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1

Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

Infertility means not being able to become pregnant after a year of trying. If a woman can ... keeps having miscarriages or stillbirths, that's also called infertility. Infertility is fairly common. After one year of ...

2

Infertility  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Health Matters, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's online gateway to health issues, presents this in-depth feature on infertility. Readers will find a detailed introduction to "the different kinds of infertility, what can be done, the costs involved, and the tricky ethical and legal issues that can crop up." The feature also includes a number of useful links, recommended reading, and an indispensable glossary of terms.

3

Defining Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Defining infertility What is infertility? Infertility is “the inability to conceive after 12 ... as the woman gets older. What can cause infertility? Age: A woman’s age can have a big ...

4

Treating Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

What is infertility? Infertility is defined as not having become pregnant after 1 year of having regular sexual intercourse without the ... to infertility. What treatment options are available for infertility? Treatment options depend on the cause of your ...

5

Female Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

Infertility is a term doctors use if a woman hasn't been able to get pregnant after ... woman keeps having miscarriages, it is also called infertility. Female infertility can result from physical problems, hormone ...

6

Male Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... treatments may include medicines, surgery, or assisted reproductive technologies. Happily, two-thirds of couples treated for infertility are able to have babies. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

7

Treating Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... infertility. Lifestyle changes, medication, surgery, or assisted reproductive technology (ART) may be recommended. Several different treatments may ... risks of intrauterine insemination? • What is assisted reproductive technology (ART)? • How can I find out ART success ...

8

Infertility FAQ's  

MedlinePLUS

... Couples with unexplained infertility. What is assisted reproductive technology (ART)? Assisted reproductive technology (ART) includes all fertility ... Top of Page How often is assisted reproductive technology (ART) successful? Success rates vary and depend on ...

9

Infertility and Fertility  

MedlinePLUS

... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications En Español Infertility and Fertility: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is infertility? "Infertility" is a term that describes when a ...

10

Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... asrm.org PATIENT FACT SHEET Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility You probably don't realize how many people ... talk to a sex therapist. Sexual dysfunction and infertility Sexual dysfunction may cause problems getting pregnant (infertility). ...

11

Psychological Component of Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... Organizations Resources: FAQs › FAQs - The Psychological Component of Infertility -- written by the ASRM Mental Health Professional Group ( ... Professional in your area ) Q1. What impact does infertility have on psychological well being? Infertility often creates ...

12

Primary infertility (image)  

MedlinePLUS

Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

13

Infertility and Women  

MedlinePLUS

... the way certain hormones are released from the pituitary gland (a gland at the base of the brain). ... released from the ovary. & infertility Women Ovary uterus Pituitary Gland www.hormone.org infertility and Women fact sheet ...

14

Phthalates and Male Infertility  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... HealthDay February 19, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Environmental Health Infertility Reproductive Hazards Transcript Baby boys whose mothers were exposed to chemicals called phthalates during pregnancy may be at increased risk of future infertility, according to a new study. ...

15

Parenthood after Primary Infertility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the literature on the experience of parenting after primary infertility and describes construction and initial testing of an instrument for assessing characteristics of this understudied population. (Contains 52 references and 4 tables.) (GCP)

Frances-Fischer, Jana E.; Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.

2003-01-01

16

State Infertility Insurance Laws  

MedlinePLUS

... tubes that are not a result of voluntary sterilization; or Abnormal male factors contributing to the infertility. ... or other assisted reproductive techniques, reversal of a tubal ligation, a vasectomy, or any other method of sterilization. ...

17

Ovarian Drilling for Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... Website of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Ovarian drilling for infertility This fact sheet was developed ... modified wedge resection, and other names. What is ovarian drilling and how does it work? Women with ...

18

Causes of Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... elements can lead to infertility. Frequent use of laptops near the testicles 4 as well as saunas ... D, Komaroff E. Increase in scrotal temperature in laptop computer users. Human Reproduction 2004. Available at http:// ...

19

Psychosexual responses to infertility.  

PubMed

Clearly, infertility is one of several gynecologic conditions that may have a profound effect on the psychological and sexual status of its victim. It is obvious from indepth discussions with many infertile couples that they want their physician to help them recognize and deal with these problems. Unfortunately, we are often ill-prepared to meet such a request. Hopefully, however, the next several years will see an increase in the systematic and scientific study of such problems and their solutions, thus providing us with a rational and proven method of dealing with these problems. PMID:6488617

Keye, W R

1984-09-01

20

Managing Endometriosis Associated Infertility  

PubMed Central

Endometriosis is associated with infertility; however the etiology of this association is unclear, thus complicating management. Several mechanisms of pathogenesis have been proposed, however no one theory has been implicated. Medical therapy can be helpful in managing symptoms, but does not improve pregnancy rates. The role of surgical treatment remains controversial. There is little data regarding ovulation induction treatments for endometriosis only, while superovulation with intrauterine insemination has shown modest improvement in pregnancy rates in women who may have endometriosis. The most effective treatment for endometriosis-associated infertility is in-vitro fertilization. Recent focus on proteomics and genetics of the disease may aid in optimizing treatment options. PMID:22031261

Senapati, Suneeta; Barnhart, Kurt

2012-01-01

21

Treating infertility in Roman Catholics.  

PubMed

This article sets out to assess Roman Catholic doctrine on the medical treatment of infertility, and the implications of that doctrine for infertile couples. Children are vitally important for a Catholic marriage to be perceived as successful. Couples wishing to seek medical treatment for infertility may experience enhanced stress due to restrictive Catholic doctrine, which prohibits the use of several modern treatments. PMID:8546940

Fryday, M

22

Infertility: Medical and Social Choices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report illustrates a range of options for Congressional action in nine principal areas of public policy related to infertility: (1) collecting data on reproductive health; (2) preventing infertility; (3) information to inform and protect consumers; (4) providing access to infertility services; (5) reproductive health of veterans; (6) transfer…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

23

Parenting after Infertility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

Olshansky, Ellen

2009-01-01

24

Fertility and Infertility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this report, emphasis is placed on major research developments in the reproductive sciences, their impact on the health of individuals as well as on that of society, and on current trends that may provide new opportunities for future research in fertility and infertility. In the first section, major developments in the reproductive sciences are…

Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; And Others

25

Lycopene and male infertility  

PubMed Central

Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inflicted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneficial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility—lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4–8 mg of lycopene daily for 3–12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility. PMID:24675655

Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Prashast, Pallavi

2014-01-01

26

Preconception interventions in infertile couples  

PubMed Central

Background: Preconception interventions in infertile couples can increase the chance of pregnancy and lower its complications. The success in infertility treatment and achieving a successful pregnancy is of great importance among infertile couples compared to others. This study has tried to investigate necessary preconception interventions before beginning of infertility treatment cycle among infertile couples. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 268 individuals presenting to fertility clinics (Moshtagh and Shahid beheshty) across the city of Isfahan, Iran. Simple sampling method was used. Questionnaire and patients’ medical records were used to collect data. Descriptive and analytic statistical methods and SPSS software were used for analysis. Results: The results showed that the interventions related to diseases treatment and prescription of folic acid before the beginning of infertility treatment were complete for most of the subject (47.06% and 79.9% respectively), but referral for genetics counseling had not been conducted in most of the cases (98.9%). Specific interventions in relation with the infertility treatment before beginning the treatment cycle had been conducted in 50% of the subjects. Conclusion: The results of this study showed a weakness concerning necessary preconception interventions before beginning of infertility treatment cycle in most of the studied subjects. With regard to the effect of preconception interventions on outcome of infertility treatment, and with consideration of high importance of pregnancy success in infertile couples, paying more attention to conduct this manner is necessary. PMID:25250367

Nekuei, Nafisehsadat; Kazemi, Ashraf; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

2014-01-01

27

Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Y chromosome infertility On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... definitions Reviewed January 2009 What is Y chromosome infertility? Y chromosome infertility is a condition that affects ...

28

Poetry Therapy and Infertility Counseling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various authors have recognized the significance of grief among clients who are infertile. Poetry therapy offers unique opportunities for clients to crystallize and communicate their thoughts and feelings about this painful issue. Examples of poetry used to illustrate the various stages of grieving reflect the author's personal experience of infertility.

Michelle Emery Blake

2002-01-01

29

A Biopsychosocial Theory of Infertility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Briefly reviews the literature on infertility and its emotional, physical, existential, and relational effects on individuals, couples, and families. Life crisis and biopsychosocial theories are discussed as they apply to persons struggling with infertility issues. In addition, stage models derived from a biopsychosocial perspective are presented.…

Gerrity, Deborah A.

2001-01-01

30

Strategies for Counseling Infertile Couples.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents specific intervention strategies that may serve to reinforce infertility experience as opportunity for personal and marital growth. Concludes through counseling clients may complete much of the emotional work required to reach a point of resolution and acceptance of their infertility. (Author/ABL)

Daniluk, Judith C.

1991-01-01

31

Microsurgical management of male infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The introduction of microsurgical techniques has revolutionized the treatment of male infertility. As a result of technical advances and innovation over the past 10–15 years, previously infertile couples are now able to conceive naturally or to parent their own biological children with the aid of assisted reproductive technologies. This article reviews the indications, techniques, and outcomes of the various microsurgical

Marc Goldstein; Cigdem Tanrikut

2006-01-01

32

Ozone Therapy in Female Infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this work was to study the effect of ozone in the treatment of female infertility of inflammatory aetiology. We administered ozone to 56 patients (50 out of which were infertile), who had previously unsuccessfully undergone various kinds of treatments for inflammatory diseases of the genitalia,. Ozone therapy in the concentrations used by us has good curative effect

Rajani Chandra-D; Ronald D'Mello

33

Stigma: The hidden burden of infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infertility is experienced by 5 million U.S. couples, some of whom perceive it a stigmatizing condition. Recent technological innovations have created a multitude of medical interventions for those infertile individuals who can financially afford them. For some infertile women, those interventions also transform infertility from a private pain to a public, prolonged crisis. Our research focuses on 25 U.S. women

Linda M. Whiteford; Lois Gonzalez

1995-01-01

34

Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility?  

MedlinePLUS

... Website of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility? This fact sheet was ... with The Society of Reproductive Surgeons What is endometriosis? When the tissue that normally lines the inside ...

35

What Infertility Treatments Are Available?  

MedlinePLUS

... Males Fertility Treatments for Females Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Treatments for Diseases That Cause Infertility Other FAQs ... medications to embryo implantation through assisted reproductive technology (ART). There are treatments that are specifically for men ...

36

Uterine fibroids associated with infertility.  

PubMed

In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the contributory role of uterine fibroids to infertility. The prevalence of these tumors increases with age, which becomes significant as more women are delaying childbearing. Therefore, fibroids and infertility frequently occur together. Treatment varies with fibroid location and size. The various methods of treatment include open myomectomy, laparoscopic or robot-assisted myomectomy, medical treatment, uterine artery embolization and magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery. While there is a general consensus on the treatment of submucosal fibroids, the management of intramural fibroids in the infertility patient remains controversial. This paper aims to review and summarize the current literature in regards to the approach to uterine fibroids in the infertile patient. PMID:25482490

Heertum, Kristin Van; Barmat, Larry

2014-11-01

37

[Studies on male infertility: 6. Clinical observation on male infertility].  

PubMed

Results of clinical observations of male infertility cases seen in S eoul, Korea, National University's Department of Urology between January 1955 and December 1969 are presented. 920 infertile men were seen, repr esenting 3.2% of 36,071 urological outpatients, and 3.9% of 30,125 male outpatients seen during this 15-year period. The number of male inferti lity cases has increased from 10 (1.09%) cases in 1955 to 166 (18.04%) cases in 1969. Primary sterility was found in 78% of the 920 infertile cases in 1969. Primary sterility was found in 22%. The ages of the infertile men ranged from 24 to 61 years (mean=35); the ages of their sp ouses ranged from 24 to 49 years (mean=32). Infertile marital life ranged from 1 to 40 years (mean=7). The duration of infertility cases seen between 1955 and 1959 was 10 years, between 1960 and 1964, 8 years; and between 1965 and 1969, 6 years. There was no close correlation between incidence of infertility and occupation (290 cases were white-collar workers and 414 were physical laborers). Etiological classifications indicate that 40% of the male infertility cases were due to faulty spermatogenesis, 21% due to faulty transportation, 14% due to faulty seminal composition, .5% due to faulty ejaculation, and 24% from unknown causes. In 840 cases where semen was analyzed, 51% had azoospermia, 34% had oligospermia, and 7% had normospermia. In 41 cases analysis revealed normal semen, however, no children have been conceived in 3 years. Testicular biopsies of azoospermias revealed 30% hypospermatogenesis, 27% germinal aplasia, 20% germinal cell arrest, 11% efferent duct occlusion, 9% peritubular fibrosis, and 3% normospermatogenesis. There was no significant difference in average frequency of sexual intercourse between fertile and infertile couples. Medical treatment combined with various drugs (e.g., testosterone, vitamedine) for 3-12 months was most effective in oligospermia (52 out of 101 cases) and azoospermia (13 out of 126 cases). In 22 cases of bilateral epididymal obstruction treated by epidiymovasostomy, viable sperm appeared in the ejaculates of 9. Vasovasostomy performed on 85 previously vasectomized men yielded successful results in 62 of 71 azoospermia cases in which the semen could be repeatedly examined. PMID:12177911

Lee, H Y

1970-12-01

38

No Link Seen Between Celiac Disease, Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... enable JavaScript. No Link Seen Between Celiac Disease, Infertility Researcher says findings should reassure women with the ... 9, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Celiac Disease Female Infertility Women's Health TUESDAY, Dec. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- ...

39

Preparing for Pregnancy and Infertility Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... Reproductive Health Preconception Care Preparing for Pregnancy and Infertility Treatment " When you go through something like In- ... community. What you may change as you begin infertility treatment. Use of medications and treatment (prescription, over- ...

40

Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... PATIENT FACT SHEET Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility When a couple has trouble having a baby, ... to find out what may be causing your infertility. Semen analysis Semen analysis is probably the first ...

41

Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... in Reproductive Medicine Should Celebrities Come Clean About Infertility? From: Headlines in Reproductive Medicine Understanding the Worldwide ... societies. Latest Additions: Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility Robotic surgery The Intrauterine Device (IUD): A Long- ...

42

Rectourethral fistula: a rare cause of infertility.  

PubMed

Rectourethral fistulas are rare, and infertility due to rectal ejaculation is extremely rare. We report a case of congenital rectourethral fistula presenting as infertility due to rectal ejaculation. PMID:3787902

Hershman, M; Kallmeyer, V; Wood, C B; Williams, G

1986-11-01

43

Statistical Issues and Methods inStatistical Issues and Methods in Infertility ResearchInfertility Research  

E-print Network

Statistical Issues and Methods inStatistical Issues and Methods in Infertility ResearchInfertility. Schieve, E. Schisterman #12;Main statistical issues: overview · General structure in infertility data · Correlated data methods · Further methodology development #12;Structure in infertility data Hierarchical

Stephens, Matthew

44

Coping with infertility: a body-mind group intervention programme for infertile couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The recognition of the distressing character of infertility diagnosis and treatment has led to the development of several psychosocial interventions for infertile couples. At the Leuven University Fertility Centre, a body- mind marital group intervention was developed to help infertile couples cope with the distress related to infertility. METHODS AND RESULTS: This treatment programme was originally adapted from a

G. M. D. Lemmens; M. Vervaeke; P. Enzlin; E. Bakelants; D. Vanderschueren; T. D'Hooghe; K. Demyttenaere

2004-01-01

45

Ectopic pregnancy after infertility treatment  

PubMed Central

Early pregnancy complications are more common in women who conceive after infertility treatment. Most of these occur before 12 weeks of gestation and include miscarriage, vaginal bleeding, intrauterine hematoma, vanishing twin, and ectopic pregnancy (EP). The incidence of EPs following infertility treatment is much higher compared with that in spontaneous pregnancies. The occurrence of an EP is very distressing to an infertile couple, who has lots of hopes pinned on the treatment outcome, especially because of the cost incurred and the physical and mental trauma both have gone through during the treatment process. The association between infertility and EP is complex, as it can be a consequence of infertility as well as a cause. The two principal risk factors for an EP are genital tract infections and tubal surgeries. Though several etiologies are proposed, but patients with tubal factor infertility are at an increased risk of an EP. Earlier diagnosis of EP helps to improve prognosis and optimize subsequent fertility. It is pivotal to evaluate the likelihood of subsequent occurrence of an EP and be too vigilant when treating. The correct choice of the treatment modality should be made to prevent the recurrence. The early prediction of the pregnancy outcome therefore has great importance for both the couple and clinician. Today with the help of sensitive beta human chorionic gonadotropin (?-hCG) assays and transvaginal sonography, one can diagnose an EP prior to symptoms, and conservative treatment for the preservation of the fallopian tube is possible. Conservative management in the form of expectant and medical management should be considered as a first-line treatment modality, provided that the overall clinical picture suggests that it is safe to do so. If not, laparoscopic management of EPs appears to be the favored approach of management as compared to laparotomy. PMID:23162353

Patil, Madhuri

2012-01-01

46

Infertility: A Crisis with No Resolution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses helpful ways for mental health counselors to work with infertile clients, explaining nature of infertility, psychological crisis it provokes, common reactions of infertile clients, and strategies to help clients cope. Discusses specific strategies for assessing clients' potential for suicide or self-destructive acts and improving their…

Butler, Robert R.; Koraleski, Stephanie

1990-01-01

47

Infertility and Life Satisfaction among Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from a random sample of 580 midwestern women, the authors explore the association between lifetime infertility and life satisfaction. Past research shows lower life satisfaction among those seeking help for infertility. The authors find no direct effects of lifetime infertility, regardless of perception of a problem, on life…

McQuillan, Julia; Stone, Rosalie A. Torres; Greil, Arthur L.

2007-01-01

48

Sex and Intimacy among Infertile Couples.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Infertility is a widespread health problem in the United States, affecting anywhere from 10 to 15 percent and perhaps even a greater percentage of U.S. couples. Infertility can have far-reaching effects on life satisfaction, well-being, and psychological adjustment. This paper presents an analysis of sex and intimacy among infertile couples based…

Greil, Arthur; And Others

49

Childlessness: Strategies for Coping with Infertility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the coping strategies adopted by 50 infertile men and women. All interviewed had sought medical help, and many became knowledgeable about reproduction and infertility. Redefining the problem and managing negative concepts about infertility were other coping strategies. Seeking social support, positive identities, and other ways of meeting…

Woollett, Anne

1985-01-01

50

Infertility: An Unanticipated and Prolonged Life Crisis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews literature on infertility with a focus on myths and misunderstandings about the causes of infertility; a description of the crisis of infertility including common psychological responses; the additional psychological complexity introduced by medical procedures and reproductive technology; and suggestions for mental health counselors.…

Forrest, Linda; Gilbert, Mary S.

1992-01-01

51

Genital tract infections and infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infectious agents can impair various important human functions, including reproduction. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites are able to interfere with the reproductive function in both sexes. Infections of male genito-urinary tract account for about 15% of the case of male infertility. Infections can affect different sites of the male reproductive tract, such as the testis, epididymis and male accessory sex

Donatella Pellati; Ioannis Mylonakis; Giulio Bertoloni; Cristina Fiore; Alessandra Andrisani; Guido Ambrosini; Decio Armanini

2008-01-01

52

Genetic causes of male infertility.  

PubMed

Male infertility, affecting around half of the couples with a problem to get pregnant, is a very heterogeneous condition. Part of patients are having a defect in spermatogenesis of which the underlying causes (including genetic ones) remain largely unknown. The only genetic tests routinely used in the diagnosis of male infertility are the analyses for the presence of Yq microdeletions and/or chromosomal abnormalities. Various other single gene or polygenic defects have been proposed to be involved in male fertility. Yet, their causative effect often remains to be proven. The recent evolution in the development of whole genome-based techniques may help in clarifying the role of genes and other genetic factors involved in spermatogenesis and spermatogenesis defects. PMID:24768008

Stouffs, Katrien; Seneca, Sara; Lissens, Willy

2014-05-01

53

Fibroids, Infertility and Laparoscopic Myomectomy  

PubMed Central

Objective: To review the literature and summarize the available evidence about the relationship of fibroids with infertility and to review the role of laparoscopic myomectomy in infertility. Materials and Methods: Medline, PubMed, and Cochrane Databases were searched for articles published between 1980 and 2010. Results: Fertility outcomes are decreased in women with submucosal fibroids, and myomectomy is of value. Subserosal fibroids do not affect fertility outcomes, and removal may not confer benefit. Intramural fibroids appear to decrease fertility, but the results of therapy are unclear. Although pregnancy rates for women with leiomyomata, managed endoscopically, are similar to those after laparotomy, there is a risk of uterine rupture. The risk is essentially unknown. Finally, the risk of recurrence seems higher after laparoscopic myomectomy compared to laparotomy. Conclusions: Laparoscopic myomectomy, when performed by an experienced surgeon, can be considered a safe technique, with an extremely low failure rate and good results in terms of the outcome of pregnancy. PMID:22442534

Desai, Pankaj; Patel, Purvi

2011-01-01

54

The Infertility Experience: Biopsychosocial Effects and Suggestions for Counselors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Infertility affects many individuals and couples. This article begins with a case study of a couple who have experienced infertility yet do not identify infertility as their presenting problem. Clients and counselors alike often overlook infertility. This article offers an overview of the biology of infertility and its psychological and…

Watkins, Kathryn J.; Baldo, Tracy D.

2004-01-01

55

A survey of equine infertility  

E-print Network

for which they are bred and raised. All the above factors either singly or in combination have brought about reduced foal crop. The objectives of this study are: 1. To examme the various causes of infertility in inares and the use of hormones and other... year study at the Krempe Stud (Germany) where he examined 972 mares. He classified 60 percent as sterile due to polycystic degeneration of ovaries, folli- cular atresia, delayed ovulation, anovulatory estrus and silent heat. He was emphatic...

Balasubramanian, R. K. R

1966-01-01

56

Sexual satisfaction in male infertility.  

PubMed

Infertility is proposed to be a continuing stressor for couples suffering from involuntary childlessness. A long duration of the desire for a child and, correspondingly, a longer period of diagnostic and treatment procedures could have a negative impact on sexual satisfaction, thus leading to an unfavorable psychological circuit. The present evaluation should clarify the state of sexual satisfaction and relationships, with relevant parameters in 68 men with fertility problems, of couples with involuntary childlessness. Subjects reported relatively high average levels of present sexual satisfaction with only nonsignificant lower scores (p = .08) compared to recalled sexual satisfaction prior to diagnosis of infertility. Multiple regression analyses revealed that a positive age difference between men and their spouses (p = .042) and a higher weekly coitus frequency (p = .002) were the only significant parameters associated independently with higher sexual satisfaction. Neither the age of partners, attitudes toward sexuality, treatment duration, duration of the partnership and the duration of the desire for a child, nor andrological findings had an influence on present sexual satisfaction. The results propose that treatment duration and duration of the desire for a child may not necessarily be connected to lowered sexual satisfaction in infertile males and that coitus frequency seems to be an indicator of sexual satisfaction in this patient group. PMID:10407644

Müller, M J; Schilling, G; Haidl, G

1999-01-01

57

Eastern medicine approaches to male infertility.  

PubMed

Male factor is a common cause of infertility and the male partner must be systematically evaluated in the workup of every infertile couple. Various Eastern medical strategies have been tried with variable success. This article describes the clinical effects of Eastern medicine approaches including acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, massage, yoga, tai chi, and qi gong, which could improve the sperm parameters and motility, genital inflammatory conditions, as well as immune system disorders, sexual dysfunction, and varicocele. Acupuncture reduces inflammation, increases sperm motility, improves semen parameters, modulates the immune system, and improves sexual and ejaculatory dysfunction in male infertility. The clinical effects may be mediated via activation of somatic afferent nerves innervating the skin and muscle. Chinese herbal medicines may also exert helpful effects in male infertility, and it is worth noting that some herbal drugs may result in male infertility. Massage also exerts positive effects in male infertility. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of clinical effects are unclear. Tai chi, qi gong, and yoga have not been investigated in male infertility, but it has been reported to regulate endocrine and central or autonomic nervous systems. In conclusion, Eastern medical approaches have beneficial on reproductive effects in male infertility. However, future well-designed, randomized, clinical control trials are needed to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and mechanisms of Eastern medical approaches for male infertility. PMID:23775386

Hu, Min; Zhang, Yuehui; Ma, Hongli; Ng, Ernest H Y; Wu, Xiao-Ke

2013-07-01

58

Beyond the Mechanics of Infertility: Perspectives on the Social Psychology of Infertility and Involuntary Childlessness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the social and social psychological implications of infertility and involuntary childlessness. Examines the clinical and popular literature on the correlates and causes of infertility and the social psychological consequences of infertility. Suggests ways that family practitioners and researchers might overcome some of the limitations.…

Matthews, Anne Martin; Matthews, Ralph

1986-01-01

59

Genetics Home Reference: Sensorineural deafness and male infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Sensorineural deafness and male infertility On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... April 2010 What is sensorineural deafness and male infertility? Sensorineural deafness and male infertility is a condition ...

60

Genetics Home Reference: CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... April 2010 What is CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility? CATSPER1 -related nonsyndromic male infertility is a condition ...

61

Request for Infertility Treatment Expense Reimbursement Employee Name: ____________________________ Dartmouth ID: ______________  

E-print Network

Request for Infertility Treatment Expense Reimbursement Employee Name-mail #12;Information about the Infertility Treatment Reimbursement Benefit: Description of Benefit of infertility treatments and associated services. This benefit is available to regular benefits

Myers, Lawrence C.

62

Domestic violence in Iranian infertile women  

PubMed Central

Background: Millions of men and women suffer from infertility worldwide. In many cultures, infertile women are at risk of social and emotional problems. Infertility may affect the public health in many countries. Domestic violence is the intentional use of physical force, power or threat against oneself, another person or another group or community which leads to injury, death, mental harm, lack of development or deprivation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of domestic violence against infertile women who referred to the infertility centres of Tehran, Iran in 2011. Methods: This was cross- sectional descriptive study conducted on 400 infertile women who were selected through convenient sampling method. The questionnaire used in this study included two sections: a demographic section with questions about demographic characteristics of the infertile women and their husbands; and the domestic violence questionnaire with questions about physical, emotional and sexual violence. Data were analysed by SPSS16; descriptive statistics, Spearman’s test, t- test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression were used for data analysis. Results: Four hundred women with the average age of 30.50 ± 6.16 years participated in the study; of whom, 34.7% experienced domestic violence physical violence (5.3%), emotional violence (74.3%) and sexual violence (47.3%). Domestic violence was significantly associated with unwanted marriage, number of IVFs, drug abuse, emotional status of the women, smoking and addiction or drug abuse of the spouse, mental and physical diseases of the husband (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Many of the current problems in this society, particularly in families are due to the transition of the society from a traditional model to a modern one. The majority of the infertile women experience violence in Iran. Domestic violence against infertile women is a problem that should not be ignored. Clinicians should identify abused women. Providing counseling services to women in infertility treatment centers is suggested to prevent domestic violence against infertile women.

Sheikhan, Zohre; Ozgoli, Giti; Azar, Mahyar; Alavimajd, Hamid

2014-01-01

63

The psychological dimensions of infertility.  

PubMed

Psychological reactions of childless couples applying to an adoption agency are examined. Infertility can be a developmental life crisis and may be experienced as a narcissistic trauma, resolution of which depends upon individual character structure. Intrapsychic tasks include acceptance and working though of grief for the loss of the self-ideal, restitution of body-image deficiency, and assessment of the importance of parenthood as a developmental phase. An adaptive resolution is seen as a necessary condition for successful adoptive parenting. PMID:7425096

Kraft, A D; Palombo, J; Mitchell, D; Dean, C; Meyers, S; Schmidt, A W

1980-10-01

64

Uterine artery embolization and infertility.  

PubMed

As the acceptance of uterine artery embolization as a treatment option for uterine fibroids grows among patients and physicians, it appears that new questions are being asked about the patient selection criteria used for this procedure. In particular, patients with infertility issues or concerns about preserving fertility after fibroid treatment are often being evaluated for uterine artery embolization. This article was prepared to summarize the available literature regarding fertility preservation after both myomectomy and uterine artery embolization and to provide the reader with an algorithm for evaluating these patients and making literature-based treatment decisions. PMID:17145479

Domenico, Louis; Siskin, Gary P

2006-03-01

65

Is Infertility Associated with Childhood Autism?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Concerns persist about a possible link between infertility and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Interpretation of existing studies is limited by racial/ethnic homogeneity of study populations and other factors. Using a case-control design, we evaluated infertility history and treatment documented in medical records of members of Kaiser…

Grether, Judith K.; Qian, Yinge; Croughan, Mary S.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Schembri, Michael; Camarano, Loretta; Croen, Lisa A.

2013-01-01

66

Pastoral Care to the Infertile Couple.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the crisis of infertility in the context of the biological or instinctual, cultural, and religious root of parenting. A therapeutic approach to the problem of infertility suggests that pastoral care should make a thorough diagnosis of the correlation between the motivation for parenting, role expectations in the social and…

Louw, D. J.

67

Choices and Motivations of Infertile Couples.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Infertile couples' (N=131) consideration of options for dealing with infertility (medical help, adoption, fostering, alternative medicine, and focusing on other life goals) is studied. Options were related to specific motivations including altruistic motives for adoption or foster care. Results, timing of choices, and motivations are discussed.…

van Balen, Frank; Verdurmen, Jacqueline; Ketting, Evert

1997-01-01

68

Consequences of infertility in developing countries.  

PubMed

Infertility affects more than 10% of the world's population. In developing countries, there are severe social, psychological and economic consequences for infertile men and women. All of the cited references are compiled from primary peer-reviewed research articles that were conducted through one-to-one interviews or focus groups in countries of developing regions, such as Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The following paper seeks to raise awareness of the consequences of infertility in developing nations and identify infertility as an under-observed, but significant public health issue. It is proposed that education programmes tailored to each society's specific religious beliefs and grounded traditions must be implemented in order to reverse the social stigma, detrimental psychological effects, and loss of economic security that results from infertility. PMID:23327901

Rouchou, Brittany

2013-05-01

69

The comfort and discomfort of infertility.  

PubMed

Infertility has been described as a life crisis by many authors. Nursing has a major role in assisting couples through the infertility diagnosis and treatment regimen. The role of nurses is expanding as technologic advances expand and families are created using donor eggs, donor sperm, expanded male infertility techniques, host uteri, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. A framework for nurses to use to provide comfort in infertility is provided, as are suggestions regarding nursing interventions to assist infertile patients through the physical, social, psychospiritual, and environmental contexts. The couple using advanced reproductive technologies proceeds through the stages of grief to, it is hoped, resolution. Kolcaba's matrix can be used as a framework for nursing interventions to move couples along the continuum of ease, relief, and transcendence. PMID:8656308

Schoener, C J; Krysa, L W

1996-02-01

70

Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... 35, the chance a woman can get pregnant drops greatly after age 35 (and especially after age ... morning to see if the ovaries are releasing eggs FSH and clomid challenge test Antimullerian hormone testing ( ...

71

Social and Cultural Aspects of Infertility in Mozambique.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The sociocultural aspects of infertility among members of the matrilineal ethnic group Macua are studied. Strategies applied by infertile women, the use of traditional healers versus modern hospital, and explanations given for infertility are presented. Solutions attempted, social consequences of infertility, and recommendations for culturally…

Gerrits, Trudie

1997-01-01

72

Infertility and psychological distress: A critical review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay reviews the literature on the social psychological impact of infertility, paying special attention to the relationship between gender and the infertility experience. It is convenient to divide the literature into articles which explore the possibility that infertility may have psychological causes (Psychogenic Hypothesis) and those which examine the psychological consequences of infertility (Psychological Consequences Hypothesis). The psychogenic hypothesis

Arthur L. Greil

1997-01-01

73

Genetic male infertility and mutation of CATSPER ion channels  

Microsoft Academic Search

A clinically significant proportion of couples experience difficulty in conceiving a child. In about half of these cases male infertility is the cause and often genetic factors are involved. Despite advances in clinical diagnostics ?50% of male infertility cases remain idiopathic. Based on this, further analysis of infertile males is required to identify new genetic factors involved in male infertility.

Michael S Hildebrand; Matthew R Avenarius; Marc Fellous; Yuzhou Zhang; Nicole C Meyer; Jana Auer; Catherine Serres; Kimia Kahrizi; Hossein Najmabadi; Jacques S Beckmann; Richard J H Smith

2010-01-01

74

[The multiple interactions between infertility and sexuality].  

PubMed

After investigating into literature and clinical experience, we shall line out in this study 4 types of interactions between sexuality and infertility: sexual causes to feminine (vaginism, with and without heavy dyspareunia) or masculine (impotency, ante-portas ejaculation, anejaculation, dysejaculation), infertility; influence of tests and of treatments for infertility on sexual life; influence of infertility on sexuality focusing on the various ambiguous feelings (of culpability, inferiority, aggressivity, passivity); and last, the psychological and sexual interactions with medical assisted procreation, reinforcing the sexual separation of man and woman if the body is considered a machine. Psychosomatic guidance of the couple during these steps (with reassurance as the being helped conception) will allow maintaining on removing sexual attraction. PMID:7951622

Mimoun, S

1993-03-01

75

Investigation and Management of Male Infertility  

PubMed Central

Infertility is rarely due only to the male or female partner. Usually each partner's fertility is in some way diminished. Male infertility may be related to deficiencies in spermatogenesis or sperm transport. Accurate diagnosis can be achieved only by a careful evaluation including precise semen analyses and, where indicated, gonadotropin and other assays. Treatment may be specific for physical or endocrine deficits, but is often empirical. Factors other than the sperm count, such as emission of sperm mainly at the beginning of ejaculation, low seminal volume with good quality sperm, excessive seminal viscosity, pyospermia, and idiopathic oligospermia, may be responsible for infertility. These may respond to simple measures. Understanding and empathy for the infertile couple is of the utmost importance. PMID:21283272

Vallely, John F.

1983-01-01

76

Endometriosis and Infertility: Can Surgery Help?  

MedlinePLUS

... Website of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Endometriosis and Infertility: Can Surgery Help? This fact sheet ... with The Society of Reproductive Surgeons What is endometriosis? When the tissue that normally lines the inside ...

77

Psychological and ethical implications related to infertility.  

PubMed

Being a parent is deeply demanding and one of the most important events in life; parents experience the deepening of human relationships with their partner, within their families, and in society, and moreover the fundamental relationship between parent and child. Every medical, social, and political effort must be made to prevent infertility but also to offer infertile couples the best diagnostic and therapeutic paths. Understanding the suffering of the couple and their families prevents and helps ease the possible psychological and social complications of infertility. Therefore, infertility concerns not only biomedical sciences but also psychological and social ones-ethics and law-in their combined efforts to identify areas of understanding and of research for solutions while respecting the dignity of the couple and unborn child. The Catholic Church offers an ongoing contribution through dialogue in looking for ethical principles guiding scientific and medical research respectful of the true life of human beings. PMID:24156989

Minucci, Daria

2013-12-01

78

A comprehensive approach to treating infertility.  

PubMed

Infertility frequently provokes a life crisis that involves the loss of self-esteem and adaptive functioning. Drawing on clinical experience in counseling infertile individuals and couples and leading support groups for such clients, the author analyzes this crisis in terms of the emotional stages experienced by the individual and defines the therapeutic role of the social worker in guiding clients through the tasks of resolution. PMID:3972312

Batterman, R

1985-01-01

79

Use of Diagnostic Testing to Detect Infertility  

PubMed Central

The evaluation of the infertile male continues to be a clinical challenge of increasing significance with considerable emotional and financial burdens. Many physiological, environmental and genetic factors are implicated; however, the etiology of suboptimal semen quality is poorly understood. This review focuses on the diagnostic testing currently available, as well as future directions that will be helpful for the practicing urologist and other clinicians to fully evaluate the infertile male. PMID:21088937

Hwang, Kathleen; Lipshultz, Larry I.; Lamb, Dolores J.

2011-01-01

80

Efficacy of treatment for unexplained infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To analyze the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of alternative treatments for unexplained infertility.Design: Retrospective analysis of 45 published reports.Setting: Clinical practices.Patient(s): Couples who met criteria for unexplained infertility. Women with Stage I or Stage II endometriosis were included.Intervention(s): Observation; clomiphene citrate (CC); gonadotropins (hMG); IUI; and GIFT and IVF.Main Outcome Measure(s): Clinical pregnancy rate.Result(s): Combined pregnancy rates per initiated cycle,

DavidS Guzick; MichaelW Sullivan; G. David Adamson; MarcelleI Cedars; RichardJ Falk; EdwinP Peterson; MichaelP Steinkampf

1998-01-01

81

Psychological interactions with infertility among women.  

PubMed

Despite the fact that various studies have demonstrated the importance of the mind-body connection and fertility, the psychosocial aspects of infertility have not been adequately addressed. Fertility treatments, ranging from medical monitoring, to hormonal remedies and in vitro fertilization (IVF), are both a physical and emotional burden on women and their partners. Psychological factors such as depression, state-anxiety, and stress-induced changes in heart rate and cortisol are predictive of a decreased probability of achieving a viable pregnancy. A couple that is trying to conceive will undoubtedly experience feelings of frustration and disappointment if a pregnancy is not easily achieved. However, if the difficulties progress and the man and or woman are labelled as having fertility problems, then this may result in a severe insult to self-esteem, body image, and self-assessed masculinity or femininity. Three types of relationships have been hypothesized between psychological factors and infertility. These include: (1) psychological factors are risk factors of subsequent infertility; (2) the experience of the diagnosis and treatment of infertility causes subsequent psychological distress; (3) a reciprocal relationship exists between psychological factors and infertility. The evidence for these three relationships is reviewed and an alternative approach to the treatment of infertility including stress evaluation that precedes or is concurrent to fertility treatment is suggested. PMID:15541845

Cwikel, J; Gidron, Y; Sheiner, E

2004-12-01

82

Gestational surrogacy: Viewpoint of Iranian infertile women  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Surrogacy is a popular form of assisted reproductive technology of which only gestational form is approved by most of the religious scholars in Iran. Little evidence exists about the Iranian infertile women's viewpoint regarding gestational surrogacy. AIM: To assess the viewpoint of Iranian infertile women toward gestational surrogacy. SETTING AND DESIGN: This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study sample consisted of 238 infertile women who were selected using the eligible sampling method. Data were collected by using a researcher developed questionnaire that included 25 items based on a five-point Likert scale. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Data analysis was conducted by SPSS statistical software using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Viewpoint of 214 women (89.9%) was positive. 36 (15.1%) women considered gestational surrogacy against their religious beliefs; 170 women (71.4%) did not assume the commissioning couple as owners of the baby; 160 women (67.2%) said that children who were born through surrogacy would better not know about it; and 174 women (73.1%) believed that children born through surrogacy will face mental problems. CONCLUSION: Iranian infertile women have positive viewpoint regarding the surrogacy. However, to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile women, further efforts are needed. PMID:22346081

Rahmani, Azad; Sattarzadeh, Nilofar; Gholizadeh, Leila; Sheikhalipour, Zahra; Allahbakhshian, Atefeh; Hassankhani, Hadi

2011-01-01

83

Attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Surrogacy arrangements are multifaceted in nature, involving multiple controversial aspects and engaging ethical, moral, psychological and social issues. Successful treatment in reproductive medicine is strongly based on the mutual agreement of both partners, especially in Iran where men often make the final decision for health-related problems of this nature. AIM: The aim of the following study is to assess the attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy. SETTING AND DESIGN: This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Hamadan university of medical sciences, Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study sample consisted of 150 infertile couples selected using a systematic randomized method. Data collection was based on responses to a questionnaire consisting of 22 questions. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: P <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. RESULTS: While 33.3% of men and 43.3% of women surveyed insisted on not using surrogacy, the overall attitudes toward surrogacy were positive (53.3% of women and 54.6% of men surveyed). CONCLUSION: Although, there was not a significant difference between the overall positive attitudes of infertile women and men toward surrogacy, the general attitude toward using this method is not strongly positive. Therefore, further efforts are required to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile couples. PMID:24829531

Kian, Ensiyeh Mohebbi; Riazi, Hedieh; Bashirian, Saeid

2014-01-01

84

Secondary infertility and the aging male, overview  

PubMed Central

Introduction Old men preparing themselves for marriage late in their lives might face infertility. Infertility in this group of men should be considered from a wider perspective, as they face any age–related health troubles that include, but are not limited to, androgen deficiency and psychological disorders that impede early conception. This review aims to shed light on the proper approach to this minority of secondarily infertile men. Material and methods A comprehensive electronic English literature search was conducted, using various medical websites and books, for the factors that cause infertility in senior fathers. The physiology of geriatric males, together with their common comorbidities, were discussed. Results Old men presenting with secondary infertility should be approached differently. Aging, itself, has a significant impact on male sexual function, sperm parameters, and fertility; all of which contribute to poor fecundability, decreased fertilizing capacity, increased time to pregnancy, increased rate of DNA damage, high abortion rates and increased prevalence of fetal developmental failures. The complexity and the unknowns of the aging male physiology, together with the interaction of obstinate diseases the patient might have, make the issue very difficult to tackle. Conclusions Management should include the conventional way of treating young sufferers and further target the underlying causes, if known, along with the provision of geriatric, psychologic, and andrologic support. PMID:25140235

Al–Hawsawi, Khalid; Motair, Wael; Bawa, Abdallah Makhloof

2014-01-01

85

How Common is Male Infertility, and What Are Its Causes?  

MedlinePLUS

... Trials Resources and Publications How common is male infertility, and what are its causes? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Infertility is defined clinically in women and men who ...

86

An Investigation into Steroids and One Couple's Experience with Infertility  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This case is an investigation into the effect of steroids on infertility. Students learn about sperm counts, sperm lab analysis, infertility diagnoses, and how to put together an informative health pamphlet.

Thomas, Megan

87

What Treatment Options Are Available for Male Infertility?  

MedlinePLUS

... Publications What treatment options are available for male infertility? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... deliver a live-born infant, in most cases, infertility has no other outward symptoms. The evaluation of ...

88

Roles and Role Conflict of Women in Infertile Couples.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the experience of role conflict for women in infertile couples. Findings lead to an understanding of infertility as part of an interactional system for dealing with potentially intolerable sources of role conflict. (Author)

Allison, Janet R.

1979-01-01

89

A PROGESTOGEN (CHLORMADINONE ACETATE = CAP) FOR CYCLE CONTROL AND INFERTILITY  

E-print Network

A PROGESTOGEN (CHLORMADINONE ACETATE = CAP) FOR CYCLE CONTROL AND INFERTILITY TREATMENT IN THE MARE, CAP has been used for infertility treatments and cycle control in mares in Austria. In all indications

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

90

Infertility Peer Support Groups are held on the 3rd  

E-print Network

Infertility Peer Support Groups are held on the 3rd Thursday of every month (Couples Welcome!) Come groups to people with problems of infertility and education and assistance to associated professionals

Kim, Duck O.

91

Infertility in Malawi: exploring its impact and social consequences   

E-print Network

Infertility is a serious personal, social and public health issue in developing countries such as Malawi. Infertility is often a ‘hidden’ problem in this context as the policy and service emphasis is on issues like infant ...

de Kok, Christina

92

Infertility Counseling and Support: When and Where to Find It  

MedlinePLUS

... of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Infertility Counseling and Support: When and Where to Find It ... I need to see an infertility counselor? Consider counseling if you are feeling depressed, anxious, or so ...

93

47,XYY Syndrome and Male Infertility  

PubMed Central

Men with 47,XYY syndrome present with varying physical attributes and degrees of infertility. A retrospective chart review was performed on a male infertility and genetic anomaly database. Three patients with 47,XYY were found. Each presented with > 2 years of infertility. All were tall with elevated body mass indices. Scrotal findings ranged from normal to atrophic testicles. Semen analyses demonstrated oligospermia and varying endocrine profiles. Because of the diverse phenotype and potential lack of symptoms, identification and diagnosis of men with 47,XYY syndrome may be difficult. We recommend careful screening of 47,XYY patients and referral to primary physicians for long-term follow-up for increased incidence of health-related comorbidities. PMID:24659916

Kim, Ina W; Khadilkar, Arjun C; Ko, Edmund Y; Sabanegh, Edmund S

2013-01-01

94

47,XYY Syndrome and Male Infertility.  

PubMed

Men with 47,XYY syndrome present with varying physical attributes and degrees of infertility. A retrospective chart review was performed on a male infertility and genetic anomaly database. Three patients with 47,XYY were found. Each presented with > 2 years of infertility. All were tall with elevated body mass indices. Scrotal findings ranged from normal to atrophic testicles. Semen analyses demonstrated oligospermia and varying endocrine profiles. Because of the diverse phenotype and potential lack of symptoms, identification and diagnosis of men with 47,XYY syndrome may be difficult. We recommend careful screening of 47,XYY patients and referral to primary physicians for long-term follow-up for increased incidence of health-related comorbidities. PMID:24659916

Kim, Ina W; Khadilkar, Arjun C; Ko, Edmund Y; Sabanegh, Edmund S

2013-01-01

95

Infertility and chylous ascites? A case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Chylous ascites is defined by an accumulation of chylous fluid in the peritoneal cavity and it clinically appears as a milky fluid in which laboratory examination reveals triglycerides, cholesterol, and sometimes chylomicrons and lymphocytes. Presentation of case We report the first case of primary chylous ascites observed during laparoscopy for unexplained secondary infertility. Discussion Chylous ascites has never been linked to fertility but bathes all internal reproductive organs surfaces and is considered a communication mean between ovaries. Conclusion Despite a lack of evidence, the question of peritoneal fluid role remains in infertility. PMID:22096750

Frey, C.; Poncelet, C.

2011-01-01

96

Infertility: Identifications and disruptions with the maternal object  

Microsoft Academic Search

For many women, infertility is the first major crisis of adulthood. Maternal identification provides a template for parenting and infertility disrupts the opportunity to recapitulate this relationship or make reparation for early failures. Supportive work is often useful to address the manifest level of infertility issues; however, psychoanalytic work can broaden the treatment to encompass the unconscious meaning of the

Linda G. Klempner

1992-01-01

97

Frustrated Fertility: Infertility and Psychological Distress among Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tests the hypothesis that women who have experienced infertility report higher psychological distress. Examines whether roles or resources condition the effects of infertility or whether its effects are limited to childless women. Infertility combined with involuntary childlessness is associated with significantly greater distress. For women in…

McQuillan, Julia; Greil, Arthur L.; White, Lynn; Jacob, Mary Casey

2003-01-01

98

The status of depression and anxiety in infertile Turkish couples  

PubMed Central

Background: Infertility is a major psychosocial crisis as well as being a medical problem. The factors that predict psychosocial consequences of infertility may vary in different gender and different infertile populations. Objective: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether Turkish infertile couples had higher levels of depression and anxiety when compared to non-infertile couples. Our secondary aim was to evaluate the relationship between sociodemographic characteristics and levels of depression and anxiety in Turkish infertile couples. Materials and Methods: We designed a descriptive cross sectional study of 248 infertile women and 96 infertile men with no psychiatric disturbance and 51 women and 40 men who have children to evaluate the depression and anxiety levels between infertile couples and fertile couples. A gynecologist evaluated participants for demographic data and then they were visited by a psychologist to perform questionnaire scales which were The Beck Depression Inventory and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for the evaluation of the degree of psychopathology. The data were statistically analyzed, with p<0.05 as the level of statistical significance. Results: We observed significant differences between the infertile couples and fertile couples with respect to state and trait anxiety (p<0.0001) while no difference was regarding with depression, both of women and men. Anxiety and depression were observed as independent from gender when infertile women and men were compared (p=0.213). Conclusion: We believed that the psychological management at infertile couples must be individualized with cultural, religious, and class related aspects.

Kazandi, Mert; Gunday, Ozlem; Mermer, Timucin Kurtulus; Erturk, Nuray; Ozk?nay, Erdinc

2011-01-01

99

Risk factors for infertility in nursing cows linked to calving  

E-print Network

Risk factors for infertility in nursing cows linked to calving C Ducrot I Cimarosti F Bugnard with 3 590 cows in order to study the risk factors for infertility linked to calving. Based upon an analy infertility, breed factors, parity, fattening, comfort, calf characteristics (number, sex, weight

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

Pregnancy rates after hysteroscopic polypectomy and myomectomy in infertile women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To compare reproductive benefits of hysteroscopic myomectomy and polypectomy for infertility to outcomes in infertile couples with normal hysteroscopic findings.Methods: Women with diagnoses of infertility who had hysteroscopic evaluations by a single surgeon between 1975 and 1996 were sent a routine follow-up questionnaire regarding their reproductive histories. All 92 subjects who were located responded to the questionnaire, and 78

Nicole N Varasteh; Robert S Neuwirth; Bruce Levin; Martin D Keltz

1999-01-01

101

CATSPER2, a human autosomal nonsyndromic male infertility gene  

E-print Network

ARTICLE CATSPER2, a human autosomal nonsyndromic male infertility gene Nili Avidan1 , Hannah Tamary in spermatozoa) may explain the observed deafness and male infertility phenotypes. To the best of our knowledge associated with nonsyndromic male infertility. European Journal of Human Genetics (2003) 11, 497­502. doi:10

Lancet, Doron

102

Physiological mechanisms controlling anestrus and infertility in postpartum beef cattle  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Postpartum infertility is caused by four factors: general infertility, lack of uterine involution, short estrous cycles and anestrus. The general infertility component is common to any estrous cycle and reduces potential fertility by 20 to 30%. Incomplete uterine involution prevents fertilization during the first 20 d after calving but is not related to anestrus. Short estrous cycles prevent fertility

R. E. Short; R. A. Bellows; R. B. Staigmiller; J. G. Berardinelli; E. E. Custer; E. E. Custep

103

Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Treat Infertility Stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Women and men diagnosed with infertility experience a variety of infertility-related stressors, including changes to their family and social networks, strain on their sexual relationship, and difficulties and unexpected challenges in their relationship. Infertility stress is linked with depression and psychological distress, and can lead to premature dropout from medical treatments and unresolved feelings of loss and grief. The current

Brennan D. Peterson; Georg H. Eifert

2011-01-01

104

Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Treat Infertility Stress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Women and men diagnosed with infertility experience a variety of infertility-related stressors, including changes to their family and social networks, strain on their sexual relationship, and difficulties and unexpected challenges in their relationship. Infertility stress is linked with depression and psychological distress, and can lead to…

Peterson, Brennan D.; Eifert, Georg H.

