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Sample records for infertility

  1. Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... or for women. Some involve both partners. Drugs, assisted reproductive technology, and surgery are common treatments. Happily, many couples treated for infertility go on to have babies. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  2. Infertility - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - infertility ... The following organizations are good resources for information on infertility : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc/gov/reproductivehealth/infertility March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/ ...

  3. Male Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are infertile, see your doctor. There are tests that may tell if you have fertility problems. When it is possible to find the cause, treatments may include medicines, surgery, or assisted reproductive technology. Happily, many couples treated for infertility are able ...

  4. Female Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... might be infertile, see your doctor. There are tests that may tell if you have fertility problems. When it is possible to find the cause, treatments may include medicines, surgery, or assisted reproductive technologies. Happily, many couples treated for infertility are able ...

  5. Male Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    Advertisement Resize Text: Toggle navigation Find a Urologist Submit About Us What We Do Foundation History Leadership ... Hormone Health Network Infertility and Men Fact Sheet Advertisement Patient Education Materials We provide free patient education ...

  6. Female infertility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction About 17% of couples in industrialised countries seek help for infertility, which may be caused by ovulatory failure, tubal damage or endometriosis, or a low sperm count. In developed countries, 80% to 90% of couples attempting to conceive are successful after 1 year and 95% after 2 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for infertility caused by ovulation disorders? What are the effects of treatments for tubal infertility? What are the effects of treatments for infertility associated with endometriosis? What are the effects of treatments for unexplained infertility? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 55 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: clomifene; drug-induced ovarian suppression; gonadotrophin priming of oocytes before in vitro maturation; gonadotrophins; gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists plus gonadotrophins; gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists; in vitro fertilisation; intrauterine insemination alone, or combined with gonadotrophins or clomifene; laparoscopic ablation of endometrial deposits; laparoscopic ovarian drilling; laparoscopic removal; metformin; ovarian wedge biopsy; pulsatile gonadotrophin-releasing hormone; selective salpingography plus tubal catheterisation; tamoxifen; tubal flushing; and tubal surgery before in vitro fertilisation. PMID:21406133

  7. Female infertility

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Introduction About 17% of couples in industrialised countries seek help for infertility, which may be caused by ovulatory failure, tubal damage or endometriosis, or a low sperm count. In resource-rich countries, 80-90% of couples attempting to conceive are successful after 1 year and 95% after 2 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for infertility caused by ovulation disorders? What are the effects of treatments for tubal infertility? What are the effects of treatments for infertility associated with endometriosis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to April 2004 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 56 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: clomifene; cyclofenil; drug-induced ovarian suppression; gonadotrophin priming of oocytes before in vitro maturation; gonadotrophins; gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists plus gonadotrophins; gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists; in vitro fertilisation; intrauterine insemination plus controlled ovarian stimulation; intrauterine insemination plus gonadotrophins; laparoscopic ablation of endometrial deposits; laparoscopic ovarian drilling; metformin; ovarian wedge biopsy; pulsatile gonadotrophin-releasing hormone; selective salpingography plus tubal catheterisation; tamoxifen; tubal flushing with oil-soluble media or with water-soluble media; tubal surgery before in vitro fertilisation.

  8. Primary infertility (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  9. Infertility and family planning.

    PubMed

    Balogh, A; Tomazevic, T; Molitor-pfeffer, M P

    1989-03-01

    The contributions from 3 infertility specialists that comprise this article give an overview of the present situation in terms of infertility and its etiology and look at recent advances in infertility management, the various public health and ethical issues involved, and changes that have occurred in the attitude of family planning clinics toward infertility management. Worldwide, an estimated 60-80 million people are affected by infertility, with sexually transmitted diseases and postabortion and postpartum pelvic infections contributing a growing share of these cases. Despite spectacular advances in infertility management, the investigation and successful treatment of infertility is expensive and remain inaccessible to poor couples in developing countries. This is a key equity issue between rich and poor and between developed and developing countries. Although procedures such as artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization, and embryo transfer offer hope to infertile couples, some methods will be unacceptable from a medical or ethical point of view and not every biological development should be introduced into clinical practice. Family planning programs can play a key role in preventing infertility through sex education and encouraging the use of harmless contraceptive methods. In all cases, however, it is important that family planning personnel who work with infertile couples assess the likely psychosocial impact on the family of a child produced by techniques such as artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization. PMID:12222331

  10. Psychosocial Consequences of Infertility on Infertile Women.

    PubMed

    Fatima, P; Rahman, D; Hossain, H B; Hossain, H N; Mughi, C R

    2015-10-01

    This study explores to find out the qualitative and quantitative psychosocial consequences of infertility in women coming for infertility treatment in tertiary infertility center. A total of 400 infertile couples who agreed to participate in the study were asked to fill up the questionnaires and later interviewed to access the psychosocial consequences of infertility on their personal life in a tertiary infertility clinic in Dhaka at Center for Assisted Reproduction (CARe Hospital), Dhaka from June 2011 to December 2011 and agreed to participate in the study were included in the study. The data was analyzed and the quantitative and qualitative psychosocial factors were evaluated. Four hundred infertile couple who filled the questionnaires was included in the study. Sixty three percent of the women belonged to age group >20 30 years at the time of interview. Regarding age at marriage 43.8% of the women were married by 20 years, 51.3% were married between 20 30 years. Mean±SD duration of present married life was 7.20±4.45 (range 1 to 28) years and 74.4% of the women were living with their husbands. Of them 75.5% women were housewife. When asked whether they knew what was the reason of infertility in the couple, 32.5% knew the cause was in the female partner, 14.5%, knew the cause was in the male partner, 10.3% knew the cause was in both partners, 21.5% knew cause of infertility was not in any of the partners, and 21.3% had no idea about the cause of infertility. The male partner's response about the issue of prognosis and outcome of couple's infertility revealed 37.3% believed their wives will conceive someday, 31.3% had no intention for a second marriage, 13% were indifferent, 11.3% blamed their wives for infertility and 4.8% threatened for a second marriage. Only 2.5% of the male partners were suggested on consulting and continuing treatment by specialist. The family pressure by in-laws and relatives towards their infertility was that 57.3% insisted on consulting a good gynaecologist, 29.8% had no family pressure, 11.3% insisted the male partners to remarry, and 1.8% insisted the husbands to divorce their wives. In evaluating the social response it showed that 55.8% was suggested to consult a good gynaecologist, 31% asks embarrassing questions, 13% taunted and 0.3% insisted the husband to divorce the wife. In developing countries, despite overpopulation, unwanted childlessness is also an important psychosocial burden that needs attention. The consequences of infertility have greater impact on woman's life and can be a life time crisis. There is no direct intervention regarding infertility from government or NGO's. National services is lacking because policy makers and donor NGOs are not interested to invest on it and also women want to hide their infertility as long as they can. PMID:26620007

  11. Emotional aspects of infertility.

    PubMed

    Seibel, M M; Taymor, M L

    1982-02-01

    The psychologic aspects of infertility in men and women are reviewed, neuroendocrinologic factors thought to affect reproduction physiologically are described, and awareness of the stresses that infertility places on a couple's relationship is encouraged. Studies have found infertile women to be more neurotic, dependent, and anxious than fertile women, experiencing conflict over their femininity and fear associated with reproduction. In contrast to these reports, a double blind study could not determine the difference in the psychologic makeup of women who were infertile because of demonstrated somatic causes and those women in whom no somatic cause could be found and who were considered infertile on an emotional etiologic basis. Other studies have similarly come to negative conclusions regarding the relationship between psychologic factors and infertility. The 1st set of studies failed to consider the stress that infertility itself places on the couple. Emotional factors may negatively affect fertility in the male. Up to 10% of infertile males have had improvement in their semen analysis after cessation of all treatment for a prolonged period of time. The concept that emotional stress might lead to oligospermia was further supported in a report describing testicular biopsies obtained from men awaiting sentencing after raping and impregnating women. A more obvious effect of the emotional stress infertility places on the male is the occurrence of impotence. It has been estimated that up to 10% of infertilty may be partially or completely explained on the basis of male sexual dysfunction. The gradual unraveling of the complexities of neuroendocrinology have permitted increased understanding of the role that stress might play in infertility. Catecholamines, prolactin, adrenal steroids, endorphins, and serotonin all affect ovulation and in turn are all affected by stress. Such stress might result from infertility or habitual abortion. Infertility is frequently perceived by the couple as an enormous emotional strain, and counseling may prove helpful as a part of the initial infertility evaluation, an adjunctive measure during treatment, or a final measure to help patients cope with acceptance of their infertility problem. Although statistical evidence is overwhelmingly against the relationship of adoption and subsequent conception, it does appear that a small percentage of patients do achieve pregnancy following adoption. Possibly this can be explained by a reduction in stress, and subsequently, alterations in the neuroendocrinologic characteristics of the infertile couple. PMID:7037462

  12. Infertility with Testicular Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Kevin A; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer is one of the most curable cancers. Most patients are treated during their reproductive years, making infertility a significant quality of life issue after successful treatment. This focused review evaluates the factors that contribute to infertility and specific fertility risks with the various testicular cancer treatments. Timing of patient discussions and current fertility treatments are reviewed. PMID:26216827

  13. Infertility and Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Fertility Overview Condition Information How common is infertility for men and women? What are the causes in women? What are the causes in men? ... Staff Directory Overview Condition Information How common is infertility for men and women? What are the causes in women? What are the causes in men? ...

  14. Drug Treatment of Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Corenblum, Bernard

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of infertility, once a purely empirical process, can now be based on rational exclusion of alternatives. The author reviews the drug treatment of infertility, emphasizing ovulation induction. He also discusses the endocrine treatment of men, drug treatment of endometriosis, and antibiotic treatment of infections. The author recommends referral to a specialist when more invasive drugs, such as gonadotrophins or gonadotrophin-releasing hormone or analogue, are indicated, if the couple continues to be infertile, or when the physician suspects endometriosis. PMID:21249096

  15. Age-related infertility.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Natalie M; Steiner, Anne Z

    2015-03-01

    Oocyte number and quality decrease with advancing age. Thus, fecundity decreases as age increases, with a more rapid decline after the mid-30s. Patients more than 35 years old should receive prompt evaluation for causes of infertility after no more than 6 months of attempted conception. Patients with abnormal tests of ovarian reserve have a poorer prognosis and may need more expedited and aggressive treatment. Although oocyte donation is the best method to overcome age-related infertility, other treatment options may help women proceed quicker toward pregnancy. Patients at an advanced age should be counseled and evaluated before undergoing infertility treatments. PMID:25681837

  16. Female obesity and infertility.

    PubMed

    Talmor, Alon; Dunphy, Bruce

    2015-05-01

    Infertility affects one in seven couples, and its rate is on the increase. Ovulatory defects and unexplained causes account for >50% of infertile aetiologies. It is postulated that a significant proportion of these cases are either directly or indirectly related to obesity. The prevalence of overweight and obese men and women has topped 50% in some developed countries. Obesity is on the increase worldwide; in turn, the consequences in terms of the associated morbidity and mortality have also been increasing. Obesity is associated with various reproductive sequelae including anovulation, subfertility and infertility, increased risk of miscarriage and poor neonatal and maternal pregnancy outcomes. Thus, the combination of infertility and obesity poses some very real challenges in terms of both the short- and long-term management of these patients. The mechanism with which obesity impacts female reproductive function is summarised in this review. PMID:25619586

  17. Parenthood after Primary Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances-Fischer, Jana E.; Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the experience of parenting after primary infertility and describes construction and initial testing of an instrument for assessing characteristics of this understudied population. (Contains 52 references and 4 tables.) (GCP)

  18. Causes of Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... elements can lead to infertility. Frequent use of laptops near the testicles 4 as well as saunas ... D, Komaroff E. Increase in scrotal temperature in laptop computer users. Human Reproduction 2004. Available at http:// ...

  19. Stress and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... them feel more responsible for “causing” their own infertility and feel blamed. Telling someone to relax can cause greater stress. However, asking how couples/friends are doing and suggesting concrete and pragmatic ...

  20. Smoking and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Reproductive Medicine Smoking and infertility Can smoking affect my ability to have a child? Most people understand that smoking increases the risk for heart, vascular, and lung disease. Many do not realize that smoking can ...

  1. Diagnostic imaging of infertility

    SciTech Connect

    Winfield, A.C.; Wentz, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    This text presents a review of all the imaging modalities available in the diagnosis of infertility. This book integrates the perspectives of experts in ob/gyn, radiology, reproductive endocrinology, and urology. It's a one-of-a-kind ''how to'' guide to hysterosalpinography and infertility evaluation, providing complete clinical information on the techniques, pitfalls, problems encountered and differential diagnosis. Detailed descriptions accompany numerous high-quality illustrations to help correlate findings and give meaning to the radiographic and ultrasound images.

  2. Endocrine disorders & female infertility.

    PubMed

    Unuane, David; Tournaye, Herman; Velkeniers, Brigitte; Poppe, Kris

    2011-12-01

    Female infertility occurs in about 37% of all infertile couples and ovulatory disorders account for more than half of these. The ovaries are in continuous interaction with the other endocrine organs. The interplay may account for infertility occurring at different levels and may render the diagnosis of infertility a difficult exercise for the involved physician. A hypothalamic cause of female infertility should be considered in an appropriate clinical context, with tests pointing to a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. It can be functional, physiological or related to organic causes. Hyperprolactinemia has well characterized effects on the normal gonadal function and treatment is well established. Acromegaly and Cushing's disease may impair fertility at different levels, mechanisms involved however remain ill defined. Thyroid disorders, both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, can interact with the ovaries, through a direct effect on ovarian function, but autoimmunity may be involved, as well as alterations of the sex hormone binding protein levels. Primary ovarian disorders, such as the polycystic ovary syndrome and primary ovarian insufficiency are frequent diseases, for which novel treatments are currently being developed and discussed. We will propose an algorithm for the diagnosis and approach of the female patient presenting with infertility on the basis of the available evidence in literature. PMID:22115162

  3. [Endometriosis related infertility].

    PubMed

    Pouly, J-L; Canis, M; Velemir, L; Brugnon, F; Rabischong, B; Botchorichvili, R; Jardon, K; Peikrishvili, R; Mage, G; Janny, L

    2007-04-01

    From the literature, the crucial knowledge were drawn among endometriosis related infertility. Endometriosis is an important factor of infertility in minimal or light stages and a major one in mild or moderate stages. Thus, a laparoscopy must be performed to confirm endometriosis when suggestive clinical or biological signs exist. In absence of them, laparoscopy can be delayed after intra-uterine inseminations (IUI). The first line treatment is laparoscopic surgery. Its efficacy is proven. It is useless to prescribe a post-operative medical treatment (GnRH analogues). Surgery leads to 25 to 40% of deliveries. It is dependant on age, infertility duration, tubo-ovarian adhesion and tubes involvement. But, surgery can be avoided and the patient is directly referred to In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) when the lesions extension is so important that surgery exposes to complications or when there is a permanent other indication for IVF (severe male infertility). When infertility persists 6 to 12 months after surgery and without patent recurrence, ovulation stimulations and IUI are performed as the second line treatment. After IUI failure, or in case of recurrence, IVF must be applied. A second surgery is not recommended. The IVF results are not impaired by the presence of endometriosis and even of endometriomas. Thus, it is useless to operate again endometriosis before IVF. In opposition, in severe stages or in cases of recurrence, a pre-IVF medical treatment (GnRH analogues) improves the results. IVF do not increased the risk of endometriosis acute growth. In case of infertility and pain, infertility is considered as the first target. But medical treatment can be prescribed between the IVF attempts. PMID:17267133

  4. Antiphospholipid antibodies and infertility.

    PubMed

    Chighizola, C B; de Jesus, G R

    2014-10-01

    Since the late 1980s some publications have proposed that antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) may have some relationship with infertility, considering reported deleterious effects that aPL exert on trophoblast proliferation and growth. Although not included in current classification criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome, many physicians investigate for aPL in patients with a history of infertility, including antibodies not listed in classification criteria, and most of those patients will receive anticoagulant therapy if any of those antibodies have a result considered positive. A review of literature was conducted searching for studies that investigated the association of aPL and infertility and if aPL positivity alters in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome. The definition of infertility, routine work-up to exclude other causes of infertility, definition of IVF failure as inclusion criteria and control populations were heterogeneous among studies. Most of them enrolled women over 40 years of age, and exclusion of other confounding factors was also inconsistent. Of 29 studies that assessed aPL positivity rates in infertile women, the majority had small sample sizes, implying a lack of power, and 13 (44.8%) reported higher frequency of aPL in infertile patients compared to controls, but most of them investigated a panel of non-criteria aPL tests, whose clinical significance is highly controversial. Only two studies investigated all three criteria tests, and medium-high titer of anticardiolipin cut-off conforming to international guidelines was used in one study. Considering IVF outcome, there was also disparity in this definition: few studies assessed the live birth rate, others the implantation rate. Of 14 publications that addressed the relationship between aPL and IVF outcome, only two described a detrimental effect of these autoantibodies. In conclusion, available data do not support an association between aPL and infertility, and aPL positivity does not seem to influence IVF outcome. Well-designed clinical studies recruiting women with a clear diagnosis of infertility and a high-risk aPL profile should be performed to test whether clinically relevant aPL do-or not-exert an effect on human fertility. PMID:25228713

  5. Psychological impact of infertility.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, Tara M; Domar, Alice D

    2007-04-01

    The inability to conceive children is experienced as a stressful situation by individuals and couples all around the world. The consequences of infertility are manifold and can include societal repercussions and personal suffering. Advances in assisted reproductive technologies, such as IVF, can offer hope to many couples where treatment is available, although barriers exist in terms of medical coverage and affordability. The medicalization of infertility has unwittingly led to a disregard for the emotional responses that couples experience, which include distress, loss of control, stigmatization, and a disruption in the developmental trajectory of adulthood. Evidence is emerging of an association between stress of fertility treatment and patient drop-out and pregnancy rates. Fortunately, psychological interventions, especially those emphasizing stress management and coping-skills training, have been shown to have beneficial effects for infertility patients. Further research is needed to understand the association between distress and fertility outcome, as well as effective psychosocial interventions. PMID:17241818

  6. Infertility: Medical and Social Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report illustrates a range of options for Congressional action in nine principal areas of public policy related to infertility: (1) collecting data on reproductive health; (2) preventing infertility; (3) information to inform and protect consumers; (4) providing access to infertility services; (5) reproductive health of veterans; (6) transfer…

  7. Parenting after Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  8. Lycopene and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Prashast, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inflicted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneficial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility-lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4-8 mg of lycopene daily for 3-12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility. PMID:24675655

  9. Fertility and Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; And Others

    In this report, emphasis is placed on major research developments in the reproductive sciences, their impact on the health of individuals as well as on that of society, and on current trends that may provide new opportunities for future research in fertility and infertility. In the first section, major developments in the reproductive sciences are…

  10. Fertility and Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; And Others

    In this report, emphasis is placed on major research developments in the reproductive sciences, their impact on the health of individuals as well as on that of society, and on current trends that may provide new opportunities for future research in fertility and infertility. In the first section, major developments in the reproductive sciences are

  11. Preconception interventions in infertile couples

    PubMed Central

    Nekuei, Nafisehsadat; Kazemi, Ashraf; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preconception interventions in infertile couples can increase the chance of pregnancy and lower its complications. The success in infertility treatment and achieving a successful pregnancy is of great importance among infertile couples compared to others. This study has tried to investigate necessary preconception interventions before beginning of infertility treatment cycle among infertile couples. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 268 individuals presenting to fertility clinics (Moshtagh and Shahid beheshty) across the city of Isfahan, Iran. Simple sampling method was used. Questionnaire and patients’ medical records were used to collect data. Descriptive and analytic statistical methods and SPSS software were used for analysis. Results: The results showed that the interventions related to diseases treatment and prescription of folic acid before the beginning of infertility treatment were complete for most of the subject (47.06% and 79.9% respectively), but referral for genetics counseling had not been conducted in most of the cases (98.9%). Specific interventions in relation with the infertility treatment before beginning the treatment cycle had been conducted in 50% of the subjects. Conclusion: The results of this study showed a weakness concerning necessary preconception interventions before beginning of infertility treatment cycle in most of the studied subjects. With regard to the effect of preconception interventions on outcome of infertility treatment, and with consideration of high importance of pregnancy success in infertile couples, paying more attention to conduct this manner is necessary. PMID:25250367

  12. Treatment of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Gianpiero D; Kocent, Justin; Monahan, Devin; Neri, Queenie V; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2014-01-01

    Major difficulties exist in the accurate and meaningful diagnosis of male reproductive dysfunction, and our understanding of the epidemiology and etiology of male infertility has proven quite complex.The numerous spermatozoa produced in mammals and other species provides some degree of protection against adverse environmental conditions represented by physical and chemical factors that can reduce reproductive function and increase gonadal damage even resulting in testicular cancer or congenital malformations. The wide fluctuations of sperm production in men, both geographical and temporal, may reflect disparate environmental exposures, occurring on differing genetic backgrounds, in varying psychosocial conditions, and leading to the diversified observed outcomes.Sperm analysis is still the cornerstone in diagnosis of male factor infertility, indeed, individually compromised semen paramaters while adequately address therapeutic practices is progressively flanked by additional tests. Administration of drugs, IUI, correction of varicocele, and, to a certain extent, IVF although they may not be capable of restoring fertility itself often result in childbearing. PMID:24782020

  13. Endometriosis and infertility.

    PubMed

    Donnez, Jacques; Donnez, Olivier; Orellana, Renan; Binda, Maria M; Dolmans, Marie M

    2016-06-01

    Endometriosis remains a very enigmatic and perplexing disease. The exact mechanism by which endometriosis causes infertility is still unclear. In the present paper, we will review possible mechanisms leading to subfertility or infertility in women with endometriosis and examine them according to location. Endometriosis in the pelvic cavity is a pathology associated with a general inflammatory response and should therefore be considered an inflammatory disease. Inflammatory changes affect the peritoneal fluid and hence the intratubal milieu, since the ampulla (where fertilization takes place) is exposed to peritoneal fluid through the fimbria. Any inflammatory change at this level may therefore impact fertilization and natural conception. The relationship between ovarian endometriomas and infertility may, of course, be explained by the presence of periovarian endometriosis. In the ovary, fibrosis observed in some cortical areas is induced by the inflammatory reaction caused by the presence of endometriomas. The association between fibrosis and a reduced ovarian reserve was demonstrated. Upregulated recruitment and the subsequent demise of early follicles may result in focal exhaustion of primordial follicles. Burn-out of early follicles by a local pelvic inflammatory environment caused by endometriomas may therefore be suggested. However, intraovarian inflammation, subsequent fibrosis and depletion of the ovarian reserve constitute another reason that should also be given due consideration. In addition, surgery should not be ruled out as a possible cause of ovarian reserve depletion. In conclusion, potential mechanisms leading to infertility are numerous, and while some of them remain hypothetical for now, others are supported by clear evidence. These possible mechanisms were reviewed in the present paper. PMID:26837776

  14. Infertility, infertility treatment and behavioural problems in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Basso, Olga; Henriksen, Tine B; Bech, Bodil H; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Olsen, Jørn

    2011-09-01

    Behavioural patterns in children of infertile couples may be influenced by both the underlying causes of infertility and stress in the couples. Treatment procedures, such as culture media and manipulation of gametes and embryos, may also result in developmental problems. We examined behavioural problems in children as a function of infertility and infertility treatment, using data from three population-based birth cohorts in Denmark (Aalborg-Odense Birth Cohort, Aarhus Birth Cohort and Danish National Birth Cohort). Information on time to pregnancy and infertility treatment was collected during pregnancy. Children aged between 7 and 21 years were assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). The SDQ was completed by mothers in all cohorts and, in addition, by teachers in the Aarhus cohort and by children themselves in the Aalborg-Odense cohort. Children born after a time to pregnancy of >12 months and no infertility treatment had a behavioural pattern similar to children of fertile parents. Teachers reported a higher total difficulties score for children born after infertility treatment, but no significant differences were seen on any subscales of the teachers' report, and neither the mothers nor the children reported any differences on the total difficulties score and the prosocial behaviour score. Our results are thus overall reassuring regarding behavioural problems in children born to infertile couples, regardless of infertility treatment. PMID:21819428

  15. Tarlov Cyst and Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Azam, Amir; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objective: Tarlov cysts or spinal perineurial cysts are uncommon lesions. These are mostly incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging or myelograms. The objectives of this study were to describe Tarlov cysts of the sacral region as a potential cause for retrograde ejaculations and review available management options. Methods: Case report and literature review. Results: A 28-year-old man presented with back pain and retrograde ejaculations resulting in infertility. After microsurgical excision of large perineurial cysts, back pain resolved, but semen quality showed only marginal improvement. Later, the couple successfully conceived by intrauterine insemination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Tarlov cyst associated with retrograde ejaculation and infertility. Conclusions: Despite being mostly asymptomatic and an incidental finding, Tarlov cyst is an important clinical entity because of its tendency to increase in size with time. Tarlov cysts of the sacral and cauda equina region may be a rare underlying cause in otherwise unexplained retrograde ejaculations and infertility. Microsurgical excision may be a good option in a select group of patients. PMID:19569467

  16. Aetiology of infertility in Cameroun.

    PubMed

    Nasah, B T

    1979-01-01

    Efforts were made to identify factors responsible for the pattern of high infertility and high pregnancy wastage in Cameroon. High spontaneous abortion rates, the relative frequency of illegal abortion, and poor delivery practices were probably responsible for complications which lead to secondary infertility among a large number of Cameroon women. At the infertility Clinic of the University of Yaounde among the 388 patients seen over a 2 year period 40% had primary infertility and 60% had secondary infertility. 26.8% of the former and 32.8% of the latter had evidence of pelvic pathology. A clinical case control study of puerperal infection led to the conclusion that the prevalence of gonorrhoea in the general population was high and that further research was needed to determine the extent to which gonorrhoea contributed toward infertility in Cameroon. Pelvic tuberculosis may also be responsible for the high infertility rates in Cameroon. Some investigators have found pelvic tuberculosis in 5%-25% of their patients. An examination of tecticular biopsies from men with sperm counts of less than 20 million/ml lead to the suggestion that parasitic filarial infection may play a role in oligospermia. Considerable research is needed to identify and assess the role of these many factors contributing to both pregnancy wastage and to infertility. Until the problem of infertility in sub-Saharan countries is adequately dealt with, efforts to promote family planning will be viewed as irrelevant by many. PMID:525051

  17. Sexual dysfunction in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Zahra; Amirian, Malihe; Golmakani, Nahid; Mazlom, Reza; Laal Ahangar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual problems have different effects on the life of people by influencing their interpersonal and marital relationships and satisfaction. Relationship between sexual dysfunctions and infertility can be mutual. Sexual dysfunction may cause difficulty conceiving but also attempts to conceive, may cause sexual dysfunction. Objective: This paper compares sexual dysfunction in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 110 infertile couples referring to Montasarieh Infertility Clinic and 110 fertile couples referring to five healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected by class cluster sampling method. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Glombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction. Data were analyzed through descriptive and analytical statistical methods by SPSS. Results: There was no significant difference in total score of sexual problems and other dimensions of sexual problems (except infrequency) in fertile 28.9 (15.5) and infertile 29.0 (15.4) women. Fertile women had more infrequency than infertile women (p=0.002). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between fertile and infertile women in terms of sexual problems. Paying attention to sexual aspects of infertility and presence of programs for training of sexual skills seems necessary for couples. PMID:27200422

  18. Oral Drugs for Unexplained Infertility.

    PubMed

    Allahbadia, Gautam N

    2016-02-01

    Of the infertile couples unable to conceive without any identifiable cause, 30 % are defined as having unexplained infertility. Management depends on duration of infertility and age of female partner. The treatment of unexplained infertility is empirical, and many different regimens have been used. Among these are expectant management, ovarian stimulation with clomiphene citrate, gonadotropins and aromatase inhibitors, fallopian tube sperm perfusion, tubal flushing, intrauterine insemination, gamete intrafallopian transfer, and IVF. The first approach to treatment of unexplained infertility generally is the use of drugs that stimulate oocyte production. For over four decades, the first-line treatment for ovarian stimulation in unexplained infertility has been clomiphene citrate. Multiple reports suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be effective alternative agents for ovarian stimulation in couples with unexplained infertility. Their administration is reported to be associated with monofollicular development in most cases, which may result in enhanced fertility and a reduced risk of ovarian hyperstimulation and multiple births, as compared to current standard therapies such as gonadotropin and clomiphene. Despite world evidence to the contrary, letrozole has been banned for use for infertility management in India since 2011. PMID:26924899

  19. Strategies for Counseling Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniluk, Judith C.

    1991-01-01

    Presents specific intervention strategies that may serve to reinforce infertility experience as opportunity for personal and marital growth. Concludes through counseling clients may complete much of the emotional work required to reach a point of resolution and acceptance of their infertility. (Author/ABL)

  20. A Biopsychosocial Theory of Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrity, Deborah A.

    2001-01-01

    Briefly reviews the literature on infertility and its emotional, physical, existential, and relational effects on individuals, couples, and families. Life crisis and biopsychosocial theories are discussed as they apply to persons struggling with infertility issues. In addition, stage models derived from a biopsychosocial perspective are presented.…

  1. Leiomyomas and infertility.

    PubMed

    Siristatidis, Charalampos; Vaidakis, Dennis; Rigos, Ioannis; Chrelias, George; Papantoniou, Nikolaos

    2016-06-01

    Leiomyomas are the commonest benign tumor in the female reproductive tract. Even though their role on infertility is still questionable, evidence to date suggest that the anatomic location may be related to reproductive outcomes. Several possible mechanisms suggest that leiomyomas may affect fertility, especially in terms of the anatomical distortion of endometrial cavity, the abnormal uterine contractility, reduced blood supply to the endometrium and altered endometrial receptivity. The effect of leiomyomas on IVF outcomes has been the subject of many studies; however, a definitive direction is yet required to adjust clinical management accordingly. Management of leiomyomas is challenging in terms of clinical decision, especially among subfertile patients, since potential treatment complications and their consequences in endometrial dynamics should be also accounted. Expectant management is recommended for asymptomatic patients, whereas in symptomatic subfertile patients, medical and/ or surgical management is usually recommended. PMID:26824506

  2. The male infertility office visit.

    PubMed

    Dadhich, P; Ramasamy, R; Lipshultz, L I

    2015-06-01

    One in six couples are infertile, and in 50% of these couples, a male factor plays a role. Therefore, it is imperative that physicians become comfortable in the basic evaluation of the infertile male. By performing a thorough history and physical examination, physicians can usually establish a differential diagnosis and proceed to laboratory testing that will help to establish an etiology for infertility. The purpose of this review is to provide general guidelines for a physician seeking to evaluate a man's fertility status and to suggest the most common pathologies that might be found through a directed work-up. PMID:25604696

  3. Medical treatment of male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Dabaja, Ali A.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of male infertility is idiopathic. However, there are multiple known causes of male infertility, and some of these causes can be treated medically with high success rates. In cases of idiopathic or genetic causes of male infertility, medical management is typically empirical; in most instances medical therapy represents off-label use that is not specifically approved by the FDA. Understanding the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and the effect of estrogen excess is critical for the assessment and treatment of male infertility. The use of certain medical treatment has been associated with an increase in sperm production or motility, and primarily focuses on optimizing testosterone (T) production from the Leydig cells, increasing follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels to stimulate Sertoli cells and spermatogenesis, and normalizing the T to estrogen ratio. PMID:26816749

  4. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Harton, Gary L; Tempest, Helen G

    2012-01-01

    Infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family. Despite this, the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered. Nevertheless, more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified. This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically: chromosomal aneuploidy, structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions. Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans. Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin, but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts. Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm. Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed, as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases. Clinical recommendations where possible will be made, as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility. PMID:22120929

  5. [Treatment of male infertility].

    PubMed

    Jardin, A

    1995-10-28

    Progress in medically assisted procreation has made it possible to obtain an embryon with a single spermatozoid or even a single spermatid. But such advanced technology must not overshadow the basic principles of patient management since there are many other medical or surgical possibilities for improving male fertility. Although the physiological mechanisms leading to azoospermia are relatively well understood, many questions remain as to the origin of oligo-asthenoteratospermia. Varicocela had been incriminated by many authors: in 25% of the cases, surgical care is followed by pregnancy. Other factors including autoimmunity, infection, environment and drugs also have an effect. Careful history taking can identify the main causes of male infertility before the problem of procreation occurs and in cases of definitive azoospermia the principles of management are relatively simple. The true problem is the fact that new techniques such as in vitro fertilization have acquired popularity in the general population but cannot be accepted as the gold standard by the medical community. It must not be forgotten that these artificial techniques cause a major psychological trauma to the couple and can lead to difficult situations (multiple pregnancies, extra embryos) with no totally satisfactory solution. PMID:8545356

  6. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Brazdova, Andrea; Senechal, Helene; Peltre, Gabriel; Poncet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility. PMID:27123194

  7. Infertility as a psychological problem.

    PubMed

    Podolska, Magdalena Z; Bidzan, Mariola

    2011-01-01

    Recently there has been enormous progress in couple infertility treatment and diagnostics. Some couples cannot conceive despite the fact that there seems to be no objective somatic or immunologic reasons. In such situations gynaecologists are helpless and couples may be overwhelmed by a sense of defeat and hopelessness. Thus, consulting a psychologist or therapist on how to cope better with the problem may be a good solution. The objective of the following paper is to discuss the dilemmas of couples undergoing infertility treatment, related psychological problems, and to determine the need for psychological and therapeutic support. The study demonstrates numerous infertility causes and concludes that there is no universal method of dealing with them. Very frequently psychological and somatic problems overlap. Psychological causes are often the primary factors, but sometimes they are secondary derivatives of the therapeutic process. A wide scope of factors must be considered to attempt psychological analysis of patients treated for infertility including the influence of the family and relations within, reaction to the diagnosis and suggested treatment, the influence of religion on the treatment, the evaluation of the relations in the family of procreation, sexual life assessment, the sense of a woman's self-esteem and self-acceptance. Basing on empirical analysis it was concluded that all women treated for infertility want to create a full family. They have problems in coping with emotional liability during treatment and a sense of fear and failure. Understanding the psychological mechanisms observed in patients treated for infertility might help to diagnose the causes of their problems with facing the new, extremely difficult situation. PMID:21469521

  8. Childlessness: Strategies for Coping with Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woollett, Anne

    1985-01-01

    Examines the coping strategies adopted by 50 infertile men and women. All interviewed had sought medical help, and many became knowledgeable about reproduction and infertility. Redefining the problem and managing negative concepts about infertility were other coping strategies. Seeking social support, positive identities, and other ways of meeting…

  9. Infertility: A Crisis with No Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Robert R.; Koraleski, Stephanie

    1990-01-01

    Discusses helpful ways for mental health counselors to work with infertile clients, explaining nature of infertility, psychological crisis it provokes, common reactions of infertile clients, and strategies to help clients cope. Discusses specific strategies for assessing clients' potential for suicide or self-destructive acts and improving their…

  10. Sex and Intimacy among Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greil, Arthur; And Others

    Infertility is a widespread health problem in the United States, affecting anywhere from 10 to 15 percent and perhaps even a greater percentage of U.S. couples. Infertility can have far-reaching effects on life satisfaction, well-being, and psychological adjustment. This paper presents an analysis of sex and intimacy among infertile couples based…

  11. Infertility and Life Satisfaction among Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillan, Julia; Stone, Rosalie A. Torres; Greil, Arthur L.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from a random sample of 580 midwestern women, the authors explore the association between lifetime infertility and life satisfaction. Past research shows lower life satisfaction among those seeking help for infertility. The authors find no direct effects of lifetime infertility, regardless of perception of a problem, on life…

  12. Infertility: An Unanticipated and Prolonged Life Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Linda; Gilbert, Mary S.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews literature on infertility with a focus on myths and misunderstandings about the causes of infertility; a description of the crisis of infertility including common psychological responses; the additional psychological complexity introduced by medical procedures and reproductive technology; and suggestions for mental health counselors.…

  13. Diagnostic Testing for Female Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... and ovaries for abnormalities such as fibroids and ovarian cysts. Ovarian Reserve Testing: When attempting to test for a ... single ovary; 4) have a history of previous ovarian surgery, chemotherapy, or pelvic radiation therapy; 5) have unexplained infertility; or 6) have shown ...

  14. Barriers to Infertility Treatment: An Integrated Study

    PubMed Central

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Parandavar, Nehle; Abdollahifard, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infertility is one of the most important events in life. Despite the negative impact of infertility, a significant number of women struggling to conceive do not consult a physician and do not fallow up infertility treatment. This integrated study aimed to investigate a large amount of factors which influenced discontinuation of infertility treatment. Methods: This integrated study (qualitative – quantitative study) was done on infertile women who had referred to infertility center in Jahrom University of medical sciences using purposive sampling. In the first study, data were collected from a valid questionnaire with 22 questions in a 5-point likert scale about barriers to infertility treatments and in the second study, as a phenomenology approach, data collection was done using deep unstructured interviews and focused groups were aimed to identify deep individual experiences about it. Results: major barriers to infertility treatments included the probability of treatment failure (52.5%), couple’s age and possibility of high risk pregnancy (51.5%), Painfulness of some treatment methods such as laparoscopy (50.5%). Qualitative results led to the identification of three main themes: Nature of treatment, negative thinking, social and cultural factors. Conclusion: As a result, we suggest family education and enrichment of cultural context in the field of infertility; infertile people would be willing to pursue infertility treatments. PMID:24373278

  15. [Circulating nucleic acids and infertility].

    PubMed

    Scalici, E; Mullet, T; Ferrières Hoa, A; Gala, A; Loup, V; Anahory, T; Belloc, S; Hamamah, S

    2015-09-01

    Circulating nucleic acids (cell-free DNA and microRNAs) have for particularity to be easily detectable in the biological fluids of the body. Therefore, they constitute biomarkers of interest in female and male infertility care. Indeed, in female, they can be used to detect ovarian reserve disorders (polycystic ovary syndrome and low functional ovarian reserve) as well as to assess follicular microenvironment quality. Moreover, in men, their expression levels can vary in case of spermatogenesis abnormalities. Finally, circulating nucleic acids have also the ability to predict successfully the quality of in vitro embryo development. Their multiple contributions during assisted reproductive technology (ART) make of them biomarkers of interest, for the development of new diagnostic and/or prognostic tests, applied to our specialty. Circulating nucleic acids would so offer the possibility of personalized medical care for infertile couples in ART. PMID:26298813

  16. Hysterectomy: treatment for secondary infertility.

    PubMed

    Wani, Reena; Patra, Chinmayee; Dusane, Veena

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a distressing condition but extenuating circumstances sometimes make the choice of treatment seem paradoxical. Here is discussed a challenging case of a 30-year-old woman with no living child and secondary infertility who presented with a large abdominal mass and severe abdominal pain, sequelae of previous obstructed labour. There was complex management dilemma. She was young, had no living child, had undergone vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) repair and vaginoplasty yet was wanting fertility; however she was distressed with the abdominal pain and desired a complete cure. Both she and her spouse were counselled about the high possibility of failure if repeat attempt at vaginoplasty was made, and possible damage to the VVF repair. Finally, decision of exploratory laparotomy with total abdominal hysterectomy was taken after counselling the couple about adoption as an option for childbearing. PMID:25935952

  17. Aromatase inhibitors for male infertility.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Peter N

    2012-12-01

    Some men with severely defective sperm production commonly have excess aromatase activity, reflected by low serum testosterone and relatively elevated estradiol levels. Aromatase inhibitors can increase endogenous testosterone production and serum testosterone levels. Treatment of infertile males with the aromatase inhibitors testolactone, anastrazole, and letrozole has been associated with increased sperm production and return of sperm to the ejaculate in men with non-obstructive azoospermia. Use of the aromatase inhibitors anastrazole (1 mg/day) and letrozole (2.5 mg/day) represent off-label use of these agents for impaired spermatogenesis in men with excess aromatase activity (abnormal testosterone/estradiol [T/E] ratios). Side effects have rarely been reported. Randomized controlled trials are needed to define the magnitude of benefit of aromatase inhibitor treatment for infertile men. PMID:23103016

  18. The Infertility Experience: Biopsychosocial Effects and Suggestions for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Kathryn J.; Baldo, Tracy D.

    2004-01-01

    Infertility affects many individuals and couples. This article begins with a case study of a couple who have experienced infertility yet do not identify infertility as their presenting problem. Clients and counselors alike often overlook infertility. This article offers an overview of the biology of infertility and its psychological and…

  19. Understanding and treating infertility: psychoanalytic considerations.

    PubMed

    Leon, Irving G

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how the intrapsychic, psychosocial, and social ramifications of infertility may be addressed when infertility patients present with distress at the psychotherapist's office. Self psychology provides a valuable framework for the therapist, given the profound and multiple narcissistic assaults on self-esteem, consolidation of identity, developmental aspirations, and other self attributes which infertility causes. The therapist's empathy becomes the primary tool of both understanding and alleviating suffering resulting from infertility. The current medical and interpersonal experiences of the infertile person must be part of the therapeutic process. A psychodynamic model of treatment is outlined which includes goals of reestablishing narcissistic equilibrium, diminishing internalized stigma, and ameliorating other adverse psychological consequences of infertility diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20297890

  20. Male Infertility and Its Causes in Human

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Tsujimura, Akira; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Namiki, Mikio; Sengoku, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent findings. PMID:22046184

  1. SOCIAL CORRELATES OF FEMALE INFERTILITY IN UZBEKISTAN

    PubMed Central

    JUMAYEV, IZATULLA; HARUN-OR-RASHID, MD.; RUSTAMOV, OYBEK; ZAKIROVA, NODIRA; KASUYA, HIDEKI; SAKAMOTO, JUNICHI

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this matched case-control study was to investigate the social correlates of primary infertility among females aged 35 years or less. The study was conducted in the Clinics of Samarkand Medical Institute, Uzbekistan, among 120 infertile and 120 healthy women matched by age, residential area, and occupation from January to June 2009. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire. Median duration of infertility was 10.0 months (interquartile range = 6.0–13.0). The rate of remarriage was 3.5 times higher among infertile women compared with healthy subjects. Insufficient family income, poor quality of life, life stress, and discontentment with daily routines as well as ‘bad’ relationships with family members (husband, mother- and father-in-law) were significant correlates of female infertility. Infertile women were more likely to underestimate the importance of sexual intimacy, and a negative attitude to sex. Female infertility is associated with various social correlates leading to higher remarriage rates and to further complicating the problem of infertility. Thus, a correction of women’s basic attitudes and their relationships to their surrounding social habitat should be an essential component of any program of infertility management. PMID:23092100

  2. Beyond the Mechanics of Infertility: Perspectives on the Social Psychology of Infertility and Involuntary Childlessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Anne Martin; Matthews, Ralph

    1986-01-01

    Examines the social and social psychological implications of infertility and involuntary childlessness. Examines the clinical and popular literature on the correlates and causes of infertility and the social psychological consequences of infertility. Suggests ways that family practitioners and researchers might overcome some of the limitations.…

  3. Genetics Home Reference: CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... related nonsyndromic male infertility CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description CATSPER1 -related nonsyndromic male infertility is a condition that affects the function of ...

  4. Domestic violence in Iranian infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhan, Zohre; Ozgoli, Giti; Azar, Mahyar; Alavimajd, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Millions of men and women suffer from infertility worldwide. In many cultures, infertile women are at risk of social and emotional problems. Infertility may affect the public health in many countries. Domestic violence is the intentional use of physical force, power or threat against oneself, another person or another group or community which leads to injury, death, mental harm, lack of development or deprivation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of domestic violence against infertile women who referred to the infertility centres of Tehran, Iran in 2011. Methods: This was cross- sectional descriptive study conducted on 400 infertile women who were selected through convenient sampling method. The questionnaire used in this study included two sections: a demographic section with questions about demographic characteristics of the infertile women and their husbands; and the domestic violence questionnaire with questions about physical, emotional and sexual violence. Data were analysed by SPSS16; descriptive statistics, Spearman’s test, t- test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression were used for data analysis. Results: Four hundred women with the average age of 30.50 ± 6.16 years participated in the study; of whom, 34.7% experienced domestic violence physical violence (5.3%), emotional violence (74.3%) and sexual violence (47.3%). Domestic violence was significantly associated with unwanted marriage, number of IVFs, drug abuse, emotional status of the women, smoking and addiction or drug abuse of the spouse, mental and physical diseases of the husband (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Many of the current problems in this society, particularly in families are due to the transition of the society from a traditional model to a modern one. The majority of the infertile women experience violence in Iran. Domestic violence against infertile women is a problem that should not be ignored. Clinicians should identify abused women. Providing counseling services to women in infertility treatment centers is suggested to prevent domestic violence against infertile women. PMID:25695010

  5. Epigenetics, spermatogenesis and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Rajender, Singh; Avery, Kelsey; Agarwal, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications characterized by DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling are important regulators in a number of biological processes, including spermatogenesis. Several genes in the testes are regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, indicating a direct influence of epigenetic mechanisms on the process of spermatogenesis. In the present article, we have provided a comprehensive review of the epigenetic processes in the testes, correlation of epigenetic aberrations with male infertility, impact of environmental factors on the epigenome and male fertility, and significance of epigenetic changes/aberrations in assisted reproduction. The literature review suggested a significant impact of epigenetic aberrations (epimutations) on spermatogenesis, and this could lead to male infertility. Epimutations (often hypermethylation) in several genes, namely MTHFR, PAX8, NTF3, SFN, HRAS, JHM2DA, IGF2, H19, RASGRF1, GTL2, PLAG1, D1RAS3, MEST, KCNQ1, LIT1, and SNRPN, have been reported in association with poor semen parameters or male infertility. Environmental toxins/drugs may affect fertility via epigenetic modifications. For example, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, an anticancer agent, causes a decrease in global DNA methylation that leads to altered sperm morphology, decreased sperm motility, decreased fertilization capacity, and decreased embryo survival. Similarly, Endocrine disruptors, such as methoxychlor (an estrogenic pesticide) and vinclozolin (an anti-androgenic fungicide) have been found by experiments on animals to affect epigenetic modifications that may cause spermatogenic defects in subsequent generations. Assisted reproduction procedures that have been considered rather safe, are now being implicated in inducing epigenetic changes that could affect fertility in subsequent generations. Techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and round spermatid injection (ROSI) may increase the incidence of imprinting disorders and adversely affect embryonic development by using immature spermatozoa that may not have established proper imprints or global methylation. Epigenetic changes, in contrast to genetic aberrations, may be less deleterious because they are potentially reversible. Further research could identify certain drugs capable of reversing epigenetic changes. PMID:21540125

  6. Male reproductive health and infertility.

    PubMed

    Frey, Keith A

    2010-09-01

    Primary care physicians have an essential role and opportunity in positively impacting the reproductive health of men. Although men are less likely than women to consistently seek preventive services, an office visit for any reason should be seen as an opportunity to introduce the idea of reproductive health. Additionally, primary care physicians can and should initiate the diagnostic workup for infertile couples in their practices. The initial assessment for the male partner consists of a thorough history and physical examination and appropriate laboratory tests, including a semen analysis. PMID:20705204

  7. Investigation of the Infertile Couple

    PubMed Central

    Daya, Salim

    1989-01-01

    Although the exact incidence of infertility in Canada is unknown, mathematical models predict that approximately 10% to 15% of couples will fail to achieve a pregnancy after one year of unprotected intercourse. The diagnosis requires assessment of both male and female partners. During the initial visit, a comprehensive history should be elicited and a thorough physical examination performed. The couple should receive complete information about the proposed diagnostic evaluation, and any misinformation that may have been gained from friends and the media should be corrected. When the primary evaluation and treatment has failed to result in a pregnancy, the couple should be referred to a specialist. PMID:21248976

  8. Trends of male factor infertility, an important cause of infertility: A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naina; Singh, Amit Kant

    2015-01-01

    Infertility and problems of impaired fecundity have been a concern through ages and is also a significant clinical problem today, which affects 8–12% of couples worldwide. Of all infertility cases, approximately 40–50% is due to “male factor” infertility and as many as 2% of all men will exhibit suboptimal sperm parameters. It may be one or a combination of low sperm concentration, poor sperm motility, or abnormal morphology. The rates of infertility in less industrialized nations are markedly higher and infectious diseases are responsible for a greater proportion of infertility. The present literature will help in knowing the trends of male factor infertility in developing nations like India and to find out in future, various factors that may be responsible for male infertility. PMID:26752853

  9. Choices and Motivations of Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Balen, Frank; Verdurmen, Jacqueline; Ketting, Evert

    1997-01-01

    Infertile couples' (N=131) consideration of options for dealing with infertility (medical help, adoption, fostering, alternative medicine, and focusing on other life goals) is studied. Options were related to specific motivations including altruistic motives for adoption or foster care. Results, timing of choices, and motivations are discussed.…

  10. Male factor infertility: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Cloonan, Yona K; Holt, Victoria L; Goldberg, Jack

    2007-05-01

    There is a considerable body of literature on the causes of female infertility, but far less is known about male factor infertility. We conducted a classical twin study to estimate the genetic influence on 12-month male factor infertility. The study used the Vietnam Era Twin (VET) Registry, which includes male twin pairs born between 1939 and 1957, and who served in the US military between 1965 and 1975. In 1987, a health survey was mailed to all twins and obtained a 74% response rate. The current analyses comprised 1795 complete pairs in which both twins were married only once. Proband-wise concordance rates, tetrachoric correlations, and a bivariate probit model were used to calculate estimates of familial clustering and heritability for male factor infertility. The proband concordance rate for male factor infertility was 38% [95% CI 32.8, 42.4] in monozygotic (MZ) pairs and 33% [95% CI 28.0, 38.6] in dizygotic (DZ) pairs. The tetrachoric correlations for male infertility were 0.15 in MZ and 0.04 in DZ pairs. This pattern provides evidence of familial clustering, although genetic influence was not evident (P = 0.21). The current study identified that 12-month male factor infertility clustered within families. However, results suggest that factors unique to individual twins may play a more prominent role in male infertility than additive genetic effects or the common environment. PMID:17439531

  11. Pastoral Care to the Infertile Couple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louw, D. J.

    This paper examines the crisis of infertility in the context of the biological or instinctual, cultural, and religious root of parenting. A therapeutic approach to the problem of infertility suggests that pastoral care should make a thorough diagnosis of the correlation between the motivation for parenting, role expectations in the social and…

  12. Is Infertility Associated with Childhood Autism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grether, Judith K.; Qian, Yinge; Croughan, Mary S.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Schembri, Michael; Camarano, Loretta; Croen, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns persist about a possible link between infertility and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Interpretation of existing studies is limited by racial/ethnic homogeneity of study populations and other factors. Using a case-control design, we evaluated infertility history and treatment documented in medical records of members of Kaiser…

  13. Infertility, cancer, and changing gender norms

    PubMed Central

    Gardino, Shauna; Rodriguez, Sarah; Campo-Engelstein, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Recent improvements in cancer detection, treatment, and technology have increased survivorship rates. These same life-saving treatments, however, can lead to infertility or sterility. Oncofertility, an emerging field at the intersection of cancer and oncology, centers on providing cancer patients with the potential to preserve their biological fertility. Methods We examine the history of how men and women have been treated for infertility and analyze contemporary studies of how women without cancer respond to infertility. Results Both female and male cancer patients and survivors value their fertility, although there is conflicting evidence on the degree to which women and men value fertility. Some studies have found that women and men value their fertility equally while others found that women value their fertility more than men. Gendered norms around fertility and parenthood seem to be changing, which may minimize these discrepancies. Discussions/conclusions Although oncofertility is a nascent field, infertility is a historically relevant medical condition that is characterized by gendered narratives and norms. An analysis of the historical evolution of the understanding and treatment of infertility leads insight into modern conceptualizations of infertility both generally and in the case of cancer. Understanding these historical and current gendered influences helps to define the current context in which cancer patients are confronting potential infertility. Implications for cancer survivors The insight gained from this analysis can be used to inform clinical practice, offering guidance to healthcare providers approaching cancer patients about potential infertility, regardless of gender. PMID:21193963

  14. Aetiology of infertility in the Came Roune.

    PubMed

    Nasah, B T

    1978-09-01

    Involuntary infertility is a public health problem for couples in Africa where a suspected belt of low infertility stretches across Gabon, Cameroon, Peoples Republic of Congo, Central African Empire, Zaire, Uganda and Southern Sudan. No single factor has been isolated as the cause, however, secondary infertility is highly correlated with induced or spontaneous abortion. 388 patients were seen over a 2 year period in Cameroon. 149 were primary and 238 were secondary cases of infertility. Ages of patients ranged from 16-40 years. The majority of secondary cases had delivered their babies in private or public health facilities. It was hypothesized that an infection was contracted in the hospital. Puerperal infection was studied at the Central Maternity in Younde. Neisseria gonorrhoea was found to be 25% incidence, high enough to be considered an epidemic. Improved facilities for diagnosis and neonatology, particularly the prevention of prematurity, are needed. Women in Cameroon are more afraid of infertility than of cancer. PMID:569948

  15. Psychoanalysis and infertility. Myths and realities.

    PubMed

    Apfel, Roberta J; Keylor, Rheta G

    2002-02-01

    Psychoanalysis, long interested in infertility, and a valuable treatment for men and women suffering with this affliction, has also helped to create and support a myth of psychogenic infertility. Multiple causes of infertility exist across the physiological-psychological spectrum. There is no simple psychodynamic causality. Advances in assisted reproductive technologies provide treatments that create emotional stress and outpace psychological preparedness of patients and analysts. This paper is based on the experience of a unique study group in Boston. An analytic case illustrates some of the ways analysis can be a treatment of choice for people using assisted reproduction. In fact, analysis offers a unique opportunity to elaborate fully the complex realities and dilemmas faced by people and their therapists throughout the infertility experience. More generally, this study of the concept of psychogenic infertility explores a valuable role for psychoanalysis in the treatment of medical conditions. PMID:11915150

  16. Genetic evaluation of male infertility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Men with severe oligospermia (<5 million sperm/mL ejaculate fluid) or azoospermia should receive genetic testing to clarify etiology of male infertility prior to treatment. Categorization by obstructive azoospermia (OA) or non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is critical since genetic testing differs for the former with normal testicular function, testicular volume (~20 mL), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (1-8 IU/mL) when compared to the latter with small, soft testes and increased FSH. History and physician examination along with laboratory testing (following appropriate genetic counseling) is critical to accurate selection of genetic testing appropriate for azoospermia due to primary testicular failure as compared with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). Genetic testing options include cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) testing for men with congenital absence of the vas, while karyotype, Y chromosome microdeletions (YCMD), and other specific genetic tests may be warranted depending on the clinical context of severe oligospermia or NOA. The results of genetic testing guide management options. The most recent techniques for genetic analysis, including sperm microRNA (miRNA) and epigenetics, are forming the foundation for future genetic diagnosis and therapeutic targets in male infertility. PMID:26813518

  17. Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... as intrauterine insemination (IUI) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) Medicines to treat infections and clotting disorders Medicines ... include advanced techniques such as in vitro fertilization (IVF).

  18. Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in Human Infertility.

    PubMed

    Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Liehr, Thomas; Tachdjian, Grard

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by banding cytogenetics. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of sSMC frequency and characterization in a context of infertility and to review the literature describing sSMC in relation with male and female infertility. Therefore, a systematic literature review on sSMC associated with infertility was conducted by means of a PubMed literature and a sSMC database (http://ssmc-tl.com/sSMC.html) search. A total of 234 patients with infertility were identified as carriers of sSMC. All chromosomes, except chromosomes 10, 19 and the X, were involved in sSMC, and in 72% the sSMC originated from acrocentric chromosomes. Euchromatic imbalances were caused by the presence of sSMC in 30% of the cases. Putative genes have been identified in only 1.2% of sSMC associated with infertility. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to a partial trisomy of some genes but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis. Further precise molecular and interphase-architecture studies on sSMC are needed in the future to characterize the relationship between this chromosomal anomaly and human infertility. PMID:26398339

  19. Infertility in women and moderate alcohol use.

    PubMed Central

    Grodstein, F; Goldman, M B; Cramer, D W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between moderate alcohol intake and fertility. METHODS. Interviews were conducted with 3833 women who recently gave birth and 1050 women from seven infertility clinics. The case subjects were categorized based on the infertility specialist's assignment of the most likely cause of infertility: ovulatory factor, tubal disease, cervical factor, endometriosis, or idiopathy. Separate logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship between alcohol use and each type of infertility, adjusted for age, infertility center, cigarette smoking, caffeine use, number of sexual partners, use of an intrauterine device (for tubal disease), and body mass index and exercise (for ovulatory factor). RESULTS. We found an increase in infertility, due to ovulatory factor or endometriosis, with alcohol use. The odds ratio for ovulatory factor was 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0, 1.7) for moderate drinkers and 1.6 (95% CI = 1.1, 2.3) for heavier drinkers, compared with nondrinkers. The risk of endometriosis was roughly 50% higher in case subjects with any alcohol intake than in control subjects (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1, 2.3, at moderate levels; OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 0.8, 2.7, at heavier levels). CONCLUSIONS. Moderate alcohol use may contribute to the risk of specific types of infertility. PMID:8092366

  20. Variations in Antioxidant Genes and Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bolan; Huang, Zhaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from both endogenous and environmental resources, which in turn may cause defective spermatogenesis and male infertility. Antioxidant genes, which include catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione S-transferase (GST), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), play important roles in spermatogenesis and normal sperm function. In this review, we discuss the association between variations in major antioxidant genes and male infertility. Numerous studies have suggested that genetic disruption or functional polymorphisms in these antioxidant genes are associated with a higher risk for male infertility, which include low sperm quality, oligoasthenoteratozoospermia, oligozoospermia, and subfertility. The synergistic effects of environmental ROS and functional polymorphisms on antioxidant genes that result in male infertility have also been reported. Therefore, variants in antioxidant genes, which independently or synergistically occur with environmental ROS, affect spermatogenesis and contribute to the occurrence of male infertility. Large cohort and multiple center-based population studies to identify new antioxidant genetic variants that increase susceptibility to male infertility as well as validate its potential as genetic markers for diagnosis and risk assessment for male infertility for precise clinical approaches are warranted. PMID:26618172

  1. Male infertility: an obstacle to sexuality?

    PubMed

    Bechoua, S; Hamamah, S; Scalici, E

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between infertility and sexuality are numerous and complex. Infertile men may suffer from sexual dysfunction (SD) when undergoing an assisted reproductive technology programme. We undertook a review both in French and English of the available data on male SD when being diagnosed with a fertility problem with a specific focus on azoospermic men. The review was performed over a 30-year time period using PubMed/Medline. The sexual concerns and needs of infertile/sterile men for whom potential parenting can be compromised were evaluated. When diagnosed with infertility, men usually go through a crisis that can have a deleterious effect on their sexuality with sometimes a feeling of sexual inadequacy. Infertile men will feel stigmatized because they are perceived as being deficient in a specific component of their masculinity. Hence, subsequent SD may occur that can impact the couple sexuality and the infertility management. However, little is known on how the announcement of azoospermia may affect male on a sexual and psychological point of view. The present review suggests that a global management through a healthcare network (biologist, andrologist, sexologist and psychologist) is required which will allow to consider infertility and its subsequent sexual disorders as a whole and not as dichotomized issues. PMID:27061770

  2. Social and Cultural Aspects of Infertility in Mozambique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrits, Trudie

    1997-01-01

    The sociocultural aspects of infertility among members of the matrilineal ethnic group Macua are studied. Strategies applied by infertile women, the use of traditional healers versus modern hospital, and explanations given for infertility are presented. Solutions attempted, social consequences of infertility, and recommendations for culturally…

  3. Selecting barrenness: the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis by congenitally infertile women to select for infertility.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kavita R

    2010-01-01

    Congenitally infertile women such as those with Turner syndrome or Mayer Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome have available the technologies of oocyte harvesting, cryropreservation, in-vitro fertilization, and gestational surrogacy in order to have genetically related offspring. Since congenital infertility results in a variety of experiences that impacts on nearly every aspect of a person's life, in the future it is possible that these women might desire a congenitally infertile child through the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis so as to share this common bond. While infertility results in a relatively normal quality of life, it is morally wrong to necessitate the future use of infertility services with its variable success rate on a child. Also, whereas the woman has fundamental reproductive autonomy, she lacks the substantive autonomy regarding the specific characteristics of her child. Finally, the infertile community does exhibit a strong presence, but it lacks characteristics that define it as a culture. PMID:21644427

  4. [The multiple interactions between infertility and sexuality].

    PubMed

    Mimoun, S

    1993-03-01

    After investigating into literature and clinical experience, we shall line out in this study 4 types of interactions between sexuality and infertility: sexual causes to feminine (vaginism, with and without heavy dyspareunia) or masculine (impotency, ante-portas ejaculation, anejaculation, dysejaculation), infertility; influence of tests and of treatments for infertility on sexual life; influence of infertility on sexuality focusing on the various ambiguous feelings (of culpability, inferiority, aggressivity, passivity); and last, the psychological and sexual interactions with medical assisted procreation, reinforcing the sexual separation of man and woman if the body is considered a machine. Psychosomatic guidance of the couple during these steps (with reassurance as the being helped conception) will allow maintaining on removing sexual attraction. PMID:7951622

  5. Perspective in infertility: the ovarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Silvestris, Erica; D'Oronzo, Stella; Cafforio, Paola; D'Amato, Giuseppe; Loverro, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is a medical and social condition that affects millions of women worldwide and is today considered so far as a new disease. A considerable progress has been recently pursued in the field of the reproductive medicine and the infertility treatment may account for novel and modern procedures such as in vitro oocyte fertilization, egg donation, pregnancy surrogacy and preimplantation diagnosis. However, great interest has lately been reserved to the ovarian stem cells (OSCs) whose existence in woman ovaries has been proven. OSCs are thus suitable for developmental studies in infertility and in other clinical applications as endocrine derangements due to premature ovarian failure, or for infertility treatment after cancer chemotherapies, as well as in restoring the hormonal balance in postmenopausal age. PMID:26250560

  6. Psychological and ethical implications related to infertility.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Daria

    2013-12-01

    Being a parent is deeply demanding and one of the most important events in life; parents experience the deepening of human relationships with their partner, within their families, and in society, and moreover the fundamental relationship between parent and child. Every medical, social, and political effort must be made to prevent infertility but also to offer infertile couples the best diagnostic and therapeutic paths. Understanding the suffering of the couple and their families prevents and helps ease the possible psychological and social complications of infertility. Therefore, infertility concerns not only biomedical sciences but also psychological and social ones-ethics and law-in their combined efforts to identify areas of understanding and of research for solutions while respecting the dignity of the couple and unborn child. The Catholic Church offers an ongoing contribution through dialogue in looking for ethical principles guiding scientific and medical research respectful of the true life of human beings. PMID:24156989

  7. Surgical management of male infertility: an update

    PubMed Central

    Velasquez, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Male factor infertility is common, affecting 7% of the total population and up to half of couples who are trying to conceive. Various surgical and reconstructive options allow biological paternity depending on the etiology of the male factor issues. This article describes historical treatments and newer approaches, discussing the role for traditional open surgery, microsurgery and robotic surgery, as well as interventional radiologic procedures in the management of male infertility. PMID:26816754

  8. Stock breeding technique applied to human infertility.

    PubMed

    Merz, B

    1983-09-01

    The Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, California, has reported the achievement of pregnancy in two infertile women by means of embryo transfer from ovum donors artificially inseminated with sperm from the infertile women's husbands. The procedure is seen as a nonsurgical alternative to in vitro fertilization. Fertility and Genetics Research, Inc. of Chicago, funding organization for the development of the technique, has applied for a patent on the procedure. PMID:6876306

  9. Helping patients through the pain of infertility.

    PubMed

    Kelly-Weeder, Susan

    2012-02-12

    While males and combined couple factors play a large part in infertility cases, women often carry the physical, social, and emotional burden of these diagnoses. Nurse practitioners are in a prime position to assess women at risk for infertility, initiate an investigation to identify potential etiologies, refer women to specialized centers, and provide them with ongoing care and support through this difficult period in their lives. PMID:22252029

  10. Hysteroscopy for infertile women: a review.

    PubMed

    Cholkeri-Singh, Aarathi; Sasaki, Kirsten J

    2015-01-01

    Hysteroscopy is widely performed in infertile women. A review of peer-reviewed, published literature from the PubMed database on uterine intracavitary pathology, proximal tubal occlusion, failed in vitro fertilization procedures, and first trimester miscarriages of infertile women was performed to examine the importance, feasibility, and success rates of diagnostic and operative hysteroscopy when evaluating and treating these conditions. PMID:25553895

  11. The impact of infertility on infertile men and women in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Sonja L; Odukogbe, Akin-Tunde A; Theobald, Sally; Liu, Xiaoyun

    2009-09-01

    This study explored the impact of infertility on infertile men and women in Ibadan, Nigeria. The qualitative study design included the application of focus group discussions with community members (7 FGDs, n=42), in-depth interviews with infertile men (n=7), infertile women (n=8) and professionals (n=13). The findings revealed that infertile men and women and community members commonly perceived that contraceptives and abortion cause infertility, as well as supernatural and behavioural factors. Measures to prevent infertility were not well known by the participants. Infertility treatment is sought from a mixture of biomedical, faith-based and traditional service providers. Infertile women prioritize the psychological impact of infertility while infertile men prioritize the economic impact, and reported spending between 55-100% of their income to address infertility. Infertility has a serious social, psychological and economic impact on women and men's lives. Efforts to reduce the impact should prioritize education on the causes, prevention and treatment of infertility, offer psychological support and ensure an efficient referral system for managing infertility. PMID:20690264

  12. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws. PMID:27030084

  13. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws. PMID:27030084

  14. [Causes and Factors of Male Infertility].

