AFTER INFECTED TOTAL KNEE AND TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Mittag, Falk; Leichtle, Carmen Ina; Schlumberger, Michael; Leichtle, Ulf Gunther; Wünschel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Infection after total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a serious complication which typically leads to a long lasting and intensive surgical and medicamentous treatment. The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence outcome after revision surgery caused by prosthetic infection. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 64 patients who had revision surgery between 1989 and 2009 due to periprosthetic infection. We examined a total of 69 joints (TKA: 36%, THA: 64%), follow-up 5.1 years (0.5-21 years) after the initial surgical intervention. The mean patient age at time of surgery was 67 years old (43-79 years old). Clinical data and scores including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC)-Index, the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS) were surveyed. Results: There was no difference in clinical scores regarding treatment between a single and a multiple stage treatment regime. Infections with multiple microorganisms and Enterococcus spp. lead to a significantly higher number of interventions. Using a modified Tsukayama system we classified 24% as type I, 34% type II and 42% type III- infections, with no differences in clinical outcome. Overweight patients had a significantly lower HHS and WOMAC-score. Immunosuppression leads to a worse WOMAC and HSS-Score. An increased number of procedures was associated to a limping gait. Conclusion: Thorough surgical technique leads to good clinical results independent of infection-type and treatment philosophy. Level of Evidence III, Case Control Study. PMID:26997914

  9. Clinical outcome following primary total hip or knee replacement in nonagenarians.

    PubMed

    Skinner, D; Tadros, B J; Bray, E; Elsherbiny, M; Stafford, G

    2016-04-01

    Introduction The Elective Orthopaedic Centre in Epsom has an established patient reported outcome measures programme, into which all patients are enrolled. Postoperative complications, Oxford hip/knee scores (OHS/OKS) and EQ-5D™ (EuroQol, Rotterdam, Netherlands) scores are collected up to the second postoperative year. Our population is ageing and the number of joint replacements being performed on the very elderly is rising. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of joint replacements in a nonagenarian population. Methods Our dataset was reviewed retrospectively for a cohort of nonagenarians undergoing either a primary total hip replacement (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR) between April 2008 and October 2011. Postoperative complications, mortality rates and functional outcomes were compared with those of a time matched 70-79-year-old cohort. Results Nonagenarians requiring a THR presented with a lower preoperative OHS (p=0.020) but made a greater improvement in the first postoperative year than the younger cohort (p=0.040). The preoperative OKS was lower for nonagenarians than for the control group (p=0.022). At one and two years after TKR, however, there was no significant difference between the age groups. The nonagenarians had a greater risk of requiring a blood transfusion following both THR (p=0.027; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11-5.75) and TKR (p=0.037; 95% CI: 1.08-16.65) while the latter cohort also required a longer stay than their younger counterparts (p=0.001). Mortality rates were higher in the nonagenarian group but these were in keeping with the life expectancy projections identified by the Office for National Statistics. Conclusions Over a two-year period, the functional outcome and satisfaction rates achieved by nonagenarians following a THR or TKR are comparable with 70-79-year-olds. PMID:26924477

  10. The concentration of manganese, iron, and strontium in hip joint bone obtained from patients undergoing hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Budis, Halina; Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Lanocha, Natalia; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Sokolowski, Sebastian; Dobiecki, Konrad; Kolodziej, Lukasz; Bohatyrewicz, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and strontium (Sr) in the cartilage with adjacent compact bone and spongy bone collected from patients after total hip replacement surgery. In addition, we examined relations between the concentrations of the metals in the bone and selected environmental factors. The concentration of Fe was the highest while Mn concentration was the lowest. The concentrations of Fe in the spongy bone in patients from larger cities were higher than in those living in smaller towns and villages. Significant correlations were found between Fe and Mn concentrations in the cartilage with adjacent compact bone and in the spongy bone, and between Mn and Sr in the spongy bone. In general, Mn, Fe and Sr concentrations in the bones of patients from NW Poland were lower than in other Polish regions and Europe, especially in industrialized countries. In conclusion, it seems that in addition to routine monitoring of the abiotic environment, it is essential to monitor concentrations of heavy metals having a long-term impact in humans. PMID:24074650

  11. Prevention of Periprosthetic Joint Infections of the Hip and Knee.

    PubMed

    Levy, David M; Wetters, Nathan G; Levine, Brett R

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a rare but devastating complication of arthroplasty. Research has been dedicated to minimizing the incidence of PJI, leading to the development of a comprehensive perioperative approach. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors can increase patient risk. From medical management and skin sterilization to wound sterility and blood management, multiple issues must be considered in a well-rounded prevention protocol. In this literature review, we consolidate the current information that orthopedic surgeons can use to minimize PJI after total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27552468

  12. Using acetabular fossa as a guide for anticipated inclination of uncemented cup in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junwei; Gao, Xu; Yang, Guanghui; Zhang, Yanru

    2015-01-01

    Positions of acetabular implant generally are considered to be major causative factors of dislocation. Accurate and consistent achievement of the preoperatively anticipated orientation of the acetabular cup is a great challenge in total hip replacement (THR). In the present study, we investigated the surgical application of acetabular fossa as a guide for anticipated inclination of uncemented cup, and evaluated its accuracy as an anatomic reference for achieving the preoperatively anticipated abduction of the acetabular cup in comparison with traditional device method on cadaveric specimens. Sixteen normal adult pelvic cadaveric specimens were collected. On each of the sixteen normal adult pelvic cadaveric specimens, acetabular fossa related anatomic sites were marked and studied on pelvic radiographs. Our results showed that there is close correlation between most medial aspect of acetabular sourcil and central axis of the acetabular cup at anticipated inclination of 40° ± 5°. And the fossa group can achieve the preoperatively anticipated cup abduction more accurately than the device group. The current results demonstrated that acetabular fossa can be a reasonable alternative, or as a complement to the currently used methods guiding total hip replacement. PMID:25784987

  13. Proliferative cell response to loosening of total hip replacements: a cytofluorographic cell cycle analysis.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, S; Pajamäki, J; Eskola, A; Konttinen, Y T; Lindholm, T

    1991-01-01

    Monocyte/macrophages and fibroblasts are the major reactive cells in the periprosthetic connective tissue in a loose totally replaced hip. Monocyte/macrophages are bone-marrow-derived, hematogenous cells, whereas mesenchymal fibroblasts replenish by local proliferation. The cell-cycle-phase frequency distribution therefore reflects the local mitotic fibroblast response to the loose total hip replacement (THR) implant. In 13 patients who underwent revision of a loose THR implant, most of the local cells were in the resting G0/G1 phase (88.1 +/- 6.3%, mean +/- SD), whereas 8.6 +/- 3.7% were in the S phase of the cycle, and 3.4 +/- 2.9% had already reached the G2/M phase. The highest DNA values were recorded in an osteoarthritic patient undergoing revision 4 years after the primary uncemented THR, while the lowest values were observed in a rheumatoid arthritis patient with a loose cemented prosthesis 15 years after the primary operation. The results suggest that the local proliferative fibroblast response in general is uniform and does not seem to depend on the type of prosthesis or the use of cement. The responses in aggressive granulomatous-type loosening and the common type of loosening were similar. PMID:1772725

  14. Impact of Intraoperative Acetaminophen Administration on Postoperative Opioid Consumption in Patients Undergoing Hip or Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Cathy; McGee, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Opioid utilization for acute pain has been associated with numerous adverse events, potentially resulting in longer inpatient stays and increased costs. Objective: To examine the effect of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen administered intraoperatively on postoperative opioid consumption in adult subjects who underwent hip or knee replacement. Methods: This retrospective cohort study evaluated postoperative opioid consumption in 176 randomly selected adult subjects who underwent hip or knee replacement at Duke University Hospital (DUH). Eighty-eight subjects received a single, intraoperative, 1 g dose of IV acetaminophen. The other subjects did not receive any IV acetaminophen. This study evaluated mean opioid consumption (in oral morphine equivalents) during the 24-hour postoperative period in the 2 groups. Other endpoints included length of stay in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), incidence of oversedation, need for acute opioid reversal, and adjunctive analgesic utilization. Results: Subjects who were given a single dose of intraoperative acetaminophen received an average of 149.3 mg of oral morphine equivalents during the 24 hours following surgery compared to 147.2 mg in participants who were not exposed to IV acetaminophen (P = .904). The difference in average length of PACU stay between the IV acetaminophen group (163 minutes) and those subjects not exposed to IV acetaminophen (169 minutes) was not statistically significant (P = .588). No subjects in the study experienced oversedation or required acute opioid reversal. Conclusion: There was not a statistically significant difference in postoperative opioid consumption between patients receiving and not receiving IV acetaminophen intraoperatively. PMID:25673891

  15. Development of an extremely wear-resistant ultra high molecular weight polyethylene for total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Shen, F W; Lu, B; Campbell, P; Salovey, R

    1999-03-01

    Osteolysis induced by ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris is one of the primary factors limiting the lifespan of total hip replacements. Crosslinking polyethylene is known to improve its wear resistance in certain industrial applications, and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups have shown improved wear resistance in two clinical studies. In the present study, crosslinked polyethylene cups were produced by two methods. Chemically crosslinked cups were produced by mixing a peroxide with ultra high molecular weight polyethylene powder and then molding the cups directly to shape. Radiation-crosslinked cups were produced by exposing conventional extruded ultra high molecular weight polyethylene bar stock to gamma radiation at various doses from 3.3 to 100 Mrad (1 Mrad = 10 kGy), remelting the bars to extinguish residual free radicals (i.e., to minimize long-term oxidation), and then machining the cups by conventional techniques. In hip-joint simulator tests lasting as long as 5 million cycles, both types of cross-linked cups exhibited dramatically improved resistance to wear. Artificial aging of the cups by heating for 30 days in air at 80 degrees C induced oxidation of the chemically crosslinked cups. However, a chemically crosslinked cup that was aged 2.7 years at room temperature had very little oxidation. Thus, whether substantial oxidation of chemically crosslinked polyethylene would occur at body temperature remains unclear. The radiation-crosslinked remelted cups exhibited excellent resistance to oxidation. Because crosslinking can reduce the ultimate tensile strength, fatigue strength, and elongation to failure of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, the optimal crosslinking dose provides a balance between these physical properties and the wear resistance of the implant and might substantially reduce the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis with total hip replacements. PMID:10221831

  16. Surface engineering: a low wearing solution for metal-on-metal hip surface replacements.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Ian J; Williams, Sophie; Brown, Chris; Anderson, James; Isaac, Graham; Hatto, Peter; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2009-08-01

    Increased patient blood and serum levels of Co and Cr and dissemination of metal wear particles throughout organs and tissues are the primary concerns with metal-on-metal surface replacements. Surface engineering, providing a ceramic bearing surface on a metal substrate, could provide a solution. This study investigated thick (>10 microm) arc evaporation plasma vapor deposition chromium nitride (CrN) coated surface replacements in terms of wear, ion levels, and wear particles in a 10 million cycle hip simulator study, compared to a contemporary metal-on-metal surface replacement. The ion levels were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The wear particles were imaged by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy. The CrN-coated bearings had 80% lower wear than the MoM controls. The Cr and Co ion levels in the lubricant of the CrN bearings were 73 and 98% lower than in the MoM controls. The wear particles produced were in the nanometer size range and round to oval in morphology. The CrN coating could provide a reduction in the wear and ion release of MoM surface replacements, thereby reducing the perceived risks to the patient associated with these prostheses. PMID:19195030

  17. Role of Mental Disorders in Nosocomial Infections after Hip Fracture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Cano, Juan Ramon; Cruz, Encarnacion; Benitez-Parejo, Nicolás; Perea-Milla, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    The association between mental disorders (MDs) and iatrogenic complications after hip fracture surgery has been poorly studied. Among iatrogenic complications, nosocomial infections (NIs) are a major factor in hip fracture surgery. The aim of this paper was to determine whether patients with a MD and a hip fracture develop more NIs after hip surgery than patients with no MD. We studied 912 patients who underwent surgery for a hip fracture (223 patients with a MD who underwent surgery for a hip fracture and 689 control patients without a MD who also underwent surgery for a hip fracture) and followed them after surgery. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed using simple and multiple logistic regression analysis (confidence interval, crude and adjusted odds ratios, and P value). We found that MDs, gender, and comorbidities were not associated with a higher risk of developing a NI after surgery for a hip fracture. Only age increases the risk of a NI. PMID:20628560

  18. Sexual Activity after Total Hip Replacement in Korean Patients: How They Do, What They Want, and How to Improve

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Byung-Ho; Lee, Kyung-Hag; Noh, Serae; Ha, Yong-Chan; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2013-01-01

    Background Concerns of patients on sexual activity after total hip arthroplasty have not been well studied in Asian patients. This study aimed to determine the following: (1) what are the concerns of patients related to sexual activity after total hip arthroplasty? (2) what are the changes in sexual activity after total hip replacement in Korean patients? Methods Details of sexual activity and concerns were obtained using a questionnaire designed specifically for the study. The questionnaire was administered to 64 patients in a face-to-face interview at an outpatient clinic. Results Preoperatively, 53.1% of patients experienced difficulties, primarily due to hip pathology and limitations of motion. The median time to the resumption of sexual activity was 3 months postoperatively, and most patients had no increase in the frequency of sexual activity after the total hip replacement. In 39.1% of patients were seen having difficulties with leg positioning following total hip replacement, and they were likely to change coital positions. The most common concern regarding sexual activity of patients was the fear of dislocation. Furthermore, patients with a higher stress level had lower satisfaction rates. Most patients were unable to obtain information on sexual activity following the total hip arthroplasty, and they did not consult with a physician due to the private nature of the topic. Conclusions Dislocation was the most common concern of patients during sexual activity following a total hip arthroplasty, and a higher stress level was found to be associated with a lower satisfaction rate. Because most patients were unprepared to consult a physician, the provision of appropriate information before a consultation might be beneficial. PMID:24340146

  19. An Unusual Cause of Fever in a Patient with Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a challenging clinical problem despite recent advances in the diagnostic modalities. The diagnosis of the cause of fever is especially difficult in the postoperative period as the focus remains on the operative site. We present an unusual cause of PUO in a patient with advanced HIV disease during an immediate postoperative period following total hip arthroplasty (THA) for osteoarthritis (OA) of the left hip. The fever started on the eighth postoperative day, and after an extensive workup to rule out infection it was found that the patient was allergic to sulfa drugs. The fever subsided after discontinuation of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Fever in an immunocompromised patient should not be attributed only to infection. A high index of suspicion along with careful history making is required to diagnose drug fever. An early diagnosis of drug fever can reduce hospital stay and the costs of investigations and treatment. PMID:27014530

  20. An Unusual Cause of Fever in a Patient with Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a challenging clinical problem despite recent advances in the diagnostic modalities. The diagnosis of the cause of fever is especially difficult in the postoperative period as the focus remains on the operative site. We present an unusual cause of PUO in a patient with advanced HIV disease during an immediate postoperative period following total hip arthroplasty (THA) for osteoarthritis (OA) of the left hip. The fever started on the eighth postoperative day, and after an extensive workup to rule out infection it was found that the patient was allergic to sulfa drugs. The fever subsided after discontinuation of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Fever in an immunocompromised patient should not be attributed only to infection. A high index of suspicion along with careful history making is required to diagnose drug fever. An early diagnosis of drug fever can reduce hospital stay and the costs of investigations and treatment. PMID:27014530

  1. Psychometric properties of the Brief Pain Inventory among patients with osteoarthritis undergoing total hip replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pain is a cardinal symptom of osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and important for deciding when to operate. This study assessed the internal consistency reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) among patients with OA undergoing total hip replacement (THR). Methods We prospectively included 250 of 356 patients who were accepted to the waiting list for primary THR surgery. All participants responded to the BPI, WOMAC and SF-36 at baseline and 1 year after surgery. Results Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α) was >0.80 for the BPI, the WOMAC and five of the eight SF-36 scales The pattern of associations of the two BPI scales with corresponding and non-corresponding scales of the WOMAC and SF-36 largely supported the construct validity of the BPI. The responsiveness indices for change from baseline to 1 year after THR ranged from 1.52 to 2.05 for the BPI scales, from 1.69 to 2.84 for the WOMAC scales, and from 0.25 (general health) to 2.77 (bodily pain) for the SF-36 scales. Conclusions The BPI showed acceptable reliability, construct validity and responsiveness in patients with OA undergoing THR. BPI is short and therefore is easy to use and score, though the instrument offers few advantages over and duplicates scales of more comprehensive instruments, such as the WOMAC and SF-36. PMID:21143926

  2. Subject-specific finite element model with an optical tracking system in total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Li, Qing; Chen, Youngang; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Intra-operative peri-prosthetic femoral fractures are a significant concern in total hip arthroplasty and can occur at any time during surgery, with the highest incidence during implant insertion. This study combines subject-specific finite element analysis modeling with an optical tracking system to characterize the resultant strain in the bone and results of impaction during total hip replacement surgery. The use of ABG II femoral stem (Stryker Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ, USA) in the model yielded the following results. Hammer velocity was measured experimentally using a three-dimensional optical tracking system and these data were input into the finite element analysis model so that intra-operative loading scenario could be simulated. A quasi-static explicit simulation and a dynamic loading step using two implant-bone interface friction (0.1 and 0.4 friction coefficients) states were simulated. The maximum swing velocity of a mallet was experimentally measured at 1.5 m/s and occurred just before impaction of the hammer with implant introducer. Two friction states resulted in different results with the lower friction coefficient generating higher strains in the anterior regions of the model and higher displacement of the implant with respect to the femur when compared to the high friction state. PMID:25934257

  3. Size of metallic and polyethylene debris particles in failed cemented total hip replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Salvati, E. A.; Betts, F.; DiCarlo, E. F.; Doty, S. B.; Bullough, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    Reports of differing failure rates of total hip prostheses made of various metals prompted us to measure the size of metallic and polyethylene particulate debris around failed cemented arthroplasties. We used an isolation method, in which metallic debris was extracted from the tissues, and a non-isolation method of routine preparation for light and electron microscopy. Specimens were taken from 30 cases in which the femoral component was of titanium alloy (10), cobalt-chrome alloy (10), or stainless steel (10). The mean size of metallic particles with the isolation method was 0.8 to 1.0 microns by 1.5 to 1.8 microns. The non-isolation method gave a significantly smaller mean size of 0.3 to 0.4 microns by 0.6 to 0.7 microns. For each technique the particle sizes of the three metals were similar. The mean size of polyethylene particles was 2 to 4 microns by 8 to 13 microns. They were larger in tissue retrieved from failed titanium-alloy implants than from cobalt-chrome and stainless-steel implants. Our results suggest that factors other than the size of the metal particles, such as the constituents of the alloy, and the amount and speed of generation of debris, may be more important in the failure of hip replacements.

  4. Good sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for detecting pseudotumors in 83 failed metal-on-metal hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Lainiala, Olli; Elo, Petra; Reito, Aleksi; Pajamäki, Jorma; Puolakka, Timo; Eskelinen, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Ultrasound is used for imaging of pseudotumors associated with metal-on-metal (MoM) hips. Ultrasound has been compared with magnetic resonance imaging, but to date there have been no studies comparing ultrasound findings and revision findings. Methods We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of preoperative ultrasound for detecting pseudotumors in 82 patients with MoM hip replacement (82 hips). Ultrasound examinations were performed by 1 of 3 musculoskeletal radiologists, and pseudotumors seen by ultrasound were retrospectively classified as fluid-filled, mixed-type, or solid. Findings at revision surgery were retrieved from surgical notes and graded according to the same system as used for ultrasound findings. Results Ultrasound had a sensitivity of 83% (95% CI: 63–93) and a specificity of 92% (CI: 82–96) for detecting trochanteric region pseudotumors, and a sensitivity of 79% (CI: 62–89) and a specificity of 94% (CI: 83–98) for detecting iliopsoas-region pseudotumors. Type misclassification of pseudotumors found at revision occurred in 8 of 23 hips in the trochanteric region and in 19 of 33 hips in the iliopsoas region. Interpretation Despite the discrepancy in type classification between ultrasound and revision findings, the presence of pseudotumors was predicted well with ultrasound in our cohort of failed MoM hip replacements. PMID:25582840

  5. Displacement and Stress Analysis around the Artificial Acetabular Cup in a Total Hip Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakunai, Satoshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Tohru; Abo, Masayoshi; Ikeda, Daisaku; Fujiwara, Hiroo

    In order to improve the service life of the artificial acetabular cup in a total hip replacement, it is important to determine the best material and design, and to assess the mechanical behavior around the cup. In this study, electronic speckle interferometry (ESPI) and the two-dimensional finite element method (FEM) are employed to investigate the mechanical behavior. The influence of the cancellous bone and cup thickness on mechanical behavior around the cup was investigated. Good agreement of the cup model was found between the ESPI measurements and FEM predictions. The following results were obtained. (1) Cancellous bone with a porous structure can be measured by the ESPI method. (2) There are discontinuities of the displacement distribution in the transverse direction in each boundary region of the cup, bone cement and cancellous bone. (3) The maximum shear stress exists in the boundary region of the cup and bone cement.

  6. Biomechanical Study on Distal Filling Effects in Cementless Total Hip Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Soo-Won; Lee, Jun-Hyoung; Choi, Hyung-Yun

    In cementless total hip replacement, initial stability of the femoral component is important in the long term fixation of the femoral stem. Initial stability is closely related to the relative displacement between the prosthesis and the cancellous bone of the proximal femur. After implantation of the prosthesis, the surrounding bone is partially shielded from load carrying and starts to resorb. Stress shielding causes the loss of the proximal bone. The stress distribution of femur must be assessed to predict stress shielding. The initial stability and the stress shielding were investigated for two loading conditions approximating a single leg stance and stair climbing. Two types of stems involving a distal filling and a distal short stem were studied by the finite element method to investigate the biomechanical distal filling effects. The distal short stem produced less stress shielding at the proximal bone than the distal filling stem, while both types of stems seemed to satisfy the initial stability requirement.

  7. Postoperative analgesia following total hip replacement: a comparison of intrathecal morphine and diamorphine.

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, D J; Milligan, K R

    1995-01-01

    Sixty patients undergoing elective total hip replacement under spinal anaesthesia were randomly assigned to receive either intrathecal (IT) diamorphine 0.75 mg (n = 30) or IT morphine 1.0 mg (n = 30). Postoperative pain scores, analgesic requirements and side effects were assessed by a blinded observer. Postoperative pain scores were broadly similar and satisfactory for both groups but the amount of additional IV morphine required to achieve this was significantly reduced in the morphine compared with the diamorphine group (P < 0.05). Twelve of the morphine group required no postoperative analgesics compared with four in the diamorphine group (P < 0.02). There were no differences between the groups in the incidence of side effects such as emesis and pruritus. No significant postoperative respiratory depression was noted. In the doses used intrathecal morphine provided superior postoperative analgesia to that of intrathecal diamorphine. PMID:7769597

  8. Surfing for hip replacements: has the "internet tidal wave" led to better quality information.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Mujtaba; Bruce-Brand, Robert A; O'Neill, Francis; Chenouri, Shojaeddin; Curtin, Paul T

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the quality of information available on the internet regarding Total Hip Replacement (THR). The unique websites identified were categorised by type and assessed using the DISCERN score, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark criteria, and a novel (THR)-specific content score. The presence of the Health On the Net (HON) code, a reported quality assurance marker, was noted. Commercial websites predominate. Governmental & Non-Profit Organizations websites attained the highest DISCERN score. Sites that bore the HONcode seal obtained significantly higher DISCERN and THR content scores than those without the certification. Physicians should recommend the HONcode seal to their patients as a reliable indicator of website quality or, better yet, refer patients to sites they have personally reviewed. PMID:24559520

  9. First Report of a Hip Prosthetic and Joint Infection Caused by Lactococcus garvieae in a Woman Fishmonger▿

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, G. G.; Bémer, P.; Guillouzouic, A.; Crémet, L.; Touchais, S.; Fraquet, N.; Boutoille, D.; Reynaud, A.; Lepelletier, D.; Corvec, S.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the first case of hip prosthetic infection due to Lactococcus garvieae. The patient, a 71-year-old woman fishmonger, developed a hip infection 7 years after total hip arthroplasty. The origin of infection was possibly due to the manipulation or intake of seafood or fish contaminated with Lactococcus garvieae. PMID:21367987

  10. First report of a hip prosthetic and joint infection caused by Lactococcus garvieae in a woman fishmonger.

    PubMed

    Aubin, G G; Bémer, P; Guillouzouic, A; Crémet, L; Touchais, S; Fraquet, N; Boutoille, D; Reynaud, A; Lepelletier, D; Corvec, S

    2011-05-01

    We describe the first case of hip prosthetic infection due to Lactococcus garvieae. The patient, a 71-year-old woman fishmonger, developed a hip infection 7 years after total hip arthroplasty. The origin of infection was possibly due to the manipulation or intake of seafood or fish contaminated with Lactococcus garvieae. PMID:21367987

  11. Metal on metal surface replacement of the hip. Experience of the McMinn prothesis.

    PubMed

    McMinn, D; Treacy, R; Lin, K; Pynsent, P

    1996-08-01

    The historical failure of surface replacement has been due to the production of wear debris with subsequent bone resorption, loosening, and failure. To avoid these problems, a surface replacement using a metal on metal bearing allowing thin components and femoral design and instrumentation to avoid varus alignment has been designed. Two hundred thirty-five joints have been resurfaced with this prosthesis in almost 5 years. There have been no femoral neck fractures and no dislocations. There have been 4 designs differing in the method of fixation. In the press fit group, 6 of 70 hips had to be revised for aseptic loosening. In the cemented group, debonding of the cup occurred in 3 of 43 cases. Six patients had hydroxyapatite coated components and have had excellent clinical outcomes. The current design uses a peripherally expanded hydroxyapatite coated cup and a cemented metal head; 116 of this design have been implanted during a 19-month period with excellent outcome. Despite short followup the authors are hopeful that the combination of a polar metal on metal bearing with appropriate fixation will yield a method of preserving bone stock in the younger patient requiring arthroplasty. PMID:8769326

  12. The effect of lubricant constituents on lubrication mechanisms in hip joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Nečas, David; Vrbka, Martin; Urban, Filip; Křupka, Ivan; Hartl, Martin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present paper is to provide a novel experimental approach enabling to assess the thickness of lubricant film within hip prostheses in meaning of the contribution of particular proteins. Thin film colorimetric interferometry was combined with fluorescent microscopy finding that a combination of optical methods can help to better understand the interfacial lubrication processes in hip replacements. The contact of metal femoral head against a glass disc was investigated under various operating conditions. As a test lubricant, the saline solution containing the albumin and γ-globulin in a concentration 2:1 was employed. Two different mean speeds were applied, 5.7 and 22mm/s, respectively. The measurements were carried out under pure rolling, partial negative and partial positive sliding conditions showing that kinematic conditions substantially affects the formation of protein film. Under pure rolling conditions, an increasing tendency of lubricant film independently on rolling speed was detected, while the total thickness of lubricant film can be attributed mainly to albumin. When the ball was faster than the disc (negative sliding), a very thin lubricant film was observed for lower speed with no significant effect of particular proteins. The increase in sliding speed led to the increase of film thickness mainly caused due to the presence of γ-globulin. On the contrary, when the disc was faster than the ball (positive sliding), the film formation was very complex and time dependent while both of the studied proteins have shown any qualitative change during the test, however the effect of albumin seems to be much more important. Since a very good agreement of the results was obtained, it can be concluded that the approach consisting of two optical methods can provide the fundamental information about the lubricant film formation in meaning of particular proteins while the simultaneous presence of other constituents in model synovial fluid. PMID

  13. Is the use of antidepressants associated with patient-reported outcomes following total hip replacement surgery?

    PubMed

    Greene, Meridith E; Rolfson, Ola; Gordon, Max; Annerbrink, Kristina; Malchau, Henrik; Garellick, Göran

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - Patients with anxiety and/or depression tend to report less pain reduction and less satisfaction with surgical treatment. We hypothesized that the use of antidepressants would be correlated to patient-reported outcomes (PROs) 1 year after total hip replacement (THR), where increased dosage or discontinuation would be associated with worse outcomes. Patients and methods - THR cases with pre- and postoperative patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were selected from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register (n = 9,092; women: n = 5,106). The PROMs were EQ-5D, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, Charnley class, and VAS for satisfaction after surgery. These cases were merged with a national database of prescription purchases to determine the prevalence of antidepressant purchases. Regression analyses were performed where PROs were dependent variables and sex, age, Charnley class, preoperative pain, preoperative health-related quality of life (HRQoL), patient-reported anxiety/depression, and antidepressant use were independent variables. Results - Antidepressants were used by 10% of the cases (n = 943). Patients using antidepressants had poorer HRQoL and higher levels of pain before and after surgery and they experienced less satisfaction. Preoperative antidepressant use was independently associated with PROs 1 year after THR regardless of patient-reported anxiety/depression. Interpretation - Antidepressant usage before surgery was associated with reduced PROs after THR. Cases at risk of poorer outcomes may be identified through review of the patient's medical record. Clinicians are encouraged to screen for antidepressant use preoperatively, because their use may be associated with PROs after THR. PMID:27482877

  14. What do we tell patients about elective total hip replacement in the UK? An analysis of patient literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although hip information literature is given to people following total hip replacement (THR) almost routinely, little evaluation has been conducted on it to date. Our aim was therefore to analyse and evaluate the literature provided to patients by occupational therapists concerning elective hip surgery in the UK. Methods This was a pragmatic, descriptive analysis of information leaflets routinely given to patients undergoing primary total hip replacement (THR). The literature was collected as part of a national survey of occupational therapy practice. In the absence of a suitable evaluation tool, the patient leaflets were compared using a checklist devised by the researchers. The three areas of interest were: accessibility including presentation of information, breadth of information covered and specific activities of daily living described. Results 111 information leaflets and booklets were examined. These ranged from hospital publications which were professionally printed to those produced by individual departments. There was a variation in the readability of the leaflets ranging from 13% to 83%; the mean was 45% (SD 15). There was also variation in the content ranging from those covering surgery and possible complications, to those including diet and hip exercises. The most commonly covered activity of daily living was advice on sitting (99; 89%); the least commonly covered was work (26; 23%). Only 3 (2.7%) booklets had involved patients in their production and only 22 (20%) signposted obtaining information in another language or in Braille. Conclusions There was a range of literature in terms of presentation and content given to people who had a total hip replacement (THR). Although some booklets and leaflets scored highly, some did not meet basic standards such as providing contact details for help, using good quality diagrams, suggesting further reading or involving patients in their design. These results highlight important and fundamental

  15. Prevalence and risk factors for periprosthetic fracture in older recipients of total hip replacement: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The growing utilization of total joint replacement will increase the frequency of its complications, including periprosthetic fracture. The prevalence and risk factors of periprosthetic fracture require further study, particularly over the course of long-term follow-up. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence and risk factors for periprosthetic fractures occurring in recipients of total hip replacement. Methods We identified Medicare beneficiaries who had elective primary total hip replacement (THR) for non-fracture diagnoses between July 1995 and June 1996. We followed them using Medicare Part A claims data through 2008. We used ICD-9 codes to identify periprosthetic femoral fractures occurring from 2006–2008. We used the incidence density method to calculate the annual incidence of these fractures and Cox proportional hazards models to identify risk factors for periprosthetic fracture. We also calculated the risk of hospitalization over the subsequent year. Results Of 58,521 Medicare beneficiaries who had elective primary THR between July 1995 and June 1996, 32,463 (55%) survived until January 2006. Of these, 215 (0.7%) developed a periprosthetic femoral fracture between 2006 and 2008. The annual incidence of periprosthetic fracture among these individuals was 26 per 10,000 person-years. In the Cox model, a greater risk of periprosthetic fracture was associated with having had a total knee replacement (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.30, 2.55) or a revision total hip replacement (HR1.40, 95% CI 0.95, 2.07) between the primary THR and 2006. Compared to those without fractures, THR recipients who sustained periprosthetic femoral fracture had three-fold higher risk of hospitalization in the subsequent year (89% vs. 27%, p < 0.0001). Conclusion A decade after primary THR, periprosthetic fractures occur annually in 26 per 10,000 persons and are especially frequent in those with prior total knee or revision total hip replacements. PMID:24885707

  16. Efficacy of Debridement for Early Periprosthetic Joint Infection after Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Chun, Sung Kwang; Yoon, Yong Cheol; Lakhotia, Devendra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In early prosthetic joint infection after hip arthroplasty, debridement with prosthesis retention may be performed for implant salvage, but the reported success rates are highly variable. Hence we reviewed the outcome of radical debridement and retention of prosthesis using established diagnostic criteria and surgical procedures in relation to significant variables including clinical characteristics, pathogenicity, and antibiotic treatment. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 20 patients (11 men and 9 women) with early prosthetic joint infection after unilateral hip arthroplasty, treated by radical debridement with retention of prosthesis from January 2000 to May 2011. Average follow-up period was 55 months (12-178 months). The outcome was evaluated and analyzed based on recurrence of infection and clinical (Harris hip score) and radiological criteria. Results Pathogens were isolated from 11 hips (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] in three, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis [MRSE] in two, methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus [MSSA] in one, Acinetobacter baumannii in two, Enterococcus faecalis in two patients, and Enterococcus, Citrobacter species in one). The mean duration of antibiotic administration was 43.5 days. Recurrence of infection was not observed in any case. Average Harris hip score was 91 points at the last follow-up. Revision surgery was not required for any reason including implant failure. Dislocation occurred in two hips after debridement and was treated conservatively. Conclusion Radical debridement with prosthesis retention is an effective procedure for early prosthetic joint infection after hip arthroplasty in carefully selected patients and with early diagnosis.

  17. Clinical Characteristics of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection for Chronic Periprosthetic Hip and Knee Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Dong Jin; Moon, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Myung Ku; Kwon, Dae Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Deep infection after hip and knee arthroplasty is a serious complication and is difficult to treat due to its toxicity. The aims of our study were to find out the differences of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection after hip and knee arthroplasty focusing on clinical course and laboratory findings. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 61 staphylococcal infection cases after hip and knee arthroplasty (MSSA in 25 patients, MRSA in 36 patients). Vital signs, laboratory tests, microbiology and clinical courses were analyzed. The average follow-up period was 3.8 years (range, 2 to 10.1 years). Results At initial visit, MRSA group showed significant higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein (CRP) and neutrophil percentage. The average duration for the normalization of CRP was longer in MRSA group (MRSA: 36.7±25.1 days, MSSA: 24.7±13.6 days; P=0.008). The mean interval between staging operation was longer in MRSA group (MRSA: mean 8.7 weeks [range, 6.4 to 21.4 weeks], MSSA: mean 6.8 weeks [range, 6 to 13.1 weeks]; P=0.012). MRSA group (13.9%) revealed higher recurrence rate than MSSA group (4%). Two patients (5.6%) from MRSA group expired by sepsis. One limb amputation (2.7%) was carried out in MRSA group. Conclusion MRSA infection after arthroplasty showed more toxic serologic parameter and poorer prognosis. Aggressive treatment should be considered for MRSA infection following arthroplasty.

  18. Novel carbon fiber composite for hip replacement with improved in vitro and in vivo osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Dimitrievska, S; Whitfield, J; Hacking, S A; Bureau, M N

    2009-10-01

    A novel composite femoral stem has been developed to match cortical stiffness and achieve fixation by osseointegration with the primary goal to reduce cortical bone loss associated with stress shielding. The femoral stem consists of three distinct material layers: the first is a long carbon fiber (CF) in a polyamide 12 (PA12) polymer matrix (PA12/CF); the second is a PA12/HA (hydroxyapatite) interface; and the third is a plasma-sprayed coating of HA. In vitro studies with MG63 cells indicated that the HA surface supported improved proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like cells as determined by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin production when compared with Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64). In vivo studies comparing the composite and Ti64 rods in the rabbit femur demonstrated significantly higher bone apposition to the composite than Ti64 rods. The results of this study indicate that the invasion of surrounding bone cells and thus osteointegration together with its bone-matching mechanical properties make the PA12/CF/HA stem a promising hip replacement candidate. PMID:18688795

  19. Development of a non-invasive diagnostic technique for acetabular component loosening in total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Alshuhri, Abdullah A; Holsgrove, Timothy P; Miles, Anthony W; Cunningham, James L

    2015-08-01

    Current techniques for diagnosing early loosening of a total hip replacement (THR) are ineffective, especially for the acetabular component. Accordingly, new, accurate, and quantifiable methods are required. The aim of this study was to investigate the viability of vibrational analysis for accurately detecting acetabular component loosening. A simplified acetabular model was constructed using a Sawbones(®) foam block. By placing a thin silicone layer between the acetabular component and the Sawbones block, 2- and 4-mm soft tissue membranes were simulated representing different loosening scenarios. A constant amplitude sinusoidal excitation with a sweep range of 100-1500 Hz was used. Output vibration from the model was measured using an accelerometer and an ultrasound probe. Loosening was determined from output signal features such as the number and relative strength of observed harmonic frequencies. Both measurement methods were sufficient to measure the output vibration. Vibrational analysis reliably detected loosening corresponding to both 2 and 4 mm tissue membranes at driving frequencies between 100 and 1000 Hz (p < 0.01) using the accelerometer. In contrast, ultrasound detected 2-mm loosening at a frequency range of 850-1050 Hz (p < 0.01) and 4-mm loosening at 500-950 Hz (p < 0.01). PMID:26054805

  20. Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk Assessment to Optimize Prosthesis Selection in Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pétursson, Þröstur; Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnús Kjartan; Magnússon, Benedikt; Magnúsdóttir, Gígja; Halldórsson, Grétar; Jónsson, Halldór; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The variability in patient outcome and propensity for surgical complications in total hip replacement (THR) necessitates the development of a comprehensive, quantitative methodology for prescribing the optimal type of prosthetic stem: cemented or cementless. The objective of the research presented herein was to describe a novel approach to this problem as a first step towards creating a patient-specific, presurgical application for determining the optimal prosthesis procedure. Finite element analysis (FEA) and bone mineral density (BMD) calculations were performed with ten voluntary primary THR patients to estimate the status of their operative femurs before surgery. A compilation model of the press-fitting procedure was generated to define a fracture risk index (FRI) from incurred forces on the periprosthetic femoral head. Comparing these values to patient age, sex, and gender elicited a high degree of variability between patients grouped by implant procedure, reinforcing the notion that age and gender alone are poor indicators for prescribing prosthesis type. Additionally, correlating FRI and BMD measurements indicated that at least two of the ten patients may have received nonideal implants. This investigation highlights the utility of our model as a foundation for presurgical software applications to assist orthopedic surgeons with selecting THR prostheses. PMID:26417376

  1. Evaluation of silicon nitride as a wear resistant and resorbable alternative for total hip joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Johanna; Grehk, T. Mikael; Berlind, Torun; Persson, Cecilia; Jacobson, Staffan; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Many of the failures of total joint replacements are related to tribology, i.e., wear of the cup, head and liner. Accumulation of wear particles at the implants can be linked to osteolysis which leads to bone loss and in the end aseptic implant loosening. Therefore it is highly desirable to reduce the generation of wear particles from the implant surfaces. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) has shown to be biocompatible and have a low wear rate when sliding against itself and is therefore a good candidate as a hip joint material. Furthermore, wear particles of Si3N4 are predicted to slowly dissolve in polar liquids and they therefore have the potential to be resorbed in vivo, potentially reducing the risk for aseptic loosening. In this study, it was shown that α-Si3N4-powder dissolves in PBS. Adsorption of blood plasma indicated a good acceptance of Si3N4 in the body with relatively low immune response. Si3N4 sliding against Si3N4 showed low wear rates both in bovine serum and PBS compared with the other tested wear couples. Tribofilms were built up on the Si3N4 surfaces both in PBS and in bovine serum, controlling the friction and wear characteristics. PMID:23507807

  2. Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk Assessment to Optimize Prosthesis Selection in Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Pétursson, Þröstur; Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnús Kjartan; Magnússon, Benedikt; Magnúsdóttir, Gígja; Halldórsson, Grétar; Jónsson, Halldór; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The variability in patient outcome and propensity for surgical complications in total hip replacement (THR) necessitates the development of a comprehensive, quantitative methodology for prescribing the optimal type of prosthetic stem: cemented or cementless. The objective of the research presented herein was to describe a novel approach to this problem as a first step towards creating a patient-specific, presurgical application for determining the optimal prosthesis procedure. Finite element analysis (FEA) and bone mineral density (BMD) calculations were performed with ten voluntary primary THR patients to estimate the status of their operative femurs before surgery. A compilation model of the press-fitting procedure was generated to define a fracture risk index (FRI) from incurred forces on the periprosthetic femoral head. Comparing these values to patient age, sex, and gender elicited a high degree of variability between patients grouped by implant procedure, reinforcing the notion that age and gender alone are poor indicators for prescribing prosthesis type. Additionally, correlating FRI and BMD measurements indicated that at least two of the ten patients may have received nonideal implants. This investigation highlights the utility of our model as a foundation for presurgical software applications to assist orthopedic surgeons with selecting THR prostheses. PMID:26417376

  3. Finite element analysis of retroacetabular osteolytic defects following total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Munro, Jacob T; Anderson, Iain A; Walker, Cameron G; Shim, Vickie B

    2013-09-27

    Periprosthetic osteolysis in the retroacetabular region with cancellous bone loss is a recognized phenomenon in the long-term follow-up of total hip replacement. The effects on load transfer in the presence of defects are less well known. A finite element model incorporating a retroacetabular defect behind a cementless component was validated against a 4th generation sawbone pelvis. Computational predictions of surface strain and von Mises stresses were closely correlated to experimental findings. The presence of a cancellous defect increased von Mises stress in the cortical bone of the medial wall of the pelvis. At a load of 600 N this was under the predicted failure stress for cortical bone. Increases in the cup size relative to the acetabulum caused increased stress in the cortical bone of the lateral wall of the pelvis, adjacent to the acetabulum. We are confident that our modeling approach can be applied to patient specific defects to predict pelvis stress with large loads and a range of activities. PMID:23972431

  4. [Effect of pre-surgical stress on recovery of patients undergoing hip replacement procedures].