2011-01-01

105

Characteristics of the Biopsychosocial Crisis of Infertility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a framework for understanding the crisis of infertility which is characterized by extensive anxiety, damaged self-esteem, grief, uncertainty about the future, and estranged relationships with each other and with family and friends. Proposes some interventions appropriate to helpers from a variety of disciplines. (ABB)

Cook, Ellen Piel

1987-01-01

106

Coping Processes of Couples Experiencing Infertility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the coping processes of couples experiencing infertility. Participants included 420 couples referred for advanced reproductive treatments. Couples were divided into groups based on the frequency of their use of eight coping strategies. Findings suggest that coping processes, which are beneficial to individuals, may be…

Peterson, Brennan D.; Newton, Christopher R.; Rosen, Karen H.; Schulman, Robert S.

2006-01-01

107

Guidelines for counselling in infertility: outline version.  

PubMed

The Guidelines for Counselling in Infertility describe the purpose, objectives, typical issues and communication skills involved in providing psychosocial care to individuals using fertility services. The Guidelines are presented in six sections. The first section describes how infertility consultations differ from other medical consultations in obstetrics and gynaecology, whereas the second section addresses fundamental issues in counselling, such as what is counselling in infertility, who should counsel and who is likely to need counselling. Section 3 focuses on how to integrate patient-centred care and counselling into routine medical treatment and section 4 highlights some of the special situations which can provoke the need for counselling (e.g. facing the end of treatment, sexual problems). Section 5 deals exclusively with third party reproduction and the psychosocial implications of gamete donation, surrogacy and adoption for heterosexual and gay couples and single women without partners. The final section of the Guidelines is concerned with psychosocial services that can be used to supplement counselling services in fertility clinics: written psychosocial information, telephone counselling, self-help groups and professionally facilitated group work. This paper summarizes the different sections of the Guidelines and describes how to obtain the complete text of the Guidelines for Counselling in Infertility. PMID:11387309

Boivin, J; Appleton, T C; Baetens, P; Baron, J; Bitzer, J; Corrigan, E; Daniels, K R; Darwish, J; Guerra-Diaz, D; Hammar, M; McWhinnie, A; Strauss, B; Thorn, P; Wischmann, T; Kentenich, H

2001-06-01

108

Lost in transition: women experiencing infertility.  

PubMed

This paper illustrates key findings from a qualitative doctoral research project exploring women's experience of infertility. Six women maintained treatment diaries, reflecting on their experiences prior to, during and beyond infertility treatment. The following key themes are identified: hopefulness, adaptation, transitioning and shifting focus. The data suggest that treatment, clinic experience and living a life 'on hold' act as turning points within the individual life course. It is at the intersection between treatment and outcome that difficulties negotiating the expected and anticipated life course become illuminated, revealing limited connectivity and transitioning through and beyond the treatment process. This is a critical focus area and one that sets the scene for effective future adaptation. The data suggest that the accessibility of supportive care moving through and beyond treatment is limited. This paper argues that the infertility clinic is a critical space and place and one where effective supportive care may enable effective transitioning beyond the experience of infertility as an unanticipated life course disruption. PMID:25019683

Cunningham, Nicola

2014-09-01

109

Spermatogenesis in an infertile XYY man  

Microsoft Academic Search

Testicular histology and meiosis has been studied in an XYY male patient identified at an infertility clinic. This man was found to have an XYY sex chromosome complement in 15% of spermatogonial metaphases. There was no clear evidence of 2 Y chromosomes at diakinesis but there appeared to be a slight excess of sperm with a fluorescent Y body.

Michael Faed; Janet Robertson; W. G. MacIntosh; J. Grieve

1976-01-01

110

Infertility treatment for HIV–serodiscordant couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was once associated with a poor prognosis. Today, however, with the use of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, the condition has been reduced to no more than a chronic illness, infected people leading normal lives. In addition, infertility and obstetric treatment can be individualized to enable infected couples to conceive safely and give birth with

Richard Ajayi; Adegbite Ogunmokun

2004-01-01

111

Infertility and childlessness: a qualitative study of the experiences of infertile couples in Northern Ghana  

PubMed Central

Background Infertility is a global reproductive health issue that affects many individuals and couples. Despite the high prevalence of infertility in Ghana, no study has been done on the experiences of infertile couples in Northern Ghana. This study therefore explored the experiences of infertile couples in Northern Ghana using the Upper West Region as a case study. Methods We interviewed fifteen childless couples, forty-five couples with children, and eight key informants using a semi-structured interview guide. We also carried out three focus group discussions; one for childless women, one for women with children and one for men with children. The data were transcribed, coded, arranged and analyzed for categories and themes. Results Infertile couples are socially stigmatised and excluded from leadership roles in their communities. Couples without children are denied membership in the ancestral world thereby losing the opportunity to live again. Both males and females are engaged in sex with multiple partners to prove their fertility. Conclusions Both men and women suffer from the social effects of childlessness. The desire to have biological children in a pronatalist society results in unhealthy practices. Health policy makers and gender advocates should be more concerned about infertility. PMID:23517021

2013-01-01

112

Primary male infertility in Kuwait: a cytogenetic and molecular study of 289 infertile Kuwaiti patients.  

PubMed

Infertility is one of the major public health problems, affecting 15% of couples who attempt pregnancy; in 50% of these, the male partner is responsible. Chromosomal abnormalities and Y microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF) region are known to be associated with spermatogenetic failure. In the present study, 289 patients with primary male infertility because of spermatogenetic failure were studied in order to highlight the molecular background of male infertility in Kuwait, and to avoid the possibility of transmission of any microdeletions/chromosomal aberrations to offspring via intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Of the 289 infertile men, 23 patients (8%) had chromosomal aberration in the form of Klinefelter syndrome/variant (16/23; 69.6%), XYY syndrome (3/23; 13%), XX male syndrome (2/23; 8.7%), 45,X/46X, i(Yp)(1/23; 4.4%) and 45,XY, t(9;22) (1/23;4.4%). Y-chromosome microdeletion in the AZFb and AZFc regions were detected in 7/266 cases (2.6%). Testicular biopsy was carried out in 31 azoospermic patients, of whom five men had Sertoli-cell only syndrome, while 26 patients had spermatogenic arrest. In conclusion, this study showed that the frequency of both chromosomal anomalies and Y microdeletions were found in 10.4% of the infertile men. The potential risk of transmitting these genetic disorders to offspring provides a rationale for screening infertile men prior to ICSI. PMID:17683468

Mohammed, F; Al-Yatama, F; Al-Bader, M; Tayel, S M; Gouda, S; Naguib, K K

2007-06-01

113

A survey on depression among infertile women in Ghana  

PubMed Central

Background The desire of many young women to become parents may be influenced by the premium placed on children by society. In Africa, children are highly valued for social, cultural and economic reasons. Infertile and childless women in Africa are therefore confronted with a series of societal discrimination and stigmatization which may lead to psychological disorders such as anxiety and depression. Even though some research has been done on the prevalence of infertility in Ghana, very little is known about the psychological impact of childlessness among infertile women. The present study aimed to examine prevalence and severity of depression in relation to age, type of infertility and duration of infertility in Ghanaian infertile women. Methods A total of 100 infertile women who met the selection criteria and had agreed to participate in the study were interviewed using the Beck Depression Inventory questionnaire from December 2012 to April 2013 at the Tamale Teaching Hospital, Tamale/Ghana. Data concerning socio-demographic characteristics such as age, monthly income, duration of infertility, marital status, educational level, number of previous conception, number of previous children, religion, as well as occupation of the respondents were recorded. Results The prevalence of depression among the women was 62.0% with the level of depression showing a significant positive correlation with age of the women and the duration of infertility. The level of depression was significantly higher among subjects with low or no formal education and among the unemployed. Women with primary infertility also presented with high depression scores as measured by BDI. Conclusions In conclusion, the prevalence of depression among the infertile women is high, especially among infertile women age 26 and above, those who are less educated, those with primary infertility, as well as those who have been diagnosed as infertile for more than 3 years. Interventions to decrease and prevent the development of severe depression among these patients should be considered. PMID:24612693

2014-01-01

114

Recent advances in the surgery of infertility.  

PubMed

Because of the use of antibiotics to treat pelvic infections, the presenting patient with tubal infertility more frequently shows occluded tubes due to adhesions, rather than other forms of pelvic pathology, and this condition is more operable for reversing the sterility than others. The present report is of a series of "50 consecutive operations on intelligent and often beautiful young women" with the "essential clinical interest that there is no palpable tubal pathology." 9 figures accompany the textual presentation of surgical procedures appropriate for reversing infertile conditions caused by hydrosalpinx, endometriosis, tuberculosis, Stein-Levanthal syndrome, and habitual abortions. 3 procedures are discussed: 1) uterine retroversion concommittant with insertion of a prosthetic device in the damaged fallopian tube; 2) tubo-uterine implantation; and 3) x-ray therapy. PMID:12261923

Green-armytage, V B

1959-02-01

115

Diagnostic approach to the infertile male patient.  

PubMed

There are several objectives to be achieved during the diagnostic evaluation of a male partner of an infertile partnership. The first is to identify whether or not there is a male factor present and, if so, whether this is attributable to an underlying medical illness. The second is to identify the cause of reduced male fertility and whether or not it is amenable to therapeutic intervention. PMID:17543720

Jarow, Jonathan P

2007-06-01

116

Medical and Surgical Management of Male Infertility  

PubMed Central

This article is the review of the book “Medical & Surgical Management of Male Infertility” edited by Botros RMB Rizk, Nabil Aziz, Ashok Agarwal and Edmund Sabanegh Jr. This book (hardcover) was published by Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishing, New Delhi.London.Philadelphia.Panama on September 2013 (1st edition). The contents of the book and its relevance to medical education are discussed in this invited review.

Sadri-Ardekani, Hooman

2014-01-01

117

Effect of varicocelectomy on male infertility.  

PubMed

Varicocele is the most common cause of male infertility and is generally correctable or at least improvable by various surgical and radiologic techniques. Therefore, it seems simple and reasonable that varicocele should be treated in infertile men with varicocele. However, the role of varicocele repair for the treatment of subfertile men has been questioned during the past decades. Although varicocele repair can induce improvement of semen quality, the obvious benefit of spontaneous pregnancy has not been shown through several meta-analyses. Recently, a well-designed randomized clinical trial was introduced, and, subsequently, a novel meta-analysis was published. The results of these studies advocate that varicocele repair be regarded as a standard treatment modality in infertile men with clinical varicocele and abnormal semen parameters, which is also supported by current clinical guidelines. Microsurgical varicocelectomy has been regarded as the gold standard compared to other surgical techniques and radiological management in terms of the recurrence rate and the pregnancy rate. However, none of the methods has been proven through well-designed clinical trials to be superior to the others in the ability to improve fertility. Accordingly, high-quality data from well-designed studies are needed to resolve unanswered questions and update current knowledge. Upcoming trials should be designed to define the best technique and also to define how to select the best candidates who will benefit from varicocele repair. PMID:25405011

Cho, Kang Su; Seo, Ju Tae

2014-11-01

118

Human infertility: are endocrine disruptors to blame?  

PubMed Central

Over recent decades, epidemiological studies have been reporting worrisome trends in the incidence of human infertility rates. Extensive detection of industrial chemicals in human serum, seminal plasma and follicular fluid has led the scientific community to hypothesise that these compounds may disrupt hormonal homoeostasis, leading to a vast array of physiological impairments. Numerous synthetic and natural substances have endocrine-disruptive effects, acting through several mechanisms. The main route of exposure to these chemicals is the ingestion of contaminated food and water. They may disturb intrauterine development, resulting in irreversible effects and may also induce transgenerational effects. This review aims to summarise the major scientific developments on the topic of human infertility associated with exposure to endocrine disruptors (EDs), integrating epidemiological and experimental evidence. Current data suggest that environmental levels of EDs may affect the development and functioning of the reproductive system in both sexes, particularly in foetuses, causing developmental and reproductive disorders, including infertility. EDs may be blamed for the rising incidence of human reproductive disorders. This constitutes a serious public health issue that should not be overlooked. The exposure of pregnant women and infants to EDs is of great concern. Therefore, precautionary avoidance of exposure to EDs is a prudent attitude in order to protect humans and wildlife from permanent harmful effects on fertility. PMID:23985363

Marques-Pinto, André; Carvalho, Davide

2013-01-01

119

An analysis of the costs of infertility treatment.  

PubMed Central

For 597 couples receiving care at an infertility clinic in Nova Scotia, the average cost of diagnosis and treatment per successful pregnancy is $10,700. This is compared to the costs of alternatives to infertility treatment. Adoption costs generally range from $3,000 to $10,000, and surrogate mother arrangements are much higher (around $20,000). This study demonstrates the feasibility and value of a systematic analysis of the costs of infertility. PMID:3728759

Cooper, G S

1986-01-01

120

A reappraisal of the endometrium in infertility.  

PubMed

It will be obvious to the reader that the author has gone to considerable lengths to exculpate the endometrium from playing a significant role in the aetiology and pathogenesis of infertility. No apology is necessary for this approach as it is known to obstetricians and gynaecologists engaged in the management and treatment of the infertile couple that most causes of infertility have little to do directly with endometrial abnormalities. This does not mean, however, that an endometrial biopsy or curettage specimen has no place in the investigation of the infertile woman. It can be used as an adjunct to the monitoring of the efficacy of treatment for ovulatory failure and in the confirmation and typing of endometrial hyperplasia in the woman with persistent anovulatory cycles. It is virtually indispensable for the diagnosis of genital tuberculosis and as a means of culturing the mycobacterium for antibiotic sensitivity testing so that appropriate therapy can be given. While there are better methods now available, such as laparoscopy, for the diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease, the finding of unsuspected endometritis in the infertile woman can be used as an indicator of low-grade chronic genital tract infection that may not be otherwise apparent. There would seem to be no need for routine investigation of the endometrium in women afflicted with endometriosis or tubal disorders. The most controversial use of endometrial biopsy as an investigational technique is in the diagnosis of luteal deficiency and related disorders. If it is to be used in this circumstance, then it is essential that there should be the closest possible consultation between the clinician and the pathologist. It is too early yet to declare the endometrium always blameless in reproductive failure but there is little hope that purely morphological studies, even at the ultrastructural level, will supply answers to the unresolved questions. The investigation of the complex biochemistry and biology of the endometrium is still very much in the developmental stage. Pathologists interested in reproductive biology must be prepared to adapt and to devise new techniques based on biochemical discoveries to supplement their traditional morphological assessment of this important and fascinating tissue. PMID:6370533

Robertson, W B

1984-04-01

121

Constructing infertility in Malawi: Management of interpersonal, normative and moral issues in talk   

E-print Network

This study examines social constructions of infertility in Malawi. The literature on infertility consists of epidemiological studies, describing patterns of infertility in terms of its incidence, causes and health seeking ...

de Kok, Bregje Christina

2007-01-01

122

Relationship between epidemiological features and aetiology of male infertility as diagnosed by a comprehensive infertility service provider  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between demographic features and aetiological causes of male infertility. Primary infertility was the presentation in 78% of patients. The incidence of varicocele was the highest (31%), whereas only 4.6% had vasectomy reversal and 7.4% of men were diagnosed with idiopathic infertility. Using the chi-squared test, there was no significant difference in the incidence of different

Nabil Aziz; Ashok Agarwal; Kiran P Nallella; Anthony J Thomas Jr

2006-01-01

123

Reversible Infertility Associated with Testosterone Therapy for Symptomatic Hypogonadism in Infertile Couple  

PubMed Central

Purpose Androgen replacement therapy has been shown to be safe and effective for most patients with testosterone deficiency. Male partners of infertile couples often report significantly poorer sexual activity and complain androgen deficiency symptoms. We report herein an adverse effect on fertility caused by misusage of androgen replacement therapy in infertile men with hypogonadal symptoms. Materials and Methods The study population consisted of 8 male patients referred from a local clinic for azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia between January 2008 and July 2011. After detailed evaluation at our andrology clinic, all patients were diagnosed with iatrogenic hypogonadism associated with external androgen replacement. We evaluated changes in semen parameters and serum hormone level, and fertility status. Results All patients had received multiple testosterone undecanoate (NebidoR) injections at local clinic due to androgen deficiency symptoms combined with lower serum testosterone level. The median duration of androgen replacement therapy prior to the development of azoospermia was 8 months (range: 4-12 months). After withdrawal of androgen therapy, sperm concentration and serum follicle-stimulating hormone level returned to normal range at a median 8.5 months (range: 7-10 months). Conclusion Misusage of external androgen replacement therapy in infertile men with poor sexual function can cause temporary spermatogenic dysfunction, thus aggravating infertility. PMID:23549818

Bang, Jeong Kyoon; Lim, Jung Jin; Choi, Jin; Won, Hyung Jae; Yoon, Tae Ki; Hong, Jae Yup; Park, Dong Soo

2013-01-01

124

Predictors of Psychological Distress among Infertility Clinic Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated predictors of psychological distress among infertility clinic patients. Analyses indicated that infertile men and women reported greater psychological distress than the general population. Self-blame and avoidance coping significantly predicted psychological distress among men and women. Increased age and childlessness added to…

Morrow, Kelly A.; And Others

1995-01-01

125

Themes of Hope and Healing: Infertile Couples' Experiences of Adoption.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using qualitative approach, authors explored the experiences of becoming parents through adoption after unsuccessful infertility treatments. Analysis of data revealed three overarching themes. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for counselors who work with infertile couples considering adoption, clients engaged in adoption…

Daniluk, Judith C.; Hurtig-Mitchell, Joss

2003-01-01

126

Associations of Psychosocial Factors with the Stress of Infertility Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated psychosocial factors thought to be associated with perceived stress over the course of infertility treatment. The research was based on secondary analysis of data from the Study of Marriage, Family, and Life Quality with a sample of 128 people who completed an infertility-related stress instrument at all three measurement…

Schneider, Myra G.; Forthofer, Melinda S.

2005-01-01

127

Infertility in the Gambia: Traditional and Modern Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A population survey was undertaken to study infertility in Gambia. All infertile women in 24 randomly selected enumeration areas were assessed. Problems faced, coping mechanisms employed, and types of health care available were examined. Patterns of consultation with traditional versus formal health care and rural/urban differences were uncovered…

Sundby, Johanne

1997-01-01

128

Psychotherapy for Infertility: A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach for Couples.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a cognitive-behavioral model for treating couples' negative reactions to infertility. After a discussion of why the cognitive-behavioral approach can competently address the goals of couples coping with infertility, three phases of treatment are outlined: assessment, therapy, and closure. Areas for assessment include spouses, marital…

Myers, Lisa B.; Wark, Linda

1996-01-01

129

[Psychosocial responses of infertile couples attending an assisted reproduction program].  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate gender differences in the psychosocial responses of 85 couples who attended the assisted reproduction program at Chung Shan Medical & Dental College Hospital from September 1991 to February 1992. The infertile couples were investigated by a self-administered structured questionnaire about demographic data, infertility history, and psychosocial responses and 75 couples completed the questionnaire. The average age of husbands was 35.0 years/and wives, 31.6 years. The average duration of infertility and treatment was 52.7 and 34.6 months, respectively. Parental expectation was the leading source of stress for men, while women counted being unable to meet childbearing demands as the main source of stress. Infertile women showed a higher psychosocial distress than their partners on the global measures and all the subscales of the infertility questionnaire and psychiatric symptoms test. Except for hostility, the differences between couples in subscales of self-esteem/body image, guilty, and all psychiatric symptoms reached statistical significance (p < 0.05). Among varied psychosocial responses of infertile couples, concordant response was demonstrated only in response to sexuality and physical condition. We consistently conclude with previous reports that infertile women showed a higher level of distress than their spouses, and that men and women displayed different psychosocial responses to infertility. PMID:7549587

Lee, S H; Kau, B J; Lee, M C; Lee, M S

1995-06-01

130

Genetic male infertility and mutation of CATSPER ion channels  

PubMed Central

A clinically significant proportion of couples experience difficulty in conceiving a child. In about half of these cases male infertility is the cause and often genetic factors are involved. Despite advances in clinical diagnostics ?50% of male infertility cases remain idiopathic. Based on this, further analysis of infertile males is required to identify new genetic factors involved in male infertility. This review focuses on cation channel of sperm (CATSPER)-related male infertility. It is based on PubMed literature searches using the keywords ‘CATSPER', ‘male infertility', ‘male contraception', ‘immunocontraception' and ‘pharmacologic contraception' (publication dates from January 1979 to December 2009). Previously, contiguous gene deletions including the CATSPER2 gene implicated the sperm-specific CATSPER channel in syndromic male infertility (SMI). Recently, we identified insertion mutations of the CATSPER1 gene in families with recessively inherited nonsyndromic male infertility (NSMI). The CATSPER channel therefore represents a novel human male fertility factor. In this review we summarize the genetic and clinical data showing the role of CATSPER mutation in human forms of NSMI and SMI. In addition, we discuss clinical management and therapeutic options for these patients. Finally, we describe how the CATSPER channel could be used as a target for development of a male contraceptive. PMID:20648059

Hildebrand, Michael S; Avenarius, Matthew R; Fellous, Marc; Zhang, Yuzhou; Meyer, Nicole C; Auer, Jana; Serres, Catherine; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, Richard J H

2010-01-01

131

Psychological functioning across stages of treatment for infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychological functioning was examined for a cross section of 104 couples in different stages of medical investigation for infertility. Couples were separated into three stages based upon the length of time they had been pursuing medical treatment for infertility: year 1, year 2, and year 3 and beyond. Emotional strain was moderately elevated during the first year, returned to more

Barbara J. Berg; John F. Wilson

1991-01-01

132

The detection of diminished ovarian reserve in infertile women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Women in their mid to late 30s and early 40s with infertility constitute the largest portion of the total infertility population. These women frequently undergo multiple testing, and most will require expensive and invasive therapies, including assisted reproductive technologies, with markedly reduced pregnancy rates in those older than 40. These women also have a higher incidence of pregnancy loss even

Fady I. Sharara; Richard T. Scott; David B. Seifer

1998-01-01

133

Population study of causes, treatment, and outcome of infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Specialist infertility practice was studied in a group of 708 couples within a population of residents of a single health district in England. They represented an annual incidence of 1.2 couples for every 1000 of the population. At least one in six couples needed specialist help at some time in their lives because of an average of infertility of 21\\/2

M G Hull; C M Glazener; N J Kelly; D I Conway; P A Foster; R A Hinton; C Coulson; P A Lambert; E M Watt; K M Desai

1985-01-01

134

The biology of infertility: research advances and clinical challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reproduction is required for the survival of all mammalian species, and thousands of essential 'sex' genes are conserved through evolution. Basic research helps to define these genes and the mechanisms responsible for the development, function and regulation of the male and female reproductive systems. However, many infertile couples continue to be labeled with the diagnosis of idiopathic infertility or given

Martin M Matzuk; Dolores J Lamb

2008-01-01

135

Practical approaches to the diagnosis and management of male infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male infertility affects 10% of couples of reproductive age worldwide, and is treatable in many cases. In addition to well-established etiologies, genetic causes of male infertility are now diagnosed more commonly, as our knowledge of genomic medicine advances. Using principles of evidence-based medicine, this review outlines diagnostic and treatment algorithms that guide clinical management. In order of importance, randomized controlled

Paul J Turek

2005-01-01

136

Male infertility after surgery for imperforate anus.  

PubMed

Congenital abnormalities of the genitourinary tract often coexist, and cryptorchidism is common in patients who have had imperforate anus. Twenty men who had pull-through procedures for imperforate anus in infancy have been evaluated for infertility. Seven had coexisting renal abnormalities, 4 had had recurrent epididymitis, 3 had had bilateral orchidopexies (at age 7 to 12), 2 had spina bifida, and 1 had a pituitary adenoma. Seven had no ejaculate (aspermia), 11 were azoospermic, 1 was severely oligozoospermic, and 1 had a normal sperm concentration in a small volume of ejaculate. Both vasa were blocked in 5 men, and this appeared to be a result of the original operative procedure. One vas was blocked in another 7 patients who had abnormalities on the contralateral side; three had epididymal blocks after epididymitis, and four had congenital malformations associated with an absent or ectopic kidney. After reconstruction (4), insertion of sperm reservoirs (4), microscopic epididymal sperm aspiration (2), or artificial insemination (1), sperm were retrieved from 9 men (ejaculated by 4) 2 pregnancies occurred. Male infertility after treatment of imperforate anus in infancy can be related to a wide variety of cause, some of which are amenable to treatment. PMID:8749922

Holt, B; Pryor, J P; Hendry, W F

1995-12-01

137

Possible fetal determinants of male infertility.  

PubMed

Although common reproductive problems, such as male infertility and testicular cancer, present in adult life, strong evidence exists that these reproductive disorders might have a fetal origin. The evidence is derived not only from large epidemiological studies that show birth-cohort effects with regard to testicular cancer, levels of testosterone and semen quality, but also from histopathological observations. Many infertile men have histological signs of testicular dysgenesis, including Sertoli-cell-only tubules, immature undifferentiated Sertoli cells, microliths and Leydig cell nodules. The most severe gonadal symptoms occur in patients with disorders of sexual development (DSDs) who have genetic mutations, in whom even sex reversal of individuals with a 46,XY DSD can occur. However, patients with severe DSDs might represent only a small proportion of DSD cases, with milder forms of testicular dysgenesis potentially induced by exposure to environmental and lifestyle factors. Interestingly, maternal smoking during pregnancy has a stronger effect on spermatogenesis than a man's own smoking. Other lifestyle factors such as alcohol consumption and obesity might also have a role. However, increasing indirect evidence exists that exposure to ubiquitous endocrine disrupting chemicals, present at measurable concentrations in individuals, might affect development of human fetal testis. If confirmed, health policies to prevent male reproductive problems should not only target adult men, but also pregnant women and their children. PMID:24935122

Juul, Anders; Almstrup, Kristian; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Jensen, Tina K; Jørgensen, Niels; Main, Katharina M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Toppari, Jorma; Skakkebæk, Niels E

2014-09-01

138

Infertility and Parenthood: Does Becoming a Parent Increase Well-Being?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined parenthood among 174 infertile couples and 74 presumed fertile couples. Infertile women who became parents experienced greater global well-being but diminished marital well-being, compared with infertile women who had not become parents. Infertile men who became parents experienced same negative effects that wives reported but did not…

Abbey, Antonia; And Others

1994-01-01

139

Psychosocial Predictors of Life Quality: How Are They Affected by Infertility, Gender, and Parenthood?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Longitudinally examined effects of infertility on marital and global life quality with 174 infertile couples and 74 fertile couples. By third interview, 42% of infertile couples and 36% of fertile couples were parents. Psychosocial predictors of life quality were highly similar for members of infertile and fertile couples and for couples with and…

Abbey, Antonia; And Others

1994-01-01

140

Psychological sequelae of infertility treatment: The role of gender and sex-role identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infertility has traditionally been viewed as a female problem and women have been expected to suffer greater psychological distress due to infertility. This paper investigates the nature of gender differences and sex-role identification in the psychological sequelae associated with infertility treatment. The expectation that infertile women experience higher distress levels than men was not supported by these data. No gender

Barbara J. Berg; John F. Wilson; Paul J. Weingartner

1991-01-01

141

Heterologous Ovum Penetration Test and Seminal Parameters in Fertile and Infertile Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sperm penetration rates in the heterologous ovum pen- etration test were correlated with results of routine semen analysis in 30 fertile and 50 infertile men. There was no difference in penetration rates when comparing infertile men with normal and abnormal seminal pa- rameters, nor was any difference seen between fertile (15-83%) and infertile men (8-83%). Of the 22 infertile men

E. JEAN WICKINGS; CARL-WILHELM FREISCHEM; KLAUS LANGER; EBERHARD NIESCHLAG

142

The End of the LineInfertile Men's Experiences of Being Unable to Produce a Child  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this qualitative study, in-depth interviews were used to explore the experience of infertility for six men diagnosed with male factor infertility. A thematic analysis of the interview data generated seven phenomenological themes that reflect how being infertile changed and shaped the lives of these men as they attempted to come to terms with their infertility.

RUSSELL E. WEBB; JUDITH C. DANILUK

1999-01-01

143

Association of exposure to phenols and idiopathic male infertility.  

PubMed

Widespread human exposure to phenols has been documented recently, and some phenols which are potential endocrine disruptors have demonstrated adverse effects on male reproduction in animal and in vitro studies. However, implications about exposure to phenols and male infertility are scarce in humans. Case-control study of 877 idiopathic infertile men and 713 fertile controls was conducted. Urinary levels of bisphenol A, benzophenone-3, pentachlorophenol, triclosan, 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP), 4-n-octylphenol (4-n-OP) and 4-n-nonylphenol (4-n-NP) and semen parameters were measured. After multivariate adjustment, we found 4-t-OP, 4-n-OP and 4-n-NP exposure was associated with idiopathic male infertility (p-value for trend: <0.0001, 0.014 and 0.001, respectively). Aside from these associations, 4-t-OP and 4-n-NP exposure was also associated with idiopathic male infertility with abnormal semen parameters. Moreover, we observed significant associations between sum alkylphenols (APs) exposure and idiopathic male infertility. There were no relationships between exposure to other phenols and idiopathic male infertility in the present study. Our study provides the first evidence that exposure to APs (4-t-OP, 4-n-OP and 4-n-NP) is associated with idiopathic male infertility. PMID:23435201

Chen, Minjian; Tang, Rong; Fu, Guangbo; Xu, Bin; Zhu, Pengfei; Qiao, Shanlei; Chen, Xiaojiao; Xu, Bo; Qin, Yufeng; Lu, Chuncheng; Hang, Bo; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru

2013-04-15

144

The experience of infertility: A review of recent literature  

PubMed Central

About 10 years ago Greil published a review and critique of the literature on the socio-psychological impact of infertility. He found at the time that most scholars treated infertility as a medical condition with psychological consequences rather than as a socially constructed reality. This article examines research published since the last review. More studies now place infertility within larger social contexts and social scientific frameworks although clinical emphases persist. Methodological problems remain but important improvements are also evident. We identify two vigorous research traditions in the social scientific study of infertility. One tradition uses primarily quantitative techniques to study clinic patients in order to improve service delivery and to assess the need for psychological counseling. The other tradition uses primarily qualitative research to capture the experiences of infertile people in a sociocultural context. We conclude that more attention is now being paid to the ways in which the experience of infertility is shaped by social context. We call for continued progress in the development of a distinctly sociological approach to infertility and for the continued integration of the two research traditions identified here. PMID:20003036

Greil, Arthur L.; Slauson-Blevins, Kathleen; McQuillan, Julia

2011-01-01

145

Cost-effectiveness of infertility treatments: a cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine the cost-effectiveness of infertility treatments.Design: Retrospective cohort study.Setting: Academic medical center infertility practice.Patient(s): All patients treated for infertility in a 1-year time span.Intervention(s): Intrauterine inseminations, clomiphene citrate and IUI (CC-IUI), hMG and IUI (hMG-IUI), assisted reproductive techniques (ART), and neosalpingostomy by laparotomy.Main Outcome Measure(s): All medical charges and pregnancy outcomes associated with the treatments were obtained. Cost-effectiveness

Bradley J. Van Voorhis; Amy E. T. Sparks; Brian D. Allen; Dale W. Stovall; Craig H. Syrop; F. K. Chapler

1997-01-01

146

Increasing and decreasing factors of hope in infertile women with failure in infertility treatment: A phenomenology study  

PubMed Central

Background: Assisted reproductive technology (ART) provide the hope of pregnancy for infertile women, but do not always turn this hope into reality. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of infertile women from increasing and decreasing factors of hope in infertile women with failure in infertility treatment. Materials and Methods: Using a qualitative research design (Phenomenology study), 23 subjects were selected who had experienced infertility failure visited by gynecologist (Rasekh Infertility center) in 2012. The data were collected through semi structured interviews and analyzed using interpretive research strategies of phenomenology by Collizi's seven-stage method. Results: Totally 96 codes were identified. The data arranged in two categories. The factors decreasing and increasing hope in infertility treatments. Totally 5 themes and 20 sub themes were extracted. The increasing factors which emerged from the data contain "spiritual source", "family interaction and support" and "information through the media", and decreasing factors contain "nature of treatments" and "negatively oriented mind". PMID:24799869

Mosalanejad, Leili; Parandavar, Nehle; Gholami, Morteza; Abdollahifard, Sareh

2014-01-01

147

The emotional-psychological consequences of infertility among infertile women seeking treatment: Results of a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background: Infertility is a major life event that brings about social and psychological problems. The type and rate these problems in the context of socio-cultural of different geographical areas and sex of people is different. Objective: The aim of this qualitative study was to explain the psychological consequences of infertility in Iranian infertile women seeking treatment. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was done using qualitative content analysis on 25 women affected by primary and secondary infertility with no surviving children in 2012. They were purposefully selected with maximum sample variation from a large Fertility Health Research Center in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected using 32 semi-structured interviews and analyzed by the conventional content analysis method. Results: The findings of this study include four main themes: 1. Cognitive reactions of infertility (mental engagement; psychological turmoil). 2. Cognitive reactions to therapy process (psychological turmoil; being difficult to control in some situations; reduced self-esteem; feelings of failure). 3. Emotional-affective reactions of infertility (fear, anxiety and worry; loneliness and guilt; grief and depression; regret). 4. Emotional-affective reactions to therapy process (fear, anxiety and worry; fatigue and helplessness; grief and depression; hopelessness). Conclusion: This study revealed that Iranian infertile women seeking treatment face several psychological-emotional problems with devastating effects on the mental health and well-being of the infertile individuals and couples, while the infertility is often treated as a biomedical issue in Iranian context with less attention on the mental-emotional, social and cultural aspects. This article extracted from Ph.D. thesis. (Seyede Batool Hasanpoor-Azghady) PMID:24799871

Hasanpoor-Azghdy, Seyede Batool; Simbar, Masoumeh; Vedadhir, Abouali

2014-01-01

148

Analysis of PAEs in semen of infertile men.  

PubMed

Objectives: Phthalates are environmental chemicals with reproductive toxicity and estrogenic effects in animals. They are of increasing concern to human health. Aim: To determine whether phthalate levels in semen were associated with infertility. Methods: Using semen samples from 107 infertile and 94 fertile men, the presence and quantity of five phthalate esters were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Using data collected from questionnaires and clinical examinations, the correlation between phthalate exposure and semen quality was analyzed. Results: The cumulative levels of the measured phthalate esters were significantly higher in the infertility group compared to the control group (P<0·05). Concentrations of the five phthalate esters in men varied by age with older men showing higher cumulative levels. Conclusions: The presence of phthalates may contribute to male infertility in our study population. PMID:25384258

Wang, Sheng-Yuan; Wang, Yu; Xie, Fang-Qin; Li, Yan-Xing; Wan, Xue-Lian; Ma, Wei-Wei; Wang, De-Cai; Wu, Yong-Hui

2014-11-10

149

Treatments for Infertility Resulting from Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)  

MedlinePLUS

... Publications En Español Treatments for Infertility Resulting from PCOS Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... In most cases, fertility problems in women with PCOS result from the absence of ovulation (anovulation), but ...

150

[Sexual dissatisfaction and somatic complaints in male infertility].  

PubMed

Several relevant sociodemographic and psychological variables were assessed in addition to clinical and andrological examinations in order to find predictors for sexual satisfaction and somatisation in 68 infertile men of involuntarily childless couples. Subjects reported relatively high average levels of both sexual satisfaction and somatisation, with considerable variance between subjects. Multiple regression analyses revealed that neither age, attitudes towards sexuality, nor andrological findings had an influence on sexual satisfaction. However, an inverse relationship between sexual satisfaction and somatisation was found. Furthermore, a short-lasting partnership and high sexual dissatisfaction prior to the diagnosis of infertility could be unveiled as risk factors for somatisation in infertile men. These results propose state and trait characteristics of sexual satisfaction and suggest a buffering role of longer lasting and sexually satisfying partnerships with respect to the distress of infertility. The promising results need confirmation by repeated investigation. Other possible influences, e.g. styles of coping, should be included in future studies. PMID:10488646

Schilling, G; Müller, M J; Haidl, G

1999-08-01

151

Nonsurgical treatment of male infertility: specific and empiric therapy  

PubMed Central

Management of male infertility is always a difficult task, and the pathologic process is often poorly understood. Even though modern assisted reproduction techniques (ART) can help overcome severe male factor infertility, the application of these methods in all infertile couples would definitely represent over-treatment. Several conditions can interfere with spermatogenesis and reduce sperm quality and production. A careful diagnostic work-up is necessary before any andrological treatment can be initiated so that adequate treatment options can be selected for individual patients. Most hormonal imbalances can be readily identified and successfully treated nonsurgically. However, the treatment of men with unexplained idiopathic infertility remains a challenge. In the absence of a correctable etiology, patients are managed with either empirical medical therapy or ART. Empiric medical therapy continues as a viable option. However, physicians and patients must understand that the success rates with any of the pharmacological therapies remain suboptimal. PMID:19707335

Cocuzza, Marcello; Agarwal, Ashok

2007-01-01

152

MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH  

EPA Science Inventory

Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000 Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa: Potential for Infertility Research David Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3 1Reproductive ...

153

Surgical techniques for the management of male infertility  

PubMed Central

Evaluation and surgical treatment of male infertility has evolved and expanded, now leading to more precise diagnoses and tailored treatments with diminished morbidity and greater success. Surgeries for male infertility are divided into four major categories: (i) diagnostic surgery; (ii) surgery to improve sperm production; (iii) surgery to improve sperm delivery; and (iv) surgery to retrieve sperm for use with in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF–ICSI). While today we are more successful than ever in treating male infertility, pregnancy is still not always achieved likely due to factors that remain poorly understood. Clinicians treating infertility should advocate for couple-based therapy, and require that both partners have a thorough evaluation and an informed discussion before undergoing specific surgical therapies. PMID:22120932

Lopushnyan, Natalya A; Walsh, Thomas J

2012-01-01

154

Report on varicocele and infertility: a committee opinion.  

PubMed

This document discusses the evaluation and management of varicoceles in the male partners of infertile couples, and presents the controversies and recommendations regarding this condition. This document replaces the ASRM Practice Committee document titled "Report on Varicocele and Infertility," last published in 2008, and was developed in conjunction with the Society for Male Reproduction and Urology (Fertil Steril 2008;90:S247-9). PMID:25458620

2014-12-01

155

NK Cells, Autoantibodies, and Immunologic Infertility: A Complex Interplay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infertility and recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) are heterogeneous conditions that have been frequently explained with\\u000a an immunological pathomechanism. A deeper insight into apparently unexplained infertility and RSA shows increasing evidences\\u000a supporting both alloimmune and autoimmune mechanisms, in which natural killer (NK) cells and autoantibodies seem to play a\\u000a relevant role. Successful pregnancy is considered as Th1–Th2 cooperation phenomenon, with a

Caterina De Carolis; Carlo Perricone; Roberto Perricone

2010-01-01

156

Clinical factors affecting pregnancy rates among infertile couples.  

PubMed

In a follow-up study of 1297 couples registered at a Nova Scotia infertility clinic with a complaint of infertility of at least 12 months' duration, the cumulative pregnancy rate at 36 months, with 95% confidence limits, was found to be 49 +/- 4%. The predictors of pregnancy by univariate analysis were a favourable primary clinical diagnosis (p less than 0.001), a duration of infertility of less than 3 years (p less than 0.001), a single diagnosis for the infertility (p less than 0.001), a previous pregnancy in the partnership (p = 0.001) and a length of marriage of less than 4 years (p = 0.002). Proportional hazards analysis confirmed these variables as predictors of pregnancy. The highest cumulative pregnancy rates after 12 and 36 months of follow-up were observed in cases of ovulation deficiency, and the lowest were seen in cases of tubal defects. However, before the process of diagnosing infertility begins, useful prognostic information can be determined from the length of marriage, the duration of infertility and the partnership's history of previous pregnancy. PMID:6692211

Collins, J A; So, Y; Wilson, E H; Wrixon, W; Casper, R F

1984-02-01

157

Recommended foods for male infertility in Iranian traditional medicine  

PubMed Central

Background: Male infertility accounts for 30-50% of all infertilities among couples. Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) stressed the importance of nutrition in the prevention and treatment of male infertility. Many Iranian traditional physicians have described the traits of specific foods for prevention and treatment of male infertility. Objective: To explore the principles and roles of foods recommended by ITM scientists in prevention and treatment of male infertility as well as enlisting all the recommended foods for treating this problem addressed through the ITM original resources written between 815 and 1901. Materials and Methods: In this review study specific data related to the subject among all referral ITM texts was extracted firstly, and then the collected data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Results: The analysis of data revealed that foods that enhance sexual performance must have 3 properties; they should be warm in nature, very nutritious, and flatulent. Foods that are warm in nature and nutritious affect the quality and quantity of semen. A food having the third trait of being flatulent is required to complete sexual performance by creating an erection. Foods with only one of these traits must be consumed with another food that has the other trait. This study also provided a list of foods that can enhance the quality and increase the quantity of semen. Conclusion: Foods that can enhance sexual performance and the quality and quantity of semen can be recommended to male patients who suffer from infertility in medical centers. PMID:25246919

Nejatbakhsh, Fatemeh; Nazem, Esmaeil; Goushegir, Ashrafeddin; Isfahani, Mohammad Mahdi; Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Alireza; Baygom Siahpoosh, Marzieh

2012-01-01

158

Correlation between HPV sperm infection and male infertility  

PubMed Central

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases which comprises a group of small DNA viruses that infect both cutaneous and mucous squamous epithelia. Liquid bead microarray technology (LBMA) were used to evaluate 24 HPV genotypes in confirmed fertile and infertile males of North China so that the effects of HPV infection on semen parameters and relationship with male infertility could be discussed. A total of 1138 subjects were recruited in this study; 142 were HPV-positive (12.48%). Among 523 confirmed fertile males, only 35 were HPV-positive (6.70%), and two of them had multiple infections. Among 615 infertile males, 107 were HPV-positive (17.4%), and 29 of them had multiple infections. Infertile males had a relatively high HPV infection rate compared with confirmed fertile males. Sperm progressive motility (PR) and the normal morphology rate were significantly decreased in HPV-positive subjects. HPV-45, HPV-52, HPV-18, HPV-59 and HPV-16 infections were more frequently in infertile males. Hence, HPV infection is closely related to male infertility which will decrease sperm PR and morphology. HPV-45, HPV-52, HPV-18, HPV-59 and HPV-16 infection seems to be major risk factors. PMID:23603919

Yang, Yang; Jia, Chan-Wei; Ma, Yan-Min; Zhou, Li-Ying; Wang, Shu-Yu

2013-01-01

159

Feeling the Blues of Infertility in a South Asian Context: Psychological Well-Being and Associated Factors Among Sri Lankan Women with Primary Infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primary infertility may have a considerable impact on the psychological well-being of women. In the present study, the authors investigated the psychological well-being and its correlates among Sri Lankan women with primary infertility. A total of 177 women with primary infertility were compared with 177 fertile women matched for age and duration of marriage to identify differences in the psychological

Nirosha Lansakara; Ananda Rajitha Wickramasinghe; Harshalal Rukka Seneviratne

2011-01-01

160

Recent advances in male infertility research.  

PubMed

Recent developments in the following areas of andrology are highlighted: varicocele; biochemical markers of epididymal function; genitourinary tract infection; evaluation of sperm motility; capacity for sperm fertilization; and the immunologic consequences of vasectomy. Discussion of the varicocele effect focuses on detection of thesubclinical varicocele, spermatic venography, Leydig cell functon, experimental models, and percutaneous venous treatment modalities. The size of the varicocele bears no relationship to its subsequent effects on spermatogenesis. Consequently, the "subclinical" varicocele, which is not palpable, becomes an important entity in the infertile patient. Use of a Doppler ultrasonic stethoscope for the detection of the nonpalpable varicocele and use of scrotal thermography have been reported although caution is advised with these techniques. The stress pattern is a nonspecific response of the germinal epithelium to a stimulus or the lack of a stimulus. Genitourinary infection or endocrinopathy can also cause an increased number of ejaculated immature sperm. Spermatic vein ligation is not justified in an infertile patient with a seminal stress pattern but without clinial evidence of a varicocele. Varicocelectomy also is unjustified in a patient with a palpable asymptomatic varicocele in the absence of a stress pattern. Venography in patients with varicocele should be reserved for individuals in whom persistence of a palpable or subclinical varicocele and abnormal semen parameters are observed following spermatic vein legation. It is also a research tool and can prove helpful in providing more information about testicular venous drainage. It may provide a vehicle for percutaneous treatment of the varicocele. Recent attention has been directed to a possible correlation between the presence of varicocele, Leydig cell function, and testosterone synthesis. The seminal stress pattern has been successfully produced in monkeys by a 90% constriction of the left renal vein between the vena cava and spermatic vein. The results indicated a bilateral testicular effect based on testicular biopsies. The conventional treatment for varicoceles is surgery. Recently, there have been reports of percutaneous, fluoroscopic treatment of these lesions. Originally considered to be a passive conduit for sperm transport, it is now evident that the epididymis is actively involved in the maturation of spermatozoa. The applicability of epididymal markers will be based primarily on the relative ease of determination in a clinical laboratory. Several newer methods for determining sperm motility -- turbidimetric techniques, laser light scattering techniques, and photographic tracking of sperm movement -- have been reported in an effort to increase objectivity, provide accurate records of sperm motilit, and study patterns of sperm movement and the effects of various exogenous agents. Vasectomy results in sperm antibody production. The presence of circulating sperm antibodies after vasectomy raises the possibility of systemic effects. PMID:7010747

Caldamone, A A; Cockett, A T

1981-02-01

161

Variation in distress among women with infertility: evidence from a population-based sample†  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND We examine variation in fertility-specific distress (FSD) and general distress according to different experiences of infertility among 1027 US women who have experienced infertility within the previous 10 years. METHODS General distress was measured by a short form of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression. Multiple regression analysis was conducted on self-report data (based on a telephone interview) from a probability-based sample of US women aged 25–45 years. We compare women with infertility who have had a prior pregnancy (secondary infertility, n = 628) to women with infertility with no prior pregnancies (primary infertility, n = 399). We further distinguish between women with infertility who were actually ‘trying’ to become pregnant (the infertile with intent) with those who met the medical definition of infertile but did not describe themselves as trying to become pregnant (infertile without intent). RESULTS Both types of infertility (primary versus secondary) (? = 0.31*) and intentionality (infertile with and without intent) (? = 0.08*) are associated with FSD. These associations persist when we control for resource and demographic variables, life course variables, social support and social pressure variables. General distress does not vary by infertility type or intentionality. CONCLUSIONS Results reveal variation in women's recalled experiences of infertility and that FSD is more sensitive to effects of different experiences than general distress. Women with primary infertility who were explicitly trying to become pregnant at the time of the infertility episode stand out as a particularly distressed group. Caregivers should be aware that the emotional needs of women with primary infertility may differ from those with secondary infertility. PMID:21659313

Greil, Arthur L.; Shreffler, Karina M.; Schmidt, Lone; McQuillan, Julia

2011-01-01

162

SUFFERING INFERTILITY: THE IMPACT OF INFERTILITY ON WOMEN’S LIFE EXPERIENCES IN TWO NIGERIAN COMMUNITIES  

PubMed Central

This paper examines the experiences of women with infertility in two Nigerian communities with different systems of descent and historically different levels of infertility. First, the paper focuses on the life experiences of individual women across the two communities and second, it compares these experiences with those of their fertile counterparts, in each community. In doing this, women who are childless are distinguished from those with subfertility and compared with high-fertility women. The research is based on interdisciplinary research conducted among the Ijo and Yakurr people of southern Nigeria, which included a survey of approximately 100 childless and subfertile women and a matching sample of 100 fertile women as well as in-depth ethnographic interviews with childless and subfertile women in two communities: Amakiri in Delta State and Lopon in Cross River State. The findings indicate that while there are variations in the extent to which childlessness is considered to be problematic, the necessity for a woman to have a child remains basic in this region. PMID:20561392

LARSEN, ULLA; HOLLOS, MARIDA; OBONO, OKA; WHITEHOUSE, BRUCE

2013-01-01

163

Power of Proteomics in Linking Oxidative Stress and Female Infertility  

PubMed Central

Endometriosis, PCOS, and unexplained infertility are currently the most common diseases rendering large numbers of women infertile worldwide. Oxidative stress, due to its deleterious effects on proteins and nucleic acids, is postulated to be the one of the important mechanistic pathways in differential expression of proteins and in these diseases. The emerging field of proteomics has allowed identification of proteins involved in cell cycle, as antioxidants, extracellular matrix (ECM), cytoskeleton, and their linkage to oxidative stress in female infertility related diseases. The aim of this paper is to assess the association of oxidative stress and protein expression in the reproductive microenvironments such as endometrial fluid, peritoneal fluid, and follicular fluid, as well as reproductive tissues and serum. The review also highlights the literature that proposes the use of the fertility related proteins as potential biomarkers for noninvasive and early diagnosis of the aforementioned diseases rather than utilizing the more invasive methods used currently. The review will highlight the power of proteomic profiles identified in infertility related disease conditions and their linkage with underlying oxidative stress. The power of proteomics will be reviewed with regard to eliciting molecular mechanisms for early detection and management of these infertility related conditions. PMID:24900998

Gupta, Sajal; Sharma, Rakesh; Agarwal, Ashok

2014-01-01

164

Empirical medical therapy in idiopathic male infertility: Promise or panacea?  

PubMed Central

Male factors account for 20%-50% of cases of infertility and in 25% of cases, the etiology of male infertility is unknown. Effective treatments are well-established for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, male accessory gland infection, retrograde ejaculation, and positive antisperm antibody. However, the appropriate treatment for idiopathic male infertility is unclear. Empirical medical treatment (EMT) has been used in men with idiopathic infertility and can be divided into two categories based on the mode of action: hormonal treatment and antioxidant supplementation. Hormonal medications consist of gonadotropins, androgens, estrogen receptor blockers, and aromatase inhibitors. Antioxidants such as vitamins, zinc, and carnitines have also been widely used to reduce oxidative stress-induced spermatozoa damage. Although scientifically acceptable evidence of EMT is limited because of the lack of large, randomized, controlled studies, recent systematic reviews with meta-analyses have shown that the administration of gonadotropins, anti-estrogens, and oral antioxidants results in a significant increase in the live birth rate compared with control treatments. Therefore, all physicians who treat infertility should bear in mind that EMT can improve semen parameters and subsequent fertility potential through natural intercourse. PMID:25309854

Jung, Jae Hung

2014-01-01

165

The biology of infertility: research advances and clinical challenges  

PubMed Central

Reproduction is required for the survival of all mammalian species, and thousands of essential ‘sex’ genes are conserved through evolution. Basic research helps to define these genes and the mechanisms responsible for the development, function and regulation of the male and female reproductive systems. However, many infertile couples continue to be labeled with the diagnosis of idiopathic infertility or given descriptive diagnoses that do not provide a cause for their defect. For other individuals with a known etiology, effective cures are lacking, although their infertility is often bypassed with assisted reproductive technologies (ART), some accompanied by safety or ethical concerns. Certainly, progress in the field of reproduction has been realized in the twenty-first century with advances in the understanding of the regulation of fertility, with the production of over 400 mutant mouse models with a reproductive phenotype and with the promise of regenerative gonadal stem cells. Indeed, the past six years have witnessed a virtual explosion in the identification of gene mutations or polymorphisms that cause or are linked to human infertility. Translation of these findings to the clinic remains slow, however, as do new methods to diagnose and treat infertile couples. Additionally, new approaches to contraception remain elusive. Nevertheless, the basic and clinical advances in the understanding of the molecular controls of reproduction are impressive and will ultimately improve patient care. PMID:18989307

Matzuk, Martin M; Lamb, Dolores J

2013-01-01

166

Epigenetic germline mosaicism in infertile men.  

