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Sample records for infections salmonella enteritidis

  1. Infection and excretion of Salmonella Enteritidis in two different chicken lines with concurrent Ascaridia galli infection.

    PubMed

    Eigaard, N M; Schou, T W; Permin, A; Christensen, J P; Ekstrøm, C T; Ambrosini, F; Cianci, D; Bisgaard, M

    2006-12-01

    Studies on the impact of interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and the parasitic nematode Ascaridia galli with the avian host were undertaken with particular emphasis on infection and excretion of these pathogens in two different layer lines. A total of 148 salmonella-free 1-day-old chickens (73 Hellevad and 75 Lohmann Brown) were randomly divided into five groups for each line. Group 1 served as an uninoculated control group. Groups 2 and 3 were infected with A. galli and S. Enteritidis, respectively. Group 4 was first infected with S. Enteritidis and subsequently with A. galli, and vice versa for group 5. The number of chickens excreting S. Enteritidis was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the groups infected with both S. Enteritidis and A. galli compared with those only infected with S. Enteritidis over time. Furthermore, excretion of S. Enteritidis over time was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the group first infected with S. Enteritidis and subsequently with A. galli compared with the group infected in the reverse order. No significant differences were observed between the two lines concerning excretion of S. Enteritidis over time in any group (P = 0.61 (group 3), P = 0.73 (group 4), P = 0.31 (group 5)). A. galli established itself significantly better (P = 0.02) in the group first infected with A. galli and subsequently with S. Enteritidis compared with the group infected in the reverse order. Furthermore, the A. galli infection rate was significantly higher (P = 0.02) in Hellevad chickens compared with Lohmann Brown chickens at the end of the experiment. PMID:17121738

  2. Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since the 1980's, public health authorities around the world have continued to report high incidences of human SE infections. In both 2008 and 2009, SE was the Salmonella serotype most often associated with human illness in the US, with more than 7000 cases reported each year. Far more SE cases and ...

  3. Composition of Gut Microbiota Influences Resistance of Newly Hatched Chickens to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection.

    PubMed

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Kubasova, Tereza; Davidova-Gerzova, Lenka; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Sebkova, Alena; Faldynova, Marcela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Since poultry is a very common source of non-typhoid Salmonella for humans, different interventions aimed at decreasing the prevalence of Salmonella in chickens are understood as an effective measure for decreasing the incidence of human salmonellosis. One such intervention is the use of probiotic or competitive exclusion products. In this study we tested whether microbiota from donor hens of different age will equally protect chickens against Salmonella Enteritidis infection. Newly hatched chickens were therefore orally inoculated with cecal extracts from 1-, 3-, 16-, 28-, and 42-week-old donors and 7 days later, the chickens were infected with S. Enteritidis. The experiment was terminated 4 days later. In the second experiment, groups of newly hatched chickens were inoculated with cecal extracts of 35-week-old hens either on day 1 of life followed by S. Enteritidis infection on day 2 or were infected with S. Enteritidis infection on day 1 followed by therapeutic administration of the cecal extract on day 2 or were inoculated on day 1 of life with a mixture of the cecal extract and S. Enteritidis. This experiment was terminated when the chickens were 5 days old. Both Salmonella culture and chicken gene expression confirmed that inoculation of newly hatched chickens with microbiota from 3-week-old or older chickens protected them against S. Enteritidis challenge. On the other hand, microbiota from 1-week-old donors failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis challenge. Microbiota from 35-week-old hens protected chickens even 24 h after administration. However, simultaneous or therapeutic microbiota administration failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis infection. Gut microbiota can be used as a preventive measure against S. Enteritidis infection but its composition and early administration is critical for its efficacy. PMID:27379083

  4. Composition of Gut Microbiota Influences Resistance of Newly Hatched Chickens to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Kubasova, Tereza; Davidova-Gerzova, Lenka; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Sebkova, Alena; Faldynova, Marcela; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Since poultry is a very common source of non-typhoid Salmonella for humans, different interventions aimed at decreasing the prevalence of Salmonella in chickens are understood as an effective measure for decreasing the incidence of human salmonellosis. One such intervention is the use of probiotic or competitive exclusion products. In this study we tested whether microbiota from donor hens of different age will equally protect chickens against Salmonella Enteritidis infection. Newly hatched chickens were therefore orally inoculated with cecal extracts from 1-, 3-, 16-, 28-, and 42-week-old donors and 7 days later, the chickens were infected with S. Enteritidis. The experiment was terminated 4 days later. In the second experiment, groups of newly hatched chickens were inoculated with cecal extracts of 35-week-old hens either on day 1 of life followed by S. Enteritidis infection on day 2 or were infected with S. Enteritidis infection on day 1 followed by therapeutic administration of the cecal extract on day 2 or were inoculated on day 1 of life with a mixture of the cecal extract and S. Enteritidis. This experiment was terminated when the chickens were 5 days old. Both Salmonella culture and chicken gene expression confirmed that inoculation of newly hatched chickens with microbiota from 3-week-old or older chickens protected them against S. Enteritidis challenge. On the other hand, microbiota from 1-week-old donors failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis challenge. Microbiota from 35-week-old hens protected chickens even 24 h after administration. However, simultaneous or therapeutic microbiota administration failed to protect chickens against S. Enteritidis infection. Gut microbiota can be used as a preventive measure against S. Enteritidis infection but its composition and early administration is critical for its efficacy. PMID:27379083

  5. EFFECT OF PRIOR SERIAL IN VIVO PASSAGE ON THE FREQUENCY OF SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS CONTAMINATION IN EGGS FROM EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED LAYING HENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental infection models are valuable tools for understanding and preventing the deposition of Salmonella enteritidis inside eggs. Oral inoculation is believed to closely simulate naturally occurring S. enteritidis infections of chickens, but oral infection studies have often generated relative...

  6. Transcriptional Response of Chicken Macrophages to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) continues to be the predominant etiologic agent of salmonellosis, with contaminated egg products being the primary source of infection. At the present time, the molecular and immunological mechanisms involved in SE colonization of chicken hosts are not we...

  7. SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION MODULATES DIVERSE FUNCTIONAL PROCESSES OF CHICKEN MACROPHAGE AT THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL LEVEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is a major etiologic agent of non-typhoid salmonellosis. The organisms colonize adult chicken hosts without causing overt clinical signs. The immunological mechanisms underlying the silent and persistent infection of chickens by SE are not clearly underst...

  8. CONTROLLING EGG CONTAMINATION BY UNDERSTANDING SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS INFECTIONS IN LAYING HENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For more than twenty years, public health authorities have reported the transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis to consumers of internally contaminated eggs produced by infected hens. Egg contamination is both a cause of food-borne human illness and a principal diagnostic criterion for identifying in...

  9. Salmonella Enteritidis deposition in eggs after experimental infection of laying hens with different oral doses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The continuing attribution of human Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections to internally contaminated eggs has necessitated the commitment of substantial public and private resources to SE testing and control programs in commercial laying flocks. Cost-effective risk reduction requires a detailed and...

  10. Controlling Egg Contamination by Understanding Salmonella Enteritidis Infections in Laying Hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For more than twenty years, public health authorities have reported the transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis to consumers of internally contaminated eggs produced by infected hens. Egg contamination is both a cause of food-borne human illness and a principal diagnostic criterion for identifying in...

  11. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE OF CHICKEN MACROPHAGES TO SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcriptional profiles of chicken macrophages (HD11) infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) were analyzed by using avian macrophage microarray and real time RT-PCR. Out of 4,906 array elements interrogated, 269 genes exhibited a 2-fold change (P < 0.001) over a 24-hour time...

  12. Comparison of four different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for serological diagnosis of Salmonella enteritidis infections in experimentally infected chickens.

    PubMed Central

    van Zijderveld, F G; van Zijderveld-van Bemmel, A M; Anakotta, J

    1992-01-01

    The program for the eradication of Salmonella enteritidis from chickens in The Netherlands is based on bacteriological examination of breeding flocks. There is a great need for a specific and sensitive serological screening test. For that purpose, we developed four different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), i.e., an indirect ELISA with S. enteritidis flagellin, an indirect ELISA with S. enteritidis lipopolysaccharide, a double-antibody sandwich blocking ELISA that uses monoclonal antibodies against S. enteritidis flagellin (GM-DAS blocking ELISA), and a double-antibody sandwich ELISA that uses monoclonal antibodies against S. enteritidis lipopolysaccharide. In the present study, we compare the results of those ELISAs with sera from experimentally infected 1-day-old chickens and with sera and eggs from experimentally infected laying hens. Experimental infections were induced with strains of S. enteritidis phage types 1 and 2, S. typhimurium, and S. panama. Sera were collected up to days 44 and 39 after infection from 1-day-old chickens and laying hens, respectively. Only the GM-DAS blocking ELISA was able to discriminate between S. enteritidis infections and infections with the other serotypes. This ELISA had both a sensitivity and a specificity of 100% for all serum samples from experimentally infected chickens. A field study is in progress to evaluate whether this test can be implemented in the Dutch S. enteritidis eradication program. PMID:1400954

  13. Emergence of new Salmonella Enteritidis phage types in Europe? Surveillance of infections in returning travellers

    PubMed Central

    Nygård, Karin; de Jong, Birgitta; Guerin, Philippe J; Andersson, Yvonne; Olsson, Agneta; Giesecke, Johan

    2004-01-01

    Background Among human Salmonella Enteritidis infections, phage type 4 has been the dominant phage type in most countries in Western Europe during the last years. This is reflected in Salmonella infections among Swedish travellers returning from abroad. However, there are differences in phage type distribution between the countries, and this has also changed over time. Methods We used data from the Swedish infectious disease register and the national reference laboratory to describe phage type distribution of Salmonella Enteritidis infections in Swedish travellers from 1997 to 2002, and have compared this with national studies conducted in the countries visited. Results Infections among Swedish travellers correlate well with national studies conducted in the countries visited. In 2001 a change in phage type distribution in S. Enteritidis infections among Swedish travellers returning from some countries in southern Europe was observed, and a previously rare phage type (PT 14b) became one of the most commonly diagnosed that year, continuing into 2002 and 2003. Conclusions Surveillance of infections among returning travellers can be helpful in detecting emerging infections and outbreaks in tourist destinations. The information needs to be communicated rapidly to all affected countries in order to expedite the implementation of appropriate investigations and preventive measures. PMID:15345058

  14. Salmonella enteritidis in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Caffer, M I; Eiguer, T

    1994-01-01

    A significant increase in the number of isolations of Salmonella enteritidis has been observed in Argentina since 1986. Outbreaks of foodborne diseases in humans were associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked hens' eggs. Between 1986 and the first 6 months of 1993 there were 150 outbreaks reported, affecting more than 6000 persons. A total of 71.3% of these outbreaks were confirmed by stool cultures, and 47.3% by bacteriological study of the food implicated in the outbreak. A permanent surveillance of salmonellosis is imperative, taking into account the persistence of Salmonella enteritidis isolations in sporadic cases and in new outbreaks. PMID:8155472

  15. Gene Expression Profiles of Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts in Response to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Szmolka, Ama; Wiener, Zoltán; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Varmuzova, Karolina; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The response of chicken to non-typhoidal Salmonella infection is becoming well characterised but the role of particular cell types in this response is still far from being understood. Therefore, in this study we characterised the response of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) to infection with two different S. Enteritidis strains by microarray analysis. The expression of chicken genes identified as significantly up- or down-regulated (≥3-fold) by microarray analysis was verified by real-time PCR followed by functional classification of the genes and prediction of interactions between the proteins using Gene Ontology and STRING Database. Finally the expression of the newly identified genes was tested in HD11 macrophages and in vivo in chickens. Altogether 19 genes were induced in CEFs after S. Enteritidis infection. Twelve of them were also induced in HD11 macrophages and thirteen in the caecum of orally infected chickens. The majority of these genes were assigned different functions in the immune response, however five of them (LOC101750351, K123, BU460569, MOBKL2C and G0S2) have not been associated with the response of chicken to Salmonella infection so far. K123 and G0S2 were the only ’non-immune’ genes inducible by S. Enteritidis in fibroblasts, HD11 macrophages and in the caecum after oral infection. The function of K123 is unknown but G0S2 is involved in lipid metabolism and in β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria. PMID:26046914

  16. Effects of prior coinfection with different Salmonella serovars on the progression of a Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis infection in hens undergoing induced molt.

    PubMed

    Holt, Peter S; Gast, Richard K

    2004-01-01

    Four trials were conducted to evaluate whether prior infection with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) or Salmonella enterica serovar muenchen (S. muenchen) would modify the severity or the transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis (S. enteritidis) challenge in hens undergoing molt via feed withdrawal. Hens were separated into two groups where one group received a prior S. typhimurium or S. muenchen infection, whereas the other group remained untreated until S. enteritidis challenge. In trials 1 and 2, one group of hens was infected with S. typhimurium 5 days prior to feed withdrawal. Both groups of hens were then challenged with S. enteritidis on day 4 post feed withdrawal. In trials 3 and 4, one group of hens received S. typhimurium or S. muenchen, respectively, 1 day after feed was withdrawn. Transmission of S. enteritidis was evaluated by challenging the center hen in rows of 11 hens per row with S. enteritidis at 4 days post feed withdrawal and following the progression of the S. enteritidis down the row of hens over time. In trials 1 and 2, where hens received S. typhimurium 5 days prior to feed withdrawal, shedding of the S. enteritidis challenge was significantly reduced in hens on day 10 postchallenge in trial 1 and on days 3 and 10 postchallenge in trial 2 compared with the hens subjected only to the molt procedure. Significantly fewer S. enteritidis were recovered in livers and spleens at day 9 postchallenge in trial 2 from hens receiving the prior S. typhimurium infection. In trial 3, where hens received S. typhimurium 1 day after feed withdrawal, S. enteritidis transmission was significantly reduced in these hens on days 3, 10, and 24 postchallenge. In trial 4, similar in methodology to trial 3 except that, rather than S. typhimurium, hens received S. muenchen, a Salmonella organism totally lacking any antigen cross-reactive with S. enteritidis, S. enteritidis transmission was significantly reduced on days 3, 10, 17

  17. Influence of 5 major Salmonella pathogenicity islands on NK cell depletion in mice infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In this study we were interested in the colonisation and early immune response of Balb/C mice to infection with Salmonella Enteritidis and isogenic pathogenicity island free mutants. Results The virulence of S. Enteritidis for Balb/C mice was exclusively dependent on intact SPI-2. Infections with any of the mutants harbouring SPI-2 (including the mutant in which we left only SPI-2 but removed SPI-1, SPI-3, SPI-4 and SPI-5) resulted in fatalities, liver injures and NK cell depletion from the spleen. The infection was of minimal influence on counts of splenic CD4 CD8 T lymphocytes and γδ T-lymphocytes although a reduced ability of splenic lymphocytes to respond to non-specific mitogens indicated general immunosuppression in mice infected with SPI-2 positive S. Enteritidis mutants. Further investigations showed that NK cells were depleted also in blood but not in the caecal lamina propria. However, NK cell depletion was not directly associated with the presence of SPI-2 and was rather an indicator of virulence or avirulence of a particular mutant because the depletion was not observed in mice infected with other attenuated mutants such as lon and rfaL. Conclusions The virulence of S. Enteritidis for Balb/C mice is exclusively dependent on the presence of SPI-2 in its genome, and a major hallmark of the infection in terms of early changes in lymphocyte populations is the depletion of NK cells in spleen and blood. The decrease of NK cells in circulation can be used as a marker of attenuation of S. Enteritidis mutants for Balb/C mice. PMID:20226037

  18. Characterization of Chicken Spleen Transcriptome after Infection with Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Matulova, Marta; Rajova, Jana; Vlasatikova, Lenka; Volf, Jiri; Stepanova, Hana; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this study we were interested in identification of new markers of chicken response to Salmonella Enteritidis infection. To reach this aim, gene expression in the spleens of naive chickens and those intravenously infected with S. Enteritidis with or without previous oral vaccination was determined by 454 pyrosequencing of splenic mRNA/cDNA. Forty genes with increased expression at the level of transcription were identified. The most inducible genes encoded avidin (AVD), extracellular fatty acid binding protein (EXFABP), immune responsive gene 1 (IRG1), chemokine ah221 (AH221), trappin-6-like protein (TRAP6) and serum amyloid A (SAA). Using cDNA from sorted splenic B-lymphocytes, macrophages, CD4, CD8 and γδ T-lymphocytes, we found that the above mentioned genes were preferentially expressed in macrophages. AVD, EXFABP, IRG1, AH221, TRAP6 and SAA were induced also in the cecum of chickens orally infected with S. Enteritidis on day 1 of life or day 42 of life. Unusual results were obtained for the immunoglobulin encoding transcripts. Prior to the infection, transcripts coding for the constant parts of IgM, IgY, IgA and Ig light chain were detected in B-lymphocytes. However, after the infection, immunoglobulin encoding transcripts were expressed also by T-lymphocytes and macrophages. Expression of AVD, EXFABP, IRG1, AH221, TRAP6, SAA and all immunoglobulin genes can be therefore used for the characterization of the course of S. Enteritidis infection in chickens. PMID:23094107

  19. Large Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak with prolonged transmission attributed to an infected food handler, Texas, 2002.

    PubMed

    Beatty, M E; Shevick, G; Shupe-Ricksecker, K; Bannister, E; Tulu, A; Lancaster, K; Alexander, N; Zellner, D E; Lyszkowicz, E; Braden, C R

    2009-03-01

    In March 2002, an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections occurred at a convention centre in Dallas, Texas and continued for 6 weeks. We conducted epidemiological studies, obtained clinical and environmental cultures, and interviewed employees to identify risk factors for infection. From 17 March-25 April 2002, the implicated hotel kitchen catered 41 multi-day conferences attended by 9790 persons. We received 617 illness reports from residents of 46 states. Sauces or items served with sauces were implicated in three cohort studies. SE phage-type 8 was identified as the agent. Eleven food service employees, including one who prepared sauces and salsa, had stool cultures that yielded SE. Although the original source was not determined, prolonged transmission resulted in the largest food handler-associated outbreak reported to date, affecting persons from 46 US states. Transmission ended with implementation of policies to screen food handlers and exclude those whose stool cultures yielded salmonellas. PMID:18817586

  20. Use of bacteriophage for biological control of Salmonella Enteritidis infection in chicken.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Myung-Seob; Lee, Dong-Hun; Lee, Yu-Na; Park, Jae-Keun; Youn, Ha-Na; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Yang, Si-Yong; Cho, Young-Wook; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2012-12-01

    Bacteriophage ΦCJ07 with broad host ranges for Salmonella strains isolated from sewage effluent were used to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infection in chickens. One-day-old chicks challenged with 5×10(7) colony-forming units/bird of SE were cohabitated with contact chicks and treated with three concentrations (10(5), 10(7) and 10(9) plaque forming units (PFU)/g) of bacteriophage prepared as a feed additive for 21days after challenge. Salmonella in the intestine was quantified and environmental contamination level was examined at 1, 2 and 3weeks after challenge. All treatments reduced intestinal SE colonization in challenged and contact chickens and reduced the environmental contamination level, but the reductions produced by 10(7) and 10(9)PFU/g of bacteriophage were significant (P<0.05) as compared with untreated controls. In addition, seven out of 10 (70%) contact chickens treated with 10(9)PFU/g of bacteriophage had no detectable intestinal Salmonella at 3weeks after treatment, suggesting that bacteriophage therapy significantly prevented the horizontal transmission of SE. These results provide important insights into preventive and control strategies against SE infection in poultry and indicate that the use of bacteriophage could reduce the incidence of Salmonella food poisoning. PMID:22795674

  1. Protection Against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Gallinarum, and Salmonella Enteritidis Infection in Layer Chickens Conferred by a Live Attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium Strain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protection conferred by a live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) strain against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Gallinarum (SG), and Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infection in layer chickens. Birds were orally primed with the attenuated ST strain at 7 days of age and then boosted at 4 weeks post prime immunization (PPI). Sequential monitoring of plasma IgG and mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA) levels revealed that inoculation with ST induced a significant antibody response to antigens against ST, SE, and SG. Moreover, significant lymphoproliferative responses to the 3 Salmonella serovars were observed in the immunized group. We also investigated protection against virulent ST, SE, and SG strain challenge. Upon virulent SG challenge, the immunized group showed significantly reduced mortality compared to the non-immunized group. The reduced persistence of the virulent ST and SE challenge strains in the liver, spleen, and cecal tissues of the immunized group suggests that immunization with the attenuated ST strain may not only protect against ST infection but can also confer cross protection against SE and SG infection. PMID:25713506

  2. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More human illnesses caused by Salmonella Enteritidis throughout the world have been linked to the consumption of contaminated eggs than to any other food vehicle. Deposition of this pathogen in the edible contents of eggs occurs when systemic infections of laying hens involve colonization of reprod...

  3. Isolation of Salmonella Enteritidis from Internal Organs of Experimentally Infected Laying Hens Housed in Conventional or Enriched Cages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human illness caused by Salmonella Enteritidis has been more frequently linked to the consumption of contaminated eggs than to any other food source. This pathogen can be deposited inside the edible contents of eggs when reproductive organs are colonized in systemically infected laying hens. In rece...

  4. Detection of airborne Salmonella enteritidis in the environment of experimentally infected laying hens by an electrostatic sampling device.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Mitchell, Bailey W; Holt, Peter S

    2004-01-01

    Bacteriologic culturing of environmental samples taken from sources such as manure pits and egg belts has been the principal screening tool in programs for identifying commercial laying flocks that have been exposed to Salmonella enteritidis and are thus at risk to produce contaminated eggs. Because airborne dust and aerosols can carry bacteria, air sampling offers a potentially efficient and inexpensive alternative for detecting S. enteritidis in poultry house environments. In the present study, an electrostatic air sampling device was applied to detect S. enteritidis in a room containing experimentally infected, caged laying hens. After oral inoculation of hens with a phage type 13a S. enteritidis strain, air samples were collected onto agar plates with the electrostatic sampling device, an impaction air sampler, and by passive exposure to the settling of aerosols and dust. Even though the floor of the room was cleaned once per week (removing most manure, dust, and feathers), air samples were positive for S. enteritidis for up to 4 wk postinoculation. On the basis of both the number of S. enteritidis colonies observed on incubated agar plates and the frequency of positive results, the efficiency of the electrostatic device was significantly greater than that of the passive exposure plates (especially at short collection intervals) and was similar to that of the far more expensive impaction sampler. The electrostatic device, used for a 3-hr sampling interval, detected airborne S. enteritidis on 75% of agar plates over the 4 wk of the study. PMID:15077808

  5. Multistate outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis infection associated with pet guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bartholomew, Michael L; Heffernan, Richard T; Wright, Jennifer G; Klos, Rachel F; Monson, Timothy; Khan, Sofiya; Trees, Eija; Sabol, Ashley; Willems, Robert A; Flynn, Raymond; Deasy, Marshall P; Jones, Benjamen; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella causes about one million illnesses annually in the United States. Although most infections result from foodborne exposures, animal contact is an important mode of transmission. We investigated a case of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (SE) sternal osteomyelitis in a previously healthy child who cared for two recently deceased guinea pigs (GPs). A case was defined as SE pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) XbaI pattern JEGX01.0021, BlnI pattern JEGA26.0002 (outbreak strain) infection occurring during 2010 in a patient who reported GP exposure. To locate outbreak strain isolates, PulseNet and the US Department of Agriculture National Veterinary Service Laboratories (NVSL) databases were queried. Outbreak strain isolates underwent multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Traceback and environmental investigations were conducted at homes, stores, and breeder or broker facilities. We detected 10 cases among residents of eight states and four NVSL GP outbreak strain isolates. One patient was hospitalized; none died. The median patient age was 9.5 (range, 1-61) years. Among 10 patients, two purchased GPs at independent stores, and three purchased GPs at different national retail chain (chain A) store locations; three were chain A employees and two reported GP exposures of unknown characterization. MLVA revealed four related patterns. Tracebacks identified four distributors and 92 sources supplying GPs to chain A, including one breeder potentially supplying GPs to all case-associated chain A stores. All environmental samples were Salmonella culture-negative. A definitive SE-contaminated environmental source was not identified. Because GPs can harbor Salmonella, consumers and pet industry personnel should be educated regarding risks. PMID:24866204

  6. Detection of Salmonella spp, Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium in naturally infected broiler chickens by a multiplex PCR-based assay

    PubMed Central

    Paião, F.G.; Arisitides, L.G.A.; Murate, L.S.; Vilas-Bôas, G.T.; Vilas-Boas, L.A.; Shimokomaki, M.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of Salmonella in the intestinal tract, on the chickens skin and among their feathers, may cause carcasses contamination during slaughtering and processing and possibly it is responsible by the introduction of this microorganism in the slaughterhouses. A rapid method to identify and monitor Salmonella and their sorovars in farm is becoming necessary. A pre-enriched multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) assay employing specific primers was developed and used to detect Salmonella at the genus level and to identify the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in broiler chicken swab samples. The method was validated by testing DNA extract from 90 fresh culture cloacal swab samples from poultry chicken cultured in phosphate buffer peptone water at 37 °C for 18 h. The final results showed the presence of Salmonella spp. in 25% of samples, S. Enteritidis was present in 12% of the Salmonella-positive samples and S. Typhimurium in 3% of the samples. The m-PCR assay developed in this study is a specific and rapid alternative method for the identification of Salmonella spp. and allowed the observation of specific serovar contamination in the field conditions within the locations where these chickens are typically raised. PMID:24159281

  7. Detecting Salmonella Enteritidis in Laying Hens and Eggs after Experimental Infection at Different Oral Dose Levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The attribution of human illness to eggs contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis has led to substantial commitments of resources (by both government and industry) to risk reduction and testing programs in egg-laying flocks. Cost-effective application of testing requires a thorough understanding of ...