    PubMed

    Marek, Motyka; Małgorzata, Kamińska; Małgorzata, Kochman

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of emotional stress experienced by patients prior to surgery on the process of post-surgical recovery. The study covered 50 hospitalised patients (31 women and 19 men) who underwent hip replacement procedures. The research relied on STAI-X1 anxiety questionnaire, as well as a specially prepared survey and the analysis of medical documentation. The results of the study suggest that fears most frequently listed by patients include fear of pain and anaesthesia, as well as anxieties related to the possibility of medical complications and the need to rely on a stranger. A positive statistical correlation was found between the level of emotional stress and the occurrence of psychological and care problems in the first three days following the surgery (unfounded anxieties, self-removal of drainage, ports or dressing). In addition, a statistically significant relation was found between the emotional stress level before the surgery and the number of times the patient's blood pressure exceeded 140/90 mmHg (p = 0.0408), as well as his or her consumption of analgesics (p = 0.0033), sedatives (p = 0.0340) and soporific drugs (p = 0.0273) in postoperative period. PMID:27120945

  5. Role of parenteral iron in transfusion requirements after total hip replacement. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Naveira, E; Seara, J; Palmer, J H; Cuenca, J; García-Erce, J A

    2006-04-01

    An important percentage of patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) receive allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) to avoid the risks of acute anaemia. However, concerns about the risks of ABT have led to the search for alternatives, such as stimulation of erythropoiesis. We prospectively investigated the effect of postoperative administration of 300 mg of intravenous iron sucrose on ABT requirements in THR patients (group 2; n = 24). A previous series of 22 THR patients served as the control group (group 1). All patients were operated on by the same surgeon, using the same implant, and a set of clinical data was gathered. No adverse reactions to iron administration were observed. The group-given iron showed a trend to a lower transfusion rate (46 vs. 73%; P = 0.067) and lower transfusion index (0.96 vs. 1.68 units/patient; P = 0.038). Moreover, amongst the non-transfused patients, admission haemoglobin levels were lower in those coming from the iron group than those from the control group (12.7 +/- 0.9 vs. 14.0 +/- 1.2 g dL(-1), respectively; P = 0.017). Postoperative parenteral iron administration could be a safe and effective way to reduce ABT requirements in the THR patients. A large, randomized controlled trial to confirm these results is warranted. PMID:16623920

  6. Wear in alumina-on-alumina ceramic total hip replacements: a retrieval analysis of edge loading.

    PubMed

    Esposito, C I; Walter, W L; Roques, A; Tuke, M A; Zicat, B A; Walsh, W R; Walter, W K

    2012-07-01

    We analysed 54 alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings from total hip replacements retrieved at one centre after a mean duration of 3.5 years (0.2 to 10.6) in situ. These implants were obtained from 54 patients (16 men and 38 women) with a mean age of 67 years (33 to 88) who underwent revision for a variety of reasons. Posterior edge loading was found in the majority of these retrievals (32 out of 54). Anterosuperior edge loading occurred less often but produced a higher rate of wear. Stripe wear on the femoral heads had a median volumetric wear rate of 0.2 mm(3)/year (0 to 7.2). The wear volume on the femoral heads corresponded to the width of edge wear on the matching liner. Anteversion of the acetabular component was found to be a more important determinant than inclination for wear in ceramic bearings. Posterior edge loading may be considered to be a normal occurrence in ceramic-on-ceramic bearings, with minimal clinical consequences. Edge loading should be defined as either anterosuperior or posterior, as each edge loading mechanism may result in different clinical implications. PMID:22733943

  7. Validation of a Kinect-based telerehabilitation system with total hip replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Antón, David; Nelson, Mark; Russell, Trevor; Goñi, Alfredo; Illarramendi, Arantza

    2016-04-01

    The evolving telecommunications industry combined with medical information technology has been proposed as a solution to reduce health care cost and provide remote medical services. This paper aims to validate and show the feasibility and user acceptance of using a telerehabilitation system called Kinect Rehabilitation System (KiReS) in a real scenario, with patients attending repeated rehabilitation sessions after they had a Total Hip Replacement (THR). We present the main features of KiReS, how it was set up in the considered scenario and the experimental results obtained in relation to two different perspectives: patients' subjective perceptions (gathered through questionnaires) and the accuracy of the performed exercises (by analysing the data captured using KiReS). We made a full deployment of KiReS, defining step by step all the elements of a therapy: postures, movements, exercises and the therapy itself. Seven patients participated in this trial in a total of 19 sessions, and the system recorded 3865 exercise executions. The group showed general support for telerehabilitation and the possibilities that systems such as KiReS bring to physiotherapy treatment. PMID:26130735

  8. Effect of implant material properties on the performance of a hip joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Rotem, A

    1994-01-01

    A composite material implant prosthesis for hip replacement has been developed. The design of the prosthesis substructure was based on investigation of the stress and strain fields that were developed in the human femur at the proximal end when a prosthesis stem had been inserted into it. The prosthesis stem structure was of unidirectional fibrous composite material core (graphite fibres in polysulfone matrix), wrapped with four layers of the same material but orientated at different angles. The orthotropic moduli of the outer layer are very close to the moduli of a human cortical bone in the vertical and circumferential directions. The moduli increased gradually from the outer layer to the inner core. A three-dimensional finite element model of the prosthesis and the bone has been constructed and loaded with the range of forces that might appear upon operation. The behaviour of the composite prosthesis and the femur was then compared with the intact femur and three other types of prosthesis materials, namely stainless steel, titanium, an isoelastic material and a hypothetical one with moduli identical to the cortical bone. The titanium has modulus of elasticity that is only half of the stainless steel. It was found that the composite prosthesis gave the best performance for most of the categories that were examined. PMID:7595934

  9. Fixation method does not affect restoration of rotation center in hip replacements: A single-site retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aseptic loosening is one of the greatest problems in hip replacement surgery. The rotation center of the hip is believed to influence the longevity of fixation. The aim of this study was to compare the influence of cemented and cementless cup fixation techniques on the position of the center of rotation because cemented cup fixation requires the removal of more bone for solid fixation than the cementless technique. Methods We retrospectively compared pre- and post-operative positions of the hip rotation center in 25 and 68 patients who underwent artificial hip replacements in our department in 2007 using cemented or cementless cup fixation, respectively, with digital radiographic image analysis. Results The mean horizontal and vertical distances between the rotation center and the acetabular teardrop were compared in radiographic images taken pre- and post-operatively. The mean horizontal difference was −2.63 mm (range: -11.00 mm to 10.46 mm, standard deviation 4.23 mm) for patients who underwent cementless fixation, and −2.84 mm (range: -10.87 to 5.30 mm, standard deviation 4.59 mm) for patients who underwent cemented fixation. The mean vertical difference was 0.60 mm (range: -20.15 mm to 10.00 mm, standard deviation 3.93 mm) and 0.41 mm (range: -9.26 mm to 6.54 mm, standard deviation 3.58 mm) for the cementless and cemented fixation groups, respectively. The two fixation techniques had no significant difference on the position of the hip rotation center in the 93 patients in this study. Conclusions The hip rotation center was similarly restored using either the cemented or cementless fixation techniques in this patient cohort, indicating that the fixation technique itself does not interfere with the position of the center of rotation. To completely answer this question further studies with more patients are needed. PMID:22686355

  10. Relation between mouth and haematogenous infection in total joint replacements.

    PubMed Central

    Bartzokas, C. A.; Johnson, R.; Jane, M.; Martin, M. V.; Pearce, P. K.; Saw, Y.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the source of infections associated with orthopaedic prostheses. DESIGN--Analysis of four infections of prosthetic joints with case records; minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentrations and sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the cell wall polypeptides of the Streptococcus sanguis isolates from the mouth and infected prostheses; examination of the patients' mouths for periodontal disease and caries. SUBJECTS--Four adults (three men) aged 58-83. RESULTS--For each patient the strain of S sanguis isolated from the mouth was indistinguishable from that isolated from the prosthesis. All patients had severe periodontal disease and caries. CONCLUSIONS--The mouth was probably the source of bacterial infection in the prosthetic joints of these patients; the route of infection was possibly haematogenous. Incipient oral infection should be treated before joint replacement, and oral health should be maintained indefinitely. PMID:8086903

  11. Cancer incidence and cause-specific mortality in patients with metal-on-metal hip replacements in Finland

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Metal-on-metal hip implants have been widely used, especially in the USA, Australia, England and Wales, and Finland. We assessed risk of death and updated data on the risk of cancer related to metal-on-metal hip replacements. Patients and methods A cohort of 10,728 metal-on-metal hip replacement patients and a reference cohort of 18,235 conventional total hip replacement patients were extracted from the Finnish Arthroplasty Register for the years 2001–2010. Data on incident cancer cases and causes of death until 2011 were obtained from the Finnish Cancer Registry and Statistics Finland. The relative risk of cancer and death were expressed as standardized incidence ratio (SIR) and standardized mortality ratio (SMR). SIR/SIR ratios and SMR/SMR ratios, and Poisson regression were used to compare the cancer risk and the risk of death between cohorts. Results The overall risk of cancer in the metal-on-metal cohort was not higher than that in the non-metal-on-metal cohort (RR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.82–1.02). The risk of soft-tissue sarcoma and basalioma in the metal-on-metal cohort was higher than in the non-metal-on-metal cohort (SIR/SIR ratio = 2.6, CI: 1.02–6.4 for soft-tissue sarcoma; SIR/SIR ratio = 1.3, CI: 1.1–1.5 for basalioma). The overall risk of death in the metal-on-metal cohort was less than that in the non-metal-on-metal cohort (RR = 0.78, CI: 0.69–0.88). Interpretation The overall risk of cancer or risk of death because of cancer is not increased after metal-on-metal hip replacement. The well-patient effect and selection bias contribute substantially to the findings concerning mortality. Arthrocobaltism does not increase mortality in patients with metal-on-metal hip implants in the short term. However, metal-on-metal hip implants should not be considered safe until data with longer follow-up time are available. PMID:24397743

  12. Hip Implant Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip replacement surgery, the damaged portions of the hip joint are removed. The ball (femoral head) is removed ... hip or leg Swelling at or near the hip joint A limp or change in walking ability Noise ( ...

  13. Management of a full-thickness burn to the foot following sciatic nerve palsy secondary to primary total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Jabir, Shehab; Frew, Quentin; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic nerve palsy following total hip replacement is a rare but serious complication. The neurological sequelae that follow range from pure sensory loss to combined motor and sensory loss involving most of the lower limb. The loss of nociceptive feedback predisposes patients to accidental damage to the lower limb. We present the case of a lady with sciatic nerve palsy who sustained full-thickness burn injuries to her foot via a hot water bottle. The dilemma between debridement and grafting following a recent history of surgical trauma (ie, total hip replacement) versus secondary healing via dressings and regular review is discussed. Although grafting is the standard treatment in such burns, we recommend secondary healing over grafting provided the burns are not extensive. This enables potential recovery of sensation and reduces operative trauma to the limb which may retard resolution of the neuropraxia. PMID:23595171

  14. Evaluation of ranges of motion of a new constrained acetabular prosthesis for canine total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Total hip replacement (THR) is considered to be the most effective treatment option for advanced osteoarthritis of the hip in large breed dogs. However, a proportion of post-THR patients suffer prosthesis dislocation for various reasons, which may be addressed by a constrained acetabular prosthesis design. The study proposed a new THR with constrained acetabular component that aimed to decrease the incidence of postoperative dislocation while maintaining the necessary range of motion (ROM); and, through computer-simulated implantations, evaluated the ROM of the THR with and without malpositioning of the acetabular component. Methods A new THR with a constrained acetabular component that had an inward eccentric lining and a 60° cut-out on the dorsal side was designed, and its computer-aided design models were implanted into the pelvic and femoral models reconstructed from the computed tomography data of six healthy Labrador Retriever dogs. The allowable and functional ROM of the implanted THR were determined via computer simulations. The contact patterns between the bone or the prosthetic components at extreme positions of the THR were analyzed. Influence of malpositioning of the acetabular component on the ROM was assessed. Results The means (SD) of the functional ranges for flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, internal rotation and external rotation were 51.8° (6.6°), 163.3° (7.3°), 33.5° (5.7°), 74.0° (3.7°), 41.5° (8.3°) and 65.2° (9.9°), respectively. Malpositioning of the acetabular component by 20° in one direction was found to reduce ROM in other directions (reducing lateral opening: flexion: 12°, adduction: 20°, internal/external rotations: < 20°; increasing lateral opening: extension and abduction: < 16°; reducing retroversion: extension: < 20°, abduction: 15°, external rotation: < 20°; increasing retroversion: flexion: < 20°, abduction, adduction and internal rotation: 20°). Conclusions From the computer

  15. Activity and loading influence the predicted bone remodeling around cemented hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Alexander S

    2014-04-01

    Periprosthetic bone remodeling is frequently observed after total hip replacement. Reduced bone density increases the implant and bone fracture risk, and a gross loss of bone density challenges fixation in subsequent revision surgery. Computational approaches allow bone remodeling to be predicted in agreement with the general clinical observations of proximal resorption and distal hypertrophy. However, these models do not reproduce other clinically observed bone density trends, including faster stabilizing mid-stem density losses, and loss-recovery trends around the distal stem. These may resemble trends in postoperative joint loading and activity, during recovery and rehabilitation, but the established remodeling prediction approach is often used with identical pre- and postoperative load and activity assumptions. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the influence of pre- to postoperative changes in activity and loading upon the predicted progression of remodeling. A strain-adaptive finite element model of a femur implanted with a cemented Charnley stem was generated, to predict 60 months of periprosthetic remodeling. A control set of model input data assumed identical pre- and postoperative loading and activity, and was compared to the results obtained from another set of inputs with three varying activity and load profiles. These represented activity changes during rehabilitation for weak, intermediate and strong recoveries, and pre- to postoperative joint force changes due to hip center translation and the use of walking aids. Predicted temporal bone density change trends were analyzed, and absolute bone density changes and the time to homeostasis were inspected, alongside virtual X-rays. The predicted periprosthetic bone density changes obtained using modified loading inputs demonstrated closer agreement with clinical measurements than the control. The modified inputs also predicted the clinically observed temporal density change trends, but still under

  16. Variability of indication criteria in knee and hip replacement: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Total knee (TKR) and hip (THR) replacement (arthroplasty) are effective surgical procedures that relieve pain, improve patients' quality of life and increase functional capacity. Studies on variations in medical practice usually place the indications for performing these procedures to be highly variable, because surgeons appear to follow different criteria when recommending surgery in patients with different severity levels. We therefore proposed a study to evaluate inter-hospital variability in arthroplasty indication. Methods The pre-surgical condition of 1603 patients included was compared by their personal characteristics, clinical situation and self-perceived health status. Patients were asked to complete two health-related quality of life questionnaires: the generic SF-12 (Short Form) and the specific WOMAC (Western Ontario and Mcmaster Universities) scale. The type of patient undergoing primary arthroplasty was similar in the 15 different hospitals evaluated. The variability in baseline WOMAC score between hospitals in THR and TKR indication was described by range, mean and standard deviation (SD), mean and standard deviation weighted by the number of procedures at each hospital, high/low ratio or extremal quotient (EQ5-95), variation coefficient (CV5-95) and weighted variation coefficient (WCV5-95) for 5-95 percentile range. The variability in subjective and objective signs was evaluated using median, range and WCV5-95. The appropriateness of the procedures performed was calculated using a specific threshold proposed by Quintana et al for assessing pain and functional capacity. Results The variability expressed as WCV5-95 was very low, between 0.05 and 0.11 for all three dimensions on WOMAC scale for both types of procedure in all participating hospitals. The variability in the physical and mental SF-12 components was very low for both types of procedure (0.08 and 0.07 for hip and 0.03 and 0.07 for knee surgery patients). However, a moderate

  17. Comparative Effectiveness of Ceramic-on-Ceramic Implants in Stemmed Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Sedrakyan, Art; Graves, Stephen; Bordini, Barbara; Pons, Miquel; Havelin, Leif; Mehle, Susan; Paxton, Elizabeth; Barber, Thomas; Cafri, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The rapid decline in use of conventional total hip replacement with a large femoral head size and a metal-on-metal bearing surface might lead to increased popularity of ceramic-on-ceramic bearings as another hard-on-hard alternative that allows implantation of a larger head. We sought to address comparative effectiveness of ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-HXLPE (highly cross-linked polyethylene) implants by utilizing the distributed health data network of the ICOR (International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries), an unprecedented collaboration of national and regional registries and the U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Methods: A distributed health data network was developed by the ICOR and used in this study. The data from each registry are standardized and provided at a level of aggregation most suitable for the detailed analysis of interest. The data are combined across registries for comprehensive assessments. The ICOR coordinating center and study steering committee defined the inclusion criteria for this study as total hip arthroplasty performed without cement from 2001 to 2010 in patients forty-five to sixty-four years of age with osteoarthritis. Six national and regional registries (Kaiser Permanente and HealthEast in the U.S., Emilia-Romagna region in Italy, Catalan region in Spain, Norway, and Australia) participated in this study. Multivariate meta-analysis was performed with use of linear mixed models, with survival probability as the unit of analysis. We present the results of the fixed-effects model and include the results of the random-effects model in an appendix. SAS version 9.2 was used for all analyses. We first compared femoral head sizes of >28 mm and ≤28 mm within ceramic-on-ceramic implants and then compared ceramic-on-ceramic with metal-on-HXLPE. Results: A total of 34,985 patients were included; 52% were female. We found a lower risk of revision associated with use of ceramic-on-ceramic implants when a larger head

  18. Effect of preparatory information prior to elective total hip replacement on psychological coping outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gammon, J; Mulholland, C W

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of preparatory information on psychological coping outcomes among total hip replacement (THR) patients. A quasi-experimental design within an ethnographic clinical context was used. Eighty-two healthy individuals, scheduled for elective THR were recruited for the study and nonrandom selection techniques were used. The subjects in the experimental group were given procedural, sensory and coping information relating to the whole surgical procedure of a THR. In addition, written information was given to support the verbal information. Subjects in the control group received only the advice and support that would routinely be given to THR patients by ward, medical and nursing staff. The main outcomes were measured using standard questionnaires, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) measuring anxiety and depression, Rosenburg Self-Esteem Scale measuring self-esteem, and Health Illness Questionnaire measuring sense of control. Lastly, a Linear Analogue Coping Scale was developed and applied to assess a subject's personal perception of coping with a THR. Providing information had positive effects on the psychological coping outcomes measured. Subjects in the experimental group had significantly less anxiety and depression with a high self-esteem and sense of control. The Linear Analogue Coping Scale demonstrated a strong correlation between how subjects believed they were coping and that measured using the standard questionnaires. The study concluded that preparatory information of various types and in different forms appears to have positive effects on psychological coping outcomes for THR patients, which may have influenced postoperative recovery. PMID:8858434

  19. Sciatic Nerve Injury Related to Hip Replacement Surgery: Imaging Detection by MR Neurography Despite Susceptibility Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marcel; Bäumer, Philipp; Pedro, Maria; Dombert, Thomas; Staub, Frank; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    Sciatic nerve palsy related to hip replacement surgery (HRS) is among the most common causes of sciatic neuropathies. The sciatic nerve may be injured by various different periprocedural mechanisms. The precise localization and extension of the nerve lesion, the determination of nerve continuity, lesion severity, and fascicular lesion distribution are essential for assessing the potential of spontaneous recovery and thereby avoiding delayed or inappropriate therapy. Adequate therapy is in many cases limited to conservative management, but in certain cases early surgical exploration and release of the nerve is indicated. Nerve-conduction-studies and electromyography are essential in the diagnosis of nerve injuries. In postsurgical nerve injuries, additional diagnostic imaging is important as well, in particular to detect or rule out direct mechanical compromise. Especially in the presence of metallic implants, commonly applied diagnostic imaging tests generally fail to adequately visualize nervous tissue. MRI has been deemed problematic due to implant-related artifacts after HRS. In this study, we describe for the first time the spectrum of imaging findings of Magnetic Resonance neurography (MRN) employing pulse sequences relatively insensitive to susceptibility artifacts (susceptibility insensitive MRN, siMRN) in a series of 9 patients with HRS procedure related sciatic nerve palsy. We were able to determine the localization and fascicular distribution of the sciatic nerve lesion in all 9 patients, which clearly showed on imaging predominant involvement of the peroneal more than the tibial division of the sciatic nerve. In 2 patients siMRN revealed direct mechanical compromise of the nerve by surgical material, and in one of these cases indication for surgical release of the sciatic nerve was based on siMRN. Thus, in selected cases of HRS related neuropathies, especially when surgical exploration of the nerve is considered, siMRN, with its potential to largely

  20. A visual-aided wireless monitoring system design for total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Gao, Jiyang; Su, Shaojie; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Zhihua

    2015-04-01

    To improve the positioning accuracy of implants in Total Hip Replacement (THR) surgeries, a visual-aided wireless monitoring system for THR surgery is proposed in this paper. This system aims to measure and display the contact distribution and relative pose between femoral head and acetabulum prosthesis during the surgery to help surgeons obtain accurate position of implants. The system consists of two parts: the Sensors Array Measuring System (SAMS) and the display part. The SAMS is composed of a sensors array (including contact sensors and an image sensor), signal conditioning circuits, a low power microcontroller (MCU), and a low-power transceiver. The SAMS is designed to estimate the relative pose of femoral head component to acetabular component. The display part processes the data from sensors and demonstrates the contact distribution and the pose of the prothesis during the surgery in 3-D graphics. The two parts of the system communicate with each other on an RF link at the band of 400 MHz. The signal conditioning circuits have been designed and fabricated in 0.18 μm CMOS process. Testing results show that the resolution of the signal conditioning circuits is 60.1 μ Vpp (1.35 g) with ±100 mVpp input. The chip can operate under 1.2-to-3.6 V supply voltage for single battery applications with 116-160 μ A current consumption. The system has been verified by the simulation with rotation quaternion and translation vector. The experimental results show that the contact distribution and relative pose of the two components could be measured and demonstrated in real time. The relative error of rotation is less than 8% and the actual relative error of translation is less than 10%. PMID:25879970

  1. Post-operative gait analysis in total hip replacement patients-a review of current literature and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Alistair M; Stewart, Su; St Clair Gibson, Alan; Kashyap, Shankar N; Caplan, Nick

    2012-05-01

    Gait analysis has been used to measure gait adaptations following total hip replacement (THR) for many years. In this time, advances have been made in implant technology and surgical procedure. However, gait adaptations persist after surgery. This review of seven published studies, where gait characteristics were compared between post-operative THR patients and healthy controls, had the objective of investigating current practice in gait analysis of this patient population and to determine if there is a consensus on post-operative gait changes associated with THR. Levels of methodological quality and study design were found to be variable. Meta-analyses were performed on all gait variables reported by at least three studies to determine overall Cohen's d effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals. Reductions in walking velocity (d=-0.79; CI=-1.54, -0.04), stride length (d=-1.06; CI=-1.62, -0.49) and sagittal hip range of motion (d=-1.58; CI=-2.12, -1.04) were observed. Increases in peak hip flexion (d=0.52; CI=-0.01, 1.09) and extension (d=0.54; CI=-0.10, 1.09) moments were found, although these were likely to be of less clinical significance. Reduced peak hip abduction was also observed (d=-0.58; CI=-1.09, -0.06). Future developments in THR technology and surgical methods should therefore aim to reduce the differences between patients and controls in terms of walking velocity, stride length, hip range of motion and hip abduction moments. PMID:22410129

  2. Obesity and long term functional outcomes following elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Obesity rates continue to rise and more total hip arthroplasty procedures are being performed in progressively younger, obese patients. Hence, maintenance of long term physical function will become very important for quality of life, functional independence and hip prosthesis survival. Presently, there are no reviews of the long term efficacy of total hip arthroplasty on physical function. This review: 1) synopsized available data regarding obesity effects on long term functional outcomes after total hip arthroplasty, and 2) suggested future directions for research. Methods A literature search was conducted from 1965 to January of 2011 for studies that evaluated long term functional outcomes at one year or longer after THA in obese (body mass index values ≥30 kg/m2) and non-obese patients (body mass index <30 kg/m2). Results Five retrospective studies and 18 prospective studies were identified as those that assessed physical function before surgery out to ≥ one year after total hip arthroplasty. Study sample sizes ranged from 108–18,968 and followed patients from one to twenty years. Total hip arthroplasty confers significant pain reduction and improvement in quality of life irrespective of body mass index. Functional improvement occurred after total hip arthroplasty among all studies, but obese patients generally did not attain the same level of physical function by the follow-up time point. Discussion Uncontrolled obesity after total hip arthroplasty is related to worsening of comorbidities and excessive health care costs over the long term. Aggressive and sustainable rehabilitation strategies that include physical exercise, psychosocial components and behavior modification may be highly useful in maximizing and maintaining weight loss after total hip arthroplasty. PMID:22533938

  3. Risk of Hip Fracture Associated with Untreated and Treated Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Dana D.; Newcomb, Craig W.; Carbonari, Dena M.; Nezamzadeh, Melissa S.; Leidl, Kimberly B. F.; Herlim, Maximilian; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Hennessy, Sean; Kostman, Jay R.; Leonard, Mary B.; Localio, A. Russell; Lo Re, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is associated with reduced bone mineral density, but its association with fractures is unknown. Our objectives were to determine whether untreated or treated CHB-infected persons are at increased risk for hip fracture compared to uninfected persons. Methods We conducted a cohort study among 18,796 untreated CHB-infected, 7,777 treated CHB-infected, and 979,751 randomly sampled uninfected persons within the U.S. Medicaid populations of California, Florida, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania (1999 – 2007). CHB infection was defined by two CHB diagnoses recorded >6 months apart and was classified as treated if a diagnosis was recorded and antiviral therapy was dispensed. After propensity score matching of CHB-infected and uninfected persons, Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of incident hip fracture in: 1) untreated CHB-infected versus uninfected, and 2) treated CHB-infected versus uninfected patients. Results Untreated CHB-infected patients of black race had a higher rate of hip fracture than uninfected black persons (HR, 2.55 [95% CI, 1.42 – 4.58]). Compared to uninfected persons, relative hazards of hip fracture were increased for untreated white (HR, 1.26 [95% CI, 0.98 – 1.62]) and Hispanic (HR, 1.36 [95% CI, 0.77 – 2.40]) CHB-infected patients, and treated black (HR, 3.09 [95% CI, 0.59 – 16.22) and white (HR, 1.90 [95% CI, 0.81 – 4.47]) CHB-infected patients, but these associations were not statistically significant. Conclusions Among U.S. Medicaid enrollees, untreated CHB-infected patients of black race had a higher risk of hip fracture than uninfected black persons. PMID:24713185

  4. Probabilistic finite element analysis of the uncemented hip replacement--effect of femur characteristics and implant design geometry.

    PubMed

    Dopico-González, Carolina; New, Andrew M; Browne, Martin

    2010-02-10

    In the present study, a probabilistic finite element tool was assessed using an uncemented total hip replacement model. Fully bonded and frictional interfaces were investigated for combinations of three proximal femurs and two implant designs, the Proxima short stem and the IPS hip stem prostheses. The Monte Carlo method was used with two performance indicators: the percentage of bone volume that exceeded specified strain limits and the maximum nodal micromotion. The six degrees of freedom of bone-implant relative position, magnitude of the hip contact force (L), and spatial direction of L were the random variables. The distal portion of the proximal femurs was completely constrained and some of the main muscle forces acting in the hip were applied. The coefficients of the linear approximation between the random variables and the output were used as the sensitivity values. In all cases, bone-implant position related parameters were the most sensitive parameters. The results varied depending on the femur, the implant design and the interface conditions. Values of maximum nodal micromotion agreed with results from previous studies, confirming the robustness of the implemented computational tool. It was demonstrated that results from a single model study should not be generalised to the entire population of femurs and that bone variability is an important factor that should be investigated in such analyses. PMID:19896129

  5. Semi-automated CT-based analysis of regional bone-density in contra lateral total hip replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Tamez-Pena, Jose; Crilly, Therese; Looney, John R.; O'Keefe, R.; Campbell, Debbie; Totterman, Saara M.

    2004-04-01

    Methods for quantifying hip prosthesis induced changes in the adjacent bone are of great interest to orthopedics. In this work, we present a semi-automated technique for measuring the differences in bone density between the prosthetic and contra lateral hips within a CT volumetric data set. In order to reliably compare the bone-density measurements between the prosthetic and the contra laterals hips, a standardized zoning was developed. Using a spherical model of the outer surface of the prosthetic cup, the superior volume of the acetabular region was subdivided into four distance zones: 0-1mm, 1-6mm, 6-11mm, and 11-16mm, respectively. Furthermore, these regions were divided into four positional zones: medial, lateral, anterior, and posterior. At the same time, the positional zones were divided into four angular regions 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees from the apex of the acetabular cup. The bone density is computed as the average density in Hounsfield unit (HU) measured from the CT scan using all the voxels within each of the 64 zones. Preliminary analysis has been completed on 3 subjects with total hip replacement. The zonal densities on the prosthetic hip and the contra lateral hip were computed and compared. Contrary to initial expectations, a paired t-test showed no statistical significance between the prosthetic and contra lateral bone-densities at any of the four distance zones. Further analysis with a larger sample subject is needed to detect differences in bone-density between the hips in the stress/weight bearing areas in the 15 to 30 degree regions. A method for reliably and consistently measuring the bone-density within standardized zones has been developed and applied on prosthetic and contra lateral hips. The average bone-density for each of the zones takes into account the entire volumetric data set within that region, which is a considerable improvement over the subjective, user driven region of interest estimate selected within one slice practiced in

  6. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Zywiel, Michael G; Mahomed, Nizar N; Perruccio, Anthony V

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475). When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P < 0.01)) of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement. PMID:25861476

  7. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Zywiel, Michael G.; Mahomed, Nizar N.; Perruccio, Anthony V.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475). When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P < 0.01)) of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement. PMID:25861476

  8. A short course of low-molecular-weight heparin to prevent deep venous thrombosis after elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gallay, Steve; Waddell, James P.; Cardella, Piera; Morton, Jane

    1997-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of a short course of low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaparin) in the prevention of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after elective total hip replacement. Design A prospective cohort study. Follow-up was a minimum of 3 months. Setting An acute-care hospital with a large-volume practice of elective total joint replacement. Patients A prospective group of 150 patients who required primary total hip arthroplasty and a historic control group of 150 patients. All patients were treated with compression stockings, indomethacin and early mobilization. The treatment group received low-molecular-weight heparin, 30 mg every 12 hours for 5 days postoperatively; the control group received no specific anticoagulant therapy. Interventions Total hip replacement. Doppler venography on postoperative day 5 and 2 to 5 days later if required. Main outcome measures Presence or absence of deep venous thrombosis. Wound hemorrhage, transfusion rate, number of units of blood transfused and changes in the hemoglobin level. Results The incidence of proximal deep venous thrombosis (popliteal vein to common iliac vein) was 0% in the treatment group versus 4% in the control group. There was no difference in bleeding or number of transfusions required. There was, however, a significant (p = 0.005) drop in hemoglobin level in the treatment group. Conclusions A short course of low-molecular-weight heparin provides effective protection against proximal deep venous thrombosis without significantly increasing the risk to the patient. The treatment is compatible with early patient discharge and the pharmacologic prevention of heterotopic ossification after total joint replacement. PMID:9126125

  9. A valuable technique for femoral stem revision in total hip replacement: The in-cement revision - A case series and technical note.

    PubMed

    McDougall, C J; Yu, J; Calligeros, K; Crawford, R; Howie, C R

    2016-12-01

    Revision of a cemented femoral stem can be a challenging procedure. We present a series of cases utilising the "In-cement" revision, whereby the same size stem is introduced into the original cement mantle, without additional cementing. It requires a stable cement mantle in the correct version. We describe the technique and present a review of 23 revision total hip replacements performed over a 5 year period. At average follow-up of 67 months (12-128 months), the overall survivorship was 91.3% with no patient requiring re-revision for stem loosening or mechanical failure. Two patients required re-revision for infection and one of those patients is now deceased. No further operations were required in 21 patients. The "In-cement" revision can be a valuable technique for the revision arthroplasty surgeon. Early results suggest this is a safe and effective technique in the appropriate patient. PMID:27408507

  10. Survival of ceramic bearings in total hip replacement after high-energy trauma and periprosthetic acetabular fracture.

    PubMed

    Salih, S; Currall, V A; Ward, A J; Chesser, T J S

    2009-11-01

    Surgeons remain concerned that ceramic hip prostheses may fail catastrophically if either the head or the liner is fractured. We report two patients, each with a ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacement who sustained high-energy trauma sufficient to cause a displaced periprosthetic acetabular fracture in whom the ceramic bearings survived intact. Simultaneous fixation of the acetabular fracture, revision of the cementless acetabular prosthesis and exchange of the ceramic bearings were performed successfully in both patients. Improved methods of manufacture of new types of alumina ceramic with a smaller grain size, and lower porosity, have produced much stronger bearings. Whether patients should be advised to restrict high-impact activities in order to protect these modern ceramic bearings from fracture remains controversial. PMID:19880903

  11. Uncemented Total Hip Replacement Stem Loosening after Long Term Compressive Stress Application: A Simulated FEA Study of Cortical Bone Remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Duk-Young; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Nakai, Ryusuke; Ikeuchi, Ken; Sekel, Ron

    The purpose of this study is to predict with the use of FEA, the differing predisposition to cortical bone resorption and subsequent distal migration of an un-cemented femoral hip replacement stem subjected to long term biomechanical high compressive stresses, while varying the load angles, the material properties of the stem, and the stem length. A two-dimensional hip model was constructed to estimate the minimum principle stresses (P3) and migration magnitudes. Bone remodeling at the interface between the bone and the prosthesis was performed by comparison of the local compressive stress to physiological stress values governing bone resorption. With respect to load angles, migrations of the hip prosthesis did not occur with load angles between 63° and 74° load angle in relation to the longitudinal axis of the bony femur, as the compressive stress generated on the cortical bone was under the criteria threshold for bone resorption (-50MPa). In addition, the magnitude of migration (17%decrease) was relatively more sensitive to changes in stem length than those (92%decrease) of changes of material properties. In conclusion, using an FEA model for bone remodeling, based on the high compressive stresses exerted on distal cortical bone, it is possible to estimate migration magnitudes of cementless hip prostheses in the long term. The load angles have been shown to be an important parameter affecting the migration magnitudes and furthermore, it can be demonstrated that the stiffer materials and reduction of stem length can decrease the migration of cementless hip prosthesis in the long term.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of enoxaparin versus warfarin prophylaxis against deep-vein thrombosis after total hip replacement.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, B J; Anderson, D R; Goeree, R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of enoxaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin derivative, with that of low-dose warfarin in the prevention of deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) after total hip replacement. DATA SOURCES: English-language articles on enoxaparin and warfarin prophylaxis is patients undergoing total hip replacement published from January 1982 to December 1992. STUDY SELECTION: Four trials of enoxaparin (involving 567 patients) and six trials of warfarin (involving 630) met the following criteria: randomized controlled trial, prophylaxis started no later than 24 hours after surgery and continued for at least 7 days, warfarin dose monitored and adjusted appropriately, enoxaparin dosage 30 mg twice daily, and DVT confirmed by bilateral venography. DATA EXTRACTION: Rates of DVT, cost of prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment per patient, rate of pulmonary embolism (PE), number of deaths and incremental cost-effectiveness (cost per life-year gained). DATA SYNTHESIS: The pooled rate of DVT was 13.6% with enoxaparin (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.9% to 16.3%) and 20.6% with warfarin (95% CI 17.4% to 23.8%). At a cost of $19.55 per day for enoxaparin the total cost per patient, including prophylaxis and management of DVT, exceeded that per patient receiving warfarin by about $121. For every 10,000 patients treated the use of enoxaparin will prevent 47 cases of DVT, 3 cases of PE and 4 deaths. Thus, the estimated incremental cost-effectiveness of enoxaparin is $29 120 per life-year gained. CONCLUSION: On the basis of current Canadian cost-effectiveness guidelines the results of this study would be considered moderate to strong evidence to adopt enoxaparin prophylaxis against DVT after total hip replacement. However, because of the limited data the estimates are uncertain. Future trials should compare enoxaparin and warfarin and incorporate a prospective economic appraisal. PMID:8137188

  13. Modular titanium alloy neck failure in total hip replacement: analysis of a relapse case.

    PubMed

    Ceretti, Marco; Falez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Modular neck hip prosthesis born in the 1990 with the aim of allowing the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intra-operatively restoring patient's original biomechanics. In order to achieve the best biomechanics of the reconstructed hip, preoperative planning is essential. In the last few years modularity has been questioned and an argument made for the return to mono block stems due to events of breakage or disconnection of modular components. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such modular device due to the contamination inside the modular coupling or to high loads. We present a case of repetitive modular femoral neck prosthesis fracture. PMID:27163109

  14. Wear properties of polyethylene-metal and polyethylene-ceramic bearings for hip joint replacements: The effect of temperature and protein precipitation in hip simulator tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yen-Shuo

    Ultra-high-molecular weight polyethylene (PE) cups bearing against metal or ceramic balls are the most commonly used combinations of materials for human hip joint replacements. The wear properties of these materials are typically evaluated in the laboratory using hip joint wear simulators, while lubricated with bovine serum. A previous test evaluating the PE cups against cobalt-chrome (CoCr), zirconia (Zr) and alumina balls demonstrated the sensitivity of serum proteins to elevated temperature; especially for Zr/PE, which showed the highest protein precipitation and bulk lubricant temperature but the lowest cup wear. In the present investigation, a temperature control system was used on a hip simulator to systematically evaluate the relationship between temperature and denaturation of the serum proteins which, in turn, affects the friction and wear properties of the prosthetic materials being tested. In order to control protein precipitation, the interface was temperature reduced by circulating coolant at 4°C through the center of the CoCr or Zr balls during a wear test. With cooling, protein assay of the serum showed 66% and 50% reductions in protein precipitation with the CoCr and Zr balls, respectively. The wear rate of the PE cups against the CoCr balls decreased by an average of 44%, whereas two of the three PE cups running against Zr balls exhibited slight increases in their wear rates, and the third showed a two fold increase. Under scanning electron microscopy, there were marked differences in the worn surfaces of the cups for the various conditions, and differences in the morphology of the PE wear debris recovered from the serum. For example, granular particles predominated without cooling, whereas fibrous particles predominated with cooling. Since particles generated in vivo (i.e., retrieved from periprosthetic tissues) typically show approximately equal proportions of granules and fibrils, the use of an intermediate coolant temperature might provide

  15. High friction moments in large hard-on-hard hip replacement bearings in conditions of poor lubrication.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Nicholas E; Hothan, Arne; Morlock, Michael M

    2013-05-01

    Disappointing clinical results for large diameter metal replacement bearings for the hip are related to compromised lubrication due to poor cup placement, which increases wear as well as friction moments. The latter can cause overload of the implant-bone interfaces and the taper junction between head and stem. We investigated the influence of lubrication conditions on friction moments in modern hip bearings. Friction moments for large diameter metal and ceramic bearings were measured in a hip simulator with cup angles varying from 0° to 60°. Two diameters were tested for each bearing material, and measurements were made in serum and in dry conditions, representing severely compromised lubrication. Moments were lower for the ceramic bearings than for the metal bearings in lubricated conditions, but approached those for metal bearings at high cup inclination. In dry conditions, friction moments increased twofold to 12 Nm for metal bearings. For ceramic bearings, the increase was more than fivefold to over 25 Nm. Although large diameter ceramic bearings demonstrate an improvement in friction characteristics in the lubricated condition, they could potentially replicate problems currently experienced due to high friction moments in metal bearings once lubrication is compromised. PMID:23239536

  16. Computer-based gait analysis of dogs: evaluation of kinetic and kinematic parameters after cemented and cementless total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Drüen, S; Böddeker, J; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Fehr, M; Nolte, I; Wefstaedt, P

    2012-01-01

    To date it is unclear whether cementless total hip replacement (THR) in dogs is of clinical advantage in comparison to cemented THR with regard to lameness improvement. Thus the aim of this study was to compare objectively the development of the gait pattern after cemented and cementless THR in dogs. For this purpose, 18 adult dogs with hip dysplasia underwent computer-based gait analysis on an instrumented treadmill prior to unilateral THR and then again ten days, four weeks and four months after surgery. Analysed kinetic parameters were symmetry indices (SI) of vertical ground reaction forces (GRF), which included peak vertical forces (PFz), mean vertical forces (MFz), vertical impulse (IFz), and vertical ground reaction forces of the arthroplasty limbs only. Analysed kinematic parameters were range-of-motion and the flexion and extension angles of hip, stifle and hock joints. The symmetry indice for PVF, MFz and IFz decreased to a value less than six in both THR groups four months after surgery, which is defined as not lame. Improvement in lameness of the arthroplasty limbs during the examination period of four months was not significantly different between the cemented and cementless groups. The results suggest that within a short-term observation period of four months after surgery, neither cementless nor cemented THR have a greater advantage with regard to lameness improvement. Additional studies with larger pools of subjects and longer time periods for follow-up examinations are necessary to verify these findings. PMID:22828804

  17. Alumina-alumina hip replacement in patients younger than 50 years old.

    PubMed

    Sedel, L; Nizard, R S; Kerboull, L; Witvoet, J

    1994-01-01

    From April 1977 to December 1990, 131 total hip arthroplasties were performed on 113 patients younger than 50 years of age (median, 41 years); 64 were men and 49 women. The majority were active people. Sixty-six hips had no previous operations, and 33 had at least one previous arthroplasty. The femoral component was a cemented collared titanium alloy stem, and alumina socket was cemented for 99 hips and press-fit for 32. The mean follow-up period was five years, with 32 hips followed for more than ten years. Revision arthroplasty was considered as a failure. Survivorship analysis depicted a 97.5% rate of survival at five years, an 89.4% rate at ten years, and an 86.2% at 11 years. Nine revisions were performed: one experienced a femoral head rupture after three years, one had bipolar loosening, one experienced femoral cystic formation, and six were revised for acetabular cup loosening, all from the cemented group. Two revisions occurred on the same patient. No stem revision was necessary before ten years. Only one of these revisions was required in patients aged 40 or younger (64 patients). Alumina-alumina friction is an extremely interesting phenomenon in young patients, and could be related to the low wear debris production. PMID:8118972

  18. Outcome of Hemiarthroplasty and Total Hip Replacement for Active Elderly Patients with Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures: A Meta-Analysis of 8 Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yiqiong; Fu, Dong; Chen, Kai; Li, Guodong; Cai, Zhengdong; Shi, Yan; Yin, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    Background Displaced fracture of the femoral neck has been a common clinical problem, especially in aged patients. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of randomized clinical trials assessing the results of hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement in patients undergoing either alternative using meta-analysis. Methods A literature search for randomized clinical trials was conducted through Medline, Embase and Cochrane library between 1969 and 2013 with no restrictions. Additional relevant articles were referred as source of information by way of manual searches on major orthopedic journals. Upon the search, two authors independently evaluated study quality and relevant data was extracted. Results A total of 8 studies with 983 patients were included in this meta-analysis. After pooling the available data, a significant dominance of Harris hip score was found for total hip replacement compared with hemiarthroplasty (SMD: −7.11, 95%:−10.70,−3.53) one year postoperatively and the advantage kept over (SMD: −6.91, 95%:−12.98, −0.85) two years after surgery. A trend toward a higher dislocation rate was found in total hip replacement group (RR: 0.46, 95%: 0.21, 1.02), of which the difference was considered insignificant. The risk of revision in group hemiarthroplasty appeared to be more than two folds higher than that after total hip replacement (RR: 4.14, 95%CI: 2.09, 8.19). Conclusion Even though there is a higher rate of dislocation after total hip replacement, this disadvantage could be accounted for, on the basis of a better functional score and the lower revision rate. However, from the results, it stands to reason that total hip replacement should be strongly suggested in elderly active patients with femoral neck fracture. PMID:24854195

  19. The effect of cup outer sizes on the contact mechanics and cement fixation of cemented total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-10-01

    One important loosening mechanism of the cemented total hip arthroplasty is the mechanical overload at the bone-cement interface and consequent failure of the cement fixation. Clinical studies have revealed that the outer diameter of the acetabular component is a key factor in influencing aseptic loosening of the hip arthroplasty. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the cup outer diameter on the contact mechanics and cement fixation of a cemented total hip replacement (THR) with different wear penetration depths and under different cup inclination angles using finite element (FE) method. A three-dimensional FE model was developed based on a typical Charnley hip prosthesis. Two acetabular cup designs with outer diameters of 40 and 43 mm were modelled and the effect of cup outer diameter, penetration depth and cup inclination angle on the contact mechanics and cement fixation stresses in the cemented THR were studied. The results showed that for all penetration depths and cup inclination angles considered, the contact mechanics in terms of peak von Mises stress in the acetabular cup and peak contact pressure at the bearing surface for the two cup designs were similar (within 5%). However, the peak von Mises stress, the peak maximum principal stress and peak shear stress in the cement mantle at the bone-cement interface for the 43 mm diameter cup design were predicted to be lower compared to those for the 40 mm diameter cup design. The differences were predicted to be 15-19%, 15-22% and 18-20% respectively for different cup penetration depths and inclination angles, which compares to the clinical difference of aseptic loosening incidence of about 20% between the two cup designs. PMID:26343226

  20. Efficacy of stereoscopic visualization and six degrees of freedom interaction in preoperative planning of total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Testi, Debora; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Benvegnù, Marco; Petrone, Marco; Zannoni, Cinzia; Viceconti, Marco; Toni, Aldo

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of a six-degrees-of-freedom application for pre-operative planning of total hip replacement in a virtual reality (VR) environment. A test was performed estimating the system inherent accuracy. The users can move objects in the VR environment with an intrinsic accuracy almost four orders of magnitude greater than the object dimension. A second unambiguous and relevant task was defined to assess the accuracy achievable with the interface in a specific planning task. The results were compared with those obtained with 2D interfaces for both the stem and the cup component. The RMSE was assumed as an indicator of the achievable accuracy. The accuracy of the immersive interface was comparable with that achievable with a standard mouse - monitor interface. The users were consistent using the VR interface, confirming the high usability of the new interface and the steep learning curve of users unfamiliar with the new environment. This study has demonstrated that the application of VR environment for pre-operative planning of total hip replacement may help to shorten the duration of the positioning and to yield consistent results even with first-time users. PMID:16954057

  1. The contact mechanics and occurrence of edge loading in modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement during daily activities.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of edge loading in hip joint replacement has been associated with many factors such as prosthetic design, component malposition and activities of daily living. The present study aimed to quantify the occurrence of edge loading/contact at the articulating surface and to evaluate the effect of cup angles and edge loading on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR) during different daily activities. A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing system. Different cup inclination and anteversion angles were modelled and six daily activities were considered. The results showed that edge loading was predicted during normal walking, ascending and descending stairs activities under steep cup inclination conditions (≥55°) while no edge loading was observed during standing up, sitting down and knee bending activities. The duration of edge loading increased with increased cup inclination angles and was affected by the cup anteversion angles. Edge loading caused elevated contact pressure at the articulating surface and substantially increased equivalent plastic strain of the polyethylene liner. The present study suggested that correct positioning the component to avoid edge loading that may occur during daily activities is important for MoP THR in clinical practice. PMID:27056255

  2. Acute delayed infection: increased risk in failed metal on metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Hernan A; Berbari, Elie F; Sierra, Rafael J

    2014-09-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions occurring in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) could potentially lead to secondary failure modes such as dislocation or infection. The authors report a series of 124 patients treated with MoM hip arthroplasty between 2006 and 2010 with a minimum follow-up of 3 years. Eight hips presented with acute delayed or late periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) (defined as an infection occurring after 3 months in an otherwise well functioning implant). The rate of infection observed was higher than expected, almost 4 times higher (5.6%) compared to previous historical cohorts from our institution (1.3%). This high risk of infection in patients with DePuy ASR implants requires further study but we theorize that the increased prevalence of infection could be due to a combination of particulate debris, molecular (rather than particulate) effects of Co and Cr ions on soft tissues, and/or products of corrosion that may change the local environment predisposing to infection. PMID:24851788

  3. [Fat embolism after total hip prosthesis replacement preserving the femoral stem].