PubMed

Imprinted genes are expressed either from the paternal or the maternal allele, because the other allele has been silenced in the mother's or father's germline. Imprints are characterized by DNA methylation at cytosine phosphate guanine sites. Recently, abnormal sperm parameters and male infertility have been linked to aberrant methylation patterns of imprinted genes in sperm DNA. However, these studies did not account for possible epigenetic heterogeneity in sperm. We have investigated whether spermatozoa are a homogeneous cell population regarding DNA methylation of imprinted genes. Swim-up sperm was obtained from 45 men with normal (n = 19) and abnormal (n = 26) sperm parameters. DNA methylation of the imprinted gene KCNQ1OT1 was measured in multiple pools of 10 spermatozoa by a highly sensitive pyrosequencing-based oligo-sperm methylation assay (OSMA). DNA methylation of four imprinted genes (KCNQ1OT1, MEST, H19 and MEG3) was further analysed by deep bisulfite sequencing, which allows analysis at the single-cell level. Using OSMA, we found a significantly increased variation in the DNA methylation values of the maternally methylated gene KCNQ1OT1 in samples with abnormal sperm parameters. DBS showed that normozoospermic samples had a homogenous pattern of DNA methylation, whereas oligoasthenozoospermic samples contained discrete populations of spermatozoa with either normal or abnormal methylation patterns. Aberrant methylation of H19 appears to occur preferentially on the maternally inherited allele. Our results demonstrate the presence of epigenetic mosaicism in the semen of oligoasthenozoospermic men, which probably results from errors in imprint erasure. PMID:25336341

Laurentino, Sandra; Beygo, Jasmin; Nordhoff, Verena; Kliesch, Sabine; Wistuba, Joachim; Borgmann, Jennifer; Buiting, Karin; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Gromoll, Jörg

2015-03-01

167

[Surgery of male infertility: an update.  

PubMed

Surgery for male infertility includes three main areas: varicocele surgery, recanalization of seminal tract, sperm retrieval.Varicocele treatment in infertily is still controversial. Recent scientific evidence appears to demonstrate that in selected cases varicocele treatment is beneficial in improving semen parameters and pregnancy rate. The key for the success of treatment seems to be a correct indication. It is our opinion that varicocele should be treated in presence of abnormal semen parameters, when clinically significant, and in adolescents with atrophy of the affected testis. So far, no specific technique, either surgical, microsurgical or sclerotherapic, can be considered the gold standard. Good results in our hands have been obtained with the microsurgical lymphatic sparing high ligation of internal spermatic vein.Innovations in surgery for seminal tract obstructions include the new tubular invagination techniques for epididimovasostomy, which showed excellent results with a simplified and time-saving microsurgical approach. In distal obstructions, a new transperineal ultrasound-guided approach has been proposed for the diagnostic work-up and treatment. Advantages of this technique and of the TURED must be balanced with those of immediate sperm retrieval for ART.In sperm retrieval, microTESE represents the most important surgical evolution in non-obstructive azoospermia. We have recently proposed a new stepwise approach starting with a minimal equatorial incision for conventional testicular biopsy which is extended to perform microTESE only when no sperm is retrieved. In this way microTESE is offered only to patients who really need it. Another field of innovation is sperm retrieval for ICSI in patients with Klinefelter Syndrome. PMID:25214369

Franco, Giorgio; Misuraca, Leonardo; Ciletti, Mario; Leonardo, Costantino; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Palminteri, Enzo; De Dominicis, Carlo

2014-09-12

168

Researchers are developing 3D approaches for in vitro ovarian follicle maturation, a promising therapy for infertility.  

E-print Network

therapy for infertility. NORTHWESTERN CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TISSUE ENGINEERING Principal) Objective: The in vitro maturation of ovarian follicles is a potential therapy for female infertility

Shull, Kenneth R.

169

Infertility in public health: the case of Norway  

PubMed Central

Infertility is a health issue that demonstrates how unequal access to health care is at a global level. In the poorer segments­­ of the world, and in poor parts of wealthy societies, access is often minimal or non-existent. Public and lay attitudes to modern infertility treatment have been heavily debated alongside development of methods. I have looked at the changes in the public discourse in modern media, legislation, politics, and among professionals. The paper seeks to present and discuss some of these changes as they have evolved in one of the countries that have had one of the more strict laws regulating access to treatment, namely Norway. It is a country that nevertheless offers treatment in the public health system. The paper also tries to connect this discussion to the difficulties faced in every attempt to expand­­ infertility services to the developing world. PMID:25013709

Sundby, J.

2010-01-01

170

Global infertility and the globalization of new reproductive technologies: illustrations from Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infertility is a problem of global proportions, affecting on average 8–12 percent of couples worldwide. In some societies, however—particularly those in the “infertility belt” of sub-Saharan Africa—as many as one-third of all couples are unable to conceive. Factors causing high rates of tubal infertility in parts of the developing world include sexually transmitted, postpartum, and postabortion infections; however, male infertility,

Marcia C. Inhorn

2003-01-01

171

Associated Factors with Male Infertility: A Case Control Study  

PubMed Central

Objective: Sperm analysis is an important step to evaluate and diagnose male’s infertility. The present study aimed to determine associated factors with males’ infertility by using semen analysis. Materials and Methods: In this study 96 men were evaluated who attended to the infertility clinics of Ilam province, western Iran between May 2010 to May 2011. Semen analysis was done using the Weili Dynamic Sperm Analysis software adapted to the WHO classification. Based on movement and speed characters, sperms were classified to either A, B, C or D classes. Participants were stratified into two groups that called “Oligospermia (OS)” with sperm counts of less than 20 million in mL (n=48) and “Non-Oligospermia (NOS)” with values more than determined cutoff point (n=48). Results: The Mean age ±SD for OS and NOS group were 29.9 ±5.1 y and 31.17 ±5.24 y, respectively (p>0.05). Overall, 62.5% of OS and 31.2% of NOS were clinically infertile (OR=3.6, CI, 1.5-8.5, p=0.01). A significant difference was found between job and live ratio(A+B+C) in NOS group (F=2.8, p<0.05). Conclusion: Prevalence of infertility was higher in the OS men compared to the NOS group. The main risk factors in the OS group were History of Varicocele surgery and residence site of patients that are totally similar to the NOS men. Further case-control studies and clinical trials are recommended to recognize infertility causes in men. PMID:25386439

Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza Hafezi; Yasemi, Masood; Peyman, Hadi; Khajavikhan, Javaher; Yaghoubi, Monireh; Bimanand, Lida

2014-01-01

172

Infertility: from a personal to a public health problem.  

PubMed Central

The inability to conceive a child is most often viewed as a private matter, but public health perspectives and skills can contribute greatly to our knowledge about infertility, and the development of effective and rational public policy for prevention, access to health care, and regulation of new technologies. We offer a primer of public health aspects of infertility in an effort to encourage the broad spectrum of public health professionals to become more knowledgeable about these topics and join in the national debate about preventive strategies, cost-benefit assessment, resource allocation, and ethics. Images p494-a p495-a p499-a p506-a PMID:10670617

Fidler, A T; Bernstein, J

1999-01-01

173

Recent Advances in the Management of Infertility of Women  

PubMed Central

The management of infertility rests on correct diagnosis of the reasons for failure to conceive. Both marriage partners must be examined and an adequate history taken of both. Dealing with infertility in women involves taking complete menstrual history, testing for endometriosis, examination of the cervix, testing for sperm antibody and investigation of the tubal factor. Endocrine disorders deserve special attention, especially those which point to failure to ovulate. Finally, there are many cases where no adequate reason for failure to conceive can be found—for these cases supportive therapy is the only treatment. PMID:20468559

Mitton, D. M.; Macleod, S. C.

1970-01-01

174

Infertility: Towards an Awareness of a Need among Family Life Practitioners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses emotional problems related to infertility investigation and treatment. Reviews causes and treatment of infertility, coping patterns, and the role of counselors and family life educators in easing the crises of infertility and facilitating successful resolution of associated emotional problems. (JAC)

Porter, Nancy L.; Christopher, F. Scott

1984-01-01

175

What Are the Issues Confronting Infertile Women? A Qualitative and Quantitative Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Infertility is a stressful experience, yet little is known about the specific issues confronting infertile women. In the present study, researchers sought to identify themes important to infertile women and examine possible associations with mental health levels. Using qualitative content analysis, researchers analyzed the email messages of 57…

Hammerli, Katja; Znoj, Hansjorg; Berger, Thomas

2010-01-01

176

The Effect of Social Coping Resources and Growth-Fostering Relationships on Infertility Stress in Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The experience of infertility often results in multiple stresses and needs for coping in these women. Study examines the relationship between the uses of social coping resources, growth-fostering relationships, and infertility stress. Results support the use of social coping resources for coping with infertility stress. (Contains 62 references and…

Gibson, Donna M.; Myers, Jane E.

2002-01-01

177

Prolactin secretion in infertile men before and after treatment with bromocriptine  

E-print Network

Prolactin secretion in infertile men before and after treatment with bromocriptine D. BOUCHER J. This report studies prolactin secretion in infertile men and the effect of bro- mocriptine treatment. Twelve normal and 90 infertile men are studied. Prolactin, LH, FSH and testosterone are specifically

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

178

Increased egg infertility associated with translocating inbred takahe (Porphyrio hochstetteri) to island refuges in New Zealand  

E-print Network

Increased egg infertility associated with translocating inbred takahe (Porphyrio hochstetteri infertility than birds that have remained within their natural habitat range. For takahe, whether breeders had success. The coecient of inbreeding was high for island takahe but high infertility and low juvenile

Jamieson, Ian

179

Relationship between oxidative stress, semen characteristics, and clinical diagnosis in men undergoing infertility investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine whether particular semen characteristics in various clinical diagnoses of infertility are associated with high oxidative stress and whether any group of infertile men is more likely to have high seminal oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in sperm physiological functions, but elevated levels of ROS or oxidative stress are related to male infertility.Design:

Fabio F Pasqualotto; Rakesh K Sharma; David R Nelson; Anthony J Thomas; Ashok Agarwal

2000-01-01

180

XX/XY chromosomal chimerism in infertile sheep of the Cambridge breed  

E-print Network

XX/XY chromosomal chimerism in infertile sheep of the Cambridge breed JJB Gill1 DAR Davies2 of Domestic Animals; Toulouse-Auzeville, 10-13 July 1990) sheep / chimerism / XX/XY / infertility-type external genitalia. Apart from this animal, all the ultimately infertile females showed no sign

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

181

Revised 6/1/2011 Request for Infertility Treatment Expense Reimbursement  

E-print Network

Revised 6/1/2011 Request for Infertility Treatment Expense Reimbursement Employee Name/Explanation: ______________________________________________________ #12;Revised 6/1/2011 Information about the Infertility Treatment Reimbursement Benefit: Description for fees incurred as a result of infertility treatments or services as follows: · Maximum reimbursement per

Myers, Lawrence C.

182

Ikbkap/Elp1 Deficiency Causes Male Infertility by Disrupting Meiotic Progression  

E-print Network

Ikbkap/Elp1 Deficiency Causes Male Infertility by Disrupting Meiotic Progression Fu-Jung Lin1 Deficiency Causes Male Infertility by Disrupting Meiotic Progression. PLoS Genet 9(5): e1003516. doi:10 in developmental defects, including mental retardation in Trisomy 21, infertility, to name two [1]. During

Zhang, Yi

183

Estimation of the frequency of involuntary infertility on a nation-1 wide basis2  

E-print Network

1 Estimation of the frequency of involuntary infertility on a nation-1 wide basis2 3 Running title remain infertile is challenging. Our aim was to describe the couple4 fecundity (in terms of frequency of involuntary infertility) among the general population living5 in France. METHODS: We used a current

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

184

The better prognosis in secondary infertility is associated with a higher proportion of ovulation disorders.  

PubMed

To determine the reason for the higher pregnancy rate in couples with secondary infertility, the authors compared 237 infertile couples who had a previous pregnancy in the current partnership (secondary infertility) with 135 infertile couples in whom the woman had been pregnant only in a previous partnership and 925 couples with primary infertility. Couples with secondary infertility had the highest proportion of ovulation disorders (36%); these couples with secondary infertility and an ovulation disorder had the shortest duration of infertility (26 months). Cumulative pregnancy rates at 36 months were 56% in secondary fertility, 44% in primary infertility, and 42% in pregnancy in a previous partnership (P = 0.001). In this study, the better prognosis in secondary infertility may be related to the higher proportion of couples with ovulation disorders, who had a shorter duration of infertility. Abortion rates in the earlier pregnancies with current or previous partners were 37% and 30%, respectively; after the period of infertility, the abortion rates were 14% and 12%, respectively. PMID:3699169

Collins, J A; Rand, C A; Wilson, E H; Wrixon, W; Casper, R F

1986-05-01

185

Psychological and relationship changes of couples undergoing an infertility investigation: Some implications for counsellors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emotional and psychological aspects of the experience of infertility have been largely ignored by researchers. A study was accordingly undertaken of 43 infertile couples who were undergoing medical investigation of their fertility problems. Preliminary analysis of the data suggests that the infertility investigation was most stressful for the participants at the time of the initial medical interview, and that

Judith C. Daniluk; Arthur Leader; Patrick J. Taylor

1987-01-01

186

Are there any clinical signs and symptoms that are related to endometriosis in infertile women?  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to assess the physical signs and clinical symptoms associated with endometriosis in infertile women. STUDY DESIGN: This case-control study was carried out in an academic tertiary hospital. There were 174 infertile women with endometriosis and 174 infertile women without endometriosis, all of them studied by laparoscopy. Before laparoscopy a standard interview and a standard physical examination

Roberto Matorras; Fernando Rodríguez; Jose Ignacio Pijoan; Enrique Soto; Carlos Pérez; Olga Ramón; Francisco Rodríguez-Escudero

1996-01-01

187

Gender and Infertility: A Relational Approach To Counseling Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Relational Model (J. V. Jordan, 1995) of women's development is a theory that explains women's development in a context of relationships, specifically relationships that promote growth for self and others. This model is applied to counseling women who are experiencing infertility, and a case presentation is provided to illustrate the approach.…

Gibson, Donna M.; Myers, Jane E.

2000-01-01

188

Incorporating Ideological Context in Counseling Couples Experiencing Infertility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the influence of ideological values on couples' experience of infertility. Contextual issues are considered in terms of how they influence medical decision making as well as emotional factors. Strength-based counseling interventions that attend to couples' diverse values are described. Last, implications for counselors,…

Burnett, Judith A.; Panchal, Krishna

2008-01-01

189

Cultural Considerations in Counseling Couples Who Experience Infertility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Infertility creates challenges affecting various aspects of couples' intimate lives. Practices regarding reproduction are often shaped by cultural messages. Culturally sensitive treatment methods help counselors provide effective therapy to couples with fertility problems. This article describes cultural influences, challenges, and counseling…

Burnett, Judith A.

2009-01-01

190

Five Medical Treatment Stages of Infertility: Implications for Counselors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the marital happiness, state/trait anxiety, coping techniques, and types of support received for a national sample of men and women experiencing the infertility medical process. Suggests that counselors should be aware that medical treatment affects the distress level of the individual and couple and the types of coping used. Further…

Gerrity, Deborah A.

2001-01-01

191

Male infertility testing: reactive oxygen species and antioxidant capacity.  

PubMed

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an integral component of sperm developmental physiology, capacitation, and function. Elevated ROS levels, from processes such as infection or inflammation, can be associated with aberrations of sperm development, function, and fertilizing capacity. We review the impact of ROS on sperm physiology, its place in infertility evaluation, the implications for reproductive outcomes, and antioxidant therapy. Our systematic review of PubMed literature from the last 3 decades focuses on the physiology and etiology of ROS and oxidative stress (OS), evaluation of ROS, and antioxidants. ROS is normally produced physiologically and is used to maintain cellular processes such as sperm maturation, capacitation, and sperm-oocyte interaction. When ROS production exceeds the buffering capacity of antioxidants, OS occurs and can have a negative impact on sperm and fertility. ROS and antioxidant capacity testing can potentially add additional prognostic information to standard laboratory testing for the infertile male, although its role as standard part of an evaluation has yet to be determined. Elevated ROS levels have been implicated with abnormal semen parameters and male infertility, but the impact of ROS on fertilization rates and pregnancy is controversial. This is partly because of the lack of consensus on what type of patients may be suitable for ROS testing and assay standardization. Routine ROS testing for the infertile male is not currently recommended. PMID:25458618

Ko, Edmund Y; Sabanegh, Edmund S; Agarwal, Ashok

2014-12-01

192

Environmental Contaminants and Human Infertility: Hypothesis or Cause for Concern?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Throughout the 1980s and 1990s the crude human birth rate (live births per 1000 population) declined, indicating reduced fertility and suggesting a potential decline in fecundity (the potential to conceive). Detection of environmental contaminants in human tissues, together with reports of a global decline in semen quality, further fueled speculation that human infertility rates are increasing and environmental toxicants are

Warren G. Foster; Michael S. Neal; Myoung-Soek Han; Miguel M. Dominguez

2008-01-01

193

Reproductive endocrinology and infertility training in the Philippines.  

PubMed

This article provides insights into the reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) training in the Philippines offered by the University of the Philippines College of Medicine. First, the paper presents how the structured residency training program in obstetrics and gynecology started in the Philippines, including its subspecializations which include perinatal medicine, maternal medicine, and OB-Gyn ultrasonography, with special emphasis on REI. It then traces the history of the Philippine Society of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (PSREI). The main objective of the Society is to improve the quality of training and practice in reproductive medicine and surgery. Under its established Guideline on Ethics of Infertility Management, PSREI has categorized the qualifications of physicians who should treat patients with infertility problems into three levels: Level I, Level II, and Level III care. The program is, however, constrained by problems such as lack of training centers, cost of instrumentation, lack of research grants, and resistance to accept minimally invasive surgery. The future of the program depends on the support from training centers abroad, increase in the number of local training centers, and availability of more affordable assisted reproductive technology. PMID:12179662

Gonzaga, F P

1998-01-01

194

Original article Infertility of Varroa jacobsoni females after invasion  

E-print Network

was studied in worker brood invaded by a sin- gle mite. Africanized and European colonies of Apis mellifera of infertile mites sampled from colonies of Africanized and European honey bees at the same tropical study site selection and breeding efforts in order to produce European bee strains tolerant against varroatosis. Varroa

Boyer, Edmond

195

Human genetics and diseaseMouse models of male infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spermatogenesis is a complex process that involves stem-cell renewal, genome reorganization and genome repackaging, and that culminates in the production of motile gametes. Problems at all stages of spermatogenesis contribute to human infertility, but few of them can be modelled in vitro or in cell culture. Targeted mutagenesis in the mouse provides a powerful method to analyse these steps and

Howard J. Cooke; Philippa T. K. Saunders

2002-01-01

196

Estimation of the prevalence and causes of infertility in western Siberia.  

PubMed Central

The study examined the epidemiology and causes of infertility in Tomsk, Western Siberia, using methodological approaches recommended by WHO and was based on the findings for a randomly selected sample of 2000 married women aged 18-45 years. Among the respondents, 333 couples were considered infertile since they had not conceived after 12 months or more of unprotected intercourse. This group of infertile couples was offered comprehensive clinical investigations but only 186 couples completed them. The infertility rate in Tomsk was 16.7%, being caused by diseases of the female reproduction system in 52.7% of the couples and by male reproductive diseases in 6.4%. In 38.7% of couples, both spouses suffered from infertility, while in 2.2% of cases the cause of infertility was not determined. Among the causes of female infertility, secondary infertility dominated (12.9% of all the women questioned), while primary infertility affected 3.8% of the women. The most frequent causes of female infertility were disturbances to tubal patency (36.5%) and pelvic adhesions (23.6%). Endocrine pathology was found in 32.8% of cases. The most frequent cause of male infertility was inflammatory disease of male accessory glands (12.9%). In 8.6% of cases infection resulted in obstructive azoospermia. Varicocele was registered in 11.3% of cases, and idiopathic pathospermia in 20.9%. Inflammatory complications among females were 4.2 times more frequent than among males. PMID:9648359

Philippov, O. S.; Radionchenko, A. A.; Bolotova, V. P.; Voronovskaya, N. I.; Potemkina, T. V.

1998-01-01

197

Folic acid supplementation and IVF pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained infertility.  

PubMed

Folic acid supplements are commonly used by infertile women which leads to a positive folate status. However, the effect of folic acid supplements on pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained infertility has not been well investigated. This study evaluated folic acid supplement use and folate status in women with unexplained infertility in relation to IVF pregnancy outcome. In addition, use of folic acid supplements and folate status were compared between women with unexplained infertility and fertile, nonpregnant control women. Women with unexplained infertility used significantly more folic acid supplements and had higher median total folic acid intake from supplements compared with fertile control women (both P < 0.001). Women with unexplained infertility also had significantly higher median plasma folate and lower median plasma homocysteine concentrations than fertile women (both P < 0.001), but folic acid supplementation or folate status were not related to pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained infertility. In conclusion, folic acid supplementation or good folate status did not have a positive effect on pregnancy outcome following infertility treatment in women with unexplained infertility. Folate is one of the B vitamins which has been suggested to be related to infertility. Folic acid is an artificial form of folate which is commonly used in dietary supplements. Folic acid supplementation has been shown to increase folate concentrations and decrease concentrations of the amino acid homocysteine in the blood. Folic acid supplementation is commonly used by infertile women, but the effect on pregnancy outcome in women with a diagnosis of unexplained infertility has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, folic acid supplement use and folate status (concentrations of folate and homocysteine) in women with unexplained infertility were evaluated in relation to pregnancy outcome. In addition, the use of folic acid supplements and folate status were compared between women with unexplained infertility and fertile control women. Our results showed that women with unexplained infertility used considerably more folic acid supplements and had higher total folic acid intake from supplements compared with fertile control women. Women with unexplained infertility had better blood folate and homocysteine concentrations than fertile women, but folic acid supplementation or folate status were not related to pregnancy outcome following the infertility treatment. In conclusion, high folic acid intake or good folate status did not increase the possibility of a birth of a healthy baby after infertility treatment in women with unexplained infertility. PMID:24745837

Murto, T; Skoog Svanberg, A; Yngve, A; Nilsson, T K; Altmäe, S; Wånggren, K; Salumets, A; Stavreus-Evers, A

2014-06-01

198

A qualitative study of Ottawa university students’ awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART)  

PubMed Central

Background Awareness of infertility risk factors is an essential first step to safeguard future fertility. Whereas several studies have examined university students’ awareness of female fertility and related risk factors, the topic of male infertility has not been well examined. The objective of this study was to assess young men and women’s awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, male and female infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2008 with a multi-ethnic sample of sixteen male and twenty-three female Ottawa university students, followed by qualitative data analysis to identify major themes. Interview topics included awareness of male and female infertility risk factors, infertility diagnosis/treatments and personal options in the event of future infertility. Results Participants were generally familiar with infertility as a biomedical health problem, could identify sex-specific risk factors but overestimated fertility of women in their thirties and ART success rates. Reproductive health knowledge gaps and confusion of the physiological life-stage of menopause with infertility were apparent. Most participants would pursue in vitro fertilization or international adoption in the event of personal infertility. Some participants wished to use a ‘natural’ approach and were concerned with potential side effects of ART-related medications. Conclusions The general awareness of infertility in young adults is promising and supports the potential uptake for health promotion of fertility preservation. This study underscores the continued need for comprehensive sexual and reproductive health education and promotion for adolescents and young adults. PMID:23962162

2013-01-01

199

Cellular Angiofibroma of Vagina Presenting with Secondary Infertility  

PubMed Central

Background Cellular angiofibroma, first described in 1997, is known to occur in both genders with equal predilection occurring in middle aged females and older males. Case Presentation In this study, a case of vaginal cellular angiofibroma was reported in a 30 year old female presenting with secondary infertility. The case was diagnosed based on morphology and immunohistochemistry and was treated surgically. The interesting feature of the case was the rarity of its incidence at the vagina and its resemblance to other benign and more aggressive tumours in the same site. Conclusion Cellular angiofibromas are benign tumours, which rarely occur in vagina. Although middle aged females are affected more, cellular angiofibromas can affect females of reproductive age group and can cause secondary infertility. These tu-mours need to be distinguished from other benign tumours and aggressive tumours occurring in the same site. PMID:25202676

Bharti, Jyotsna Naresh; Dey, Biswajit; Raj, Vikram G; Arora, Prerna

2014-01-01

200

Surgical treatment of female infertility: value of paradoxical oophorectomy.  

PubMed Central

The outcome of surgical treatment for infertility in 111 women has been reviewed. The procedures used, depending on the lesions present, were: myomectomy; tubal implantation, anastomosis, and salpingostomy; division of adhesions; ovarian wedge resection; and "paradoxical" oophorectomy. The results are analysed by comparing pregnancy rates after surgery with those for the total time of exposure. Only for division of adhesions and oophorectomy were statistically significant results obtained. Many of the pregnancies, however, occurred soon after operations that had been preceded by long periods of infertility. With single tube patency, which had been proved at laparotomy, contralateral oophorectomy appeared to be of value. In the light of these observations we suggest that in cases of tubal ectopic gestation salpingo-oophorectomy should be considered in preference to salpingectomy when the opposite tube and ovary are healthy. Wedge resection for the Stein-Leventhal syndrome effectively restored ovulatory activity. PMID:943208

Scott, J S; Lynch, E M; Anderson, J A

1976-01-01

201

Nonmosaic 47,XYY syndrome presenting with male infertility: case series.  

PubMed

In this study, we describe nine patients with 47,XYY presenting with male infertility. All patients were subjected to history taking, clinical examination, duplex ultrasonographic examination of the scrotum, endocrinological investigations and cytogenetic analysis of peripheral lymphocytes. Two patients tried intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Our results showed that seven patients were oligospermic and two patients were azoospermic. Bilateral varicocele was detected in seven patients. The hormonal levels in the majority of the patients were within normal range. Two patients showed improvement after varicocelectomy. The wife of one of the oligospermic patients became successfully pregnant after the first trial of ICSI. In conclusion, this report suggests that patients with XYY may present with primary infertility and may show oligospermia and nonobstructive azoospermia. Careful clinical, ultrasonographic, endocrinological and cytogenetic examinations should be a part of their diagnostic work-up for the proper management of these patients. In addition, ICSI may be a hope for some of these patients. PMID:21671976

Abdel-Razic, M M; Abdel-Hamid, I A; ElSobky, E S

2012-06-01

202

Opinion: Natural family planning and the management of infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reproductive behaviour in modern western society has changed dramatically in the last two decades. Parenthood is now well\\u000a planned. If planned pregnancies do not occur as expected, early infertility care is often demanded with the risk of over-treatment.\\u000a Live birth rates in untreated subfertile couples reach nearly 55% in 36 months. During this period, self-monitoring with natural\\u000a family planning (NFP)

Christian Gnoth; Petra Frank-Herrmann; Günter Freundl

2002-01-01

203

Gonadal dysfunction and infertility in kidney transplant patients receiving sirolimus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sirolimus is an immunosupressor of the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR-I) group. Recent studies have emphasized\\u000a a potential impact of sirolimus on male gonadal function. We report our clinical experience with sirolimus-induced gonadal\\u000a dysfunction and infertility in both male and female kidney transplant patients. Of the 170 kidney transplant patients, nine\\u000a (5.3%) patients (six males and three females) were

Yousef Boobes; Bassam Bernieh; Hussein Saadi; M. Raafat Al Hakim; Samra Abouchacra

2010-01-01

204

[48,XXYY men with azoospermia: how to manage infertility?].  

PubMed

48,XXYY syndrome is a rare form of sex chromosomal aneuploidy. Usually considered as a variant of Klinefelter syndrome because of shared features (azoospermia, tall stature, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism), it is a separate entity because diagnostic is currently made in prepubertal boy with neuro-psychological disorders. We here report the case of a 48,XXYY patient consulting for adult infertility and the indication to perform testicular sperm extraction is discussed. PMID:24934769

Roche, C; Sonigo, C; Benmiloud-Tandjaoui, N; Boujenah, J; Benzacken, B; Poncelet, C; Hugues, J-N

2014-01-01

205

The use of fluorescent in situ hybridization in male infertility  

PubMed Central

Male factors are implicated in up to 50% of couples being evaluated and treated for infertility with advanced assisted reproductive technologies. Genetic abnormalities, including sperm chromosome aneuploidy as well as structural aberrations, are one of the major causes of infertility. The use of chromosome-specific DNA probes labeled with fluorochromes, particularly the combination with multiple probes, has been used to indirectly study the sperm chromosome by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Clinically, this technique is also used to assess the sperm of men recovering from gonadotoxic treatment. Recent advances in this technology facilitate the evaluation of sperm aneuploidy. Sperm FISH is a widely used screening tool to aid in counseling couples with severe male factor infertility, especially in cases of prior repeated in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection failure or recurrent pregnancy loss. Automation of FISH imaging and analysis, as well as the development of emerging techniques such as comparative genomic hybridization, will all contribute to the promise of future diagnostic approaches aimed at improving the quality, ease, and efficiency of aneuploidy analysis. PMID:21789092

Hwang, Kathleen; Weedin, John W.; Lamb, Dolores J.

2010-01-01

206

STAG3 is a strong candidate gene for male infertility.  

PubMed

Oligo- and azoospermia are severe forms of male infertility. However, known genetic factors account only for a small fraction of the cases. Recently, whole-exome sequencing in a large consanguineous family with inherited premature ovarian failure (POF) identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in the STAG3 gene leading to a premature stop codon. STAG3 encodes a meiosis-specific subunit of the cohesin complex, a large proteinaceous ring with DNA-entrapping ability that ensures sister chromatid cohesion and enables correct synapsis and segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis. The pathogenicity of the STAG3 mutations was functionally validated with a loss-of-function mouse model for STAG3 in oogenesis. However, and since none of the male members of this family was homozygous for the mutant allele, we only could hypothesized its putative involvement in male infertility. In this report, we show that male mice devoid of Stag3 display a severe meiotic phenotype that includes a meiotic arrest at zygonema-like shortening of their chromosome axial elements/lateral elements, partial loss of centromeric cohesion at early prophase and maintenance of the ability to initiate but not complete RAD51- and DMC1-mediated double-strand break repair, demonstrating that STAG3 is a crucial cohesin subunit in mammalian gametogenesis and supporting our proposal that STAG3 is a strong candidate gene for human male infertility. PMID:24608227

Llano, Elena; Gomez-H, Laura; García-Tuñón, Ignacio; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel; Caburet, Sandrine; Barbero, Jose Luis; Schimenti, John C; Veitia, Reiner A; Pendas, Alberto M

2014-07-01

207

Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury.  

PubMed

Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses, and vacuum constriction devices. In anejaculatory patients who wish to father children, semen retrieval is necessary. Penile vibratory stimulation is recommended as the first line of treatment. Patients who fail penile vibratory stimulation can be referred for electroejaculation. If this approach is not possible, prostate massage is an alternative. Surgical sperm retrieval should be considered as a last resort when other methods fail. Most men with SCI have a unique semen profile characterized by normal sperm count but abnormally low sperm motility. Scientific investigations indicate that accessory gland dysfunction and abnormal semen constituents contribute to the problem. Despite abnormalities, sperm from men with SCI can successfully induce pregnancy. In selected couples, the simple method of intravaginal insemination is a viable option. Another option is intrauterine insemination. The efficacy of intrauterine insemination increases as the total motile sperm count inseminated increases. In vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are options in cases of extremely low total motile sperm count. Reproductive outcomes for SCI male factor infertility are similar to outcomes for general male factor infertility. PMID:20157304

Brackett, Nancy L; Lynne, Charles M; Ibrahim, Emad; Ohl, Dana A; Sønksen, Jens

2010-03-01

208

Hypothetical Link between Infertility and Genetically Modified Food.  

PubMed

It is speculated that genetically modified food (GMF)/genetically modified organism (GMO) is responsible for infertility development. The risk associated with a wide use of GMFs/GMOs provides the basis for social criticism. However, to date, it has not been clarified whether the harmful effects is directly resulted from products of genetic modifications or from the transgenesis process. Extensive experience with the risk assessment of whole foods has been applied recently on the safety and nutritional testing of GMFs/GMOs. Investigations including sub-acute, chronic, reproductive, multi-generation and carcinogenicity studies have tested the safety of GMFs. We extrapolated the potential risks associated with GMFs/GMOs on reproduction, and analyzed the multi-aspect linked between infertility and GMFs/GMOs. It could be conjectured that GMFs/GMOs could exist potential hazard on reproduction, linking to the development of infertility through influencing the endocrine metabolism, endometriosis. However, little evidence shows the impaction on embryo or reproductive related tumor due to the limited literatures, and needs further research. The article presents some related patents on GMFs/GMOs, and some methods for tracking GMOs. PMID:25342149

Gao, Mingxia; Li, B; Yuan, Wenzhen; Zhao, Lihui; Zhang, Xuehong

2014-10-24

209

Ensuring access to education and services on infertility for the underserved.  

PubMed

Race, culture, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (SES) all influence how men and women cope with cancer-related infertility and whether they use infertility services. Unfortunately, these variables have not yet been studied in samples of cancer survivors. This article provides an overview of Medline-cited studies from 1980 to the present that examine the influence of ethnicity and socioeconomic status on the use of infertility services. Although underserved groups are disproportionately at risk for infertility in the United States, they are also less likely than middle- to high-SES Caucasians to seek medical treatment for this problem. Barriers to their use of infertility treatment include lack of knowledge, lack of financial resources, and cultural norms. It is very important for oncology care providers to take ethnicity and SES into account when counseling patients about infertility and to be aware of cultural and religious values with regard to assisted reproductive technology. PMID:15784836

Jenkins, Rosell L

2005-01-01

210

The psychological impact of male factor infertility and fertility treatment on men: a qualitative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the subjective experiences of males attending a fertility treatment unit due to male factor infertility (MFI). In particular, the study aimed to explore how infertile males construe their infertility and how this impacts on their psychological well-being. In-depth interviews were conducted with nine males and analysed using grounded theory. Three inter-dependent themes were identified: (1) Impact to

Maeve Dooley; Aonghus Nolan; K. M. Sarma

2011-01-01

211

A survey of relationship between anxiety, depression and duration of infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: A cross sectional study was designed to survey the relationship between anxiety\\/depression and duration\\/cause of infertility, in Vali-e-Asr Reproductive Health Research Center, Tehran, Iran. METHODS: After obtaining their consents, 370 female patients with different infertility causes participated in, and data gathered by Beck Depression Inventory(BDI) and Cattle questionnaires for surveying anxiety and depression due to the duration of infertility.

Fatemeh Ramezanzadeh; Malek Mansour Aghssa; Nasrin Abedinia; Farid Zayeri; Navid Khanafshar; Mamak Shariat; Mina Jafarabadi

2004-01-01

212

In vitro fertilization for male infertility: when and how?  

PubMed

The first observation that in vitro fertilization (IVF) was useful for treating oligozoospermia and oligoasthenozoospermia was reported by Fishel and Edwards in 1982. This was followed by a series of cases indicating the value of IVF in such cases. Conventional IVF has been modified and refined to achieve increased rates of conception in cases of male factor infertility. Methods such as high insemination concentration IVF for the treatment of teratozoospermia and microscopic IVF for the treatment of oligozoospermia have had some impact on fertilization and pregnancy rates; however, reports of success are varied. The recent advent of micromanipulation and, in particular, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has overshadowed the use of these modified IVF procedures. Because of the high fertilization and pregnancy rates achieved with ICSI, other micromanipulation techniques (subzonal insemination and partial zona dissection) have been abandoned; there have also been suggestions that other more conventional techniques, i.e. IVF, should also be abandoned and that ICSI become the sole technique for the treatment of infertility. The rapid increase in the number of centres using ICSI has led to extreme pressure for individual units to achieve high fertilization and pregnancy rates and there is a temptation to assign all patients to ICSI treatment. It is important that, in this highly competitive environment, new techniques are not applied haphazardly and reduced to the mere injection of gametes and achievement of pregnancy regardless of the cause of infertility. In his 1986 IVF--Historical Perspective, Fishel quoted Auguste Comte: 'to understand science it is necessary to know its history'. IVF has much recent history in animal and also human work. Although ICSI is the most significant therapeutic advance in male infertility treatment, its application to human IVF is only 4 years old, with a paucity of animal studies on which to rely. For this reason IVF still plays a very important role in the treatment of male factor infertility and should only be ruled out when it has failed previously or the number of available sperm is limited. PMID:9692012

Hall, J; Fishel, S

1997-12-01

213

Laparoscopy:As a First Line Diagnostic Tool for Infertility Evaluation  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The role of diagnostic and therapeutic hystero-laparoscopy in women with infertility is well established. It is helpful not only in the identification of the cause but also in the management of the same at that time. Materials and Methods: In this study, the aim was to analyse the results of 203 women on whom laparoscopy for the evaluation of infertility was done. This study was carried out at a tertiary level hospital from 2005 to 2012. The study group included 121 women with primary infertility and 82 women with secondary infertility. Women with incomplete medical records and isolated male factor infertility were excluded from the study. Results: It was observed that tubal disease was the responsible factor in 62.8% women with primary infertility and 54.8% women with secondary infertility followed by pelvic adhesions in 33% and 31.5%, ovarian factor in 14% and 8.5%, pelvic endometriosis in 9.9% and 6.1% women respectively. Thus tubal factor infertility is still a major cause of infertility in developing countries and its management at an early stage is important to prevent an irreversible damage. At the same time, it also directs which couples would be benefited from assisted reproductive technologies (ART). PMID:25478408

Khatuja, Ritu; Juneja, Atul; Mehta, Sumita

2014-01-01

214

Clinical management and therapeutic outcome of infertile couples in southeast Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background Infertility is highly prevalent in Nigeria and most infertile couples in southeast Nigeria are offered conventional forms of treatment, which consist mainly of ovulation induction and tubal surgery, due to limited availability and high cost of endoscopic and assisted reproductive technologies like laparoscopy and in vitro fertilization. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of infertility, outcome of infertility investigation, and the treatment outcome of infertile couples following therapeutic interventions in southeast Nigeria over a 12-month period. Methods This was a prospective cross-sectional study of 218 consecutive infertile couples presenting for infertility management at the infertility clinics of two tertiary health institutions in Enugu, southeast Nigeria. Infertility investigations were carried out on these couples using the available conventional diagnostic facilities. Following the results of the investigations/diagnosis, conventional treatment was offered to the couples as appropriate. Data analysis was both descriptive and inferential at 95% confidence level. Results The mean age of the women was 33.5±4.62 (range: 15–49) years. Most (58.3% [n=127]) were nulliparous. The prevalence of infertility was 12.1%. Infertility was primary in 28.4% (n=62) and secondary in 71.6% (n=156). Female etiologic factors were responsible in 32.1% (n=70), male factors in 26.1% (n=57), and a combination of male/female factors in 29.4% (n=64). The etiology was unknown in 12.4% (n=27). Tubal factors 23.8 % (n=52) and ovulation failures 26.1% (n=57) are common female factors implicated. Pregnancy rate following treatment was 16.7% (n=28). Multivariate regression analysis indicates that younger age of ?30 years, duration of infertility ?5 years, and female factor infertility were associated with higher pregnancy outcome following treatment. Conclusion The prevalence of infertility is high and pregnancy rate following conventional treatment is poor. There is a need to improve facilities for managing infertility as well as making artificial reproductive techniques readily available, accessible, and affordable. PMID:25328391

Menuba, Ifeanyi E; Ugwu, Emmanuel O; Obi, Samuel N; Lawani, Lucky O; Onwuka, Chidinma I

2014-01-01

215

Measuring infertility in populations: constructing a standard definition for use with demographic and reproductive health surveys  

PubMed Central

Background Infertility is a significant disability, yet there are no reliable estimates of its global prevalence. Studies on infertility prevalence define the condition inconsistently, rendering the comparison of studies or quantitative summaries of the literature difficult. This study analyzed key components of infertility to develop a definition that can be consistently applied to globally available household survey data. Methods We proposed a standard definition of infertility and used it to generate prevalence estimates using 53 Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). The analysis was restricted to the subset of DHS that contained detailed fertility information collected through the reproductive health calendar. We performed sensitivity analyses for key components of the definition and used these to inform our recommendations for each element of the definition. Results Exposure type (couple status, contraceptive use, and intent), exposure time, and outcomes were key elements of the definition that we proposed. Our definition produced estimates that ranged from 0.6% to 3.4% for primary infertility and 8.7% to 32.6% for secondary infertility. Our sensitivity analyses showed that using an exposure measure of five years is less likely to misclassify fertile unions as infertile. Additionally, using a current, rather than continuous, measure of contraceptive use over five years resulted in a median relative error in secondary infertility of 20.7% (interquartile range of relative error [IQR]: 12.6%-26.9%), while not incorporating intent produced a corresponding error in secondary infertility of 58.2% (IQR: 44.3%-67.9%). Conclusions In order to estimate the global burden of infertility, prevalence estimates using a consistent definition need to be generated. Our analysis provided a recommended definition that could be applied to widely available global household data. We also summarized potential biases that should be considered when making estimates of infertility prevalence using household survey data. PMID:22938182

2012-01-01

216

Clinical genetic testing for male factor infertility: current applications and future directions.  

PubMed

Spermatogenesis involves the aggregated action of up to 2300 genes, any of which, could, potentially, provide targets for diagnostic tests of male factor infertility. Contrary to the previously proposed common variant hypothesis for common diseases such as male infertility, genome-wide association studies and targeted gene sequencing in cohorts of infertile men have identified only a few gene polymorphisms that are associated with male infertility. Unfortunately, the search for genetic variants associated with male infertility is further hampered by the lack of viable animal models of human spermatogenesis, difficulty in robustly phenotyping infertile men and the complexity of pedigree studies in male factor infertility. In this review, we describe basic genetic principles involved in understanding the genetic basis of male infertility and examine the utility and proper clinical use of the proven genetic assays of male factor infertility, specifically Y chromosome microdeletions, chromosomal translocations, karyotype, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutation analysis and sperm genetic tests. Unfortunately, these tests are only able to diagnose the cause of about 20% of male factor infertility. The remainder of the review will be devoted to examining novel tests and diagnostic tools that have the potential to explain the other 80% of male factor infertility that is currently classified as idiopathic. Those tests include epigenetic analysis of the spermatozoa and the evaluation of rare genetic variants and copy number variations in patients. Success in advancing to the implementation of such areas is not only dependent on technological advances in the laboratory, but also improved phenotyping in the clinic. PMID:24711280

Hotaling, J; Carrell, D T

2014-05-01

217

Genetic susceptibility to male infertility: news from genome-wide association studies.  

PubMed

A thorough understanding of the genetic basis of male infertility has eluded researchers in spite of significant efforts to identify novel genetic causes of the disease, particularly over the past decade. Approximately half of male factor infertility cases have no known cause; however, it is likely that the majority of idiopathic male factor infertility cases have some unidentified genetic basis. Well-established genetic causes of male infertility are limited to Y chromosome microdeletions and Klinefelter's syndrome, together accounting for 10-20% of cases of severe spermatogenic failure. In addition to these, several genetic polymorphisms have been demonstrated to be significantly associated with male infertility. The discovery of new genetic associations with male infertility has been hampered by two primary factors. First, most studies are underpowered because of insufficient sample size and ethnic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Second, most studies evaluate a single gene, an approach that is very inefficient in the context of male infertility, considering that many hundreds of genes are involved in the process of testicular development and spermatogenesis. Significant recent advances in microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled the application of whole-genome approaches to the study of male infertility. We recently performed a pilot genome-wide association study (GWAS) for severe spermatogenic failure, and several additional male infertility GWAS have since been published. More recently, genomic microarray tools have been applied to the association of copy number variants with male infertility. These studies are beginning to shed additional light on the genetic architecture of male infertility, and whole-genome studies have proven effective in identifying novel genetic causes of the disease. This review will discuss some of the recent findings of these whole-genome studies as well as future directions for this research that will likely be the most productive moving forward. PMID:24574159

Aston, K I

2014-05-01

218

Infertility treatment outcome in sub groups of obese population  

PubMed Central

Background Obesity is a common disorder with a negative impact on IVF treatment outcome. It is not clear whether morbidly obese women (BMI >= 35 kg/m2) respond to treatment differently as compared to obese women (BMI = 30–34.9 kg/m2) in IVF. Our aim was to compare the outcome of IVF or ICSI treatments in obese patients to that in morbidly obese patients. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted in a tertiary care centre. Patients inclusion criteria were as follows; BMI ? 30, age 20–40 years old, first cycle IVF/ICSI treatment with primary infertility and long follicular pituitary down regulation protocol. Results A total of 406 obese patients (group A) and 141 morbidly obese patients (group B) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Average BMI was 32.1 ± 1.38 kg/m2 for group A versus 37.7 ± 2.99 kg/m2 for group B. Patient age, cause of infertility, duration of stimulation, fertilization rate, and number of transferred embryos were similar in both groups. Compared to group A, group B had fewer medium size and mature follicles (14 vs. 16), fewer oocytes collected (7 vs. 9) and required higher doses of HMG (46.2 vs. 38.5 amps). There was also a higher cancellation rate in group B (28.3% vs. 19%) and lower clinical pregnancy rate per started cycle (19.9% vs. 28.6%). Conclusion In a homogenous infertile and obese patient population stratified according to their BMI, morbid obesity is associated with unfavorable IVF/ICSI cycle outcome as evidenced by lower pregnancy rates. It is recommended that morbidly obese patients undergo appropriate counseling before the initiation of this expensive and invasive therapy. PMID:19473499

Awartani, Khalid A; Nahas, Samar; Al Hassan, Saad H; Al Deery, Mashael A; Coskun, Serdar

2009-01-01

219

An evidence-based evaluation of endometriosis-associated infertility.  

PubMed

Although endometriosis is associated with infertility, a clear causal relationship has yet to be established, unless adhesive disease is found. Despite this indirect association, multiple theories have been promulgated and studies are currently underway to investigate theoretic pathogenetic mechanisms. The data regarding the treatment of endometriosis-associated infertility are limited and conflicting; however, some general preliminary conclusions can be drawn. It seems that, with early-stage disease, surgical treatment increases pregnancy rates. Using the US Preventive Services Task Force classification scheme, the evidence in support of this finding is of the highest quality, or level I. Surgical treatment for moderate and severe disease also confers benefit, although the evidence in support of this treatment is of lesser quality, level II-3 by the scheme. Medical treatment, particularly if it induces an anovulatory state, has no benefit and may delay fertility. This evidence is again of the highest quality, with a classification of level I. Although assisted reproductive technologies are of benefit regarding fertility for women with endometriosis, the IVF evidence is inconclusive, with both treatments being evaluated by at least one randomized, controlled trial conferring a level I classification to the evidence. It is unclear at this time whether endometriomas have an impact on IVF outcome. The evidence consists of only a few lower-quality studies, with a classification level of II-2. Despite the haziness of current insight into the treatment of endometriosis-associated infertility, well-designed clinical trials and basic mechanistic investigations are underway in many reproductive medicine centers. As the data from these scientific inquiries emerge, clinicians will have a clearer view of effective treatment regimens for endometriosis. PMID:14560892

Pritts, Elizabeth A; Taylor, Robert N

2003-09-01

220

[Inherited thrombophilic factors in women with secondary infertility].  

PubMed

Because of the presence of additional confounding factors, such as cervical incompetence or uterine infections, the impact of inherited thrombophilia in women with second infertility has been hard to assess. The evaluation of the significance of the most common inherited thrombophilic factors - Factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin gene mutation 20210 G > A (FII), polymorphism (PL) 677 C > T in MTHFR, PL A1/A2 in platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and PAL-1 PL 4G/5G in 35 women with two or more secondary (who have given birth to at least one child) recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) before 14 weeks of gestation compared to 70 healthy women with no history of RPL and at least one uncomplicated full-term pregnancy, has been performed. Eight out of 35 women with secondary RPL (25.7%) and 6 out of 70 controls (8.6%) have had FVL or FII 20210 G > A (OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 1.05-13.2, p = 0.038). Five (14.3%) women with secondary infertility were carriers for FVL and four (11.4%) for FII 20210 G > A, corresponding to four (5.7%) and two (2.9%) of the women in the control group. The carrier status for MTHFR 677 C > T (TT genotype), PL A1/A2 and PL 4G/5G (4G/4G genotype) was as follows: 11.4%, 28% and 30.8% in patients and 14.3%, 17.1% and 24.3% in controls without significant difference between the groups. Despite of the presence of background factors, an appreciable role of inherited thrombophilia in secondary RPL was established, which enforces thrombophilia testing and management of women with second infertility as well as women with primary RPL. PMID:23234018

Ivanov, P; Gecheva, Sv; Tsvyatkovska, Tsv; Georgieva, G; Komsa-Penkova, R; Konova, E; Simeonova, M; Tanchev, St

2012-01-01

221

Impaired E-cadherin expression in human spermatozoa in a male factor infertility subset signifies E-cadherin-mediated  

E-print Network

Impaired E-cadherin expression in human spermatozoa in a male factor infertility subset signifies E in a human male infertility disorder points towards genetic defects causing failure in gamete interactions. Ã?

Abraham, Nader G.