  8. Horizontal transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The majority of human illnesses caused by Salmonella Enteritidis are attributed to contaminated eggs, and the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial laying flocks has been identified as a leading epidemiologic risk factor. Flock housing and management systems can affect opportunities for the intr...

  9. Mechanisms of egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis is the major cause of the food-borne salmonellosis pandemic in humans of the last 20 years, during which contaminated eggs were the most important vehicle of the infection. Eggs can be contaminated on the outer shell surface and internally. Internal contamination can be the re...

  10. Serum, disc and egg ELISA for the serodiagnosis of Salmonella gallinarum and S. enteritidis infections in chickens.

    PubMed

    Minga, U M; Wray, C; Gwakisa, P S

    1992-01-01

    An ELISA was evaluated for the serodiagnosis of fowl typhoid and paratyphoid due to Salmonella enteritidis in chickens. The hot phenol: water lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extract of Salmonella was used as the antigen. Chicken serum, eggs and discs impregnated with chicken blood were tested for the presence of antibodies against Salmonella factor 'O' 9 antigen. The substrate and chromogen used were hydrogen peroxide and orthophenylenediamine respectively. Serological results from the experimentally and naturally infected chickens showed close agreement between the conventional Serum Tube Agglutination Test (SAT) and serum ELISA while serum ELISA results were in close agreement with the egg and disc ELISA results. It was noted that ELISA was highly sensitive, convenient and versatile. It is concluded that ELISA, especially disc ELISA, ought to replace SAT for seroscreening chickens against S. gallinarum and other Salmonella Group D infections. PMID:1381107

  11. Prophylactic Bacteriophage Administration More Effective than Post-infection Administration in Reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Shedding in Quail

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mosab; Karimi Torshizi, M. Amir; Rahimi, Shaban; Dennehy, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella bacteria, often through poultry products, are a serious public health issue. Because of drawbacks associated with antibiotic prophylaxis, alternative treatments are sought. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) may provide an effective alternative, but concerns remain with respect to bacteriophage stability and effectiveness. To this end, we assessed the stability of a novel bacteriophage isolated from poultry excreta, siphovirus PSE, and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we sought to determine how the timing (prophylactic or therapeutic) and route (oral gavage or vent lip) of PSE administration impacted its effectiveness. Here we report that significant quantities of viable PSE bacteriophages were recovered following exposure to high and low pH, high temperatures, and bile salts, testifying to its ability to survive extreme conditions. In addition, we found that ileal lactic acid bacteria and Streptococcus spp. counts increased, but colibacilli and total aerobe counts decreased, in quail receiving phage PSE through both oral gavage and vent lip routes. In other experiments, we assessed the efficiency of PSE administration, in both prophylactic and therapeutic contexts, via either oral gavage or vent lip administration, on S. Enteritidis colonization of quail cecal tonsils. Our results demonstrate that administration of PSE as a preventive agent could reduce the S. Enteritidis colonization more effectively than post-challenge administration. Furthermore, oral administration of PSE phage is a more effective prophylactic tool for reduction of S. Enteritidis shedding in poultry than is vent lip administration. PMID:27555842

  12. Prophylactic Bacteriophage Administration More Effective than Post-infection Administration in Reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Shedding in Quail.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mosab; Karimi Torshizi, M Amir; Rahimi, Shaban; Dennehy, John J

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella bacteria, often through poultry products, are a serious public health issue. Because of drawbacks associated with antibiotic prophylaxis, alternative treatments are sought. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) may provide an effective alternative, but concerns remain with respect to bacteriophage stability and effectiveness. To this end, we assessed the stability of a novel bacteriophage isolated from poultry excreta, siphovirus PSE, and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we sought to determine how the timing (prophylactic or therapeutic) and route (oral gavage or vent lip) of PSE administration impacted its effectiveness. Here we report that significant quantities of viable PSE bacteriophages were recovered following exposure to high and low pH, high temperatures, and bile salts, testifying to its ability to survive extreme conditions. In addition, we found that ileal lactic acid bacteria and Streptococcus spp. counts increased, but colibacilli and total aerobe counts decreased, in quail receiving phage PSE through both oral gavage and vent lip routes. In other experiments, we assessed the efficiency of PSE administration, in both prophylactic and therapeutic contexts, via either oral gavage or vent lip administration, on S. Enteritidis colonization of quail cecal tonsils. Our results demonstrate that administration of PSE as a preventive agent could reduce the S. Enteritidis colonization more effectively than post-challenge administration. Furthermore, oral administration of PSE phage is a more effective prophylactic tool for reduction of S. Enteritidis shedding in poultry than is vent lip administration. PMID:27555842

  13. An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 infection in a rural community in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Doherty, L; McCartney, M; Mitchell, E; Wilson, T S

    1997-05-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis arose in people who attended a charity barbecue at a hotel in a rural area of Northern Ireland in July 1995. About 120 people attended the barbecue, 98 of whom were identified. Fifty-one of them and seven members of hotel staff met the case definition. An epidemiological investigation showed that illness was significantly associated with eating foods containing mayonnaise that had been prepared using raw shell eggs and stored at too high a temperature. Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 was cultured from 17 out of 24 faecal specimens received from people who attended the barbecue and in 17 out of 34 faecal specimens from staff, including all seven staff cases. The primary source of infection was not identified despite thorough investigation. This paper highlights the value of administering questionnaires by telephone when investigating community outbreaks of infection in rural areas, the important role of general practitioners in the identification of community outbreaks, and the need to periodically reiterate public health messages, in particular for food handlers and caterers. PMID:9175310

  14. Incidence, distribution, seasonality, and demographic risk factors of Salmonella Enteritidis human infections in Ontario, Canada, 2007–2009

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Canada, surveillance systems have highlighted the increasing trend of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) human infections. Our study objectives were to evaluate the epidemiology of S. Enteritidis infections in Ontario using surveillance data from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2009. Methods Annual age-and-sex-adjusted incidence rates (IRs), annual and mean age-adjusted sex-specific IRs, and mean age-and-sex-adjusted IRs by public health unit (PHU), were calculated for laboratory-confirmed S. Enteritidis cases across Ontario using direct standardization. Multivariable Poisson regression with PHU as a random effect was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of S. Enteritidis infections among years, seasons, age groups, and sexes. Results The annual age-and-sex-adjusted IR per 100,000 person-years was 4.4 [95% CI 4.0-4.7] in 2007, and 5.2 [95% CI 4.8-5.6] in both 2008 and 2009. The annual age-adjusted sex-specific IRs per 100,000 person-years ranged from 4.5 to 5.5 for females and 4.2 to 5.2 for males. The mean age-adjusted sex-specific IR was 5.1 [95% CI 4.8-5.4] for females and 4.8 [95% CI 4.5-5.1] for males. High mean age-and-sex-adjusted IRs (6.001-8.10) were identified in three western PHUs, one northern PHU, and in the City of Toronto. Regression results showed a higher IRR of S. Enteritidis infections in 2009 [IRR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.06-1.32; P = 0.003] and 2008 [IRR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.05-1.31; P = 0.005] compared to 2007. Compared to the fall season, a higher IRR of S. Enteritidis infections was observed in the spring [IRR = 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.29; P = 0.040]. Children 0–4 years of age (reference category), followed by children 5–9 years of age [IRR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.52-0.78; P < 0.001] had the highest IRRs. Adults ≥ 60 years of age and 40–49 years of age [IRR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.26-0.37; P < 0.001] had the lowest IRRs. Conclusions The study findings suggest that there was an increase in the incidence of S

  15. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Anderson, Kenneth E; Karcher, Darrin M

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiologic analyses have linked the frequency of human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis to the consumption of contaminated eggs and thus to the prevalence of this pathogen in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis is a consequence of the colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. The animal welfare implications of laying hen housing systems have been widely debated, but no definitive consensus has yet emerged about the food safety significance of poultry housing options. The present study sought to determine the effects of two different bird stocking densities on the invasion of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas. In two trials, groups of laying hens were distributed at two different stocking densities into colony cages and (along with a group housed in conventional cages) orally inoculated with doses of 1.0 × 10(7) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. At 5 to 6 d post-inoculation, hens were euthanized and samples of internal organs were removed for bacteriologic culturing. For both trials combined, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered at a significantly (P < 0.05) greater frequency from hens in enriched colony cages at the higher stocking density than at the lower density from livers (75.0% vs. 51.4%) and ovaries (51.4% vs. 30.6%). However, spleens from hens in enriched colony cages at the higher stocking density were significantly less often positive for Salmonella Enteritidis than from hens in conventional cages at that same density (90.3% vs. 68.1%). These results suggest that stocking density can influence the susceptibility of hens to Salmonella Enteritidis, but other housing systems parameters may also contribute to the outcome of infections. PMID:26944976

  16. Requirement for cobalamin by Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Pullorum, Gallinarum and Enteritidis during infection in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Jacqueline Boldrin; Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Junior, Angelo Berchieri; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synthesizes cobalamin (vitamin B12) only during anaerobiosis. Two percent of the S. Typhimurium genome is devoted to the synthesis and uptake of vitamin B12 and to B12-dependent reactions. To understand the requirement for cobalamin synthesis better, we constructed mutants of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Pullorum that are double-defective in cobalamin biosynthesis (ΔcobSΔcbiA). We compared the virulence of these mutants to that of their respective wild type strains and found no impairment in their ability to cause disease in chickens. We then assessed B12 production in these mutants and their respective wild type strains, as well as in S. Typhimurium ΔcobSΔcbiA, Salmonella Gallinarum ΔcobSΔcbiA, and their respective wild type strains. None of the mutants was able to produce detectable B12. B12 was detectable in S. Enteritidis, S. Pullorum and S. Typhimurium wild type strains but not in S. Gallinarum. In conclusion, the production of vitamin B12in vitro differed across the tested Salmonella serotypes and the deletion of the cbiA and cobS genes resulted in different levels of alteration in the host parasite interaction according to Salmonella serotype tested. PMID:24031771

  17. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The frequency of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) has been linked to contaminated eggs and thus to SE prevalence in commercial egg-laying flocks. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is a consequence of SE colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. T...

  18. FUNCTIONS EXERTED BY THE VIRULENCE ASSOCIATED TYPE THREE SECRETION SYSTEMS DURING SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS INFECTION OF CHICKEN OVIDUCT EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar, Enteritidis (SE) infection of chicken is a major contributing factor to non-typhoidal salmonellosis. The roles of the type three secretion systems (T3SS-1 and T3SS-2) in the pathogenesis of SE infection of chickens are poorly understood. In this study, the functions exer...

  19. A colonisation-inhibition culture consisting of Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strains protects against infection by strains of both serotypes in broilers.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Mot, D; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2014-08-01

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is still an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans and there is a need for control methods that protect broilers from day-of-hatch until slaughter age against infection with Salmonella. Colonisation-inhibition, a concept in which a live Salmonella strain is orally administered to day-old chickens and protects against subsequent challenge, can potentially be used as control method. In this study, the efficacy of a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain as a colonisation-inhibition strain for protection of broilers against Salmonella Typhimurium was evaluated. Administration of a Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old broiler chickens decreased faecal shedding and strongly reduced caecal and internal organ colonisation of a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge strain administered one day later using a seeder bird model. In addition, it was verified whether a colonisation-inhibition culture could be developed that protects against both Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium. Therefore, the Salmonella Typhimurium ΔhilAssrAfliG strain was orally administered simultaneously with a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old broiler chickens, which resulted in a decreased caecal and internal organ colonisation for both a Salmonella Enteritidis and a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge strain short after hatching, using a seeder bird model. The combined culture was not protective against Salmonella Paratyphi B varietas Java challenge, indicating serotype-specific protection mechanisms. The data suggest that colonisation-inhibition can potentially be used as a versatile control method to protect poultry against several Salmonella serotypes. PMID:24975814

  20. Chicken-Specific Kinome Array Reveals that Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Modulates Host Immune Signaling Pathways in the Cecum to Establish a Persistence Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Michael H.; Swaggerty, Christina L.; Byrd, James Allen; Selvaraj, Ramesh; Arsenault, Ryan J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induces an early, short-lived pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are only beginning to be elucidated. We hypothesize that alteration of host signaling pathways mediate the induction of a tolerance response. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune peptide arrays and quantitative RT-PCR of infected cecal tissue, we have previously evaluated the development of disease tolerance in chickens infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in a persistent infection model (4–14 days post infection). Here, we have further outlined the induction of an tolerance defense strategy in the cecum of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis beginning around four days post-primary infection. The response is characterized by alterations in the activation of T cell signaling mediated by the dephosphorylation of phospholipase c-γ1 (PLCG1) that inhibits NF-κB signaling and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling and blockage of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production through the disruption of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway (dephosphorylation of JAK2, JAK3, and STAT4). Further, we measured a significant down-regulation reduction in IFN-γ mRNA expression. These studies, combined with our previous findings, describe global phenotypic changes in the avian cecum of Salmonella Enteritidis-infected chickens that decreases the host responsiveness resulting in the establishment of persistent colonization. The identified tissue protein kinases also represent potential targets for future antimicrobial compounds for decreasing Salmonella loads in the intestines of food animals before going to market. PMID:27472318

  1. Chicken-Specific Kinome Array Reveals that Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Modulates Host Immune Signaling Pathways in the Cecum to Establish a Persistence Infection.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Michael H; Swaggerty, Christina L; Byrd, James Allen; Selvaraj, Ramesh; Arsenault, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induces an early, short-lived pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are only beginning to be elucidated. We hypothesize that alteration of host signaling pathways mediate the induction of a tolerance response. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune peptide arrays and quantitative RT-PCR of infected cecal tissue, we have previously evaluated the development of disease tolerance in chickens infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in a persistent infection model (4-14 days post infection). Here, we have further outlined the induction of an tolerance defense strategy in the cecum of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis beginning around four days post-primary infection. The response is characterized by alterations in the activation of T cell signaling mediated by the dephosphorylation of phospholipase c-γ1 (PLCG1) that inhibits NF-κB signaling and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling and blockage of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production through the disruption of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway (dephosphorylation of JAK2, JAK3, and STAT4). Further, we measured a significant down-regulation reduction in IFN-γ mRNA expression. These studies, combined with our previous findings, describe global phenotypic changes in the avian cecum of Salmonella Enteritidis-infected chickens that decreases the host responsiveness resulting in the establishment of persistent colonization. The identified tissue protein kinases also represent potential targets for future antimicrobial compounds for decreasing Salmonella loads in the intestines of food animals before going to market. PMID:27472318

  2. Identification of novel attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis mutants.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jason; Pang, Ervinna; He, Haiqi; Kwang, Jimmy

    2008-06-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a major food-borne pathogen that causes nontyphoidal diarrhoea in humans. Infection of adult egg-laying hens usually results in symptomless carriage but in young chicks it may cause paratyphoid disease. It is not known whether S. Enteritidis requires genes additional to known virulence genes for systemic infection of young chickens. A transposon insertion library was created using S. Enteritidis 10/02, which yielded 1246 mutants. Of 384 mutants screened in chickens for attenuation (30.8% of insertion library), 12 (3.1%) had a 50% lethal dose at least 100 times that of the parental strain. Sequencing revealed insertions in genes involved in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide, cell membrane, ATP biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation of virulence and the yhbC gene, which has an unknown function. Evaluation of in vitro virulence characteristics of a Delta yhbC mutant revealed that its ability to invade HeLa cells and survive within a chicken macrophage cell line (HD11) was significantly reduced. It was also less resistant to reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates and had a retarded growth rate. Chickens challenged with the Delta yhbC mutant cleared the organism from the liver and spleen 1 week faster than the parental strain and were able to develop specific serum IgG antibodies against the Delta yhbC mutant. PMID:18355292

  3. The rise and fall of salmonella enteritidis in poultry: implications for human health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Describe how the dynamic of Salmonella prevalence within an animal species is serotype specific. Background: Among the >2500 Salmonella serotypes, infection with serovar Enteritidis can result in increased morbidity and mortality. Although the overall incidence of food borne salmonellosis...

  4. Differential Responses of Macrophages to Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophages are major effectors against Salmonella infection, and also transport bacteria between host tissues and provide a protected site for intracellular bacterial replication. We hypothesized that differences in chicken macrophage responses to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) and s...

  5. Salmonella enteritidis infections associated with foods purchased from mobile lunch trucks--Alberta, Canada, October 2010-February 2011.

    PubMed

    2013-07-19

    During October 2010-February 2011, an outbreak of 91 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Alberta, Canada, was investigated by a local public health department (Alberta Health Services, Calgary Zone). Index cases initially were linked through a common history of consumption of food purchased from mobile food-vending vehicles (lunch trucks) operating at worksites in Alberta. Further investigation implicated one catering company that supplied items for the lunch trucks and other vendors. In 85 cases, patients reported consumption of food prepared by the catering company in the 7 days before illness. Six patients were employees of the catering company, and two food samples collected from the catering company were positive for SE. Foods likely were contaminated directly or indirectly through the use of illegally sourced, SE-contaminated eggs at the implicated catering facility and by catering employees who were infected with SE. Public health interventions put into place to control the outbreak included screening employees for Salmonella, excluding those infected from food-handling duties, and training employees in safe food-handling procedures. No further outbreak cases were identified after full implementation of the interventions. This investigation highlights the potential for lunch trucks to be a source of foodborne illness and the need for robust regulatory compliance monitoring of lunch trucks and their food suppliers. PMID:23863703

  6. First-trimester Septic Abortion Due to Salmonella enteritidis Oranienburg

    PubMed Central

    Jelsema, Russel D.; Isada, Nelson B.

    1995-01-01

    Background: Septic abortion caused by transplacental salmonella infection is extremely rare; there are no reported cases of serotype oranienburg as an etiology. Case: We describe a patient with non-typhoidal Salmonella enteritidis serotype oranienburg as a cause of first-trimester pregnancy loss. The rapid progression of this patient's septicemia and adverse outcome is described. The epidemiology and natural history of salmonella infections are also discussed. Conclusion: Non-typhoidal salmonella is still a cause of morbidity in Western countries. This infection can result in rapid-onset fetal demise and septic abortion. PMID:18475401

  7. Salmonella Enteritidis organ invasion and egg contamination in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both disease surveillance and epidemiologic analyses have confirmed a strong association between human salmonellosis and the prevalence of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in commercial egg flocks. The majority of human illnesses caused by this pathogen are attributed to contaminated eggs. Animal welfare...

  8. Contamination of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis in experimentally infected laying hens housed in conventional or enriched cages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both epidemiologic analyses and active disease surveillance confirm an ongoing strong association between human salmonellosis and the prevalence of Salmonella Enteritidis in commercial egg flocks. The majority of human illnesses caused by this pathogen are attributed to the consumption of contaminat...

  9. Comparative Virulotyping of Salmonella typhi and Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Elemfareji, Omar Ismail; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2013-12-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are important foodborne pathogens of significant public health concern worldwide. This study aimed to determine a range of virulence genes among typhoidal (S. typhi) and non-typhoidal (S. enteritidis) strains isolated from different geographical regions and different years. A total of 87 S. typhi and 94 S. enteritidis strains were tested for presence of 22 virulence genes by employing multiplex PCR and the genetic relatedness of these strains was further characterized by REP-PCR. In S. typhi, invA, prgH, sifA, spiC, sopB, iroN, sitC, misL, pipD, cdtB, and orfL were present in all the strains, while sopE, agfC, agfA, sefC, mgtC, and sefD were present in 98.8, 97.7, 90.8, 87.4, 87.4 and 17.2 %, of the strains, respectively. No lpfA, lpfC, pefA, spvB, or spvC was detected. Meanwhile, in S. enteritidis, 15 genes, agfA, agfC, invA, lpfA, lpfC, sefD, prgH, spiC, sopB, sopE, iroN, sitC, misL, pipD, and orfL were found in all S. enteritidis strains 100 %, followed by sifA and spvC 98.9 %, pefA, spvB and mgtC 97.8 %, and sefC 90.4 %. cdtB was absent from all S. enteritidis strains tested. REP-PCR subtyped S. typhi strains into 18 REP-types and concurred with the virulotyping results in grouping the strains, while in S. enteritidis, REP-PCR subtyped the strains into eight profiles and they were poorly distinguishable between human and animal origins. The study showed that S. typhi and S. enteritidis contain a range of virulence factors associated with pathogenesis. Virulotyping is a rapid screening method to identify and profile virulence genes in Salmonella strains, and improve an understanding of potential risk for human and animal infections. PMID:24426144

  10. Integrated farm management to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis contamination of eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in contaminated eggs is a public health hazard which may cause hospitalization or death in the elderly, infants, and individuals with impaired immune systems. Prevention of SE infection of laying hens is an essential first step in reducing SE outbreaks in humans. Multiple...

  11. Controlling Egg Contamination with Salmonella Enteritidis by Understanding its Pathobiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For more than twenty years, public health authorities have reported the transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis to consumers of internally contaminated eggs produced by infected hens. Egg contamination is both a cause of food-borne human illness and a principal diagnostic criterion for identifying in...