    PubMed

    Messant, I; Ouardirhi, Y; Vernet, M; Lile, A; Girard, C

    2003-11-01

    Fat embolism is a known complication of traumatology, especially in long bone fractures. It may also occur in liposuction and articular surgery (0.1%). Fat embolic events are most often clinically insignificant and difficult to recognize since clinical manifestations are varied and there is no routine laboratory or radiographic diagnosis. Classically, fat embolism syndrome presents with the triad of pulmonary distress, mental status changes, and cutaneous manifestations. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman who developed acute respiratory distress 10 days after hip arthroplasty. Several aetiologies such as fibrinocruoric pulmonary embolism, pulmonary aspiration and bacterial pneumonia were discussed. Fat embolism was diagnosed, based on suggestive clinical manifestations, radiographic and laboratory findings, although fat embolism after hip arthroplasty without intramedullary pressurization is infrequent. PMID:14612171

  4. Regional or general anesthesia for fast-track hip and knee replacement - what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Kehlet, Henrik; Aasvang, Eske Kvanner

    2015-01-01

    Regional anesthesia for knee and hip arthroplasty may have favorable outcome effects compared with general anesthesia by effectively blocking afferent input, providing initial postoperative analgesia, reducing endocrine metabolic responses, and providing sympathetic blockade with reduced bleeding and less risk of thromboembolic complications but with undesirable effects on lower limb motor and urinary bladder function. Old randomized studies supported the use of regional anesthesia with fewer postoperative pulmonary and thromboembolic complications, and this has been supported by recent large non-randomized epidemiological database cohort studies. In contrast, the data from newer randomized trials are conflicting, and recent studies using modern general anesthetic techniques may potentially support the use of general versus spinal anesthesia. In summary, the lack of properly designed large randomized controlled trials comparing modern general anesthesia and spinal anesthesia for knee and hip arthroplasty prevents final recommendations and calls for prospective detailed studies in this clinically important field. PMID:26918127

  5. Modular titanium alloy neck failure in total hip replacement: analysis of a relapse case

    PubMed Central

    Ceretti, Marco; Falez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Modular neck hip prosthesis born in the 1990 with the aim of allowing the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intra-operatively restoring patient’s original biomechanics. In order to achieve the best biomechanics of the reconstructed hip, preoperative planning is essential. In the last few years modularity has been questioned and an argument made for the return to mono block stems due to events of breakage or disconnection of modular components. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such modular device due to the contamination inside the modular coupling or to high loads. We present a case of repetitive modular femoral neck prosthesis fracture. PMID:27163109

  6. Metal release and metal allergy after total hip replacement with resurfacing versus conventional hybrid prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Klas; Jakobsen, Stig S; Lorenzen, Nina D; Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Bonefeld, Charlotte M; Stilling, Maiken; Baad-Hansen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip arthroplasties were reintroduced because of the problems with osteolysis and aseptic loosening related to polyethylene wear of early metal-on-polyethylene (MOP) arthroplasties. The volumetric wear rate has been greatly reduced with MOM arthroplasties; however, because of nano-size wear particles, the absolute number has been greatly increased. Thus, a source of metal ion exposure with the potential to sensitize patients is present. We hypothesized that higher amounts of wear particles result in increased release of metal ions and ultimately lead to an increased incidence of metal allergy. Methods 52 hips in 52 patients (median age 60 (51–64) years, 30 women) were randomized to either a MOM hip resurfacing system (ReCap) or a standard MOP total hip arthoplasty (Mallory Head/Exeter). Spot urine samples were collected preoperatively, postoperatively, after 3 months, and after 1, 2, and 5 years and tested with inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry. After 5 years, hypersensitivity to metals was evaluated by patch testing and lymphocyte transformation assay. In addition, the patients answered a questionnaire about hypersensitivity. Results A statistically significant 10- to 20-fold increase in urinary levels of cobalt and chromium was observed throughout the entire follow-up in the MOM group. The prevalence of metal allergy was similar between groups. Interpretation While we observed significantly increased levels of metal ions in the urine during the entire follow-up period, no difference in prevalence of metal allergy was observed in the MOM group. However, the effect of long-term metal exposure remains uncertain. PMID:24930546

  7. Fabrication and wear test of a continuous fiber/particulate composite total surface hip replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. C.; Ling, F. F.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Continuous fiber woven E-glass composite femoral shells having the ame elastic properties as bone were fabricated. The shells were then encrusted with filled epoxy wear resistant coatings and run dry against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in 42,000 and 250,000 cycle were tests on a total hip simulator. The tribological characteristics of these shells atriculating with the acetabular cups are comparable to a vitallium bal articulating with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene cup.

  8. [An unusual early complication in cementless replacement of the hip joint. Case report].

    PubMed

    Kauschke, T; Zilch, H

    1994-12-01

    This is the first description of a dislocation of the polyethyleninlay from the cup of a cementless hip prosthesis. Due to a fall of the patient 8 months after the implantation an unspecific complaint arised. In spite of detailed diagnostic no reason could have been found. During the renewed operation we saw the dislocated inlay by mechanical anchorage of the cup and the shaft. Retrospective there were made suggestions how the described complication could be recognized earlier. PMID:7871611

  9. Correlation between patient age at total hip replacement surgery and lifeexpectancy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann1, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Crestani, Marcus Vinicius; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most cost-effective hip surgeries among orthopedic procedures. We conducted an extensive literature review with 5,394 papers regarding survival rates after THA. We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library from January 1st, 1970 to July 31th, 2014 looking for all citations about total hip arthroplasty with a long term follow-up (longer than 10 years). The criteria were rigorous: no loss of follow-up, and follow-up more than 10 years. The authors should have known the complete history of patients (whether the patient is alive or dead). Considering the criteria, we found only 15 papers. To evaluate the relationship between follow-up and survival, a linear regression analysis was applied. Considering the papers analysed, and applying the search criteria, we obtained a mean age for the patients above 57.5 years. The chance of survival at 15 years was 57.6%, at 20 years it was 34.6% and at 25 years it is only 11.6%. The relationship between follow-up and survival was significantly linear (p <0.001). Only 11.6% of patients undergoing THA will be still alive 25 years after the surgical procedure. Level of Evidence I, Prognostic Study. PMID:27057147

  10. Surface and Subsurface Analyses of Metal-on-Polyethylene Total Hip Replacement Retrievals.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Vicky; Pettersson, Maria; Persson, Cecilia; Larsson, Sune; Grandfield, Kathryn; Engqvist, Håkan

    2016-05-01

    Metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) articulations are one of the most reliable implanted hip prostheses. Unfortunately, long-term failure remains an obstacle to the service life. There is a lack of higher resolution research investigating the metallic surface component of MoP hip implants. This study investigates the surface and subsurface features of metallic cobalt chromium molybdenum alloy (CoCrMo) femoral head components from failed MoP retrievals. Unused prostheses were used for comparison to differentiate between wear-induced defects and imperfections incurred during implant manufacturing. The predominant scratch morphology observed on the non-implanted references was shallow and linear, whereas the scratches on the retrievals consisted of largely nonlinear, irregular scratches of varying depth (up to 150 nm in retrievals and up to 60 nm in reference samples). Characteristic hard phases were observed on the surface and subsurface material of the cast samples. Across all samples, a 100-400 nm thick nanocrystalline layer was visible in the immediate subsurface microstructure. Although observation of the nanocrystalline layer has been reported in metal-on-metal articulations, its presence in MoP retrievals and unimplanted prostheses has not been extensively examined. The results suggest that manufacturing-induced surface and subsurface microstructural features are present in MoP hip prostheses prior to implantation and naturally, these imperfections may influence the in vivo wear processes after implantation. PMID:26399989

  11. A CaRBS analysis of hip replacement approaches and non-pathology

    PubMed Central

    Whatling, G.M.; Beynon, M.J.; Holt, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the differences in hip biomechanics for subjects following a total hip arthroplasty (THA), through the lateral approach (LA) and posterior approach (PA), to those with no pathology (NP). The principal component analysis was performed on two kinematic and two kinetic waveforms (subject-based characteristics) from level gait to identify salient portions of the waveforms for comparison between the subject cohorts. These were classified to identify the differences between post-THA and non-pathological cohorts. The primary technique exposited in the THA analysis is classification and ranking belief simplex (CaRBS). Within the analysis, from the configuration of a CaRBS model, there is discussion on the model fit and contribution of the subject-based characteristics. Where appropriate, comparisons to the CaRBS model are made with the results from a logistic regression (LR) analysis. In terms of model fit, using CaRBS, 24 out of 27 LA/PA subjects (88.89%) and 13 out of 16 NP subjects (81.25%) were correctly classified as exhibiting either post-THA or NP hip functional characteristics during level gait, combining to 86.05% classification accuracy, compared with 81.40% classification accuracy when using LR. PMID:22292467

  12. Variations in the trunnion surface topography between different commercially available hip replacement stems.

    PubMed

    Munir, Selin; Walter, William L; Walsh, William Robert

    2015-01-01

    Modular hip implants allows for the adjustment of leg length, offset, and the ability to remove the head for acetabular exposure during primary and revision surgery. The design of the Morse taper facilitates the intimate contact of the conical trunnion of the femoral stem (male component), with the conical bore of the femoral head (female component). Orthopaedic trunnion tapers are not standardized and vary in length, taper angle, and base dimension. Variations in the design and surface characteristics of the trunnion, will directly reflect on the interface at the taper junction and can influence the likelihood of subsequent wear, corrosion and longevity of the implant. The effect of surface topography of trunnions on commercially available hip stems has not yet been considered as a possible contributing factor in the corrosion observed at taper junctions. In this study we analyzed the surface topography and surface roughness of randomly selected commercially available femoral hip stem trunnions to obtain a greater insight into their surface characteristics. PMID:25319315

  13. Severity of Diabetes Mellitus and Total Hip or Knee Replacement: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Nielen, Johannes T H; Emans, Pieter J; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Boonen, Annelies; Lalmohamed, Arief; de Boer, Anthonius; van den Bemt, Bart J F; de Vries, Frank

    2016-05-01

    It is generally thought that people with diabetes mellitus (DM) are more likely to suffer from osteoarthritis (OA) due to an increased body mass index (BMI), resulting in mechanical destruction of cartilage. However, previous studies have suggested a coexisting metabolic causality.To evaluate the risk of hip or knee replacement, as a proxy for severe OA, in patients with DM. We additionally evaluated the risk of total joint replacement (TJR) with various proxies for increased DM severity.A population-based case-control study was performed, using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Cases (n = 94,609) were defined as patients >18 years who had undergone TJR between 2000 and 2012. Controls were matched by age, gender, and general practice. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of total knee (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR) surgery associated with use of antidiabetic drugs (ADs). We additionally stratified current AD users by proxies for DM severity.Current AD use was significantly associated with a lower risk of TKR (OR = 0.86 (95% CI = 0.78-0.94)) and THR (OR = 0.90 (95% CI = 0.82-0.99)) compared to patients not using ADs. Moreover, risk of TKR and THR was decreased with increasing HbA1c.This study does not support the theory that DM patients are more likely to suffer from severe OA as compared to patients without diabetes. Moreover, risk of severe OA necessitating TJR decreases with increasing DM severity. This is possibly due to dissimilarities in methodology, a decrease in eligibility for surgery, or variability of OA phenotypes. PMID:27196498

  14. Venous Thromboembolism Following Hip and Knee Replacement Arthroplasty in Korea: A Nationwide Study Based on Claims Registry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sahnghoon; Hwang, Jee-In; Kim, Yunjung; Yoon, Pil Whan; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Yoo, Jeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and trends of clinically relevant venous thromboembolism (VTE) including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) after hip and knee replacement arthroplasty (HKRA) in Korea. Between January 1 and December 31, 2010, 22,127 hip replacement arthroplasty (HRA) patients and 52,882 knee replacement arthroplasty (KRA) patients were enrolled in the analysis using the administrative claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA). All available parameters including procedure history and clinically relevant VTE during the 90 days after HKRA were identified based on diagnostic and electronic data interchange (EDI) codes. The overall incidence of VTE, DVT, and PE during the 90 days was 3.9% (n=853), 2.7% (n=597), and 1.5% (n=327) after HRA, while the incidence was 3.8% (n=1,990), 3.2% (n=1,699), and 0.7% (n=355) after KRA. The incidence of VTE after HKRA was significantly higher in patients who had previous VTE history (odds ratio [OR], 10.8 after HRA, OR, 8.5 after KRA), chronic heart failure (2.1, 1.3), arrhythmia (1.8, 1.7), and atrial fibrillation (3.4, 2.1) than in patients who did not. The VTE incidence in patients with chemoprophylaxis was higher than that in patients without chemoprophylaxis. The incidence of VTEs revealed in this retrospective review was not low compared with the results of the studies targeting other Asian or Caucasian populations. It may warrant routine prevention including employment of chemoprophylaxis. However, the limitation of the reviewed data mandates large scale prospective investigation to affirm this observation. PMID:26770042

  15. Venous Thromboembolism Following Hip and Knee Replacement Arthroplasty in Korea: A Nationwide Study Based on Claims Registry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and trends of clinically relevant venous thromboembolism (VTE) including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) after hip and knee replacement arthroplasty (HKRA) in Korea. Between January 1 and December 31, 2010, 22,127 hip replacement arthroplasty (HRA) patients and 52,882 knee replacement arthroplasty (KRA) patients were enrolled in the analysis using the administrative claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA). All available parameters including procedure history and clinically relevant VTE during the 90 days after HKRA were identified based on diagnostic and electronic data interchange (EDI) codes. The overall incidence of VTE, DVT, and PE during the 90 days was 3.9% (n=853), 2.7% (n=597), and 1.5% (n=327) after HRA, while the incidence was 3.8% (n=1,990), 3.2% (n=1,699), and 0.7% (n=355) after KRA. The incidence of VTE after HKRA was significantly higher in patients who had previous VTE history (odds ratio [OR], 10.8 after HRA, OR, 8.5 after KRA), chronic heart failure (2.1, 1.3), arrhythmia (1.8, 1.7), and atrial fibrillation (3.4, 2.1) than in patients who did not. The VTE incidence in patients with chemoprophylaxis was higher than that in patients without chemoprophylaxis. The incidence of VTEs revealed in this retrospective review was not low compared with the results of the studies targeting other Asian or Caucasian populations. It may warrant routine prevention including employment of chemoprophylaxis. However, the limitation of the reviewed data mandates large scale prospective investigation to affirm this observation. PMID:26770042

  16. Key role of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of infections around the hip and pelvic girdle mimicking septic arthritis of the hip in children.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lee, Si Wook; Bae, Ki Cheor

    2016-05-01

    Infections around the hip and the pelvic girdle mimicking septic hip arthritis are rare conditions in the pediatric population requiring urgent treatment. They are not readily diagnosed because of rarity, resemblance to septic hip, and unclear pathophysiology, which often results in misdiagnosis, delayed diagnosis, and delayed treatment. The aim of this study was to prove the key role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the first-line modality in making a early definite diagnosis of an uncommon perihip infection in children. We retrospectively reviewed 20 children with a provisional diagnosis of unilateral septic hip who were confirmed finally to have perihip infections and combined with concomitant osteomyeltis using MRI. All patients were treated with intravenous antibiotics with or without abscess aspiration until normalization of clinical symptoms and laboratory tests including serum C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. All infections healed successfully and the final C-reactive protein was recovered to a mean of 0.37 mg/dl (range 0.01-0.78 mg/dl) without recurrence or complication. Although the MRI is costly and limited in practical application, it was found to be effective as a primary diagnostic tool for an early, accurate diagnosis of infections around the hip and the pelvic girdle in children to correctly guide the decision and the approach for treatment. PMID:27007545

  17. Appropriateness of primary total hip and knee replacements in regions of Ontario with high and low utilization rates.

    PubMed Central

    van Walraven, C V; Paterson, J M; Kapral, M; Chan, B; Bell, M; Hawker, G; Gollish, J; Schatzker, J; Williams, J I; Naylor, C D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the appropriateness of case selection for primary hip and knee replacements between two regions in Ontario: one with a high population-based utilization rate and one with a low rate. DESIGN: Random audit of medical records sampled from hospital discharge abstracts, with subsequent implicit and explicit criteria-based assessments of the appropriateness of surgery. STUDY POPULATION: People aged 60 years or over who underwent elective, single-joint, non-fracture-related, primary hip or knee replacement between Apr. 1, 1992, and Mar. 31, 1993, at one of seven hospitals in a high-rate region (comprising Brant, Huron and Oxford countries) or one of eight hospitals in a low-rate region (comprising the cities of Scarborough and Toronto). INTERVENTIONS: Structured review of hospital medical records, with additional review of information from surgeons and family physicians' office charts if necessary. Three physicians reviewed patient data and rated the preoperative pain level and functional status of patients, with agreement among at least two reviewers. The proportion of inappropriate cases was then assessed according to explicit criteria defined by a multidisciplinary panel using the delphi process. Profiles of each case were also subjected to independent implicit review by two rheumatologists and two orthopedic surgeons. OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of joint replacements deemed inappropriate in the high- and low-rate regions according to either the explicit criteria or the implicit review, as well as preoperative pain levels and functional status of patients in the high- and low-rate regions. RESULTS: Hip replacements were more common among patients sampled in the low-rate region than among those in the high-rate region (57.3% v. 39.3%; p < 0.002), although the patients' baseline characteristics, including severity of preoperative pain and dysfunction, were otherwise similar between the regions. Inappropriate surgery, determined by explicit criteria

  18. Mechanical effects of stem cement interface characteristics in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Verdonschot, N; Huiskes, R

    1996-08-01

    Stem cement debonding is 1 of the most common forms of fixation failure and is thought to be a prelude to gross loosening of a total hip reconstruction. However, the immediate consequences of debonding remains a matter of controversy. The dynamic effects of stem cement debonding in total hip reconstruction were analyzed using 3-dimensional finite element techniques. Stem cement interface conditions were assumed as completely bonded or unbonded, with or without friction. The dynamic effects were accounted for, as presented by the stance and swing phases of the gait cycle. It was found that both cyclic micromotions at the stem cement interface and stresses in the cement mantle were effectively reduced by friction. The friction cases produced failure probabilities of the cement mantle that were relatively close to the one generated by the bonded stem. The probability of mechanical failure of the cement bone interface decreased after debonding and decreased more with reduced stem cement friction. These results show that, although a firm and lasting bond between stem and cement may be desirable for preventing cement failure, the mechanical effects of a debonded stem are less detrimental than were assumed earlier. For straight tapered stem shapes subjected to the loading conditions described, a polished stem may be desirable for the cement bone interface mechanics. PMID:8769468

  19. Tribological characterization of surface-treated commercially pure titanium for femoral heads in total hip replacement: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Cotogno, G; Holzwarth, U; Franchi, M; Rivetti, S; Chiesa, R

    2006-12-01

    Most noncemented total hip replacements combine a titanium alloy stem, a CoCrMo femoral head and an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular cup. In spite of its nickel content of up to 1% and the resulting biocompatibility issues in some clinical situations, the higher cost and some difficulties in machining, CoCrMo alloy is preferred to titanium alloys thanks to its outstanding tribological properties, higher hardness and elastic modulus. Nowadays most of the heads of hip prostheses use CoCrMo as bearing material. The present study investigates the effect of various surface treatments and combinations of treatments, such as electrochemical oxidation (anodization), laser surface melting and barrel polishing, on the tribological properties of commercially pure grade 2 titanium. The aim of the study was to characterize surface treatments capable of improving the tribological properties of titanium surface to the same extent as CoCrMo. The tribological properties were characterized by multidirectional pin-on-flat screening wear tests, using UHMWPE pins as bearing surface. The experiments showed the possibility of improving the wear resistance of titanium to the degree of CoCrMo. Although further efforts will be required to optimize the treatments studied, the results are encouraging enough to warrant pursuing this direction of investigation. PMID:17219358

  20. Surveillance of deep vein thrombosis in asymptomatic total hip replacement patients. Impedance phlebography and fibrinogen scanning versus roentgenographic phlebography

    SciTech Connect

    Paiement, G.; Wessinger, S.J.; Waltman, A.C.; Harris, W.H.

    1988-03-01

    Nine hundred thirty-seven limbs in 537 patients over the age of 39 years who underwent total hip replacement were studied by roentgenographic phlebography, cuff-impedance phlebography, and iodine-125 fibrinogen scanning. Cuff-impedance phlebography had a sensitivity of only 12.3 percent for thigh thrombi. Fibrinogen scanning had a sensitivity of only 59.1 percent for calf thrombi and 13.7 percent for thigh thrombi. The combined use of the two methods resulted in only a 23.2 percent sensitivity for thigh thrombi and an overall sensitivity of 47.4 percent. We have concluded that in asymptomatic patients, in contrast with symptomatic patients, the combination of cuff-impedance phlebography and fibrinogen scanning is not an effective screening method.

  1. Effect of preoperative intravenous methocarbamol and intravenous acetaminophen on opioid use after primary total hip and knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Looke, Thomas D; Kluth, Cameron T

    2013-02-01

    Between 2010 and 2011, a perioperative pain protocol for primary total hip and knee replacement at one Florida medical center replaced preoperative oral analgesics with intravenous methocarbamol and intravenous acetaminophen. This is a retrospective cohort study of 300 patients, with 150 patients using the new pain protocol and 150 patients using a 2008 pain protocol that did not include these medications. The 2 cohorts were similar in patient gender, age, and body mass index. Opioid consumption was evaluated for a period of 48 hours after incision and was divided into 3 separate time intervals, as well as total 48-hour consumption. Mean opiate use decreased significantly from 2008 to 2011 in all time intervals and total consumption (7.5±3.4 mg to 6.1±3.0 mg; P<.01). Subgroup analysis suggested that changes to the hip protocol were responsible for decreased opioid use in the operating room and the postanesthesia care unit, and changes to the knee protocol were responsible for decreased opioid use on the hospital floor and total consumption. The difference between the 2 protocol groups was not due to differences in individual surgeon practice patterns. Physical therapy progress of knee flexion, average walking distance, and maximum walking distance were significantly improved. Hospital discharge was shorter in the 2011 group (4.0±1.1 days in 2008 group and 3.6±1.0 days in 2011 group). This study shows significant improvement in patient care from 2008 to 2011 that is at least partially due to the change to the use of preoperative intravenous methocarbamol and intravenous acetaminophen. PMID:23379573

  2. The effect of tranexamic acid on blood coagulation in total hip replacement arthroplasty: rotational thromboelastographic (ROTEM®) analysis.

    PubMed

    Na, H S; Shin, H J; Lee, Y J; Kim, J H; Koo, K H; Do, S H

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated changes in rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM(®) ) parameters and clinical outcomes in patients undergoing total hip replacement arthroplasty, with concomitant infusions of tranexamic acid and of 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4. Fifty-five patients were randomly assigned to either the tranexamic acid (n = 29) or the control (n = 26) group. Hydroxyethyl starch was administered in the range of 10-15 ml.kg(-1) during the operation in both groups. In the control group, the clot formation time and maximum clot firmness of APTEM showed significant differences when compared with those of EXTEM at one hour postoperatively, suggestive of fibrinolysis. In the tranexamic acid group, there was no significant difference between each postoperative EXTEM and APTEM parameter. In the tranexamic acid and control group, postoperative blood loss was 308 ml (210-420 [106-745]) and 488 ml (375-620 [170-910], p = 0.002), respectively, and total blood loss was 1168 ml (922-1470 [663-2107]) and 1563 ml (1276-1708 [887-1494], p = 0.003). Haemoglobin concentration was higher in the tranexamic acid group on the second postoperative day (10.5 (9.4-12.1 [7.9-14.0]) vs. 9.6 (8.9-10.5[7.3-16.0]) g.dl(-1) , p = 0.027). In patients undergoing total hip replacement arthroplasty, postoperative fibrinolysis aggravated by hydroxyethyl starch was attenuated by co-administration of 10 mg.kg(-1) tranexamic acid, which may have led to less postoperative blood loss. PMID:26559015

  3. A Multi-centre Study to Assess the Long-term Performance of the Summit™ Hip in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  4. A Randomised Multi-centre Study to Compare the Long-term Performance of the Future Hip to 3 Other Implants in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-09-01

    Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis; Perthes Disease

  5. Scintigraphy of infected total hip arthroplasty (THA): A canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, K.D.; Brown, M.L.; Fitzgerald, R.H.; Dewanjee, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    Differentiating low-grade sepsis from aseptic loosening of an orthopedic prosthesis is difficult. This study was designed to compare the ability of Tc-99m-HMDP, Ga-67, and In-111 leukocytes (WC) to differentiate low-grade sepsis from aseptic THA component loosening in a canine model. A canine THA was implanted in 14 dogs. Six dogs were given infected femoral components by injecting 10/sup 5/ colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus into the femoral canal 6y0 to 90 seconds prior to cementing. Four dogs had an aseptic loose femoral component, and four dogs had an aseptic tight femoral component (control). At six months all dogs were evaluated with X-ray, lab scintigraphy, and tissue quantitation of each tracer. Diagnosis was confirmed by histology and quantitative microbiology. White blood cell counts and differentials were normal in all dogs, and in only one out of six infected dogs was the sedimentation rate abnormal. X-rays were interpreted as possible infection in five dogs and probable infection in only one dog. In-111 WBC scans were more accurate than sequential Tc-Ga scans (sensitivity 94% vs 61%, specificity 86% vs 71% accuracy 90% vs 67%). Quantitative counting of gamma camera data and tissue samples demonstrated significantly (P < .01) higher accumulation of In-111 WBC about the infected than the loose or control component. No significant difference was demonstrated between the loose and septic components with TC-HMDP or Ga. These results correlate well and confirm our clinical data that In-111 WBC scanning is accurate and useful in the workup of the painful orthopedic prosthesis.

  6. Incidence, risk factors and the healthcare cost of falls postdischarge after elective total hip and total knee replacement surgery: protocol for a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Anne-Marie; Ross-Adjie, Gail; McPhail, Steven M; Monterosso, Leanne; Bulsara, Max; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Powell, Sarah-Jayne; Hardisty, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The number of major joint replacement procedures continues to increase in Australia. The primary aim of this study is to determine the incidence of falls in the first 12 months after discharge from hospital in a cohort of older patients who undergo elective total hip or total knee replacement. Methods and analyses A prospective longitudinal observational cohort study starting in July 2015, enrolling patients aged ≥60 years who are admitted for elective major joint replacement (n=267 total hip replacement, n=267 total knee replacement) and are to be discharged to the community. Participants are followed up for 12 months after hospital discharge. The primary outcome measure is the rate of falls per thousand patient-days. Falls data will be collected by 2 methods: issuing a falls diary to each participant and telephoning participants monthly after discharge. Secondary outcomes include the rate of injurious falls and health-related quality of life. Patient-rated outcomes will be measured using the Oxford Hip or Oxford Knee score. Generalised linear mixed modelling will be used to examine the falls outcomes in the 12 months after discharge and to examine patient and clinical characteristics predictive of falls. An economic evaluation will be conducted to describe the nature of healthcare costs in the first 12 months after elective joint replacement and estimate costs directly attributable to fall events. Ethics and dissemination The results will be disseminated through local site networks and will inform future services to support older people undergoing hip or knee joint replacement and also through peer-reviewed publications and medical conferences. This study has been approved by The University of Notre Dame Australia and local hospital human research ethics committees. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000653561; Pre-results. PMID:27412102

  7. Heterotopic ossification after total hip replacement and the HLA system in the Sicilian population.

    PubMed

    Sessa, G; Costarella, L; Mollica, R; Pavone, V

    2002-06-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication following total hip arthroplasty (THA). At present, the etiology HO is unknown, however, genetic predisposition may be a cause of HO in individuals in whom no risk factors can be detected. The goal of this study was to investigate the HLA system, searching for any correlation with the presence of HO after THA. Thirty-five patients of Sicilian origin were operated on between January 1997 and January 1999 for cementless THA under regional anesthesia. The entire series was divided into three groups and all underwent histocompatibility typing. Group I was made up of 10 patients who presented with HO Brooker grades 1 and 2 after THA; group 2 comprised 7 patients affected by grades 3 and 4 HO after THA; and group 3 was made up of 18 subjects who presented with one or more preoperative risk factors for developing peri-prosthetic HO before undergoing THA. No positivity for HLA-B27 antigen was observed, but there was as an increase in HLA-B18 (with respect to that in the Sicilian population) in patients with HO following THA. The main conclusion from the study is that there is a strong correlation between the presence of the antigens HLA-A2 and HLA-B18 in patients with HO grades 3 and 4. PMID:24604489

  8. Bone remodeling adjacent to total hip replacements: A naturally occurring material design problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Timothy P.; Hamilton, James J.

    1993-10-01

    The reaction of bone to orthopedic implants is an example of a self-adjusting material which changes from a ‘normal state’ to an altered state, based on the mechanical features of the implant and the loads applied to it. The changes in bone around cemented and uncemented femoral total hip components are well documented, and many numerical characterizations of the material reaction to stress have attempted to mimic the natural remodeling process. In this study we review the development of a simple material remodeling rule which yields a stable structure which is optimal and which allows a unique solution. We then use this algorithm to assess the effect of prosthesis stiffness and the presence of a compliant layer on bone remodeling around these implants. An axisymmetric model for axial loading is used to model changes in bone density through the thickness of the cancellous bone around the implants. With cortical remodeling left out of the simulation, the simulations showed density distributions that agreed in general with the results in the literature, and showed a marked difference in response if a compliant layer was added to the prosthesis.

  9. Two-stage revision of implant-associated infections after total hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Lenz, Robert; Haenle, Maximilian; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Septic loosening of total hip and knee endoprostheses gains an increasing proportion of revision arthroplasties. Operative revisions of infected endoprostheses are mentally and physically wearing for the patient, challenging for the surgeon and a significant economic burden for healthcare systems. In cases of early infection within the first three weeks after implantation a one-stage revision with leaving the implant in place is widely accepted. The recommendations for the management of late infections vary by far. One-stage revisions as well as two-stage or multiple revision schedules have been reported to be successful in over 90% of all cases for certain patient collectives. But implant associated infection still remains a severe complication. Moreover, the management of late endoprosthetic infection requires specific logistics, sufficient and standardized treatment protocol, qualified manpower as well as an efficient quality management. With regard to the literature and experience of specialized orthopaedic surgeons from several university and regional hospitals we modified a commonly used treatment protocol for two-stage revision of infected total hip and knee endoprostheses. In addition to the achievement of maximum survival rate of the revision implants an optimisation of the functional outcome of the affected artificial joint is aimed for. PMID:22242098

  10. Friction and stem stiffness affect dynamic interface motion in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, J H; Huiskes, R

    1996-01-01

    Large cyclic movements between the femoral stem and bone during the first weeks after total hip arthroplasty may hamper bone ingrowth and adversely affect the eventual success of the arthroplasty. Little is known, however, about the magnitude of the motions and its relationship to design and surgical factors. A two-dimensional finite element model of a cementless prosthesis inserted into the proximal femur was constructed to study the effects of two mechanical variables--the stiffness of the implant and the coefficient of friction between bone and implant--on the magnitude of the motions. We investigated the influences of these variables on the subsidence of the prosthesis, the magnitudes of the cyclic motions, and the level of the interface stresses. The presence of friction reduced cyclic motions by about 85% compared with a frictionless interface. Once friction was assumed, varying the coefficient of friction had little effect. The effect of friction on the interface stress state and gross subsidence of the prosthesis was not as great as on cyclic motion. Implant stiffness also affected the magnitudes and distributions of the cyclic motions along the interface. A flexible stem generated motions about three to four times larger proximally than those of a stiff stem, which generated larger motions distally. The influence of stem stiffness on interface stresses and prosthetic subsidence was less than on cyclic motion. The location of the peak shear stresses at the interface around a bonded prosthesis corresponded to the location where cyclic interface motion was maximal for an unbonded prosthesis. However, no direct relationship was found between the magnitudes of peak stresses and the amplitudes of cyclic motions. PMID:8618164

  11. Feasibility of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to ICP-MS for the characterization of wear metal particles and metalloproteins in biofluids from hip replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Harrington, Chris F; Kearney, Jacque-Lucca; Langton, David J; Larsen, Erik H

    2015-06-01

    Hip replacements are used to improve the quality of life of people with orthopaedic conditions, but the use of metal-on-metal (MoM) arthroplasty has led to poor outcomes for some patients. These problems are related to the generation of micro- to nanosized metal wear particles containing Cr, Co or other elements, but the current analytical methods used to investigate the processes involved do not provide sufficient information to understand the size or composition of the wear particles generated in vivo. In this qualitative feasibility study, asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to investigate metal protein binding and the size and composition of wear metal particles present in serum and hip aspirates from MoM hip replacement patients. A well-established HPLC anion exchange chromatography (AEC) separation system coupled to ICP-MS was used to confirm the metal-protein associations in the serum samples. Off-line single particle ICP-MS (spICP-MS) analysis was used to confirm the approximate size distribution indicated by AF(4) of the wear particles in hip aspirates. In the serum samples, AF(4) -ICP-MS suggested that Cr was associated with transferrin (Tf) and Co with albumin (Alb) and an unidentified species; AEC-ICP-MS confirmed these associations and also indicated an association of Cr with Alb. In the hip aspirate sample, AF(4)-ICP-MS suggested that Cr was associated with Alb and Tf and that Co was associated with Alb and two unidentified compounds; AEC analysis confirmed the Cr results and the association of Co with Alb and a second compound. Enzymatic digestion of the hip aspirate sample, followed by separation using AF(4) with detection by UV absorption (280 nm), multi-angle light scattering and ICP-MS, suggested that the sizes of the Cr-, Co- and Mo-containing wear particles in a hip aspirate sample were in the range 40-150 nm. Off-line spICP-MS was used to confirm these

  12. Treatment and prevention of postoperative complications in hip fracture patients: infections and delirium.

    PubMed

    Dovjak, Peter; Iglseder, Bernhard; Mikosch, Peter; Gosch, Markus; Müller, Ernst; Pinter, Georg; Pils, Katharina; Gerstofer, Inge; Thaler, Heinrich; Zmaritz, Michaela; Weissenberger-Leduc, Monique; Müller, Walter

    2013-10-01

    The course of older patients with hip fractures is often complicated by infections and delirium. Accurate care and high suspicion for these complications are essential, since these conditions are associated with an increase in mortality, length of hospital stay and nursing home placement, poorer mobility, and functional decline. Because of immunosenescence and higher infection rates, older patients need specific care, immediate diagnosis, and treatment of infections. Numerous guidelines of various medical societies outline the management of nosocomial infections, but there is a need of an individualized treatment plan because of comorbidities and polypharmacy. Hygiene measures have first priority to reduce the rate of infections. Treatment of geriatric syndromes like malnutrition, exsiccosis, gait disorders, falls, delirium, urine incontinence, and organ insufficiency are as important as immunization against pneumococci and influenza. Advanced age, cognitive impairment, hearing loss, peripheral vascular disease, prior delirium episodes, sight disorders, and polypharmacy are established risk factors for delirium; thus, older people with several chronic diseases are prone to delirium. A multifactorial approach, comprising standardized screening, oxygen support, intravenous fluid administration and augmented nutrition, monitoring of vital signs, pain treatment, optimized medication, and modification in perioperative management, significantly reduces delirium incidence during hospitalization for hip fracture. An interdisciplinary approach between surgeons and geriatricians may warrant optimized satisfaction of patients' needs. PMID:23949565

  13. Development of a Risk Stratification Model for Delayed Inpatient Recovery of Physical Activities in Patients Undergoing Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Elings, Jordi; van der Sluis, Geert; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Galindo Garre, Francisca; de Gast, Arthur; Hoogeboom, Thomas; van Meeteren, Nico L U

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort design using data derived from usual care. Background It is important that patients are able to function independently as soon as possible after total hip replacement. However, the speed of regaining activities differs significantly. Objectives To develop a risk stratification model (RSM) to predict delayed inpatient recovery of physical activities in people who underwent total hip replacement surgery. Methods This study was performed in 2 routine orthopaedic settings: Diakonessenhuis Hospital (setting A) and Nij Smellinghe Hospital (setting B). Preoperative screening was performed for all consecutive patients. In-hospital recovery of activities was assessed with the Modified Iowa Level of Assistance Scale. Delayed inpatient recovery of activities was defined as greater than 5 days. The RSM, developed using logistic regression analysis and bootstrapping, was based on data from setting A (n = 154). External validation was performed on the data set from setting B (n = 271). Results Twenty-one percent of the patients in setting A had a delayed recovery of activities during their hospital stay. Multivariable logistic regression modeling yielded a preliminary RSM that included the following factors: male sex (odds ratio [OR] = 0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.2, 2.6), 70 or more years of age (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.4, 3.4), body mass index of 25 kg/m(2) or greater (OR = 2.2; 95% CI: 0.7, 7.4), an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.3, 4.4), a Charnley score of B or C (OR = 6.1; 95% CI: 2.2, 17.4), and a timed up-and-go score of 12.5 seconds or greater (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 9.0). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.90) and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test score was 3.57 (P>.05). External validation yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.71 (95% CI: 0.61, 0.81). Conclusion We demonstrated that the risk for delayed recovery of activities during the hospital

  14. Implant Optimisation for Primary Hip Replacement in Patients over 60 Years with Osteoarthritis: A Cohort Study of Clinical Outcomes and Implant Costs Using Data from England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Simon S.; Mason, James; Baker, Paul N.; Gregg, Paul J.; Deehan, David J.; Reed, Mike R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hip replacement is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures worldwide; hundreds of implant configurations provide options for femoral head size, joint surface material and fixation method with dramatically varying costs. Robust comparative evidence to inform the choice of implant is needed. This retrospective cohort study uses linked national databases from England and Wales to determine the optimal type of replacement for patients over 60 years undergoing hip replacement for osteoarthritis. Methods and Findings Implants included were the commonest brand from each of the four types of replacement (cemented, cementless, hybrid and resurfacing); the reference prosthesis was the cemented hip procedure. Patient reported outcome scores (PROMs), costs and risk of repeat (revision) surgery were examined. Multivariable analyses included analysis of covariance to assess improvement in PROMs (Oxford hip score, OHS, and EQ5D index) (9159 linked episodes) and competing risks modelling of implant survival (79,775 procedures). Cost of implants and ancillary equipment were obtained from National Health Service procurement data. Results EQ5D score improvements (at 6 months) were similar for all hip replacement types. In females, revision risk was significantly higher in cementless hip prostheses (hazard ratio, HR = 2.22, p<0.001), when compared to the reference hip. Although improvement in OHS was statistically higher (22.1 versus 20.5, p<0.001) for cementless implants, this small difference is unlikely to be clinically important. In males, revision risk was significantly higher in cementless (HR = 1.95, p = 0.003) and resurfacing implants, HR = 3.46, p<0.001), with no differences in OHS. Material costs were lowest with the reference implant (cemented, range £1103 to £1524) and highest with cementless implants (£1928 to £4285). Limitations include the design of the study, which is intrinsically vulnerable to omitted variables, a paucity of long

  15. Anesthesia Strategies and Perioperative Optimization for Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis Undergoing Total Hip Replacement Surgery.

    PubMed

    2016-06-10

    Objective To identify the characteristics of anesthesia and perioperative management for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA). Methods Totally 63 patients scheduled for single THA in PUMC Hospital from January 1st 2013 to June 1st 2015 were included in this retrospective analysis,among whom 21 patients were diagnosed of AS. The perioperative clinical data included:demographic data,American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification,medical history,airway assessment,preoperative laboratory examinations,electrocardiogram,pulmonary function tests,intubation information,operation time,intraoperative intake and output volume,postoperative hospital stay,and postoperative complications. Results Significantly fewer AS patients undergoing THA were evaluated as ASA classification I than non-AS patients (9.5% vs. 33.3%,P=0.041). AS patients had significantly higher level of preoperative high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [(17.0±14.8)mg/L vs.(4.3±7.1)mg/L,P<0.001],platelets [(275.0±71.3)×10(9)/L vs. (237.7±68.0)×10(9)/L,P=0.048] and neutrophils [(4.7±1.7)×10(9)/L vs. (3.9±1.4)×10(9)/L,P=0.044] and higher incidence of pulmonary function abnormality (42.9% vs.16.7%,P=0.024).More AS patients were induced with scoline (14.3% vs.0,P=0.012). More AS patients underwent THA with Mallampati classification 3 (28.6% vs.7.1%,P=0.022),reduced neck extension(47.6% vs.2.4%,P<0.001),Cormack-Lehane classification2(56.3% vs.15.4%,P=0.002)and 3 (18.8% vs.0,P=0.005),while much fewer AS patients had Cormack-Lehane classification1 (25.0% vs.84.6%,P<0.001).A variety of difficult airway tools were used in intubation (AS group:Macintosh laryngoscope:14%,Macintosh laryngoscope with stylet:38%,visualization laryngoscope:24%,visualization stylet:10% and fiber bronchoscope:14%;non-AS group:57%,24%,12%,5% and 2%,respectively). The use of intraoperative autologous blood transfusion (33.3% vs.11.9%,P

  16. Rivaroxaban: a review of its use for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism after total hip or knee replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T

    2012-02-01

    Rivaroxaban (Xarelto®), an oral oxazolidinone-based anticoagulant, is a potent, selective, direct inhibitor of factor Xa that is used in the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in adult patients after total hip replacement (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR) surgery. In large, clinical trials, oral rivaroxaban 10 mg once daily was more effective than subcutaneous enoxaparin 40 mg once daily in preventing postoperative VTE in patients undergoing THR or TKR surgery. Rivaroxaban was associated with significantly lower incidences of the primary endpoint, total VTE (composite of deep vein thrombosis, non-fatal pulmonary embolism, or death from any cause) compared with enoxaparin regimens across all studies. For example, in the largest trial in patients undergoing THR, total VTE occurred in 1.1% of rivaroxaban recipients and 3.7% of enoxaparin recipients (absolute risk reduction 2.6% [95% CI 1.5, 3.7]) in the modified intent-to-treat population. Notably, the greater efficacy of rivaroxaban was achieved without a significant increase in the incidence of major bleeding episodes compared with enoxaparin; bleeding events were the most frequently reported adverse events across clinical trials. Pyrexia, vomiting, nausea, and constipation were the most frequently reported of the non-bleeding treatment-emergent adverse events in rivaroxaban recipients and occurred at a similar rate to that with enoxaparin treatment. In addition, preliminary pharmacoeconomic analyses in Canada and the US indicate that rivaroxaban is a cost-saving treatment strategy versus enoxaparin. Although the position of rivaroxaban relative to other therapies remains to be fully determined, it is an effective option for the prophylaxis of VTE following THR and TKR. PMID:22272729

  17. Assessing the material loss of the modular taper interface in retrieved metal-on-metal hip replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, Paul J.; Racasan, R.; Tessier, P.; Blunt, L. A.

    2015-06-01

    Measuring the amount of material loss in the case of revised hip replacements is considered to be a prerequisite of understanding and assessing the true in vivo performance of the implant. This paper outlines a method developed by the authors for quantifying taper material loss as well as more general taper interface parameters. Previous studies have mostly relied on visual inspection to assess the material loss at the taper interface, whereas this method aims to characterize any surface and form changes through the use of an out-of-roundness measurement machine. Along with assessing the volumetric wear, maximum linear penetration and taper contact length can also be determined. The method was applied to retrieved large head metal-on-metal femoral heads in order to quantify the material loss at this junction. Material loss from the female femoral head taper can be characterized as a localized area that is in contact with the stem taper surface. The study showed that this method has good repeatability and a low level of interoperability variation between operators.

  18. Preoperative administration of etoricoxib in patients undergoing hip replacement causes inhibition of inflammatory mediators and pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Renner, B; Walter, G; Strauss, J; Fromm, MF; Zacher, J; Brune, K

    2012-01-01

    Objective Administering cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors preoperatively appears attractive since these drugs reduce post-operative pain, but do not increase the risk of post-operative bleeds, asthmatic attacks and stress-related gastrointestinal ulcers. In a former investigation, we could show that post-operative administration of etoricoxib reduces prostaglandin production in wound fluid, but the onset of action is variable due to delayed post-operative absorption. Methods In this study, we investigated the preoperative administration of etoricoxib in patients undergoing hip replacement. They received 120 mg etoricoxib or placebo 2 h before surgery and 1 day after in a double-blinded, randomized, parallel group design. Results A total of 11 patients were randomized (placebo n = 5; verum n = 6). We found high and constant levels of the drug in blood, central nervous system and wound fluid already at the end of surgery (tmax < 2 h). This was accompanied by inhibition of prostaglandin production in the wound tissue (treatment p < 0.05), suppression of interleukin 6 increase in plasma (treatment p < 0.01), and – despite existing standard pain relief procedures – higher satisfaction with analgesics (time vs. treatment p < 0.05) and less demand for opioids (treatment p < 0.01) and intrathecal bupivacaine (treatment p = 0.05) administration. Conclusion Administration of etoricoxib 2 h before surgery allows for an effective drug concentration in critical tissues, a reduction of the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and for better pain relief. PMID:22337568

  19. Enhanced wear and corrosion in modular tapers in total hip replacement is associated with the contact area and surface topography.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidou, Anna; Meswania, Jay; Hua, Jia; Muirhead-Allwood, Sarah; Hart, Alister; Blunn, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Widespread concern exists about adverse tissue reactions after metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip replacement (THR). Concerns have also been expressed with wear and corrosion of taper junctions in THR. We report the effect of surface finish and contact area associated with a single combination of materials of modular tapers. In an in vitro test, we investigated the head/neck (CoCrMo/Ti) interface of modular THRs using commercially available heads. Wear and corrosion of taper surfaces was compared following a 10 million loading cycle. Surface parameters and profiles were measured before and after testing. Electrochemical static and dynamic corrosion tests were performed under loaded and non-loaded conditions. After the load test, the surface roughness parameters on the head taper were significantly increased where the head/neck contact area was reduced. Similarly, the surface roughness parameters on the head taper were significantly increased where rough neck tapers were used. Corrosion testing showed breaching of the passive film on the rough but not the smooth neck tapers. Thus, surface area and surface finish are important factors in wear and corrosion at modular interfaces. PMID:23966288

  20. Validity of a simple Internet-based outcome-prediction tool in patients with total hip replacement: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stöckli, Cornel; Theiler, Robert; Sidelnikov, Eduard; Balsiger, Maria; Ferrari, Stephen M; Buchzig, Beatus; Uehlinger, Kurt; Riniker, Christoph; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A

    2014-04-01

    We developed a user-friendly Internet-based tool for patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) due to osteoarthritis to predict their pain and function after surgery. In the first step, the key questions were identified by statistical modelling in a data set of 375 patients undergoing THR. Based on multiple regression, we identified the two most predictive WOMAC questions for pain and the three most predictive WOMAC questions for functional outcome, while controlling for comorbidity, body mass index, age, gender and specific comorbidities relevant to the outcome. In the second step, a pilot study was performed to validate the resulting tool against the full WOMAC questionnaire among 108 patients undergoing THR. The mean difference between observed (WOMAC) and model-predicted value was -1.1 points (95% confidence interval, CI -3.8, 1.5) for pain and -2.5 points (95% CI -5.3, 0.3) for function. The model-predicted value was within 20% of the observed value in 48% of cases for pain and in 57% of cases for function. The tool demonstrated moderate validity, but performed weakly for patients with extreme levels of pain and extreme functional limitations at 3 months post surgery. This may have been partly due to early complications after surgery. However, the outcome-prediction tool may be useful in helping patients to become better informed about the realistic outcome of their THR. PMID:24585892

  1. The stress response and anesthetic potency of unilateral spinal anesthesia for total Hip Replacement in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Tian, Chun; Li, Min; Peng, Ming-Qing; Ma, Kun-Long; Wang, Zhong-Lin; Ding, Jia-Hui; Cai, Yi

    2014-11-01

    Recently, some scholars suggested that it is important to keep a stablehemodynamic state and prevent the stress responses in geriatric patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR). We conducted this randomized prospective study to observe anesthetic potency of unilateral spinal anesthesia and stress response to it in geriatric patients during THR. We compared the effect of unilateral spinal and bilateral spinal on inhibition of stress response through measuring Norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and cortisol (CORT). Plasma concentrations of NE, E and CORT were determined in blood samples using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) at three time points: To (prior to anesthesia) T1 (at the time point of skin closure), T2 (twenty-four hours after the operation). Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups: group A (unilateral spinal anesthesia) and group B (conventional bilateral spinal anesthesia). 7.5tymg of hypobaric bupivacaine were injected into subarachnoid cavity at group A and 12mg hypobaric bupivacaine were given at group B. The onset time of sensory and motor block, loss of pinprick sensation, degree of motor block, regression of sensory and motor blocks and hemodynamic changes were also recorded. These data were used to evaluate anesthetic potency of spinal anesthesia. The results of this experiment show that unilateral spinal anesthesia can provide restriction of sensory and motor block, minimize the incidence of hypotension and prevent the stress responses undergoing THR. It is optimal anesthesia procedure for geriatric patients by rapid subarachnoid injection of small doses of bupivacaine. PMID:25410068

  2. Gluteal muscle fatty atrophy is not associated with elevated blood metal ions or pseudotumors in patients with a unilateral metal-on-metal hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reito, Aleksi; Elo, Petra; Nieminen, Jyrki; Puolakka, Timo; Eskelinen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose There are no international guidelines to define adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD). Muscle fatty atrophy has been reported to be common in patients with failing metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements. We assessed whether gluteal muscle fatty atrophy is associated with elevated blood metal ion levels and pseudotumors. Patients and methods 263 consecutive patients with unilateral ASR XL total hip replacement using a posterior approach and with an unoperated contralateral hip were included in the study. All patients had undergone a standard screening program at our institution, including MRI and blood metal ion measurement. Muscle fatty atrophy was graded as being absent, mild, moderate, or severe in each of the gluteal muscles. Results The prevalance of moderate-to-severe gluteal muscle atrophy was low (12% for gluteus minimus, 10% for gluteus medius, and 2% for gluteus maximus). Muscle atrophy was neither associated with elevated blood metal ion levels (> 5 ppb) nor with the presence of a clear (solid- or mixed-type) pseudotumor seen in MRI. A combination of moderate-to-severe atrophy in MRI, elevated blood metal ion levels, and MRI-confirmed mixed or solid pseudotumor was rare. Multivariable regression revealed that “preoperative diagnosis other than osteoarthrosis” was the strongest predictor of the presence of fatty atrophy. Interpretation Gluteal muscle atrophy may be a clinically significant finding with influence on hip muscle strength in patients with MoM hip replacement. However, our results suggest that gluteal muscle atrophy seen in MRI is not associated with either the presence or severity of ARMD, at least not in patients who have been operated on using the posterior approach. PMID:26427902

  3. Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation for the treatment of persistent periprosthetic hip infections: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Söylemez, Mehmet Salih; Özkan, Korhan; Kılıç, Bülent; Erinç, Samet

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi) is starting to be used successfully to treat early periprosthetic infections of endoprostheses. However, few articles have reported the outcome of treatment with intermittent NPWTi for late persistent periprosthetic infections of the hip. In this study, we report two cases who underwent several rounds of radical wound debridement for the treatment of a late persistent periprosthetic infection of the hip. Intermittent NPWTi was used in both cases. Patients were treated successfully and there was no recurrence after 3 and 1 years of follow-up, respectively. PMID:26929628

  4. Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation for the treatment of persistent periprosthetic hip infections: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Söylemez, Mehmet Salih; Özkan, Korhan; Kılıç, Bülent; Erinç, Samet

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi) is starting to be used successfully to treat early periprosthetic infections of endoprostheses. However, few articles have reported the outcome of treatment with intermittent NPWTi for late persistent periprosthetic infections of the hip. In this study, we report two cases who underwent several rounds of radical wound debridement for the treatment of a late persistent periprosthetic infection of the hip. Intermittent NPWTi was used in both cases. Patients were treated successfully and there was no recurrence after 3 and 1 years of follow-up, respectively. PMID:26929628

  5. Bursitis of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... following: Repeated overuse or stress of the hip Rheumatoid arthritis Gout Pseudogout Injury of the hip Infection with bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus (or a staph infection) Diabetes Spine problems, such as scoliosis Uneven leg lengths ...