222

Natural procreative technology for infertility and recurrent miscarriage  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To study the outcomes of women with infertility or miscarriage treated with natural procreative technology (NaProTechnology or NPT), a systematic medical approach to promoting conception in vivo; and to compare the outcomes with those previously published from a general practice in Ireland. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting An urban Canadian primary care practice in which the physician had a part-time practice in NPT. Participants Couples with infertility or recurrent miscarriage who received treatment in the practice between August 2000 and July 2006. Intervention All couples were taught to identify the fertile time of their menstrual cycles using the Creighton Model FertilityCare System (CrMS) and completed a standard NPT evaluation. Many also received additional medical treatment to enhance conception in vivo. Main outcome measures Live birth was the primary outcome; secondary outcomes included conceptions, multiple births, low birth weight, and prematurity. Results A total of 108 couples received NPT and were included in the analysis, of which 19 (18%) reported having 2 or more previously unexplained miscarriages. The average female age was 35.4 years. Couples had been attempting to conceive for a mean of 3.2 years. Twenty-two participants (20%) had previously given birth; 24 (22%) had previous intrauterine insemination; and 9 (8%) had previous assisted reproductive technology. The cumulative adjusted proportion of first live births for those completing up to 24 months of NPT treatment was 66 per 100 couples, and the crude proportion was 38%. The cumulative adjusted proportion of first conceptions was 73 per 100 couples, and the crude proportion was 47%. Of the 51 couples who conceived, 12 couples (24%) conceived with CrMS instruction alone, 35 (69%) conceived with CrMS and NPT medical treatment, and 4 (8%) conceived after additional surgical treatment. All births were singleton births; 54% were born at 37 weeks’ gestation or later; and 78% had birth weights of 2500 g or greater. Conclusion Natural procreative technology in a family physician’s office was effective in treating infertility and miscarriage with outcomes that were comparable to those in an NPT general practice in Ireland. Larger multicentre prospective studies to compare NPT directly to other forms of infertility treatment are warranted. PMID:22734170

Tham, Elizabeth; Schliep, Karen; Stanford, Joseph

2012-01-01

223

[Diagnosis and treatment of pelvic splenosis during exploration of infertility].  

PubMed

Splenosis is the heterotopic autotransplantation of splenic tissue that usually follows traumatic splenectomy. Rare pelvic localizations are reported. We report here a case of a 36-year-old woman, followed for secondary infertility. On transvaginal ultrasound pelvic scanning hypervascular paracervical nodules were demonstrated. Pelvic splenosis was suspected regarding the patient's medical past (post-traumatic splenectomy). Surgical exploration and resection were decided considering the nodule localization, the risk during ovarian punction for IVF, and the hypothetical risk of bleeding at delivery. Generally, it is recommended to leave in place the splenic tissue, which may be immunologically functional. PMID:22104355

Jost, S; Epelboin, S; Valiere, M; Chis, C; Walker, F; Luton, D

2012-04-01

224

Infertility in Women: Hysterosalpingographic Assessment of the Fallopian Tubes in Lagos, Nigeria  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tubal disease constitutes a major factor in infertility especially in developing countries. This study was undertaken to assess the hysterosalpingographic patterns seen in infertile patients in an urban centre in Lagos. Two hundred and twenty patients who reported from the gynaecology clinic to the radiology department of Lagos State University…

Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Fabamwo, A. O.

2009-01-01

225

A Holistic Approach to the Treatment of the Crisis of Infertility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the importance of assessing the impact infertility has on couples/individuals and understanding the relevance of this impact in the context of psychological treatment. Infertility's negative impact can be minimized by therapeutic intervention. Three psychological-behavioral categories for couples are posited, with case studies. (Author)

Bresnick, Ellen R.

1981-01-01

226

An Exploratory Study of the Psychological Correlates of Infertility on Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated effect of various factors related to infertility on women's (N=31) self-esteem and concomitant incidence of depression. Results support positive relationship between infertile women's self-esteem and their internal locus of control, self-esteem and subjective satisfaction with their social support, and general satisfaction with social…

Fouad, Nadya A.; Fahje, Kristin Kons

1989-01-01

227

Male infertility related to an aberrant karyotype, 47,XYY: four case reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: 47,XYY syndrome is a sex chromosomal abnormality observed in humans, with a prevalence of 0.1% of male births. Sex chromosome anomalies are more frequently associated with male infertility. CASE REPORT: We present here four cases of infertile men with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia attending a genetic and fertility clinic. Chromosomal analysis of the peripheral blood lymphocytes demonstrated the constitutional

Faeza El-Dahtory; Hany M Elsheikha

2009-01-01

228

The economic impact of infertility on women in developing countries ? a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background: It is the responsibility of health systems to provide quality health care and to protect consumers against impoverishing health costs. In the case of infertility in developing countries, quality care is often lacking and treatment costs are usually covered by patients. Additional financial hardship may be caused by various social consequences. The economic implications of infertility and its treatment have not been systematically explored. Methods: A systematic MEDLINE search was conducted to identify English language publications providing original data from developing countries on out-of-pocket payment (OoPP) for infertility treatment and on other economic consequences of involuntary childlessness. Findings: Twenty one publications were included in this review. Information on OoPP was scant but suggests that infertility treatment is associated with a significant risk of catastrophic expenditure, even for basic or ineffective interventions. Other economic disadvantages, which may be profound, are caused by loss of access to child labour and support, divorce, as well as customary laws or negative attitudes which discriminate against infertile individuals. Women in particular are affected. Conclusion: Pertinent data on OoPP and other economic disadvantages of infertility in developing countries are limited. According to the evidence available, infertility may cause impoverishing health costs as well as economic instability or deprivation secondary to social consequences. Health systems in developing countries do not appear to meet their responsibilities vis-à-vis infertile patients. PMID:24753897

Dyer, S.J.; Patel, M.

2012-01-01

229

Use of multivitamins, intake of B vitamins and risk of ovulatory infertility  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine whether use of multivitamins and intake of specific nutrients in multivitamins is associated with ovulatory infertility. Design and Setting The Nurses’ Health Study II, a prospective cohort study. Participants 18,555 married, pre-menopausal women without a history of infertility who attempted a pregnancy or became pregnant between 1991 and 1999. Main outcome measures Incident reports of infertility due to anovulation. Results During 8 years of follow-up 438 women reported infertility due to ovulatory disorder. There was an inverse association between frequency of multivitamin use and ovulatory infertility. The multivariate-adjusted relative risk (95% confidence interval) of ovulatory infertility was 0.88 (0.60, 1.28) for women consuming 2 tablets/week or less, 0.69 (0.51, 0.95) for women consuming 3 to 5 tablets/week and 0.59 (0.46, 0.75) for women consuming 6 or more tablets/week, when compared to women who did not use these supplements (P, trend <0.001). Folic acid appeared to explain part of the association between multivitamin supplement use and risk of ovulatory infertility. Conclusions Regular use of multivitamin supplements may decrease the risk of ovulatory infertility. PMID:17624345

Chavarro, Jorge E.; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Willett, Walter C.

2008-01-01

230

Assessment of Questionnaires Measuring Quality of Life in Infertile Couples: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Infertility has potentially inappropriate effects on quality of life in infertile couples. Various general and specific questionnaires have been structured for assessing different aspects of quality of life in infertile men, women, or couples. The present systematic review was designed to assess these questionnaires and also identify different factors affecting infertile couples based on the aforesaid questionnaires. Methods The research strategy involved general and specific terms in relation to couples's infertility and their quality of life. A review was done for studies published from 1982 to 2012 that were indexed in Medline, ISI Web of Science and Scopus as well as abstract books on this subject. We also corresponded with the authors of the references in related studies for introducing more resources and references. Results In all reviewed studies, different aspects of the quality of life in couples were evaluated including sexual, psychological, social, communicational, environmental, occupational, medical, as well as economical ones. In total, after initial screening of all studies, 10 general and 2 specific questionnaires were retrieved. Although no meta-analysis was found in the review, infertility had a negative effect on quality of life in couples. Conclusion This study revealed that some general questionnaires such as SF-36 and WHO-QOL were mostly used for assessing quality of life in infertile couples and some specific questionnaires such as FERTI-QoL and Fertility Problem Inventory were rarely used. Thus, it seems that the evaluation of quality of life in infertile couples needs valid instruments for measurement. PMID:24163794

Mousavi, Seyyed Abbas; Masoumi, Seyyedeh Zahra; Keramat, Afsaneh; Pooralajal, Jalal; Shobeiri, Fatemeh

2013-01-01

231

Motherhood and Female Labor Supply in the Developing World: Evidence from Infertility Shocks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We introduce a new instrument for family size, infertility, to investigate the causal relationship between children and female labor force participation. Infertility mimics an experiment where nature assigns an upper bound for family size, independent of a woman's background. This new instrument allows us to investigate the differential labor…

Aguero, Jorge M.; Marks, Mindy S.

2011-01-01

232

Relationship between oxidative stress, varicocele and infertility: a meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Varicocele is one of the leading causes of male infertility, and is present in almost 40% of infertile males. Recent understanding of the role of oxidative stress in male reproduction has led some researchers to postulate oxidative stress as the possible cause of sperm dysfunction in varicocele patients. The objective of the present study was to examine the published literature

Ashok Agarwal; Sushil Prabakaran; Shyam SSR Allamaneni

2006-01-01

233

Recent insights on the significance of transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis of male factor infertility.  

PubMed

Infertility is a worldwide reproductive health problem which affects approximately 15% of couples, with male factor infertility dominating nearly 50% of the affected population. The nature of the phenomenon is underscored by a complex array of transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic differences which interact in unknown ways. Many causes of male factor infertility are still defined as idiopathic, and most diagnosis tends to be more descriptive rather than specific. As such, the emergence of novel transcriptomic and metabolomic studies may hold the key to more accurately diagnose and treat male factor infertility. This paper provides the most recent evidence underlying the role of transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis in the management of male infertility. A summary of the current knowledge and new discovery of noninvasive, highly sensitive and specific biomarkers which allow the expansion of this area is outlined. PMID:24875852

Lee, L K; Foo, K Y

2014-07-01

234

“Trying” Times: Medicalization, Intent, and Ambiguity in the Definition of Infertility  

PubMed Central

Researchers studying infertility from the perspective of anthropology and other the social sciences seldom examine the assumptions embedded in the biomedical definition of infertility. Implicit in the biomedical definition is the assumption that people can be divided straightforwardly into those who are trying to conceive and those who are not trying to conceive. If being infertile implies “intent to conceive,” we must recognize that there are various degrees of intent and that the line between the fertile and the infertile is not as sharp as is usually imagined. Drawing on structured interview data collected from a random sample of Midwestern U.S. women and from qualitative interviews, we demonstrate that that there is a wide range of intent among those classified as infertile according to the biomedical definition. We explore the implications of this for research. PMID:20550090

Greil, Arthur L.; McQuillan, Julia

2011-01-01

235

Mutations in DNAH1, which Encodes an Inner Arm Heavy Chain Dynein, Lead to Male Infertility from Multiple  

E-print Network

REPORT Mutations in DNAH1, which Encodes an Inner Arm Heavy Chain Dynein, Lead to Male Infertility with infertility and a male factor is involved in approximately half the cases. A genetic etiology is likely in most cases yet only few genes have been formally correlated with male infertility. Homozygosity mapping

Thierry-Mieg, Nicolas

236

BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION 65, 913920 (2001) Infertility and Testicular Atrophy in the Antiestrogen-Treated Adult Male Rat1  

E-print Network

913 BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION 65, 913­920 (2001) Infertility and Testicular Atrophy- trol). The effects of ICI included testicular atrophy and infertility, similar to terminal effects mouse lacking a functional ER ( ERKO) is infertile [6, 7]. The absence of ER has no apparent effect

Hess, Rex A.

237

Appendix Tables and Data Appendices, Effects of Increased Access to Infertility Treatment on Infant and Child Health: Evidence from  

E-print Network

Appendix Tables and Data Appendices, Effects of Increased Access to Infertility Treatment on Infant cover/offer to cover infertility treatment and its interaction with the mother being 30, those in column 2 for indicators for infertility treatment mandates for insurers that exclude IVF treatment

Silver, Whendee

238

Are Caucasian-European men delaying fatherhood? Results of a 7 year observational study of infertile couples with male factor infertility.  

PubMed

This study was aimed at assessing presence and predictors of a trend towards more advanced paternal age at presentation in a cohort of 1283 Caucasian-European infertile couples with male factor infertility (MFI) over a short time frame. Multivariate linear regression analysis tested the association between predictors [namely, partners' age, length of infertility at first presentation, patients' comorbidities as scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and educational status] and patient's age at presentation. Using anova, patient's age at presentation (F ratio: 2.43; p = 0.024) and patients' educational status (?(2) trend: 142.38; p < 0.001) significantly increased over time. In contrast, length of infertility at first presentation, CCI and partners' age did not significantly change over time (all p ? 0.05). Linear regression analyses showed that CCI, educational status and year of presentation were not correlated with patients' age at presentation (all p ? 0.05), whereas partners' age (? = 0.170; p < 0.001) and length of infertility (? = 0.123; p = 0.004) were independent predictors of delayed fatherhood. These results showed a significant shift towards advanced paternal age, but a non-significant increase of maternal age at first presentation among Caucasian-European infertile couples with MFI over a short time frame. PMID:21696399

Salonia, A; Matloob, R; Saccà, A; Ferrari, M; Gallina, A; Castiglione, F; Abdollah, F; Raber, M; Brigante, C; Candiani, M; Rigatti, P; Montorsi, F

2012-04-01

239

[Cervical mucus as a biological sign of fertility and infertility].  

PubMed

The ovulation method makes women aware of certain changes in their cervical mucus. These modifications help to distinguish the beginning and end of the cycle's fertile period and indicate the time of maximum fertility. In addition to pinpointing the date of ovulation, the method permits the user to know she is not fertile when there is no ovulation. The principle of the method is the state of "basic infertility" which preceeds follicular development. The method cannot be implemented with success unless it is properly acquired. After some preliminary considerations regarding the fertile period, ovluation detection and periodic abstinence, some clinical and hormonal observations are compared in 2 basic studies in order to show to what extent cervical mucus reflects ovarian activity. The application of the method requires an understanding of the "basic infertility profile" and 2 sets of rules regarding the 1st days and the peak sign which indicate respectively the beginning and end of the fertile period. The criteria of an ideal birth control method and the importance of proper teaching are also dealt with. With regard to Natural Family Planning, 2 problems are pointed out--incomplete terminology in data collection and absence of a positive and detailed approach to periodic abstinence. (author's modified) PMID:12265827

Billings, J J

1984-02-01

240

Serum oestradiol levels in male partners of infertile couples.  

PubMed

A prospective clinical study was performed in the reproduction centre of Ichikawa General Hospital (Chiba, Japan) to investigate the relationship between sperm quality and serum oestradiol (E2) level in male partners of infertile couples. The semen parameters and blood samples were assessed in relation to several variables, including body mass index (BMI) and serum oestradiol (E2) levels. Four hundred and nine male partners of infertile couples aged 22-55 years (mean: 36.5 years) were referred to the reproduction centre. In total, 143 patients (35.0%) were included in the low E2 level group (18 pg ml(-1)  ? E2). Serum E2 levels were slightly correlated with testosterone levels, BMI and serum FSH levels. Total motile sperm count and morphology were decreased in low E2 level group. In multivariate analysis, serum testosterone, E2 levels, existence of varicocele and age were risk factors for decreased semen quality. Serum E2 might be associated with BMI, serum testosterone level and spermatogenesis. PMID:25059733

Hagiuda, J; Ishikawa, H; Marumo, K

2014-07-25

241

Lower genital tract infections in infertile Nigerian women compared with controls.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE--To investigate the possibility that infertile Nigerian women have a higher rate of cervical colonisation with pathogenic and facultative organisms than fertile controls. DESIGN--The prevalence of common microorganisms in the vagina and endocervical canals of infertile women was compared with that of pregnant controls. SETTING--The Obafemi Awolowo University Hospital Maternity Centre. SUBJECTS--92 infertile women were compared with 86 pregnant controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--rates of isolation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Candida albicans, Trichomonas vaginalis and other facultative organisms in cases and controls. RESULTS--The rate of isolation of Neisseria gonorrheae was 17.4% among infertile women compared with 10.5% in the group of pregnant women (p > 0.05). There was no significant difference between the groups in the rate of isolation of Candida albicans, Trichomonas vaginalis and other facultative organisms. High rates of isolation of microorganisms were observed in both groups. However, women with secondary infertility had higher rate of carriage of Neisseria gonorrheae, Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus as compared with women with primary infertility. Nearly 15% of infertile women had previous episodes of pelvic inflammatory disease and 26% had had induced abortions. A positive history of vaginal discharge was a poor predictor of vagina and endocervical carriage of microorganisms. CONCLUSIONS--High rates of pathogenic organisms exist in the lower genital tract of infertile women and controls. Women with secondary infertility are more likely to have pathogenic organisms than women with primary infertility. A policy of routinely screening women for lower genital tract infections should be pursued in this population because of the high rate of infection. PMID:7635492

Okonofua, F E; Ako-Nai, K A; Dighitoghi, M D

1995-01-01

242

Women’s Experiences and Preferences in Relation to Infertility Counselling: A Multifaith Dialogue  

PubMed Central

Background Religion and spirituality are a fundamental part of culture and influence how individuals experience and interpret infertility counselling. Thus far, little research has examined the influence of religiosity on the experience of infertility, and to our knowledge no study exists investigating the responses of religious infertile women to counselling. In this study we explored Muslim and Christian women’s experiences and preferences with regard to infertility counselling. Materials and Methods Using a grounded theory approach, 30 infertile women affiliated to different denominations of Islam (Shiite and Sunni) and Christianity (Protestantism, Catholicism, Orthodoxies) were interviewed. Data were collected through semi-structured in-depth interviews at fertility clinics in the UK and Iran, and analyzed using the Straussian mode of grounded theory. Results Emerging categories included: Appraising the meaning of infertility religiously, applying religious coping strategies, and gaining a faith-based strength. These were encompassed in the core category of ‘relying on a higher being’. Religious infertile women experienced infertility as an enriching experience for spiritual growth. This perspective helped them to acquire a feeling of self- confidence and strength to manage their emotions. Hence, they relied more on their own religious coping strategies and less on formal support resources like counselling services. However, they expected counsellors to be open to taking time to discuss their spiritual concerns in counselling sessions. Conclusion In addition to focusing on clients’ psychosocial needs, infertility counsellors should also consider religious and spiritual issues. Establishing a sympathetic and accepting relationship with infertile women will allow them to discuss their religious perspectives, which consequently may enhance their usage of counselling services. PMID:25101160

Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Allan, Helen T.

2011-01-01

243

Prevalence of high DNA fragmentation index in male partners of unexplained infertile couples.  

PubMed

The sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) parameter DNA fragmentation Index (DFI) is a valuable tool for prediction of fertility in vivo. Clinical data show that a DFI above 30% is associated with very low chance for achieving pregnancy by natural conception or by insemination. Already when DFI is above 20% the chance of natural pregnancy is reduced, this despite normal conventional semen parameters. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of high DFI in male partners of unexplained infertile couples to further identification of male factors contributing to subfertility. Among 212 consecutive men under infertility investigation, 122 cases with the diagnosis 'unexplained infertility' were identified. For all but three, SCSA data were available. The percentage of couples with diagnosis 'unexplained infertility' in which the male partner has DFI >20% or DFI >30% was calculated. In the group diagnosed with 'unexplained infertility' 17.7% of the men (95% CI 10.8-24.5) presented with 20 ?DFI <30 and 8.4% (95% CI 3.40-13.4) had DFI ?30%. A significant part of men diagnosed as unexplained infertile according to traditional diagnostic methods has remarkably high degrees of fragmented sperm DNA. Apart from adding to our understanding of biology of infertility our finding has clinical implications. Couples in which the DFI of the male partner is high can avoid prolonged attempts to become spontaneously pregnant or referral for intrauterine insemination, both having low chances of leading to conception. PMID:23596042

Oleszczuk, K; Augustinsson, L; Bayat, N; Giwercman, A; Bungum, M

2013-05-01

244

Prevention of Chlamydia-induced infertility by inhibition of local caspase activity.  

PubMed

Tubal factor infertility (TFI) represents 36% of female infertility and genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) is a major cause. Although TFI is associated with host inflammatory responses to bacterial components, the molecular pathogenesis of Chlamydia-induced infertility remains poorly understood. We investigated the hypothesis that activation of specific cysteine proteases, the caspases, during C. trachomatis genital infection causes the disruption of key fertility-promoting molecules required for embryo development and implantation. We analyzed the effect of caspase inhibition on infertility and the integrity of Dicer, a caspase-sensitive, fertility-promoting ribonuclease III enzyme, and key micro-RNAs in the reproductive system. Genital infection with the inflammation- and caspase-inducing, wild-type C. trachomatis serovar L2 led to infertility, but the noninflammation-inducing, plasmid-free strain did not. We confirmed that caspase-mediated apoptotic tissue destruction may contribute to chlamydial pathogenesis. Caspase-1 or -3 deficiency, or local administration of the pan caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK into normal mice protected against Chlamydia-induced infertility. Finally, the oviducts of infected infertile mice showed evidence of caspase-mediated cleavage inactivation of Dicer and alteration in critical miRNAs that regulate growth, differentiation, and development, including mir-21. These results provide new insight into the molecular pathogenesis of TFI with significant implications for new strategies for treatment and prevention of chlamydial complications. PMID:23303804

Igietseme, Joseph U; Omosun, Yusuf; Partin, James; Goldstein, Jason; He, Qing; Joseph, Kahaliah; Ellerson, Debra; Ansari, Uzma; Eko, Francis O; Bandea, Claudiu; Zhong, Guangming; Black, Carolyn M

2013-04-01

245

Associations of variants in MTHFR and MTRR genes with male infertility in the Jordanian population.  

PubMed

Folate pathway is expected to play an important role in spermatogenesis since it is involved in DNA synthesis, repair and methylation. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between male infertility and the MTHFR (C677T and A1298C) and MTRR (A66G) polymorphisms. A group of 300 males was recruited in this study from different Jordanian infertility clinics. Of these, 150 cases of infertile men that included oligozoospermia cases (n=45), severe oligozoospermia (n=71) and azoospermia (n=34) were studied. The other 150 males were age matched fertile controls. Genotyping of MTHFR and MTRR polymorphisms was performed using PCR-RFLP technique. The results showed an association between MTHFR 677TT genotype and male infertility (P<0.05). However, the distribution of MTHFR A1298C and MTRR A66G genotypes were not different between the fertile and infertile groups (P>0.05). In addition, none of the examined polymorphisms was related to any of the semen parameters in the infertile group. In conclusion, this study showed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism is associated with male infertility in Jordanians. PMID:24334125

Mfady, Doaa S; Sadiq, May F; Khabour, Omar F; Fararjeh, Abdulfattah S; Abu-Awad, Aymen; Khader, Yousef

2014-02-15

246

Experiences of infertility: liminality and the role of the fertility clinic.  

PubMed

This paper explores the experiences of infertile women who occupy a liminal space in society, and argues that the fertility clinic served as a space to tolerate women's experiences of liminality. It provided not only rituals aimed at transition to pregnancy, but also a space where women's liminal experiences, which are caused by the existential chaos of infertility, could be tolerated. The British experience seemed to differ from the American one identified in the literature, where self-management and peer group support are described as strategies used by infertile women to manage infertility. The British women in this study did not appear to draw so much on self-management or peer group support to deal with their experiences of infertility. They appeared to be isolated in their experience. The clinic thus provided a space in which recognition was given to their intensely private experiences of difference from those in the outside fertile world and allowed them to manage these socially unacceptable, culturally taboo and invisible experiences. However, because of its very limited success rate in enabling women to become pregnant, rather than facilitating the transition of status from infertile to fertile woman, the clinic also served to reinforce the liminal experiences of those women who remained infertile. Inadvertently, the clinic offered a way of being in limbo while at the same time reinforcing the liminal experiences of women. PMID:17518825

Allan, Helen

2007-06-01

247

The Effect of Marital Violence on Infertility Distress among A Sample of Turkish Women  

PubMed Central

Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF) center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, an infertility distress scale (IDS) for determining the severity effect of infertility and the scale for marital violence against women (SDVW) for determining level of marital violence against the women were used. Results: The total IDS score of the study sample was 37.76 ± 10.53. There was no significant relationship between the age and education level of the women and the total IDS score. The total IDS score was higher in women who did not work and those being treated for infertility for more than three years. The total SDVW score of the study sample was 67.0 ± 8.26. The total SDVW score was higher in women who had been trying to have a child for more than six years and had received infertility treatment for longer than three years. The employment status of the women and physical, emotional, and sexual violence scores had a statistically significant relationship with the IDS scores. The emotional violence score was found to have the highest significance among the variables affecting total IDS score. Conclusion: Marital violence is a factor increasing the distress of infertile women. Healthcare staff serving infertile couples should consider the possibility of domestic violence against women as a factor affecting the psychological infertility distress level. PMID:24696770

Akyüz, Aygül; ?ahiner, Gönül; Seven, Memnun; Bak?r, Bilal

2014-01-01

248

Prospective study of MTHFR genetic polymorphisms as a possible etiology of male infertility.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between 2 genetic polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR), C677T and A1298C, and determine the long-term reproductive outcome in infertile men. This was a prospective study conducted in an andrology clinic. Men with a 1-year history of infertility were assessed for the MTHFR polymorphisms at a 5-year follow-up. We compared the MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism between men who did and did not bear children during follow-up. Of the 215 men who were infertile at 1 year, 82 (38.1%) remained infertile and 133 (61.9%) achieved natural conception during the 5-year follow-up, with the highest rate in the first year (32.6%). The MTHFR 677TT genotype (homozygote) was associated with a substantially increased risk of infertility during follow-up [odds ratio (OR) = 10.242; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.257-83.464] relative to the MTHFR 677CC genotype (wild-type). Risk of infertility was not increased by the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism alone, but was increased by the combination of polymorphisms MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C (OR = 11.818; 95%CI = 1.415-98.674). The homozygous MTHFR C677T genotype was a risk factor for male infertility during 5-year follow-up, whereas a correlation between MTHFR A1298C and infertility was not observed. The MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C polymorphisms had additive effects on male infertility. PMID:24737513

Li, S-S; Li, J; Xiao, Z; Ren, A-G; Jin, L

2014-01-01

249

Eurycoma longifolia Jack in managing idiopathic male infertility  

PubMed Central

This study investigated the effect of treatment with the proprietary standardized, water-soluble extract of the root of the Malaysian plant, Eurycoma longifolia Jack, which is thought to enhance male fertility with regard to higher semen volumes, sperm concentrations, the percentage of normal sperm morphology and sperm motility in male partners of sub-fertile couples with idiopathic infertility. A total of 350 patients were given 200 mg of the extract daily and follow-up semen analyses were performed every 3 months for 9 months. Of these 350 patients, 75 patients completed one full cycle of 3 months. Follow-up semen analyses in these patients showed significant improvement in all semen parameters. The proprietary extract of Eurycoma longifolia Jack significantly improved the sperm quality in these patients, allowing for 11 (14.7%) spontaneous pregnancies. PMID:20348942

Bin Mohd Tambi, Mohd Ismail; Imran, M. Kamarul

2010-01-01

250

[Clinical investigation of male infertile patients with chromosomal anomalies].  

PubMed

We investigated 470 male patients who came to the Reproduction Medical Center of Yokohama City University Medical Center complaining of infertility between April 2,000 and August 2013. We analyzed the chromosomes of 90 patients whose sperm concentration was below 1.0 × 107/ml. Nineteen of the 90 (21.1%) patients showed sex chromosomal anomalies including 12 Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY or 46, XY/47, XXY), Robertsonian translocation, 2 autosome-autosome translocation, Y-autosome translocation, 46, X with marker chromosome (46, Xmar?), XX male and Y chromosome macrodeletion (46, XYq-). While patients with chromosomal abnormalities except XX male or some of 46, XYq- may succeed in reproduction using testicular sperm extraction-intracytoplasmic sperm injection, we need to inform the patients about the risks of chromosomal abnormalities in the resulting fetus. PMID:25142955

Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Yumura, Yasushi; Yasuda, Kengo; Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Takeshima, Teppei; Kobayashi, Masataka; Kato, Yoshitake; Iwasaki, Akira; Noguchi, Kazumi

2014-07-01

251

The Invention of Infertility in the Classical Greek World:  

PubMed Central

Summary The article examines the understandings of, and responses to, reproductive failure in the classical Greek world. It discusses explanations and treatments for non-procreation in a range of ancient Greek medical texts, focusing on the writings of the Hippocratic Corpus, which devote considerable energy to matters of fertility and generation, and places them alongside the availability of a divine approach to dealing with reproductive disruption, the possibility of asking various deities, including the specialist healing god Asclepius, for assistance in having children. Though the relations between these options are complex, they combine to produce a rich remedial array for those struggling with childlessness, the possibility that any impediment to procreation can be removed. Classical Greece, rather than the nineteenth century, or even 1978, is thus the time when “infertility,” understood as an essentially reversible somatic state, was invented. PMID:24362276

Flemming, Rebecca

2013-01-01

252

Male infertility: decreased levels of selenium, zinc and antioxidants.  

PubMed

In this study, we aimed to compare the level of zinc, selenium, glutathione peroxidase activity and antioxidant status in following populations of men: severe inflammation in prostate (>10(6) white blood cells in prostate secretion; n=29), severe leukocytospermia, (>10(6) white blood cells in semen; n=31), mild inflammation, (0.2-1M white blood cells in semen or prostate secretion; n=24), non-inflammatory oligozoospermia (n=32) and healthy controls (n=27). Male partners of infertile couples had reduced level of antioxidative activity, selenium and zinc in their seminal plasma. Most importantly, reduced selenium levels were evident in all patient groups regardless of inflammation status. Therefore, these patients might gain some benefit from selenium supplementation. PMID:24462254

Türk, Silver; Mändar, Reet; Mahlapuu, Riina; Viitak, Anu; Punab, Margus; Kullisaar, Tiiu

2014-04-01

253

Knowledge, perceptions and myths regarding infertility among selected adult population in Pakistan: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background The reported prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is approximately 22% with 4% primary and 18% secondary infertility. Infertility is not only a medical but also a social problem in our society as cultural customs and perceived religious dictums may equate infertility with failure on a personal, interpersonal, or social level. It is imperative that people have adequate knowledge about infertility so couples can seek timely medical care and misconceptions can be rectified. We aim to assess the knowledge, perception and myths regarding infertility and suggest ways to improve it. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out by interviewing a sample of 447 adults who were accompanying the patients at two tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. They were interviewed one-on-one with the help of a pretested questionnaire drafted by the team after a thorough literature review and in consultation with infertility specialists. Results The correct knowledge of infertility was found to be limited amongst the participants. Only 25% correctly identified when infertility is pathological and only 46% knew about the fertile period in women's cycle. People are misinformed that use of IUCD (53%) and OCPs (61%) may cause infertility. Beliefs in evil forces and supernatural powers as a cause of infertility are still prevalent especially amongst people with lower level of education. Seeking alternative treatment for infertility remains a popular option for 28% of the participant as a primary preference and 75% as a secondary preference. IVF remains an unfamiliar (78%) and an unacceptable option (55%). Conclusions Knowledge about infertility is limited in the population and a lot of misconceptions and myths are prevalent in the society. Alternative medicine is a popular option for seeking infertility treatment. The cultural and religious perspective about assisted reproductive technologies is unclear, which has resulted in its reduced acceptability. PMID:21970548

2011-01-01

254

Relationship amongst teratozoospermia, seminal oxidative stress and male infertility  

PubMed Central

Background Spermatozoa morphology is an important and complex characteristic of the fertilization capacity of male germ cells. Morphological abnormalities have been observed to be accompanied by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction and further damage to spermatozoa, ultimately leading to infertility. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the relationship between seminal ROS production and sperm morphology in infertile teratozoospermic patients as well as in healthy men of proven and unproven fertility. Methods Semen samples were collected from 79 patients classified as teratozoospermic and 56 healthy donors (control). Standard semen analysis was performed and spermatozoa morphology was assessed according to the WHO 2010 guidelines. Seminal ROS was measured by chemiluminescence assay. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated, and sensitivity, specificity, cutoff value and area under curve (AUC) were determined. Results Sperm morphology was significantly poor in the Teratozoospermic Group compared with the 3 Donor Groups (P?

2014-01-01

255

The Role of Infertility Etiology in Success Rate of Intrauterine Insemination Cycles: An Evaluation of Predictive Factors for Pregnancy Rate  

PubMed Central

Background: The objective of this study was to identify the prognostic factors that influence the outcome of ovarian stimulation with intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles in couples with different infertility etiology. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed in data of 1348 IUI cycles with ovarian stimulation by clomiphene citrate (CC) and/or gonadotropins in 632 women with five different infertility etiology subgroups at Akbarabbadi Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Results: The pregnancy rate (PR)/ cycle was highest (19.9%) among couples with unexplained infertility and lowest (10.6%) in couples with multiple factors infertility. In cases of unexplained infertility, the best PRs were seen after CC plus gonadotropins stimulation (26.3%) and with inseminated motile sperm count>30×106 (21.9%), but the tendency didn’t reach statistical significant. In the ovarian factor group, the best PRs were observed in women aged between 30 and 34 years (20.8%), with 2-3 preovulatory follicles (37.8%) and infertility duration between 1and 3 years (20.8%), while only infertility duration (p=0.03) and number of preovulatory follicles (p=0.01) were statistically significant. Multiple logistic regression analysis determined that number of preovulatory follicles (p=0.02), duration of infertility (p=0.015), age (p=0.019), infertility etiology (p=0.05) and stimulation regimen (p=0.01) were significant independent factors in order to predict overall clinical PR. Conclusion: The etiology of infertility is important to achieve remarkable IUI success. It is worth mentioning that within different etiologies of infertility, the demographic and cycles characteristics of couples did not show the same effect. Favorable variables for treatment success are as follows: age <40, duration of infertility ?5 years and a cause of infertility except of multiple factors. PMID:24520471

Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Rashidi, Mandana; Ghasemi, Afsaneh; Arabipoor, Arezoo; Daghighi, Sara; Pourasghari, Parisa; Zolfaghari, Zahra

2013-01-01

256

Therapy with Infertile Heterosexual Couples: It’s Not About Gender—Or is it?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In spite of medical data that show males are equal to their female partners as a source of a heterosexual couple’s infertility,\\u000a therapists face many unanswered questions about the extent to which gender influences each partner’s infertility experience\\u000a in American culture. How is “hers” different from “his?” To what extent should the therapist strive to help the couple define\\u000a the

Constance Hoenk Shapiro

2009-01-01

257

The risk of infertility and delayed conception associated with exposures in the Danish workplace  

SciTech Connect

The association between infertility and a number of occupations and occupational exposures was examined in a case-control study utilizing data collected from medical records and mailed questionnaires. The results suggest that male exposure to heat and female exposure to noise, textile dyes and lead, mercury, and cadmium are associated with infertility. Further research is needed to examine the entire spectrum of abnormal reproductive and developmental outcomes of exposure to these agents and to identify their full effects.

Rachootin, P.; Olsen, J.

1983-05-01

258

Increased oxidative deoxyribonucleic acid damage in the spermatozoa of infertile male patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate whether a high level of oxidative DNA damage in spermatozoa occurs in infertile male patients and to examine the influence of antioxidant treatments on the levels of this damage.Design: Controlled clinical study and uncontrolled pilot study.Setting: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Akita University School of Medicine.Patient(s): Nineteen infertile male and 17 control patients.Intervention(s): The levels of oxidative

Hideya Kodama; Raizo Yamaguchi; Jun Fukuda; Hiroshi Kasai; Toshinobu Tanaka

1997-01-01

259

Birth characteristics in a clinical sample of women seeking infertility treatment: a case–control study  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the distribution of low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, small for gestational age (SGA) and large for gestational age (LGA) by main cause of infertility (female, combined, male, unexplained) in women seeking infertility treatment. Design A case–control study. Setting A Centre for Reproductive Medicine in Sweden. Participants All women (n=1293) born in Sweden in 1973 or later and who were part of heterosexual couples seeking infertility treatment at a Centre of Reproductive Medicine from 2005 to 2010 were asked to participate. Those who had not begun the diagnostic process and who declined participation in the study were excluded. In total, 1206 women (94.5%) participated in the study. Main outcome measures Main cause of infertility (female, combined, male, unexplained) collected from the patients’ medical charts. LBW (<2500?g), preterm birth (<37?weeks), SGA (+2SD of the mean weight for the gestational length), collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Results The risk of being born with LBW was increased about 2.4 times (OR=2.40, CI 1.13 to 5.07, p=0.02) in women seeking treatment for infertility due to female causes rather than for male or unexplained causes. Women with a female infertility factor were 2.7 times more likely to be born SGA (OR=2.73, CI 1.02 to 7.34, p=0.047) compared with those in whom the cause of infertility was unexplained. Conclusions Women born with LBW or SGA seem to suffer an increased risk of infertility due to a female factor. Thus, infants born with birth characteristics that deviate from the norm may be at greater risk of difficulties in childbearing later on in life. Since this study is the first of its kind, more studies are needed to verify the associations found in this study and to determine their nature. PMID:24613821

Vikström, Josefin; Hammar, Mats; Josefsson, Ann; Bladh, Marie; Sydsjö, Gunilla

2014-01-01

260

Health-promoting Lifestyle and its Demographic Predictors in Infertile Couples Referred to Infertility Clinic of Tabriz Al-Zahra Hospital, 2013  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Improving the lifestyle of infertile couples led to the preservation of their performance, increase their quality of life, and reduce health cost. So, the aims of this study were to determine the health-promoting lifestyle and its predictors among infertile couples. Methods: In a cross-sectional, analytical study 322 infertile couples referred to an infertility clinic in Tabriz was participated with convenience sampling method. The demographic and the standard Health Promoting Lifestyle-II (HPLP II) questionnaires were completed by all couples individually. For determining the demographic predictors of health-promoting lifestyle, the multivariate linear regression was used. Results: The mean (standard deviation) score of health-promoting lifestyle in couples was 2.4 (0.4) of the achievable score ranged from 1 to 4. The highest mean score was for nutrition subscale 2.6 (0.5) in both men and women and the lowest mean score was for physical activity subscale in women 2.1(0.5) and men 2.3(0.5) and health responsibility subscale (2.3(0.5) in both men and women. Educational level, cause of infertility, adequacy of income for living expense, and living situation were predictors of health-promoting lifestyle. Conclusion: The results showed that participants do not carry out all health-promoting behaviors, especially physical activity and health responsibility, in an acceptable level. These behaviors have an important role in improving the quality of life, health maintenance, and fertility. Thus, the provision of strategies, including those in accordance with predictors of health-promoting behaviors, is important for improving the health status of infertile couples. PMID:25276761

Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Sehhati, Fahimeh; Rahimi, Mareieh

2014-01-01

261

X chromosome aneuploidy in infertile women: Analysis by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization  

SciTech Connect

Up to 1 in 3 couples have a problem of infertility at some time in their lives. Sex chromosome anomalies are found in 5-10% of couples, with mosaic aneuploidy being a common finding in primary infertility. Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA), in contrast, is frequently associated with autosomal structural anomalies. We hypothesized that low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy was associated with primary infertility but not with RSA. Three groups were studied: women from couples with primary infertillity (n=26); women with three or more spontaneous abortions (n=22); and age-matched normally fertile women (at least two pregnancies; n=28). Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine X chromosome ploidy in 100 nuclei per patient, using a contig of three cosmids from MAO locus (kindly donated by W. Berger, Nijmegen). A control probe (chr. 15 centromere) was simultaneously hybridized, and only nuclei containing two control signals were scored for the X chromosome. The mean numbers of nuclei with two X chromosome signals were the same in all groups (Welch equality of means test: p>0.97). However, there is a significant difference between the variances of the primary infertile and RSA groups (Levene`s test: p=0.025 after Bonferrone correction for multiple testing). This provides preliminary support for the hypothesis of an association between primary infertility and low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy.

Morris, M.A.; Moix, I.; Mermillod, B. [Univ. and Cantonal Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)] [and others

1994-09-01

262

Sexuality, Self-Esteem and Partnership Quality in Infertile Women and Men  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Infertile couples often report quality-of-life impairments, especially in terms of sexuality, self-esteem and partnership quality. So far, there have been no systematic studies of the sex lives and behaviour of infertile women and men before and after the emergence of their mutual desire for a child. Materials and Methods: From February 2010 to August 2010 all couples starting treatment either at Heidelberg University?s Women?s Hospital or at the Fertility Center Berlin were asked to fill out the Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR). A total of n?=?158 women and n?=?153 men participated in the study. Results: Decreasing tendencies were observable for both partners in the domains Sexual Relationship Satisfaction and Confidence and in the subscales Self-Esteem and Overall Relationship Satisfaction. There were especially clear indications of a loss of spontaneous sexuality during the experience of infertility. We were also able to establish that infertility has a negative impact on women?s self-esteem. Discussion: The results of this study indicate that SEAR can be used as a feasible instrument for identifying infertile women and men whose infertility has a negative effect on their relationship quality and/or sex lives. PMID:25221344

Wischmann, T.; Schilling, K.; Toth, B.; Rösner, S.; Strowitzki, T.; Wohlfarth, K.; Kentenich, H.

2014-01-01

263

A proportional hazards analysis of the clinical characteristics of infertile couples.  

PubMed

Evaluated were methods of ordering the many possible predictors of infertility outcome. The clinical characteristics of infertile couples were studied with respect to the occurrence of pregnancy during follow-up, by means of the methods of survival analysis. Among 1,297 couples who were infertile for 12 months or more, the cumulative pregnancy rate at 36 months with 95% confidence limits was 49% +/- 4%. The proportional hazards analysis identified three independent predictors of the occurrence of pregnancy from the couple's history (with P values in brackets): a history of pregnancy in the partnership (0.0001); shorter duration of infertility (0.0001); and shorter length of marriage (0.005). The predictors arising from the diagnostic process (with P values in brackets) were: fewer infertility diagnoses (0.0001); a favorable primary clinical diagnosis (0.001); and the presence of any tubal disease, regardless of the primary clinical diagnosis (0.001). The analysis selected an economical set of significant predictor variables and demonstrated that a longer period of contraception was associated with a lower pregnancy rate among infertile couples. Also, three simple questions from the history were nearly equivalent to the entire diagnostic process as predictors of the outcome. PMID:6702913

Collins, J A; Garner, J B; Wilson, E H; Wrixon, W; Casper, R F

1984-03-01

264

Sexuality, Self-Esteem and Partnership Quality in Infertile Women and Men.  

PubMed

Introduction: Infertile couples often report quality-of-life impairments, especially in terms of sexuality, self-esteem and partnership quality. So far, there have been no systematic studies of the sex lives and behaviour of infertile women and men before and after the emergence of their mutual desire for a child. Materials and Methods: From February 2010 to August 2010 all couples starting treatment either at Heidelberg University's Women's Hospital or at the Fertility Center Berlin were asked to fill out the Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR). A total of n?=?158 women and n?=?153 men participated in the study. Results: Decreasing tendencies were observable for both partners in the domains Sexual Relationship Satisfaction and Confidence and in the subscales Self-Esteem and Overall Relationship Satisfaction. There were especially clear indications of a loss of spontaneous sexuality during the experience of infertility. We were also able to establish that infertility has a negative impact on women's self-esteem. Discussion: The results of this study indicate that SEAR can be used as a feasible instrument for identifying infertile women and men whose infertility has a negative effect on their relationship quality and/or sex lives. PMID:25221344

Wischmann, T; Schilling, K; Toth, B; Rösner, S; Strowitzki, T; Wohlfarth, K; Kentenich, H

2014-08-01

265

Age of the female partner is a prognostic factor in prolonged unexplained infertility: a multicenter study.  

PubMed

Among 2,106 couples registered in 12 Canadian infertility clinics, 470 (22.3%) were classed as unexplained infertility after a uniform evaluation of the male ejaculate, ovulation, and tubal patency. The unexplained group included more older female partners; 44% were over 30 years of age at registration in the participating clinics, compared with 36% in other infertility diagnostic groups. The mean duration of infertility was 40.1 months, and the cumulative pregnancy rate was 36.6 +/- 2.9% at 2 years after registration. When the variables were examined with the use of proportional hazards analysis, each additional month of duration of infertility reduced the expected prognosis by 2%, and a history of pregnancy in the partnership improved the prognosis by 80%. Among couples with 3 years or more duration of infertility (cumulative pregnancy rate, 27.5 +/- 3.9%), an additional year in the age of the female partner when conception was first attempted (mean, 26.8 years) reduces the prognosis by 9%. PMID:2526029

Collins, J A; Rowe, T C

1989-07-01

266

Antioxidants and infertility treatment, the role of Satureja Khuzestanica: A mini-systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background: The use of antioxidants in the treatment of infertility has been suggested and recent studies have indicated that oral administration of Satureja Khuzestanica essential oil (SKEO) to rats induces significant antioxidative effects. Objective: This systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of antioxidants in infertility and also to assess the effectiveness of Satureja Khuzestanica in infertility management. Materials and Methods: Pubmed, Scopus, and Cochrane Library were searched for relevant trials published from respective database inception dates to August 2010. Study selection, and data extraction were performed by authors. Results: Fifteen trials on evaluation of antioxidants in infertility and seven studies on the effectiveness of Satureja Khuzestanica were identified. Only 4 of the 15 trials were with application of allocation concealment and three studies were done in in-vitro environment. Despite the methodological and clinical heterogeneity of the trials, 14 of the 15 (93.33%) trials showed an improvement in either sperm quality or pregnancy rate after antioxidant therapy. The human and animal studies of Satureja Khuzestanica showed a significant antioxidative potential of the plant and its effectiveness for infertility improvement. Conclusion: The use of oral antioxidants in infertility could improve sperm quality and pregnancy rates. Improved fertility observed by SKEO in rats might be due to its antioxidative effect. Further studies and clinical trials in humans are necessary to evaluate SKEO effectiveness in fertility disturbances.

Safarnavadeh, Tahereh; Rastegarpanah, Mansoor

2011-01-01

267

SNaPshot assay for the detection of the most common CFTR mutations in infertile men.  

PubMed

Congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD) is the most common CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD) that explains about 1-2% of the male infertility cases. Controversial data have been published regarding the involvement of CFTR mutations in infertile men with non-obstructive azoospermia and oligozoospermia. Here, we describe single base extension (SNaPshot) assay for detection of 11 common CFTR mutations: F508del, G542X, N1303K, 621+1G->T, G551D, R553X, R1162X, W1282X, R117H, 2184insA and 1717-1G->A and IVS8polyT variants. The assay was validated on 50 previously genotyped samples and was used to screen a total of 369 infertile men with different impairment of spermatogenesis and 136 fertile controls. Our results show that double heterozygosity of cystic fibrosis (CF) and CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD) mutations are found in a high percentage (22.7%) of infertile men with obstructive azoospermia, but not in other studied groups of infertile men. The SNaPshot assay described here is an inexpensive, fast and robust method for primary screening of the most common CFTR mutations both in patients with classical CF and CFTR-RD. It can contribute to better understanding of the role of CFTR mutations in impaired spermatogenesis, ultimately leading to improved management of infertile men. PMID:25386751

Noveski, Predrag; Madjunkova, Svetlana; Mircevska, Marija; Plaseski, Toso; Filipovski, Vanja; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

2014-01-01

268

SNaPshot Assay for the Detection of the Most Common CFTR Mutations in Infertile Men  

PubMed Central

Congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD) is the most common CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD) that explains about 1–2% of the male infertility cases. Controversial data have been published regarding the involvement of CFTR mutations in infertile men with non-obstructive azoospermia and oligozoospermia. Here, we describe single base extension (SNaPshot) assay for detection of 11 common CFTR mutations: F508del, G542X, N1303K, 621+1G->T, G551D, R553X, R1162X, W1282X, R117H, 2184insA and 1717-1G->A and IVS8polyT variants. The assay was validated on 50 previously genotyped samples and was used to screen a total of 369 infertile men with different impairment of spermatogenesis and 136 fertile controls. Our results show that double heterozygosity of cystic fibrosis (CF) and CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD) mutations are found in a high percentage (22.7%) of infertile men with obstructive azoospermia, but not in other studied groups of infertile men. The SNaPshot assay described here is an inexpensive, fast and robust method for primary screening of the most common CFTR mutations both in patients with classical CF and CFTR-RD. It can contribute to better understanding of the role of CFTR mutations in impaired spermatogenesis, ultimately leading to improved management of infertile men. PMID:25386751

Mircevska, Marija; Plaseski, Toso; Filipovski, Vanja; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

2014-01-01

269

The mediator role of emotion regulation processes on infertility-related stress.  

PubMed

The objective of this study is to investigate gender differences regarding the mediator role of self-compassion and self-judgment on the effects of external shame, internal shame, dyadic adjustment, on infertility-related stress. One hundred and sixty-two women and 147 men with a primary infertility diagnosis completed the following set of self-report measures: Others as Shamer, Experience of Shame Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Self-Compassion Scale, and Fertility Problem Inventory. Path analyses results revealed that in women self-compassion fully mediated the effect of internal shame on infertility-related stress and partially mediated the effect of dyadic adjustment on this variable, while external shame had only a direct effect. In men self-judgment fully mediated the effect of external and internal shame on infertility-related stress. Dyadic adjustment had only a direct effect on infertility-related stress. In conclusion, there is a distinct role of self-compassion and self-judgment on the relationship between shame and infertility-related stress in men and women. Such differences should be taken into account in psychological interventions with these patients. Future research is warranted to further support our results. PMID:23821009

Galhardo, Ana; Cunha, M; Pinto-Gouveia, J; Matos, M

2013-12-01

270

Prevalence of carcinoma in situ in testicular biopsies of infertile Iranian men.  

PubMed

Almost all testicular germ cell tumours are proved to originate from carcinoma in situ cells. Infertility is one of the factors that increase the risk of carcinoma in situ. The reported prevalence for carcinoma in situ from different parts of the world is 0-3.7% in infertile men. This retrospective study was performed to determine the prevalence of carcinoma in situ in Iranian infertile men. We reviewed the testicular biopsies of 1153 infertile men at the pathology department of Avicenna Infertility Center. One hundred and fifty-one cases were suspicious of having carcinoma in situ. Immunohistochemical marker for placental alkaline phosphatase was employed to confirm the diagnosis of carcinoma in situ. Positive results were detected in 7 (0.6%) of 1153 cases (95% CI 0.24%-1.24%), 6 (0.94%) of which (95% CI 0.34%-2.04%) were under the age of 35 years (636 patients were in this age group). This study is the first study in Iran determining the prevalence of carcinoma in situ among the infertile Iranian men; the result is in the range of reports from other countries. PMID:23869800

Soltanghoraee, H; Pourkeramati, F; Khoddami, M; Amirjannati, N; Akhondi, M M; Soltani, A

2014-09-01

271

Guideline-based management of male infertility: Why do we need it?  