  12. Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Core O Polysaccharide Conjugated to H:g,m Flagellin as a Candidate Vaccine for Protection against Invasive Infection with S. Enteritidis▿†

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Raphael; Tennant, Sharon M.; Wang, Jin Y.; Schmidlein, Patrick J.; Lees, Andrew; Ernst, Robert K.; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium are a common cause of gastroenteritis but also cause invasive infections and enteric fever in certain hosts (young children in sub-Saharan Africa, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals). Salmonella O polysaccharides (OPS) and flagellar proteins are virulence factors and protective antigens. The surface polysaccharides of Salmonella are poorly immunogenic and do not confer immunologic memory, limitations overcome by covalently attaching them to carrier proteins. We conjugated core polysaccharide-OPS (COPS) of Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to flagellin protein from the homologous strain. COPS and flagellin were purified from a genetically attenuated (ΔguaBA) “reagent strain” (derived from an isolate from a patient with clinical bacteremia) engineered for increased flagellin production (ΔclpPX). Conjugates were constructed by linking flagellin monomers or polymers at random COPS hydroxyls with various polysaccharide/protein ratios by 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) or at the 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO) terminus by thioether chemistry. Mice immunized on days 0, 28, and 56 with COPS-flagellin conjugates mounted higher anti-LPS IgG levels than mice receiving unconjugated COPS and exhibited high antiflagellin IgG; anti-LPS and antiflagellin IgG levels increased following booster doses. Antibodies generated by COPS-flagellin conjugates mediated opsonophagocytosis of S. Enteritidis cells into mouse macrophages. Mice immunized with flagellin alone, COPS-CRM197, or COPS-flagellin conjugates were significantly protected from lethal challenge with wild-type S. Enteritidis (80 to 100% vaccine efficacy). PMID:21807909

  13. Control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in laying hens by inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; Mesquita, Aline Lopes; de Paiva, Jaqueline Boldrin; Zotesso, Fábio; Berchieri Júnior, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of the agents that is responsible for outbreaks of human foodborne salmonellosis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis and is generally associated with the consumption of poultry products. Inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis cell vaccine is one of the available methods to control Salmonella Enteritidis in breeders and laying hens, however results in terms of efficacy vary. This vaccine has never been tested in Brazil, therefore, the present work was carried out to assess three commercial inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines allowed in Brazil. Four hundred white light variety commercial laying hens were obtained at one-day-of age. At eight weeks old, the birds were divided into four groups with one hundred animals each. Birds from three groups (V1, V2 and V3) received different intramuscular vaccines, followed by a booster dose at 16 weeks of age. Birds from another group (CG) were not vaccinated. When the laying hens were 20, 25 and 31 weeks old, 13 from each group were transferred to another room and were challenged by inoculating 2 mL neat culture of Salmonella Enteritidis. On the second day after each challenge, the caecal contents, spleen, liver and ovary of three birds from each group were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Twice a week a cloacal swab of each bird was taken and all eggs laid were examined for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. After four consecutive negative cloacal swabs in all the groups, the birds were sacrificed so as to examine the liver, caecal contents and ovaries. Overall, the inactivated vaccine used in group V3 reduced Salmonella Enteritidis in the feces and eggs. A very small amount of Salmonella was found in the spleen, liver, ovary and caeca of the birds in the four groups during the whole experiment. In general, inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines was able to decrease the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis in the birds and in the eggs as well. Nevertheless, they must

  14. A Mexican restaurant-associated outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis type 34 infections traced to a contaminated egg farm.

    PubMed

    McNeil, M M; Sweat, L B; Carter, S L; Watson, C B; Holloway, J T; Manning, R; Altekruse, S F; Blake, P A

    1999-04-01

    In May 1996, the Georgia Division of Public Health was notified about a cluster of persons with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Waycross, Georgia. A matched pair case-control study to determine risk factors for illness found a statistically significant association of SE infection with a history of having eaten at Restaurant A during the 5 days before onset of illness (relative risk = 13 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 3-62, P < 0.01]). In a second case-control study, to determine specific food exposures, consumption of a deep-fried Mexican dish (chile relleno) (4 of 21 cases vs. 0 of 26 controls, odds ratio undefined, 95% CI > 1.46, P = 0.034) was found to be significantly associated with SE infection. An environmental investigation found evidence of suboptimal food storage and cooking temperatures at Restaurant A; cross contamination of foods may have contributed to the low attributable risk identified for chile rellenos. Five of 37 Restaurant A food and environment specimens yielded SE strains. All five positive specimens were from chiles rellenos. Of the seven outbreak-associated strains (six patient isolates and one food isolate from Restaurant A) for which phage typing was conducted, all were phage type 34. A FDA traceback investigation through Restaurant A's single-egg supplier identified the potential source as three interrelated farms in South Carolina. Environmental culture from one of these farms yielded SE phage type 34. As a result of this outbreak, FDA helped institute a statewide egg quality-assurance programme in South Carolina to minimize SE contamination of eggs. PMID:10355784

  15. [Salmonella enteritidis: an unusual meningitis agent in an adult patient].

    PubMed

    Metan, Gökhan; Alp, Emine; Eşel, Duygu; Aygen, Bilgehan; Sümerkan, Bülent

    2005-10-01

    Salmonella species may cause wide spectrum of infections changing from enterocolitis to sepsis. However, Salmonella meningitis in adults is a rare but important clinical condition with a high mortality rate. In this report, a 71 years old male patient with Salmonella enteritidis meningitis who was followed-up with the diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura and had been administered azothioprin and prednisolone, has been presented and similar cases in the literature have been reviewed. The cerebrospinal fluid culture yielded S. enteritidis, and the isolate was intermediate susceptible to ampicillin, susceptible to cefotaxime, trimethoprim-sulphametoxasole, ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol. Our patient was successfully treated with ceftriaxone (2 x 2 gr i.v.) and discharged with total cure. PMID:16544553

  16. MHC haplotype and susceptibility to experimental infections (Salmonella Enteritidis, Pasteurella multocida or Ascaridia galli) in a commercial and an indigenous chicken breed.

    PubMed

    Schou, T W; Labouriau, R; Permin, A; Christensen, J P; Sørensen, P; Cu, H P; Nguyen, V K; Juul-Madsen, H R

    2010-05-15

    In three independent experimental infection studies, the susceptibility and course of infection of three pathogens considered of importance in most poultry production systems, Ascaridia galli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Pasteurella multocida were compared in two chicken breeds, the indigenous Vietnamese Ri and the commercial Luong Phuong. Furthermore, the association of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) with disease-related parameters was evaluated, using alleles of the LEI0258 microsatellite as markers for MHC haplotypes. The Ri chickens were found to be more resistant to A. galli and S. Enteritidis than commercial Luong Phuong chickens. In contrast, the Ri chickens were more susceptible to P. multocida, although production parameters were more affected in the Luong Phuong chickens. Furthermore, it was shown that the individual variations observed in response to the infections were influenced by the MHC. Using marker alleles of the microsatellite LEI0258, which is located within the MHC region, several MHC haplotypes were identified as being associated with infection intensity of A. galli. An association of the MHC with the specific antibody response to S. Enteritidis was also found where four MHC haplotypes were shown to be associated with high specific antibody response. Finally, one MHC haplotype was identified as being associated with pathological lesions and mortality in the P. multocida experiment. Although not statistically significant, our analysis suggested that this haplotype might be associated with resistance. These results demonstrate the presence of local genetic resources in Vietnamese chickens, which could be utilized in breeding programmes aiming at improving disease resistance. PMID:19945754

  17. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the spleens of hens by bacterins that vary in fimbrial protein SefD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene sefD is part of operon sefABCD, and it is required for production of the SEF14 fimbria by Salmonella Enteritidis. We compared strains that varied in SefD content for their ability to reduce recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from the spleens of hens infected by parenteral challenge. The two bac...

  18. Identification of novel attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of egg-laying hens results in symptomless carriage but in young chicks it causes paratyphoid disease. Little is known about whether S. Enteritidis requires other genes additional to known virulence genes for systemic infection of young chickens. A transposon insertion library was created...

  19. Virulence and metabolic characteristics of Salmonella Enteritidis sefD variants in hens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of a few pathogenic Salmonella enterica serotypes that have SEF14 fimbriae encoded by the sef operon, which consists of 4 co-transcribed genes sefABCD that are regulated by sefR. To explore the function of sefD within the infection pathway resulting in egg contamination...

  20. The effects of polymorphisms in 7 candidate genes on resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis in native chickens.

    PubMed

    Tohidi, R; Idris, I B; Malar Panandam, J; Hair Bejo, M

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection is a common concern in poultry production for its negative effects on growth as well as food safety for humans. Identification of molecular markers that are linked to resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis may lead to appropriate solutions to control Salmonella infection in chickens. This study investigated the association of candidate genes with resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis in young chickens. Two native breeds of Malaysian chickens, namely, Village Chickens and Red Junglefowl, were evaluated for bacterial colonization after Salmonella Enteritidis inoculation. Seven candidate genes were selected on the basis of their physiological role in immune response, as determined by prior studies in other genetic lines: natural resistance-associated protein 1 (NRAMP1), transforming growth factor β3 (TGFβ3), transforming growth factor β4 (TGFβ4), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (IAP1), caspase 1 (CASP1), lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α factor (LITAF), and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Polymerase chain reaction-RFLP was used to identify polymorphisms in the candidate genes; all genes exhibited polymorphisms in at least one breed. The NRAMP1-SacI polymorphism correlated with the differences in Salmonella Enteritidis load in the cecum (P = 0.002) and spleen (P = 0.01) of Village Chickens. Polymorphisms in the restriction sites of TGFβ3-BsrI, TGFβ4-MboII, and TRAIL-StyI were associated with Salmonella Enteritidis burden in the cecum, spleen, and liver of Village Chickens and Red Junglefowl (P < 0.05). These results indicate that the NRAMP1, TGFβ3, TGFβ4, and TRAIL genes are potential candidates for use in selection programs for increasing genetic resistance against Salmonella Enteritidis in native Malaysian chickens. PMID:23472012

  1. Sporadic salmonellosis in Lower Saxony, Germany, 2011-2013: raw ground pork consumption is associated with Salmonella Typhimurium infections and foreign travel with Salmonella Enteritidis infections.

    PubMed

    Rettenbacher-Riefler, S; Ziehm, D; Kreienbrock, L; Campe, A; Pulz, M; Dreesman, J

    2015-10-01

    To investigate risk factors for sporadic salmonellosis, for each notified case four randomly selected population controls matched for age, sex and geographical region were interviewed via self-administered questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression analysis of 285 matched pairs revealed significant associations for raw ground pork consumption [odds ratio (OR) 6·0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·8-20·1], taking antacids (OR 5·8, 95% CI 1·4-24·5), eating meat outside the home (OR 5·7, 95% CI 2·2-14·6) and daily changing or cleaning of dishcloth (OR 2·1, 95% CI 1·2-3·9). Animal contact and ice cream consumption were negatively associated with salmonellosis (OR 0·5, 95% CI 0·2-1 and OR 0·3, 95% CI 0·1-0·6, respectively). S. Typhimurium infections were significantly associated with raw ground pork consumption (OR 16·7, 95% CI 1·4-194·4) and S. Enteritidis infections with having travelled abroad (OR 9·7, 95% CI 2·0-47·3). Raw egg consumption was not a risk factor, substantiating the success of recently implemented national control programmes in the poultry industry. Unexpectedly, hygienic behaviour was more frequently reported by cases, probably because they overestimated their hygiene precautions retrospectively. Although animal contact might enhance human immunocompetence, underreporting of salmonellosis by pet owners could have occurred. Eating raw pork products is the major risk factor for sporadic human S. Typhimurium infections in Lower Saxony. PMID:25626727

  2. SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS-INDUCED ALTERATION OF INFLAMMATORY CXCL CHEMOKINE MESSENGER-RNA EXPRESSION AND HISTOLOGIC CHANGES IN THE CECA OF INFECTED CHICKS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the avian host immune response to Salmonella enteritidis, we examined mRNA expression for 8 genes: CXCLi1[K60], CXCLi2 [IL-8/CAF], Interferon [IFN]-y Interleukin [IL] -1, IL-6, IL-12, IL-12, and Gallinacin [Gal] -2 in the cecum of young chicks one week post-inoculation with Sa...

  3. The influence of a fructooligosaccharide (FOS) prebiotic combined with alfalfa molt diets on the gastrointestinal tract fermentation, Salmonella Enteritidis infection and intestinal shedding in laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molting is a natural process which birds undergo to rejuvenate their reproductive organs. The United States poultry egg production industry have used feed withdrawal to effectively induce molt, however, due to its correlation with increase susceptibility to Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) the developme...

  4. Mapping B-cell responses to Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis in chickens for the discrimination of infected from vaccinated animals.

    PubMed

    Naqid, Ibrahim A; Owen, Jonathan P; Maddison, Ben C; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D; Warry, Andrew; Flynn, Robin J; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J; Davies, Robert H; La Ragione, Roberto M; Gough, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Serological surveillance and vaccination are important strategies for controlling infectious diseases of food production animals. However, the compatibility of these strategies is limited by a lack of assays capable of differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA tests) for established killed or attenuated vaccines. Here, we used next generation phage-display (NGPD) and a 2-proportion Z score analysis to identify peptides that were preferentially bound by IgY from chickens infected with Salmonella Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis compared to IgY from vaccinates, for both an attenuated and an inactivated commercial vaccine. Peptides that were highly enriched against IgY from at least 4 out of 10 infected chickens were selected: 18 and 12 peptides for the killed and attenuated vaccines, respectively. The ten most discriminatory peptides for each vaccine were identified in an ELISA using a training set of IgY samples. These peptides were then used in multi-peptide assays that, when analysing a wider set of samples from infected and vaccinated animals, diagnosed infection with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The data describes a method for the development of DIVA assays for conventional attenuated and killed vaccines. PMID:27510219

  5. Mapping B-cell responses to Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis in chickens for the discrimination of infected from vaccinated animals

    PubMed Central

    Naqid, Ibrahim A.; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D.; Warry, Andrew; Flynn, Robin J.; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J.; Davies, Robert H.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Serological surveillance and vaccination are important strategies for controlling infectious diseases of food production animals. However, the compatibility of these strategies is limited by a lack of assays capable of differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA tests) for established killed or attenuated vaccines. Here, we used next generation phage-display (NGPD) and a 2-proportion Z score analysis to identify peptides that were preferentially bound by IgY from chickens infected with Salmonella Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis compared to IgY from vaccinates, for both an attenuated and an inactivated commercial vaccine. Peptides that were highly enriched against IgY from at least 4 out of 10 infected chickens were selected: 18 and 12 peptides for the killed and attenuated vaccines, respectively. The ten most discriminatory peptides for each vaccine were identified in an ELISA using a training set of IgY samples. These peptides were then used in multi-peptide assays that, when analysing a wider set of samples from infected and vaccinated animals, diagnosed infection with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The data describes a method for the development of DIVA assays for conventional attenuated and killed vaccines. PMID:27510219

  6. Multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis on Egg Yolk Membranes and Penetration into Yolk Contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt refrigeration to limit bacterial multiplication is a critical aspect of efforts to control the transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) to consumers of contaminated eggs. However, a proposed national S. Enteritidis control program would allow unrefrigerated am...

  7. Evaluation of the respiratory route as a viable portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry via intratracheal challenge of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium1

    PubMed Central

    Kallapura, G.; Morgan, M. J.; Pumford, N. R.; Bielke, L. R.; Wolfenden, A. D.; Faulkner, O. B.; Latorre, J. D.; Menconi, A.; Hernandez-Velasco, X.; Kuttappan, V. A.; Hargis, B. M.; Tellez, G.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that primary infection of Salmonella is by the oral-fecal route for poultry. However, the airborne transmission of Salmonella and similar enteric zoonotic pathogens has been historically neglected. Increasing evidence of Salmonella bioaerosol generation in production facilities and studies suggesting the vulnerabilities of the avian respiratory architecture together have indicated the possibility of the respiratory system being a potential portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry. Presently, we evaluated this hypothesis through intratracheal (IT) administration of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, as separate challenges, in a total of 4 independent trials, followed by enumeration of cfu recovery in ceca-cecal tonsils and recovery incidence in liver and spleen. In all trials, both Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, challenged IT colonized cecae to a similar or greater extent than oral administration at identical challenge levels. In most trials, chickens cultured for cfu enumeration from IT-challenged chicks at same dose as orally challenged, resulted in an increase of 1.5 log higher Salmonella Enteritidis from ceca-cecal tonsils and a much lower dose IT of Salmonella Enteritidis could colonize ceca to the same extent than a higher oral challenge. This trend of increased cecal colonization due to IT challenge was observed with all trails involving week-old birds (experiment 2 and 3), which are widely considered to be more difficult to infect via the oral route. Liver-spleen incidence data showed 33% of liver and spleen samples to be positive for Salmonella Enteritidis administered IT (106 cfu/chick), compared with 0% when administered orally (experiment 2, trial 1). Collectively, these data suggest that the respiratory tract may be a largely overlooked portal of entry for Salmonella infections in chickens. PMID:24570455

  8. Penetration of Salmonella enteritidis through the yolk membrane in eggs from six genetically distinct commercial lines of laying hens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infected laying hens can deposit Salmonella enteritidis inside developing eggs and thereby transmit disease to humans. Although deposition of S. enteritidis inside yolks is less common than deposition in the albumen or on the yolk (vitelline) membrane in naturally contaminated eggs, migration across...

  9. Salmonella Enteritidis strains from poultry show differential responses to acid stress, oxidative stress and survival in the egg albumen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis is the major food-borne pathogen primarily causing human infection through contaminated chicken meat and eggs. We recently demonstrated that S. Enteritidis strains from poultry differ in their ability to invade human intestinal cells and cause disease in orally challenged mice...

  10. Evaluating area-level spatial clustering of Salmonella Enteritidis infections and their socioeconomic determinants in the greater Toronto area, Ontario, Canada (2007 – 2009): a retrospective population-based ecological study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There have been only a few region-level ecological studies conducted in Canada investigating enteric infections in humans. Our study objectives were to 1) assess the spatial clustering of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) human infections in the Greater Toronto Area, and 2) identify underlying area-level associations between S. Enteritidis infection rates and socioeconomic status (SES) indicators that might explain the clustering of infections. Methods Retrospective data on S. Enteritidis infections from 2007 to 2009 were obtained from Ontario’s reportable disease surveillance database and were grouped at the forward sortation area (FSA) - level. A spatial scan statistic was employed to identify FSA-level spatial clusters of high infection rates. Negative binomial regression was used to identify FSA-level associations between S. Enteritidis infection rates and SES indicators obtained from the 2006 Census of Canada. Global Moran’s I statistic was used to evaluate the final model for residual spatial clustering. Results A spatial cluster that included nine neighbouring FSAs was identified in downtown Toronto. A significant positive curvilinear relationship was observed between S. Enteritidis infection rates and FSA-level average number of children at home per census family. Areas with high and areas with low average median family income had higher infection rates than FSAs with medium average median family income. Areas with a high proportion of visible minority population had lower infection rates than FSAs with a medium proportion of visible minority population. The Moran’s I statistic was not significant, indicating that no residual spatial autocorrelation was present after accounting for the SES variables in the final model. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that FSAs with high and low average median family income, medium proportion of visible minority population, and high average number of children at home per census

  11. ISOLATIONS OF SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS AND SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM FROM MICE IN POULTRY FLOCKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    House mice (Mus musculus), laying hens and the environments of thirty-nine poultry flocks in Pennsylvania, USA were cultured for Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium. Mice spleen and intestinal samples were each cultured, individually, with S. enteritidis isolated from fifteen and thi...

  12. Enjoying Homemade Ice Cream without the Risk of Salmonella Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... responsible for the outbreaks is raw or undercooked eggs. A person infected with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), the strain of Salmonella found most frequently in raw eggs, usually has fever, diarrhea and abdominal cramps beginning ...

  13. Evaluating risk factors for endemic human Salmonella Enteritidis infections with different phage types in Ontario, Canada using multinomial logistic regression and a case-case study approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identifying risk factors for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Ontario will assist public health authorities to design effective control and prevention programs to reduce the burden of SE infections. Our research objective was to identify risk factors for acquiring SE infections with various phage types (PT) in Ontario, Canada. We hypothesized that certain PTs (e.g., PT8 and PT13a) have specific risk factors for infection. Methods Our study included endemic SE cases with various PTs whose isolates were submitted to the Public Health Laboratory-Toronto from January 20th to August 12th, 2011. Cases were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire that included questions pertaining to demographics, travel history, clinical symptoms, contact with animals, and food exposures. A multinomial logistic regression method using the Generalized Linear Latent and Mixed Model procedure and a case-case study design were used to identify risk factors for acquiring SE infections with various PTs in Ontario, Canada. In the multinomial logistic regression model, the outcome variable had three categories representing human infections caused by SE PT8, PT13a, and all other SE PTs (i.e., non-PT8/non-PT13a) as a referent category to which the other two categories were compared. Results In the multivariable model, SE PT8 was positively associated with contact with dogs (OR=2.17, 95% CI 1.01-4.68) and negatively associated with pepper consumption (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.13-0.94), after adjusting for age categories and gender, and using exposure periods and health regions as random effects to account for clustering. Conclusions Our study findings offer interesting hypotheses about the role of phage type-specific risk factors. Multinomial logistic regression analysis and the case-case study approach are novel methodologies to evaluate associations among SE infections with different PTs and various risk factors. PMID:23057531

  14. Limited Genetic Diversity in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis PT13

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has emerged as a significant food-borne pathogen throughout the world and it is commonly characterized by phage typing (PT). In Canada, PT4, 8 and 13 are the predominant PTs. Epidemiological subtyping of Salmonella is typically done by PFGE but plasmid profil...

  15. Colonization of avian reproductive tract tissues by variant subpopulations of Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leghorn hens were infected with Salmonella Enteritidis cultures to determine their comparative ability to colonize the avian reproductive tract. Group 1 received PT4 22079, which was previously shown to contaminate eggs and to form biofilm. Group 2 received a 90:10 mixture of PT13a strains 21027 and...

  16. Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008-2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible. PMID:25988406

  17. MITIGATION OF AVIAN REPRODUCTIVE TRACT FUNCTION BY SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS PRODUCING HIGH-MILECULAR-MASS LIPOPPOLYSACCHARIDE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hens were infected with a wild-type Salmonella enteritidis and its wzz mutant, which lacked the ability to make high-molecular-mass lipopolysaccharide, in six experiments paired by dosage and by route of exposure. Hens underwent involution of the reproductive tract when injected subcutaneously with ...

  18. Influence of exogenous melatonin administration on Salmonella enteritidis colonization in molted layers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of exogenous melatonin on Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infection in experimentally-challenged laying hens subjected to a forced molt. Single Comb White Leghorn hens (W-36) over 50-wk-of-age were randomly placed in one of two rooms, allowed to acclima...

  19. Potential International Spread of Multidrug-Resistant Invasive Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Rodicio, M. Rosario; Guerra, Beatriz; Hopkins, Katie L.

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causes substantial illness and death, and drug resistance is increasing. Isolates from the United Kingdom containing virulence-resistance plasmids were characterized. They mainly caused invasive infections in adults linked to Africa. The common features in isolates from these continents indicate the role of human travel in their spread. PMID:22709653

  20. Effect of passage through laying hens on organ invasiveness and phenotypic heterogeneity of Salmonella enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horizontal transmission within and between flocks is an important aspect of the epidemiology of Salmonella enteritidis (SE) in poultry. Previously, a series of passages through infected laying hens increased the frequency at which an SE isolate was deposited inside eggs. The present study evaluated ...

  1. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation induces an adverse pregnancy outcome in the murine model.

    PubMed

    Noto Llana, Mariángeles; Sarnacki, Sebastián Hernán; Aya Castañeda, María del Rosario; Pustovrh, María Carolina; Gartner, Alejandra Sonia; Buzzola, Fernanda Roxana; Cerquetti, María Cristina; Giacomodonato, Mónica Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne diseases caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) are a significant health problem. Pregnancy, state of immunological tolerance, is a predisposing condition for the development of infections with intracellular pathogens. Salmonella species can cause pregnancy complications such as chorioamnionitis, transplacental fetal infection, pre term labor, abortions, neonatal and maternal septicemia. However, the specific mechanisms by which Salmonella infections trigger these alterations are not clear. In the present work, using a self-limiting enterocolitis murine model, we show that the ingestion of a low dose of S. Enteritidis at late stages of pregnancy (day 15 of gestation) is sufficient to induce massive maternal infection. We found that Salmonella infection leads to 40% of pre term delivery, 33% of abortion and fetal growth restriction. Placental dysfunction during S. Enteritidis enterocolitis was confirmed through cellular infiltration and hypoxia markers (MPO activity and COX-1 and COX-2 expression, respectively). Apoptosis in placental tissue due to Salmonella infection was also evident at day 18 of gestation when investigated by morphometric procedure, DNA fragmentation and Fas/FasL expression. Also, the expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17 and IL-10 was up regulated in response to Salmonella not only in placenta, but also in amniotic fluid and maternal serum. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S. Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation causes detrimental effect on pregnancy outcome. PMID:25365504

  2. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Levine, Myron M

    2015-06-19

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed Salmonella Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Paratyphi A, Salmonella Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. PMID:25902362

  3. Genomic and phenotypic variation in epidemic-spanning Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) has caused major epidemics of gastrointestinal infection in many different countries. In this study we investigate genome divergence and pathogenic potential in S. Enteritidis isolated before, during and after an epidemic in Uruguay. Results 266 S. Enteritidis isolates were genotyped using RAPD-PCR and a selection were subjected to PFGE analysis. From these, 29 isolates spanning different periods, genetic profiles and sources of isolation were assayed for their ability to infect human epithelial cells and subjected to comparative genomic hybridization using a Salmonella pan-array and the sequenced strain S. Enteritidis PT4 P125109 as reference. Six other isolates from distant countries were included as external comparators. Two hundred and thirty three chromosomal genes as well as the virulence plasmid were found as variable among S. Enteritidis isolates. Ten out of the 16 chromosomal regions that varied between different isolates correspond to phage-like regions. The 2 oldest pre-epidemic isolates lack phage SE20 and harbour other phage encoded genes that are absent in the sequenced strain. Besides variation in prophage, we found variation in genes involved in metabolism and bacterial fitness. Five epidemic strains lack the complete Salmonella virulence plasmid. Significantly, strains with indistinguishable genetic patterns still showed major differences in their ability to infect epithelial cells, indicating that the approach used was insufficient to detect the genetic basis of this differential behaviour. Conclusion The recent epidemic of S. Enteritidis infection in Uruguay has been driven by the introduction of closely related strains of phage type 4 lineage. Our results confirm previous reports demonstrating a high degree of genetic homogeneity among S. Enteritidis isolates. However, 10 of the regions of variability described here are for the first time reported as being variable in S

  4. Refined Live Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis Vaccines Mediate Homologous and Heterologous Serogroup Protection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26351285

  5. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26351285

  6. Fitness Costs and Stability of a High-Level Ciprofloxacin Resistance Phenotype in Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis: Reduced Infectivity Associated with Decreased Expression of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fitness costs associated with high-level fluoroquinolone resistance were examined in phenotypically and genotypically characterized ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis mutants (104-cip and 5408-cip, MIC > 32 µg/ml). The stability of the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype in both mut...