  6. Have cementless and resurfacing components improved the medium-term results of hip replacement for patients under 60 years of age?

    PubMed Central

    Mason, James; Baker, Paul; Gregg, Paul J; Porter, Martyn; Deehan, David J; Reed, Mike R

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The optimal hip replacement for young patients remains unknown. We compared patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), revision risk, and implant costs over a range of hip replacements. Methods We included hip replacements for osteoarthritis in patients under 60 years of age performed between 2003 and 2010 using the commonest brand of cemented, cementless, hybrid, or resurfacing prosthesis (11,622 women and 13,087 men). The reference implant comprised a cemented stem with a conventional polyethylene cemented cup and a standard-sized head (28- or 32-mm). Differences in implant survival were assessed using competing-risks models, adjusted for known prognostic influences. Analysis of covariance was used to assess improvement in PROMs (Oxford hip score (OHS) and EQ5D index) in 2014 linked procedures. Results In males, PROMs and implant survival were similar across all types of implants. In females, revision was statistically significantly higher in hard-bearing and/or small-stem cementless implants (hazard ratio (HR) = 4) and resurfacings (small head sizes (< 48 mm): HR = 6; large head sizes (≥ 48 mm): HR = 5) when compared to the reference cemented implant. In component combinations with equivalent survival, women reported significantly greater improvements in OHS with hybrid implants (22, p = 0.006) and cementless implants (21, p = 0.03) (reference, 18), but similar EQ5D index. For men and women, National Health Service (NHS) costs were lowest with the reference implant and highest with a hard-bearing cementless replacement. Interpretation In young women, hybrids offer a balance of good early functional improvement and low revision risk. Fully cementless and resurfacing components are more costly and do not provide any additional benefit for younger patients. PMID:25285617

  7. Titanium-copper-nitride coated spacers for two-stage revision of infected total hip endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Haenle, Maximilian; Lenz, Robert; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Within the first two years after total hip arthroplasty implant-associated infection has become the second most common reason for a revision surgery. Two-stage implant exchange is frequently conducted using temporary spacers made of antibiotic-loaded cement in order to prevent a bacterial colonization on the spacer. Avoiding several disadvantages of cement spacers, a conventional hemi-endoprosthesis was equipped with a copper-containing implant coating for inhibition of bacterial biofilms. In the present paper details of this novel treatment concept are presented including a case report. PMID:22242097

  8. Modular titanium alloy neck adapter failures in hip replacement - failure mode analysis and influence of implant material

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modular neck adapters for hip arthroplasty stems allow the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intraoperatively. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such a modular device due to high loads or surface contamination inside the modular coupling. Unfortunately we have experienced such a failure of implants and now report our clinical experience with the failures in order to advance orthopaedic material research and joint replacement surgery. The failed neck adapters were implanted between August 2004 and November 2006 a total of about 5000 devices. After this period, the titanium neck adapters were replaced by adapters out of cobalt-chromium. Until the end of 2008 in total 1.4% (n = 68) of the implanted titanium alloy neck adapters failed with an average time of 2.0 years (0.7 to 4.0 years) postoperatively. All, but one, patients were male, their average age being 57.4 years (36 to 75 years) and the average weight 102.3 kg (75 to 130 kg). The failures of neck adapters were divided into 66% with small CCD of 130° and 60% with head lengths of L or larger. Assuming an average time to failure of 2.8 years, the cumulative failure rate was calculated with 2.4%. Methods A series of adapter failures of titanium alloy modular neck adapters in combination with a titanium alloy modular short hip stem was investigated. For patients having received this particular implant combination risk factors were identified which were associated with the occurence of implant failure. A Kaplan-Meier survival-failure-analysis was conducted. The retrieved implants were analysed using microscopic and chemical methods. Modes of failure were simulated in biomechanical tests. Comparative tests included modular neck adapters made of titanium alloy and cobalt chrome alloy material. Results Retrieval examinations and biomechanical simulation revealed that primary micromotions initiated fretting within the modular tapered neck connection. A continuous

  9. A novel analytical approach for determining the frictional moments and torques acting on modular femoral components in total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Farhoudi, H; Oskouei, R H; Jones, C F; Taylor, M

    2015-04-13

    A three dimensional analytical approach was developed to determine the frictional moment vector generated by the relative sliding of the head-cup bearing couple of a total hip replacement. The frictional moment projection onto the femoral neck was also determined over the loading cycle. Predicted frictional moments for nine combinations of bearing materials and diameters were in close agreement with existing in vitro data. The analytical method was then applied to simplified gait (lubrication conditions of dry and serum), ISO standard gait and physiological level gait loading cycles. ISO standard gait had a total contact force of about two fold of physiological level gait and there was a corresponding increase in the maximum frictional torque on neck from 0.66×BW%m to 0.88×BW%m. For the ISO standard gait, the maximum frictional torque occurred at the same instance of maximum frictional moment and the maximum contact force. In contrast, for the physiological level gait, the frictional torque did not occur at the same instance as the peak load. This suggests that the neck frictional torque is a function of other parameters, such as angle between neck axis and frictional moment vector, as well as the magnitude of the contact force and frictional moment. The developed methodology was able to predict the maximum magnitude and change of directions of moments and the variation of torque at the head neck interface. The data will be useful for experimental studies assessing the fretting behaviour of the head neck junction, by providing appropriate loading data. PMID:25721768

  10. The Influence of Oral Carbohydrate Solution Intake on Stress Response before Total Hip Replacement Surgery during Epidural and General Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Çeliksular, M. Cem; Saraçoğlu, Ayten; Yentür, Ercüment

    2016-01-01

    Objective The effects of oral carbohydrate solutions, ingested 2 h prior to operation, on stress response were studied in patients undergoing general or epidural anaesthesia. Methods The study was performed on 80 ASA I–II adult patients undergoing elective total hip replacement, which were randomized to four groups (n=20). Group G patients undergoing general anaesthesia fasted for 8 h preoperatively; Group GN patients undergoing general anaesthesia drank oral carbohydrate solutions preoperatively; Group E patients undergoing epidural anaesthesia fasted for 8 h and Group EN patients undergoing epidural anaesthesia drank oral carbohydrate solutions preoperatively. Groups GN and EN drank 800 mL of 12.5% oral carbohydrate solution at 24:00 preoperatively and 400 mL 2 h before the operation. Blood samples were taken for measurements of glucose, insulin, cortisol and IL-6 levels. Results The effect of preoperative oral carbohydrate ingestion on blood glucose levels was not significant. Insulin levels 24 h prior to surgery were similar; however, insulin levels measured just before surgery were 2–3 times higher in groups GN and EN than in groups G and E. Insulin levels at the 24th postoperative hour in epidural groups were increased compared to those at basal levels, although general anaesthesia groups showed a decrease. From these measurements, only the change in Group EN was statistically significant (p<0.05). Plasma cortisol levels at the 2nd peroperative hour were higher in epidural groups than in general anaesthesia groups. Both anaesthesia techniques did not have an effect on IL-6 levels. Conclusion We concluded that epidural anaesthesia suppressed stress response, although preoperative oral carbohydrate nutrition did not reveal a significant effect on surgical stress response. PMID:27366573

  11. Prediction of contact mechanics in metal-on-metal Total Hip Replacement for parametrically comprehensive designs and loads.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Finn E; Nyman, Edward; Coburn, James C

    2015-07-16

    Manufacturers and investigators of Total Hip Replacement (THR) bearings require tools to predict the contact mechanics resulting from diverse design and loading parameters. This study provides contact mechanics solutions for metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings that encompass the current design space and could aid pre-clinical design optimization and evaluation. Stochastic finite element (FE) simulation was used to calculate the head-on-cup contact mechanics for five thousand combinations of design and loading parameters. FE results were used to train a Random Forest (RF) surrogate model to rapidly predict the contact patch dimensions, contact area, pressures and plastic deformations for arbitrary designs and loading. In addition to widely observed polar and edge contact, FE results included ring-polar, asymmetric-polar, and transitional categories which have previously received limited attention. Combinations of design and load parameters associated with each contact category were identified. Polar contact pressures were predicted in the range of 0-200 MPa with no permanent deformation. Edge loading (with subluxation) was associated with pressures greater than 500 MPa and induced permanent deformation in 83% of cases. Transitional-edge contact (with little subluxation) was associated with intermediate pressures and permanent deformation in most cases, indicating that, even with ideal anatomical alignment, bearings may face extreme wear challenges. Surrogate models were able to accurately predict contact mechanics 18,000 times faster than FE analyses. The developed surrogate models enable rapid prediction of MoM bearing contact mechanics across the most comprehensive range of loading and designs to date, and may be useful to those performing bearing design optimization or evaluation. PMID:25980556

  12. Porous titanium particles for acetabular reconstruction in total hip replacement show extensive bony armoring after 15 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Walschot, Lucas H B; Aquarius, René; Verdonschot, Nico; Buma, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — The bone impaction grafting technique restores bone defects in total hip replacement. Porous titanium particles (TiPs) are deformable, like bone particles, and offer better primary stability. We addressed the following questions in this animal study: are impacted TiPs osteoconductive under loaded conditions; do released micro-particles accelerate wear; and are systemic titanium blood levels elevated after implantation of TiPs? Animals and methods — An AAOS type-III defect was created in the right acetabulum of 10 goats weighing 63 (SD 6) kg, and reconstructed with calcium phosphate-coated TiPs and a cemented polyethylene cup. A stem with a cobalt chrome head was cemented in the femur. The goats were killed after 15 weeks. Blood samples were taken pre- and postoperatively. Results — The TiP-graft layer measured 5.6 (SD 0.8) mm with a mean bone ingrowth distance of 2.8 (SD 0.8) mm. Cement penetrated 0.9 (0.3–1.9) mm into the TiPs. 1 reconstruction showed minimal cement penetration (0.3 mm) and failed at the cement-TiP interface. There were no signs of accelerated wear, metallic particle debris, or osteolysis. Median systemic titanium concentrations increased on a log-linear scale from 0.5 (0.3–1.1) parts per billion (ppb) to 0.9 (0.5–2.8) ppb (p = 0.01). Interpretation — Adequate cement pressurization is advocated for impaction grafting with TiPs. After implantation, calcium phosphate-coated TiPs were osteoconductive under loaded conditions and caused an increase in systemic titanium concentrations. However, absolute levels remained low. There were no signs of accelerated wear. A clinical pilot study should be performed to prove that application in humans is safe in the long term. PMID:25238431

  13. Bilateral Staged Total Hip Replacement and the Natural Progress of an Untreated Case of Developmental Dysplasia (Dislocation) of the Hip: A Clinical Case Report by the Surgeon and the Patient

    PubMed Central

    Honarpisheh, Hamid; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-01-01

    The natural history of an untreated case of a Developmental Dysplasia (Dislocation) of the Hip (DDH) associated with multiple congenital abnormalities is reported in a 55-years-old man. The patient’s complaints and the varieties of the typical manifestations emerged in other parts of the body throughout the life are reviewed and discussed as comorbidities of a dysplastic condition. Two-stage bilateral total hip replacement (THR) operations were performed at the age of 55. In addition, to relieve the pain, the walking disabilities were overcome, hence gaining normal walking in swing and stances. The leg length discrepancy was corrected by anatomically positioned prostheses, examined by the knee bending test and characterized and evidenced by radiological features and indices. PMID:26170527

  14. Bilateral Staged Total Hip Replacement and the Natural Progress of an Untreated Case of Developmental Dysplasia (Dislocation) of the Hip: A Clinical Case Report by the Surgeon and the Patient.

    PubMed

    Honarpisheh, Hamid; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-07-01

    The natural history of an untreated case of a Developmental Dysplasia (Dislocation) of the Hip (DDH) associated with multiple congenital abnormalities is reported in a 55-years-old man. The patient's complaints and the varieties of the typical manifestations emerged in other parts of the body throughout the life are reviewed and discussed as comorbidities of a dysplastic condition. Two-stage bilateral total hip replacement (THR) operations were performed at the age of 55. In addition, to relieve the pain, the walking disabilities were overcome, hence gaining normal walking in swing and stances. The leg length discrepancy was corrected by anatomically positioned prostheses, examined by the knee bending test and characterized and evidenced by radiological features and indices. PMID:26170527

  15. Missed low-grade infection in suspected aseptic loosening has no consequences for the survival of total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boot, Willemijn; Moojen, Dirk Jan F; Visser, Els; Lehr, A Mechteld; De Windt, Tommy S; Van Hellemondt, Gijs; Geurts, Jan; Tulp, Niek J A; Schreurs, B Wim; Burger, Bart J; Dhert, Wouter J A; Gawlitta, Debby; Vogely, H Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — Aseptic loosening and infection are 2 of the most common causes of revision of hip implants. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces not only the rate of revision due to infection but also the rate of revision due to aseptic loosening. This suggests under-diagnosis of infections in patients with presumed aseptic loosening and indicates that current diagnostic tools are suboptimal. In a previous multicenter study on 176 patients undergoing revision of a total hip arthroplasty due to presumed aseptic loosening, optimized diagnostics revealed that 4–13% of the patients had a low-grade infection. These infections were not treated as such, and in the current follow-up study the effect on mid- to long-term implant survival was investigated. Patients and methods — Patients were sent a 2-part questionnaire. Part A requested information about possible re-revisions of their total hip arthroplasty. Part B consisted of 3 patient-related outcome measure questionnaires (EQ5D, Oxford hip score, and visual analog scale for pain). Additional information was retrieved from the medical records. The group of patients found to have a low-grade infection was compared to those with aseptic loosening. Results — 173 of 176 patients from the original study were included. In the follow-up time between the revision surgery and the current study (mean 7.5 years), 31 patients had died. No statistically significant difference in the number of re-revisions was found between the infection group (2 out of 21) and the aseptic loosening group (13 out of 152); nor was there any significant difference in the time to re-revision. Quality of life, function, and pain were similar between the groups, but only 99 (57%) of the patients returned part B. Interpretation — Under-diagnosis of low-grade infection in conjunction with presumed aseptic revision of total hip arthroplasty may not affect implant survival. PMID:26364842

  16. Hip replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... need help preparing meals, bathing, moving around the house, and doing other daily activities. Over time, you ... Blood in your stools, or your stools turn dark Swelling in one of your legs (it will ...

  17. Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... leg • Inadequate pain relief from anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, or walking supports Page ( 3 ) AAOS does not ... your mobility. Other treatment options — such as medications, physical therapy, or other types of surgery — also may be ...

  18. Impact of an Automated Surveillance to Detect Surgical-Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Perdiz, Luciana B; Yokoe, Deborah S; Furtado, Guilherme H; Medeiros, Eduardo A S

    2016-08-01

    In this retrospective study, we compared automated surveillance with conventional surveillance to detect surgical site infection after primary total hip or knee arthroplasty. Automated surveillance demonstrated better efficacy than routine surveillance in SSI diagnosis, sensitivity, and predictive negative value in hip and knee arthroplasty. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:991-993. PMID:27072598

  19. Digital correction of magnification in pelvic x rays for preoperative planning of hip joint replacements: Theoretical development and clinical results of a new protocol

    SciTech Connect

    The, B.; Diercks, R.L.; Stewart, R.E.; Ooijen, P.M.A. van; Horn, J.R. van

    2005-08-15

    The introduction of digital radiological facilities leads to the necessity of digital preoperative planning, which is an essential part of joint replacement surgery. To avoid errors in the preparation and execution of hip surgery, reliable correction of the magnification of the projected hip is a prerequisite. So far, no validated method exists to accomplish this. We present validated geometrical models of the x-ray projection of spheres, relevant for the calibration procedure to correct for the radiographic magnification. With help of these models a new calibration protocol was developed. The validity and precision of this procedure was determined in clinical practice. Magnification factors could be predicted with a maximal margin of error of 1.5%. The new calibration protocol is valid and reliable. The clinical tests revealed that correction of magnification has a 95% margin of error of -3% to +3%. Future research might clarify if a strict calibration protocol, as presented in this study, results in more accurate preoperative planning of hip joint replacements.

  20. 2-stage revision of 120 deep infected hip and knee prostheses using gentamicin-PMMA beads.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Daniël M C; Geurts, Jan A P; Jütten, Liesbeth M C; Walenkamp, Geert H I M

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - A 2-stage revision is the most common treatment for late deep prosthesis-related infections and in all cases of septic loosening. However, there is no consensus about the optimal interval between the 2 stages. Patients and methods - We retrospectively studied 120 deep infections of total hip (n = 95) and knee (n = 25) prostheses that had occurred over a period of 25 years. The mean follow-up time was 5 (2-20) years. All infections had been treated with extraction, 1 or more debridements with systemic antibiotics, and implantation of gentamicin-PMMA beads. There had been different time intervals between extraction and reimplantation: median 14 (11-47) days for short-term treatment with uninterrupted hospital stay, and 7 (3-22) months for long-term treatment with temporary discharge. We analyzed the outcome regarding resolution of the infection and clinical results. Results - 88% (105/120) of the infections healed, with no difference in healing rate between short- and long-term treatment. 82 prostheses were reimplanted. In the most recent decade, we treated patients more often with a long-term treatment but reduced the length of time between the extraction and the reimplantation. More reimplantations were performed in long-term treatments than in short-term treatments, despite more having difficult-to-treat infections with worse soft-tissue condition. Interpretation - Patient, wound, and infection considerations resulted in an individualized treatment with different intervals between stages. The 2-stage revision treatment in combination with local gentamicin-PMMA beads gave good results even with difficult prosthesis infections and gentamicin-resistant bacteria. PMID:26822990

  1. Local anaesthetic infiltration for peri-operative pain control in total hip and knee replacement: systematic review and meta-analyses of short- and long-term effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical pain is managed with multi-modal anaesthesia in total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR). It is unclear whether including local anaesthetic infiltration before wound closure provides additional pain control. Methods We performed a systematic review of randomised controlled trials of local anaesthetic infiltration in patients receiving THR or TKR. We searched MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane CENTRAL to December 2012. Two reviewers screened abstracts, extracted data, and contacted authors for unpublished outcomes and data. Outcomes collected were post-operative pain at rest and during activity after 24 and 48 hours, opioid requirement, mobilisation, hospital stay and complications. When feasible, we estimated pooled treatment effects using random effects meta-analyses. Results In 13 studies including 909 patients undergoing THR, patients receiving local anaesthetic infiltration experienced a greater reduction in pain at 24 hours at rest by standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.61 (95% CI -1.05, -0.16; p = 0.008) and by SMD -0.43 (95% CI -0.78 -0.09; p = 0.014) at 48 hours during activity. In TKR, diverse multi-modal regimens were reported. In 23 studies including 1439 patients undergoing TKR, local anaesthetic infiltration reduced pain on average by SMD -0.40 (95% CI -0.58, -0.22; p < 0.001) at 24 hours at rest and by SMD -0.27 (95% CI -0.50, -0.05; p = 0.018) at 48 hours during activity, compared with patients receiving no infiltration or placebo. There was evidence of a larger reduction in studies delivering additional local anaesthetic after wound closure. There was no evidence of pain control additional to that provided by femoral nerve block. Patients receiving local anaesthetic infiltration spent on average an estimated 0.83 (95% CI 1.54, 0.12; p = 0.022) and 0.87 (95% CI 1.62, 0.11; p = 0.025) fewer days in hospital after THR and TKR respectively, had reduced opioid consumption, earlier

  2. Infection post-total knee replacement: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Alijanipour, Pouya; Parvizi, Javad

    2014-06-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection is a hot topic for investigation because it represents a challenging clinical problem with considerable burden for patients, institutions, and health systems. Despite our substantial knowledge, many details in prevention, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious complications following total knee arthroplasty remain to be controversial with the available evidence being insufficient and at times conflictive. This manuscript is an attempt to approach the most recently published literature regarding the aforementioned details and aims to provide the reader with an updated perspective in the management of periprosthetic joint infection of the knee. PMID:24706155

  3. Prosthesis Infections after Orthopedic Joint Replacement: The Possible Role of Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhijun; Borgwardt, Lotte; Høiby, Niels; Wu, Hong; Sørensen, Torben Sandberg; Borgwardt, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Prosthesis-related infection is a serious complication for patients after orthopedic joint replacement, which is currently difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy. Consequently, in most cases, removal of the infected prosthesis is the only solution to cure the infection. It is, therefore, important to understand the comprehensive interaction between the microbiological situation and the host immune responses that lead to prosthesis infections. Evidence indicates that prosthesis infections are actually biofilm-correlated infections that are highly resistant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune responses. The authors reviewed the related literature in the context of their clinical experience, and discussed the possible etiology and mechanism leading to the infections, especially problems related to bacterial biofilm, and prophylaxis and treatment of infection, including both microbiological and surgical measures. Recent progress in research into bacterial biofilm and possible future treatment options of prosthesis-related infections are discussed. PMID:23888204

  4. Equine pericardial roll graft replacement of infected pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Resection of the infected aorta, debridement of the surrounding tissue, in situ graft replacement, and omentopexy is the standard procedure for treating infected aortic aneurysms, but the question of which graft material is optimal is still a matter of controversy. We recently treated a patient with an infected thoracic aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm was located in the proximal aortic arch. Because the patients had previously undergone abdominal surgery, the aortic arch were replaced in situ with a branched equine pericardial roll grafts. The patient is alive and well 23 months after the operation. PMID:22583570

  5. Increased infection risk after hip hemiarthroplasty in institutionalized patients with proximal femur fracture.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Calero, Irene; Larrainzar-Coghen, Thais; Rodriguez-Pardo, Dolors; Pigrau, Carles; Sánchez-Raya, Judith; Amat, Carles; Lung, Maily; Carrera, Luis; Corona, Pablo S

    2016-04-01

    In patients undergoing hip hemiarthroplasty (HHA) secondary to proximal femur fracture, acute periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most important complications. We have detected an increased risk of PJI in chronic institutionalized patients (CIPs), and a higher number of early postoperative infections are caused by Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), not covered by the current prophylaxis (cefazolin in noninstitutionalized patients (NIPs) and cotrimoxazole in CIPs). We sought to compare infection characteristics between NIPs and CIPs, analyzing predisposing factors, causative pathogens, and antibiotic prophylaxis-related microbiological characteristics. We performed a retrospective review of our prospective institutional database to identify all patients consecutively admitted for HHA to treat proximal femur fracture at our centre between 2011 and 2013. PJI was diagnosed in 21 of 381 (5.51%) patients, with 10 of 105 (9.52%) in the CIP group and 11 of 276 (3.99%) in the NIP group, and statistical significance was achieved. GNB accounted for PJI in 14 (66.67%) patients. We detected a single case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in the NIP group. We confirm a higher risk of acute PJI among institutionalized patients, commonly caused by Gram-negative microorganisms, which are not covered by the current prophylaxis. New prophylactic strategies should be investigated in order to reduce this problem. PMID:26857632

  6. Prevention of Surgical Site Infections in Joint Replacement Surgery.

    PubMed

    Marculescu, Camelia E; Mabry, Tad; Berbari, Elie F

    2016-04-01

    Prosthetic joint infections (PJI), although rare, represent a serious complication of total joint arthroplasty as they pose not only a direct financial burden to the patient but also an indirect burden related to psychosocial impact that PJI incur on the patient. Treatment of PJI is complex and requires a combined surgical and medical approach. Patients are often subjected to multiple surgical procedures and prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy. Therefore, all efforts should be directed toward maximizing the prophylactic measures in the peri-operative and post-operative phases in order to prevent the occurrence of surgical site infections. This article explores primarily the prophylactic measures that target the host and the operative theater environment. Implementation of such preventive measures requires a multi-disciplinary approach and is crucial for a successful outcome of the total joint arthroplasty. PMID:26855288

  7. Whipworm (Trichuris discolor) infection in dairy replacement heifers.

    PubMed

    Perdrizet, J A; King, J M

    1986-05-01

    Trichuriasis caused by Trichuris discolor was diagnosed in a 19-month-old Holstein heifer examined because of emaciation, diarrhea, recumbency, and oral ulceration. The heifer's problem was representative of a herd problem involving pastured replacement heifers. Euthanasia was elected due to the heifer's moribund state and poor prognosis. Gross necropsy revealed subcutaneous edema and diffuse edema of the colon, with hundreds of adult Trichuris discolor in the cecum and colon. Histologic examination revealed multifocal subacute necrotizing colitis, with many adult Trichuris discolor embedded in the mucosa. Treatment instituted on the farm consisted of levamisole hydrochloride at a dosage of 6 mg/kg of body weight. Favorable response was documented by clinical improvement and elimination of fecal shedding of trichurid eggs. PMID:3710897

  8. 2-stage revision recommended for treatment of fungal hip and knee prosthetic joint infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Fungal prosthetic joint infections are rare and difficult to treat. This systematic review was conducted to determine outcome and to give treatment recommendations. Patients and methods After an extensive search of the literature, 164 patients treated for fungal hip or knee prosthetic joint infection (PJI) were reviewed. This included 8 patients from our own institutions. Results Most patients presented with pain (78%) and swelling (65%). In 68% of the patients, 1 or more risk factors for fungal PJI were found. In 51% of the patients, radiographs showed signs of loosening of the arthroplasty. Candida species were cultured from most patients (88%). In 21% of all patients, fungal culture results were first considered to be contamination. There was co-infection with bacteria in 33% of the patients. For outcome analysis, 119 patients had an adequate follow-up of at least 2 years. Staged revision was the treatment performed most often, with the highest success rate (85%). Interpretation Fungal PJI resembles chronic bacterial PJI. For diagnosis, multiple samples and prolonged culturing are essential. Fungal species should be considered to be pathogens. Co-infection with bacteria should be treated with additional antibacterial agents. We found no evidence that 1-stage revision, debridement, antibiotics, irrigation, and retention (DAIR) or antifungal therapy without surgical treatment adequately controls fungal PJI. Thus, staged revision should be the standard treatment for fungal PJI. After resection of the prosthesis, we recommend systemic antifungal treatment for at least 6 weeks—and until there are no clinical signs of infection and blood infection markers have normalized. Then reimplantation can be performed. PMID:24171675

  9. Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infected Wound following Dynamic Hip Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Nizamoglu, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an inflammatory ulcerative neutrophilic dermatosis that can occur following skin trauma. The correct diagnosis is not often made immediately as the condition can mimic an infective appearance. This leads to delays in the appropriate management of high dose steroids. Although debridement can offer aid in resolving lesions, this is contraindicated in the acute phase as this can cause acceleration of the pathogenic process. Biopsy of the lesion does not offer a definitive diagnosis; therefore suspicion must be maintained as the diagnosis is ultimately a clinical one. Any postoperative pustular ulcerative lesion not improving despite antibiotic therapy that also yields negative bacteriological and fungal studies should lead to consideration of this diagnosis. We document the first case of PG developing following intertrochanteric femur fracture fixation using dynamic hip screw. PMID:26380139

  10. OARSI/OMERACT Initiative to Define States of Severity and Indication for Joint Replacement in Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis. An OMERACT 10 Special Interest Group

    PubMed Central

    GOSSEC, LAURE; PATERNOTTE, SIMON; BINGHAM, CLIFTON O.; CLEGG, DANIEL O.; COSTE, PHILIPPE; CONAGHAN, PHILIP G.; DAVIS, AILEEN M.; GIACOVELLI, GIAMPAOLO; GUNTHER, KLAUS-PETER; HAWKER, GILLIAN; HOCHBERG, MARC C.; JORDAN, JOANNE M.; KATZ, JEFFREY N.; KLOPPENBURG, MARGREET; LANZAROTTI, ARTURO; LIM, KEITH; LOHMANDER, L. STEFAN; MAHOMED, NIZAR N.; MAILLEFERT, JEAN FRANCIS; MANNO, REBECCA L.; MARCH, LYN M.; MAZZUCA, STEVEN A.; PAVELKA, KAREL; PUNZI, LEONARDO; ROOS, EWA M.; ROVATI, LUCIO C.; SHI, HELEN; SINGH, JASVINDER A.; SUAREZ-ALMAZOR, MARIA E.; TAJANA-MESSI, ELEONORA; DOUGADOS, MAXIME

    2012-01-01

    Objective To define pain and physical function cutpoints that would, coupled with structural severity, define a surrogate measure of “need for joint replacement surgery,” for use as an outcome measure for potential structure-modifying interventions for osteoarthritis (OA). Methods New scores were developed for pain and physical function in knee and hip OA. A cross-sectional international study in 1909 patients was conducted to define data-driven cutpoints corresponding to the orthopedic surgeons’ indication for joint replacement. A post hoc analysis of 8 randomized clinical trials (1379 patients) evaluated the prevalence and validity of cutpoints, among patients with symptomatic hip/knee OA. Results In the international cross-sectional study, there was substantial overlap in symptom levels between patients with and patients without indication for joint replacement; indeed, it was not possible to determine cutpoints for pain and function defining this indication. The post hoc analysis of trial data showed that the prevalence of cases that combined radiological progression, high level of pain, and high degree of function impairment was low (2%–12%). The most discriminatory cutpoint to define an indication for joint replacement was found to be [pain (0–100) + physical function (0–100) > 80]. Conclusion These results do not support a specific level of pain or function that defines an indication for joint replacement. However, a tentative cutpoint for pain and physical function levels is proposed for further evaluation. Potentially, this symptom level, coupled with radiographic progression, could be used to define “nonresponders” to disease-modifying drugs in OA clinical trials. PMID:21807799

  11. Is two-stage reimplantation effective for virulent pathogenic infection in a periprosthetic hip? A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yong-Cheol; Lakhotia, Devendra; Oh, Jong-Keon; Moon, Jun Gyu; Prashant, Kumar; Shon, Won Yong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of two-stage reimplantation using antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) and the risk factors associated with failure to control periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 38 consecutive hips managed using two-stage reimplantation with ALBC. The mean follow-up period was 5.4 years (range: 2.5-9 years). RESULTS: The causative pathogens were isolated from 29 patients (76%), 26 of whom were infected with highly virulent organisms. Sixteen patients (42%) underwent at least two first-stage debridements. An increased debridement frequency correlated significantly with high comorbidity (P < 0.001), a lower preoperative Harris hip score (HHS; P < 0.001), antimicrobial resistance, and gram-negative and polymicrobial infection (P = 0.002). Of the 35 patients who underwent two-stage reimplantation, 34 showed no signs of recurrence of infection. The mean HHS improved from 46 ± 12.64 to 78 ± 10.55 points, with 7 (20%), 12 (34%), 11 (32%) and 5 (14%) patients receiving excellent, good, fair and poor ratings, respectively. CONCLUSION: The current study demonstrated that two-stage reimplantation could successfully treat PJI after hip arthroplasty. However, the ability of ALBC to eradicate infection was limited because frequent debridement was required in high-risk patients (i.e., patients who are either in poor general health due to associated comorbidities or harbor infections due to highly virulent, difficult-to-treat organisms). Level of evidence: Level IV. PMID:26495248

  12. Propionibacterium avidum as an Etiological Agent of Prosthetic Hip Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brüggemann, Holger; Scholz, Christian F. P.; Leimbach, Andreas; Söderquist, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is well-established as a possible etiologic agent of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs). Other Propionibacterium spp. have occasionally been described as a cause of PJIs, but this has not previously been the case for P. avidum despite its capacity to form biofilm. We describe two patients with prosthetic hip joint infections caused by P. avidum. Both patients were primarily operated with an anteriorly curved skin incision close to the skin crease of the groin, and both were obese. Initial treatment was performed according to the DAIR procedure (debridement, antibiotics, and implant retention). In case 1, the outcome was successful, but in case 2, a loosening of the cup was present 18 months post debridement. The P. avidum isolate from case 1 and two isolates from case 2 (obtained 18 months apart) were selected for whole genome sequencing. The genome of P. avidum obtained from case 1 was approximately 60 kb larger than the genomes of the two isolates of case 2. These latter isolates were clonal with the exception of SNPs in the genome. All three strains possessed the gene cluster encoding exopolysaccharide synthesis. P. avidum has a pathogenic potential and the ability to cause clinically relevant infections, including abscess formation, in the presence of foreign bodies such as prosthetic joint components. Skin incision in close proximity to the groin or deep skin crease, such as the anteriorly curved skin incision approach, might pose a risk of PJIs by P. avidum, especially in obese patients. PMID:27355425

  13. Do we need hip-ankle radiographs to assess the coronal alignment and implant position after total knee replacement?

    PubMed Central

    Dargel, Jens; Oppermann, Johannes; Eysel, Peer; Penning, Lenhard

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Restoration of the coronal alignment of the knee is known to be one of the major criteria of a successful total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It therefore appears to be mandatory to routinely assess the postoperative limb alignment using hip-ankle radiographs and to identify implants that may be at risk of premature failure. However, there is no clear consensus whether weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs or rather standardized a-p knee-radiographs should be used to assess implant position and coronal alignment after TKA. It is the aim of the present study to investigate if implant position and the mechanical alignment after TKA can reproducibly be assessed using standardized a-p knee-radiographs or rather if weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs are needed. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 100 postoperative weight-bearing hip-ankle radiographs after conventional primary TKA. The true mechanical and anatomical femorotibial angle as well as coronal implant position (MPTA, LDFA) was assessed using the MediCAD software, which served as a control. The hip-ankle radiographs were then digitally cropped to 80%, 60% and 40% of the leg-length. In each cropped radiograph, tibial coronal implant position was assessed by referencing against the visible mid-shaft, whereas femoral implant position was referenced against the visible mid-shaft (anatomical axis) or against a surrogate mechanical axis, which was drawn perpendicular to the distal tangent of the femoral component. Each measurement was performed by three independent observers. The difference between the alignment parameters in the hip-ankle radiographs were statistically compared with the cropped radiographs and the inter-observer correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for each parameter. Results: The ICC for inter-observer agreement of measurement of the mechanical femorotibial angle was significantly higher in hip-ankle radiographs (.95) when compared with a radiograph cropped

  14. The long-term outcome of the cemented Weber acetabular component in total hip replacement using a second-generation cementing technique.

    PubMed

    de Jong, P T; de Man, F H R; Haverkamp, D; Marti, R K

    2009-01-01

    We report the long-term outcome of a modified second-generation cementing technique for fixation of the acetabular component of total hip replacement. An earlier report has shown the superiority of this technique assessed by improved survival compared with first-generation cementing. The acetabular preparation involved reaming only to the subchondral plate, followed by impaction of the bone in the anchorage holes. Between 1978 and 1993, 287 total hip replacements were undertaken in 244 patients with a mean age of 65.3 years (21 to 90) using a hemispherical Weber acetabular component with this modified technique for cementing and a cemented femoral component. The survival with acetabular revision for aseptic loosening as the endpoint was 99.1% (95% confidence interval 97.9 to 100 after ten years and 85.5% (95% confidence interval 74.7 to 96.2) at 20 years. Apart from contributing to a long-lasting fixation of the component, this technique also preserved bone, facilitating revision surgery when necessary. PMID:19092001

  15. The perioperative dialogue - a model of caring for the patient undergoing a hip or a knee replacement surgery under spinal anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, Maria; Junttila, Kristiina; Lindwall, Lillemor

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to describe how patients undergoing either a hip or a knee replacement surgery under spinal anaesthesia experienced to be a part of the perioperative dialogue as an ideal model of caring. A qualitative approach was chosen as a method. Nineteen patients undergoing either a hip or a knee replacement surgery under spinal anaesthesia participated. These patients and their nurse anaesthetists had three perioperative dialogues in the pre-, intra- and postoperative phase of care. Data were collected by means of conversational interviews by four voluntary nurse anaesthetists who wrote the dialogues from each perioperative phase. The text from the collected data was analysed by qualitative, latent content analysis. The findings of the analysis show three identified themes: Suffering while waiting for surgery (preoperative dialogue), Continuity creates togetherness (intraoperative dialogue) and Uniqueness - the patient has been seen (postoperative dialogue). The findings show evidence that the perioperative dialogue is an ideal model of caring and serves the patients' desires of individual and dignified care. The patients have a deep appreciation when there is time to develop a caring encounter with his or her own nurse. When a caring encounter has been established, the patient is involved in his or her own care. This model of caring offers the perioperative nurses a new way of caring and arouses reflections about their main task caring for the suffering patient. The continuity created by the perioperative dialogue probably has an influence on both patient satisfaction and patient safety. PMID:25919943

  16. SU-E-T-504: Usefulness of CT-MR Fusion in Radiotherapy Planning for Prostate Cancer Patient with Bilateral Hip Replacements

    SciTech Connect

    He, R.; Giri, Shankar; Kumar, P.; Hu, Y.; Suggs, J.; Yang, C.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Target localization of prostate for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in patients with bilateral hip replacements is difficult due to artifacts in Computed Tomography (CT) images generated from the prostheses high Z materials. In this study, Magnetic Resonance (MR) images fused with CT images are tested as a solution. Methods: CT images of 2.5 mm slice thickness were acquired on a GE Lightspeed scanner with a flat-topped couch for a prostate cancer patient with bilateral hip replacements. T2 weighted images of 5 mm separation were acquired on a MR Scanner. After the MR-CT registration on a radiotherapy treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian), the target volumes were defined by the radiation oncologists on MR images and then transferred to CT images for planning and dose calculation. The CT Hounsfield Units (HU) was reassigned to zero (as water) for artifacts. The Varian flat panel treatment couch was modeled for dose calculation accuracy with heterogeneity correction. A Volume Matrix Arc Therapy (VMAT) and a seven-field IMRT plans were generated, each avoiding any beam transversing the prostheses; the two plans were compared. The superior VMAT plan was used for treating the patient. In-vivo dosimetry was performed using MOSFET (Best Canada) placed in a surgical tube inserted into the patient rectum during therapy. The measured dose was compared with planned dose for MOSFET location. Results: The registration of MR-CT images and the agreement of target volumes were confirmed by three physicians. VMAT plan was deemed superior to IMRT based on dose to critical nearby structures and overall conformality of target dosing. In-vivo measured dose compared with calculated dose was -4.5% which was likely due to attenuation of the surgical tube surrounding MOSFET. Conclusion: When artifacts are present on planning CT due to bilateral hip prostheses, MR-CT image fusion is a feasible solution for target delineation.