PubMed Central

The current clinical guidelines for the management of infertility as presented by the American Urologic Association and European Association of Urology represent consensus opinions for the management of male-factor infertility. The goal of the present study is to define the currently available guidelines for male-factor infertility, provide a rationale for why guidelines should be implemented, and review concerns and shortcomings towards their incorporation into clinical practice. Successfully integrating guidelines into clinical practice offers the potential benefit of creating a standardized, efficient, and cost-effective algorithm for the evaluation of infertility and facilitates future research. Despite their availability and ease of use, many clinicians fail to adopt clinical guidelines for numerous reasons including decreased awareness of available guidelines, insufficient time, lack of interest, and personal financial considerations. The current guidelines are limited by the inability to generalize recommendations to a heterogeneous patient sample, the lack of interdisciplinary adoption of guidelines, and the need for additional emphasis on prevention and lifestyle modifications. Future direction for the current guidelines will likely incorporate a multidisciplinary approach with increasing utilization of genetic analysis and novel treatment strategies. As the field of infertility continues to expand, the utility of guidelines combined with physician clinical judgment will remain prominent in the treatment of male-factor infertility. PMID:21716890

Trost, Landon W.; Nehra, Ajay

2011-01-01

272

Laparohysteroscopy in female infertility: A diagnostic cum therapeutic tool in Indian setting  

PubMed Central

Aims: To evaluate the role of laparohysteroscopy in female infertility andto study the effect of therapeutic procedures in achieving fertility. Settings and Design: Patients with female infertility presenting to outpatient Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology were evaluated over a period of 18 months. Materials and Methods: Fifty consenting subjects excluding male factor infertility with normal hormonal profile and no contraindication to laparoscopy were subject to diagnostic laparoscopy and hysteroscopy. Statistical Analysis Used: T-test. Results: We studied 50 patients comprising of 24 (48%) cases of primary infertility and 26 (52%) patients of secondary infertility. The average age of active married life for 50 patients was between 8 and 9 years. In our study, the most commonly found pathologies were PCOD, endometroisis and tubal blockage. 11 (28.2) patients conceived after laparohysteroscopy followed by artificial reproductive techniques. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the benefit of laparohysteroscopy for diagnosis and as a therapeutic tool in patients with primary and secondary infertility. We were able to achieve a higher conception rate of 28.2%. PMID:25664268

Puri, Suman; Jain, Dinesh; Puri, Sandeep; Kaushal, Sandeep; Deol, Satjeet Kaur

2015-01-01

273

The challenge of providing infertility services to a low-income immigrant Latino population  

PubMed Central

Study Objective To provide insight into the experience of low income immigrant Latino couples seeking infertility treatment. Design Qualitative interview study. Setting Infertility Clinic at a University-affiliated urban public teaching hospital. Patients Infertile low-income immigrant Latino couples (105 women and 40 men). Interventions In-depth tape-recorded interviews. Main Outcome Measures After transcription and translation, the interviews were coded and analyzed for thematic content. Results We identified four major challenges to providing infertility services to this population: (1) Communication: Language and cultural barriers resulted in patients having difficulty both in understanding diagnoses and treatments and in communicating their questions, concerns and experiences to physicians; (2) Continuity: Because medical student and residents rotated frequently, patients usually saw a different physician at each visit. (3) Bureaucracy: Patients reported having difficulty with appointment scheduling, follow-up visits, and timed laboratory procedures. (4) Accessibility: Patients faced issues of limited availability and affordability of treatment. Conclusions At a large, urban, University-affiliated infertility clinic, challenges related to communication, comprehension, continuity, bureaucracy, accessibility, availability, and affordability impeded the delivery of optimal infertility care to many low income immigrant Latino patients. We recommend a greater availability of translators and both patient and physician cultural orientations to address these health care barriers. PMID:18710703

Nachtigall, Robert D.; Castrillo, Martha; Shah, Nina; Turner, Dylan; Harrington, Jennifer; Jackson, Rebecca

2009-01-01

274

Body weight control practice as a cause of infertility.  

PubMed

Evidence concerning the relationship between the ratio of lean mass to body fat in the female body and the maintenance of female reproductive functions was examined, and the results of a US clinical study in which a weight gain regime was used to treat unexplained in fertility in 29 fashionabely slim women were presented. During the female pubertal process, there is an average increase in the lean body weight of 44% and a mean increase in the body fat of 120%. Apparently, the accummulation of fat is a necessary prerequisite for the onset of menarche and the establishment and maintenance of regular ovulatory cycles. A small change in body weight produces a relatively large shift in the body weight to fat ratio. As a result, weight loss is frequently followed by amenorrhea. Studies of the endocrine and central nervous system changes in patients with anorexia nervosa, an extreme form of overzealous weight control, provides clues for understanding the effects of less extreme weight control practices on reproductive functions. The gonadotropin secretory pattern of anorexia nervosa patients is similar to the prepubertal pattern. When gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is administered to patients with 53%-64% of their ideal body weight (IBW), they have a weak luteinizing hormone (LH) response and a normal follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) response. As their weight increases, the LH response becomes stronger, and at 90%-94% of their IBW, the LH response is frequently exaggerated. Other studies indicate that an exaggerated LH response also occurs when GnRH is administered to fashionably slim women. This finding suggests that gonadotropin secretory studies should be conducted when evaluating women with weight related menstrual dysfunctions. In the present study, 29 patients with unexplained infertility were identified as being overly, but not excessively, concerned with maintaining a slim body image. On the average, they were 91% below their IBW. The women were asked to increase their body weight until they reached their IBW. Serum LH/FSH ratios were monitored. Blood samples were taken during the midfollicular phase of the menstrual cycle and at random times among those patients with amenorrhea. 3 women withdrew from the study as they did not want to gain weight. The remaining 26 women attained at least 98% of their IBW. At 95% of their IBW, the women attained normal LH/FSH ratios, and at 98% of their IBW, the women attained normal ovulatory cycles. 19 of the women eventually conceived. Clinicians who wise to use this technique for treating infertility should first rule out other possible causes for infertility. If weight gain treatment appears to be appropriate, the physician should be sensitive to the woman's concerns about her body image. The patient will require considerable encouragement during the weight gaining process. Patients should be advised to expect changes in breast size and configuration and an increase in endocervical canal secretions. The increased body fat will be unevenly distributed in the body, and patients should be instructed not to undertake fat redistribution exercises. Physicians should refrain from administering clomiphene citrate as a supplement to the weight gain regime. PMID:3931948

Bates, G W

1985-09-01

275

Letrozole versus Clomiphene for Infertility in the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Clomiphene is the current first-line infertility treatment in women with the polycystic ovary syndrome, but aromatase inhibitors, including letrozole, might result in better pregnancy outcomes. METHODS In this double-blind, multicenter trial, we randomly assigned 750 women, in a 1:1 ratio, to receive letrozole or clomiphene for up to five treatment cycles, with visits to determine ovulation and pregnancy, followed by tracking of pregnancies. The polycystic ovary syndrome was defined according to modified Rotterdam criteria (anovulation with either hyperandrogenism or polycystic ovaries). Participants were 18 to 40 years of age, had at least one patent fallopian tube and a normal uterine cavity, and had a male partner with a sperm concentration of at least 14 million per milliliter; the women and their partners agreed to have regular intercourse with the intent of conception during the study. The primary outcome was live birth during the treatment period. RESULTS Women who received letrozole had more cumulative live births than those who received clomiphene (103 of 374 [27.5%] vs. 72 of 376 [19.1%], P = 0.007; rate ratio for live birth, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.87) without significant differences in overall congenital anomalies, though there were four major congenital anomalies in the letrozole group versus one in the clomiphene group (P = 0.65). The cumulative ovulation rate was higher with letrozole than with clomiphene (834 of 1352 treatment cycles [61.7%] vs. 688 of 1425 treatment cycles [48.3%], P<0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in pregnancy loss (49 of 154 pregnancies in the letrozole group [31.8%] and 30 of 103 pregnancies in the clomiphene group [29.1%]) or twin pregnancy (3.4% and 7.4%, respectively). Clomiphene was associated with a higher incidence of hot flushes, and letrozole was associated with higher incidences of fatigue and dizziness. Rates of other adverse events were similar in the two treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS As compared with clomiphene, letrozole was associated with higher live-birth and ovulation rates among infertile women with the polycystic ovary syndrome. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00719186.) PMID:25006718

Legro, Richard S.; Brzyski, Robert G.; Diamond, Michael P.; Coutifaris, Christos; Schlaff, William D.; Casson, Peter; Christman, Gregory M.; Huang, Hao; Yan, Qingshang; Alvero, Ruben; Haisenleder, Daniel J.; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Bates, G. Wright; Usadi, Rebecca; Lucidi, Scott; Baker, Valerie; Trussell, J.C.; Krawetz, Stephen A.; Snyder, Peter; Ohl, Dana; Santoro, Nanette; Eisenberg, Esther; Zhang, Heping

2014-01-01

276

Middle Eastern masculinities in the age of new reproductive technologies: male infertility and stigma in Egypt and Lebanon.  

PubMed

Worldwide, male infertility contributes to more than half of all cases of childlessness; yet, it is a reproductive health problem that is poorly studied and understood. This article examines the problem of male infertility in two Middle Eastern locales, Cairo, Egypt, and Beirut, Lebanon, where men may be at increased risk of male infertility because of environmental and behavioral factors. It is argued that male infertility may be particularly problematic for Middle Eastern men in their pronatalist societies; there, both virility and fertility are typically tied to manhood. Thus, male infertility is a potentially emasculating condition, surrounded by secrecy and stigma. Furthermore, the new reproductive technology called intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), designed specifically to overcome male infertility, may paradoxically create additional layers of stigma and secrecy, due to the complex moral and marital dilemmas associated with Islamic restrictions on third-party donation of gametes. PMID:15272802

Inhorn, Marcia C

2004-06-01

277

Acid soil infertility effects on peanut yields and yield components  

SciTech Connect

The interpretation of soil amelioration experiments with peanuts is made difficult by the unpredictibility of the crop and by the many factors altered when ameliorating acid soils. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of lime and gypsum applications on peanut kernel yield via the three first order yield components, pods per ha, kernels per pod, and kernel mass. On an acid medium sandy loam soil (typic Plinthustult), liming resulted in a highly significant kernel yield increase of 117% whereas gypsum applications were of no significant benefit. As indicated by path coefficient analysis, an increase in the number of pods per ha was markedly more important in increasing yield than an increase in either the number of kernels per pod or kernel mass. Furthermore, exch. Al was found to be particularly detrimental to pod number. It was postulated that poor peanut yields resulting from acid soil infertility were mainly due to the depressive effect of exch. Al on pod number. Exch. Ca appeared to play a secondary role by ameliorating the adverse effects of exch. Al.

Blamey, F.P.C.

1983-01-01

278

Fertility, infertility and child survival of Somali women.  

PubMed

The relationship of reproductive patterns, some socio-economic factors and child survival was studied in 766 rural Somali women. A structured questionnaire was the method of data collection. Teenage marriage was the norm for the women, and divorce was very common. The mean number of live births was 5.2, and the mean number of surviving children was 3.7. 2/3 of the women aged 45+ had a parity of 6 or more, about one third had had at least one miscarriage and one fifth had experienced one stillbirth. Primary infertility was observed in 7% of the women aged 45+, while 20% were considered subfertile. Verbal autopsy showed that mortality was highest among infants and accounted for 63% of the child deaths. Major causes of death were neonatal tetanus, diarrhoea and respiratory diseases. Child survival and reproductive outcome ratios were found to be negatively related to the increasing age of the mother and parity. Divorce and widowhood were also found to be associated with low child survival. PMID:7846477

Omar, M M; Högberg, U; Bergström, B

1994-09-01

279

Molecular and other predictors for infertility in patients with varicoceles.  

PubMed

Varicoceles are a treatable cause of male infertility, but very clinically diverse. Both histologic and molecular changes occur in the testes of men with varicocele. Physical measurements (scrotal temperature, testicular volume, pressure within the pampiniform plexus, basal lamina thickness) correlate with prognosis, but these correlations have not been accepted as predictors of successful repair because of variation within patient populations. Conventional semen parameters similarly correlate, but these correlations apply only to men with >5 x106 sperm/ejaculate. Levels of toxicants (e.g. norepinephrine, cadmium), reactive oxygen species byproducts, and hormones, their receptors and modulators have been evaluated as predictors in small-scale studies. Medical therapies (antoxidants, anti-inflammatories and hormones) have been applied empirically to small groups of patients with positive results that have not been verified in large-scale trials. Thus, urologists still face a challenge to determine which patients will benefit from varicocelectomies and/or medical interventions. In this review we summarize our current understanding of the pathophysiology of varicoceles, and discuss some of the new findings that may be applicable to specific clinical situations. PMID:19273300

Benoff, Susan; Marmar, Joel L; Hurley, Ian R

2009-01-01

280

Incidence of anti-zona pellucida and anti-sperm antibodies among infertile Jordanian women and its relation to mycoplasmas.  

PubMed

Anti-zona-pellucida autoantibodies (AZP-Ab) and anti-sperm isoantibodies (ASA) were assessed in the cervical secretions from 73 infertile Jordanian women and 41 fertile control women using latex agglutination. Significantly more women with infertility had AZP-Ab and ASA (16.4% and 8.2% respectively) compared with fertile women (9.4% and 0%), with no relation to the etiology of infertility. Using polymerase chain reaction Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum were detected in cervical secretions of 19.2% and 13.7% of infertile women, and the presence of mycoplasma was significantly correlated with the presence of AZP-Ab and ASA. PMID:20214140

Al-Daghistani, H I; Fram, K M

2009-01-01

281

The risk factor profile of women with secondary infertility: an unmatched case-control study in Kigali, Rwanda  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Secondary infertility is a common, preventable but neglected reproductive health problem in resource-poor countries. This\\u000a study examines the association of past sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV, bacterial vaginosis (BV) and\\u000a factors in the obstetric history with secondary infertility and their relative contributions to secondary infertility.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Between November 2007 and May 2009 a research infertility clinic was set up at

Nathalie Dhont; Claude Muvunyi; Joseph Vyankandondera; Ludwig De Naeyer; Marleen Temmerman; Janneke van de Wijgert

2011-01-01

282

Family-Related Opinions and Stressful Situations Associated with Psychological Distress in Women Undergoing Infertility Treatment  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study is to investigate how family-related opinions and stressful situations are related to psychological distress in women undergoing infertility treatment. The subjects in this cross-sectional study were recruited from female patients undergoing infertility treatment (n = 2540) at 70 infertility treatment institutions in Japan. Because of non-participation or missing data, the number of subjects included in the analysis was 635 (response rate, 25.0%). The family-related opinions and stressful situations were evaluated using the original questions. Psychological distress was assessed using a self-report measure, the Kessler Six-question Psychological Distress Scale (K6). The K6 scores of the following participants were significantly (p < 0.05) and independently high: those with more frequent miscarriage/stillbirth/abortions, those with repeated miscarriages as the cause of infertility, those with infertility of unknown causes, those living with no child, those having a low joint income with their partner, those with the opinion that “women should devote themselves to their household duties” those who had considered stopping treatment, those without the opinion that “married life without children is favorable” and those who had experienced stressful situations such as inadequate explanation by doctors, frustration of multiple failed attempts, differences of opinion with the partner, and lack of knowledge regarding when to stop treatment. Family-related opinions and stressful situations associated with psychological distress in women undergoing infertility treatment are outlined. The results of this study may contribute to the prevention of and care for psychological distress in female patients undergoing infertility treatment. PMID:25184788

Takaki, Jiro; Hibino, Yuri

2014-01-01

283

Infertility Specific Quality of Life and Gender Role Attitudes in German and Hungarian Involuntary Childless Couples  

PubMed Central

Introduction: As gender role attitudes and the evaluation of parenthood and childlessness have subtle variations in each society, cross-country studies focusing on infertility are needed to draw a complex picture in the psychosocial context of infertility. This study investigates similarities and differences between German and Hungarian infertile couples regarding infertility specific quality of life and personal gender role attitudes. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with data of 540 participants (270 couples) attending the first fertility consultation in one fertility clinic in Germany and in five fertility clinics in Hungary. Data were collected between February 2012 and March 2013. Two psychological questionnaires were applied: The FertiQoL to measure infertility specific quality of life and the PAQ to measure gender role attitudes like “instrumental” acting (as a traditional “masculine” attitude) and “expressive” communicating (as a traditional “femine” attitude) and their combinations “combined” attitude (as both “instrumental” and “expressive”) and “neutral” attitude (neither “instrumental” nor “expressive”). Results: German couples seeking assisted reproduction treatment are older aged and have longer lasting relationships than Hungarian couples. Hungarian couples scored higher on all quality of life scales than did German couples. In the Hungarian group, “combined” attitudes (use of both “expressive” and “instrumental” attitudes) is associated with higher levels of quality of life compared with other gender role attitudes. In the German group, individuals with “combined” attitudes seem to show better quality of life than those in “expressive” and “neutral” clusters. Conclusions: The strategy of using combined “expressive” and “instrumental” attitudes proved to act as a buffer against infertility-related stress for both members of the couple in two European countries and can therefore be recommended as helpful in counselling the infertile couple. PMID:25484375

Cserepes, R. E.; Bugán, A.; Korösi, T.; Toth, B.; Rösner, S.; Strowitzki, T.; Wischmann, T.

2014-01-01

284

Development of a scale for determining violence against infertile women: a scale development study  

PubMed Central

Background To develop a scale to evaluate violence experienced among infertile women. Method Three steps were followed in the development of the scale: Literature review and deep interviews to generate item pool, content validity testing, and administration of draft. Content validity was evaluated by experts. The draft scale was pilot-tested with a convenience sample of 30 women during their treatment. After the pilot-test, 166 infertile females filled the scale in the infertility clinic of a university hospital in Istanbul. Results For evaluation of construct validity, Kaiser-Mayer Olkin was 0.91. Bartlett test was statistically significant (p?=?0.00). According to the results of analysis, 5 domains were determined: “domestic violence”, “social pressure”, “punishment”, “exposure to traditional practices” and “exclusion”. The values of correlation of item were between 0.50 and 0.82. Item-total and subscale-total correlation varied between 0.57-0.91. The scale had good internal reliability, with Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient of 0.96. The other coefficients of subscales varied between 0.80-0.94. Conclusions The scale called “Infertile Women’s Exposure to Violence Determination Scale” indicates high reliability, good content and construct validity. Routine screening for domestic violence in infertility clinics is necessary to give affected women an opportunity to access appropriate health care and support services. On the other hand, common use of Infertile Women’s Exposure to Violence Determination Scale in infertility clinics provides increased sensitivity and awareness by caregivers. PMID:24576353

2014-01-01

285

Infertility Specific Quality of Life and Gender Role Attitudes in German and Hungarian Involuntary Childless Couples.  

PubMed

Introduction: As gender role attitudes and the evaluation of parenthood and childlessness have subtle variations in each society, cross-country studies focusing on infertility are needed to draw a complex picture in the psychosocial context of infertility. This study investigates similarities and differences between German and Hungarian infertile couples regarding infertility specific quality of life and personal gender role attitudes. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with data of 540 participants (270 couples) attending the first fertility consultation in one fertility clinic in Germany and in five fertility clinics in Hungary. Data were collected between February 2012 and March 2013. Two psychological questionnaires were applied: The FertiQoL to measure infertility specific quality of life and the PAQ to measure gender role attitudes like "instrumental" acting (as a traditional "masculine" attitude) and "expressive" communicating (as a traditional "femine" attitude) and their combinations "combined" attitude (as both "instrumental" and "expressive") and "neutral" attitude (neither "instrumental" nor "expressive"). Results: German couples seeking assisted reproduction treatment are older aged and have longer lasting relationships than Hungarian couples. Hungarian couples scored higher on all quality of life scales than did German couples. In the Hungarian group, "combined" attitudes (use of both "expressive" and "instrumental" attitudes) is associated with higher levels of quality of life compared with other gender role attitudes. In the German group, individuals with "combined" attitudes seem to show better quality of life than those in "expressive" and "neutral" clusters. Conclusions: The strategy of using combined "expressive" and "instrumental" attitudes proved to act as a buffer against infertility-related stress for both members of the couple in two European countries and can therefore be recommended as helpful in counselling the infertile couple. PMID:25484375

Cserepes, R E; Bugán, A; Korösi, T; Toth, B; Rösner, S; Strowitzki, T; Wischmann, T

2014-11-01

286

A review of management of infertility in Nigeria: framing the ethics of a national health policy  

PubMed Central

Infertility has recently been construed to be a serious problem in sub-Saharan Africa. This problem seems to be viewed as of low priority with reference to the effective and efficient allocation of available health resources by national governments as well as by international donors sponsoring either research or service delivery in the public health sector. In this paper the problem of infertility in Nigeria is surveyed with a view to assessing the ethical dimension of proposals to manage infertility as a public sector priority in health care delivery. The population/individual and public/private distinction in the formulation of health policy has ethical implications that cannot simply be ignored and are therefore engaged in critically assessing the problem of infertility. Cost–utility analysis (such as Quality Adjusted Life-Year composite index) in the management of infertility in Nigeria entails the need for caution relevant to the country’s efforts to achieve Millennium Development Goals. This should remain the case whether the ethical evaluation appeals to utilitarian or contractarian (Rawlsian) principles. The “worst off ” category of Nigerians includes (1) underweight children less than 5 years of age, with special concern for infants (0–1 years of age) and (2) the proportion of the population below a minimum level of dietary consumption. The Rawlsian ethic implies that any Federal Ministry of Health policy aimed at establishing public programs for infertility management can be considered a “fair” allocation and expenditure if, and only if, the situation for these two cohorts is not thereby made worse. Nigerian health policy cannot assume this type of increased allocation of its resources to infertility care without it being hard pressed to warrant defensible moral or rational argument. PMID:21892337

Akinloye, Oluyemi; Truter, Ernest J

2011-01-01

287

Global infertility and the globalization of new reproductive technologies: illustrations from Egypt.  

PubMed

Infertility is a problem of global proportions, affecting on average 8-12 percent of couples worldwide. In some societies, however-particularly those in the "infertility belt" of sub-Saharan Africa-as many as one-third of all couples are unable to conceive. Factors causing high rates of tubal infertility in parts of the developing world include sexually transmitted, postpartum, and postabortion infections; however, male infertility, which is rarely acknowledged, contributes to more than half of all cases. Unfortunately, the new reproductive technologies (NRTs) such as in vitro fertilization (IVF), which are prohibitively expensive and difficult to implement in many parts of the developing world, represent the only solution to most cases of tubal and male infertility. Not surprisingly, these technologies are rapidly globalizing to pronatalist developing societies, where children are highly desired, parenthood is culturally mandatory, and childlessness socially unacceptable. Using Egypt as an illustrative case study, this paper examines five of the major forces fueling the global demand for NRTs; these include demographic and epidemiological factors, the fertility-infertility dialectic, problems in health care seeking, gendered suffering, and adoption restrictions. Following this overview, a detailed examination of the implications of the rapid global spread of NRTs to the developing world will be offered. By focusing on Egypt, where nearly 40 IVF centers are in operation, this article will demonstrate the considerable constraints on the practice and utilization of NRTs in a developing country on the "receiving end" of global reproductive technology transfer. The article concludes by stressing the need for primary prevention of infections leading to infertility, thereby reducing global reliance on NRTs. PMID:12650724

Inhorn, Marcia C

2003-05-01

288

Attitudes of fertile and infertile woman towards new reproductive technologies: a case study of Lithuania  

PubMed Central

Background This article analyzes several key issues in the debate: the acceptability of in vitro fertilization; regulation of assisted reproduction and the possibilities of reimbursement for assisted reproduction treatment in Lithuania. Method Two groups of respondents participated in the survey: fertile women and women with fertility disorders. 93 completed questionnaires from women with fertility problems and 146 from women with no fertility problems were analysed. Results Fertile respondents more frequently perceived the embryo as a human being (Fertile Individuals – 68.5%; Infertile Individuals – 35.5%; p < 0.05) and more frequently maintained that assisted reproduction treatment should be only partly reimbursed (Fertile Individuals – 71.3%; Infertile Individuals – 39.8%; p < 0.05). Respondents with fertility disorders more frequently thought that artificial insemination procedure could also be applied to unmarried couples (Fertile Individuals – 51.4%; Infertile Individuals – 76.3%; p < 0.05), and more frequently agreed that there should be no age limit for artificial insemination procedures (Fertile Individuals – 36.3%; Infertile Individuals – 67.7%; p < 0.05). The majority of respondents in both groups (Fertile Individuals – 77.4%; Infertile Individuals – 82.8%; p < 0.05) believed that donation of reproductive cells should be regulated by law. Fertile respondents more frequently considered that strict legal regulation was necessary in case of the number of transferred embryos (Fertile Individuals – 69.2%; Infertile Individuals – 39.8%; p < 0.05) and freezing of embryos (Fertile Individuals – 69.9%; Infertile Individuals – 57.0%; p < 0.05). Conclusion Fertile respondents were statistically more likely to believe that the IVF procedure should be applied only to married couples or women who had a regular partner, the age limit should be defined and the psychological assessment of the couple’s relationship and their readiness for the IVF procedure was necessary. In contrast, infertile couples were statistically more likely than fertile respondents to maintain that the IVF procedure should be fully reimbursed by the state. Fertile respondents were statistically more likely to be categorical with respect to the number of embryos and the freezing of embryos. Meanwhile there is a statistically significant difference in opinions of infertile respondents who were in favour of stricter regulation on donation of reproductive cells. PMID:24684746

2014-01-01

289

Significant Impact of the MTHFR Polymorphisms and Haplotypes on Male Infertility Risk  

PubMed Central

Background Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) converts 5,10-methylene tetrahydrofolate to 5-methyl tetrahydrofolate and affects the activity of cellular cycles participating in nucleotide synthesis, DNA repair, genome stability, maintenance of methyl pool, and gene regulation. Genetically compromised MTHFR activity has been suggested to affect male fertility. The objective of the present study was to find the impact on infertility risk of c.203G>A, c.1298A>C, and c.1793G>A polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene. Methods PCR-RFLP and DNA sequencing were used to genotype the common SNPs in the MTHFR gene in 630 infertile and 250 fertile males. Chi-square test was applied for statistical comparison of genotype data. Linkage disequilibrium between the SNPs and the frequency of common haplotypes were assessed using Haploview software. Biochemical levels of total homocysteine (tHcy) and folic acid were measured. Meta-analysis on c.1298A>C polymorphism was performed using data from ten studies, comprising 2734 cases and 2737 controls. Results c.203G>A and c.1298A>C were found to be unrelated to infertility risk. c.1793G>A was protective against infertility (P?=?0.0008). c.677C>T and c.1793G>A were in significant LD (D’?=?0.9). Folic acid and tHcy level did not correlate with male infertility. Pooled estimate on c.1298A>C data from all published studies including our data showed no association of this polymorphism with male infertility (Odds ratio?=?1.035, P?=?0.56), azoospermia (Odds ratio?=?0.97, P?=?0.74), or oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (Odds ratio?=?0.92, p?=?0.29). Eight haplotypes with more than 1% frequency were detected, of which CCGA was protective against infertility (p?=?0.02), but the significance of the latter was not seen after applying Bonferroni correction. Conclusion Among MTHFR polymorphisms, c.203G>A and c.1298A>C do not affect infertility risk and c.1793G>A is protective against infertility. Haplotype analysis suggested that risk factors on the MTHFR locus do not extend too long on the DNA string. PMID:23874907

Gupta, Nishi; Sarkar, Saumya; David, Archana; Gangwar, Pravin Kumar; Gupta, Richa; Khanna, Gita; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Khanna, Anil; Rajender, Singh

2013-01-01

290

Interaction of microbiology and pathology in women undergoing investigations for infertility.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Cases of endometriosis with no tubal damage are associated with infertility, suggesting an immunological rather than mechanical barrier to reproduction. Laparoscopy and falloposcopy results of clinically asymptomatic women undergoing investigation of infertility were correlated with the outcomes of microbiological screening for Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, ureaplasma species, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Neisseria meningitidis and Chlamydia pneumoniae. METHODS: A total of 44 women presenting to a hospital IVF service for laparoscopic or laparoscopic/falloposcopic investigation of infertility provided endocervical swabs, fallopian tube washings, and peripheral whole blood for analysis. RESULTS: Of these 44 women, 15.9% (7) showed evidence of C. trachomatis infection as detected by either PCR or EIA serology. Of these 7 women, 5 (71%) had no or mild endometriosis and 2 (29%) had moderate or severe endometriosis. Of the remaining 37 women who showed no evidence of chlamydial infection, 15 (40.5%) had no or mild endometriosis. CONCLUSION: Women with infertility, but without severe endometriosis at laparoscopy, showed a trend towards tubal damage and a higher rate of previous C. trachomatis infection. Although not statistically significant, this trend would suggest that, where moderate to severe tubal damage is found to be the primary cause of infertility, C. trachomatis infection could be a likely cause for such tubal damage. PMID:15763913

Debattista, Joseph; Gazzard, Caroline M.; Wood, Robyn N.; Allan, John A.; Allan, Janet M.; Scarman, Anthony; Mortlock, Miranda; Timms, Peter; Knox, Christine L.

2004-01-01

291

Seminal plasma oxytocin and oxidative stress levels in infertile men with varicocele.  

PubMed

This study aimed to assess seminal plasma oxytocin (OT) and oxidative stress (OS) levels in infertile men with varicocele (Vx). A total of 131 men were divided into fertile men (n = 20), fertile men with Vx (n = 17), infertile men without Vx (n = 40) and infertile men with Vx (n = 54). OT, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were estimated in seminal plasma. Mean levels of seminal OT, MDA were significantly decreased, and the mean level of GPx was significantly increased in fertile men with/without Vx compared with infertile men with/without Vx. Mean levels of OT, MDA were increased, and mean level of GPx was significantly decreased in Vx grade III cases compared with Vx grades I, II cases and in bilateral Vx cases compared with unilateral Vx. There was significant negative correlation between seminal OT with sperm count, sperm motility, seminal GPx and significant positive correlation with sperm abnormal forms, seminal MDA. It is concluded that seminal OT is significantly decreased in fertile men with/without Vx compared with infertile men with/without Vx. Seminal OT demonstrated significant negative correlation with sperm count, sperm motility, seminal GPx and significant positive correlation with sperm abnormal forms, seminal MDA. Seminal OT is associated with Vx grade and its bilaterality. PMID:24635706

Mostafa, T; Rashed, L A; Osman, I; Marawan, M

2015-03-01

292

Human catalase gene polymorphism (CAT C-262T) and risk of male infertility.  

PubMed

Infertility is the failure of a couple to engender after endeavouring at least one full year of unprotected intercourse. It has been reported that reactive oxygen species contributed to pathogenesis of various disease. To inactivate ROS cells biosynthesise several antioxidant enzymes, one of them is catalase which contributes H2 O2 to H2 O and O2 . This study set out to delineate the association of catalase C-262T polymorphism with idiopathic male infertility. The study included 195 men with idiopathic infertility and 190 healthy volunteers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes. Genotype and allele frequencies were determined in patients and controls using allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR). The prevalence of genotype frequencies of the CAT CC/CT/TT was 31.79%, 65.12% and 3.07%, respectively, in infertile subjects, as against 24.73%, 55.26% and 20%, respectively, in healthy volunteers. Statistical analysis has emerged significant difference from the comparison of either genotype (P < 0.05). Taking into accounts of results, the catalase C-262T polymorphism indicates that CAT-262T/T genotype confers less susceptibility to male infertility. Further studies with larger numbers of patients are required for further evaluation and confirmation of our finding. PMID:24456074

Sabouhi, S; Salehi, Z; Bahadori, M H; Mahdavi, M

2015-02-01

293

Anti-HE4 Antibodies in infertile women and women with Ovarian Cancer  

PubMed Central

Objectives To develop an assay for anti-HE4 antibodies and assess such antibodies in sera from women with increased epidemiologic risk for ovarian cancer (infertility) and patients with ovarian cancer in comparison to controls. Methods An ELISA was developed to measure antibodies to recombinant full length HE4 and cut-off values were determined for different levels of specificity (up to 99%). Results Infertile women more frequently had anti-HE4 antibodies than controls (23% at 98% specificity, p<0.001) with antibodies most frequent in women with POF (31%) and ovulatory dysfunction (47%). There was also an increased frequency of anti-HE4 antibodies in patients with ovarian cancer (14% at 97% specificity, p<0.01), but more women with certain types of infertility have anti-HE4 antibodies than women with ovarian cancer. Most patients with ovarian cancer have circulating HE4 antigen, which may interfere with detection of antibodies, while the level of HE4 antigen in sera from infertile women was not higher than in normal controls. There was a statistically significant correlation between antibodies to HE4 and antibodies to mesothelin in the same patients. Conclusions Women with certain types of infertility, which have increased risk to develop ovarian cancer, and women with ovarian cancer more frequently than controls have antibodies to HE4, a biomarker for ovarian cancer. The antibodies may reflect a tumor-promoting Th2 type of inflammation. PMID:23727327

Hellstrom, Ingegerd; Swisher, Elizabeth; Hellstrom, Karl Erik; Yip, Yuen Yee; Agnew, Kathy; Luborsky, Judith L.

2013-01-01

294

Association of C677T transition of the human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with male infertility.  

PubMed

The human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene encodes one of the key enzymes in folate metabolism. This gene is located on chromosome 1 (1p36.3), which has 12 exons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association of the two (C677T and A1298C) polymorphisms of this gene with male infertility. In a case-control study, 250 blood samples were collected from IVF centres in Sari and Babol (Iran): 118 samples were from oligospermic men and 132 were from controls. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms of the MTHFR genotype were detected using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. There was no association found between the A1298C variant and male infertility. However, carriers of the 677T allele (CT and TT genotypes) were at a higher risk of infertility than individuals with other genotypes (odds ratio 1.84; 95% confidence interval 1.11-3.04; P=0.0174). Structural analysis of human MTHFR flavoprotein showed that C677T transition played an important role in the change in affinity of the MTHFR-Flavin adenine dinucleotide binding site. Based on our results, we suggest that C677T transition in MTHFR may increase the risk of male infertility, and detection of the C677T polymorphism biomarker may be helpful in the screening of idiopathic male infertility. PMID:25412139

Karimian, Mohammad; Colagar, Abasalt Hosseinzadeh

2014-11-21

295

Regional and geographical variations in infertility: effects of environmental, cultural, and socioeconomic factors.  

PubMed Central

Fertility is affected by many different cultural, environmental, and socioeconomic factors, especially in developing countries where poverty and infections are commonplace. Environmental factors play a major role in infertility in Africa. One of the most important health problems in sub-Saharan Africa is the high rate of infertility and childlessness. The African society has a strong traditional heritage, and the study of the patterns of infertility in this part of the world would be incomplete without consideration of the sociocultural and environmental factors. The most cost-effective approach to solving the infertility problems in Africa is prevention and education. In Mexico, problems of reproductive health are associated with pregnancy in adolescents, sexually transmitted diseases and genitourinary neoplasms. Infertility affects 10% of couples, usually as a result of asymptomatic infection. Education, poverty, nutrition, and pollution are problems that must be tackled. The government has taken positive action in the State of São Paulo in Brazil, where gender discrimination is a major factor affecting women's health and reproductive outcomes. The implementation of new policies with adequate funding has resulted in marked improvements. PMID:8243409

Leke, R J; Oduma, J A; Bassol-Mayagoitia, S; Bacha, A M; Grigor, K M

1993-01-01

296

FSHR single nucleotide polymorphism frequencies in proven fathers and infertile men in Southeast Turkey.  

PubMed

The influence of FSH receptor (FSHR) variants on male infertility is not completely understood. The present investigation is the first screening study for SNP at nucleotide position -29 in the core promoter region and codon 680 in exon 10 of the FSHR and the effect of the serum levels of FSH on male infertility in Southeast Turkey. The SNPs in codon 680 and at position -29 of the FSHR gene were analyzed by PCR-RFLP technique in 240 men with proven fathers, and 270 infertile men (150 nonobstructive azoospermic and 120 severe oligozoospermic). The separate analysis for SNP at nucleotide position -29 did not show any difference in genotypic frequencies and serum FSH levels. The genotype distribution of SNP at position 680 was different but does not influence serum FSH levels. Together the two SNPs form four discrete haplotypes (A-Thr-Asn, G-Thr-Asn, A-Ala-Ser, and G-Ala-Ser) occurring in 10 combinations. A statistically significant difference in the allelic distribution of G-Asn/G-Ser and G-Ser/G-Ser genotype between proven fathers and infertile men but there were not any statistically significant difference in the overall frequency of the four FSHR haplotypes. We conclude that the FSHR haplotype does not associate with different serum FSH levels but it is differently distributed in proven fathers and infertile men. PMID:20454649

Balkan, Mahmut; Gedik, Abdullah; Akkoc, Hasan; Izci Ay, Ozlem; Erdal, M Emin; Isi, Hilmi; Budak, Turgay

2010-01-01

297

FSHR Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Frequencies in Proven Fathers and Infertile Men in Southeast Turkey  

PubMed Central

The influence of FSH receptor (FSHR) variants on male infertility is not completely understood. The present investigation is the first screening study for SNP at nucleotide position ?29 in the core promoter region and codon 680 in exon 10 of the FSHR and the effect of the serum levels of FSH on male infertility in Southeast Turkey. The SNPs in codon 680 and at position ?29 of the FSHR gene were analyzed by PCR-RFLP technique in 240 men with proven fathers, and 270 infertile men (150 nonobstructive azoospermic and 120 severe oligozoospermic). The separate analysis for SNP at nucleotide position ?29 did not show any difference in genotypic frequencies and serum FSH levels. The genotype distribution of SNP at position 680 was different but does not influence serum FSH levels. Together the two SNPs form four discrete haplotypes (A-Thr-Asn, G-Thr-Asn, A-Ala-Ser, and G-Ala-Ser) occurring in 10 combinations. A statistically significant difference in the allelic distribution of G-Asn/G-Ser and G-Ser/G-Ser genotype between proven fathers and infertile men but there were not any statistically significant difference in the overall frequency of the four FSHR haplotypes. We conclude that the FSHR haplotype does not associate with different serum FSH levels but it is differently distributed in proven fathers and infertile men. PMID:20454649

Balkan, Mahmut; Gedik, Abdullah; Akkoc, Hasan; Izci Ay, Ozlem; Erdal, M. Emin; Isi, Hilmi; Budak, Turgay

2010-01-01

298

A retrospective chromosome studies among Iranian infertile women: Report of 21 years  

PubMed Central

Background: The infertility is an important health problem, affecting about 15% of couples. The important role of genetic factors in pathogenesis of infertility is now increasingly recognized. The value of karyotyping women in the routine work-out of couples referred for sterility has long been recommended. Objective: The aim of this study was to define the frequency of all chromosomal aberrations among women which referred to our department due to infertility during the 21-year period. Materials and Methods: In this 21-year retrospective study, for the first time, we investigated 896 women which referred to our department due to infertility during 1986 to 2006. For chromosome analysis, heparinized peripheral blood samples were cultured, harvested and banded according to standard methods. Results: Out of 896 patients, 710 patients (79.24%) had a normal karyotype, and 186 patients (20.76%) showed abnormal karyotype. Among the abnormal ones 48 patients (25.81%) showed Turner's syndrome (45,X), and 45 patients (24.19%) were sex reversal with 46,XY karyotype. The rest of 93 patients (50%) revealed a wide range of chromosome abnormalities. Conclusion: Our results emphasized the importance of the standard cytogenetic methods in assessing the genetic characteristics of infertile females, which allows detecting a variety of somatic chromosome abnormalities, because some of these may interfere with the success of reproduction. PMID:24639762

Azimi, Cyrus; Khaleghian, Malihea; Farzanfar, Farideh

2013-01-01

299

Early stage management of ovarian endometrioma to prevent infertility  

PubMed Central

There are now convincing data showing that cystectomy of the endometrioma is not only no cure of infertility, but may harm follicle reserve. The question arises why is cystectomy for an endometrioma, in contrast with other ­benign cysts, a risk for follicle reserve and how can ovarian damage be prevented. Surgical specimens of ovaries with endometrioma in situ show in the majority of cases manifestly a combined ­extra-ovarian and intra-ovarian pathology with the cortex invaginated to form a pseudocyst. The extra-ovarian pathology includes endometrial lining of the cortex, bleeding and adhesions with surrounding tissues. The intra-ovarian pathology is characterized by microscopic stromal implants, fibrosis, smooth muscle metaplasia and ­arteriosclerosis, all affecting follicle reserve in the endometrioma bed. Clinically, ovarioscopy allows differential diagnosis (e.g. luteal cyst) and evaluation of the degree of fibrosis and darkening of the cortical wall. Transvaginal colour Doppler sonography can demonstrate the presence and extent of devascularisation in the endometrioma bed. Given this reality, surgery should be based on evaluation of the pathology of the endometrioma bed, but not on the mere size of the chocolate cyst. The main clinical problem is indeed the delayed diagnosis and consequently advanced irreversible cortical damage. Therefore, the sooner endometriomas are diagnosed, the better, because it increases the chances that vascularisation of the endometrioma bed is preserved. Finally, ablation, but not excision is the treatment of choice. The diagnosis of endometriosis is traditionally based on laparoscopy, but in a sexually active adolescent transvaginal endoscopy can be proposed. PMID:24753958

Brosens, I.; Puttemans, P.; Gordts, Sy.; Campo, R.; Gordts, S.; Benagiano, G.

2013-01-01

300

Effects of physiotherapeutic TENS in a woman with unexplained infertility.  

PubMed

Unexplained infertility (UI) is a difficult diagnosis in the field of obstetrics and gynaecology. This report describes TENS treatment as an adjunct therapy for a 30-year-old woman with long-standing UI who was scheduled to undergo ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer. She had three unsuccessful intrauterine insemination treatments. Her last IVF treatment also failed. The treatment consisted of burst-TENS for seven sessions, which was applied daily from the second day of induction of ovulation (IO) to hCG administration. The transvaginal ultrasonography with pulsed Doppler curves was performed to measure the uterine artery impedance indices of Pulsatility Index (PI) and Resistance Index (RI). Before TENS application, on the first day of IO, the PI and RI for right side uterine artery were 3.96 and 0.96, respectively. For left uterine artery, the PI and RI were 6.92 and 1, respectively. After treatment with TENS, on the day of hCG administration, the PI and RI for right side uterine artery were 3.39 and 0.90, respectively. On the left side, they were PI=2.62 and RI=0.86. IVF was performed and on the day of oocytes collection, 22 oocytes were collected and inseminated. Fertilization was confirmed 16 hours after insemination by visualization of 2 pronuclei. A singleton pregnancy was achieved by the presence of a fetal sac during an ultrasound examination. It is concluded that the addition of TENS resulted in remarkable reduction of uterine artery PI and RI and a successful pregnancy after IVF for this woman with UI. PMID:20690870

Salsabili, Nasser; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Berjis, Katayoon; Sedighi, Asefeh; Salsabili, Hoda

2011-02-01

301

Unexplained infertility as primary presentation of celiac disease, a case report and literature review  

PubMed Central

Background: Celiac sprue (gluten sensitive enteropathy) is an autoimmune disease which is hereditary and its pathology mainly bases on immunologic intolerance to gluten. It has a vast variety of signs and symptoms and its clinical features range from a silent disease to a typical gastrointestinal disorder. In this study we reviewed and summarized some other related issues about this disease and its relation with infertility. Case: The case is a 26 years old lady who had referred to a gynecologist because of infertility for 2 years and later it revealed that she has celiac sprue. Conclusion: Screening for its silent or subtle types especially among suspicious cases such as unexplained infertility seems to be a cost effective action. Meanwhile, in time administration of a gluten-free diet can lead to an almost complete cure.

Ghadir, Mohammadreza; Iranikhah, Abolfazl; Jandaghi, Mahboubeh; Joukar, Farahnaz; Sedigh-Rahimabadi, Massih; Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz

2011-01-01

302

Chromosome microarray analysis: a case report of infertile brothers with CATSPER gene deletion.  

PubMed

We present the case of two brothers who were referred to a male infertility clinic for infertility workup. Conventional chromosome analysis and Y chromosome microdeletions did not reveal any genetic alterations. We utilized the chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) to identify novel and common variations associated with this severely impaired spermatogenesis cases. CMA specific results showed a common deletion in the 15q15.3 region that harbors genes like CATSPER2, STRC and PPIP5K1 in both cases (M18 and M19). In addition we identified small duplication in X and 11 chromosomes of M19. This is the first familial case report from India on occurrence of CATSPER gene deletion in human male infertility. PMID:24690399

Jaiswal, Deepika; Singh, Vertika; Dwivedi, U S; Trivedi, Sameer; Singh, Kiran

2014-06-01

303

Specific antibodies to porcine zona pellucida detected by quantitative radioimmunoassay in both fertile and infertile women  

SciTech Connect

The specific radioimmunoassay system was developed for the titration of the antibodies to porcine zona pellucida (ZP) in human sera by using /sup 125/I-labeled purified porcine ZP as antigen, which is known to have cross-reactivity with human ZP. The antibodies in human sera were detected in 3 of 11 (27%) women with unexplained infertility, in 16 of 48 (33%) amenorrheic patients, in 4 of 12 (33%) fertile women, and in 3 of 10 (30%) men. Moreover, antibody titers in infertile women were no higher than those in fertile women and in men. These results seem to suggest that the antibodies in human sera that cross-react with porcine ZP may not be an important factor in causing infertility in women.

Kurachi, H.; Wakimoto, H.; Sakumoto, T.; Aono, T.; Kurachi, K.

1984-02-01

304

Simultaneous Serous Cyst Adenoma and Ovarian Pregnancy in An Infertile Woman  

PubMed Central

Ovarian pregnancy is a rare form of extra uterine pregnancy. Serous cyst adenoma is a benign variant of epithelial cell tumors of ovary. The coexistence of a cyst adenoma with an ovarian pregnancy in the same ovary is extremely rare. Some studies suggested that infertility or ovulation-inducing drugs can be involved in increased risk of ovarian tumors and ovarian pregnancies. A 28-year-old infertile woman presented with a ruptured ovarian pregnancy following ovulation induction with metformin. She had a concurrent benign serous cyst adenoma in the same ovary. Resection of both ovarian pregnancy and tumoral mass were performed. The ovary was preserved. Removal of gestational tissue and preservation of the involved ovary are the best options for management of ovarian pregnancy in young patient. Although there is an association between infertility/ovulation inducting medications and ovarian gestation, their connections with serous cyst adenoma are undetermined. PMID:24696771

Ebrahimi, Mahbod; Akbari Asbagh, Firoozeh

2014-01-01

305

Women's Perceptions of Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Failed Infertility Treatment on Marital and Sexual Satisfaction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined immediate and long-term effects of infertility treatment on the marital and sexual relationship, as perceived by women (n=40) who failed to become pregnant during treatment. Results indicated infertility treatment significantly affected both marital and sexual satisfaction after treatment was terminated, as well as during treatment. (ABL)

Pepe, Margaret V.; Byrne, T. Jean

1991-01-01

306

Infertility and Subjective Well-Being: The Mediating Roles of Self-Esteem, Internal Control, and Interpersonal Conflict.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined relationship between self-esteem, perceived control, interpersonal conflict between spouses, global and intimacy life quality, and stress produced by infertility in 185 married infertile couples. Found that fertility problem stress had indirect negative effects on life quality via its mediating effects on self-esteem, internal control,…

Abbey, Antonia; And Others

1992-01-01

307

How Husbands Cope When Pregnancy Fails: A Longitudinal Study of Infertility and Psychosocial Generativity. Working Paper No. 167.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The experience of marital infertility is a major biosocial life crisis that also represents a serious threat to the development of psychosocial generativity. Psychological studies of the consequences of involuntary infertility, however, are rare. A study was undertaken to identify variations in the coping patterns used by men who have experienced…

Snarey, John; And Others

308

Alterations in the steroid hormone receptor co-chaperone FKBPL are associated with male infertility: a case-control study  

E-print Network

Abstract Background Male infertility is a common cause of reproductive failure in humans. In mice, targeted deletions of the genes coding for FKBP6 or FKBP52, members of the FK506 binding protein family, can result in male infertility. In the case...

Sunnotel, Olaf; Hiripi, Laszlo; Lagan, Kevin; McDaid, Jennifer R; De Leon, Johanny M; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Crowe, Hannah; Kaluskar, Soniya; Ward, Michael; Scullion, Catherine; Campbell, Alan; Downes, C S; Hirst, David; Barton, David; Mocanu, Edgar; Tsujimura, Akira; Cox, Marc B; Robson, Tracy; Walsh, Colum P

2010-03-08

309

Expression Profiling of Endometrium from Women with Endometriosis Reveals Candidate Genes for Disease-Based Implantation Failure and Infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Endometriosis is clinically associated with pelvic pain and infertility, with implantation failure strongly suggested as an underlying cause for the observed infertility. Eutopic endo- metrium of women with endometriosis provides a unique ex- perimental paradigm for investigation into molecular mech- anisms of reproductive dysfunction and an opportunity to identify specific markers for this disease. We applied paral- leled gene expression

L. C. Kao; A. GERMEYER; S. TULAC; S. LOBO; J. P. YANG; R. N. TAYLOR; K. OSTEEN; B. A. LESSEY; L. C. GIUDICE

2003-01-01

310

CYP19 gene variant confers susceptibility to endometriosis-associated infertility in Chinese women  

PubMed Central

An aromatase encoded by the CYP19 gene catalyzes the final step in the biosynthesis of estrogens, which is related to endometriosis development. To assess the association of CYP19 gene polymorphisms with the risks of endometriosis, chocolate cysts and endometriosis-related infertility, a case–control study was conducted in Chinese Han women by recruiting 225 healthy control females, 146 patients with endometriosis, 94 endometriosis women with chocolate cyst and 65 women with infertility resulting from endometriosis, as diagnosed by both pathological and laparoscopic findings. Individual genotypes at rs2236722:T>C, rs700518:A>G, rs10046:T>C and [TTTA]n polymorphisms were identified. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were compared between the control group and case groups by chi-square analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were determined by logistic regression analysis to predict the association of CYP19 gene polymorphisms with the risk of endometriosis, the related chocolate cysts and infertility. The genotype distributions of the tested CYP19 gene polymorphisms were not significantly different between the healthy control group and the endometriosis/endometriosis with the chocolate cyst group. However, the CYP19 rs700518AA genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of endometriosis-related infertility (55.4% in the infertility group vs 25.3% in the control group, P<0.001; OR (95% CI): 3.66 (2.06–6.50)) under the recessive form of the A allele. Therefore, we concluded that in Chinese Han females CYP19 gene polymorphisms are not associated with susceptibility to endometriosis or chocolate cysts, whereas CYP19 rs700518AA genotype confers genetic susceptibility to endometriosis-related infertility. PMID:24968701

Wang, Ledan; Lu, Xiaosheng; Wang, Danhan; Qu, Wanglei; Li, Wenju; Xu, Xiaowen; Huang, Qiusui; Han, Xueying; Lv, Jieqiang

2014-01-01

311

Characterizing semen parameters and their association with reactive oxygen species in infertile men  

PubMed Central

Background A routine semen analysis is a first step in the laboratory evaluation of the infertile male. In addition, other tests such as measurement of reactive oxygen species can provide additional information regarding the etiology of male infertility. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of semen parameters with reactive oxygen species (ROS) in two groups: healthy donors of unproven and proven fertility and infertile men. In addition, we sought to establish an ROS cutoff value in seminal plasma at which a patient may be predicted to be infertile. Methods Seminal ejaculates from 318 infertile patients and 56 donors, including those with proven fertility were examined for semen parameters and ROS levels. Correlations were determined between traditional semen parameters and levels of ROS among the study participants. ROS levels were measured using chemiluminescence assay. Receiver operating characteristic curves were obtained to calculate a cutoff value for these tests. Results Proven Donors (n?=?28) and Proven Donors within the past 2 years (n?=?16) showed significantly better semen parameters than All Patients group (n?=?318). Significantly lower ROS levels were seen in the two Proven Donor groups compared with All Patients. The cutoff value of ROS in Proven Donors was determined to be 91.9 RLU/s with a specificity of 68.8% and a sensitivity of 93.8%. Conclusions Infertile men, irrespective of their clinical diagnoses, have reduced semen parameters and elevated ROS levels compared to proven fertile men who have established a pregnancy recently or in the past. Reactive oxygen species are negatively correlated with traditional semen parameters such as concentration, motility and morphology. Measuring ROS levels in the seminal ejaculates provides clinically-relevant information to clinicians. PMID:24885775

2014-01-01

312

Differences in the endocannabinoid system of sperm from fertile and infertile men.  