  7. Salmonella Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bacteria of the genus Salmonella are responsible for a variety of acute and chronic diseases in poultry. These diseases continue to cause economically significant losses in many nations and absorb a large investment of resources in testing and control efforts in others. Infected poul...

  8. A Role for the Non-Canonical Wnt-β-Catenin and TGF-β Signaling Pathways in the Induction of Tolerance during the Establishment of a Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Persistent Cecal Infection in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Michael H.; Arsenault, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induce an early pro-inflammatory response in chickens. However, the response is short-lived, asymptomatic of disease, resulting in a persistent colonization of the ceca, and fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent infection of chickens by Salmonella are unknown. Recently, we found an expansion of the Treg population and subsequent increased in vitro immunosuppressive functions of the CD4+CD25+ cells isolated from the ceca of the Salmonella-infected chickens by day 4 post-infection that increased steadily throughout the course of the 14 days of infection, whereas the number of CD4+CD25+ cells in the non-infected controls remained steady throughout the study. CD4+CD25+ cells from cecal tonsils of S. enteritidis-infected birds had greater expression of IL-10 mRNA content than the CD4+CD25+ cells from the non-infected controls at all the time points studied. These results suggest the development of a tolerogenic immune response in the cecum of Salmonella-infected chickens may contribute to the persistance of Salmonella cecal colonization. Using a chicken-specific kinome peptide immune array, we have analyzed the signaling pathways altered during the establishment of this tolerogenic state. This analysis has revealed a role for the non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway in the cecum at 4 days post-infection. Infection induced the significant (p < 0.01) phosphorylation of the G-protein-coupled transmembrane protein, Frizzled 1 (FZD1), resulting in an influx of intracellular Ca2+ and the phosphorylation of the Ca2+-dependent effector molecules calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CamKII), β-catenin, protein kinase C, and the activation of the transcription factor, NFAT. Nuclear translocation of NFAT resulted in a significant increase in the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β. Increased expression of TGF-β4 mRNA activates the TGF-β signaling pathway that

  9. Isolation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from House Flies (Musca domestica) Found in Rooms Containing Salmonella serovar Enteritidis-challenged hens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    House flies (Musca domestica) released into rooms containing hens challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. enteritidis) rapidly became contaminated with S. enteritidis. Forty to 50% of the flies were contaminated at 48 hours which increased to 50-70% at 4 and 7 days post exposur...

  10. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the spleens of hens by bacterins that vary in fimbrial protein SefD.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Guard, Jean; Morales, Cesar A; Icard, Alan H

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this research was to determine whether variation in the presence of fimbrial protein SefD would impact efficacy of bacterins as measured by recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) from the spleens of hens. Two bacterins were prepared that varied in SefD content. Also, two adjuvants were tested, namely, water-in-oil and aluminum hydroxide gel (alum). Control groups for both adjuvant preparations included infected nonvaccinated hens and uninfected nonvaccinated hens. At 21 days postinfection, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 69.7%, 53.1%, and 86.0% from the spleens of all hens vaccinated with bacterins lacking SefD, bacterins that included SefD, and infected nonvaccinated control hens, respectively. No Salmonella was recovered from uninfected nonvaccinates. Results from individual trials showed that both bacterins reduced positive spleens, but that the one with SefD was more efficacious. Alum adjuvant had fewer side effects on hens and egg production as compared to water-in-oil. However, adjuvant did not change the relative recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from spleens. These results suggest that SefD is a promising target antigen for improving the efficacy of immunotherapy in hens, and is intended to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis in the food supply. PMID:26218804

  11. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis in the Spleens of Hens by Bacterins That Vary in Fimbrial Protein SefD

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Morales, Cesar A.; Icard, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this research was to determine whether variation in the presence of fimbrial protein SefD would impact efficacy of bacterins as measured by recovery of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) from the spleens of hens. Two bacterins were prepared that varied in SefD content. Also, two adjuvants were tested, namely, water-in-oil and aluminum hydroxide gel (alum). Control groups for both adjuvant preparations included infected nonvaccinated hens and uninfected nonvaccinated hens. At 21 days postinfection, Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from 69.7%, 53.1%, and 86.0% from the spleens of all hens vaccinated with bacterins lacking SefD, bacterins that included SefD, and infected nonvaccinated control hens, respectively. No Salmonella was recovered from uninfected nonvaccinates. Results from individual trials showed that both bacterins reduced positive spleens, but that the one with SefD was more efficacious. Alum adjuvant had fewer side effects on hens and egg production as compared to water-in-oil. However, adjuvant did not change the relative recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis from spleens. These results suggest that SefD is a promising target antigen for improving the efficacy of immunotherapy in hens, and is intended to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis in the food supply. PMID:26218804

  12. Epidemiological differentiation of pathogenic strains of Salmonella enteritidis by ribotyping.

    PubMed Central

    Landeras, E; González-Hevia, M A; Alzugaray, R; Mendoza, M C

    1996-01-01

    The usefulness of two-way ribotyping, performed with SphI and PstI, as a genetic marker for a series of pathogenic Salmonella enteritidis strains is reported. Eighteen combined ribotypes were differentiated, a discrimination index of 0.77 was reached, a genetic relationship dendrogram was traced, and the results were applied in an epidemiological study. PMID:8862603

  13. Method for the detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    DOEpatents

    Agron, Peter G.; Andersen, Gary L.; Walker, Richard L.

    2008-10-28

    Described herein is the identification of a novel Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis locus that serves as a marker for DNA-based identification of this bacterium. In addition, three primer pairs derived from this locus that may be used in a nucleotide detection method to detect the presence of the bacterium are also disclosed herein.

  14. Limited genetic diversity in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis PT13

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has emerged as a significant foodborne pathogen throughout the world and is commonly characterized by phage typing. In Canada phage types (PT) 4, 8 and 13 predominate and in 2005 a large foodborne PT13 outbreak occurred in the province of Ontario. The ability ...

  15. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076) and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184), were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI) was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4%) and 298 (95.8%) of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage) contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 104 CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184), then treated with 1 × 108 PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5–4 log CFU/sample, p < 0.05) was observed in all tested foods. The two phages on the three food samples were relatively stable, especially at 4 °C, with the phages exhibiting the greatest stability in milk. Our research shows that our phages have potential effectiveness as a bio-control agent of Salmonella in foods. PMID:26305252

  16. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-01

    Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076) and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184), were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI) was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4%) and 298 (95.8%) of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage) contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 10(4) CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184), then treated with 1 × 10(8) PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5-4 log CFU/sample, p < 0.05) was observed in all tested foods. The two phages on the three food samples were relatively stable, especially at 4 ºC, with the phages exhibiting the greatest stability in milk. Our research shows that our phages have potential effectiveness as a bio-control agent of Salmonella in foods. PMID:26305252

  17. Effect of a Selected Lactobacillus spp-Based Probiotic on Salmonella Serovar Enteritidis-Infected Broiler Chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of a Lactobacillus-based probiotic (FM-B11**TM) on Salmonella recovery was evaluated in liquid (Exp. 1) and lyophilized (Exp. 2) forms in two separate experiments with two trials each. For each trial, eighty broiler chicks were randomly allocated into two treatments: control and probioti...

  18. Salmonella enteritidis contamination of ice cream associated with a 1994 multistate outbreak.

    PubMed

    Vought, K J; Tatini, S R

    1998-01-01

    Nine ice cream sample containers, representing three production lots involved in a 1994 outbreak of salmonellosis, were obtained from the manufacturer's distribution warehouse and from consumers. Single 100-g samples from each container were tested initially, with analyses beginning seven weeks after the ice cream was produced. Quantitative salmonella analysis of these samples was performed 14 weeks after the production date using a three-replicate, three-dilution most probable number (MPN) procedure using 100-, 10-, and 1-g samples. The MPN/g estimates ranged from 0.004 to 0.46 Salmonella enteritidis per g with six of nine samples showing an MPN value of 0.093 S. enteritidis per g. The 95% confidence interval for S. enteritidis among these samples was < 0.001 to 2.4 cells/g. The 95% upper limit of S. enteritidis per g was 0.38 for five of six consumer samples. Based on this, the number of S. enteritidis cells per serving (65 g) was 25. Based on the consumption of a single sundae cone (73 g, prepackaged), which caused severe illness in an eight-year-old boy and moderate to mild illness in the adult parents, the infective dose would appear to be no more than 28 cells. PMID:9708244

  19. Fecal shedding and internal organ colonization following exposure of laying hens to different oral doses of Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected laying hens continue to pose a significant public health concern as a leading source of transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis infections to humans. A recently implemented national regulatory program for egg-producing flocks in the United States seeks to contro...

  20. Purification and characterization of fimbriae from Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Feutrier, J; Kay, W W; Trust, T J

    1986-01-01

    A human isolate of Salmonella enteritidis which displayed strong pellicle formation during static broth culture and mannose-sensitive hemagglutination produced fimbriae which were morphologically indistinguishable from type 1 fimbriae of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Fimbrin was purified to homogeneity, and the apparent molecular weight (Mr, 14,400) was markedly lower than that reported for the type 1 fimbrin of Salmonella typhimurium (Mr, 22,100). This fimbrin contained 40% hydrophobic amino acids and lacked cysteine. The sequence of the N-terminal 64 amino acids was determined, and sequence alignment revealed that although the 18 N-terminal residues of the S. enteritidis molecule shared considerable homology with Escherichia coli and S. typhimurium type 1 fimbrins, the S. enteritidis fimbrin lacked a 6- to 9-residue terminal sequence present in the other type 1 fimbrins and, after residue 18, shared little homology with the E. coli sequence. Antibodies raised to the purified S. enteritidis fimbrin bound to surface-exposed conformational epitopes on the native fimbriae and displayed pronounced serospecificity. These antibodies were used in the isolation of a nonfimbriated Tn10 insertion mutant which was unable to hemagglutinate. Images PMID:2875990

  1. Distribution of Salmonella serovars and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella Enteritidis from poultry in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Makaya, P V; Matope, G; Pfukenyi, D M

    2012-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Salmonella serovars from chickens from large-scale commercial (LSC), small-scale commercial (SSC), and rural free-range (RFR) farms of Zimbabwe. Pooled cloacal swabs were collected for culture and isolation of Salmonella spp. A chi-square test was used to assess distribution differences of salmonellas among the farming sectors. Approximately 10% (283/2833) of the swabs were positive for Salmonella enterica, with only subspecies enterica (98.6%) and arizonae (1.4%) being detected. The prevalence of S. enterica varied significantly (P<0.05) among areas, with Harare (27.8%) and Buhera (1.3%) recording the highest and the least prevalence, respectively. S. enterica was only isolated from LSC and SSC farms, with the former having a significantly (P<0.001; χ(2)=155.3) higher prevalence than the latter. S. arizonae was only isolated from the SSC farms while none were obtained from the RFR farms. The serovars isolated were Salmonella Enteritidis (72.8%), Group C (20.1%), Group B (4.2%), Salmonella Typhimurium (1.1%) and Salmonella Gallinarum (0.4%). S. Enteritidis predominated in the urban/periurban areas. Approximately 26% (53/206) of S. Enteritidis isolates were resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents. Resistance to tetracycline was the most common, while no resistance was detected for furazolidone, neomycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. There were 12.1% multi-drug-resistant S. Enteritidis isolates, and the resistance to ampicillin/kanamycin was predominant. The identification of multi-drug-resistant S. Enteritidis is of public health concern. Thus, stringent control of S. Enteritidis will reduce the public health risk of human salmonellosis. PMID:22515540

  2. Interrelationships between strains of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Threlfall, E. J.; Chart, H.

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to S. typhimurium [19], S. enteritidis is a serotype which has its primary food-animal reservoir in poultry. To date, phage typing has been of paramount importance in studying the epidemiology of this serotype and in particular, has demonstrated the involvement of both poultry meat and whole shell eggs in the transmission of S. enteritidis PT4 to humans. The findings discussed above describe various aspects of the serotype, particularly in relation to the involvement of both LPS and plasmids in its virulence and phage type identity (Fig. 2). These findings have led to an increased understanding of the biology of this serotype, which is of major importance in human food-poisoning in England and Wales at the present time. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8348924

  3. High Incubation Temperature and Threonine Dietary Level Improve Ileum Response Against Post-Hatch Salmonella Enteritidis Inoculation in Broiler Chicks

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Heraldo Bezerra; Campos, Danila Barreiro; Guerra, Ricardo Romão; Costa, Fernando Guilherme Perazzo

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of both embryonic thermal manipulation and dietary threonine level on the response of broilers inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, considering bacterial counts in the cecal contents, intestinal morphology, mucin and heat shock protein 70 gene expression, body weight and weight gain. Thermal manipulation was used from 11 days of incubation until hatch, defining three treatments: standard (37.7°C), continuous high temperature (38.7°C) and continuous low temperature (36.7°C). After hatch, chicks were distributed according to a 3x2+1 factorial arrangement (three temperatures and two threonine levels and one sham-inoculated control). At two days of age, all chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, except for the sham-inoculated control group. There was no interaction between the factors on any analyses. High temperature during incubation was able to reduce colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in the first days, reducing both Salmonella counts and the number of positive birds. It also increased mucin expression and decreased Hsp70 expression compared with other inoculated groups. High temperature during incubation and high threonine level act independently to reduce the negative effects associated to Salmonella Enteritidis infection on intestinal morphology and performance, with results similar to sham-inoculated birds. The findings open new perspectives for practical strategies towards the pre-harvest Salmonella control in the poultry industry. PMID:26131553

  4. High Incubation Temperature and Threonine Dietary Level Improve Ileum Response Against Post-Hatch Salmonella Enteritidis Inoculation in Broiler Chicks.

    PubMed

    de Barros Moreira Filho, Alexandre Lemos; de Oliveira, Celso José Bruno; de Oliveira, Heraldo Bezerra; Campos, Danila Barreiro; Guerra, Ricardo Romão; Costa, Fernando Guilherme Perazzo; Givisiez, Patricia Emília Naves

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of both embryonic thermal manipulation and dietary threonine level on the response of broilers inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, considering bacterial counts in the cecal contents, intestinal morphology, mucin and heat shock protein 70 gene expression, body weight and weight gain. Thermal manipulation was used from 11 days of incubation until hatch, defining three treatments: standard (37.7°C), continuous high temperature (38.7°C) and continuous low temperature (36.7°C). After hatch, chicks were distributed according to a 3x2+1 factorial arrangement (three temperatures and two threonine levels and one sham-inoculated control). At two days of age, all chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, except for the sham-inoculated control group. There was no interaction between the factors on any analyses. High temperature during incubation was able to reduce colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in the first days, reducing both Salmonella counts and the number of positive birds. It also increased mucin expression and decreased Hsp70 expression compared with other inoculated groups. High temperature during incubation and high threonine level act independently to reduce the negative effects associated to Salmonella Enteritidis infection on intestinal morphology and performance, with results similar to sham-inoculated birds. The findings open new perspectives for practical strategies towards the pre-harvest Salmonella control in the poultry industry. PMID:26131553

  5. Detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) Antibodies in Serum Using A Polystyrene Bead/SE Flagella Agglutination Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serologic screening of flocks can be an important method to detect Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infections but can be labor intensive or lack specificity. Our goal was to develop a rapid agglutination assay using SE flagella adsorbed to polystyrene beads as a simple, relatively specific test to dete...

  6. In Vitro Penetration of Salmonella Enteritidis through Yolk Membranes of Eggs from Six Genetically Distinct Commercial Lines of Laying Hens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although deposition of Salmonella Enteritidis inside yolks is less common than deposition in albumen or on the vitelline (yolk) membrane in naturally contaminated eggs laid by infected hens, bacterial migration into the yolk to reach its nutrient-rich contents could lead to extensive multiplication...

  7. Successful treatment of a septic aneurysm due to Salmonella enteritidis complicated by the rupture of the pelvis of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Rókusz, László; Dlustus, Béla; Tóth, Gyula; Acs, Tihamér; Orgován, György

    2007-10-01

    We report on a 43-year-old patient with septic aneurysm complicated by rupture of the pelvis of the kidney due to Salmonella enteritidis that we treated successfully by empiric therapy, then targeted antibiotic therapy and late surgical intervention with iliofemoral crossover bypass grafting and aneurysm resection. The course was complicated by deep neutropenia and chronic hepatitis C infection. PMID:17985776

  8. Frequency and persistence of fecal shedding following exposure of laying hens to different oral doses of Salmonella enteritidi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections of egg-laying poultry with Salmonella enteritidis and the associated transmission of illness to consumers of contaminated eggs has been a prominent international public health concern for many years. Testing and risk reduction programs for laying flocks have been implemented in many natio...

  9. A hotel-based outbreak of Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) in the United Kingdom, 2006.

    PubMed

    Calvert, N; Murphy, L; Smith, A; Copeland, D

    2007-03-01

    An outbreak of food-borne Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 occurred in Cumbria, in north-west England, in the summer of 2006. Fifteen people, all with positive stool samples, met the case definition; three of these were admitted to hospital, including one patient who died. Preliminary investigations suggested a link to a meal served at a local hotel. A case control study was implemented, together with microbiological and environmental investigations. Fifteen microbiologically confirmed cases and 27 unmatched controls were included in the study, controls being randomly selected from people who had eaten at the hotel on the same day. The epidemiological evidence indicated a very strong association between infection and consumption of tiramisu made with raw shell eggs, although none were available for microbiological investigation. These results are in line with other salmonellosis outbreaks that have been associated with the use of raw shell eggs in food manufacturing and production. This paper highlights the continuing need for a greater awareness by those who work in the food industry of the health risks associated with the consumption of raw shell eggs. PMID:17439807

  10. Use of random forest to estimate population attributable fractions from a case-control study of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections.

    PubMed

    Gu, W; Vieira, A R; Hoekstra, R M; Griffin, P M; Cole, D

    2015-10-01

    To design effective food safety programmes we need to estimate how many sporadic foodborne illnesses are caused by specific food sources based on case-control studies. Logistic regression has substantive limitations for analysing structured questionnaire data with numerous exposures and missing values. We adapted random forest to analyse data of a case-control study of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis illness for source attribution. For estimation of summary population attributable fractions (PAFs) of exposures grouped into transmission routes, we devised a counterfactual estimator to predict reductions in illness associated with removing grouped exposures. For the purpose of comparison, we fitted the data using logistic regression models with stepwise forward and backward variable selection. Our results show that the forward and backward variable selection of logistic regression models were not consistent for parameter estimation, with different significant exposures identified. By contrast, the random forest model produced estimated PAFs of grouped exposures consistent in rank order with results obtained from outbreak data, with egg-related exposures having the highest estimated PAF (22·1%, 95% confidence interval 8·5-31·8). Random forest might be structurally more coherent and efficient than logistic regression models for attributing Salmonella illnesses to sources involving many causal pathways. PMID:25672399

  11. Isolation of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 from a single almond orchard over a 4-year period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2001, Salmonella Enteritidis phage type (PT) 30 was isolated from drag swabs of 17 61-ha almond orchards on three farms linked to an outbreak of salmonellosis associated with consumption of raw almonds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term persistence of Salmonella Enteritidi...

  12. Improving Food Safety by Understanding the Evolution of Egg-contaminating Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving Food Safety by Understanding the Evolution of Egg-contaminating Salmonella Enteritidis Jean Guard, Veterinary Medical Officer U. S. Department of Agriculture, Athens, GA USA (jean.guard@ars.usda.gov) The curious case of egg contamination by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis S. ...

  13. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  14. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying...

  15. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one...

  16. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  17. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one...

  18. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one...

  19. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying...

  20. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An...

  1. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  2. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying...

  3. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An...

  4. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An...

  5. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one...

  6. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An...

  7. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  8. 21 CFR 118.7 - Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.7 Section 118.7 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....7 Sampling methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental sampling. An...

  9. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying...

  10. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  11. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one...

  12. 21 CFR 118.5 - Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.5 Section 118.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5 Environmental testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). (a) Environmental testing when laying...

  13. Evolutionary trends of Salmonella Enteritidis linked to subpopulation biology and virulence attributes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. enteritidis) is currently the world’s leading cause of food borne salmonellosis. It is the only serotype out of over 1400 within Salmonella enterica I that contaminates the internal contents of the egg by vertical transmission from the reproductive tract...

  14. Prophylactic Supplementation of Caprylic Acid in Feed Reduces Salmonella Enteritidis Colonization in Commercial Broiler Chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a major foodborne pathogen for which chickens serve as reservoir hosts. Reducing Salmonella Enteritidis carriage in chickens would reduce contamination of poultry meat and eggs with this pathogen. We investigated the prophylactic efficacy of feed supplemented with caprylic ...