  17. Effect of progressive wear on the contact mechanics of hip replacements--does the realistic surface profile matter?

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Yang, Wenjian; Peng, Xifeng; Li, Dichen; Dong, Shuangpeng; Zhang, Shu; Zhu, Jinyu; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-04-13

    The contact mechanics of artificial metal-on-polyethylene hip joints are believed to affect the lubrication, wear and friction of the articulating surfaces and may lead to the joint loosening. Finite element analysis has been widely used for contact mechanics studies and good agreements have been achieved with current experimental data; however, most studies were carried out with idealist spherical geometries of the hip prostheses rather than the realistic worn surfaces, either for simplification reason or lacking of worn surface profile. In this study, the worn surfaces of the samples from various stages of hip simulator testing (0 to 5 million cycles) were reconstructed as solid models and were applied in the contact mechanics study. The simulator testing results suggested that the center of the head has various departure value from that of the cup and the value of the departure varies with progressively increased wear. This finding was adopted into the finite element study for better evaluation accuracy. Results indicated that the realistic model provided different evaluation from that of the ideal spherical model. Moreover, with the progressively increased wear, large increase of the contact pressure (from 12 to 31 MPa) was predicted on the articulating surface, and the predicted maximum von Mises stress was increased from 7.47 to 13.26 MPa, indicating the marked effect of the worn surface profiles on the contact mechanics of the joint. This study seeks to emphasize the importance of realistic worn surface profile of the acetabular cup especially following large wear volume. PMID:25680298

  18. Highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and knee replacement: spatial distribution of molecular orientation and shape recovery behavior.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Masaoka, Toshinori; Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Shishido, Takaaki; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated effects of processing procedures on morphology of highly cross-linked and re-melted UHMWPE (XLPE) in total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA, TKA). The shape recovery behavior was also monitored via uniaxial compression test at room temperature after non-destructive characterizations of the in-depth microstructure by confocal/polarized Raman spectroscopy. The goal of this study was to relate the manufacturing-induced morphology to the in vivo micromechanical performance, and ultimately to explore an optimal structure in each alternative joint bearing. It was clearly confirmed that the investigated XLPE hip and knee implants, which were produced from different orthopaedic grade resins (GUR 1050 and GUR 1020), consisted of two structural regions in the as-received states: the near-surface transitional anisotropic layer (≈100 μm thickness) and the bulk isotropic structural region. These XLPEs exhibited a different crystalline anisotropy and molecular texture within the near-surface layers. In addition, the knee insert showed a slightly higher efficiency of shape recovery against the applied strain over the hip liner owing to a markedly higher percentage of the bulk amorphous phase with intermolecular cross-linking. The quantitative data presented in this study might contribute to construct manufacturing strategies for further rationalized structures as alternative bearings in THA and TKA. PMID:25243183

  19. Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene in Total Hip and Knee Replacement: Spatial Distribution of Molecular Orientation and Shape Recovery Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Masaoka, Toshinori; Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Shishido, Takaaki; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Kosuke

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated effects of processing procedures on morphology of highly cross-linked and re-melted UHMWPE (XLPE) in total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA, TKA). The shape recovery behavior was also monitored via uniaxial compression test at room temperature after non-destructive characterizations of the in-depth microstructure by confocal/polarized Raman spectroscopy. The goal of this study was to relate the manufacturing-induced morphology to the in vivo micromechanical performance, and ultimately to explore an optimal structure in each alternative joint bearing. It was clearly confirmed that the investigated XLPE hip and knee implants, which were produced from different orthopaedic grade resins (GUR 1050 and GUR 1020), consisted of two structural regions in the as-received states: the near-surface transitional anisotropic layer (≈100 μm thickness) and the bulk isotropic structural region. These XLPEs exhibited a different crystalline anisotropy and molecular texture within the near-surface layers. In addition, the knee insert showed a slightly higher efficiency of shape recovery against the applied strain over the hip liner owing to a markedly higher percentage of the bulk amorphous phase with intermolecular cross-linking. The quantitative data presented in this study might contribute to construct manufacturing strategies for further rationalized structures as alternative bearings in THA and TKA. PMID:25243183

  20. Hybrid in situ replacement for Samson group V Staphylococcus aureus aortic graft infection

    PubMed Central

    Karpenko, A A; Ignatenko, P V; Beliaev, A M

    2013-01-01

    Aortic prosthesis replacements including extra-anatomical bypass procedures, in situ revascularisations with the neoaortoiliac system, antibiotic bounded prostheses or allogeneic grafts have high graft reinfection rates. We described a case of a 68-year-old man with Samson group V Staphylococcus aureus infection of his aortobifemoral graft. He underwent an explantation of the infected graft, wound debridement and a hybrid in situ allogeneic aortoiliofemoral replacement. During surgery one of the limbs of the cryopreserved human aortic allogeneic graft was anastomosed with the endarterectomised left common iliac artery, which later was angioplastied and stented. The closed system Jackson-Pratt drains were used to prevent perigraft fluid collection. The groin wound was treated with the vacuum-assisted closure dressing. On review in 6 months he remained symptom free. We conclude that a hybrid management of infected aortic prosthesis may reduce graft reinfection. PMID:23897382

  1. Hybrid in situ replacement for Samson group V Staphylococcus aureus aortic graft infection.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, A A; Ignatenko, P V; Beliaev, A M

    2013-01-01

    Aortic prosthesis replacements including extra-anatomical bypass procedures, in situ revascularisations with the neoaortoiliac system, antibiotic bounded prostheses or allogeneic grafts have high graft reinfection rates. We described a case of a 68-year-old man with Samson group V Staphylococcus aureus infection of his aortobifemoral graft. He underwent an explantation of the infected graft, wound debridement and a hybrid in situ allogeneic aortoiliofemoral replacement. During surgery one of the limbs of the cryopreserved human aortic allogeneic graft was anastomosed with the endarterectomised left common iliac artery, which later was angioplastied and stented. The closed system Jackson-Pratt drains were used to prevent perigraft fluid collection. The groin wound was treated with the vacuum-assisted closure dressing. On review in 6 months he remained symptom free. We conclude that a hybrid management of infected aortic prosthesis may reduce graft reinfection. PMID:23897382

  2. Bilateral One-Stage Revision of Infected Total Hip Arthroplasties: Report of Two Cases and Management of Antibiotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pommepuy, Thomas; Lons, Adrien; Benad, Kevin; Beltrand, Eric; Senneville, Eric; Migaud, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations for the management of chronic and bilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA) infection are lacking. However, this type of infection involves medical problems concerning the management of the antibiotic therapy. We report two cases of such infections operated as one-stage revision. For each case, both hips were infected with the same bacteria (Staphylococcus caprae for one patient and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus for the other). The probabilistic antibiotic treatment started during the first side (after harvesting intraoperative samples) did not prevent the culture of the bacteriologic harvested during the intervention of the second side. Cultures were positive for the same bacteria for both sides in the two cases presented herein. After results of intraoperative cultures, patients received culture-guided antibiotic therapy for three months and were considered cured at the end of a two-year follow-up. Our results suggest one-stage bilateral change of infected THA is a viable option and that early intraoperative antibiotic, started during the first-side exchange, does not jeopardize microbiological documentation of the second side. This work brings indirect arguments, in favor of the use of prophylactic antibiotics during revision of infected THA. PMID:26904335

  3. Bilateral One-Stage Revision of Infected Total Hip Arthroplasties: Report of Two Cases and Management of Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pommepuy, Thomas; Lons, Adrien; Benad, Kevin; Beltrand, Eric; Senneville, Eric; Migaud, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations for the management of chronic and bilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA) infection are lacking. However, this type of infection involves medical problems concerning the management of the antibiotic therapy. We report two cases of such infections operated as one-stage revision. For each case, both hips were infected with the same bacteria (Staphylococcus caprae for one patient and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus for the other). The probabilistic antibiotic treatment started during the first side (after harvesting intraoperative samples) did not prevent the culture of the bacteriologic harvested during the intervention of the second side. Cultures were positive for the same bacteria for both sides in the two cases presented herein. After results of intraoperative cultures, patients received culture-guided antibiotic therapy for three months and were considered cured at the end of a two-year follow-up. Our results suggest one-stage bilateral change of infected THA is a viable option and that early intraoperative antibiotic, started during the first-side exchange, does not jeopardize microbiological documentation of the second side. This work brings indirect arguments, in favor of the use of prophylactic antibiotics during revision of infected THA. PMID:26904335

  4. Simultaneous bilateral hip replacement reveals superior outcome and fewer complications than two-stage procedures: a prospective study including 1819 patients and 5801 follow-ups from a total joint replacement registry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Total joint replacements represent a considerable part of day-to-day orthopaedic routine and a substantial proportion of patients undergoing unilateral total hip arthroplasty require a contralateral treatment after the first operation. This report compares complications and functional outcome of simultaneous versus early and delayed two-stage bilateral THA over a five-year follow-up period. Methods The study is a post hoc analysis of prospectively collected data in the framework of the European IDES hip registry. The database query resulted in 1819 patients with 5801 follow-ups treated with bilateral THA between 1965 and 2002. According to the timing of the two operations the sample was divided into three groups: I) 247 patients with simultaneous bilateral THA, II) 737 patients with two-stage bilateral THA within six months, III) 835 patients with two-stage bilateral THA between six months and five years. Results Whereas postoperative hip pain and flexion did not differ between the groups, the best walking capacity was observed in group I and the worst in group III. The rate of intraoperative complications in the first group was comparable to that of the second. The frequency of postoperative local and systemic complication in group I was the lowest of the three groups. The highest rate of complications was observed in group III. Conclusions From the point of view of possible intra- and postoperative complications, one-stage bilateral THA is equally safe or safer than two-stage interventions. Additionally, from an outcome perspective the one-stage procedure can be considered to be advantageous. PMID:20973941

  5. Contributions of human tissue analysis to understanding the mechanisms of loosening and osteolysis in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Jiri; Vaculova, Jana; Goodman, Stuart B.; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic loosening and osteolysis are the most frequent late complications of total hip arthroplasty (THA) leading to revision of the prosthesis. This review aims to demonstrate how histopathological studies contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of aseptic loosening/osteolysis development. Only studies analysing periprosthetic tissues retrieved from failed implants in humans were included. Data from 101 studies (5532 patients with failure of THA implants) published in English or German between 1974 and 2013 were included. “Control” samples were reported in 45 of the 101 studies. The most frequently examined tissues were the bone-implant interface membrane and pseudosynovial tissues. Histopathological studies contribute importantly to determination of key cell populations underlying the biological mechanisms of aseptic loosening and osteolysis. The studies demonstrated the key molecules of the host response at the protein level (chemokines, cytokines, nitric oxide metabolites, metalloproteinases). However, these studies also have important limitations. Tissues harvested at revision surgery reflect specifically end-stage failure and may not adequately reveal the evolution of pathophysiological events that lead to prosthetic loosening and osteolysis. One possible solution is to examine tissues harvested from stable total hip arthroplasties that have been revised at various time periods due to dislocation or periprosthetic fracture in multicenter studies. PMID:24525037

  6. Understanding the differences between the wear of metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-Pina, C G; Yan, Y; Neville, A; Fisher, J

    2008-04-01

    Hip simulator studies have been carried out extensively to understand and test artificial hip implants in vitro as an efficient alternative to obtaining long-term results in vivo. Recent studies have shown that a ceramic-on-metal material combination lowers the wear by up to 100 times in comparison with a typical metal-on-metal design. The reason for this reduction remains unclear and for this reason this study has undertaken simple tribometer tests to understand the fundamental material loss mechanisms in two material combinations: metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic. A simple-configuration reciprocating pin-on-plate wear study was performed under open-circuit potential (OCP) and with applied cathodic protection (CP) in a serum solution using two tribological couples: firstly, cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) pins against Co-Cr plates; secondly, Co-Cr pins against alumina (Al2O3) plates. The pin and plate surfaces prior to and after testing were examined by profilometry and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed a marked reduction in wear when CP was applied, indicating that total material degradation under the OCP condition was attributed to corrosion processes. The substitution of the Co-Cr pin with an Al2O3 plate also resulted in a dramatic reduction in wear, probably due to the reduction in the corrosion-wear interactions between the tribological pair. PMID:18491698

  7. Effect of a virtual reality interface on the learning curve and on the accuracy of a surgical planner for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Petrolo, Luca; Testi, Debora; Taddei, Fulvia; Viceconti, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of a non-conventional input and output device (virtual reality) in a total hip replacement surgical planner. A test was performed asking five users to position a cup in a defined position. Every user performed the task using three different hardware configurations: (I) conventional mouse and monitor, (II) mouse and auto-stereoscopic monitor, and (III) 12-DOF tracker (haptic device) and auto-stereoscopic monitor. The results were evaluated in terms of root mean square error of the obtained position with respect to the target one and in terms of learning curve. The results showed that the examined VR technology does not show a sufficient positioning accuracy to be considered for clinical assessment. PMID:20015571

  8. Osteonecrosis with the use of polymethylmethacrylate cement for hip replacement: thermal-induced damage evidenced in vivo by decreased osteocyte viability.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, M R; Atwal, N S; Pabbruwe, M; Blom, A W; Bannister, G C

    2014-01-01

    Thermal damage to host bone is a possible source of compromise of fixation in patients undergoing cemented total hip replacement (THR). Data on the subject to date are derived from mathematical modelling powered by animal studies. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cement thickness on osteocyte viability in a population of patients undergoing cemented THR. An in vivo model was designed and validated by means of a finite element analysis. During standard hip joint replacement in 14 patients, the femoral necks were exposed before final resection to the heat of a curing cement mantle equivalent to 2.5 (Group 1) or 5 mm (Group 2) in vivo in the cemented acetabulum. Matched controls were collected for each patient. Osteocyte counts and viability were assessed by means of haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Ex vivo experiments were performed to determine the extent of thermal insult. H&E staining proved unreliable for assessing thermal insult in the short term. The LDH assay was reliable and demonstrated a significant reduction in osteocyte viability to a depth of 2.19 mm in group 1 and 9.19 mm in group 2. There was a significant difference between the groups at all depths. The ex vivo experiments revealed thermoclines indicating that host bone in the population undergoing cemented THR is more sensitive to the thermal insult delivered by curing polymethylmethacrylate cement than previously believed. This thermal insult may weaken the fixation between bone and cement and contribute towards aseptic loosening, the commonest cause of failure of THRs. PMID:24464728

  9. Roles of Sagittal Anatomical Parameters of the Pelvis in Primary Total Hip Replacement for Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Minghui; Zhang, Zhiqi; Kang, Yan; Sheng, Puyi; Yang, Zibo; Zhang, Ziji; Liao, Weiming

    2015-12-01

    We examined the correlation between acetabular prostheses and sagittal anatomical parameters of the pelvis for the preoperative evaluation of total hip arthroplasty in 29 patients with ankylosing spondylitis between April 2004 and November 2011. No implant dislocation or subsidence was observed at 4.18 years. The relationship between sagittal parameters conformed to the equation Pelvic incidence (PI)=Pelvic tilt (PT)+Sacral slope (SS). Better outcomes were achieved in the SS>PT group, postoperative function was positively correlated with SS/PI. Functional abduction and anteversion were positively correlated with PT but negatively correlated with SS. Due to the compensatory changes in the pelvis and spine of patients with AS, the preoperative assessment of sagittal parameters plays pivotal roles in placing acetabular prostheses in optimal positions and preventing postoperative impingement and dislocation. PMID:26164560

  10. Tantalum acetabular augments in one-stage exchange of infected total hip arthroplasty: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Klatte, Till Orla; Kendoff, Daniel; Sabihi, Reza; Kamath, Atul F; Rueger, Johannes M; Gehrke, Thorsten

    2014-07-01

    During the one-stage exchange procedure for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA), acetabular defects challenge reconstructive options. Porous tantalum augments are an established tool for addressing acetabular destruction in aseptic cases, but their utility in septic exchange is unknown. This retrospective case-control study presents the initial results of tantalum augmentation during one-stage exchange for PJI. Primary endpoints were rates of re-infection and short-term complications associated with this technique. Study patients had no higher risk of re-infection with equivalent durability at early follow-up with a re-infection rate in both groups of 4%. In conclusion, tantalum augments are a viable option for addressing acetabular defects in one-stage exchange for septic THA. Further study is necessary to assess long-term durability when compared to traditional techniques for acetabular reconstruction. PMID:24559522

  11. Re-Infection Outcomes following One- and Two-Stage Surgical Revision of Infected Hip Prosthesis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kunutsor, Setor K.; Whitehouse, Michael R.; Blom, Ashley W.; Beswick, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The two-stage revision strategy has been claimed as being the “gold standard” for treating prosthetic joint infection. The one-stage revision strategy remains an attractive alternative option; however, its effectiveness in comparison to the two-stage strategy remains uncertain. Objective To compare the effectiveness of one- and two-stage revision strategies in treating prosthetic hip infection, using re-infection as an outcome. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, manual search of bibliographies to March 2015, and email contact with investigators. Study Selection Cohort studies (prospective or retrospective) conducted in generally unselected patients with prosthetic hip infection treated exclusively by one- or two-stage revision and with re-infection outcomes reported within two years of revision. No clinical trials were identified. Review Methods Data were extracted by two independent investigators and a consensus was reached with involvement of a third. Rates of re-infection from 38 one-stage studies (2,536 participants) and 60 two-stage studies (3,288 participants) were aggregated using random-effect models after arcsine transformation, and were grouped by study and population level characteristics. Results In one-stage studies, the rate (95% confidence intervals) of re-infection was 8.2% (6.0–10.8). The corresponding re-infection rate after two-stage revision was 7.9% (6.2–9.7). Re-infection rates remained generally similar when grouped by several study and population level characteristics. There was no strong evidence of publication bias among contributing studies. Conclusion Evidence from aggregate published data suggest similar re-infection rates after one- or two-stage revision among unselected patients. More detailed analyses under a broader range of circumstances and exploration of other sources of heterogeneity will require collaborative pooling of individual

  12. Triceps insufficiency after the treatment of deep infection following total elbow replacement.

    PubMed

    Duquin, T R; Jacobson, J A; Schleck, C D; Larson, D R; Sanchez-Sotelo, J; Morrey, B F

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of an infected total elbow replacement (TER) is often successful in eradicating or suppressing the infection. However, the extensor mechanism may be compromised by both the infection and the surgery. The goal of this study was to assess triceps function in patients treated for deep infection complicating a TER. Between 1976 and 2007 a total of 217 TERs in 207 patients were treated for infection of a TER at our institution. Superficial infections and those that underwent resection arthroplasty were excluded, leaving 93 TERs. Triceps function was assessed by examination and a questionnaire. Outcome was measured using the Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS). Triceps weakness was identified in 51 TERs (49 patients, 55%). At a mean follow-up of five years (0.8 to 34), the extensor mechanism was intact in 13 patients, with the remaining 38 having bone or soft-tissue loss. The mean MEPS was 70 points (5 to 100), with a mean functional score of 18 (0 to 25) of a possible 25 points. Infection following TER can often be eradicated; however, triceps weakness occurs in more than half of the patients and may represent a major functional problem. PMID:24395316

  13. [Infection prevention during the perioperative period of primary hip and knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Suárez-Ahedo, C E; Obil-Chavarría, C A; Gil-Orbezo, F I; García-Félix Díaz, G

    2011-01-01

    All surgical wounds are at risk of contamination by pathogens that may get in through the incision. The pre-surgical bath with a skin antiseptic agent 24 hours prior to the surgery, the timing of administration of prophylactic antibiotics, the choice and postoperative duration of the latter, the number of individuals within the OR and the movement inside it, the choice of chlorhexidine gluconate for its long duration against gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, and the use of a hair remover or an electric razor, all of the former concepts, some new and others not so new, led to performing an extensive bibliographic review with the idea of starting a standardization process that could change the way in which institutions operate when performing primary joint replacement, trying to reduce the annual infection rate and upgrade the quality of life of patients. PMID:21548251

  14. Total Hip Arthroplasty in a Girdlestone Hip following a Failed Hemiarthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, VJ; Ranganath, BT

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Girdlestone hip arthroplasty, though described as a salvage procedure for infected hip joints, can also be considered for failed Hemiarthroplasty procedures. The functional results of such Girdlestone hip may not be satisfactory. They may require total hip replacement to improve the quality of life, which are technically challenging. Here we are reporting such a case ina 60 year old male patient, with review of literature. Case Report: A 60 year old male patient underwent cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty for fracture neck of femur which failed, owing to improper implantation. Subsequently he underwent Girdlestone arthroplasty which resulted in persistent painful hip. He presented to us in this situation, where we successfully converted the Girdlestone arthroplasty to a Total Hip arthroplasty. Conclusion: Improper implantation in Hemiarthroplasty fails subsequently. In such cases Girdlestone arthroplasty may be an option to consider, though it may not give requisite relief to patient in some cases. In such situations total hip arthroplasty procedure, though technically challenging will give stable painless hip to the patient. PMID:27299043

  15. The effect of epsilon aminocaproic acid on blood loss in patients who undergo primary total hip replacement: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Brian J.; Beaupré, Lauren A.; Jones, C. Allyson; Cinats, John G.; Guenther, Craig R.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine if the use of an antifibrinolytic agent (epsilon aminocaproic acid [EACA]) decreased perioperative and postoperative blood loss in patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA). Design A prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Setting A university-affiliated tertiary care hospital with a large joint arthroplasty population. Participants Fifty-five patients who were scheduled for a primary THA. Method Patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups to receive either EACA or saline placebo perioperatively. Preoperatively, the groups were similar with respect to gender, mean age, mean hemoglobin level, operative time and prosthesis type. Outcome measures Blood loss from the start of surgery until the Hemovac drain was removed, and the transfusion rate and hemoglobin levels. Results Mean (and standard error) total blood loss for patients receiving EACA was 867 (207) mL and for patients receiving placebo was 1198 (544) mL (p < 0.025). Four patients in the EACA group received 7 units of packed red blood cells and 7 patients in the saline group required 12 units. Conclusions Patients receiving the placebo sustained greater total blood loss than EACA patients and were more likely to require blood transfusion. In the current climate of concern over blood transfusions during surgery, EACA administration can reduce blood loss and consequently transfusion and transfusion-related risk. PMID:12067170

  16. Multisite Infection with Mycobacterium abscessus after Replacement of Breast Implants and Gluteal Lipofilling

    PubMed Central

    Rüegg, Eva; Cheretakis, Alexandre; Modarressi, Ali; Harbarth, Stephan; Pittet-Cuénod, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Medical tourism for aesthetic surgery is popular. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) occasionally cause surgical-site infections. As NTM grow in biofilms, implantations of foreign bodies are at risk. Due to late manifestation, infections occur when patients are back home, where they must be managed properly. Case Report. A 39-year-old healthy female was referred for acute infection of the right gluteal area. Five months before, she had breast implants replacement, abdominal liposuction, and gluteal lipofilling in Mexico. Three months postoperatively, implants were removed for NTM-infection in Switzerland. Adequate antibiotic treatment was stopped after seven days for drug-related hepatitis. At entrance, gluteal puncture for bacterial analysis was performed. MRI showed large subcutaneous collection. Debridement under general anaesthesia was followed by open wound management. Total antibiotic treatment was 20 weeks. Methods. Bacterial analysis of periprosthetic and gluteal liquids included Gram-stain plus acid-fast stain, and aerobic, anaerobic and mycobacterial cultures.  Results. In periprosthetic fluid, Mycobacterium abscessus, Propionibacterium, and Staphylococcus epidermidis were identified. The same M. abscessus strain was found gluteally. The gluteal wound healed within six weeks. At ten months' follow-up, gluteal asymmetry persists for deep scarring. Conclusion. This case presents major complications of multisite aesthetic surgery. Surgical-site infections in context of medical tourism need appropriate bacteriological investigations, considering potential NTM-infections. PMID:25893122

  17. Poor patient-reported outcome after hip replacement, related to poor perception of perioperative information, commoner in immigrants than in non-immigrants.

    PubMed

    Krupic, Ferid; Rolfson, Ola; Nemes, Szilard; Kärrholm, Johan

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - In preparing patients for total hip replacement surgery, providing thorough information helps to reduce anxiety, manage postoperative pain, prevent complications, and better engage patients in their rehabilitation. However, patient characteristics may have an influence on the ability to comprehend and assimilate the information given. We investigated differences in patients born in Sweden and those born outside Sweden regarding how they perceived the information given before THR, and if this was associated with different patient-reported outcomes one year after surgery. Patients and methods - From Sahlgrenska University Hospital, we recruited 150 patients born in Sweden and 50 patients born outside Sweden who were to undergo THR. We retrieved routinely collected data from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register including basic demographic variables and patient-reported outcome measures, both preoperatively and at 1-year follow-up. In a separate survey carried out 1-2 weeks after surgery, patients were asked about the information provided in connection with the operation. Results - Patients born outside Sweden more frequently reported that they were poorly informed about possibilities to treat pain and about the operation itself. 1 year after the operation, patients born outside Sweden who, 1-2 weeks after the operation, had reported that they were poorly informed also reported having worse outcomes. Poorer results were found for the questions self-care and anxiety/depression in the EQ-5D questionnaire, pain on a visual analog scale (VAS), EQVAS, and EQ-5D index compared to those patients born in Sweden who had received at least some information of acceptable quality. Interpretation - One quarter of the patients were not satisfied with the information provided before and after THR. These patients more commonly reported perioperative anxiety and they were more often born outside Sweden. Poorly informed patients who had come from countries

  18. Poor patient-reported outcome after hip replacement, related to poor perception of perioperative information, commoner in immigrants than in non-immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Krupic, Ferid; Rolfson, Ola; Nemes, Szilard; Kärrholm, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose In preparing patients for total hip replacement surgery, providing thorough information helps to reduce anxiety, manage postoperative pain, prevent complications, and better engage patients in their rehabilitation. However, patient characteristics may have an influence on the ability to comprehend and assimilate the information given. We investigated differences in patients born in Sweden and those born outside Sweden regarding how they perceived the information given before THR, and if this was associated with different patient-reported outcomes one year after surgery. Patients and methods From Sahlgrenska University Hospital, we recruited 150 patients born in Sweden and 50 patients born outside Sweden who were to undergo THR. We retrieved routinely collected data from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register including basic demographic variables and patient-reported outcome measures, both preoperatively and at 1-year follow-up. In a separate survey carried out 1–2 weeks after surgery, patients were asked about the information provided in connection with the operation. Results Patients born outside Sweden more frequently reported that they were poorly informed about possibilities to treat pain and about the operation itself. 1 year after the operation, patients born outside Sweden who, 1–2 weeks after the operation, had reported that they were poorly informed also reported having worse outcomes. Poorer results were found for the questions self-care and anxiety/depression in the EQ-5D questionnaire, pain on a visual analog scale (VAS), EQVAS, and EQ-5D index compared to those patients born in Sweden who had received at least some information of acceptable quality. Interpretation One quarter of the patients were not satisfied with the information provided before and after THR. These patients more commonly reported perioperative anxiety and they were more often born outside Sweden. Poorly informed patients who had come from countries outside

  19. Association between Exposure to Benzodiazepines and Related Drugs and Survivorship of Total Hip Replacement in Arthritis: A Population-Based Cohort Study of 246,940 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beziz, Dan; Colas, Sandrine; Collin, Cédric; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Zureik, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Total hip replacement (THR) is successful in treating hip arthritis. Prosthetic survivorship may depend on the medications taken by the patient; particularly, the role of benzodiazepines and related drugs (Z-drugs) with THR revision has been poorly investigated. Our objective was to compare THR short-term survivorship according to level of exposure to benzodiazepine and Z-drugs. Design, Setting and Participants All French patients aged 40 years or older, having undergone primary THR from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2012, for arthritis according to French national health insurance databases were included in the cohort. Outcome of interest was THR revision, including any surgical procedure in which the implant or any component was changed or removed. Follow-up started the day the primary THR was performed. Observations were right-censored on December 31, 2014, if neither revision nor death had yet occurred. Exposure of interest was the cumulative defined daily doses per day (cDDD/day) of benzodiazepines and Z-drugs dispensed within 6 months before or after inclusion. We defined four exposure groups; cDDD/d = 0: unexposed; <0.08: low exposure;] 0.08–0.38]: medium exposure; >0.38: high exposure. THR survivorship was assessed according to level of exposure to benzodiazepines and Z-drugs in univariate and multivariate Cox models adjusted for patient, THR and implanting center characteristics. Results The study cohort comprised 246,940 individuals: mean age at baseline, 69.9 years; women, 57.9%; unexposed: 51.7%; low exposure: 16.7%; medium exposure: 15.9%; and high exposure: 15.7%. During the median 45-month follow-up, 9043 individuals underwent prosthetic revision. Adjusted hazard ratios in low, medium and high exposed groups were 1.18 (95%CI, 1.12–1.26; P<0.001), 1.32 (95%CI, 1.24–1.40; P<0.001) and 1.37 (95%CI, 1.29–1.45; P<0.001), respectively, compared to unexposed. Conclusion and Relevance Exposure to benzodiazepines and Z-drugs is

  20. [The effectiveness of gait rehabilitation in the patients following endoprosthetic hip replacement by means of the biofeedback-based hardware videoreconstruction of the walking stereotype].

    PubMed

    Koneva, E S

    2015-01-01

    follow-up period did not reveal any case of displacement of the prosthetic components. It is concluded that the restoration of the walking stereotype in the patients following hip endoprosthetic hip replacement by means of the biofeedback-based hardware videoreconstruction of the walking stereotype during the early postoperative period is an efficient and safe method of the rehabilitative treatment. PMID:26841525

  1. Models to assess how best to replace dengue virus vectors with Wolbachia-infected mosquito populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianghong; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    Dengue fever is increasing in importance in the tropics and subtropics. Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria as novel control methods can reduce the ability of virus transmission. So, many mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia are released in some countries so that strategies for population replacement can be fulfilled. However, not all of these field trails are successful, for example, releases on Tri Nguyen Island, Vietnam in 2013 failed. Thus, we evaluated a series of relevant issues such as (a) why do some releases fail? (b) What affects the success of population replacement? And (c) Whether or not augmentation can block the dengue diseases in field trials. If not, how we can success be achieved? Models with and without augmentation, incorporating the effects of cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) and fitness effects are proposed to describe the spread of Wolbachia in mosquito populations. Stability analysis revealed that backward bifurcations and multiple attractors may exist, which indicate that initial quantities of infected and uninfected mosquitoes, augmentation methods (timing, quantity, order and frequency) may affect the success of the strategies. The results show that successful population replacement will rely on selection of suitable strains of Wolbachia and careful design of augmentation methods. PMID:26407645

  2. The behavior of the micro-mechanical cement-bone interface affects the cement failure in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Waanders, Daan; Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, the effects of different ways to implement the complex micro-mechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface on the fatigue failure of the cement mantle was investigated. In an FEA-model of a cemented hip reconstruction the cement-bone interface was modeled and numerically implemented in four different ways: (I) as infinitely stiff, (II) as infinitely strong with a constant stiffness, (III) a mixed-mode failure response with failure in tension and shear, and (IV) realistic mixed mode behavior obtained from micro FEA-models. Case II, III and IV were analyzed using data from a stiff and a compliant micro-FEA model and their effects on cement failure were analyzed. The data used for Case IV was derived from experimental specimens that were tested previously. Although the total number of cement cracks was low for all cases, the compliant Case II resulted in twice as many cracks as Case I. All cases caused similar stress distributions at the interface. In all cases, the interface did not display interfacial softening; all stayed the elastic zone. Fatigue failure of the cement mantle resulted in a more favorable stress distribution at the cement-bone interface in terms of less tension and lower shear tractions. We conclude that immediate cement-bone interface failure is not likely to occur, but its local compliancy does affect the formation of cement cracks. This means that at a macro-level the cement-bone interface should be modeled as a compliant layer. However, implementation of interfacial post-yield softening does seem to be necessary. PMID:21036358

  3. Expression and Significance of the HIP/PAP and RegIIIγ Antimicrobial Peptides during Mammalian Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, John David; Jackson, Ashley R.; Li, Birong; Ching, Christina B.; Vonau, Martin; Easterling, Robert S.; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; McHugh, Kirk M.; Becknell, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) serve key roles in defending the urinary tract against invading uropathogens. To date, the individual contribution of AMPs to urinary tract host defense is not well defined. In this study, we identified Regenerating islet-derived 3 gamma (RegIIIγ) as the most transcriptionally up-regulated AMP in murine bladder transcriptomes following uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) infection. We confirmed induction of RegIIIγ mRNA during cystitis and pyelonephritis by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunoblotting demonstrates increased bladder and urinary RegIIIγ protein levels following UPEC infection. Immunostaining localizes RegIIIγ protein to urothelial cells of infected bladders and kidneys. Human patients with UTI have increased urine concentrations of the orthologous Hepatocarcinoma-Intestine-Pancreas / Pancreatitis Associated Protein (HIP/PAP) compared to healthy controls. Recombinant RegIIIγ protein does not demonstrate bactericidal activity toward UPEC in vitro, but does kill Staphylococcus saprophyticus in a dose-dependent manner. Kidney and bladder tissue from RegIIIγ knockout mice and wild-type mice contain comparable bacterial burden following UPEC and Gram-positive UTI. Our results demonstrate that RegIIIγ and HIP/PAP expression is induced during human and murine UTI. However, their specific function in the urinary tract remains uncertain. PMID:26658437

  4. Expression and Significance of the HIP/PAP and RegIIIγ Antimicrobial Peptides during Mammalian Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Spencer, John David; Jackson, Ashley R; Li, Birong; Ching, Christina B; Vonau, Martin; Easterling, Robert S; Schwaderer, Andrew L; McHugh, Kirk M; Becknell, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) serve key roles in defending the urinary tract against invading uropathogens. To date, the individual contribution of AMPs to urinary tract host defense is not well defined. In this study, we identified Regenerating islet-derived 3 gamma (RegIIIγ) as the most transcriptionally up-regulated AMP in murine bladder transcriptomes following uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) infection. We confirmed induction of RegIIIγ mRNA during cystitis and pyelonephritis by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunoblotting demonstrates increased bladder and urinary RegIIIγ protein levels following UPEC infection. Immunostaining localizes RegIIIγ protein to urothelial cells of infected bladders and kidneys. Human patients with UTI have increased urine concentrations of the orthologous Hepatocarcinoma-Intestine-Pancreas / Pancreatitis Associated Protein (HIP/PAP) compared to healthy controls. Recombinant RegIIIγ protein does not demonstrate bactericidal activity toward UPEC in vitro, but does kill Staphylococcus saprophyticus in a dose-dependent manner. Kidney and bladder tissue from RegIIIγ knockout mice and wild-type mice contain comparable bacterial burden following UPEC and Gram-positive UTI. Our results demonstrate that RegIIIγ and HIP/PAP expression is induced during human and murine UTI. However, their specific function in the urinary tract remains uncertain. PMID:26658437

  5. Young Adult Hip: Reactivation of dormant, previously undiagnosed Mycobacterium Tuberculosis infection following intra-articular steroid injection

    PubMed Central

    B.J, Tadros; G.H, Stafford

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) still remains a common problem in the UK and, with the increasing number of patients being offered arthroplasties; periprosthetic involvement is not uncommon anymore. However, the diagnosis of TB infected arthroplasties still remains difficult and misdiagnosis is common, therefore delaying treatment. Case Report: We describe a 36-years old Caucasian female with no known history of TB who presented with hip pain thought to be due to femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI). In the course of 18 months, the patient had been investigated extensively; including steroid injection, hip arthroscopy (including synovial biopsies), and eventually a total hip arthroplasty. During arthroplasty, further extensive biopsies were performed which raised the suspicion of TB on histology. Further synovial biopsies obtained arthroscopically were microbiologically positive for TB (PCR). The patient was sent to an infectious disease specialist. It appeared that the patient had TB in the past, of which she was unaware. Conclusion: We hypothesise that the immunosuppressant effects of the steroid injections she received reactivated her TB. PMID:27299119

  6. Impact of a multidisciplinary pain program for the management of chronic low back pain in patients undergoing spine surgery and primary total hip replacement: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a very common disorder. In this field chronic low back pain represents a special challenge. The management of chronic low back pain consists of a range of different intervention strategies. Usually operative intervention should be avoided if possible. However, there are constellations were surgical therapy in patients with chronic low back pain seems to be meaningful. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical outcomes after spine surgery and hip replacement in patients with chronic low back pain after undergoing a structured rehabilitation program including cognitive – behavioral therapy. Methods From January 1, 2007 to January 1, 2010 patients were indicated for total hip replacement (THA) or spine surgery after receiving inpatient multidisciplinary pain programs including cognitive – behavioral therapy at our orthopedic institute with a specialized unit for the rehabilitation of chronic pain patients. Indications for surgery were based on the synopsis of clinical and imaging findings and on positive effects after local injections during the multidisciplinary pain program. The tools for assessment included follow-up at 6 and 12 months and analyses of pain, chronicity, physical functioning and depression. Results Of the 256 patients admitted for multidisciplinary pain program, fifteen were indicated to benefit from a surgical intervention during multidisciplinary pain program. Ten patients received spine surgery. THA was indicated in five patients. In all cases, the peri- and postoperative clinical courses were uneventful. Only two of the patients subjected to spine surgery and three patients who had THA were improved after 12 months. One patient reported a worsened condition. All patients presented with good functional outcomes and normal radiological findings. Conclusions The indication for surgical intervention in patients with chronic low back pain and degenerative diseases must be critically assessed. THA in this

  7. Trends in Transfusion Transmitted Infections Among Replacement Blood Donors in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Irfan, Syed Mohammad; Uddin, Jamal; Zaheer, Hasan Abbas; Sultan, Sadia; Baig, Amjad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Hepatitis-B, Hepatitis-C and Human Immunodeficiency infections in replacement blood donors. Materials and Methods: From January 2004 to December 2011, 108,598 apparently healthy donors donated blood at our Blood Bank. Screening was done by Microparticle Enzyme Immuno Assay (MEIA) method on Axsym System (Abbott Diagnostic, USA) and in year 2011 by Chemiluminescent Immunoassay (CIA) method on Architect i2000 (Abbott Diagnostic, USA). From 2010 onward, HIV reactive donors were advised for confirmatory tests and reported back with the results. Results: Of the 108,598 total donors, 108,393 (99.8%) were replacement donors with a mean age of 28.92 (17-55) years. Of this, only 164 (0.15%) were females. Among the replacement donors, 4,906 (4.5%) were found to be reactive for Hepatitis-B, C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus. All the reactive patients, except one, were males. HbsAg was positive in 2,068 (1.90%) and anti-HCV in 2832 (2.61%) donors, while 111 (0.10%) were positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus. Co-infectivity was observed in 103 (0.09%) cases. The prevalence appeared to be higher in younger age group (17-30 yrs). Only 16.6% cases should be patients returned with results of the confirmatory tests for HIV and were found positive. Conclusion: Hepatitis-B and C sero-prevalence in our series of replacement donors appears high compared to most studies from neighboring countries and relatively low in comparison to earlier studies from Pakistan. Prevalence of HIV, however, appears low and turn out of HIV positive cases for confirmatory tests is low. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385780

  8. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... hemiarthroplasty to replace the ball part of your hip joint. You should have received physical therapy while you were in the hospital or at a rehabilitation center before going home from the hospital.

  9. Artifact level produced by different femoral head prostheses in CT imaging: diamond coated silicon nitride as total hip replacement material.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Simone P; Paiva, José M; De Francesco, Silvia; Amaral, Margarida I; Oliveira, Filipe J; Silva, Rui F

    2013-01-01

    Commercial femoral head prostheses (cobalt-chromium alloy, yttria partially stabilized zirconia (Y-PSZ) and alumina) and new silicon nitride ceramic ones (nanocrystalline diamond coated and uncoated) were compared in terms of artifact level production by computed tomography (CT). Pelvis examination by CT allows the correct diagnosis of some pathologies (e.g. prostate and colon cancer) and the evaluation of the prosthesis-bone interface in post-operative joint surgery. Artifact quantification is rarely seen in literature despite having a great potential to grade biomaterials according to their imaging properties. Materials' characteristics (density and effective atomic number), size and geometry of the prostheses can cause more or less artifact. A quantification procedure based on the calculation of four statistical parameters for the Hounsfield pixel values (mean, standard deviation, mean squared error and worst case error) is presented. CT sequential and helical scanning modes were performed. Results prove the artifact reproducibility and indicate that the cobalt-chromium and Y-PSZ are the most artifact-inducing materials, while alumina and silicon nitride (diamond coated and uncoated) ceramic ones present a low level of artifact. Considering the excellent biocompatibility and biotribological behaviour reported in earlier works, combined with the high medical imaging quality here assessed, diamond coated silicon nitride ceramics are arising as new materials for joint replacement. PMID:23053807

  10. Cost minimisation and cost effectiveness in anaesthesia for total hip replacement surgery, in Belgium? A study comparing three general anaesthesia techniques.

    PubMed

    Demeere, J-L; Merckx, Ch; Demeere, N

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the prospective randomised study is to compare the cost effectiveness of three general anaesthesia techniques for total hip replacement surgery and the cost minimisation by use of anaesthetics. For induction propofol was used in the three techniques. For maintenance, we used desflurane, or sevoflurane, or propofol. There was no significant difference in consumption of drugs for pain treatment, treatment of nausea and vomiting or cost of hospital stay or total cost for pharmacy. In terms of cost-effectiveness we can consider that the three techniques are similar. The cost of an i.v. technique was always higher than inhaled anaesthetics. The major cost in anaesthesia is the fee for the anaesthesiologist. But all in, the cost of anaesthesia was only 15.1% of the total cost of the procedure. Cost of inhaled or i.v. anaesthetics was 0.55% to 1.0% of the total cost. There was a discrepancy between the measured consumption of inhaled anaesthetics and the consumption (and cost) on the invoice. Cost minimisation based on anaesthetic medication is ridiculously by small considering the total cost of the procedure. PMID:16916184

  11. Presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated reactions in periprosthetic tissue after aseptic loosening of total hip replacements with metal bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huber, Monika; Reinisch, Georg; Trettenhahn, Günter; Zweymüller, Karl; Lintner, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Aseptic loosening of articular implants is frequently associated with tissue reactions to wear particles. Some patients, who had received metal-on-metal articulations, present early symptoms including persistent pain and implant failure. These symptoms raise the suspicion about the development of an immunological response. Furthermore, the generation of rare corrosion products in association with metallic implants has been observed. Corrosion products are known to enhance third-body wear and contribute to the loss of the implant. The purpose of this study was to investigate periprosthetic tissue containing solid corrosion products after aseptic loosening of second-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements made of low-carbon cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy for the presence of immunologically determined tissue changes. Periprosthetic tissue of 11 cases containing uncommon solid deposits was investigated by light microscopy. In order to confirm the presence of corrosion products, additional methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were used. All investigated cases revealed solid chromium orthophosphate corrosion products as well as metallic wear particles to a various extent. Moreover, various intense tissue reactions characteristic of immune response were observed in all cases. The simultaneous presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated tissue reaction indicates that a relationship between corrosion development and implant-related hypersensitivity may exist. PMID:18725188

  12. The use of ultrasound in acquisition of the anterior pelvic plane in computer-assisted total hip replacement: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Parratte, S; Kilian, P; Pauly, V; Champsaur, P; Argenson, J-N A

    2008-02-01

    We have evaluated in vitro the accuracy of percutaneous and ultrasound registration as measured in terms of errors in rotation and version relative to the bony anterior pelvic plane in computer-assisted total hip replacement, and analysed the intra- and inter-observer reliability of manual or ultrasound registration. Four clinicians were asked to perform registration of the landmarks of the anterior pelvic plane on two cadavers. Registration was performed under four different conditions of acquisition. Errors in rotation were not significant. Version errors were significant with percutaneous methods (16.2 degrees; p < 0.001 and 19.25 degrees with surgical draping; p < 0.001), but not with the ultrasound acquisition (6.2 degrees, p = 0.13). Intra-observer repeatability was achieved for all the methods. Inter-observer analysis showed acceptable agreement in the sagittal but not in the frontal plane. Ultrasound acquisition of the anterior pelvic plane was more reliable in vitro than the cutaneous digitisation currently used. PMID:18256101

  13. Incidence and risk factors for surgical infection after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Babkin, Yuri; Raveh, David; Lifschitz, Moshe; Itzchaki, Menachem; Wiener-Well, Yonit; Kopuit, Puah; Jerassy, Ziona; Yinnon, Amos M

    2007-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after total knee replacement (TKR) is a devastating complication. We performed a retrospective study of all consecutive TKRs performed during a 2-y period. Surgical site infection (SSI) was defined by standard criteria. All patients were examined 1 y following surgery. Of 180 patients undergoing TKR, 10 (5.6%) developed a superficial (3, 1.7%) or deep (7, 3.9%) SSI. Two independent risk factors for SSI were detected: left knees became infected more often (9/ 92, 9.8%) than right knees (1/88, 1.1%) (Relative Risk 6.7 +/- 95% CI 1.7-26.8); and 7/72 (9.7%) patients receiving a type-1 prosthesis developed infection versus 3/104 (3.1%) receiving a type-2 prosthesis (RR 4.7, 95% CI 1.18-18.4). Investigation of the operating room revealed 3 problems: there was significant traffic through the door on the left of the patient; a nonstandard horizontal-flow air conditioner had been installed above that door; a tool-washing sink was in use on the other side of that door. Infection control guidelines were rehearsed: the sink was removed, the air conditioner was disconnected, and the door was locked. In a prospective survey performed 2 y later only 1/45 patients (2.2%) undergoing TKR developed a superficial SSI (p = 0.5). Correction of independent risk factors for infection following TKR led to a decrease in SSI rate. PMID:17852911

  14. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patient with Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young Wook; Kim, Seung Chan; Kwon, Soon Yong; Park, Do Joon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with aplastic anemia (AA) are now living longer and therefore are at increased risk for the development of osteonecrosis of the hip. However, studies on the results of total hip arthroplasty (THA) are lacking. The purpose of this study is to present the result of THA in patients with AA. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the data for a group of 29 patients (45 hips) with AA who presented to our institution for THA between May 2008 and May 2012. All hips were replaced because of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. A specific prospective protocol was followed for the perioperative transfusion of platelets and blood. The clinical and radiographic evaluations were done, and the minimum follow-up period was 3 years (mean, 49.2 months; range, 36 to 84 months). Results Three hips had excessive perioperative bleeding and hematoma formation, and then hematoma evacuations were done; one hip was finally revised because of infection of acetabular component. One patient with poorly controlled AA died due to delayed infection on the hip joint. All hips showed stable fixation, and the mean Harris hip score was improved from 54.2 points (range, 42 to 69 points) preoperatively to 90.8 points (range, 73 to 97 points) at the time of the latest follow-up. Conclusion In the present study, the durability of implant fixation was maintained and the clinical results demonstrated a sustained increase in function of the hip. Postoperatively, paying attention to bleeding and infection should be needed. PMID:27536640

  15. Rose Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... a chemical found in rose hip, might slow blood clotting. Taking rose hip might increase the risk of ... a chemical found in rose hip, might slow blood clotting. There is concern that rose hip might cause ...

  16. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bones or cartilage of your hip, including: Hip fractures – can cause sudden hip pain. These injuries can be serious and lead to major problems. Hip fractures are more common as people get older because ...

  17. A Randomised Single Centre Study to Compare the Long-term Performance of 4 Designs of the DePuy Ultima LX Stem in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-09

    Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorder; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  18. A Randomised Single Centre Study to Compare the Long-Term Wear Characteristics of Marathon™ and Enduron™ Polyethylene Cup Liners in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-04-07

    Osteoarthritis; Post-Traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  19. A Two Centre Study to Assess the Long-term Performance of the Pinnacle™ Cup With a Metal-on-Metal Bearing in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-29

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  20. A Multi-centre Study to Assess the Long-term Performance of the Pinnacle™ Cup With a Polyethylene-on-metal Bearing in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis.

  1. A Two Centre Study to Assess the Stability and Long-term Performance of the C-Stem™ AMT in a Total Primary Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis.