PubMed

Male infertility is a major cause of problems for many couples in conceiving a child. Recently, lifestyle pastimes such as alcohol, tobacco and marijuana have been shown to have further negative effects on male reproduction. The endocannabinoid system (ECS), mainly through the action of anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) at cannabinoid (CB(1), CB(2)) and vanilloid (TRPV1) receptors, plays a crucial role in controlling functionality of sperm, with a clear impact on male reproductive potential. Here, sperm from fertile and infertile men were used to investigate content (through LC-ESI-MS), mRNA (through quantitative RT-PCR), protein (through Western Blotting and ELISA) expression, and functionality (through activity and binding assays) of the main metabolic enzymes of AEA and 2-AG (NAPE-PLD and FAAH, for AEA; DAGL and MAGL for 2-AG), as well as of their binding receptors CB(1), CB(2) and TRPV1. Our findings show a marked reduction of AEA and 2-AG content in infertile seminal plasma, paralleled by increased degradation: biosynthesis ratios of both substances in sperm from infertile versus fertile men. In addition, TRPV1 binding was detected in fertile sperm but was undetectable in infertile sperm, whereas that of CB(1) and CB(2) receptors was not statistically different in the two groups. In conclusion, this study identified unprecedented alterations of the ECS in infertile sperm, that might impact on capacitation and acrosome reaction, and hence fertilization outcomes. These alterations might also point to new biomarkers to determine male reproductive defects, and identify distinct ECS elements as novel targets for therapeutic exploitation of ECS-oriented drugs to treat male fertility problems. PMID:23082196

Lewis, Sheena E M; Rapino, Cinzia; Di Tommaso, Monia; Pucci, Mariangela; Battista, Natalia; Paro, Rita; Simon, Luke; Lutton, Deborah; Maccarrone, Mauro

2012-01-01

313

Super Infection of An Ovarian Dermoid Cyst with Actinomyces in An Infertile Woman  

PubMed Central

We present super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst with actinomyces in an infertile patient. This is a case-report study for evaluation a couple with male factor infertility, who was a good candidate for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), while a 10 cm dermoid cyst was found in the woman’s right ovary. Patient complained of pelvic pain, intermittent fever, dysmenorrhea, and dyspareunia. The cyst was extracted using laparoscopy, whilst in histopathological examination, an actinomycosis super infection was reported. Actinomyc super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst is a very rare incident which can also occur in women with no history of intrauterine device (IUD) usage or previous fertility. PMID:24520476

Salehpour, Saghar; Akbari Sene, Azadeh

2013-01-01

314

Reproductive healthcare systems should include accessible infertility diagnosis and treatment: an important challenge for resource-poor countries.  

PubMed

Infertility is a central issue in the lives of many couples who suffer from it. In resource-poor countries the problem of childlessness is even more pronounced compared with Western societies owing to different sociocultural circumstances. It often leads to severe psychological, social, and economic suffering, and access to infertility treatment is often limited to certain procedures and certain costumers. The issue of infertility in resource-poor countries is underestimated and neglected, not only by local governments but also by the international nonprofit organizations. Simplification of the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, minimizing the complication rate, and incorporating fertility centers into existing reproductive healthcare programs are essential measures to take in resource-poor countries if infertility treatment is to be accessible for a large part of the population. For reasons of social justice, a search for strategies to implement simplified methods of infertility diagnosis and treatment in resource-poor countries is urgently warranted. PMID:19535067

Ombelet, Willem

2009-08-01

315

Infertility in the third millennium: implications for the individual, family and society: Condensed Meeting Report from the Bertarelli Foundation's Second Global Conference  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primary infertility is a key issue in the developed world, while the developing world has high rates of secondary infertility. The impact of HIV\\/AIDS on fertility is insufficiently explored. One of the most important barriers to access to infertility treatment is cost; at the same time the role of social and cultural factors in restricting access should not be underestimated.

B. Lunenfeld; A. Van Steirteghem

2004-01-01

316

The problem of infertility in high fertility populations: Meanings, consequences and coping mechanisms in two Nigerian communities  

PubMed Central

This paper examines how socio-economic contexts shape local meanings of infertility, how the prevalence of infertility affects these meanings, and how the above affect community responses, life experiences and infertility treatment-seeking behaviors in two African communities. The paper is based on interdisciplinary research conducted among the Ijo and the Yakurr people of southern Nigeria that included a survey of approximately 100 infertile women and a matching sample of 100 fertile women, as well as in-depth ethnographic interviews with infertile and fertile women in two communities: Amakiri in Delta State and Lopon in Cross River State. In-depth interview results show that female infertility is more problematic among the Ijo in Amakiri, where kinship is patrilineal (traced through the father's side), than among the Yakurr in Lopon, where kinship is double unilineal (traced through both parents). Childless women in Ijo society are not only disadvantaged economically but are prevented from attaining full adult womanhood. They therefore leave the community more often than other members. In Lopon there is also a strong preoccupation with fertility as a central fact of life, but infertile women receive support from maternal kin as well as voluntary associations serving as support groups. Our survey data confirm that there are significant differences between the life experiences of infertile and fertile women and between the infertile women of the two communities. The overall findings indicate that while there are variations in the extent to which infertility is considered problematic, the necessity for a woman to have a child remains basic in this region. Motherhood continues to define an individual woman's treatment in the community, her self-respect and her understanding of womanhood. PMID:19356835

Hollos, Marida; Larsen, Ulla; Obono, Oka; Whitehouse, Bruce

2014-01-01

317

Male infertility in long-term survivors of pediatric cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of male infertility and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors. Methods Within the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, 1622 survivors and 274 siblings completed the Male Health Questionnaire. The analysis was restricted to survivors (938/1622; 57.8%) and siblings (174/274; 63.5%) who tried to become pregnant. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the prevalence of self-reported infertility were calculated using generalized linear models for demographic variables and treatment-related factors to account for correlation among survivors and siblings of the same family. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Among those who provided self-report data, the prevalence of infertility was 46.0% in survivors versus 17.5% in siblings (RR=2.64, 95% CI 1.88-3.70, p < 0.001). Of survivors who met the definition for infertility, 37% had reported at least one pregnancy with a female partner that resulted in a live birth. In a multivariable analysis, risk factors for infertility included an alkylating agent dose score (AAD) ? 3 (RR= 2.13, 95% CI 1.69-2.68 for AAD ? 3 versus AAD<3), surgical excision of any organ of the genital tract (RR=1.63, 95% CI 1.20-2.21), testicular radiation ? 4Gy (RR=1.99, 95% CI 1.52-2.61), and exposure to bleomycin (RR=1.55, 95% CI 1.20-2.01). Conclusion Many survivors who experience infertility father their own children suggesting episodes of both fertility and infertility. This and the novel association of infertility with bleomycin warrant further investigation. Implications for Cancer Survivors Though infertility is common, male survivors reporting infertility often father their own children. Bleomycin may pose some fertility risk. PMID:24711092

Wasilewski-Masker, K; Seidel, K D; Leisenring, W; Mertens, A C; Shnorhavorian, M; Ritenour, C W; Stovall, M; Green, D M; Sklar, C A; Armstrong, G T; Robison, L L; Meacham, L R

2014-01-01

318

Measuring resilience in women experiencing infertility using the CD-RISC: Examining infertility-related stress, general distress, and coping styles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychological morbidity concurrent with fertility problems has been the focus of substantial scientific inquiry. However, researchers have largely overlooked psychological resilience within this population. This study explored the associations between resilience, infertility-related and general distress, and coping behaviors in forty women from nine fertility clinics throughout the United States. Participants completed the Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90), Beck-Depression

Minden B. Sexton; Michelle R. Byrd; Silvia von Kluge

2010-01-01

319

Infertility and Crisis: Self-Discovery and Healing through Poetry Writing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offers a personal narrative on how the author's own poetry helped her cope with the crisis of infertility, serving as a tool for self-discovery and healing. Suggests that specific advantages of poetry writing within the context of psychotherapy include problem solving; expression of feelings; insight; couple communication; and individual and…

Barney, Anne

1992-01-01

320

USING DNA MICROARRAYS TO CHARACTERIZE GENE EXPRESSION IN TESTES OF FERTILE AND INFERTILE HUMANS AND MICE  

EPA Science Inventory

USING DNA MICROARRAYS TO CHARACTERIZE GENE EXPRESSION IN TESTES OF FERTILE AND INFERTILE HUMANS AND MICE John C. Rockett1, J. Christopher Luft1, J. Brian Garges1, M. Stacey Ricci2, Pasquale Patrizio2, Norman B. Hecht2 and David J. Dix1 Reproductive Toxicology Divisio...

321

[Analysis of microdeletions of azoospermia factor genes on Y chromosome in infertile males].  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE To investigate the location and characteristics of microdeletions of Y chromosome azoospermia factor (AZF) genes in infertile males with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia in southern Sichuan. METHODS Multiplex PCR was used to detect 18 sequence tagged sites (STS) involved in Y chromosome AZF microdeletions among 224 infertile males (including 134 azoospermia cases and 90 severe oligozoospermia cases) and 70 healthy males. RESULTS Among the 224 infertile males, the overall frequency of microdeletions was 12.1% (27/224), and were 13.4% (18/134) in those with azoospermia and 10.0% (9/90) in those with severe oligozoospermia. The most frequent microdeletions have occurred in the AZFc region (51.9%). Compared with the 6 STS loci recommended by European Academy of Andrology and European Molecular Genetics Quality Network, 22.7% more deletions were detected based on the 18 STS loci selected from the AZF region. CONCLUSION Identification of Y chromosome microdeletions has a significant implication on the diagnosis of male infertility. The most frequent microdeletions have occurred in the AZFc region in southern Sichuan. To use more sequence tagged sites for the screening can improve the reliability and detection rate of Y chromosome microdeletions. PMID:25636108

Fu, Li; Mao, Xiguang; Chen, Shaowei; Zhang, Hongbin; Wang, Mingyong; Huang, Guiying; Wang, Fang

2015-02-10

322

Couple Infertility: From the Perspective of the Close-Relationship Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents Close-Relationship Model as comprehensive framework in which to examine interrelated nature of causes and effects of infertility on marital relationship. Includes these factors: physical and psychological characteristics of both partners; joint, couple characteristics; physical and social environment; and relationship itself. Discusses…

Higgins, Barbara S.

1990-01-01

323

Partnered Decisions? U.S. Couples and Medical Help-Seeking for Infertility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined male partners' influence on the decision to seek medical help for infertility using the National Study of Fertility Barriers. Building upon an existing help-seeking framework, we incorporated characteristics of both partners from 219 heterosexual couples who had ever perceived a fertility problem. In logistic regression analyses, we…

Johnson, Katherine M.; Johnson, David R.

2009-01-01

324

A strategy for treatment of couples with unexplained infertility who failed to conceive after intrauterine insemination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Couples with unexplained infertility treated unsuccessfully with intrauterine insemination often receive further treatment with IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of fertilization and fertilization failure with respect to the method of fertilization used, when half of the sibling oocytes were fertilized by conventional IVF and insemination and the remainder by

L Bungum; M Bungum; P Humaidan; C Yding Andersen

2004-01-01

325

Barriers of child adoption in infertile couples: Iranian’s views  

PubMed Central

Background: There are many reasons why some couples do not become parents. Some are infertile, some do not want kids, children can be in a social context unacceptable and for others different life goals are more important. Objective: This study was designed to determine barriers of child adoption in infertile couples in Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out at Iran from April 2010 to June 2011. The research program was comprised consecutively in 240 infertile couples. Experts in Guidance and Counseling vetted the instrument and set that it has content validity. Test re-test reliability was conducted by the investigators using a sample of 20 couples who have filled questionnaire. Results: Although 230 (96%) of the respondents heard of child adoption, only 89 (37.3%) of couples knew correct meaning of child adoption. Fifty four women (24%) knew how to adopt a baby while the rest did not; 196 (82%) respondents expressed their unwillingness to adopt a baby. Hoping of childbearing (78%) was the main barrier to adopt a child. Conclusion: The barriers mentioned were cultural practices, stigmatization, financial implications, and technical problems. Most of the infertile Iranian couples prefer to stay even so without children or think about new treatment. PMID:25246908

Bokaie, Mahshid; Farajkhoda, Tahmineh; Enjezab, Behnaz; Heidari, Pooran; Karimi Zarchi, Mojgan

2012-01-01

326

Ipsilateral Testicular Hypotrophy is Associated With Decreased Sperm Counts in Infertile Men With Varicoceles  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeThe presence of ipsilateral testicular growth retardation (hypotrophy) is the most common indication for prophylactic varicocele repair in adolescents in an effort to prevent future infertility. We examined the relationship between semen parameters and ipsilateral versus contralateral testicular size in men with unilateral varicoceles to determine whether testicular size is an appropriate parameter for predicting future fertility.

Mark Sigman; Jonathan P. Jarow

1997-01-01

327

Aberrant protamine 1\\/protamine 2 ratios in sperm of infertile human males  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Protamines were extracted from the sperm of fertile and infertile human males and the relative proportion of protamines 1, 2, and 3 were determined by scanning microdensitometry following electrophoresis of total protamine in polyacrylamide gels. The proportion of the three protamines was found to be similar in sperm obtained from different normal males. The distribution of protamines in sperm

R. Balhorn; S. Reed; N. Tanphaichitr

1988-01-01

328

Infertility: Couples' experiences and the use of counselling in treatment centres  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infertility can have profound effects on couples, who may spend years in an increasingly stressful quest for conception; by law, counselling must be offered to those undergoing licensed treatments. This study found that such couples relied on their own partnership as their main resource for managing stress. Predominantly the partnership was organized in a psychological division of labour -the woman

Paul Pengelly; Margaret Inglis; Lynne Cudmore

1995-01-01

329

A pilot study comparing the DuoFertility® monitor with ultrasound in infertile women  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of ovulation detection by the DuoFertility® monitor compared with transvaginal ultrasound in infertile women with regular menstrual cycles. Methods Eight infertile patients, aged 27–40 years, with a body mass index of 19–29, regular menses, normal ovaries on pelvic ultrasound scan, and normal early follicular luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone, and prolactin were recruited from infertility clinics in primary and secondary care for this pilot, prospective, observational study. The patients were asked to use the DuoFertility monitor for the whole cycle, with investigators and patients blind to DuoFertility data. Daily urine LH monitoring commenced on cycle day 8, with daily transvaginal ultrasound following the first positive LH until ovulation was observed. Ovulation was further confirmed by serum progesterone. The main outcome measure was detection of ovulation by the DuoFertility monitor, and correlation between day of ovulation assessed by DuoFertility and ultrasound. Results DuoFertility identified ovulation as having occurred within one day of that determined via ultrasound in all cycles. The sensitivity of ovulation detection was 100% (95% confidence interval 82–100). The specificity could not be concluded from the data. Conclusion In infertile women with regular cycles, the DuoFertility monitor appears to accurately identify ovulatory cycles and the day of ovulation. PMID:25075200

Rollason, Jennie CB; Outtrim, Joanne G; Mathur, Raj S

2014-01-01

330

Effect of Sperm Count on Success of Intrauterine Insemination in Couples Diagnosed with Male Factor Infertility  

PubMed Central

Objective: To exam semen parameters in predicting intrauterine insemination (IUI) outcomes in couples with male factor. Study design: This retrospective study was performed at department of infertility and sexual medicine from September 2007 to February 2014. 307 couples with male factor infertility were included and 672 IUI cycles were analyzed. Results: From 672 inseminations performed on 307 couples, there are 27.36% couples get pregnancy (84 out of 307) and the overall pregnancy rate was 12.95% (87 out of 672) of IUI. With the increase of post total progressive sperm count, the clinical pregnancy rate increased. When the initial progressive sperm count was lower than 5*106, there was no pregnant in the IUI cycle. At the end of the third cycle, 85 clinical pregnancies had been achieved (97.70%). Conclusions: The initial total progressive sperm count lower than 5*106 means the poor outcome of IUI in the infertile couples with male factor. If the infertile couples with male factor don’t get pregnancy after three IUI cycles, the couples should receive re-assessment or other artificial reproductive technology.

Zhang, Erhong; Tao, Xin; Xing, Weijie; Cai, Liuhong; Zhang, Bin

2014-01-01

331

Increased interleukin-6 levels in peritoneal fluid of infertile patients with active endometriosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between the levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-6 soluble receptor, and tumor necrosis factor-? in peritoneal fluid and the size and number of active red endometriotic lesions.STUDY DESIGN: In a university hospital 39 women of reproductive age underwent either laparoscopy for infertility workup or laparoscopic surgery for ovarian chocolate cysts. Peritoneal fluid was collected

Tasuku Harada; Hiroki Yoshioka; Souichi Yoshida; Tomio Iwabe; Yoshimasa Onohara; Masahiro Tanikawa; Naoki Terakawa

1997-01-01

332

Infertility patients’ knowledge of the effects of obesity on reproductive health outcomes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE The objective of the study was to assess the infertility patient knowledge of reproductive outcomes affected by obesity. STUDY DESIGN This was a prospective survey study of 150 female infertility patients in an academic medical center. Subjects were administered the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine–Short Form and a questionnaire on the health risks of obesity, and investigators obtained height and weight measurements. RESULTS Subjects’ age ranged from 21 to 45 years (mean 34.8 ± 4.94 SD) and body mass index ranged from 17.9 to 62.9 kg/m2 (mean 26.5 ± 7.54 SD). The following percentages of women were aware that obesity increases the risk of infertility (82.7%), irregular periods (70.0%), miscarriage (60.7%), cesarean section (48.7%), breast cancer (38.7%), birth defects (29.3%), stillbirth (22.7%), and endometrial cancer (20.7%). CONCLUSION Among women with infertility, there is limited knowledge of reproductive outcomes affected by obesity. Public education is needed to increase awareness. Women undergoing fertility treatment are motivated for reproductive success and may be uniquely receptive to obesity education and weight loss intervention. PMID:22981319

Cardozo, Eden R.; Neff, Lisa M.; Brocks, Maureen E.; Ekpo, Geraldine E.; Dune, Tanaka J.; Barnes, Randall B.; Marsh, Erica E.

2014-01-01

333

Semen parameters at different age groups of male partners of infertile couples.  

PubMed

As a good number of couples are coming to infertility clinics to have children at advanced ages, it is essential to know whether advanced paternal age is associated with diminished semen quality and a higher risk of infertility. This retrospective study was done to see the effects of age on semen quality, a well-known indicator of fertility status. Semen parameters of smokers and non-smokers in the study population were also analyzed. A sample of 1121 male partners of infertile couples (aged 25-55 years) who came to an infertility clinic for treatment were included into the study. In addition to clinical history including lifestyle, medical and occupational details and physical examination, their semen samples were examined. Semen volume (ml), sperm concentration (x 10(6)/ml), motility (%), rapidly progressing (%), slowly progressing (%), non-progressive (%) motility and morphology (%) were measured. Semen volume showed IQR 1.5-3.0 ml, and significant decreasing trend with increasing age (r = -0.070, p<0.05). Sperm motility and rapidly progressing motility showed significant decrease (IQR 40.0-70.0, r = -0.115, p<0.01 and IQR 20.0-50.0, r = -0.107, p<0.01 respectively) with increasing age. There was no significant difference between semen parameters of smokers and non-smokers in the study population. This study shown that semen volume, sperm motility and rapidly progressing motility were significantly decreased with increasing age. PMID:22561776

Hossain, M M; Fatima, P; Rahman, D; Hossain, H B

2012-04-01

334

MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH AND SCREENING  

EPA Science Inventory

Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa: Potential for Infertility Research and Screening David Miller1, David Dix2, Robert Reid3, Susan Wykes3 and Stephen Krawetz3 1Reproductive Biology Group, University of Leeds, UK 2Reproductive Toxicology Division, U.S. Environmenta...

335

Long-Term Adjustment of Infertile Couples Following Unsuccessful Medical Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 33-month longitudinal study was conducted with 38 infertile couples making the transition to biological childlessness after unsuccessful fertility treatments. Changes in their levels of psychological distress; marital, sexual, and life satisfaction; and self-esteem were examined. Increased self-esteem and decreased sexual satisfaction were…

Daniluk, Judith C.; Tench, Elizabeth

2007-01-01

336

Reconstructing Their Lives: A Longitudinal, Qualitative Analysis of the Transition to Biological Childlessness for Infertile Couples.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on a three-year, longitudinal study conducted to determine how infertile couples make the transition to biological childlessness after medical treatment fails. Phenomenological analysis of data indicated progressive adaptation by the participants to their biological childlessness over time, with greater overall life satisfaction being most…

Daniluk, Judith C.

2001-01-01

337

Association of azoospermia factor region deletions in infertile male subjects among Malaysians.  

PubMed

Azoospermia factor region (AZF) deletions (AZFa, AZFb, AZFc and AZFd) in the Y chromosome were analysed in male infertility subjects in various populations with conflicting results. This study comprised of 54 infertile males and 63 fertile controls, and the frequency of AZFa, AZFb, AZFc and AZFd deletions were determined using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as well as real-time PCR-high resolution melting analysis-based methods. The results of this study showed that, three of 54 cases (5.55%) had AZF (a, b and c) deletions (two had AZFc and one had AZFa deletions). Four cases were found to have AZFd deletions (7.4%) with two of them being associated with AZFc deletions (P = 0.028). The frequency of AZF (a, b and c) deletions in Malaysian infertile male subjects was found to be comparable with other populations. AZFd deletions were found to be significant (P < 0.05) in male infertility and it may be associated with other types of AZF deletions. PMID:24528375

Hussein, A A; Vasudevan, R; Patimah, I; Prashant, N; Nora, F A

2015-03-01

338

An association study of HFE gene mutation with idiopathic male infertility in the Chinese Han population  

PubMed Central

Mutations in the haemochromatosis gene (HFE) influence iron status in the general population of Northern Europe, and excess iron is associated with the impairment of spermatogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between three mutations (C282Y, H63D and S65C) in the HFE gene with idiopathic male infertility in the Chinese Han population. Two groups of Chinese men were recruited: 444 infertile men (including 169 with idiopathic azoospermia) and 423 controls with proven fertility. The HFE gene was detected using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. The experimental results demonstrated that no C282Y or S65C mutations were detected. Idiopathic male infertility was not significantly associated with heterozygous H63D mutation (odds ratio=0.801, 95% confidence interval=0.452–1.421, ?2=0.577, P=0.448). The H63D mutation frequency did not correlate significantly with the serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T) levels in infertile men (P=0.896, P=0.404 and P=0.05, respectively). Our data suggest that the HFE H63D mutation is not associated with idiopathic male reproductive dysfunction. PMID:22504868

Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Bin-Bin; Xin, Zhong-Cheng; Liu, Tao; Ma, Ke; Jiang, Jian; Fang, Xiang; Yu, Li-Hua; Peng, Yi-Feng; Ma, Xu

2012-01-01

339

Comparison of reactive oxygen species in neat and washed semen of infertile men  

PubMed Central

Background: Male are involved in near 50% of cases of infertility and reactive oxygen species (ROS) playing an important role in decreasing fertility potential. Accurate measurement of ROS seems to be important in evaluation of infertile male patients. Objective: To compare ROS measurement in neat and washed semen samples of infertile men and define the best method for evaluation of ROS in these patients. Materials and Methods: We measured the level of ROS in semen samples of thirty five non-azoospermic men with infertility. The semen samples were divided into two parts and the semen parameters and ROS levels in neat and washed samples were evaluated. We also evaluated the presence of pyospermia using peroxidase test. Results: The differences regarding sperm count and quick motility were significant in neat and washed semen samples. The mean ROS level was significantly higher in neat samples compared with washed spermatozoa (7.50 RLU vs. 1.20 RLU respectively). Difference in ROS levels was more significant in patients with pyospermia compared to whom with no pyospermia (378.67 RLU vs. 9.48 RLU respectively). Conclusion: Our study confirmed that neat or unprocessed samples are better index of normal oxidative status of semen samples. Because we do not artificially add or remove factors that may play an important role in oxidative equilibrium status. PMID:25031573

Moein, Mohammad Reza; Vahidi, Serajedin; Ghasemzadeh, Jalal; Tabibnejad, Nasim

2014-01-01

340

Reduced recombination associated with the production of aneuploid sperm in an infertile man: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies using gene-linkage analysis have suggested that abnormal recombination during meiosis may lead to the pro- duction of aneuploid gametes; however, there is little direct evidence of a link between the two in human males. We analysed spermatocytes in the pachytene stage from a man with extremely high aneuploidy rates in his sperm. Testic- ular tissue specimens of the infertile

S. Ma; K. A. Ferguson; S. Arsovska; P. Moens; V. Chow; Willow Pavilion

2005-01-01

341

Role of metabolomic analysis of biomarkers in the management of male infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metabolomics is the systematic study of metabolites as small-molecule biomarkers that represent the functional phenotype in a cell, tissue or organism. Detection of crucial disturbances in the concentration of metabolites by metabolomic profiling of key biomarkers can be beneficial in the management of various medical conditions, including male-factor infertility. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential role of this rapid, noninvasive

Fnu Deepinder; Hyndhavi T Chowdary; Ashok Agarwal

2007-01-01

342

Combined effects of urinary phytoestrogens metabolites and polymorphisms in metabolic enzyme gene on idiopathic male infertility.  

PubMed

Phytoestrogens are plant-derived compounds that may interact with estrogen receptors and mimic estrogenic effects. It remains unclear whether the individual variability in metabolizing phytoestrogens contributes to phytoestrogens-induced beneficial or detrimental effects. Our aim was to determine whether there is any interaction between metabolic rates (MR) of phytoestrogens and genetic polymorphisms in related xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme genes. MR was used to assess phytoestrogen exposure and individual metabolic ability. The amount of phytoestrogens in urine was measured by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 600 idiopathic infertile male patients and 401 controls. Polymorphisms were genotyped using the SNPstream platform combined with the Taqman method. Prototypes and metabolites of secoisolariciresinol (SEC) have inverse effects on male reproduction. It was found that low MR of SEC increased the risk of male infertility (OR 2.49, 95 % CI 1.78, 3.48, P trend = 8.00 × 10(-8)). Novel interactions were also observed between the MR of SEC and rs1042389 in CYP2B6, rs1048943 in CYP1A1, and rs1799931 in NAT2 on male infertility (P inter = 1.06 × 10(-4), 1.14 × 10(-3), 3.55 × 10(-3), respectively). By analyzing the relationships between urinary phytoestrogen concentrations, their metabolites and male infertility, we found that individual variability in metabolizing SEC contributed to the interpersonal differences in SEC's effects on male reproduction. PMID:24488272

Qin, Yufeng; Du, Guizhen; Chen, Minjian; Hu, Weiyue; Lu, Chuncheng; Wu, Wei; Hang, Bo; Zhou, Zuomin; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

2014-08-01

343

VALUING REDUCTIONS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SOURCES OF INFERTILITY RISK USING THE EFFICIENT HOUSEHOLD FRAMEWORK  

EPA Science Inventory

There is an increasing body evidence suggesting that a broad range of pollutants have the potential to alter human endocrine systems. One disturbing consequence of exposures to these endocrine disruptors is that they may significantly increase the incidence of infertility in exp...

344

An association study of HFE gene mutation with idiopathic male infertility in the Chinese Han population.  

PubMed

Mutations in the haemochromatosis gene (HFE) influence iron status in the general population of Northern Europe, and excess iron is associated with the impairment of spermatogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between three mutations (C282Y, H63D and S65C) in the HFE gene with idiopathic male infertility in the Chinese Han population. Two groups of Chinese men were recruited: 444 infertile men (including 169 with idiopathic azoospermia) and 423 controls with proven fertility. The HFE gene was detected using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. The experimental results demonstrated that no C282Y or S65C mutations were detected. Idiopathic male infertility was not significantly associated with heterozygous H63D mutation (odds ratio=0.801, 95% confidence interval=0.452-1.421, ?(2)=0.577, P=0.448). The H63D mutation frequency did not correlate significantly with the serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T) levels in infertile men (P=0.896, P=0.404 and P=0.05, respectively). Our data suggest that the HFE H63D mutation is not associated with idiopathic male reproductive dysfunction. PMID:22504868

Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Bin-Bin; Xin, Zhong-Cheng; Liu, Tao; Ma, Ke; Jiang, Jian; Fang, Xiang; Yu, Li-Hua; Peng, Yi-Feng; Ma, Xu

2012-07-01

345

Dietary fatty acid intakes and the risk of ovulatory infertility1-3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Pharmacologic activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-) improves ovulatory function in women with polycystic ovary syndrome, and specific dietary fatty acids can affect PPAR- activity. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess whether the intakes of total fat, cholesterol, and major types of fatty acids affect the risk of ovulatory infertility. Design: We conducted a prospective

Jorge E Chavarro; Janet W Rich-Edwards; Bernard A Rosner; Walter C Willett

346

Factors influencing the success of in vitro fertilization for alleviating human infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The program for in vitro fertilization at Bourn Hall began in October 1980. Various types of infertility have been treated during this time using the natural menstrual cycle or stimulation of follicular growth with antiestrogens and gonadotrophins. Follicular growth and maturation are assayed by urinary estrogens and LH, monitored regularly during the later follicular stage. Many patients had an endogenous

R. G. Edwards; S. B. Fishel; J. Cohen; C. B. Fehilly; J. M. Purdy; J. M. Slater; P. C. Steptoe; J. M. Webster

1984-01-01

347

The Acridine Orange test: a clinically relevant screening method for sperm quality during infertility investigation?  

PubMed

To determine the clinical usefulness of Acridine Orange (AO) staining of spermatozoa as a screening test for the evaluation of semen quality during basic infertility investigation, semen smears from 103 randomly chosen males of subfertile couples were examined. The median duration of infertility was 4.5 years (range 1-15) and the median age was 33 years (range 21-43). The outcome of AO staining ranged from 5 to 81%, with a median of 24%, green fluorescent spermatozoa. Results were not significantly related to the parameters of semen analysis (sperm count, motility, standard morphology, viability, pH and volume, as well as fructose concentration and number of found cells) or to local sperm antibody testing and semen cultures. Fluorescence after AO staining was also not related to sperm functional capacity (evaluated using sperm-mucus interaction tests in vitro and in vivo), or the medical history of the patient. No significant differences in the AO test outcome were seen in patients with explained and unexplained infertility, or with regard to subsequent fertility [with a median value of 21% (range 5-46) green fluorescence in the fertile group, compared with a median value of 28% (range 9-81) green fluorescence in the other men]. The results of this prospective study indicate that under the usual conditions of conception, the AO test is not clinically useful as a screening procedure to determine semen quality during basic infertility investigation. PMID:8671329

Eggert-Kruse, W; Rohr, G; Kerbel, H; Schwalbach, B; Demirakca, T; Klinga, K; Tilgen, W; Runnebaum, B

1996-04-01

348

An algorithm for treatment of infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition with both a reproductive and metabolic phenotype. Women with PCOS often seek care because of infertility or menstrual cycle irregularities that result from chronic anovulation interspersed with occasional ovulatory cycles. Initially, it is important to delineate a differential diagnosis for oligo- or amenorrhea and to evaluate for disorders that may “masquerade” as

Jennifer F. Kawwass; Tammy L. Loucks; Sarah L. Berga

2010-01-01

349

Morphological evaluation of sperm from infertile men selected by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS).  

PubMed

Electron microscopy analysis performed in five infertile human subjects after sperm selection by swim-up followed by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) demonstrated a decrease in the number of spermatozoa with characteristics compatible with cell death. However, no significant differences were found when the swim-up/MACS semen fraction was compared with swim-up fraction alone. PMID:25454495

Curti, Gianni; Skowronek, Fernanda; Vernochi, Rita; Rodriguez-Buzzi, Ana Laura; Rodriguez-Buzzi, Juan Carlos; Casanova, Gabriela; Sapiro, Rossana

2014-12-01

350

Mutation analysis of TNP1 gene in infertile men with varicocele  

PubMed Central

Background: Varicocele is associated with the failure of ipsilateral testicular growth and development, and the symptoms of pain and reduced fertility. The highly condensed structure of the sperm nuclear chromatin is provided by proper expression of Transition Nuclear Protein (TNP) genes, so any dysregulational expression of these genes results in abnormal spermatogenesis and infertility. Objective: The aim of present study was to assess the association between TNP1 mutations and varicocele in Iranian infertile men. Materials and Methods: Analysis of association between TNP1 gene mutation and varicocele phenotype was performed using PCR and Single-Stranded Conformational Polymorphism technique and DNA sequencing in 82 varicocele infertile men and 80 control subjects. Results: Sequence analysis was identified one variant in this gene that found in 15 infertile men and was absent in control group. This variant was a single nucleotide polymorphism that were identified in the intron region of this gene at position g.IVS1+75T>C. Conclusion: The effect of this nucleotide substitution in intronic region of the TNP1 gene and their role on expression remains to be determined. PMID:24976820

Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi; Khatami, Mehri; Talebi, Ali Reza; Moezzi, Fahime

2014-01-01

351

Global access to infertility care in developing countries: a case of human rights, equity and social justice.  

PubMed

According to WHO data more than 180 million couples in developing countries suffer from primary or secondary infertility. The social stigma of childlessness still leads to isolation and abandonment in many developing countries. Differences between the developed and developing world are emerging because of the different availability in infertility care and different socio-cultural value surrounding procreation and childlessness. Although reproductive health education and prevention of infertility are number one priorities, the need for accessible diagnostic procedures and new reproductive technologies (ART) is very high. The success and sustainability of ART in resource-poor settings will depend to a large extend on our ability to optimise these techniques in terms of availability, affordability and effectiveness. Accessible infertility treatment can only be successfully introduced in developing countries if socio-cultural and economic prerequisites are fulfilled and governments can be persuaded to support their introduction. We have to liaise with the relevant authorities to discuss the strengthening of infertility services, at the core of which lies the integration of infertility, contraceptive and maternal health services within public health care structures. After a fascinating period of more than 30 years of IVF, only a small part of the world population benefits from these new technologies. Time has come to give equitable access to effective and safe infertility care in resource-poor countries as well. PMID:24753875

Ombelet, W

2011-01-01

352

Association of Pericentric Inversion of Chromosome 9 and Infertility in Romanian Population  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Background: One of the most common structural balanced chromosome rearrangements is pericentric inversion of chromosome 9; inv(9)(p11q12), which is consider to be the variant of normal karyotype and has been found in normal population. Although it seems not to correlate with abnormal phenotypes, there have been many controversial reports indicating that it may lead to abnormal clinical conditions such as infertility and recurrent abortions. The incidence is found to be about 1% - 3% in the general population. The aim of this study was to re-evaluate the clinical impact of inv(9)(p11q12)/(p11q13) in infertility. Materials and Methods: We investigated the karyotypes of 900 infertile couples (1800 individuals) admitted in our hospital for cytogenetic analysis. The control group consists of 1116 fetuses investigated by amniocentesis. This group was considered to be a sample of the fertile population, as the fetus being karyotyped is the result of a spontaneous pregnancy. Fetal karyotyping was made according to the standard indications for prenatal diagnosis (abnormal maternal serum screening results). Chromosomes from cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes and amniotic fluid were analyzed using Giemsa Trypsin-Giemsa (GTG) banding. The results of the two groups were compared. Results: 1800 infertile people were submitted for cytogenetic investigation. In the control group 97.73% had normal karyotype and 2.27% showed inversion of chromosome 9, while in the studied group 96.24% had normal karyotype and 3.76% showed inversion of chromosome 9. The incidence of inversion 9 in both male and female patients is not significantly higher comparing with normal population (p = 0.343, p< 0.05). Conclusions: Because a considerable proportion of patients with reproductive dysfunction had various cytogenetic abnormalities, the chromosomal analysis should be considered as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of reproductive dysfunction (infertility in men due to spermatogenic disturbances and in recurrent spontaneous abortion in females). PMID:23118816

DANA, Mierla; STOIAN, Veronica

2012-01-01

353

Rational approach to genetic testing of cystic fibrosis (CF) in infertile men.  

PubMed

Male infertility as a result of isolated congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) is one primary genital form of cystic fibrosis (CF) and occurs in 1-2% of infertile men. Assisted fertilization in patients with CBAVD increases the risk of transmitting mutations in the CF gene. We developed a rational approach to genetic CF testing in infertile men. A total of 282 infertile male patients were screened for the most common CF mutations (DeltaF508, R117H, IVS8-5T). Clinical data including medical history, examination, semen analysis, sweat tests, karyotypes and hormonal values were analysed. We identified 23 patients carrying mutations in the CF gene (DeltaF508: 10 patients; R117H: six patients; IVS8-5T: 11 patients). Two patients were compound heterozygote for DeltaF508/R117H, two others for DeltaF508/IVS8-5T. Correlating these molecular analyses with the clinical data pertaining to serum follicle-stimulating hormone concentration, semen pH, sperm count and total testicular volume, we were able to develop a score with a high specificity (98.4) for the presence of a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation, but only with a low sensitivity (positive post-test likelihood: 62.5%; negative post-test likelihood: 6.3%). With regard to the low sensitivity and the high number of CFTR mutations found in this heterogeneous group of infertile men, we still recommend genetic CF testing before assisted fertilization. PMID:15644056

Mennicke, K; Klingenberg, R D; Bals-Pratsch, M; Diedrich, K; Schwinger, E

2005-02-01

354

Childhood Thyroid Radioiodine Exposure and Subsequent Infertility in the Intermountain Fallout Cohort  

PubMed Central

Background: Above-ground and underground nuclear weapon detonation at the Nevada Test Site (1951–1992) has resulted in radioiodine exposure for nearby populations. Although the long-term effect of environmental radioiodine exposure on thyroid disease has been well studied, little is known regarding the effect of childhood radioiodine exposure on subsequent fertility. Objectives: We investigated early childhood thyroid radiation exposure from nuclear testing fallout (supplied predominantly by radioactive isotopes of iodine) and self-reported lifetime incidence of male or female infertility or sterility. Methods: Participants were members of the 1965 Intermountain Fallout Cohort, schoolchildren at the time of exposure who were reexamined during two subsequent study phases to collect dietary and reproductive histories. Thyroid radiation exposure was calculated via an updated dosimetry model. We used multivariable logistic regression with robust sandwich estimators to estimate odds ratios for infertility, adjusted for potential confounders and (in separate models) for a medically confirmed history of thyroid disease. Results: Of 1,389 participants with dosimetry and known fertility history, 274 were classified as infertile, including 30 classified as sterile. Childhood thyroid radiation dose was possibly associated with infertility [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.17; 95% CI: 0.82, 1.67 and AOR = 1.35; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.90 for the middle and upper tertiles vs. the first tertile of exposure, respectively]. The odds ratios were attenuated (AOR = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.75, 1.55 and AOR = 1.29; 95% CI: 0.91, 1.83 for the middle and upper tertiles, respectively) after adjusting for thyroid disease. There was no association of childhood radiation dose and sterility. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that childhood radioiodine exposure from nuclear testing may be related to subsequent adult infertility. Further research is required to confirm this. PMID:23099433

Stone, Mary Bishop; Lyon, Joseph L.; VanDerslice, James A.; Alder, Stephen C.

2012-01-01

355

Reduced recombination associated with the production of aneuploid sperm in an infertile man: a case report.  

PubMed

Studies using gene-linkage analysis have suggested that abnormal recombination during meiosis may lead to the production of aneuploid gametes; however, there is little direct evidence of a link between the two in human males. We analysed spermatocytes in the pachytene stage from a man with extremely high aneuploidy rates in his sperm. Testicular tissue specimens of the infertile man and two vasectomy reversals were processed with immuofluorescent techniques to visualize synaptonemal complex and recombination foci and fluorescent in situ hybridization on spermatocytes and sperm with probes for chromosomes 13, 21, 18, X and Y. We observed no recombination between sex chromosomes in the infertile man, while in two controls, we observed recombination rates of 79.3 and 81.0% between the sex chromosomes. This was associated with a total sex aneuploidy rate of 41.61% in testicular sperm of the infertile man (0.44 and 0.62% in two controls). Recombination on chromosome 21 was reduced in the infertile man, with 10.62% of spermatocytes showing no recombination (0 and 1.67% in two controls), as well as chromosome 13, with 53.98% having < or =1 recombination foci (22.05 and 21.67% in two controls). This was associated with increased aneuploidy for those chromosomes. Chromosome 18 aneuploidy was slightly increased, although there was no apparent decrease in recombination. These results provide the first evidence of both recombination and non-disjunction abnormalities in the same individual. This is also the only reported case of an infertile man who shows no recombination between the sex chromosomes, despite the formation of the sex body. PMID:16373411

Ma, S; Ferguson, K A; Arsovska, S; Moens, P; Chow, V

2006-04-01

356

Personal Overview of the Application of LLLT in Severely Infertile Japanese Females  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims: The rapidly graying population in Japan is being compounded by the rapidly-dropping birth rate. The latter is mostly due to the later ages at which women are giving birth as the marriage age has also been increasing. Giving birth at a later stage is associated with problems for both mother and child, but for older would-be mothers the greatest problem is infertility, sometimes severe. The present article will show how the application of low level laser therapy (LLLT) is a potentially effective treatment for severe infertility. Subjects and Methods: Seventy-four females (average age 39.28 yr) with severe infertility in whom assisted reproductive technology (ART) had been unsuccessful (average of 9.13 yr) participated in the first part of a study from October 1996 — April 2000. LLLT was applied (830 nm, CW, GaAlAs 60 mW diode LLLT) in Ohshiro's proximal priority technique (average 21.08 sessions) with or without other ART approaches. Based on successful outcomes, the study was then extended to March 2012, amassing a final total of 701 patients. Results: Pregnancy was achieved in the first part of the trial in 16 patients (21.7% of 74) of whom 11 (68%) achieved successful live delivery. In the extended trial, pregnancy was achieved in 156 (22.3% of 701) with 79 live deliveries (50.1%). Conclusions: The use of 830 nm LLLT in the proximal priority technique at the parameters used in the present study, on its own or as an adjunct to other techniques, resulted in successful induction of pregnancy in just over 21% of severely infertile females, with a substantial number of these achieving live births. No adverse events were noted in any patient. LLLT is a pain-free and sideeffect free modality which could give hope to the increasing numbers of older females with infertility in Japan and potentially worldwide. Multinational studies are warranted. PMID:24610987

2012-01-01

357

Expression of HOXA11 in the mid-luteal endometrium from women with endometriosis-associated infertility  

PubMed Central

Background A decrease in HOXA11 expression in eutopic mid-secretory endometrium has been found in women with endometriosis-associated infertility. Methods Using Real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) and western blotting analysis we studied the HOXA11 transcript and protein levels in mid-luteal eutopic endometrium from eighteen infertile women with minimal endometriosis, sixteen healthy fertile women and sixteen infertile women with fallopian tubal occlusion from the Polish population. We also evaluated transcript levels of DNA methyltransferases DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B in these groups of women. Results There were significantly lower levels of HOXA11 transcripts (p = 0.003, p = 0.041) and protein (p = 0.004, p = 0.001) in women with endometriosis as compared to fertile women and infertile women with tubal occlusion. Moreover, we found significantly higher methylation levels of the CpG region in the first exon of HOXA11 in infertile women with endometriosis compared with fertile women (p < 0.001) and infertile women with tubal occlusion (p < 0.001). We also observed significantly increased levels of DNMT3A transcript in women with endometriosis than fertile women (p = 0.044) and infertile women with tubal occlusion (p = 0.047). However, we did not observe significant differences in DNMT1 and DNMT3B transcript levels between these investigated groups of women. Conclusions We confirmed that reduced HOXA11 expression may contribute to endometriosis-associated infertility. Moreover, we found that DNA hypermethylation can be one of the possible molecular mechanisms causing a decrease in HOXA11 expression in the eutopic mid-secretory endometrium in infertile women with endometriosis. PMID:22233680

2012-01-01

358

Intracytoplasmic sperm injection and conventional in vitro fertilization for sibling oocytes in cases of unexplained infertility and borderline semen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: In a prospective study, conventional IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) were performed on sibling oocytes of 22 patients with unexplained infertility (Group A) and 24 patients with borderline semen (Group B).

Mohamed A. Aboulghar; Ragaa T. Mansour; Gamal I. Serour; Mehana A. Sattar; Yehia M. Amin

1996-01-01

359

Reactive Oxygen Species Production by the Spermatozoa of Patients With Idiopathic Infertility: Relationship to Seminal Plasma Antioxidants  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeWe attempted to determine reactive oxygen species production by the spermatozoa of patients with idiopathic infertility and healthy donors, and observe whether increased production was due to decreased seminal plasma reactive oxygen species scavengers.

Ilter Alkan; Ferruh Simsek; Goncagul Haklar; Ertan Kervancioglu; Hakan Ozveri; Suha Yalcin; Atif Akdas

1997-01-01

360

Chromosomal Translocation t (10;19) (q11.2;q13.4) in an Infertile Male  

PubMed Central

Chromosomal rearrangements are usually associated with male factor infertility. We report here a 34-year-old man suffering from primary infertility for 15 years. The cytogenetic analysis and investigation of Y-chromosome microdeletions were performed. A reciprocal balanced translocation t (10;19) (q11.2;q13.4) was found in oligozoospermic infertile men with no Y-chromosome microdeletions. In this case, we aimed to evaluate the 46,XY,t (10;19) (q11.2;q13.4) karyo-type, which was detected through a cytogenetic analysis of a person referred to our genetic laboratory due to primary infertility, in the light of the literature.

Kara, Murat; Sen, Askin; Cetin, Esin Sakall?; Kargun, Kursat

2014-01-01

361

A nomogram to predict the probability of live birth after clomiphene citrate induction of ovulation in normogonadotropic oligoamenorrheic infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To establish whether initial screening characteristics of normogonadotropic anovulatory infertile women can aid in predicting live birth after induction of ovulation with clomiphene citrate (CC).Design: Prospective longitudinal single-center study.Setting: Specialist academic fertility unit.Patient(s): Two hundred fifty-nine couples with a history of infertility, oligoamenorrhea, and normal follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations who have not been previously treated with any ovulation-induction medication.Intervention(s):

Babak Imani; Marinus J. C Eijkemans; Egbert R te Velde; J. Dik F Habbema; Bart C. J. M Fauser

2002-01-01

362

Correlations between two markers of sperm DNA integrity, DNA denaturation and DNA fragmentation, in fertile and infertile men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate two different assays of human sperm DNA integrity, DNA denaturation (DD) and DNA fragmentation (DF), and to correlate these with standard semen parameters.Design: Prospective, observational study.Setting: University infertility clinic.Patient(s): Forty consecutive semen samples from 33 nonazoospermic men presenting for infertility evaluation and 7 fertile men presenting for vasectomy.Intervention(s): Assessment of sperm concentration, motility, morphology, DD and DF.Main

Armand Zini; Ryszard Bielecki; Donna Phang; Maria Teresa Zenzes

2001-01-01

363

Application of transvaginal hydrolaparoscopy for ovarian drilling using Nd:YAG laser in infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since transvaginal hydrolaparoscopy (THL) was introduced as the first-line procedure in the early stage of the exploration\\u000a of the tubo-ovarian structures in infertile women, it has been shown that THL is a less traumatic and a more suitable outpatient\\u000a procedure than diagnostic laparoscopy In the present study a minimally invasive surgery was carried out in infertile women\\u000a with polycystic ovary

Yuki Hirano; Hiroaki Shibahara; Satoru Takamizawa; Izumi Suzuki; Seiji Yamanaka; Tatsuya Suzuki; Hiroyuki Fujiwara; Mitsuaki Suzuki

2003-01-01

364

Relationship between seminal plasma interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor a levels with semen parameters in fertile and infertile men  

Microsoft Academic Search

The levels of two proinflammatory cytokines, namely tumor necrosis factor ! (TNF-!) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), were investigated in seminal plasma (SP) of proven fertile (n=24) and infertile (n=55) men to evaluate the relationship between diagnosis and semen parameters in a prospective study. Infertile men were divided into four groups as follows: (1) varicocele (n=23), (2) 3 months after varicocelectomy

Izzet Koçak; Çigdem Yenisey; Mehmet Dündar; Pinar Okyay; Mukadder Serter

2002-01-01

365

Chromosomal analysis of early fetal losses in relation to transvaginal ultrasonographic detection of fetal heart motion after infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the prognostic value of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) detection of fetal heart motion (FHM) in view of maternal age and chromosomal analysis of spontaneously aborted fetal tissue.Design: A 3-year retrospective, descriptive study.Setting: Two medical center-based infertility-care facilities.Patient(s): 336 pregnancies were initiated by intrauterine insemination or embryo transfer for women of reproductive age who were seeking infertility treatment.Intervention(s): None.Main

Cecilia Schmidt-Sarosi; Lisa Barrie Schwartz; Jennifer Lublin; Dinah Kaplan-Grazi; Peter Sarosi; Mary Ann Perle

1998-01-01

366

Use of complementary and alternative medicines by a sample of Turkish women for infertility enhancement: a descriptive study  

PubMed Central

Background Infertility patients are a vulnerable group that often seeks a non-medical solution for their failure to conceive. World-wide, women use CAM for productive health, but only a limited number of studies report on CAM use to enhance fertility. Little is known about traditional and religious forms of therapies that are used in relation to conventional medicine in Turkey. We investigated the prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) used by infertile Turkish women for fertility enhancement. Methods A face-to-face questionnaire inquiring demographic information and types of CAM used for fertility enhancement were completed by hundred infertility patients admitted to a primary care family planning centre in Van, Turkey between January and July 2009. Results The vast majority of infertile women had used CAM at least once for infertility. CAM use included religious interventions, herbal products and recommendations of traditional "hodja's" (faith healers). Of these women, 87.8% were abused in the last 12 months, 36.6% felt not being supported by her partner and 80.5% had never spoken with a physician about CAM. Conclusions Infertile Turkish women use complementary medicine frequently for fertility enhancement and are in need of information about CAM. Religious and traditional therapies are used as an adjunct to, rather than a substitute for, conventional medical therapy. Physicians need to approach fertility patients with sensitivity and should be able to council their patients about CAM accordingly. PMID:20307291

2010-01-01

367

Numerical chromosome abnormalities in spermatozoa of fertile and infertile men detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with single-color chromosome-specific probes was used to study the rates of disomy for chromosome 1, 16, X, and Y in sperm of fertile and infertile subjects. Diploidy rates were studied using a two-color cocktail of probes for chromosomes 17 and 18 in the same sperm samples. Two-color methodology was not available at the outset of

Norio Miharu; Robert G. Best; S. Robert Young

1994-01-01

368

Effect of infertility treatment and pregnancy-related hormones on breast cell proliferation in vitro  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Breast cancer development involves a series of mutations in a heterogeneous group of proto-oncogenes/tumor suppressor genes that alter mammary cells to create a microenvironment permissive to tumorigenesis. Exposure to hormones during infertility treatment may have a mutagenic effect on normal mammary epithelial cells, high-risk breast lesions and early-stage breast cancers. Our goal was to understand the association between infertility treatment and normal and cancerous breast cell proliferation. METHODS MCF-10A normal mammary cells and the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 [estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, well differentiated] and HCC 1937 (ER-negative, aggressive, BRCA1 mutation) were treated with the weak ER activator clomiphene citrate and hormones that are increased during infertility treatment. Direct effects of treatment on cell proliferation and colony growth were determined. RESULTS While clomiphene citrate had no effect on MCF-10A cells or MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it decreased proliferation of HCC 1937 versus untreated cells (P= 0.003). Estrogen had no effect on either MCF-10A or HCC 1937 cells but, as expected, increased cell proliferation (20–100 nM; P?0.002) and colony growth (10–30 nM; P< 0.0001) of MCF-7 cells versus control. Conversely, progesterone decreased both proliferation (P= 0.001) and colony growth (P= 0.01) of MCF-10A cells, inhibited colony size of MCF-7 cells (P= 0.01) and decreased proliferation of HCC 1937 cells (P= 0.008) versus control. hCG (100 mIU/ml) decreased both proliferation (P ? 0.01) and colony growth (P ? 0.002) of all three cell lines. CONCLUSIONS Although these data are preclinical, they support possible indirect estrogenic effects of infertility regimens on ER-positive breast cancer cells and validate the potential protective effect of pregnancy-related exposure to hCG. PMID:22081245

Cooley, Anne; Matthews, Laura; Zelivianski, Stanislav; Hardy, Ashley; Jeruss, Jacqueline S.