  15. Salmonella Enteritidis Phage Types 1 and 4: Pheno- and Genotypic Epidemiology of Recent Outbreaks in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Lukinmaa, Susanna; Schildt, Raili; Rinttilä, Teemu; Siitonen, Anja

    1999-01-01

    In the 1990s, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis has caused 15 outbreaks in Finland; 12 of them were caused by phage type 1 (PT1) and PT4. Thus far, there has been no clear evidence as to the source of these Salmonella Enteritidis PT1 and PT4 strains, so it was necessary to try to characterize them further. Salmonella Enteritidis PT1 (n = 57) and PT4 (n = 43) isolates from different sources were analyzed by genomic pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), plasmid profiling, and antimicrobial resistance testing to investigate the distribution of their subtypes in Finland. It was also hoped that this investigation would help in identifying the sources of the infections, especially the sources of the outbreaks caused by PT1 and PT4 in the 1990s. The results showed that both PFGE and plasmid profiling, but not antimicrobial susceptibility testing, were capable of differentiating isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis PT1 and PT4. By genotypic methods, it was possible to divide both PT1 and PT4 isolates into 12 subtypes. It could also be shown that all PT1 outbreak isolates were identical and, at least with this collection of isolates, that the outbreaks did not originate from the Baltic countries or from Russia, where this phage type predominates. It was also established that the outbreaks caused by PT4 all had different origins. Valuable information for future investigations was gained on the distribution of molecular subtypes of strains that originated from the tourist resorts that are popular among Finns and of strains that were isolated from livestock. PMID:10364582

  16. Linear antigenic mapping of flagellin (FliC) from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis with yeast surface expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoling; Shi, Bingtian; Li, Tao; Zuo, Teng; Wang, Bin; Si, Wei; Xin, Jiuqing; Yang, Kongbin; Shi, Xuanlin; Liu, Siguo; Liu, Henggui

    2016-02-29

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of food-borne illness around the world and can have significant health implications in humans, poultry and other animals. Flagellin (FliC) is the primary component of bacterial flagella. It has been shown that the FliC of S. Enteritidis is a significant antigenic structure and can elicit strong humoral responses against S. Enteritidis infection in chickens. Here, we constructed a FliC antigen library using a yeast surface expression system. Yeast cells expressing FliC peptide antigens were labeled with chicken sera against S. Enteritidis and sorted using FACS. The analyses of FliC peptides revealed that the FliC linear antigenicity in chickens resided on three domains which were able to elicit strong humoral responses in vivo. Animal experiments further revealed that the antibodies elicited by these antigenic domains were able to significantly inhibit the invasion of S. Enteritidis into the liver and spleen of chickens. These findings will facilitate our better understanding of the humoral responses elicited by FliC in chickens upon infection by S. Enteritidis. PMID:26854340

  17. Egg contamination by Salmonella serovar enteritidis following vaccination with Delta-aroA Salmonella serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Parker, C; Asokan, K; Guard-Petter, J

    2001-02-01

    The efficacy of an aroA Salmonella serovar typhimurium modified live vaccine to decrease internal egg contamination after oral challenge of hens with egg-contaminating Salmonella serovar enteritidis was assessed. Challenge was with a mixed phenotype of S. enteritidis that had virulence characteristics previously associated with enhanced oral invasiveness and egg contamination in chickens. Immunized birds had fewer positive ovary/oviduct pools and lower cfu g(-1) cecal contents than did non-immunized birds, but the differences were not significant. The number of positive intestinal (duodenum, jejunum, ileum) and organ (spleen, kidney, liver) pools following challenge from each treatment group were equivalent. Most importantly, immunization did not decrease egg contamination. These results suggest that the ability of modified live vaccines to reduce internal egg contamination by S. serovar enteritidis can be assessed using characterized strains for challenge. PMID:11166998

  18. Isolation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    PubMed

    Marietto-Gonçalves, Guilherme Augusto; de Almeida, Sílvia Maria; de Lima, Edna Tereza; Okamoto, Adriano Sakai; Pinczowski, Pedro; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio

    2010-03-01

    Avian salmonellosis is a disease caused by bacteria of the genus Salmonella that can cause three distinct diseases in birds: pullorum diseases, fowl typhoid, and paratyphoid infection. Various wildlife species are susceptible to infections by Salmonella, regardless of whether they live in captivity or freely in the wild. The present study verified the presence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in three captive specimens of Amazona aestiva. The study involved a total of 103 birds undergoing rehabilitation to prepare for living in the wild, after having been captured from animal traffickers and delivered to the Centrofauna Project of the Floravida Institute in Sao Paulo, Brazil. This is the first report of Salmonella Enteritidis isolation in A. aestiva that originated from capture associated with animal trafficking; Salmonella was detected during the study by the serologic method of rapid serum agglutination on a plate with bacterial isolate. The antimicrobial profile exam of the isolated samples demonstrated sensitivity to ampicillin, cefaclor, ciprofloxacin, and cloranfenicol. The three samples also presented resistance to more than four antibiotics. The presence of the genes invA and spvC was verified by PCR technique and was associated with virulence and absence of class 1 integron, a gene related to antimicrobial resistance. The commercial antigen for pullorum disease was shown to be a useful tool for rapid detection in the screening of Salmonella of serogroup D1 in Psittaciformes. New studies on Salmonella carriage in birds involved in trafficking must be performed to better understand their participation in the epidemiologic cycle of salmonellosis in humans and other animals. PMID:20408416

  19. Chicken-specific kinome array reveals that Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis modulates host immune signaling pathways in the cecum to establish a persistence infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induce an early, short-lived, pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The und...

  20. Heat transfer models for predicting Salmonella enteritidis in shell eggs through supply chain distribution.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, S; Simpson, R; Teixeira, A

    2007-11-01

    Egg and egg preparations are important vehicles for Salmonella enteritidis infections. The influence of time-temperature becomes important when the presence of this organism is found in commercial shell eggs. A computer-aided mathematical model was validated to estimate surface and interior temperature of shell eggs under variable ambient and refrigerated storage temperature. A risk assessment of S. enteritidis based on the use of this model, coupled with S. enteritidis kinetics, has already been reported in a companion paper published earlier in JFS. The model considered the actual geometry and composition of shell eggs and was solved by numerical techniques (finite differences and finite elements). Parameters of interest such as local (h) and global (U) heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity, and apparent volumetric specific heat were estimated by an inverse procedure from experimental temperature measurement. In order to assess the error in predicting microbial population growth, theoretical and experimental temperatures were applied to a S. enteritidis growth model taken from the literature. Errors between values of microbial population growth calculated from model predicted compared with experimentally measured temperatures were satisfactorily low: 1.1% and 0.8% for the finite difference and finite element model, respectively. PMID:18034720

  1. The role of roof rats (Rattus rattus) in the spread of Salmonella Enteritidis and S. Infantis contamination in layer farms in eastern Japan

    PubMed Central

    LAPUZ, R.; TANI, H.; SASAI, K.; SHIROTA, K.; KATOH, H.; BABA, E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The prevalence of Salmonella in four layer farms in eastern Japan was investigated between 2004 and 2006 to determine the role of roof rats (Rattus rattus) in the epizootology of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). Persistent S. Enteritidis and S. Infantis contamination of the environment and pooled egg samples were detected in three out of four layer farms. A total of 113 (13·3%) and 158 (18·6%) out of 851 rats examined were positive for S. Enteritidis and S. Infantis, respectively. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, only one indistinguishable pulsed-field pattern was yielded by S. Enteritidis strains from rats, eggs and environmental samples from each of the two contaminated layer farms. Although, a variety of pulsed-field patterns were generated by S. Enteritidis isolates from rats, eggs, and the environment of the other contaminated farms, there are, however, some S. Enteritidis strains that are closely related clones. These results suggest that roof rats are carriers of S. Enteritidis and S. Infantis and that persistent S. Enteritidis and S. Infantis infections in a rat population may play an important role in the spread and maintenance of these pathogens inside the layer premises. PMID:17988423

  2. Characterization of the ELPhiS prophage from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis strain LK5.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L Farris; Matthews, T David; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Hasty, David; Edwards, Robert A

    2012-03-01

    Phages are a primary driving force behind the evolution of bacterial pathogens by transferring a variety of virulence genes into their hosts. Similar to other bacterial genomes, the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis LK5 genome contains several regions that are homologous to phages. Although genomic analysis demonstrated the presence of prophages, it was unable to confirm which phage elements within the genome were viable. Genetic markers were used to tag one of the prophages in the genome to allow monitoring of phage induction. Commonly used laboratory strains of Salmonella were resistant to phage infection, and therefore a rapid screen was developed to identify susceptible hosts. This approach showed that a genetically tagged prophage, ELPhiS (Enteritidis lysogenic phage S), was capable of infecting Salmonella serovars that are diverse in host range and virulence and has the potential to laterally transfer genes between these serovars via lysogenic conversion. The rapid screen approach is adaptable to any system with a large collection of isolates and may be used to test the viability of prophages found by sequencing the genomes of various bacterial pathogens. PMID:22247173

  3. Rapid inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis on shell eggs by plant-derived antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Darre, Michael J; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a common foodborne pathogen transmitted to humans largely by consumption of contaminated eggs. The external surface of eggs becomes contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis from various sources on farms, the main sources being hens' droppings and contaminated litter. Therefore, effective egg surface disinfection is critical to reduce pathogens on eggs and potentially control egg-borne disease outbreaks. This study investigated the efficacy of GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status, plant-derived antimicrobials (PDA), namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), carvacrol (CR), and eugenol (EUG), as an antimicrobial wash for rapidly killing Salmonella Enteritidis on shell eggs in the presence or absence of chicken droppings. White-shelled eggs inoculated with a 5-strain mixture of nalidixic acid (NA) resistant Salmonella Enteritidis (8.0 log cfu/mL) were washed in sterile deionized water containing each PDA (0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75%) or chlorine (200 mg/kg) at 32 or 42°C for 30 s, 3 min, or 5 min. Approximately 6.0 log cfu/mL of Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from inoculated and unwashed eggs. The wash water control and chlorine control decreased Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs by only 2.0 log cfu/mL even after washing for 5 min. The PDA were highly effective in killing Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs compared with controls (P < 0.05). All treatments containing CR and EUG reduced Salmonella Enteritidis to undetectable levels as rapidly as within 30 s of washing, whereas TC (0.75%) completely inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs washed at 42°C for 30 s (P < 0.05). No Salmonella Enteritidis was detected in any PDA or chlorine wash solution; however, substantial pathogen populations (~4.0 log cfu/mL) survived in the antibacterial-free control wash water (P < 0.05). The CR and EUG were also able to eliminate Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs to undetectable levels in the presence of 3% chicken droppings at 32°C (P < 0.05). This study

  4. Molting in Salmonella enteritidis-challenged laying hens fed alfalfa crumbles. I. Salmonella enteritidis colonization and virulence gene hilA response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to examine microbial population shifts and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) responses in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)-challenged molted and non-molted hens fed different dietary regimens. Fifteen Salmonella-free single comb Leghorn hen...

  5. Prevention of Salmonella enteritidis in shell eggs during production, storage, and transportation. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-07-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule that requires shell egg producers to implement measures to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) from contaminating eggs on the farm and from further growth during storage and transportation, and requires these producers to maintain records concerning their compliance with the rule and to register with FDA. FDA is taking this action because SE is among the leading bacterial causes of foodborne illness in the United States, and shell eggs are a primary source of human SE infections. The final rule will reduce SE-associated illnesses and deaths by reducing the risk that shell eggs are contaminated with SE. PMID:19588581

  6. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis SE86 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Scapin, Diane; Grando, Williani Fabiola; Rossi, Eliandra Mirlei; Perez, Karla Joseane; Malheiros, Patrícia da Silva; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the main pathogens responsible for foodborne illness in Brazil. Probiotic bacteria can play a role in defense and recovery from enteropathogenic infections. In this study, the ability of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 to colonise and exert antagonistic effects in the gastrointestinal tract was tested before and during experimental infection in conventional mice contaminated with S. Enteritidis (SE86). A dose of 0.1 mL containing 108 viable cells of SE86 and L. acidophilus LA10 was orally administered by gavage to mice. The experiment was divided into groups. As a negative control, Group 1 was administered only sterile saline solution. As a positive control, Group 2 was administered only SE86. Group 3 was first administered SE86, and after 10 days, treated with L. acidophilus LA10. Group 4 was first administered L. acidophilus LA10, and after 10 days, challenged with SE86. The results demonstrated that a significant number of SE86 cells were able to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of mice, specifically in the colon and ileum. L. acidophilus LA10 demonstrated an antagonistic effect against SE86, with better results observed for Group 3 over Group 4. Thus, L. acidophilus LA10 shows potential antagonistic effects against S. Enteritidis SE86, especially if administered after infection. PMID:24159284

  7. Emergence of host-adapted Salmonella Enteritidis through rapid evolution in an immunocompromised host.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Elizabeth J; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Hadfield, James; Forbester, Jessica L; Harris, Simon R; Hale, Christine; Heath, Jennifer N; Wileman, Thomas; Clare, Simon; Kane, Leanne; Goulding, David; Otto, Thomas D; Kay, Sally; Doffinger, Rainer; Cooke, Fiona J; Carmichael, Andrew; Lever, Andrew M L; Parkhill, Julian; MacLennan, Calman A; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Dougan, Gordon; Kingsley, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Host adaptation is a key factor contributing to the emergence of new bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens. Many pathogens are considered promiscuous because they cause disease across a range of host species, while others are host-adapted, infecting particular hosts(1). Host adaptation can potentially progress to host restriction, where the pathogen is strictly limited to a single host species and is frequently associated with more severe symptoms. Host-adapted and host-restricted bacterial clades evolve from within a broader host-promiscuous species and sometimes target different niches within their specialist hosts, such as adapting from a mucosal to a systemic lifestyle. Genome degradation, marked by gene inactivation and deletion, is a key feature of host adaptation, although the triggers initiating genome degradation are not well understood. Here, we show that a chronic systemic non-typhoidal Salmonella infection in an immunocompromised human patient resulted in genome degradation targeting genes that are expendable for a systemic lifestyle. We present a genome-based investigation of a recurrent blood-borne Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection covering 15 years in an interleukin-12 β1 receptor-deficient individual that developed into an asymptomatic chronic infection. The infecting S. Enteritidis harboured a mutation in the mismatch repair gene mutS that accelerated the genomic mutation rate. Phylogenetic analysis and phenotyping of multiple patient isolates provides evidence for a remarkable level of within-host evolution that parallels genome changes present in successful host-restricted bacterial pathogens but never before observed on this timescale. Our analysis identifies common pathways of host adaptation and demonstrates the role that immunocompromised individuals can play in this process. PMID:27572160

  8. Emergence of host-adapted Salmonella Enteritidis through rapid evolution in an immunocompromised host

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Elizabeth J; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Hadfield, James; Forbester, Jessica L; Harris, Simon R; Hale, Christine; Heath, Jennifer N; Wileman, Thomas; Clare, Simon; Kane, Leanne; Goulding, David; Otto, Thomas D; Kay, Sally; Doffinger, Rainer; Cooke, Fiona J; Carmichael, Andrew; Lever, Andrew ML; Parkhill, Julian; MacLennan, Calman A; Kumararatne, Dinakantha

    2016-01-01

    Summary Host adaptation is a key factor contributing to the emergence of new bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens. Many pathogens are considered promiscuous because they cause disease across a range of host species, while others are host-adapted, infecting particular hosts1. Host adaptation can potentially progress to host restriction where the pathogen is strictly limited to a single host species and is frequently associated with more severe symptoms. Host-adapted and host-restricted bacterial clades evolve from within a broader host-promiscuous species and sometimes target different niches within their specialist hosts, such as adapting from a mucosal to a systemic lifestyle. Genome degradation, marked by gene inactivation and deletion, is a key feature of host adaptation, although the triggers initiating genome degradation are not well understood. Here, we show that a chronic systemic non-typhoidal Salmonella infection in an immunocompromised human patient resulted in genome degradation targeting genes that are expendable for a systemic lifestyle. We present a genome-based investigation of a recurrent blood-borne Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection covering 15 years in an interleukin (IL)-12 β-1 receptor-deficient individual that developed into an asymptomatic chronic infection. The infecting S. Enteritidis harbored a mutation in the mismatch repair gene mutS that accelerated the genomic mutation rate. Phylogenetic analysis and phenotyping of multiple patient isolates provides evidence for a remarkable level of within-host evolution that parallels genome changes present in successful host-restricted bacterial pathogens but never before observed on this timescale. Our analysis identifies common pathways of host adaptation and demonstrates the role that immunocompromised individuals can play in this process. PMID:27127642

  9. Risks Involved in the Use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Heidelberg in Commercial Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Barrera, Eduardo; Calhoun, Nicole; Lobato-Tapia, Jose L.; Lucca, Vivian; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Merino-Guzman, Ruben; Petrone-García, Victor M.; Latorre, Juan D.; Mahaffey, Brittany D.; Teague, Kyle D.; Graham, Lucas E.; Wolfenden, Amanda D.; Baxter, Mikayla F. A.; Hargis, Billy M.; Tellez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) or Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) in commercial poultry and determine the effects of a probiotic as an antibiotic alternative. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the risks involved in the use of Enrofloxacin for SE or SH in commercial poultry. Experiment 1 consisted of two trials. In each trial, chickens were assigned to one of three groups; control + SE challenged; Enrofloxacin 25 mg/kg + SE; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SE. Chickens received Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, all groups received fresh water without any treatment. All chickens were orally gavaged with 107 cfu/chick of SE at 7 days of age and euthanized on 8 days of age. In Experiment 2, turkey poults were assigned to one of the three groups; control + SH; probiotic + SH; and Enrofloxacin 50 mg/kg + SH. Poults received probiotic or Enrofloxacin in the drinking water from days 1 to 5 of age. On day 6, poults received fresh water without any treatment. Poults were orally gavaged with 107 cfu/poult of SH at 7 days of age. Poults were weighed and humanely killed 24 h post-SH challenge to evaluate serum concentration of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran to evaluate intestinal permeability, metagenomics, and SH infection. In both trials of Experiment 1, chickens treated with Enrofloxacin were more susceptible to SE organ invasion and intestinal colonization when compared with control non-treated chickens (P < 0.05). In Experiment 2, poults treated with 50 mg/kg of Enrofloxacin showed an increase in body weight, however, this group also showed an increase in SH susceptibility, intestinal permeability, and lower proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, but with control group had the highest proportion of Proteobacteria. By contrast, poults that received the probiotic had the highest

  10. Salmonella Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... reptiles like snakes, turtles, and lizards. Symptoms include Fever Diarrhea Abdominal cramps Headache Possible nausea, vomiting, and ... be serious. The usual treatment is antibiotics. Typhoid fever, a more serious disease caused by Salmonella, is ...

  11. Electron-beam-inactivated vaccine against Salmonella enteritidis colonization in molting hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electron Beam (eBeam) ionization technology has a variety of applications in modern society. The underlying hypothesis was that electron beam (eBeam) inactivated Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) cells can serve as a vaccine to control Salmonella colonization and Salmonella shedding in c...

  12. Antibacterial effect of trans-cinnamaldehyde on Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni in chickens drinking water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni are two major food-borne pathogens in the US, accounting to more than 3 million cases of human illness annually. Chickens are the natural hosts of these bacteria. Drinking water can be a potential source of S. Enteritidis and C.jejuni, resulting in the...

  13. Inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni in Poultry Drinking Water by trans-cinnamaldehyde

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni are two major food-borne pathogens in the US, accounting to more than 3 million cases of human illness annually. Chickens are the natural hosts of these bacteria. Poultry drinking water can be a potential source of S. Enteritidis and C.jejuni, resultin...

  14. COMPARATIVE GENOME SEQUENCING OF SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS ISOLATES THAT VARY IN VIRULENCE CHARACTERISTICS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subspecies I enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is currently the leading cause of salmonellosis worldwide and the second leading cause in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the USDA Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) have recently describe...

  15. Mutational Mapping and Location of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Salmonella Enteritidis Isolates that Vary in Virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subspecies I enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is currently the leading cause of salmonellosis worldwide and the second leading cause in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the USDA Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) have recently describe...

  16. Molecular and virulence characteristics of multi-drug resistant Salmonella Enteritidis strains isolated from poultry.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Kim, Ji Hee; Park, Jong Ho; Lee, Young-Ju; Lee, John Hwa

    2011-09-01

    Forty-six Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) strains were isolated from chicken meat, faeces, and eggshells collected from hatcheries throughout Korea. The strains were examined for the presence of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. All 46 isolates were resistant to at least one of 21 antibiotics used in this study, 30 (65.2%) were resistant to three or more antimicrobials, and a single remarkable isolate was resistant to 15 antimicrobials. The isolates were primarily resistant to penicillins, sulfisoxazole, streptomycin, tetracycline and quinolones. The high rate of resistance in S. Enteritidis strains, sometimes to multiple drugs, may complicate future options for treating human infections. Nineteen of the 21 penicillin resistant isolates carried the bla(TEM) gene, while one strain, resistant both to penicillins and ceftriaxone, carried the bla(CTX-M) gene. Thirty-seven of the 45 sulfisoxazole resistant isolates carried sul2, and 23/24 streptomycin resistant isolates carried both strA and strB. All 10 tetracycline resistant isolates carried the tet(A) gene. Most isolates harboured both SPI-1 and SPI-2-associated genes, and the spv operon, which are known to be associated with human infections. The presence of these genes suggests that these strains could give rise to public health problems if dispersed in the general human population. PMID:20822940

  17. Research note: Salmonella enteritidis and Arizona hinshawii isolated from wild sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; Trainer, D.O.; Duncan, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis serotype Rubislaw and Arizona hinshawii were isolated from cloacal swabs of 'healthy' live-trapped sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) in Indiana and Wisconsin. These respective isolations were the first reported from wild sandhill cranes.

  18. Microarray-Based Detection of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Genes Involved in Chicken Reproductive Tract Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Raspoet, R.; Appia-Ayme, C.; Shearer, N.; Martel, A.; Pasmans, F.; Haesebrouck, F.; Ducatelle, R.; Thompson, A.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has developed the potential to contaminate table eggs internally, by colonization of the chicken reproductive tract and internalization in the forming egg. The serotype Enteritidis has developed mechanisms to colonize the chicken oviduct more successfully than other serotypes. Until now, the strategies exploited by Salmonella Enteritidis to do so have remained largely unknown. For that reason, a microarray-based transposon library screen was used to identify genes that are essential for the persistence of Salmonella Enteritidis inside primary chicken oviduct gland cells in vitro and inside the reproductive tract in vivo. A total of 81 genes with a potential role in persistence in both the oviduct cells and the oviduct tissue were identified. Major groups of importance include the Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2, genes involved in stress responses, cell wall, and lipopolysaccharide structure, and the region-of-difference genomic islands 9, 21, and 40. PMID:25281378

  19. Conjugal Transfer of the Pathogenicity Island ROD21 in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Depends on Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J.; Tobar, Hugo E.; Nieto, Pamela A.; Riedel, Claudia A.; Bueno, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Unstable pathogenicity islands are chromosomal elements that can be transferred from one bacterium to another. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a pathogenic bacterium containing such unstable pathogenicity islands. One of them, denominated ROD21, is 26.5 kb in size and capable of excising from the chromosome in certain culture conditions, as well as during bacterial infection of phagocytic cells. In this study we have evaluated whether ROD21 can be effectively transferred from one bacterium to another. We generated a donor and several recipient strains of S. Enteritidis to carry out transfer assays in liquid LB medium. These assays showed that ROD21 is effectively transferred from donor to recipient strains of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium. When Escherichia coli was used as the recipient strain, ROD21 transfer failed to be observed. Subsequently, we showed that a conjugative process was required for the transfer of the island and that changes in temperature and pH increased the transfer frequency between Salmonella strains. Our data indicate that ROD21 is an unstable pathogenicity island that can be transferred by conjugation in a species-specific manner between Salmonellae. Further, ROD21 transfer frequency increases in response to environmental changes, such as pH and temperature. PMID:24705125

  20. Immunogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis virulence protein, InvH, and cross-reactivity of its antisera with Salmonella strains.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Behzad; Rasooli, Iraj; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Nadooshan, Mohammad Reza Jalali; Owlia, Parviz; Nazarian, Shahram

    2013-02-22

    Acellular vaccines containing bacterial immunodominant components such as surface proteins may be potent alternatives to live attenuated vaccines in order to reduce salmonellosis risk to human health. invH gene, an important part of needle complex in type three secretion system (TTSS) plays important role in efficient bacterial adherence and entry into epithelial cells. In this work we hypothesize that use of a 15 kDa recombinant InvH as Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis surface protein could provoke antibody production in mouse and would help us study feasibility of its potential for diagnosis and/or a recombinant vaccine. The purified InvH provoked significant rise of IgG in mice. Active protection induced by immunization with InvH against variable doses of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, indicated that the immunized mice were completely protected against challenge with 10(4) LD(50). The immunoreaction of sera from immunized mice with other Salmonella strains or cross reaction with sera of Salmonella strains inoculated mice is indicative of possessing by Salmonella strains of the surface protein, InvH, that can be employed in both prophylactic and diagnostic measures against S. enterica. Bacteria free spleen and ileum of the immunized mice in this study indicate that the invH gene affects bacterial invasion. Efficacy of the virulence protein, InvH, in shuttling into host cells in injectisome of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis and inhibition of this phenomenon by active immunization was shown in this study. In conclusion immunization with InvH protein can develop protection against S. enterica serovar Enteritidis infections. InvH in Salmonella strains can be exploited in protective measures as well as a diagnostic tool in Salmonella infections. PMID:23141708

  1. Numbers of Salmonella enteritidis in the contents of naturally contaminated hens' eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, T. J.; Whitehead, A.; Gawler, A. H.; Henley, A.; Rowe, B.