  2. A Study to Assess the Long-term Performance of SmartSet® HV and SmartSet® GHV Bone Cements in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-12

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  3. A Single Centre Study to Assess the Long-term Performance of the Pinnacle™ Cup With a Ceramic-on-ceramic Bearing in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-13

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  4. Prevalence of Failure due to Adverse Reaction to Metal Debris in Modern, Medium and Large Diameter Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements – The Effect of Novel Screening Methods: Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reito, Aleksi; Lainiala, Olli; Elo, Petra; Eskelinen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements were used for almost a decade before adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) were found to be a true clinical problem. Currently, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the usefulness of systematic screening for ARMD. We implemented a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish the prevalence of revision confirmed ARMD stratified by the use of different screening protocols in patients with MoM hip replacements. Five levels of screening were identified: no screening (level 0), targeted blood metal ion measurement and/or cross-sectional imaging (level 1), metal ion measurement without imaging (level 2), metal ion measurement with targeted imaging (level 3) and comprehensive screening (both metal ions and imaging for all; level 4). 122 studies meeting our eligibility criteria were included in analysis. These studies included 144 study arms: 100 study arms with hip resurfacings, 33 study arms with large-diameter MoM total hip replacements (THR), and 11 study arms with medium-diameter MoM THRs. For hip resurfacing, the lowest prevalence of ARMD was seen with level 0 screening (pooled prevalence 0.13%) and the highest with level 4 screening (pooled prevalace 9.49%). Pooled prevalence of ARMD with level 0 screening was 0.29% and with level 4 screening 21.3% in the large-diameter MoM THR group. In metaregression analysis of hip resurfacings, level 4 screening was superior with regard to prevalence of ARMD when compared with other levels. In the large diameter THR group level 4 screening was superior to screening 0,2 and 3. These outcomes were irrespective of follow-up time or study publication year. With hip resurfacings, routine cross-sectional imaging regardless of clinical findings is advisable. It is clear, however, that targeted metal ion measurement and/or imaging is not sufficient in the screening for ARMD in any implant concepts. However, economic aspects should be weighed when choosing the preferred screening level

  5. Prevalence of Failure due to Adverse Reaction to Metal Debris in Modern, Medium and Large Diameter Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements--The Effect of Novel Screening Methods: Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reito, Aleksi; Lainiala, Olli; Elo, Petra; Eskelinen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements were used for almost a decade before adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) were found to be a true clinical problem. Currently, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the usefulness of systematic screening for ARMD. We implemented a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish the prevalence of revision confirmed ARMD stratified by the use of different screening protocols in patients with MoM hip replacements. Five levels of screening were identified: no screening (level 0), targeted blood metal ion measurement and/or cross-sectional imaging (level 1), metal ion measurement without imaging (level 2), metal ion measurement with targeted imaging (level 3) and comprehensive screening (both metal ions and imaging for all; level 4). 122 studies meeting our eligibility criteria were included in analysis. These studies included 144 study arms: 100 study arms with hip resurfacings, 33 study arms with large-diameter MoM total hip replacements (THR), and 11 study arms with medium-diameter MoM THRs. For hip resurfacing, the lowest prevalence of ARMD was seen with level 0 screening (pooled prevalence 0.13%) and the highest with level 4 screening (pooled prevalace 9.49%). Pooled prevalence of ARMD with level 0 screening was 0.29% and with level 4 screening 21.3% in the large-diameter MoM THR group. In metaregression analysis of hip resurfacings, level 4 screening was superior with regard to prevalence of ARMD when compared with other levels. In the large diameter THR group level 4 screening was superior to screening 0,2 and 3. These outcomes were irrespective of follow-up time or study publication year. With hip resurfacings, routine cross-sectional imaging regardless of clinical findings is advisable. It is clear, however, that targeted metal ion measurement and/or imaging is not sufficient in the screening for ARMD in any implant concepts. However, economic aspects should be weighed when choosing the preferred screening level

  6. Do the poor cost much more? The relationship between small area income deprivation and length of stay for elective hip replacement in the English NHS from 2001 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Richard; Laudicella, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    The Blair/Brown reforms of the English NHS in the early to mid 2000s gave hospitals strong new incentives to reduce waiting times and length of stay for elective surgery. One concern was that these efficiency-oriented reforms might harm equity, by giving hospitals new incentives to select against socio-economically disadvantaged patients who stay longer and cost more to treat. This paper aims to assess the magnitude of these new selection incentives in the test case of hip replacement. Anonymous hospital records are extracted on 274,679 patients admitted to English NHS Hospital Trusts for elective total hip replacement from 2001/2 through 2007/8. The relationship between length of stay and small area income deprivation is modelled allowing for other patient characteristics (age, sex, number and type of diagnoses, procedure type) and hospital effects. After adjusting for these factors, we find that patients from the most deprived tenth of areas stayed just 6% longer than others in 2001/2, falling to 2% by 2007/8. By comparison, patients aged 85 or over stayed 57% longer than others in 2001/2, rising to 71% by 2007/8, and patients with seven or more diagnoses stayed 58% longer than others in 2001/2, rising to 73% by 2007/8. We conclude that the Blair/Brown reforms did not give NHS hospitals strong new incentives to select against socio-economically deprived hip replacement patients. PMID:21131119

  7. A Trend for Increased Risk of Revision Surgery due to Deep Infection following Fast-Track Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Amlie, Einar; Lerdal, Anners; Gay, Caryl L; Høvik, Øystein; Nordsletten, Lars; Dimmen, Sigbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Rates of revision surgery due to deep infection following total hip arthroplasty (THA) increased at a Norwegian hospital following implementation of fast-track procedures. The purpose of this study was to determine whether selected demographic (age and sex) and clinical (body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, surgery duration, length of hospital stay, cemented versus uncemented prosthesis, and fast-track procedures) factors were associated with higher risk of revision surgery due to deep infection following THA. In a prospective designed study 4,406 patients undergoing primary THA between January 2001 and January 2013 where included. Rates of infection-related revision surgery within 3 months of THA were higher among males and among patients who received fast-track THA. Adjusting for sex and age, the implemented fast-track elements were significantly associated with increased risk of revision surgery. Risk of infection-related revision surgery was unrelated to body mass index, physical status, surgery duration, length of hospital stay, and prosthesis type. Because local infiltration analgesia, drain cessation, and early mobilization were introduced in combination, it could not be determined which component or combination of components imposed the increased risk. The findings in this small sample raise concern about fast-track THA but require replication in other samples. PMID:27034841

  8. A Trend for Increased Risk of Revision Surgery due to Deep Infection following Fast-Track Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Amlie, Einar; Lerdal, Anners; Gay, Caryl L.; Høvik, Øystein; Nordsletten, Lars; Dimmen, Sigbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Rates of revision surgery due to deep infection following total hip arthroplasty (THA) increased at a Norwegian hospital following implementation of fast-track procedures. The purpose of this study was to determine whether selected demographic (age and sex) and clinical (body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, surgery duration, length of hospital stay, cemented versus uncemented prosthesis, and fast-track procedures) factors were associated with higher risk of revision surgery due to deep infection following THA. In a prospective designed study 4,406 patients undergoing primary THA between January 2001 and January 2013 where included. Rates of infection-related revision surgery within 3 months of THA were higher among males and among patients who received fast-track THA. Adjusting for sex and age, the implemented fast-track elements were significantly associated with increased risk of revision surgery. Risk of infection-related revision surgery was unrelated to body mass index, physical status, surgery duration, length of hospital stay, and prosthesis type. Because local infiltration analgesia, drain cessation, and early mobilization were introduced in combination, it could not be determined which component or combination of components imposed the increased risk. The findings in this small sample raise concern about fast-track THA but require replication in other samples. PMID:27034841

  9. Testosterone replacement therapy among HIV-infected men in the CFAR Network of Integrated Clinical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Ramona; Murphy, Adam B.; Raper, James L.; Chamie, Gabriel; Kitahata, Mari M.; Drozd, Daniel R.; Mayer, Kenneth; Napravnik, Sonia; Moore, Richard; Achenbach, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to determine the rate of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) initiation, TRT predictors and associated monitoring in HIV-infected men. Design A multisite cohort study. Methods We examined TRT initiation rates and monitoring among adult HIV-infected men in routine care at seven sites in the Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS) from 1996 to 2011. We determined TRT predictors using Cox regression modelling. Results Of 14 454 men meeting inclusion criteria, TRT was initiated in 1482 (10%) with an initiation rate of 19.7/1000 person-years [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 18.7–20.7]. In the multivariable model, TRT was significantly associated with age at least 35 years, white race, diagnosis of AIDS wasting, hepatitis C coinfection, protease inhibitor based antiretroviral therapy and nadir CD4+ cell count of 200 cells/µl or less. Overall, 1886 out of 14 454 (13%) had testosterone deficiency. Among those initiating TRT, 992 out of 1482 (67%) had a pre-TRT serum total testosterone measured, and deficiency [<300 ng/dl (10.4 nmol/l)] was found in 360 out of 1482 (24%). Post-TRT serum total testosterone was measured within 6 months of TRT initiation in 377 out of 1482 (25%) men. Conclusion TRT was common in HIV-infected men, though evidence for pre-TRT testosterone deficiency was lacking in 76%. Endocrine guidelines for post-TRT monitoring were uncommonly followed. Given cardiovascular and other risks associated with TRT, efforts should focus on understanding factors driving these TRT practices in HIV-infected men. PMID:25387318

  10. Influence of geometry and materials on the axial and torsional strength of the head-neck taper junction in modular hip replacements: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Fallahnezhad, Khosro; Farhoudi, Hamidreza; Oskouei, Reza H; Taylor, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The assembly force is important in establishing the mechanical environment at the head-neck taper junction of modular hip replacements. Previous experimental results of the assembled taper junctions with different material combinations (Co-28Cr-6Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) reported similar axial strengths (pull-off loads), but lower torsional strengths (twist-off moments) for the CoCr/CoCr junction. However, mechanics of the junction and the strength behaviour have not been understood yet. A three dimensional finite element model of an isolated femoral head-neck junction was developed to explore the assembly and disassembly procedures, particularly the axial and torsional strengths for different material combinations and geometries. Under the same assembly load, the contacting length between the CoCr head and titanium neck was greater than that of in CoCr/CoCr. The contact length in the titanium neck was more sensitive to the assembly force when compared to the CoCr neck. For instance, with increasing the assembly force from 1890 to 3700N, the contact length increased by 88% for CoCr/Ti and 59% for CoCr/CoCr junctions. The torsional strength of the junction was related to the lateral deformation of the neck material due to the applied moment. The angular mismatch existing between the head and neck components was found to play the main role in the torsional strength of the junction. The smaller mismatch angle the higher torsional strength. It is suggested to consider reducing the mismatch angle, particularly in CoCr/CoCr junctions, and ensure a sufficiently high assembly force is applied by impaction for this combination. PMID:26807768

  11. Are periprosthetic tissue reactions observed after revision of total disc replacement comparable to the reactions observed after total hip or knee revision surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Punt, Ilona M.; Austen, Shennah; Cleutjens, Jack P.M.; Kurtz, Steven M.; ten Broeke, René H.M.; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W.; Willems, Paul C.; van Ooij, André

    2011-01-01

    Study design Comparative study. Objective To compare periprosthetic tissue reactions observed after total disc replacement (TDR), total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision surgery. Summary of background data Prosthetic wear debris leading to particle disease, followed by osteolysis, is often observed after THA and TKA. Although the presence of polyethylene (PE) particles and periprosthetic inflammation after TDR has been proven recently, osteolysis is rarely observed. The clinical relevance of PE wear debris in the spine remains poorly understood. Methods Number, size and shape of PE particles, as well as quantity and type of inflammatory cells in periprosthetic tissue retrieved during Charité TDR (n=22), THA (n=10) and TKA (n=4) revision surgery were compared. Tissue samples were stained with hematoxylin/eosin and examined by using light microscopy with bright field and polarized light. Results After THA, large numbers of PE particles <6 µm were observed, which were mainly phagocytosed by macrophages. The TKA group had a broad size range with many larger PE particles and more giant cells. In TDR, the size range was similar to that observed in TKA. However, the smallest particles were the most prevalent with 75% of the particles being <6 µm, as seen in revision THA. In TDR, both macrophages and giant cells were present with a higher number of macrophages. Conclusions Both small and large PE particles are present after TDR revision surgery compatible with both THA and TKA wear patterns. The similarities between periprosthetic tissue reactions in the different groups may give more insight in the clinical relevance of PE particles and inflammatory cells in the lumbar spine. The current findings may help to improve TDR design as applied from technologies previously developed in THA and TKA with the goal of a longer survival of TDR. PMID:21336235

  12. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Infected Pacemaker Leads After Replacement of a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device

    PubMed Central

    Said, Salah A.M.; Nijhuis, Rogier; Derks, Anita; Droste, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 70 Final Diagnosis: Pacemaker leads endocarditis Symptoms: Bacterial lead endocarditis • congestive heart failure • fever • pacemaker dysfunction Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Pacemaker box replacement due to end-of-service Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been demonstrated to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced, drug-refractory heart failure. Procedure-related mortality is less than 1% in larger studies. Approximately10% of CRT patients have to undergo surgical revision because of infections, dislocations, or unacceptable electrical behavior manifested as high threshold, unstable sensing, or unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation. Case Report: A 70-year-old man with symptomatic congestive heart failure underwent implantation of a biventricular pacemaker on the left anterior chest wall in 2003 and pulse generator exchange in August 2009. The patient responded well to CRT. At follow-up, the pacing system functioned normally. In September 2009, in the context of a predialysis program, an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in another hospital for assessment and evaluation of chronic kidney disease. This procedure was complicated with peripheral thrombophlebitis that was managed appropriately with complete recovery. Eight months later (May 2010), the patient was admitted to our hospital with fever, anemia, and elevated infection parameters. During admission, blood cultures grew Staphylococcus epidermidis. The chest X-ray, lung perfusion scintigraphy, and CT scan depicted pulmonary embolism and infarction. The right ventricular lead threshold was found to be increased to 7 volts with unsuccessful capture. Echocardiography demonstrated vegetations on leads. The entire pacing system was explanted, but the patient expired few days later following percutaneous removal due to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: In heart failure

  13. YouTube Videos to Create a “Virtual Hospital Experience” for Hip and Knee Replacement Patients to Decrease Preoperative Anxiety: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Katharyn; Kazmerchak, Shari; Pratt, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background With declining reimbursement to health care systems, face-to-face time between patients and providers to optimize preoperative education and counseling may be challenging. Objective Because high patient anxiety prior to surgery has been linked to more severe and persistent pain after joint replacement surgery, the Orthopedic Surgery Department at Mayo Clinic in Florida created a playlist of 16 YouTube videos aimed at creating a virtual hospital experience for primary total hip and knee joint replacement patients. A randomized trial was then performed to evaluate the potential impact of viewing this playlist on preoperative anxiety. Methods Each patient completed a Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) score assessment at the time of the routine preoperative clinic visit and then randomized based on his/her gender, type of surgery, and initial GAD score to either the control group of standard education (education at face-to-face clinical visits as well as printed educational materials) or the treatment group (standard education plus access to the YouTube playlist). On the morning of the patient’s surgery, the same survey was repeated. Of the 65 patients who consented to participate in the study, 53 completed the study (82%) with 28 of 29 (97% completed) in the control group and 25 of 36 (69% completed) in the treatment group. Results Overall, the results showed a trend toward less anxiety in patients who viewed the YouTube videos; this was exhibited by a reduction in the median GAD score by 1 point. This trend is more clearly present in patients with high preoperative anxiety (predominantly women), as seen in the reduction of the median GAD score by 6 points in the treatment group. Conclusions Although our experience is limited, our results indicate that a series of tailored videos may decrease patient anxiety preoperatively. We recommend further exploration of both this concept and the use of social media tools in preoperative patient education. Trial

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Isolate Staphylococcus aureus LHSKBClinical, Isolated from an Infected Hip

    PubMed Central

    Stipetic, Laurence H.; Hamilton, Graham; Dalby, Matthew J.; Davies, Robert L.; Meek, R. M. Dominic; Ramage, Gordon; Smith, David G. E.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of a clinical isolate of Staphylococcus aureus from an orthopedic infection. Phenotypically diverse Staphylococcus aureus strains are associated with orthopedic infections and subsequent implant failure, and some are highly resistant to antibiotics. This genome sequence will support further analyses of strains causing orthopedic infections. PMID:25931597

  15. Management of periprosthetic joint infection after total hip arthroplasty using a custom made articulating spacer (CUMARS); the Exeter experience.

    PubMed

    Tsung, Jason D; Rohrsheim, James A L; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Wilson, Matthew J; Howell, Jonathan R

    2014-09-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after THA is a major complication with an incidence of 1%-3%. We report our experiences with a technique using a custom-made articulating spacer (CUMARS) at the first of two-stage treatment for PJI. This technique uses widely available all-polyethylene acetabular components and the Exeter Universal stem, fixed using antibiotic loaded acrylic cement. Seventy-six hips were treated for PJI using this technique. Performed as the first of a two-stage procedure, good functional results were commonly seen, leading to postponing second stage indefinitely with retention of the CUMARS prosthesis in 34 patients. The CUMARS technique presents an alternative to conventional spacers, using readily available components that are well tolerated, allowing weight bearing and mobility, and achieving comparable eradication rates. PMID:24851790

  16. Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... this view, I mean this is the traditional Smith Meet Jeu De view of the acetabulum,. I ... re using only part of what’s called the “Smith-Peterson approach.” The true Smith- Peterson, you would ...

  17. What Is a Hip Replacement?

    MedlinePlus

    ... you will meet a respiratory therapist and a physical therapist. The respiratory therapist may ask you to breathe ... fluid out of your lungs after surgery. The physical therapist will teach you how to sit up, bend ...

  18. Total Hip Replacement Learning Module

    MedlinePlus

    ... Now OKOJ OKOJ Home JBJS JBJS Home Education Education Services CME Transcript Maintenance of Certification Learning Portfolio Examination & ResStudy Center Education by Area of Interest Adult Reconstruction Foot and ...

  19. In vitro measurement of strain in the bone cement surrounding the femoral component of total hip replacements during simulated gait and stair-climbing.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, D O; Burke, D W; Jasty, M; Sedlacek, R C; Harris, W H

    1996-09-01

    The strains in the cement mantle surrounding the cemented femoral component of a total hip replacement were measured in vitro, using strain gauges embedded within the cement mantle adjacent to the femoral component in femurs from cadavers under physiologic loads simulating both single-limb stance and stair-climbing. Cement strains in the most proximal portion of the cement mantle were measured with and without full contact of the collar of the femoral stem on the cortex of the medial portion of the femoral neck during both loading conditions. To our knowledge, these are the first studies to contrast by direct measurement the strain profile in the cement mantle of a cemented femoral component under simulated stair-climbing with that occurring under simulated single-limb stance. They extend the findings from finite element analyses and from clinical specimens retrieved at autopsy in identifying those regions of the cement mantle most likely to fail. At two specific foci, the magnitude of the strain in the cement mantle approaches values that could lead to early fatigue failure of the cement. The two regions in which the strains were highest (greater than 1,000 microstrain) were the most proximal portions of the cement mantle and near the tip of the femoral component. Although these two regions are recognized areas of high strain and also common sites of cement debonding and cement mantle failure, the strain-gauge studies showed that the magnitude of cement strains in the proximal portion of the cement mantle were highest during stair-climbing; in contrast, high strains at the tip region occurred in both gait and stair-climbing. Contact between the collar and the medial portion of the femoral neck reduced the strain in the proximal portion of the cement mantle not only in single-limb stance but in stair-climbing as well. The level of strain recorded in these studies for a simulated person weighing 115 pounds (52 kg) could lead to cement fracture during extended in

  20. Deep recurrent infection of the hip after tumoral resection in an 18–years old male–a case report

    PubMed Central

    Negrusoiu, M

    2008-01-01

    An 18 years old male was referred to us 4 years after major tumoral surgery. In 2002 he was diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma of the proximal two–thirds of his left femur. Wide resection of the tumor was performed, with a makeshift implant one–stage reconstruction, followed by a combination of chemo and radiotherapy for another 6 months. Eight months after surgery a deep infection of the hip developed, and despite antibiotic treatment and two consecutive debridments and lavage the results were negative. When we first saw the patient in 2006, he still had an active infection in his left hip and a septic general appearance. A two–stage revision was performed and a modular tumoral reconstruction was implanted. At two years follow up the patient presents no signs of recurrence neither of the infection nor of the primary tumor. PMID:20108525

  1. [Early reoperation for infection in orthopedic surgery of the leg (arthroplasties and hip surgical procedures excluded)].

    PubMed

    Lortat-Jacob, A; Hardy, P; Benoit, J

    1990-01-01

    The authors report 32 cases of post-operative infections reoperated before the first month of which 12 articular fractures of the tibia. 6 tibial osteotomies of valgisation, 6 tibial diaphyseal fractures, 2 fractures of the lower extremity of the femur, 2 bimalleolar fractures, 1 serious knee sprain, 1 patellar fracture, 1 calcaneum fracture and an arthroscopic arthrolysis of the knee. Twelve of them had an articular infection. Globally, they have obtained 22 satisfactory results (very good or good) and 10 non satisfactory results out of which 2 deaths and 1 amputation. The bad results were due either to a particularly aggressive germ (streptococcus and gas gangrene), or to an articular infection insufficiently controlled: 5 out of the 10 arthrites on infected articular fractures have had a non satisfactory result. As for metaphyseal infections, a simple cleaning has given 4 very good results out of 6, the 2 excluded being very serious and special cases. For the 6 diaphyseal leg infections after osteosynthesis, the early reoperation has not avoided a secundary graft in a picture of infected pseudoarthrosis. In view of this series, the authors propose to adapt the cleaning operation to the localisation and to the presence or not of an articular infection. PMID:2148414

  2. [Pseudotumors caused by hip prostheses].

    PubMed

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Lohman, Martina; Alberty, Anne

    2015-01-01

    More than 100000 hip replacements have been performed in Finland. In the hip replacement operations performed due to osteoarthritis, the artificial joint surfaces are made of metal, plastic or ceramics. Pseudotumors associated with metal-on-metal (MoM) sliding surfaces have received worldwide attention. Soft issue lesions, not always symptomatic, may develop around the joint replacements. These may even require joint revision surgery. PMID:26237883

  3. Application of an anisotropic bone-remodelling model based on a damage-repair theory to the analysis of the proximal femur before and after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Doblaré, M; García, J M

    2001-09-01

    In this work, a new model for internal anisotropic bone remodelling is applied to the study of the remodelling behaviour of the proximal femur before and after total hip replacement (THR). This model considers bone remodelling under the scope of a general damage-repair theory following the principles of continuum damage mechanics. A "damage-repair" tensor is defined in terms of the apparent density and Cowin's "fabric tensor", respectively, associated with porosity and directionality of the trabeculae. The different elements of a thermodynamically consistent damage theory are established, including resorption and apposition criteria, evolution law and rate of remodelling. All of these elements were introduced and discussed in detail in a previous paper (García, J. M., Martinez, M. A., Doblaré, M., 2001. An anisotrophic internal-external bone adaptation model based on a combination of CAO and continuum damage mechanics technologies. Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering 4(4), 355-378.), including the definition of the proposed mechanical stimulus and the qualitative properties of the model. In this paper, the fundamentals of the proposed model are briefly reviewed and the computational aspects of its implementation are discussed. This model is then applied to the analysis of the remodelling behaviour of the intact femur obtaining densities and mass principal values and directions very close to the experimental data. The second application involved the proximal femoral extremity after THR and the inclusion of an Exeter prosthesis. As a result of the simulation process, some well-known features previously detected in medical clinics were recovered, such as the stress yielding effect in the proximal part of the implant or the enlargement of the cortical layer at the distal part of the implant. With respect to the anisotropic properties, bone microstructure and local stiffness are known to tend to align with the stress principal directions. This

  4. Genitourinary Procedures as Risk Factors for Prosthetic Hip or Knee Infection: A Hospital-Based Prospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arjun; Osmon, Douglas R.; Hanssen, Arlen D.; Lightner, Deborah J.; Wilson, Walter R.; Steckelberg, James M.; Baddour, Larry M.; Harmsen, William S.; Mandrekar, Jay N.; Berbari, Elie F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) as a complication of routine genitourinary (GU) procedures in patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and to study the impact of antibiotic prophylaxis administered prior to these procedures. Methods. We conducted a prospective, single-center, case-control study between December 1, 2001 and May 31, 2006. Case patients were hospitalized with total hip or knee PJI. Control subjects underwent a THA or TKA and were hospitalized during the same period on the same orthopedic floor without a PJI. Data regarding demographic features and potential risk factors were collected. The outcome measure was the odds ratio (OR) of PJI after GU procedures performed within 2 years of admission. Results. A total of 339 case patients and 339 control subjects were enrolled in the study. Of these, 52 cases (15%) and 55 controls (16%) had undergone a GU procedure in the preceding 2 years. There was no increased risk of PJI for patients undergoing a GU procedure with or without antibiotic prophylaxis (adjusted OR [aOR] = 1.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2–4.5, P = .95 and aOR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.6–1.7, P = .99, respectively). Results were similar in a subset of patients with a joint age less than 6 months, less than 1 year, or greater than 1 year. Conclusions. Genitourinary procedures were not risk factors for subsequent PJI. The use of antibiotic prophylaxis before GU procedures did not decrease the risk of subsequent PJI in our study. PMID:26258154

  5. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Infected Pacemaker Leads After Replacement of a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device.

    PubMed

    Said, Salah A M; Nijhuis, Rogier; Derks, Anita; Droste, Herman

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been demonstrated to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced, drug-refractory heart failure. Procedure-related mortality is less than 1% in larger studies. Approximately10% of CRT patients have to undergo surgical revision because of infections, dislocations, or unacceptable electrical behavior manifested as high threshold, unstable sensing, or unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation. CASE REPORT A 70-year-old man with symptomatic congestive heart failure underwent implantation of a biventricular pacemaker on the left anterior chest wall in 2003 and pulse generator exchange in August 2009. The patient responded well to CRT. At follow-up, the pacing system functioned normally. In September 2009, in the context of a predialysis program, an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in another hospital for assessment and evaluation of chronic kidney disease. This procedure was complicated with peripheral thrombophlebitis that was managed appropriately with complete recovery. Eight months later (May 2010), the patient was admitted to our hospital with fever, anemia, and elevated infection parameters. During admission, blood cultures grew Staphylococcus epidermidis. The chest X-ray, lung perfusion scintigraphy, and CT scan depicted pulmonary embolism and infarction. The right ventricular lead threshold was found to be increased to 7 volts with unsuccessful capture. Echocardiography demonstrated vegetations on leads. The entire pacing system was explanted, but the patient expired few days later following percutaneous removal due to multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS In heart failure, replacement of the CRT device may be complicated by bacterial endocarditis. As noted from this case report, sudden elevation of the pacing lead threshold should prompt thorough and immediate investigation to unravel its causes, not only the electrical characteristics but also the anatomical features. PMID:27435910

  6. Endovascular PTFE-Covered Stent for Treatment of an External Iliac Artery Pseudoaneurysm in the Presence of Chronic Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Martin J. Fabian, Sebastian; Tisi, Paul

    2007-07-15

    A 75-year-old woman with an external iliac artery pseudoaneurysm, thought to have resulted from a chronic loosening and infection of a total hip replacement, was successfully treated by placement of a covered endoluminal stent.

  7. Rose Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... de l’Églantier, Gulab, Heps, Hip, Hip Fruit, Hip Sweet, Hipberry, Hop Fruit, Persian Rose, Phool Gulab, Pink Rose, Poire d’oiseaux, Rosa alba, Rosa centifolia, Rosa damascena, Rosa de castillo, Rosa ... Rose Hips, Rosa lutetiana, Rosa pomifera, Rosa rugosa, Rosa villosa, ...

  8. [Hip arthroscopy].

    PubMed

    Gollwitzer, H; Banke, I J; Schauwecker, J

    2016-02-01

    Hip arthroscopy represents an important component in the treatment of diseases of the hip joint and is nowadays an indispensible tool in modern hip-preserving surgery. This article provides a review of the basic technical principles, typical indications and complications of hip arthroscopy. Furthermore, current developments as well as possibilities and limitations of the arthroscopic technique are reviewed. PMID:26781702

  9. Clinical evolution of chronic renal patients with HIV infection in replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Saracho, Ramón; Martín Escobar, Eduardo; Comas Farnés, Jordi; Arcos, Emma; Mazuecos Blanca, Auxiliadora; Gentil Govantes, Miguel Ángel; Castro de la Nuez, Pablo; Zurriaga, Óscar; Ferrer Alamar, Manuel; Bouzas Caamaño, Encarnación; García Falcón, Teresa; Portolés Pérez, José; Herrero Calvo, José A; Chamorro Jambrina, Carlos; Moina Eguren, Íñigo; Rodrigo de Tomás, María Teresa; Abad Díez, José María; Sánchez Miret, José I; Alvarez Lipe, Rafael; Díaz Tejeiro, Rafael; Moreno Alía, Inmaculada; Torres Guinea, Marta; Huarte Loza, Enma; Artamendi Larrañaga, Marta; Fernández Renedo, Carlos; González Fernández, Raquel; Sánchez Álvarez, Emilio; Alonso de la Torre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT) infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are a special group with growing interest. In order to study the epidemiological data of HIV+ patients on RRT in Spain, we collected individual information from 2004-2011 (period of use of highly active antiretroviral therapy [HAART] in the Autonomous Communities of Andalusia, Aragon, Asturias, Catalonia, Valencia, Castilla la Mancha, Castilla León, Galicia, Madrid, La Rioja and the Basque Country, comprising 85% of the Spanish population. A total of 271 incident and 209 prevalent patients were analysed. They were compared with the remaining patients on RRT during the same period. The annual incidence was 0.8 patients per one million inhabitants, with a significant increase during the follow-up period. The proportion of prevalent HIV+ patients was 5.1 per 1,000 patients on RRT (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.4-5.8. Although glomerular diseases constituted the majority of cases (42%), diabetic nephropathy was the cause in 14% of patients. The nation-wide totals for these percentages were 13 and 25%, respectively. Compared to the total of patients in treatment, the risk of death was significantly higher in the HIV+ group: hazard ratio (HR) adjusted for age, sex and diabetes was 2.26 (95% CI 1.74 - 2.91). Hepatitis C coinfection increased the risk of death in the HIV+ group (HR 1.77; 95% CI 1.10 - 2.85). The probability of kidney transplantation in HIV+ was only 17% after 7 years, comparing with total RTT patients (HR 0.15; 95% CI: 0.10-0.24). Despite the use of HAART, the incidence of HIV+ patients on dialysis has increased; their mortality still exceeds non-HIV patients, and they have a very low rate of transplantation. It is necessary to further our knowledge of this disease in order to improve results. PMID:26409500

  10. Assessment of Patients with a DePuy ASR Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacement: Results of Applying the Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Hip Surgery in a Tertiary Referral Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Valencia, Jenaro; Gallart, Xavier; Bori, Guillem; Ramiro, Sebastián Garcia; Combalía, Andrés; Riba, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis associated with the DePuy ASR hip cup is poor and varies according to the series. This implant was withdrawn from use in 2010 and all patients needed to be assessed. We present the results of the assessment of our patients treated with this device, according to the Spanish Society of Hip Surgery (SECCA) algorithm published in 2011. This retrospective study evaluates 83 consecutive ASR cups, followed up at a mean of 2.9 years. Serum levels of chromium and cobalt, as well as the acetabular abduction angle, were determined in order to assess their possible correlation with failure, defined as the need for revision surgery. The mean Harris Hip Score was 83.2 (range 42–97). Eight arthroplasties (13.3%) required revision due to persistent pain and/or elevated serum levels of chromium/cobalt. All the cups had a correct abduction angle, and there was no correlation between elevated serum levels of metal ions and implant failure. Since two previous ASR implants were exchanged previously to the recall, the revision rate for ASR cups in our centre is 18.2% at 2.9 years. PMID:25431677

  11. Patient-related medical risk factors for periprosthetic joint infection of the hip and knee

    PubMed Central

    Eka, Aleeson

    2015-01-01

    Despite advancements and improvements in methods for preventing infection, periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a significant complication following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Prevention is the most important strategy to deal with this disabling complication, and prevention should begin with identifying patient-related risk factors. Medical risk factors, such as morbid obesity, malnutrition, hyperglycemia, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), preoperative anemia, cardiovascular disorders, chronic renal failure, smoking, alcohol abuse and depression, should be evaluated and optimized prior to surgery. Treating patients to get laboratory values under a specified threshold or cessation of certain modifiable risk factors can decrease the risk of PJI. Although significant advances have been made in past decades to identify these risk factors, there remains some uncertainty regarding the risk factors predisposing TJA patients to PJI. Through a review of the current literature, this paper aims to comprehensively evaluate and provide a better understanding of known medical risk factors for PJI after TJA. PMID:26539450

  12. Retrospective cohort study of the performance of the Pinnacle metal on metal (MoM) total hip replacement: a single-centre investigation in combination with the findings of a national retrieval centre

    PubMed Central

    Langton, David John; Sidaginamale, Raghavendra Prasad; Avery, Peter; Waller, Sue; Tank, Ghanshyabhai; Lord, James; Joyce, Thomas; Cooke, Nick; Logishetty, Raj; Nargol, Antoni Viraf Francis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine risk factors for revision in patients implanted with a commonly used metal on metal (MoM) hip replacement. Design Retrospective cohort study in combination with a prospective national retrieval study (Northern Retrieval Registry (NRR)). Setting Combined orthopaedic unit in combination with the NRR. Participants All patients implanted with a DePuy Pinnacle MoM hip prostheses by the 2 senior authors were invited to attend for a review which included clinical examination, blood metal ion measurements, radiographs and targeted imaging. Explanted components underwent wear analysis using validated methodology and these results were compared with those obtained from the NRR. Results 489 MoM Pinnacle hips were implanted into 434 patients (243 females and 191 males). Of these, 352 patients attended the MoM recall clinics. 64 patients had died during the study period. For the purposes of survival analysis, non-attendees were assumed to have well-functioning prostheses. The mean follow-up of the cohort as a whole was 89 months. 71 hips were revised. Prosthetic survival for the whole cohort was 83.6% (79.9–87.3) at 9 years. The majority of explanted devices exhibited signs of taper junction failure. Risk factors for revision were bilateral MoM prostheses, smaller Pinnacle liners, and implantation in 2006 and later years. A significant number of devices were found to be manufactured out of their specifications. This was confirmed with analysis of the wider data set from the NRR. Conclusions This device was found to have an unacceptably high revision rate. Bilateral prostheses, those implanted into female patients and devices implanted in later years were found to be at greater risk. A significant number of explanted components were found to be manufactured with bearing diameters outside of the manufacturer's stated tolerances. Our findings highlight the clinical importance of hitherto unrecognised variations in device production. PMID:27130159

  13. Improving Surveillance for Surgical Site Infections Following Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Using Diagnosis and Procedure Codes in a Provincial Surveillance Network.

    PubMed

    Rusk, Alysha; Bush, Kathryn; Brandt, Marlene; Smith, Christopher; Howatt, Andrea; Chow, Blanda; Henderson, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate hospital administrative data to identify potential surgical site infections (SSIs) following primary elective total hip or knee arthroplasty. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING All acute care facilities in Alberta, Canada. METHODS Diagnosis and procedure codes for 6 months following total hip or knee arthroplasty were used to identify potential SSI cases. Medical charts of patients with potential SSIs were reviewed by an infection control professional at the acute care facility where the patient was identified with a diagnosis or procedure code. For SSI decision, infection control professionals used the National Healthcare Safety Network SSI definition. The performance of traditional surveillance methods and administrative data-triggered medical chart review was assessed. RESULTS Of the 162 patients identified by diagnosis or procedure code, 46 (28%) were confirmed as an SSI by an infection control professional. More SSIs were identified following total hip vs total knee arthroplasty (42% vs16%). Of 46 confirmed SSI cases, 20 (43%) were identified at an acute care facility different than their procedure facility. Administrative data-triggered medical chart review with infection control professional confirmation resulted in a 1.1- to 1.7-fold increase in SSI rate compared with traditional surveillance. SSIs identified by administrative data resulted in sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 99%. CONCLUSION Medical chart review for cases identified through administrative data is an efficient supplemental SSI surveillance strategy. It improves case-finding by increasing SSI identification and making identification consistent across facilities, and in a provincial surveillance network it identifies SSIs presenting at nonprocedure facilities. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:699-703. PMID:27018968

  14. Older Person's Guide to Joint Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... he or she will refer you to an orthopedic surgeon who does hip and knee replacement surgery. ... The Arthritis Foundation Web The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons ' The American Association of Knee and Hip ...

  15. Fibular nerve palsy after hip replacement: Not only surgeon responsibility. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) a rare cause of nerve liability.

    PubMed

    Logroscino, G; Del Tedesco, F; Cambise, C; Coraci, D; Donati, F; Santilli, V; Padua, L

    2016-06-01

    Mononeuropathy after surgery may occur and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a possible pathological condition related to paresis after hip surgery. We present a case of 66-year-old man presenting severe weakness at inferior limb muscles after hip prosthesis revision. Clinic and electrophysiology showed severe right fibular nerve damage and ultrasound found a marked enlargement of the same nerve, associated with focal enlargements in other nerves. A diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies was suspected and confirmed by genetic test. The patient gradually recovered returning to a normal daily active life. Ultrasound was crucial for diagnosis. The suspicion and diagnosis of latent neuropathy, which can occur after surgical intervention, may lead to a better understand of the risks of the surgery, specific for the patient, and avoid the wrong attribution to surgical malpractice. PMID:27084090

  16. Hip instability.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew V; Sekiya, Jon K

    2010-06-01

    Hip instability is becoming a more commonly recognized source of pain and disability in patients. Traumatic causes of hip instability are often clear. Appropriate treatment includes immediate reduction, early surgery for acetabular rim fractures greater than 25% or incarcerated fragments in the joint, and close follow-up to monitor for avascular necrosis. Late surgical intervention may be necessary for residual symptomatic hip instability. Atraumatic causes of hip instability include repetitive external rotation with axial loading, generalized ligamentous laxity, and collagen disorders like Ehlers-Danlos. Symptoms caused by atraumatic hip instability often have an insidious onset. Patients may have a wide array of hip symptoms while demonstrating only subtle findings suggestive of capsular laxity. Traction views of the affected hip can be helpful in diagnosing hip instability. Open and arthroscopic techniques can be used to treat capsular laxity. We describe an arthroscopic anterior hip capsular plication using a suture technique. PMID:20473129

  17. Release of gentamicin and vancomycin from preformed spacers in infected total hip arthroplasties: measurement of concentrations and inhibitory activity in patients' drainage fluids and serum.

    PubMed

    Regis, Dario; Sandri, Andrea; Samaila, Elena; Benini, Anna; Bondi, Manuel; Magnan, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Gentamicin (G) and vancomycin (V) concentrations in drainage fluids obtained from patients during the first 24 hours after implantation of antibiotic-loaded polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) spacers in two-stage revision of infected total hip arthroplasty were studied. The inhibitory activity of drainage fluids against different multiresistant clinical isolates was investigated as well. Seven hips were treated by implantation of industrial G-loaded spacers. Vancomycin was added by manually mixing with PMMA bone cement. Serum and drainage fluid samples were collected 1, 4, and 24 hours after spacer implantation. Antibiotics concentrations and drains bactericidal titer of combination were determined against multiresistant staphylococcal strains. The release of G and V from PMMA cement at the site of infection was prompt and effective. Serum levels were below the limit of detection. The local release kinetics of G and V from PMMA cement was similar, exerting a pronounced, combined inhibitory effect in the implant site. The inhibitory activity of drainage fluids showed substantial intersubject variability related to antibiotic concentrations and differed according to the pathogens tested. Gentamicin and vancomycin were released from temporary hip spacers at bactericidal concentrations, and their use in combination exerted strong inhibition against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Coagulase Negative Staphylococci strains. PMID:24174916

  18. Taking care of your new hip joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cabrera AL. Total hip replacement. In: Frontera, WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine ... Groomes TE. Total knee replacement. In: Frontera, WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine ...

  19. Polysaccharide intercellular adhesin or protein factors in biofilm accumulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from prosthetic hip and knee joint infections.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Holger; Burandt, Eike C; Siemssen, Nicolaus; Frommelt, Lars; Burdelski, Christoph; Wurster, Sabine; Scherpe, Stefanie; Davies, Angharad P; Harris, Llinos G; Horstkotte, Matthias A; Knobloch, Johannes K-M; Ragunath, Chandran; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Mack, Dietrich

    2007-03-01

    Nosocomial staphylococcal foreign-body infections related to biofilm formation are a serious threat, demanding new therapeutic and preventive strategies. As the use of biofilm-associated factors as vaccines is critically restricted by their prevalence in natural staphylococcal populations we studied the distribution of genes involved in biofilm formation, the biofilm phenotype and production of polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) in clonally independent Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from prosthetic joint infections after total hip or total knee arthroplasty. Biofilm formation was detected in all S. aureus and 69.2% of S. epidermidis strains. Importantly, 27% of biofilm-positive S. epidermidis produced PIA-independent biofilms, in part mediated by the accumulation associated protein (Aap). Protein-dependent biofilms were exclusively found in S. epidermidis strains from total hip arthroplasty (THA). In S. aureus PIA and proteins act cooperatively in biofilm formation regardless of the infection site. PIA and protein factors like Aap are of differential importance for the pathogenesis of S. epidermidis in prosthetic joint infections (PJI) after THA and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), implicating that icaADBC cannot serve as a general virulence marker in this species. In S. aureus biofilm formation proteins are of overall importance and future work should focus on the identification of functionally active molecules. PMID:17187854

  20. Hip Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIPS. See your doctor. Use ice and an anti-inflammatory medicine to relieve the pain. *3. Do you ... hip pain may be from ARTHRITIS. Try an anti-inflammatory medicine. If you don't feel better, see ...

  1. Clinical and radiographic outcomes of acetabular impaction grafting without cage reinforcement for revision hip replacement: a minimum ten-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Gilbody, J; Taylor, C; Bartlett, G E; Whitehouse, S L; Hubble, M J W; Timperley, A J; Howell, J R; Wilson, M J

    2014-02-01

    Impaction bone grafting for the reconstitution of bone stock in revision hip surgery has been used for nearly 30 years. Between 1995 and 2001 we used this technique in acetabular reconstruction, in combination with a cemented component, in 304 hips in 292 patients revised for aseptic loosening. The only additional supports used were stainless steel meshes placed against the medial wall or laterally around the acetabular rim to contain the graft. All Paprosky grades of defect were included. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were collected in surviving patients at a minimum of ten years after the index operation. Mean follow-up was 12.4 years (sd 1.5) (10.0 to 16.0). Kaplan-Meier survival with revision for aseptic loosening as the endpoint was 85.9% (95% CI 81.0 to 90.8) at 13.5 years. Clinical scores for pain relief remained satisfactory, and there was no difference in clinical scores between cups that appeared stable and those that appeared radiologically loose. PMID:24493183

  2. AVASCULAR NECROSIS OF THE FEMORAL HEAD IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR CERAMIC-CERAMIC JOINT REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Cabrita, Henrique Amorim; Santos, Alexandre Leme de Godoy; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Lima, Ana Lúcia Munhoz; Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba; Ejnisman, Leandro; Gurgel, Henrique Melo Campos; Uip, David; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the initial functional results and early complication rate of ceramic-ceramic total hip replacements among patients living with HIV who presented osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Method: Twelve HIV–positive patients with a diagnosis of osteonecrosis of the incongruent femoral head were evaluated using clinical and laboratory criteria and the WOMAC functional scale before and after treatment with joint replacement. Results: We observed that 83.3% of the subjects were taking protease inhibitors, 75% had dyslipidemia and 66.6% had lipodystrophy syndrome. The improvement over the evolution of the WOMAC score was statistically significant at six and twelve months after the operation, in comparison with the preoperative score. We did not observe complications secondary to this procedure. Conclusion: Total hip arthroplasty with a ceramic-ceramic implant for treating avascular necrosis of the hip is an appropriate surgical option for this portion of the population. It provides a significant initial functional improvement and a low early complication rate. PMID:27047876

  3. Biomaterials in total joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Katti, Kalpana S

    2004-12-10

    The current state of materials systems used in total hip replacement is presented in this paper. An overview of the various material systems used in total hip replacement reported in literature is presented in this paper. Metals, polymers, ceramics and composites are used in the design of the different components of hip replacement implants. The merits and demerits of these material systems are evaluated in the context of mechanical properties most suitable for total joint replacement such as a hip implant. Current research on advanced polymeric nanocomposites and biomimetic composites as novel materials systems for bone replacement is also discussed. This paper examines the current research in the materials science and the critical issues and challenges in these materials systems that require further research before application in biomedical industry. PMID:15556342

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of adjunctive cerclage wire fixation for the prevention of periprosthetic femur fractures using cementless press-fit total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Scott A; Kim, Stanley E; Roe, Simon; Pozzi, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Periprosthetic femoral fractures are a common complication associated with cementless press-fit total hip arthroplasty. The use of prophylactic cerclage wire fixation has been advocated to reduce this complication. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a double loop cerclage wire, used as adjunctive fixation, increased the peak torsional load to failure in femora implanted with press-fit cementless stems. Peak torsional load to failure was compared between femora without adjunctive fixation and femora receiving a 1 mm double loop cerclage wire placed proximally to the lesser trochanter. Femora treated with adjunctive cerclage wire fixation failed at 20% greater peak torque (P = 0.0001). In conclusion, a double loop cerclage wire may aid in the prevention of periprosthetic fractures associated with press-fit cementless femoral stems. PMID:27387718

  5. A Simplified Method for the Aspiration of Bone Marrow from Patients Undergoing Hip and Knee Joint Replacement for Isolating Mesenchymal Stem Cells and In Vitro Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Subhash C.; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Ganguly, Milan; Veillette, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The procedure for aspiration of bone marrow from the femur of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) may vary from an OR (operating room) to OR based on the surgeon's skill and may lead to varied extent of clotting of the marrow and this, in turn, presents difficulty in the isolation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from such clotted bone marrow. We present a simple detailed protocol for aspirating bone marrow from such patients, isolation, and characterization of MSCs from the aspirated bone marrow specimens and show that the bone marrow presented no clotting or exhibited minimal clotting. This represents an economical source and convenient source of MSCs from bone marrow for use in regenerative medicine. Also, we presented the detailed protocol and showed that the MSCs derived from such bone marrow specimens exhibited MSCs characteristics and generated micromass cartilages, the recipe for regenerative medicine for osteoarthritis. The protocols we presented can be used as standard operating procedures (SOPs) by researchers and clinicians. PMID:27057356

  6. A Simplified Method for the Aspiration of Bone Marrow from Patients Undergoing Hip and Knee Joint Replacement for Isolating Mesenchymal Stem Cells and In Vitro Chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Subhash C; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Ganguly, Milan; Veillette, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The procedure for aspiration of bone marrow from the femur of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) may vary from an OR (operating room) to OR based on the surgeon's skill and may lead to varied extent of clotting of the marrow and this, in turn, presents difficulty in the isolation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from such clotted bone marrow. We present a simple detailed protocol for aspirating bone marrow from such patients, isolation, and characterization of MSCs from the aspirated bone marrow specimens and show that the bone marrow presented no clotting or exhibited minimal clotting. This represents an economical source and convenient source of MSCs from bone marrow for use in regenerative medicine. Also, we presented the detailed protocol and showed that the MSCs derived from such bone marrow specimens exhibited MSCs characteristics and generated micromass cartilages, the recipe for regenerative medicine for osteoarthritis. The protocols we presented can be used as standard operating procedures (SOPs) by researchers and clinicians. PMID:27057356

  7. The use of postoperative irradiation for the prevention of heterotopic bone after total hip replacement with biologic fixation (porous coated) prosthesis: An animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Konski, A.; Weiss, C.; Rosier, R.; Poulter, C.; Pelligrini, V.; Anthony, P.; Evarts, C.M.; Richardson, M.; Henzler, M.; Rubin, P. )

    1990-04-01

    Radiation has been shown to be effective in the prevention of heterotopic bone. The exact etiology of heterotopic bone is unknown. Total hip prosthetic devices that do not depend upon bone cement for fixation have become increasingly popular. The mechanism by which the bone forms around the prosthesis is similar to the process by which fractures heal which has been shown to be sensitive to irradiation. Using a rabbit model we have undertaken a study to investigate the effect of irradiation on the bony ingrowth on porous coated implants. Forty-five rabbits had porous coated implants surgically placed in the tibiae bilaterally. Each rabbit had one tibia randomly irradiated with 1,000 cGy in 5 fractions starting on the first post-operative day. Animals were sacrificed weekly starting 2 weeks post-operatively and the tibae were sent for pullout studies. The amount of force necessary to pullout the treated tibae was statistically less than the amount of force necessary to remove the untreated tibae at 2 weeks. From 3 weeks on there was no difference in the force necessary to remove the prosthesis from the untreated or treated tibae. Histologically, the untreated tibae showed bone formation while the treated tibae did not. Because of these results, it is suggested that the treatment of patients at risk for development of heterotopic bone be modified to only include the area between the femur and pelvis avoiding treatment of the prosthetic device.