    PubMed

    Kolesnikova, L I; Kolesnikov, S I; Kurashova, N A; Bairova, T A

    2015-01-01

    The preservation of reproductive health of the population is an important factor of demographic policy of the state. According to some authors from 14 to 30% of couples of reproductive age suffer from infertility, malefactor in such marriages is detected in more than half of the cases. As you know, in recent years there has been a significant deterioration in the main indicators of reproductive function of men. Increased the number of andrological diseases, morphological disorders of the male reproductive system, almost halved the production of sperm in men of reproductive age. The reason probably lies behind a whole range ofstressfactors, such as medical ignorance, uncontrolled and inappropriate use of medication, metabolic disturbances, lack of vitamins and minerals, the impact of industrial pollutants, as well as the growth of addictive disorders (alcoholism, smoking and drug addiction). The forms of infertility differ according to its etiology and severity from minor changes to complete spermatogenesis dysfunction of the gonads, and can also occur due to genetic disorders. The lack of analysis of the relationship between clinical and genetic-biochemical components in men with infertility makes it impossible to understand the pathogenesis of infertility and to assess the risks of male infertility. High level of current medicine does not always guarantee an identification of the cause of male infertility. The article analyzes data from the review of specialized literature on the diagnosis and etiopathogenesis of male infertility. Frequency and clinical signs of pathology of the male reproductive system depend on the combinatorial effects of environmental influences, manifested most often in mutually reinforcing effect. A combination of several, seemed to be imperceptible factors makes the risk of development of male reproductive pathology very high. This situation compels specialists to conduct comprehensive studies on the men reproductive potential. PMID:26846084

  15. Association between neuropeptide oxytocin and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Chao; Cui, Xin-gang; Wang, Yi-xin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between oxytocin (OT) and male infertility, serum OT baseline concentration and oxytocin receptor (OTR) gene expression in fertile and infertile men were investigated. Methods and patients Twenty obstructive azoospermia patients, twenty five idiopathic asthenozoospermia patients, twenty idiopathic oligozoospermia patients and twenty healthy subjects were taken into consideration. Serum OT baseline concentration was determined by radioimmunoassay. Moreover, serum concentration of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T) were determined by chemoluminescence to evaluate the correlation with OT. OTR gene promotor and OTR mRNA expressions were determined by polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. OTR protein expression was also performed by Western Blot. Results Serum OT baseline concentrations in infertile groups were significantly higher than in fertile group (F0.05/2(2,82) = 8.29, p < 0.001). Serum baseline concentration of OT was not correlated with that of LH, FSH and T. There was no significant difference in gene sequences of OTR gene promotor and OTR mRNA when comparing infertile patients with fertile. Human OTR was in the form of oligomers and monomers, and the oligomers were in the majority containing tetramers and hexamers. Monomer expression was significantly higher in idiopathic asthenozoospermia and idiopathic oligozoospermia than that in obstructive azoospermia and control group (F0.05/2(2,82) = 115.50, p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in oligomer expression between different groups, but 20% of idiopathic asthenozoospermia cases showed a decrease. Conclusions Significantly different OT baseline concentrations and OTR expressions between fertile and infertile men strongly suggest that OT/OTR system is likely to be linked with male infertility, providing new insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of male infertility. PMID:20711752

  16. Cytokine profile in Nigerians with tubal infertility

    PubMed Central

    Charles-Davies, Mabel A.; Bello, Folashade A.; Taiwo, Victor O.; Bin, Li; Oni, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Immune response to genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection is involved in both immunity and pathology. The cytokine profile during infection has been implicated in the disease outcome, either resolution or severe sequelae. Serum cytokines of Chlamydia positive Nigerian women with tubal infertility were assessed to determine their possible relationship with tubal occlusion. Material and methods One hundred and fifty age-matched consenting women (100 fertile and 50 with tubal infertility) were recruited based on C. trachomatis antibody positivity and grouped into infertile Chlamydia positive (CTpos) women (n = 50), fertile Chlamydia positive women (n = 50) and fertile Chlamydia negative (CTneg) women as controls (n = 50). High vaginal swabs and endo-cervical swabs were collected for microscopy, culture and gram staining. Cytokines [transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), interferon γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17A] were estimated by ELISA in sera. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, χ 2 and Spearman's correlation at p = 0.05. Results Lower IFN-γ levels were observed in infertile women compared to fertile women. Fertile CTneg women had significantly higher TNF-α, and TGF-β1 compared to fertile and infertile CTpos women, respectively. Lower IL-10 levels were seen in fertile CTpos women compared to the infertile CTpos group. Vaginal discharge was negatively correlated with TNF-α and IFN-γ and positively with IL-4 in Chlamydia positive women. Conclusions Chlamydia positive women with tubal infertility have higher IL-10 and lower IFN-γ levels than controls, which may contribute to their development of tubal pathology. PMID:27095929

  17. [Cyclic impotence in male infertility].

    PubMed

    Lew-Starowicz, Z

    1988-11-01

    23 men were treated during 1977-87 in a special hospital in Warsaw for infertility by administering the Mell-Krat scale, the Rorschach test, and a test consisting of drawing figures. Most of them were in the 26-35 age group and had secondary and higher level education. 15 of them had a domineering mother, and 13 were only children. 14 had been married for 5 years and had used a biological method of contraception for 5-8 years. The personality tests indicated that 16 were immature and 5 were neurotic; in 13, the marital roles were reversed; the need for fatherhood was lacking in 7, and it was deficient in 9; 17 had disorders of erection, 4 had premature ejaculation, and 2 half diminished libido; the partners of 9 were tolerant and passive concerning the sexual dysfunction, 7 were critical and castrating, and 4 were understanding and helpful. The causative factors and the effectiveness of treatment were: partner-related in 13 cases (9 treated), stereotypical transformation of cohabitation in 23 cases (14 treated), burdensome sexual activity in 3 cases (1 treated), and 4 unknown factors (1 treated). Various therapeutic methods were used: hypnosis, psychotherapy of married couple, and training. 14 patients were successfully treated and rehabilitated; however, 9 patients did not improve. Although the small number of this sample does not permit the drawing of sweeping conclusions, some inferences could be made on forms of impotence of psychogenic origin. Implicated factors were: having a domineering mother, being an only child, and immature personality. Other causes had to do with the partner, sexual duty, and stereotypical sexual cohabitation of many years' duration during a nonfertile period of the woman using a natural method of contraception. PMID:3253157

  18. Secondary infertility and the aging male, overview

    PubMed Central

    Al–Hawsawi, Khalid; Motair, Wael; Bawa, Abdallah Makhloof

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Old men preparing themselves for marriage late in their lives might face infertility. Infertility in this group of men should be considered from a wider perspective, as they face any age–related health troubles that include, but are not limited to, androgen deficiency and psychological disorders that impede early conception. This review aims to shed light on the proper approach to this minority of secondarily infertile men. Material and methods A comprehensive electronic English literature search was conducted, using various medical websites and books, for the factors that cause infertility in senior fathers. The physiology of geriatric males, together with their common comorbidities, were discussed. Results Old men presenting with secondary infertility should be approached differently. Aging, itself, has a significant impact on male sexual function, sperm parameters, and fertility; all of which contribute to poor fecundability, decreased fertilizing capacity, increased time to pregnancy, increased rate of DNA damage, high abortion rates and increased prevalence of fetal developmental failures. The complexity and the unknowns of the aging male physiology, together with the interaction of obstinate diseases the patient might have, make the issue very difficult to tackle. Conclusions Management should include the conventional way of treating young sufferers and further target the underlying causes, if known, along with the provision of geriatric, psychologic, and andrologic support. PMID:25140235

  19. Attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy

    PubMed Central

    Kian, Ensiyeh Mohebbi; Riazi, Hedieh; Bashirian, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surrogacy arrangements are multifaceted in nature, involving multiple controversial aspects and engaging ethical, moral, psychological and social issues. Successful treatment in reproductive medicine is strongly based on the mutual agreement of both partners, especially in Iran where men often make the final decision for health-related problems of this nature. AIM: The aim of the following study is to assess the attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy. SETTING AND DESIGN: This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Hamadan university of medical sciences, Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study sample consisted of 150 infertile couples selected using a systematic randomized method. Data collection was based on responses to a questionnaire consisting of 22 questions. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: P <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. RESULTS: While 33.3% of men and 43.3% of women surveyed insisted on not using surrogacy, the overall attitudes toward surrogacy were positive (53.3% of women and 54.6% of men surveyed). CONCLUSION: Although, there was not a significant difference between the overall positive attitudes of infertile women and men toward surrogacy, the general attitude toward using this method is not strongly positive. Therefore, further efforts are required to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile couples. PMID:24829531

  20. [Protamine gene polymorphisms and male infertility].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-jun; Zhang, Jing; Xia, Xin-yi; Xu, Hao-qin

    2015-12-01

    Protamine (PRM) is one of the most abundant arginine-rich nucleoproteins in sperm and plays an important role in spermatogenesis. In the late stage of spermatogenesis, the replacement of PRM by histone prompts the closer combination between the nuclear matrix of sperm and nucleoprotein in order for high enrichment and condensation of nuclear chromatin in addition to preventing the sperm genome from mutation induced by internal and external factors. With the development of DNA sequencing techniques, researches on the association between PRM polymorphisms and male fertility are surfacing as a hot field. Many studies show that rs2301365 polymorphism is a risk factor for male infertility and increases the risk of male infertility by 27 - 66%, that rs737008 polymorphism of PRM1 and rs1646022 polymorphism of PRM2 are protective factors against Asian infertility, and that the ratio of PRM1 to PRM2 is intensively associated with male infertility. This review presents an update on the association between PRM gene polymorphisms and male infertility. PMID:26817310

  1. Infertility Counseling and Support: When and Where to Find It

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infertility is a medical condition that touches all aspects of your life. It may affect your relationships ... can offer information and understanding about the emotional aspects of infertility. Support groups and informational meetings can ...

  2. Psychiatric morbidity in the infertile population: a reconceptualization.

    PubMed

    Berg, B J; Wilson, J F

    1990-04-01

    The understanding of psychiatric morbidity in the infertile population relies to a great extent upon the instruments used to measure psychopathology. The present study investigated the distinction between psychiatric morbidity and infertility strain reactions in a sample of 104 infertile couples using the SCL-90-R. Some symptoms ordinarily indicative of psychopathology can represent normal side effects or reactions to infertility treatment, thus causing spurious estimates of pathology. Alternately, item analyses revealed a profile of infertility strain reflecting tension, depressive symptoms, worry, and interpersonal alienation frequently occurring among both male and female infertility patients. The concept of infertility strain is suggested as a vehicle for understanding the functioning of infertile patients and to circumvent the stigmatizing effects of psychiatric labels while providing appropriate intervention. PMID:2318324

  3. Roles and Role Conflict of Women in Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Janet R.

    1979-01-01

    Explores the experience of role conflict for women in infertile couples. Findings lead to an understanding of infertility as part of an interactional system for dealing with potentially intolerable sources of role conflict. (Author)

  4. Impact of obesity on infertility in women

    PubMed Central

    Dağ, Zeynep Özcan; Dilbaz, Berna

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and overweight are increasing and have become an epidemic worldwide. Obesity has detrimental influences on all systems, including reproductive health. The prevalence of obesity in infertile women is high, and it is well known that there is an association between obesity and infertility. The relationship between obesity and reproductive functions is still being explored. Overweight women have a higher incidence of menstrual dysfunction and anovulation. Overweight and obese women are at a high risk for reproductive health. The risk of subfecundity and infertility, conception rates, miscarriage rates, and pregnancy complications are increased in these women. They have poor reproductive outcomes in natural as well as assisted conception. These poor reproductive outcomes include assisted reproduction such as ovulation induction, in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI), and ovum donation cycles. Weight loss has beneficial effects on the reproductive outcomes in these patients. PMID:26097395

  5. Predictive value of hormonal parameters for live birth in women with unexplained infertility and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infertile women might get pregnant sometime after fertility treatment, but today, there is no prediction model on who will eventually have children. The objective of the present study was to characterize hormone levels in an arbitrary menstrual cycle in women with unexplained infertility and male infertility, and to determine the predictive value for long-term possibility of live birth. Methods In this cross-sectional study, with 71 infertile women with diagnosis unexplained infertility and male infertility, blood samples were obtained during the proliferative and secretory phases of an arbitrary menstrual cycle. Serum concentrations of FSH, LH, AMH, inhibin B, estradiol, progesterone, PRL and TSH were determined. The predictive value of ovulation and hormonal analysis was determined by identifying the proportion of women with at least one live birth. Mann Whitney U test, chi2 test and Spearman’s correlation were used for statistical analysis. A value of p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results There were no differences in hormone values and live birth rates between women with unexplained infertility and male infertility. The best sole predictors of live birth were age of the women, followed by ovulatory cycle, defined as serum progesterone concentration of greater than or equal to 32 nmol/L, and a serum TSH concentration of less than or equal to 2.5 mIU/L. Combining the age with the ovulatory cycle and serum TSH less than or equal to 2.5 mIU/L or serum AMH greater than or equal to 10 pmol/L the predictive value was close to 90%. Conclusions Age in combination with the presence of an ovulatory cycle and serum TSH or serum AMH is predictive for long-term live birth. The advantage of serum AMH compared with serum TSH is the very little variation throughout the menstrual cycle, which makes it a useful tool in infertility diagnosis. PMID:23844631

  6. Infertility and the provision of infertility medical services in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, Willem; Cooke, Ian; Dyer, Silke; Serour, Gamal; Devroey, Paul

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Worldwide more than 70 million couples suffer from infertility, the majority being residents of developing countries. Negative consequences of childlessness are experienced to a greater degree in developing countries when compared with Western societies. Bilateral tubal occlusion due to sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy-related infections is the most common cause of infertility in developing countries, a condition that is potentially treatable with assisted reproductive technologies (ART). New reproductive technologies are either unavailable or very costly in developing countries. This review provides a comprehensive survey of all important papers on the issue of infertility in developing countries. METHODS Medline, PubMed, Excerpta Medica and EMBASE searches identified relevant papers published between 1978 and 2007 and the keywords used were the combinations of ‘affordable, assisted reproduction, ART, developing countries, health services, infertility, IVF, simplified methods, traditional health care'. RESULTS The exact prevalence of infertility in developing countries is unknown due to a lack of registration and well-performed studies. On the other hand, the implementation of appropriate infertility treatment is currently not a main goal for most international non-profit organizations. Keystones in the successful implementation of infertility care in low-resource settings include simplification of diagnostic and ART procedures, minimizing the complication rate of interventions, providing training-courses for health-care workers and incorporating infertility treatment into sexual and reproductive health-care programmes. CONCLUSIONS Although recognizing the importance of education and prevention, we believe that for the reasons of social justice, infertility treatment in developing countries requires greater attention at National and International levels. PMID:18820005

  7. Exploration of Infertile Couples’ Support Requirements: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari, Fatemeh; Ghahiri, Ataollah; Habibi, Mojtaba; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to high prevalence of infertility, increasing demand for infertility treatment, and provision of high quality of fertility care, it is necessary for healthcare professionals to explore infertile couples’ expectations and needs. Identification of these needs can be a prerequisite to plan the effective supportive interventions. The current study was, therefore, conducted in an attempt to explore and to understand infertile couples’ experiences and needs. Materials and Methods This is a qualitative study based on a content analysis ap- proach. The participants included 26 infertile couples (17 men and 26 women) and 7 members of medical personnel (3 gynecologists and 4 midwives) as the key informants. The infertile couples were selected from patients attending public and private infertility treatment centers and private offices of infertility specialists in Isfahan and Rasht, Iran, during 2012-2013. They were selected through purposive sampling method with maximum variation. In-depth unstructured interviews and field notes were used for data gathering among infertile couples. The data from medical personnel was collected through semi-structured interviews. The interview data were analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results Data analysis revealed four main categories of infertile couples’ needs, including: i. Infertility and social support, ii. Infertility and financial support, iii. Infertility and spiritual support and iv. Infertility and informational support. The main theme of all these categories was assistance and support. Conclusion The study showed that in addition to treatment and medical needs, infertile couples encounter various challenges in different emotional, psychosocial, communicative, cognitive, spiritual, and economic aspects that can affect various areas of their life and lead to new concerns, problems, and demands. Thus, addressing infertile couples’ needs and expectations alongside their medical treatments as well as provision of psychosocial services by development of patient-centered approaches and couple-based interventions can improve their quality of life and treatment results and also relieve their negative psychosocial consequences. PMID:25918596

  8. Frustrated Fertility: Infertility and Psychological Distress among Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillan, Julia; Greil, Arthur L.; White, Lynn; Jacob, Mary Casey

    2003-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that women who have experienced infertility report higher psychological distress. Examines whether roles or resources condition the effects of infertility or whether its effects are limited to childless women. Infertility combined with involuntary childlessness is associated with significantly greater distress. For women in…

  9. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Treat Infertility Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Eifert, Georg H.

    2011-01-01

    Women and men diagnosed with infertility experience a variety of infertility-related stressors, including changes to their family and social networks, strain on their sexual relationship, and difficulties and unexpected challenges in their relationship. Infertility stress is linked with depression and psychological distress, and can lead to…

  10. Prevalence and predictors of infertility-specific stress in women diagnosed with primary infertility: A clinic-based study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ansha; Sharma, P. S. V. N.; Narayan, Pratapkumar; Binu, V. S.; Dinesh, N.; Pai, Praveena Joglekar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to the existing literature on infertility, stress appears to be inevitably associated with infertility diagnosis and treatment in sub-fertile individuals. The epidemiological data on the prevalence and predictors of infertility-specific stress in cultural specific scenario are scarce. The objective of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of infertility-specific stress and identify predictors of infertility-specific stress in women diagnosed with primary infertility. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 300 infertile married women, diagnosed with primary infertility. The tools used for the assessment were “semi-structured questionnaire” compiled by the authors, “ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioral Disorders (Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines),” and “Psychological Evaluation Test for infertility.” STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Data were analyzed using SPSS (version 15). Chi-square test was used for univariate analysis followed by multiple logistic regressions between stress and the predictor variables. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The prevalence of stress among women was 80%. Univariate analysis revealed that predictors of stress were years of marital life, duration of infertility, infertility type, history of gynecological surgery, cycles of ovulation induction with timed intercourse and intra-uterine inseminations, present and past psychiatric morbidity, coping difficulties, gynecological diagnosis, and severity of premenstrual dysphoria. Multivariate analysis showed leading associations of stress with infertility type and coping difficulties. PMID:27110075

  11. Sexual behavior of infertile women: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Bokaie, Mahshid; Simbar, Masoumeh; Yassini Ardekani, Seyed Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility makes an essential challenge to the sexual life of couples, especially infertile women. When pregnancy does not happen, infertile women think that sexual intercourse is not fruitful and sexual desire became reduce gradually. Infertile women progressively forget that their sexual relationship is also a response to their natural need. Objective: This qualitative study was conducted to explore the infertility consequences in the sexual behavior of infertile women. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative content analysis study; and it was part of a widespread study, used a sequential mixed-method and conducted from August 2014 until February 2015. A purposeful sampling was used to recruit infertile women who had referred to Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility. Data gathering techniques employed in this research included in-depth semi structured open face-to-face interviews and field notes. Credibility, transferability, confirm ability, and dependability were assessed for the rigor of the data collection. Results: Totally, 15 infertile women and 8 key informants were interviewed. Data analysis showed four themes about impact of infertility on female sexual behavior: 1/ Impact of infertility drugs on couple sexual behavior, 2/ Impact of assisted reproductive technologies on female sexual behavior, 3/ Timed intercourse during infertility and 4/ The psychological impact of infertility on sexual behavior. Conclusion: Some of Iranian infertile women could cope with their problems, but some of them were very affected by infertility drugs and assisted reproductive technologies procedures. Psychosexual counseling before medical treatment could help them to have a better sexual life. PMID:26644793

  12. Infertility, infertility treatment and psychomotor development: the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Olsen, Jørn

    2009-03-01

    Babies born of infertile couples, regardless of treatment, have a higher risk of preterm birth and low birthweight, conditions associated with delayed development. We examined developmental milestones in singletons as a function of parental infertility [time to pregnancy (TTP) > 12 months] and infertility treatment. From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 37 897 singletons born of fertile couples (TTP < or = 12 months), 4351 born of infertile couples conceiving naturally (TTP > 12 months), and 3309 born after infertility treatment. When the children were about 18 months old, mothers reported 12 developmental milestones by responding to structured questions. We defined a failure to achieve the assessed milestone or the minimal numbers of milestones in a summary (motor, or cognitive/language skills) as delay. Naturally conceived children born of infertile couples had a pattern of psychomotor development similar to that of children born of fertile couples, but increasing TTP correlated with a modest delay. When the analysis was restricted to infertile couples (treated and untreated), children born after treatment showed a slight delay in cognitive/language development (odds ratio 1.24, [95% confidence interval 1.01, 1.53]) for not meeting at least three out of six cognitive/language milestones); children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) had the highest estimated relative risk of delay for most milestones, especially motor milestones. These results suggest that a long TTP may be associated with a modest developmental delay. Infertility treatment, especially ICSI, may be associated with a slight delay for some of these early milestones. PMID:19159396

  13. Lost in transition: women experiencing infertility.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Nicola

    2014-09-01

    This paper illustrates key findings from a qualitative doctoral research project exploring women's experience of infertility. Six women maintained treatment diaries, reflecting on their experiences prior to, during and beyond infertility treatment. The following key themes are identified: hopefulness, adaptation, transitioning and shifting focus. The data suggest that treatment, clinic experience and living a life 'on hold' act as turning points within the individual life course. It is at the intersection between treatment and outcome that difficulties negotiating the expected and anticipated life course become illuminated, revealing limited connectivity and transitioning through and beyond the treatment process. This is a critical focus area and one that sets the scene for effective future adaptation. The data suggest that the accessibility of supportive care moving through and beyond treatment is limited. This paper argues that the infertility clinic is a critical space and place and one where effective supportive care may enable effective transitioning beyond the experience of infertility as an unanticipated life course disruption. PMID:25019683

  14. Coping Processes of Couples Experiencing Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Newton, Christopher R.; Rosen, Karen H.; Schulman, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the coping processes of couples experiencing infertility. Participants included 420 couples referred for advanced reproductive treatments. Couples were divided into groups based on the frequency of their use of eight coping strategies. Findings suggest that coping processes, which are beneficial to individuals, may be…

  15. Characteristics of the Biopsychosocial Crisis of Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Ellen Piel

    1987-01-01

    Presents a framework for understanding the crisis of infertility which is characterized by extensive anxiety, damaged self-esteem, grief, uncertainty about the future, and estranged relationships with each other and with family and friends. Proposes some interventions appropriate to helpers from a variety of disciplines. (ABB)

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Y chromosome and occurs in men with no history of the disorder in their family. When men with Y chromosome infertility do father children, either naturally or with the aid of assisted reproductive technologies, they pass on the genetic changes on the ...

  17. Guidelines for counselling in infertility: outline version.

    PubMed

    Boivin, J; Appleton, T C; Baetens, P; Baron, J; Bitzer, J; Corrigan, E; Daniels, K R; Darwish, J; Guerra-Diaz, D; Hammar, M; McWhinnie, A; Strauss, B; Thorn, P; Wischmann, T; Kentenich, H

    2001-06-01

    The Guidelines for Counselling in Infertility describe the purpose, objectives, typical issues and communication skills involved in providing psychosocial care to individuals using fertility services. The Guidelines are presented in six sections. The first section describes how infertility consultations differ from other medical consultations in obstetrics and gynaecology, whereas the second section addresses fundamental issues in counselling, such as what is counselling in infertility, who should counsel and who is likely to need counselling. Section 3 focuses on how to integrate patient-centred care and counselling into routine medical treatment and section 4 highlights some of the special situations which can provoke the need for counselling (e.g. facing the end of treatment, sexual problems). Section 5 deals exclusively with third party reproduction and the psychosocial implications of gamete donation, surrogacy and adoption for heterosexual and gay couples and single women without partners. The final section of the Guidelines is concerned with psychosocial services that can be used to supplement counselling services in fertility clinics: written psychosocial information, telephone counselling, self-help groups and professionally facilitated group work. This paper summarizes the different sections of the Guidelines and describes how to obtain the complete text of the Guidelines for Counselling in Infertility. PMID:11387309

  18. Infertility and childlessness: a qualitative study of the experiences of infertile couples in Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infertility is a global reproductive health issue that affects many individuals and couples. Despite the high prevalence of infertility in Ghana, no study has been done on the experiences of infertile couples in Northern Ghana. This study therefore explored the experiences of infertile couples in Northern Ghana using the Upper West Region as a case study. Methods We interviewed fifteen childless couples, forty-five couples with children, and eight key informants using a semi-structured interview guide. We also carried out three focus group discussions; one for childless women, one for women with children and one for men with children. The data were transcribed, coded, arranged and analyzed for categories and themes. Results Infertile couples are socially stigmatised and excluded from leadership roles in their communities. Couples without children are denied membership in the ancestral world thereby losing the opportunity to live again. Both males and females are engaged in sex with multiple partners to prove their fertility. Conclusions Both men and women suffer from the social effects of childlessness. The desire to have biological children in a pronatalist society results in unhealthy practices. Health policy makers and gender advocates should be more concerned about infertility. PMID:23517021

  19. Anti-GAPDHS antibodies: a biomarker of immune infertility.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jun; Yao, Rongyan; Luo, Yanyun; Yang, Dantong; Cao, Yang; Qiu, Yi; Song, Wei; Miao, Shiying; Gu, Yiqun; Wang, Linfang

    2016-04-01

    Numerous investigations have focused on the detection of antisperm antibodies, which have a naturally occurring impact on male and female fertility. In this study, spermatogenic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS) was considered to be a candidate biomarker of immune infertility. The concentrations of anti-GAPDHS antibodies in the sera of sterile individuals and fertile couples were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Sera were collected from immune infertile (n = 175) and fertile (n = 237) individuals and were screened by tray agglutination tests (TAT). Infertile sera were further divided into two groups according to the serum titers obtained by TAT (titers ≤ 1:8, n = 58; titers > 1:8, n = 117). The concentrations of anti-GAPDHS antibodies were significantly higher in the immune infertile group than in the fertile group and were much higher with regard to the increased degrees of sperm agglutination (titers > 1:8). Surprisingly, we found statistically significantly higher concentrations of antibodies in the sera of infertile men than in those of infertile women, and a similar statistical result was obtained in the sera when primary infertility was compared with secondary infertility. Thus, anti-GAPDHS antibodies seem to be a sensitive parameter in immune infertile detection and might be one of the main factors causing immune infertility. This factor might be valuable as an indicator in the clinical diagnosis and monitoring treatment of infertility. PMID:26846113

  20. The prevalence of abnormal cervical cytology in women with infertility.

    PubMed

    AbdullGaffar, Badr; Kamal, Mohamed O; Hasoub, Ahmed

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the frequency of abnormal cervical cytology in women with infertility problems with that of fertile women by using ThinPrep® liquid-based Pap Tests™. A retrospective case-control study for over 2 years was conducted. The cases included all women with infertility problems who had Pap tests during their infertility treatment period. The cases were further subdivided into primary and secondary infertility groups. The control group included all women without infertility problems who had routine Pap tests in the same period. The age and demographic features were adjusted and matched for both groups. Statistical analysis included chi-square test and Fischer exact test. The infertility group (n = 490) showed significantly (P < 0.05) more abnormal cervical squamous epithelial abnormalities (48 positive cases, 9.8%) than the controls (n = 7,150, 216 positive cases, 3%). Women with secondary infertility had more epithelial abnormalities and more high-grade lesions than women with primary infertility. Women with infertility had statistically significant higher frequency of squamous intraepithelial lesions than women without infertility problems of similar age and demographic background. The data suggest that women with infertility might benefit from more frequent cervical cytology screening. PMID:20014305

  1. New insights into the genetic basis of infertility

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Thejaswini; Suresh, Padmanaban S; Tsutsumi, Rie

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system characterized by inability to achieve pregnancy after 12 or more months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. A variety of factors, including ovulation defects, spermatogenic failure, parental age, obesity, and infections have been linked with infertility, in addition to specific karyotypes and genotypes. The study of genes associated with infertility in rodent models has expanded the field of translational genetics in identifying the underlying cause of human infertility problems. Many intriguing aspects of the molecular basis of infertility in humans remain poorly understood; however, application of genetic knowledge in this field looks promising. The growing literature on the genetics of human infertility disorders deserves attention and a critical concise summary is required. This paper provides information obtained from a systematic analysis of the literature related to current research into the genetics of infertility affecting both sexes. PMID:25506236

  2. Psychological profile of women with infertility: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Shuvabrata; Sanyal, Nilanjana; Mukherjee, Urbi

    2014-01-01

    Background: An endeavour to probe into the psychological profile of infertile women in a comparative stance with the fertile women is not very common. This study is an attempt to explore the possible non-apparent personality factors which contribute to the unexplained pain of infertility. Methods: The main objectives of the present study were (a) to examine whether infertile women are different from fertile women in terms of selected psychological variables- narcissistic components, dimensions of attachment style and uses of defensive manoeuvres; and (b) whether the primary infertile women (n=18) are different from the secondary infertile women (n=12) with respect to those variables. A total of 60 individuals (30 infertile women and 30 matched fertile women) were assessed through Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ), Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) and Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40). General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) was administered on to the fertile women to rule out the psychiatric morbidity. Results: Findings revealed that infertile women group differed from fertile women group with respect to narcissism, dimensions of attachment style and uses of defense mechanism. The primary infertile group also showed marked difference from the secondary infertile group with respect to those variables. Conclusions: This study endeavours to enrich the knowledge regarding the personality dynamics of infertile women to design psychotherapeutic programme to aid their well-being, help them to cherish the flavour of parenthood and improve their quality of life. PMID:25788801

  3. The dark mink: a model of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Tung, K S; Ellis, L E; Childs, G V; Dufau, M

    1984-03-01

    Breeding mink for a fine dark fur has coselected male infertility, which may be manifest at the onset of breeding (primary infertility) or after one or more fertile breeding seasons (secondary infertility). Mink with primary infertility have low LH and testosterone levels. However, they respond to exogenous GnRH with increases in LH production and in the number and size of LH and FSH positive gonadotropes in the anterior pituitary. Exogenous human CG also induces testosterone secretion. Thus, mink with primary infertility are probably defective in GnRH secretion, which is due either to abnormal hypothalamic function or its control mechanisms. Autoimmune orchitis with testicular immune complexes are frequent in mink with secondary infertility, suggesting an autoimmune etiology. In contrast, fertile dark mink and fertile mink with the opaline and pastel fur have normal serum LH and testosterone levels; their testes are also normal. In mink with secondary infertility, the frequency and degree of orchitis and testicular immune complexes increased from March (peak sexual activity) to April (onset of testicular regression). Thus, testicular autoimmunity most likely develops during testicular regression. Antisperm antibodies also increased in frequency during testicular regression in the fertile dark mink and in dark mink with primary and secondary infertility. Thus, antisperm antibody per se is insufficient to induce autoimmune orchitis. It is concluded that the infertile mink is a useful model of human male infertility, involving both endocrinological and immunological mechanisms. PMID:6421566

  4. Advances in the management of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Haidl, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Male infertility can be treated by surgical procedures (e.g., varicocelectomy) or by administration of drugs if causal factors (e.g., seminal tract infections) are detected. In more severe cases, methods of assisted fertilization often have to be applied, but even these have only a limited success rate. Recent studies have demonstrated that disturbances of sperm DNA integrity (determined by the acridine orange test) can explain certain cases of fertilization failure and failure to achieve pregnancy following in vitro fertilisation with intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The evaluation of DNA integrity should be considered when diagnosing male infertility as it has been shown to be an independent factor and can be used as a supplement to standard semen analysis. Analysis of DNA integrity may, therefore, provide further information about altered male fertility and lead to administration of more appropriate therapy. PMID:20948685

  5. Prevention of multiple pregnancies in infertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Tiitinen, Aila

    2012-12-01

    The most important outcome of infertility treatment is a birth of a healthy baby. In many countries, in-vitro fertilisation treatments carry a high risk of twin pregnancy, which brings a higher risk to the mother and child than singleton pregnancies. Preterm delivery and low birth weight are the main factors accounting for the excess in neonatal morbidity. The use of elective single embryo transfer combined with cryopreservation can minimise the twin rate. Recent studies have shown that repeat single-embryo transfer can produce more live births per oocyte retrieval than double-embryo transfer. Ovulation-induction treatment protocols can also be improved and optimised. Correct counselling is important, as many infertile couples may desire twin pregnancies. Good counselling should include realistic information on the risks of twin gestation and also on later burdens with a multiple birth. PMID:22795237

  6. Homeopathy for infertility treatment: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kalampokas, T; Botis, S; Kedikgianni-Antoniou, A; Papamethodiou, D; Kivellos, S; Papadimitriou, V; Salvanos, G; Paparistidis, N; Gavaris, I; Sofoudis, C; Kalampokas, E; Farmakides, G; Vithoulkas, G

    2014-01-01

    Homeopathy has been used in the past for treating a broad aspect of diseases. In gynecology, its use remains limited. Taking under consideration its clinical aspects, the authors attempted to use it for treating female sub fertility problems. With this study, the authors present five cases of female infertility treated successfully with the use of homeopathic treatment in a large obstetrics-gynecology Hospital in Athens. PMID:24779242

  7. Human infertility: are endocrine disruptors to blame?

    PubMed Central

    Marques-Pinto, André; Carvalho, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Over recent decades, epidemiological studies have been reporting worrisome trends in the incidence of human infertility rates. Extensive detection of industrial chemicals in human serum, seminal plasma and follicular fluid has led the scientific community to hypothesise that these compounds may disrupt hormonal homoeostasis, leading to a vast array of physiological impairments. Numerous synthetic and natural substances have endocrine-disruptive effects, acting through several mechanisms. The main route of exposure to these chemicals is the ingestion of contaminated food and water. They may disturb intrauterine development, resulting in irreversible effects and may also induce transgenerational effects. This review aims to summarise the major scientific developments on the topic of human infertility associated with exposure to endocrine disruptors (EDs), integrating epidemiological and experimental evidence. Current data suggest that environmental levels of EDs may affect the development and functioning of the reproductive system in both sexes, particularly in foetuses, causing developmental and reproductive disorders, including infertility. EDs may be blamed for the rising incidence of human reproductive disorders. This constitutes a serious public health issue that should not be overlooked. The exposure of pregnant women and infants to EDs is of great concern. Therefore, precautionary avoidance of exposure to EDs is a prudent attitude in order to protect humans and wildlife from permanent harmful effects on fertility. PMID:23985363

  8. Frequency and epidemiologic aspects of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Sohrabvand, Farnaz; Jafari, Mohammad; Shariat, Mamak; Haghollahi, Fedyeh; Lotfi, Mandana

    2015-01-01

    According to different geographical conditions, human health in different sub-regions of the world and cultural differences, the male factor infertility has heterogeneous causes in the world. This study was performed in an attempt to clarify the associated factors which might play a role in this respect in a group of Iranian infertile men. This study was a cross - sectional, descriptive and retrospective study. The information was obtained from the men who had attended the clinic from March 2004-2006. The factors which were studied in this research are the demographic characteristics, smoking, addiction, alcohol drinking, and exposure to lead, cimetidine and history of surgery. In 23.7 % of couples the cause of infertility was pure male factor and in 19.3 % of them the problem was related to male and female factor both. The most important associated factors for male factor included smoking (29%) and history of varicocele operation (22%). Since the quality of individual and social life is related to fertility state, it seems that more comprehensive studies on factors affecting male fertility at the community level are justified and recommended. PMID:25871021

  9. Anabolic steroids abuse and male infertility.

    PubMed

    El Osta, Rabih; Almont, Thierry; Diligent, Catherine; Hubert, Nicolas; Eschwège, Pascal; Hubert, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, testosterone and its synthetic derivatives have been used with anabolic and androgenic purposes. These substances were first restricted to professional bodybuilders, but become more and more popular among recreational athletes. Up to date, 3,000,000 anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) users have been reported in the United States with an increasing prevalence, making AAS consumption a major public health growing concern. Infertility is defined by the WHO as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse and a male factor is present in up to 50 % of all infertile couples. Several conditions may be related to male infertility. Substance abuse, including AAS, is commonly associated to transient or persistent impairment on male reproductive function, through different pathways. Herein, a brief overview on AAS is offered. Steroids biochemistry, patterns of use, physiological and clinical issues are enlightened. A further review about fertility outcomes among male AAS abusers is also presented, including the classic reports on transient anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH), and the more recent experimental reports on structural and genetic sperm damage. PMID:26855782

  10. The status of depression and anxiety in infertile Turkish couples

    PubMed Central

    Kazandi, Mert; Gunday, Ozlem; Mermer, Timucin Kurtulus; Erturk, Nuray; Ozkınay, Erdinc

    2011-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a major psychosocial crisis as well as being a medical problem. The factors that predict psychosocial consequences of infertility may vary in different gender and different infertile populations. Objective: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether Turkish infertile couples had higher levels of depression and anxiety when compared to non-infertile couples. Our secondary aim was to evaluate the relationship between sociodemographic characteristics and levels of depression and anxiety in Turkish infertile couples. Materials and Methods: We designed a descriptive cross sectional study of 248 infertile women and 96 infertile men with no psychiatric disturbance and 51 women and 40 men who have children to evaluate the depression and anxiety levels between infertile couples and fertile couples. A gynecologist evaluated participants for demographic data and then they were visited by a psychologist to perform questionnaire scales which were The Beck Depression Inventory and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for the evaluation of the degree of psychopathology. The data were statistically analyzed, with p<0.05 as the level of statistical significance. Results: We observed significant differences between the infertile couples and fertile couples with respect to state and trait anxiety (p<0.0001) while no difference was regarding with depression, both of women and men. Anxiety and depression were observed as independent from gender when infertile women and men were compared (p=0.213). Conclusion: We believed that the psychological management at infertile couples must be individualized with cultural, religious, and class related aspects. PMID:25587255

  11. Protective emotional regulation processes towards adjustment in infertile patients.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Gouveia, José; Galhardo, Ana; Cunha, Marina; Matos, Marcela

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about emotional regulation processes of psychological flexibility/acceptance, self-compassion, and coping styles in infertility and the way they may exert a protective function towards depression. The aim of the current study was to explore how these emotion regulation processes are related to depression and to the sense of self-efficacy to deal with infertility in infertile patients. Gender differences were also considered. One hundred couples without known fertility problems and 100 couples with an infertility diagnosis completed the instruments: Beck Depression Inventory, Coping Styles Questionnaire, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire, Self-Compassion Scale and Infertility Self-efficacy Scale. Infertile couples presented statistically significantly higher scores on depression and lower scores in psychological flexibility/acceptance and self-compassion than the control group. This pattern was particularly identified in women who also tended to use less an emotional/detached coping style and to perceive themselves as less confident to deal with infertility than men. Multiple regression analysis showed that psychological flexibility/acceptance was a significant predictor of depressive symptoms in men and women with infertility. Emotional regulation processes, such as psychological flexibility/acceptance and self-compassion, seem to be relevant to the understanding of depressive symptoms and psychological adjustment to infertility, suggesting that these issues should be addressed in a therapeutic context with these couples. PMID:22309792

  12. Genetics Home Reference: sensorineural deafness and male infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... links) Encyclopedia: Sensorineural Deafness Health Topic: Assisted Reproductive Technology Health Topic: Hearing Disorders and Deafness Health Topic: Male Infertility Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Sensorineural Hearing ...

  13. Current medical management of endocrine-related male infertility.

    PubMed

    Ring, Joshua D; Lwin, Aye A; Köhler, Tobias S

    2016-01-01

    Male factor contributes to 50%-60% of overall infertility but is solely responsible in only 20% of couples. Although most male factor infertility is ascertained from an abnormal semen analysis, other male factors can be contributory especially if the sample returns normal. Male infertility can be due to identifiable hormonal or anatomical etiologies that may be reversible or irreversible. This manuscript will highlight existing guidelines and our recommendations for hormone evaluation for male infertility and empiric therapies including multivitamins, estrogen receptor modulators (clomiphene), estrogen conversion blockers (anastrozole), and hormone replacement. PMID:27098657

  14. Current medical management of endocrine-related male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Joshua D; Lwin, Aye A; Köhler, Tobias S

    2016-01-01

    Male factor contributes to 50%–60% of overall infertility but is solely responsible in only 20% of couples. Although most male factor infertility is ascertained from an abnormal semen analysis, other male factors can be contributory especially if the sample returns normal. Male infertility can be due to identifiable hormonal or anatomical etiologies that may be reversible or irreversible. This manuscript will highlight existing guidelines and our recommendations for hormone evaluation for male infertility and empiric therapies including multivitamins, estrogen receptor modulators (clomiphene), estrogen conversion blockers (anastrozole), and hormone replacement. PMID:27098657

  15. Frequency and outcome of treatment in polycystic ovaries related infertility

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Farzana; Arif, Nesreen; Halepota, Hafeez

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is defined as inability of couple to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse. The prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is 21.9%. The most common cause of medically treatable infertility is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCO). This study was conducted to see the frequency and outcome of treatment in PCOs related infertility in infertile couples coming to Mohammad Medical College Hospital, Mirpurkhas, Sindh. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted at Muhammad Medical College for three years from 2005 to 2008. Total 1289 infertile couples were included in this study. Result: The frequency of PCOs in female related infertility was 38.5%. Other causes of female infertility were in the frequency of 44% pelvic inflammatory disease, 12.3% endometriosis, 2.9% hyperprolactenemia, and 1.35% hypothyroidism. Patients with PCOS were given different treatment modalities. One hundred fifty patients with PCO were given ovulation induction with clomephene citrate and out of them 109 (72%) conceived. Sixty three women were given combination of clomephene citrate and Metformin. Out of them 50 (79%) conceived. Five patients were given gonadotrophins, Out of them 2 (40%) patients conceived. Five patients had laparoscopic drilling out of them 3 (60%) conceived. Conclusion: In contrast to the literature review Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome turned out to be the second most common cause of female related infertility. But as the international literature shows it had very good out come after medical and /or surgical treatment. PMID:26150870

  16. Complementary therapy and infertility: an Icelandic perspective.

    PubMed

    Veal, L

    1998-02-01

    Complementary therapists take a more holistic view of inferitility treatment than do allopathic health professionals. Lifestyle and nutritional factors may be considered and possibly changed, and psychological and emotional problems such as stress will be treated. Hormonal imbalance in both sexes may be treated with Chinese herbal mixtures such as Hachimijiogan, herbs such as Vitex agnus-castus, or a blend of essential oils designed to treat amenorrhoea or scanty/irregular periods. Herbalists, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine, aromatherpists, homeopaths and Ayurvedic practitioners all have a range of treatments for infertile people. PMID:9677926

  17. [Relationship of MTHFR gene polymorphisms with infertility].

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai-min; Tian, Run-hui; Wang, Hong-liang

    2016-02-01

    The folate metabolic pathway plays important roles in cellular physiology by participating in nucleotide synthesis, DNA repair and methylation, and maintenance and stability of the genome. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key regulatory enzyme involved in folate metabolism. Polymorphisms of MTHFR may change the level of homocysteine and affect DNA synthesis and methylation, leading to an increased oxidative stress and disturbed methylation reactions and consequently affecting reproductive function. This article presents an overview on MTHFR gene polymorphisms, proposing that multicentered, large-sample and long-term prospective studies are needed to reveal the relationship between MTHFR gene polymorphisms and infertility. PMID:26939404

  18. A Comparative Study of Serum and Follicular Fluid Leptin Concentrations among Explained Infertile, Unexplained Infertile and Fertile Women

    PubMed Central

    Kamyabi, Zahra; Gholamalizade, Tayebe

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between metabolism and reproduction has been always considered as an important topic in female endocrinology. It seems that leptin is one of the involved factors in infertility. Leptin, in addition to regulating body weight plays an important role in regulation of endocrine, reproductive and immune systems. The aim of this stduy is to compare serum and follicular fluid leptin concentrations in order to find the role of leptin level in infertility. Materials and Methods This case-control study was performed from September 2010 to March 2013. A total of 90 women referred to the Infertility Center of Afzalipour Hos- pital, Kerman, Iran, and divided into three equal groups (n=30/per group) of explained infertile (including 4 subgroups), unexplained infertile and normal fertile (control group). The three groups were matched in regard to demographic features [age: 20-40 years and body mass index (BMI): 20-25]. In order to determine leptin level, blood sample and fol- licular fluid were taken one hour prior and at the time of follicular puncture, respectively. Serum and follicular fluid leptin levels were measured using enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Data were analyzed using descriptive-analytic tests, like Mann- Whitney and Kruskal Wallis tests, through Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16. Results In explained infertile and fertile groups, as opposed to unexplained infertile group, mean leptin level was lower in follicular fluid than in serum. Mean follicular fluid leptin concentration in women with unexplained infertility was higher com- pared to the other two groups. Women with unexplained infertility had lower level of serum leptin in comparison to the other two groups. Follicular fluid leptin level in all subgroups of explained infertile group was lower as compared to unexplained and fertile women. Conclusion The results suggested that high leptin level of follicular fluid is one of the main factors involved in infertility. PMID:26246872

  19. A Study of Couple Burnout in Infertile Couples

    PubMed Central

    Ghavi, Fatemeh; Jamale, Safieh; Mosalanejad, Leili; Mosallanezhad, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility is a major crisis that can cause psychological problems and emotionally distressing experiences, and eventually affect a couples’ relationship. The objective of this study is to investigate couple burnout in infertile couples who were undergoing treatmentat the Infertility Clinic of Yazd, Iran. Method: The present study is a cross-sectional descriptive one on 98 infertile couples referringto the Infertility Centerof Yazd, Iran, who were chosen on a simple random sampling basis. The measuring tools consisted of the Couple Burnout Measure (CBM) and a demographic questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 16 and the statistical tests of ANOVA and t-test. P-values less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: The results show that infertile women experience higher levels of couple burnout than their husbands (p<0.001). Also, a comparison of the scales of couple burnout—psychological burnout (p<0.01), somatic burnout (p<0.01), and emotional burnout (p<0.001)—between wives and husbands show that women are at greater risk. Conclusion: Infertile couples’ emotional, mental, and sexual problems need to be addressed as part of the infertility treatment programs, and psychotherapists should be included in the medical team. PMID:26573033

  20. Infertility: A Review of Physical and Emotional Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kredentser, Jeremy V.

    1986-01-01

    Infertility affects 15% of couples. The primary causes are poor sperm production, ovulation defects, and fallopian tube obstruction, which can be detected by a simple, logical investigation. Infertility and its investigation precipitate characteristic emotional responses that require care by an informed, sensitive physician. PMID:21267117

  1. Predictors of Psychological Distress among Infertility Clinic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Kelly A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigated predictors of psychological distress among infertility clinic patients. Analyses indicated that infertile men and women reported greater psychological distress than the general population. Self-blame and avoidance coping significantly predicted psychological distress among men and women. Increased age and childlessness added to…

  2. Associations of Psychosocial Factors with the Stress of Infertility Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Myra G.; Forthofer, Melinda S.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial factors thought to be associated with perceived stress over the course of infertility treatment. The research was based on secondary analysis of data from the Study of Marriage, Family, and Life Quality with a sample of 128 people who completed an infertility-related stress instrument at all three measurement…

  3. Psychotherapy for Infertility: A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach for Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Lisa B.; Wark, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Describes a cognitive-behavioral model for treating couples' negative reactions to infertility. After a discussion of why the cognitive-behavioral approach can competently address the goals of couples coping with infertility, three phases of treatment are outlined: assessment, therapy, and closure. Areas for assessment include spouses, marital…

  4. Infertility in the Gambia: Traditional and Modern Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundby, Johanne

    1997-01-01

    A population survey was undertaken to study infertility in Gambia. All infertile women in 24 randomly selected enumeration areas were assessed. Problems faced, coping mechanisms employed, and types of health care available were examined. Patterns of consultation with traditional versus formal health care and rural/urban differences were uncovered…

  5. Themes of Hope and Healing: Infertile Couples' Experiences of Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniluk, Judith C.; Hurtig-Mitchell, Joss

    2003-01-01

    Using qualitative approach, authors explored the experiences of becoming parents through adoption after unsuccessful infertility treatments. Analysis of data revealed three overarching themes. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for counselors who work with infertile couples considering adoption, clients engaged in adoption…

  6. Psychosocial response of Chinese infertile husbands and wives.

    PubMed

    Lee, T Y; Sun, G H

    2000-01-01

    Some 15% or 1 in 6 American couples in the childbearing years have infertility problems. Numerous studies have demonstrated that both infertile men and women have negative emotional responses, such as stress, anxiety and depression. In Europe, Canada, and the United States the response of infertile husbands was different from that of their wives in self-image, marital adjustment, and sexual relations. The differences in psychological distress, marital satisfaction, and sexual satisfaction between Chinese infertile husbands and wives were evaluated. Fifty-nine infertile couples participated in this study. The subjects completed an Infertility Questionnaire, Marital Satisfaction Questionnaire, and Sexual Satisfaction Questionnaire as measures of gender differences in facing infertility problems. Paired t tests revealed that husbands expressed significantly less distress than that of the wives. The husbands' self-esteem was higher than that of the wives. The husbands' marital and sexual satisfaction was also higher than that of the wives. These results propose that although differences exist in cultural, ethnic, and religious norms between Chinese society and Western society, the Chinese couples' response to infertility is similar to that of Western couples. The major difference is that the in-laws play an important role in Chinese society, especially in marital satisfaction. PMID:11111862

  7. Infertility. Contemporary office-based evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Penzias, A S

    2000-09-01

    Infertility is a common condition that is highly treatable. Couples can help themselves by recognizing that they have a problem, and practitioners can help patients by recognizing who requires an infertility investigation and when they need it. Instituting a clear and comprehensive evaluation will enable patients who need treatment to achieve their goals. PMID:10957998

  8. One consequence of infertility treatment: multifetal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Little, Cindy M

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the issue of multifetal pregnancy as a result of fertility treatments. Pregnancies with multiple gestations are associated with serious infant and maternal health risks as well as psychological distress and significant financial consequences, and are a far too common consequence of infertility treatments such as assisted reproductive technology (ART) and ovulation induction drugs. Women with multifetal pregnancies are at a higher risk for multiple pregnancy complications and maternal morbidity/mortality as well as stress, depression, and anxiety disorders, especially when there is the threat of a loss of one or more fetuses. The rise in rates of multifetal gestation and the accompanying increased risk to both mother and fetuses have led the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology to develop guidelines to limit the number of transferred embryos during in vitro fertilization. Nurses who work with infertile women are in a position to educate them about the risks, benefits, and alternatives associated with ARTs and multifetal pregnancies, and should endeavor to learn as much as possible about this topic. PMID:20453592

  9. [Infertility, fertility treatment and breast cancer risk].

    PubMed

    Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Israel and throughout the world. It is the leading cause of death from cancer in women. The cause of breast cancer is unknown; however gynecological history and hormonal factors have a major impact on the risk to develop breast cancer. Infertility affects 15-20% of couples in developed countries and most of them will need fertility treatment. The variety of fertility treatments and their use has been widespread during the last 50 years and especially since the introduction of in vitro fertilization. During fertility treatment, and depending on the type of treatment, there is ovarian hyperstimulation with maturation of several follicles and higher than normal estradiol levels. This article reviews the leading studies that evaluated the possible link between fertility treatment and the development of breast cancer. Most studies showed no association between fertility drugs and breast cancer. Whereas other researchers demonstrated a possible link between some fertility drugs and increased risk for breast cancer in certain subgroups. Therefore, larger studies with longer follow-up periods and better control for all possible confounding factors are needed in order to confirm the safety of fertility treatments in the long run. The combination of infertility and fertility treatment might cause harm, such as an increased risk for breast cancer Therefore, one has to consider carefully, together with the woman, the need for fertility treatment and give the lowest possible dosage for the shortest duration in order to minimize the risk. PMID:24450034

  10. Evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Jacky; Gameiro, Sofia

    2015-08-01

    Five key paradigm shifts are described to illustrate the evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility. The first paradigm shift was in the 1930s when psychosomatic concepts were introduced in obstetrics and gynecology as causal factors to explain why some couples could not conceive despite the absence of organic pathology. In the second shift, the nurse advocacy movement of the 1970s stimulated the investigation of the psychosocial consequences of infertility and promoted counseling to help couples grieve childlessness when medical treatments often could not help them conceive. The third shift occurred with the advent of IVF, which created a demand for mental health professionals in fertility clinics. Mental health professionals assessed the ability of couples to withstand the demands of this new high technology treatment as well as their suitability as potential parents. The fourth shift, in the 1990s, saw reproductive medicine embrace the principles of evidence-based medicine, which introduced a much more rigorous approach to medical practice (effectiveness and safety) that extended to psychosocial interventions. The most recent paradigm shift, in the new millennium, occurred with the realization that compliance with protracted fertility treatment depended on the adoption of an integrated approach to fertility care. An integrated approach could reduce treatment burden arising from multiple sources (i.e., patient, clinic, and treatment). This review describes these paradigm shifts and reflects on future clinical and research directions for mental health professionals. PMID:26092131

  11. Possible fetal determinants of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Juul, Anders; Almstrup, Kristian; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Jensen, Tina K; Jørgensen, Niels; Main, Katharina M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Toppari, Jorma; Skakkebæk, Niels E

    2014-09-01

    Although common reproductive problems, such as male infertility and testicular cancer, present in adult life, strong evidence exists that these reproductive disorders might have a fetal origin. The evidence is derived not only from large epidemiological studies that show birth-cohort effects with regard to testicular cancer, levels of testosterone and semen quality, but also from histopathological observations. Many infertile men have histological signs of testicular dysgenesis, including Sertoli-cell-only tubules, immature undifferentiated Sertoli cells, microliths and Leydig cell nodules. The most severe gonadal symptoms occur in patients with disorders of sexual development (DSDs) who have genetic mutations, in whom even sex reversal of individuals with a 46,XY DSD can occur. However, patients with severe DSDs might represent only a small proportion of DSD cases, with milder forms of testicular dysgenesis potentially induced by exposure to environmental and lifestyle factors. Interestingly, maternal smoking during pregnancy has a stronger effect on spermatogenesis than a man's own smoking. Other lifestyle factors such as alcohol consumption and obesity might also have a role. However, increasing indirect evidence exists that exposure to ubiquitous endocrine disrupting chemicals, present at measurable concentrations in individuals, might affect development of human fetal testis. If confirmed, health policies to prevent male reproductive problems should not only target adult men, but also pregnant women and their children. PMID:24935122

  12. Common causes of male dog infertility.

    PubMed

    Memon, M A

    2007-08-01

    A complete breeding soundness evaluation is essential for assessment of the infertile male dog. Cryptorchidism, a sex-limited autosomal recessive trait, is more common as a unilateral condition. Azoospermia is an ejaculate consisting of seminal plasma but lacking sperm; repeated semen collections in the presence of an estrual bitch will rule out inadequate experience and lack of sexual stimulation. Both carnitine and alkaline phosphatase (AP) are produced in the epididymis; seminal plasma AP concentrations>5000 U/L indicate a normal ejaculate, whereas <5000 U/L is associated with incomplete ejaculation. Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), the most common age-related condition in intact male dogs, is characterized by a sanguineous urethral discharge, hematuria, or hemospermia; diagnosis is based on prostatic enlargement and confirmed by a transabdominal biopsy. Although castration is recommended, valuable breeding dogs can be given finasteride. Prostatitis is more common in older dogs with BPH. Culture of the third fraction of the ejaculate or urine obtained by cystocentesis is indicated. Bacterial prostatitis is treated with antibiotics with high lipid solubility. Some dogs with bacterial prostatitis may develop prostatic abscesses (a medical and surgical emergency). Prostatic cysts are often asymptomatic. Approximately, 5-7% of dogs with prostatic disease have prostatic neoplasia, most commonly adenocarcinoma (it occurs in both intact and castrated dogs), which often metastasizes and has a very poor prognosis. Although a specific diagnosis can be made in many cases of male dog infertility, not all causes are amenable to treatment. PMID:17512045

  13. [History of gynecologic treatment of infertility].

    PubMed

    Ludwig, H; Stalder, M

    1996-06-01

    Within less than 20 years this branch of the infertility treatment by new reproductive medical technologies has left behind the original concept of bypassing blocked tubes. It has started to bypass nature. As the extracorporal way, however of shortest duration within the human prenatal development, exposes the human being to external influences, the discussion about the pros and cons of the new technologies is already abundant and still rising. The field named infertility-treatment was once in the middle and in the heart of the gynecologic discipline. It gave rise to the most intellectual branch of gynecology, the gynecologic endocrinology. Undoubtedly, there are tendencies at present to make "Reproductive Medicine" an independent discipline splitting from gynecology and obstetrics, with only the core remaining gynecology, but with the addition of essential constituents coming from genetics, human biology, andrology, medical ethics, even from sociology and law. Gynecology would tremendously suffer from this loss. The field "Reproductive Medicine" has gained the most attentive audience far beyond the scope of our gynecologic profession. One thinks it should have calm and peace to grow further in the same way other fields of medicine flourish, guided by science, concience and compassion. The juxta-medical expansion of the field could as well not have been foreseen one-hundred years ago. PMID:8767552

  14. Effect of fertility and infertility on longevity.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Shelley

    2015-05-01

    Changing demographic trends and projections of the survival and fertility rates of each generation have been a topic of great interest to not only demographers and epidemiologists but also to evolutionary biologists and reproductive endocrinologists. Compelling evolutionary theories suggest that there is an inverse association between fertility and longevity. Multiple historic, demographic, and current studies have since been conducted to test this theory, but the results have been inconclusive. The average number of children born to each woman has been declining progressively in developed countries during recent decades. This is in part due to changes in the behavior of couples but also to environmental factors. While improved accessibility to assisted reproductive technology can relieve some of the burden of infertility on these couples and lessen the problem of low total fertility rates in many developed countries, it is not enough to overcome the overall decrease in total fertility rates that we have witnessed in recent decades. This article critically reviews some important studies and provides an overview of this ongoing debate, while highlighting the relevance of trying to understand the possible mechanisms that may link fertility and infertility to longevity. PMID:25934598

  15. Cytokines in the blood and semen of infertile patients

    PubMed Central

    Havrylyuk, Anna; Chopyak, Valentyna; Boyko, Yaryna; Kril, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines have been important mediators of the immunity and can be involved in numerous processes in the male genital tract including acting as immunomodulatory elements within the male gonad. The aims of this study were: 1) to detect pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in the control group and subgroups of infertile men; and 2) to set up the practical recommendations concerning determination of cytokine levels for the male infertility diagnosis. Observations were performed in a group of 82 men: healthy controls (n = 27) and infertile patients (n = 55). The male infertility group was further subdivided into patients with: varicocele (n = 22), idiopathic infertility (n = 13) and partners of couples with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA; n = 20). Semen analysis was determined following WHO criteria. The cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, IL-18; tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interferon g (IFN-g) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) contents in serum and seminal plasma were determined by quantitative ELISA. An interesting marker of male infertility appears to be TGF-β1 (blood) significantly elevated in idiopathically infertile males and in the RSA group. Besides elevated TGF-β1 in a group of idiopathic infertility significantly elevated IL-10, IL-18, IFN-g (blood) and statistically decreased IL-1β while increased IFN-g were revealed in seminal plasma compared to healthy controls. We may postulate novel cytokine micropatterns for patients with different background of infertility. Therefore, circulating cytokines: IL-1β, IL-10, IL-18, TGF-β1, IFN-g and IL-1β, IFN-g and TGF-β1 in seminal plasma should be extended in evaluation of specific types of male infertility. PMID:26648778

  16. Cytokines in the blood and semen of infertile patients.

    PubMed

    Havrylyuk, Anna; Chopyak, Valentyna; Boyko, Yaryna; Kril, Iryna; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines have been important mediators of the immunity and can be involved in numerous processes in the male genital tract including acting as immunomodulatory elements within the male gonad. The aims of this study were: 1) to detect pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in the control group and subgroups of infertile men; and 2) to set up the practical recommendations concerning determination of cytokine levels for the male infertility diagnosis. Observations were performed in a group of 82 men: healthy controls (n = 27) and infertile patients (n = 55). The male infertility group was further subdivided into patients with: varicocele (n = 22), idiopathic infertility (n = 13) and partners of couples with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA; n = 20). Semen analysis was determined following WHO criteria. The cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, IL-18; tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interferon g (IFN-g) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) contents in serum and seminal plasma were determined by quantitative ELISA. An interesting marker of male infertility appears to be TGF-β1 (blood) significantly elevated in idiopathically infertile males and in the RSA group. Besides elevated TGF-β1 in a group of idiopathic infertility significantly elevated IL-10, IL-18, IFN-g (blood) and statistically decreased IL-1β while increased IFN-g were revealed in seminal plasma compared to healthy controls. We may postulate novel cytokine micropatterns for patients with different background of infertility. Therefore, circulating cytokines: IL-1β, IL-10, IL-18, TGF-β1, IFN-g and IL-1β, IFN-g and TGF-β1 in seminal plasma should be extended in evaluation of specific types of male infertility. PMID:26648778

  17. Predictors of not pursuing infertility treatment after an infertility diagnosis: examination of a prospective U.S. cohort

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Michael L.; Smith, James F.; Millstein, Susan G.; Nachtigall, Robert D.; Adler, Nancy E.; Pasch, Lauri A.; Katz, Patricia P.

    2010-01-01

    We studied a prospective cohort of 434 couples in Northern California and found that 13% did not pursue any form of infertility treatment after their initial consultation. While age, education, and financial concerns remain important for patients in choosing whether to pursue infertility treatment, depressive symptoms may also be a barrier to achieving reproductive goals. PMID:20471010

  18. [Infertility: psychological-psychopathological consequences and cognitive-behavioural interventions].

    PubMed

    Mitsi, C; Efthimiou, K

    2014-01-01

    Infertility primarily refers to the biological inability of a man or a woman to contribute to conception. Infertility may also refer to the state of a woman who is unable to carry a pregnancy to full term, however other causes can be found in both sexes. The diagnosis of infertility and the concurrent medical treatment are rather stressful events for the couple and can provoke a number of negative symptoms such as depression, anxiety and psychosomatic symptoms which may interfere with the medical therapeutic procedures especially with the in-vitro fertilisation technique. The relationship between infertility and psychological factors has not been explored fully and are still under research. However current findings can be summarized in three basic hypotheses; namely, the effect of psychological factors on the appearance of infertility, the psychological consequences of infertility at the couple, and the reciprocal relation of psychological factors and infertility. Stress and anxiety activate the hypothalamic-adrenal axis (HPA), and this activation can disturb the hormones of fertility. The presence of depressive/anxiety symptoms seems to have a negative impact on the treatment of infertility and sometimes can be a risk factor for lower pregnancy rate. There is a possibility that psychological complaints could develop, prior, during and after the diagnosis of infertility and may interfere with the fertilisation therapy. Should such psychological complaints develop it is suggested that psychotherapeutic treatment is used in conjunction with the treatment approach of infertility, e.g. IVF. The above mentioned suggestion is supported by a large number of researchers and current research efforts focus on different psychotherapeutic interventions such as Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) has shown during research its superiority compared to other psychotherapeutic interventions and that could be an effective way to decrease the depressive and anxiety symptoms during several stages of the infertility treatment. Moreover Cognitive-Behavioural Group Therapy seems to strengthen the infertile couple's ability to deal with possible changes and the stress during the infertility treatment. It has also been reported in the research community that the use of CBT can improve the pregnancy rate. However, this finding should be viewed with caution due to its insufficient body of evidence and methodological problems incurred. PMID:25630548

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine utilization by a sample of infertile couples in Jordan for infertility treatment: clinics-based survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although there is little information available to quantify the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), growing evidence suggests that CAM prevalence among patients seeking infertility treatment is increasing worldwide. There are many products available on the market and many infertile patients demand information about CAM from their health care providers. This paper investigates the prevalence of CAM use among infertile couples in Jordan. Additionally, trends and factors contributing to CAM use for infertility treatment among these couples have been evaluated. Methods A face-to-face questionnaire inquiring demographic information, use of CAM for medical conditions, in general, and types of CAM used for infertility treatment, in specific, was completed by one thousand twenty one infertile patients attending at two types of facilities; in vitro Fertilization (IVF) centers at both public and private hospitals and infertility private clinics. Both types of facilities were distributed in different areas of Amman, the capital city of Jordan. The study was conducted between May and August 2012. Results Our results show that CAM therapies for infertility treatment were encountered in 44.7% of the study sample. The vast majority of CAM users were females. The most commonly used CAM therapies were herbs and spiritual healing. A clear correlation between the use of CAM for infertility versus the use of CAM for other chronic medical conditions has been found. Conclusions The prevalence of CAM use for infertility treatment in Jordan is relatively high, particularly among young females, well educated and with a low income, in consistence with the studies reported elsewhere. Herbs and spiritual healing are widely used among patients in adjunct to conventional medical interventions. As CAM use is prevalent among patients, there is a clear need for health providers to become more aware of this phenomenon and for further research in this field. PMID:23414246

  20. A study on Trichomoniasis vaginalis and female infertility.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, A M; El-Naggar, H M; Soliman, M; El-Negeri, M; El-Nemr, H E; Handousa, A E; Morsy, T A

    2001-08-01

    A total of 280 patients, 240 infertile and 40 pregnant were subjected to thorough history taking, general and local examination for exclusion of organic lesion, laboratory investigations to exclude parasitic, bacterial and fungal infections. Sterile vaginal swab from the posterior fornix was taken, and examined by wet smear preparation, Giemsa staining and cultivation on C.P.L.M. medium for trichomoniasis infection. The mean age of the infertile group was 25.75+/-3.92, and of the control group was 21.6+/-2.38 (in years). The mean duration of infertility was 2.81+/-1.51 (years). Out of 240 infertile women, 18.75% complained of discharge, 17.5% itching, 15.42% dysuria, 14.58% dyspareunia, and 10% had cervical lesion. Of the 40 controls, 5% complained of discharge, 2.5% complained of itching, dysuria, dyspareunia, but none had cervical lesion. Of the total cases (280), 36 (12.9%) had T. vaginalis. The clinical data observed were significantly higher among the infertile group than the control group. Cultures were positive in 14.58% of the infertile group and 2.5% in the control group. The difference between the 2 groups was statistically significant. No doubt, T. vaginalis plays an important role in female infertility. PMID:11478453

  1. Models Predicting Success of Infertility Treatment: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zarinara, Alireza; Zeraati, Hojjat; Kamali, Koorosh; Mohammad, Kazem; Shahnazari, Parisa; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertile couples are faced with problems that affect their marital life. Infertility treatment is expensive and time consuming and occasionally isn’t simply possible. Prediction models for infertility treatment have been proposed and prediction of treatment success is a new field in infertility treatment. Because prediction of treatment success is a new need for infertile couples, this paper reviewed previous studies for catching a general concept in applicability of the models. Methods: This study was conducted as a systematic review at Avicenna Research Institute in 2015. Six data bases were searched based on WHO definitions and MESH key words. Papers about prediction models in infertility were evaluated. Results: Eighty one papers were eligible for the study. Papers covered years after 1986 and studies were designed retrospectively and prospectively. IVF prediction models have more shares in papers. Most common predictors were age, duration of infertility, ovarian and tubal problems. Conclusion: Prediction model can be clinically applied if the model can be statistically evaluated and has a good validation for treatment success. To achieve better results, the physician and the couples’ needs estimation for treatment success rate were based on history, the examination and clinical tests. Models must be checked for theoretical approach and appropriate validation. The privileges for applying the prediction models are the decrease in the cost and time, avoiding painful treatment of patients, assessment of treatment approach for physicians and decision making for health managers. The selection of the approach for designing and using these models is inevitable. PMID:27141461

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in women with unexplained infertility

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Sabeti, Parvin; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Sheikhha, Mohammad Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genital tuberculosis (GTB) is an important cause of female infertility, especially in developing countries. The positive results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in endometrial GTB in the absence of tubal damage raise the possibility of the detection of sub-clinical or latent disease, with doubtful benefits of treatment. Objective: To evaluate the mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in endometrial biopsy samples collected from unexplained infertile women attending Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility by using PCR techniques. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 144 infertile women with unexplained infertility aged 20-35 years old and normal Histro-saplango graphy findings were enrolled. Endometrial biopsy samples from each participant were tested for mycobacterium tuberculosis detecting by PCR. In 93 patients, peritoneal fluid was also taken for culture and PCR. Results: The PCR results of endometrial specimens were negative in all cases, demonstrating that there was no GTB infection among our patients. Conclusion: Our results showed that GTB could not be considered as a major problem in women with unexplained infertility. Although, studies have indicated that PCR is a useful method in diagnosing early GTB disease in infertile women with no demonstrable evidence of tubal or endometrial involvement.