2012-01-01

369

Y Choromosomal Microdeletion Screening in The Workup of Male Infertility and Its Current Status in India  

PubMed Central

Spermatogenesis is an essential stage in human male gamete development, which is regulated by many Y chromosome specific genes. Most of these genes are centred in a specific region located on the long arm of the human Y chromosome known as the azoospermia factor region (AZF). Deletion events are common in Y chromosome because of its peculiar structural organization. Astonishingly, among the several known genetic causes of male infertility, Y chromosomal microdeletions emerged as the most frequent structural chromosome anomaly associated with the quantitative reduction of sperm. The development of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) like intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE) helps to bypass the natural barriers of fertilization, but it increases the concern about the transmission of genetic defects. Experimental evidence suggested that the men with Y chromosomal microdeletions vertically transmitted their deletion as well as related fertility disorders to their offspring via these ART techniques. In India, infertility is on alarming rise. ART centres have opened up in virtually every state but still most of the infertility centres in India do not choose to perform Y chromosomal microdeletion diagnosis because of some advanced theoretical reasons. Moreover, there is no consensus among the clinicians about the diagnosis and management of Y chromosomal microdeletion defects. The current review discusses thoroughly the role of Y chromosome microdeletion screening in the workup of male infertility, its significance as a diagnostic test, novel approaches for screening Y deletions and finally a systematic review on the current status of Y chromosome microdeletion deletion screening in India. PMID:24520494

Suganthi, Ramaswamy; Vijesh, Vijayabhavanath Vijayakumaran; Vandana, Nambiar; Fathima Ali Benazir, Jahangir

2014-01-01

370

Detection of Human Herpesviruses (HHVs) in Semen of Human Male Infertile Patients  

PubMed Central

Recently we demonstrated an ectopic expression of the human herpesvirus 1 thymidine kinase (HHV1-TK) gene by functioning of an intrinsic endogenous promoter in the transgenic rat (TG-rat), suggesting that HHV1 infection in humans induces expression of the TK gene with the ectopic promoter in the testis and results in accumulation of HHV1-TK protein, triggering male infertility similar to that in the TG-rat. Hence, in this study, we started to investigate a relationship between infection of herpesvirus and human male infertility. Semen was donated by Chinese male infertile patients (153 men, aged 21–49 years) with informed consent, followed by DNA preparation and analysis by PCR and DNA sequencing. Semen volume, sperm number and density, and sperm motility were examined. DNAs of HHV1, HHV4, HHV5 and HHV6 were confirmed by PCR, electrophoresis and DNA sequencing. Finally, virus DNA was identified in 59 patients (39%). The number of carriers was 39 (25%) for HHV1, 6 (4%) for HHV4, 33 (22%) for HHV5 and 3 (2%) for HHV6, respectively. Moreover, double-infection was found in 22 out of 59 specimens (37%), most of which were double-infection of HHV1 and HHV5 (15 out of 22 carriers). Though slight severity was present in some of the carriers, the relationship between virus infection and sperm impairment was not conclusive. Accordingly, it is essential to examine whether the viral HHV1-TK gene is expressed in the testis of the infertile human HHV carrier. PMID:23748714

CHEN, Mo; CAI, Li-Yi; KANNO, Naoko; KATO, Takako; LU, Jinxing; JIN, Fan; WANG, Honghua; SEKITA, Masayo; HIGUCHI, Masashi; YOSHIDA, Saishu; YAKO, Hideji; UEHARU, Hiroki; IZUMI, Shun-Ichiro; KATO, Yukio

2013-01-01

371

Infertility caused by male partners with genetic defects in Sichuan Province of China.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to detect chromosomal aberrations and azoospermia factor (AZF) microdeletions in male patients with reproductive problems and to summarize related clinical features to provide reliable information for evaluating prenatal and preimplantation diagnoses. A large cohort of 5083 men with various phenotypes of male infertility was analyzed via G-banding karyotyping, and Origin 8.0 was used to analyze the prevalence of abnormalities. Additionally, patients with azoospermia, oligozoospermia, and oligoasthenozoospermia were analyzed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction to detect microdeletion in the AZF. We identified 387 patients with abnormal karyotypes, and the ratio was 7.61%. Among them were 175 patients with Klinefelter's syndrome, which was the most common numerical chromosomal abnormality and accounted for 45.22% of all chromosomal aberrations. The frequencies of increased satellites, balanced translocations, and Robertsonian translocations were 6.47, 7.00, and 3.62%, respectively. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction performed in 810 cases with azoospermia, oligozoospermia, and oligoasthenozoospermia found a ratio of AZF microdeletions of 4.94%. The finding suggests that chromosomal abnormalities and AZF deletion are main factors that result in male infertility. Detecting these common genetic variations is necessary in infertile men seeking assisted reproductive technology. PMID:24390997

Quan, Q; Li, T J; Ding, X P; Wei, J; Li, L X; Fu, L

2013-01-01

372

Genome rearrangements and pervasive meiotic drive cause hybrid infertility in fission yeast  

PubMed Central

Hybrid sterility is one of the earliest postzygotic isolating mechanisms to evolve between two recently diverged species. Here we identify causes underlying hybrid infertility of two recently diverged fission yeast species Schizosaccharomyces pombe and S. kambucha, which mate to form viable hybrid diploids that efficiently complete meiosis, but generate few viable gametes. We find that chromosomal rearrangements and related recombination defects are major but not sole causes of hybrid infertility. At least three distinct meiotic drive alleles, one on each S. kambucha chromosome, independently contribute to hybrid infertility by causing nonrandom spore death. Two of these driving loci are linked by a chromosomal translocation and thus constitute a novel type of paired meiotic drive complex. Our study reveals how quickly multiple barriers to fertility can arise. In addition, it provides further support for models in which genetic conflicts, such as those caused by meiotic drive alleles, can drive speciation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02630.001 PMID:24963140

Zanders, Sarah E; Eickbush, Michael T; Yu, Jonathan S; Kang, Ji-Won; Fowler, Kyle R; Smith, Gerald R; Malik, Harmit Singh

2014-01-01

373

A novel functional role for apolipoprotein B in male infertility in heterozygous apolipoprotein B knockout mice.  

PubMed Central

Male infertility, affecting as many as 10% of the adult population, is an extremely prevalent disorder. In most cases, the cause of the condition is unknown, and genetic factors that might affect male fertility, other than some sequences on the Y chromosome, have not been identified. We report here that male mice heterozygous for a targeted mutation of the apolipoprotein B (apo B) gene exhibit severely compromised fertility. Sperm from these mice failed to fertilize eggs both in vivo and in vitro. However, these sperm were able to fertilize eggs once the zona pellucida was removed but displayed persistent abnormal binding to the egg after fertilization. In vitro fertilization-related and other experiments revealed reduced sperm motility, survival time, and sperm count also contributed to the infertility phenotype. Recognition of the infertility phenotype led to the identification of apo B mRNA in the testes and epididymides of normal mice, and these transcripts were substantially reduced in the affected animals. Moreover, when the genomic sequence encoding human apo B was introduced into these animals, normal fertility was restored. These findings suggest that this genetic locus may have an important impact on male fertility and identify a previously unrecognized function for apo B. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8855280

Huang, L S; Voyiaziakis, E; Chen, H L; Rubin, E M; Gordon, J W

1996-01-01

374

Male infertility: a public health issue caused by sexually transmitted pathogens.  

PubMed

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are caused by several pathogens, including bacteria, viruses and protozoa, and can induce male infertility through multiple pathophysiological mechanisms. Additionally, horizontal transmission of STD pathogens to sexual partners or vertical transmission to fetuses and neonates is possible. Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma spp., human papillomavirus, hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses, HIV-1 and human cytomegalovirus have all been detected in semen from symptomatic and asymptomatic men with testicular, accessory gland and urethral infections. These pathogens are associated with poor sperm quality and decreased sperm concentration and motility. However, the effects of these STD agents on semen quality are unclear, as are the effects of herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma spp., Treponema pallidum and Trichomonas vaginalis, because few studies have evaluated the influence of these pathogens on male infertility. Chronic or inadequately treated infections seem to be more relevant to infertility than acute infections are, although in many cases the exact aetiological agents remain unknown. PMID:25330794

Gimenes, Fabrícia; Souza, Raquel P; Bento, Jaqueline C; Teixeira, Jorge J V; Maria-Engler, Silvya S; Bonini, Marcelo G; Consolaro, Marcia E L

2014-12-01

375

Beneficial effect of tamoxifen on sperm recovery in infertile men with nonobstructive azoospermia.  

PubMed

About 10% of infertile men have azoospermia. After the introduction of microinjection [intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)], many of these men obtain the chance to be a father. But still in many cases of nonobstructive azoospermia, we are not able to find spermatozoa for ICSI. Medications may be able to increase the chance of finding spermatozoa in testis samples. So in this study, we evaluated the effect of tamoxifen citrate on the results of sperm recovery from testis tissue in infertile men with nonobstructive azoospermia. Thirty-two azoospermic infertile men with proved nonobstructive azoospermia were selected. Tamoxifen was administered for 3 months. Semen samples and in the cases of azoospermia second testis biopsy were taken, and the results were compared with the first samples. According to first testis samples, 13 patients had hypospermatogenesis, 9 had maturation arrest and 10 patients sertoli cell syndrome. After tamoxifen treatment, six patients showed spermatozoa in their ejaculates. From other patients all in hypospermatogenesis group, 75% in maturation arrest group and 20% in sertoli cell group showed spermatozoa in their second testis samples. Our study showed that treatment of patients with nonobstructive azoospermia with anti-oestrogenic drugs like tamoxifen can improve the results of sperm recovery in testis samples and also increase the chance of pregnancy by microinjection. PMID:21651602

Moein, M-R; Tabibnejad, N; Ghasemzadeh, J

2012-05-01

376

Implementation of hysteroscopy in an infertility clinic: The one-stop uterine diagnosis and treatment  

PubMed Central

Magnetic Resonant Imaging (MRI) has demonstrated that we can differentiate the uterus in 3 important functional areas. Exploration of the uterus in the infertile patient should implement the evaluation of the endometrium, the Junctional zone myometrium (JZ), the outer myometrium and the cervical canal. Especially the JZ myometrium should receive our close attention in the exploration and treatment of the infertile patient. MRI cannot be implemented as a screening examination but also limiting the imaging of the womb to a 2 or 3 D ultrasound exam only does not meet the scientific requirements of sensitivity and specificity. Modern ambulatory uterine diagnosis in a one-stop approach includes transvaginal ultrasound, fluid mini Hysteroscopy, contrast sonography and endomyometrial tissue sampling. Transvaginal Ultrasound being the gold standard for global uterine screening has a cardinal importance for diagnosis of myometrial disorders and uterine congenital malformations whereas hysteroscopy remains the gold standard for the evaluation of the endometrium and cervical canal. The major challenge remains to perform a tissue sampling of the endo-myometrium in an ambulatory, patient friendly and reliable way for which the newly designed Trophy hysteroscope provide a satisfactory answer. This one-stop approach opens a total new and advanced dimension to the screening, diagnosis and treatment of uterine pathology in the infertile patient.

Fam name, Initiaal; Meier, R.; Dhont, N.; Mestdagh, G.; Ombelet, W.

2014-01-01

377

‘At the hospital I learnt the truth’: diagnosing male infertility in rural Malawi  

PubMed Central

This paper examines how men's reproductive bodies are problematised in rural northern Malawi as access to biomedically defined diagnoses of the health of men's sperm contribute to the visibility of male infertility. Ethnographic research with infertile and fertile men explored pathways into the sexual health and fertility services offered in district hospitals, men's clinical engagements and masculine imaginaries. The research suggested that men's willingness to be referred for semen analysis is an extension of intensive and persistent help-seeking for childlessness instigated by couples and encouraged by families. Within the laboratory, acceptable social arrangements for semen sample collection are negotiated between male clients and laboratory staff, which emphasise heterosexual and marital virility. Following diagnosis, counselling by clinical officers, without any significant therapeutic interventions, focuses on compassion in marriage. This paper considers: what is the role of semen analysis within public health facilities and why do men participate? How do men experience an infertility diagnosis and what do they and their partners do with this knowledge? In addition, how do these practices shape gendered relationships in families and communities? The analysis builds on Inhorn's (2012) concept of ‘emergent masculinities’ to better understand the connections between male subjectivities, medical technologies and the globalisation of male reproductive health, as they relate to men's lives in rural Malawi. PMID:25175293

Parrott, Fiona R.

2014-01-01

378

Role of metabolomic analysis of biomarkers in the management of male infertility.  

PubMed

Metabolomics is the systematic study of metabolites as small-molecule biomarkers that represent the functional phenotype in a cell, tissue or organism. Detection of crucial disturbances in the concentration of metabolites by metabolomic profiling of key biomarkers can be beneficial in the management of various medical conditions, including male-factor infertility. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential role of this rapid, noninvasive analysis in the investigation of infertile men. Differences in the concentration of oxidative stress biomarkers (-CH, -NH, -OH and ROH) have been found to be uniquely associated with semen plasma of healthy men compared with patients with idiopathic infertility, varicocele and vasectomy reversal. Furthermore, NMR spectra have shown significant differences in citrate, lactate, glycerylphosphorylcholine and glycerylphosphorylethanolamine among semen samples of men with spermatogenesis failure, obstructive azoospermia, oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and healthy donors. Evidence has also shown the value of (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in differentiating patients with testicular failure and ductal obstruction by utilizing phosphomonoester and beta-adenosine triphosphate as biomarkers. In addition, metabolomics has shown promise in assisted reproductive techniques. Recent studies involving spectroscopic measurements of follicular fluid and embryo culture media have revealed an association between biomarkers of oxidative stress and pregnancy outcome of oocytes and embryos. PMID:17620044

Deepinder, Fnu; Chowdary, Hyndhavi T; Agarwal, Ashok

2007-07-01

379

Surgical treatment of male infertility in the era of intracytoplasmic sperm injection – new insights  

PubMed Central

Assisted reproductive technology is an evolving area, and several adjuvant procedures have been created to increase a couple's chance of conceiving. For male infertility, the current challenges are to properly accommodate old and new techniques that are both cost-effective and evidence-based. In this context, urologists are expected to diagnose, counsel, provide medical or surgical treatment whenever possible and/or correctly refer male patients for assisted conception. Urologists are sometimes part of a multiprofessional team in an assisted reproduction unit and are responsible for the above-cited tasks as well as the surgical retrieval of sperm from either the epididymides or testicles. We present a comprehensive review of the surgical treatment options for infertile males, including the perioperative planning and prognostic aspects, with an emphasis on the role of microsurgery in the optimization of treatment results. This review also discusses current techniques for sperm retrieval that are used in association with assisted reproductive technology and includes sperm retrieval success rates according to the technique and the type of azoospermia. New insights are provided with regard to each surgical treatment option in view of the availability of assisted conception to overcome male infertility. PMID:21915501

Esteves, Sandro C.; Miyaoka, Ricardo; Agarwal, Ashok

2011-01-01

380

NPHP4 mutation is linked to cerebello-oculo-renal syndrome and male infertility.  

PubMed

Nephronophthisis is the most common genetic cause of renal failure in children and young adults. It is genetically heterogeneous and can be seen in isolation or in combination with other ciliopathy phenotypes. Here we report an index case where nephronophthisis is associated with oculomotor apraxia and cerebellar abnormalities, consistent with the clinical diagnosis of cerebello-oculo-renal syndrome. Prompted by a family history of an uncle with early onset end stage renal failure and infertility, we performed semen analysis on the index. This revealed marked reduction in the count of motile sperms as well as multiple abnormalities in the head and tail. Autozygome-guided mutation analysis followed by exome sequencing and segregation analysis revealed a homozygous truncating mutation in NPHP4, indicating that mutations of this gene can on rare occasions cause cerebello-oculo-renal syndrome. Our finding of severe male infertility in a family with NPHP4 truncation is strongly supported by the mouse model and, to our knowledge, is the first reported male infertility phenotype in association with NPHP4 or any other nephrocystin in humans. PMID:23574405

Alazami, A M; Alshammari, M J; Baig, M; Salih, M A; Hassan, H H; Alkuraya, F S

2014-04-01

381

Do Cigarette Smoking and Obesity Affect Semen Abnormality in Idiopathic Infertile Males?  

PubMed Central

Purpose This study was conducted to find the relative risk of semen abnormality with respect to smoking history and obesity. Materials and Methods Subfertile or infertile men were enrolled in this study from July 2010 to June 2011. All participants provided their cigarette use information, self-reported weight, height, semen analysis, physical examination, and sexually transmitted disease status. None of the enrolled patients had any specific pathological reason for infertility. Semen abnormality was defined as a condition in which one or more parameters did not satisfy the World Health Organization's criteria. Results A total of 1,073 male patients were considered for this study. After the application of the inclusion criteria, 193 patients were finally analyzed. These patients were divided into two groups according to semen abnormality: the normal semen group (n=72) and the abnormal semen group (n=121). Baseline characteristics, except age and smoking history, were not significantly different between the two groups. Smoking history and age were risk factors for the semen abnormality of idiopathic infertile male patients. Conclusions Smoking and old age were risk factors for semen abnormality. However, obesity did not affect the semen abnormality. Smoking affected semen quality and is therefore expected to play a negative role in conception. PMID:25237661

Lee, Hui Dai; Lee, Hyo Serk; Lee, Joong Shik; Park, Yong-Seog

2014-01-01

382

Prevalence of sexually transmissible pathogens in semen from asymptomatic male infertility patients with and without leukocytospermia  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the prevalence of pathogens that cause sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in semen from asymptomatic male infertility patients with and without leukocytospermia (LCS), and associations between STIs, inflammatory markers and other semen variables. Design Retrospective, controlled study. Setting Center for Reproductive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Patient(s) 241 male infertility patients undergoing routine semen analysis; 132 with LCS, and 109 without LCS. Intervention(s) None Main Outcome Measure(s) DNA from STI pathogens [human papillomavirus (HPV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), human herpes virus type 6 (HHV-6), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT)], routine semen parameters and markers of accessory gland and epididymal function and inflammation. Results STI DNA was detected in 45/241 (18.7%) of the samples (CMV 8.7%, HPV 4.5%, HHV-6 3.7%, HSV 3.7%, CT 2.5%, EBV 0.4%, and HBV 0%), with no difference in prevalence between LCS and non-LCS groups. STI DNA in semen was associated with a decrease in sperm concentration, motile sperm concentration, total sperm count and neutral ?-glucosidase concentration, whereas LCS was associated with a decrease in total sperm count, % normal forms and fructose concentration. Conclusion(s) STI pathogen DNA was detected in semen from a high percentage of asymptomatic male infertility patients and was associated with poor semen quality. Efforts to diagnose and treat subclinical genital tract infections should be intensified. PMID:17433312

Bezold, Guntram; Politch, Joseph A.; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Kuypers, Jane M.; Wolff, Hans; Anderson, Deborah J.

2009-01-01

383

Genome rearrangements and pervasive meiotic drive cause hybrid infertility in fission yeast.  

PubMed

Hybrid sterility is one of the earliest postzygotic isolating mechanisms to evolve between two recently diverged species. Here we identify causes underlying hybrid infertility of two recently diverged fission yeast species Schizosaccharomyces pombe and S. kambucha, which mate to form viable hybrid diploids that efficiently complete meiosis, but generate few viable gametes. We find that chromosomal rearrangements and related recombination defects are major but not sole causes of hybrid infertility. At least three distinct meiotic drive alleles, one on each S. kambucha chromosome, independently contribute to hybrid infertility by causing nonrandom spore death. Two of these driving loci are linked by a chromosomal translocation and thus constitute a novel type of paired meiotic drive complex. Our study reveals how quickly multiple barriers to fertility can arise. In addition, it provides further support for models in which genetic conflicts, such as those caused by meiotic drive alleles, can drive speciation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02630.001. PMID:24963140

Zanders, Sarah E; Eickbush, Michael T; Yu, Jonathan S; Kang, Ji-Won; Fowler, Kyle R; Smith, Gerald R; Malik, Harmit Singh

2014-01-01

384

Survey of reasons for discontinuation from in vitro fertilization treatment among couples attending infertility clinic  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: With the increase in infertility burden, more and more couples are opting for in vitro fertilization (IVF). Despite the availability of various treatment options, the major concern that needs to be addressed is the reasons why such couples, initially motivated so strongly, drop out in fairly high numbers from IVF cycles. With this point of view the study was designed. AIM: The objective of this study was to explore the reasons why couples discontinue fertility treatment. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This retrospective study was carried out among couples in the age group of 20-40 years who opted for IVF at Tertiary care hospital and a private infertility center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records for 3 years (2009-2012) were taken out and included in the study for analysis. Socio-demographic details along with indication for IVF and reasons for drop-separate IVF therapy were recorded on case record form and were analyzed. RESULTS: Twenty-one percent of the patients had tubal pathology, thus making it the commonest female related factor for indication of IVF. Oligoasthenospermia (13%) was the commonest cause of male related infertility factor. Financial burden was the primary cause for terminating treatment in majority of the IVF cases. CONCLUSIONS: Financial burden (62.5%) was the commonest reason for drop out among couples from IVF cycle. PMID:25624660

Kulkarni, Grishma; Mohanty, Nimain C.; Mohanty, Ipseeta Ray; Jadhav, Pradeep; Boricha, B. G.

2014-01-01

385

Infertility in the hyperplasic ovary of freshwater planarians: the role of programmed cell death.  

PubMed

Ex-fissiparous planarians produce infertile cocoons or, in very rare cases, cocoons with very low fertility. Here, we describe the features of programmed cell death (PCD) occurring in the hyperplasic ovary of the ex-fissiparous freshwater planarian Dugesia arabica that may explain this infertility. Based on TEM results, we demonstrate a novel extensive co-clustering of cytoplasmic organelles, such as lysosomes and microtubules, and their fusion with autophagosomes during the early stage of oocyte cell death occurring through an autophagic pattern. During a later stage of cell death, the generation of apoptotic vesicles in the cytoplasm can be observed. The immunohistochemical labeling supports the ultrastructural results because it has been shown that the proapoptotic protein bax was more highly expressed in the hyperplasic ovary than in the normal one, whereas the anti-apoptotic protein bcl2 was slightly more highly expressed in the normal ovary compared to the hyperplasic one. TUNEL analysis of the hyperplasic ovary confirmed that the nuclei of the majority of differentiating oocytes were TUNEL-positive, whereas the nuclei of oogonia and young oocytes were TUNEL-negative; in the normal ovary, oocytes are TUNEL-negative. Considering all of these data, we suggest that the cell death mechanism of differentiating oocytes in the hyperplasic ovary of freshwater planarians is one of the most important factors that cause ex-fissiparous planarian infertility. We propose that autophagy precedes apoptosis during oogenesis, whereas apoptotic features can be observed later. PMID:25107610

Harrath, Abdel Halim; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Mansour, Lamjed; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Sirotkin, Alexander V; Al Omar, Suliman Y; Arfah, Maha; Al Anazi, Mohamed S; Alhazza, Ibrahim M; Nyengaard, Jens R; Alwasel, Saleh

2014-11-01

386

Alteration in Endometrial Proteins during Early- and Mid-Secretory Phases of the Cycle in Women with Unexplained Infertility  

PubMed Central

Background Compromised receptivity of the endometrium is a major cause of unexplained infertility, implantation failure and subclinical pregnancy loss. In order to investigate the changes in endometrial protein profile as a cause of unexplained infertility, the current study was undertaken to analyze the differentially expressed proteins of endometrium from early-secretory (LH+2) to mid-secretory phase (LH+7), in women with unexplained infertility. Methods 2-D gel electrophoresis was performed to analyze the proteomic changes between early- (n?=?8) and mid-secretory (n?=?8) phase endometrium of women with unexplained infertility. The differentially expressed protein spots were identified by LC-MS analysis and validated by immunoblotting and immuno-histochemical analysis in early- (n?=?4) and mid-secretory (n?=?4) phase endometrium of infertile women. Validated proteins were also analyzed in early- (n?=?4) and mid-secretory (n?=?4) phase endometrium of fertile women. Results Nine proteins were found to be differentially expressed between early- and mid- secretory phases of endometrium of infertile women. The expression of Ras-related protein Rap-1b, Protein disulfide isomerase A3, Apolipoprotein-A1 (Apo-A1), Cofilin-1 and RAN GTP-binding nuclear protein (Ran) were found to be significantly increased, whereas, Tubulin polymerization promoting protein family member 3, Superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn], Sorcin, and Proteasome subunit alpha type-5 were significantly decreased in mid- secretory phase endometrium of infertile women as compared to early-secretory phase endometrium of infertile women. Validation of 4 proteins viz. Sorcin, Cofilin-1, Apo-A1 and Ran were performed in separate endometrial biopsy samples from infertile women. The up-regulated expression of Sorcin and down-regulated expression of Cofilin-1 and Apolipoprotein-A1, were observed in mid-secretory phase as compared to early-secretory phase in case of fertile women. Conclusions De-regulation of the expression of Sorcin, Cofilin-1, Apo-A1 and Ran, during early- to mid-secretory phase may have physiological significance and it may be one of the causes for altered differentiation and/or maturation of endometrium, in women with unexplained infertility. PMID:25405865

Manohar, Murli; Khan, Huma; Sirohi, Vijay Kumar; Das, Vinita; Agarwal, Anjoo; Pandey, Amita; Siddiqui, Waseem Ahmad; Dwivedi, Anila

2014-01-01

387

The prevalence of azoospermia factor microdeletion on the Y chromosome of Chinese infertile men detected by multi-analyte suspension array technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim:To develop a high-throughput multiplex, fast and simple assay to scan azoospermia factor (AZF) region microdeletions on the Y chromosome and establish the prevalence of Y chromosomal microdeletions in Chinese infertile males with azoospermia or oligozoospermia.Methods:In total, 178 infertile patients with azoospermia (non-obstructed), 134 infertile patients with oligozoospermia as well as 40 fertile man controls were included in the present

Yi-Jian Zhu; Si-Yao Liu; Huan Wang; Ping Wei; Xian-Ping Ding

2008-01-01

388

Effect of smoking on reproductive hormones and semen parameters of infertile Saudi Arabians  

PubMed Central

Objective: The purpose of this retrospective study is to look into the effect of smoking on semen and hormonal profile of Saudi Arabians attending infertility clinics. Materials and Methods: Medical record numbers of patients who attended infertility clinics and who underwent full assessment were identified rom Quadramed system and out-patient log books between January 2010 and December 2012. The standard protocol of the patients include full history, age, number of years of marriage personal habits of smoking, alcohol consumption, primary or secondary infertility. Standard laboratory tests which were performed, included, complete blood picture, random blood sugar, testosterone, follicle stimulation hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin level and semen analysis; volume, count, progressive motility and morphology. The data was entered in the database and analyzed. Results: During the study period, 279 patients attended and infertility clinic and only 258 gave the sample for analysis. The average age of patients in the smoking group was 34.23 ± 7.66 and in the nonsmokers 34.07 ± 7.92 years. Primary infertility was more common in smokers versus nonsmokers P < 0.001 confidence interval (CI)< ?44.0705, total serum testosterone level was lower 383.8 ± 239.5 versus 422.5 ± 139.2 ng/dL (0.009 CI< ?9.9415), serum prolactin level was higher 18.68 ± 13.28 versus 12.85 ± 12.34 ng/mL (0.001 CI < 8.3794). The average volume of the semen among the smokers was 2.8 ± 1.35 mL and in nonsmokers it was 3.08 ± 0.76 mL (P < 0.008 CI< ?0.123). The mean progressive motility in smokers was 31.5 ± 23.1 compared to nonsmokers 40.05 ± 25.43% (0.002 CI< ?3.2962) and total sperm count was 119.52 ± 114.12 and 139.71 ± 104.82 million/mL (0.07 CI < 1.4657). Conclusions: This study shows that the effect of smoking is dramatic reduction in the hormonal levels and semen parameters. It is recommended that smoking men undergoing fertility treatment should stop smoking to increase their chances of having offspring. PMID:25657547

Al-Turki, Haifa A.

2015-01-01

389

Association of decreased spermatozoa omega-3 fatty acid levels and increased oxidative DNA damage with varicocele in infertile men: a case control study.  

PubMed

Varicocele is commonly associated with male infertility because it impairs normal sperm morphology and activity. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are important determinants of sperm cell structure and function, but their relationship with varicocele remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the PUFA composition in spermatozoa of infertile men with varicocele and to evaluate the potential relationship between PUFA and varicocele. This case control study recruited 92 infertile men with varicocele, 99 infertile men without varicocele and 95 fertile male control subjects. Semen morphology and activity parameters were assessed and seminal plasma 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content was determined by ELISA. Sperm concentrations of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography. Infertile men with varicocele had lower concentrations of omega-3 PUFA, higher omega-6:omega-3 PUFA ratios and greater oxidative DNA damage in spermatozoa compared with infertile men without varicocele and normal subjects. The degree of varicocele and DNA damage was associated with decreased omega-3 PUFA concentrations and semen quality in infertile men with varicocele. The findings suggest that omega-3 PUFA deficiency could be implicated in varicocele-associated infertility, and highlight the need for intervention trials to test the usefulness of omega-3 supplementation in reducing sperm abnormalities in infertile men with varicocele. PMID:25405715

Tang, Li-Xin; Yuan, Dong-Juan; Wang, Qi-Ling; Jiang, Fang; Guo, Jian; Tang, Yun-Ge; Zheng, Li-Xin; Kang, Jing X

2014-11-19

390

The relationship between body mass index and sexual function in infertile women: A cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background: Infertility as the bitterest life experience can affect sexual function. Many studies have shown agitation, depression, marital dissatisfaction, and sexual dysfunction as the psychological outcomes resulting from infertility. Many factors, including body mass index, influence the female sexual function. Objective: This study aimed to assess the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction and the relationship between sexual function and body mass index in the Iranian infertile women who had attended the infertility clinic. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 502 infertile women who had attended Honoree clinic, Jahrom in Iran between April 2012 and December 2012. The infertile cases were classified into three groups according to the body mass index: 20-24.9 (Group I), 25-29.9 (Group II), and >29.9 and above (Group III). In addition, Female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire was used in order to assess the sexual problems. Finally, the data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, ANOVA and Student’s t-test. Results: The mean age of women was 30.95±6.80 years. The results showed that 430 subjects (87.1%) had sexual dysfunction. Furthermore, the rate of sexual dysfunction among the infertile women was reported as 23.30%, 31.47%, and 45.23% in groups I, II, and III, respectively. Considering body mass index, FSFI score was 21.65±1.70 in the women with normal weight, 18.08±1.52 in overweight women, and 12.21±3.62 in obese women and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Conclusion: The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was quite high in infertile women, which might be due to the lack of knowledge about marital issues and lack of training in the society. If body mass index is too high, it can have a great effect on fertility. In this study, being overweight and obese based on body mass index had a negative effect on the infertile woman’s sexual function. PMID:24799879

Jamali, Safieh; Zarei, Hossein; Rasekh Jahromi, Athar

2014-01-01

391

Application of medicinal plants in maternal healthcare and infertility: a South African perspective.  

PubMed

Plants have played significant roles as medicine during pregnancy, birth, and postpartum care in many rural areas of the world. In addition to this, plants have been used for centuries to treat infertility and related reproduction problems. The aim of this paper was to review the current status of plant species used in maternal healthcare, including infertility, in South Africa, in terms of scientific evaluation for efficacy and safety. In addition to this, the role of medicinal plants as a tool in achieving the MDG5 of reducing maternal mortality by 2015 was evaluated. A search was done with the aid of Google Scholar, PubMed, Science Direct, peer-reviewed papers, and books, using keywords such as child birth, labour pain, maternal health, maternal mortality, menstrual pains, and postpartum. The plants listed in the different research articles were classified according to their use and the target effect of a plant extract or compound on reproductive function. Eighty-four plant species were found to be used to treat infertility and related problems. Twenty plant species are used during pregnancy, while 26 plant species are used to ease childbirth. For postpartum healing and any problems after childbirth, nine plant species were recorded. Unhealthy pregnancy and birth complications are among the factors that contribute to the loss of cognitive potential in the developing world's children, condemning them to impoverished lives. The best way to keep a country poor is to rob its children of their full developmental potential. In this respect, medicinal plants play a significant role in reducing maternal mortality and ensuring the birth of healthy children. PMID:23609109

Abdillahi, Halima S; Van Staden, Johannes

2013-05-01

392

Uterine cavity assessment in infertile women: Sensitivity and specificity of three-dimensional Hysterosonography versus Hysteroscopy  

PubMed Central

Background: Assessment of uterine abnormalities is a core part in infertility evaluation. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of three-dimensional hysterosonography (3-DHS) in the diagnosis of uterine abnormalities in infertile women. Materials and Methods: The infertile women who visited Royan Institute and referred to 3-DHS consecutively, prior to in vitro fertilization, from 2010-2011 included in this cross-sectional study. For patients who underwent hysteroscopy in addition to 3-DHS (214/977), the verification bias adjusted sensitivity and specificity of 3-DHS which were calculated by global sensitivity analysis method. Hysteroscopy was used as the gold standard for diagnosis of uterine abnormalities. Histological diagnosis of resected endometrial tissues by hysteroscopy was assessed and the adjusted sensitivity and specificity of 3-DHS and hysteroscopy in detection of polyp or hyperplasia were determined. Histopathologic results were considered as the gold standard for diagnosis of polyp or hyperplasia. Results: The overall sensitivity and specificity for 3-DHS in diagnosis of uterine anomalies considering hysteroscopy as the gold standard were 68.4% and 96.3% respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of hysteroscopy in diagnose of polyp or hyperplasia was calculated at 91.3% and 81.4% respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of 3-DHS in diagnosis polyps or hyperplasia was calculated at 91.4% and 80.2 % respectively. Conclusion: The results of present study proved that, compared to hysteroscopy; 3-DHS has a reliable specificity for diagnosis of uterine abnormalities. Sensitivity and specificity of 3-DHS and hysteroscopy in detecting polyp or hyperplasia regarding histopathology as the gold standard was the same. PMID:24639723

Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Rashidy, Zohreh; Haghighi, Hadieh; Akhoond, Mohamadreza; Niknejadi, Maryam; Hemat, Mandana; ShamsiPour, Mansour

2013-01-01

393

Effects of micronutrients on the reproduction of infertility rat model induced by adenine  

PubMed Central

Male infertility is a serious global medical and social issue demanding more specific and effective treatments. In this study, we generated a male infertility rat model using adenine induction to study the effects of certain micronutrients on reproduction. Fifty male SD rats were used in the study, and thirty of them received daily intra-gastric administration of 300 mg/kg adenine for four weeks. The thirty adenine treated mice were evenly divided into 3 groups to receive intra-gastric administration of micronutrient mixture of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, Zinc, and selenium (micronutrient group), normal saline (model control group), and methyl testosterone solution (androgen group). The other twenty rats used were normal male SD rats that were evenly divided into two groups to receive intra-gastric administration of normal saline (normal control group) and micronutrient mixture first then adenine 40 min later (micronutrient prevention group). After four weeks of micronutrient and other treatments, all rats were sacrificed for analyses. Compared with those in the model control group, the rats in the micronutrient group showed significantly improved physical signs, significantly increased body weights, significantly increased testis index, significantly increased sperm counts and motility, significantly decreased sperm malformation, and significantly repaired testis tissue. Compared with those in the model control group, the rats in the micronutrient group showed significantly decreased FSH levels and recovered LH and testosterone levels. The rats in the micronutrient prevention group did not show significant differences in sperm counts, sperm motility, sperm malformation, and hormonal levels from those in the normal control group. The findings from this study provide evidence for the potential application of micronutrients in male infertility treatments. PMID:25356136

Yu, Zheng-Zheng; Chen, Jing; Shou, Pei-Qin; Feng, Lei

2014-01-01

394

Congenital Malformations among Babies Born Following Letrozole or Clomiphene for Infertility Treatment  

PubMed Central

Context Clomiphene citrate (CC) is the first line drug for ovulation induction but because of its peripheral antiestrogenic effect, letrozole was introduced as the 2nd line drug. It lacks the peripheral antiestrogenic effect and is associated with similar or even higher pregnancy rates. Since letrozole is a drug for breast cancer, its use for the purpose of ovulation induction became controversial in the light of studies indicating an increased incidence of congenital malformations. Aims To evaluate and compare the incidence of congenital malformations among offsprings of infertile couples who conceived naturally or with clomiphene citrate or letrozole treatment. Settings and Design A retrospective cohort study done at a tertiary infertility centre. Methods and Material A total of 623 children born to infertile women who conceived naturally or following clomiphene citrate or letrozole treatment were included in this study. Subjects were sorted out from medical files of both mother and newborn and follow up study was done based on the information provided by parents through telephonic conversations. Babies with suspected anomaly were called and examined by specialists for the presence of major and minor congenital malformations. Other outcomes like multiple pregnancy rate and birth weight were also studied. Results Overall, congenital malformations, chromosomal abnormalities were found in 5 out of 171 (2.9%) babies in natural conception group and 5 out of 201 babies in the letrozole group (2.5%) and in 10 of 251 babies in the CC group (3.9%). Conclusions There was no significant difference in the overall rate of congenital malformations among children born to mothers who conceived naturally or after letrozole or CC treatment. Key Messages Congenital malformations have been found to be comparable following natural conception, letrozole and clomiphene citrate. Thus, the undue fear against letrozole may be uncalled for. PMID:25272289

Sharma, Sunita; Ghosh, Sanghamitra; Singh, Soma; Chakravarty, Astha; Ganesh, Ashalatha; Rajani, Shweta; Chakravarty, B. N.

2014-01-01

395

A heterozygous mutation of GALNTL5 affects male infertility with impairment of sperm motility  

PubMed Central

For normal fertilization in mammals, it is important that functionally mature sperm are motile and have a fully formed acrosome. The glycosyltransferase-like gene, human polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-like protein 5 (GALNTL5), belongs to the polypeptide N-acetylgalactosamine-transferase (pp-GalNAc-T) gene family because of its conserved glycosyltransferase domains, but it uniquely truncates the C-terminal domain and is expressed exclusively in human testis. However, glycosyltransferase activity of the human GALNTL5 protein has not been identified by in vitro assay thus far. Using mouse Galntl5 ortholog, we have examined whether GALNTL5 is a functional molecule in spermatogenesis. It was observed that mouse GALNTL5 localizes in the cytoplasm of round spermatids in the region around the acrosome of elongating spermatids, and finally in the neck region of spermatozoa. We attempted to establish Galntl5-deficient mutant mice to investigate the role of Galntl5 in spermiogenesis and found that the heterozygous mutation affected male fertility due to immotile sperm, which is diagnosed as asthenozoospermia, an infertility syndrome in humans. Furthermore, the heterozygous mutation of Galntl5 attenuated glycolytic enzymes required for motility, disrupted protein loading into acrosomes, and caused aberrant localization of the ubiquitin–proteasome system. By comparing the protein compositions of sperm from infertile males, we found a deletion mutation of the exon of human GALNTL5 gene in a patient with asthenozoospermia. This strongly suggests that the genetic mutation of human GALNTL5 results in male infertility with the reduction of sperm motility and that GALNTL5 is a functional molecule essential for mammalian sperm formation. PMID:24398516

Takasaki, Nobuyoshi; Tachibana, Kouichi; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Matsuzaki, Hideki; Hagiuda, Jun; Ishikawa, Hiromichi; Mochida, Keiji; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Ogura, Atsuo; Noce, Toshiaki; Ito, Chizuru; Toshimori, Kiyotaka; Narimatsu, Hisashi

2014-01-01

396

Predictors of patients remaining anovulatory during clomiphene citrate induction of ovulation in normogonadotropic oligoamenorrheic infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diagnostic criteria used to identify patients suffering from\\u000a polycystic ovary syndrome remain controversial. The present prospective\\u000a longitudinal follow-up study was designed to identify whether certain\\u000a criteria assessed during standardized initial screening could predict the\\u000a response to ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate (CC) in 201\\u000a patients presenting with oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea and infertility.\\u000a Serum FSH levels were within the normal

B. Imani; M. J. C. Eijkemans; Velde te E. R; J. D. F. Habbema; B. C. J. M. Fauser

1998-01-01

397

Urinary Estrogen Metabolites and Self-Reported Infertility in Women Infected with Schistosoma haematobium  

PubMed Central

Background Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease, endemic in 76 countries, that afflicts more than 240 million people. The impact of schistosomiasis on infertility may be underestimated according to recent literature. Extracts of Schistosoma haematobium include estrogen-like metabolites termed catechol-estrogens that down regulate estrogen receptors alpha and beta in estrogen responsive cells. In addition, schistosome derived catechol-estrogens induce genotoxicity that result in estrogen-DNA adducts. These catechol estrogens and the catechol-estrogen-DNA adducts can be isolated from sera of people infected with S. haematobium. The aim of this study was to study infertility in females infected with S. haematobium and its association with the presence of schistosome-derived catechol-estrogens. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional study was undertaken of female residents of a region in Bengo province, Angola, endemic for schistosomiasis haematobia. Ninety-three women and girls, aged from two (parents interviewed) to 94 years were interviewed on present and previous urinary, urogenital and gynecological symptoms and complaints. Urine was collected from the participants for egg-based parasitological assessment of schistosome infection, and for liquid chromatography diode array detection electron spray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/UV-DAD/ESI-MSn) to investigate estrogen metabolites in the urine. Novel estrogen-like metabolites, potentially of schistosome origin, were detected in the urine of participants who were positive for eggs of S. haematobium, but not detected in urines negative for S. haematobium eggs. The catechol-estrogens/ DNA adducts were significantly associated with schistosomiasis (OR 3.35; 95% CI 2.32–4.84; P?0.001). In addition, presence of these metabolites was positively associated with infertility (OR 4.33; 95% CI 1.13–16.70; P?0.05). Conclusions/Significance Estrogen metabolites occur widely in diverse metabolic pathways. In view of the statistically significant association between catechol-estrogens/ DNA adducts and self-reported infertility, we propose that an estrogen-DNA adduct mediated pathway in S. haematobium-induced ovarian hormonal deregulation could be involved. In addition, the catechol-estrogens/ DNA adducts described here represent potential biomarkers for schistosomiasis haematobia. PMID:24848950

Santos, Júlio; Gouveia, Maria João; Vale, Nuno; Delgado, Maria de Lurdes; Gonçalves, Ana; da Silva, José M. Teixeira.; Oliveira, Cristiano; Xavier, Pedro; Gomes, Paula; Santos, Lúcio L.; Lopes, Carlos; Barros, Alberto; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Brindley, Paul J.; da Costa, José M. Correia; Sousa, Mário; Botelho, Mónica C.

2014-01-01

398

Spermatozoal head defect as a cause of infertility in a stallion.  