    1991-01-01

    Over 5700 hens eggs from 15 flocks naturally infected with Salmonella enteritidis were examined individually for the presence of the organism in either egg contents or on shells. Thirty-two eggs (0.6%) were positive in the contents. In the majority, levels of contamination were low. Three eggs, however, were found to contain many thousands of cells. In eggs where it was possible to identify the site of contamination, the albumen was more frequently positive than the yolk. Storage at room temperature had no significant effect on the prevalence of salmonella-positive eggs but those held for more than 21 days were more likely (P less than 0.01) to be heavily contaminated. In batches of eggs where both shells and contents were examined, 1.1% were positive on the former site and 0.9% in the latter. PMID:2050203

  2. Analysis of Molecular Epidemiology of Chilean Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis Isolates by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Bacteriophage Typing

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Jorge; Fica, Alberto; Ebensperger, German; Calfullan, Hector; Prat, Soledad; Fernandez, Alda; Alexandre, Marcela; Heitmann, Ingrid

    2003-01-01

    Human Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections emerged in Chile in 1994. S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 1 isolates predominated in the north, and phage type 4 isolates predominated in the central and southern regions. A study was planned to characterize this epidemic using the best discriminatory typing technique. Research involved 441 S. enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates, including clinical preepidemic samples (n = 74; 1975 to 1993) and epidemic (n = 199), food (n = 72), poultry (n = 57), and some Latin American (n = 39) isolates. The best method was selected based on a sample of preepidemic isolates, analyzing the discriminatory power (DP) obtained by phage typing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE) analysis. The highest DP was associated with BlnI PFGE-bacteriophage typing analysis (0.993). A total of 38 BlnI patterns (B patterns) were identified before the epidemic period, 19 since 1994, and only 4 in both periods. Two major clusters were identified by phylogenetic analysis, and the predominant B patterns clustered in the same branch. Combined analysis revealed that specific B pattern-phage type combinations (subtypes) disappeared before 1994, that different genotypes associated with S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 4 had been observed since 1988, and that strain diversity increased before the expansion of S. enterica serotype Enteritidis in 1994. Predominant subtype B3-phage type 4 was associated with the central and southern regions, and subtype B38-phage type 1 was associated with the north (P < 0.0001). Food and poultry isolates matched the predominant S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes, but isolates identified in neighboring countries (Peru and Bolivia) did not match S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes identified in the north of Chile. The results of this work demonstrate that genetic diversity, replacement, and expansion of specific S. enterica serotype

  3. Analysis of molecular epidemiology of Chilean Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and bacteriophage typing.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Jorge; Fica, Alberto; Ebensperger, German; Calfullan, Hector; Prat, Soledad; Fernandez, Alda; Alexandre, Marcela; Heitmann, Ingrid

    2003-04-01

    Human Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections emerged in Chile in 1994. S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 1 isolates predominated in the north, and phage type 4 isolates predominated in the central and southern regions. A study was planned to characterize this epidemic using the best discriminatory typing technique. Research involved 441 S. enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates, including clinical preepidemic samples (n = 74; 1975 to 1993) and epidemic (n = 199), food (n = 72), poultry (n = 57), and some Latin American (n = 39) isolates. The best method was selected based on a sample of preepidemic isolates, analyzing the discriminatory power (DP) obtained by phage typing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE) analysis. The highest DP was associated with BlnI PFGE-bacteriophage typing analysis (0.993). A total of 38 BlnI patterns (B patterns) were identified before the epidemic period, 19 since 1994, and only 4 in both periods. Two major clusters were identified by phylogenetic analysis, and the predominant B patterns clustered in the same branch. Combined analysis revealed that specific B pattern-phage type combinations (subtypes) disappeared before 1994, that different genotypes associated with S. enterica serotype Enteritidis phage type 4 had been observed since 1988, and that strain diversity increased before the expansion of S. enterica serotype Enteritidis in 1994. Predominant subtype B3-phage type 4 was associated with the central and southern regions, and subtype B38-phage type 1 was associated with the north (P < 0.0001). Food and poultry isolates matched the predominant S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes, but isolates identified in neighboring countries (Peru and Bolivia) did not match S. enterica serotype Enteritidis subtypes identified in the north of Chile. The results of this work demonstrate that genetic diversity, replacement, and expansion of specific S. enterica serotype

  4. Prevention of egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis after oral vaccination of laying hens with Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC mutants.

    PubMed

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination of laying hens has been successfully used to reduce egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis, decreasing human salmonellosis cases worldwide. Currently used vaccines for layers are either inactivated vaccines or live attenuated strains produced by mutagenesis. Targeted gene deletion mutants hold promise for future vaccines, because specific bacterial functions can be removed that may improve safety and allow differentiation from field strains. In this study, the efficacy of Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains in laying hens as live vaccines was evaluated. The mutants are deficient in either the membrane channel TolC (ΔtolC) or the multi-drug efflux systems acrAB, acrEF and mdtABC (ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC). These strains have a decreased ability for gut and tissue colonization and are unable to survive in egg white, the latter preventing transmission of the vaccine strains to humans. Two groups of 30 laying hens were orally inoculated at day 1, 6 weeks and 16 weeks of age with 10(8) cfu of either vaccine strain, while a third group was left unvaccinated. At 24 weeks of age, the birds were intravenously challenged with 5 × 10(7) cfu Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 S1400/94. The vaccine strains were not shed or detected in the gut, internal organs or eggs, 2 weeks after the third vaccination. The strains significantly protected against gut and internal organ colonization, and completely prevented egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis under the conditions of this study. This indicates that Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains might be valuable strains for vaccination of layers against Salmonella Enteritidis. PMID:27519174

  5. Genetic and phenotypic evidence of the Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis human-animal interface in Chile.

    PubMed

    Retamal, Patricio; Fresno, Marcela; Dougnac, Catherine; Gutierrez, Sindy; Gornall, Vanessa; Vidal, Roberto; Vernal, Rolando; Pujol, Myriam; Barreto, Marlen; González-Acuña, Daniel; Abalos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is a worldwide zoonotic agent that has been recognized as a very important food-borne bacterial pathogen, mainly associated with consumption of poultry products. The aim of this work was to determine genotypic and phenotypic evidence of S. Enteritidis transmission among seabirds, poultry and humans in Chile. Genotyping was performed using PCR-based virulotyping, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Pathogenicity-associated phenotypes were determined with survival to free radicals, acidic pH, starvation, antimicrobial resistance, and survival within human dendritic cells. As result of PCR and PFGE assays, some isolates from the three hosts showed identical genotypic patterns, and through MLST it was determined that all of them belong to sequence type 11. Phenotypic assays show diversity of bacterial responses among isolates. When results were analyzed according to bacterial host, statistical differences were identified in starvation and dendritic cells survival assays. In addition, isolates from seabirds showed the highest rates of resistance to gentamycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin. Overall, the very close genetic and phenotypic traits shown by isolates from humans, poultry, and seabirds suggest the inter-species transmission of S. Enteritidis bacteria between hosts, likely through anthropogenic environmental contamination that determines infection of seabirds with bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for other susceptible organism, including humans. PMID:26029196

  6. Genetic and phenotypic evidence of the Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis human-animal interface in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Patricio; Fresno, Marcela; Dougnac, Catherine; Gutierrez, Sindy; Gornall, Vanessa; Vidal, Roberto; Vernal, Rolando; Pujol, Myriam; Barreto, Marlen; González-Acuña, Daniel; Abalos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is a worldwide zoonotic agent that has been recognized as a very important food-borne bacterial pathogen, mainly associated with consumption of poultry products. The aim of this work was to determine genotypic and phenotypic evidence of S. Enteritidis transmission among seabirds, poultry and humans in Chile. Genotyping was performed using PCR-based virulotyping, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Pathogenicity-associated phenotypes were determined with survival to free radicals, acidic pH, starvation, antimicrobial resistance, and survival within human dendritic cells. As result of PCR and PFGE assays, some isolates from the three hosts showed identical genotypic patterns, and through MLST it was determined that all of them belong to sequence type 11. Phenotypic assays show diversity of bacterial responses among isolates. When results were analyzed according to bacterial host, statistical differences were identified in starvation and dendritic cells survival assays. In addition, isolates from seabirds showed the highest rates of resistance to gentamycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin. Overall, the very close genetic and phenotypic traits shown by isolates from humans, poultry, and seabirds suggest the inter-species transmission of S. Enteritidis bacteria between hosts, likely through anthropogenic environmental contamination that determines infection of seabirds with bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for other susceptible organism, including humans. PMID:26029196

  7. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been significantly associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible conten...

  8. Genetically Similar Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis Persistent in China for a Long-Term Period.

    PubMed

    Song, Qifa; Shen, Xuanyi; Yang, Yuanbin; Zhang, Danyang; Gao, Hong

    2016-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is an important causative agent of nontyphoidal salmonellosis in human populations. In this study, we collected 72 S. Enteritidis strains from 2004 to 2014 in Ningbo, mid-east China. Of the 72 strains, we identified a dominant clone of 58 strains recovered from patient's feces (n = 48), blood (n = 1), pleural effusion (n = 1), chickens (n = 3), and dessert cakes (n = 5) by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). The profile arrangements of MLVA were SE1-SE2-SE3-SE5-SE6-SE8-SE9: 4-4-3-11-10-1-3. These dominant strains were susceptible to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and resistant to nalidixic acid. Additionally, all isolates harboured virulence genes invA, sipA, sopE, and spvB when tested by PCR. Our results reveal that genetically similar S. Enteritidis strains which accounted for several outbreaks as well as blood infection and pleural cavity infection are prevalent in China for a long-term period. This situation calls for further attention in the prevention and control of foodborne disease caused by Salmonella species. PMID:27228342

  9. Transposon Mutagenesis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Identifies Genes That Contribute to Invasiveness in Human and Chicken Cells and Survival in Egg Albumen

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaohui; Kim, Hye-Young; Call, Douglas R.; Guard, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important food-borne pathogen, and chickens are a primary reservoir of human infection. While most knowledge about Salmonella pathogenesis is based on research conducted on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis is known to have pathobiology specific to chickens that impacts epidemiology in humans. Therefore, more information is needed about S. Enteritidis pathobiology in comparison to that of S. Typhimurium. We used transposon mutagenesis to identify S. Enteritidis virulence genes by assay of invasiveness in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells and chicken liver (LMH) cells and survival within chicken (HD-11) macrophages as a surrogate marker for virulence. A total of 4,330 transposon insertion mutants of an invasive G1 Nalr strain were screened using Caco-2 cells. This led to the identification of attenuating mutations in a total of 33 different loci, many of which include genes previously known to contribute to enteric infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1], SPI-4, SPI-5, CS54, fliH, fljB, csgB, spvR, and rfbMN) in S. Enteritidis and other Salmonella serovars. Several genes or genomic islands that have not been reported previously (e.g., SPI-14, ksgA, SEN0034, SEN2278, and SEN3503) or that are absent in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars (e.g., pegD, SEN1152, SEN1393, and SEN1966) were also identified. Most mutants with reduced Caco-2 cell invasiveness also showed significantly reduced invasiveness in chicken liver cells and impaired survival in chicken macrophages and in egg albumen. Consequently, these genes may play an important role during infection of the chicken host and also contribute to successful egg contamination by S. Enteritidis. PMID:22988017

  10. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium in raw chicken meat at retail markets in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Thung, T Y; Mahyudin, N A; Basri, D F; Wan Mohamed Radzi, C W J; Nakaguchi, Y; Nishibuchi, M; Radu, S

    2016-08-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the major food-borne diseases in many countries. This study was carried out to determine the occurrence of Salmonella spp., Salmonella Enteritidis, and Salmonella Typhimurium in raw chicken meat from wet markets and hypermarkets in Selangor, as well as to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profile of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium. The most probable number (MPN) in combination with multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) method was used to quantify the Salmonella spp., S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium in the samples. The occurrence of Salmonella spp., S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium in 120 chicken meat samples were 20.80%, 6.70%, and 2.50%, respectively with estimated quantity varying from <3 to 15 MPN/g. The antibiogram testing revealed differential multi-drug resistance among S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium isolates. All the isolates were resistance to erythromycin, penicillin, and vancomycin whereas sensitivity was recorded for Amoxicillin/Clavulanic acid, Gentamicin, Tetracycline, and Trimethoprim. Our findings demonstrated that the retail chicken meat could be a source of multiple antimicrobial-resistance Salmonella and may constitute a public health concern in Malaysia. PMID:27118863

  11. Viable but nonrecoverable stage of Salmonella enteritidis in aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Roszak, D B; Grimes, D J; Colwell, R R

    1984-03-01

    An environmental isolate (13- 1BB ) of Salmonella enteritidis serogroup C1 was inoculated into sterile Potomac River water microcosms to observe survival and culturability of the organism by employing acridine orange direct count, fluorescent antibody direct count, direct viable count, plate count on veal infusion agar and xylose lysine decarboxylase agar, and indirect enumeration by the most-probable-number method (MPN), using media selective for Salmonella. Loss of culturability on laboratory media was observed within 48 h. However, cultures could be "resuscitated" and cultured on solid media, following addition of nutrients to the microcosms . Cells, resuscitated 4 days after apparent "die-off" (0 colony-forming units (cfu)/mL) using plate count techniques, yielded numbers of cfu in the same order of magnitude as had been observed before the onset of nutrient limitation. Microscopic techniques for direct viable counting indicated that viability is maintained for as long as 60 days after depletion of nutrients, although attempts to culture these cells, by addition of nutrient, after 21 days yielded apparently sterile plates. Thus, longer periods of "dormancy" appear to require conditions other than simple nutrient addition for resumption of cell growth and division. PMID:6372975

  12. Identification of SNPs in two Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT13a pathotypes that point to epidemiological trends.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract: Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most frequent cause of salmonellosis in the world. Epidemiological data from the Centers for Disease Control indicates that the incidence of illness from S. Enteritidis in the United States increased during 2005 despi...

  13. In vitro multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis on the egg yolk membrane and penetration to the yolk contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Refrigeration to limit bacterial multiplication is a critical aspect of efforts to control the transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) to consumers of contaminated eggs. Although the nutrient-rich yolk interior is an uncommon location for S. Enteritidis contaminatio...

  14. Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure Pulsing on the Inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis in Liquid Whole Egg

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella in Eggs and egg-containing foods have caused numerous food-borne outbreaks and recalls. Liquid whole egg inoculated with Salmonella enteritidis at 108 CFU/ml were treated with continuous or repeating hydrostatic -pressures (300 MPa to 400 MPa) at 25C, 40C and 50C for up to 40 min. Treatme...

  15. Antibacterial effect of trans-cinnamaldehyde on Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni in chicken drinking water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni are two major food-borne pathogens in the US, accounting to more than 3 million cases of human illness annually. Chickens are the natural hosts of these bacteria and their drinking water can be a potential source of Salmonella and Campylobacter resulti...

  16. Circulating γδ T Cells in Response to Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Exposure in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Angela; Pieper, Jana; Methner, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    γδ T cells are considered crucial to the outcome of various infectious diseases. The present study was undertaken to characterize γδ (T-cell receptor 1+ [TCR1+]) T cells phenotypically and functionally in avian immune response. Day-old chicks were orally immunized with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis live vaccine or S. enterica serovar Enteritidis wild-type strain and infected using the S. enterica serovar Enteritidis wild-type strain on day 44 of life. Between days 3 and 71, peripheral blood was examined flow cytometrically for the occurrence of γδ T-cell subpopulations differentiated by the expression of T-cell antigens. Three different TCR1+ cell populations were found to display considerable variation regarding CD8α antigen expression: (i) CD8α+high TCR1+ cells, (ii) CD8α+dim TCR1+ cells, and (iii) CD8α− TCR1+ cells. While most of the CD8α+high TCR1+ cells expressed the CD8αβ heterodimeric antigen, the majority of the CD8α+dim TCR1+ cells were found to express the CD8αα homodimeric form. After immunization, a significant increase of CD8αα+high γδ T cells was observed within the CD8α+high TCR1+ cell population. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed reduced interleukin-7 receptor α (IL-7Rα) and Bcl-x expression and elevated IL-2Rα mRNA expression of the CD8αα+high γδ T cells. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated a significant increase of CD8α+ and TCR1+ cells in the cecum and spleen and a decreased percentage of CD8β+ T cells in the spleen after Salmonella immunization. After infection of immunized animals, immune reactions were restricted to intestinal tissue. The study showed that Salmonella immunization of very young chicks is accompanied by an increase of CD8αα+high γδ T cells in peripheral blood, which are probably activated, and thus represent an important factor for the development of a protective immune response to Salmonella organisms in chickens. PMID:16790770

  17. Identification of Key Genes in the Response to Salmonella enterica Enteritidis, Salmonella enterica Pullorum, and Poly(I:C) in Chicken Spleen and Caecum

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhongwei; Dai, Aiqin; Zhai, Fei; Li, Jianchao; Xia, Mingxiu; Hua, Dengke; Xu, Lu; Wang, Hongzhi; Chen, Jing; Liu, Lu; Chen, Guohong

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) and Salmonella enterica Pullorum (S. pullorum) are regarded as a threat to poultry production. This study's aim is to characterize the expression profiles in response to three different challenges and to identify infection-related genes in the chicken spleen and caecum. Groups of the Chinese chicken breed Langshan were challenged with either S. Enteritidis, S. pullorum, or poly(I:C). The concentrations of cytokines and antibodies and the Salmonella colonization level of the caecum and liver were detected in each group at 7 days postinfection. Expression microarray experiments were conducted using mRNA isolated from both spleen and caecum. Crucial differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with immunity were identified. Four DEGs were identified in spleen of all three challenge groups (RBM16, FAH, SOX5, and RBM9) and different four genes in caecum (SOUL, FCN2, ANLN, and ACSL1). Expression profiles were clearly different among the three challenged groups. Genes enriched in the spleen of birds infected with S. pullorum were enriched in lymphocyte proliferation related pathways, but the enriched genes in the caecum of the same group were primarily enriched in innate immunity or antibacterial responses. The DEGs that appear across all three challenge groups might represent global response factors for different pathogens. PMID:24707473

  18. Salmonella Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... vegetables. You also can get infected after handling pets, especially reptiles like snakes, turtles, and lizards. Symptoms include Fever Diarrhea Abdominal cramps Headache Possible nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite Symptoms usually last 4-7 days. ...

  19. Induction of CXC chemokine mRNA expression in chicken oviduct epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis via the type three secretion system-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The messenger-RNA (mRNA) expression of selected cytokines and chemokines in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells (COEC) was determined following in vitro infection with wild type or type three secretion system (T3SS) mutant Salmonella enteritidis (SE) strains. All SE strains examined in this stu...

  20. Effect of in-feed supplementation of trans-cinnamaldehyde and caprylic acid on chicken cecal microbiome in response to Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is a major foodborne pathogen causing enteric illnesses in humans, with undercooked eggs and poultry meat as the primary sources of infection. Our previous research revealed that in-feed supplementation of two GRAS (generally recognized as safe)-status, natural compounds,...

  1. Microarray analysis of Salmonella Enteritidis Phage Type 8 treated with subinhibitory concentrations of trans-cinnamaldehyde or eugenol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 8 (PT8) is a major poultry-associated Salmonella isolate implicated in foodborne outbreaks in the United States. We previously reported that the GRAS-status plant-derived compounds trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) significantly reduced S. Enteritidis colon...

  2. Effect of Salmonella infection on cecal tonsil regulatory T cell properties in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to study Regulatory T cell (Treg) properties post-Salmonella infection in broiler birds. Four-day-old broiler chicks were orally infected with 5x106 CFU/ml Salmonella enteritidis or sterile PBS (control). Samples were collected at 4, 7, 10, and 14 d post-infection. ...

  3. Emerging Salmonella Enteritidis anaerogenic phage type 14b: outbreak in Norwegian, Swedish and Finnish travellers returning from Greece.

    PubMed

    Guerin, P J; Nygard, K; Siitonen, A; Vold, L; Kuusi, M; de Jong, B; Rottingen, J A; Alvseike, O; Olsson, A; Lassen, J; Andersson, Y; Aavitsland, P

    2006-01-01

    In July 2001, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (Folkehelseinstituttet, FHI) reported a cluster of Salmonella Enteritidis of phage type 14b infections in Norwegian travellers returning from Greece. An increase in the same uncommon phage type was also registered in Sweden and Finland at the same time. Cases of S. Enteritidis PT 14b in patients returning from Greece were reported in these three Nordic countries in 2001 (303 cases), 2002 (164 cases) and 2003 (199 cases). Case-control studies performed in 2001 in Norway and Sweden indicated that consumption of chicken was associated with illness. In 2002 and 2003, continuing case reports indicated that this uncommon phage type had probably become established in the Greek food chain. Tour operators were informed and contacts were made with Greek public health authorities. Because place of infection is not systematically included in most Salmonella notification systems, the S. Enteritidis phage type 14b outbreak reported here may represent only part of a larger outbreak among travellers visiting Greece. Infections are often reported only in the tourists' home countries and public health authorities in the tourist destinations may not be aware of the problem. Further collaboration between national institutes of public health in Europe is needed to detect outbreaks occurring among tourists. PMID:16525196

  4. Investigation of the distribution and control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT6 in layer breeding and egg production.

    PubMed

    Davies, Robert; Liebana, Ernesto; Breslin, Mark

    2003-06-01

    Investigations were carried out in a layer breeder hatchery, a layer parent rearing farm, a layer parent farm and in a commercial pullet rearing and cage layer farm where Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) PT6 had become established. PT6 was initially found in focal points in the hatchery, such as hatcher ventilation ducting, tray wash areas and waste areas, but improved disinfection was followed by a rapid disappearance of contamination. Several different phage types of S. Enteritidis were found in the hatchery but most of these proved to be genotypically identical with PT6. Investigations of contaminated layer breeder and rearing sites showed that the terminal disinfection programmes in place were effective in that no carry-over of infection occurred and the organism was rapidly eliminated from the organization. Infection with PT6 originating from chicks was investigated on a commercial pullet rearing farm. After several rounds of treatment with a fluoroquinolone antibiotic and competitive exclusion, no Salmonella was found in faeces or cloacal swabs but was present in dust in one of six houses. Sampling carried out after cleaning and disinfection confirmed clearance of the organism from the site, but infection did become established in a commercial laying house receiving the birds. PMID:12850912

  5. Rapid real-time PCR methods to distinguish Salmonella Enteritidis wildtype field isolates from vaccine strains Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE and AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E.

    PubMed

    Maurischat, Sven; Szabo, Istvan; Baumann, Beatrice; Malorny, Burkhard

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major non-typhoid Salmonella serovar causing human salmonellosis mainly associated with the consumption of poultry and products thereof. To reduce infections in poultry, S. Enteritidis live vaccine strains AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E and Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE have been licensed and used in several countries worldwide. To definitively diagnose a S. Enteritidis contamination in vaccinated herds a reliable and fast method for the differentiation between vaccine and wildtype field isolates is required. In this study, we developed and validated real-time PCR (qPCR) assays to distinguish those variants genetically. Suitable target sequences were identified by whole genome sequencing (WGS) using the Illumina MiSeq system. SNP regions in kdpA and nhaA proved to be most useful for differentiation of AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E and Salmovac SE/Gallivac SE, respectively, from wildtype strains. For each vaccine strain one TaqMan-qPCR assay and one alternative approach using High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis was designed. All 30 Salmovac SE and 7 AviPro SALMONELLA VAC E vaccine strain reisolates tested were correctly identified by both approaches (100% inclusivity). Furthermore, all 137 (TaqMan) and 97 (HRM) Salmonella non-vaccine and related Enterobacteriaceae strains tested were excluded (100% exclusivity). The analytical detection limits were determined to be approx. 10(2) genome copies/reaction for the TaqMan and 10(4) genome copies/reaction for the HRM approach. The real-time PCR assays proved to be a reliable and fast alternative to the cultural vaccine strain identification tests helping decision makers in control measurements to take action within a shorter period of time. PMID:25794902

  6. Development and Optimization of a Novel Immunomagnetic Separation- Bacteriophage Assay for Detection of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis in Broth

    PubMed Central

    Favrin, Stacy J.; Jassim, Sabah A.; Griffiths, Mansel W.