  3. The experience of infertility: A review of recent literature

    PubMed Central

    Greil, Arthur L.; Slauson-Blevins, Kathleen; McQuillan, Julia

    2011-01-01

    About 10 years ago Greil published a review and critique of the literature on the socio-psychological impact of infertility. He found at the time that most scholars treated infertility as a medical condition with psychological consequences rather than as a socially constructed reality. This article examines research published since the last review. More studies now place infertility within larger social contexts and social scientific frameworks although clinical emphases persist. Methodological problems remain but important improvements are also evident. We identify two vigorous research traditions in the social scientific study of infertility. One tradition uses primarily quantitative techniques to study clinic patients in order to improve service delivery and to assess the need for psychological counseling. The other tradition uses primarily qualitative research to capture the experiences of infertile people in a sociocultural context. We conclude that more attention is now being paid to the ways in which the experience of infertility is shaped by social context. We call for continued progress in the development of a distinctly sociological approach to infertility and for the continued integration of the two research traditions identified here. PMID:20003036

  4. Association of Mycoplasma genitalium with infertility in North Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumari, Nonika; Kaur, Harsimran; Roy, Amit; Gupta, Nalini; Dhaliwal, Lakhbir Kaur; Sethi, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Data regarding the association of Mycoplasma genitalium with infertility is scarce. This study was planned to look for the presence and association of M. genitalium in women with infertility. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted on 100 cases of infertile women. The control group included 100 healthy fertile women. Samples of first void urine (FVU), endocervical swabs (ECS), and endometrial biopsies were subjected to polymerase chain reaction targeting MgPa gene to look for the presence of M. genitalium DNA. All endometrial biopsy samples were subjected to histopathological examination. A detailed clinical history of patients was taken, and all relevant investigations were recorded. Results: M. genitalium was found in 16% of women with infertility from either of the samples that is, FVU and/or ECS and/or endometrium biopsy, and none from controls. ECS and biopsy could detect the highest number of cases (27%). Asymptomatic cases predominated in the study and M. genitalium positivity (73.3%) was seen more in primary infertility. Tubal occlusion and disordered proliferative endometrium were demonstrated in 33% and 26.66% of M. genitalium positive cases respectively. Conclusions: The study shows an association of M. genitalium infection and infertility and suggests routine screening of this pathogen in patients with infertility. PMID:26692605

  5. Psychosocial Predictors of Life Quality: How Are They Affected by Infertility, Gender, and Parenthood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Longitudinally examined effects of infertility on marital and global life quality with 174 infertile couples and 74 fertile couples. By third interview, 42% of infertile couples and 36% of fertile couples were parents. Psychosocial predictors of life quality were highly similar for members of infertile and fertile couples and for couples with and…

  6. Infertility and Parenthood: Does Becoming a Parent Increase Well-Being?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined parenthood among 174 infertile couples and 74 presumed fertile couples. Infertile women who became parents experienced greater global well-being but diminished marital well-being, compared with infertile women who had not become parents. Infertile men who became parents experienced same negative effects that wives reported but did not…

  7. Infertility and Parenthood: Does Becoming a Parent Increase Well-Being?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined parenthood among 174 infertile couples and 74 presumed fertile couples. Infertile women who became parents experienced greater global well-being but diminished marital well-being, compared with infertile women who had not become parents. Infertile men who became parents experienced same negative effects that wives reported but did not

  8. TGFβ3 (TGFB3) polymorphism is associated with male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Droździk, Marek; Kaczmarek, Maciej; Malinowski, Damian; Broś, Urszula; Kazienko, Anna; Kurzawa, Rafał; Kurzawski, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    Factors affecting the blood-testis barrier function may be involved in testicular damage and male infertility. Two cytokines play an important role in the barrier regulation, namely transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-β3) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α). The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between TGF-β3 (TGFB3) and TNF-α (TNF) gene polymorphisms and male infertility. A total of 846 subjects, 423 diagnosed with male infertility and 423 fertile men were enrolled. TGFB3 (rs2268626:T > C, rs3917158:C > T, rs2284792:A > G, rs2268625:T > C, rs3917187:C > T) and TNF (rs1800629:-308G > A) gene polymorphisms were genotyped. No association between TNF genotype and infertility was observed. As for TGFB3, the genotypes distribution was similar in infertile and fertile men. However, rs2284792 minor allele frequency was significantly higher among infertile subjects. Heterozygous rs2284792 AG genotype was associated with increased odds for infertility [OR = 1.40 (95% CI 1.05–1.86), p = 0.021] and similar results were observed for G allele carrier status [OR = 1.40 (95% CI 1.06–1.84), p = 0.017]. Heterozygosity in TGFB3 rs3917158 was also associated with the infertility [OR = 1.37 (95% CI 1.01–1.87), p = 0.041]. The TGFB3 variant genotypes were associated with lower spermatozoa motility parameters in fertile men. The results indicate that variants in TGFB3 gene may be associated with male infertility. However, the findings require further replication and validation. PMID:26612435

  9. Mutant ZP1 in familial infertility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hua-Lin; Lv, Chao; Zhao, Ying-Chun; Li, Wen; He, Xue-Mei; Li, Ping; Sha, Ai-Guo; Tian, Xiao; Papasian, Christopher J; Deng, Hong-Wen; Lu, Guang-Xiu; Xiao, Hong-Mei

    2014-03-27

    The human zona pellucida is composed of four glycoproteins (ZP1, ZP2, ZP3, and ZP4) and has an important role in reproduction. Here we describe a form of infertility with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, characterized by abnormal eggs that lack a zona pellucida. We identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in ZP1 in six family members. In vitro studies showed that defective ZP1 proteins and normal ZP3 proteins colocalized throughout the cells and were not expressed at the cell surface, suggesting that the aberrant ZP1 results in the sequestration of ZP3 in the cytoplasm, thereby preventing the formation of the zona pellucida around the oocyte. PMID:24670168

  10. Transplantation of male germ line stem cells restores fertility in infertile mice

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Takehiko; Dobrinski, Ina; Avarbock, Mary R.

    2016-01-01

    Azoospermia or oligozoospermia due to disruption of spermatogenesis are common causes of human male infertility. We used the technique of spermatogonial transplantation in two infertile mouse strains, Steel (Sl) and dominant white spotting (W), to determine if stem cells from an infertile male were capable of generating spermatogenesis. Transplantation of germ cells from infertile Sl/Sld mutant male mice to infertile W/Wv or Wv/W54 mutant male mice restored fertility to the recipient mice. Thus, transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells from an infertile donor to a permissive testicular environment can restore fertility and result in progeny with the genetic makeup of the infertile donor male. PMID:10613820

  11. Management of infertility in women over 40.

    PubMed

    Cabry, Rosalie; Merviel, Philippe; Hazout, Andre; Belloc, Stephanie; Dalleac, Alain; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef

    2014-05-01

    Women's fertility potential is declining with age because of multiples intrinsic and extrinsic factors such as life style, oxidative stress and/or endocrine disruptors and is affecting the ability of these women to conceive naturally. This declining fertility potential and the late age of motherhood is increasing significantly the number of patients consulting infertility specialists. Different strategies of investigation and management are proposed to patients over 40 in order to overcome their infertility and improve the live birth rate in these patients. Intra Uterine Insemination (IUI) in women over 40 is associated with a low rate of ongoing pregnancy and IUI should not therefore be offered always as the first line of treatment. When the predictive factors are positive IVF/ICSI seem to be good alternatives until 43 years of age. Customized ovarian stimulation and flexible laboratory methods such as in vitro maturation (IVM), preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), embryo vitrification and transfer after thawing in subsequent natural or artificial cycles can improve the success rate of ART in patients over 40. Meanwhile, oocyte and embryos donation remain good options for patient over 40 with a bad prognosis and can lead to successful ongoing pregnancies until 45 years of age. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation, oocyte vitrification at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage or metaphase II stage present a breakthrough for fertility preservation but the ideal age for starting fertility preservation is still debated as well as the minimum number of oocytes to be vitrified in order to optimize the chances of pregnancy when needed at an older age. This manuscript reports the results of our own experience from patients older than 40 in the light of the published data and discusses the different therapeutic alternatives which can be proposed to patients over 40 consulting ART centres. PMID:24679892

  12. Occupational exposure to solvents and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, N; Labreche, F; Collins, J; Tulandi, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine whether, in a case-referent study of infertility patients, cases with low motile sperm count were more likely than referents to have had exposure to organic solvents.
METHODS—Occupations of men attending fertility clinics in Canada were assigned codes reflecting probable exposure to organic solvents, at four grades of intensity, using a job exposure matrix previously developed. A case referent design was used, with cases being defined as men with <12×106/ml motile sperm. Information from 656 men in manual work attending a single clinic in Montreal in 1972-91 was used for the main study. A separate analysis was conducted with information for 574 men in manual work attending 10 further clinics across Canada in 1984-7.
RESULTS—In the Montreal series a significant association was found between intensity of exposure to solvents and clinical findings of <12×106/ml motile sperm. Odds ratios (ORs), after allowing for confounding, were 2.07 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.24 to 3.44) for moderate exposure to solvents and 3.83 (95% CI 1.37 to 10.65) for high exposure. In the second series of 568 men, the effect was confirmed at high exposure to solvents (OR 2.90, 95% CI 1.01 to 8.34) but not at moderate exposure (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.92).
CONCLUSIONS—Exposure to organic solvents is common both at work and in recreational pursuits. The results of this study suggest that efforts should be made to identify the compounds hazardous to male fertility, and if the risk is confirmed, to regulate their use.


Keywords: infertility; solvents; male manual workers PMID:11555684

  13. Parental infertility and cerebral palsy in children

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Thorsen, Poul; Uldall, Peter; Olsen, Jørn

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Children born after in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) have been reported to have a higher risk of cerebral palsy (CP), perhaps due to the higher frequency of preterm birth, multiple births or vanishing embryo in the pregnancies. However, it has been suggested that the underlying infertility may be part of the pathway. In this study, we examined whether untreated subfecundity (measured by time to pregnancy) or infertility treatment was associated with an increased risk of CP in the offspring. METHODS Using the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997–2003), we compared children born after 0–2 months of waiting time to pregnancy (n = 35 848) with those born after a time to pregnancy of 3–5 months (n = 15 361), 6–12 months (n = 11 528) and >12 months (n = 7387), as well as those born after IVF/ICSI (n = 3617), ovulation induction with or without intrauterine insemination (n = 3000), and unplanned pregnancies (n = 13 462). CP cases were identified through the Danish CP Register. RESULTS In total, 165 (0.18%) children were diagnosed with CP in the entire cohort. We found no significant association between time to pregnancy and the risk of CP in children conceived spontaneously. Children born after IVF/ICSI had an increased risk of CP, even after adjustment for preterm birth and multiplicity (hazard ratio 2.30, 95% confidence interval 1.12–4.73). CONCLUSIONS Subfecundity per se did not appear to be associated with the risk of CP in children, whereas being born after IVF/ICSI conferred an increased risk. PMID:21045245

  14. How does lead induce male infertility?

    PubMed Central

    Vigeh, Mohsen; Smith, Derek R.; Hsu, Ping-Chi

    2011-01-01

    An important part of male infertility of unknown etiology may be attributed to various environmental and occupational exposures to toxic substances, such as lead. The reproductive effects of lead are complex and appear to involve multiple pathways, not all of which are fully understood. It is still unclear, for example, if male reproductive issues in lead-exposed persons are mostly related to the disruption of reproductive hormones, whether the problems are due to the lead’s direct effects on the gonads, or both? This question has been difficult to answer, because lead, especially at high levels, may adversely affect many human organs. Although lead can potentially reduce male fertility by decreasing sperm count and motility, inducing abnormal morphology and affecting functional parameters; not all studies have been able to clearly demonstrate such findings. In addition, research has shown that the blood-testis barrier can protect testicular cells from direct exposure to high levels of blood lead. For these reasons and considering the wide spectrum of lead toxicity on reproductive hormones, the present review suggests that lead’s main influence on male reproduction probably occurs by altering the reproductive hormonal axis and the hormonal control on spermatogenesis, rather than by a direct toxic effect on the seminiferous tubules of the testes. As blood lead concentrations below the currently accepted worker protection standard may still adversely affect male fertility, future studies should aim to establish more concrete links between lead exposure (especially at low levels) and subsequent male infertility. Research should also pay more attention to lead’s effects on reducing male fertility rates based on not only hormonal axis alteration, but also on the changes in sperm characteristic among exposed subjects. PMID:25356074

  15. Distributive justice and infertility treatment in Canada.

    PubMed

    Nisker, Jeff

    2008-05-01

    An exploration of distributive justice in Canadian infertility treatment requires the integration of ethical, clinical, and economic principles. In 1971, American philosopher John Rawls proposed a theoretical model for fair decision-making in which "rational" and "self-interested" citizens are behind a "veil of ignorance" with respect to both their own position and the position of other decision-makers. Rawls proposed that these self-interested decision-makers, fearing that they are among the least advantaged persons who could be affected by the decision, will agree only upon rules that encode equality of opportunity and that bestow the greatest benefit on the least advantaged citizens. Regarding health policy decision-making, Rawls' model is best illustrated by Canadian philosopher Warren Bourgeois in his panel of "volunteers." These rational and self-interested volunteers receive an amnestic drug that renders them unaware of their health, social, and financial position, but they know that they are representative of diverse spheres of citizens whose well-being will be affected by their decision. After describing fair decision-making, Bourgeois considers the lack of a distributive justice imperative in Canada's Assisted Human Reproduction Act, in contrast to legislation in European nations and Australia, summarizes the economic and clinical considerations that must be provided to the decision-makers behind the "veil of ignorance" for fair decisions to occur, and considers altruism in relation to equality of access. He concludes by noting that among countries with legislation governing assisted reproduction Canada is alone in having legislation that is void of distributive justice in providing access to clinically appropriate infertility care. PMID:18505667

  16. Increasing and decreasing factors of hope in infertile women with failure in infertility treatment: A phenomenology study

    PubMed Central

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Parandavar, Nehle; Gholami, Morteza; Abdollahifard, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Assisted reproductive technology (ART) provide the hope of pregnancy for infertile women, but do not always turn this hope into reality. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of infertile women from increasing and decreasing factors of hope in infertile women with failure in infertility treatment. Materials and Methods: Using a qualitative research design (Phenomenology study), 23 subjects were selected who had experienced infertility failure visited by gynecologist (Rasekh Infertility center) in 2012. The data were collected through semi structured interviews and analyzed using interpretive research strategies of phenomenology by Collizi's seven-stage method. Results: Totally 96 codes were identified. The data arranged in two categories. The factors decreasing and increasing hope in infertility treatments. Totally 5 themes and 20 sub themes were extracted. The increasing factors which emerged from the data contain "spiritual source", "family interaction and support" and "information through the media", and decreasing factors contain "nature of treatments" and "negatively oriented mind". PMID:24799869

  17. Occupational risk for male infertility: a case-control study of 218 infertile and 227 fertile men.

    PubMed

    Chia, S E; Tay, S K

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if certain occupations pose an increased risk for infertility (of no known cause) among a group of infertile men compared with a group of fertile men. A total of 640 consecutive men whose spouses were unable to conceive were recruited from an infertility clinic. Of these, 218 men (cases) were found to have no known cause for their infertility. A total of 227 men whose spouses were pregnant at the time of the study were recruited as controls. The Singapore Standard Occupational Classification was used to code the subjects' occupations. Semen parameters (density, total sperm counts, motility, viability, and normal morphology) in all of the cases were significantly poorer than those in the controls. The risk for infertility is associated with smoking adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.85 and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.91 to 4.24. Work, independently, is not a risk factor for infertility. Engineering technicians (adjusted OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.36 to 5.54), finance analysts (adjusted OR, 4.66; 95% CI, 1.90 to 11.40), corporate and computing managers (adjusted OR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.04 to 5.98), and teachers (adjusted OR, 7.72; 95% CI, 1.86 to 32.10) were at a greater risk of infertility compared with "services and clerical workers." Using services and clerical workers as a reference group, certain occupations are at a higher risk for infertility. Higher work demands and possible electromagnetic field exposure could be contributory factors for infertility. PMID:11725334

  18. The emotional-psychological consequences of infertility among infertile women seeking treatment: Results of a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpoor-Azghdy, Seyede Batool; Simbar, Masoumeh; Vedadhir, Abouali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a major life event that brings about social and psychological problems. The type and rate these problems in the context of socio-cultural of different geographical areas and sex of people is different. Objective: The aim of this qualitative study was to explain the psychological consequences of infertility in Iranian infertile women seeking treatment. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was done using qualitative content analysis on 25 women affected by primary and secondary infertility with no surviving children in 2012. They were purposefully selected with maximum sample variation from a large Fertility Health Research Center in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected using 32 semi-structured interviews and analyzed by the conventional content analysis method. Results: The findings of this study include four main themes: 1. Cognitive reactions of infertility (mental engagement; psychological turmoil). 2. Cognitive reactions to therapy process (psychological turmoil; being difficult to control in some situations; reduced self-esteem; feelings of failure). 3. Emotional-affective reactions of infertility (fear, anxiety and worry; loneliness and guilt; grief and depression; regret). 4. Emotional-affective reactions to therapy process (fear, anxiety and worry; fatigue and helplessness; grief and depression; hopelessness). Conclusion: This study revealed that Iranian infertile women seeking treatment face several psychological-emotional problems with devastating effects on the mental health and well-being of the infertile individuals and couples, while the infertility is often treated as a biomedical issue in Iranian context with less attention on the mental-emotional, social and cultural aspects. This article extracted from Ph.D. thesis. (Seyede Batool Hasanpoor-Azghady) PMID:24799871

  19. How Common is Male Infertility, and What Are Its Causes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... common is male infertility, and what are its causes? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... and an individual case may have a single cause, several causes, or—in some cases—no identifiable ...

  20. Nonsurgical treatment of male infertility: specific and empiric therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cocuzza, Marcello; Agarwal, Ashok

    2007-01-01

    Management of male infertility is always a difficult task, and the pathologic process is often poorly understood. Even though modern assisted reproduction techniques (ART) can help overcome severe male factor infertility, the application of these methods in all infertile couples would definitely represent over-treatment. Several conditions can interfere with spermatogenesis and reduce sperm quality and production. A careful diagnostic work-up is necessary before any andrological treatment can be initiated so that adequate treatment options can be selected for individual patients. Most hormonal imbalances can be readily identified and successfully treated nonsurgically. However, the treatment of men with unexplained idiopathic infertility remains a challenge. In the absence of a correctable etiology, patients are managed with either empirical medical therapy or ART. Empiric medical therapy continues as a viable option. However, physicians and patients must understand that the success rates with any of the pharmacological therapies remain suboptimal. PMID:19707335

  1. Surgical techniques for the management of male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Lopushnyan, Natalya A; Walsh, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation and surgical treatment of male infertility has evolved and expanded, now leading to more precise diagnoses and tailored treatments with diminished morbidity and greater success. Surgeries for male infertility are divided into four major categories: (i) diagnostic surgery; (ii) surgery to improve sperm production; (iii) surgery to improve sperm delivery; and (iv) surgery to retrieve sperm for use with in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF–ICSI). While today we are more successful than ever in treating male infertility, pregnancy is still not always achieved likely due to factors that remain poorly understood. Clinicians treating infertility should advocate for couple-based therapy, and require that both partners have a thorough evaluation and an informed discussion before undergoing specific surgical therapies. PMID:22120932

  2. Analysis of PAEs in semen of infertile men

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-Yuan; Wang, Yu; Xie, Fang-Qin; Li, Yan-Xing; Wan, Xue-Lian; Ma, Wei-Wei; Wang, De-Cai; Wu, Yong-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Phthalates are environmental chemicals with reproductive toxicity and estrogenic effects in animals. They are of increasing concern to human health. Aim: To determine whether phthalate levels in semen were associated with infertility. Methods: Using semen samples from 107 infertile and 94 fertile men, the presence and quantity of five phthalate esters were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Using data collected from questionnaires and clinical examinations, the correlation between phthalate exposure and semen quality was analyzed. Results: The cumulative levels of the measured phthalate esters were significantly higher in the infertility group compared to the control group (P<0·05). Concentrations of the five phthalate esters in men varied by age with older men showing higher cumulative levels. Conclusions: The presence of phthalates may contribute to male infertility in our study population. PMID:25384258

  3. Active, Passive Smoking Tied to Infertility, Early Menopause: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_156230.html Active, Passive Smoking Tied to Infertility, Early Menopause: Study Researchers found ... 16, 2015 TUESDAY, Dec. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking and being exposed to secondhand smoke may trigger ...

  4. Male infertility: recent advances and a look towards the future.

    PubMed

    Lamb, D J; Lipshultz, L I

    2000-07-01

    The past decade has witnessed clinical and basic scientific advances that have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of the infertile male. Advances in the clinic and laboratory have resulted in men who were previously thought to be hopelessly infertile, but who are now able to conceive their own biologic offspring. In the future, we believe that the laboratory will continue to play a key role in advancing our ability both to diagnose and to treat the infertile male. We summarize here some of the major advances of the past decade that have influenced our treatment and our understanding of the etiology of male infertility. When possible, clinical innovations and advances in basic science are discussed in combination in order to emphasize the translational importance of reproductive research. PMID:10918975

  5. What Treatment Options Are Available for Male Infertility?

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Family Physician , 75, 849–856. [top] « What causes male infertility? Last Reviewed: ... NICHD News and Spotlights Couples’ pre-pregnancy caffeine consumption linked to miscarriage risk ...

  6. Knowledge, attitude, and practices of infertility among Saudi couples

    PubMed Central

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A; Alabdrabalnabi, Abdullah A; Albacker, Rehab B; Al-Jughaiman, Umar A; Hassan, Samar N

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Infertility places a huge psychological burden on infertile couples, especially for women. Greater knowledge of the factors affecting fertility may help to decrease the incidence of infertility by allowing couples to avoid certain risk factors. The aim of our study was (1) to assess the knowledge and attitudes of infertile and fertile Saudi participants on infertility, possible risk factors, and social consequences; and (2) to determine the practices of infertile Saudi couples to promote their fertility before having them attend an in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinic. Methods and materials We conducted a cross-sectional study on 277 fertile participants from outpatient clinics and 104 infertile patients from the IVF clinic at King Abdulaziz Medical City between June 24, 2012 and July 4, 2012, using a previously validated interview questionnaire. Descriptive and analytical statistics were applied with a significance threshold of P ≤ 0.05. Results A generally poor level of knowledge (59%) and a neutral attitude (76%) toward infertility were reported by participants. Mistaken beliefs commonly held by the study participants regarding the causes of infertility were Djinns and supernatural causes (58.8%), black magic (67.5%), intrauterine devices (71.3%), and contraceptive pills (42.9%). The healer/Sheikh was reported as the primary and secondary preference for infertility treatment by 6.7% and 44.2% of IVF patients, respectively. Compared with fertile patients, IVF patients were significantly less likely to favor divorce (38.5% versus 57.6%; P = 0.001) or marriage to a second wife (62.5% versus 86.2%; P < 0.001), if the woman could not have a baby. The patients with infertility had more favorable attitudes toward fertility drugs (87.5% versus 68.4%; P = 0.003) and having a test tube baby (92.4% versus 70.3%; P < 0.001). Child adoption was accepted as an option for treatment by the majority of IVF patients (60.6%) and fertile outpatients (71.5%). Alternative treatments previously practiced by the IVF patients to improve fertility include practicing Ruqia (61%), using alternative medicine (42%), engaging in physical exercise (39%), eating certain foods (22%), and quitting smoking (12%). Conclusion These findings have implications for health care providers regarding the reluctance that couples experiencing fertility problems may have, at least initially, to accept some interventions required for the couple to conceive. PMID:23874117

  7. Prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in infertile couples in romania

    PubMed Central

    Mierla, D; Malageanu, M; Tulin, R; Albu, D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a correlation between the presence of chromosomal abnormalities in one of the partners and infertility. This retrospective study was performed at the Department of Reproductive Medicine, Life Memorial Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, between August 2007 to December 2011. Two thousand, one hundred and ninety-five patients with reproductive problems were investigated, and the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities was calculated. The control group consisting of 87 fertile persons who had two or more children, was investigated in this retrospective study. All the patients of this study were investigated by cytogenetic techniques and the results of the two groups were compared by a two-tailed Fisher’s exact test. In this study, 94.99% patients had a normal karyotype and 5.01% had chromosomal abnormalities (numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities). In the study group, numerical chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.14% of infertile men and 0.62% of infertile women, and structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.38% of infertile men and 1.87% of infertile women, respectively. The correlation between the incidence of chromosomal anomalies in the two sexes in couple with reproductive problems was not statistically significant. Recently, a possible association between infertility and chromosomal abnormalities with a significant statistical association has been reported. Our study shows that there is no association between chromosomal abnormalities and infertility, but this study needs to be confirmed with further investigations and a larger control group to establish the role of chromosomal abnormalities in the etiology of infertility. PMID:26929902

  8. Current Chlamydia trachomatis Infection, A Major Cause of Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Mania-Pramanik, Jayanti; Kerkar, Shilpa; Sonawane, Shobha; Mehta, Pratibha; Salvi, Vinita

    2012-01-01

    Background In India, the impact of current Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) in reproductive health remains a neglected area of investigation. The present study evaluates if current Chlamydia infection is associated with any clinical complication that needs the attention of clinical investigators. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we enrolled 896 women attending the Gynecology Out Patient for the detection of C. trachomatis infection. Polymerase chain reaction was used to diagnose current C. trachomatis infection and ELISA for past infections. Bacterial vaginosis, Candida and Trichomonas were screened. The results of symptomatic and asymptomatic groups were compared. The data was analyzed using Epi Info version 6 and “Z” test. A probability value of p≤0.05 was considered as significant.. Results Statistical analysis revealed significant association between current C. trachomatis infection with infertility when comparing infected fertile (18.6% vs. 9.4%, odds ratio: 2.19, p<0.0005) and uninfected infertile women (45.6% vs. 27.3%, odds ratio: 2.24, p<0.0001). Average infection rate was 12.1%, highest in women with infertility (18.6%) or with ectopic pregnancy (25%). Significant proportions of infected women with infertility (p<0.01) or with recent pregnancy (p<0.001) were asymptomatic. Follow up of infected women who became negative after treatment [28 women from infertility group and 9 women with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA)] revealed live birth in 8 (21.6%) women within one year, 4 with infertility and 4 with RSA. Conclusion Study findings suggest association between current C. trachomatis infection and infertility. Absence of signs and symptoms associated with this infection highlights its diagnosis in women with a history of infertility and RSA for their better management, as revealed by live births with one year of follow up. PMID:23926547

  9. Prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in infertile couples in romania.

    PubMed

    Mierla, D; Malageanu, M; Tulin, R; Albu, D

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a correlation between the presence of chromosomal abnormalities in one of the partners and infertility. This retrospective study was performed at the Department of Reproductive Medicine, Life Memorial Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, between August 2007 to December 2011. Two thousand, one hundred and ninety-five patients with reproductive problems were investigated, and the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities was calculated. The control group consisting of 87 fertile persons who had two or more children, was investigated in this retrospective study. All the patients of this study were investigated by cytogenetic techniques and the results of the two groups were compared by a two-tailed Fisher's exact test. In this study, 94.99% patients had a normal karyotype and 5.01% had chromosomal abnormalities (numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities). In the study group, numerical chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.14% of infertile men and 0.62% of infertile women, and structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.38% of infertile men and 1.87% of infertile women, respectively. The correlation between the incidence of chromosomal anomalies in the two sexes in couple with reproductive problems was not statistically significant. Recently, a possible association between infertility and chromosomal abnormalities with a significant statistical association has been reported. Our study shows that there is no association between chromosomal abnormalities and infertility, but this study needs to be confirmed with further investigations and a larger control group to establish the role of chromosomal abnormalities in the etiology of infertility. PMID:26929902

  10. Isolation of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum in semen of an infertile patient.

    PubMed

    Penna-Videau, Salvador; Cermeño, Julman; Padrón-Medina, Aracelis

    2006-09-01

    This is the report of a genital tract infection caused by Arcanobacterium haemolyticum in an infertile man from Venezuela. This 29 year-old patient was evaluated for primary infertility, without symptoms of seminal infection. Laboratory analysis showed leukocytospermia, low sperm count, motility and vitality, without abnormalities in hormonal profile. Sperm culture was positive for A. haemolyticum. After erythromycin therapy an improvement in some sperm parameters was observed. A. haemolyticum could be considered as a cause for silent seminal infection. PMID:17672288

  11. Estrogen promotes Leydig cell engulfment by macrophages in male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wanpeng; Zheng, Han; Lin, Wei; Tajima, Astushi; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Hongwen; Wu, Jihua; Han, Daishu; Rahman, Nafis A.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Gao, George Fu; Inoue, Ituro; Li, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Male infertility accounts for almost half of infertility cases worldwide. A subset of infertile men exhibit reduced testosterone and enhanced levels of estradiol (E2), though it is unclear how increased E2 promotes deterioration of male fertility. Here, we utilized a transgenic mouse strain that overexpresses human CYP19, which encodes aromatase (AROM+ mice), and mice with knockout of Esr1, encoding estrogen receptor α (ERαKO mice), to analyze interactions between viable Leydig cells (LCs) and testicular macrophages that may lead to male infertility. In AROM+ males, enhanced E2 promoted LC hyperplasia and macrophage activation via ERα signaling. E2 stimulated LCs to produce growth arrest–specific 6 (GAS6), which mediates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by bridging cells with surface exposed phosphatidylserine (PS) to macrophage receptors, including the tyrosine kinases TYRO3, AXL, and MER. Overproduction of E2 increased apoptosis-independent extrusion of PS on LCs, which in turn promoted engulfment by E2/ERα-activated macrophages that was mediated by AXL-GAS6-PS interaction. We further confirmed E2-dependant engulfment of LCs by real-time 3D imaging. Furthermore, evaluation of molecular markers in the testes of patients with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) revealed enhanced expression of CYP19, GAS6, and AXL, which suggests that the AROM+ mouse model reflects human infertility. Together, these results suggest that GAS6 has a potential as a clinical biomarker and therapeutic target for male infertility. PMID:24762434

  12. Counselling, care in infertility: the ethic of care.

    PubMed

    Appleton, T

    1990-07-01

    Infertility is a health-care problem which has very definite physiological, psychological and social implications. Infertile couples are continually reminded of their plight--the structure of society is based on the family unit; simple activities such as shopping are a constant reminder, the shops being geared to the family; the neighbours fill their cars with all the paraphernalia which accompanies children--the stigma of infertility often leads to mental disharmony, marital difficulties, divorce, and in some cultures to ostracism. The suffering experienced by infertile people is very real. We need to remind ourselves that we are treating 'people who are infertile' rather than 'infertility'. Our care goes beyond their physical treatment--their stresses and strains are our concern and we must be careful not to add additional stress to their existing problems. Successful treatment can transform their lives: 'They are bright, healthy, beautiful children--a dream come true. Our lives are transformed and complete. Thank you a million times.' Failure after years of trying is all the more painful. The availability of effective, informed, independent and involved counselling is essential. PMID:2207611

  13. Estrogen promotes Leydig cell engulfment by macrophages in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wanpeng; Zheng, Han; Lin, Wei; Tajima, Astushi; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Hongwen; Wu, Jihua; Han, Daishu; Rahman, Nafis A; Korach, Kenneth S; Gao, George Fu; Inoue, Ituro; Li, Xiangdong

    2014-06-01

    Male infertility accounts for almost half of infertility cases worldwide. A subset of infertile men exhibit reduced testosterone and enhanced levels of estradiol (E2), though it is unclear how increased E2 promotes deterioration of male fertility. Here, we utilized a transgenic mouse strain that overexpresses human CYP19, which encodes aromatase (AROM+ mice), and mice with knockout of Esr1, encoding estrogen receptor α (ERαKO mice), to analyze interactions between viable Leydig cells (LCs) and testicular macrophages that may lead to male infertility. In AROM+ males, enhanced E2 promoted LC hyperplasia and macrophage activation via ERα signaling. E2 stimulated LCs to produce growth arrest-specific 6 (GAS6), which mediates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by bridging cells with surface exposed phosphatidylserine (PS) to macrophage receptors, including the tyrosine kinases TYRO3, AXL, and MER. Overproduction of E2 increased apoptosis-independent extrusion of PS on LCs, which in turn promoted engulfment by E2/ERα-activated macrophages that was mediated by AXL-GAS6-PS interaction. We further confirmed E2-dependant engulfment of LCs by real-time 3D imaging. Furthermore, evaluation of molecular markers in the testes of patients with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) revealed enhanced expression of CYP19, GAS6, and AXL, which suggests that the AROM+ mouse model reflects human infertility. Together, these results suggest that GAS6 has a potential as a clinical biomarker and therapeutic target for male infertility. PMID:24762434

  14. Saline sonohysterosalpingographic findings in infertile Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Onah, H E; Ezike, H A; Mgbor, S O

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes the findings in the first 100 women who underwent saline sonohysterosalpingography (SHG) at two privately owned health facilities in Enugu, South East Nigeria. This was a prospective study of the first 100 consecutive women presenting with infertility to the authors at Mbanefo Hospital and Hansa Clinics, both in Enugu, South-East geopolitical zone of Nigeria from 1 May 2005 to 20 January 2006. Saline sonohysterosalpingography was carried out in the standard way in these women. The findings were analysed using simple percentages and means +/- SD. The procedure was completed in 98 women, while in two others it was not possible to cannulate the uterine cavity. A total of 61 of the women had normal uterine musculature, 37 had interstitial fibroids and two had sonographic features of adenomyosis. Regarding the endometrial cavity, 93 women had a normal endometrium, four had a submucosal fibroid, one had intrauterine adhesions, while the endometrial cavity could not be assessed in two women who could not be cannulated. No case of submucosal polyp or uterine septa or other congenital uterine anomalies was seen. As assessed sonologically, 77 of the study subjects had bilateral patent tubes, while five had unilateral tubal patency. In one woman, there was uncertainty about tubal patency or blockage; in two women, the tubes could not be assessed because of non-cannulation of the uterine cavity and in 15 women, both tubes were blocked. A total of 74 women had normal ovaries; 15 had polycystic ovaries; five had atrophic ovaries consistent with ovarian failure and six women had ovarian cysts. In 18 women, the findings at sonosalpingography (SSG) were confirmed at laparoscopy in 11 women or laparotomy (two women) or by the fact that the patients became pregnant (five women). In 15 (83.3%) of these 18 women, the findings at SSG and laparotomy/laparoscopy or of the woman becoming pregnant were compatible. SSG is a useful screening test for assessing endometrial, tubal and ovarian factors in infertile Nigerian women, thereby obviating the need for laparoscopy and hysteroscopy in the majority of cases. PMID:17130032

  15. New studies link IUDs, infertility; say copper devices safer.

    PubMed

    1985-06-01

    2 studies sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) report direct evidence of a link between IUDs and infertility. Both studies indicate that copper-bearing IUDs are less likely than inert IUDs to lead to infertility, but increased risk was evident for both types of IUDs. 2 of the studies' authors said the findings confirm the current practice of many clinicians to discourage women who have no children from using IUDs as their contraceptive method. 1 study involved about 90% of the infertility specialists in Seattle. Janet R. Daling, Ph.D., University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine, and colleagues compared rates of IUD use in 159 childless women who had tubal infertility with an equal number of new mothers. They reached the following conclusions: using any IUD more than doubled (2.6 times) the risk of tubal infertility compared with not using an IUD; the type of IUD affected risk with Dalkon Shield users having 6.8 times the risk of tubal infertility compared with women who never used IUDs, Lippes Loop or Saf-Toil users having 3.2 times the risk, and Copper-7 or Copper-T users having 1.9 times the risk if a copper device was used at 1 time and a plastic device at another time but 1.3 times the risk if only a copper device was used; and the risk of tubal infertility for IUD users increased among women who did not have symptoms of infection as well as those who did. A 2nd larger study involved 7 infertility centers and collaborating hospitals. Dr. Daniel W. Cramer, Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, headed the investigation, which evaluated IUD use in 283 childless women with tubal infertility, 69 women with tubal infertility after 1 child, and 3833 new mothers. The Boston-based study found the following: overall the cumulative experience with all IUD use doubled (2.0 relative risk) the risk of tubal infertility; the type of IUD affected the risk of tubal infertility; no increased risk of infertility was apparent for women with a single sex partner; a high risk was apparent for women with a history of infection, pain, or bleeding with IUD use; and noncopper IUD users with 1 child had about 3 times the risk (2.8 relative risk) of never users of developing "secondary" tubal infertility or infertility associated with using an IUD after a 1st live birth. George Rubin, chief of the epidemiological studies branch of the Centers for Disease Control Division of Reproductive Health states that the new data confirm what has been good clinical practice for a number of years. PMID:12313655

  16. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khatami, Saeid Reza; Galehdari, Hamid; Rasekh, Abdorrahman; Mombeini, Hayat; Konar, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background The androgen receptor (AR) gene contains a polymorphic trinucleotide repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in its N-terminal transactivation domain (N- TAD). We aimed to find a correlation between the length of this polymorphic tract and azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12) of azoospermia or oligozoospermia resulting from Y chromosome microdele- tions were excluded from our study. The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was determined in 72 patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and in 72 fertile controls, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results Microdeletions were detected in 14.3% (n=12) patients suffering severe oligozoospermia. The mean CAG repeat length was 18.99 0.35 (range, 11-26) and 19.96 0.54 (range, 12-25) in infertile males and controls, respectively. Also in the infertile group, the most common allele was 19 (26.38%), while in controls, it was 25 (22.22%). Conclusion Y chromosome microdeletions could be one of the main reasons of male infertility living in Khuzestan Province, while there was no correlation between CAG length in AR gene with azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. PMID:26246877

  17. Varicocele-Induced Infertility in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Mazdak; Malekinejad, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Varicocele is characterized by abnormal tortuosity and dilation of the veins of the pampiniform plexus within the spermatic cord. Although several reports show the mechanisms by which the varicocele exerts its infertility impact, the exact pathophysiology for varicocele-induced inflammation and its relationship with testicular endocrine disruption remain largely unknown. This review article will update previous findings by discussing the pathophysiology of long term-induced varicocele in rats. Testicular endocrine disruption in experimentally-induced varicocele, new findings related to biochemical alterations in germinal epithelium, and sperm cells apoptosis are highlighted. Recent observations show that varicocele down-regulates first and second maturation divisions, results in Leydig and Sertoli cell inflammation, and increases immune cell infiltration in the testes of the rat as an animal model. Ultimately, previous findings of our laboratory have revealed that varicocele decreased sperm motility, viability and severe DNA damage. Damage in sperm significantly lowers the animal’s fertility potential. Varicocele not only exerts its pathologic impact by lowering the testicular antioxidant capacity but it also down-regulates first and second maturation divisions by exerting biochemical alterations such as reducing the intracytoplasmic carbohydrate ratio in germinal epithelium. PMID:26246871

  18. Folate and vitamin B12 in idiopathic male infertility.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Laurel E; Mills, James L; Molloy, Anne M; Qian, Cong; Carter, Tonia C; Strevens, Helena; Wide-Swensson, Dag; Giwercman, Aleksander; Levine, Richard J

    2011-11-01

    Although methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, a folate enzyme gene, has been associated with idiopathic male infertility, few studies have examined other folate-related metabolites and genes. We investigated whether idiopathic male infertility is associated with variants in folate, vitamin B(12) (B12) and total homocysteine (tHcy)-related genes and measured these metabolites in blood. We conducted a case-control study that included 153 men with idiopathic infertility and 184 fertile male controls recruited at the Fertility Center and Antenatal Care Center, University Hospital, Malm and Lund, Sweden. Serum folate, red cell folate (RCF), serum B12, plasma tHcy and semen quality were measured. Subjects were genotyped for 20 common variants in 12 genes related to folate/B12/homocysteine metabolism. Metabolite concentrations and genotype distributions were compared between cases and controls using linear and logistic regression with adjustment for covariates. The phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) M175V and TCblR rs173665 polymorphisms were significantly associated with infertility (P=0.01 and P=0.009, respectively), but not with semen quality. Among non-users of supplements, infertile men had lower serum folate concentrations than fertile men (12.89 vs. 14.73 nmol l(-1); P=0.02), but there were no significant differences in RCF, B12 or tHcy. Folate, B12 and tHcy concentrations were not correlated with any semen parameters. This study provides little support for low folate or B12 status in the pathogenesis of idiopathic male infertility. Although additional data are needed to confirm these initial findings, our results suggest that PEMT and TCblR, genes involved in choline and B12 metabolism, merit further investigation in idiopathic male infertility. PMID:21857689

  19. Cost-effective treatment for the couple with infertility.

    PubMed

    Van Voorhis, B J; Syrop, C H

    2000-12-01

    Although the evaluation of cost-effective approaches to infertility treatment remains in its infancy, several important principles have emerged from the initial studies in this field. Currently, in treating couples with infertility without tubal disease or severe male-factor infertility, the most cost-effective approach is to start with IUI or superovulation-IUI treatments before resorting to IVF procedures. The woman's age and number of sperm present for insemination are significant factors influencing cost-effectiveness. The influence of certain diagnoses on the cost-effectiveness of infertility treatments requires further study. Even when accounting for the costs associated with multiple gestations and premature deliveries, the cost of IVF decreases within the range of other cost-effective medical procedures and decreases to less than the willingness to pay for these procedures. Indeed, for patients with severe tubal disease, IVF has been found to be more cost-effective than surgical repair. The cost-effectiveness of IVF will likely improve as success rates show continued improvements over the course of time. In addition, usefulness of embryo selection and practices to reduce the likelihood of high-order multiple pregnancies, without reductions in pregnancy rates, will significantly impact cost-effectiveness. The exclusion of infertility treatments from insurance plans is unfortunate and accentuates the importance of physicians understanding the economics of infertility treatment with costs that are often passed directly to the patient. The erroneous economic policies and judgments that have led to inequities in access to infertility health care should not be tolerated. PMID:11100309

  20. Human parasitic protozoan infection to infertility: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nourollahpour Shiadeh, Malihe; Niyyati, Maryam; Fallahi, Shirzad; Rostami, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Protozoan parasitic diseases are endemic in many countries worldwide, especially in developing countries, where infertility is a major burden. It has been reported that such infections may cause infertility through impairment in male and female reproductive systems. We searched Medline, PubMed, and Scopus databases and Google scholar to identify the potentially relevant studies on protozoan parasitic infections and their implications in human and animal model infertility. Literature described that some of the protozoan parasites such as Trichomonas vaginalis may cause deformities of the genital tract, cervical neoplasia, and tubal and atypical pelvic inflammations in women and also non-gonoccocal urethritis, asthenozoospermia, and teratozoospermia in men. Toxopalasma gondii could cause endometritis, impaired folliculogenesis, ovarian and uterine atrophy, adrenal hypertrophy, vasculitis, and cessation of estrus cycling in female and also decrease in semen quality, concentration, and motility in male. Trypanosoma cruzi inhibits cell division in embryos and impairs normal implantation and development of placenta. Decrease in gestation rate, infection of hormone-producing glands, parasite invasion of the placenta, and overproduction of inflammatory cytokines in the oviducts and uterine horns are other possible mechanisms induced by Trypanosoma cruzi to infertility. Plasmodium spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause damage in pituitary gland, hormonal disorders, and decreased semen quality. Entamoeba histolytica infection leads to pelvic pain, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess, and genital ulcers. Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis can induce genital lesion, testicular amyloidosis, inflammation of epididymis, prostatitis, and sperm abnormality in human and animals. In addition, some epidemiological studies have reported that rates of protozoan infections in infertile patients are higher than healthy controls. The current review indicates that protozoan parasitic infections may be an important cause of infertility. Given the widespread prevalence of parasitic protozoa diseases worldwide, we suggest further studies to better understanding of relationship between such infections and infertility. PMID:26573517

  1. The incidence, characteristics, and prognosis of patients whose infertility is unexplained.

    PubMed

    Templeton, A A; Penney, G C

    1982-02-01

    Review of the case records of 500 consecutive couples attending one Scottish infertility clinic revealed a group of patients whose infertility remained unexplained after completion of a standard protocol of investigations. The incidence of this condition in the clinic population was 24%. Various patient characteristics were examined, and no differences from patients with a detectable, organic cause for their infertility were found. Life-table analysis was used to provide a prognostic guide for such couples. About 34% of those with primary infertility and 21% of those with secondary infertility will remain infertile after 9 years of attempting to conceive. PMID:7060767

  2. A comparative analysis of arterial blood flow in unexplained infertility, tubal infertility and fertile groups.

    PubMed

    Zebitay, A G; Tutumlu, M; Verit, F F; Ilhan, G K; Gungor, E S; Cetin, O; Vuruşkan, E

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to compare ovarian (O), uterine (U) and spiral (S) artery (A) resistance of patients diagnosed as fertile, unexplained infertility (UI) and tubal factor infertility (TFI) in the peri-implantation period and independent from the impact of the treatment. UI (n = 70), TFI (n = 75) and fertile (n = 72) patients' ovarian, uterine and spiral artery pulsatility index (PI), resistance index (RI) and the endometrial thickness, serum estradiol and progesterone levels were compared. The specificity and sensitivity values were calculated according to determined cutoff values. Both TFI and control groups' UA PI values were significantly lower than the UI group's PI values. The highest UA RI values were found in UI group and the lowest values were in the control group. UI and TFI groups' OA PI/RI values were significantly higher than the control group. Both the control and TFI groups' SA PI/RI values were significantly lower than UI group's PI/RI values. UI patients' uterine and spiral arteries PI values >1.86 and >0.85, RI values >0.80 and >0.53 can be used as a valuable test showing reduced uterine perfusion. Ovarian artery PI values  >0.96 and RI values  >0.58 can be used as tests showing decreased ovarian perfusion in patients with TFI. In these patients, embryo cryopreservation can be considered. PMID:26699267

  3. SUFFERING INFERTILITY: THE IMPACT OF INFERTILITY ON WOMEN’S LIFE EXPERIENCES IN TWO NIGERIAN COMMUNITIES

    PubMed Central

    LARSEN, ULLA; HOLLOS, MARIDA; OBONO, OKA; WHITEHOUSE, BRUCE

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the experiences of women with infertility in two Nigerian communities with different systems of descent and historically different levels of infertility. First, the paper focuses on the life experiences of individual women across the two communities and second, it compares these experiences with those of their fertile counterparts, in each community. In doing this, women who are childless are distinguished from those with subfertility and compared with high-fertility women. The research is based on interdisciplinary research conducted among the Ijo and Yakurr people of southern Nigeria, which included a survey of approximately 100 childless and subfertile women and a matching sample of 100 fertile women as well as in-depth ethnographic interviews with childless and subfertile women in two communities: Amakiri in Delta State and Lopon in Cross River State. The findings indicate that while there are variations in the extent to which childlessness is considered to be problematic, the necessity for a woman to have a child remains basic in this region. PMID:20561392

  4. [Surgery of male infertility: an update].

    PubMed

    Franco, Giorgio; Misuraca, Leonardo; Ciletti, Mario; Leonardo, Costantino; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Palminteri, Enzo; De Dominicis, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Surgery for male infertility includes three main areas: varicocele surgery, recanalization of seminal tract, sperm retrieval.Varicocele treatment in infertily is still controversial. Recent scientific evidence appears to demonstrate that in selected cases varicocele treatment is beneficial in improving semen parameters and pregnancy rate. The key for the success of treatment seems to be a correct indication. It is our opinion that varicocele should be treated in presence of abnormal semen parameters, when clinically significant, and in adolescents with atrophy of the affected testis. So far, no specific technique, either surgical, microsurgical or sclerotherapic, can be considered the gold standard. Good results in our hands have been obtained with the microsurgical lymphatic sparing high ligation of internal spermatic vein.Innovations in surgery for seminal tract obstructions include the new tubular invagination techniques for epididimovasostomy, which showed excellent results with a simplified and time-saving microsurgical approach. In distal obstructions, a new transperineal ultrasound-guided approach has been proposed for the diagnostic work-up and treatment. Advantages of this technique and of the TURED must be balanced with those of immediate sperm retrieval for ART.In sperm retrieval, microTESE represents the most important surgical evolution in non-obstructive azoospermia. We have recently proposed a new stepwise approach starting with a minimal equatorial incision for conventional testicular biopsy which is extended to perform microTESE only when no sperm is retrieved. In this way microTESE is offered only to patients who really need it. Another field of innovation is sperm retrieval for ICSI in patients with Klinefelter Syndrome. PMID:25214369

  5. The biology of infertility: research advances and clinical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Matzuk, Martin M; Lamb, Dolores J

    2013-01-01

    Reproduction is required for the survival of all mammalian species, and thousands of essential ‘sex’ genes are conserved through evolution. Basic research helps to define these genes and the mechanisms responsible for the development, function and regulation of the male and female reproductive systems. However, many infertile couples continue to be labeled with the diagnosis of idiopathic infertility or given descriptive diagnoses that do not provide a cause for their defect. For other individuals with a known etiology, effective cures are lacking, although their infertility is often bypassed with assisted reproductive technologies (ART), some accompanied by safety or ethical concerns. Certainly, progress in the field of reproduction has been realized in the twenty-first century with advances in the understanding of the regulation of fertility, with the production of over 400 mutant mouse models with a reproductive phenotype and with the promise of regenerative gonadal stem cells. Indeed, the past six years have witnessed a virtual explosion in the identification of gene mutations or polymorphisms that cause or are linked to human infertility. Translation of these findings to the clinic remains slow, however, as do new methods to diagnose and treat infertile couples. Additionally, new approaches to contraception remain elusive. Nevertheless, the basic and clinical advances in the understanding of the molecular controls of reproduction are impressive and will ultimately improve patient care. PMID:18989307

  6. Empirical medical therapy in idiopathic male infertility: Promise or panacea?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Hung

    2014-01-01

    Male factors account for 20%-50% of cases of infertility and in 25% of cases, the etiology of male infertility is unknown. Effective treatments are well-established for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, male accessory gland infection, retrograde ejaculation, and positive antisperm antibody. However, the appropriate treatment for idiopathic male infertility is unclear. Empirical medical treatment (EMT) has been used in men with idiopathic infertility and can be divided into two categories based on the mode of action: hormonal treatment and antioxidant supplementation. Hormonal medications consist of gonadotropins, androgens, estrogen receptor blockers, and aromatase inhibitors. Antioxidants such as vitamins, zinc, and carnitines have also been widely used to reduce oxidative stress-induced spermatozoa damage. Although scientifically acceptable evidence of EMT is limited because of the lack of large, randomized, controlled studies, recent systematic reviews with meta-analyses have shown that the administration of gonadotropins, anti-estrogens, and oral antioxidants results in a significant increase in the live birth rate compared with control treatments. Therefore, all physicians who treat infertility should bear in mind that EMT can improve semen parameters and subsequent fertility potential through natural intercourse. PMID:25309854

  7. Association between endometriosis and hyperprolactinemia in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilzadeh, Seddigheh; Mirabi, Parvaneh; Basirat, Zahra; Zeinalzadeh, Mahtab; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Background: The association of endometriosis with hyperprolactinemia is controversial. Objective: The present study aimed to determine the frequency of endometriosis and association of prolactin with endometriosis in infertile women. Materials and Methods: 256 infertile women who underwent diagnostic laparoscopy for the evaluation of infertility, referred to Fatemezahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center were included in a cross-sectional study. The presence of endometriosis was evaluated. To investigate the association of endometriosis with hyperprolactinemia, the patients whose infertility was not caused by endometriosis were included as control group. Serum prolactin (PRL) level was measured in both groups. The comparison of basal serum PRL levels between the two groups was performed, using independent t-test. One way ANOVA was used to determine PRL association with endometriosis stages. Results: The frequency of endometriosis was found to be 29%. PRL levels were significantly higher in endometriosis group compared to control group (23.021.25 vs. 17.221.22 respectively, p=0.004). Statistically significant associations were found between staging of endometriosis and prolactin levels (p=0.01). Conclusion: Hyperprolactinemia may be associated with endometriosis and its progression. PMID:26000006

  8. Microbiota of the seminal fluid from healthy and infertile men

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dongsheng; Zhou, Xia; Zhong, Xue; Settles, Matt; Herring, Jessica; Wang, Li; Abdo, Zaid; Forney, Larry J.; Xu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore potential causes of male infertility by determining the composition and structure of commensal bacterial communities in seminal fluids. Design: Microscopy of gram stained semen samples and classification of 16S rRNA gene sequences to determine the species composition of semen bacterial communities. Setting(s): Clinical andrology laboratory and academic research laboratories. Patient(s): 19 sperm donors and 58 infertility patients. Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): Classification of 16S rRNA gene sequences, clustering of seminal microbial communities, and multiple statistical tests. Result(s): High numbers of diverse kinds of bacteria were present in most samples of both sperm donors and infertility patients. The bacterial communities varied widely between subjects, but they could be clustered into six groups based on similarities in composition and the rank abundances of taxa. Overall there were no significant differences between sperm donors and infertility patients. However, multiple statistical tests showed a significant negative association between sperm quality and the presence of Anaerococcus. The results also indicated that many of the bacterial taxa identified in semen also occur in the vaginal communities of some women, especially those with bacterial vaginosis, which suggests heterosexual sex partners may share bacteria. Conclusion(s): Diverse kinds of bacteria were present in the human semen, there were no significant differences between sperm donors and infertility patients, The presence of Anaerococcus might be a biomarker for low sperm quality. PMID:23993888

  9. Seminal biomarkers for the evaluation of male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Bieniek, Jared M; Drabovich, Andrei P; Lo, Kirk C

    2016-01-01

    For men struggling to conceive with their partners, diagnostic tools are limited and often consist of only a standard semen analysis. This baseline test serves as a crude estimation of male fertility, leaving patients and clinicians in need of additional diagnostic biomarkers. Seminal fluid contains the highest concentration of molecules from the male reproductive glands, therefore, this review focuses on current and novel seminal biomarkers in certain male infertility scenarios, including natural fertility, differentiating azoospermia etiologies, and predicting assisted reproductive technique success. Currently available tests include antisperm antibody assays, DNA fragmentation index, sperm fluorescence in situ hybridization, and other historical sperm functional tests. The poor diagnostic ability of current assays has led to continued efforts to find more predictive biomarkers. Emerging research in the fields of genomics, epigenetics, proteomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics holds promise for the development of novel male infertility biomarkers. Seminal protein-based assays of TEX101, ECM1, and ACRV1 are already available or under final development for clinical use. Additional panels of DNA, RNA, proteins, or metabolites are being explored as we attempt to understand the pathophysiologic processes of male infertility. Future ventures will need to continue data integration and validation for the development of clinically useful infertility biomarkers to aid in male infertility diagnosis, treatment, and counseling. PMID:26975492

  10. Relationship between ovarian cysts and infertility: what surgery and when?

    PubMed

    Legendre, Guillaume; Catala, Laurent; Morinière, Catherine; Lacoeuille, Céline; Boussion, Françoise; Sentilhes, Loïc; Descamps, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between ovarian cysts and infertility is a subject of debate, mainly because it is difficult to determine the real impact of the cyst and its treatment on later fertility. For a long time it was hoped that surgical treatment could prevent potential complications (such as rupture or malignancy). For presumed benign ovarian tumors, fertility sparing should be the main concern. The goal of this survey of current knowledge on the subject is to thoroughly explore the potential relationship between cysts, their treatment, and infertility. Our study is based on a review of the literature dealing with the epidemiology of ovarian cysts and the effects of their surgical management in relation to infertility. Analysis of the epidemiologic data, drawn mainly from comparative studies and cohorts, shows that the role of cysts in infertility is controversial and that the effects of surgical treatment are often more harmful than the cyst itself to the ovarian reserve. Surgery does not seem to improve pregnancy rates. When a surgical option is nonetheless chosen, a conservative laparoscopic approach is more suitable. Besides excision, sclerotherapy and plasma vaporization are promising, offering a greater preservation of the ovarian parenchyma, especially in endometriomas. These techniques must be better defined. The context of the infertility is essential, and surgeons and specialists in reproductive medicine should decide management jointly. PMID:24559614

  11. Seminal biomarkers for the evaluation of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Bieniek, Jared M; Drabovich, Andrei P; Lo, Kirk C

    2016-01-01

    For men struggling to conceive with their partners, diagnostic tools are limited and often consist of only a standard semen analysis. This baseline test serves as a crude estimation of male fertility, leaving patients and clinicians in need of additional diagnostic biomarkers. Seminal fluid contains the highest concentration of molecules from the male reproductive glands, therefore, this review focuses on current and novel seminal biomarkers in certain male infertility scenarios, including natural fertility, differentiating azoospermia etiologies, and predicting assisted reproductive technique success. Currently available tests include antisperm antibody assays, DNA fragmentation index, sperm fluorescence in situ hybridization, and other historical sperm functional tests. The poor diagnostic ability of current assays has led to continued efforts to find more predictive biomarkers. Emerging research in the fields of genomics, epigenetics, proteomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics holds promise for the development of novel male infertility biomarkers. Seminal protein-based assays of TEX101, ECM1, and ACRV1 are already available or under final development for clinical use. Additional panels of DNA, RNA, proteins, or metabolites are being explored as we attempt to understand the pathophysiologic processes of male infertility. Future ventures will need to continue data integration and validation for the development of clinically useful infertility biomarkers to aid in male infertility diagnosis, treatment, and counseling. PMID:26975492

  12. Power of Proteomics in Linking Oxidative Stress and Female Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sajal; Sharma, Rakesh; Agarwal, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis, PCOS, and unexplained infertility are currently the most common diseases rendering large numbers of women infertile worldwide. Oxidative stress, due to its deleterious effects on proteins and nucleic acids, is postulated to be the one of the important mechanistic pathways in differential expression of proteins and in these diseases. The emerging field of proteomics has allowed identification of proteins involved in cell cycle, as antioxidants, extracellular matrix (ECM), cytoskeleton, and their linkage to oxidative stress in female infertility related diseases. The aim of this paper is to assess the association of oxidative stress and protein expression in the reproductive microenvironments such as endometrial fluid, peritoneal fluid, and follicular fluid, as well as reproductive tissues and serum. The review also highlights the literature that proposes the use of the fertility related proteins as potential biomarkers for noninvasive and early diagnosis of the aforementioned diseases rather than utilizing the more invasive methods used currently. The review will highlight the power of proteomic profiles identified in infertility related disease conditions and their linkage with underlying oxidative stress. The power of proteomics will be reviewed with regard to eliciting molecular mechanisms for early detection and management of these infertility related conditions. PMID:24900998

  13. Evaluation of the immunological cause of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Hinting, A; Soebadi, D M; Santoso, R I

    1996-01-01

    The presence of antisperm antibodies was considered as one of the main causes of male infertility. This study was conducted on 776 semen samples of the male partners of infertile couples in order to evaluate the immunological factor. The detection of antisperm antibodies was performed by means of the direct Mixed Antiglobulin Reaction (MAR) test. A positive test was found in 35 samples. Hence, the prevalence of immunological infertility in this study is 4.5% among the male partners of infertile couples. Further explorations were performed on men with positive results, in order to detect the presence of antibodies in the sera by means of the indirect MAR tests, and sperm immobilization tests for quantitating the cytotoxic activity of the antibodies. The indirect MAR tests showed that 97% of the antibodies were present in sera, whereas 51% of the samples were cytotoxic. Routine semen analysis indicated that around 60% of the semen samples with antisperm antibodies were good. Semen culture showed that positive results were detected in 40% of samples. Clinical evaluations revealed that the presence of antisperm antibodies may have been the cause of long-standing infertility, on average 5 years, and were not all primary. Evaluations of all clinical and laboratory findings indicated that unilateral testis obstruction and male accessory gland infection were the main pathologies found. PMID:8849047

  14. Infertility in public health: the case of Norway

    PubMed Central

    Sundby, J.