  8. Cancer incidence and causes of death among total hip replacement patients: a review based on Nordic cohorts with a special emphasis on metal-on-metal bearings.

    PubMed

    Visuri, T I; Pukkala, E; Pulkkinen, P; Paavolainen, P

    2006-02-01

    All patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA) are exposed to soluble or particulate forms of Co and Cr. Adverse effects of these wear products are not known. Data from Nordic registries is used to estimate adverse effects on a large scale, based mostly on metal-on-polyethylene bearings. Cancer incidence was in line with the general population when the patients were operated on for all indications and significantly decreased when the indication was primary osteoarthritis. Stomach cancer and colorectal cancers were significantly reduced and prostate cancer and skin melanoma significantly increased. There was no significant excess of cancer in target organs, i.e. liver, kidney, or haematopoietic cancers. THA patients had reduced mortality and extended life expectancy compared with standard Nordic populations. All-site cancer incidence of the first-generation metal-on-metal McKee-Farrar patients operated on for primary osteoarthritis was in line with the general population after follow-up for up to 28 years. General mortality of these patients was also reduced and they also had an extended life expectancy. Temporary increases in haematopoietic cancers at different follow-up periods were seen in some cohorts. This malignancy deserves a special record linkage monitoring while large numbers of young patients are provided with the second generation of metal-on-metal prostheses. PMID:16669405

  9. Total hip replacement through a posterior approach using a 22 mm diameter femoral head : the role of the transverse acetabular ligament and capsular repair in reducing the rate of dislocation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Sharma, S; James, J; Hodgkinson, J P; Hemmady, M V

    2014-09-01

    Despite a lack of long-term follow-up, there is an increasing trend towards using femoral heads of large diameter in total hip replacement (THR), partly because of the perceived advantage of lower rates of dislocation. However, increasing the size of the femoral head is not the only way to reduce the rate of dislocation; optimal alignment of the components and repair of the posterior capsule could achieve a similar effect. In this prospective study of 512 cemented unilateral THRs (Male:Female 230:282) performed between 2004 and 2011, we aimed to determine the rate of dislocation in patients who received a 22 mm head on a 9/10 Morse taper through a posterior approach with capsular repair and using the transverse acetabular ligament (TAL) as a guide for the alignment of the acetabular component. The mean age of the patients at operation was 67 years (35 to 89). The mean follow-up was 2.8 years (0.5 to 6.6). Pre- and post-operative assessment included Oxford hip, Short Form-12 and modified University of California Los Angeles and Merle D'Aubigne scores. The angles of inclination and anteversion of the acetabular components were measured using radiological software. There were four dislocations (0.78%), all of which were anterior. In conclusion, THR with a 22 mm diameter head performed through a posterior approach with capsular repair and using the TAL as a guide for the alignment of the acetabular component was associated with a low rate of dislocation. PMID:25183591

  10. Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials of Antibiotics and Antiseptics for Preventing Infection in People Receiving Primary Total Hip and Knee Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Michael; Darouiche, Rabih

    2015-01-01

    Infection rates in primary (first-time) major joint arthroplasty continue to be a significant issue. The effect of antibiotic and antiseptic prophylaxis on outcomes for this type of surgery has not been adequately reviewed. A systematic search of the main databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating antibiotics and antiseptics was conducted to evaluate the predetermined endpoints of infection, adverse events, costs, quality of life, and concentration levels of antibiotics. A meta-analysis using pooled effect estimates and fixed-effect and random-effect models of risk ratios (RR), calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI), was utilized. Thirty (30) RCTs examined the effects of antibiotic and antiseptic prophylaxis on infections after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) (total of 11,597 participants) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (total of 6,141 participants). For THA, preoperative systemic intravenous (i.v.) antibiotic prophylaxis may be effective in reducing the incidence of infection after THA from 6 months to ≥5 years. For TKA, there is no RCT evidence that antibiotics and/or antiseptics have any effect on infection rate. Preoperative systemic antibiotic prophylaxis in primary THA may be effective at reducing infection rate. There is no evidence that timing, route of administration, or concentration levels have an effect on reducing infections, adverse events, or costs in THA or TKA. Many of the trials included in this study were published in the 1980s and 1990s. Thus, it would be important to replicate a number of them based on current patient demographics and incidence of bacterial resistance. PMID:26259793

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of HipA Mediated Multidrug Tolerance and its Neutralization by HipB

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Maria A.; Piro, Kevin M.; Xu, Weijun; Hansen, Sonja; Lewis, Kim; Brennan, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Bacterial multidrug tolerance is largely responsible for the inability of antibiotics to eradicate infections and is caused by a small population of dormant bacteria called persisters. HipA is a critical Escherichia coli persistence factor that is normally neutralized by HipB, a transcription repressor, which also regulates hipBA expression. Here we report multiple structures of HipA and a HipA-HipB-DNA complex. HipA has a eukaryotic Ser/Thr kinase-like fold and can phosphorylate the translation factor, EF-Tu, suggesting a persistence mechanism via cell stasis. The HipA-HipB-DNA structure reveals the HipB-operator binding mechanism, ~70° DNA bending and unexpected HipA-DNA contacts. Dimeric HipB interacts with two HipA molecules to inhibit its kinase activity through sequestration and conformational inactivation. Combined, these studies suggest mechanisms for HipA-mediated persistence and its neutralization by HipB. PMID:19150849

  12. A 20-year study on treating childhood infective endocarditis with valve replacement in a single cardiac center in China

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian; Yin, Liang; Lin, Yiyun; Zhang, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Children with infective endocarditis (IE) have to undergo valve replacement instead of valve repair in China due to severe valve damage. The present study is to review our experience on surgical treatment of children with IE in reference to the incidence, pathologic status, diagnosis, surgical strategies and outcomes. Methods We reviewed 35 patients with a mean age of 13.7±2.2 years who were underwent valve replacement surgery for IE during the period from January 1993 to December 2013. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE) evaluation and transesophageal echocardiography during operation were performed in all patients. All the children underwent chart review and retrospective risk-hazard analysis. Results Among the patients surveyed congenital cardiac lesions were present in 15 (42.8%), rheumatic heart valve disease in 2 (5.7%) and previous heart surgery in 2 (5.7%). The median stay of intensive care unit was 6 days. Intraoperative findings showed that the endocarditis involved mostly the mitral and aortic valves (88.5%). Triple or quadruple valve involvement was found in one patient each. Ten-year freedom from IE-related death and re-intervention was 94.2% and 91.6%, respectively. Conclusions Children undergoing surgery for IE frequently have advanced disease with embolic complications. Although valve replacement is not the primary option for pediatric IE, the rate of 5-year survival and freedom from re-operation was optimal prognostically. Pediatric physicians should pay attention to the common clinical features of IE so that the native valve is preserved well. PMID:27499950

  13. Wear of 36-mm BIOLOX(R) delta ceramic-on-ceramic bearing in total hip replacements under edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Fisher, John; Tipper, Joanne L; Williams, Sophie; Jennings, Louise M

    2013-05-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have become of great interest due to the substantial improvements in the manufacturing techniques and material properties and due to polyethylene wear debris-induced osteolysis and the issues with metal wear debris and ion release by metal-on-metal bearings. Edge loading conditions due to translational malpositioning (microseparation conditions) have been shown to replicate clinically relevant wear mechanisms and increase the wear of ceramic-on-ceramic bearings; thus, it was necessary to test new bearing materials and designs under these adverse conditions. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of increasing head size on the wear of BIOLOX(®) delta ceramic-on-ceramic bearings under edge loading conditions due to rotational (steep cup inclination angle) and translational (microseparation) malpositioning. In this study, six 36-mm ceramic-on-ceramic bearings (BIOLOX delta, CeramTec, Germany) were tested under standard and edge loading conditions using the Leeds II hip simulator and compared to the 28-mm bearings tested and published previously under identical conditions. The mean wear rate under standard gait conditions was below 0.1 mm(3)/million cycles for both the 28-mm and the 36-mm ceramic-on-ceramic bearings, and increasing the inclination angle did not affect the wear rates. The introduction of microseparation to the gait cycle increased the wear rate of ceramic-on-ceramic bearing and resulted in stripe wear on the femoral heads. Under microseparation conditions, the wear rate of size 36-mm bearings (0.22 mm(3)/million cycles) was significantly higher (p = 0.004) than that for size 28-mm bearings (0.13 mm(3)/million cycles). This was due to the larger contact area for the larger bearings and deprived lubrication under edge loading conditions. The wear rate of BIOLOX delta ceramic-on-ceramic bearings under microseparation conditions was still very low (<0.25 mm(3)/million cycles) compared to earlier generation

  14. Prevention of orthopaedic wound infections: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Douglas, P; Asimus, M; Swan, J; Spigelman, A

    2001-12-01

    Using clinical practice improvement methodology, a project was undertaken to reduce the incidence of surgical wound infections following elective hip and knee replacement surgery. A team was established, key measures for improvement were identified, strategies for change were developed and an action plan was implemented. Outcomes for this project included a reduction in the rate of clean surgical wound infection for joint replacement surgery from 28% to zero. Average length of stay for total hip replacement surgery was reduced from 13.9 to 9.3 days and from 14.6 to 10.4 days for total knee replacement surgery. Guidelines for patient selection were developed along with a protocol for the management of preparation to prevent urinary tract infections. Post-discharge surveillance and a preoperative rehabilitation and exercise programme have been implemented. There is potential for wider uptake and implementation of the quality principles described herein. PMID:11856413

  15. A long-term follow-up of 60 Lord total hip arthroplasties in rheumatic disease: a mean follow-up of 14 years.

    PubMed

    Lybäck, C C; Lybäck, C O; Kyrö, A; Kautiainen, H J; Belt, E A

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the survivorship of 60 total hip arthroplasties using the cementless Lord prosthesis in 51 patients with inflammatory joint disease. Patients were operated on between the years 1985 and 1988. The mean follow-up time was 13.8 (4.0-18.6) years. During the follow-up, one deep infection was encountered, and seven patients died of causes unrelated to the hip replacement. Revision surgery or death of the patient was used as an end point. The overall survival was 88.1% [95% confidence interval (CI) 76.6-94.1] for the stem, and 64.3% (95% CI 50.6-75.1) for the cup at 15 years. Causes for revision surgery were loosening of the cup in 17 hips, loosening of both components in five hips, and one deep infection. PMID:16691388

  16. Length of Stay and Achievement of Functional Milestones in a Rural First Nations Population in Northwestern Ontario during Acute-Care Admission after Total Hip Replacement: A Retrospective Chart Review

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, Nicole; Hopman, Wilma M.; Kelly, Len

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To understand the postoperative acute-care physiotherapy course for First Nations people returning after total hip replacement (THR) to remote communities with limited rehabilitation services and to evaluate length of stay and attainment of functional milestones after THR to determine to what extent an urban-based clinical pathway is transferrable to and effective for First Nations patients in a rural setting. Methods: Data were collected retrospectively by reviewing charts of patients who underwent THR in the Northwest Ontario catchment area from 2007 through 2012. Results: For the 36 patient charts reviewed, median length of stay (LOS) at the Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre (SLMHC) was 7.5 days (range 2–335); median LOS from time of surgery at the regional hospital (Thunder Bay Regional Health Centre) to discharge from SLMHC was 13.5 days; and median time for mobilizing and stairs was 9 days (range 1–93). Conclusion: Commonly accepted urban clinical pathways are not a good fit for smaller rural hospitals from which First Nations patients return to remote communities without rehabilitation services. LOS in a rural acute-care facility is similar to LOS in an urban rehabilitation facility. PMID:26839456

  17. Implant Design in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Taek

    2016-01-01

    When performing cementless hip arthroplasty, it is critical to achieve firm primary mechanical stability followed by biological fixation. In order to achieve this, it is essential to fully understand characteristics of implant design. In this review, the authors review fixation principles for a variety of implants used for cementless hip replacement and considerations for making an optimal selection. PMID:27536647

  18. Hip arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    Johnson D, Weiss WM. Basic arthroscopic principles. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ... 11. Sanchez VMI, Meza AO. Hip arthroscopy. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ...

  19. Hip arthroscopy☆

    PubMed Central

    de Amorim Cabrita, Henrique Antônio Berwanger; de Castro Trindade, Christiano Augusto; de Campos Gurgel, Henrique Melo; Leal, Rafael Demura; de Souza Marques, Ricardo da Fonseca

    2014-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a safe method for treating a variety of pathological conditions that were unknown until a decade ago. Femoroacetabular impingement is the commonest of these pathological conditions and the one with the best results when treated early on. The instruments and surgical technique for hip arthroscopy continue to evolve. New indications for hip arthroscopy has been studied as the ligamentum teres injuries, capsular repair in instabilities, dissection of the sciatic nerve and repair of gluteal muscles tears (injuries to the hip rotator cuff), although still with debatable reproducibility. The complication rate is low, and ever-better results with fewer complications should be expected with the progression of the learning curve. PMID:26229924

  20. Hip ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Garello, Isabella; Marchetti, Alessandra; Palmieri, Federigo; Altafini, Luisa; Valle, Maura; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2012-12-01

    In newborns, US has an established role in the detection and management of developmental dysplasia of the hip. Later in childhood, when the limping child is a major diagnostic dilemma, US is extremely helpful in the identification of the varied disease processes underlying this condition, as transient synovitis, septic arthritis, Perthes disease and slipped femoral capital epiphysis. In adolescent practicing sporting activities, US is an excellent means to identify apophyseal injures about the pelvic ring, especially when avulsions are undisplaced and difficult-to-see radiographically. Later on, in the adulthood, US is an effective modality to diagnose tendon and muscle injuries about the hip and pelvis, identify effusion or synovitis within the hip joint or its adjacent bursae and guide the treatment of these findings. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the most common pathologic conditions about the hip, in which the contribution of US is relevant for the diagnostic work-up. PMID:21571471

  1. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Pulled hip flexor - aftercare; Hip flexor injury - aftercare; Hip flexor tear - aftercare; Iliopsoas strain - aftercare; Strained iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Torn iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Psoas strain - aftercare

  2. Cemented total hip prosthesis: Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Aliabadi, P.; Tumeh, S.S.; Weissman, B.N.; McNeil, B.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Conventional radiographs, technetium-99m bone scans, and gallium-67 scans were reviewed in 44 patients who had undergone cemented total hip joint replacement and were imaged because of suspicion of prosthesis loosening or infection. A complete radiolucent line of 2 mm or wider along the bone-cement interface or metal-cement lucency on conventional radiographs was used as the criterion for prosthetic loosening with or without infection and proved to be 54% sensitive and 96% specific. Scintigraphic criteria for prosthetic loosening were increased focal uptake of the radiopharmaceutical for the femoral component and increased focal or diffuse uptake for the acetabular component. For bone scintigraphy, sensitivity was 73% and specificity was 96%. Combining the results of conventional radiographs and bone scans increased sensitivity to 84% and decreased specificity to 92% for the diagnosis of loosening, infection, or both. The study also showed that Ga-67 scintigraphy has a low sensitivity for the detection of infection.

  3. The Finnish Arthroplasty Register: report of the hip register.

    PubMed

    Puolakka, T J; Pajamäki, K J; Halonen, P J; Pulkkinen, P O; Paavolainen, P; Nevalainen, J K

    2001-10-01

    The Finnish Arthroplasty Register was established in 1980. Between 1980 and 1999, 62,841 primary and 12,224 revision total hip arthroplasties (THA) were recorded. The annual number of both primary and revision THA has increased: in 1999, the incidence of primary THAs was 93/100,000. 174 implant designs have been used, but the 6 commonest implants comprised 82% in 1999. Since the late 1980s, more than 40% of the hips were inserted without cement. Over 47% of the cementless primary hip prostheses were used in patients younger than 60 years and over 93% of the cemented primary hips were used in patients 60 years or older. The 10-year survival rate was 72 (95% CI 67-76)% in patients younger than 55 years and 90 (89-91)% in patients older than 70 years. The commonest reasons for revision were aseptic loosening (65%), dislocation (9%) and infection (7%). In revisions, the 5-year survival of the cementless hip prosthesis improved over time: it was 85 (82-87)% in 1985-1989, 89 (88-91)% in 1990-1994 and 92 (88-95)% in 1995-1999. There are striking differences between the Arthroplasty Registers of Scandinavia as regards the end-point definition of survival. The Finnish Arthroplasty Register considers all reasons for revisions as the end-point of survival, but the Swedish register takes into account only aseptic loosening, so direct comparisons between registers are not possible. Recent data from the Finnish Arthroplasty Register indicate that the results of total hip replacements are improving in Finland. With the civic registration number, one can link and match data files. For example, with use of the Finnish Cancer Register, we found no increase in the risk of cancer after a THA. PMID:11728068

  4. Hip Surgery Candidates: A Comparative Study of Hip Osteoarthritis and Prior Hip Fracture Patient Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Ray

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess similarities and differences in patient-related characteristics before and after surgery for painful disabling hip osteoarthritis among elderly subgroups with and without a trauma history. Method: First, a cohort of 1000 hospitalized patients were assessed for trends in: perceived duration of the condition, pain intensity, functional performance ability, walking distance, body mass, and comorbidity characteristics among other factors. Then, the most salient of these patient-related characteristics were compared between 42 cases of hip osteoarthritis without a trauma history and 42 cases with a trauma history matched for age and gender, using medical records and standard data recording and analysis procedures. Results: Hip osteoarthritis cases with a prior hip fracture history had a longer duration of disability, and were more impaired functionally before surgery (p < 0.05) than those with no such history. They also had lower leg muscle strength and used more assistive devices. Conclusion: Patients undergoing hip replacement surgery for painful hip osteoarthritis who have a hip fracture history are likely to be more impaired and disabled than those with no such history. PMID:19478931

  5. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint... replace a hip joint. The device prevents dislocation in more than one anatomic plane and has...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint... replace a hip joint. The device prevents dislocation in more than one anatomic plane and has...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint... replace a hip joint. The device prevents dislocation in more than one anatomic plane and has...

  8. CoCr wear particles generated from CoCr alloy metal-on-metal hip replacements, and cobalt ions stimulate apoptosis and expression of general toxicology-related genes in monocyte-like U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Posada, Olga M; Gilmour, Denise; Tate, Rothwelle J; Grant, M Helen

    2014-11-15

    Cobalt-chromium (CoCr) particles in the nanometre size range and their concomitant release of Co and Cr ions into the patients' circulation are produced by wear at the articulating surfaces of metal-on-metal (MoM) implants. This process is associated with inflammation, bone loss and implant loosening and led to the withdrawal from the market of the DePuy ASR™ MoM hip replacements in 2010. Ions released from CoCr particles derived from a resurfacing implant in vitro and their subsequent cellular up-take were measured by ICP-MS. Moreover, the ability of such metal debris and Co ions to induce both apoptosis was evaluated with both FACS and immunoblotting. qRT-PCR was used to assess the effects on the expression of lymphotoxin alpha (LTA), BCL2-associated athanogene (BAG1), nitric oxide synthase 2 inducible (NOS2), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible alpha (GADD45A). ICP-MS showed that the wear debris released significant (p<0.05) amounts of Co and Cr ions into the culture medium, and significant (p<0.05) cellular uptake of both ions. There was also an increase (p<0.05) in apoptosis after a 48h exposure to wear debris. Analysis of qRT-PCR results found significant up-regulation (p<0.05) particularly of NOS2 and BAG1 in Co pre-treated cells which were subsequently exposed to Co ions+debris. Metal debris was more effective as an inducer of apoptosis and gene expression when cells had been pre-treated with Co ions. This suggests that if a patient receives sequential bilateral CoCr implants, the second implant may be more likely to produce adverse effects than the first one. PMID:25281833

  9. Continuous spinal analgesia with levobupivacaine for postoperative pain management: Comparison of 0.125% versus 0.0625% in elective total knee and hip replacement: A double-blind randomized study

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambrosio, Alessandro; Spadaro, Savino; Natale, Chiara; Cotoia, Antonella; Dambrosio, Michele; Cinnella, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) has not been widely used for postoperative analgesia, mainly to avoid complications from the subarachnoid injection. Recently, the introduction of low caliber CSA catheters (Spinocath®), has allowed to decrease anesthetics doses and volumes with good analgesia and reduced complications. The aim of this present study was to compare two concentrations of levobupivacaine administered through CSA for postoperative pain management after major orthopedic surgery. Secondary outcomes were adverse events associated with CSA. Material and Methods: Thirty-two patients were randomized to receive sufentanil 1 mcg/h plus levobupivacaine 0.125%-1 ml/h (Group A0.125) or 0.0625%-2 ml/h (Group B0.0625) for postoperative analgesia through CSA catheter, connected to the elastomeric pump over 48 h. The quality of analgesia was assessed based on pain intensity by Visual Analogic Scale (VAS). Sensory and motor function, hemodynamic, and respiratory parameters were recorded for 96 h after surgery, after which the catheter was removed. In addition, joint mobility was assessed, and any side effects were noted. Results: VAS score was ≤30 mm in 25 patients. Three patients in Group A0.125 and 4 in Group B0.0625 (NS), received a rescue dose of levobupivacaine. Median VAS in Group A0.125 was lower than in Group B0.0625 on T1h (8 ± 11 vs 16 ± 11; P < 0.05), and on T4h (11 ± 8 vs 18 ± 1; P < 0.05). All patients remained hemodynamically stable. There were no significant differences between groups for postoperative joints mobility. Conclusion: Levobupivacaine at a dose of 1.25 mg/h administered by CSA provides good quality analgesia independent of concentration and solution volume in patients undergoing total knee and hip replacement. PMID:26702204

  10. 'Hip' pain.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Josef; Gursche, Angelika

    2003-02-01

    'Hip' pain is usually located in the groin, upper thigh or buttock and is a common complaint. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis, avascular femoral head necrosis and apophyseal avulsion are the most common diagnoses in childhood and adolescents. Strains and fractures are common in sport-active adults. Osteoarthritis occurs in middle-aged and older adults. Trauma may result in femoral head fracture or typical muscle and tendon sprains and bursitis. Septic or inflammatory arthritis can occur at every age. Septic arthritis, fractures and acute epiphyseal slipping are real emergency cases. Congenital dysplasia of the hip joint may lead to labral tears and early osteoarthritis. The most important hip problems in children, adolescents, adult and older people are discussed; these problems originate from intra-articular disorders and the surrounding extra-articular soft tissues. Medical history, clinical examination and additional tests, including imaging, will be demonstrated. Principles of treatment are given for specific disorders. PMID:12659822

  11. Multi-Disciplinary Antimicrobial Strategies for Improving Orthopaedic Implants to Prevent Prosthetic Joint Infections in Hip and Knee

    PubMed Central

    Getzlaf, Matthew A.; Lewallen, Eric A.; Kremers, Hilal M.; Jones, Dakota L.; Bonin, Carolina A.; Dudakovic, Amel; Thaler, Roman; Cohen, Robert C.; Lewallen, David G.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2016-01-01

    Like any foreign object, orthopaedic implants are susceptible to infection when introduced into the human body. Without additional preventative measures, the absolute number of annual prosthetic joint infections will continue to rise, and may exceed the capacity of health care systems in the near future. Bacteria are difficult to eradicate from synovial joints due to their exceptionally diverse taxonomy, complex mechanistic attachment capabilities, and tendency to evolve antibiotic resistance. When a primary orthopaedic implant fails from prosthetic joint infection, surgeons are generally challenged by limited options for intervention. In this review, we highlight the etiology and taxonomic groupings of bacteria known to cause prosthetic joint infections, and examine their key mechanisms of attachment. We propose that antimicrobial strategies should focus on the most harmful bacteria taxa within the context of occurrence, taxonomic diversity, adhesion mechanisms, and implant design. Patient-specific identification of organisms that cause prosthetic joint infections will permit assessment of their biological vulnerabilities. The latter can be targeted using a range of antimicrobial techniques that exploit different colonization mechanisms including implant surface attachment, biofilm formation, and/or hematogenous recruitment. We anticipate that customized strategies for each patient, joint, and prosthetic component will be most effective at reducing prosthetic joint infections, including those caused by antibiotic-resistant and polymicrobial bacteria. PMID:26449208

  12. Multi-disciplinary antimicrobial strategies for improving orthopaedic implants to prevent prosthetic joint infections in hip and knee.

    PubMed

    Getzlaf, Matthew A; Lewallen, Eric A; Kremers, Hilal M; Jones, Dakota L; Bonin, Carolina A; Dudakovic, Amel; Thaler, Roman; Cohen, Robert C; Lewallen, David G; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-02-01

    Like any foreign object, orthopaedic implants are susceptible to infection when introduced into the human body. Without additional preventative measures, the absolute number of annual prosthetic joint infections will continue to rise, and may exceed the capacity of health care systems in the near future. Bacteria are difficult to eradicate from synovial joints due to their exceptionally diverse taxonomy, complex mechanistic attachment capabilities, and tendency to evolve antibiotic resistance. When a primary orthopaedic implant fails from prosthetic joint infection, surgeons are generally challenged by limited options for intervention. In this review, we highlight the etiology and taxonomic groupings of bacteria known to cause prosthetic joint infections, and examine their key mechanisms of attachment. We propose that antimicrobial strategies should focus on the most harmful bacteria taxa within the context of occurrence, taxonomic diversity, adhesion mechanisms, and implant design. Patient-specific identification of organisms that cause prosthetic joint infections will permit assessment of their biological vulnerabilities. The latter can be targeted using a range of antimicrobial techniques that exploit different colonization mechanisms including implant surface attachment, biofilm formation, and/or hematogenous recruitment. We anticipate that customized strategies for each patient, joint, and prosthetic component will be most effective at reducing prosthetic joint infections, including those caused by antibiotic-resistant and polymicrobial bacteria. PMID:26449208

  13. Total Hip Replacement (Arthroplasty) (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Licensed Materials from any location via the Internet. b. STANDALONE WORKSTATION: A standalone subscription permits multiple ... computer. A Standalone Workstation license does not include Internet access to the Licensed Materials. c. INSTITUTIONAL SUBSCRIPTION: ...

  14. Questions and Answers about Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery Follow the doctor’s instructions. Work with a physical therapist or other health care professional to rehabilitate your ... While you are still in the hospital, a physical therapist may teach you exercises such as contracting and ...

  15. [What's new in total hip replacement?].

    PubMed

    Kowalczewski, Jacek B; Milecki, Marcin; Marczak, Dariusz

    2005-01-01

    The authors present special types of stems and acetabulum components. Analyzing the available the authors try to assess which parameters of the prosthesis influence long-term outcomes. "Wear and tear" of the implants was also analysed. Cemented and cementless acetabular components where also analysed. Capoplasties neck-sparing procedures and MIS techniques were also taken into consideration with special attention given to the dangers related to these new techniques. PMID:16875180

  16. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... the joint, lungs (pneumonia), or urinary tract. Poor wound healing. This is more likely for people who are not healthy before surgery, who smoke or have diabetes, or who take medicines that weaken their immune ...

  17. Primary hyperparathyroidism: an uncommon cause of hip pain.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Muhammad; Erickson, Evelyn; Agyare, Samuel; Godil, Mushtaq A

    2015-04-01

    Hip pain is a common complaint in a pediatric emergency department. The causes of hip pain are diverse and generally include traumatic and infectious causes. We report a case of hip pain caused by deep soft tissue infection associated with hypercalcemia and primary hyperparathyroidism. Atypical presentation of primary hyperparathyroidism may result in a delay in diagnosis. PMID:25831028

  18. Increasing Resistance of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci in Total Hip Arthroplasty Infections: 278 THA-Revisions due to Infection Reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register from 1993 to 2007

    PubMed Central

    Langvatn, Håkon; Dale, Håvard; Schrama, Johannes Cornelis; Hallan, Geir; Sjursen, Haakon; Engesæter, Lars B.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated bacterial findings from intraoperative tissue samples taken during revision due to infection after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim was to investigate whether the susceptibility patterns changed during the period from 1993 through 2007. Reported revisions due to infection in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR) were identified, and 10 representative hospitals in Norway were visited. All relevant information on patients reported to the NAR for a revision due to infection, including bacteriological findings, was collected from the medical records. A total of 278 revision surgeries with bacterial growth in more than 2 samples were identified and included. Differences between three 5-year time periods were tested by the chi-square test for linear trend. The most frequent isolates were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) (41%, 113/278) and Staphylococcus aureus (19%, 53/278). The proportion of CoNS resistant to the methicillin-group increased from 57% (16/28) in the first period, 1993–1997, to 84% (52/62) in the last period, 2003–2007 (P = 0.003). There was also significant increase in resistance for CoNS to cotrimoxazole, quinolones, clindamycin, and macrolides. All S. aureus isolates were sensitive to both the methicillin-group and the aminoglycosides. For the other bacteria identified no changes in susceptibility patterns were found. PMID:25371827

  19. [Total hip arthroplasty in the treatment of arthrosis with coexistent high developmental hip dislocation].

    PubMed

    Matewski, Dariusz; Szymkowiak, Edward; Gumański, Ryszard

    2008-01-01

    The question if total hip arthroplasty ought to be advised for patients with high developmental hip dislocation is still actual. The subject of hip arthroplasty, as a method of surgical treatment of high developmental hip dislocation, was analyzed on the base of follow up of seven patients, who underwent this procedure. The mean age of patients was 44.5 (+/- 12.6) years. The mean time of follow up was 64.4 (21.6) months. Initial three patients were treated in two stage regime. In first stage, a surgical hip liberalization and skeletal traction through 3 weeks was performed. In 2nd stage we did total hip replacement with simultaneous shortening of the femoral shaft just below the lesser trochanter. In next four patients we performed total hip arthroplasty with simultaneous shortening of the femoral shaft in one stage. Protection of undesirable rotational instability after osteotomy was done by means of different ways of osteotomy fixation describe in paper. Applied surgical treatment allowed for implanting a cup of prosthesis in original place of acetabulum and reduction of the big anteversion of the femoral neck. The hip congruency was improved in all patients. Score in functional Harris hip scale increased from mean value of 50 points before hip arthroplasty to mean value of 85 points after surgery. The symptoms of late consolidation of osteotomy were observed in one patient with transverse osteotomy without anty-rotational fixation. Total hip replacement with simultaneous "Z" shortening osteotomy of the femoral shaft give good such clinical as radiological results in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis in accordance to high developmental hip dislocation. PMID:18847022

  20. MRSA-Infected External Iliac Artery Pseudoaneurysm Treated with Endovascular Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, M.G.; Thomas, H.G. Chester, J.F.

    2005-04-15

    A 48-year-old woman with severe juvenile-onset rheumatoid arthritis presented with a bleeding cutaneous sinus distal to her right total hip replacement scar. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated on culture. She had previously undergone bilateral total hip and knee replacements at aged 23 and six years later had the right knee prosthesis removed for infection, with subsequent osteomyelitis of the femoral shaft and right total hip prosthesis disruption. Peripheral arteriography was performed in view of persistent bleeding from the sinus, which revealed a 6 cm false aneurysm filling from and compressing the right external iliac artery (EIA). A PTFE-covered, balloon expandable JOSTENT was deployed in the right EIA, successfully excluding the false aneurysm and preventing further bleeding from the sinus. No graft infection was reported at 12 months. This case illustrates the potential use of endovascular stent-grafting in the treatment of an infected pseudoaneurysm.

  1. Preventing mechanical complications of hip spacer implantation: technical tips and pearls.

    PubMed

    Barreira, Pedro; Leite, Pedro; Neves, Pedro; Soares, Daniel; Sousa, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection is a frequent complication after total hip replacement. Two-stage exchange with the use of a temporary cement spacer is commonplace. Several complications are possible with its use. In addition to infection persistence, mechanical complications such as dislocation or fractures are among the most common. Several risk factors can and should be addressed during first stage or spacer implantation surgery in order to minimize complications. Technical aspects as well as practical tips and pearls to overcome common nuisances such as spacer instability or femoral and acetabular bone loss will be discussed. PMID:26280978

  2. Are WHO/UNAIDS/UNICEF-recommended replacement milks for infants of HIV-infected mothers appropriate in the South African context?

    PubMed Central

    Papathakis, P. C.; Rollins, N. C.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the nutritional adequacy and feasibility of breastmilk replacement options recommended by WHO/UNAIDS/UNICEF. The study aim was to explore suitability of the 2001 feeding recommendations for infants of HIV-infected mothers for a rural region in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa specifically with respect to adequacy of micronutrients and essential fatty acids, cost, and preparation times of replacement milks. METHODS: Nutritional adequacy, cost, and preparation time of home-prepared replacement milks containing powdered full cream milk (PM) and fresh full cream milk (FM) and different micronutrient supplements (2 g UNICEF micronutrient sachet, government supplement routinely available in district public health clinics, and best available liquid paediatric supplement found in local pharmacies) were compared. Costs of locally available ingredients for replacement milk were used to calculate monthly costs for infants aged one, three, and six months. Total monthly costs of ingredients of commercial and home-prepared replacement milks were compared with each other and the average monthly income of domestic or shop workers. Time needed to prepare one feed of replacement milk was simulated. FINDINGS: When mixed with water, sugar, and each micronutrient supplement, PM and FM provided <50% of estimated required amounts for vitamins E and C, folic acid, iodine, and selenium and <75% for zinc and pantothenic acid. PM and FM made with UNICEF micronutrient sachets provided 30% adequate intake for niacin. FM prepared with any micronutrient supplement provided no more than 32% vitamin D. All PMs provided more than adequate amounts of vitamin D. Compared with the commercial formula, PM and FM provided 8-60% of vitamins A, E, and C, folic acid, manganese, zinc, and iodine. Preparations of PM and FM provided 11% minimum recommended linoleic acid and 67% minimum recommended alpha-linolenic acid per 450 ml mixture. It took 21-25 minutes to optimally prepare

  3. Cementless total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Morscher, E W

    1983-12-01

    The differences between prostheses fixed with and without cement are mainly in the design and nature of the surface implant. The shapes of the sockets to be implanted without cement show a wide variety: cylinder, square, conus, and ellipsoid with and without threads. The hemispheric shape, however, which was chosen for the acetabular component of the isoelastic hip joint, does not disturb the natural form and function of the hip joint since the outer surface is closely adapted to the original subchondral bone layer. The noncemented cup is secured by threads, pegs, screws, etc., and by ingrowth of bony tissue in the grooves of the surfaces. Most femoral stems are based on the self-locking principle. All prosthetic models incorporate attempts to increase the surface of the stem (ribs, wings, corrugations, rims, etc.). There is a tendency to use less rigid elastic implants instead of the well known rigid metallic prostheses. The aim is to overcome the problems of stress protection and stress concentration observed with rigid implants. For the biomechanical integration of an implant, the properties of the surface, especially macroporosity and microporosity, are important. Most European models of noncemented endoprostheses are based on macroporosity (porometal, madreporic, etc.). The increase in implant surface area achieved with macroscopic perforations and recesses is relatively minor compared with the possibilities offered by microporosity ("alumine fritée," Proplast, fiber-metal, etc.). The best indication for use of a cementless hip endoprosthesis is in revision arthroplasty. The lost bone stock is replaced by bone grafts, thereby creating a situation comparable with that of a primary arthroplasty. Clinical experience with noncemented hip endoprostheses is, to date, promising, although the observation time for most models is short. PMID:6357588

  4. CoCr wear particles generated from CoCr alloy metal-on-metal hip replacements, and cobalt ions stimulate apoptosis and expression of general toxicology-related genes in monocyte-like U937 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Posada, Olga M.; Gilmour, Denise; Tate, Rothwelle J.; Grant, M. Helen

    2014-11-15

    Cobalt-chromium (CoCr) particles in the nanometre size range and their concomitant release of Co and Cr ions into the patients' circulation are produced by wear at the articulating surfaces of metal-on-metal (MoM) implants. This process is associated with inflammation, bone loss and implant loosening and led to the withdrawal from the market of the DePuy ASR™ MoM hip replacements in 2010. Ions released from CoCr particles derived from a resurfacing implant in vitro and their subsequent cellular up-take were measured by ICP-MS. Moreover, the ability of such metal debris and Co ions to induce both apoptosis was evaluated with both FACS and immunoblotting. qRT-PCR was used to assess the effects on the expression of lymphotoxin alpha (LTA), BCL2-associated athanogene (BAG1), nitric oxide synthase 2 inducible (NOS2), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible alpha (GADD45A). ICP-MS showed that the wear debris released significant (p < 0.05) amounts of Co and Cr ions into the culture medium, and significant (p < 0.05) cellular uptake of both ions. There was also an increase (p < 0.05) in apoptosis after a 48 h exposure to wear debris. Analysis of qRT-PCR results found significant up-regulation (p < 0.05) particularly of NOS2 and BAG1 in Co pre-treated cells which were subsequently exposed to Co ions + debris. Metal debris was more effective as an inducer of apoptosis and gene expression when cells had been pre-treated with Co ions. This suggests that if a patient receives sequential bilateral CoCr implants, the second implant may be more likely to produce adverse effects than the first one. - Highlights: • Effects of CoCr nanoparticles and Co ions on U937 cells were investigated. • Ions released from wear debris play an important role in cellular response, • Toxicity of Co ions could be related to NO metabolic processes and apoptosis. • CoCr particles were a more effective inducer of apoptosis after cell

  5. Current concepts in total femoral replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Deepak; Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Klika, Alison K; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K; Joyce, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Total femoral replacement (TFR) is a salvage arthroplasty procedure used as an alternative to lower limb amputation. Since its initial description in the mid-20th century, this procedure has been used in a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic indications. The most compelling advantage of TFR is the achievement of immediate fixation which permits early mobilization. It is anticipated that TFR will be increasingly performed as the rate of revision arthroplasty rises worldwide. The existing literature is mainly composed of a rather heterogeneous mix of retrospective case series and a wide assortment of case reports. Numerous TFR prostheses are currently available and the surgeon must understand the unique implications of each implant design. Long-term functional outcomes are dependent on adherence to proper technique and an appropriate physical therapy program for postoperative rehabilitation. Revision TFR is mainly performed for periprosthetic infection and the severe femoral bone loss associated with aseptic revisions. Depending on the likelihood of attaining infection clearance, it may sometimes be advisable to proceed directly to hip disarticulation without attempting salvage of the TFR. Other reported complications of TFR include hip joint instability, limb length discrepancy, device failure, component loosening, patellar maltracking and delayed wound healing. Further research is needed to better characterize the long-term functional outcomes and complications associated with this complex procedure. PMID:26716087

  6. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2014-11-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  7. Bursae and abscess cavities communicating with the hip: diagnosis using arthrography and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, L.S.; Schneider, R.; Goldman, A.B.; Kazam, E.; Ranawat, C.S.; Ghelman, B.

    1985-08-01

    Bursae or abscess cavities communicating with the hip joint were demonstrated by hip arthrography or by computed tomography (CT) in 40 cases. The bursae or abscess cavities were associated with underlying abnormalities in the hip, including painful hip prostheses, infection, and inflammatory or degenerative arthritis. Symptoms may be produced directly as a result of infection or indirectly as a result of inflammation or pressure on adjacent structures. Hip arthrography can confirm a diagnosis of bursae and abscess cavities communicating with the hip joint in patients with hip pain or soft-tissue masses around the groin. Differentiation of enlarged bursae from other abnormalities is important to avoid unnecessary or incorrect surgery.

  8. Hip Dysplasia in the Young Adult.

    PubMed

    Gala, Luca; Clohisy, John C; Beaulé, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is a leading precursor of osteoarthritis and is seen in 20% to 40% of patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. An increase in mechanical stress on the cartilage matrix with failure of the acetabular labrum represents the major pathomechanism of degeneration. Because the prevalence of associated femoral deformities is high (>50%), the structural anatomy of the dysplastic hip must be assessed in multiple planes using radiographs and, if needed, advanced imaging modalities. Acetabular osteotomy (periacetabular and/or rotational) is the most commonly used procedure for the treatment of the majority of dysplastic hips in adults. Modern total hip replacement remains an excellent option for the more arthritic joints. Difficulties can arise from anatomical abnormalities and previous operations. PMID:26738905

  9. Hip arthroscopy in obese, a successful combination?

    PubMed

    Bech, N H; Kodde, I F; Dusseldorp, F; Druyts, P A M C; Jansen, S P L; Haverkamp, D

    2016-04-01

    Discussion persists about the outcome and results of hip arthroscopy in obese patients. Hip arthroscopy gained popularity over time. A current discussion is if obese patients can reach similar results after surgery compared with non-obese. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review of literature about hip arthroscopy and obesity. We searched the Pubmed/Medline databases for literature and included three studies that compared the outcome of hip arthroscopy between different BMI groups. We extracted and pooled the data. For continues data a weighted mean difference was calculated, for dichotomous variables a weighted odds ratio (OR) was calculated using Review Software Manager. Heterogeneity of the included studies was calculated using I(2) statistics. Data were extracted from two studies. In the Obese group, there was significant more conversion to total hip replacement or resurfacing hip replacement (OR = 2.21, 95% CI 1.07-4.56) and more re-arthroscopy (OR = 4.68, 95% CI 1.41-15.45). Any reoperation occurred more often in the obese group (OR = 2.87, 95% CI 1.53-5.38). In the Non Arthritic Hip Score obese scored lower than the non-Obese group [10.9 (-14,6 to 7.1)]. For the modified Harris Hip Score the score is - 6,6, according to the MCID this difference is clinically relevant. For both scores obese show lower outcomes but similar improvement after hip arthroscopy. Regarding a higher chance of needing a re-operation and lower subjective outcome scores obesity appears to have a negative influence on the outcome of hip arthroscopy. PMID:27026817

  10. Hip arthroscopy in obese, a successful combination?

    PubMed Central

    Bech, N. H.; Kodde, I. F.; Dusseldorp, F.; Druyts, P. A. M. C.; Jansen, S. P. L.; Haverkamp, D.

    2016-01-01

    Discussion persists about the outcome and results of hip arthroscopy in obese patients. Hip arthroscopy gained popularity over time. A current discussion is if obese patients can reach similar results after surgery compared with non-obese. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review of literature about hip arthroscopy and obesity. We searched the Pubmed/Medline databases for literature and included three studies that compared the outcome of hip arthroscopy between different BMI groups. We extracted and pooled the data. For continues data a weighted mean difference was calculated, for dichotomous variables a weighted odds ratio (OR) was calculated using Review Software Manager. Heterogeneity of the included studies was calculated using I2 statistics. Data were extracted from two studies. In the Obese group, there was significant more conversion to total hip replacement or resurfacing hip replacement (OR = 2.21, 95% CI 1.07–4.56) and more re-arthroscopy (OR = 4.68, 95% CI 1.41–15.45). Any reoperation occurred more often in the obese group (OR = 2.87, 95% CI 1.53–5.38). In the Non Arthritic Hip Score obese scored lower than the non-Obese group [10.9 (−14,6 to 7.1)]. For the modified Harris Hip Score the score is − 6,6, according to the MCID this difference is clinically relevant. For both scores obese show lower outcomes but similar improvement after hip arthroscopy. Regarding a higher chance of needing a re-operation and lower subjective outcome scores obesity appears to have a negative influence on the outcome of hip arthroscopy. PMID:27026817

  11. The clinical efficacy of using autologous platelet rich plasma in hip arthroplasty: A retrospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Atif; Shaaban, Hamid; Tibayan, Restituto; Miller, Richard; Boairdo, Richard; Guron, Gunwant

    2015-01-01

    Background: Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is a blood derivative concentrate of platelets, fibrin and growth factors obtained through withdrawal and centrifugation of autologous blood and use for its inherent hemostatic and adhesive properties to promote wound healing. Hip arthroplasty is often associated with significant perioperative complications including blood loss necessitating blood transfusions, which can lead to multiple adverse reactions, infection transmission, and longer hospital stay. Materials and Methods: We conducted this retrospective comparative study to determine whether the use of PRP can reduce the bleeding complications in hip replacement surgeries and therefore decrease analgesic requirements and shorten the hospital stay. Results: Sixty patients had consecutive hip replacement surgeries. The study group (n=23) received PRP applications while the control group (n=37) were operated without PRP applications. Postoperative drop of hemoglobin, number of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, analgesic requirements, and duration of hospital stay were recorded. There was no significant difference in the drop of hemoglobin preoperatively and postoperatively comparing study and control groups (P=0.75). There was no difference in transfusion requirements between the two groups (P=0.16) but there was trend toward less transfusion in the PRP-treated group. There were also no statistical differences in analgesic use (P=0.83) and lengths of hospitalization (P=0.68) between the two groups. Conclusion: We concluded that there is no clinical efficacy in using PRP in hip replacement surgeries. We recommend a larger prospective study be conducted to determine its clinical utility as an optimization strategy to improve outcome after hip arthroplasty PMID:25810634

  12. Impact on red blood cell immunity patterns in postoperative phase following total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Defu; Fu, Changma; Yu, Runze

    2014-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to measure changes in red blood cell (RBC) immunity and cytokine levels after performing total hip replacement surgery. Material and methods Twenty patients receiving total hip arthroplasty were investigated by measuring presurgical and postoperative RBC natural tumor erythrocyte rosette rate (NTERR), RBC C3b receptor rosette rate (RC3bRR), RBC membrane CD35, CD58 and CD59 expression and cytokine levels [including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)]. Blood samples were collected on the day before surgery and on the first day after hip arthroplasty. Results Postoperative NTERR and RC3bRR were significantly lower than presurgical levels (p < 0.05). The RBC membrane CD35, CD58 and CD59 expressions were significantly decreased in the postoperative phase compared to pre-operative levels. Importantly, RBC promoting lymphocyte proliferation rates were significantly reduced after surgery. In addition, postoperative TNF-α, IL-2 and IFN-γ levels in RBC and lymphocyte culture fluid were lower than those pre-operation, whereas IL-10 and PGE2 were significantly increased compared to presurgical levels (p < 0.05). Conclusions The modification of RBC immune function may be involved in the occurrence and development of the infection following hip arthroplasty, and this suggests a novel strategy to prevent such infection. PMID:26155151

  13. Clinical wear behaviour of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene cups paired with metal and ceramic ball heads in comparison to metal-on-metal pairings of hip joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Semlitsch, M; Willert, H G

    1997-01-01

    In the course of 30 years of hip endoprosthetics, a number of material combinations for the cups and balls of total hip prostheses have proven successful under clinical conditions. Favourably priced hip prostheses with polyethylene cups and metal balls are available for older patients with a moderate range of activity. Polyethylene wear of 100-300 microns/year is to be expected with these models. Ceramic balls (aluminium oxide for diameters 32 and 28 mm and zirconium oxide for 22 mm) paired with polyethylene cups are recommended for patients with a life expectancy of 10 to 20 years, because the expected polyethylene wear rate with this material combination is only 50-150 microns/year. In other words, the life cycle of the polyethylene cup is doubled, when it is paired with a ceramic ball. A similar polyethylene wear rate is also to be expected with oxygen-deep-hardened TiAlNb metal balls, which are currently the subject of a clinical field study. Last but not least, CoCrMoC metal-metal and Al2O3 ceramic ceramic pairings, which have the lowest wear rate of 2-20 microns/year, are available for highly active patients with a life expectancy of more than 20 years. As far as the cup-ball pairing is concerned and under the current pressure of costs, the surgeon should be able to select the optimum hip prosthesis model for every patient from these three categories. PMID:9141893

  14. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... Ankle replacement surgery is most often done while you are under general anesthesia. This means you will ...