PubMed

A 9-year-old Arabian stallion with a 3-year history of infertility was evaluated for breeding soundness. Both testes were small. Ultrasonography revealed a small amount of free fluid between the tunics of both testes. Results of cytologic examination of the fluid were unremarkable. On semen examination, progressive motility was 10%, and total number of spermatozoa in the ejaculate was 6.6 x 10(9), of which 92% were abnormal. Predominant abnormalities were head defects (75%): 57% of the heads had single or multiple vacuoles, and 60% also had midpiece swelling or bending. PMID:1813470

Held, J P; Prater, P; Stettler, M

1991-12-15

399

Treating Female Infertility and Improving IVF Pregnancy Rates With a Manual Physical Therapy Technique*  

PubMed Central

Context Infertility and pregnancy. Objective To assess the effectiveness of site-specific manual soft tissue therapy in (1) facilitating natural fertility and (2) improving in vitro fertilization (IVF) pregnancy rates in women with histories indicating abdominopelvic adhesion formation. Design and Intervention Pursuant to 2 promising pilot studies, 53 infertile, premenopausal patients received a 10- to 20-hour series of site-specific manual physical therapy treatments. Seventeen patients hoped to achieve a natural pregnancy; 36 planned to undergo IVF within 15 months. The primary criteria for inclusion in the studies were the inability to conceive following a minimum of 12 months of unprotected intercourse and suspected or confirmed pelvic adhesions due to abdominal and/or pelvic surgery, infectious or inflammatory disease (eg, endometriosis, PID), or trauma. Treatments were specifically designed to address biomechanical dysfunctions of the pelvis, sacrum, and coccyx and restricted soft tissue and visceral mobility due to adhesions or microadhesions affecting the reproductive organs and adjacent structures. Main Outcome Measures (1) Natural fertility group: pregnancy within 1 year of therapy and subsequent full-term delivery; (2) Pre-IVF group: pregnancy (via transfer of fresh embryos from nondonor eggs) within 15 months of the last manual treatment date. Results Natural Fertility Group Of the 14 patients available for follow-up (ages 25 to 44; mean, 33.5 years), 10 (71.4%) became pregnant within 1 year, and 9 (64.3%) reported full-term deliveries. Three of the 9 women who delivered reported a subsequent pregnancy, suggesting that the treatment protocol might have lasting effects. Two women have had a second live birth delivery; and the third is still pregnant. Pre-IVF group Of the 25 patients available for follow-up (ages 28 to 44; mean, 36 years), clinical pregnancies were documented in 22 of 33 embryo transfers vs the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2001 age-adjusted expected number of 12.7 (P < .001). The estimated odds ratio for a successful pregnancy in a cycle (manual treatment: no treatment) is 3.20 (95% confidence interval = 1.55–8.4). Conclusions The data trend across these studies suggests that this innovative site-specific protocol of manual soft-tissue therapy facilitates fertility in women with a wide array of adhesion-related infertility and biomechanical reproductive organ dysfunction. The therapy, designed to improve function by restoring visceral, osseous, and soft-tissue mobility, is a nonsurgical, noninvasive manual technique with no risks and few, if any, adverse side effects or complications. As such, it should be considered a new adjunct to existing medical infertility treatments. PMID:15266276

Wurn, Belinda F; Wurn, Lawrence J; Roscow, Amanda S; King, C. Richard; Heuer, Marvin A; Scharf, Eugenia S; Shuster, Jonathan J

2004-01-01

400

Comparison of Oxidative Stress/DNA Damage in Semen and Blood of Fertile and Infertile Men  

PubMed Central

Abnormal spermatozoa frequently display typical features of oxidative stress, i.e. excessive level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depleted antioxidant capacity. Moreover, it has been found that a high level of oxidatively damaged DNA is associated with abnormal spermatozoa and male infertility. Therefore, the aim of our study was the comparison of oxidative stress/DNA damage in semen and blood of fertile and infertile men. The broad range of parameters which describe oxidative stress and oxidatively damaged DNA and repair were analyzed in the blood plasma and seminal plasma of groups of fertile and infertile subjects. These parameters include: (i) 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2?-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) levels in urine; (ii) 8-oxodG level in DNA isolated from leukocytes and spermatozoa; (iii) antioxidant vitamins (A, C and E) and uric acid. Urinary excretion of 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua and the level of oxidatively damaged DNA in leukocytes as well as the level of antioxidant vitamins were analyzed using HPLC and HPLC/GC/MS methods. The results of our study demonstrate that 8-oxodG level significantly correlated with every parameter which describe sperm quality: sperm count, motility and morphology. Moreover, the data indicate a higher level of 8-oxodG in sperm DNA compared with DNA of surrogate tissue (leukocytes) in infertile men as well as in healthy control group. For the whole study population the median values of 8-oxodG/106 dG were respectively 7.85 and 5.87 (p?=?0.000000002). Since 8-oxodG level in sperm DNA is inversely correlated with urinary excretion rate of 8-oxoGua, which is the product of OGG1 activity, we hypothesize that integrity of spermatozoa DNA may be highly dependent on OGG1 activity. No relationship between the whole body oxidative stress and that of sperm plasma was found, which suggests that the redox status of semen may be rather independent on this characteristic for other tissues. PMID:23874641

Guz, Jolanta; Gackowski, Daniel; Foksinski, Marek; Rozalski, Rafal; Zarakowska, Ewelina; Siomek, Agnieszka; Szpila, Anna; Kotzbach, Marcin; Kotzbach, Roman; Olinski, Ryszard

2013-01-01

401

Metabolic syndrome and prostate abnormalities in male subjects of infertile couples  

PubMed Central

No previous study has evaluated systematically the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and prostate-related symptoms and signs in young infertile men. We studied 171 (36.5 ± 8.3-years-old) males of infertile couples. MetS was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Third Adult Treatment Panel. All men underwent hormonal (including total testosterone (TT) and insulin), seminal (including interleukin-8 (IL-8), seminal plasma IL-8 (sIL-8)), scrotal and transrectal ultrasound evaluations. Because we have previously assessed correlations between MetS and scrotal parameters in a larger cohort of infertile men, here, we focused on transrectal features. Prostate-related symptoms were assessed using the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Twenty-two subjects fulfilled MetS criteria. In an age-adjusted logistic ordinal model, insulin levels increased as a function of MetS components (Wald = 29.5, P < 0.0001) and showed an inverse correlation with TT (adjusted r = -0.359, P< 0.0001). No association between MetS and NIH-CPSI or IPSS scores was observed. In an age-, TT-, insulin-adjusted logistic ordinal model, an increase in number of MetS components correlated negatively with normal sperm morphology (Wald = 5.59, P< 0.02) and positively with sIL-8 levels (Wald = 4.32, P < 0.05), which is a marker of prostate inflammation, with prostate total and transitional zone volume assessed using ultrasound (Wald = 17.6 and 12.5, both P < 0.0001), with arterial peak systolic velocity (Wald = 9.57, P = 0.002), with texture nonhomogeneity (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.87 (1.05–3.33), P < 0.05), with calcification size (Wald = 3.11, P < 0.05), but not with parameters of seminal vesicle size or function. In conclusion, in males of infertile couples, MetS is positively associated with prostate enlargement, biochemical (sIL8) and ultrasound-derived signs of prostate inflammation but not with prostate-related symptoms, which suggests that MetS is a trigger for a subclinical, early-onset form of benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:24435050

Lotti, Francesco; Corona, Giovanni; Vignozzi, Linda; Rossi, Matteo; Maseroli, Elisa; Cipriani, Sarah; Gacci, Mauro; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario

2014-01-01

402

A redesigned follitropin alfa pen injector for infertility: results of a market research study  

PubMed Central

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient-learning and nurse-teaching experiences when using a redesigned prefilled, ready-to-use follitropin alfa pen injector. Methods: Seventy-three UK women of reproductive age either administering daily treatment with self-injectable gonadotropins or about to start gonadotropin treatment for infertility (aged 24–47 years; 53 self-injection-experienced and 20 self-injection-naïve) and 28 nurses from UK infertility clinics were recruited for the study. Following instruction, patients and nurses used the redesigned follitropin alfa pen to inject water into an orange and completed questionnaires to evaluate their experiences with the pen immediately after the simulated injections. Results: Most (88%, n = 64) patients found it easy to learn how to use the pen. Among injection-experienced patients, 66% (n = 35) agreed that the redesigned pen was easier to learn to use compared with their current method and 70% (n = 37) also said they would prefer its use over current devices for all injectable fertility medications. All nurses considered the redesigned pen easy to learn and believed it would be easy to teach patients how to use. Eighty-six percent (n = 24) of the nurses thought it was easy to teach patients to determine the remaining dose to be dialed and injected in a second pen if the initial dose was incomplete. Compared with other injection devices, 96% (n = 27) thought it was “much easier” to “as easy” to teach patients to use the redesigned pen. Based on ease of teaching, 68% (n = 19) of nurses would choose to teach the pen in preference to any other injection method. Almost all (93%, n = 26) nurses considered that having the same pen format for a range of injectable gonadotropins would facilitate teaching and learning self-injection. Conclusion: In this market research study with infertile patients and infertility nurses, the redesigned follitropin alfa pen was perceived as easy to learn, easy to teach how to use, and well accepted. PMID:21792303

Abbotts, Carole; Salgado-Braga, Cristiana; Audibert-Gros, Céline

2011-01-01

403

Pan Endoscopic Approach “Hysterolaparoscopy” as an Initial Procedure in Selected Infertile Women  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Tuboperitoneal pathology is responsible for 40-50% cases of infertility. Hysterosalpingography (HSG) & laparoscopy are the two classic methods available for evaluation of tubal pathology and are complementary to each other. Though pelvic sonography and HSG are good enough to exclude gross intrauterine pathology, but subtle changes in the form of small polyps, adhesions and seedling fibroid are better picked up on magnification with hysteroscopy. Combined hysterolaparoscopy may obviate need for HSG, as complete evaluation and treatment is possible in the same sitting. Aim: To assess the utility of Hysterolaparoscopy as one step procedure and compare it with HSG, in the subset of ovulatory infertile women with normal pelvic sonography / seminogram /hormonal assays. Materials and Method: In this analytical prospective study, 193 infertile women aged 19 to 42 years underwent HSG and Hysterolaparoscopy over a period of six months. They were confirmed to have ovulatory cycles and normal seminogram. Patient with active genital infection were excluded. Findings were categorized as normal/abnormal and therapeutic intervention done, if required. Statistical evaluation was carried out using Chi- square test. Result: On comparing HSG and Hysteroscopy, uterine findings matched in 66.3% patients. HSG failed to detect uterine pathology in 32.12% patients (62/193) with a sensitivity of 21.3% and specificity of 97.45%. Ninety three percent of intrauterine adhesions/polyps were missed on HSG. Hysteroscopic intervention was required in 23.83% cases, adhesiolysis being the commonest. On comparing tubal patency on HSG and laparoscopy, the sensitivity of HSG in detecting bilateral tubal block was 80.6% and specificity of 81.5%. With regard to unilateral tubal block, sensitivity was 34.6% and specificity 89.8%. The agreement between the two was 74%. Pathology such as adhesions, fimbrial agglutination and endometriosis were dealt surgically in 65.8% patients. As per HSG, 112/193 women had both tubes patent and 177 revealed normal uterine cavity. When these 112 women (58.03%) with normal HSG report were further subjected to hysterolaparoscopy, only 35/193 (18.13%) of them actually had normal tubes and uterus; rest 77 women (39.89%) were benefited by one step procedure of hysterolaparoscopic evaluation and intervention and further treatment done. Conclusion: Hysterolaparoscopy (Pan Endoscopic) approach is better than HSG and should be encouraged as first and final procedure in selected infertile women. PMID:24701493

Vaid, Keya; Mehra, Sheila; Verma, Mita; Jain, Sandhya; Sharma, Abha; Bhaskaran, Sruti

2014-01-01

404

Family Planning Choices in Couples Using Contraception without Knowing They Are Infertile: Should NewlyWed Men Undergo a Routine Spermiogram?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Newly-weds choose to use contraception either to spend the first years of their marriage more freely, because of economic reasons or because of the increase in working career women. We studied the reasons for infertility and the rate of contraception use in the first years of marriage among couples with primary infertility and evaluated the use of a spermiogram

Hakan Kiran; Deniz Cemgil Arikan; Ayhan Coskun; Mustafa Kaplanoglu; Gurkan Kiran; Ozgur Ozdemir; M. Turan Cetin

2012-01-01

405

Effectiveness of bromocriptine monotherapy or combination treatment with clomiphene for infertility in women with galactorrhea and normal prolactin: A systematic review and meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Among women with unexplained infertility, 28% to 55% of patients with galactorrhea are normoprolactinemic. Bromocriptine, a common treatment for infertile women with hyperprolactinemia, has been used in the treatment of unexplained subfertility in women with galactorrhea and normal prolactin; however, its effectiveness and safety profile have never been determined.Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the relative

Tao Xue; Shang-Wei Li; Yan Wang

2010-01-01

406

HPV-DNA sperm infection and infertility: from a systematic literature review to a possible clinical management proposal.  

PubMed

The objectives of this study were to investigate the implications of human papillomavirus (HPV) sperm infection on male fertility, impairment of sperm parameters, and possible alteration of sperm nuclear status and to identify a possible effective management of infertile men with HPV sperm infection. We employed a systematic review and clinical management proposal at the Centers for Reproductive and Health care for treating infertile male patients with HPV infection. Literature search was carried out in electronic databases in the last two decades. We focused our attention on: (i) HPV sperm prevalence (ii) HPV-related alteration of sperm parameters; (iii) molecular mechanisms of HPV semen infection and infertility. The main outcome measures were HPV prevalence in infertile male patients and semen parameters. The prevalence of HPV sperm infection ranges between 2 and 31% in men from general population and between 10 and 35.7% in men affected by unexplained infertility. The presence of HPV in semen is associated with an impairment of sperm motility and the presence of anti-sperm antibodies. The molecular mechanisms underlying impairment of sperm motility apparatus need further evaluations. A greater attention should be applied to assess HPV sperm infection, particularly in men undergoing assisted reproduction techniques cycle for male infertility or sperm banking. It would be useful to perform HPV test and fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis for HPV in semen from these patients both at first admission, to define the possible presence and localization of semen infection, and after 6 months, to assess the possible virus clearance retrieval on normal sperm parameters. PMID:25270519

Foresta, C; Noventa, M; De Toni, L; Gizzo, S; Garolla, A

2014-10-01

407

History of infertility and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective analysis of 40,773 pregnancies.  

PubMed

Studies of delayed conception and risk of gestational diabetes (GDM) are sparse, although common underlying mechanisms are plausible, including insulin resistance and inflammation. The association between a history of infertility and GDM was assessed prospectively among 40,773 eligible pregnancies in the US Nurses' Health Study II cohort (1989-2001). Biennial questionnaires provided updated information on infertility and several lifestyle and health-related characteristics. Multivariable log-binomial models with generalized estimating equations were used to compute risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusting for age, prepregnancy body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)), and additional potential confounders. GDM occurred among 1,405 (5.2%) women. A prepregnancy history of infertility was reported by 5,497 (20.5%) participants and was significantly associated with a 39% greater risk of GDM (risk ratio (RR) = 1.39, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.24, 1.57; P < 0.001). Underlying reasons for infertility associated with GDM included ovulation disorders (RR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.87; P < 0.001) and tubal blockage (RR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.20, 2.77; P = 0.005). The association of cervical mucus disorder with GDM was of borderline significance (RR = 1.70, 95% CI: 0.88, 3.30; P = 0.11). Endometriosis (RR = 1.27, 95% CI: 0.70, 2.31; P = 0.43) and male factor infertility (RR = 1.12, 95% CI: 0.78, 1.61; P = 0.55) were not associated with GDM risk. These novel findings suggest that infertility, particularly from ovulation disorders and tubal blockage, is associated with an increased GDM risk. Further research is needed to identify mechanisms or common underlying metabolic dysfunction explaining these observations. PMID:23956097

Tobias, Deirdre K; Chavarro, Jorge E; Williams, Michelle A; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Hu, Frank B; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Missmer, Stacey A; Zhang, Cuilin

2013-10-15

408

Balanced complex chromosome rearrangement in male infertility: case report and literature review.  

PubMed

Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs) are structural rearrangements involving at least three chromosomes and three or more chromosome breakpoints. Generally, balanced CCR carriers have a normal phenotype but they are at a higher reproductive risk. Azoospermia was discovered in the male partner of a couple with primary infertility. Conventional cytogenetics identified a CCR refined by fluorescent in situ hybridisation. The CCR involved three chromosomes, four breakpoints and an insertion. A literature search identified 43 phenotypically normal males referred for reproductive problems presenting a CCR. More males were ascertained because of spermatogenesis failure or disturbances than because of repeated abortions and/or birth of a malformed child. Male carriers of CCR produce a high frequency of chromosomally abnormal spermatozoa due to the aberrant segregation of the rearranged chromosomes. The number of chromosomes and breakpoints involved in the rearrangement, the position of breakpoints, the relative size of the resultant chromosomes and the presence or absence of recombination inside the paired-rearranged segments are presumed to affect the fertility of the carrier. Testicular biopsy should not be performed in males with azoospermia. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection should not be proposed as a procedure for treating the infertility of CCR male carriers as a successful result is unlikely. PMID:24612408

Nguyen, M H; Morel, F; Pennamen, P; Parent, P; Douet-Guilbert, N; Le Bris, M J; Basinko, A; Roche, S; De Braekeleer, M; Perrin, A

2015-03-01

409

A strategy for treatment of couples with unexplained infertility who failed to conceive after intrauterine insemination.  

PubMed

Couples with unexplained infertility treated unsuccessfully with intrauterine insemination often receive further treatment with IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of fertilization and fertilization failure with respect to the method of fertilization used, when half of the sibling oocytes were fertilized by conventional IVF and insemination and the remainder by ICSI. Included was the first IVF/ICSI treatment of 248 unexplained infertile couples who had failed to conceive after three IUI cycles. An overall pregnancy rate per embryo transfer of 57% was observed. A significantly better fertilization rate was obtained after ICSI as compared with IVF (68 versus 46%) (P < 0.005), and total fertilization failure following ICSI and IVF treatment was seen in 4.4 and 25% of the cycles respectively. The group who experienced total fertilization failure after IVF had normal semen parameters, although significantly lower sperm concentration and motility as compared with the entire study group. Transfer of their ICSI-fertilized oocytes subsequently resulted in a pregnancy rate of 49.2% per transfer. The policy of splitting the sibling oocytes can effectively minimize complete fertilization failure while maintaining high chances of achieving a pregnancy. At the same time, the optimal fertilization method for subsequent treatment cycles can be determined. PMID:15151728

Bungum, L; Bungum, M; Humaidan, P; Andersen, C Yding

2004-05-01

410

Knockdown of hypothalamic RFRP3 prevents chronic stress-induced infertility and embryo resorption.  

PubMed

Whereas it is well established that chronic stress induces female reproductive dysfunction, whether stress negatively impacts fertility and fecundity when applied prior to mating and pregnancy has not been explored. In this study, we show that stress that concludes 4 days prior to mating results in persistent and marked reproductive dysfunction, with fewer successful copulation events, fewer pregnancies in those that successfully mated, and increased embryo resorption. Chronic stress exposure led to elevated expression of the hypothalamic inhibitory peptide, RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP3), in regularly cycling females. Remarkably, genetic silencing of RFRP3 during stress using an inducible-targeted shRNA completely alleviates stress-induced infertility in female rats, resulting in mating and pregnancy success rates indistinguishable from non-stress controls. We show that chronic stress has long-term effects on pregnancy success, even post-stressor, that are mediated by RFRP3. This points to RFRP3 as a potential clinically relevant single target for stress-induced infertility. PMID:25581095

Geraghty, Anna C; Muroy, Sandra E; Zhao, Sheng; Bentley, George E; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Kaufer, Daniela

2015-01-01

411

Making technology familiar: orthodox Jews and infertility support, advice, and inspiration.  

PubMed

This paper examines how orthodox Jews use traditional strategies and new media simultaneously to cope with infertility in the age of new reproductive technologies. Not only have they used the Internet to establish support, information, and educational networks, but also they have created frameworks for unique professional collaborations among rabbis, doctors, and clinic personnel in order to ensure that their fertility treatments are conducted with strict attention to Jewish legal concerns, particularly with regard to incest, adultery, and traditional practices regarding bodily emissions. Throughout these processes, they have innovated a hybrid language for describing and explaining infertility treatments that blends Hebrew prayers, Yiddish aphorisms, English slang, Gematria (numerology), and biomedical terminology. By using idiomatic language and folk practice, orthodox Jews construct a unique terrain that shapes and makes familiar their experience and understanding of fertility treatment. Biomedicine in this context is understood as a set of tools and strategies that can be readily appropriated and harnessed to a particular set of individual and collective goals. PMID:17082984

Kahn, Susan Martha

2006-12-01

412

Restoration of spermatogenesis in infertile male chickens after transplantation of cryopreserved testicular cells.  

PubMed

Abstract 1. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of frozen-thawed testicular cells transplanted into infertile cocks to restore spermatogenesis and to compare two cryoprotectants (CPA) (dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and Biofreeze). 2. A total of 24 infertile White Leghorn (WL) cocks were transplanted with cryopreserved testicular cells from fertile adult donor cocks. Both genetically close and phylogenetically distant chicken breeds were used as donor cocks. 3. Twelve out of 24 WL recipient cocks with cryopreserved testicular cells restored spermatogenesis within 2 months after the transplantation. Six out of 12 recipient cocks with restored spermatogenesis successfully produced progeny expressing the donor phenotype. 4. There was no difference between the CPA in cell viability after thawing or in the number of offspring produced from cryopreserved testicular tissue. 5. The present work represents the first report of production of a donor-derived healthy progeny following frozen-thawed testicular cell transplantation in adult birds. The described results may contribute to preservation of endangered avian species and to maintaining their genetic variability. PMID:25384762

Benesova, B; Mucksova, J; Kalina, J; Trefil, P

2014-12-01

413

Benzo(A)pyrene (BaP) treatment results in complete infertility in female pigeons  

SciTech Connect

BaP is a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and a common environmental pollutant. Show Racer and White Carneau female pigeons injected weekly with BaP for 3 for 5 months were completely infertile, with ovaries appearing necrotic or oxidized. Fertility in benzo(e)pyrene (BeP, a noncarcinogenic PAH) treated birds was the same as for corn oil treated controls, as was embryo development. Thus, infertility in BaP treated birds appears to be related to its structure-carcinogenic potential. There was no readily apparent affect of BaP treatment on testes from male birds. In order to determine whether BaP metabolites covalently bind to DNA in the ovaries of these birds, pigeons were injected with BaP or BeP, controls were injected with corn oil. Animals were sacrificed 24h later, the ovaries or testes removed, and the DNA isolated and analyzed for PAH-DNA adducts by {sup 32}P-post labeling assay. One major and one minor PAH-DNA adduct was found in ovaries and testes from BaP treated birds. However, no PAH adducts were found in BeP treated or control animals. Thus, problems with fertility may arise because of the alteration in DNA by BaP metabolite binding in ovaries where rapid cell growth occurs during egg production.

Hough, J.L.; Darrow, D.; Eaton, J.; Baird, M.B. (Masonic Medical Research Lab., Utica, NY (United States))

1991-03-11

414

Presence of aerobic micro-organisms and their influence on basic semen parameters in infertile men.  

PubMed

Urogenital tract infections in males are one of the significant etiological factors in infertility. In this prospective study, 72 patients with abnormal semen parameters or any other symptoms of urogenital tract infection were examined. Semen analysis according to the WHO 2010 manual was performed together with microbial assessment: aerobic bacteria culture, Chlamydia antigen test, Candida culture, Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma-specific culture. In total, 69.4% of semen samples were positive for at least one micro-organism. Ureaplasma sp. was the most common micro-organism found in 33% of semen samples of infertile patients with suspected male genital tract infection. The 2nd most common micro-organisms were Enterococcus faecalis (12.5%) and Escherichia coli (12.5%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (7%), Chlamydia trachomatis (7%) and Candida sp. (5.6%). Generally, bacteria were sensitive to at least one of the antibiotics tested. No statistically significant relationship was observed between the presence of aerobic micro-organisms in semen and basic semen parameters: volume, pH, concentration, total count, motility, vitality and morphology. PMID:25209133

Filipiak, E; Marchlewska, K; Oszukowska, E; Walczak-Jedrzejowska, R; Swierczynska-Cieplucha, A; Kula, K; Slowikowska-Hilczer, J

2014-09-11

415

Insight into human sex ratio imbalance: the more boys born, the more infertile men.  

PubMed

This study investigated, through large-scale statistical analysis of the global population, whether the human sex ratio is skewing worldwide, and if so, why and how it shifts, and the impact of any shift on human reproduction. A significant imbalance of the sex ratio was observed in the whole human population, resulting in a vicious circle where the more boys born, the more infertile men occur as a consequence of the adjustment of the human sex ratio. It is proposed that both accelerated degeneration of the Y chromosome and dynamically differential fertilization of the egg by the X- and Y-bearing spermatozoa may contribute to the changing structure of the human population, suggesting a potential selection pressure favouring an alternative sex-determining/differentiation system for the human species: the DMRT1 gene on the autosome may tend to replace the SRY gene on the Y chromosome as a master sex-determining gene during evolution. These viewpoints may open a debate on the future of the human race, and assist in guiding diagnostic, prognostic and preventive treatments of human infertility and in defining population policy. PMID:18028737

Cheng, Hanhua; Shang, Xuan; He, Yan; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Zhou, Rongjia

2007-11-01

416

The social construction of infertility: the case of the matrilineal Nayars in south India.  

PubMed

This paper explores the relationship between central Kerala Nayar social constructions of fertility and gender, and the Nayar institution of matrilineality, one of the most extreme cases of matrilineality documented in the anthropological literature. The article shows that social responsibility and consequence are implicated in central Kerala Nayar constructions of infertility and that these are traced matrilineally. It is the duty of matrilineal kin to attend to the family god of fertility and to the needs of females of the matrilineage to see that they foster progeny in the kin group's best interests. When this responsibility is violated, powerful forms of negative consequences may transpire for all lineage members, in the idiom of curses of family fertility gods. In the ritual of pampin tullal performed to propitiate these gods, concepts of fertility are extended to include other, 'auspicious' forms of prosperity. In ritual, unattached Nayar women serve as proxy for the well-being of the matrilineage. These unattached women--infertile, unmarried, 'separated', and widowed--are, for the natal kin group, symbolic virgins (kanya), the life force (sákti) of which lineage members seek to harness for their well-being. The concept of fertility is thus extended to include marriage proposals, job offers, and other health and economic concerns of lineage members. PMID:7973848

Neff, D L

1994-08-01

417

Does Varicocelectomy Improve Gonadal Function in Men with Hypogonadism and Infertility? Analysis of a Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Varicocele in infertile males is associated with Leydig cell dysfunction and hypogonadism. The effect of varicocelectomy on serum testosterone level is not yet established. We analysed 200 heterosexual infertile men diagnosed to have clinical varicocele they were divided into two groups: group 1 (100 men) had microsurgical varicocelectomy, and group 2 (100 patients) underwent assisted reproduction procedures. All participants had semen analysis, serum levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, and total testosterone (TT), measured both at recruitment time and 6 months later. In group 1, the mean TT level increased significantly after varicocelectomy (1.644 ± 0.029 to 2.461 ± 0.0198?ng/dL, P < 0.0001) and testicular size correlated with the mean change in TT (P = 0.001). No similar change was found in group 2. Out of the 100 patients in group 1, 78 had postoperative normalization of TT unlike only 16 men in group 2. PMID:22190930

Sathya Srini, Vasan; Belur Veerachari, Srinivas

2011-01-01

418

Association of the MTHFR A1298C Variant with Unexplained Severe Male Infertility  

PubMed Central

The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is one of the main regulatory enzymes involved in folate metabolism, DNA synthesis and remethylation reactions. The influence of MTHFR variants on male infertility is not completely understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the distribution of the MTHFR C677T and A1298C variants using PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) in a case group consisting of 344 men with unexplained reduced sperm counts compared to 617 ancestry-matched fertile or normozoospermic controls. The Chi square test was used to analyze the genotype distributions of MTHFR polymorphisms. Our data indicated a lack of association of the C677T variant with infertility. However, the homozygous (C/C) A1298C polymorphism of the MTHFR gene was present at a statistically high significance in severe oligozoospermia group compared with controls (OR?=?3.372, 95% confidence interval CI?=?1.27–8.238; p?=?0.01431). The genotype distribution of the A1298C variants showed significant deviation from the expected Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, suggesting that purifying selection may be acting on the 1298CC genotype. Further studies are necessary to determine the influence of the environment, especially the consumption of diet folate on sperm counts of men with different MTHFR variants. PMID:22457816

Eloualid, Abdelmajid; Abidi, Omar; Charif, Majida; El houate, Brahim; Benrahma, Houda; Louanjli, Noureddine; Chadli, Elbakkay; Ajjemami, Maria; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken; Rhaissi, Houria; Rouba, Hassan

2012-01-01

419

Association of the MTHFR A1298C variant with unexplained severe male infertility.  

PubMed

The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is one of the main regulatory enzymes involved in folate metabolism, DNA synthesis and remethylation reactions. The influence of MTHFR variants on male infertility is not completely understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the distribution of the MTHFR C677T and A1298C variants using PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) in a case group consisting of 344 men with unexplained reduced sperm counts compared to 617 ancestry-matched fertile or normozoospermic controls. The Chi square test was used to analyze the genotype distributions of MTHFR polymorphisms. Our data indicated a lack of association of the C677T variant with infertility. However, the homozygous (C/C) A1298C polymorphism of the MTHFR gene was present at a statistically high significance in severe oligozoospermia group compared with controls (OR?=?3.372, 95% confidence interval CI?=?1.27-8.238; p?=?0.01431). The genotype distribution of the A1298C variants showed significant deviation from the expected Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, suggesting that purifying selection may be acting on the 1298CC genotype. Further studies are necessary to determine the influence of the environment, especially the consumption of diet folate on sperm counts of men with different MTHFR variants. PMID:22457816

Eloualid, Abdelmajid; Abidi, Omar; Charif, Majida; El Houate, Brahim; Benrahma, Houda; Louanjli, Noureddine; Chadli, Elbakkay; Ajjemami, Maria; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken; Rhaissi, Houria; Rouba, Hassan

2012-01-01

420

Male Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... necessary, to retrieve sperm for use in assisted reproduction. Besides a semen analysis, your doctor may order ... that resembles a neck. In the context of reproduction, it refers to the neck of the uterus ( ...

421

Evaluating Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... discharge, pelvic pain, and disorders that can affect reproduction, such as thyroid disease. If you have a ... made by male sex glands that contains sperm. Sexual Intercourse: The act of the penis of the ...

422

Male Infertility  

MedlinePLUS

... that may affect fertility include tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and abuse of ... to test your semen more than once. A semen analysis can tell your doctor about your sperm count ...

423

Semen quality of suspected infertile Ethiopians at Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) Central Clinic, Addis Ababa: a retrospective review.  

PubMed

Abnormal semen quality is often associated with male infertility. The objective of this retrospective study was to determine the quality of semen in suspected infertile Ethiopians. All individual infertility records from Jan. 1, 1991 to June 30, 1995 were retrieved and the first semen analysis results of 914 subjects were analyzed. Other information like demographic data and VDRL test results were also collected. Ninety males (10%) came themselves first for infertility investigation while the rest were approached through their female partners. Town dwellers were 89% and 61% had secondary and above educational level, but only 11.2% gave history of use of fertility period. There were 913 semen specimen examined since one was aspermic. Of the total, only 30% semen specimens were normal in all the parameters. The remaining (70%) had abnormalities in one or more parameters; like azoospermia 26%, asthenozoospermia 31%, hypovolemia 47% and their combinations. Among the spermatozoa identified sample group (673), asthenozoospermia and oligospermia make 42% and 11% respectively. The frequent association of hypooligospermia with other parameter abnormalities was noted. The review indicated poor quality of semen parameters but needs further research under quality controlled standard analysis for international comparison. PMID:12596652

Kitilla, Tadesse

2002-10-01

424

Effect of cognitive behavioral therapy in mental health and hardiness of infertile women receiving assisted reproductive therapy (ART)  

PubMed Central

Background: Infertility is a stressful event that can give rise to psychological difficulties. Now, a wide range of psychosocial interventions for infertile couples has been developed. Objective: Purpose of this study was to determine the effect of group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to reduce stress, anxiety and depression of women undergoing assisted reproductive therapy (ART). Materials and Methods: This study was an experimental study (before and after study with control group) on infertile women who were referring to Gynecological clinics of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences to receive ART. 31 women who had criteria to enter the study were randomly divided into experimental group (n=15) and control group (n=16). The participants in the experimental group received 1 hour and 30 minute weekly session’s group therapy in 15 week as intervention. For gathering data, depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS) normalized Persian version and Ahvaz Hardiness Test (AHT) were used to assess psychological distress and psychological hardiness in pre-posttest. Results: There were significant differences in mean score of infertile psychological distress, anxiety, depression, and stress in experimental group pretest with posttest. Furthermore, the results indicated that there were significant differences between hardiness in two groups. The experimental group had higher scores in hardiness than control group (p=0.001). Conclusion: It seems to be, that group therapy interventions, specially, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be useful and applicable to women who receiving ART. PMID:25246916

Mosalanejad, Leili; Khodabakshi Koolaee, Anahita; Jamali, Safie

2012-01-01

425

The Role of Parenting in Men's Psychosocial Development: A Longitudinal Study of Early Adulthood Infertility and Midlife Generativity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A longitudinal study investigated variations in the coping patterns of 52 married men who experienced infertility problems in their first marriage. Styles of coping considered were initial substitutes, subsequent parenting resolutions, and final marital outcomes and the impact of these variations on the men's subsequent success in achieving…

Snarey, John; And Others

1987-01-01

426

Intra-individual variation in sperm chromatin structure assay parameters in men from infertile couples: clinical implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Sperm DNA integrity is an important factor in the prognosis of male fertility. In this study, we investigated intra-individual variation of sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) parameters in infertility patients undergoing assisted reproductive techniques (ARTs). METHODS: Retrospective study of 282 consecutive patients referred for ART (intrauterine insemination (IUI), IVF or ICSI) with repeated (between 2 and 5) SCSA measure-

J. Erenpreiss; M. Bungum; M. Spano; S. Elzanaty; J. Orbidans; A. Giwercman

2006-01-01

427

Breast cancer risk associated with being treated for infertility: results from the French E3N cohort study  

E-print Network

Breast cancer risk associated with being treated for infertility: results from the French E3N countries and concern has been raised as to the possible impact of fertility treatments on breast cancer follow-up period, 2571 cases of primary invasive breast cancer were diagnosed (183 in treated women). Our

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

428

Trans-fatty acid levels in sperm are associated with sperm concentration among men from an infertility clinic.  

PubMed

We measured the sperm fatty acid composition using gas chromatography in anonymized semen samples of 33 men undergoing infertility evaluation at an academic medical center. Trans-fatty acids were present in human sperm and were related inversely to sperm concentration (r = -0.44). PMID:21071027

Chavarro, Jorge E; Furtado, Jeremy; Toth, Thomas L; Ford, Jennifer; Keller, Myra; Campos, Hannia; Hauser, Russ

2011-04-01

429

Exposure to Endocrine Disrupters and Nuclear Receptor Gene Expression in Infertile and Fertile Women from Different Italian Areas  

PubMed Central

Within the PREVIENI project, infertile and fertile women were enrolled from metropolitan, urban and rural Italian areas. Blood/serum levels of several endocrine disrupters (EDs) (perfluorooctane sulfonate, PFOS; perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA; di-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate, DEHP; mono-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate, MEHP; bisphenol A, BPA) were evaluated concurrently with nuclear receptors (NRs) gene expression levels (ER?, ER?, AR, AhR, PPAR?, PXR) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Infertile women from the metropolitan area displayed significantly higher levels of: BPA compared to fertile women (14.9 vs. 0.5 ng/mL serum); BPA and MEHP compared to infertile women from urban and rural areas; enhanced expression levels of NRs, except PPAR?. Infertile women from urban and rural areas had PFOA levels significantly higher than those from metropolitan areas. Our study indicates the relevance of the living environment when investigating the exposure to EDs and the modulation of the NR panel in PBMC as a suitable biomarker of the effect, to assess the EDs impact on reproductive health. PMID:25268510

La Rocca, Cinzia; Tait, Sabrina; Guerranti, Cristiana; Busani, Luca; Ciardo, Francesca; Bergamasco, Bruno; Stecca, Laura; Perra, Guido; Mancini, Francesca Romana; Marci, Roberto; Bordi, Giulia; Caserta, Donatella; Focardi, Silvano; Moscarini, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto

2014-01-01

430

The reactive oxygen species—total antioxidant capacity score is a new measure of oxidative stress to predict male infertility  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is growing evidence that oxidative stress significantly impairs sperm function, and plays a major role in the aetiology The imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) of defective sperm function. This may lead to the onset of production and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in seminal male infertility via mechanisms involving the induction of fluid indicates oxidative stress and is correlated

Rakesh K. Sharma; Fabio F. Pasqualotto; David R. Nelson; Anthony J. Thomas Jr; Ashok Agarwal

431

Chronic prostatitis and male accessory gland infection - is there an impact on male infertility (diagnosis and therapy)?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. The aim of this article was to discuss by means of a review of the literature and own study material the multifactorial aetiology of male infer- tility, extrapolate this hypothesis to male accessory gland infection (MAGI) and relate it to chronic prostatitis and its treatment. Infertility is a multifac- torial disease and diagnosis and therapy must be oriented as

K. Everaert; A. Mahmoud; C. Depuydt; M. Maeyaert; F. Comhaire

2003-01-01

432

Quality of life in women with infertility via the FertiQoL and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between quality of life, anxiety, and depression in female patients with infertility. This was a cross-sectional study with 89 women with infertility. Patients completed a questionnaire that included demographic data, the FertiQoL scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The average total FertiQoL score was 66.0?±?14.5. There were negative correlations between the treatment and core FertiQoL scores and the Hospital Anxiety-Depression subscale scores. The attempted conception duration was negatively correlated with the total and core (emotional, mind-body, and social subscales) scores of the FertiQoL. The number of in vitro fertilizations was negatively correlated with the total, core (mind-body subscale), and treatment (tolerability subscale) scores of the FertiQoL. In conclusion, infertility significantly reduces quality of life in women by increasing their anxiety and depression levels. Thus, healthcare professionals should consider quality of life with a holistic approach when examining and treating women with infertility. PMID:25263133

Kahyaoglu Sut, Hatice; Balkanli Kaplan, Petek

2014-09-28

433

No CAG repeat expansion of polymerase gamma is associated with male infertility in Tamil Nadu, South India  

PubMed Central

Mitochondria contains a single deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymerase, polymerase gamma (POLG) mapped to long arm of chromosome 15 (15q25), responsible for replication and repair of mitochondrial DNA. Exon 1 of the human POLG contains CAG trinucleotide repeat, which codes for polyglutamate. Ten copies of CAG repeat were found to be uniformly high (0.88) in different ethnic groups and considered as the common allele, whereas the mutant alleles (not -10/not -10 CAG repeats) were found to be associated with oligospermia/oligoasthenospermia in male infertility. Recent data suggested the implication of POLG CAG repeat expansion in infertility, but are debated. The aim of our study was to explore whether the not -10/not -10 variant is associated with spermatogenic failure. As few study on Indian population have been conducted so far to support this view, we investigated the distribution of the POLG CAG repeats in 61 infertile men and 60 normozoospermic control Indian men of Tamil Nadu, from the same ethnic background. This analysis interestingly revealed that the homozygous wild type genotype (10/-10) was common in infertile men (77% - 47/61) and in normozoospermic control men (71.7% - 43/60). Our study failed to confirm any influence of the POLG gene polymorphism on the efficiency of the spermatogenesis. PMID:24339545

Poongothai, J.

2013-01-01

434

Idiopathic male infertility is strongly associated with aberrant methylation of MEST and IGF2/H19 ICR1.  

PubMed

Aberrant imprinting in spermatozoa in a subset of infertile men has been postulated to be a risk factor for congenital diseases in children conceived via assisted reproduction techniques (ART). Studies in clinically well characterized large cohorts, however, have been missing. Using bisulfite sequencing, we determined the degree of methylation of the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) and MEST differentially methylated regions in swim-up purified spermatozoa from 148 idiopathic infertile men and 33 normozoospermic controls. All control individuals had a high degree of IGF2/H19 ICR1 and a low degree of MEST methylation. Low sperm counts were clearly associated with IGF2/H19 ICR1 hypomethylation and, even stronger, with MEST hypermethylation. MEST hypermethylation, but not IGF2/H19 ICR1 hypomethylation was found in idiopathic infertile men with progressive sperm motility below 40% and bad sperm morphology below 5% normal spermatozoa. Ageing could be ruled out as a cause for the observed methylation defects. Sequence analysis of the CTCFL gene in peripheral blood DNA from 20 men with severe methylation defects revealed several polymorphisms, but no bona fide mutation. We conclude that idiopathic male infertility is strongly associated with imprinting defects at IGF2/H19 ICR1 and MEST, with aberrant MEST methylation being a strong indicator for sperm quality. The male germ cell thus represents a potential source for aberrant epigenetic features in children conceived via ART. PMID:19878521

Poplinski, A; Tüttelmann, F; Kanber, D; Horsthemke, B; Gromoll, J

2010-08-01

435

The Relationship of Infertility and Death: Using the Relational\\/Cultural Model of Counseling in Making Meaning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the crisis of infertility and attitudes associated with death are often approached differently in counseling, they both share similar attributes. Often, these experiences are described negatively and are associated with at least some form of loss. These negative experiences affect individuals' personal and existential meaning in a profound way. In this article, these experiences will be explored. Specifically, the

Donna M. Gibson

2007-01-01

436

Proteomics of human seminal plasma: identification of biomarker candidates for fertility and infertility and the evolution of technology.  

PubMed

Proteomics is a research area that has developed rapidly in the last decade. It studies the large-scale characterization of the full protein components of a cell, a tissue, or a biological fluid. In the last decade, clinical proteomics has developed new technology and bioinformatics useful in identifying molecular markers of pathology; the next decade might be the era of proteomics. Seminal plasma (SP) represents a good sample for proteomic analysis in the evaluation of male fertility/infertility. SP is an acellular fluid conglomerate, comprised of contributions from the epididymis and accessory sexual glands. Human SP contains many proteins that are important to the successful fertilization of the oocyte by the spermatozoa. Proteomic studies have identified numerous seminal-specific proteins, and recent reports have provided a further understanding of their function with respect to male fertility. Upon further validation, these proteins may be useful in the clinical distinction between fertility and infertility. This article reviews the proteomic methods, such as one dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (1D-PAGE), two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), and mass spectrometry (MS), employed to detect human SP markers involved in fertility and infertility. As such, proteomic studies will help the development of new techniques to identify novel biomarkers for a better clinical diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. PMID:23559416

Milardi, Domenico; Grande, Giuseppe; Vincenzoni, Federica; Castagnola, Massimo; Marana, Riccardo

2013-05-01

437

Sperm with large nuclear vacuoles and semen quality in the evaluation of male infertility.  

PubMed

This study compared the sperm nuclear vacuoles and semen quality in the evaluation of male infertility. One hundred and forty-two semen samples were obtained from patients who visited the Male Infertility Clinic at Toyama University Hospital. Semen samples were evaluated by conventional semen analyses and the Sperm Motility Analysis System (SMAS). In addition, spermatozoa were analyzed at 3,700-6,150x magnification on an inverted microscope equipped with DIC/Nomarski differential interference contrast optics. A large nuclear vacuole (LNV) was defined as one or more vacuoles with the maximum diameter showing?>?50% width of the sperm head. The percentage of spermatozoa with LNV (% LNV) was calculated for each sample. Correlations between the % LNV and parameters in SMAS and conventional semen analyses were analyzed. Processed motile spermatozoa from each sample were evaluated. The mean age of patients was 35 years old. Semen volume was 2.9?±?1.6mL (0.1-11.0; mean?±?standard deviation, minimum-maximum), sperm count was 39.3 ± 54.9 (x10(6)/mL, 0.01-262.0), sperm motility was 25.1?±?17.8% (0-76.0), and normal sperm morphology was 10.3?±?10.1% (0-49.0). After motile spermatozoa selection, we could evaluate % LNV in 125 ejaculates (88.0%) and at least one spermatozoon with LNV was observed in 118 ejaculates (94.4%). The percentage of spermatozoa with LNV was 28.0?±?22.4% (0-100) and % LNV increased significantly when semen quality decreased. The correlation between the % LNV and the semen parameters was weak to moderate; correlation coefficients were -0.3577 in sperm count (p?infertility; however, a certain level of negative influence of LNV to sperm quality cannot be excluded. PMID:23072254

Komiya, Akira; Watanabe, Akihiko; Kawauchi, Yoko; Fuse, Hideki

2013-02-01

438

Clinical implications of measuring prolactin levels in males of infertile couples.  

PubMed

Although in females of infertile couples abnormal prolactin (PRL) has a definitive role in the medical flowchart, its role in males is less clear. Animal models suggest that PRL does not play a major role in male reproduction, although its trophic action on male accessory glands was often observed. Studies in humans are scanty. We systematically evaluated possible clinical and ultrasound correlates of PRL in males of infertile couples. Of 288 consecutive males of infertile couples, 269 (36.6 ± 4.4 years) without genetic abnormalities were studied. All men underwent physical, biochemical, seminal evaluation and scrotal and transrectal ultrasound before and after ejaculation. Ejaculatory and erectile functions were assessed by Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-15 respectively; prostate-related symptoms by National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index and International Prostate Symptom Score; psychological symptoms by Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire. Among semen parameters, only the positive association between PRL and ejaculate volume was significant, even adjusting for age, total testosterone and thyroid-stimulating hormone (adj. r = 0.126, p < 0.05). In a logistic ordinal model, adjusting for the aforementioned confounders and ejaculate volume, PRL was negatively associated with delaying ejaculation according to PEDT#1 score (Wald = 4.65, p < 0.05). In an age- and ejaculate volume-adjusted, iterative binary logistic model, low PRL was associated with a fivefold risk of any failure in controlling ejaculation (HR = 5.15 [1.15-23], p < 0.05). Among scrotal and transrectal ultrasound features, we found a significant positive association between PRL and seminal vesicles (SV) volume and inhomogeneity, before and after ejaculation, and with deferential ampullas diameter. Associations with PRL were confirmed in nested 1 : 1 case-control analysis. No significant associations were found between PRL and other clinical parameters. For the first time, this study extends the concept of a trophic effect of PRL on male accessory glands from animals to humans. We report a positive association among PRL and ejaculate and SV volume, before and after ejaculation. Low PRL is associated with a lessened ability to control ejaculation. PMID:23970454

Lotti, F; Corona, G; Maseroli, E; Rossi, M; Silverii, A; Degl'innocenti, S; Rastrelli, G; Forti, G; Maggi, M

2013-09-01

439

Factors associated with acceptability of child adoption as a management option for infertility among women in a developing country  

PubMed Central

Background Adoption as a treatment option for infertility amongst those that cannot access and/or afford assisted reproduction is not well accepted in developing countries. This study sets out to determine the willingness of infertile women in developing countries to adopt a child and factors that influence women’s attitude to adoption. Methods We conducted a questionnaire survey of consecutive infertile patients who attended the gynecological clinic of a regional teaching hospital over a 2-month period. Information on demographics, fertility history, and attitude to adoption was obtained, and the data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. Tests of statistical significance were used where appropriate at the 95% confidence level. Results The majority of respondents were aware of child adoption, and the most common source of information was friends (47.8%), followed by the media (39.7%); 42.6% of respondents were willing to adopt if their infertility became intractable. The main reasons given by those unwilling to adopt were culture (78.3%) and family constraints (13.45%). On univariate analysis of factors associated with a favorable or unfavorable attitude to adoption, awareness of adoption (P = 0.002), duration of infertility > 5 years (P = 0.015), no living child (P = 0.007), tertiary education (P < 0.001), pressure from parents (P = 0.041), household yearly income ? $650 (P < 0.001), and belief that treatment will bring about the desired results (P < 0.001) were significant, and all except awareness of adoption turned out to be significant on multiple logistic regression analysis. Conclusion There was a high level of awareness about child adoption among all respondents. However, the acceptability of adoption was significantly lower among poor women and those with limited education. Community advocacy and mobilization, especially through the media as well as via health care providers, will go a long way towards enlightening and enhancing the uptake of adoption among women in Nigeria. PMID:22927767

Adewunmi, Adeniyi Abiodun; Etti, Elizabeth Arichi; Tayo, Adetokunbo Olufela; Rabiu, Kabiru Afolarin; Akindele, Raheem Akinwunmi; Ottun, Tawakwalit Abimbola; Akinlusi, Fatimat Motunrayo

2012-01-01

440

Partial AZFc duplications not deletions are associated with male infertility in the Yi population of Yunnan Province, China*  

PubMed Central

Objective: There are many reports on associations between spermatogenesis and partial azoospermia factor c (AZFc) deletions as well as duplications; however, results are conflicting, possibly due to differences in methodology and ethnic background. The purpose of this study is to investigate the association of AZFc polymorphisms and male infertility in the Yi ethnic population, residents within Yunnan Province, China. Methods: A total of 224 infertile patients and 153 fertile subjects were selected in the Yi ethnic population. The study was performed by sequence-tagged site plus/minus (STS+/?) analysis followed by gene dosage and gene copy definition analysis. Y haplotypes of 215 cases and 115 controls were defined by 12 binary markers using single nucleotide polymorphism on Y chromosome (Y-SNP) multiplex assays based on single base primer extension technology. Results: The distribution of Y haplotypes was not significantly different between the case and control groups. The frequencies of both gr/gr (7.6% vs. 8.5%) and b2/b3 (6.3% vs. 8.5%) deletions do not show significant differences. Similarly, single nucleotide variant (SNV) analysis shows no significant difference of gene copy definition between the cases and controls. However, the frequency of partial duplications in the infertile group (4.0%) is significantly higher than that in the control group (0.7%). Further, we found a case with sY1206 deletion which had two CDY1 copies but removed half of DAZ genes. Conclusions: Our results show that male infertility is associated with partial AZFc duplications, but neither gr/gr nor b2/b3 deletions, suggesting that partial AZFc duplications rather than deletions are risk factors for male infertility in Chinese-Yi population. PMID:24009201

Ye, Jun-jie; Ma, Li; Yang, Li-juan; Wang, Jin-huan; Wang, Yue-li; Guo, Hai; Gong, Ning; Nie, Wen-hui; Zhao, Shu-hua

2013-01-01

441

Assessment of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of infertile men using sperm karyotyping and multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)  

SciTech Connect

Individuals with male factor infertility resulting from idiopathic oligo-, astheno- or teratozoospermia are frequently offered IVF in an attempt to increase their chances of having a child. A concern remains whether these infertile males have an elevated risk of transmitting chromosomal abnormalities to their offspring. Sperm chromosomal complements from these men were assayed using the human sperm/hamster oocyte fusion system and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on sperm nuclei. For each of 5 infertile patients, 100 sperm karyotypes were analyzed and multicolour FISH analysis was performed on a minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei for each chromosome-specific DNA probe for chromosomes 1 (pUC1.77), 12 (D12Z3), X (XC) and Y (DYZ3). As a group, the infertile patients showed increased frequencies of both numerical ({chi}{sup 2}=17.26, {proportional_to} <0.001) and total abnormalities ({chi}{sup 2}=7.78, {proportional_to} <0.01) relative to control donors when assessed by sperm karyotypes. Analysis of sperm nuclei by FISH indicated a significant increase in the frequency of disomy for chromosome 1 in three of the five patients as compared to control donors ({chi}{sup 2}>8.35, {proportional_to} <0.005). In addition, the frequency of XY disomy was significantly higher in four of the five patients studied by FISH ({chi}{sup 2}>10.58, {proportional_to}<0.005), suggesting that mis-segregation caused by the failure of the XY bivalent to pair may play a role in idiopathic male infertility.

Moosani, N.; Martin, R.H. [Alberta Children`s Hospital and Univ. of Calgary (Canada)

1994-09-01

442

Prevalence and patterns of Y chromosome microdeletion in infertile men with azoospermia and oligzoospermia in Northeast China  

PubMed Central

Background: In some cases infertile men showed small deletions of specific genes in the Y chromosome. It had been confirmed, these deleted genes are greatly associated with spermatogenic failure. However, the frequency and the patterns of such microdeletions among infertile men are not clearly clarified. Objective: We sought to determine the frequency and the patterns of Y chromosome microdeletions in azoospermic and oligozoospermic infertile men in Northeast China, and try to optimize the selection of sequence tagged sites (STSs) of AZF microdeletions in multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: 720 azoospermic and 330 oligozoospermic infertile men, from Northeast China were included in this retrospective study during May 2008 to November 2012. Semen analysis was performed according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Y chromosome microdeletions were detected by polymerase chain reaction assays. G-banding method was used for chromosome Karyotype analysis. Chi-square tests were used to compare patterns of Y chromosome microdeletions in azoospermic and oligozoospermic patients. Results: Of 1050 infertile men, 12.95% cases had shown Y chromosome microdeletions, and 19.43% of cases showed abnormal chromosomal karyotype. Deletions in AZFc region was the most frequent 75.00%, followed by deletions in AZFb region 13.33%, AZFbc region 09.62%, and AZFa region 2.22%. All oligozoospermic patients showed presence of sY84, sY86, sY127, and sY134. Deletion of sY127 (p=0.0101) and sY157 (p=0.0043) showed significant difference between azoospermic group and oligozoospermic group. Conclusion: Deletions of sY127 may relate to azoospermia while sY84, sY86, sY127 can be ignored in AZF screening for oligozoospermic patients. PMID:25071845

Elfateh, Fadlalla; Rulin, Dai; Xin, Yun; Linlin, Li; Haibo, Zhu; Liu, Rui-Zhi

2014-01-01

443

An evaluation of the effect of infertility on marital, sexual satisfaction indices and health-related quality of life in women  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: The effect of infertility on marital and sexual functioning, health-related quality of life (QoL) and the acceptability of the treatment modalities is a poorly researched area in India. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To measure and compare the impact of infertility on marital adjustment, sexual functioning, QoL and the acceptability of various treatment modalities in infertility. DESIGN AND SETTING: Hospital-based cross-sectional controlled study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data regarding infertility, socio-demographic characteristics and treatment acceptability was obtained via a semi-structured questionnaire. validated, standardized scales were used to measure marital adjustment (abbreviated dyadic adjustment scale), sexual functioning (abbreviated sexual functioning questionnaire) in cases and controls, and quality of life (FertiQol) in cases. Data from 106 women attending tertiary infertility centers who met the definition of primary infertility and 212 controls attending the medical outpatient department in the same centers was obtained. RESULTS: Body mass index and socioeconomic status were significant (P < 0.006 and < 0.0001 respectively) for infertility. Fertility-enhancing regimens and adoption had the highest acceptability with a wide dispersion of range for adoption and least acceptance for sperm, egg, embryo donation and surrogate motherhood. Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant effect size of infertility on marital adjustment (Nagelkerke R2 0.725, Cohen's D 0.86) and sexual functioning (Nagelkerke R2 0.73, Cohen's D 0.815). QoL showed a decrease in mean scores on the FertiQol scale similar to normative data. CONCLUSIONS: Effective counseling, reassurance and measures to reduce the impact of the condition on marital and sexual life, overall QoL are needed to impart a holistic treatment in infertility. PMID:22065832

Valsangkar, Sameer; Bodhare, Trupti; Bele, Samir; Sai, Surendranath

2011-01-01

444

[Exploration into rules of combined Chinese and Western medical treatment on immune infertility].  

PubMed

In order to explore the rules of combined Chinese and Western medical treatment on immune infertility, the study was carried out by searching relative primary documents from databases and 26 articles (dealing with 5865 cases) were screened out. Excel was used to perform the frequency analysis on the Western drugs and 27 Chinese recipes emerging in the documents separately. It was discovered that the combined use of Chinese and Western medicines has its superiority. Low dose glucocorticoids together with vitamine is the main Western treatment used, and dexamethasone is the most frequently used preparation of glucocorticoids. Among the 72 Chinese drugs presented in the 27 Chinese recipes, 13 appeared for more than 1800 times, they were Angelica sinensis, Salvia miltiorrhiz