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a health issue that demonstrates how unequal access to health care is at a global level. In the poorer segments of the world, and in poor parts of wealthy societies, access is often minimal or non-existent. Public and lay attitudes to modern infertility treatment have been heavily debated alongside development of methods. I have looked at the changes in the public discourse in modern media, legislation, politics, and among professionals. The paper seeks to present and discuss some of these changes as they have evolved in one of the countries that have had one of the more strict laws regulating access to treatment, namely Norway. It is a country that nevertheless offers treatment in the public health system. The paper also tries to connect this discussion to the difficulties faced in every attempt to expand infertility services to the developing world. PMID:25013709

  15. [A Case of Kartagener's Syndrome in Infertile Male Patients].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohei; Yumura, Yasushi; Takeshima, Teppei; Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Sanjyo, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kengo; Noguchi, Kazumi

    2015-12-01

    The patient was a 33-year-old man attending the infertility clinic with primary infertility of 3 years duration. The semen examination showed oligozoospermia and suspected primary male infertility. He had a history of chronic sinusitis and respiratory disease. His chest X-ray showed dextrocardia. Abnormality of the ultrastructure of the cilia of the tract epithelium was found by electron microscopy, and further examination revealed bronchoectasis. We gave him a diagnosis of Kartagener syndrome from these findings. Kartagener syndrome consists of bronchiectasis, sinusitis and situs inversus and is considered a form of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). PCD is also a cause of motor impairment of sperm flagella. This case had successful in-vitro fertilization pregnancy with spermatozoa from the patient. PMID:26790766

  16. Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Decreasing male fertility has been observed for the past fifty years. Examples of affected reproductive parameters include decreases in sperm count and sperm quality and increases in testicular cancer, cryptorchidism and hypospadias. Exposures to environmental toxicants during fetal development and early postnatal life have been shown to promote infertility. Environmental exposures inducing epigenetic changes related to male infertility range from life style, occupational exposures, environmental toxicants and nutrition. Exposures during fetal gonadal sex determination have been shown to alter the epigenetic programming of the germline that then can transmit this altered epigenetic information to subsequent generations in the absence of any exposures. This environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease will be a component of the etiology of male infertility. PMID:25104619

  17. Effect of Palm Pollen on Sperm Parameters of Infertile Man.

    PubMed

    Rasekh, Athar; Jashni, Hojjatollah Karimi; Rahmanian, Karamatollah; Jahromi, Abdolreza Sotoodeh

    2015-04-01

    There is a rapidly growing trend in the consumption of herbal remedies in the developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of orally administered Date Palm Pollen (DPP) on the results of semen analysis in adult infertile men. Forty infertile men participated in our study. They were treated by Pollen powder 120 mg kg(-1) in gelatinous capsules every other day, for two months. Before and at the end of therapy, the semen was collected after masturbation and sperm numbers, motility and morphology were determined. Our findings revealed that consumption of DPP improved the sperm count. The treatment was significantly increased sperm motility, morphology and forward progressive motility. Date palm pollen seems to cure male infertility by improving the quality of sperm parameters. PMID:26506651

  18. Male infertility: the role of imaging in diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, T; Sidhu, P S; Wilkins, C J

    2012-01-01

    The investigation of male infertility is assuming greater importance, with male factors implicated as a causal factor in up to half of infertile couples. Following routine history, examination and blood tests, imaging is frequently utilised in order to assess the scrotal contents for testicular volume and morphology. Additionally, this may give indirect evidence of the presence of possible reversible pathology in the form of obstructive azoospermia. Further imaging in the form of transrectal ultrasound and MRI is then often able to categorise the level of obstruction and facilitate treatment planning without resort to more invasive imaging such as vasography. Ultrasound guidance of therapy such as sperm or cyst aspiration and vasal cannulation may also be performed. This article reviews the imaging modalities used in the investigation of male infertility, and illustrates normal and abnormal findings that may be demonstrated. PMID:22763036

  19. Infertility in public health: the case of Norway.

    PubMed

    Sundby, J

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a health issue that demonstrates how unequal access to health care is at a global level. In the poorer segments-- of the world, and in poor parts of wealthy societies, access is often minimal or non-existent. Public and lay attitudes to modern infertility treatment have been heavily debated alongside development of methods. I have looked at the changes in the public discourse in modern media, legislation, politics, and among professionals. The paper seeks to present and discuss some of these changes as they have evolved in one of the countries that have had one of the more strict laws regulating access to treatment, namely Norway. It is a country that nevertheless offers treatment in the public health system. The paper also tries to connect this discussion to the difficulties faced in every attempt to expand-- infertility services to the developing world. PMID:25013709

  20. Sulfasalazine induced oxidative stress: a possible mechanism of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Virginia; Linares, Victoria; Bellés, Montserrat; Albina, Maria L; Sirvent, Juan J; Domingo, José L; Sánchez, Domènec J

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of action of sulfasalazine (SASP) in male infertility is not well elucidated. For it, an oxidative stress-like mechanism inductor of infertility was hypothesized. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (20/group) were orally administered 0, 300, and 600mg SASP/kg body weight for 14 days. One-half of animals in each group remained an additional period of 14 days without treatment. SASP induced a significant decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR) at the highest dose in both testis and epididymis. GR remained altered in these tissues within the recovery period. However, an increase in SOD was noted in epididymis. An increase in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) was noted in all SASP-treated groups. In epididymis, catalase (CAT) significantly increased at 600mg/(kgday). These results suggest that SASP induces oxidative stress, which in turn might act as a possible mechanism of male-induced infertility. PMID:19028562

  1. Utilization of Infertility Services: How Much Does Money Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Farley Ordovensky Staniec, J; Webb, Natalie J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effects of financial access and other individual characteristics on the likelihood that a woman pursues infertility treatment and the choice of treatment type. Data Source/Study Setting The 1995 National Survey of Family Growth. Study Design We use a binomial logit model to estimate the effects of financial access and individual characteristics on the likelihood that a woman pursues infertility treatment. We then use a multinomial logit model to estimate the differential effects of these variables across treatment types. Data Collection/Extraction Method This study analyzes the subset of 1,210 women who meet the definition of infertile or subfecund from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth. Principal Findings We find that income, insurance coverage, age, and parity (number of previous births) all significantly affect the probability of seeking infertility treatment; however, the effect of these variables on choice of treatment type varies significantly. Neither income nor insurance influences the probability of seeking advice, a relatively low cost, low yield treatment. At the other end of the spectrum, the choice to pursue assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs)—a much more expensive but potentially more productive option—is highly influenced by income, but merely having private insurance has no significant effect. In the middle of the spectrum are treatment options such as testing, surgery, and medications, for which “financial access” increases their probability of selection. Conclusions Our results illustrate that for the sample of infertile of subfecund women of childbearing age studied, and considering their options, financial access to infertility treatment does matter. PMID:17489899

  2. Analysis of partial AZFc deletions in Malaysian infertile male subjects.

    PubMed

    Almeamar, Hussein Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Ismail, Patimah; Nadkarni, Prashan; Fawzi, Nora

    2013-04-01

    Complete deletions in the AZF (a, b, and c) sub-regions of the Y-chromosome have been shown to contribute to unexplained male infertility. However, the role of partial AZFc deletions in male infertility remains to be verified. Three types of partial AZFc deletions have been identified. They are gr/gr, b1/b3, and b2/b3 deletions. A recent meta-analysis showed that ethnic and geographical factors might contribute to the association of partial AZFc deletions with male infertility. This study analyzed the association of partial AZFc deletions in Malaysian infertile males. Fifty two oligozoospermic infertile males and 63 fertile controls were recruited to this study. Screening for partial AZFc deletions was done using the two sequence-tagged sites approach (SY1291 and SY1191) which were analyzed using both the conventional PCR gel-electrophoresis and the high resolution melt, HRM method. Gr/gr deletions were found in 11.53% of the cases and 9.52% of the controls (p = 0.725). A B2/b3 deletion was found in one of the cases (p = 0.269). No B1/b3 deletions were identified in this study. The results of HRM analysis were consistent with those obtained using the conventional PCR gel-electrophoresis method. The HRM analysis was highly repeatable (95% limit of agreement was -0.0879 to 0.0871 for SY1191 melting temperature readings). In conclusion, our study showed that partial AZFc deletions were not associated with male infertility in Malaysian subjects. HRM analysis was a reliable, repeatable, fast, cost-effective, and semi-automated method which can be used for screening of partial AZFc deletions. PMID:23231020

  3. Psychiatric Morbidity in Infertility Patients in a Tertiary Care Setup

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Pankaj; Rastogi, Rajesh; Gandhi, Raghu; Kapoor, Rohit; Sachdeva, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    Context Infertility is regarded as a trigger for psychological morbidity. Infertile couples often suffer from anxiety, depression and lack of self confidence. Aims To study the demographic factors associated with infertility in a tertiary care setup and to determine the level of anxiety and depression associated with it by using standardized scales. The study protocol also included studying the various coping strategies employed by these patient groups. Settings and Design Case control study. Materials and Methods A prestructured questionnaire based study conducted for a span of 6 months. The study population included the patients attending the infertility and the family planning outpatient department. We applied the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) and the Becks Depression Inventory (BDI). Brief COPE Inventory was applied to look for the various coping measures that are employed by the anxious and depressed patients. Statistical Analysis Data analysis was done using SPSS ver20. Results A total of 280 study subjects were included in the study; which included 140 women from the infertility clinic and 140 from the family planning OPD. A total of 56.4% (79/140) of the females were found to be suffering from depression and 68.9% (96/140) of the females were found to be suffering from anxiety and depression both. Seven risk factors were found to be significant for depression based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scale and 6 risk factors were found to be significant based on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The most common coping method employed by depressed women was venting 72.2% (57/79) followed by behavioural disengagement 70.9% (56/79); whereas the most important coping method employed by the anxious and depressed women was behavioural disengagement 71.9% (69/96). Conclusion Anxiety and depression is common among patients suffering from infertility and measures should be taken to alleviate it. PMID:26500988

  4. Spermatogenesis, DNA damage and DNA repair mechanisms in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Sezgin; Al-Sadaan, Maha; Agarwal, Ashok

    2015-09-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process of proliferation and differentiation during male germ cell development involving mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis. Endogenous and exogenous physical, chemical and biological sources modify the genome of spermatozoa. The genomic integrity and stability of the sperm is protected by DNA repair mechanisms. In the male germline cells, DNA repair mechanisms include nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, DNA mismatch repair, double strand break repair and post-replication repair. Defects in repair mechanisms cause arrest of spermatogenesis and abnormal recombination, ultimately resulting in male infertility. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways, DNA repair defects and male infertility. PMID:26206278

  5. Varicocele-induced infertility: Newer insights into its pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Michael L.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2011-01-01

    The association between varicoceles and male infertility has been known since the 1950s; however, the pathophysiology of the process remains uncertain. The primary proposed hypotheses involve hyperthermia, venous pressure, testicular blood flow, hormonal imbalance, toxic substances, and reactive oxygen species. It is difficult to identify a single or dominant factor, and it is likely that many of these factors contribute to the infertile phenotype seen in clinical practice. Moreover, patient lifestyle and genetic factors likely affect patient susceptibilities to the varicocele insult. While the current studies have weaknesses, they provide building blocks for futures studies into the pathophysiology of the varicocele. PMID:21716891

  6. [Surgical laparoscopy in the management of women infertility].

    PubMed

    Rachdi, Radhouane; Messaoudi, Fethi; Yazidi, M; Ben Temime, Riadh; Basly, Mohamed; Chlayh, Mounir; Zayene, H; Messaoudi, Lotfi; Chibani, Mounir

    2004-09-01

    The authors report their experience about surgical laparoscopy in the management of women infertility. Based on a series of 87 patients (median age: 31 years), 61% have primary infertility. The surgical procedures were distal tuboplasty in 26 cases, endometriosis cure in 19 cases, ovarian driling for polycystic ovarian syndrome in 18 cases and adhesiolysis in 24 cases. The rate of intra uterine pregnancy of the 81 followed patients is 40.7% with 23 newborn (28.39%), 5 abortions (6.17%) and 5 current pregnancies (6.17%). The rate of ectopic pregnancies is 3.7%. PMID:15693477

  7. Infertility: from a personal to a public health problem.

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, A T; Bernstein, J

    1999-01-01

    The inability to conceive a child is most often viewed as a private matter, but public health perspectives and skills can contribute greatly to our knowledge about infertility, and the development of effective and rational public policy for prevention, access to health care, and regulation of new technologies. We offer a primer of public health aspects of infertility in an effort to encourage the broad spectrum of public health professionals to become more knowledgeable about these topics and join in the national debate about preventive strategies, cost-benefit assessment, resource allocation, and ethics. Images p494-a p495-a p499-a p506-a PMID:10670617

  8. What Are the Issues Confronting Infertile Women? A Qualitative and Quantitative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammerli, Katja; Znoj, Hansjorg; Berger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a stressful experience, yet little is known about the specific issues confronting infertile women. In the present study, researchers sought to identify themes important to infertile women and examine possible associations with mental health levels. Using qualitative content analysis, researchers analyzed the email messages of 57…

  9. Infertility: Towards an Awareness of a Need among Family Life Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Nancy L.; Christopher, F. Scott

    1984-01-01

    Discusses emotional problems related to infertility investigation and treatment. Reviews causes and treatment of infertility, coping patterns, and the role of counselors and family life educators in easing the crises of infertility and facilitating successful resolution of associated emotional problems. (JAC)

  10. The Effect of Social Coping Resources and Growth-Fostering Relationships on Infertility Stress in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Donna M.; Myers, Jane E.

    2002-01-01

    The experience of infertility often results in multiple stresses and needs for coping in these women. Study examines the relationship between the uses of social coping resources, growth-fostering relationships, and infertility stress. Results support the use of social coping resources for coping with infertility stress. (Contains 62 references and…

  11. Socio-Demographic Correlates of Women’s Infertility and Treatment Seeking Behavior in India

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sanjit; Gupta, Pallavi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertility is an emergent issue in India. Until recently, very few studies have understood the patterns and consequences of infertility in India. Family planning programs in India also viewed exclusively the patterns and determinants of overfertility rather than infertility. Furthermore, there is the lack of information about treatment seeking behavior of infertile couples. Therefore, this paper aimed to examine the extent of infertility and treatment seeking behavior among infertile women in India. An attempt was also made to evaluate the effects of socio-demographic factors on treatment seeking behavior. Methods: The study used the data from the District Level Household and Facility Survey carried out in India during 2007–08. Several statistical techniques such as chi-square test, proportional hazard model and binary logistic regression model were used for the analysis. Results: Approximately, 8% of currently married women suffered from infertility in India and most of them were secondary infertile (5.8%). Within India, women’s infertility rate was the highest in west Bengal (13.9 percent) and the lowest in Meghalaya (2.5 percent). About 80% of infertile women sought treatment but a substantial proportion (33%) received non-allopathic and traditional treatment due to expensive modern treatment and lack of awareness. Conclusion: In the context of policy response, it can be said that there is a need to improve the existing services and quality of care for infertile women. Treatment for infertility should be integrated into the larger reproductive health packages. PMID:27141468

  12. Age-related infertility: a tale of two technologies.

    PubMed

    Szewczuk, Elizabeth

    2012-03-01

    The reproductive body has become the site of intensive medical intervention, yet, paradoxically, women have never been more at risk of suffering the distress of infertility. Drawing on in-depth interviews with 22 infertile women, this article explores their reproductive experience from fertility postponement to assisted conception. All had used both modern contraception and in vitro fertilisation, yet none achieved the fertility they desired, when they desired it. All had structured their use of these technologies around the social practice of postponement. Modern contraception, however, while removing the sexual costs of postponement, did not resolve its reproductive dilemmas. Rather it appeared to collapse the experience of this traditionally difficult process, sustaining an illusion of reproductive control in which fertility decisions were 'put on the back burner', undiscussed and sometimes unimagined. For these women this delay then revealed the hidden cost of postponement--infertility--which, in turn, led to their pursuit of assisted conception after the age of 35, at precisely the point when its already limited efficacy begins to fail sharply. In these accounts age-related infertility emerged as a tale of two technologies: two technologies linked to each woman, and each other, through the social practice of postponement. PMID:21812793

  13. Ethical boundary-work in the infertility clinic.

    PubMed

    Frith, Lucy; Jacoby, Ann; Gabbay, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Infertility practice and reproductive technologies are generally seen as 'controversial' areas of scientific inquiry that raise many complex ethical issues. This paper presents a qualitative study that considered how clinicians constructed the role of the 'ethical' in their everyday practice. We use the concept of ethical boundary-work to develop a theory of 'settled' and 'controversial' morality to illuminate how infertility clinicians drew boundaries between different conceptions of the role ethics played in their practice. An attention to areas of settled morality, usually rendered invisible by their very nature, enables us to see how clinicians manage the 'ethical' in their practice. We argue that by creating a space of 'no-ethics' in their practice--part of a settled morality that does not require articulation--the informants re-appropriate an area of their practice from 'outside' influences and control. Bringing these elements to light can help 'outsiders' to challenge and question these distinctions and therefore bring additional perspectives to debates over morality in the infertility clinic. Illuminating the everyday ethical concerns of infertility clinicians can help direct ethical thinking towards these practical concerns, as well as to more abstract debates. PMID:21226735

  14. Is the wrong question being asked in infertility research?

    PubMed

    Luke, Barbara; Stern, Judy E; Hornstein, Mark D; Kotelchuck, Milton; Diop, Hafsatou; Cabral, Howard; Declercq, Eugene R

    2016-01-01

    A persistent finding is that assisted reproductive technology (ART) is associated with compromised birth outcomes, including higher risks for prematurity, low birthweight, and congenital malformations, even among singletons. Over the past decade, our research group, the Massachusetts Outcome Study of Assisted Reproductive Technology (MOSART), has evaluated pregnancy and birth outcomes among three groups of women, those women treated with ART, those with indicators of subfertility but without ART treatment, and fertile women. We have also explored the influence of infertility-related diagnoses on outcomes for women and infants. Over the course of our research, we have changed our perspective from an original focus on ART treatment parameters as the primary cause of excess morbidity to one centered instead on the underlying infertility-related diagnoses. This paper summarizes the research findings from our group that support this change in focus for infertility-based research from a primary emphasis on ART treatment to greater attention to the contribution of preexisting pathology underlying the infertility and suggests directions for future analyses. PMID:26634257

  15. The autoimmune bases of infertility and pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Carp, Howard J A; Selmi, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2012-05-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that autoimmune mechanisms may influence the reproductive life and fertility of both sexes, commonly manifesting as infertility or pregnancy loss. Part of the controversy that characterizes this assumption derives from the overlooked suspect of autoimmune conditions in the absence of symptoms or the limited physician awareness in a gynecological setting. Numerous autoimmune diseases, including but not limited to systemic lupus erythematosus and anti-phospholipid syndrome, may be associated with infertility and pregnancy loss through different putative mechanisms. First, serum autoantibodies such as anti-phospholipid, anti-thyroid, or antinuclear antibodies may be directly associated with infertility, regardless of the presence of a clinically overt autoimmune disease. Second, autoimmunity may affect all stages of fertility, via ovarian failure, testicular failure, implantation failure, and pregnancy loss. Third, infertility may also be secondary to vasculitis associated with other conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus and diabetes mellitus. This review article will illustrate and critically discuss the available data on the link between the breakdown of tolerance that characterizes autoimmune diseases and the changes in reproductive life that affect patients in real clinical setting and that often constitute the iatrotropic stimulus. PMID:22284905

  16. Epigenetic alterations in sperm associated with male infertility.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Akane; Miyauchi, Naoko; Hamada, Hirotaka; Hiura, Hitoshi; Chiba, Hatsune; Okae, Hiroaki; Sato, Akiko; John, Rosalind M; Arima, Takahiro

    2015-08-01

    The most common form of male infertility is a low sperm count, known as oligozoospermia. Studies suggest that oligozoospermia is associated with epigenetic alterations. Epigenetic alterations in sperm, which may arise due to the exposure of gametes to environmental factors or those that pre-exist in the sperm of infertile individuals, may contribute to the increased incidence of normally rare imprinting disorders in babies conceived after assisted reproductive technology using the sperm of infertile men. Genomic imprinting is an important developmental process whereby the allelic activity of certain genes is regulated by DNA methylation established during gametogenesis. The aberrant expression of several imprinted genes has been linked to various diseases, malignant tumors, lifestyle and mental disorders in humans. Understanding how infertility and environmental factors such as reproductive toxicants, certain foods, and drug exposures during gametogenesis contribute to the origins of these disorders via defects in sperm is of paramount importance. In this review, we discuss the association of epigenetic alterations with abnormal spermatogenesis and the evidence that epigenetic processes, including those required for genomic imprinting, may be sensitive to environmental exposures during gametogenesis, fertilization and early embryonic development. In addition, we review imprinting diseases and their relationships with environmental factors. While the plasticity of epigenetic marks may make these more susceptible to modification by the environment, this also suggests that aberrant epigenetic marks may be reversible. A greater understanding of this process and the function of epidrugs may lead to the development of new treatment methods for many adult diseases in the future. PMID:26212350

  17. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Infertile Men from Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Suganya, Jaganathan; Kujur, Smita B; Selvaraj, Kamala; Suruli, Muthiah S.; Haripriya, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Male infertility has been associated with aneuploidies and structural chromosomal abnormalities, Yq microdeletions and specific gene mutations and/or polymorphisms. Besides genetic factors, any block in sperm delivery, endocrine disorders, testicular tumours, infectious diseases, medications, lifestyle factors and environmental toxins can also play a causative role. This study aimed to determine the constitutional karyotype in infertile males having normal female partners in a south Indian population. Materials and Methods A total of 180 men with a complaint of primary infertility ranging from 1 to 25 years were screened for chromosomal abnormalities through conventional analysis of GTG-banded metaphases from cultured lymphocytes. Results Four individuals were diagnosed to have Klinefelter syndrome. Two cases exhibited reciprocal translocations and one showed a maternally inherited insertion. Polymorphisms were seen in sixty-seven patients (37.2%). Conclusion The occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities in 4.6% and variants involving the heterochromatic regions of Y, chromosome 9 and the acrocentric chromosomes in 38.2% of the infertile men with an abnormal seminogram strongly reiterates the inclusion of routine cytogenetic testing and counselling in the diagnostic work-up prior to the use of assisted reproduction technologies. PMID:26393143

  18. Spermatozoa protein alterations in infertile men with bilateral varicocele

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Cui, Zhihong; Ayaz, Ahmet; Gupta, Sajal; Willard, Belinda; Gopalan, Banu; Sabanegh, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Among infertile men, a diagnosis of unilateral varicocele is made in 90% of varicocele cases and bilateral in the remaining varicocele cases. However, there are reports of under-diagnosis of bilateral varicocele among infertile men and that its prevalence is greater than 10%. In this prospective study, we aimed to examine the differentially expressed proteins (DEP) extracted from spermatozoa cells of patients with bilateral varicocele and fertile donors. Subjects consisted of 17 men diagnosed with bilateral varicocele and 10 proven fertile men as healthy controls. Using the LTQ-orbitrap elite hybrid mass spectrometry system, proteomic analysis was done on pooled samples from 3 patients with bilateral varicocele and 5 fertile men. From these samples, 73 DEP were identified of which 58 proteins were differentially expressed, with 7 proteins unique to the bilateral varicocele group and 8 proteins to the fertile control group. Majority of the DEPs were observed to be associated with metabolic processes, stress responses, oxidoreductase activity, enzyme regulation, and immune system processes. Seven DEP were involved in sperm function such as capacitation, motility, and sperm-zona binding. Proteins TEKT3 and TCP11 were validated by Western blot analysis and may serve as potential biomarkers for bilateral varicocele. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time the presence of DEP and identified proteins with distinct reproductive functions which are altered in infertile men with bilateral varicocele. Functional proteomic profiling provides insight into the mechanistic implications of bilateral varicocele-associated male infertility. PMID:25999357

  19. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis
    New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000

    Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa:
    Potential for Infertility Research

    David Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3
    1Reproductive ...

  20. Five Medical Treatment Stages of Infertility: Implications for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrity, Deborah A.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the marital happiness, state/trait anxiety, coping techniques, and types of support received for a national sample of men and women experiencing the infertility medical process. Suggests that counselors should be aware that medical treatment affects the distress level of the individual and couple and the types of coping used. Further…

  1. Incorporating Ideological Context in Counseling Couples Experiencing Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Judith A.; Panchal, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the influence of ideological values on couples' experience of infertility. Contextual issues are considered in terms of how they influence medical decision making as well as emotional factors. Strength-based counseling interventions that attend to couples' diverse values are described. Last, implications for counselors,…

  2. Cultural Considerations in Counseling Couples Who Experience Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    Infertility creates challenges affecting various aspects of couples' intimate lives. Practices regarding reproduction are often shaped by cultural messages. Culturally sensitive treatment methods help counselors provide effective therapy to couples with fertility problems. This article describes cultural influences, challenges, and counseling…

  3. Gender and Infertility: A Relational Approach To Counseling Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Donna M.; Myers, Jane E.

    2000-01-01

    The Relational Model (J. V. Jordan, 1995) of women's development is a theory that explains women's development in a context of relationships, specifically relationships that promote growth for self and others. This model is applied to counseling women who are experiencing infertility, and a case presentation is provided to illustrate the approach.…

  4. Male infertility risk factors in a French military population.

    PubMed

    Velez de la Calle, J F; Rachou, E; le Martelot, M T; Ducot, B; Multigner, L; Thonneau, P F

    2001-03-01

    We investigated infertility risk factors by conducting a population-based case-control study in the military population of the French town of Brest. Sixty couples who had sought medical advice for infertility of more than 12 months duration (cases) were compared with 165 couples who had had a child (controls). All the men in these couples had been employed by the military. The infertility risk factors studied were male and female medical factors, occupational and environmental exposures. We obtained age-adjusted odds ratios of 7.4 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4--39.5] for testis surgery, and 13.0 for varicocele (95% CI: 1.4--120.3) in men. In logistic regression, the age-adjusted odds ratio for men who had worked in a nuclear submarine was found to be 2.0 (95% CI: 1.0--3.7), and that for heat exposure was 4.5 (95% CI: 1.9--10.6). One limitation of this study is the lack of exposure measurements, especially for potential exposure to nuclear radiation (type of reactor used in nuclear-powered submarines, inability to obtain personal dosimeters worn by military personnel working in nuclear submarines). In conclusion, this study suggests that in this military population, having worked as a submariner in a nuclear-powered submarine, and having worked in very hot conditions, should be considered as risk factors for infertility. PMID:11228215

  5. Infectious, inflammatory, and immunologic conditions resulting in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Bassel G; Jarvi, Keith

    2014-02-01

    This article provides an overview of infectious and inflammatory conditions associated with male infertility. These conditions may affect several components of the male reproductive tract and therefore have the ability to potentially alter sperm function. The effect of these conditions on male fertility is poorly understood and often underestimated. PMID:24286768

  6. Dietary intakes in infertile women a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The reproductive axis is closely linked to nutritional status. The purpose of this study was to compare the nutritional status in two groups of young infertile women, without clinically overt eating disorders: hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods Eighteen young infertile women (10 HA, 8 PCOS) attending an outpatient gynecological endocrinology unit, underwent evaluation of anthropometry, body composition, dietary intakes by means of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and a seven-day food diary (7DD), and psychological characteristics by means of EDI2 and SCL90 tests. Results HA women had lower BMI and body fat compared to PCOS women. Habitual intake derived from FFQs showed a similar macronutrient distribution between groups (about 16% protein, 33% fat, 52% carbohydrates). The psychometric profiles of the two groups did not differ significantly. The underreporting of dietary intakes (measured as habitual energy intake by FFQs/basal metabolic rate) was found to be negatively correlated with the interpersonal sensitivity SCL-90 subscale scores (r = -0.54, p = 0.02). Conclusion Our study identified differences in body composition but not in dietary habits between HA and PCOS infertile women. We documented, for the first time, a relationship between the accuracy of dietary surveys and the psychological characteristics of subjects with anovulation. This finding suggests that it may be important to be aware of the psychological terrain when planning a dietary survey in infertile women. PMID:19903344

  7. Spermatozoa protein alterations in infertile men with bilateral varicocele.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Cui, Zhihong; Ayaz, Ahmet; Gupta, Sajal; Willard, Belinda; Gopalan, Banu; Sabanegh, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Among infertile men, a diagnosis of unilateral varicocele is made in 90% of varicocele cases and bilateral in the remaining varicocele cases. However, there are reports of under-diagnosis of bilateral varicocele among infertile men and that its prevalence is greater than 10%. In this prospective study, we aimed to examine the differentially expressed proteins (DEP) extracted from spermatozoa cells of patients with bilateral varicocele and fertile donors. Subjects consisted of 17 men diagnosed with bilateral varicocele and 10 proven fertile men as healthy controls. Using the LTQ-orbitrap elite hybrid mass spectrometry system, proteomic analysis was done on pooled samples from 3 patients with bilateral varicocele and 5 fertile men. From these samples, 73 DEP were identified of which 58 proteins were differentially expressed, with 7 proteins unique to the bilateral varicocele group and 8 proteins to the fertile control group. Majority of the DEPs were observed to be associated with metabolic processes, stress responses, oxidoreductase activity, enzyme regulation, and immune system processes. Seven DEP were involved in sperm function such as capacitation, motility, and sperm-zona binding. Proteins TEKT3 and TCP11 were validated by Western blot analysis and may serve as potential biomarkers for bilateral varicocele. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time the presence of DEP and identified proteins with distinct reproductive functions which are altered in infertile men with bilateral varicocele. Functional proteomic profiling provides insight into the mechanistic implications of bilateral varicocele-associated male infertility. PMID:25999357

  8. Associations of psychosocial factors with the stress of infertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Myra G; Forthofer, Melinda S

    2005-08-01

    This study investigated psychosocial factors thought to be associated with perceived stress over the course of infertility treatment. The research was based on secondary analysis of data from the Study of Marriage, Family, and Life Quality with a sample of 128 people who completed an infertility-related stress instrument at all three measurement intervals (1988, 1999, and 1990). Self-esteem and perceived health were associated with stress at the study baseline, importance of a biological family and extent of spousal support associated with stress at the 12-month follow-up, and factors pertaining to infertility treatment (number of treatments, relationship with physicians) associated with stress at the 24-month follow-up. Self-esteem was the only psychosocial factor associated with change in stress over the course of treatment. Social workers and health care professionals should be sensitive to the emotional experiences of couples during infertility treatment. Identifying factors explaining stress, or that may be targets for intervention, has significance for social workers in health care and other settings. PMID:16190294

  9. Infertility, infertility treatment, and achievement of pregnancy in female survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Sara E.; Najita, Julie S.; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E.; Sklar, Charles A.; Robison, Leslie L.; Diller, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies have documented decreased pregnancy rates and early menopause in female cancer survivors; however, infertility rates and reproductive interventions have not been studied. This study investigates infertility and time to pregnancy among female childhood cancer survivors, and analyzes treatment characteristics associated with infertility and subsequent pregnancy. Methods The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) is a cohort study including five-year cancer survivors from 26 institutions who were <21 years old at the time of diagnosis between January 1, 1970, and December 31, 1986, and a sibling control group. CCSS females ages 18–39 years reporting they had ever been sexually active (3,531 survivors and 1,366 female controls) were studied. Self-reported infertility, medical treatment for infertility, the time to first pregnancy in survivors and siblings, and the risk of infertility in survivors by demographic, disease, and treatment variables were analyzed. Findings Survivors had an increased risk of clinical infertility (>1 year of attempts at conception without success) compared to siblings which was most pronounced at early reproductive ages (≤24 years Relative Risk (RR)=2·92, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1·18–7·20; 25–29 years RR=1·61, 95% CI 1·05–2·48; 30–39 years RR=1·37, 95% CI 1·11–1·69). Despite being equally likely to seek treatment for infertility, survivors were less likely to be prescribed medication for treatment of infertility (RR=0·57, 95% CI 0·46–0·70). Increasing doses of uterine radiation and alkylating agent chemotherapy were most strongly associated with infertility. Although survivors had an increased time to pregnancy interval (p=0·032), 64·2% (292/455) with infertility achieved a pregnancy. Interpretation A more comprehensive understanding of infertility after cancer is critical for counseling and decision-making regarding future attempts at conception as well as fertility preservation. PMID:23856401

  10. Initial evaluation and management of infertility by the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Frey, Keith A; Patel, Ketan S

    2004-11-01

    Infertility is a common condition seen in primary care practices. Infertility is defined as 1 year of unprotected intercourse during which a pregnancy is not achieved. in the United States, 15% to 20% of all couples are infertile, with higher rates seen in older couples. The causes of infertility include abnormalities of any portion of the male or female reproductive system. The female partner usually presents initially for an infertilty problem, often in the context of an annual well-women examination. The primary care physician who provides such preventive care can initiate the diagnostic evaluation and can treat some causes of infertility. PMID:15544024

  11. Estimation of the prevalence and causes of infertility in western Siberia.

    PubMed Central

    Philippov, O. S.; Radionchenko, A. A.; Bolotova, V. P.; Voronovskaya, N. I.; Potemkina, T. V.

    1998-01-01

    The study examined the epidemiology and causes of infertility in Tomsk, Western Siberia, using methodological approaches recommended by WHO and was based on the findings for a randomly selected sample of 2000 married women aged 18-45 years. Among the respondents, 333 couples were considered infertile since they had not conceived after 12 months or more of unprotected intercourse. This group of infertile couples was offered comprehensive clinical investigations but only 186 couples completed them. The infertility rate in Tomsk was 16.7%, being caused by diseases of the female reproduction system in 52.7% of the couples and by male reproductive diseases in 6.4%. In 38.7% of couples, both spouses suffered from infertility, while in 2.2% of cases the cause of infertility was not determined. Among the causes of female infertility, secondary infertility dominated (12.9% of all the women questioned), while primary infertility affected 3.8% of the women. The most frequent causes of female infertility were disturbances to tubal patency (36.5%) and pelvic adhesions (23.6%). Endocrine pathology was found in 32.8% of cases. The most frequent cause of male infertility was inflammatory disease of male accessory glands (12.9%). In 8.6% of cases infection resulted in obstructive azoospermia. Varicocele was registered in 11.3% of cases, and idiopathic pathospermia in 20.9%. Inflammatory complications among females were 4.2 times more frequent than among males. PMID:9648359

  12. Limitations and barriers in access to care for male factor infertility.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Akanksha; Nangia, Ajay K; Dupree, James M; Smith, James F

    2016-05-01

    The primary challenge to identifying and addressing barriers in access to care for male factor infertility is accurate measurement of the prevalence of male infertility. Current estimates are based on couples pursuing assisted reproduction, and likely underestimate the problem. These estimates also fail to account for the number of patients facing infertility due to cancer or cancer treatment. Lack of health insurance coverage for the diagnosis and treatment of infertility presents a major barrier for couples struggling with infertility. However, it is not the only barrier. Education level, household income, cultural norms, religious beliefs, geographic location, and the availability of specialty-trained reproductive urologists are all important factors in determining the ease with which patients access and obtain infertility care. Addressing each of these obstacles directly is imperative to improving reproductive care and outcomes for infertile couples in the United States. PMID:27054307

  13. Infertility Care Among OEF/OIF/OND Women Veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs

    PubMed Central

    Mattocks, Kristin; Kroll-Desrosiers, Aimee; Zephyrin, Laurie; Katon, Jodie; Weitlauf, Julie; Bastian, Lori; Haskell, Sally; Brandt, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing number of young women Veterans seek reproductive health care through the VA, yet little is known regarding the provision of infertility care for this population. The VA provides a range of infertility services for Veterans including artificial insemination, but does not provide in vitro fertilization. This study will be the first to characterize infertility care among OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans using VA care. Methods We analyzed data from the OEF/OIF/OND roster file from the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC)—Contingency Tracking System Deployment file of military discharges from October 1, 2001–December 30, 2010, which includes 68,442 women Veterans between the ages of 18 and 45 who utilized VA health care after separating from military service. We examined the receipt of infertility diagnoses and care using ICD-9 and CPT codes. Results Less than 2% (n = 1323) of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received an infertility diagnosis during the study period. Compared with women VA users without infertility diagnosis, those with infertility diagnosis were younger, obese, black, or Hispanic, have a service-connected disability rating, a positive screen for military sexual trauma, and a mental health diagnosis. Overall, 22% of women with an infertility diagnosis received an infertility assessment or treatment. Thirty-nine percent of women Veterans receiving infertility assessment or treatment received this care from non-VA providers. Conclusions Overall, a small proportion of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received infertility diagnoses from the VA during the study period, and an even smaller proportion received infertility treatment. Nearly 40% of those who received infertility treatments received these treatments from non-VA providers, indicating that the VA may need to examine the training and resources needed to provide this care within the VA. Understanding women’s use of VA infertility services is an important component of understanding VA’s commitment to comprehensive medical care for women Veterans. PMID:25767979

  14. Folic acid supplementation and IVF pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained infertility.

    PubMed

    Murto, T; Skoog Svanberg, A; Yngve, A; Nilsson, T K; Altmäe, S; Wånggren, K; Salumets, A; Stavreus-Evers, A

    2014-06-01

    Folic acid supplements are commonly used by infertile women which leads to a positive folate status. However, the effect of folic acid supplements on pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained infertility has not been well investigated. This study evaluated folic acid supplement use and folate status in women with unexplained infertility in relation to IVF pregnancy outcome. In addition, use of folic acid supplements and folate status were compared between women with unexplained infertility and fertile, nonpregnant control women. Women with unexplained infertility used significantly more folic acid supplements and had higher median total folic acid intake from supplements compared with fertile control women (both P < 0.001). Women with unexplained infertility also had significantly higher median plasma folate and lower median plasma homocysteine concentrations than fertile women (both P < 0.001), but folic acid supplementation or folate status were not related to pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained infertility. In conclusion, folic acid supplementation or good folate status did not have a positive effect on pregnancy outcome following infertility treatment in women with unexplained infertility. Folate is one of the B vitamins which has been suggested to be related to infertility. Folic acid is an artificial form of folate which is commonly used in dietary supplements. Folic acid supplementation has been shown to increase folate concentrations and decrease concentrations of the amino acid homocysteine in the blood. Folic acid supplementation is commonly used by infertile women, but the effect on pregnancy outcome in women with a diagnosis of unexplained infertility has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, folic acid supplement use and folate status (concentrations of folate and homocysteine) in women with unexplained infertility were evaluated in relation to pregnancy outcome. In addition, the use of folic acid supplements and folate status were compared between women with unexplained infertility and fertile control women. Our results showed that women with unexplained infertility used considerably more folic acid supplements and had higher total folic acid intake from supplements compared with fertile control women. Women with unexplained infertility had better blood folate and homocysteine concentrations than fertile women, but folic acid supplementation or folate status were not related to pregnancy outcome following the infertility treatment. In conclusion, high folic acid intake or good folate status did not increase the possibility of a birth of a healthy baby after infertility treatment in women with unexplained infertility. PMID:24745837

  15. Indonesian infertility patients’ health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive technology (ART) in Indonesia is imperative. The principle objectives of this article are to improve our understanding of infertility patients’ patterns of health seeking behaviour and their patterns of access to infertility treatment in Indonesia, in order to highlight the possibilities for improving access. Methods An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with 212 female infertility patients recruited through three Indonesian infertility clinics between July and September 2011. Participants were self-selected and data was subject to descriptive statistical analysis. Results Patients identified a number of barriers to access, including: low confidence in infertility treatment and high rates of switching between providers due to perceived treatment failure; the number and location of clinics; the lack of a well established referral system; the cost of treatment; and patients also experienced fear of receiving a diagnosis of sterility, of vaginal examinations and of embarrassment. Women’s age of marriage and the timing of their initial presentation to gynaecologists were not found to be barriers to timely access to infertility care. Conclusions The findings based on the responses of 212 female infertility patients indicated four key areas of opportunity for improving access to infertility care. Firstly, greater patient education about the nature and progression of infertility care was required among this group of women. Secondly, increased resources in terms of the number and distribution of infertility clinics would reduce the substantial travel required to access infertility care. Thirdly, improvements in the financial accessibility of infertility care would have promoted ease of access to care in this sample. Finally, the expansion of poorly developed referral systems would also have enhanced the efficiency with which this group of patients were able to access appropriate care. PMID:23020912

  16. A qualitative study of Ottawa university students’ awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Awareness of infertility risk factors is an essential first step to safeguard future fertility. Whereas several studies have examined university students’ awareness of female fertility and related risk factors, the topic of male infertility has not been well examined. The objective of this study was to assess young men and women’s awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, male and female infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2008 with a multi-ethnic sample of sixteen male and twenty-three female Ottawa university students, followed by qualitative data analysis to identify major themes. Interview topics included awareness of male and female infertility risk factors, infertility diagnosis/treatments and personal options in the event of future infertility. Results Participants were generally familiar with infertility as a biomedical health problem, could identify sex-specific risk factors but overestimated fertility of women in their thirties and ART success rates. Reproductive health knowledge gaps and confusion of the physiological life-stage of menopause with infertility were apparent. Most participants would pursue in vitro fertilization or international adoption in the event of personal infertility. Some participants wished to use a ‘natural’ approach and were concerned with potential side effects of ART-related medications. Conclusions The general awareness of infertility in young adults is promising and supports the potential uptake for health promotion of fertility preservation. This study underscores the continued need for comprehensive sexual and reproductive health education and promotion for adolescents and young adults. PMID:23962162

  17. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with Endometriosis in Infertile Women

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Sadatmahalleh, Shahideh Jahanian; Akhoond, Mohammad Reza; Talebi, Mehrak

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometriosis affects women’s physical and mental wellbeing. Symptoms include dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, pelvic pain, and infertility. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation between some relevant factors and symptoms and risk of an endometriosis diagnosis in infertile women. Materials and Methods A retrospective study of 1282 surgical patients in an infertility Institute, Iran between 2011 and 2013 were evaluated by laparoscopy. Of these, there were 341 infertile women with endometriosis (cases) and 332 infertile women with a normal pelvis (comparison group). Chi-square and t tests were used to compare these two groups. Logistic regression was done to build a prediction model for an endometriosis diagnosis. Results Gravidity [odds ratio (OR): 0.8, confidence interval (CI): 0.6-0.9, P=0.01], parity (OR: 0.7, CI: 0.6-0.9, P=0.01), family history of endometriosis (OR: 4.9, CI: 2.1-11.3, P<0.001), history of galactorrhea (OR: 2.3, CI: 1.5-3.5, P=0.01), history of pelvic surgery (OR: 1.9, CI: 1.3-2.7, P<0.001), and shorter menstrual cycle length (OR: 0.9, CI: 0.9-0.9, P=0.04) were associated with endometriosis. Duration of natural menstruation and age of menarche were not correlated with subsequent risk of endometriosis (P>0.05). Fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, pelvic pain and premenstrual spotting were more significant among late-stage endometriosis patients than in those with early-stage endometriosis and more prevalent among patients with endometriosis than that of the comparison group. In the logistic regression model, gravidity, family history of endometriosis, history of galactorrhea, history of pelvic surgery, dysmenorrhoea, pelvic pain, dysparaunia, premenstrual spotting, fatigue, and diarrhea were significantly associated with endometriosis. However, the number of pregnancies was negatively related to endometriosis. Conclusion Endometriosis is a considerable public health issue because it affects many women and is associated with the significant morbidity. In this study, we built a prediction model which can be used to predict the risk of endometriosis in infertile women. PMID:27123195

  18. The Impact of Emotionally Focused Therapy on Emotional Distress in Infertile Couples

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Marzieh; Shairi, Mohammad Reza; Roshan, Rasoul; Rahimi, Changiz Rahimi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study investigated the effect of emotionally focused therapy (EFT) on factors contributing to emotional distress among infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, the subjects consisted of 12 Iranian couples: six infertile men and six infertile women. They were assessed as depressed, anxious and stressful individuals using depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS). The subjects were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental group with six couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women) received EFT, while the control group with similar number of couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women) was deprived of the treatment. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding job, educational level, income, age, marriage and infertility duration. The pre- and post-test comparisons of DASS subscales showed that level of depression, anxiety and stress among couples with EFT instruction was significantly less than those without such in- structions (p<0.0001). Conclusion Emotionally focused therapy could reduce the rate of depression, anxiety and stress in infertile couples, regardless of the man or woman as the cause of infertility. PMID:24520504

  19. Sexual function in women with primary and secondary infertility in comparison with controls.

    PubMed

    Davari Tanha, F; Mohseni, M; Ghajarzadeh, M

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a distressing health condition that has diverse effects on couples' lives. One of the most affected aspects of life in infertile women is sexual function, which is a key factor in physical and marital health. The goal of this study was to evaluate sexual function according to the type of infertility in comparison with controls. In this study, 191 women with primary infertility and 129 with secondary infertility along with 87 age-matched healthy controls were enrolled. They were asked to fill a valid and reliable FSFI (Female Sexual Function Index). Age, partner age and duration of marriage were significantly different between the primary and secondary infertility groups. The score of each FSFI domain was significantly higher in the control group, and the only significant difference between primary and secondary infertility groups was in the desire domain. Multiple linear regression analysis between the total FSFI score as a dependent variable and age, partner age, Body Mass Index and marriage duration as independent variables showed that age is a dependent predictor of FSFI in the primary group. We found significant negative correlation between total FSFI score and age, partner age and marriage duration (r1=-0.21 and P<0.001, r2=-0.14 and P=0.01, r3=-0.19 and P<0.001). Sexual dysfunction is high in all infertile women, and women with secondary infertility suffer more from impaired sexual function compared with those with primary infertility. PMID:24430276

  20. Comparison of dysfunctional attitudes and social adjustment among infertile employed and unemployed women in Iran.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Azadeh S; Younesi, Seyed Jalal; Azkhosh, Manouchehr; Askari, Ali

    2010-04-01

    This study aims to compare dysfunctional attitudes and social adjustment in infertile employed and unemployed females. Due to the stresses of infertility, infertile females are faced with a variety of sexual and psychological problems, as well as dysfunctional attitudes that can lead to depression. Moreover, infertility problems provoke women into maladjustment and inadvertent corruption of relationships. In this regard, our goal is to consider the effects of employment in conjunction with education on dysfunctional attitudes and social adjustment among infertile women in Iran. In this work, we employed the survey method. We recruited 240 infertile women, utilizing the cluster random sampling method. These women filled out the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale and the social adjustment part of the California Test of Personality. Next, multivariate analysis of variance was performed to test the relationship of employment status and education with dysfunctional attitudes and social adjustment. Our results indicated that dysfunctional attitudes were far more prevalent in infertile unemployed women than in infertile employed women. Also, social adjustment was better in infertile employed women than in infertile unemployed women. It was shown that education level alone does not have significant effect on dysfunctional attitudes and social adjustment. However, we demonstrated that the employment status of infertile women in conjunction with their education level significantly affects the two dimensions of dysfunctional attitudes (relationships, entitlements) and has insignificant effects on social adjustment. It was revealed that in employed infertile women in Iran, the higher education level, the less dysfunctional were attitudes in relationships and entitlements, whereas in unemployed infertile women, those with a college degree had the least and those with master's or higher degrees had the most dysfunctional attitudes in terms of relationships and entitlements. PMID:22043894

  1. Genital tuberculosis in the infertile women - an update.

    PubMed

    Ishrat, S; Fatima, P

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is endemic in many developing countries of the world including Bangladesh. Genital tuberculosis is a significant cause of infertility in the women of these countries. The diagnosis of genital tuberculosis in infertile women is difficult as most of the cases are usually asymptomatic. A high index of clinical suspicion is required. Genital tuberculosis always affects the fallopian tubes. It affects the endometrium in half of the cases. In addition to tuberculin skin tests and interferon gamma release assays, procedures like hysterosalpingography, laparoscopy-dye test, endometrial curettage and laparoscopy with multiple sampling for smear microscopy and culture for mycobacterium tuberculosis can detect the cases. In recent years diagnosis has been improved by polymerase chain reaction targeted against mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA. Following early diagnosis, treatment with anti-tubercular drugs is favourable for fertility only when tubal and endometrial damage is minimal. In cases where the organs are more severely involved the outcome is poor even with in- vitro fertilization. PMID:25725695

  2. Male Reproductive Cancers and Infertility: A Mutual Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Tvrda, Eva; Agarwal, Ashok; Alkuhaimi, Nawaf

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive dysfunction and malignancies related to the male gender represent a serious health concern, whose incidence has significantly risen over the past years. Prior to treatment, testicular or prostate cancer patients often display poor semen characteristics similar to subfertile or infertile patients. This fact is underscored by cases where the malignancy is often diagnosed in males who undergo a general fertility screening. This review aims to examine the associations between male infertility and reproductive cancers focusing on common etiologies and biological mechanisms underlining these pathologies. Furthermore, we discuss compelling epidemiological data hypothesizing that male reproductive failure may act as a precursor of future andrological malignancies, including testicular or prostate cancer, thus providing a stimulus for a more specific research in male reproductive health and emphasizing the importance of this relation for physicians taking care of male patients with a reproductive disease. PMID:25837470

  3. The meaning of parenthood and couples' reactions to male infertility.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, R J; Humphrey, M; Owens, D J

    1994-09-01

    This paper reports findings from a postal survey of 205 couples belonging to the National Association for the Childless who saw their infertility as due to the male partner. Two self-report scales used in previous studies were administered to measure personal and social identity needs as a basis for parenthood (the Meaning of Parenthood scale), and emotional distress and marital problems. Endorsement of items on the Meaning of Parenthood (MOP) scale showed only small mean gender differences for each item and a consistent item rank order for men and women. Factor analysis confirmed that the scale tapped dimensions pertaining to social and personal identity needs. For women, distress was associated with ratings on the MOP scale which emphasized the link between femininity and motherhood, while for men distress was associated with ratings which emphasized masculinity and fatherhood. Implications of the results for further research and counselling in relation to male infertility are discussed. PMID:7803320

  4. [Progress in research on imprinted gene associated with male infertility].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Wang, Ruixue; Liu, Ruizhi

    2015-10-01

    The connection between male infertility and abnormal methylation of imprinted genes has attracted much attention. Some imprinted genes, e.g., H19, MEG3, MEST and SNRPN, are known to be related with male infertility. Abnormal imprinted information may influence sperm concentration, motility and morphology, but the mechanism is still unclear. Sperm genomic imprinting reconstruction and erase respectively occur at the time of spermatogenesis and before embryo transfer. Many studies have shown that the probability of imprinting disorder syndrome of offspring born through assisted reproductive technology (ART) was significantly higher, leading to the worry about the safety of ART and speculation that the operation and in vitro environment may affect sperm imprinted information, which in turn may lead to imprinting diseases in the offspring. However, above connection still lacks convincing evidence. This paper has conducted a literature review of recent literature and explored the impact of abnormal methylation of imprinted genes on male fertility and the offspring. PMID:26419002

  5. [New methods for the ambulatory evaluation of female infertility].

    PubMed

    Török, Péter; Major, Tamás

    2013-08-18

    Incidence of infertility increased in the past years and it affects 15% of couples. Female and male factors are responsible in 40% and 40% of the cases, respectively, while factors present in both females and males can be found in 20% of cases. Female factors can be further divided into organic and functional ones. Function of the female organs can be evaluated in an outpatient setting by well-developed laboratory techniques but evaluation of the uterine cavity and inspection of the tubal patency have been traditionally carried out in one-day surgery. However, the latter can be performed under ambulatory setting with the use of office hysteroscopy, so that the use of operating theatre and staff costs can be saved. Using selective pertubation for the evaluation of tubal patency via office hysteroscopy can reduce cost further. The new methods in infertility workup which can be performed in ambulatory setting have several advantages for the patients. PMID:23933606

  6. Obesity-associated infertility - the earliest known description.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shlomo, Izhar; Grinbaum, Eliezer; Levinger, Uriel

    2008-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a leading cause of anovulatory infertility. It was originally described as a syndrome by Stein and Leventhal in 1935. Its frequent association with obesity and the beneficial effects of weight loss are well established. In 1328, the French Rabbi Levi ben Gershom (1288-1344 AD), in a detailed commentary on the Bible, states that: '...it is recognized that excess fat and obesity are reasons for infertility'. He explains that Sarah and Rachel allowed Abraham and Jacob respectively to have children with their maids, expecting this to reduce their own appetite, lead to weight loss and consequent conception. Even if one doubts the historical accuracy of this explanation of the ancestors' situation, one cannot doubt that Rabbi Levi ben Gershom is describing a situation familiar to him, to explain the seemingly paradoxical behaviour of the two mothers. PMID:18644215

  7. The public sector's role in infertility management in India.

    PubMed

    Widge, Anjali; Cleland, John

    2009-03-01

    This objective of this paper is to explore the public sector's role in infertility management in India. It focuses on services available in the public sector, problems faced by and critiques of public sector providers. A postal survey was conducted with a sample of 6000 gynaecologists and in-depth interviews were conducted with 39 gynaecologists in four cities. The role of the public sector in infertility management is weak as even basic investigations and services were limited or incomplete. Inadequate infrastructure, inappropriate management including time management, lack of information and training, absence of clear protocols at all levels, private practice by public health doctors, pre-occupation with other health issues and lack of regulation were the main problems mentioned by providers. Amongst key recommendations are realistic and low-cost management, streamlining and regulating services, counselling of couples, providing information and raising awareness of patients, health personnel and policy makers. PMID:19181675

  8. Smoking and Male Infertility: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Harlev, Avi; Gunes, Sezgin Ozgur; Shetty, Amit; du Plessis, Stefan Simon

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have reported that the contents of cigarette smoke negatively affect sperm parameters, seminal plasma, and various other fertility factors. Nevertheless, the actual effect of smoking on male fertility is not clear. The effect of smoking on semen parameters is based on the well-established biological finding that smoking increases the presence of reactive oxygen species, thereby resulting in oxidative stress (OS). OS has devastating effects on sperm parameters, such as viability and morphology, and impairs sperm function, hence reducing male fertility. However, not all studies have come to the same conclusions. This review sheds light upon the arguable association between smoking and male fertility and also assesses the impact of non-smoking routes of tobacco consumption on male infertility. It also highlights the evidence that links smoking with male infertility, including newly emerging genetic and epigenetic data, and discusses the clinical implications thereof. PMID:26770934

  9. Infertility and miscarriage: common pathways in manifestation and management.

    PubMed

    Agenor, Angena; Bhattacharya, Sohinee

    2015-07-01

    The relationship between miscarriage and fertility is complex. While most healthcare settings treat miscarriage as a problem of subfertility in assisted reproduction units, others believe that miscarriage occurs in super-fertile women. Infertile women undergoing assisted reproduction are at a greater risk of having a miscarriage especially at an advanced age compared with women conceiving naturally. Aberrant expression of immunological factors and chromosomal abnormalities underlie both infertility and miscarriage. Common risk factors include increased maternal age, obesity, smoking, alcohol, pre-existing medical conditions and anatomical abnormalities of the reproductive system. Management pathways of both conditions may be similar with pre-implantation genetic testing and assisted reproductive technology used in both conditions. This paper discusses the synergies and differences between the two conditions in terms of their epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, risk factors and management strategies. The two conditions are related as degrees of severity of reproductive failure with common pathways in manifestation and management. PMID:26238301

  10. AB031. Challenge of microsurgery for male infertility in China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yiming; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2016-01-01

    There are more than 15% couples suffer from infertility within 1 year. One in eight couples encounters problems when attempting to conceive a first child and one in six when attempting to conceive a subsequent child. The causes of infertility both of male and female could share 50%. With the recent advances in assisted fertilization such as in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), the couples suffer from infertility would like to choose assisted fertilization and nearly 1 million cycles ICSI were carried out in China every year, even its pregnancy rate 40% and live birth rate 35%, with very costed and with risks of inherent and born defects. Among of male factors of infertility, varicoceles are highly relevant (38%) and can result in a myriad of deleterious effects on male reproduction. Varicocele repair may be effective in men with subnormal semen analysis, a clinical varicocele and otherwise unexplained infertility. Numerous therapeutic options are available for correcting varicoceles, including surgical varicocelectomy and radiographic venous embolization. However, recent studies demonstrated that microsurgery for varicocele correction, with the lowest recurrence rate and the highest pregnancy rate compared with other surgical approaches, is a more cost-effective therapeutic modality than both assisted fertility for in infertility couples and it is safe and effective compared to the others surgical approaches. Obstructive azoospermia (OA) are highly prevalent (13%) in male infertility results from obstruction of the excurrent ducts (due to many causes) at any location between the rete testis and the ejaculatory ducts. Recent advances in microsurgical approaches with reversal rate 63.8–79.2%, pregnancy rate 30.6–35.8%. According to the calculations of cost per delivery for vasectomy reversal vs. sperm retrieval/ICSI, under a wide variety of initial assumptions, it is clear that vasectomy reversal/epididymovasostomy is associated with a considerably lower cost per delivery and higher delivery rates. Sperm retrieval and ICSI must yield an 81% pregnancy rate per cycle to achieve equal costs to vasectomy reversal. For the treatment of non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA), microdissection TESE is a more effective approach than other TESE approaches for ICSI, with a patency rate 40–60%, which change the impossible to possible for NOA patients, who want their own inherent child. In our center, there are more than 4,000 cases of patients were treated by microsurgery, including microsurgical varicocelectomy/vasectomy reversal/epididymovasostomy/microdissection TESE, from 2006 to 2016. We think that microsurgical training is important for urologists and clinical. Up to now, in the recent decade, we have trained about 500 surgeons for microsurgery from 30 provinces in China. In summary, the excellent efficacies were noted by microsurgical approaches for male infertility on varicoceles and OA, with lower cost and risks of inherent and born defects compared to in assisted fertilization such as IVF and ICSI.

  11. Endometriosis and Infertility: How and When to Treat?

    PubMed Central

    Fadhlaoui, Anis; Bouquet de la Jolinière, Jean; Feki, Anis

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is defined as the presence of endometrial-like tissue (glands or stroma) outside the uterus, which induces a chronic inflammatory reaction. Although endometriosis impairs fertility, it does not usually completely prevent conception. The question of evidence based-medicine guidelines in endometriosis-associated infertility is weak in many situations. Therefore, we will highlight in this issue where the challenges are. PMID:25593948

  12. Chinese herbal medicine for infertility with anovulation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Tong, Yao; Sze, Stephen Cho Wing; Xu, Mei; Shi, Yang; Song, Xin-yang; Zhang, Ting-ting

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness and safety of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in treatment of anovulation and infertility in women. Eight (8) databases were extensively retrieved. The Chinese electronic databases included VIP Information, CMCC, and CNKI. The English electronic databases included AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Embase, and MEDLINE(®). Randomized controlled trials using CHM as intervention were included in the study selection. The quality of studies was assessed by the Jadad scale and the criteria referred to Cochrane reviewers' handbook. The efficacy of CHM treatment for infertility with anovulation was evaluated by meta-analysis. There were 692 articles retrieved according to the search strategy, and 1659 participants were involved in the 15 studies that satisfied the selection criteria. All the included trials were done in China. Meta-analysis indicated that CHM significantly increased the pregnancy rate (odds ratio [OR] 3.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.50-3.88) and reduced the miscarriage rate (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.10-0.41) compared to clomiphene. In addition, CHM also increased the ovulation rate (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.06-2.25) and improved the cervical mucus score (OR 3.82, 95% CI 1.78-8.21) compared to clomiphene, while there were no significant difference between CHM and clomiphene combined with other medicine. CHM is effective in treating infertility with anovulation. Also, no significant adverse effects were identified for the use of CHM from the studies included in this review. However, owing to the low quality of the studies investigated, more randomized controlled trials are needed before evidence-based recommendation regarding the effectiveness and safety of CHM in the management of infertility with anovulation can be provided. PMID:23198826

  13. [48,XXYY men with azoospermia: how to manage infertility?].

    PubMed

    Roche, C; Sonigo, C; Benmiloud-Tandjaoui, N; Boujenah, J; Benzacken, B; Poncelet, C; Hugues, J-N

    2014-01-01

    48,XXYY syndrome is a rare form of sex chromosomal aneuploidy. Usually considered as a variant of Klinefelter syndrome because of shared features (azoospermia, tall stature, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism), it is a separate entity because diagnostic is currently made in prepubertal boy with neuro-psychological disorders. We here report the case of a 48,XXYY patient consulting for adult infertility and the indication to perform testicular sperm extraction is discussed. PMID:24934769

  14. Infertility evaluation and treatment according to Jewish law.

    PubMed

    Schenker, J G

    1997-02-01

    The Jewish attitude toward infertility can be learned from the fact that the first commandment of God to Adam was "be fruitful and multiply". When evaluating an infertile couple according to the Halakha (Hebrew law), one should first evaluate the female factor. If pathology is found, one may proceed to investigate the male factor, inadequate or abnormal production, ejaculation, or deposition of spermatozoa. The basic fact that allows in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer (ET) to be considered in the rabbinical literature at all is that the oocyte and the sperm originate from the wife and the husband, respectively. For many centuries Jewish religious authorities have discussed the principle involved in artificial insemination from a donor. The discussions are based on ancient sources in the Talmud and the codes of Jewish law is prohibited for a variety of reasons e.g. incest, lack of genealogy, and the problem of inheritance. In the case of egg donation the problem that arises is who should be considered the mother, the donor of the oocyte or the one in whose uterus the embryo develops, the one who gives birth. Jewish law states that the child is related to the woman who finished its formation, the one who gave birth. The Jewish religion does not forbid the practice of surrogate motherhood in the case of full surrogacy. From the religious point of view, the child will belong to the father who gave the sperm and to the woman who gave birth. Creating and inducing a preimplantation in embryo in vitro for fertility research should be allowed if there is a real chance that the sperm owner may benefit and have a child as a result of this research. Nowadays, assisted reproductive technology is a common practice in the treatment of infertility. Nevertheless, different religious arguments of the world's religions impose limitations on the therapeutic approach to infertility. PMID:9138953

  15. Factors Affecting Response to Infertility Treatment: Case of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Peyromusavi, Fatemeh; Barouni, Mohsen; Naderi, Tayebeh; Shahravan, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility affects both women and men in all the countries. Infertility often has profound long-term or short-term impacts on the people involved and puts them at risk of familial and social pressures. According to WHO estimates, between 8% and 12% of all the couples worldwide experience some form of infertility during their reproductive life, i.e. 50–80 million people are affected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response to infertility treatment by taking into account factors such as age, hirsutism, menstruation and galactose among women in Kerman. Methodology: Of a total of 300 patient files evaluated 220 cases were flawless, of which the study factors were recorded. These data were estimated by Logit model. The dependent variable was the response to treatment (0 and 1) and the independent variables included age of men and women, hirsutism, menstruation, galactose, duration of the period no preventive measures were used and body mass index. After entering the data, model output was analyzed by using the STATA software. Results: The results showed that of all the model variables, female age (prob=0.0065), menstruation (prob=0.04), hirsutism (prob=0.02), marriage age (in months) (prob=0.02) and BMI were significant and other variables were not significant. McFadden analysis for goodness of fit was 0.92. Conclusion: The study results showed that women should pay more attention to variables such as BMI, menstruation quality (regular and irregular) and aging because clinical disregard of any of the above can have a significant impact on the individual’s fertility. PMID:26234994

  16. Seminal Corynebacterium strains in infertile men with and without leucocytospermia.

    PubMed

    Mashaly, M; Masallat, D T; Elkholy, A A; Abdel-Hamid, I A; Mostafa, T

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify seminal Corynebacterium strains in infertile men with and without leucocytospermia. Semen samples from 60 infertile men were allocated into two equal groups: semen samples with leucocytospermia and semen samples without leucocytospermia. Semen culture for Corynebacterium species was carried out on Columbia agar medium confirmed by Gram-stained film and biochemical tests followed by analytical profile index biotyping and antibiotic susceptibility. Bacterial isolates were detected in 20/60 semen cultures (33.3%) as Corynebacteria, Staphylococci, Alpha haemolytic streptococci and E. coli. In all, 12/60 (20%) had Corynebacterium positive semen culture, whereas C. seminal was the major isolated species followed by C. amycolatum, C. jekium and C. urealyticum. There was nonsignificant difference between patients with/without Corynebacterium positive culture regarding sperm concentration and normal sperm morphology; however, in positive cultures sperm motility was significantly lower compared with negative cultures. Antimicrobial sensitivity among Corynebacteria strains was highest for vancomycin, rifampicin then imipenem, ampicillin + sulbactam, ciprofloxacin. It is concluded that positive semen cultures for different Corynebacteria species were demonstrated in infertile men, whereas Corynebacterium seminale was the most common isolated species. Vancomycin, rifampicin then imipenem and ampicillin + sulbactam are recommended as sensitive antibiotics. PMID:26228802

  17. [On warrior virgins, effeminate men, and infertility among ancient Scythians].