  15. A Nonviral Peptide Can Replace the Entire N Terminus of Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Potyvirus Coat Protein and Permits Viral Systemic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arazi, T.; Shiboleth, Y. M.; Gal-On, A.

    2001-01-01

    Systematic deletion and peptide tagging of the amino-terminal domain (NT, ∼43 amino acids) of an attenuated zucchini yellow mosaic potyvirus (ZYMV-AGII) coat protein (CP) were used to elucidate its role in viral systemic infection. Deletion mutants truncated by 8, 13, and 33 amino acid residues from the CP-NT 5′ end were systemically infectious and produced symptoms similar to those of the AGII virus. Tagging these deletion mutants with either human c-Myc (Myc) or hexahistidine peptides maintained viral infectivity. Similarly, addition of these peptides to the intact AGII CP-NT did not affect viral life cycle. To determine which parts, if any, of the CP-NT are essential for viral systemic infection, a series of Myc-tagged mutants with 8 to 43 amino acids removed from the CP-NT were constructed. All Myc-tagged CP-NT deletion mutants, including those from which virtually all the viral CP-NT had been eliminated, were able to encapsidate and cause systemic infection. Furthermore, chimeric viruses with deletions of up to 33 amino acids from CP-NT produced symptoms indistinguishable from those caused by the parental AGII virus. In contrast to CP-NT Myc fusion, addition of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) immunogenic epitope to AGII CP-NT did not permit systemic infection. However, fusion of the Myc peptide to the N terminus of the FMDV peptide restored the capability of the virus to spread systemically. We have demonstrated that all CP-NT fused peptides were exposed on the virion surface, masking natural CP immunogenic determinants. Our findings demonstrate that CP-NT is not essential for ZYMV spread and that it can be replaced by an appropriate foreign peptide while maintaining systemic infectivity. PMID:11413299

  16. [Acute total knee replacement infection after a cat bite and scratch: a clinical case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Miranda, I; Angulo, M; Amaya, J V

    2013-01-01

    In the last 15 years only few cases of Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) total knee arthroplasty infection have been published, mostly related to cat or dog bites or scratches. We report a case of P. multocida total knee arthroplasty infection in a 64-year- old patient, 10 days after being scratched and bitten by his cat. The patient was successfully treated with debridement and tibial interspacer exchange and antibiotic treatment for 6 weeks. Antimicrobial prophylaxis should be considered in cat or dog bites or scratches victims with prosthetic joints. PMID:23885657

  17. ELIGIBILITY FOR THE HIP-RESURFACING ARTHROPLASTY PROCEDURE: AN EVALUATION ON 592 HIPS

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Faria, Rafael Salomon Silva; Duarte, David Marcelo; Takano, Marcelo Itiro; Sugiyama, Mauricio Morita

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the percentage of ideal patients who would be eligible for hip-resurfacing surgery at a reference service for hip arthroplasty. Methods: Out of all the cases of hip arthroplasty operated at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo (HSPE) between January 2009 and December 2010, we assessed a total of 592 procedures that would fit the criteria for indication for resurfacing arthroplasty, after clinical and radiological evaluation according to the criteria established by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and by Seyler et al. Results: Among the total number of hip replacement arthroplasty cases, 5.74% of the patients were eligible. Among the patients who underwent primary arthroplasty, we found that 8.23% presented ideal conditions for this procedure. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that this type of surgery still has a limited role among hip surgery methods. PMID:27047851

  18. Recurrent Catastrophic Ceramic Femoral Head Failure in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tai, S. M. M.; Parker, L.; de Roeck, N. J.; Skinner, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Fracture of a modern ceramic head component in total hip replacement is an uncommon but catastrophic complication. Hence, the occurrence of a second ceramic head fracture in the same hip replacement of an individual represents a perishingly rare event. We present the case as a means of highlighting potential risk factors for ceramic head fracture and suggest possible management strategies in such cases. PMID:24991441

  19. Celiac Disease in Women with Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    LeBoff, Meryl S.; Cobb, Haley; Gao, Lisa Y.; Hawkes, William; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Kolatkar, Nikheel S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Objective Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density, however, the risk of fractures in celiac disease patients is unclear. We compared the prevalence of celiac disease between a group of women with hip fractures and a group of women undergoing elective joint replacement surgery and the association between celiac disease and vitamin D levels. Methods Two hundred eight community dwelling and postmenopausal women were recruited from Boston, MA (n=81) and Baltimore, MD (n=127). We measured tissue transglutaminase IgA by ELISA to diagnose celiac disease and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels by radioimmunoassay in both women with hip fractures (n=157) and the control group (n=51), all of whom were from Boston. Subjects were excluded if they took any medications or had medical conditions that might affect bone. Results Median serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower (p< 0.0001) in the hip fracture cohorts compared to the elective joint replacement cohort (14.1 ng/ml vs. 21.3 ng/ml, respectively). There were no differences in the percentage of subjects with a positive tissue transglutaminase in the women with hip fractures versus the control group (1.91% vs. 1.61%, respectively). Conclusion Vitamin D levels are markedly reduced in women with hip fractures, however hip fracture patients did not show a higher percentage of positive tissue transglutaminase levels compared with controls. These data suggest that routine testing for celiac disease among hip fracture patients may not prove useful, although larger prospective studies among hip fracture subjects are needed. PMID:23732553

  20. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Developmental hip dysplasia; DDH; Congenital dysplasia of the hip; Congenital dislocation of the hip; CDH; Pavlik harness ... dislocation Shorter leg on the side with the hip dislocation Uneven skin folds of thigh or buttocks After ...

  1. Two Different Total Hip Arthroplasties for Hartofilakidis Type C1 Developmental Dysplasia of Hip in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ya-Ming; Zhou, Yi-Xin; Han, Na; Yang, De-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty (THA) in developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is more complex than the normal hip, with large replacement risks and many complications. Although nonosteotomy THA is convenient to perform, femoral osteotomy shortening can avoid blood vessel and nerve traction injuries. This study aimed to compare osteotomy THA with nonosteotomy to determine reasonable options for operative management of DDH. Methods: Data on 48 DDH patients who underwent THA were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups: Group A 29 cases (nonosteotomy), and group B 19 cases (osteotomy). Harris and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores, limb length discrepancy (LLD), radiological data on the hip, and claudication were evaluated. Data were analyzed by using paired-sample Student's t-test, independent-sample Student's t-test, and Pearson's Chi-square test; the test level was α =0.05. Results: Postoperative Harris (90.7 ± 5.1) and WOMAC scores (88.0 ± 10.6) were significantly improved compared with preoperative Harris (44.8 ± 5.7) and WOMAC scores (42.0 ± 5.3) in group A (P < 0.05). Postoperative Harris (90.4 ± 2.8) and WOMAC scores (88.2 ± 5.9) were significantly improved compared with preoperative Harris (44.4 ± 4.2) and WOMAC scores (43.2 ± 4.3) in group B (P < 0.05). One case of dislocation occurred in group A; after closed reduction, dislocation did not recur. In group A, 2 patients developed cutaneous branch injury of the femoral nerve, which spontaneously recovered without treatment. Postoperative LLD >2 cm was seen in one case in group A and five cases in group B. Postoperative claudication showed no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). No patients developed infection; postoperative X-rays showed that the location of the prosthesis was satisfactory, and the surrounding bone was not dissolved. Conclusions: THA is effective and safe for DDH. For unilateral high

  2. Influence of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Gait Mechanics of the Replaced and Non-Replaced Limb During Stair Negotiation.

    PubMed

    Standifird, Tyler W; Saxton, Arnold M; Coe, Dawn P; Cates, Harold E; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    This study compared biomechanics during stair ascent in replaced and non-replaced limbs of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients with control limbs of healthy participants. Thirteen TKA patients and fifteen controls performed stair ascent. Replaced and non-replaced knees of TKA patients were less flexed at contact compared to controls. The loading response peak knee extension moment was greater in control and non-replaced knees compared with replaced. The push-off peak knee abduction moment was elevated in replaced limbs compared to controls. Loading and push-off peak hip abduction moments were greater in replaced limbs compared to controls. The push-off peak hip abduction moment was greater in non-replaced limbs compared to controls. Future rehabilitation protocols should consider the replaced knee and also the non-replaced knee and surrounding joints. PMID:26231075

  3. Measurement outcomes from hip simulators.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Danielle; Shelton, Julia C

    2016-05-01

    Simulation of wear in total hip replacements has been recognised as an important factor in determining the likelihood of clinical success. However, accurate measurement of wear can be problematic with factors such as number and morphology of wear particles produced as well as ion release proving more important in the biological response to hip replacements than wear volume or wear rate alone. In this study, hard-on-hard (CoCr alloy, AgCrN coating) and hard-on-soft (CoCr alloy and CrN coating on vitamin E blended highly cross-linked polyethylene) bearing combinations were tested in an orbital hip simulator under standard and some adverse conditions. Gravimetric wear rates were determined for all bearings, with cobalt and where applicable, silver release determined throughout testing. Isolation of wear particles from the lubricating fluid was used to determine the influence of different bearing combinations and wear conditions on particle morphology. It was found that cobalt and silver could be measured in the lubricating fluid even when volumetric wear was not detectable. In hard-on-hard bearings, Pearson's correlation of 0.98 was established between metal release into the lubricating fluid and wear volume. In hard-on-soft bearings, coating the head did not influence the polyethylene wear rates measured under standard conditions but did influence the cobalt release; the diameter influenced both polyethylene wear and cobalt release, and the introduction of adverse testing generated smaller polyethylene particles. While hip simulators can be useful to assess the wear performance of a new material or design, measurement of other outcomes may yield greater insight into the clinical behaviour of the bearings in vivo. PMID:26888886

  4. Microscopical analysis of synovial fluid wear debris from failing CoCr hip prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, M. B.; Brown, A. P.; Cox, A.; Curry, A.; Denton, J.

    2010-07-01

    Metal on metal hip joint prostheses are now commonly implanted in patients with hip problems. Although hip replacements largely go ahead problem free, some complications can arise such as infection immediately after surgery and aseptic necrosis caused by vascular complications due to surgery. A recent observation that has been made at Manchester is that some Cobalt Chromium (CoCr) implants are causing chronic pain, with the source being as yet unidentified. This form of replacement failure is independent of surgeon or hospital and so some underlying body/implant interface process is thought to be the problem. When the synovial fluid from a failed joint is examined particles of metal (wear debris) can be found. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been used to look at fixed and sectioned samples of the synovial fluid and this has identified fine (< 100 nm) metal and metal oxide particles within the fluid. TEM EDX and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) have been employed to examine the composition of the particles, showing them to be chromium rich. This gives rise to concern that the failure mechanism may be associated with the debris.

  5. Biotribology of artificial hip joints

    PubMed Central

    Di Puccio, Francesca; Mattei, Lorenza

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroplasty can be considered one of the major successes of orthopedic surgery, with more than 350000 replacements performed every year in the United States with a constantly increasing rate. The main limitations to the lifespan of these devices are due to tribological aspects, in particular the wear of mating surfaces, which implies a loss of matter and modification of surface geometry. However, wear is a complex phenomenon, also involving lubrication and friction. The present paper deals with the tribological performance of hip implants and is organized in to three main sections. Firstly, the basic elements of tribology are presented, from contact mechanics of ball-in-socket joints to ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear laws. Some fundamental equations are also reported, with the aim of providing the reader with some simple tools for tribological investigations. In the second section, the focus moves to artificial hip joints, defining materials and geometrical properties and discussing their friction, lubrication and wear characteristics. In particular, the features of different couplings, from metal-on-plastic to metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic, are discussed as well as the role of the head radius and clearance. How friction, lubrication and wear are interconnected and most of all how they are specific for each loading and kinematic condition is highlighted. Thus, the significant differences in patients and their lifestyles account for the high dispersion of clinical data. Furthermore, such consideration has raised a new discussion on the most suitable in vitro tests for hip implants as simplified gait cycles can be too far from effective implant working conditions. In the third section, the trends of hip implants in the years from 2003 to 2012 provided by the National Joint Registry of England, Wales and Northern Ireland are summarized and commented on in a discussion. PMID:25621213

  6. Coloured cornea replacements with anti-infective properties: expanding the safe use of silver nanoparticles in regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon, E. I.; Vulesevic, B.; Argawal, A.; Ross, A.; Bejjani, P.; Podrebarac, J.; Ravichandran, R.; Phopase, J.; Suuronen, E. J.; Griffith, M.

    2016-03-01

    Despite the broad anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), their use in bioengineered corneal replacements or bandage contact lenses has been hindered due to their intense yellow coloration. In this communication, we report the development of a new strategy to pre-stabilize and incorporate AgNPs with different colours into collagen matrices for fabrication of corneal implants and lenses, and assessed their in vitro and in vivo activity.Despite the broad anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), their use in bioengineered corneal replacements or bandage contact lenses has been hindered due to their intense yellow coloration. In this communication, we report the development of a new strategy to pre-stabilize and incorporate AgNPs with different colours into collagen matrices for fabrication of corneal implants and lenses, and assessed their in vitro and in vivo activity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Collagen hydrogel, moulded as a cornea, prepared containing collagen protected AgNPs and representative images for collagen hydrogels, moulded as corneas, containing Blue AgNPs either unprotected or protected with LL37-SH; representative TEM images for Green-1 AgNPs prepared in this work; changes on surface plasmon band after synthesis for Green-2 AgNPs without LL37-SH; representative picture of the powder obtained for Green-1 AgNPs capped with LL37-SH after 72 h lyophilization, see main text; representative TEM images for Blue and Green-1 AgNPs prepared in this work; absorption spectra for the supernatants for collagen hydrogels containing Blue AgNPs; absorbance at 600 nm of PAO1 cultures prepared in 25% LB media incubated for 14 h at 37 °C in the presence of different concentrations of AgNPs, Green-1 or Blue, or silver nitrate; HECC cell density (cells per cm2) measured on gels with and without silver nitrate after 1 day of cell incubation; total silver concentration

  7. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007633.htm Hip joint injection To use the sharing features on this ... injection is a shot of medicine into the hip joint. The medicine helps relieve pain and inflammation. It ...

  8. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or falling can all sometimes lead to hip injuries. These include Strains Bursitis Dislocations Fractures Certain diseases also lead to hip injuries or problems. Osteoarthritis can cause pain and limited ...

  9. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis-hip ... You may receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means ... spinal anesthesia. With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  10. Uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis of hip secondary to low and high dislocated hips: A mid-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; O’Dwyer, Sinead; Masterson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: Performing successful total hip replacement (THR) in dysplastic, subluxed, and dislocated hip is a challenging task. Here, we assessed midterm clinical and radiological outcomes of uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis (OA) of hip secondary to Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocated hips with a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of prospectively collected data was designed involving all consecutive patients who underwent uncemented THR for OA of hip secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip and Grade II or Grade III Hartofilakidis classification. Results: Thirty-two patients underwent 45 THR, with 23 Grade II (low dislocation) and 22 Grade III (high-dislocation) of Hartofilakidis classification. Thirteen patients had bilateral hip replacements, 19 patients had unilateral THR. There was highly statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative HHS and SF-36v2™ at each follow-up. Survivorship of original implant was 98.88% at a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. The mean improvement in leg length in this series was 3.6 cm (1.8-4.5, 95% confidence interval). No sciatic nerve or femoral nerve palsies were observed. Conclusions: Uncemented THR provides better function and quality of life. However, longer follow-up studies are needed to assess survivorship of uncemented THR in Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocations. PMID:27433063

  11. Five-year results of a cementless short-hip-stem prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Ralf H.; Steffen, Reinhard; Windhagen, Henning; Bücking, Petra; Wilcke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Hip prosthesis stems with a short stem length and proximal fixation geometry support a bone-preserving and muscle-sparing implantation and should also allow for revision surgery with a standard hip stem. We present 250 prospectively documented clinical and radiological results from the Metha Short Hip Stem prosthesis (B. Braun-Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany) after an average follow-up of 4.9 years. The average patient age at surgery was 60 years. Indication for total hip replacement was primary osteoarthrosis (OA) (78% of patients), OA based on developmental dysplasia of the hip (16%), and other indications (6%). At the last follow-up, the average Harris Hip Score was 97 points. 85% of patients were very satisfied and 14% were satisfied after surgery, whereas 1% were dissatisfied. Pain according to the Visual Analogue Scale improved from 7.4 (min 1.6, max 9.5) pre-operatively to 0.23 (min 0, max 6.6). No joint dislocations occurred when predominantly using 28 mm and 32 mm prosthesis heads. Nine short-stems were revised: three after bacterial infections, two after primary via valsa with penetration of the femoral cortex two and three months after surgery, and three after early aseptic cases of loosening within the first year. A further nine osseously consolidated short-stems had to be replaced due to breakage of the modular titanium cone adapter after an average of 3.1 years (min 1.9, max 4.4). All surgical revisions were performed using primary standard stems. Without taking the material-related adapter failures into account, a five year Kaplan-Meier survival rate of 96.7% (95% confidence interval 93.4–98.3) was determined for the short-stem prostheses. There were no radiological signs of loosening in any of the short-stem prostheses at the last examination. Fine sclerotic lines were detected in Gruen's AP zones 1 (19%) and 2 (10.5%), individual hypertrophies in zone 3 (3.5%), fine seams in zones 4 (5.5%) and 5 (4%), without pedestal formations in zone 4, clear

  12. Hip reconstruction osteotomy by Ilizarov method as a salvage option for abnormal hip joints.

    PubMed

    Umer, Masood; Rashid, Haroon; Umer, Hafiz Muhammad; Raza, Hasnain

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint instability can be secondary to congenital hip pathologies like developmental dysplasia (DDH) or acquired such as sequel of infective or neoplastic process. An unstable hip is usually associated with loss of bone from the proximal femur, proximal migration of the femur, lower-extremity length discrepancy, abnormal gait, and pain. In this case series of 37 patients coming to our institution between May 2005 and December 2011, we report our results in treatment of unstable hip joint by hip reconstruction osteotomy using the Ilizarov method and apparatus. This includes an acute valgus and extension osteotomy of the proximal femur combined with gradual varus and distraction (if required) for realignment and lengthening at a second, more distal, femoral osteotomy. 18 males and 19 females participated in the study. There were 17 patients with DDH, 12 with sequelae of septic arthritis, 2 with tuberculous arthritis, 4 with posttraumatic arthritis, and 2 with focal proximal femoral deficiency. Outcomes were evaluated by using Harris Hip Scoring system. At the mean follow-up of 37 months, Harris Hip Score had significantly improved in all patients. To conclude, illizarov hip reconstruction can successfully improve Trendelenburg's gait. It supports the pelvis and simultaneously restores knee alignment and corrects lower-extremity length discrepancy (LLD). PMID:24895616

  13. Hip Reconstruction Osteotomy by Ilizarov Method as a Salvage Option for Abnormal Hip Joints

    PubMed Central

    Umer, Masood; Rashid, Haroon; Raza, Hasnain

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint instability can be secondary to congenital hip pathologies like developmental dysplasia (DDH) or acquired such as sequel of infective or neoplastic process. An unstable hip is usually associated with loss of bone from the proximal femur, proximal migration of the femur, lower-extremity length discrepancy, abnormal gait, and pain. In this case series of 37 patients coming to our institution between May 2005 and December 2011, we report our results in treatment of unstable hip joint by hip reconstruction osteotomy using the Ilizarov method and apparatus. This includes an acute valgus and extension osteotomy of the proximal femur combined with gradual varus and distraction (if required) for realignment and lengthening at a second, more distal, femoral osteotomy. 18 males and 19 females participated in the study. There were 17 patients with DDH, 12 with sequelae of septic arthritis, 2 with tuberculous arthritis, 4 with posttraumatic arthritis, and 2 with focal proximal femoral deficiency. Outcomes were evaluated by using Harris Hip Scoring system. At the mean follow-up of 37 months, Harris Hip Score had significantly improved in all patients. To conclude, illizarov hip reconstruction can successfully improve Trendelenburg's gait. It supports the pelvis and simultaneously restores knee alignment and corrects lower-extremity length discrepancy (LLD). PMID:24895616

  14. Do normal hips dislocate?

    PubMed

    Alshameeri, Zeiad; Rehm, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    There have been a small number of case reports describing late normal-hip dislocations in children who were later diagnosed with developmental dysplasia of the hip. Here, we contest the assumption that normal hips can dislocate. We argue that (as in our case) the ultrasound scans in all published case reports on late dislocated normal hips did not show results that were entirely normal and therefore, so far, there has been no convincing evidence of a dislocation of a normal hip. We also want to highlight the importance of meticulous ultrasound and clinical assessments of high-risk children by an experienced orthopaedic surgeon. PMID:25144883

  15. Current topics in the radiology of joint replacement surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, B.N. )

    1990-09-01

    Several methods of total hip joint replacement are currently used. Radiographic appearances after cemented, bone ingrowth, press-fit, and bipolar hip prostheses are reviewed. The roles of nuclear medicine and arthrographic procedures for identifying complications are discussed. Total knee prostheses and, in particular, complications related to the patellar component are described.115 references.

  16. Hip resurfacing after iliofemoral distraction for type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip a case report.

    PubMed

    Sambri, A; Cadossi, M; Mazzotti, A; Faldini, C; Giannini, S

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip is a surgical challenge because of the modified anatomy of the acetabulum which is deficient in its shape with poor bone quality, torsional deformities of the femur and the altered morphology of femoral head. Particularly in Crowe type III and IV, additional surgical challenges are present, such as limb-length discrepancy and adductor muscle contractures. This is a bilateral hip dysplasia case where bilateral hip replacement was indicated, on the left side with a resurfacing one and on the other side a two stage procedure using a iliofemoral external fixator to restore equal leg length with a lower risk of complications. This case report shows both the negative clinical outcome of the left and the excellent one of the right hip where the dysplasia was much more severe. Patient selection and implant positioning are crucial in determining long-term results. PMID:27218252

  17. Osteoarthritis of the hip: an occupational disease in farmers.

    PubMed Central

    Croft, P.; Coggon, D.; Cruddas, M.; Cooper, C.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that farmers are at high risk of hip osteoarthritis and to investigate possible causes for such a hazard. DESIGN--Cross sectional survey. SETTING--Five rural general practices. SUBJECTS--167 male farmers aged 60-76 and 83 controls from mainly sedentary jobs. All those without previous hip replacement underwent radiography of the hip. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Hip replacement for osteoarthritis or radiological evidence of hip osteoarthritis. RESULTS--Prevalence of hip osteoarthritis was higher in farmers than controls and especially in those who had farmed for over 10 years (odds ratio 9.3, 95% confidence interval 1.9 to 44.5). The excess could not be attributed to any one type of farming, and heavy lifting seems the likely explanation. CONCLUSIONS--Manual handling in agriculture should be limited where possible. Consideration should be given to making hip osteoarthritis a prescribed industrial disease in farmers. There may be wider implications for the prevention of hip osteoarthritis in the general population. PMID:1606427

  18. Mortality and implant revision rates of hip arthroplasty in patients with osteoarthritis: registry based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    McMinn, D J W; Snell, K I E; Daniel, J; Treacy, R B C; Pynsent, P B

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine mortality and revision rates among patients with osteoarthritis undergoing hip arthroplasty and to compare these rates between patients undergoing cemented or uncemented procedures and to compare outcomes between men undergoing stemmed total hip replacements and Birmingham hip resurfacing. Design Cohort study. Setting National Joint Registry. Population About 275 000 patient records. Main outcome measures Hip arthroplasty procedures were linked to the time to any subsequent mortality or revision (implant failure). Flexible parametric survival analysis methods were used to analyse time to mortality and also time to revision. Comparisons between procedure groups were adjusted for age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, and complexity. Results As there were large baseline differences in the characteristics of patients receiving cemented, uncemented, or resurfacing procedures, unadjusted comparisons are inappropriate. Multivariable survival analyses identified a higher mortality rate for patients undergoing cemented compared with uncemented total hip replacement (adjusted hazard ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.16); conversely, there was a lower revision rate with cemented procedures (0.53, 0.50 to 0.57). These translate to small predicted differences in population averaged absolute survival probability at all time points. For example, compared with the uncemented group, at eight years after surgery the predicted probability of death in the cemented group was 0.013 higher (0.007 to 0.019) and the predicted probability of revision was 0.015 lower (0.012 to 0.017). In multivariable analyses restricted to men, there was a higher mortality rate in the cemented group and the uncemented group compared with the Birmingham hip resurfacing group. In terms of revision, the Birmingham hip resurfacings had a similar revision rate to uncemented total hip replacements. Both uncemented total hip replacements and Birmingham hip

  19. The effectiveness of providing peer benchmarked feedback to hip replacement surgeons based on patient-reported outcome measures—results from the PROFILE (Patient-Reported Outcomes: Feedback Interpretation and Learning Experiment) trial: a cluster randomised controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Maria B; Browne, John P

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test whether providing surgeons with peer benchmarked feedback about patient-reported outcomes is effective in improving patient outcomes. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Secondary care—Ireland. Participants Surgeons were recruited through the Irish Institute of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, and patients were recruited in hospitals prior to surgery. We randomly allocated 21 surgeons and 550 patients. Intervention Surgeons in the intervention group received peer benchmarked patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) feedback and education. Main outcome variable Postoperative Oxford Hip Score (OHS). Results Primary outcome data were available for 11 intervention surgeons with responsibility for 230 patients and 10 control surgeons with responsibility for 228 patients. The mean postoperative OHS for the intervention group was 40.8 (95% CI 39.8 to 41.7) and for the control group was 41.9 (95% CI 41.1 to 42.7). The adjusted effect estimate was −1.1 (95% CI −2.4 to 0.2, p=0.09). Secondary outcomes were the Hip Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), EQ-5D and the proportion of patients reporting a problem after surgery. The mean postoperative HOOS for the intervention group was 36.2 and for the control group was 37.1. The adjusted effect estimate was −1.1 (95% CI −2.4 to 0.3, p=0.1). The mean postoperative EQ-5D for the intervention group was 0.85 and for the control group was 0.87. The adjusted effect estimate was −0.02 (95% CI −0.05 to 0.008, p=0.2). 27% of intervention patients and 24% of control patients reported at least one complication after surgery (adjusted OR=1.2, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.3, p=0.6). Conclusions Outcomes for patients operated on by surgeons who had received peer benchmarked PROMs data were not statistically different from the outcomes of patients operated on by surgeons who did not receive feedback. PROMs information alone seems to be insufficient to identify opportunities for quality improvement. Trial

  20. Adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) associated with corrosion products in metal-on-metal and dual modular neck total hip replacements is associated with upregulation of interferon gamma-mediated chemokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Kolatat, Kritti; Perino, Giorgio; Wilner, Gabrielle; Kaplowitz, Elianna; Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Boettner, Friedrich; Westrich, Geoffrey H; Jerabek, Seth A; Goldring, Steven R; Purdue, P Edward

    2015-10-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR) associated with tribocorrosion following total hip arthroplasty (THA) have become a significant clinical concern in recent years. In particular, implants featuring metal-on-metal bearing surfaces and modular femoral stems have been reported to result in elevated rates of ALTR. These tribocorrosion-related tissue reactions are characterized by marked necrosis and lymphocytic infiltration, which contrasts sharply with the macrophagic and foreign body giant cell inflammation associated with polyethylene wear particle induced peri-implant osteolysis. In this study, we characterize tribocorrosion-associated ALTR at a molecular level. Gene expression profiling of peri-implant tissue around failing implants identifies upregulation of numerous inflammatory mediators in ALTR, including several interferon gamma inducible factors, most notably the chemokines MIG/CXCL9 and IP-10/CXCL10. This expression profile is distinct from that associated with polyethylene wear induced osteolysis, which is characterized by induction of markers of alternative macrophage activation, such as chitotriosidase (CHIT-1). Importantly, MIG/CXCL9 and IP-10/CXCL10 are also elevated at the protein level in the synovial fluid and, albeit more moderately, the serum, of ALTR patients, raising the possibility that these factors may serve as circulating biomarkers for the early detection of ALTR in at-risk patients. PMID:25940887

  1. The bacterial antitoxin HipB establishes a ternary complex with operator DNA and phosphorylated toxin HipA to regulate bacterial persistence

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yurong; Behiels, Ester; Felix, Jan; Elegheert, Jonathan; Vergauwen, Bjorn; Devreese, Bart; Savvides, Savvas N.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly all bacteria exhibit a type of phenotypic growth described as persistence that is thought to underlie antibiotic tolerance and recalcitrant chronic infections. The chromosomally encoded high-persistence (Hip) toxin–antitoxin proteins HipASO and HipBSO from Shewanella oneidensis, a proteobacterium with unusual respiratory capacities, constitute a type II toxin–antitoxin protein module. Here we show that phosphorylated HipASO can engage in an unexpected ternary complex with HipBSO and double-stranded operator DNA that is distinct from the prototypical counterpart complex from Escherichia coli. The structure of HipBSO in complex with operator DNA reveals a flexible C-terminus that is sequestered by HipASO in the ternary complex, indicative of its role in binding HipASO to abolish its function in persistence. The structure of HipASO in complex with a non-hydrolyzable ATP analogue shows that HipASO autophosphorylation is coupled to an unusual conformational change of its phosphorylation loop. However, HipASO is unable to phosphorylate the translation factor Elongation factor Tu, contrary to previous reports, but in agreement with more recent findings. Our studies suggest that the phosphorylation state of HipA is an important factor in persistence and that the structural and mechanistic diversity of HipAB modules as regulatory factors in bacterial persistence is broader than previously thought. PMID:25056321

  2. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inter-trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Subtrochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Femoral neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - discharge

  3. Transient Synovitis of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation and swelling of the tissues around the hip joint. Usually only one hip is affected. This condition ... to reduce the swelling and inflammation around the hip joint. Your child's doctor will probably ask you to ...

  4. Shoulder replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... the opening at the end of the shoulder blade, called the socket. This type of joint allows ... head. The socket part (glenoid) of your shoulder blade will be replaced with a smooth plastic shell ( ...

  5. Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not helping you anymore. When you have a total knee replacement, the surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone ...

  6. Hip arthrodesis in the pediatric population: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Zaps, Daniela; Bomar, James D; Hosalkar, Harish S

    2011-01-01

    Reconstructive and salvage procedures have continued to evolve in orthopedic surgery with changing functional demands of the population as well as advances in implants and surgical techniques. What used to be popular or traditional care at some point may eventually become a thing of the past, and this is true as far as many orthopedic surgical procedures are concerned. Understanding the etiology, pathogenesis, and managing and postponing the destructive pathway of osteoarthritis (OA) has been the goal of orthopedists since the specialty began in the early part of 18(th) century. Options of treating the severe sequelae of an arthritic joint have varied in different treatment eras. Management options have changed from a spectrum of non-treatment and slow suffering to muscle and soft-tissue releases, interposition arthroplasty and eventual extreme options like joint fusion or arthrodesis. The concept and advent of joint replacement surgery started a new era in the management of OA and was a dream come true in many ways. Mobility and stability are achieved together during the arthroplasty (joint replacement) that allowes the patient to maintain a good level of function. Arthroplasty certainly has its pros and cons as we have discovered in the past six decades. Pushing the envelope to younger population has its limitation in terms of longevity of the prosthesis, early loosening, need for repeated revisions that at some point may not be technically possible and risk of infection and disastrous consequences like PE and death associated with the gravity of the procedure. As infrequent as it is in today's clinical practice, arthrodesis of the hip joint has a role and remains a solid option for a well selected case.The purpose of this review is to discuss the current indications in the pediatric population and outline surgical techniques for hip arthrodesis while pointing out limitations and shortcomings. PMID:22053254

  7. Hip arthrodesis in the pediatric population: where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Zaps, Daniela; Bomar, James D.; Hosalkar, Harish S.

    2011-01-01

    Reconstructive and salvage procedures have continued to evolve in orthopedic surgery with changing functional demands of the population as well as advances in implants and surgical techniques. What used to be popular or traditional care at some point may eventually become a thing of the past, and this is true as far as many orthopedic surgical procedures are concerned. Understanding the etiology, pathogenesis, and managing and postponing the destructive pathway of osteoarthritis (OA) has been the goal of orthopedists since the specialty began in the early part of 18th century. Options of treating the severe sequelae of an arthritic joint have varied in different treatment eras. Management options have changed from a spectrum of non-treatment and slow suffering to muscle and soft-tissue releases, interposition arthroplasty and eventual extreme options like joint fusion or arthrodesis. The concept and advent of joint replacement surgery started a new era in the management of OA and was a dream come true in many ways. Mobility and stability are achieved together during the arthroplasty (joint replacement) that allowes the patient to maintain a good level of function. Arthroplasty certainly has its pros and cons as we have discovered in the past six decades. Pushing the envelope to younger population has its limitation in terms of longevity of the prosthesis, early loosening, need for repeated revisions that at some point may not be technically possible and risk of infection and disastrous consequences like PE and death associated with the gravity of the procedure. As infrequent as it is in today's clinical practice, arthrodesis of the hip joint has a role and remains a solid option for a well selected case. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current indications in the pediatric population and outline surgical techniques for hip arthrodesis while pointing out limitations and shortcomings. PMID:22053254

  8. Short-term results with the Zweymueller-SL metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Petsinis, Georgios; Repanti, Maria; Papazisis, Zisis; Iliopoulos, Panagiotis; Soucacos, Panagiotis N

    2002-01-01

    In a prospective study we followed 266 consecutive patients who received 350 Zweymueller-SL uncemented total hip replacements with metal-on-metal articulation for osteoarthritis. Mean follow-up was 52 (range 37-92) months. Patient age at the time of surgery was 55±9 (25-70) years. Pre-operative Harris score of 45±19 was increased post-operatively to 96±4. Pre-operative invalidity was significantly improved post-operatively (P<0.001), and 97% of the patients were either satisfied or very satisfied with the results. There was no aseptic loosening of either component. Revision was made in six hips (1.8%) because of either septic loosening (five, 1.5%) or technical error (one, 0.3%). At revision, surgical microscopic evidence for metalosis (Mirra grades 1 and 2) was shown in all revised hips. The reasons for early loosening were unrelated to the metal-on-metal bearing but rather were the result of either low-grade deep infection or inadequate surgical technique. Survival rate for Zweymueller screw socket and stem 7.6 years after implantation was 99.4% and 96.8% respectively. There was no evidence that metal-on-metal articulation gives rise to new problems or complications. PMID:24570158

  9. Hip Problems in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems that can lead to dislocation of the hip bones. This is also called dysplasia (say: "diss-play-see-uh"). This means that ... problems later in life? Source Screening for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip by LM French, M.D., and FR Dietz, ...

  10. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... because the ball-like top of your thigh bone moves within a cup-like space in your pelvis. Your hips are very stable. When they are healthy, it takes great force to hurt them. However, playing sports, running, ... of the hip causes weak bones that break easily. Both of these are common ...

  11. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Monzón, Daniel Godoy; Iserson, Kenneth V.; Jauregui, José; Musso, Carlos; Piccaluga, Francisco; Buttaro, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to determine the dislocation and reoperation rate, functional outcomes, and the survival rate of the unique subset of very old but lucid and independent patients with hip fractures following a total hip arthroplasty (THA) and geriatric team-coordinated perioperative care. Method: Between 2000 and 2006, previously independent ambulatory patients ≥80 years old presenting with an intracapsular hip fracture were given THAs under the care of an integrated orthopedic surgery–geriatric service. Their fracture-related complications, ambulation, mental status, and survival were followed for 5 to 11 years postinjury. Results: Five years postinjury, 57 (61.3%) patients of the original study group were living. In all, 3 (3.2%) patients had postoperative hip dislocations (and 2 patients had dislocation twice) and 2 reoperations were needed within the first postoperative month. There were no hip dislocations or reoperations after the first year. Radiographs obtained on 88% of the surviving patients at 5 years postoperatively showed that all remained unchanged from their immediate postoperative images. Nearly half of the patients were still able to ambulate as they did preoperatively and their mixed-model equation was statistically unchanged. Conclusion: This study of patients >80 years old with previously good functional status demonstrates that with appropriate surgical (best prosthesis, good operating technique, and regional anesthesia) and geriatric (pre- and postoperative assessments, close follow-up, medication adjustments, and fall-prevention instruction) care, they have few hip dislocations and reoperations, survive postfracture at least as long as their noninjured contemporaries, and continue to function and ambulate as they did prior to their injury. PMID:24660092

  12. Formed HIP Can Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Kester Diederik

    2015-07-27

    The intent of this report is to document a procedure used at LANL for HIP bonding aluminum cladding to U-10Mo fuel foils using a formed HIP can for the Domestic Reactor Conversion program in the NNSA Office of Material, Management and Minimization, and provide some details that may not have been published elsewhere. The HIP process is based on the procedures that have been used to develop the formed HIP can process, including the baseline process developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The HIP bonding cladding process development is summarized in the listed references. Further iterations with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) to refine the process to meet production and facility requirements is expected.

  13. Septic arthritis of the hip - current concepts.

    PubMed

    Rutz, E; Brunner, R

    2009-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the hip is the commonest septic condition during growth, reaching a distinct peak in frequency during infancy. The aetiology is a haematogenous joint infection. Indicative signs are severe pain when moving the joint, septic appearance and a poor general condition of these small and young patients. The diagnosis often can be difficult in infants since septic temperatures are not always present. An ultrasound scan shows the hip joint effusion and the capsular distension. X-ray investigation helps to exclude defective situations. Therapeutic options are: in patients with short history without radiologically visible complications we recommend repeated arthroscopic irrigation and in patients with long history and a radiologically visible defect of the femoral head or dislocation we recommend arthrotomy and open revision or reduction of the hip joint. PMID:19306242

  14. Two-Stage Progressive Femoral Lowering Followed by Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty for Treating Crowe IV-Hartofilakidis Type 3 Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Binazzi, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    High developmental dysplasia of the hip is commonly treated with total hip arthroplasty and shortening osteotomy. We present a two stage technique, consisting of progressive femoral lowering followed by total hip arthroplasty. The clinico-radiographic results of eleven patients (twelve hips) who were operated on with the two-stage technique were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 11 ± 5 years. At the final follow-up, ten patients (eleven hips) had a mean Harris hip score of 85 ± 5 points with no implant loosening. One patient (one hip) was revised at 5 years due to infection. No neurovascular complications were observed in any patients. With this technique, we could place the cup in the anatomical position and obtain complete limb symmetry with excellent clinical results at long-term. PMID:25599863

  15. Outcomes of Geriatric Hip Fractures Treated with AFFIXUS Hip Fracture Nail

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Ahmed; Madhusudan, Mysore; Waseem, Mohammed; Kershaw, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Geriatric hip fractures are one of the commonest fractures worldwide. The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of a series of unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail. A retrospective study of 100 unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail is presented. The mean follow-up duration was 8 months (range 3–32). Of the patients 83% were female. The average age was 85 years. The fracture was treated by closed reduction and intramedullary fixation. The mean acute hospital stay was 17.6 days. Systemic complications occurred in 29 patients (29%) and local complications in 3 patients (3%) including lag screw cutout in one patient (1%), lag screw backout in one patient (1%), and deep infection in one patient (1%). Mechanical failures and periprosthetic fractures were not observed in our series. Fractures united in all patients. Preinjury activity level was recovered in 78% of the patients. The results of AFFIXUS hip fracture nail were satisfactory in most elderly patients. The unique design of the lag screw and its thread spacing had effectively reduced cut-out rate. PMID:25580303

  16. Use of DXA-Based Structural Engineering Models of the Proximal Femur to Discriminate Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lang; Peel, Nicola; Clowes, Jackie A; McCloskey, Eugene V; Eastell, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Several DXA-based structural engineering models (SEMs) of the proximal femur have been developed to estimate stress caused by sideway falls. Their usefulness in discriminating hip fracture has not yet been established and we therefore evaluated these models. The hip DXA scans of 51 postmenopausal women with hip fracture (30 femoral neck, 17 trochanteric, and 4 unspecified) and 153 age-, height-, and weight-matched controls were reanalyzed using a special version of Hologic’s software that produced a pixel-by-pixel BMD map. For each map, a curved-beam, a curved composite-beam, and a finite element model were generated to calculate stress within the bone when falling sideways. An index of fracture risk (IFR) was defined over the femoral neck, trochanter, and total hip as the stress divided by the yield stress at each pixel and averaged over the regions of interest. Hip structure analysis (HSA) was also performed using Hologic APEX analysis software. Hip BMD and almost all parameters derived from HSA and SEM were discriminators of hip fracture on their own because their ORs were significantly >1. Because of the high correlation of total hip BMD to HSA and SEM-derived parameters, only the bone width discriminated hip fracture independently from total hip BMD. Judged by the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve, the trochanteric IFR derived from the finite element model was significant better than total hip BMD alone and similar to the total hip BMD plus bone width in discriminating all hip fracture and femoral neck fracture. No index was better than total hip BMD for discriminating trochanteric fractures. In conclusion, the finite element model has the potential to replace hip BMD in discriminating hip fractures. PMID:18767924

  17. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M.; Kowalczuk, M.; Simunovic, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia is controversial in the orthopaedic community, as the outcome literature has been variable and inconclusive. We hypothesise that outcomes of hip arthroscopy may be diminished in the setting of hip dysplasia, but outcomes may be acceptable in milder or borderline cases of hip dysplasia. Methods A systematic search was performed in duplicate for studies investigating the outcome of hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia up to July 2015. Study parameters including sample size, definition of dysplasia, outcomes measures, and re-operation rates were obtained. Furthermore, the levels of evidence of studies were collected and quality assessment was performed. Results The systematic review identified 18 studies investigating hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, with 889 included patients. Criteria used by the studies to diagnose hip dysplasia and borderline hip dysplasia included centre edge angle in 72% of studies but the range of angles were quite variable. Although 89% of studies reported improved post-operative outcome scores in the setting of hip dysplasia, revision rates were considerable (14.1%), with 9.6% requiring conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Conclusion The available orthopaedic literature suggests that although improved outcomes are seen in hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, there is a high rate of re-operation and conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Furthermore, the criteria used to define hip dysplasia vary considerably among published studies. Cite this article: M. Yeung, M. Kowalczuk, N. Simunovic, O. R. Ayeni. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:225–231. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000533. PMID:27313136

  18. Shoulder replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Total shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Replacement - shoulder - discharge; ...

  19. Review of the role of dynamic 18F-NaF PET in diagnosing and distinguishing between septic and aseptic loosening in hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Adesanya, Olu; Sprowson, Andrew; Masters, James; Hutchinson, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Joint replacements may fail due to infection, dislocation, peri-prosthetic fracture and loosening. Between 0.4 and 4% of joint replacements are known to be complicated by infection and aseptic loosening 2-18%. Differentiating between infection and aseptic loosening has an important bearing on the ongoing strategy for antimicrobial therapy and surgical intervention, but distinguishing one from the other can be difficult and will often require a battery of clinical and biochemical tests including the use of varying radiological modalities to accurately identify whether problematic joints are infected or aseptically loose. Prompt diagnosis is important due to the development of a biofilm on the surface of the infected prosthesis, which makes treatment difficult. There is no consensus among experts on the ideal imaging technique nor the methodology for image interpretation, but there is an increasing trend to apply hybrid imaging in the investigation of painful joint prosthesis and recent attempts have been made using PET-CT to identify aseptic loosening and infection with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and sodium fluoride (18)F-Na. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the role of (18)F-NaF sodium fluoride ((18)F-NaF) positron emission tomography (PET) in distinguishing between septic and aseptic failure in hip and knee replacements, in addition to evaluating the feasibility of using multi-sequential (18)F-NaF PET-CT for the assessment of painful lower limb prostheses. PMID:25592441

  20. Pelvic osteomyelitis mimicking septic hip arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Richelle C; Strongwater, Allan M

    2009-09-01

    Peripelvic infections are rare, compared with the incidence of septic hip arthritis, but are serious, requiring emergent treatment. They often are not included in differential diagnoses for patients presenting with fever, pain, inability to bear weight, elevated white blood cell count, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Most patients are treated initially as a septic hip arthritis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial to outcome in peripelvic abscess. Use of MRI may help to elucidate the correct diagnosis. Previously reported peripelvic infections included obturator internus and externus, and psoas, but to the best of our knowledge, this is first case report of infection of the ischiopubic ramus synchondrosis presenting as septic arthritis. PMID:19491707