    2001-01-01

    Salmonella is the second-leading cause of food-borne illness in most developed countries, causing diarrhea, cramps, vomiting, and often fever. Many rapid methods are available for detection of Salmonella in foods, but these methods are often insensitive or expensive or require a high degree of technical ability to perform. In this paper we describe development and characterization of a novel assay that utilizes the normal infection cycle of bacteriophage SJ2 for detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in broth. The assay consists of four main stages: (i) capture and concentration of target cells by using immunomagnetic separation (IMS); (ii) infection of the target bacterium with phage; (iii) amplification and recovery of progeny phage; and (iv) assay of progeny phage on the basis of their effect on a healthy population of host cells (signal-amplifying cells). The end point of the assay can be determined by using either fluorescence or optical density measurements. The detection limit of the assay in broth is less than 104 CFU/ml, and the assay can be performed in 4 to 5 h. The results of this study demonstrate that the IMS-bacteriophage assay is a rapid, simple, and sensitive technique for detection of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis in broth cultures which can be applied to preenriched food samples. PMID:11133448

  7. Reduction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Colonization in 20-Day-Old Broiler Chickens by the Plant-Derived Compounds trans-Cinnamaldehyde and Eugenol

    PubMed Central

    Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Mattson, Tyler; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne; Babapoor, Sankhiros; March, Benjamin; Valipe, Satyender; Darre, Michael; Hoagland, Thomas; Schreiber, David; Khan, Mazhar I.; Donoghue, Ann; Donoghue, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The efficacies of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) and eugenol (EG) for reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in broiler chickens were investigated. In three experiments for each compound, 1-day-old chicks (n = 75/experiment) were randomly assigned to five treatment groups (n = 15/treatment group): negative control (-ve S. Enteritidis, -ve TC, or EG), compound control (-ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.75% [vol/wt] TC or 1% [vol/wt] EG), positive control (+ve S. Enteritidis, -ve TC, or EG), low-dose treatment (+ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.5% TC, or 0.75% EG), and high-dose treatment (+ve S. Enteritidis, +ve 0.75% TC, or 1% EG). On day 0, birds were tested for the presence of any inherent Salmonella (n = 5/experiment). On day 8, birds were inoculated with ∼8.0 log10 CFU S. Enteritidis, and cecal colonization by S. Enteritidis was ascertained (n = 10 chicks/experiment) after 24 h (day 9). Six birds from each treatment group were euthanized on days 7 and 10 after inoculation, and cecal S. Enteritidis numbers were determined. TC at 0.5 or 0.75% and EG at 0.75 or 1% consistently reduced (P < 0.05) S. Enteritidis in the cecum (≥3 log10 CFU/g) after 10 days of infection in all experiments. Feed intake and body weight were not different for TC treatments (P > 0.05); however, EG supplementation led to significantly lower (P < 0.05) body weights. Follow-up in vitro experiments revealed that the subinhibitory concentrations (SICs, the concentrations that did not inhibit Salmonella growth) of TC and EG reduced the motility and invasive abilities of S. Enteritidis and downregulated expression of the motility genes flhC and motA and invasion genes hilA, hilD, and invF. The results suggest that supplementation with TC and EG through feed can reduce S. Enteritidis colonization in chickens. PMID:22327574

  8. [Significance of Salmonella enteritidis in outbreaks of diseases transmitted by foods in Argentina, 1986-1988].

    PubMed

    Eiguer, T; Caffer, M I; Fronchkowsky, G B

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the outbreaks of food-borne-diseases due to Salmonella Enteritidis which occurred in Argentina between 1986 and 1988. In 39 registered episodes 210 strains were isolated from human feces (28 outbreaks) and 59 from food (23 outbreaks). More than 2,500 people in different provinces were affected, the chief characteristics of the clinical picture being the gravity of the symptoms (high temperature, vomiting, diarrhea and severe dehydration). The main source of infection was related to raw eggs, eaten in the form of home-made mayonnaise. It is considered necessary to carry out an effective control of poultry products, as well as a permanent surveillance of salmonellosis. PMID:2274662

  9. Effect of selected antibiotics and anticoccidials on Salmonella enteritidis cecal colonization and organ invasion in Leghorn chicks.

    PubMed

    Manning, J G; Hargis, B M; Hinton, A; Corrier, D E; DeLoach, J R; Creger, C R

    1994-01-01

    One-day-old leghorn chicks were placed in floor pens on previously used poultry litter (potentially providing exposure to normal chicken enteric flora) for 7 days and provided feed containing one of several antibiotics or anticoccidials. On day 7, all groups were challenged orally with an isolate of Salmonella enteritidis (10(6) colony-forming units) that was resistant to bacitracin, novobiocin, nalidixic acid, and nitrofurazone. All chicks were killed on day 13, and liver, spleen, and cecal tonsils were cultured. Dietary administration of novobiocin (0.385 g/kg) caused a significant increase (P < 0.05) in positive chick colonization rate (either liver and spleen or cecal tonsils) compared with the unmedicated controls. Similarly, chicks administered dietary nitrofurazone (0.3 g/kg) were infected with S. enteritidis at a significantly greater frequency than the unmedicated controls. A significant decrease in cecal volatile fatty acid concentration, previously shown to influence susceptibility to selected enteric pathogens, was observed in the novobiocin- and nitrofurazone-treated groups. Treatment with chlortetracycline (11.4 g/kg), monensin (0.91 g/kg), or nicarbazin (0.49 g/kg) had no effect on S. enteritidis invasion or colonization. Bacitracin (0.49 g/kg) significantly increased S. enteritidis cecal colonization rate when administered continuously throughout the study. These data support and extend previous investigations involving other salmonellae and indicate that selected antibiotics may increase the severity and frequency of S. enteritidis colonization and invasion rate in leghorn chicks. PMID:7980273

  10. Contribution of the Type VI Secretion System Encoded in SPI-19 to Chicken Colonization by Salmonella enterica Serotypes Gallinarum and Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Carlos J.; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Castro, Benjamín; Chiang, Sebastián; Toro, Cecilia S.; Zaldívar, Mercedes; Contreras, Inés; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Santiviago, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella Gallinarum is a pathogen with a host range specific to poultry, while Salmonella Enteritidis is a broad host range pathogen that colonizes poultry sub-clinically but is a leading cause of gastrointestinal salmonellosis in humans and many other species. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the complex interplay between Salmonella and their hosts, the molecular basis of host range restriction and unique pathobiology of Gallinarum remain largely unknown. Type VI Secretion System (T6SS) represents a new paradigm of protein secretion that is critical for the pathogenesis of many Gram-negative bacteria. We recently identified a putative T6SS in the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 19 (SPI-19) of Gallinarum. In Enteritidis, SPI-19 is a degenerate element that has lost most of the T6SS functions encoded in the island. In this work, we studied the contribution of SPI-19 to the colonization of Salmonella Gallinarum strain 287/91 in chickens. Non-polar deletion mutants of SPI-19 and the clpV gene, an essential T6SS component, colonized the ileum, ceca, liver and spleen of White Leghorn chicks poorly compared to the wild-type strain after oral inoculation. Return of SPI-19 to the ΔSPI-19 mutant, using VEX-Capture, complemented this colonization defect. In contrast, transfer of SPI-19 from Gallinarum to Enteritidis resulted in transient increase in the colonization of the ileum, liver and spleen at day 1 post-infection, but at days 3 and 5 post-infection a strong colonization defect of the gut and internal organs of the experimentally infected chickens was observed. Our data indicate that SPI-19 and the T6SS encoded in this region contribute to the colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and internal organs of chickens by Salmonella Gallinarum and suggest that degradation of SPI-19 T6SS in Salmonella Enteritidis conferred an advantage in colonization of the avian host. PMID:20661437

  11. Salmonella Infections in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Bula-Rudas, Fernando J; Rathore, Mobeen H; Maraqa, Nizar F

    2015-08-01

    Salmonella are gram-negative bacilli within the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are the cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Animals (pets) are an important reservoir for nontyphoidal Salmonella, whereas humans are the only natural host and reservoir for Salmonella Typhi. Salmonella infections are a major cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. They account for an estimated 2.8 billion cases of diarrheal disease each year. The transmission of Salmonella is frequently associated with the consumption of contaminated water and food of animal origin, and it is facilitated by conditions of poor hygiene. Nontyphoidal Salmonella infections have a worldwide distribution, whereas most typhoidal Salmonella infections in the United States are acquired abroad. In the United States, Salmonella is a common agent for food-borne–associated infections. Several outbreaks have been identified and are most commonly associated with agricultural products. Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection is usually characterized by a self-limited gastroenteritis in immunocompetent hosts in industrialized countries, but it may also cause invasive disease in vulnerable individuals (eg, children less than 1 year of age, immunocompromised). Antibiotic treatment is not recommended for treatment of mild to moderate gastroenteritis by nontyphoidal Salmonella in immunocompetent adults or children more than 1 year of age. Antibiotic treatment is recommended for nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in infants less than 3 months of age, because they are at higher risk for bacteremia and extraintestinal complications. Typhoid (enteric) fever and its potential complications have a significant impact on children, especially those who live in developing countries. Antibiotic treatment of typhoid fever has become challenging because of the emergence of Salmonella Typhi strains that are resistant to classically used first-line agents: ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol. The

  12. O-antigen chain-length distribution in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is regulated by oxygen availability.

    PubMed

    Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia A; Velásquez, Felipe; Peñailillo, Johany; Garcias-Papayani, Héctor; Fernández, Paulina; Tobar, Pía; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A; Álvarez, Sergio A

    2016-09-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) consists of three covalently linked domains: the lipid A, the core region and the O antigen (OAg), consisting of repeats of an oligosaccharide. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) produces a LPS with two OAg preferred chain lengths: a long (L)-OAg controlled by WzzSE and a very long (VL)-OAg controlled by WzzfepE. In this work, we show that OAg produced by S. Enteritidis grown in E minimal medium also presented two preferred chain-lengths. However, a simultaneous and opposing change in the production of L-OAg and VL-OAg was observed in response to oxygen availability. Biochemical and genetics analyses indicate that this process is regulated by transcriptional factors Fnr and ArcA by means of controlling the transcription of genes encoding WzzSE and WzzfepE in response to oxygen availability. Thus, our results revealed a sophisticated regulatory mechanism involved in the adaptation of S. Enteritidis to one of the main environmental cues faced by this pathogen during infection. PMID:27343553

  13. In Vitro Penetration of Egg Yolks by Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Heidelberg Strains During 36-hour Ambient Temperature Storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although Salmonella deposition inside egg yolks is uncommon, migration through the vitelline membrane into the nutrient-rich yolk contents could enable rapid bacterial multiplication. Egg refrigeration restricts both penetration and growth, but a recently proposed national S. enteritidis control pro...

  14. Red Seaweeds Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii and Chondrus crispus down Regulate Virulence Factors of Salmonella Enteritidis and Induce Immune Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Borza, Tudor; Rathgeber, Bruce; Stratton, Glenn S.; Thomas, Nikhil A.; Critchley, Alan; Hafting, Jeff; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Red seaweeds are a rich source of unique bioactive compounds and secondary metabolites that are known to improve human and animal health. S. Enteritidis is a broad range host pathogen, which contaminates chicken and poultry products that end into the human food chain. Worldwide, Salmonella outbreaks have become an important economic and public health concern. Moreover, the development of resistance in Salmonella serovars toward multiple drugs highlights the need for alternative control strategies. This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of red seaweeds extracts against Salmonella Enteritidis using the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. Six red seaweed species were tested for their antimicrobial activity against S. Enteritidis and two, Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG) and Chondrus crispus (CC), were found to exhibit such properties. Spread plate assay revealed that SG and CC (1%, w/v) significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis. Seaweed water extracts (SWE) of SG and CC, at concentrations from 0.4 to 2 mg/ml, significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis (log CFU 4.5–5.3 and log 5.7–6.0, respectively). However, methanolic extracts of CC and SG did not affect the growth of S. Enteritidis. Addition of SWE (0.2 mg/ml, CC and SG) significantly decreased biofilm formation and reduced the motility of S. Enteritidis. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that SWE (CC and SG) suppressed the expression of quorum sensing gene sdiA and of Salmonella Pathogenesis Island-1 (SPI-1) associated genes sipA and invF, indicating that SWE might reduce the invasion of S. Enteritidis in the host by attenuating virulence factors. Furthermore, CC and SG water extracts significantly improved the survival of infected C. elegans by impairing the ability of S. Enteritidis to colonize the digestive tract of the nematode and by enhancing the expression of C. elegans immune responsive genes. As the innate immune response pathways of C. elegans and mammals show a

  15. Red Seaweeds Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii and Chondrus crispus down Regulate Virulence Factors of Salmonella Enteritidis and Induce Immune Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Borza, Tudor; Rathgeber, Bruce; Stratton, Glenn S; Thomas, Nikhil A; Critchley, Alan; Hafting, Jeff; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Red seaweeds are a rich source of unique bioactive compounds and secondary metabolites that are known to improve human and animal health. S. Enteritidis is a broad range host pathogen, which contaminates chicken and poultry products that end into the human food chain. Worldwide, Salmonella outbreaks have become an important economic and public health concern. Moreover, the development of resistance in Salmonella serovars toward multiple drugs highlights the need for alternative control strategies. This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of red seaweeds extracts against Salmonella Enteritidis using the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. Six red seaweed species were tested for their antimicrobial activity against S. Enteritidis and two, Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG) and Chondrus crispus (CC), were found to exhibit such properties. Spread plate assay revealed that SG and CC (1%, w/v) significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis. Seaweed water extracts (SWE) of SG and CC, at concentrations from 0.4 to 2 mg/ml, significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis (log CFU 4.5-5.3 and log 5.7-6.0, respectively). However, methanolic extracts of CC and SG did not affect the growth of S. Enteritidis. Addition of SWE (0.2 mg/ml, CC and SG) significantly decreased biofilm formation and reduced the motility of S. Enteritidis. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that SWE (CC and SG) suppressed the expression of quorum sensing gene sdiA and of Salmonella Pathogenesis Island-1 (SPI-1) associated genes sipA and invF, indicating that SWE might reduce the invasion of S. Enteritidis in the host by attenuating virulence factors. Furthermore, CC and SG water extracts significantly improved the survival of infected C. elegans by impairing the ability of S. Enteritidis to colonize the digestive tract of the nematode and by enhancing the expression of C. elegans immune responsive genes. As the innate immune response pathways of C. elegans and mammals show a high

  16. Differential Transcriptional Regulation Between Egg-contaminating and Non-egg-contaminating Strains of Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is the most common cause of food-borne salmonellosis primarily transmitted by contaminated poultry eggs. Despite its genetically clonal nature, SE strains differ markedly in their ability to disseminate systemically in chickens and subsequently invade the inte...

  17. Thermal inactivation kinetics of Salmonella Enteritidis and Oranienberg in commercially acquired 10% salted liquid whole egg

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liquid egg pasteurization requirements are based on time/temperature combinations in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 9, Ch. III, Sec. 590.570 from data acquired prior to 1970. These guidelines are being reevaluated in light of recent risk assessments. Heat-resistant Salmonella Enteritidi...

  18. Genomic epidemiology of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis based on population structure of prevalent lineages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (SE) is one of the most commonly reported causes of human salmonellosis. The low genetic diversity of SE measured by fingerprinting methods has made subtyping a challenge. In this study, we used whole genome sequencing to characterize a total of 125 SE and Sa...

  19. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms that Differentiate Two Subpopulations of Salmonella Enteritidis Within Phage Type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is currently the world’s leading cause of salmonellosis, in part because of its ability to contaminate the internal contents of eggs. Comparative whole genome mutational mapping of two PT13a strains that historically varied in the ability to contaminate eggs a...

  20. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... or processed as egg products in accordance with the Egg Products Inspection Act, 21 CFR 118.6(f... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.6...

  1. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... or processed as egg products in accordance with the Egg Products Inspection Act, 21 CFR 118.6(f... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.6...

  2. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or processed as egg products in accordance with the Egg Products Inspection Act, 21 CFR 118.6(f... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.6...

  3. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... or processed as egg products in accordance with the Egg Products Inspection Act, 21 CFR 118.6(f... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.6...

  4. 21 CFR 118.6 - Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... or processed as egg products in accordance with the Egg Products Inspection Act, 21 CFR 118.6(f... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Egg testing for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.6... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.6...

  5. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.8 Section 118.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.8 Testing methodology for...

  6. 21 CFR 118.8 - Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testing methodology for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). 118.8 Section 118.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PRODUCTION, STORAGE, AND TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.8 Testing methodology for...

  7. Reduction of Salmonella Enteritidis Population Sizes on Almond Kernels with Infrared Heat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalytic infrared (IR) heating was investigated to determine its effect on Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis population sizes on raw almond kernels. Using a double-sided catalytic infrared heating system, a radiation intensity of 5458 W/m2 caused a fast temperature increase at the kernel surf...

  8. Removal of Salmonella Enteritidis from commercial† unpasteurized liquid egg white using pilot scale crossflow tangential microfiltration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of a pilot-scale cross-flow microfiltration (MF) process for removal of Salmonella enteritidis from liquid egg white (LEW) was evaluated. To facilitate MF, 110 L of unpasteurized LEW from a local egg breaking plant was first wedge screened, homogenized and then diluted (1:2 w/w) w...

  9. Inactivation kinetics of a four-strain composite of Salmonella Enteritidis and Oranienberg in commercial liquid egg yolk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study was to develop a general model of inactivation of salmonellae in commercial liquid egg yolk for temperatures ranging from 58 to 66 deg C by studying the inactivation kinetics of Salmonella in liquid egg yolk. Heat-resistant salmonellae (three serovars of Enteritidis [two of p...

  10. Evolutionary trends in two strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis PT13a that vary in virulence potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the world's leading cause of salmonellosis. Eggs contaminated by apparently healthy hens and that have been improperly cooked can result in illness in humans who consume them. Although the incidence of this pathogen within the Uni...

  11. Detection of Polymorphism in a Diguanylate Cyclase of Egg-Contaminating Salmonella enteritidis Deficient in Biofilm Formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. enteritidis) is a model organism for evaluating how genetic drift impacts phenotype, because mutational mapping of clonally related pathotypes has been completed and small scale evolutionary events (SSEE) are being linked to the ability of this food-borne...

  12. Evolutionary trends in two strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis PT13a that vary in virulence potential.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the world's leading cause of salmonellosis. Eggs contaminated by apparently healthy hens and that have been improperly cooked can result in illness in humans who consume them. Although the incidence of this pathogen within the Unit...

  13. Critical role of glycogen synthase kinase-3ß in regulating the avian heterophil response to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A microarray-assisted gene expression screen of chicken heterophils revealed glycogen synthase kinase-3ß (GSK-3ß), a multifunctional Ser/Thr kinase, to be consistently up-regulated 30-180 min following stimulation with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). The present study was ...

  14. Evolutionary trends in two strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis PT13a that vary in virulence potential.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the world's leading cause of salmonellosis. Eggs contaminated by apparently healthy hens can result in illness in humans who consume them. Although the incidence of this pathogen within the United States has not been as high as it ...

  15. Evolutionary trends in two strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis PT13a that vary in virulence potential.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. I serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the world's leading cause of salmonellosis. Eggs that are contaminated by apparently healthy hens and that have been improperly cooked can result in illness in humans who consume them. Although the incidence of this pathogen within...

  16. Multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg yolks after inoculation outside, on, and inside vitelline membranes and storage at different temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt refrigeration to restrict bacterial growth is a widely acknowledged practice for reducing the risk of egg-borne transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis to consumers. A recently published federal regulation for S. Enteritidis control requires eggs to be refrigerated within 36 after they are la...

  17. Genetic Diversity and Evolution of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Strains with Different Phage Types

    PubMed Central

    Pettengill, James; Strain, Errol; Allard, Marc W.; Ahmed, Rafiq; Zhao, Shaohua; Brown, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Phage typing has been used for the epidemiological surveillance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis for over 2 decades. However, knowledge of the genetic and evolutionary relationships between phage types is very limited, making differences difficult to interpret. Here, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from whole-genome comparisons were used to determine the relationships between some S. Enteritidis phage types (PTs) commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in the United States. Emphasis was placed on the predominant phage types PT8, PT13a, and PT13 in North America. With >89,400 bp surveyed across 98 S. Enteritidis isolates representing 14 distinct phage types, 55 informative SNPs were discovered within 23 chromosomally anchored loci. To maximize the discriminatory and evolutionary partitioning of these highly homogeneous strains, sequences comprising informative SNPs were concatenated into a single combined data matrix and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The resultant phylogeny allocated most S. Enteritidis isolates into two distinct clades (clades I and II) and four subclades. Synapomorphic (shared and derived) sets of SNPs capable of distinguishing individual clades/subclades were identified. However, individual phage types appeared to be evolutionarily disjunct when mapped to this phylogeny, suggesting that phage typing may not be valid for making phylogenetic inferences. Furthermore, the set of SNPs identified here represents useful genetic markers for strain differentiation of more clonal S. Enteritidis strains and provides core genotypic markers for future development of a SNP typing scheme with S. Enteritidis. PMID:24574287

  18. Cloning and expression of a Salmonella enteritidis fimbrin gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Feutrier, J; Kay, W W; Trust, T J

    1988-01-01

    A gene bank of DNA from a human isolate of Salmonella enteritidis was constructed in the cosmid pHC79 in Escherichia coli HB101. Five clones containing 35- to 45-kilobase inserts of S. enteritidis DNA reacted in colony immunoblot assays with a polyclonal antiserum prepared against purified S. enteritidis fimbriae. Electron microscopy showed that none of the five fimbrin-producing clones produced fimbriae, yet radioimmunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis located the 14,400-molecular-weight S. enteritidis in the outer membrane fraction of three of the clones and in the periplasmic fraction of all five clones. By using an oligonucleotide probe homologous to the 5' region of the fimbrin structural gene, the fimbrin gene was located on a 5.3-kilobase HindIII fragment. In vitro transcription-translation analysis verified that this HindIII fragment subcloned into plasmid pTZ18R produced unprocessed S. enteritidis fimbrin of molecular weight 16,400. Dot blot hybridization against a selection of strains of the family Enterobacteriaceae indicated a limited distribution of the S. enteritidis fimbrin gene. Images PMID:2900832

  19. Antimicrobial effect of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) extracts against the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the antimicrobial effects of berry extracts obtained from four cultivars (Elliott, Darrow, Bluecrop and Duke) of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Enteritidis. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal conc...

  20. SHV-12-Like Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Strains of Salmonella enterica Serotypes Babelsberg and Enteritidis Isolated in France among Infants Adopted from Mali

    PubMed Central

    Weill, François-Xavier; Demartin, Marie; Tandé, Didier; Espié, Emmanuelle; Rakotoarivony, Ignace; Grimont, Patrick A. D.

    2004-01-01

    From December 2002 to June 2003, 14 cultures of Salmonella enterica serotype Babelsberg and 6 cultures of serotype Enteritidis, isolated in France from internationally adopted children, were identified at the French National Reference Center for Salmonella. All serotype Babelsberg isolates were related, as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and all serotype Enteritidis strains displayed the same phage type. All serotype Enteritidis and seven serotype Babelsberg isolates produced an SHV-12-like extended-spectrum β-lactamase as determined by sequencing of PCR products and by isoelectrofocusing. Some serotype Enteritidis isolates exhibited additional antimicrobial resistance (aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, sulfonamides, and trimethoprim). Our investigation indicated that these Salmonella isolates were certainly acquired in the same orphanage in Bamako, Mali, before the children were adopted by French families. An inappropriate use of ceftriaxone was probably the cause of the emergence of such strains. There is an urgent need to determine the origin of the contamination and to introduce adequate antibiotic protocols into this orphanage to prevent further transmission and dissemination. Screening for infections and follow-up, adapted to the origin of the internationally adopted children, should be recommended. PMID:15184415

  1. Application of bacteriocin produced by Streptococcus cricetus S760 for treating Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella-associated infections in broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enteritidis are leading food-borne pathogens worldwide. An important natural reservoir for these pathogens is commercially distributed poultry. Objective: To control C. jejuni and S. enteritidis associated infections in broilers by treating with a p...