    PubMed

    Frøland, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The Hippocratic text 'On the winds, waters and places' contains a fairly long description of an ancient Scythian tribe, the nomadic Sauromats. In this tribe the gender roles appear to have been inverted to some degree. The virgin women fight from horseback with swords, bows and arrows, and are not allowed to marry before they have killed three enemies. The married women are often infertile. The Hippocratic author ascribes this to the pronounced fatness of these women. Many men suffer from impotence and as a consequence dress as women, talk like them and carry out feminine household work. The Hippocratic author emphasises that the male impotence and the female infertility stem from the cold, damp climate and the Scythians' way of living, particularly the men spending most of their time riding. In contrast Herodotus states that the male impotence is Aphrodite's revenge because the Scythians ravaged her temple in Ascalon many years earlier. The difference between the Hippocratic emphasis on natural explanations for all natural phenomena, including health and disease and the occasional divine intervention promoted by Herodotus is underlined. There seems to be no plausible modern explanation for the impotence and infertility as described by the Hippocratic author. PMID:22332473

  18. Contemporary concepts in the evaluation and management of male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kathleen; Walters, R. Chanc; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2013-01-01

    Infertility in men is a common condition. At the core of the medical evaluation of the male partner in a couple who are unable to conceive is the history and physical examination. Special attention should be directed to the patients developmental history and any use of testosterone products. The physical examination focuses on the genitals, and includes assessments of the size and consistency of the testicles, epididymis, vas deferens, and presence of varicoceles. Although many sophisticated tests are available, semen analysis is still the most important diagnostic tool used to assess fertility, and includes parameters such as sperm count, motility and viability. Treatment of male factor infertility can involve targeted agents, in the case of specific conditions such as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, or it can be empiricalusing medical therapy or assisted conception techniquesfor patients in whom no underlying cause has been identified. Although an all-encompassing treatment for male factor infertility has not yet been developed, the field offers many promising avenues of research. PMID:21243017

  19. Hypothetical link between infertility and genetically modified food.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingxia; Li, Bin; Yuan, Wenzhen; Zhao, Lihui; Zhang, Xuehong

    2014-01-01

    It is speculated that genetically modified food (GMF)/genetically modified organism (GMO) is responsible for infertility development. The risk linked with a wide use of GMFs/GMOs offers the basic elements for social criticism. However, to date, it has not been justified whether the bad effects are directly resulted from products of genetic modifications or trans-genesis process. Extensive experience with the risk assessment of whole foods has been applied recently on the safety and nutritional testing of GMFs/GMOs. Investigations have tested the safety of GMFs including sub-acute, chronic, reproductive, multi-generation and carcinogenicity studies. We extrapolated the potential risks associated with GMFs/GMOs on reproduction, and analyzed the multi-aspect linked between infertility and GMFs/GMOs. It could be conjectured that GMFs/GMOs could be potential hazard on reproduction, linking to the development of infertility through influencing the endocrine metabolism, endometriosis. However, little evidence shows the impaction on embryo or reproductive related tumor due to the limited literatures, and needs further research. The article presents some related patents on GMFs/GMOs, and some methods for tracking GMOs. PMID:25342149

  20. Infertility, impotence, and emasculation - psychosocial contexts for abandoning reproduction.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Erik; Johnson, Thomas W; Wassersug, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    From a Darwinian perspective we live to reproduce, but in various situations genetic males elect not to reproduce by choosing medical treatments leading to infertility, impotence, and, in the extreme, emasculation. For many men, infertility can be psychologically distressing. However, for certain genetic males, being infertile may improve their quality of life. Examples include (1) men who seek vasectomy, (2) individuals with Gender Dysphoria (e.g., transwomen, and modern day voluntary eunuchs), (3) most gay men, and (4) men treated for testicular and prostate cancer. Men who desire vasectomy typically have a Darwinian fitness W >1 at the time of their vasectomies; i.e., after they have their desired number of offspring or consider themselves past an age for parenting newborns. In contrast, prostate and testicular cancer patients, along with individuals with extreme Gender Dysphoria, do not necessarily seek to be sterile, but accept it as an unavoidable consequence of the treatment for their condition undertaken for survival (in case of cancer patients) or to achieve a better quality of life (for those with Gender Dysphoria). Most gay men do not father children, but they may play an avuncular role, providing for their siblings' offspring's welfare, thus improving their inclusive fitness through kin selection. In a strictly Darwinian model, the primary motivation for all individuals is to reproduce, but there are many situations for men to remove themselves from the breeding populations because they have achieved a fitness W ≥1, or have stronger medical or psychological needs that preclude remaining fertile. PMID:26924280

  1. Trace elements in seminal plasma of men from infertile couples

    PubMed Central

    Szynkowska, Małgorzata I.; Motak-Pochrzęst, Hanna; Pawlaczyk, Aleksandra; Sypniewski, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An analysis of lead, zinc, cadmium and other trace elements in semen of men from infertile couples was performed to determine the association between abnormal semen parameters and enviromental or occupational exposure to some trace metals. Material and methods Presence of manganese, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, tin and lead was measured in seminal plasma of 34 men from infertile couples using spectrometry with time-of-flight analysis. Correlations among sperm parameters and trace metals were determined using cluster analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results Abnormally high concentrations of lead, cadmium, zinc and cobalt were found in 23 seminal plasma of men from infertile couples. The most consistent evidence was determined for an association between high cadmium concentration in seminal plasma and sperm count, motility and morphology below reference limits (p < 0.01). A correlation of significantly increased tin level and reduced sperm count in semen of men with limited fertility potential was observed (p = 0.04). Conclusions In our study we observed a correlation of tin level with sperm count in semen of men with limited fertility potential. PMID:26170853

  2. Infertility, impotence, and emasculation – psychosocial contexts for abandoning reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Wibowo, Erik; Johnson, Thomas W; Wassersug, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    From a Darwinian perspective we live to reproduce, but in various situations genetic males elect not to reproduce by choosing medical treatments leading to infertility, impotence, and, in the extreme, emasculation. For many men, infertility can be psychologically distressing. However, for certain genetic males, being infertile may improve their quality of life. Examples include (1) men who seek vasectomy, (2) individuals with Gender Dysphoria (e.g., transwomen, and modern day voluntary eunuchs), (3) most gay men, and (4) men treated for testicular and prostate cancer. Men who desire vasectomy typically have a Darwinian fitness W >1 at the time of their vasectomies; i.e., after they have their desired number of offspring or consider themselves past an age for parenting newborns. In contrast, prostate and testicular cancer patients, along with individuals with extreme Gender Dysphoria, do not necessarily seek to be sterile, but accept it as an unavoidable consequence of the treatment for their condition undertaken for survival (in case of cancer patients) or to achieve a better quality of life (for those with Gender Dysphoria). Most gay men do not father children, but they may play an avuncular role, providing for their siblings’ offspring's welfare, thus improving their inclusive fitness through kin selection. In a strictly Darwinian model, the primary motivation for all individuals is to reproduce, but there are many situations for men to remove themselves from the breeding populations because they have achieved a fitness W ≥1, or have stronger medical or psychological needs that preclude remaining fertile. PMID:26924280

  3. Infertility and Perinatal Loss: When the Bough Breaks.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Amritha; Byatt, Nancy

    2016-03-01

    Infertility and perinatal loss are common, and associated with lower quality of life, marital discord, complicated grief, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Young women, who lack social supports, have experienced recurrent pregnancy loss or a history of trauma and / or preexisting psychiatric illness are at a higher risk of experiencing psychiatric illnesses or symptoms after a perinatal loss or during infertility. It is especially important to detect, assess, and treat depression, anxiety, or other psychiatric symptoms because infertility or perinatal loss may be caused or perpetuated by such symptoms. Screening, psychoeducation, provision of resources and referrals, and an opportunity to discuss their loss and plan for future pregnancies can facilitate addressing mental health concerns that arise. Women at risk of or who are currently experiencing psychiatric symptoms should receive a comprehensive treatment plan that includes the following: (1) proactive clinical monitoring, (2) evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy, and (3) discussion of risks, benefits, and alternatives of medication treatment during preconception and pregnancy. PMID:26847216

  4. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Brackett, Nancy L; Lynne, Charles M; Ibrahim, Emad; Ohl, Dana A; Sønksen, Jens

    2010-03-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses, and vacuum constriction devices. In anejaculatory patients who wish to father children, semen retrieval is necessary. Penile vibratory stimulation is recommended as the first line of treatment. Patients who fail penile vibratory stimulation can be referred for electroejaculation. If this approach is not possible, prostate massage is an alternative. Surgical sperm retrieval should be considered as a last resort when other methods fail. Most men with SCI have a unique semen profile characterized by normal sperm count but abnormally low sperm motility. Scientific investigations indicate that accessory gland dysfunction and abnormal semen constituents contribute to the problem. Despite abnormalities, sperm from men with SCI can successfully induce pregnancy. In selected couples, the simple method of intravaginal insemination is a viable option. Another option is intrauterine insemination. The efficacy of intrauterine insemination increases as the total motile sperm count inseminated increases. In vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are options in cases of extremely low total motile sperm count. Reproductive outcomes for SCI male factor infertility are similar to outcomes for general male factor infertility. PMID:20157304

  5. STAG3 is a strong candidate gene for male infertility.

    PubMed

    Llano, Elena; Gomez-H, Laura; García-Tuñón, Ignacio; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel; Caburet, Sandrine; Barbero, Jose Luis; Schimenti, John C; Veitia, Reiner A; Pendas, Alberto M

    2014-07-01

    Oligo- and azoospermia are severe forms of male infertility. However, known genetic factors account only for a small fraction of the cases. Recently, whole-exome sequencing in a large consanguineous family with inherited premature ovarian failure (POF) identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in the STAG3 gene leading to a premature stop codon. STAG3 encodes a meiosis-specific subunit of the cohesin complex, a large proteinaceous ring with DNA-entrapping ability that ensures sister chromatid cohesion and enables correct synapsis and segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis. The pathogenicity of the STAG3 mutations was functionally validated with a loss-of-function mouse model for STAG3 in oogenesis. However, and since none of the male members of this family was homozygous for the mutant allele, we only could hypothesized its putative involvement in male infertility. In this report, we show that male mice devoid of Stag3 display a severe meiotic phenotype that includes a meiotic arrest at zygonema-like shortening of their chromosome axial elements/lateral elements, partial loss of centromeric cohesion at early prophase and maintenance of the ability to initiate but not complete RAD51- and DMC1-mediated double-strand break repair, demonstrating that STAG3 is a crucial cohesin subunit in mammalian gametogenesis and supporting our proposal that STAG3 is a strong candidate gene for human male infertility. PMID:24608227

  6. Laparoscopy--or not--for management of unexplained infertility.

    PubMed

    Badawy, A; Khiary, M; Ragab, A; Hassan, M; Sherif, L

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the role of laparoscopy in the management of unexplained infertility in a prospective randomised controlled trial. The study comprised of 255 patients as a study group and 257 patients as a control group. All women had unexplained infertility. Patients in the study group had laparoscopy followed by ovarian stimulation and timed intercourse for six cycles, while patients in the control group were treated directly with ovarian stimulation and timed intercourse for six cycles. Severe adhesions were found in one in each of the two groups, respectively. They were referred directly to the IVF/ICSI programme. Moderate pelvic endometriosis was demonstrated in three cases in the two groups. Again, severe endometriosis was found in two cases in the study groups and they were referred to the IVF/ICSI programme. After 6 months of follow-up, clinical pregnancy occurred in 114/255 (44.7%) in the study group and 107/257 (41.7%) in the control group and the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The miscarriage rate was similar in the two groups. We concluded that laparoscopy could be postponed when proceeding in the management of unexplained infertility, until ovarian stimulation and timed intercourse had been found to be unsuccessful in achieving pregnancy. PMID:20925617

  7. Genetically determined asynapsis, spermatogenic degeneration, and infertility in men.

    PubMed Central

    Chaganti, R S; Jhanwar, S C; Ehrenbard, L T; Kourides, I A; Williams, J J

    1980-01-01

    We report a family in which azoospermia and infertility affected two sibs whose parents were first cousins once removed. Meiotic cells of the proband, who had the chromosomal complement of a normal male (46,XY), exhibited asynapsis, defective synaptonemal complex (SC) formation, chiasma failure, and degeneration of prophase spermatocytes with asynapsis. Based on these observations, we suggest that the meiotic abnormalities and infertility in this family comprise a trait with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Review of published cases of infertile men with normal chromosomal complements and disturbed meiosis suggests that genetically determined asynapsis and desynapsis similar to that established in plant and insect species also occur in humans. In humans, asynapsis appears to be inherited as an autosomal recessive. The mode of inheritance of desynapsis is not clear; X-linked recessive or autosomal dominant has been suggested in one family. Studies by us and by others reported in the literature suggest that the mode of action of genes that affect synapsis and cause a reduction in the numbers of visible chiasmata at diakinesis is dissimilar to that of the action of genes that cause defective meiotic recombination, defective repair of induced damage to DNA in somatic cells, and chromosome instability. Images Fig. 5-12 Fig. 2-4 Fig. 13-15 Fig. 16-18 PMID:7446525

  8. Meiotic recombination and male infertility: from basic science to clinical reality?

    PubMed

    Hann, Michael C; Lau, Patricio E; Tempest, Helen G

    2011-03-01

    Infertility is a common problem that affects approximately 15% of the population. Although many advances have been made in the treatment of infertility, the molecular and genetic causes of male infertility remain largely elusive. This review will present a summary of our current knowledge on the genetic origin of male infertility and the key events of male meiosis. It focuses on chromosome synapsis and meiotic recombination and the problems that arise when errors in these processes occur, specifically meiotic arrest and chromosome aneuploidy, the leading cause of pregnancy loss in humans. In addition, meiosis-specific candidate genes will be discussed, including a discussion on why we have been largely unsuccessful at identifying disease-causing mutations in infertile men. Finally clinical applications of sperm aneuploidy screening will be touched upon along with future prospective clinical tests to better characterize male infertility in a move towards personalized medicine. PMID:21297654

  9. Infertility treatment in a population-based sample: 2004-2005.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Sara E; Baksh, Laurie; Stanford, Joseph B

    2012-05-01

    To describe the characteristics of women seeking infertility treatment and the types of fertility treatment sought within a population-based sample. We analyzed data from the cross-sectional Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) of women with a live birth using data from seven states. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with infertility treatment utilization. Infertility treatment was reported by 10.5% of women who were trying to become pregnant. The most common treatment reported was fertility enhancing drugs (29%), followed by assisted reproductive technology including in vitro fertilization (21%), and artificial insemination together with fertility enhancing drugs (15%). Some women reported using other types of treatment (23%). The PRAMS data provide insights into the use of infertility treatment among women giving birth in the United States. Further research is needed to understand the true prevalence of infertility, factors that influence treatment choices, and the longitudinal impact of infertility treatment on outcomes. PMID:21559776

  10. On-label and off-label drugs used in the treatment of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Chehab, Mahmoud; Madala, Alosh; Trussell, J C

    2015-03-01

    Infertility affects 6.1 million U.S. couples-representing 10% of reproductive-age adults and 15% of all couples trying to conceive. Half of the time, infertility is the result of an abnormal semen analysis or other male factors, with 40%-50% of these infertile men diagnosed with idiopathic or nonclassifiable infertility. While the role of hormone therapy for men with an identified abnormality is well defined, the literature remains inconclusive and controversial regarding hormone manipulation using empirical (off-label) medical therapies for men with idiopathic infertility. This manuscript reviews the commonly used off-label medications used to treat idiopathic male factor infertility: clomiphene citrate, letrozole/anastrozole, exogenous androgens, and pentoxifylline. PMID:25660648

  11. Effect of gender on antisperm antibodies in infertile couples in central India.

    PubMed

    Khatoon, Maria; Chaudhari, A R; Singh, Ramji

    2012-01-01

    The presence of antisperm antibodies in serum may impair sperm function leading to immunological infertility. The aim of study was to determine the presence of antisperm antibodies in the circulating blood of infertile couples. This cross sectional study included 109 couples suffering from infertility for more than one-year duration. Serum antisperm antibodies were determined by Varelisa Sperm Antibodies Enzyme Immunoassay kit. The percentage incidence of antisperm antibodies in infertile men was 30.27% was statistically not significant from the 33.03% incidence in infertile women (P Value > 0.05). In the nineteen (15.59%) couples both the husband as well as wife was positive for sperm antibodies. The presence of antisperm antibodies may impair fertilizing ability therefore its assessment should be consideredas an essential part of infertility management. PMID:23734441

  12. In vitro fertilization for male infertility: when and how?

    PubMed

    Hall, J; Fishel, S

    1997-12-01

    The first observation that in vitro fertilization (IVF) was useful for treating oligozoospermia and oligoasthenozoospermia was reported by Fishel and Edwards in 1982. This was followed by a series of cases indicating the value of IVF in such cases. Conventional IVF has been modified and refined to achieve increased rates of conception in cases of male factor infertility. Methods such as high insemination concentration IVF for the treatment of teratozoospermia and microscopic IVF for the treatment of oligozoospermia have had some impact on fertilization and pregnancy rates; however, reports of success are varied. The recent advent of micromanipulation and, in particular, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has overshadowed the use of these modified IVF procedures. Because of the high fertilization and pregnancy rates achieved with ICSI, other micromanipulation techniques (subzonal insemination and partial zona dissection) have been abandoned; there have also been suggestions that other more conventional techniques, i.e. IVF, should also be abandoned and that ICSI become the sole technique for the treatment of infertility. The rapid increase in the number of centres using ICSI has led to extreme pressure for individual units to achieve high fertilization and pregnancy rates and there is a temptation to assign all patients to ICSI treatment. It is important that, in this highly competitive environment, new techniques are not applied haphazardly and reduced to the mere injection of gametes and achievement of pregnancy regardless of the cause of infertility. In his 1986 IVF--Historical Perspective, Fishel quoted Auguste Comte: 'to understand science it is necessary to know its history'. IVF has much recent history in animal and also human work. Although ICSI is the most significant therapeutic advance in male infertility treatment, its application to human IVF is only 4 years old, with a paucity of animal studies on which to rely. For this reason IVF still plays a very important role in the treatment of male factor infertility and should only be ruled out when it has failed previously or the number of available sperm is limited. PMID:9692012

  13. Evaluation of the melatonin and oxidative stress markers level in serum of fertile and infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani Rad, Sara; Abbasalizadeh, Shamsi; Ghorbani Haghjo, Amir; Sadagheyani, Mehzad; Montaseri, Azadeh; Soleimani Rad, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is defined as the inability to achieve the pregnancy within a year of unprotected intercourse. Infertility is a complex issue and different factors such as stress oxidative can be involved in this problem. So, any attempt to neutralize oxidative stress would be helpful in the treatment of infertility. Melatonin is a known scavenger of free radicals. Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the level of melatonin and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: The participants including fertile and infertile women were divided into two groups of 30 people. Blood sampling was performed and sera were collected. The level of Malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and melatonin were detected. Data were analyzed using T-test and their correlation was assessed using Spearman test. Results: Serum melatonin from fertile women was higher than infertile women but the difference was not significant (p= 0.46). MDA level in fertile women was significantly lower than infertile women (p<0.001) and the level of TAC in fertile women was significantly higher than infertile women (p<0.001). Spearman test revealed a significant and direct correlation between melatonin and TAC in fertile and infertile women and a significant but reverse correlation between melatonin and MDA in infertile and fertile women. Conclusion: Differences in the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in fertile and infertile individuals have been reported. This study revealed a significant correlation between melatonin and oxidative stress biomarkers, concluding that melatonin level could be involved in infertility. PMID:26494992

  14. On-label and off-label drug use in the treatment of female infertility.

    PubMed

    Usadi, Rebecca S; Merriam, Kathryn S

    2015-03-01

    Female infertility affects millions of couples worldwide and is estimated to account for one-third of all cases of infertility. The purpose of this article is to review the uses of both off-label treatments and those approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for female infertility, by examining the mechanism of action, the side-effect profile, fetal anomaly risks, and contraindications for the various drugs. PMID:25660647

  15. A Prospective Study of Depression and Anxiety in Female Fertility Preservation and Infertility Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Angela K.; Klock, Susan C.; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Hirshfeld-Cytron, Jennifer; Smith, Kristin N.; Kazer, Ralph R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prospectively assess anxiety, depression, coping, and appraisal in female fertility preservation patients compared to infertile patients. Design Prospective pre- and post-treatment survey. Setting Academic medical center. Patients 47 women with cancer (FP) and 91 age-matched infertile patients. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Depression, anxiety, coping, infertility–related stress, appraisal of treatment, and medical outcomes. Results FP patients reported more symptoms of anxiety and depression than infertile patients, but infertile patients’ symptoms worsened over time. 44% of FP and 14% of infertile patients’ scores exceeded the clinical cut-off for depression at pre-treatment. The interval between surveys and medical treatment data did not predict changes in mood symptoms. Coping strategies and infertility-related stress did not differ between groups and avoidant coping predicted higher depression and anxiety scores. Conclusion FP patients reported more anxiety and depression than infertile patients at enrollment in treatment, with more than one third of FP patients reporting clinically significant depressive symptoms. However, infertile patients’ anxiety and depressive symptoms increased across treatment. This increase was not related to time between registration for IVF and oocyte retrieval or the medical aspects of treatment. FP and infertile patients should be provided psychological consultation prior to treatment to identify mood and anxiety symptoms and to refer patients for counseling as needed to prevent worsening of symptoms. PMID:25154674

  16. Infertility: Why can't we classify this inability as disability?

    PubMed Central

    Khetarpal, Abha; Singh, Satendra

    2012-01-01

    Disability is a complex phenomenon. It reflects an interaction between features of a person's body and features of the society in which he or she lives. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), lays stress on the functional as well as the structural problem of a person. All the definitions of disability also include the disorders of the reproductive and endocrine system. So infertility and impotency should also be included in the category of disability. It affects the participation in areas of life and can have a disabling affect on an individual. Like any other disability the couple has to adapt and integrate infertility in their sense of self thus infertility comes as a major life crisis. Medically, infertility, in most cases, is considered to be the result of a physical impairment or a genetic abnormality. Socially, couples are incapable of their reproductive or parental roles. On social level, infertility in most cultures remains associated with social stigma and taboo just like the social model of disability. Couples who are unable to reproduce may be looked down upon due to social stigmatisation. Infertility can lead to divorces and separation leading to a broken family life. Without labelling infertility as a disability, it is difficult for the people to access services and welfare benefits offered by the government. Infertility treatments are highly sophisticated so they are very expensive and are even not covered by insurance and government aid. In the light of all this it becomes imperative to categorise infertility as disability. PMID:22848333

  17. Systematic characterization of seminal plasma piRNAs as molecular biomarkers for male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yeting; Wang, Cheng; Fu, Zheng; Liang, Hongwei; Zhang, Suyang; Lu, Meiling; Sun, Wu; Ye, Chao; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Shi, Liang; Zhang, Chunni; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Although piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) play pivotal roles in spermatogenesis, little is known about piRNAs in the seminal plasma of infertile males. In this study, we systematically investigated the profiles of seminal plasma piRNAs in infertile males to identify piRNAs that are altered during infertility and evaluate their diagnostic value. Seminal plasma samples were obtained from 211 infertile patients (asthenozoospermia and azoospermia) and 91 fertile controls. High-throughput sequencing technology was employed to screen piRNA profiles in seminal plasma samples pooled from healthy controls and infertile patients. The results identified 61 markedly altered piRNAs in infertile patient groups compared with control group. Next, a quantitative RT-PCR assay was conducted in the training and validation sets to measure and confirm the concentrations of altered piRNAs. The results identified a panel of 5 piRNAs that were significantly decreased in seminal plasma of infertile patients compared with healthy controls. ROC curve analysis and risk score analysis revealed that the diagnostic potential of these 5 piRNAs to distinguish asthenozoospermic and azoospermic individuals from healthy controls was high. In summary, this study identifies a panel of piRNAs that can accurately distinguish fertile from infertile males. This finding may provide pathophysiological clues about the development of infertility. PMID:27068805

  18. Frequency and patterns of abnormal Pap smears in Sudanese women with infertility: What are the perspectives?

    PubMed Central

    Almobarak, Ahmed O; Elhoweris, Mohammed H; Nour, Hilmi M; Ahmed, Mohammed Abd Allah M; Omer, Al-Fadhil Alobeed; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pelvic inflammatory disease is one of the major causes of infertility in females. Also, women with infertility are at high-risk of developing cervical intraepithelial lesions or even carcinoma. Aim: To assess the prevalence and patterns of epithelial cell abnormalities in cervical smears in Sudanese infertile and fertile women. Materials and Methods: The present study included 200 cases (women with infertility) of age group 20-60 years who had routine pap smear. A total of 700 fertile women constituted the control group. Results: Among the 200 infertile women, 93.5% reported as negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (NILM), and 6.5% were epithelial cell abnormalities (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and above). In the control group 96.6% of the smears reported as NILM and 3.4% as epithelial cell abnormalities. The percentage of abnormal pap smears in the infertile women was significantly higher when compared with the control group. Conclusions: Epithelial cell abnormalities are significantly higher in women with infertility as compared with fertile women. Importantly, inflammatory smears were reported two times more than in the controls. We recommend pap smear as a routine practice for all women assessed for infertility problems. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the incidence of human papilloma virus infections in infertile women with abnormal cervical cytology. PMID:23833398

  19. Chromosomal Aberrations and Polymorphic Evaluation in Males with Primary Infertility from Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Pokale, Yamini S.; Jadhav, Ajinkya M.; Gangane, Suresh D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives: The chromosomal abnormalities are one of the important causes of male infertility. In view of the genetic risks for the next generation, the importance of careful evaluation of karyotype is essential. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men with primary infertility from Indian population. Materials and Methods: The 78 infertile men with primary infertility, out of which 26 men were azoospermic, 19 men were oligospermic, 4 men were asthenospermic and 29 men were oligoasthenospermic were studied. Karyoptying was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes by using the Giemsa trypsin banding (GTG) banding technique. Additional data was collected from published studies in Indian population leading to a total of 1814 cases. Results: Chromosome analysis of 78 infertile males showed major chromosome abnormalities in 10.2%, with 6.4% in autosomal chromosome abnormalities and 3.8% in sex chromosome abnormalities. The incidence of major chromosome abnormalities in oligospermic males were 21% and azoospermic males were 15.4 %. Chromosomal polymorphic variants were identified to be 16.7%. Combining the data from other published studies identified 153/ 1814 (8.4%) infertile men of chromosomal abnormalities; with 10.8% in azoospermia, 7.3% in oligospermia and 7.3% in oligoasthenoteratospermic from India. Interpretation and Conclusion: The overall high prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in infertile males suggests that the conventional chromosomal analysis is an important investigative tool for male infertility, especially prior to use of any assisted reproductive techniques. PMID:25478430

  20. Factor structure of the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28) from infertile women attending the Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Shayan, Zahra; Pourmovahed, Zahra; Najafipour, Fatemeh; Abdoli, Ali Mohammad; Mohebpour, Fatemeh; Najafipour, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, infertility problems have become a social concern, and are associated with multiple psychological and social problems. Also, it affects the interpersonal communication between the individual, familial, and social characteristics. Since women are exposed to stressors of physical, mental, social factors, and treatment of infertility, providing a psychometric screening tool is necessary for disorders of this group. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the factor structure of the general health questionnaire-28 to discover mental disorders in infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this study, 220 infertile women undergoing treatment of infertility were selected from the Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility with convenience sampling in 2011. After completing the general health questionnaire by the project manager, validity and, reliability of the questionnaire were calculated by confirmatory factor structure and Cronbach's alpha, respectively. Results: Four factors, including anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction, depression, and physical symptoms were extracted from the factor structure. 50.12% of the total variance was explained by four factors. The reliability coefficient of the questionnaire was obtained 0.90. Conclusion: Analysis of the factor structure and reliability of General Health Questionnaire-28 showed that it is suitable as a screening instrument for assessing general health of infertile women.

  1. Comparison of sexual dysfunction in women with infertility and without infertility referred to Al-Zahra Hospital in 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Mirblouk, Fariba; Asgharnia, Dr.Maryam; Solimani, Robabeh; Fakor, Fereshteh; Salamat, Fatemeh; Mansoori, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the affected aspects in infertile women that have not been given sufficient attention is sexual function. Sexual function is a key factor in physical and marital health, and sexual dysfunction could significantly lower the quality of life. Aim of this study was to assess the comparison sexual dysfunction in women with infertility and without infertility, admitted to Al- Zahra Hospital. Objective: We decided to assess the prevalence of women sexual disorders in fertile and infertile subjects, admitted to Al-Zahra Hospital. Materials and Methods: 149 fertile and 147 infertile women who referred to infertility clinic of Al-Zahra Hospital during 2013-2014 were entered this cross-sectional study and Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire (FSFI) had been filled by all the cases. Most of women were married for 6-10 years (35.5%) and mean marriage time in participants was 9.55±6.07 years. Data were analyzed using SPSS software Ver. 18 and 2 test and logistic regression model has been used for analysis. Results: Results showed significant differences between desire (p=0.004), arousal (p=0.001), satisfaction (p=0.022) and total sexual dysfunction (p=0.011) in both groups but in lubrication (p=0.266), orgasm (p=0.61) and pain (p=0.793) difference were not significant. Conclusion: Some of sexual dysfunction indices are high in all infertile women. Our findings suggest that infertility impacts on women’s sexual function in desire, arousal, satisfaction and total sexual dysfunction. Health care professional should be sensitive to impact that diagnosis of infertility can have on women’s sexuality. PMID:27200426

  2. Preterm delivery and low birth weight in singleton pregnancies conceived by women with and without a history of infertility

    PubMed Central

    Camarano, Loretta; Alkon, Abbey; Nachtigall, Robert D.; Schembri, Michael; Weiss, Sandra; Croughan, Mary S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine predictors of low birth weight (LBW) and preterm delivery (PTD) in singleton pregnancies conceived by women with and without a history of infertility. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Eleven infertility clinics in Northern California. Patients Three groups of women who carried singleton pregnancies to ≥ 20 weeks gestation: 542 infertile women who conceived after treatment, 441 infertile women who conceived spontaneously, and 1008 fertile women for comparison. Interventions Chart review. Main Outcome Measures Association of LBW or PTD with infertility treatment, maternal age, parity, obesity, or development of gestational diabetes. Results Infertile women who conceived with treatment were more likely to be obese, develop gestational diabetes, and have ovarian, ovulatory, or male factor infertility than infertile women who conceived spontaneously. Infertile women who conceived after treatment had 1.61 (95% CI 1.08– 2.41) times greater odds of having a LBW infant. Nulliparity was an independent predictor of LBW 1.54 (95% CI 1.09– 2.16) and PTD (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.20–2.49) in all three groups after controlling for maternal age, history of infertility, infertility treatment, obesity, and gestational diabetes. Conclusions Nulliparous women and women with a history of infertility who conceive a singleton after treatment may be at increased odds for having a LBW infant. Infertile women do not appear to be at increased odds for PTD. PMID:22633266

  3. Clinical management and therapeutic outcome of infertile couples in southeast Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Menuba, Ifeanyi E; Ugwu, Emmanuel O; Obi, Samuel N; Lawani, Lucky O; Onwuka, Chidinma I

    2014-01-01

    Background Infertility is highly prevalent in Nigeria and most infertile couples in southeast Nigeria are offered conventional forms of treatment, which consist mainly of ovulation induction and tubal surgery, due to limited availability and high cost of endoscopic and assisted reproductive technologies like laparoscopy and in vitro fertilization. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of infertility, outcome of infertility investigation, and the treatment outcome of infertile couples following therapeutic interventions in southeast Nigeria over a 12-month period. Methods This was a prospective cross-sectional study of 218 consecutive infertile couples presenting for infertility management at the infertility clinics of two tertiary health institutions in Enugu, southeast Nigeria. Infertility investigations were carried out on these couples using the available conventional diagnostic facilities. Following the results of the investigations/diagnosis, conventional treatment was offered to the couples as appropriate. Data analysis was both descriptive and inferential at 95% confidence level. Results The mean age of the women was 33.5±4.62 (range: 15–49) years. Most (58.3% [n=127]) were nulliparous. The prevalence of infertility was 12.1%. Infertility was primary in 28.4% (n=62) and secondary in 71.6% (n=156). Female etiologic factors were responsible in 32.1% (n=70), male factors in 26.1% (n=57), and a combination of male/female factors in 29.4% (n=64). The etiology was unknown in 12.4% (n=27). Tubal factors 23.8 % (n=52) and ovulation failures 26.1% (n=57) are common female factors implicated. Pregnancy rate following treatment was 16.7% (n=28). Multivariate regression analysis indicates that younger age of ≤30 years, duration of infertility ≤5 years, and female factor infertility were associated with higher pregnancy outcome following treatment. Conclusion The prevalence of infertility is high and pregnancy rate following conventional treatment is poor. There is a need to improve facilities for managing infertility as well as making artificial reproductive techniques readily available, accessible, and affordable. PMID:25328391

  4. Genetic susceptibility to male infertility: news from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Aston, K I

    2014-05-01

    A thorough understanding of the genetic basis of male infertility has eluded researchers in spite of significant efforts to identify novel genetic causes of the disease, particularly over the past decade. Approximately half of male factor infertility cases have no known cause; however, it is likely that the majority of idiopathic male factor infertility cases have some unidentified genetic basis. Well-established genetic causes of male infertility are limited to Y chromosome microdeletions and Klinefelter's syndrome, together accounting for 10-20% of cases of severe spermatogenic failure. In addition to these, several genetic polymorphisms have been demonstrated to be significantly associated with male infertility. The discovery of new genetic associations with male infertility has been hampered by two primary factors. First, most studies are underpowered because of insufficient sample size and ethnic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Second, most studies evaluate a single gene, an approach that is very inefficient in the context of male infertility, considering that many hundreds of genes are involved in the process of testicular development and spermatogenesis. Significant recent advances in microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled the application of whole-genome approaches to the study of male infertility. We recently performed a pilot genome-wide association study (GWAS) for severe spermatogenic failure, and several additional male infertility GWAS have since been published. More recently, genomic microarray tools have been applied to the association of copy number variants with male infertility. These studies are beginning to shed additional light on the genetic architecture of male infertility, and whole-genome studies have proven effective in identifying novel genetic causes of the disease. This review will discuss some of the recent findings of these whole-genome studies as well as future directions for this research that will likely be the most productive moving forward. PMID:24574159

  5. Comparison of lifestyle in fertile and infertile couples in Kermanshah during 2013

    PubMed Central

    Khosrorad, Tahereh; Dolatian, Mahrokh; Riazi, Hedyeh; Mahmoodi, Zohreh; Alavimajd, Hamid; Shahsavari, Soodeh; Bakhtiari, Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a major reproductive health in gynecology. According to the world health organization, there are currently 50-80 million infertile couples in the world. Objective: Considering the critical effects of lifestyle on reproductive health, this study aimed to compare the lifestyle of fertile and infertile couples in Kermanshah during 2013. Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive cross sectional study that was done on 216 fertile and infertile couples attending Infertility Center and six medical centers that were selected through the convenience sampling. Data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire containing demographic and fertility-related information and also lifestyle items on nutrition, physical activity, perceived social support, responsibility for health, and inappropriate health behaviors. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression analysis, independent t, chi-square and Generalized Estimating equation were performed to analyze the data. Results: Fertile and infertile women (86.1% and 73. 1% respectively, p= 0. 03) as well as fertile and infertile men were significantly different in terms of physical activity (87% and 96.3% p<0.001, respectively) and perceived social support (p<0.001). Moreover, there was a significant difference between fertile and infertile women in nutrition (p<0.001). Similar differences were observed in responsibility for health and inappropriate health behaviors between fertile and infertile men. However, all of the dimensions of lifestyle, except nutrition, were significantly different between fertile and infertile couples. Conclusion: As lifestyle plays a crucial role in reproductive health, the inappropriate lifestyle of infertile couples has to be modified through effective measures such as awareness promotion, behavioral changes, and development of a healthy environment. PMID:26568759

  6. Measuring infertility in populations: constructing a standard definition for use with demographic and reproductive health surveys

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infertility is a significant disability, yet there are no reliable estimates of its global prevalence. Studies on infertility prevalence define the condition inconsistently, rendering the comparison of studies or quantitative summaries of the literature difficult. This study analyzed key components of infertility to develop a definition that can be consistently applied to globally available household survey data. Methods We proposed a standard definition of infertility and used it to generate prevalence estimates using 53 Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). The analysis was restricted to the subset of DHS that contained detailed fertility information collected through the reproductive health calendar. We performed sensitivity analyses for key components of the definition and used these to inform our recommendations for each element of the definition. Results Exposure type (couple status, contraceptive use, and intent), exposure time, and outcomes were key elements of the definition that we proposed. Our definition produced estimates that ranged from 0.6% to 3.4% for primary infertility and 8.7% to 32.6% for secondary infertility. Our sensitivity analyses showed that using an exposure measure of five years is less likely to misclassify fertile unions as infertile. Additionally, using a current, rather than continuous, measure of contraceptive use over five years resulted in a median relative error in secondary infertility of 20.7% (interquartile range of relative error [IQR]: 12.6%-26.9%), while not incorporating intent produced a corresponding error in secondary infertility of 58.2% (IQR: 44.3%-67.9%). Conclusions In order to estimate the global burden of infertility, prevalence estimates using a consistent definition need to be generated. Our analysis provided a recommended definition that could be applied to widely available global household data. We also summarized potential biases that should be considered when making estimates of infertility prevalence using household survey data. PMID:22938182

  7. Family physicians’ attitude and practice of infertility management at primary care - Suez Canal University, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Eldein, Hebatallah Nour

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The very particular natures of infertility problem and infertility care make them different from other medical problems and services in developing countries. Even after the referral to specialists, the family physicians are expected to provide continuous support for these couples. This place the primary care service at the heart of all issues related to infertility. The aim of the work: to improve family physicians' attitude and practice about the approach to infertility management within primary care setting. Methods This study was conducted in the between June and December 2010. The study sample comprised 100 family physician trainees in the family medicine department and working in family practice centers or primary care units. They were asked to fill a questionnaire about their personal characteristics, attitude, and practice towards support, investigations, and treatment of infertile couples. Results Hundred family physicians were included in the study. They were previously received training in infertility management. Favorable attitude scores were detected among (68%) of physicians and primary care was considered a suitable place for infertility management among (77%) of participants. There was statistically significant difference regarding each of age groups, gender and years of experience with the physicians′ attitude. There was statistically significant difference regarding gender, perceiving PHC as an appropriate place to manage infertility and attitude towards processes of infertility management with the physicians′ practice. Conclusion Favorable attitude and practice were determined among the study sample. Supporting the structure of primary care and evidence-based training regarding infertility management are required to improve family physicians' attitude and practice towards infertility management. PMID:24244792

  8. Associations between peripheral androgens and cortisol in infertile women.

    PubMed

    Gleicher, Norbert; Seier, Kenneth; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Weghofer, Andrea; Wu, Yan-Guang; Wang, Qi; Albertini, David F; Barad, David H

    2016-04-01

    Testosterone has in recent years been proven essential for normal growth and maturation of small growing follicles. Concomitantly, low functional ovarian reserve (LFOR), characterized by a small growing follicle pool, has been associated with low testosterone levels, which can be of ovarian and/or adrenal origin. In this study we, therefore, investigated whether peripheral sex steroid precursors and testosterone levels potentially reflect on adrenal function. In a retrospective cohort study of 355 consecutive infertile women, who presented to an academically affiliated fertility center in New York City, we investigated in a series of statistical models whether low peripheral sex steroid precursors and testosterone are associated with peripheral cortisol (C) levels, reflecting adrenal function. To determine potential correlations, we investigated the dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate (DHEAS), androstenedione (AD), total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT); sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and C in a series of multivariate and logistic regression analyses, utilizing C either as a continuous variable or with cut off <5.0μg/dL, and TT only as a continuous variable. Practically all models demonstrated significant predictability of peripheral sex hormone precursors for C levels, with DHEA demonstrating the strongest and most consistent predictability as an individual parameter and as part of the DHEAS/DHEA ratio. We conclude that in infertile women peripheral sex hormone precursors, especially DHEA, reflect C levels and, therefore, adrenal function. In infertile women, at all ages low levels of sex hormone precursors, therefore, should be considered indications for further adrenal assessments. PMID:26804970

  9. Genetics of male infertility: from research to clinic.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Csilla; Escamilla, Antoni Riera; Chianese, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Male infertility is a multifactorial complex disease with highly heterogeneous phenotypic representation and in at least 15% of cases, this condition is related to known genetic disorders, including both chromosomal and single-gene alterations. In about 40% of primary testicular failure, the etiology remains unknown and a portion of them is likely to be caused by not yet identified genetic anomalies. During the last 10 years, the search for 'hidden' genetic factors was largely unsuccessful in identifying recurrent genetic factors with potential clinical application. The armamentarium of diagnostic tests has been implemented only by the screening for Y chromosome-linked gr/gr deletion in those populations for which consistent data with risk estimate are available. On the other hand, it is clearly demonstrated by both single nucleotide polymorphisms and comparative genomic hybridization arrays, that there is a rare variant burden (especially relevant concerning deletions) in men with impaired spermatogenesis. In the era of next generation sequencing (NGS), we expect to expand our diagnostic skills, since mutations in several hundred genes can potentially lead to infertility and each of them is likely responsible for only a small fraction of cases. In this regard, system biology, which allows revealing possible gene interactions and common biological pathways, will provide an informative tool for NGS data interpretation. Although these novel approaches will certainly help in discovering 'hidden' genetic factors, a more comprehensive picture of the etiopathogenesis of idiopathic male infertility will only be achieved by a parallel investigation of the complex world of gene environmental interaction and epigenetics. PMID:26447148

  10. Surrogate motherhood as a medical treatment procedure for women's infertility.

    PubMed

    Jovic, Olga S

    2011-03-01

    The content of this work is conceived on the research of the consequences of surrogate motherhood as a process of assisted procreation, which represent a way of parenthood in cases when it is not possible to realize parenthood through a natural way. Surrogate motherhood is a process in which a woman (surrogate mother) agrees to carry a pregnancy with the intent to give the child to the couple with whom she has made a contract on surrogate maternity after the birth. This process of conception and birth makes the determination of the child's origin on its mother's side hard to determine, because of the distinction of the genetic and gestation phases of the two women. The concept of surrogate motherhood is to appear in two forms, depending on the existence or the non-existence of the genetic link between the surrogate mother and the child she gives birth to. There are gestation (full) and genetic (partial) surrogates each with different modalities and legal and ethical implications. In Serbia, Infertility Treatment and the Bio-medically Assisted Procreation Act from 2009 explicitly forbids surrogate motherhood, despite the fact that an infertile couple decides to use it, as a rule, after having tried all other treatment procedures, in cases when there is a diagnosis but the conventional treatment applied has not produced the desired results. Given the fact that no one has the right to ignore the sufferings of people who cannot procreate naturally, the medical practice and legal science in our country plead for a formulation of a legal framework in which to apply surrogate motherhood as an infertility treatment, under particular conditions. PMID:21528795

  11. Natural procreative technology for infertility and recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Elizabeth; Schliep, Karen; Stanford, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To study the outcomes of women with infertility or miscarriage treated with natural procreative technology (NaProTechnology or NPT), a systematic medical approach to promoting conception in vivo; and to compare the outcomes with those previously published from a general practice in Ireland. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting An urban Canadian primary care practice in which the physician had a part-time practice in NPT. Participants Couples with infertility or recurrent miscarriage who received treatment in the practice between August 2000 and July 2006. Intervention All couples were taught to identify the fertile time of their menstrual cycles using the Creighton Model FertilityCare System (CrMS) and completed a standard NPT evaluation. Many also received additional medical treatment to enhance conception in vivo. Main outcome measures Live birth was the primary outcome; secondary outcomes included conceptions, multiple births, low birth weight, and prematurity. Results A total of 108 couples received NPT and were included in the analysis, of which 19 (18%) reported having 2 or more previously unexplained miscarriages. The average female age was 35.4 years. Couples had been attempting to conceive for a mean of 3.2 years. Twenty-two participants (20%) had previously given birth; 24 (22%) had previous intrauterine insemination; and 9 (8%) had previous assisted reproductive technology. The cumulative adjusted proportion of first live births for those completing up to 24 months of NPT treatment was 66 per 100 couples, and the crude proportion was 38%. The cumulative adjusted proportion of first conceptions was 73 per 100 couples, and the crude proportion was 47%. Of the 51 couples who conceived, 12 couples (24%) conceived with CrMS instruction alone, 35 (69%) conceived with CrMS and NPT medical treatment, and 4 (8%) conceived after additional surgical treatment. All births were singleton births; 54% were born at 37 weeks’ gestation or later; and 78% had birth weights of 2500 g or greater. Conclusion Natural procreative technology in a family physician’s office was effective in treating infertility and miscarriage with outcomes that were comparable to those in an NPT general practice in Ireland. Larger multicentre prospective studies to compare NPT directly to other forms of infertility treatment are warranted. PMID:22734170

  12. Might uterus transplantation be an option for uterine factor infertility?

    PubMed Central

    Akar, Münire Erman

    2015-01-01

    Current data on uterus allotransplantation research has been reviewed and summarized. Over the past 15 years, progress in uterus transplantation research has increased dramatically. As a consequence, the first pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation in rats have been reported. The technique has been better defined. Although clinical pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation has been reported in humans, there are still many questions to be answered before clinical application. Gestational surrogacy still remains an important option for being a genetic parent in selected cases with uterine factor infertility. PMID:25788850

  13. Prospective Changes in Infertile Patients using Nonlinear Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yuko; Tomiyama, Tatsuhiro; Matsubayashi, Hidehiko; Tsukamoto, Asami; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi

    2011-06-01

    We measured pulse waves in 22 infertile women from the beginning of in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) through to pregnancy testing. The largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) and autonomic nerve balance in the pregnancy group were significantly lower than that in the non-pregnancy group. In this study, we measured plethysmograms of four women who became pregnant and 18 who did not, ten times from each. We calculated LLE and a value for the autonomic nerve balance; from this analysis, we conclude that a mental state that allows for the possibility of becoming pregnant is necessary for a successful pregnancy.

  14. Adenomyosis reduces pregnancy rates in infertile women undergoing IVF.

    PubMed

    Salim, Rehan; Riris, Solon; Saab, Wael; Abramov, Benjamin; Khadum, Iffat; Serhal, Paul

    2012-09-01

    High-resolution transvaginal ultrasound has facilitated the diagnosis of adenomyosis. This study determined the prevalence of this finding in infertile women and its effect on the outcome of IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). This prospective study evaluated 275 consecutive women, commencing IVF/ICSI for the first time. Inclusion criteria were adequate ovarian reserve. Women with fibroids or a previous myomectomy were excluded. All women were screened for adenomyosis by transvaginal ultrasound on three separate occasions. The control group included 256 women and the adenomyosis group included 19 women. There was no significant difference in the ages of women, FSH, cause of infertility, body mass index, total dose of gonadotrophin used and number of oocytes collected between the two groups. However, women with adenomyosis had a higher mean antral follicle count (P=0.006). The clinical pregnancy rate (22.2% versus 47.2%) and ongoing pregnancy rate (11.1% versus 45.9%) were significantly lower in women with adenomyosis and the miscarriage rate (50.0% versus 2.8%) was significantly higher in women with adenomyosis (all P<0.001). Ultrasound evidence of adenomyosis is found in a significant number of women presenting with infertility and has a negative impact on the outcome of IVF/ICSI. This paper suggests that a common condition known as adenomyosis is associated with a reduced success following fertility treatment such as IVF. The diagnosis of adenomyosis has been greatly facilitated by the advent of high-resolution transvaginal ultrasound. This was a study including 275 consecutive women who were commencing IVF for the first time. Comparing women who did not have adenomyosis and those that did, the clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates were both lower in women with adenomyosis (22.2% versus 47.2% and 11.1% versus 45.9%, respectively). So, fewer women with adenomyosis became pregnant and had an ongoing pregnancy. The miscarriage rate was higher in women with adenomyosis compared with those without (50.0% versus 2.8%). We conclude that ultrasound evidence of adenomyosis is found in a significant number of women presenting with infertility and has a negative impact on the outcome of IVF. PMID:22832421

  15. Infertility treatment: lack of consensus plagues an unregulated field

    PubMed Central

    Easton, M

    1998-01-01

    Each year, in an attempt to stimulate journalism students' interest in medical writing, CMAJ sponsors the Amy Chouinard Memorial Essay Prize. The $750 award is in memory of Amy Chouinard, a longtime and valued contributor to CMAJ and the Canadian Journal of Surgery. Students from any recognized journalism program at a Canadian college or university are eligible to enter, and the deadline for 1998 entries is June 1. The 1997 winner, Megan Easton, presents a well-written and thorough account of the issues surrounding infertility treatment. Interest in the topic came naturally enough--her father, Dr. William Easton, is a urogynecologist in private practice in Scarborough, Ont. PMID:9614830

  16. [FSH and FSHR gene polymorphisms and male infertility: An update].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiu-yue; Shui, Ying-chun; Xia, Xin-yi; Huang, Yu-feng

    2015-11-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is synthesized and secreted by the anterior pituitary, which binds to its receptors expressed on the membrane of Sertoli cells in the testis to bring about spermatogenesis. With the development of DNA sequencing technology, FSH SNPs rs10835638 and FSHR SNPs rs6165, rs6166, and rs1394205 were detected, which might directly affect the expression of FSH and activity of FSHR, resulting in male spermatogenic dysfunction. This review focuses on the relationship of FSH and FSHR gene polymorphisms with male infertility. PMID:26738333

  17. An overview of the development of infertility research and treatment.

    PubMed

    Philipp, E E

    1993-01-01

    Before the invention of the microscope, knowledge of the anatomic factors in human reproduction was limited to the approximations available to the naked eye. Van Leeuwenhoek developed the microscope and also discovered the spermatozoa. With the availability of microscopy, and later biochemistry, the corpus luteum was described and the endocrine functions of the ovaries were partially elucidated. In recent times, too, imaging--by x-ray, sonography, and MRI, and through the laparoscope--has been the key to advances in our understanding of reproduction and, thus, of infertility and its treatment. PMID:8348160

  18. Survey of the Situation of Infertile Women Seeking In Vitro Fertilization Treatment in China

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xuan; Wang, Gongxian; Liu, Sisun; Zhang, Jing; Zeng, Fang; Qiu, Yun; Huang, Xiaojin

    2013-01-01

    Background. In previous studies, people's knowledge of reproductive health and infertile women's psychological states was surveyed in several countries. However, there has been limited information concerning the psychological states of infertile women seeking treatment and the outcomes of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in China. Methods. Infertile women were asked to complete short questionnaires on the day that their oocytes were retrieved; these questionnaires covered the durations of their infertility, levels of education, sources of pressure, and psychological states. Data concerning IVF outcomes were provided by embryologists and clinicians. The correlations between the duration of infertility and educational level, psychological state and education level, and psychological state and outcome of IVF were analyzed in the cohort study. Results. The duration of infertility in more than half of the females was longer than 5 years. Compared with less-educated women, women with higher levels of education sought treatment earlier and their rates of depressive symptoms were lower. There is an association between negative emotions and outcome of IVF. Conclusions. The survey of the situations of infertile women seeking IVF treatment in China indicates the importance of popularizing knowledge concerning reproductive health. Improving medical conditions, reducing the costs of treatment, and developing social culture will aid in relieving the stress of infertile women and improving assisted reproductive treatment. PMID:24369006

  19. Infertility in Women: Hysterosalpingographic Assessment of the Fallopian Tubes in Lagos, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Fabamwo, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Tubal disease constitutes a major factor in infertility especially in developing countries. This study was undertaken to assess the hysterosalpingographic patterns seen in infertile patients in an urban centre in Lagos. Two hundred and twenty patients who reported from the gynaecology clinic to the radiology department of Lagos State University

  20. Prevalence of hyperprolactinemia and abnormal magnetic resonance imaging findings in a population with infertility.

    PubMed

    Souter, Irene; Baltagi, Lina M; Toth, Thomas L; Petrozza, John C

    2010-08-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is rare among asymptomatic patients with infertility. Its prevalence and the mean PRL levels did not differ with [1] the infertility diagnosis, [2] the presence or absence of menstrual irregularities, or [3] the severity of menstrual dysregulation. Abnormal magnetic resonance imaging findings, though, are not uncommon among women with hyperprolactinemia despite the lack of symptoms and the mild PRL elevations. PMID:20116788

  1. Access to infertility care in the developing world: the family promotion gap.

    PubMed

    Asemota, Obehi A; Klatsky, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Infertility in resource-poor settings is an overlooked global health problem. Although scarce health care resources must be deployed thoughtfully, prioritization of resources may be different for recipient and donor countries, the latter of whom focus on maternal health care, prevention, and family planning. For women and couples with involuntary childlessness, the negative psychosocial, sociocultural, and economic consequences in low-income countries are severe, possibly more so than in most Western societies. Despite the local importance of infertility, few resources are committed to help advance infertility care in regions like sub-Saharan Africa. The worldwide prevalence of infertility is remarkably similar across low-, middle-, and high-income countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes infertility as a global health problem and established universal access to reproductive health care as one of the United Nation's Millennium Developmental Goals for 2015. Currently, access to infertility care is varied and is usually only attainable by the very wealthy in low-income countries. We provide an overview on the current state of access to infertility care in low-income countries such as in sub-Saharan Africa and a rationale for providing comprehensive reproductive care and possible solutions for providing cost-effective infertility services in these settings. PMID:25565507

  2. Cognitive emotional consequences of male infertility in their female partners: a qualitative content analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Fatemeh Zahra; Taghipour, Ali; Roudsari, Robab Latifnejad; Kimiaei, Seyed Ali; Mazlom, Seyed Reza; Amirian, Maliheh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Infertility, as a global phenomenon and one of the most important issues of reproductive health, affects women more often than men, even when the infertility is due to a male factor. The purpose of this study was to explore the cognitive emotional experiences of women faced with male infertility. Methods This qualitative study was conducted in 2014–2015 in Mashhad, Iran. The perceptions and experiences of healthy women whose husbands were diagnosed with primary male factor infertility were investigated using a qualitative content analysis approach. Participants were selected through purposeful sampling, and data collection was conducted using in-depth semistructured interviews. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis with MAXqda software. Study rigor was verified via criteria proposed by Lincoln and Guba. Results One main theme emerged through analysis entitled “cognitive emotional reactions confronting infertility diagnosis” with sub-themes of cognitive emotional reactions when confronted with male infertility diagnosis with subthemes of disbelief and denial, fear and apprehension, suffering and emotional distress, disappointment, frustration, confusion, and joy. Conclusion The diagnosis of male infertility was associated with important emotional cognitive consequences for their female partners. Emotional support, providing new insights into how to treat the issue, and trying to shorten the process of diagnosis are necessary for these women. This kind of support could reduce the psychological effects of confrontation with the diagnosis of male infertility, including social insecurity for women. PMID:26767097

  3. Motherhood and Female Labor Supply in the Developing World: Evidence from Infertility Shocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguero, Jorge M.; Marks, Mindy S.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new instrument for family size, infertility, to investigate the causal relationship between children and female labor force participation. Infertility mimics an experiment where nature assigns an upper bound for family size, independent of a woman's background. This new instrument allows us to investigate the differential labor

  4. A Holistic Approach to the Treatment of the Crisis of Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresnick, Ellen R.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the importance of assessing the impact infertility has on couples/individuals and understanding the relevance of this impact in the context of psychological treatment. Infertility's negative impact can be minimized by therapeutic intervention. Three psychological-behavioral categories for couples are posited, with case studies. (Author)

  5. An Exploratory Study of the Psychological Correlates of Infertility on Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Fahje, Kristin Kons

    1989-01-01

    Investigated effect of various factors related to infertility on women's (N=31) self-esteem and concomitant incidence of depression. Results support positive relationship between infertile women's self-esteem and their internal locus of control, self-esteem and subjective satisfaction with their social support, and general satisfaction with social…

  6. Motherhood and Female Labor Supply in the Developing World: Evidence from Infertility Shocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguero, Jorge M.; Marks, Mindy S.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new instrument for family size, infertility, to investigate the causal relationship between children and female labor force participation. Infertility mimics an experiment where nature assigns an upper bound for family size, independent of a woman's background. This new instrument allows us to investigate the differential labor…

  7. Economic aspects of infertility care: a challenge for researchers and clinicians.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    Infertility care has improved remarkably over the last few decades and has received growing attention from health care providers. Several treatments, including expensive options such as Assisted Reproductive Techniques, are now widely available for routine clinical use. In most cases, adoption of these treatments has occurred without robust cost-effective analyses. IVF for unexplained infertility and ICSI in the absence of semen abnormalities are two examples of this gradual technology creep. More in-depth economic analyses in the field of infertility are undoubtedly warranted. However, performing these analyses is challenging because infertility care poses a number of unique challenges. Studies of cost-effectiveness are open to criticism because there is a lack of consensus about the outcomes of choice and the appropriate perspective. The use of quality adjusted life years (QALYs) to allow comparisons with other clinical conditions is also controversial because the value associated with infertility care cannot be easily captured in QALYs. Moreover, their use triggers the crucial question of whose QALYs merit consideration-an individual's, a couple's or a child's. In conclusion, economic analysis in infertility represents a peculiar but crucial challenge. If management of infertility is to become an integral part of publicly or privately funded health care systems worldwide, better quality data and a shared vision about the costs and benefits of infertility treatments are needed. PMID:26141712

  8. Effect of Infertility on Sexual Function: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf; Direkvand-Moghadam, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sexual dysfunction is an important psychological disorder that may increase in infertile couples. Aim To evaluate the effect of infertility on sexual function in women attending in private and public institutions in Ilam during 2013. Materials and Methods In a cross - sectional study evaluated the sexual function among 384 women attending in health care centers of Ilam western of Iran during 2013. Participants were divided in two groups, fertilities and infertilities women. Data was collected by trained research midwives using demographic and FSFI questionnaires. SPSS software Package 16 was used to analyse the data of this project. Differences were regarded statistically significant with an alpha error of 0.05. Results The mean age was 29.29 ± 6.7 years in fertile and 31.74 ± 8.07 in infertile women. Significant difference was reported in mean age between fertile and infertile women (p=0.014). The Mean± SD of all demissions of female sexual function was difference between fertile and infertile women. Sexual function was lower in infertile women. Conclusion All dimensions of sexual function were lower in infertile women in compared with fertile women. Further research should be done on this subject and ways to address such problems should be found. PMID:26155520

  9. Study of cytomegalovirus infection in idiopathic infertility men referred to Shariati hospital, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Masoud; Bahrami, Alireza; Morteza, Afsaneh; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Ghadami, Mohsen; Choobineh, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a prevalent infection in humans. Recent studies have shown the role of CMV infection in male infertility disorder. Aim: Here we aimed to study the role of CMV infection in men with idiopathic infertility. Materials and Methods: We performed a case-control study of CMV serology in 200 patients attending male infertility clinic of a university hospital. There were 154 men diagnosed with infertility and 46 men without infertility. The patients were asked to donate their sperm, blood, and urine. The presence of CMV infection was studied using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: CMV infection was present in 25 of all the studied participants. Controls had a higher sperm count and sperm motility and sperm morphology compared to patients. There were no significant differences in the studied variables between those with and without CMV infection, nor in patients, neither in controls. Sperm morphology was negatively correlated with cigarette smoking (r=-0.15; p<0.03). Even though the prevalence of CMV infection was higher in patients with infertility in control and patient (5/46 vs. 20/154) respectively, this was not statistically significant. Conclusion: We did not show a significant role for CMV infection in male infertility. Based on the previous studies, it could be assumed that CMV infection is an important part of the male infertility and its treatment would improve the sperm quality, however this was not confirmed by the present study. PMID:24799874

  10. Infertility in Women: Hysterosalpingographic Assessment of the Fallopian Tubes in Lagos, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Fabamwo, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Tubal disease constitutes a major factor in infertility especially in developing countries. This study was undertaken to assess the hysterosalpingographic patterns seen in infertile patients in an urban centre in Lagos. Two hundred and twenty patients who reported from the gynaecology clinic to the radiology department of Lagos State University…

  11. Access to and use of infertility services in the United States: framing the challenges.

    PubMed

    Adashi, Eli Y; Dean, Laura A

    2016-05-01

    An overview of access to and use of general infertility and assisted reproductive technology (ART) services in the United States (U.S.) shows a declining trend for the ever-use of infertility services. Moreover, the use of ART services lags relative to other member nations of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Access to and use of general infertility and ART services is primarily undermined by a severely constrained underwriting universe dominated by self-insured employers and by a finite number of state infertility insurance mandates. The contribution of traditional public and private payers to the underwriting of ART is limited. As compared with OECD member nations wherein the access to and underwriting of general infertility and ART services is universal, the current status quo in the U.S. can only be characterized as dismal. Further, the current state of affairs is socially unjust in that the right to build a family in the face of infertility appears to have become a function of economic prowess. Given the dominance of the self-insured employers as underwriters of general infertility and ART services, advocacy directed at this interest group is likely to prove most productive. Improving the state of underwriting of general infertility and ART services in the U.S. must be embraced as a central moral imperative and as an unwavering strategic goal of the professional societies entrusted with the reproductive health of women and men. PMID:26826275

  12. Feeling the blues of infertility in a South Asian context: psychological well-being and associated factors among Sri Lankan women with primary infertility.

    PubMed

    Lansakara, Nirosha; Wickramasinghe, Ananda Rajitha; Seneviratne, Harshalal Rukka

    2011-06-21

    Primary infertility may have a considerable impact on the psychological well-being of women. In the present study, the authors investigated the psychological well-being and its correlates among Sri Lankan women with primary infertility. A total of 177 women with primary infertility were compared with 177 fertile women matched for age and duration of marriage to identify differences in the psychological well-being between the two groups. They were recruited from a prevalence survey conducted in the district of Colombo, Sri Lanka from August 2005 to February 2006. The General Health Questionnaire-30 (GHQ-30) and Mental Health sub-components of the Short Form-36 (SF-36) were used to measure psychological well-being. In addition, infertile women with and without psychological distress were compared to identify the social, marital, treatment, and demographic factors independently associated with psychological distress. A significantly higher proportion of women with primary infertility (66.1%; 95% CI 58.6-73.0%) had psychological distress as compared to fertile women (18.6 %; 95% CI 13.2-25.2%; P < 0.001). After adjustment for confounding factors, infertile women who were psychologically distressed were significantly less educated (OR = 55.3; 95% CI 15.2-201.0), had poor marital communication (OR = 3.5; 95% CI 1.3-9.8), had a higher priority for having children (OR = 4.2; 95% CI 1.3-13.8), and had been previously (OR = 39.1; 95% CI 8.3-185.4) or currently (OR = 11.0; 95% CI 3.0-40.6) investigated/treated for infertility when compared with infertile women without distress. Women with primary infertility reported more distress as compared to fertile women. Psychological distress among infertile women was associated with poorer education, being previously/currently investigated/treated, placing higher importance on having children, and having poor marital communication. The need for psychological intervention targeting infertile women in clinics and community settings is highlighted. PMID:21707340

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Infertility at a Rural Site of Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Liqiang; Tan, Jichun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate and analyze prevalence and risk factors of infertility at a representative rural site of Northern China. Method This is a cross-sectional study. We conducted a face-to-face questionnaire survey from July 2014 to October 2014 involving 5,131 women who were at childbearing age in Suizhong, a medium-sized, representative county located in Northern China. Finally, data from 4,232 valid questionnaires were analyzed. Definition Infertility is defined as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regularly unprotected sexual intercourse. Results Infertility prevalence in Suizhong County was 13.09% (95% CI, 12.09%-14.1%), of which the primary infertility incidence was 0.99% (95% CI, 0.72%-1.34%), and the secondary infertility incidence was 12.10% (95% CI, 11.13%-13.12%). For women, the infertility incidence of underweight women (Body Mass Index, BMI<18.5 kg/m2) was 1.5-fold higher than that of women with moderate BMI (18.5–24.9 kg/m2). The infertility incidence of women with little exercise was 4 times more than that of women with regular exercise, and 2 times more than that of women with heavy exercise. The group with moderate menstrual flow had the lowest prevalence of infertility, while both scant and excessive menstruation led to increased infertility incidence. Number of pregnancies (OR = 0.63; 95% CI, 0.51–0.79) was a protective factor for infertility, while the number of abortions (OR = 2.15; 95% CI, 1.58–2.93) was a risk factor for infertility. For men, those who stayed up late at night more than 3 times per week showed a significantly higher infertility incidence. Men who engaged in occupations with high-temperature working environment also suffered from an infertility incidence of about four times more than the others. Conclusions We found significant association between women's infertility incidence with their BMI, state of exercise, amount of menstrual flow, number of pregnancies and number of abortions. As for men, both staying up late and engaging in high-temperature occupations are independent factors affecting their fertility. PMID:27177147

  14. Adoption, infertility, and the new reproductive technologies: problems and prospects for social work and welfare policy.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, S M

    1990-07-01

    In this article, the author examines the social and psychological issues raised by infertility and addresses problems resulting from the increasing commercialization of children through adoption practices as well as through the proliferation of new reproductive technologies. The author begins with a discussion of infertility and considers some aspects of adoption, the traditional solution to infertility. Some historical, technical, ethical, psychological, and social aspects of artificial insemination, along with newer developments of surrogacy, such as in vitro fertilization and frozen embryos, also are discussed. Recommendations are suggested for meeting the service needs of people who have problems associated with infertility. Finally, the author stresses the importance of research along with the necessity for social workers to take a leadership role in helping society both to understand the ethical issues related to and to develop enlightened public policy on infertility, adoption, and the new reproductive technologies. PMID:2203152

  15. Differential proteomics of human seminal plasma: A potential target for searching male infertility marker proteins.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Anil Kumar; Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2012-04-01

    The clinical fertility tests, available in the market, fail to define the exact cause of male infertility in almost half of the cases and point toward a crucial need of developing better ways of infertility investigations. The protein biomarkers may help us toward better understanding of unknown cases of male infertility that, in turn, can guide us to find better therapeutic solutions. Many clinical attempts have been made to identify biomarkers of male infertility in sperm proteome but only few studies have targeted seminal plasma. Human seminal plasma is a rich source of proteins that are essentially required for development of sperm and successful fertilization. This viewpoint article highlights the importance of human seminal plasma proteome in reproductive physiology and suggests that differential proteomics integrated with functional analysis may help us in searching potential biomarkers of male infertility. PMID:22532450

  16. [Tubo-peritoneal factor of infertility: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Muzii, L; Sereni, M I; Battista, C; Zullo, M A; Tambone, V; Angioli, R

    2010-01-01

    Infertility, defined as the inability to conceive despite regular unprotected sexual intercourse over 12 years, affects approximately 10% of the fertile population. The commonest cause of tubal damage is pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which in the developed world is caused mainly by Chlamydia trachomatis infection. The incidence of tubal damage after one episode of pelvic infection is approximately 12%, 23% after two episodes and 54% after three episodes. Other causes of tubal damage include postsurgical adhesions or endometriosis. Tubal patency can be diagnosed by hysterosalpingography (HSG) or laparoscopy with chromopertubation. Surgery represents the best therapeutic approach for tubal pathology, with a term pregnancy rate of 70% after surgery in selected patients, while the latest results in Italy of assisted reproductive technology (ART) report a live birth rate per cycle of 13.8%. In conclusion, tubal reconstructive surgery remains an important option for many couples and surgery should be the fi rst line approach for a correct diagnosis and treatment of tubal infertility. PMID:20393685

  17. Zoroastrians Support Oocyte and Embryo Donation Program for Infertile Couples

    PubMed Central

    Halvaei, Iman; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi-Esmailabad, Saeed; Nabi, Ali; Shamsi, Farimah

    2014-01-01

    Background The main goal was to evaluate the attitudes and knowledge of Zoroastrians living in Iran towards oocyte donation (OD) and embryo donation (ED) program. Methods This cross sectional study consisted of 318 Zoroastrians (n=175 for OD and n=143 for ED) of both sexes. The questionnaire form comprised two parts of general demographic characteristics of the participants and twenty multiple-choice questions about attitude and knowledge of participants towards OD and ED. For statistical analysis, the chi-square test was applied for comparison of data generated from ED and OD groups. Results Majority of the participants supported OD (69.7%) and ED (71.3%) for infertile patients. In addition, 40% and 42% preferred donation program (OD and ED, respectively), compared to adoption. About 60% of the respondents believed that the donors have no right to find the child and claim it as their own. In addition, more than half of the respondents thought that the recipients of oocyte/embryo should never know the name and address of the donors. More than half of the participants did not know whether their religion accepts donation program or not. Approximately, 80% of respondents supported psychological counseling for both donors and recipients. Moreover, about 56% of the participants necessitated the advertisement on OD/ED program in the mass media. Conclusion Our preliminary data showed that Zoroastrians supported both OD and ED program equally for infertile couples. PMID:25473631

  18. The management of infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Homburg, Roy

    2003-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome [PCOS] is the commonest cause of anovulatory infertility. Treatment modes available are numerous mainly relying on ovarian stimulation with FSH, a reduction in insulin concentrations and a decrease in LH levels as the basis of the therapeutic principles. Clomiphene citrate is still the first line treatment and if unsuccessful is usually followed by direct FSH stimulation. This should be given in a low dose protocol, essential to avoid the otherwise prevalent complications of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and multiple pregnancies. The addition of a GnRH agonists, while very useful during IVF/ET, adds little to ovulation induction success whereas the position of GnRH antagonists is not yet clear. Hyperinsulinemia is the commonest contributor to the state of anovulation and its reduction, by weight loss or insulin sensitizing agents such as metformin, will alone often restore ovulation or will improve results when used in combination with other agents. Laparoscopic ovarian drilling is proving equally as successful as FSH for the induction of ovulation, particularly in thin patients with high LH concentrations. Aromatase inhibitors are presently being examined and may replace clomiphene in the future. When all else has failed, IVF/ET produces excellent results. In conclusion, there are very few women suffering from anovulatory infertility associated with PCOS who cannot be successfully treated today. PMID:14617367

  19. Human Papillomavirus Infection, Infertility, and Assisted Reproductive Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Nigel; Kucharczyk, Katherine M.; Estes, Jaclyn L.; Gerber, Rachel S.; Lekovich, Jovana P.; Elias, Rony T.; Spandorfer, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection common among men and women across all geographic and socioeconomic subgroups worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that HPV infection may affect fertility and alter the efficacy of assisted reproductive technologies. In men, HPV infection can affect sperm parameters, specifically motility. HPV-infected sperm can transmit viral DNA to oocytes, which may be expressed in the developing blastocyst. HPV can increase trophoblastic apoptosis and reduce the endometrial implantation of trophoblastic cells, thus increasing the theoretical risk of miscarriage. Vertical transmission of HPV during pregnancy may be involved in the pathophysiology of preterm rupture of membranes and spontaneous preterm birth. In patients undergoing intrauterine insemination for idiopathic infertility, HPV infection confers a lower pregnancy rate. In contrast, the evidence regarding any detrimental impact of HPV infection on IVF outcomes is inconclusive. It has been suggested that vaccination could potentially counter HPV-related sperm impairment, trophoblastic apoptosis, and spontaneous miscarriages; however, these conclusions are based on in vitro studies rather than large-scale epidemiological studies. Improvement in the understanding of HPV sperm infection mechanisms and HPV transmission into the oocyte and developing blastocyst may help explain idiopathic causes of infertility and miscarriage. PMID:26609434

  20. [Male infertility with chromosomal abnormalities. I. XYY syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hazama, M; Oka, N; Hamaguchi, T; Okada, H; Matsumoto, O; Kamidono, S; Ishigami, J

    1985-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are found in a considerably high percentage of cases of male infertility, in particular azoospermia. We report a case of the XYY syndrome and review the literature. A 36-year-old man, a factory hand, presented with infertility. He was safely delivered at term as a fourth child when his father was 41 years old and his mother 38. He had no delinquent or criminal record. His height was 179 cm, weight 75 kg and distance of extended hands 184 cm. No gynecomastia was noticed. Both testes were 8ml in size and growth of pubic hair and penis were normal. Severe oligozoospermia was identified in semen analysis. Seminal vesiculography showed pathological dilatation of the seminal vas end. The testicular biopsy specimens revealed spermatogenic arrest for the most part. Chromosomal analysis showed 47, XYY karyotype; and, two Y-chromatin was revealed in cultured lymphocytes. Though plasma gonadotropin levels were high, testosterone, estradiol, prolactin, TSH, GH, T3 and T4 levels were within normal limits. Pituitary reserve function for secreting gonadotropins and Leydig cell reserve function to secrete testosterone have been found to be almost normal. PMID:4039524

  1. Proteomic signatures of infertile men with clinical varicocele and their validation studies reveal mitochondrial dysfunction leading to infertility

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh; Samanta, Luna; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Sabanegh, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    To study the major differences in the distribution of spermatozoa proteins in infertile men with varicocele by comparative proteomics and validation of their level of expression. The study-specific estimates for each varicocele outcome were combined to identify the proteins involved in varicocele-associated infertility in men irrespective of stage and laterality of their clinical varicocele. Expression levels of 5 key proteins (PKAR1A, AK7, CCT6B, HSPA2, and ODF2) involved in stress response and sperm function including molecular chaperones were validated by Western blotting. Ninety-nine proteins were differentially expressed in the varicocele group. Over 87% of the DEP involved in major energy metabolism and key sperm functions were underexpressed in the varicocele group. Key protein functions affected in the varicocele group were spermatogenesis, sperm motility, and mitochondrial dysfunction, which were further validated by Western blotting, corroborating the proteomics analysis. Varicocele is essentially a state of energy deprivation, hypoxia, and hyperthermia due to impaired blood supply, which is corroborated by down-regulation of lipid metabolism, mitochondrial electron transport chain, and Krebs cycle enzymes. To corroborate the proteomic analysis, expression of the 5 identified proteins of interest was validated by Western blotting. This study contributes toward establishing a biomarker “fingerprint” to assess sperm quality on the basis of molecular parameters. PMID:26732106

  2. Proteomic signatures of infertile men with clinical varicocele and their validation studies reveal mitochondrial dysfunction leading to infertility.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh; Samanta, Luna; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Sabanegh, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    To study the major differences in the distribution of spermatozoa proteins in infertile men with varicocele by comparative proteomics and validation of their level of expression. The study-specific estimates for each varicocele outcome were combined to identify the proteins involved in varicocele-associated infertility in men irrespective of stage and laterality of their clinical varicocele. Expression levels of 5 key proteins (PKAR1A, AK7, CCT6B, HSPA2, and ODF2) involved in stress response and sperm function including molecular chaperones were validated by Western blotting. Ninety-nine proteins were differentially expressed in the varicocele group. Over 87% of the DEP involved in major energy metabolism and key sperm functions were underexpressed in the varicocele group. Key protein functions affected in the varicocele group were spermatogenesis, sperm motility, and mitochondrial dysfunction, which were further validated by Western blotting, corroborating the proteomics analysis. Varicocele is essentially a state of energy deprivation, hypoxia, and hyperthermia due to impaired blood supply, which is corroborated by down-regulation of lipid metabolism, mitochondrial electron transport chain, and Krebs cycle enzymes. To corroborate the proteomic analysis, expression of the 5 identified proteins of interest was validated by Western blotting. This study contributes toward establishing a biomarker "fingerprint" to assess sperm quality on the basis of molecular parameters. PMID:26732106

  3. Infertility etiologies are genetically and clinically linked with other diseases in single meta-diseases.

    PubMed

    Tarín, Juan J; García-Pérez, Miguel A; Hamatani, Toshio; Cano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The present review aims to ascertain whether different infertility etiologies share particular genes and/or molecular pathways with other pathologies and are associated with distinct and particular risks of later-life morbidity and mortality. In order to reach this aim, we use two different sources of information: (1) a public web server named DiseaseConnect ( http://disease-connect.org ) focused on the analysis of common genes and molecular mechanisms shared by diseases by integrating comprehensive omics and literature data; and (2) a literature search directed to find clinical comorbid relationships of infertility etiologies with only those diseases appearing after infertility is manifested. This literature search is performed because DiseaseConnect web server does not discriminate between pathologies emerging before, concomitantly or after infertility is manifested. Data show that different infertility etiologies not only share particular genes and/or molecular pathways with other pathologies but they have distinct clinical relationships with other diseases appearing after infertility is manifested. In particular, (1) testicular and high-grade prostate cancer in male infertility; (2) non-fatal stroke and endometrial cancer, and likely non-fatal coronary heart disease and ovarian cancer in polycystic ovary syndrome; (3) osteoporosis, psychosexual dysfunction, mood disorders and dementia in premature ovarian failure; (4) breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations in diminished ovarian reserve; (5) clear cell and endometrioid histologic subtypes of invasive ovarian cancer, and likely low-grade serous invasive ovarian cancer, melanoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in endometriosis; and (6) endometrial and ovarian cancer in idiopathic infertility. The present data endorse the principle that the occurrence of a disease (in our case infertility) is non-random in the population and suggest that different infertility etiologies are genetically and clinically linked with other diseases in single meta-diseases. This finding opens new insights for clinicians and reproductive biologists to treat infertility problems using a phenomic approach instead of considering infertility as an isolated and exclusive disease of the reproductive system/hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In agreement with a previous validation analysis of the utility of DiseaseConnect web server, the present study does not show a univocal correspondence between common gene expression and clinical comorbid relationship. Further work is needed to untangle the potential genetic, epigenetic and phenotypic relationships that may be present among different infertility etiologies, morbid conditions and physical/cognitive traits. PMID:25880215

  4. Psychological Disturbances and Quality of Life in Obese and Infertile Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Kocełak, Piotr; Chudek, Jerzy; Naworska, Beata; Bąk-Sosnowska, Monika; Kotlarz, Barbara; Mazurek, Monika; Madej, Paweł; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta; Skałba, Piotr; Olszanecka-Glinianowicz, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Anovulatory cycles and endometriosis are the main causes of female infertility. The most frequently anovulatory cycles are related to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) commonly associated with obesity and hormonal disturbances in the course of obesity. Recently published studies revealed that infertility affects about one in six couples during their lifetime and is more frequent in obese. Obesity is also associated with male infertility related to erectile dysfunction, hormonal disturbances and lower semen quality. Any of these above mentioned disorder is the important risk factor of psychological disturbances and poor quality of life among women and men in the reproductive age. On the other hand the mood disorders may exacerbate the hormonal disturbances and worsen the effectiveness of infertility management. Infertility, its therapy with accompanying psychological disturbances may also significantly affect the partners relationships. The review summarize the results described in the current literature on the association between obesity and infertility and psychological disturbances as well as their impact on quality of life and sexual functioning in women and men. Moreover, the impact of infertility and psychological disturbances on partners relationships is discussed. PMID:22844280

  5. Role of genetic mutations in folate-related enzyme genes on Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kang; Zhao, Ruizhe; Shen, Min; Ye, Jiaxin; Li, Xiao; Huang, Yuan; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Several studies showed that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes might be associated with male infertility; however, the results were still inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G mutations and the MTHFR haplotype with the risk of male infertility. Overall, a total of 37 studies were selected. Our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T mutation was a risk factor for male infertility in both azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients, especially in Asian population. Men carrying the MTHFR TC haplotype were most liable to suffer infertility while those with CC haplotype had lowest risk. On the other hand, the MTHFR A1298C mutation was not related to male infertility. MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G were potential candidates in the pathogenesis of male infertility, but more case-control studies were required to avoid false-positive outcomes. All of these results were confirmed by the trial sequential analysis. Finally, our meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis proved that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes played a significant role in male infertility. PMID:26549413

  6. Role of genetic mutations in folate-related enzyme genes on Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Zhao, Ruizhe; Shen, Min; Ye, Jiaxin; Li, Xiao; Huang, Yuan; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Several studies showed that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes might be associated with male infertility; however, the results were still inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G mutations and the MTHFR haplotype with the risk of male infertility. Overall, a total of 37 studies were selected. Our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T mutation was a risk factor for male infertility in both azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients, especially in Asian population. Men carrying the MTHFR TC haplotype were most liable to suffer infertility while those with CC haplotype had lowest risk. On the other hand, the MTHFR A1298C mutation was not related to male infertility. MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G were potential candidates in the pathogenesis of male infertility, but more case-control studies were required to avoid false-positive outcomes. All of these results were confirmed by the trial sequential analysis. Finally, our meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis proved that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes played a significant role in male infertility. PMID:26549413

  7. Genome-Wide Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis Antigens Associated with Tubal Factor Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Allison K.; Budrys, Nicole M.; Gong, Siqi; Wang, Jie; Holden, Alan; Schenken, Robert S.; Zhong, Guangming

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify C. trachomatis antigens that can be used to differentially diagnose tubal factor infertility in comparison to previously reported Heat Shock Protein 60 (HSP60). Design In Vitro Study Patients Infertile women with and without tubal pathology diagnosed laparoscopically. Setting Academic medical center. Main Outcome Measures Antibody responses to C. trachomatis in infertile women with or without tubal pathologies using a C. trachomatis genome-wide proteome array. Results Comparison of the antibody profiles revealed 30 C. trachomatis antigens that were preferentially recognized by tubal factor infertility women with a detection sensitivity and specificity of 80.6% and 56.5%, respectively, 10 of which showed 100% specificity. A combination of CT443 and CT381 antigens yielded the highest detection sensitivity (67.7%) while maintaining 100% specificity. Conclusion These findings have demonstrated that antibodies to CT443 and CT381, when used in combination, have higher sensitivity and specificity in predicting tubal factor infertility than other indicators for tubal factor infertility such as HSP60 antibodies (35.5%, 100%) or hysterosalpingogram (65%, 83%). Using a panel of C. trachomatis antigens to serologically diagnose tubal factor infertility can save the patients from undertaking expensive and invasive procedures for determining tubal pathology and choosing treatment plans. PMID:21742324

  8. Genetic and molecular diagnostics of male infertility in the clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Pizzol, Damiano; Ferlin, Alberto; Garolla, Andrea; Lenzi, Andrea; Bertoldo, Alessandro; Foresta, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Male infertility represents one of the clearest examples of complex phenotype with substantial genetic basis. It is indeed well established that genetic causes account for 10-15% of infertility cases, including chromosomal abnormalities and single-gene mutations. However, a large proportion of infertile males does not receive a clear diagnosis and thus they are reported as idiopathic or unexplained. Male (in)fertility is commonly based on standard semen analysis, which, however, cannot clearly distinguish fertile from infertile populations and therefore fails to detect any abnormality in many cases. Abnormal sperm function or specific molecular defects can be hypothesized in these cases. This review considers practical genetic and molecular diagnostic tests for male infertility, reporting on the most frequent genetic causes of male infertility and on the pros and cons of most commonly used techniques for genetic, molecular and functional sperm evaluation. Finally, this review will discuss recent advances in pharmacogenetics and new developments on sperm analysis that will form the basis for future research. PMID:24389185

  9. Traditional Practices of Turkish infertile women: an example from a rural county.

    PubMed

    Nazik, Evsen; Apay, Serap; Özdemir, Funda; Nazik, Hakan

    2015-03-01

    Infertility is not only a health problem, but is also a central existential intrapersonal and relational conflict. Infertility treatments are invasive, expensive, time-consuming, emotionally draining. All over the world there are numerous traditional methods used in the treatment of infertility. This investigation was carried out to determine the traditional practices of infertile women in a rural county in Eastern Turkey. This is a descriptive study carried out in 105 primary infertile women. Data were collected between September 2007 and April 2008 by using a questionnaire. Data analysis included descriptive statistics. 55% of the women were in the 25-34 year age range. It was observed that only 17% of the women applied to a gynecologist without using any traditional applications while 83% of the women applied for traditional applications. The most prevalent traditional practices were consulting traditional healers, visiting mausoleums where religious leaders were buried, using traditional drugs, use of written fertility amulets. Various traditional practices against infertility are prevalent rural counties. Some of these practices may be potentially harmful for women. Health professionals should be aware that infertile women may sometimes follow questionable traditional practices and advices. PMID:26040063

  10. Therapeutic Vaccines: Hope Therapy and Its Effects on Psychiatric Symptoms among Infertile Women

    PubMed Central

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Abdolahifard, Khadije; Jahromi, Masoumeh Golestan

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a life crisis which leads to serious psychological problems. The present study aims to investigate the effects of hope therapy as a psychological intervention on psychological distresses among infertile women. The present study was an experimental one. The study population included infertile women referring to gynecology clinics. Women who lived in Jahrom and could take part in psychotherapy sessions, had no chronic physical or mental disorders, suffered from primary infertility, had infertility unknown causes and had no history of miscarriage and stillbirth were selected through convenience sampling method and were divided into control and intervention groups (n=61). Women in the intervention group participated in eight 2-hour sessions for a period of 2 months. Study results revealed that there was a significant difference between the two groups after the intervention. Besides, there was a significant difference between the two groups through paired T-test (p<0.05). Furthermore, results of ANCOVA showed that after eliminating demographic variables, the intervention was effective in the total mean difference of the study groups. It means that the difference between the two groups was resulted from intervention. Hope therapy as a positive psychological approach can improve infertile women’s general health and subsequently improve family’s health. Therefore, in addition to assisted reproductive techniques, hope therapy is recommended to be presented to infertile people in order to improve the quality of their life and help them adapt with their problems. PMID:24373279

  11. Rare chromosomal, genetic, and epigenetic-related risks associated with infertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Kurinczuk, Jennifer J; Bhattacharya, Siladitya

    2014-08-01

    This article reviews the rarer chromosomal, genetic, and epigenetic-related risks of adverse child outcomes associated with infertility and its treatment. Excess structural chromosomal anomalies have been found in both male and female partners undergoing infertility treatment, and these risk direct transmission to offspring. Microdeletions of the Y-chromosome associated with male infertility have been transmitted to sons following treatment with intracytoplasmic sperm injection. It is thus possible that male offspring of men with infertility could experience fertility problems in adulthood. Infertility treatment for men with cystic fibrosis, or with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens in the absence of cystic fibrosis, who have azoospermia is now possible using surgically retrieved sperm. Transmission of known cystic fibrosis mutations can be avoided by testing the female partner prior to treatment and offering pre-implantation genetic diagnosis if she is a carrier. The effect of infertility and its treatment on genomic imprinting is of increasing concern as our understanding of the mechanisms of imprinting in germ cell development and embryogenesis expands. At present, it is far from clear whether there are longstanding effects of infertility per se or of its treatment on the health of adults who were conceived following assisted reproductive technologies, but available data suggest that this should be of concern and long-term follow-up studies are required. PMID:24893827

  12. Chlamydia trachomatis Antigens Recognized by Women With Tubal Factor Infertility, Normal Fertility, and Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Budrys, Nicole M.; Gong, Siqi; Rodgers, Allison K.; Wang, Jie; Louden, Christopher; Shain, Rochelle; Schenken, Robert S.; Zhong, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify Chlamydia trachomatis antigens associated with tubal factor infertility and acute infection. Methods A C. trachomatis proteome array was used to compare antibody profiles among women with tubal factor infertility, normal fertility, and acute C. trachomatis infection. Results Thirteen immunodominant antigens reacted with 50% or more sera from all women (N=73). Six C. trachomatis antigens were uniquely recognized by women diagnosed with tubal factor infertility. Combining fragmentation of the six antigens with serum sample dilution, chlamydial antigens HSP60, CT376, CT557, and CT443 could discriminate between women with tubal factor infertility and women with normal fertility with a sensitivity of 63% (95% CI: 0.41–0.77) and specificity of 100% (95% CI: 0.91–1), respectively. These antigens were designated as tubal factor infertility-associated antigens. However, these tubal factor antigens were unable to distinguish tubal factor infertility patients from those with acute infection. A combination of CT875 and CT147 distinguished women with acute infection from all other C. trachomatis-exposed women with a detection sensitivity of 63% (95% CI: 0.41–0.77) and specificity of 100% (95% CI: 0.95–1), respectively. Thus, CT875 and CT147 were designated as acute infection-associated antigens. Conclusion A sequential screening of antibodies against panels of C. trachomatis antigens can be used to identify women with tubal factor infertility and acute C. trachomatis infection. PMID:22525912

  13. Are superoxide dismutase 2 and nitric oxide synthase polymorphisms associated with idiopathic infertility?

    PubMed

    Faure, Celine; Leveille, Pauline; Dupont, Charlotte; Julia, Chantal; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Sutton, Angela; Levy, Rachel

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in a case-control study the associations between idiopathic infertility and antioxidant gene polymorphisms. One hundred ten infertile subjects (58 women and 52 men) with a history of idiopathic infertility and 69 fertile subjects (35 women and 34 men) with no history of infertility were included by three hospital departments of reproductive biology in the NCT01093378 French government clinical trial. Genotyping was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction with TaqMan assay. We examined genetic polymorphisms affecting five antioxidant enzymes: manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), myeloperoxidase (MPO), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1), catalase (CAT), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The presence of at least 1 Ala-MnSOD allele (rs4880) increased significantly the risk of infertility (odds ratio [OR] 2.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14, 7.60; p=0.03) in male subjects. Moreover, the presence of 2 G-eNOS allele (rs1799983) increased significantly the risk of infertility in both men and women (OR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.04, 3.54; p=0.04). Our observations lead to the hypothesis that the genetic susceptibility modulating oxidative stress may represent a risk factor for male idiopathic infertility. PMID:24444339

  14. Prospective study of MTHFR genetic polymorphisms as a possible etiology of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Li, S-S; Li, J; Xiao, Z; Ren, A-G; Jin, L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between 2 genetic polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR), C677T and A1298C, and determine the long-term reproductive outcome in infertile men. This was a prospective study conducted in an andrology clinic. Men with a 1-year history of infertility were assessed for the MTHFR polymorphisms at a 5-year follow-up. We compared the MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism between men who did and did not bear children during follow-up. Of the 215 men who were infertile at 1 year, 82 (38.1%) remained infertile and 133 (61.9%) achieved natural conception during the 5-year follow-up, with the highest rate in the first year (32.6%). The MTHFR 677TT genotype (homozygote) was associated with a substantially increased risk of infertility during follow-up [odds ratio (OR) = 10.242; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.257-83.464] relative to the MTHFR 677CC genotype (wild-type). Risk of infertility was not increased by the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism alone, but was increased by the combination of polymorphisms MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C (OR = 11.818; 95%CI = 1.415-98.674). The homozygous MTHFR C677T genotype was a risk factor for male infertility during 5-year follow-up, whereas a correlation between MTHFR A1298C and infertility was not observed. The MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C polymorphisms had additive effects on male infertility. PMID:24737513

  15. The Effect of Marital Violence on Infertility Distress among A Sample of Turkish Women

    PubMed Central

    Akyüz, Aygül; Şahiner, Gönül; Seven, Memnun; Bakır, Bilal

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF) center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, an infertility distress scale (IDS) for determining the severity effect of infertility and the scale for marital violence against women (SDVW) for determining level of marital violence against the women were used. Results: The total IDS score of the study sample was 37.76 ± 10.53. There was no significant relationship between the age and education level of the women and the total IDS score. The total IDS score was higher in women who did not work and those being treated for infertility for more than three years. The total SDVW score of the study sample was 67.0 ± 8.26. The total SDVW score was higher in women who had been trying to have a child for more than six years and had received infertility treatment for longer than three years. The employment status of the women and physical, emotional, and sexual violence scores had a statistically significant relationship with the IDS scores. The emotional violence score was found to have the highest significance among the variables affecting total IDS score. Conclusion: Marital violence is a factor increasing the distress of infertile women. Healthcare staff serving infertile couples should consider the possibility of domestic violence against women as a factor affecting the psychological infertility distress level. PMID:24696770

  16. Exploration of the counseling needs of infertile couples: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari, Fatemeh; Ghahiri, Ataollah; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Habibi, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Identification of the main needs of infertile patients is essential to provision of appropriate supportive services and care based on their needs. Thus, the present study aims to explore infertile couples’ counseling needs. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out with an inductive qualitative content analysis approach during 2012–2013. The participants of this study included 26 Iranian infertile couples and 7 medical personnel (3 gynecologists and 4 midwives). The infertile couples were selected through purposive sampling and considering maximal variation from patients attending state-run and private infertility treatment centers as well as infertility specialists, offices in Isfahan and Rasht, Iran. Unstructured in-depth interviews and field notes were utilized for data gathering and replying to this research main question, “What are the counseling needs of infertile couples?” The data from medical personnel was collected through semi-structured interviews. Data analysis was carried out through conventional content analysis. Results: Data analysis revealed two main themes. The first theme was “a need for psychological counseling,” which included four subthemes: Emotional distress management, sexual counseling, marital counseling, and family counseling. The second theme was “a need for guidance and information throughout treatment process,” which included three subthemes: Treatment counseling, financial counseling, and legal counseling. Conclusions: The counseling needs of infertile couples are varied, and they require various psychosocial support and counseling interventions. The participants of this study identified clearly the significance of psychological counseling and information throughout the long and onerous journey of infertility and its treatment. PMID:26457091

  17. Treatment of infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, P

    2010-05-01

    The treatment of infertility in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) associates lifestyle measures, and the use of drugs to induce ovulation. In this endeavour, clomifene citrate (CC) should be used as the first line of treatment, followed eventually by low dose gonadotrophin stimulation, as a second line. In rare cases, in case of failure of the CC treatment, ovarian drilling i.e. laparoscopic ovarian surgery (LOS), and finally assisted reproduction techniques can be used, if needed. Overall, ovulation induction (representing the CC-gonadotrophin paradigm) is highly effective with a cumulative singleton live birth rate of 72%. The use of insulin sensitizers i.e. metformin in PCOS should be restricted to women with glucose intolerance and/or insulin resistance. Based on recent data available, the routine use of this drug, alone, in ovulation induction is not recommended. PMID:20394912

  18. [Moving forward to overcome infertility after breast cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Tamura, Nobuko; Shimizu, Chikako

    2015-03-01

    An increase in the number of young women with breast cancer together with improved outcomes after breast cancer treatments have lead healthcare providers and society in general to become more aware of fertility preservation. The potential for infertility caused by cancer treatment is one of the most important quality-of-life issues for young women with cancer, and guidelines and decision-aids to support those who wish to have children after cancer treatment have been developed. To move forward, a prospective database needs to be developed in order to overcome safety concerns, and to allow network building among breast oncologists and reproductive specialists. A multidisciplinary team is also urgently needed to address psychosocial and ethical issues. PMID:25812495

  19. Male infertility: lifestyle factors and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies.

    PubMed

    Yao, David F; Mills, Jesse N

    2016-01-01

    While we may be comfortable with an allopathic approach to male infertility, we are also responsible for knowledge about lifestyle modifications and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies that are used by many of our patients. This paper provides an evidence-based review separating fact from fiction for several of these therapies. There is sufficient literature to support weight reduction by diet and exercise, smoking cessation, and alcohol moderation. Supplements that have demonstrated positive effects on male fertility on small randomized controlled trial (RCT) include aescin, coenzyme Q 10 , glutathione, Korean red ginseng, L-carnitine, nigella sativa, omega-3, selenium, a combination of zinc and folate, and the Menevit antioxidant. There is no support for the use of Vitamin C, Vitamin E, or saffron. The data for Chinese herbal medications, acupuncture, mind-body practice, scrotal cooling, and faith-based healing are sparse or inconclusive. PMID:26952957

  20. [Management of infertility following treatment of testicular tumors].

    PubMed

    Colpi, G M; Grugnetti, C; Mancini, M

    2000-04-01

    Testis cancer mainly affects patients in a reproductive age. Since at the present time recovery can be achieved in 84% of cases within ten years, there has been an increasing demand for paternity by these patients. In most cases, the preventive cryopreservation of spermatozoa and their subsequent use for assisted reproductive techniques can solve the problems connected with secretory infertility (no always reversible) caused by chemotherapy or radiotherapeutic treatment. Cryopreservation also allows to avoid the surgical taking of germinal cells either from testes or from seminal ducts in cases of anajeculation due to retroperineal lymphoadenectomy (present in 23.5-80% of cases). Failing the preventive cryopreservation, the surgical or microsurgical extraction of testis spermatozoa can be performed with success rates equal to 50%. Their use for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) procedures presently seems to provide some encouraging results both for fertilization and pregnancy rates. PMID:10875159

  1. Infertility today: the management of female medical causes.

    PubMed

    Tinneberg, Hans-Rudolf; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    It has to be suspected that some environmentally hazardous substances have genotoxic properties, revealing their reproductive toxicity at a later stage only. Cancer, including childhood cancer, is more common than usually expected. Undesirable side effects of surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation can be premature ovarian failure or even premature menopause. In cases of autoimmune disease, autoantibodies can directly affect maturation of oocytes in the follicle, fertilization, and implantation. Spontaneous abortions are more common in patients with autoimmune disease. Thrombophilia is known to display a higher rate of spontaneous abortions as well as pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth retardation. Infections are a common threat to pregnancy. Metabolic syndrome is increasingly frequent in western countries and often associated with hyperandrogenemia and polycystic disease. Women with inflammatory bowel disease such as Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis usually have no problems conceiving. In conclusion, even though infertility is a multifactorial disease, various medical and non-medical conditions can be attributed to it. PMID:24140222

  2. Halachic infertility: rabbis, doctors, and the struggle over professional boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ivry, Tsipy

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes a public controversy surrounding the hormonal treatment of infertility associated with observance of rabbinic law to illuminate the reach of rabbi-doctor relations in a local configuration of religion and biomedicine that I call "kosher medicine." I combine a historical perspective on the evolution of religious laws governing menstruation, and the rabbi-doctor relations with a contemporary ethnography of these relations and laws to illuminate the interplay of continuities, discontinuities, tradition, and modernity and their uses and abuses in the contemporary mode of interpenetration between observant Judaism and biomedicine. The controversy highlights asymmetric permeations into biomedical and rabbinic professional domains. Collaborations persist as long as doctors who declare their incompetence in rabbinic law accommodate to demands of rabbis who are expert in it and also claim competence to challenge medical decisions. Once a doctor demonstrates competence in rabbinic law to challenge rabbinic directives a crisis develops. PMID:23557006

  3. The Invention of Infertility in the Classical Greek World:

    PubMed Central

    Flemming, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Summary The article examines the understandings of, and responses to, reproductive failure in the classical Greek world. It discusses explanations and treatments for non-procreation in a range of ancient Greek medical texts, focusing on the writings of the Hippocratic Corpus, which devote considerable energy to matters of fertility and generation, and places them alongside the availability of a divine approach to dealing with reproductive disruption, the possibility of asking various deities, including the specialist healing god Asclepius, for assistance in having children. Though the relations between these options are complex, they combine to produce a rich remedial array for those struggling with childlessness, the possibility that any impediment to procreation can be removed. Classical Greece, rather than the nineteenth century, or even 1978, is thus the time when “infertility,” understood as an essentially reversible somatic state, was invented. PMID:24362276

  4. Male infertility: lifestyle factors and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies

    PubMed Central

    Yao, David F; Mills, Jesse N

    2016-01-01

    While we may be comfortable with an allopathic approach to male infertility, we are also responsible for knowledge about lifestyle modifications and holistic, complementary, and alternative therapies that are used by many of our patients. This paper provides an evidence-based review separating fact from fiction for several of these therapies. There is sufficient literature to support weight reduction by diet and exercise, smoking cessation, and alcohol moderation. Supplements that have demonstrated positive effects on male fertility on small randomized controlled trial (RCT) include aescin, coenzyme Q10, glutathione, Korean red ginseng, L-carnitine, nigella sativa, omega-3, selenium, a combination of zinc and folate, and the Menevit antioxidant. There is no support for the use of Vitamin C, Vitamin E, or saffron. The data for Chinese herbal medications, acupuncture, mind-body practice, scrotal cooling, and faith-based healing are sparse or inconclusive. PMID:26952957

  5. Health related quality of life among different PCOS phenotypes of infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Dilbaz, Berna; Çınar, Mehmet; Özkaya, Enis; Tonyalı, Nazan Vanlı; Dilbaz, Serdar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and health quality profile differences between infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) phenotypes and women with unexplained infertility. Material and Methods: The WHOQOL-BREF were administered in a cross-sectional survey to 132 women diagnosed with PCOS (study group) and 32 women diagnosed with unexplained infertility (control group). Body mass index (BMI), duration of infertility (DOI), type of infertility (TOI) and Ferriman Gallwey scores (FG scores), were compared between the study and control groups and between different phenotype groups of PCOS: Group 1-Hyperandrogenemia (HA)-anovulation (N=34), Group 2-HA-PCO (ovulatory PCOS, (N=34), Group 3-PCO-anovulation (N=32), and Group 4-HA-PCO-anovulation (N=32) and the associations of these parameters with the health quality profile were analyzed. Results: Physical, Spiritual and Environmental scores were significantly lower (p<0.05) in Group 1 patients (HA-AO) in comparison to the other three PCOS groups and the control group, while the same difference was observed in the social scores with a near significance (p=0.05). Linear regeression analyses revealed significant associations between type of infertility (beta coefficient: −0.423, p=0.001), FG score (beta coefficient: −0.177, p=0.016), phenotype 1 (beta coefficient: −0.236, p=0.002) and physical scores. Psychological scores were associated with the type (beta coefficient: −0.641, p=0.001) and duration (beta coefficient: −0.149, p=0.009) of infertility. Scores in the social area were only associated with type of infertility (beta coefficient: −0.443, p=0.001). Scores of environmental area were significantly associated again with the type of infertility (beta coefficient: −0.499, p=0.001) and FG scores (beta coefficient: −0.195, p=0.008). Primary infertility was a risk factor for low physical (odds ratio: 8.100, 95% CI: 3.827–17.142), social (odds ratio: 9.183, 95% CI: 4.084–20.648) and environmental (odds ratio: 9.966, 95% CI: 4.623–21.468) scores determined according to the median level. Conclusion: FG scores, primary infertility and phenotype 1 PCOS were associated with lower health quality of life scores. Infertile women with Phenotype 1 (HA-AO) had the lowest scores. PMID:24592051

  6. Evaluation of FSH, LH and testosterone levels in different subgroups of infertile males.

    PubMed

    Babu, S Ramesh; Sadhnani, M D; Swarna, M; Padmavathi, P; Reddy, P P

    2004-01-01

    Gonadotropins (FSH, LH) and testosterone are the prime regulators of germ cell development. Abnormal spermatogenesis is often associated with altered serum gonadotropins and testosterone. FSH, LH and testosterone levels were estimated in 96 infertile men of whom 35 were azoospermic, 35 were oligozoospermic, 11 were with varicocele and 15 were with histopathological abnormalities like hypospermatogenesis, spermatid arrest and sertoli-cell only syndrome. Results showed statistically significant (p<0.05), increase in the mean FSH and LH levels in all the infertile males studied when compared with the fertile controls (n=35). However, there is no significant difference in the mean levels of testosterone between the infertile and fertile men. PMID:23105425

  7. Experiences of Infertility in British and Pakistani Women: A Cross-Cultural Qualitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Batool, Syeda Shahida; de Visser, Richard Oliver

    2016-02-01

    The psychosocial impact of infertility is affected by cultural factors. In this cross-cultural qualitative study we explored the experience of infertility among six women living in Pakistan and eight living in the UK. Although infertile women in the UK and Pakistan had many shared experiences related to their own desires for motherhood and the hopes of others, they also faced unique psychosocial challenges shaped by cultural context. Based on our findings, we suggest a need for further resources and networks to support women, particularly women living in cultures that allow women few fulfilling social roles other than motherhood. PMID:25535774

  8. Oxidative stress and oocyte quality: ethiopathogenic mechanisms of minimal/mild endometriosis-related infertility.

    PubMed

    Da Broi, Michele Gomes; Navarro, Paula Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Endometriosis, a highly prevalent gynecological disease, is often associated with infertility, even in its milder forms (minimal and mild endometriosis). However, no consensus has been established with regard to this relationship and the possible mechanisms involved have not been completely elucidated. The oocyte is believed to have an important role in the infertility presented by these patients. Hence, oxidative stress events associated with alterations in the peritoneal, serum and/or follicular microenvironments might result in poor oocyte quality and compromise the reproductive potential of these women. Here, we review possible mechanisms involved in oocyte quality impairment that might lead to infertility in patients with early endometriosis. PMID:26685866

  9. Novel methods of treating ovarian infertility in older and POF women, testicular infertility, and other human functional diseases.

    PubMed

    Bukovsky, Antonin

    2015-01-01

    In vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) technologies are facing with growing demands of older women to conceive. Although ovarian stem cells (OSCs) of older women are capable of producing in vitro fresh oocyte-like cells (OLCs), such cells cannot respond to IVM and IVF due to the lack of granulosa cells required for their maturation. Follicular renewal is also dependent on support of circulating blood mononuclear cells. They induce intermediary stages of meiosis (metaphase I chromosomal duplication and crossover, anaphase, telophase, and cytokinesis) in newly emerging ovarian germ cells, as for the first time demonstrated here, induce formation of granulosa cells, and stimulate follicular growth and development. A pretreatment of OSC culture with mononuclear cells collected from blood of a young healthy fertile woman may cause differentiation of bipotential OSCs into both developing germ and granulosa cells. A small blood volume replacement may enable treatment of ovarian infertility in vivo. The transferred mononuclear cells may temporarily rejuvenate virtually all tissues, including improvement of the function of endocrine tissues. Formation of new follicles and their development may be sufficient for IVM and IVF. The novel proposed in vitro approaches may be used as a second possibility. Infertility of human males affects almost a half of the infertility cases worldwide. Small blood volume replacement from young healthy fertile men may also be easy approach for the improvement of sperm quality in older or other affected men. In addition, body rejuvenation by small blood volume replacement from young healthy individuals of the same sex could represent a decline of in vitro methodology in favor of in vivo treatment for human functional diseases. Here we propose for the first time that blood mononuclear cells are essential for rejuvenation of those tissues, where immune system components participate in an appropriate division and differentiation of tissue stem cells. If needed, small blood volume replacement from distinct young healthy individuals could be utilized in six month intervals for repair of young altered or aged reproductive and other tissue functions. Systemic and local use of honey bee propolis tincture is an alternative option for functional rejuvenation of some tissues. PMID:25889983

  10. Knowledge, perceptions and myths regarding infertility among selected adult population in Pakistan: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The reported prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is approximately 22% with 4% primary and 18% secondary infertility. Infertility is not only a medical but also a social problem in our society as cultural customs and perceived religious dictums may equate infertility with failure on a personal, interpersonal, or social level. It is imperative that people have adequate knowledge about infertility so couples can seek timely medical care and misconceptions can be rectified. We aim to assess the knowledge, perception and myths regarding infertility and suggest ways to improve it. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out by interviewing a sample of 447 adults who were accompanying the patients at two tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. They were interviewed one-on-one with the help of a pretested questionnaire drafted by the team after a thorough literature review and in consultation with infertility specialists. Results The correct knowledge of infertility was found to be limited amongst the participants. Only 25% correctly identified when infertility is pathological and only 46% knew about the fertile period in women's cycle. People are misinformed that use of IUCD (53%) and OCPs (61%) may cause infertility. Beliefs in evil forces and supernatural powers as a cause of infertility are still prevalent especially amongst people with lower level of education. Seeking alternative treatment for infertility remains a popular option for 28% of the participant as a primary preference and 75% as a secondary preference. IVF remains an unfamiliar (78%) and an unacceptable option (55%). Conclusions Knowledge about infertility is limited in the population and a lot of misconceptions and myths are prevalent in the society. Alternative medicine is a popular option for seeking infertility treatment. The cultural and religious perspective about assisted reproductive technologies is unclear, which has resulted in its reduced acceptability. PMID:21970548

  11. Differential protein expression in seminal plasma from fertile and infertile males

    PubMed Central

    Cadavid J, Angela P.; Alvarez, Angela; Markert, Udo R.; Maya, Walter Cardona

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to analyze human seminal plasma proteins in association with male fertility status using the proteomic mass spectrometry technology Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight (SELDI-TOF-MS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Semen analysis was performed using conventional methods. Protein profiles of the seminal plasma were obtained by SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry over a strong anion exchanger, ProteinChip® Q10 array. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: We found statistically significant differences in motility and sperm count between fertile and infertile men. In addition, we observed ten seminal proteins that are significantly up-regulated in the infertile group. In conclusion, comparison of seminal plasma proteome in fertile and infertile men provides new aspects in the physiology of male fertility and might help in identifying novel markers of male infertility. PMID:25395747

  12. [Professor LAI Xinsheng's treatment experience of infertility by Tongyuan needling technique].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuemei; Meng, Zhenzhen; Wang, Ranran

    2015-03-01

    Professor LAI Xinsheng's treatment experience of infertility mainly by Tongyuan needling technique for both females and males is summarized. Tongyuan needling technique is a treatment method of leading qi to its primordial location mainly through viscera back-shu points that can dredge the governor vessel and tonify the spirit and conception vessel points in abdomen and abdominal front-mu points, and according to state of illness acupoints for opening the 4 gates or five shu points are combined; reinforcing and reducing manipulations of acupuncture are applied for reference. With the method of listing cases, professor LAI Xinsheng's Tongyuan needling technique is detailedly introduced in different aspects, such as the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome infertility and male infertility and improving the success rate of test-tube baby, and the manipulation of Tongyuan needling technique is summarized, indicating that Tongyuan needling technique is worth vigorously prompting in clinical treatment of infertility. PMID:26062206

  13. Infertility Treatments Do Not Appear to Contribute to Developmental Delays in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... no risk by age 3 from in vitro fertilization, other widespread treatments. Children conceived via infertility treatments ... received: Assisted reproductive technology (ART), including: In vitro fertilization — fertilization in a laboratory dish, after eggs and ...

  14. "Spoiling the womb": definitions, aetiologies and responses to infertility in north west province, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Richards, Sarah C

    2002-04-01

    Only one generation ago, the Cameroonian national population policy was pro-natalist, with great attention paid to the problem of sterility. Now, family planning is promoted nationwide to reduce population growth, and infertility is not addressed by public health policy or services. In contrast to the biomedical definition used by planners, at the local level infertility is defined as the inability to have a child when desired, and it has many causes including contraception, abortion and witchcraft. The young, less educated women especially are unlikely to use contraception as long as they feel susceptible to infertility, since their economic, social and psychological status hinge on their ability to have children. Drawing from epidemiological literature and qualitative data gathered in a market town in North West Province, I argue that a more balanced approach to reproductive health, one that recognises the importance of infertility, is critical for women's health and well-being. PMID:12476732

  15. Investigation of Personality Traits between Infertile Women Submitted to Assisted Reproductive Technology or Surrogacy

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Najmeh; Yazdkhasti, Fariba; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Personality traits affect human relationships, social interactions, treatment procedures, and essentially all human activities. The purpose of this study is to investigate the personality traitsincluding sensation seeking, flexibility, and happiness among a variety of infertile women who were apt to choose assisted reproductive technology (ART) or surrogacy. Materials and Methods This is a cross-sectional study that was performed on 251 infertile women who visited Isfahan and Tehran Reproductive Medicine Center. These fertility clinics are located in Isfahan and Tehran, Iran. In this study, 201 infertile women who underwent treatment using ART and 50 infertile women who tended to have surrogacy were chosen by convenience sampling. Zuckerman’s Sensation Seeking Scale Form V (SSS-V), Psychological Flexibility Questionnaire (adapted from NEO Personality Inventory-Revised) and Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (OHQ) were used as research instruments. All participants had to complete the research instruments in order to be included in this study. Data were analyzed by descriptive-analytical statistics and statistical tests including multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Z Fisher. Statistically significant effects were accepted for P<0.05. Results In the sensation-seeking variable, there was a meaningful difference between under-study groups. However, the flexibility and happiness variables did not have a significant difference between under-study groups (P<0.001). Interaction between education, employment, and financial status was effective in happiness of infertile women underwent ART (P<0.05), while age, education and financial status were also effective in happiness of infertile women sought surrogacy (P<0.05). A positive meaningful relationship was seen between sensation seeking and flexibility variables in both groups (P<0.05). And a negative meaningful relationship was seen between sensation seeking and happiness in infertile women who sought surrogacy (P<0.05). The difference in rate of relationship between sensation seeking and flexibility was meaningful in infertile women who sought either ART or surrogacy (P<0.05). Conclusion Sensations seeking as a personality trait is lower in infertile women who underwent treatment using ART compared women who tended to have surrogacy. This study shows that demographic variables are effective in happiness of infertile women. Also, there is a significant relation among sensation seeking, flexibility and happiness in infertile women. PMID:27123206

  16. Improving the Reporting of Clinical Trials of Infertility Treatments (IMPRINT): modifying the CONSORT statement†‡

    PubMed Central

    Legro, Richard S.; Wu, Xiaoke; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Farquhar, Cynthia; Fauser, Bart C.J.M.; Mol, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials testing infertility treatments often do not report on the major outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians and the public (such as live birth) nor on the harms, including maternal risks during pregnancy and fetal anomalies. This is complicated by the multiple participants in infertility trials which may include a woman (mother), a man (father), and result in a third individual if successful, their offspring (child), who is also the desired outcome of treatment. The primary outcome of interest and many adverse events occur after cessation of infertility treatment and during pregnancy and the puerperium, which create a unique burden of follow-up for clinical trial investigators and participants. In 2013, because of the inconsistencies in trial reporting and the unique aspects of infertility trials not adequately addressed by existing Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statements, we convened a consensus conference in Harbin, China, with the aim of planning modifications to the CONSORT checklist to improve the quality of reporting of clinical trials testing infertility treatment. The consensus group recommended that the preferred primary outcome of all infertility trials is live birth (defined as any delivery of a live infant ≥20 weeks gestations) or cumulative live birth, defined as the live birth per women over a defined time period (or number of treatment cycles). In addition, harms to all participants should be systematically collected and reported, including during the intervention, any resulting pregnancy, and during the neonatal period. Routine information should be collected and reported on both male and female participants in the trial. We propose to track the change in quality that these guidelines may produce in published trials testing infertility treatments. Our ultimate goal is to increase the transparency of benefits and risks of infertility treatments to provide better medical care to affected individuals and couples. PMID:25217611

  17. The risk of infertility and delayed conception associated with exposures in the Danish workplace

    SciTech Connect

    Rachootin, P.; Olsen, J.

    1983-05-01

    The association between infertility and a number of occupations and occupational exposures was examined in a case-control study utilizing data collected from medical records and mailed questionnaires. The results suggest that male exposure to heat and female exposure to noise, textile dyes and lead, mercury, and cadmium are associated with infertility. Further research is needed to examine the entire spectrum of abnormal reproductive and developmental outcomes of exposure to these agents and to identify their full effects.

  18. A maternally inherited autosomal point mutation in human phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) leads to male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Kashir, Junaid; Konstantinidis, Michalis; Jones, Celine; Lemmon, Bernadette; Chang Lee, Hoi; Hamer, Rebecca; Heindryckx, Bjorn; Deane, Charlotte M.; De Sutter, Petra; Fissore, Rafael A.; Parrington, John; Wells, Dagan; Coward, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Male factor and idiopathic infertility contribute significantly to global infertility, with abnormal testicular gene expression considered to be a major cause. Certain types of male infertility are caused by failure of the sperm to activate the oocyte, a process normally regulated by calcium oscillations, thought to be induced by a sperm-specific phospholipase C, PLCzeta (PLCζ). Previously, we identified a point mutation in an infertile male resulting in the substitution of histidine for proline at position 398 of the protein sequence (PLCζH398P), leading to abnormal PLCζ function and infertility. METHODS AND RESULTS Here, using a combination of direct-sequencing and mini-sequencing of the PLCζ gene from the patient and his family, we report the identification of a second PLCζ mutation in the same patient resulting in a histidine to leucine substitution at position 233 (PLCζH233L), which is predicted to disrupt local protein interactions in a manner similar to PLCζH398P and was shown to exhibit abnormal calcium oscillatory ability following predictive 3D modelling and cRNA injection in mouse oocytes respectively. We show that PLCζH233L and PLCζH398P exist on distinct parental chromosomes, the former inherited from the patient's mother and the latter from his father. Neither mutation was detected utilizing custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism assays in 100 fertile males and females, or 8 infertile males with characterized oocyte activation deficiency. CONCLUSIONS Collectively, our findings provide further evidence regarding the importance of PLCζ at oocyte activation and forms of male infertility where this is deficient. Additionally, we show that the inheritance patterns underlying male infertility are more complex than previously thought and may involve maternal mechanisms. PMID:22095789

  19. Chinese Herbal Products for Female Infertility in Taiwan: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Chiang; Kao, Chao-Wei; Lin, Che-Chen; Liao, Yen-Nung; Wu, Bei-Yu; Hung, I-Ling; Hu, Wen-Long

    2016-03-01

    Female infertility and low birth rate are significant public health issues with profound social, psychological, and economic consequences. Some infertile women resort to conventional, complementary, or alternative therapies to conceive. The aim of this study was to identify the Chinese herbal products (CHPs) most commonly used for female infertility in Taiwan.The usage of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the frequency of CHP prescriptions to infertile women were determined based on a nationwide 1-million randomly sampled cohort of National Health Insurance Research Database beneficiaries. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis were employed to estimate the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for TCM usage and potential risk factors.In total, 8766 women with newly diagnosed infertility were included in this study. Of those, 8430 (96.17%) had sought TCM treatment in addition to visiting the gynecologist. We noted that female infertility patients with risk factors (e.g., endometriosis, uterine fibroids, or irregular menstrual cycle) were more likely to use TCM than those without TCM medication (aOR = 1.83, 1.87, and 1.79, respectively). The most commonly used formula and single CHP were Dang-Gui-Sha-Yao-San (17.25%) and Semen Cuscutae (27.40%), respectively. CHP formula combinations (e.g., Dang-Gui-Sha-Yao-San plus Wen-Jing-Tang 3.10%) or single Chinese herbal combinations (e.g., Semen Cuscutae plus Leonurus japonicus 6.31%) were also commonly used to treat female infertility. Further well-conducted, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies will be needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these CHP combinations for female infertility. PMID:26986137

  20. The hidden world of anti-phospholipid antibodies and female infertility: A literature appraisal.

    PubMed

    Chighizola, Cecilia B; de Jesus, Guilherme R; Branch, D Ware

    2016-06-01

    Even though the association of anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) with infertility is debated, infertile women are commonly screened for aPL. To review evidence, a systematic PubMed search was conducted to retrieve papers addressing (i) the association between aPL and infertility, (ii) the positivity rate of criteria and non-criteria aPL in women with infertility, (iii) the association between aPL and assisted reproduction technologies (ART) outcome, (iv) the efficacy of medical treatments on ART outcome, and (v) the effects of ART on thrombotic risk. A total of 46 papers were considered; several limitations emerged: (i) wide heterogeneity in study populations, (ii) non-prospective design in 90% of studies, and (iii) aPL cutoffs not conforming to international guidelines in more than 75% of studies; aPL positivity not confirmed in 89% of studies. Most studies evinced an association between infertility and anti-β2GPI antibodies and almost all non-criteria aPL. The association rate with infertility was below 50% for lupus anti-coagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL), and anti-phosphatidic acid antibodies. According to our estimates, overall positivity rates of criteria and non-criteria aPL tests are 6% and 3% among infertile women, 1% and 2% among controls, respectively. A significant difference in the positivity rate of patients versus controls emerged for aCL only. Five of 18 studies reported a detrimental effect of aPL on ART outcome. Only one of the six studies assessing the effects of treatment on ART outcome among aPL-positive infertile women reported a benefit. All relevant studies reported no increase in the rate of thrombosis among aPL-positive women undergoing ART. PMID:26827907

  1. Clinical, epidemiological and socio-cultural aspects of infertility in resource-poor settings. Evidence from Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Dhont, N.

    2011-01-01

    Infertility is a serious but entirely neglected public health problem in resource-poor countries. Most of the infertility is caused by infections and therefore potentially preventable. The problem of infertility in Rwanda has not been researched so far. We examined predictors for infertility and treatment-seeking behaviour in an unmatched case-control. We performed infertility investigations in all infertile couples and discussed consequences of infertility in focus group discussions. HSV-2 and HIV infection and sexual violence were the most important determinants of infertility. We found a higher HIV prevalence among couples in secondary and not primary infertile relationships with at least one HIV infected partner in 45% of these couples. Men in infertile relationships reported more frequently concurrent partners over the last year than fertile men. We found a high prevalence of tubal factor (70%) and male factor infertility (64%). Pregnancy rates (16%) were low after conventional therapy. Both men and women are unlikely to attribute infertility to the male partner. Participants reported a wide array of treatments they received in the past, often including ineffective or even harmful interventions. We demonstrated severe suffering as a consequence of infertility for both men and women but with women carrying the largest burden, similar to what is reported in other resource-poor countries. Overall, we can conclude that there is an urgent need for a more holistic approach towards reproductive health services in SSA, one that recognises the importance of reproductive failure. The link with HIV has important consequences for both HIV and reproductive health programs. PMID:24753853

  2. The genetics of human infertility by functional interrogation of SNPs in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priti; Schimenti, John C

    2015-08-18

    Infertility is a prevalent health issue, affecting ∼15% of couples of childbearing age. Nearly one-half of idiopathic infertility cases are thought to have a genetic basis, but the underlying causes are largely unknown. Traditional methods for studying inheritance, such as genome-wide association studies and linkage analyses, have been confounded by the genetic and phenotypic complexity of reproductive processes. Here we describe an association- and linkage-free approach to identify segregating infertility alleles, in which CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing is used to model putatively deleterious nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) in the mouse orthologs of fertility genes. Mice bearing "humanized" alleles of four essential meiosis genes, each predicted to be deleterious by most of the commonly used algorithms for analyzing functional SNP consequences, were examined for fertility and reproductive defects. Only a Cdk2 allele mimicking SNP rs3087335, which alters an inhibitory WEE1 protein kinase phosphorylation site, caused infertility and revealed a novel function in regulating spermatogonial stem cell maintenance. Our data indicate that segregating infertility alleles exist in human populations. Furthermore, whereas computational prediction of SNP effects is useful for identifying candidate causal mutations for diverse diseases, this study underscores the need for in vivo functional evaluation of physiological consequences. This approach can revolutionize personalized reproductive genetics by establishing a permanent reference of benign vs. infertile alleles. PMID:26240362

  3. The Social Consequences of Infertility among Iranian Women: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpoor-Azghdy, Syedeh Batool; Simbar, Masoumeh; Vedadhir, Abouali

    2015-01-01

    Background Infertility may prevent couples to achieve the desired social roles and lead to some social and psychological problems. This study aimed to explain the social consequences of infertility in Iranian women seeking treatment. Materials and Methods A qualitative content analysis was conducted based on 32 semi-structured interviews with 25 women affected by primary and secondary infertility with no surviving children. The participants were purposefully selected with maximum variability from a fertility health research center in Tehran, Iran, from January to October 2012. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the conventional content analysis method. Results Our findings indicate that the consequences of infertility are divided into five main categories: 1. violence including psychological violence and domestic physical violence, 2. marital instability or uncertainty, 3. social isolation including avoiding certain people or certain social events and self-imposed isolation from family and friends, 4. social exclusion and partial deprivation including being disregarded by family members and relatives and reducing social interactions with the infertile woman and 5. social alienation. Conclusion This study reveals that Iranian women with fertility issues seeking treatment face several social problems that could have devastating effects on the quality of their lives. It is, therefore, recommended that, in Iran, infertility is only considered as a biomedical issue of a couple and pay further attention to its sociocultural dimensions and consequences. PMID:25780523

  4. Sexuality, Self-Esteem and Partnership Quality in Infertile Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Wischmann, T.; Schilling, K.; Toth, B.; Rösner, S.; Strowitzki, T.; Wohlfarth, K.; Kentenich, H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Infertile couples often report quality-of-life impairments, especially in terms of sexuality, self-esteem and partnership quality. So far, there have been no systematic studies of the sex lives and behaviour of infertile women and men before and after the emergence of their mutual desire for a child. Materials and Methods: From February 2010 to August 2010 all couples starting treatment either at Heidelberg Universityʼs Womenʼs Hospital or at the Fertility Center Berlin were asked to fill out the Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR). A total of n = 158 women and n = 153 men participated in the study. Results: Decreasing tendencies were observable for both partners in the domains Sexual Relationship Satisfaction and Confidence and in the subscales Self-Esteem and Overall Relationship Satisfaction. There were especially clear indications of a loss of spontaneous sexuality during the experience of infertility. We were also able to establish that infertility has a negative impact on womenʼs self-esteem. Discussion: The results of this study indicate that SEAR can be used as a feasible instrument for identifying infertile women and men whose infertility has a negative effect on their relationship quality and/or sex lives. PMID:25221344

  5. Social support, marital adjustment, and psychological distress among women with primary infertility in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Farah; Khalid, Amna; Medhin, Girmay

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify prevalence rates of psychological distress among Pakistani women seeking help for primary infertility. The associations of social support, marital adjustment, and sociodemographic factors with psychological distress were also examined. A total of 177 women with primary infertility were interviewed from one hospital in Islamabad using a Self-Reporting Questionnaire, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and the Locke-Wallace Marital Adjustment Test. The data were collected between November 2012 and March 2013. The prevalence of psychological distress was 37.3 percent. The results of the logistic regression suggested that marital adjustment and social support were significantly negatively associated with psychological distress in this sample. These associations were not confounded by any of the demographic variables controlled in the multivariable regression models. The role of perceived social support and adjustment in marriage among women experiencing primary infertility are important factors in understanding their psychological distress. The results of this small-scale effort highlight the need for social and familial awareness to help tackle the psychological distress related to infertility. Future research needs to focus on the way the experience of infertility is conditioned by social structural realities. New ways need to be developed to better take into account the process and nature of the infertility experience. PMID:25837531

  6. X chromosome aneuploidy in infertile women: Analysis by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.A.; Moix, I.; Mermillod, B.

    1994-09-01

    Up to 1 in 3 couples have a problem of infertility at some time in their lives. Sex chromosome anomalies are found in 5-10% of couples, with mosaic aneuploidy being a common finding in primary infertility. Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA), in contrast, is frequently associated with autosomal structural anomalies. We hypothesized that low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy was associated with primary infertility but not with RSA. Three groups were studied: women from couples with primary infertillity (n=26); women with three or more spontaneous abortions (n=22); and age-matched normally fertile women (at least two pregnancies; n=28). Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine X chromosome ploidy in 100 nuclei per patient, using a contig of three cosmids from MAO locus (kindly donated by W. Berger, Nijmegen). A control probe (chr. 15 centromere) was simultaneously hybridized, and only nuclei containing two control signals were scored for the X chromosome. The mean numbers of nuclei with two X chromosome signals were the same in all groups (Welch equality of means test: p>0.97). However, there is a significant difference between the variances of the primary infertile and RSA groups (Levene`s test: p=0.025 after Bonferrone correction for multiple testing). This provides preliminary support for the hypothesis of an association between primary infertility and low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy.

  7. Seminal cyclooxygenase relationship with oxidative stress in infertile oligoasthenoteratozoospermic men with varicocele.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, T; Rashed, L; Taymour, M

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the relation of seminal cyclooxygenase COX-1, COX-2 with oxidative stress in infertile oligoasthenoteratozoospermic (OAT) men with varicocele (Vx). In all, 128 men were allocated into fertile men, fertile men with Vx, infertile OAT men without Vx and infertile OAT men with Vx. They were subjected to history taking, clinical examination and semen analysis. Also, seminal COX-1, COX-2, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were estimated. Mean levels of seminal COX-1, COX-2 were over-expressed, the mean level of seminal MDA was significantly increased, and the mean level of seminal GPx was significantly decreased in infertile OAT men with Vx compared with other groups. Seminal COX-1 and COX-2 were over-expressed in cases with Vx grade III compared with Vx grades I, II cases and in cases with bilateral Vx compared with unilateral Vx. There was significant negative correlation between seminal COX-1 and COX-2 with sperm concentration, sperm motility, sperm normal morphology, seminal GPx and significant positive correlation with seminal MDA. It is concluded that seminal COX-1 and COX-2 are over-expressed in infertile OAT men with Vx compared with fertile men with/without and infertile OAT men without Vx being associated with oxidative stress, Vx grade and Vx laterality. PMID:25906828

  8. The genetics of human infertility by functional interrogation of SNPs in mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Priti; Schimenti, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is a prevalent health issue, affecting ∼15% of couples of childbearing age. Nearly one-half of idiopathic infertility cases are thought to have a genetic basis, but the underlying causes are largely unknown. Traditional methods for studying inheritance, such as genome-wide association studies and linkage analyses, have been confounded by the genetic and phenotypic complexity of reproductive processes. Here we describe an association- and linkage-free approach to identify segregating infertility alleles, in which CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing is used to model putatively deleterious nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) in the mouse orthologs of fertility genes. Mice bearing “humanized” alleles of four essential meiosis genes, each predicted to be deleterious by most of the commonly used algorithms for analyzing functional SNP consequences, were examined for fertility and reproductive defects. Only a Cdk2 allele mimicking SNP rs3087335, which alters an inhibitory WEE1 protein kinase phosphorylation site, caused infertility and revealed a novel function in regulating spermatogonial stem cell maintenance. Our data indicate that segregating infertility alleles exist in human populations. Furthermore, whereas computational prediction of SNP effects is useful for identifying candidate causal mutations for diverse diseases, this study underscores the need for in vivo functional evaluation of physiological consequences. This approach can revolutionize personalized reproductive genetics by establishing a permanent reference of benign vs. infertile alleles. PMID:26240362

  9. The mediator role of emotion regulation processes on infertility-related stress.

    PubMed

    Galhardo, Ana; Cunha, M; Pinto-Gouveia, J; Matos, M

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate gender differences regarding the mediator role of self-compassion and self-judgment on the effects of external shame, internal shame, dyadic adjustment, on infertility-related stress. One hundred and sixty-two women and 147 men with a primary infertility diagnosis completed the following set of self-report measures: Others as Shamer, Experience of Shame Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Self-Compassion Scale, and Fertility Problem Inventory. Path analyses results revealed that in women self-compassion fully mediated the effect of internal shame on infertility-related stress and partially mediated the effect of dyadic adjustment on this variable, while external shame had only a direct effect. In men self-judgment fully mediated the effect of external and internal shame on infertility-related stress. Dyadic adjustment had only a direct effect on infertility-related stress. In conclusion, there is a distinct role of self-compassion and self-judgment on the relationship between shame and infertility-related stress in men and women. Such differences should be taken into account in psychological interventions with these patients. Future research is warranted to further support our results. PMID:23821009

  10. L-Selectin ligands in human endometrium: comparison of fertile and infertile subjects

    PubMed Central

    Margarit, L.; Gonzalez, D.; Lewis, P.D.; Hopkins, L.; Davies, C.; Conlan, R.S.; Joels, L.; White, J.O.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND L-selectin ligands, localized to the luminal epithelium at the time of implantation, may support the early stages of blastocyst attachment. We have assessed the expression of two L-selectin ligands, defined by MECA-79 and HECA-452 monoclonal antibodies, and the sulfotransferase GlcNAc6ST-2, involved in generation of L-selectin ligand epitopes, in the secretory phase of the endometrium from fertile and infertile patients. METHODS Endometrial samples were obtained from 33 fertile, 26 PCOS, 25 endometriosis and 33 patients diagnosed with unexplained infertility. L-selectin ligands and GlcNAc6ST-2 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. RESULTS Immunohistochemical staining of uterine epithelium, from fertile and infertile women, demonstrated differential expression of MECA-79 and HECA-452 epitopes. In fertile women in the secretory phase MECA-79 was more strongly expressed, particularly on the lumen, than in infertile women. HECA-452 staining was significantly stronger in the glands in PCOS and endometriosis patients than in fertile women. GlcNAc6ST-2 expression was reduced in infertile patients, correlating with MECA-79 expression. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated significant differences in expression of L-selectin ligands between fertile and infertile women in natural cycles, and could contribute to patient assessment prior to initiating fertility treatment. PMID:19625313

  11. Association of FCRL3 Genetic Polymorphisms With Endometriosis-Related Infertility Risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Guang; Wang, Surong; Zhang, Shiqian; Xie, Beibei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Fc receptor-like 3 (FCRL3) gene was reported to be linked to a variety of autoimmune diseases, including endometriosis-related infertility. However, this linkage has not been studied in Chinese population and there has been no meta-analysis on the interrelationship of FCRL3 gene and endometriosis-related infertility. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between FCRL3 genetic polymorphisms and the risk of endometriosis-related infertility in Han Chinese, and a further meta-analysis was conducted to confirm our results. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs7528684 [FCRL3_3], rs11264799 [FCRL3_4], rs945635 [FCRL3_5], and rs3761959 [FCRL3_6]) on FCRL3 gene were genotyped in a case–control cohort composed of 217 patients suffering from endometriosis-related infertility and 220 healthy controls using cleaved amplification polymorphism sequence-tagged sites (polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism, PCR–RFLP). Odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to evaluate the association quantitatively. Furthermore, a meta-analysis of previous studies including the present study was implemented through Stata 11.0 (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX). We found an approximately 1.4-fold significantly increased frequency of the FCRL3_3 variant in women with endometriosis-related infertility over the controls (OR = 1.41 [95% CI = 1.08–1.84], P = 0.013). However, no significant difference was found between women with endometriosis-related infertility and controls for FCRL3_4, FCRL3_5, and FCRL3_6. Regardless of the symptoms and the revised classification of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (rASRM) stage of endometriosis, there was a significant association between FCRL3_3 variant and an increased risk of endometriosis-related infertility. Meta-analysis of previous studies combined with the present study further confirmed the association between FCRL3_3 and the risk of endometriosis-related infertility. In summary, the present study suggested that FCRL3_3 variant was associated with an increased risk of endometriosis-related infertility, regardless of symptoms, and rASRM stage of the patients. Meta-analysis of previous studies combined with the present study further confirmed our results. Further large-scale studies in the future are warranted to explore the association between FCRL3 genetic polymorphisms and endometriosis-related infertility, as well as other human diseases, in Asian and other ethnicities. PMID:26334889

  12. Human sperm chromatin epigenetic potential: genomics, proteomics, and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Judit; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Ballescà, Josep Lluis; Oliva, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The classical idea about the function of the mammalian sperm chromatin is that it serves to transmit a highly protected and transcriptionally inactive paternal genome, largely condensed by protamines, to the next generation. In addition, recent sperm chromatin genome-wide dissection studies indicate the presence of a differential distribution of the genes and repetitive sequences in the protamine-condensed and histone-condensed sperm chromatin domains, which could be potentially involved in regulatory roles after fertilization. Interestingly, recent proteomic studies have shown that sperm chromatin contains many additional proteins, in addition to the abundant histones and protamines, with specific modifications and chromatin affinity features which are also delivered to the oocyte. Both gene and protein signatures seem to be altered in infertile patients and, as such, are consistent with the potential involvement of the sperm chromatin landscape in early embryo development. This present work reviews the available information on the composition of the human sperm chromatin and its epigenetic potential, with a particular focus on recent results derived from high-throughput genomic and proteomic studies. As a complement, we provide experimental evidence for the detection of phosphorylations and acetylations in human protamine 1 using a mass spectrometry approach. The available data indicate that the sperm chromatin is much more complex than what it was previously thought, raising the possibility that it could also serve to transmit crucial paternal epigenetic information to the embryo. PMID:25926607

  13. Clinical management of infertile men with nonobstructive azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sandro C

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of men with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) seeking fertility has been a challenge for andrologists, urologists, and reproductive medicine specialists alike. This review presents a personal perspective on the clinical management of NOA, including the lessons learned over 15 years dealing with this male infertility condition. A five-consecutive-step algorithm is proposed to manage such patients. First, a differential diagnosis of azoospermia is made to confirm/establish that NOA is due to spermatogenic failure. Second, genetic testing is carried out not only to detect the males in whom NOA is caused by microdeletions of the long arm of the Y chromosome, but also to counsel the affected patients about their chances of having success in sperm retrieval. Third, it is determined whether any intervention prior to a surgical retrieval attempt may be used to increase sperm production. Fourth, the most effective and efficient retrieval method is selected to search for testicular sperm. Lastly, state-of-art laboratory techniques are applied in the handling of retrieved gametes and cultivating the embryos resulting from sperm injections. A coordinated multidisciplinary effort is key to offer the best possible chance of achieving a biological offspring to males with NOA. PMID:25677138

  14. Germline deletion of Cetn1 causes infertility in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Prachee; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Ying, Guoxin; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Summary Centrins are calmodulin-like Ca2+-binding proteins that can be found in all ciliated eukaryotic cells from yeast to mammals. Expressed in male germ cells and photoreceptors, centrin 1 (CETN1) resides in the photoreceptor transition zone and connecting cilium. To identify its function in mammals, we deleted Cetn1 by homologous recombination. Cetn1−/− mice were viable and showed no sign of retina degeneration suggesting that CETN1 is nonessential for photoreceptor ciliogenesis or structural maintenance. Phototransduction components localized normally to the Cetn1−/− photoreceptor outer segments, and loss of CETN1 had no effect on light-induced translocation of transducin to the inner segment. Although Cetn1−/− females and Cetn1+/− males had normal fertility, Cetn1−/− males were infertile. The Cetn1−/− testes size was normal, and spermatogonia as well as spermatocytes developed normally. However, spermatids lacked tails suggesting severe defects at the late maturation phase of spermiogenesis. Viable sperm cells were absent and the few surviving spermatozoa were malformed. Light and electron microscopy analyses of Cetn1−/− spermatids revealed failures in centriole rearrangement during basal body maturation and in the basal-body–nucleus connection. These results confirm an essential role for CETN1 in late steps of spermiogenesis and spermatid maturation. PMID:23641067

  15. Acid soil infertility effects on peanut yields and yield components

    SciTech Connect

    Blamey, F.P.C.