  2. Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis based on Population Structure of Prevalent Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Prerak T.; den Bakker, Henk C.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tolar, Beth; Trees, Eija; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Frye, Jonathan G.; Porwollik, Steffen; Weimer, Bart C.; Wiedmann, Martin; Weinstock, George M.; Fields, Patricia I.; McClelland, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is one of the most commonly reported causes of human salmonellosis. Its low genetic diversity, measured by fingerprinting methods, has made subtyping a challenge. We used whole-genome sequencing to characterize 125 S. enterica Enteritidis and 3 S. enterica serotype Nitra strains. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were filtered to identify 4,887 reliable loci that distinguished all isolates from each other. Our whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism typing approach was robust for S. enterica Enteritidis subtyping with combined data for different strains from 2 different sequencing platforms. Five major genetic lineages were recognized, which revealed possible patterns of geographic and epidemiologic distribution. Analyses on the population dynamics and evolutionary history estimated that major lineages emerged during the 17th–18th centuries and diversified during the 1920s and 1950s. PMID:25147968

  3. Review of induced molting by feed removal and contamination of eggs with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Golden, Neal J; Marks, Harry H; Coleman, Margaret E; Schroeder, Carl M; Bauer, Nathan E; Schlosser, Wayne D

    2008-10-15

    As laying hens age, egg production and quality decreases. Egg producers can impose an induced molt on older hens that results in increased egg productivity and decreased hen mortality compared with non-molted hens of the same age. This review discusses the effect of induced molting by feed removal on immune parameters, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) invasion and subsequent production of SE-contaminated eggs. Experimental oral infections with SE show molted hens are more susceptible to SE infection and produce more SE-contaminated eggs in the first few weeks post-molt compared with pre-molt egg production. In addition, it appears that molted hens are more likely to disseminate SE into their environment. Molted hens are more susceptible to SE infection by contact exposure to experimentally infected hens; thus, transmission of SE among molted hens could be more rapid than non-molted birds. Histological examination of the gastrointestinal tracts of molted SE-infected hens revealed more frequent and severe intestinal mucosal lesions compared with non-molted SE-infected hens. These data suggest that induced molting by feed deprivation alters the normal asymptomatic host-pathogen relationship. Published data suggest the highest proportion of SE-positive eggs is produced within 1-5 weeks post-molt and decreases sharply by 6-10 weeks and dissipates to the background level for non-molted hens by 11-20 weeks. Appropriate treatment measures of eggs produced in the fist 5 weeks post-molting may decrease the risk of foodborne infections to humans. PMID:18479846

  4. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (c) Rodents, flies, and other pest control. As part of this program, you must: (1) Monitor for... conditions. “SE monitored” means the pullets are raised under SE control conditions that prevent SE... National Poultry Improvement Plan's standards for “U.S. S. Enteritidis Clean” status (9 CFR 145.23(d))...

  5. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... National Poultry Improvement Plan's standards for “U.S. S. Enteritidis Clean” status (9 CFR 145.23(d)) or... pullet house with spray, aerosol, fumigation, or another appropriate disinfection method. (b) Biosecurity... rodents by visual inspection and mechanical traps or glueboards or another appropriate monitoring...

  6. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... National Poultry Improvement Plan's standards for “U.S. S. Enteritidis Clean” status (9 CFR 145.23(d)) or... pullet house with spray, aerosol, fumigation, or another appropriate disinfection method. (b) Biosecurity... rodents by visual inspection and mechanical traps or glueboards or another appropriate monitoring...

  7. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... National Poultry Improvement Plan's standards for “U.S. S. Enteritidis Clean” status (9 CFR 145.23(d)) or... pullet house with spray, aerosol, fumigation, or another appropriate disinfection method. (b) Biosecurity... rodents by visual inspection and mechanical traps or glueboards or another appropriate monitoring...

  8. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... National Poultry Improvement Plan's standards for “U.S. S. Enteritidis Clean” status (9 CFR 145.23(d)) or.... (c) Rodents, flies, and other pest control. As part of this program, you must: (1) Monitor for... methods to achieve satisfactory rodent control; (2) Monitor for flies by spot cards, Scudder grills,...

  9. Salmonella Neck Abscess as an Opportunistic Infection in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella neck infections represent an uncommon cause of focal salmonellosis. While the incidence of nontyphoid salmonellosis is estimated at over 2 million cases annually, extraintestinal manifestations account for less than 1% of cases. This paper describes two patients with Salmonella neck abscesses as the initial presentation of diabetes mellitus. The first patient was diagnosed as having Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis sternocleidomastoid pyomyositis and the second patient Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium parapharyngeal abscess. Both patients had elevated hemoglobin A1c levels and had not been previously diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Salmonella spp. should be on the differential as a causative pathogen in patients presenting with neck abscesses and poorly controlled glucose levels. Diabetes may be a risk factor for salmonellosis due to decreased gastric acidity and prolonged gastric transit time. Prompt incision and drainage accompanied by antibiotics remains the treatment of choice for infected neck abscesses. PMID:24307959

  10. The impact of Salmonella Enteritidis on lipid accumulation in chicken hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Lan; Fan, Yang-Chi; Wang, Chinling; Tsai, Hsiang-Jung; Chou, Chung-Hsi

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is a public health concern and infected chickens serve as a reservoir that potentially transmits to humans through food. Although SE seldom causes systemic disease in chickens, virulent SE strains can colonize in intestines and lead a persistent infection of the liver. The liver is the primary organ for lipid metabolism in chickens and the site for production and assembly of main components in yolk. We performed a time-course experiment using LMH-2A cells that were infected with SE and co-incubated with β-oestradiol to evaluate if SE infection affected lipid metabolism and subsequently changed lipoprotein formation for egg yolk. The results indicated that lipid accumulation significantly increased in infected LMH-2A cells while the viability of these cells was only slightly decreased. The mRNA expressions of lipid transportation and most lipogenetic genes including sterol regulatory element binding protein 1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty-acid synthase, long-chain-fatty-acid-CoA ligase 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs) II were significantly up-regulated while the expression of lipogenetic-related stearoyl-CoA denaturase 1 was down-regulated. Moreover, decline in lipid transportation of hepatocytes was evidenced by the down-regulation of oestrogen receptor α which promotes VLDLy formation, an increase of intra-cellular accumulation of Apoprotein B (ApoB) protein, and a decrease of cellular excretion of VLDL protein. Conclusively, SE infection could elevate lipid synthesis and reduce lipid transportation in the chicken hepatocytes. These changes may lead excessive lipid accumulation in liver and slower lipoprotein deposition in yolk. PMID:26957042

  11. Efficiency of slightly acidic electrolyzed water for inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis and its contaminated shell eggs.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Zhu, Zhi Wei; Shi, Zheng Xiang; Wang, Chao Yuan; Li, Bao Ming

    2009-03-31

    The efficiency of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) at different temperatures (4, 20 and 45 degrees C) for inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis and it on the surface of shell eggs was evaluated. The bactericidal activity of SAEW, sodium hypochlorite solution (NaClO) and acidic electrolyzed water (AEW) to inactivate S. enteritidis was also compared. SAEW with a pH value of 6.0-6.5 used was generated by the electrolysis of a dilute hydrochloric acid (2.4 mM) in a chamber without a membrane. Although the pH value of SAEW was greatly higher than that of AEW (pH2.6-2.7), SAEW had a comparative powerful bactericidal activity at the same available chlorine concentrations. The efficiency of SAEW for inactivation of pure S. enteritidis cultures increased with increasing the available chlorine concentration and treatment time at the three different temperatures. The S. enteritidis counts decreased to less than 1.0 log(10) CFU/ml at available chlorine of 2 mg/l and 100% inactivation (reduction of 8.2 log(10) CFU/ml) was resulted in using SAEW with available chlorine more than 4 mg/l at 4, 20 and 45 degrees C after 2 min treatment, whereas no reduction was observed in the control samples. Moreover, SAEW was also effective for inactivating the S. enteritidis inoculated on the surface of shell eggs. A reduction of 6.5 log(10) CFU/g of S. enteritidis on shell eggs was achieved by SAEW containing 15 mg/l available chlorine for 3 min, but only a reduction of 0.9-1.2 log(10) CFU/g for the control samples. No survival of S. enteritidis was recovered in waste wash SAEW after treatment. The findings of this study indicate that SAEW may be a promising disinfectant agent for the shell egg washing processing without environmental pollution. PMID:19185376

  12. Genomic comparison of the closely-related Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, dublin and gallinarum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E.; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J.; et al

    2015-06-03

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content betweenmore » strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.« less

  13. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E.; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J.; Farris Hanna, Leigh; Schifferli, Dieter M.; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars. PMID:26039056

  14. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Matthews, T David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G Z; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J; Farris Hanna, Leigh; Schifferli, Dieter M; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars. PMID:26039056

  15. The Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 13 contributes to pathogenesis in streptomycin pre-treated mice but not in day-old chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a human and animal pathogen that causes gastroenteritis characterized by inflammatory diarrhea and occasionally an invasive systemic infection. Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs) are horizontally acquired genomic segments known to contribute to Salmone...

  16. Citrus juice composition does not influence radiation sensitivity of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Niemira, B A

    2001-06-01

    Food substrate chemistry is known to influence radiation sensitivity of pathogenic bacteria. The sensitivity of a citrus juice outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis to gamma radiation was determined in five commercial orange juice formulations. The juices differed in pH (3.87 to 4.13), calcium concentration (2.1 versus 36.9 mM), juice composition (orange versus orange-tangerine blend), and antioxidant power (11,751 to 12,826 microM ferric reducing-antioxidant power units). The Dgamma (dose required to achieve 90% destruction) varied only slightly (0.35 to 0.37 kGy), with no significant (P < 0.05) differences among any of the suspending juices. These results indicate that Salmonella Enteritidis sensitivity to gamma radiation is not strongly influenced by the composition of formulated commercial orange juices. PMID:11403141

  17. Promoting crystallisation of the Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae 14 pilin SefD using deuterium oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Garnett, James A; Lee, Wei-chao; Lin, Jing; Salgado, Paula; Taylor, Jonathan; Xu, Yingqi; Lambert, Sebastian; Cota, Ernesto; Matthews, Steve

    2012-05-01

    The use of heavy water (D(2)O) as a solvent is commonplace in many spectroscopic techniques for the study of biological macromolecules. A significant deuterium isotope effect exists where hydrogen-bonding is important, such as in protein stability, dynamics and assembly. Here we illustrate the use of D(2)O in additive screening for the production of reproducible diffraction-quality crystals for the Salmonella enteritidis fimbriae 14 (SEF14) putative tip adhesin, SefD. PMID:22497887

  18. Selection for pro-inflammatory mediators yields chickens with increased resistance against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Swaggerty, Christina L; Pevzner, Igal Y; Kogut, Michael H

    2014-03-01

    Salmonella is a leading cause of foodborne illness and can be transmitted through consumption of contaminated poultry; therefore, increasing a flock's natural resistance to Salmonella could improve food safety. Previously, we characterized the heterophil-mediated innate immune response of 2 parental broiler lines and F1 reciprocal crosses and showed that increased heterophil function and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators corresponds with increased resistance against diverse pathogens. A preliminary selection trial showed that individual sires had varying inherent levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and selection based on a high or low phenotype was passed onto progeny. Based on these results, we hypothesized selection of broilers for higher levels of the pro-inflammatory mediators IL-6, CXCLi2, and CCLi2 would produce progeny with increased resistance against Salmonella Enteritidis. Peripheral blood leukocytes were isolated from 75 commercial broiler sires, screened, and 10 naturally high and low expressing sires were selected and mated to randomly selected dams to produce the first generation of "high" and "low" progeny. The mRNA expression of CXCLi2 and CCLi2 were significantly (P ≤ 0.02) higher in the high progeny and were more resistant to liver and spleen organ invasion by Salmonella Enteritidis compared with low progeny. Production of the second generation yielded progeny that had differences (P ≤ 0.03) in all 3 mediators and further improved resistance against Salmonella Enteritidis. Feed conversion ratio and percent breast meat yield were calculated and were equal, whereas the high birds weighed slightly, but significantly, less than the low birds. These data clearly demonstrate that selection based on a higher phenotype of key pro-inflammatory mediators is a novel means to produce broilers that are naturally more resistant to Salmonella, one of the most important foodborne pathogens affecting the poultry industry. PMID:24604845

  19. Comparative genotypes of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Phage type 30 and 9c strains isolated from three outbreaks associated with raw almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2000-2001, 2003-2004 and 2005-2006, three outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis were linked with the consumption of raw almonds. The S. Enteritidis strains from these outbreaks had rare phage types (PT), PT30 and PT9c. Clinical and environmental S. Enteritidis strains were subjec...

  20. Inactivation of Salmonella enteritidis on shell eggs by coating with phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Yin, H-B; Surendran Nair, M; Chen, C-H; Lang, R; Darre, M J; Venkitanarayanan, K

    2016-09-01

    Salmonella enteritidis (SE) is a major foodborne pathogen that causes human infections largely by consumption of contaminated eggs. The external surface of eggs becomes contaminated with SE from multiple sources, highlighting the need for effective egg surface disinfection methods. This study investigated the efficacy of three GRAS-status, phytochemicals, namely carvacrol (CR), eugenol (EG), and β-resorcylic acid (BR) applied as pectin or gum arabic based coating for reducing SE on shell eggs. White-shelled eggs, spot inoculated with a 5-strain mixture of nalidixic acid (NA) resistant SE (8.0 log CFU/mL) were coated with pectin or gum arabic solution containing each phytochemical (0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75%), and stored at 4°C for 7 days. SE on eggs was enumerated on days 0, 1, 3, and 7 of storage. Approximately 4.0 log CFU/egg of SE was recovered from inoculated and pectin or gum arabic coated eggs on day 0. All coating treatments containing CR and EG, and BR at 0.75% reduced SE to undetectable levels on day 3 (P < 0.05). Results suggest that the aforementioned phytochemicals could effectively be used as a coating to reduce SE on shell eggs, but detailed studies on the sensory and quality attributes of coated eggs need to be conducted before recommending their use. PMID:27252373

  1. Coconut and Salmonella Infection

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, Carl P.; Mosbach, Klaus; Bibit, Venuso C.; Watson, Colin H.

    1967-01-01

    Raw, unprocessed coconut supports the growth of salmonellae as well as that of other enteric bacteria, salmonellae being particularly resistant to subsequent desiccation. Original contamination is not due to carriers or to polluted water supplies, but to contact with bacteria-containing soils followed by dispersion via infected coconut milk and shells. Pasteurization of raw coconut meat in a water bath at 80 C for 8 to 10 min effectively killed such bacteria, did not injure the product, and provided a prophylactic method now widely used by the coconut industry. PMID:5340650

  2. Changes in the Salmonella enterica Enteritidis phenotypes in presence of acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing signals.

    PubMed

    Campos-Galvão, Maria Emilene Martino; Ribon, Andrea Oliveira Barros; Araújo, Elza Fernandes; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2016-05-01

    Quorum sensing is used by bacteria to coordinate gene expression in response to population density and involves the production, detection and response to extracellular signaling molecules known as autoinducers (AIs). Salmonella does not synthesize the AI-1, acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) common to gram-negative bacteria; however, it has a receptor for AI-1, the SdiA protein. The effect of SdiA in modulating phenotypes of Salmonella has not been elucidated. In this report, we provide evidence that the AIs-1 affect Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis behavior by enhancing the biofilm formation and expression of virulence genes under anaerobic conditions. Biofilm formation by Salmonella was detected by the crystal violet method and by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of AHLs, particularly C12-HSL, increased biofilm formation and promoted expression of biofilm formation genes (lpfA, fimF, fliF, glgC) and virulence genes (hilA, invA, invF). Our results demonstrated that AHLs produced by other organisms played an important role in virulence phenotypes of Salmonella Enteritidis. PMID:26662614

  3. Dietary β-galactomannans have beneficial effects on the intestinal morphology of chickens challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Brufau, M T; Martín-Venegas, R; Guerrero-Zamora, A M; Pérez-Vendrell, A M; Vilà, B; Brufau, J; Ferrer, R

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the leading causes of food-borne salmonellosis in humans. Poultry is the single largest reservoir, and the consumption of incorrectly processed chicken meat and egg products is the major source of infection. Since 2006, the use of antibiotics as growth promoters has been banned in the European Union, and the dietary inclusion of β-galactomannans (βGM) has become a promising strategy to control and prevent intestinal infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various βGM-rich products on intestinal morphology in chickens challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis. To assess this effect, a total of 280 male Ross 308 chickens were studied (40 animals per treatment housed in 5 cages). There were 7 treatments, including controls: uninoculated birds fed the basal diet (negative control) and inoculated birds fed the basal diet (positive control) or the basal diet supplemented with Salmosan (1 g/kg), Duraió gum (1 g/kg), Cassia gum (1 g/kg), the cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (0.5 g/kg), or the antibiotic colistine (0.8 g/kg). The birds were fed these diets from the d 1 to 23, except the animals in the colistine group, which were fed the diet containing the antibiotic only from d 5 to 11. The inoculated animals were orally infected on d 7 with 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis. Bird performance per replicate was determined for the whole study period (23 d), and the distal ileum and cecal tonsil of 5 animals per treatment (1 animal per replicate) were observed at different magnification levels (scanning electron, light, and laser confocal microscopy). In the images corresponding to the treatments containing βGM we observed more mucus, an effect that can be associated with the observation of more goblet cells. Moreover, the images also show fewer M cells, which are characteristic of infected animals. Regarding the morphometric parameters, the animals that received Duraió and Cassia gums

  4. Subpopulation Characteristics of Egg-Contaminating Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis as Defined by the Lipopolysaccharide O Chain

    PubMed Central

    Guard-Bouldin, Jean; Gast, Richard K.; Humphrey, Thomas J.; Henzler, David J.; Morales, Cesar; Coles, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was refined by incorporating new data from isolates obtained from avian sources, from the spleens of naturally infected mice, and from the United Kingdom into an existing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-chain compositional database. From least to greatest, the probability of avian isolates producing high-molecular-mass LPS O chain ranked as follows: pooled kidney, liver, and spleen; intestine; cecum; ovary and oviduct; albumen; yolk; and whole egg. Mouse isolates were most like avian intestinal samples, whereas United Kingdom isolates were most like those from the avian reproductive tract and egg. Non-reproductive tract organ isolates had significant loss of O chain. Isogenic isolates that varied in ability to make biofilm and to be orally invasive produced different O-chain structures at 25°C but not at 37°C. Hens infected at a 91:9 biofilm-positive/-negative colony phenotype ratio yielded only the negative phenotype from eggs. These results indicate that the environment within the hen applies stringent selection pressure on subpopulations of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis at certain points in the infection pathway that ends in egg contamination. The avian cecum, rather than the intestines, is the early interface between the environment and the host that supports emergence of subpopulation diversity. These results suggest that diet and other factors that alter cecal physiology should be investigated as a means to reduce egg contamination. PMID:15128529

  5. Optical immunosensors for detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis from food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Arun K.; Geng, Tao; Lathrop, Amanda; Valadez, Angela; Morgan, Mark T.

    2004-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella are two major foodborne pathogens of significant concern. Two optical evanescent wave immunosensors were evaluated for detection: Antibody-coupled fiber-optic biosensor and a surface plasmon resonant (SPR) immunosensor. In the fiber-optic sensor, polyclonal antibodies for the test organisms were immobilized on polystyrene fiber wave -guides using streptavidin - biotin chemistry. Cyanine 5 -labeled monoclonal antibodies C11E9 (for L. monocytogenes) and SF-11 (for Salmonella Enteritidis) were used to generate a specific fluorescent signal. Signal acquisition was performed by launching a laser-light (635 nm) from an Analyte-2000. This immunosensor was able to detect 103 - 109 cfu/ml of L. monocytogenes or 106-109 cfu/ml of Salmonella Enteritidis and the assays were conducted at near real-time with results obtained within one hour of sampling. The assays were specific and showed signal even in the presence of other microorganisms such as E. coli, Enterococcus faecalis or Salmonella Typhimurium. In the SPR system, IAsys instrument (resonant mirror sensor) was used. Monoclonal antibody-C11E9 was directly immobilized onto a carboxylate cuvette. Whole Listeria cells at various concentrations did not yield any signal while surface protein extracts did. Crude protein extracts from L. monocytogenes and L. innocua had average binding responses of around 150 arc sec (0.25 ng/mm2), which was significantly different from L. grayi, L. ivanovii, or L. welshimeri with average responses of <48 arc sec. Both fiber-optic and SPR sensors show promise in near real-time detection of foodborne L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Enteritidis.

  6. Transposon mutagenesis of Salmonella Enteritidis identifies genes that contribute to invasiveness in human and chicken cells and survival in egg albumen.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis is the world’s leading cause of food borne salmonellosis and illness in people is linked strongly to its contamination of eggs produced by otherwise healthy appearing hens. Salmonella Enteritidis is noted for generating exceptional strain heterogeneity despite having a clonal ...

  7. Difference in cellular damage and cell death in thermal death time disks and high hydrostatic pressure treated Salmonella Enteritidis (ATCC13076) in liquid whole egg

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in membrane damage including leakage of intracellular UV-materials and loss of viability of Salmonella Enteritidis (ATCC13076) in liquid whole egg (LWE) following thermal-death-time (TDT) disk and high hydrostatic pressure treatments were examined. Salmonella enteritidis was inoculated ...

  8. wksl3, a New Biocontrol Agent for Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium in Foods: Characterization, Application, Sequence Analysis, and Oral Acute Toxicity Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyun-Wol; Kim, Jae-Won; Jung, Tae-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Of the Salmonella enterica serovars, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium are responsible for most of the Salmonella outbreaks implicated in the consumption of contaminated foods in the Republic of Korea. Because of the widespread occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella in foods and food processing environments, bacteriophages have recently surfaced as an alternative biocontrol tool. In this study, we isolated a virulent bacteriophage (wksl3) that could specifically infect S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, and several additional serovars. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that phage wksl3 belongs to the family Siphoviridae. Complete genome sequence analysis and bioinformatic analysis revealed that the DNA of phage wksl3 is composed of 42,766 bp with 64 open reading frames. Since it does not encode any phage lysogeny factors, toxins, pathogen-related genes, or food-borne allergens, phage wksl3 may be considered a virulent phage with no side effects. Analysis of genetic similarities between phage wksl3 and four of its relatives (SS3e, vB_SenS-Ent1, SE2, and SETP3) allowed wksl3 to be categorized as a SETP3-like phage. A single-dose test of oral toxicity with BALB/c mice resulted in no abnormal clinical observations. Moreover, phage application to chicken skin at 8°C resulted in an about 2.5-log reduction in the number of Salmonella bacteria during the test period. The strong, stable lytic activity, the significant reduction of the number of S. Enteritidis bacteria after application to food, and the lack of clinical symptoms of this phage suggest that wksl3 may be a useful agent for the protection of foods against S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium contamination. PMID:23335772

  9. Mycotic (infected) aneurysm of the popliteal artery and arthritis following Salmonella bacteriemia.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Bartolomé, P; Alonso Valle, H; Aurrecoechea, E; Acha, O; Blanco, R; Martínez-Taboada, V M; Rodríguez-Valverde, V

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of a mycotic (infected) aneurysm of the popliteal artery due to Salmonella enteritidis. The clinical presentation may be confused with other more common causes of diffuse swollen leg, causing a delay in the diagnosis and proper therapy. Prompt surgical resection of the infected aneurysm together with medical therapy is required for successful treatment. PMID:11407089

  10. Whole-Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Phage Type 4, Isolated from a Brazilian Poultry Farm

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Leandro Costa; Tirabassi, Adriane Holtz; Rodrigues, Dália Prazeres; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães; Brocchi, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4) strain IOC4647/2004, isolated from a poultry farm in São Paulo state, was obtained with high-throughput Illumina sequencing platform, generating 4,173,826 paired-end reads with 251 bp. The assembly of 4,804,382 bp in 27 scaffolds shows strong similarity to other S. Enteritidis strains. PMID:27174265