    1983-01-01

    The interpretation of soil amelioration experiments with peanuts is made difficult by the unpredictibility of the crop and by the many factors altered when ameliorating acid soils. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of lime and gypsum applications on peanut kernel yield via the three first order yield components, pods per ha, kernels per pod, and kernel mass. On an acid medium sandy loam soil (typic Plinthustult), liming resulted in a highly significant kernel yield increase of 117% whereas gypsum applications were of no significant benefit. As indicated by path coefficient analysis, an increase in the number of pods per ha was markedly more important in increasing yield than an increase in either the number of kernels per pod or kernel mass. Furthermore, exch. Al was found to be particularly detrimental to pod number. It was postulated that poor peanut yields resulting from acid soil infertility were mainly due to the depressive effect of exch. Al on pod number. Exch. Ca appeared to play a secondary role by ameliorating the adverse effects of exch. Al.

  16. Clinical management of infertile men with nonobstructive azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Sandro C

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of men with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) seeking fertility has been a challenge for andrologists, urologists, and reproductive medicine specialists alike. This review presents a personal perspective on the clinical management of NOA, including the lessons learned over 15 years dealing with this male infertility condition. A five-consecutive-step algorithm is proposed to manage such patients. First, a differential diagnosis of azoospermia is made to confirm/establish that NOA is due to spermatogenic failure. Second, genetic testing is carried out not only to detect the males in whom NOA is caused by microdeletions of the long arm of the Y chromosome, but also to counsel the affected patients about their chances of having success in sperm retrieval. Third, it is determined whether any intervention prior to a surgical retrieval attempt may be used to increase sperm production. Fourth, the most effective and efficient retrieval method is selected to search for testicular sperm. Lastly, state-of-art laboratory techniques are applied in the handling of retrieved gametes and cultivating the embryos resulting from sperm injections. A coordinated multidisciplinary effort is key to offer the best possible chance of achieving a biological offspring to males with NOA. PMID:25677138

  17. Human sperm chromatin epigenetic potential: genomics, proteomics, and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Judit; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Ballescá, Josep Lluis; Oliva, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The classical idea about the function of the mammalian sperm chromatin is that it serves to transmit a highly protected and transcriptionally inactive paternal genome, largely condensed by protamines, to the next generation. In addition, recent sperm chromatin genome-wide dissection studies indicate the presence of a differential distribution of the genes and repetitive sequences in the protamine-condensed and histone-condensed sperm chromatin domains, which could be potentially involved in regulatory roles after fertilization. Interestingly, recent proteomic studies have shown that sperm chromatin contains many additional proteins, in addition to the abundant histones and protamines, with specific modifications and chromatin affinity features which are also delivered to the oocyte. Both gene and protein signatures seem to be altered in infertile patients and, as such, are consistent with the potential involvement of the sperm chromatin landscape in early embryo development. This present work reviews the available information on the composition of the human sperm chromatin and its epigenetic potential, with a particular focus on recent results derived from high-throughput genomic and proteomic studies. As a complement, we provide experimental evidence for the detection of phosphorylations and acetylations in human protamine 1 using a mass spectrometry approach. The available data indicate that the sperm chromatin is much more complex than what it was previously thought, raising the possibility that it could also serve to transmit crucial paternal epigenetic information to the embryo. PMID:25926607

  18. Fellowship training and board certification in reproductive endocrinology and infertility.

    PubMed

    Gambone, Joseph C; Segars, James H; Cedars, Marcelle; Schlaff, William D

    2015-07-01

    Reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) is one of the original officially recognized subspecialties in obstetrics and gynecology and among the earlier subspecialties in medicine. Recognized by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1972, fellowship programs are now 3 years in length following an obstetrics and gynecology residency. Originally focused on endocrine problems related to reproductive function, the assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have recently become the larger part of training during REI fellowships. It is likely that the subspecialty of REI strengthens the specialty of obstetrics and gynecology and enhances the educational experience of residents in the field. The value of training and certification in REI is most evident in the remarkable and consistent improvement in the success of ART procedures, particularly in vitro fertilization. The requirement for documented research activity during REI fellowships is likely to stimulate a more rapid adoption (translation) of newer research findings into clinical care after training. Although mandatory reporting of outcomes has been proposed as a reason for this improvement the rapid translation of reproductive research into clinical practice is likely to be a major cause. Looking forward, REI training should emphasize and strengthen education and research into the endocrine, environmental, and genetic aspects of female and male reproduction to improve the reproductive health and fertility of all women. PMID:26048151

  19. Germline deletion of Cetn1 causes infertility in male mice.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Prachee; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Ying, Guoxin; Frederick, Jeanne M; Baehr, Wolfgang; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2013-07-15

    Centrins are calmodulin-like Ca(2+)-binding proteins that can be found in all ciliated eukaryotic cells from yeast to mammals. Expressed in male germ cells and photoreceptors, centrin 1 (CETN1) resides in the photoreceptor transition zone and connecting cilium. To identify its function in mammals, we deleted Cetn1 by homologous recombination. Cetn1(-/-) mice were viable and showed no sign of retina degeneration suggesting that CETN1 is nonessential for photoreceptor ciliogenesis or structural maintenance. Phototransduction components localized normally to the Cetn1(-/-) photoreceptor outer segments, and loss of CETN1 had no effect on light-induced translocation of transducin to the inner segment. Although Cetn1(-/-) females and Cetn1(+/-) males had normal fertility, Cetn1(-/-) males were infertile. The Cetn1(-/-) testes size was normal, and spermatogonia as well as spermatocytes developed normally. However, spermatids lacked tails suggesting severe defects at the late maturation phase of spermiogenesis. Viable sperm cells were absent and the few surviving spermatozoa were malformed. Light and electron microscopy analyses of Cetn1(-/-) spermatids revealed failures in centriole rearrangement during basal body maturation and in the basal-body-nucleus connection. These results confirm an essential role for CETN1 in late steps of spermiogenesis and spermatid maturation. PMID:23641067

  20. Infertility in reproductive-age female cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jennifer M; Kelvin, Joanne Frankel; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2015-05-15

    Improved survival rates among reproductive-age females diagnosed with cancer have increased the focus on long-term quality of life, including maintenance of the ability to conceive biological children. Cancer-directed therapies such as high-dose alkylating agents and radiation to the pelvis, which deplete ovarian reserve, radiation to the brain, which affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and surgical resection of reproductive structures can decrease the likelihood of having biological children. Standard fertility preservation strategies such as embryo and oocyte cryopreservation before the onset of therapy offer the opportunity to conserve fertility, but they may not be feasible because of the urgency to start cancer therapy, financial limitations, and a lack of access to reproductive endocrinologists. Ovarian tissue freezing is considered experimental, with limited data related to pregnancies, but it minimizes treatment delay. Studies evaluating gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues have had mixed results, although a recent randomized, prospective study in women with breast cancer demonstrated a protective effect. Fertility preservation programs are increasingly being developed within cancer programs. In this article, we describe risks to infertility and options for preservation, raise psychosocial and ethical issues, and propose elements for establishing an effective fertility preservation program. PMID:25649243

  1. Alternative and antioxidant therapies used by a sample of infertile males in Jordan: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is frequently used in the Middle East, especially to treat chronic diseases such as infertility. We aimed to examine the prevalence, characteristics, and determinants of CAM use, particularly herbs and antioxidant therapies, among infertile males presenting for infertility evaluation in Jordan. Methods Demographic information, use of alternative and antioxidant therapies for infertility treatment, and patients’ belief in efficacy and safety of the therapies used were collected using a face-to-face questionnaire. Data were collected from 428 infertile male patients presenting at infertility clinics in Amman, the capital city of Jordan. The study was conducted between April 2013 and September 2013. Results Of the 428 men who completed the questionnaire, 184 (43%) used at least one of the alternative and antioxidant therapies specified in the questionnaire. Nutritional regime; vitamins, such as vitamins C and E; and medicinal herbs, such as ginger, saw palmetto, and ginseng were the most commonly used therapies reported. A correlation between the use of alternative and antioxidant therapies versus infertility duration was found. Additionally, the majority of males using CAM did not inform their health care providers about their usage. Conclusions The high prevalence of CAM use among infertile male patients underscores the urge to assimilate CAM into the education and training of health professionals, as well as to improve infertile patients’ knowledge of the safe use of CAM modalities. PMID:25026980

  2. Studying the Relationship between the Attitude to Infertility and Coping Strategies in Couples Undergoing Assisted Reproductive Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Fatemeh; Kazemi, Ashraf; Ureizi-Samani, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Using appropriate coping strategies has a positive influence on moderating mental pressures caused by infertility and the stress during treatment. Using these strategies needs personal skills and they could be influenced by individual's inner psychological and environmental factors. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the attitude toward infertility and coping strategies considering the couple's social and financial situation. Methods: This was a cross sectional study conducted on 133 volunteered couples undergoing assisted reproductive treatment. Coping strategies and the attitude toward infertility were assessed using a self-report questionnaire. Higher scores of attitude indicated positive attitudes. Data was analyzed using paired-samples t test and multiple regression model. Results: Independent from demographic information and causes of infertility, using self-blame and self-focused rumination coping strategies were negatively related to attitude toward infertility in both men and women (p<0.05). Also, using self-blame coping strategy had a positive correlation with female infertility and negative correlation with male infertility. Conclusion: Regardless of the economic and social conditions, in infertile couples, downward trend in attitude toward infertility is mostly associated with the use of maladaptive coping strategies. PMID:26962484

  3. A review of management of infertility in Nigeria: framing the ethics of a national health policy

    PubMed Central

    Akinloye, Oluyemi; Truter, Ernest J

    2011-01-01

    Infertility has recently been construed to be a serious problem in sub-Saharan Africa. This problem seems to be viewed as of low priority with reference to the effective and efficient allocation of available health resources by national governments as well as by international donors sponsoring either research or service delivery in the public health sector. In this paper the problem of infertility in Nigeria is surveyed with a view to assessing the ethical dimension of proposals to manage infertility as a public sector priority in health care delivery. The population/individual and public/private distinction in the formulation of health policy has ethical implications that cannot simply be ignored and are therefore engaged in critically assessing the problem of infertility. Cost–utility analysis (such as Quality Adjusted Life-Year composite index) in the management of infertility in Nigeria entails the need for caution relevant to the country’s efforts to achieve Millennium Development Goals. This should remain the case whether the ethical evaluation appeals to utilitarian or contractarian (Rawlsian) principles. The “worst off ” category of Nigerians includes (1) underweight children less than 5 years of age, with special concern for infants (0–1 years of age) and (2) the proportion of the population below a minimum level of dietary consumption. The Rawlsian ethic implies that any Federal Ministry of Health policy aimed at establishing public programs for infertility management can be considered a “fair” allocation and expenditure if, and only if, the situation for these two cohorts is not thereby made worse. Nigerian health policy cannot assume this type of increased allocation of its resources to infertility care without it being hard pressed to warrant defensible moral or rational argument. PMID:21892337

  4. Usage and perceptions of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors among the male partners of infertile couples

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Suk; Shim, Sung Han; Lim, Jung Jin; Yang, Seung Choul

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and the usage of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors for ED treatment in infertile couples. Methods A total of 260 male partners in couples reporting infertility lasting at least 1 year were included in this study. In addition to an evaluation of infertility, all participants completed the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-5 questionnaire to evaluate their sexual function. The participants were asked about their use of PDE5 inhibitors while trying to conceive during their partner's ovulatory period and about their concerns regarding the risks of PDE5 inhibitor use to any eventual pregnancy and/or the fetus. Results Based on the IIEF-5 questionnaire, 41.5% of the participants (108/260) were classified as having mild ED (an IIEF-5 score of 17–21), while 10.4% of the participants (27/260) had greater than mild ED (an IIEF-5 score of 16 or less). The majority (74.2%, 193/260) of male partners of infertile couples had a negative perception of the safety of using a PDE5 inhibitor while trying to conceive. Only 11.1% of men (15/135) with ED in infertile couples had used a PDE5 inhibitor when attempting conception. Conclusion ED was found to be common in the male partners of infertile couples, but the use of PDE5 inhibitors among these men was found to be very low. The majority of male partners were concerned about the risks of using PDE5 inhibitors when attempting to conceive. Appropriate counseling about this topic and treatment when necessary would likely be beneficial to infertile couples in which the male partner has ED. PMID:27104154

  5. A Survey on Oocyte Donation: Turkish Fertile and Infertile Women’s Opinions

    PubMed Central

    Akyuz, Aygul; Sever, Nese; Karasahin, Emre; Guvenc, Gulten; Cek, Suzan

    2014-01-01

    Background There are various treatment options for infertility, and new techniques are also being developed as it is an important healthcare problem affecting approximately 15-20% of married couples. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of infor- mation of fertile and infertile Turkish women on oocyte donation in order to understand their awareness of the legal, ethical, social and religious issues regarding this technique and to compare these two groups in terms of these variables. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study included infertile women being treated at the assisted reproductive technologies (ART) program of a university hos- pital and women who had presented at the gynecology outpatients department of the same university for routine check-ups and who had no previous history of infertility. After consulting with specialists in the field and searching the related literature, a data collection form having 22 questions for infertile women and 18 questions for fertile women was prepared. Results The women were asked whether they would use the oocytes of another woman if necessary. The results showed that 67.6% of the fertile women said they would never want to use this method, while 63.9% of the infertile women stated they may accept to use this method under certain conditions (two distinct answers appeared in the answers, some women stated they would prefer donated oocytes from close relatives, while others stated they would prefer oocytes from total strangers), such as from a close relative or from someone they do not know at all. Conclusion Infertile women mentioned that they could use illegal routes if necessary to have a child at much higher rates than stated by fertile women. This shows that desire to have a child is a strong source of motivation in Turkey. PMID:25379158

  6. The Prevalence and Causes of Primary Infertility in Iran: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kazemijaliseh, Hadigheh; Tehrani, Fahimeh Ramezani; Behboudi-Gandevani, Samira; Hosseinpanah, Farhad; Khalili, Davood; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary infertility is a health issue among women over the world. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and causes of primary infertility based on a population-based study in an urban area of Iran. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, a total of 1067 married women who participated in the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study were randomly selected using systematic random sampling. Unmarried women, those with unwilling pregnancy and duration of marriage below one year were excluded from the study. Data was collected by using validated ad-hoc questionnaires. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for data analysis. Results: The mean (SD) of age and marriage age of the studied women were 40.3 (9.3) and 20.6 (4.49) years, respectively; the overall prevalence of lifetime primary infertility among couples was 17.3% (185/1067). Ovulatory disorder (39.7%) and male factors (29.1%) were the main causes of primary infertility. In addition, 31 (17%) of the women were diagnosed with more than one cause. According to the logistic regression analysis, primary infertility was independently related to the old age of women (OR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.14–13.63, P.value: 0.001), higher BMI (OR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.87–4.14, P.value: 0.003), active smoking (OR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.38–3.53, P.value: 0.012) and higher educational level (OR: 2.23; 95% CI: 1.12–5.53, P.value: 0.03). Conclusion: The prevalence of primary infertility in Iran was higher than the worldwide trends of infertility, indicating that understanding such risks help healthcare providers and policy makers to design and implement interventions to slow down this trend. PMID:26153187

  7. Oxidative stress induced sperm DNA damage, a possible reason for male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Hosen, Md Bayejid; Islam, Md Rakibul; Begum, Firoza; Kabir, Yearul; Howlader, M Zakir Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sperm DNA damage is an important factor in the etiology of male infertility. Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of oxidative stress induced sperm DNA damage with the pathogenesis of male infertility. Materials and Methods: The study comprised a total of 66 subjects, including fertile men (n=25) and infertile men (n=41) matched by age. Seminal malondialdehyde (MDA), phospholipid hydroperoxide (PHP), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant status (TAS) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxy guanosine (8-OHdG) were estimated by spectrophotometric and ELISA based methods and the association with the sperm parameters was assessed. Results: The percentages of motile and morphologically normal cells were significantly lower (p < 0.001, p <0.001, respectivly) in infertile men. Seminal levels of MDA, PHP and 8-OHdG were significantly higher (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p=0. 02, respectively) while the SOD and TAS were significantly lower (p=0. 0003, p< 0.001, respectively) in infertile men. Sperm parameters were negatively correlated with MDA, PHP and 8-OHdG while positively correlated with SOD and TAS. A positive correlation of 8-OHdG with MDA and PHP and a negative correlation with TAS and SOD were also found. Conclusion: These results suggested that oxidative stress induced sperm DNA damage might have a critical effect on the etiology of infertility. Therefore, evaluation of oxidative status, antioxidant defense systems and DNA damage, together with sperm parameters might be a useful tool for diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. PMID:26568756

  8. Infertility Specific Quality of Life and Gender Role Attitudes in German and Hungarian Involuntary Childless Couples.

    PubMed

    Cserepes, R E; Bugán, A; Korösi, T; Toth, B; Rösner, S; Strowitzki, T; Wischmann, T

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: As gender role attitudes and the evaluation of parenthood and childlessness have subtle variations in each society, cross-country studies focusing on infertility are needed to draw a complex picture in the psychosocial context of infertility. This study investigates similarities and differences between German and Hungarian infertile couples regarding infertility specific quality of life and personal gender role attitudes. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with data of 540 participants (270 couples) attending the first fertility consultation in one fertility clinic in Germany and in five fertility clinics in Hungary. Data were collected between February 2012 and March 2013. Two psychological questionnaires were applied: The FertiQoL to measure infertility specific quality of life and the PAQ to measure gender role attitudes like "instrumental" acting (as a traditional "masculine" attitude) and "expressive" communicating (as a traditional "femine" attitude) and their combinations "combined" attitude (as both "instrumental" and "expressive") and "neutral" attitude (neither "instrumental" nor "expressive"). Results: German couples seeking assisted reproduction treatment are older aged and have longer lasting relationships than Hungarian couples. Hungarian couples scored higher on all quality of life scales than did German couples. In the Hungarian group, "combined" attitudes (use of both "expressive" and "instrumental" attitudes) is associated with higher levels of quality of life compared with other gender role attitudes. In the German group, individuals with "combined" attitudes seem to show better quality of life than those in "expressive" and "neutral" clusters. Conclusions: The strategy of using combined "expressive" and "instrumental" attitudes proved to act as a buffer against infertility-related stress for both members of the couple in two European countries and can therefore be recommended as helpful in counselling the infertile couple. PMID:25484375

  9. Development of a scale for determining violence against infertile women: a scale development study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To develop a scale to evaluate violence experienced among infertile women. Method Three steps were followed in the development of the scale: Literature review and deep interviews to generate item pool, content validity testing, and administration of draft. Content validity was evaluated by experts. The draft scale was pilot-tested with a convenience sample of 30 women during their treatment. After the pilot-test, 166 infertile females filled the scale in the infertility clinic of a university hospital in Istanbul. Results For evaluation of construct validity, Kaiser-Mayer Olkin was 0.91. Bartlett test was statistically significant (p = 0.00). According to the results of analysis, 5 domains were determined: “domestic violence”, “social pressure”, “punishment”, “exposure to traditional practices” and “exclusion”. The values of correlation of item were between 0.50 and 0.82. Item-total and subscale-total correlation varied between 0.57-0.91. The scale had good internal reliability, with Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient of 0.96. The other coefficients of subscales varied between 0.80-0.94. Conclusions The scale called “Infertile Women’s Exposure to Violence Determination Scale” indicates high reliability, good content and construct validity. Routine screening for domestic violence in infertility clinics is necessary to give affected women an opportunity to access appropriate health care and support services. On the other hand, common use of Infertile Women’s Exposure to Violence Determination Scale in infertility clinics provides increased sensitivity and awareness by caregivers. PMID:24576353

  10. Prevalence of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis in High Vaginal Swab Samples of Infertile Females

    PubMed Central

    Seifoleslami, Mehri; Safari, Aghdas; Khayyat Khameneie, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum are important causative agents of vaginitis, cervicitis, postpartum sepsis, reproductive infections and infertility in both males and females. Objectives: According to the uncertain prevalence of U. urealyticum and M. hominis in Iranian infertile females, the present study was carried out to determine the prevalence of U. urealyticum and M. hominis in high vaginal swab samples of fertile and infertile females. Patients and Methods: A total of 350 high vaginal swab specimens were taken from fertile and infertile females. Samples were cultured and those that were positive for bacteria were subjected to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for further confirmation. Results: Of the 350 collected samples, eleven were positive for M. hominis (3.14%), fifteen were positive for U. urealyticum (4.28%) and five were positive for both of them (1.42%). Prevalence of U. urealyticum and M. hominis in the high vaginal parts of infertile females was higher than fertile females (P < 0.05). The results of traditional method were also confirmed, using the PCR amplification of urease gene of U. urealyticum and 16SrRNA gene of the M. hominis. Ureaplasma urealyticum and M. hominis had a higher prevalence in the high vaginal samples collected during the summer season. Conclusions: Considerable prevalence of M. hominis and U. urealyticum in the high vaginal swab samples of infertile females compared to the low prevalence in fertile females may suggest that these two pathogens can be cause infertility. Application of the PCR method is recommended for rapid and sensitive detection of M. hominis and U. urealyticum in high vaginal swab samples. PMID:26756000

  11. Family-related opinions and stressful situations associated with psychological distress in women undergoing infertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Jiro; Hibino, Yuri

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how family-related opinions and stressful situations are related to psychological distress in women undergoing infertility treatment. The subjects in this cross-sectional study were recruited from female patients undergoing infertility treatment (n = 2540) at 70 infertility treatment institutions in Japan. Because of non-participation or missing data, the number of subjects included in the analysis was 635 (response rate, 25.0%). The family-related opinions and stressful situations were evaluated using the original questions. Psychological distress was assessed using a self-report measure, the Kessler Six-question Psychological Distress Scale (K6). The K6 scores of the following participants were significantly (p < 0.05) and independently high: those with more frequent miscarriage/stillbirth/abortions, those with repeated miscarriages as the cause of infertility, those with infertility of unknown causes, those living with no child, those having a low joint income with their partner, those with the opinion that "women should devote themselves to their household duties" those who had considered stopping treatment, those without the opinion that "married life without children is favorable" and those who had experienced stressful situations such as inadequate explanation by doctors, frustration of multiple failed attempts, differences of opinion with the partner, and lack of knowledge regarding when to stop treatment. Family-related opinions and stressful situations associated with psychological distress in women undergoing infertility treatment are outlined. The results of this study may contribute to the prevention of and care for psychological distress in female patients undergoing infertility treatment. PMID:25184788

  12. A review of management of infertility in Nigeria: framing the ethics of a national health policy.

    PubMed

    Akinloye, Oluyemi; Truter, Ernest J

    2011-01-01

    Infertility has recently been construed to be a serious problem in sub-Saharan Africa. This problem seems to be viewed as of low priority with reference to the effective and efficient allocation of available health resources by national governments as well as by international donors sponsoring either research or service delivery in the public health sector. In this paper the problem of infertility in Nigeria is surveyed with a view to assessing the ethical dimension of proposals to manage infertility as a public sector priority in health care delivery. The population/individual and public/private distinction in the formulation of health policy has ethical implications that cannot simply be ignored and are therefore engaged in critically assessing the problem of infertility. Cost-utility analysis (such as Quality Adjusted Life-Year composite index) in the management of infertility in Nigeria entails the need for caution relevant to the country's efforts to achieve Millennium Development Goals. This should remain the case whether the ethical evaluation appeals to utilitarian or contractarian (Rawlsian) principles. The "worst off " category of Nigerians includes (1) underweight children less than 5 years of age, with special concern for infants (0-1 years of age) and (2) the proportion of the population below a minimum level of dietary consumption. The Rawlsian ethic implies that any Federal Ministry of Health policy aimed at establishing public programs for infertility management can be considered a "fair" allocation and expenditure if, and only if, the situation for these two cohorts is not thereby made worse. Nigerian health policy cannot assume this type of increased allocation of its resources to infertility care without it being hard pressed to warrant defensible moral or rational argument. PMID:21892337

  13. Attitudes of fertile and infertile woman towards new reproductive technologies: a case study of Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This article analyzes several key issues in the debate: the acceptability of in vitro fertilization; regulation of assisted reproduction and the possibilities of reimbursement for assisted reproduction treatment in Lithuania. Method Two groups of respondents participated in the survey: fertile women and women with fertility disorders. 93 completed questionnaires from women with fertility problems and 146 from women with no fertility problems were analysed. Results Fertile respondents more frequently perceived the embryo as a human being (Fertile Individuals – 68.5%; Infertile Individuals – 35.5%; p < 0.05) and more frequently maintained that assisted reproduction treatment should be only partly reimbursed (Fertile Individuals – 71.3%; Infertile Individuals – 39.8%; p < 0.05). Respondents with fertility disorders more frequently thought that artificial insemination procedure could also be applied to unmarried couples (Fertile Individuals – 51.4%; Infertile Individuals – 76.3%; p < 0.05), and more frequently agreed that there should be no age limit for artificial insemination procedures (Fertile Individuals – 36.3%; Infertile Individuals – 67.7%; p < 0.05). The majority of respondents in both groups (Fertile Individuals – 77.4%; Infertile Individuals – 82.8%; p < 0.05) believed that donation of reproductive cells should be regulated by law. Fertile respondents more frequently considered that strict legal regulation was necessary in case of the number of transferred embryos (Fertile Individuals – 69.2%; Infertile Individuals – 39.8%; p < 0.05) and freezing of embryos (Fertile Individuals – 69.9%; Infertile Individuals – 57.0%; p < 0.05). Conclusion Fertile respondents were statistically more likely to believe that the IVF procedure should be applied only to married couples or women who had a regular partner, the age limit should be defined and the psychological assessment of the couple’s relationship and their readiness for the IVF procedure was necessary. In contrast, infertile couples were statistically more likely than fertile respondents to maintain that the IVF procedure should be fully reimbursed by the state. Fertile respondents were statistically more likely to be categorical with respect to the number of embryos and the freezing of embryos. Meanwhile there is a statistically significant difference in opinions of infertile respondents who were in favour of stricter regulation on donation of reproductive cells. PMID:24684746

  14. Significant Impact of the MTHFR Polymorphisms and Haplotypes on Male Infertility Risk

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nishi; Sarkar, Saumya; David, Archana; Gangwar, Pravin Kumar; Gupta, Richa; Khanna, Gita; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Khanna, Anil; Rajender, Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) converts 5,10-methylene tetrahydrofolate to 5-methyl tetrahydrofolate and affects the activity of cellular cycles participating in nucleotide synthesis, DNA repair, genome stability, maintenance of methyl pool, and gene regulation. Genetically compromised MTHFR activity has been suggested to affect male fertility. The objective of the present study was to find the impact on infertility risk of c.203G>A, c.1298A>C, and c.1793G>A polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene. Methods PCR-RFLP and DNA sequencing were used to genotype the common SNPs in the MTHFR gene in 630 infertile and 250 fertile males. Chi-square test was applied for statistical comparison of genotype data. Linkage disequilibrium between the SNPs and the frequency of common haplotypes were assessed using Haploview software. Biochemical levels of total homocysteine (tHcy) and folic acid were measured. Meta-analysis on c.1298A>C polymorphism was performed using data from ten studies, comprising 2734 cases and 2737 controls. Results c.203G>A and c.1298A>C were found to be unrelated to infertility risk. c.1793G>A was protective against infertility (P = 0.0008). c.677C>T and c.1793G>A were in significant LD (D’ = 0.9). Folic acid and tHcy level did not correlate with male infertility. Pooled estimate on c.1298A>C data from all published studies including our data showed no association of this polymorphism with male infertility (Odds ratio = 1.035, P = 0.56), azoospermia (Odds ratio = 0.97, P = 0.74), or oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (Odds ratio = 0.92, p = 0.29). Eight haplotypes with more than 1% frequency were detected, of which CCGA was protective against infertility (p = 0.02), but the significance of the latter was not seen after applying Bonferroni correction. Conclusion Among MTHFR polymorphisms, c.203G>A and c.1298A>C do not affect infertility risk and c.1793G>A is protective against infertility. Haplotype analysis suggested that risk factors on the MTHFR locus do not extend too long on the DNA string. PMID:23874907

  15. Early stage management of ovarian endometrioma to prevent infertility

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, I.; Puttemans, P.; Gordts, Sy.; Campo, R.; Gordts, S.; Benagiano, G.

    2013-01-01

    There are now convincing data showing that cystectomy of the endometrioma is not only no cure of infertility, but may harm follicle reserve. The question arises why is cystectomy for an endometrioma, in contrast with other benign cysts, a risk for follicle reserve and how can ovarian damage be prevented. Surgical specimens of ovaries with endometrioma in situ show in the majority of cases manifestly a combined extra-ovarian and intra-ovarian pathology with the cortex invaginated to form a pseudocyst. The extra-ovarian pathology includes endometrial lining of the cortex, bleeding and adhesions with surrounding tissues. The intra-ovarian pathology is characterized by microscopic stromal implants, fibrosis, smooth muscle metaplasia and arteriosclerosis, all affecting follicle reserve in the endometrioma bed. Clinically, ovarioscopy allows differential diagnosis (e.g. luteal cyst) and evaluation of the degree of fibrosis and darkening of the cortical wall. Transvaginal colour Doppler sonography can demonstrate the presence and extent of devascularisation in the endometrioma bed. Given this reality, surgery should be based on evaluation of the pathology of the endometrioma bed, but not on the mere size of the chocolate cyst. The main clinical problem is indeed the delayed diagnosis and consequently advanced irreversible cortical damage. Therefore, the sooner endometriomas are diagnosed, the better, because it increases the chances that vascularisation of the endometrioma bed is preserved. Finally, ablation, but not excision is the treatment of choice. The diagnosis of endometriosis is traditionally based on laparoscopy, but in a sexually active adolescent transvaginal endoscopy can be proposed. PMID:24753958

  16. Consensus on infertility treatment related to polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    2008-03-01

    The treatment of infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is surrounded by many controversies. On the basis of the currently available evidence, a group of experts reached a consensus regarding the therapeutic challenges raised in these women. Before any intervention is initiated, preconceptional counseling should be provided emphasizing the importance of lifestyle, especially weight reduction and exercise in overweight women, smoking, and alcohol consumption. The recommended first-line treatment for ovulation induction remains the anti-estrogen clomiphene citrate (CC). Recommended second-line intervention, should CC fail to result in pregnancy, is either exogenous gonadotropins or laparoscopic ovarian surgery (LOS). The use of exogenous gonadotropins is associated with increased chances for multiple pregnancy, and, therefore, intense monitoring of ovarian response is required. Laparoscopic ovarian surgery alone is usually effective in less than 50% of women, and additional ovulation induction medication is required under those circumstances. Overall, ovulation induction (representing the CC-gonadotropin paradigm) is reported to be highly effective with a cumulative singleton live-birth rate of 72%. Recommended third-line treatment is in vitro fertilization (IVF). More patient-tailored approaches should be developed for ovulation induction based on initial screening characteristics of women with PCOS. Such approaches may result in deviation from the above mentioned first-line, second-line, or third-line ovulation strategies in well-defined subsets of patients. Metformin use in PCOS should be restricted to women with glucose intolerance. Based on recent data available in the literature, the routine use of this drug in ovulation induction is not recommended. Insufficient evidence is currently available to recommend the clinical use of aromatase inhibitors for routine ovulation induction. Even singleton pregnancies in PCOS are associated with increased health risk for both the mother and the fetus. PMID:18243179

  17. Sexual dysfunction and infertility as late effects of cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schover, Leslie R.; van der Kaaij, Marleen; van Dorst, Eleonora; Creutzberg, Carien; Huyghe, Eric; Kiserud, Cecilie E.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common consequence of cancer treatment, affecting at least half of men and women treated for pelvic malignancies and over a quarter of people with other types of cancer. Problems are usually linked to damage to nerves, blood vessels, and hormones that underlie normal sexual function. Sexual dysfunction also may be associated with depression, anxiety, relationship conflict, and loss of self-esteem. Innovations in cancer treatment such as robotic surgery or more targeted radiation therapy have not had the anticipated result of reducing sexual dysfunction. Some new and effective cancer treatments, including aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer or chemoradiation for anal cancer also have very severe sexual morbidity. Cancer-related infertility is an issue for younger patients, who comprise a much smaller percentage of total cancer survivors. However, the long-term emotional impact of being unable to have a child after cancer can be extremely distressing. Advances in knowledge about how cancer treatments may damage fertility, as well as newer techniques to preserve fertility, offer hope to patients who have not completed their childbearing at cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately, surveys in industrialised nations confirm that many cancer patients are still not informed about potential changes to their sexual function or fertility, and all modalities of fertility preservation remain underutilised. After cancer treatment, many patients continue to have unmet needs for information about restoring sexual function or becoming a parent. Although more research is needed on optimal clinical practice, current studies suggest a multidisciplinary approach, including both medical and psychosocial treatment options. PMID:26217165

  18. Association of C677T transition of the human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with male infertility.

    PubMed

    Karimian, Mohammad; Colagar, Abasalt Hosseinzadeh

    2016-04-01

    The human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene encodes one of the key enzymes in folate metabolism. This gene is located on chromosome 1 (1p36.3), which has 12 exons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association of the two (C677T and A1298C) polymorphisms of this gene with male infertility. In a case-control study, 250 blood samples were collected from IVF centres in Sari and Babol (Iran): 118 samples were from oligospermic men and 132 were from controls. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms of the MTHFR genotype were detected using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. There was no association found between the A1298C variant and male infertility. However, carriers of the 677T allele (CT and TT genotypes) were at a higher risk of infertility than individuals with other genotypes (odds ratio 1.84; 95% confidence interval 1.11-3.04; P=0.0174). Structural analysis of human MTHFR flavoprotein showed that C677T transition played an important role in the change in affinity of the MTHFR-Flavin adenine dinucleotide binding site. Based on our results, we suggest that C677T transition in MTHFR may increase the risk of male infertility, and detection of the C677T polymorphism biomarker may be helpful in the screening of idiopathic male infertility. PMID:25412139

  19. Predictors of Irrational Parenthood Cognitions in an Iranian Group of Infertile Women

    PubMed Central

    Farzadi, Laya; Ghasemzadeh, Aliyeh; Bahrami-asl, Zahra; Shirdel, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate possible predictors of irrational parenthood cognitions among infertile women seeking treatment. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 300 women who visited an Infertility Center in Iran during 2010 were studied. A pre-validated inventory was used to assess irrational parenthood cognitions. Potential predictors of the total irrational parenthood cognitions score were assessed. Results Mean irrational parenthood cognition score was 39.7(Range 0–56). Through bivariate analysis, the score on irrational parenthood cognition was inversely correlated with age and positively correlated with length of time seeking for infertility treatment and length of time expecting pregnancy. In a multivariate model, infertile women with higher education, especially academic education, or those with higher economic status were less likely to have irrational parenthood cognitions. However, higher motherhood motivation, no previous experience of pregnancy and being under social pressure, from others around, increased the likelihood of having irrational parenthood cognitions. Conclusions Some variables such as female spouse’s educational level and being under social pressure can independently predict irrational parenthood cognitions among infertile women that may be of use in designing health promotion plans in order to target the vulnerable women. PMID:25756990

  20. The epidemiology of infertility: a review with particular reference to sub-Saharan Africa*

    PubMed Central

    Belsey, Mark A.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of infertility, with particular reference to Africa south of the Sahara, is reviewed. In many areas, up to 40% of women are reported to have completed their reproductive years without bearing a child. The condition is widely distributed, but also often localized in pockets corresponding to geographical or tribal units. Most available demographic data provide estimates of childlessness but it is not sufficient to define the problem in terms of primary and secondary infertility, pregnancy wastage, and infant and child mortality. The major underlying cause for the high levels of infertility appears to be the sequelae of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection in both men and women, manifested as obstructive azoospermia and tubal occlusion. Other infections, such as those that may follow abortion or delivery, or systemic infections, may be important in some areas. The available data suggest that different patterns of infertility and pregnancy wastage, and different etiological agents and processes, contribute to the problem of infertility in the different areas. The need for a systematic, standardized research approach in several areas is clearly indicated. PMID:798639

  1. Regional and geographical variations in infertility: effects of environmental, cultural, and socioeconomic factors.

    PubMed

    Leke, R J; Oduma, J A; Bassol-Mayagoitia, S; Bacha, A M; Grigor, K M

    1993-07-01

    Fertility is affected by many different cultural, environmental, and socioeconomic factors, especially in developing countries where poverty and infections are commonplace. Environmental factors play a major role in infertility in Africa. One of the most important health problems in sub-Saharan Africa is the high rate of infertility and childlessness. The African society has a strong traditional heritage, and the study of the patterns of infertility in this part of the world would be incomplete without consideration of the sociocultural and environmental factors. The most cost-effective approach to solving the infertility problems in Africa is prevention and education. In Mexico, problems of reproductive health are associated with pregnancy in adolescents, sexually transmitted diseases and genitourinary neoplasms. Infertility affects 10% of couples, usually as a result of asymptomatic infection. Education, poverty, nutrition, and pollution are problems that must be tackled. The government has taken positive action in the State of São Paulo in Brazil, where gender discrimination is a major factor affecting women's health and reproductive outcomes. The implementation of new policies with adequate funding has resulted in marked improvements. PMID:8243409

  2. The Effect of Mirtazapine on Cisplatin-Induced Oxidative Damage and Infertility in Rat Ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Altuner, Durdu; Gulaboglu, Mine; Yapca, Omer Erkan; Cetin, Nihal

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin causes infertility due to ovarian toxicity. The toxicity mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests oxidative stress. In this study, the effect of mirtazapine on cisplatin-induced infertility and oxidative stress in rats was investigated. 64 female rats were divided into 4 groups of 16. Except for the controls that received physiologic saline only, all were administered with cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p.) and mirtazapine (15 mg/kg p.o.) or mirtazapine (30 mg/kg p.o.) for 10 days. After this period, six rats from each group were randomly selected, and malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), nitric oxide (NO), total gluthatione (tGSH), gluthatione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and 8-hydroxy-2 deoxyguanine (8-OH Gua) levels were measured in their ovarian tissues. Reproductive functions of the remaining rats were examined for 6 months. The MDA, MPO, NO groups and 8-OH Gua levels were higher in the cisplatin-treated groups than the controls, which was not observed in the mirtazapine and cisplatin groups. GSH, GPx, and SOD levels were reduced by cisplatin, which was prevented by mirtazapine. Cisplatin caused infertility by 70%. The infertility rates were, respectively, 40% and 10% for the 15 and 30 mg/kg mirtazapine administered groups. In conclusion, oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in the rat ovary tissue causes infertility in the female rats. Mirtazapine reverses this in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:23737712

  3. Regional and geographical variations in infertility: effects of environmental, cultural, and socioeconomic factors.

    PubMed Central

    Leke, R J; Oduma, J A; Bassol-Mayagoitia, S; Bacha, A M; Grigor, K M

    1993-01-01

    Fertility is affected by many different cultural, environmental, and socioeconomic factors, especially in developing countries where poverty and infections are commonplace. Environmental factors play a major role in infertility in Africa. One of the most important health problems in sub-Saharan Africa is the high rate of infertility and childlessness. The African society has a strong traditional heritage, and the study of the patterns of infertility in this part of the world would be incomplete without consideration of the sociocultural and environmental factors. The most cost-effective approach to solving the infertility problems in Africa is prevention and education. In Mexico, problems of reproductive health are associated with pregnancy in adolescents, sexually transmitted diseases and genitourinary neoplasms. Infertility affects 10% of couples, usually as a result of asymptomatic infection. Education, poverty, nutrition, and pollution are problems that must be tackled. The government has taken positive action in the State of São Paulo in Brazil, where gender discrimination is a major factor affecting women's health and reproductive outcomes. The implementation of new policies with adequate funding has resulted in marked improvements. PMID:8243409

  4. Association of polymorphisms in ART3 gene with male infertility in the Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feiyan; Jiang, Lei; Yang, Haiyan; Yang, Xu; Wu, Jianbo; Huang, Xuefeng; Ni, Wuhua

    2015-01-01

    The ADP-ribosyltransferase 3 gene (ART3) has been reported to be associated with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) in the Japanese population. In this study, we aim to explore the possible association between the four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs11097230, rs17001385, rs14773 and rs6836703) in ART3 gene and male infertility with spermatogenesis impairment in the Chinese population. The study population included 321 idiopathic infertile males with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and 250 fertile males. Four SNPs of ART3 gene were genotyped using the method of SNaPshot. The results showed that an SNP (rs6836703) in the intron11 region of ART3 gene is significantly associated with male infertility (odds ratio: 0.632, 95% confidence interval: 0.440-0.910). No significant associations were found between any of the other three variants (rs11097230, rs17001385 and rs14773) in ART3 gene and male infertility. SNP rs6836703 in ART3 gene may contribute to male infertility risk in the Chinese population. PMID:26221352

  5. Effect of lifestyle on quality of life of couples receiving infertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Teskereci, Gamze; Oncel, Selma

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of lifestyle on the quality of life among couples undergoing infertility treatment. The research universe consisted of 200 couples undergoing infertility treatment in Akdeniz University's Center of Reproductive Endocrinology and Assisted Reproductive Techniques. The data collection tools the authors used were a personal information form requesting sociodemographic characteristics and history of infertility, the SF-36 Quality of Life Scale, and the Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors Scale. This study revealed that the quality of life of the women in the study was lower than that of the men. The authors also found that the couples' quality of life was reduced by variables such as advanced age, low education level, unemployment status, lower income, long duration of infertility, high body mass index, history of andrological surgery, and previous experience of assisted reproduction techniques three or more times. Last, it was determined that the couples' quality of life improved as their healthy lifestyle behaviors increased. Demonstrating positive health behavior is likely to improve the quality of life of couples undergoing infertility treatment. PMID:23631703

  6. The effect of relaxation techniques to ease the stress in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Valiani, Mahboubeh; Abediyan, Sara; Ahmadi, Sayed Mehdi; Pahlavanzadeh, Saeid; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infertility causes psychological and emotional tension in the couples and makes severe stress on infertile men and women. Relaxation technique is one of the methods that reduces the stress and can balance the human's emotions. This study aimed to determine the effect of relaxation on the infertile women's stress score. METHODS: This was a semi-experimental and clinical trial study. Participants randomly divided into two groups. At the beginning, the stress scores were assessed in both groups using Newton's infertility stress questionnaire. The participants’ stress scores were evaluated and then, the relaxation technique was implemented on the intervention group. This technique was performed in twelve sessions. All the questionnaires were completed under supervision of the researcher after embryo was transferred to the uterus (after 2 weeks) and before conducting the pregnancy test. RESULTS: Independent t-test showed that the total stress score did not have a significant difference in groups before the intervention (p > 0.05) whereas independent t-test indicated a significant difference in stress scores between the two groups after the intervention (p < 0.05). Stress score was higher in the control group in comparison with the intervention group. CONCLUSIONS: Relaxation technique can reduce the stress score in infertile women as a complementary and alternative medicine method. PMID:22049291

  7. Treatment of infertility associated with deep endometriosis: definition of therapeutic balances.

    PubMed

    Somigliana, Edgardo; Garcia-Velasco, Juan Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Deep endometriosis is a demanding condition that is associated with infertility. However, evidence supporting a direct link between deep endometriosis and infertility is weak. In fact, infertility in affected patients is more likely to be explained by the strong association between deep endometriosis and adhesions, superficial endometriotic implants, ovarian endometriomas, and adenomyosis. The purported beneficial effects of surgery on infertility are mainly based on the 40%-42% pregnancy rate (PR) after surgery observed in published case series. However, this level of evidence is questionable and overestimates the benefits of the intervention. Even if comparative studies are lacking, IVF may be a valid alternative. The procedure may be less effective in affected women compared with other indications and it is not without additional deep endometriosis-related risks. Some case reports suggest that lesions might progress during IVF causing ureteral or intestinal complications or can decidualize during pregnancy causing intestinal perforation, pneumothorax, and pelvic vessels rupture. Finally, in the decision-making process, physicians should also consider that women with a history of deep endometriosis may face an increased risk of pregnancy complications. In conclusion, clear recommendation for the management of infertile women with deep endometriosis cannot be extrapolated from the literature. The therapeutic decision should be based on a comprehensive evaluation that includes clinical history, instrumental findings, pain symptoms, risks of pregnancy complications, and the woman's wishes. PMID:26342244

  8. A retrospective chromosome studies among Iranian infertile women: Report of 21 years

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Cyrus; Khaleghian, Malihea; Farzanfar, Farideh

    2013-01-01

    Background: The infertility is an important health problem, affecting about 15% of couples. The important role of genetic factors in pathogenesis of infertility is now increasingly recognized. The value of karyotyping women in the routine work-out of couples referred for sterility has long been recommended. Objective: The aim of this study was to define the frequency of all chromosomal aberrations among women which referred to our department due to infertility during the 21-year period. Materials and Methods: In this 21-year retrospective study, for the first time, we investigated 896 women which referred to our department due to infertility during 1986 to 2006. For chromosome analysis, heparinized peripheral blood samples were cultured, harvested and banded according to standard methods. Results: Out of 896 patients, 710 patients (79.24%) had a normal karyotype, and 186 patients (20.76%) showed abnormal karyotype. Among the abnormal ones 48 patients (25.81%) showed Turner's syndrome (45,X), and 45 patients (24.19%) were sex reversal with 46,XY karyotype. The rest of 93 patients (50%) revealed a wide range of chromosome abnormalities. Conclusion: Our results emphasized the importance of the standard cytogenetic methods in assessing the genetic characteristics of infertile females, which allows detecting a variety of somatic chromosome abnormalities, because some of these may interfere with the success of reproduction. PMID:24639762

  9. Metabolomics Analysis of Seminal Plasma in Infertile Males with Kidney-Yang Deficiency: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang; Hu, Chao; Dai, Jican; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an important treatment for male infertility, and its application to therapy is dependent on differentiation of TCM syndromes. This study aims to investigate the changes in metabolites and metabolic pathways in infertile males with Kidney-Yang Deficiency syndrome (KYDS) via metabolomics approaches. Seminal plasma samples were collected from 18 infertile males with KYDS and 18 fertile males. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry were used to characterize metabolomics profiles. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA), and pathway analysis were used for pattern recognition and metabolite identification. PCA and PLS-DA results differentiated the two groups of patients. Forty-one discriminating metabolites (18 in positive mode and 23 in negative mode) were identified. Seven metabolites were related to five potential metabolic pathways associated with biosynthesis and metabolism of aromatic amino acids, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and sphingolipid metabolism. The changes in metabolic pathways may play an important role in the origin of KYDS-associated male infertility. Metabolomics analysis of seminal plasma may be used to differentiate TCM syndromes of infertile males, but further research must be conducted. PMID:25945117

  10. Is global access to infertility care realistic? The Walking Egg Project.

    PubMed

    Ombelet, Willem

    2014-03-01

    Until very recently, the problem of infertility in developing countries has been ignored at all levels of healthcare management. Because many preventable or treatable diseases still claim millions of lives, and due to limited resources, provision of infertility care is not on the resource allocation agenda at all, prevention of sexually transmitted diseases remaining the number one priority. Tubal infertility due to sexually transmitted diseases, unsafe abortion and post-partum pelvic infections is the main cause of infertility. Most cases are only treatable with assisted reproduction technology, which are either unavailable or too costly. In December 2007, an expert meeting was organized in Arusha, Tanzania by the Walking Egg non-profit organization in co-operation with ESHRE. The meeting was the start of a global project aimed at increasing diagnostic and therapeutic options for childless couples in resource-poor countries. From the start, the Walking Egg Project has approached this problem in a multidisciplinary and global manner. It gathers medical, social, ethical, epidemiological, juridical and economic scientists to discuss and work together towards its goal. The final objective of the Walking Egg Project is the implementation of infertility services in many developing countries, preferably integrated in existing family planning and mother care services. PMID:24444813

  11. IVF as lottery or investment: contesting metaphors in discourses of infertility.

    PubMed

    de Lacey, Sheryl

    2002-03-01

    This paper reports an aspect of a poststructural feminist study in which I explored the discursive formations within which women for whom in vitro fertilisation (IVF) was unsuccessful constitute themselves. In my exploration I draw on data from interviews with women who discontinued infertility treatment, print media material and infertility self-help books. Specifically, I highlight a metaphor of lottery in discourses of infertility, arguing that it is hegemonic and showing how when women are situated as gamblers, the metaphor is instrumental in polarising them into 'winners' or 'losers' in relation to the subjectivity of motherhood. I further deconstruct these subjectivities, showing how 'winners' are valorised and 'losers' are pathologised. But importantly, I show how infertile women who are not mothers resisted locating themselves as 'losers' in a metaphor of lottery and instead situated themselves in a contesting metaphor of investment as diligent 'workers' and as active agents in choosing the best employment of their bodily and monetary resources. This paper therefore amplifies the marginalised perspective of infertile women who are not mothers. PMID:12164714

  12. Suicidal risk among infertile women undergoing in-vitro fertilization: Incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Shani, Chen; Yelena, Stukalina; Reut, Ben Kimhy; Adrian, Shulman; Sami, Hamdan

    2016-06-30

    Despite the fact that depression and other emotional distress are well documented in infertile women, little is known about the relationship between infertility and suicidal risk. The aim of this cross sectional study was to examine the rate of suicide risk (suicidal ideation/suicidal attempts) among 106 infertile women visiting Infertility and In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF) Hospital Unit, and to identify the demographic, medical and clinical correlates to suicidal risk. The incidence of suicide risk was 9.4%. Suicidal women were more likely to be childless or had fewer children and experienced higher levels of depressive symptoms. In addition, they reported more frequently on denial, social withdrawal and self-blame coping strategies compared to participants without suicidal risk. A multiple logistic regression model revealed that being childless, using non-positive reappraisal and exhibiting depressive symptoms were significant predictors of suicide risk in the future. These results suggest that routine assessment of suicidal risk and depression should be provided for infertile women in the course of IVF. Furthermore, future interventions should focus on helping them acquire different emotions regulation strategies and provide alternative skills for positive coping. PMID:27084991

  13. Semen quality, testicular B-mode and Doppler ultrasound, and serum testosterone concentrations in dogs with established infertility.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Mírley Barbosa; England, Gary C W; Mota Filho, Antônio Cavalcante; Ackermann, Camila Louise; Sousa, Carmen Vládia Soares; de Carvalho, Gabriela Guedelha; Silva, Herlon Victor Rodrigues; Pinto, José Nicodemos; Linhares, Jussiara Candeira Spíndola; Oba, Eunice; da Silva, Lúcia Daniel Machado

    2015-09-15

    Retrospective examination of breeding records enabled the identification of 10 dogs of normal fertility and 10 dogs with established infertility of at least 12 months of duration. Comparisons of testicular palpation, semen evaluation, testicular ultrasound examination, Doppler ultrasound measurement of testicular artery blood flow, and measurement of serum testosterone concentration were made between the two groups over weekly examinations performed on three occasions. There were no differences in testicular volume (cm(3)) between the two groups (fertile right testis = 10.77 ± 1.66; fertile left testis = 12.17 ± 2.22); (infertile right testis = 10.25 ± 3.33; infertile left testis = 11.37 ± 3.30), although the infertile dogs all had subjectively softer testes compared with the fertile dogs. Infertile dogs were either azoospermic or when they ejaculated, they had lower sperm concentration, sperm motility, and percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa than fertile dogs. Furthermore, infertile dogs had reduced sperm membrane integrity measured via the hypoosmotic swelling test. Infertile dogs had significantly lower basal serum testosterone concentrations (1.40 ± 0.62 ng/mL) than fertile dogs (1.81 ± 0.87 ng/mL; P < 0.05). There were subjective differences in testicular echogenicity in some of the infertile dogs, and important differences in testicular artery blood flow with lower peak systolic and end-diastolic velocities measured in the distal supratesticular artery, marginal testicular artery, and intratesticular artery of infertile dogs (P < 0.05). Notably, resistance index and pulsatility index did not differ between infertile and fertile dogs. These findings report important differences between infertile and fertile dogs which may be detected within an expanded breeding soundness examination. PMID:26116053

  14. Looking at Infertility Treatment through The Lens of The Meaning of Life: The Effect of Group Logotherapy on Psychological Distress in Infertile Women

    PubMed Central

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Khodabakshi Koolee, Anahita

    2013-01-01

    Background: Women in particular suffer from psychological stress when diagnosed with infertility. Psychosocial interventions are known to not only prevent and lessen various mental problems, but also to play a positive role in physical health and pregnancy rates. The aim of this study is to determine the unique impact of spiritual psychotherapy on concerns about infertility and their perceived psychological stresses. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial. The study population included nearly 800 infertile couples who attended the Maternity and Gynecology Clinic of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom, Iran. We enrolled65 people who were randomly divided into two groups, experimental (n=33)and control (n=32). The experimental group received spiritual group psychotherapy counseling for 12 sessions, 2 hours per week for a 3 months period. The control group did not receive any intervention, but due to ethical considerations, we gave a presentation (one session) about infertility treatment for this group after the research process was completed. We used two questionnaires to obtain data, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Data analysis was done by descriptive and analytic statistics using SPSS 16 software. Results: Psychological intervention in the treatment group significantly decreased the PSWQ (p=0.004). There were significant differences in the mean score of the PSWQ in both groups as determined by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA; p=0.009). Psychological intervention in the treatment group decreased the level of perceived stress, when compared with the control group. According to ANCOVA there were significant differences between the mean PSS scores of both groups (p=0.01). Conclusion: Logotherapy is related to stress reduction and can decrease psychiatric symptoms of worry and perceived stress. This approach tends to improve an infertile person's ability to deal with their problem of finding the meaning of life. Thus it can be concluded that logotherapy along with other treatment methods, is a useful approach for infertile couples (Registration Number:IRCT201108247407N2). PMID:24520444

  15. Simultaneous Serous Cyst Adenoma and Ovarian Pregnancy in An Infertile Woman

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mahbod; Akbari Asbagh, Firoozeh

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian pregnancy is a rare form of extra uterine pregnancy. Serous cyst adenoma is a benign variant of epithelial cell tumors of ovary. The coexistence of a cyst adenoma with an ovarian pregnancy in the same ovary is extremely rare. Some studies suggested that infertility or ovulation-inducing drugs can be involved in increased risk of ovarian tumors and ovarian pregnancies. A 28-year-old infertile woman presented with a ruptured ovarian pregnancy following ovulation induction with metformin. She had a concurrent benign serous cyst adenoma in the same ovary. Resection of both ovarian pregnancy and tumoral mass were performed. The ovary was preserved. Removal of gestational tissue and preservation of the involved ovary are the best options for management of ovarian pregnancy in young patient. Although there is an association between infertility/ovulation inducting medications and ovarian gestation, their connections with serous cyst adenoma are undetermined. PMID:24696771

  16. Specific antibodies to porcine zona pellucida detected by quantitative radioimmunoassay in both fertile and infertile women

    SciTech Connect

    Kurachi, H.; Wakimoto, H.; Sakumoto, T.; Aono, T.; Kurachi, K.

    1984-02-01

    The specific radioimmunoassay system was developed for the titration of the antibodies to porcine zona pellucida (ZP) in human sera by using /sup 125/I-labeled purified porcine ZP as antigen, which is known to have cross-reactivity with human ZP. The antibodies in human sera were detected in 3 of 11 (27%) women with unexplained infertility, in 16 of 48 (33%) amenorrheic patients, in 4 of 12 (33%) fertile women, and in 3 of 10 (30%) men. Moreover, antibody titers in infertile women were no higher than those in fertile women and in men. These results seem to suggest that the antibodies in human sera that cross-react with porcine ZP may not be an important factor in causing infertility in women.

  17. Varicocele as a source of male infertility – current treatment techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dobroński, Piotr Artur; Radziszewski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    To establish the extent of varicocele as the cause of infertility in men and compare the various techniques of treatment. We searched PubMed and the Cochrane Library database using varicocele, male infertility, varicocelectomy as keywords. Varicocele seems to be a growing problem considered to be one of the most common causes of male infertility in recent times. Nevertheless, its role remains unclear. The best treatment option seems to be microscopic surgery – the most effective and linked to rare surgical complications. But the greatest clinical problem remains the selection of patients to treat – recently it is believed that varicocelectomy is a possibly advisable option in patients with clinical varicocele and seminal parameter impairment [1]. More high-quality, multicenter, long-term randomized controlled trials (RCT's) are required to verify the findings. PMID:26568883

  18. An Analysis of the Concept of Partnership in the Couples Undergoing Infertility Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ying, Liying; Loke, Alice Yuen

    2016-04-01

    The elements of a partnership in the couples undergoing infertility treatment are not well understood. This article aims to fill the gap by using Rodger's evolutionary method of concept analysis. The attributes of the concept partnership that were identified are a process of joint hardship, sharing, intracouple communication, and mutual support. The antecedents are love and attraction for each other, agreement, and interpersonal skills. The consequences are marital benefit, improvement in psychological status, and quality of life. A middle-range model for partnership in relationship to infertile couples is proposed. The understanding of the phenomenon of partnership will enable the researchers to develop interventions, identify the appropriate assessment instruments, and to determine directions for future research on effort to support infertile couples through their hardship. PMID:25774425

  19. How Husbands Cope When Pregnancy Fails: A Longitudinal Study of Infertility and Psychosocial Generativity. Working Paper No. 167.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snarey, John; And Others

    The experience of marital infertility is a major biosocial life crisis that also represents a serious threat to the development of psychosocial generativity. Psychological studies of the consequences of involuntary infertility, however, are rare. A study was undertaken to identify variations in the coping patterns used by men who have experienced…

  20. Women's Perceptions of Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Failed Infertility Treatment on Marital and Sexual Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepe, Margaret V.; Byrne, T. Jean

    1991-01-01

    Examined immediate and long-term effects of infertility treatment on the marital and sexual relationship, as perceived by women (n=40) who failed to become pregnant during treatment. Results indicated infertility treatment significantly affected both marital and sexual satisfaction after treatment was terminated, as well as during treatment. (ABL)

  1. Infertility and Subjective Well-Being: The Mediating Roles of Self-Esteem, Internal Control, and Interpersonal Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined relationship between self-esteem, perceived control, interpersonal conflict between spouses, global and intimacy life quality, and stress produced by infertility in 185 married infertile couples. Found that fertility problem stress had indirect negative effects on life quality via its mediating effects on self-esteem, internal control,…

  2. The Walking Egg Project: Universal access to infertility care – from dream to reality

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, W.

    2013-01-01

    Childlessness and infertility care are neglected aspects of family planning in resource-poor countries, although the consequences of involuntary childlessness are much more dramatic and can create more wide ranging societal problems compared to Western societies, particularly for women. Because many families in developing countries completely depend on children for economic survival, childlessness has to be regarded as a social and public health issue and not only as an individual medical problem. In the Walking Egg Project we strive to raise awareness surrounding childlessness in resource-poor countries and to make infertility care in all its aspects, including assisted reproductive technologies, available and accessible for a much larger part of the world population. We hope to achieve this goal through innovation and research, advocacy and networking, training and capacity building and service delivery. The Walking Egg non-profit organization has chosen a holistic approach of reproductive health and therefore strengthening infertility care should go together with strengthening other aspects of family planning and mother care. Right from the start The Walking Project has approached the problem of infertility in a multidisciplinary and global manner. It gathers medical, social, ethical, epidemiological, juridical and economical scientists and experts along with artists and philosophers to discuss and work together towards its goal. We recently developed a simplified tWE lab IVF culture system with excellent results. According to our first cost calculation, the price of a single IVF cycle using the methodologies and protocols we described, seems to be less than 200 Euros. We realize that universal access to infertility care can only be achieved when good quality but affordable infertility care is linked to effective family planning and safe motherhood programmes. Only a global project with respect to sociocultural, ethical, economical and political differences can be successful. PMID:24753941

  3. The Walking Egg Project: Universal access to infertility care - from dream to reality.

    PubMed

    Ombelet, W

    2013-01-01

    Childlessness and infertility care are neglected aspects of family planning in resource-poor countries, although the consequences of involuntary childlessness are much more dramatic and can create more wide ranging societal problems compared to Western societies, particularly for women. Because many families in developing countries completely depend on children for economic survival, childlessness has to be regarded as a social and public health issue and not only as an individual medical problem. In the Walking Egg Project we strive to raise awareness surrounding childlessness in resource-poor countries and to make infertility care in all its aspects, including assisted reproductive technologies, available and accessible for a much larger part of the world population. We hope to achieve this goal through innovation and research, advocacy and networking, training and capacity building and service delivery. The Walking Egg non-profit organization has chosen a holistic approach of reproductive health and therefore strengthening infertility care should go together with strengthening other aspects of family planning and mother care. Right from the start The Walking Project has approached the problem of infertility in a multidisciplinary and global manner. It gathers medical, social, ethical, epidemiological, juridical and economical scientists and experts along with artists and philosophers to discuss and work together towards its goal. We recently developed a simplified tWE lab IVF culture system with excellent results. According to our first cost calculation, the price of a single IVF cycle using the methodologies and protocols we described, seems to be less than 200 Euros. We realize that universal access to infertility care can only be achieved when good quality but affordable infertility care is linked to effective family planning and safe motherhood programmes. Only a global project with respect to sociocultural, ethical, economical and political differences can be successful. PMID:24753941

  4. Epigenetic regulation of the RHOX homeobox gene cluster and its association with human male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Marcy E.; Bleiziffer, Andreas; Tttelmann, Frank; Gromoll, Jrg; Wilkinson, Miles F.

    2014-01-01

    The X-linked RHOX cluster encodes a set of homeobox genes that are selectively expressed in the reproductive tract. Members of the RHOX cluster regulate target genes important for spermatogenesis promote male fertility in mice. Studies show that demethylating agents strongly upregulate the expression of mouse Rhox genes, suggesting that they are regulated by DNA methylation. However, whether this extends to human RHOX genes, whether DNA methylation directly regulates RHOX gene transcription and how this relates to human male infertility are unknown. To address these issues, we first defined the promoter regions of human RHOX genes and performed gain- and loss-of-function experiments to determine whether human RHOX gene transcription is regulated by DNA methylation. Our results indicated that DNA methylation is necessary and sufficient to silence human RHOX gene expression. To determine whether RHOX cluster methylation associates with male infertility, we evaluated the methylation status of RHOX genes in sperm from a large cohort of infertility patients. Linear regression analysis revealed a strong association between RHOX gene cluster hypermethylation and three independent types of semen abnormalities. Hypermethylation was restricted specifically to the RHOX cluster; we did not observe it in genes immediately adjacent to it on the X chromosome. Our results strongly suggest that human RHOX homeobox genes are under an epigenetic control mechanism that is aberrantly regulated in infertility patients. We propose that hypermethylation of the RHOX gene cluster serves as a marker for idiopathic infertility and that it is a candidate to exert a causal role in male infertility. PMID:23943794

  5. CYP19 gene variant confers susceptibility to endometriosis-associated infertility in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ledan; Lu, Xiaosheng; Wang, Danhan; Qu, Wanglei; Li, Wenju; Xu, Xiaowen; Huang, Qiusui; Han, Xueying; Lv, Jieqiang

    2014-01-01

    An aromatase encoded by the CYP19 gene catalyzes the final step in the biosynthesis of estrogens, which is related to endometriosis development. To assess the association of CYP19 gene polymorphisms with the risks of endometriosis, chocolate cysts and endometriosis-related infertility, a case-control study was conducted in Chinese Han women by recruiting 225 healthy control females, 146 patients with endometriosis, 94 endometriosis women with chocolate cyst and 65 women with infertility resulting from endometriosis, as diagnosed by both pathological and laparoscopic findings. Individual genotypes at rs2236722:T>C, rs700518:A>G, rs10046:T>C and [TTTA]n polymorphisms were identified. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were compared between the control group and case groups by chi-square analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were determined by logistic regression analysis to predict the association of CYP19 gene polymorphisms with the risk of endometriosis, the related chocolate cysts and infertility. The genotype distributions of the tested CYP19 gene polymorphisms were not significantly different between the healthy control group and the endometriosis/endometriosis with the chocolate cyst group. However, the CYP19 rs700518AA genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of endometriosis-related infertility (55.4% in the infertility group vs 25.3% in the control group, P<0.001; OR (95% CI): 3.66 (2.06-6.50)) under the recessive form of the A allele. Therefore, we concluded that in Chinese Han females CYP19 gene polymorphisms are not associated with susceptibility to endometriosis or chocolate cysts, whereas CYP19 rs700518AA genotype confers genetic susceptibility to endometriosis-related infertility. PMID:24968701

  6. Differences in the Endocannabinoid System of Sperm from Fertile and Infertile Men

    PubMed Central

    Di Tommaso, Monia; Pucci, Mariangela; Battista, Natalia; Paro, Rita; Simon, Luke; Lutton, Deborah; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Male infertility is a major cause of problems for many couples in conceiving a child. Recently, lifestyle pastimes such as alcohol, tobacco and marijuana have been shown to have further negative effects on male reproduction. The endocannabinoid system (ECS), mainly through the action of anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) at cannabinoid (CB1, CB2) and vanilloid (TRPV1) receptors, plays a crucial role in controlling functionality of sperm, with a clear impact on male reproductive potential. Here, sperm from fertile and infertile men were used to investigate content (through LC-ESI-MS), mRNA (through quantitative RT-PCR), protein (through Western Blotting and ELISA) expression, and functionality (through activity and binding assays) of the main metabolic enzymes of AEA and 2-AG (NAPE-PLD and FAAH, for AEA; DAGL and MAGL for 2-AG), as well as of their binding receptors CB1, CB2 and TRPV1. Our findings show a marked reduction of AEA and 2-AG content in infertile seminal plasma, paralleled by increased degradation: biosynthesis ratios of both substances in sperm from infertile versus fertile men. In addition, TRPV1 binding was detected in fertile sperm but was undetectable in infertile sperm, whereas that of CB1 and CB2 receptors was not statistically different in the two groups. In conclusion, this study identified unprecedented alterations of the ECS in infertile sperm, that might impact on capacitation and acrosome reaction, and hence fertilization outcomes. These alterations might also point to new biomarkers to determine male reproductive defects, and identify distinct ECS elements as novel targets for therapeutic exploitation of ECS-oriented drugs to treat male fertility problems. PMID:23082196

  7. Identification of human candidate genes for male infertility by digital differential display.

    PubMed

    Olesen, C; Hansen, C; Bendsen, E; Byskov, A G; Schwinger, E; Lopez-Pajares, I; Jensen, P K; Kristoffersson, U; Schubert, R; Van Assche, E; Wahlstroem, J; Lespinasse, J; Tommerup, N

    2001-01-01

    Evidence for the importance of genetic factors in male fertility is accumulating. In the literature and the Mendelian Cytogenetics Network database, 265 cases of infertile males with balanced reciprocal translocations have been described. The candidacy for infertility of 14 testis-expressed transcripts (TETs) were examined by comparing their chromosomal mapping position to the position of balanced reciprocal translocation breakpoints found in the 265 infertile males. The 14 TETs were selected by using digital differential display (electronic subtraction) to search for apparently testis-specific transcripts in the TIGR database. The testis specificity of the 14 TETs was further examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on adult and fetal tissues showing that four TETs (TET1 to TET4) were testis-expressed only, six TETs (TET5 to TET10) appeared to be differentially expressed and the remaining four TETs (TET11 to TET14) were ubiquitously expressed. Interestingly, the two tesis expressed-only transcripts, TET1 and TET2, mapped to chromosomal regions where seven and six translocation breakpoints have been reported in infertile males respectively. Furthermore, one ubiquitously, but predominantly testis-expressed, transcript, TET11, mapped to 1p32-33, where 13 translocation breakpoints have been found in infertile males. Interestingly, the mouse mutation, skeletal fusions with sterility, sks, maps to the syntenic region in the mouse genome. Another transcript, TET7, was the human homologue of rat Tpx-1, which functions in the specific interaction of spermatogenic cells with Sertoli cells. TPX-1 maps to 6p21 where three cases of chromosomal breakpoints in infertile males have been reported. Finally, TET8 was a novel transcript which in the fetal stage is testis-specific, but in the adult is expressed in multiple tissues, including testis. We named this novel transcript fetal and adult testis-expressed transcript (FATE). PMID:11134355

  8. Sexual Satisfaction and Sexual Reactivity in Infertile Women: The Contribution of The Dyadic Functioning and Clinical Variables

    PubMed Central

    Czyżkowska, Anna; Awruk, Katarzyna; Janowski, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Background Infertility is a factor which has been linked to higher prevalence of sexual dysfunctions in women; however, ambiguous results have been reported about the impact of infertility on women’s sexual satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to compare sexual and dyadic functioning in infertile and fertile women. Furthermore, the associations between sexual variables and clinical variables (depressive symptoms, period trying to conceive, and treatment period) were assessed in infertile women sample. Materials and Methods The cross-sectional study involved 50 women with the history of infertility and 50 fertile women recruited from the general population. The Sexual Satisfaction Scale (SSS), Mell-Krat Scale (women’s version), Family Assessment Measure (FAM-III), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered to all participants. Results Infertile women reported lower sexual satisfaction and more maladaptive patterns of dyadic functioning in comparison to the control group. As many as 45 (90%) of infertile women, compared to 13 (26%) of the control group, reported the scores on the Mell-Krat Scale indicative of the presence of dysfunctions in sexual reactivity (P≤0.001). Infertile women reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms than the women from the control group (P≤0.001). Negative correlations were observed between sexual satisfaction and dyadic functioning in both groups (P≤0.05); however, the patterns of these associations were different in infertile and fertile women. For example, negative correlations were found between satisfaction with control and task accomplishment, role performance, affective involvement, and values and norms in infertile women. However, these relationships were not observed in the control group. No correlations were revealed between sexual reactivity and dyadic functioning in infertile women and the control group. Negative correlations were observed between satisfaction with control and relationship duration and treatment period as well as between sexual reactivity and period of trying to conceive. Multiple regression analyses also revealed different predictors of sexual satisfaction in both groups: affective involvement (P≤0.05) and relationship duration (P≤0.05) in infertile women, whereas communication (P≤0.05), affective expression (P≤0.05) and depressive symptoms (P≤0.05) in the control group. Conclusion Infertility is an important factor affecting sexual and dyadic functioning and is linked to higher depressive symptoms in infertile women. PMID:26985333

  9. Prevalence and factors associated with use of herbal medicine among women attending an infertility clinic in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Infertility is a public health problem associated with devastating psychosocial consequences. In countries where infertility care is difficult to access, women turn to herbal medicines to achieve parenthood. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with herbal medicine use by women attending the infertility clinic. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 260 women attending the infertility clinic at Mulago hospital. The interviewer administered questionnaire comprised socio-demographic characteristics, infertility-related aspects and information on herbal medicine use. The main outcome measure was herbal medicines use for infertility treatment. Determinants of herbal medicine use were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Results The majority (76.2%) of respondents had used herbal medicines for infertility treatment. The mean age of the participants was 28.3 years ± 5.5. Over 80% were married, 59.6% had secondary infertility and 2/3 of the married participants were in monogamous unions. In a multivariable model, the variables that were independently associated with increased use of herbal medicine among infertile patients were being married (OR 2.55, CI 1.24-5.24), never conceived (OR 4.08 CI 1.86-8.96) and infertility for less than 3 years (OR 3.52 CI 1.51-8.821). Factors that were associated with less use of herbal medicine among infertile women were being aged 30 years or less (OR 0.18 CI 0.07-0.46), primary and no education (OR 0.12 CI 0.05-0.46) and living with partner for less than three years (OR 0.39 CI 0.16-0.93). Conclusions The prevalence of herbal medicine use among women attending the infertility clinic was 76.2%. Herbal medicine use was associated with the participants’ age, level of education, marital status, infertility duration, nulliparity, and duration of marriage. Medical care was often delayed and the majority of the participants did not disclose use of herbal medicines to the attending physician. Health professionals should enquire about use of herbal medicines. This may help in educating the patients about the health risks of using herbal medicine and may reduce delays in seeking appropriate care. Collaboration of health professionals with herbal medicine practitioners would help identify the common herbal medicines used for infertility treatment, their potential benefits and harm. PMID:24433549

  10. Birth characteristics in a clinical sample of women seeking infertility treatment: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Vikström, Josefin; Hammar, Mats; Josefsson, Ann; Bladh, Marie; Sydsjö, Gunilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the distribution of low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, small for gestational age (SGA) and large for gestational age (LGA) by main cause of infertility (female, combined, male, unexplained) in women seeking infertility treatment. Design A case–control study. Setting A Centre for Reproductive Medicine in Sweden. Participants All women (n=1293) born in Sweden in 1973 or later and who were part of heterosexual couples seeking infertility treatment at a Centre of Reproductive Medicine from 2005 to 2010 were asked to participate. Those who had not begun the diagnostic process and who declined participation in the study were excluded. In total, 1206 women (94.5%) participated in the study. Main outcome measures Main cause of infertility (female, combined, male, unexplained) collected from the patients’ medical charts. LBW (<2500 g), preterm birth (<37 weeks), SGA (<−2SD of the mean weight for the gestational length) and LGA (>+2SD of the mean weight for the gestational length), collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Results The risk of being born with LBW was increased about 2.4 times (OR=2.40, CI 1.13 to 5.07, p=0.02) in women seeking treatment for infertility due to female causes rather than for male or unexplained causes. Women with a female infertility factor were 2.7 times more likely to be born SGA (OR=2.73, CI 1.02 to 7.34, p=0.047) compared with those in whom the cause of infertility was unexplained. Conclusions Women born with LBW or SGA seem to suffer an increased risk of infertility due to a female factor. Thus, infants born with birth characteristics that deviate from the norm may be at greater risk of difficulties in childbearing later on in life. Since this study is the first of its kind, more studies are needed to verify the associations found in this study and to determine their nature. PMID:24613821

  11. High deoxyribonucleic acid content of spermatozoa from infertile, oligospermic human males.

    PubMed

    Frajese, G; Silvestroni, L; Malandrino, F; Isidori, A

    1976-01-01

    A study has been carried out, by means of an indole microchemical technique, of the DNA content of spermatozoa from a group of 13 normal subjects and 13 patients affected by infertility, characterized by oligospermia with a clinical, hormonal, and testicular picture peculiar to "idiopathic spermatidic arrest." The DNA content of spermatozoa from the infertile, oligospermic patients was nearly double that of normal subjects. This finding can be explained tentatively on the basis of genetic and/or cytologic events occurring during meiosis. PMID:1245240

  12. [Developmental and environnemental origin of male infertility: role of endocrine disruptors].

    PubMed

    Mauduit, Claire; Siddeek, Bénazir; Benahmed, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Human and wildlife exposure to chemicals is thought to be extensive and particularly to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) suspected to alter male reproductive tract. When the exposure occurs during perinatal period (fetal, neonatal periods or puberty) the reproductive health alterations are irreversible suggesting a developmental origin to male infertility. This concept is supported by numerous epidemiologic and experimental studies. This review summarizes the data concerning the epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation, chromatin remodelling, small-non coding RNAs) involved in developmentally-induced male infertility. These data open potentially to new diagnosis tools and new trails to assessment of EDCs risks. PMID:26850606

  13. Hysteroscopic metroplasty in women with primary infertility and septate uterus: reproductive performance after surgery.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Dalal RJ; Pai HD; Palshetkar NP; Takhtani M; Pai RD; Saxena N

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess reproductive performance in women with septate uterus and otherwise unexplained infertility after hysteroscopic metroplasty.STUDY DESIGN: A total of 72 women with septate uterus and otherwise unexplained primary infertility were included in the study. All of the women underwent hysteroscopic septal resection. Reproductive performance of these women within one year of surgery was studied and analyzed.RESULTS: Thirty-three women (45.83%) conceived within one year of surgery. Only 4 women (12%) had spontaneous abortions, and only 5 (15%) had preterm delivery.CONCLUSION: Hysteroscopic metroplasty in women with septate uterus significantly improves reproductive outcomes.

  14. Empirical Drug Therapy for Idiopathic Male Infertility: What is the New Evidence?

    PubMed

    Garg, Harshit; Kumar, Rajeev

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic male infertility is empirically managed using a number of drugs. We reviewed 64 articles published in the last 10 years on such drug therapy. There was severe heterogeneity in data along with poor definition of outcome parameters. Pregnancy or live birth rate was not reported in many studies. Antiestrogens appear to improve pregnancy rates while there is some data supporting the use of aromatase inhibitors. Antioxidants significantly increase the rate of both live birth and pregnancy but the data are limited. However, valid end-points based on data are limited for the empirical use of drugs in idiopathic male infertility. PMID:26255035

  15. Herlyn–Werner–Wunderlich syndrome presenting with infertility: Role of MRI in diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zohra; Goyal, Ankur; Das, Chandan J; Deka, Dipika; Sharma, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome (HWWS), characterized by uterus didelphys, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis, is an uncommon combined Mullerian and mesonephric duct anomaly, and its presentation in adulthood is even rarer. We report here a 22-year-old female presenting with primary infertility where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested the diagnosis of HWWS with endometriosis. In a patient of infertility with endometriosis and unilateral renal agenesis, diagnosis of HWWS should be suspected and MRI is the investigation of choice for such anomalies. PMID:24347855

  16. Super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst with actinomyces in an infertile woman.

    PubMed

    Salehpour, Saghar; Akbari Sene, Azadeh

    2013-07-01

    We present super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst with actinomyces in an infertile patient. This is a case-report study for evaluation a couple with male factor infertility, who was a good candidate for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), while a 10 cm dermoid cyst was found in the woman's right ovary. Patient complained of pelvic pain, intermittent fever, dysmenorrhea, and dyspareunia. The cyst was extracted using laparoscopy, whilst in histopathological examination, an actinomycosis super infection was reported. Actinomyc super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst is a very rare incident which can also occur in women with no history of intrauterine device (IUD) usage or previous fertility. PMID:24520476

  17. Super Infection of An Ovarian Dermoid Cyst with Actinomyces in An Infertile Woman

    PubMed Central

    Salehpour, Saghar; Akbari Sene, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    We present super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst with actinomyces in an infertile patient. This is a case-report study for evaluation a couple with male factor infertility, who was a good candidate for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), while a 10 cm dermoid cyst was found in the woman’s right ovary. Patient complained of pelvic pain, intermittent fever, dysmenorrhea, and dyspareunia. The cyst was extracted using laparoscopy, whilst in histopathological examination, an actinomycosis super infection was reported. Actinomyc super infection of an ovarian dermoid cyst is a very rare incident which can also occur in women with no history of intrauterine device (IUD) usage or previous fertility. PMID:24520476

  18. Harbin consensus conference and quality of infertility trials: reflections of a scientist on the Italian experience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    During the days August 22–24, 2013 has been held in Harbin (China) an International Consensus Conference aimed to improve the quality and the reporting of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in infertility and subfertility field. I, as Italian scientist with experience in clinical infertility trials, was invited to have a speech on the Italian experience in RCTs, with particular regard for the surgical trials. Considerations on this subject were particularly interesting to highlight pitfalls and triumphs of research in Italy. PMID:24257071

  19. The problem of infertility in high fertility populations: Meanings, consequences and coping mechanisms in two Nigerian communities

    PubMed Central

    Hollos, Marida; Larsen, Ulla; Obono, Oka; Whitehouse, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how socio-economic contexts shape local meanings of infertility, how the prevalence of infertility affects these meanings, and how the above affect community responses, life experiences and infertility treatment-seeking behaviors in two African communities. The paper is based on interdisciplinary research conducted among the Ijo and the Yakurr people of southern Nigeria that included a survey of approximately 100 infertile women and a matching sample of 100 fertile women, as well as in-depth ethnographic interviews with infertile and fertile women in two communities: Amakiri in Delta State and Lopon in Cross River State. In-depth interview results show that female infertility is more problematic among the Ijo in Amakiri, where kinship is patrilineal (traced through the father's side), than among the Yakurr in Lopon, where kinship is double unilineal (traced through both parents). Childless women in Ijo society are not only disadvantaged economically but are prevented from attaining full adult womanhood. They therefore leave the community more often than other members. In Lopon there is also a strong preoccupation with fertility as a central fact of life, but infertile women receive support from maternal kin as well as voluntary associations serving as support groups. Our survey data confirm that there are significant differences between the life experiences of infertile and fertile women and between the infertile women of the two communities. The overall findings indicate that while there are variations in the extent to which infertility is considered problematic, the necessity for a woman to have a child remains basic in this region. Motherhood continues to define an individual woman's treatment in the community, her self-respect and her understanding of womanhood. PMID:19356835

  20. Piwi-pathway alteration induces LINE-1 transposon derepression and infertility development in cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Hadziselimovic, Faruk; Hadziselimovic, Nils O; Demougin, Philippe; Krey, Gunthild; Oakeley, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogonia contain processing bodies that harbor P-element-induced wimpy testis (Piwi) proteins. Piwi proteins are associated specifically with Piwi-interacting RNAs to silence transposable DNA elements. Loss-of-function mutations in the Piwi pathway lead to derepression of transposable elements, resulting in defective spermatogenesis. Furthermore, deletion of gametocyte-specific factor 1 (GTSF1), a factor involved in Piwi-mediated transcriptional repression, causes male-specific sterility and derepression of LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. No previous studies have examined GTSF1, L1 and PIWIL4 expression in cryptorchidism. We examined transposon-silencing genes and L1 transposon expression in testicular biopsies with Affymetrix microarrays and immunohistology. Seven members of the Tudor gene family, 3 members of the DEAD-box RNA helicase family, and the GTSF1 gene were found to show significantly lower RNA signals in the high-infertility-risk group. In the immunohistochemical analysis, patients from the low-infertility-risk group showed coherently stronger staining for GTSF1 and PIWIL4 proteins and weaker staining for L1 transposon when compared to the high-infertility-risk samples. These new findings provide first evidence consistent with the idea that infertility in cryptorchidism is a consequence of alterations in the Piwi pathway and transposon derepression induced by the impaired function of mini-puberty. PMID:25791297

  1. The Efficiency of a Group-Specific Mandated Benefit Revisited: The Effect of Infertility Mandates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahey, Joanna N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the labor market effects of state health insurance mandates that increase the cost of employing a demographically identifiable group. State mandates requiring that health insurance plans cover infertility treatment raise the relative cost of insuring older women of child-bearing age. Empirically, wages in this group are

  2. Association between methionine synthase reductase A66G polymorphism and primary infertility in Chinese males.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; Ye, J Z; Ding, X P; Zhang, X H; Ma, T J; Zhong, R; Ren, H Y

    2015-01-01

    We examined the association between the methionine synthase reductase (MTRR A66G), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C), and methionine synthase (MS A2756G) genotypes and non-obstructive male infertility in a Chinese population. This case-control study included 162 infertile Chinese patients with azoospermia (N = 100) or oligoasthenozoospermia (N = 62) and 120 fertile men as controls. The polymorphisms MTRR A66G, MTHFR C677T, A1298C, and MS A2756G were identified by direct DNA sequencing and the results were statistically analyzed. We found no association between the incidence of any of these variants in azoospermia patients and control populations. The frequency of the MTRR66 polymorphic genotypes (AG, AG+GG) was significantly higher in the oligoasthenozoospermia group compared to the controls (P = 0.013, 0.012). Our findings revealed an association between the single-nucleotide polymorphism A66G in the MTRR gene and male infertility, particularly in oligoasthenozoospermia males, suggesting that this polymorphism is a genetic risk factor for male infertility in Chinese men. PMID:25966116

  3. Preovulatory uterine flushing with saline as a treatment for unexplained infertility: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Dodin, Sylvie; Moore, Lynne; Bujold, Emmanuel; Lefebvre, Jessica; Bergeron, Marie-Ève

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In vitro fertilisation (IVF) is the treatment of choice for unexplained infertility. Preovulatory uterine flushing could reduce intrauterine debris and inflammatory factors preventing pregnancy and constitute an alternative to IVF. Our objective is to assess the efficacy of preovulatory uterine flushing with physiological saline for the treatment of unexplained infertility. Methods and analysis We will perform a randomised controlled trial based on consecutive women aged between 18 and 37 years consulting for unexplained infertility for at least 1 year. On the day of their luteinising hormone surge, 192 participants will be randomised in two equal groups to either receive 20 mL of physiological saline by an intrauterine catheter or 10 mL of saline intravaginally. We will assess relative risk of live birth (primary outcome), as well as pregnancy (secondary outcome) over one cycle of treatment. We will report the side effects, complications and acceptability of the intervention. Ethics and dissemination This project was approved by the Ethics committee of the Centre Hospitatlier Universitaire de Quebec (no 2015–1146). Uterine flushing is usually well tolerated by women and would constitute a simple, affordable and minimally invasive treatment for unexplained infertility. We plan to communicate the results of the review by presenting research abstracts at conferences and by publishing the results in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial registration number NCT02539290; Pre-results. PMID:26739737

  4. Epidemic seasonal infertility — a hypothesis for the cause of seasonal variation of births

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, T.; Shimura, M.

    1980-03-01

    A hypothesis is proposed to explain the seasonality of births and its variations, that some unrecognized epidemic infertile factors have existed seasonally. In that case, certain women born in a particular low birth rate season must be those who survived these infertile factors in very early stage of their fetal lives. Then in later years, when they become pregnant, they may possibly be immune or different in their susceptibility to these infertile factors. Therefore, mothers born in a particular low birth rate season would tend to bear babies more frequently in that season than the others. To examine this hypothesis, birth records in 1930 of two maternity hospitals in Tokyo were investigated. These years were chosen for a period when seasonality of birth was most prominent in Japan. First babies were excluded to eliminate disturbances by season of marriages and other possible non-biological factors. The results show that among 1038 mothers born in a low birthrate season, May July, 245 (23.6%) had babies in May July, while the other mothers had significantly less babies (19.0%, 819/4302, P<0.001) in the same season. This may imply that seasonality of birth may have been influenced by some immunogenic infertile factors epidemic in a particular season.

  5. Comparing the effectiveness of infertility treatments by numbers needed to treat (NNT).

    PubMed

    Comhaire, F; Decleer, W

    2012-12-01

    To compare the clinical efficiency of different modes of treatment of infertile couples and to estimate the possible benefit of nutraceutical food supplementation (NFS), the numbers needed to treat (NNT) was calculated in 4143 infertile couples based on controlled trials in recent literature and personal data. The NNT expresses the number of individuals who need to be treated to obtain one complementary pregnancy. In female infertility, the NNT of mild or moderate endometriosis was 8.4, and in anti-estrogens treatment of anovulation, it was 5.9. In tamoxifen treatment of idiopathic oligozoospermia, NNT was 3.9, and in antioxidant supplementation, it was 7.8. Treatment of varicocele yielded NNT of 6.3 and 6.8 after 1year in multi- or single-centre trials, respectively, and NFS lowered the NNT after 3months to 2.6. Adding NFS to the male partner increased the ongoing pregnancy rate by IVF with NNT of 8.3, and adding NFS to both partners reduced the NNT to 4.0. Although these results were obtained in heterogeneous trials and populations, it is suggested that the NNT should be useful for comparing the effectiveness of different modes of treatment of the infertile couple, and that complementary nutraceutical food supplementation may be beneficial. PMID:22536793

  6. Diagnostic diversity: the role of social class in diagnostic experiences of infertility.

    PubMed

    Bell, Ann V

    2014-05-01

    Research in the area of the sociology of diagnosis has recently expanded. Despite this development, the foundations of the social aspects of diagnoses, including race, class and gender, are relatively unexplored. Understanding such diversity is important, however, as researchers have shown that diagnoses have significant repercussions on the illness experience. This article is an effort to overcome this gap in the literature by examining class diversity in interpretations and understandings of diagnoses. Using the medicalised condition of infertility as a case example of class differences around diagnoses, I conducted 58 in-depth interviews with infertile women of various class backgrounds in the USA. By comparing the lived experiences of infertility between higher and lower class women, I explore differences in the understanding, interpretation and outcomes of diagnoses, specifically. Furthermore, among lower class women, I examine how they understand infertility outside the medical diagnostic framework. The findings reveal how interpretations and experiences of diagnoses vary depending on an individual's social location. In other words, the study demonstrates that class matters in terms of diagnoses and their understanding. PMID:24147827

  7. Treatment of infertility due to retrograde ejaculation: a simple, cost-effective method.

    PubMed

    Shangold, G A; Cantor, B; Schreiber, J R

    1990-07-01

    Our data indicate that an appropriate therapy for the infertility associated with retrograde ejaculation is isolation of sperm from voided urine after orgasm, plus IUI. This technique is simple and can be performed in the physician's office, in contrast to more complex techniques such as GIFT or in vitro fertilization. PMID:2358086

  8. Lessons learned from the implementation of an online infertility community into an IVF clinic's daily practice.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Johanna W M; Faber, Marjan J; Cohlen, Ben J; Van Oers, Anne; Nelen, WillianNe L D M; Kremer, Jan A M

    2015-12-01

    The Internet is expected to innovate healthcare, in particular patient-centredness of care. Within fertility care, information provision, communication with healthcare providers and support from peers are important components of patient-centred care. An online infertility community added to an in vitro fertilisation or IVF clinic's practice provides tools to healthcare providers to meet these. This study's online infertility community facilitates peer-to-peer support, information provision to patients and patient provider communication within one clinic. Unfortunately, these interventions often fail to become part of clinical routines. The analysis of a first introduction into usual care can provide lessons for the implementation in everyday health practice. The aim was to explore experiences of professionals and patients with the implementation of an infertility community into a clinic's care practice. We performed semi-structured interviews with both professionals and patients to collect these experiences. These interviews were analyzed using the Normalisation Process Model. Assignment of a community manager, multidisciplinary division of tasks, clear instructions to staff in advance and periodical evaluations could contribute to the integration of this online community. Interviews with patients provided insights into the possible impact on daily care. This study provides lessons to healthcare providers on the implementation of an online infertility community into their practice. PMID:26167659

  9. TNF-? -308 polymorphisms and male infertility risk: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Taymour; Taymour, Mai

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies discussing TNF-? -308 polymorphism and male infertility. This study was conformed to Preferred Reported Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. PubMed, Embase and Scopus databases were searched to identify relevant studies by two independent reviewers. Hazard ratios were pooled using fixed-effect or random-effects models when appropriate. Q-test was performed to evaluate study heterogeneity and publication bias appraised using funnel plots. The search yielded five studies (three of Caucasians ethnicity and 2 of Asian ethnicity) comprising 2939 men (2262 infertile men and 677 fertile controls). Most of the studied cases were carried out on TNF-? promoter region at positions -308 G/A (four studies) where -308 C/T was dealt with in one study. Overall, significant associations between TNF-? -308 gene polymorphisms and idiopathic male infertility risk were observed (fixed effect: OR=0.472, 95% CI: 0.378-0.589; P=0.001; random effect: OR=0.407, 95% CI: 0.211-0.785; P=0.007) with robust findings according to sensitivity analyses. Funnel plot inspections did not give evidences of publication bias. A stratified analysis performed for ethnic groups revealed significant association in both Caucasian and Asian populations. It is concluded that there are evidences of associations between TNF-? -308 gene polymorphisms and male infertility risk. PMID:26966560

  10. Bisphenol-A and Female Infertility: A Possible Role of Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Xiaona; Chen, Dan; He, Yonghua; Zhu, Wenting; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol-A (BPA) is widely used and ubiquitous in the environment. Animal studies indicate that BPA affects reproduction, however, the gene-environment interaction mechanism(s) involved in this association remains unclear. We performed a literature review to summarize the evidence on this topic. Methods: A comprehensive search was conducted in PubMed using as keywords BPA, gene, infertility and female reproduction. Full-text articles in both human and animals published in English prior to December 2014 were selected. Results: Evidence shows that BPA can interfere with endocrine function of hypothalamic-pituitary axis, such as by changing gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) secretion in hypothalamus and promoting pituitary proliferation. Such actions affect puberty, ovulation and may even result in infertility. Ovary, uterus and other reproductive organs are also targets of BPA. BPA exposure impairs the structure and functions of female reproductive system in different times of life cycle and may contribute to infertility. Both epidemiological and experimental evidences demonstrate that BPA affects reproduction-related gene expression and epigenetic modification that are closely associated with infertility. The detrimental effects on reproduction may be lifelong and transgenerational. Conclusions: Evidence on gene-environment interactions, especially from human studies, is still limited. Further research on this topic is warranted. PMID:26371021

  11. USING DNA MICROARRAYS TO CHARACTERIZE GENE EXPRESSION IN TESTES OF FERTILE AND INFERTILE HUMANS AND MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    USING DNA MICROARRAYS TO CHARACTERIZE GENE EXPRESSION
    IN TESTES OF FERTILE AND INFERTILE HUMANS AND MICE

    John C. Rockett1, J. Christopher Luft1, J. Brian Garges1, M. Stacey Ricci2, Pasquale Patrizio2, Norman B. Hecht2 and David J. Dix1
    Reproductive Toxicology Divisio...

  12. Hippo signaling disruption and Akt stimulation of ovarian follicles for infertility treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Cheng, Yuan; Suzuki, Nao; Deguchi, Masashi; Sato, Yorino; Takae, Seido; Ho, Chi-hong; Kawamura, Nanami; Tamura, Midori; Hashimoto, Shu; Sugishita, Yodo; Morimoto, Yoshiharu; Hosoi, Yoshihiko; Yoshioka, Nobuhito; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Hsueh, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) and polycystic ovarian syndrome are ovarian diseases causing infertility. Although there is no effective treatment for POI, therapies for polycystic ovarian syndrome include ovarian wedge resection or laser drilling to induce follicle growth. Underlying mechanisms for these disruptive procedures are unclear. Here, we explored the role of the conserved Hippo signaling pathway that serves to maintain optimal size across organs and species. We found that fragmentation of murine ovaries promoted actin polymerization and disrupted ovarian Hippo signaling, leading to increased expression of downstream growth factors, promotion of follicle growth, and the generation of mature oocytes. In addition to elucidating mechanisms underlying follicle growth elicited by ovarian damage, we further demonstrated additive follicle growth when ovarian fragmentation was combined with Akt stimulator treatments. We then extended results to treatment of infertility in POI patients via disruption of Hippo signaling by fragmenting ovaries followed by Akt stimulator treatment and autografting. We successfully promoted follicle growth, retrieved mature oocytes, and performed in vitro fertilization. Following embryo transfer, a healthy baby was delivered. The ovarian fragmentationin vitro activation approach is not only valuable for treating infertility of POI patients but could also be useful for middle-aged infertile women, cancer patients undergoing sterilizing treatments, and other conditions of diminished ovarian reserve. PMID:24082083

  13. Association of azoospermia factor region deletions in infertile male subjects among Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Hussein, A A; Vasudevan, R; Patimah, I; Prashant, N; Nora, F A

    2015-03-01

    Azoospermia factor region (AZF) deletions (AZFa, AZFb, AZFc and AZFd) in the Y chromosome were analysed in male infertility subjects in various populations with conflicting results. This study comprised of 54 infertile males and 63 fertile controls, and the frequency of AZFa, AZFb, AZFc and AZFd deletions were determined using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as well as real-time PCR-high resolution melting analysis-based methods. The results of this study showed that, three of 54 cases (5.55%) had AZF (a, b and c) deletions (two had AZFc and one had AZFa deletions). Four cases were found to have AZFd deletions (7.4%) with two of them being associated with AZFc deletions (P = 0.028). The frequency of AZF (a, b and c) deletions in Malaysian infertile male subjects was found to be comparable with other populations. AZFd deletions were found to be significant (P < 0.05) in male infertility and it may be associated with other types of AZF deletions. PMID:24528375

  14. Hippo signaling disruption and Akt stimulation of ovarian follicles for infertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Cheng, Yuan; Suzuki, Nao; Deguchi, Masashi; Sato, Yorino; Takae, Seido; Ho, Chi-hong; Kawamura, Nanami; Tamura, Midori; Hashimoto, Shu; Sugishita, Yodo; Morimoto, Yoshiharu; Hosoi, Yoshihiko; Yoshioka, Nobuhito; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Hsueh, Aaron J

    2013-10-22

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) and polycystic ovarian syndrome are ovarian diseases causing infertility. Although there is no effective treatment for POI, therapies for polycystic ovarian syndrome include ovarian wedge resection or laser drilling to induce follicle growth. Underlying mechanisms for these disruptive procedures are unclear. Here, we explored the role of the conserved Hippo signaling pathway that serves to maintain optimal size across organs and species. We found that fragmentation of murine ovaries promoted actin polymerization and disrupted ovarian Hippo signaling, leading to increased expression of downstream growth factors, promotion of follicle growth, and the generation of mature oocytes. In addition to elucidating mechanisms underlying follicle growth elicited by ovarian damage, we further demonstrated additive follicle growth when ovarian fragmentation was combined with Akt stimulator treatments. We then extended results to treatment of infertility in POI patients via disruption of Hippo signaling by fragmenting ovaries followed by Akt stimulator treatment and autografting. We successfully promoted follicle growth, retrieved mature oocytes, and performed in vitro fertilization. Following embryo transfer, a healthy baby was delivered. The ovarian fragmentation-in vitro activation approach is not only valuable for treating infertility of POI patients but could also be useful for middle-aged infertile women, cancer patients undergoing sterilizing treatments, and other conditions of diminished ovarian reserve. PMID:24082083

  15. Infertility resulting from transgenic I-PpoI male Anopheles gambiae in large cage trials

    PubMed Central

    Klein, T A; Windbichler, N; Deredec, A; Burt, A; Benedict, M Q

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Anopheles gambiae is the primary vector of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa and is a potential target of genetic control programs. We determined the capacity of male A. gambiae created by germline transformation to introduce infertility into stable age-distribution populations. We also determined effects of the transgenes on life history. Methods Stable age-distribution populations of A. gambiae mosquitoes were established in large indoor cages. Male mosquitoes carrying an I-PpoI homing endonuclease gene were introduced at ×5 and ×10 release rates where they competed with target male mosquitoes for matings. Similar trials were conducted in small cages with an additional ×1 release level. Results Infertility was successfully introduced into all target populations. In supporting experiments, complete female infertility was observed in all strains and species of the A. gambiae complex to which transgenic males were mated. Life history experiments demonstrated that reductions in I-PpoI male vigor exist in the form of reduced adult male emergence, longevity and competitiveness. Discussion A. gambiae I-PpoI males are capable of introducing high levels of infertility in target populations in indoor cage trials. This was accomplished despite losses of vigor resulting from the HEG transgene. These results motivate further trials of sexually I-PpoI A. gambiae in outdoor cage and field trials. PMID:22595271

  16. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH AND SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa: Potential for Infertility Research and Screening
    David Miller1, David Dix2, Robert Reid3, Susan Wykes3 and Stephen Krawetz3
    1Reproductive Biology Group, University of Leeds, UK
    2Reproductive Toxicology Division, U.S. Environmenta...

  17. An association study of HFE gene mutation with idiopathic male infertility in the Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Bin-Bin; Xin, Zhong-Cheng; Liu, Tao; Ma, Ke; Jiang, Jian; Fang, Xiang; Yu, Li-Hua; Peng, Yi-Feng; Ma, Xu

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the haemochromatosis gene (HFE) influence iron status in the general population of Northern Europe, and excess iron is associated with the impairment of spermatogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between three mutations (C282Y, H63D and S65C) in the HFE gene with idiopathic male infertility in the Chinese Han population. Two groups of Chinese men were recruited: 444 infertile men (including 169 with idiopathic azoospermia) and 423 controls with proven fertility. The HFE gene was detected using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. The experimental results demonstrated that no C282Y or S65C mutations were detected. Idiopathic male infertility was not significantly associated with heterozygous H63D mutation (odds ratio=0.801, 95% confidence interval=0.452–1.421, χ2=0.577, P=0.448). The H63D mutation frequency did not correlate significantly with the serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T) levels in infertile men (P=0.896, P=0.404 and P=0.05, respectively). Our data suggest that the HFE H63D mutation is not associated with idiopathic male reproductive dysfunction. PMID:22504868

  18. High frequency of sex chromosomal disomy in spermatozoa of Lebanese infertile men.

    PubMed

    Younes, Berthes G; Hazzouri, Khaled M; Chaaban, Mustapha J; Karam, Walid G; Abou Jaoude, Imad F; Attieh, Joanna H; Hazzouri, Mira M

    2011-01-01

    In Lebanon, assisted reproductive techniques (ART) are widely used to overcome infertility, but the genetic risk associated with these techniques is still ignored. In this study, in order to estimate the transmission risk of paternal chromosomal anomalies to ART offspring, the meiotic segregation of chromosomes X, Y, 18, and 21 was analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization on the spermatozoa of 19 Lebanese infertile men. Our results show significantly higher frequencies of sex chromosome disomies in the group of patients with oligozoospermia compared with a control group of fertile males. Interestingly, the sex chromosome aneuploidy rates were highly variable between oligozoospermic patients, and ranged between 0.9% and 12.87%. No significant increase in aneuploidy rates was found for the group of nonoligozoospermic patients with asthenozoospermia and/or teratozoospermia. In addition, the disomy rate for chromosome 21 was analyzed in 8 patients, in whom higher disomy rates were shown as compared with the controls. Altogether, the results suggest that Lebanese oligozoospermic men undergoing ART may have an increased risk of transmitting sex chromosome anomalies to their offspring, as well as, in some cases, trisomy 21. Based on this work, genetic counseling programs for Lebanese infertile couples undergoing ART procedures should be developed, in order to improve the investigation and selection of Lebanese infertile couple candidates for ART procedures and optimize the choice of ART techniques. PMID:21164147

  19. Stem cell therapeutic possibilities: future therapeutic options for male-factor and female-factor infertility?

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Charles A.; Simerly, Calvin R.; Schatten, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in assisted reproduction treatment have enabled some couples with severe infertility issues to conceive, but the methods are not successful in all cases. Notwithstanding the significant financial burden of assisted reproduction treatment, the emotional scars from an inability to conceive a child enacts a greater toll on affected couples. While methods have circumvented some root causes for male and female infertility, often the underlying causes cannot be treated, thus true cures for restoring a patient’s fertility are limited. Furthermore, the procedures are only available if the affected patients are able to produce gametes. Patients rendered sterile by medical interventions, exposure to toxicants or genetic causes are unable to utilize assisted reproduction to conceive a child – and often resort to donors, where permitted. Stem cells represent a future potential avenue for allowing these sterile patients to produce offspring. Advances in stem cell biology indicate that stem cell replacement therapies or in-vitro differentiation may be on the horizon to treat and could cure male and female infertility, although significant challenges need to be met before this technology can reach clinical practice. This article discusses these advances and describes the impact that these advances may have on treating infertility. PMID:23664220

  20. Another functional frame-shift polymorphism of DEFB126 (rs11467497) associated with male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Shiwei; Shi, Changgeng; Chen, Guowu; Zheng, Ju-fen; Wu, Bin; Diao, Hua; Ji, Lindan; Gu, Yihua; Xin, Aijie; Wu, Yancheng; Zhou, Weijin; Miao, Maohua; Xu, Limin; Li, Zheng; Yuan, Yao; Wang, Peng; Shi, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    DEFB126 rs140685149 mutation was shown to cause sperm dysfunction and subfertility. Indel rs11467497 is another 4-nucleotide frame-shift mutation (151bp upstream of rs140685149) that leads to the premature termination of translation and the expression of peptide truncated at the carboxyl terminus. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive association study to check the contribution of rs140685149 and rs11467497 to male infertility. Our results confirmed the previous findings that there was no association between rs140685149 and sperm motility. In contrast, we found a significant association of another indel rs11467497 with male infertility. Moreover, rs11467497 was shown to be associated with higher number of round cells in the infertile males with low sperm motility. Surprisingly, the two mutations commonly existed in the sperm donors (n = 672), suggesting a potential application of the two indels in the screening for eligible sperm donors. Western blotting assays showed the sperms with rs140685149 2-nt deletion tended to have unstable DEFB126 protein in contrast of no DEFB126 protein expressed in the sperms with rs11467497 4-nt deletion, suggesting a more severe consequence caused by rs11467497 mutation. In conclusion, our study presented a significant contribution of another functional frame-shift polymorphism of DEFB126 (rs11467497) to male infertility. PMID:25721098

  1. VALUING REDUCTIONS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SOURCES OF INFERTILITY RISK USING THE EFFICIENT HOUSEHOLD FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an increasing body evidence suggesting that a broad range of pollutants have the potential to alter human endocrine systems. One disturbing consequence of exposures to these endocrine disruptors is that they may significantly increase the incidence of infertility in exp...

  2. Excess cholesterol induces mouse egg activation and may cause female infertility

    PubMed Central

    Yesilaltay, Ayce; Dokshin, Gregoriy A.; Busso, Dolores; Wang, Li; Galiani, Dalia; Chavarria, Tony; Vasile, Eliza; Quilaqueo, Linda; Orellana, Juan Andrés; Walzer, Dalia; Shalgi, Ruth; Dekel, Nava; Albertini, David F.; Rigotti, Attilio; Page, David C.; Krieger, Monty

    2014-01-01

    The HDL receptor scavenger receptor, class B type I (SR-BI) controls the structure and fate of plasma HDL. Female SR-BI KO mice are infertile, apparently because of their abnormal cholesterol-enriched HDL particles. We examined the growth and meiotic progression of SR-BI KO oocytes and found that they underwent normal germinal vesicle breakdown; however, SR-BI KO eggs, which had accumulated excess cholesterol in vivo, spontaneously activated, and they escaped metaphase II (MII) arrest and progressed to pronuclear, MIII, and anaphase/telophase III stages. Eggs from fertile WT mice were activated when loaded in vitro with excess cholesterol by a cholesterol/methyl-β-cyclodextrin complex, phenocopying SR-BI KO oocytes. In vitro cholesterol loading of eggs induced reduction in maturation promoting factor and MAPK activities, elevation of intracellular calcium, extrusion of a second polar body, and progression to meiotic stages beyond MII. These results suggest that the infertility of SR-BI KO females is caused, at least in part, by excess cholesterol in eggs inducing premature activation and that cholesterol can activate WT mouse eggs to escape from MII arrest. Analysis of SR-BI KO female infertility raises the possibility that abnormalities in cholesterol metabolism might underlie some cases of human female infertility of unknown etiology. PMID:25368174

  3. Partnered Decisions? U.S. Couples and Medical Help-Seeking for Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Katherine M.; Johnson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    We examined male partners' influence on the decision to seek medical help for infertility using the National Study of Fertility Barriers. Building upon an existing help-seeking framework, we incorporated characteristics of both partners from 219 heterosexual couples who had ever perceived a fertility problem. In logistic regression analyses, we…

  4. Couple Infertility: From the Perspective of the Close-Relationship Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Barbara S.

    1990-01-01

    Presents Close-Relationship Model as comprehensive framework in which to examine interrelated nature of causes and effects of infertility on marital relationship. Includes these factors: physical and psychological characteristics of both partners; joint, couple characteristics; physical and social environment; and relationship itself. Discusses…

  5. Targeted overexpression of luteinizing hormone in transgenic mice leads to infertility, polycystic ovaries, and ovarian tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Risma, K A; Clay, C M; Nett, T M; Wagner, T; Yun, J; Nilson, J H

    1995-01-01

    Hypersecretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) is implicated in infertility and miscarriages in women. A lack of animal models has limited progress in determining the mechanisms of LH toxicity. We have recently generated transgenic mice expressing a chimeric LH beta subunit (LH beta) in gonadotropes. The LH beta chimera contains the C-terminal peptide of the human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit. Addition of this peptide to bovine LH beta resulted in a hormone with a longer half-life. Furthermore, targeted expression of the LH beta chimera led to elevated LH levels and infertility in female transgenics. These mice ovulated infrequently, maintained a prolonged luteal phase, and developed pathologic ovarian changes such as cyst formation, marked enlargement of ovaries, and granulosa cell tumors. Testosterone and estradiol levels were increased compared to nontransgenic littermates. An unusual extragonadal phenotype was also observed: transgenic females developed hydronephropathy and pyelonephritis. The pathology observed demonstrates a direct association between abnormal secretion of LH and infertility and underscores the utility of the transgenic model for studying how excess LH leads to cyst formation, ovarian tumorigenesis, and infertility. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7877975

  6. Psychometric properties of the satisfaction with life scale (SWLS) in Iranian infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Maroufizadeh, Saman; Ghaheri, Azadeh; Omani Samani, Reza; Ezabadi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a global public health issue and may adversely affect life satisfaction. One of the most widely instruments used to assess life satisfaction is the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the SWLS in Iranian infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, a total of 125 infertile women referring to Royan Institute in Tehran were selected by convenience sampling method. The participants were administered the SWLS, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and a demographic questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the SWLS were examined: construct validity using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), reliability using Cronbach’s alpha and convergent validity by examining the relationship with HADS. Result: Results of the CFA indicated that a single-factor model provides a good fit to the data (χ2/df= 1.58; GFI= 0.975; CFI= 0.995; NFI= 0.985; RMSEA= 0.069 and SRMR= 0.027). The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for SWLS was 0.887. Significant negative correlations were found between SWLS and HADS scores for anxiety (r= -0.410) and depression (r= -0.434), indicating an acceptable convergent validity. Conclusion: The SWLS has adequate psychometric properties for assessing life satisfaction in Iranian infertile women. PMID:27141550

  7. Traditional Chinese medical herbs staged therapy in infertile women with endometriosis: a clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhaorong; Lian, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a common gynecological disease defined as the presence of endometrioid tissue (glands and stroma) outside the uterus. About 30 to 40% patients with endometriosis are infertile. In traditional Chinese medical system, endometriosis associated infertility is mostly caused by kidney deficiency and blood stasis. The herb of reinforcing kidney and removing blood stasis is designed to treat the disease. Material and methods: All the 80 up-to-standard patients were divided into two different groups exactly according to the random principle. They were treated with hormone and traditional Chinese medical herb separately. After half year’s therapy, all the patients received one year’s follow-up. Their transvaginal ultrasonographic changes, serum hormone levels and pregnancy rate were recorded to analysis the effect. Results: No significant difference happened in two groups’ demographic and clinical characteristics (P > 0.05). After the treatment, the effect on serum hormone levels and specific markers are significant (P < 0.05). The transvaginal ultrasonographic changes were positive, too. The text on hepatic and renal function confirmed to the safety of the herb. Compared to hormone therapy, the traditional Chinese medical herb is safe and effective for endometriosis patients with infertility. Conclusion: Compared with hormone therapy, traditional Chinese medical herb’s two-staged therapy is effective and safe for endometriosis patients with infertility. PMID:26550373

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Infertility: Cultural and Religious Influences in a Multicultural Canadian Setting

    PubMed Central

    Read, Suzanne C.; Carrier, Marie-Eve; Whitley, Rob; Gold, Ian; Tulandi, Togas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To explore the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for infertility in a multicultural healthcare setting and to compare Western and non-Western infertility patients' reasons for using CAM and the meanings they attribute to CAM use. Design: Qualitative semi-structured interviews using thematic analysis. Settings/location: Two infertility clinics in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Participants: An ethnoculturally varied sample of 32 heterosexual infertile couples. Results: CAM used included lifestyle changes (e.g., changing diet, exercise), alternative medicine (e.g., acupuncture, herbal medicines), and religious methods (e.g., prayers, religious talismans). Patients expressed three attitudes toward CAM: desperate hope, casual optimism, and amused skepticism. Participants' CAM use was consistent with cultural traditions of health and fertility: Westerners relied primarily on biomedicine and used CAM mainly for relaxation, whereas non-Westerners' CAM use was often influenced by culture-specific knowledge of health, illness and fertility. Conclusions: Understanding patients' CAM use may help clinicians provide culturally sensitive, patient-centered care. PMID:25127071

  9. Terminal Mannose Residues in Seminal Plasma Glycoproteins of Infertile Men Compared to Fertile Donors

    PubMed Central

    Olejnik, Beata; Jarząb, Anna; Kratz, Ewa M.; Zimmer, Mariusz; Gamian, Andrzej; Ferens-Sieczkowska, Mirosława

    2015-01-01

    The impact of seminal plasma components on the fertilization outcomes in humans is still under question. The increasing number of couples facing problems with conception raises the need for predictive biomarkers. Detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms accompanying fertilization remains another challenge. Carbohydrate–protein recognition may be of key importance in this complex field. In this study, we analyzed the unique glycosylation pattern of seminal plasma proteins, the display of high-mannose and hybrid-type oligosaccharides, by means of their reactivity with mannose-specific Galanthus nivalis lectin. Normozoospermic infertile subjects presented decreased amounts of lectin-reactive glycoepitopes compared to fertile donors and infertile patients with abnormal semen parameters. Glycoproteins containing unveiled mannose were isolated in affinity chromatography, and 17 glycoproteins were identified in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The N-glycome of the isolated glycoproteins was examined in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Eleven out of 27 identified oligosaccharides expressed terminal mannose residues, responsible for lectin binding. We suggest that lowered content of high-mannose and hybrid type glycans in normozoospermic infertile patients may be associated with impaired sperm protection from preterm capacitation and should be considered in the search for new infertility markers. PMID:26147424

  10. The Efficiency of a Group-Specific Mandated Benefit Revisited: The Effect of Infertility Mandates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahey, Joanna N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the labor market effects of state health insurance mandates that increase the cost of employing a demographically identifiable group. State mandates requiring that health insurance plans cover infertility treatment raise the relative cost of insuring older women of child-bearing age. Empirically, wages in this group are…

  11. Clinical Factors Associated with Sperm DNA Fragmentation in Male Patients with Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Akira; Kato, Tomonori; Kawauchi, Yoko; Watanabe, Akihiko; Fuse, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The clinical factors associated with sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) were investigated in male patients with infertility. Materials and Methods. Fifty-four ejaculates from infertile Japanese males were used. Thirty-three and twenty-one were from the patients with varicoceles and idiopathic causes of infertility, respectively. We performed blood tests, including the serum sex hormone levels, and conventional and computer-assisted semen analyses. The sperm nuclear vacuolization (SNV) was evaluated using a high-magnification microscope. The SDF was evaluated using the sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCDt) to determine the SDF index (SDFI). The SDFI was compared with semen parameters and other clinical variables, including lifestyle factors. Results. The SDFI was 41.3 ± 22.2% (mean ± standard deviation) and did not depend on the cause of infertility. Chronic alcohol use increased the SDFI to 49.6 ± 23.3% compared with 33.9 ± 18.0% in nondrinkers. The SDFI was related to adverse conventional semen parameters and sperm motion characteristics and correlated with the serum FSH level. The SNV showed a tendency to increase with the SDFI. The multivariate analysis revealed that the sperm progressive motility and chronic alcohol use were significant predictors of the SDF. Conclusion. The SCDt should be offered to chronic alcohol users and those with decreased sperm progressive motility. PMID:25165747

  12. Evaluation of sperm retrieval rate with bilateral testicular sperm extraction in infertile patients with azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Moein, Mohammad Reza; Moein, Mahmoud Reza; Ghasemzadeh, Jalal; Pourmasoumi, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Background: About 10% to 15% of infertile men have azoospermia, which could be obstructive or non-obstructive. Diagnostic biopsy from the testis and recently testicular sperm extraction (TESE) are the most precise investigations in these patients. Testicular biopsy can be done unilaterally or bilaterally. The worth of unilateral or bilateral testicular biopsy in men with azoospermia is controversial. Objective: To evaluate the necessity of bilateral diagnostic biopsy from the testis in new era of diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the results of testis biopsy in 419 azoospermic men, referred to Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility from 2009-2013. Patients with known obstructive azoospermia were excluded from the study. Results: In totally, 254 infertile men (60.6%) were underwent unilateral TESE, which in 175 patients (88.4%) sperm were extracted from their testes successfully. Bilateral testis biopsy was done in 165 patients (39.4%) which in 37 patients (22.4%), sperm were found in their testes tissues. Conclusion: Due to the low probability of positive bilateral TESE results especially when we can’t found sperm in the first side, we recommend that physicians re-evaluate the risk and benefit of this procedure in era of newer and more precise technique of sperm retrieval like micro TESE. PMID:26730246

  13. Genetic screening and evaluation for chromosomal abnormalities of infertile males in Jilin Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Fan, H-T; Zhang, Q-S; Wang, X-Y; Yang, X; Tian, W-J; Li, R-W

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormality is the most common genetic cause of male infertility, particularly in cases of azoospermia, oligozoospermia, and recurrent spontaneous abortion. Chromosomal rearrangement may interrupt an important gene or exert position effects. The functionality of genes at specific breakpoints, perhaps with a specific role in spermatogenesis, may be altered by such rearrangements. Structural chromosome abnormalities are furthermore known to increase the risk of pregnancy loss. In this study, we aimed to assess chromosomal defects in infertile men from Jilin Province, China, by genetic screening and to evaluate the relationship between structural chromosome abnormalities and male infertility. The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities among the study participants (receiving genetic counseling in Jilin Province, China) was 10.55%. The most common chromosome abnormality was Klinefelter syndrome, and the study findings suggested that azoospermia and oligospermia may result from structural chromosomal abnormalities. Chromosome 1 was shown to be most commonly involved in male infertility and balanced chromosomal translocation was identified as one of the causes of recurrent spontaneous abortion. Chromosomes 4, 7, and 10 were the most commonly involved chromosomes in male partners of women experiencing repeated abortion. PMID:26662410

  14. Infertility and Crisis: Self-Discovery and Healing through Poetry Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, Anne

    1992-01-01

    Offers a personal narrative on how the author's own poetry helped her cope with the crisis of infertility, serving as a tool for self-discovery and healing. Suggests that specific advantages of poetry writing within the context of psychotherapy include problem solving; expression of feelings; insight; couple communication; and individual and…

  15. Ureaplasma urealyticum, Ureaplasma parvum, Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma genitalium infections and semen quality of infertile men

    PubMed Central

    Gdoura, Radhouane; Kchaou, Wiem; Chaari, Chiraz; Znazen, Abir; Keskes, Leila; Rebai, Tarek; Hammami, Adnane

    2007-01-01

    Background Genital ureaplasmas (Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum) and mycoplasmas (Mycoplasma genitalium and Mycoplasma hominis) are potentially pathogenic species playing an etiologic role in both genital infections and male infertility. Reports are, however, controversial regarding the effects of these microorganisms infections in the sperm seminological variables. This study aimed at determining the frequency of genital ureplasmas and mycoplasmas in semen specimens collected from infertile men, and at comparing the seminological variables of semen from infected and non-infected men with these microorganisms. Methods A total of 120 semen samples collected from infertile men were investigated. Semen specimens were examined by in-house PCR-microtiter plate hybridization assay for the presence of genital ureaplasmas and mycoplasmas DNA. Semen analysis was assessed according to the guidelines of the World Health Organization. Standard parametric techniques (t-tests) and nonparametric techniques (Wilcoxon tests) were used for statistical analysis. Results The frequency of genital ureaplasmas and mycoplasmas detected in semen samples of infertile men was respectively 19.2% (23/120) and 15.8% (19/120). The frequency of Ureaplasma urealyticum (15%) was higher than that of Mycoplasma hominis (10.8%), Ureaplasma parvum (4.2%) and Mycoplasma genitalium (5%). Mixed species of mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas were detected in 6.7% of semen samples. Comparison of the parameters of the standard semen analysis between the male partners of the infertile couples with and without genital ureaplasmas and mycoplasmas infection showed that the presence of Mycoplasma hominis DNA in semen samples is associated with low sperm concentration (p = 0.007) and abnormal sperm morphology (p = 0.03) and a negative correlation between sperm concentration and the detection of Mycoplasma genitalium in semen samples of infertile men (p = 0.05). The mean values of seminal volume, pH, vitality, motility and leukocyte count were not significantly related either to the detection of genital mycoplasmas DNA or to the detection of ureaplasmas DNA in semen specimens. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that genital mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas seem to be widespread among the male partners of infertile couples in Tunisia. Genital mycoplasmas infections of the male genital tract could negatively influence semen quality. Our results also indicate that PCR-microtiter plate hybridization assay method provides a rapid and effective technique to detect human genital mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas which is useful for etiological and epidemiological studies of these pathogens. PMID:17988404

  16. Body image and its relationship with sexual function and marital adjustment in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Karamidehkordi, Akram; Roudsari, Robab Latifnejad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Body image is related to cognitive, emotional, and physical aspects of women's life. Therefore, it is expected to have an important role in women's sexual health and marital adjustment too. This issue seems to be salient in infertile women who suffer from psychological consequences of infertility. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship of body image with sexual function and marital adjustment in infertile women in 2011 in Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods: This correlational study was performed on 130 infertile women who referred to Montaserieh Infertility Research Centre in Mashhad, Iran. Subjects were selected using convenient sampling method. To collect data, valid and reliable questionnaires including demographic and infertility-related data tool, modified Younesi Body Image Questionnaire, Rosen Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), and Spanier Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) were used. Data analysis was performed by SPSS software using Student's t-test, correlation, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey post-hoc test. Results: The mean scores of body image, sexual function, and marital adjustment in women were 308.1 ± 45.8, 27.23 ± 3.80, and 113.8 ± 19.73, respectively. There was a direct correlation between overall body image and subscales of sexual function including sexual arousal (P = 0.003), sexual desire (P = 0.024), vaginal moisture (P = 0.001), orgasm (P < 0.001), sexual satisfaction (P < 0.001), and dyspareunia (P = 0.007). A direct correlation was also observed between overall body image and subscales of marital adjustment including agreement and consent (P < 0.001), satisfaction with life (P < 0.001), continuity of life (P = 0.007), and expressing emotions within the family environment (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Improved sexual function and marital adjustment in cases with higher body image provides evidence that one of the solutions to reduce sexual dysfunction and marital dispute in infertile women could be planning educational and counseling programs to improve women's body image. PMID:25949252

  17. Investigation of infertility management in primary care with open access hysterosalpingography (HSG): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Scott; Murdoch, Alison; Rubin, Greg; Chinn, David; Wilsdon, John

    2006-03-01

    Infertility affects one in seven couples in the United Kingdom. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued guidance on the management of the infertile couple in February 2004, which included the statement "for the assessment of tubal damage, women not known to have co-morbidities (pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis or previous ectopic pregnancy) should be offered hysterosalpingography (HSG)". We made HSG available to six general practices in Newcastle upon Tyne as an open access investigation. Our aim was to evaluate the uptake of open access HSG, speed of access to specialist services and the quality of the information recorded in the referral letter. Using hospital clinical records we tracked the outcome of all infertile couples from the six pilot practices over a nine-month period. Of the 39 referrals identified, 10 women were eligible for open access HSG, of which six HSGs were organized by GPs. Couples who had open access HSG reached a diagnosis and management plan four weeks earlier than those who were referred directly (mean difference 4.0 weeks, 95% confidence interval (CI) -8.8 to 0.4 weeks). The information recorded in the referral letter was generally poor. However, all referrals made via the open access HSG service had the prerequisite tests done. Open access HSG allowed prompter access to specialist services with more complete information passed on in the referral letter. Open access HSG was used in 15% of all infertile couples and 60% of those who fitted the criteria for its use. Open access HSG together with semen analysis and endocrine blood tests may allow GPs to manage the initial stages of the infertile couple and make a diagnosis. PMID:16581721

  18. Should diagnostic hysteroscopy be a routine procedure during diagnostic laparoscopy in infertile women?

    PubMed

    Godinjak, Zulfo; Idrizbegović, Edin

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of simultaneous combined diagnostic approach using laparoscopy and hysteroscopy in the evaluation of female infertility. In a retrospective study, 360 infertile women underwent complete fertility evaluation. All the patients were examined by simultaneous combined laparoscopy and hysteroscopy as a part of the routine infertility evaluation. Laparoscopy and hysteroscopy were successful in 360 patients. Bilateral tubes were blocked in 18 (5%) and unilateral tubal occlusion were in 30 (8,33%) of patients. Pelvic adhesions were revealed in 40 (11,11%), and myomas in 42 (11,65%) out of that 31 (8,6%) were revealed by laparoscopy and 11 (3,05%) by hysteroscopy. Endometrial polyps were revealed in 26 (7,22%) and Syndrome Asherman in 3(0,83%) of patients. Uterine anomaly was found in 19 (5,27%) of cases and out of that septate uterus in 7 (37,15%), bicornuate uterus in 5 (26,31%), arcuate uterus in 4 (21,26%) and uterus unicornu cum cornu rudimentario in 3 (15,27%) of uterine anomalies. Endometriosis was found in 51 (14,16%), dermoid cysts in 8 (2,22%) and in 16 (4,44%) functional cysts of patients. Also, Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome was revealed in 23 (6,11%) of our patients. Laparoscopy and hysteroscopy play very important role as diagnostic tools in the infertility women. Combined diagnostic simultaneous laparoscopy and hysteroscopy should be performed in all infertile patients before the treatment. PMID:18318671

  19. AB28. Management of male factor infertility: present on the assisted reproductive technology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Chan

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a common yet complex problem affecting approximately 10-15% of couples attempting to conceive a baby. Especially, 40-50% of these factors are known as male-related disorders. Unlike female infertility, the cause of which is often easily identified, diagnosing male factors can be difficult. Male infertility is due to low sperm production, abnormal sperm function or blockages of sperm transport. Classical semen analysis in laboratory, which include sperm concentration, motility and morphology gives an approximate evaluation of the functional competence of spermatozoa, but does not always reflect the quality of sperm DNA. The fertilizing potential of sperm depends not only on the functional competence of spermatozoa but also on sperm DNA integrity. The most commonly used techniques to assess sperm DNA integrity are the TUNEL assay, Comet assay, SCSA assay and hallo sperm assay. Recent studies have highlighted the significance of sperm DNA integrity as an important factor which affects functional competence of the sperm. Sperm DNA damage has been closely associated with numerous indicators of reproductive health including fertilization, embryo quality, implantation, spontaneous abortion, congenital malformations. To overcome male infertility, there are variety of surgical and non-surgical urological procedures and medical-pharmacological interventions, and advanced assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Among the surgically retrieved methods, there are TESE, TFNA, PESA and MESA that is used with ICSI. The ART, augmented with ICSI in moderate to serve cases, efficiently treat a variety of male infertility disorders by constituting validated and successfully treatment methods. Also, this technique is employed because the limited numbers and functional capacity of motile sperm that can be obtained. Especially, there are technologies such as IMSI and PICSI that are used to select healthy sperms.

  20. Nitroreductase-mediated gonadal dysgenesis for infertility control of genetically modified zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shao-Yang; Lin, Pei-Yu; Liao, Chia-Hsuan; Gong, Hong-Yi; Lin, Gen-Hwa; Kawakami, Koichi; Wu, Jen-Leih

    2010-10-01

    Genetically modified (GM) fish with desirable features such as rapid growth, disease resistance, and cold tolerance, among other traits, have been established in aquaculture. However, commercially available GM fish are restricted because of global concerns over the incomplete assessments of food safety and ecological impact. The ecological impact concerns include gene flow and escape of the GM fish, which may cause extinction of wild natural fish stocks. Infertility control is a core technology for overcoming this obstacle. Although polyploidy technology, GnRH-specific antisense RNA, and RNAi against GnRH gene expression have been used to cause infertility in fish, these approaches are not 100% reliable and are not heritable. In the present study, zebrafish was used as a model to establish an inducible platform of infertility control in GM fish. Nitroreductase, which converts metronidazole substrate into cytotoxin, was fused with EGFP and expressed specifically by oocytes in the Tg(ZP:NTR-EGFP) by a zona pellucida promoter. Through consecutive immersion of metronidazole from 28 to 42days posthatching, oocyte-specific EGFP expression was eliminated, and atrophy of the gonads was detected by anatomical analysis. These findings reveal that oocyte-specific nitroreductase-mediated catalysis of metronidazole blocks oogenesis and leads to an undeveloped oocyte. Furthermore, oocyte cell death via apoptosis was detected by a TUNEL assay. We found that the gonadal dysgenesis induced by metronidazole resulted in activation of the ovarian killer gene bok, which is a proapoptotic gene member of the Bcl-2 family and led to infertility. These results show that oocyte-specific nitroreductase-mediated catalysis of metronidazole can cause reliable infertility in zebrafish and could potentially be used as a model for other aquaculture fish species. PMID:19941022