Science.gov

Sample records for infertility

  1. Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    Infertility means not being able to become pregnant after a year of trying. If a woman can ... keeps having miscarriages or stillbirths, that's also called infertility. Infertility is fairly common. After one year of ...

  2. Infertility - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - infertility ... The following organizations are good resources for information on infertility : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc/gov/reproductivehealth/infertility March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/ ...

  3. Female Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    Infertility means not being able to get pregnant after at least one year of trying (or 6 ... woman keeps having miscarriages, it is also called infertility. Female infertility can result from age, physical problems, ...

  4. Treating Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A common problem that leads to male infertility, varicocele , sometimes can be treated with surgery. How are ... contains and nourishes the developing fetus during pregnancy. Varicocele: Varicose veins in the scrotum. If you have ...

  5. Defining Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... years old, the chances are 10% or less. Ovulation Problems If a woman doesn’t ovulate (release ... thyroid disease, and other hormonal disorders can affect ovulation and lead to infertility. Women who don’t ...

  6. Male Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pregnant after at least one year of trying. Causes of male infertility include Physical problems with the testicles Blockages in the ducts that carry sperm Hormone problems A history of high fevers or mumps Genetic disorders Lifestyle or environmental factors About a third of ...

  7. Psychological Component of Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Organizations Resources: FAQs › FAQs - The Psychological Component of Infertility -- written by the ASRM Mental Health Professional Group ( ... Professional in your area ) Q1. What impact does infertility have on psychological well being? Infertility often creates ...

  8. Infertility and Fertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Infertility and Fertility: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is infertility? "Infertility" is a term that describes when a ...

  9. Infertility Research at the NICHD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treating infertility Demographics of infertility and its treatments Economic impact of infertility and its treatments Conditions and ... infertility, and reproductive health to understand social, cultural, economic, and policy factors that contribute to disparities in ...

  10. Primary infertility (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  11. How Is Infertility Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How is infertility diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... providers evaluate men and women differently to diagnose infertility. Evaluating Female Fertility In evaluating a woman's fertility, ...

  12. Stress and Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Stress and infertility It is not clear how exactly stress impacts ... How can stress impact a fertility patient? Sometimes, infertility patients respond to the stress of being unable ...

  13. Smoking and Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Smoking and infertility Can smoking affect my ability to have a ... smoke do not conceive as efficiently as nonsmokers. Infertility rates in both male and female smokers are ...

  14. Causes of Male Infertility

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Roger Lobo of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine covers causes of male infertility. "Understanding Infertility - The ... videos produced for the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Looking for Additional Information? Visit our provider site ...

  15. Infertility with Testicular Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Kevin A; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer is one of the most curable cancers. Most patients are treated during their reproductive years, making infertility a significant quality of life issue after successful treatment. This focused review evaluates the factors that contribute to infertility and specific fertility risks with the various testicular cancer treatments. Timing of patient discussions and current fertility treatments are reviewed. PMID:26216827

  16. copayment summary infertility benefit

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    , or if the female partner is over age 35 years, after 6 months of regular, unprotected heterosexual intercourse by WHA. · Services and supplies to reverse voluntary, surgically induced infertility are excluded. · All, but not limited to, procedure reversal attempts and infertility treatment after reversal attempts, is excluded

  17. Causes of Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... elements can lead to infertility. Frequent use of laptops near the testicles 4 as well as saunas ... D, Komaroff E. Increase in scrotal temperature in laptop computer users. Human Reproduction 2004. Available at http:// ...

  18. State Infertility Insurance Laws

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tubes that are not a result of voluntary sterilization; or Abnormal male factors contributing to the infertility. ... or other assisted reproductive techniques, reversal of a tubal ligation, a vasectomy, or any other method of sterilization. ...

  19. Male Infertility: After Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... infertile, ask your health care provider about ARTs. Vasectomy reversals cause only mild pain after surgery. But ... female partner. The number of years between your vasectomy and reversal also affects success. The longer you ...

  20. Parenthood after Primary Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances-Fischer, Jana E.; Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the experience of parenting after primary infertility and describes construction and initial testing of an instrument for assessing characteristics of this understudied population. (Contains 52 references and 4 tables.) (GCP)

  1. Infertility and Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The ovary must release an egg each month (ovulation). The egg must then be picked up by ... of women with infertility have infrequent or absent ovulation. These women usually have irregular periods or no ...

  2. Infertility Fact Sheet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... release an egg from one of her ovaries (ovulation). The egg must go through a fallopian tube ... of female infertility are caused by problems with ovulation. Without ovulation, there are no eggs to be ...

  3. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... in 2011 for the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Be sure to check out more of ASRM's ... Roger Lobo of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine discusses the various methods to evaluate infertility. Causes ...

  4. Diagnostic imaging of infertility

    SciTech Connect

    Winfield, A.C.; Wentz, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    This text presents a review of all the imaging modalities available in the diagnosis of infertility. This book integrates the perspectives of experts in ob/gyn, radiology, reproductive endocrinology, and urology. It's a one-of-a-kind ''how to'' guide to hysterosalpinography and infertility evaluation, providing complete clinical information on the techniques, pitfalls, problems encountered and differential diagnosis. Detailed descriptions accompany numerous high-quality illustrations to help correlate findings and give meaning to the radiographic and ultrasound images.

  5. Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Society for Reproductive Medicine Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility? This fact sheet was developed in collaboration with ... a surgical procedure called laparoscopy. Does endometriosis cause infertility? If you have endometriosis, it may be more ...

  6. An infertility data registry.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, D L; Garcia, C R; Bullock, W; Schieffle, S; Smith, D; Casey, M

    1978-01-01

    A computerized infertility data registry form has been developed in order to facilitate the storage of a large amount of reproductive data to allow subsequent analyses pertinent to the managment of the infertile couple. This abstract form of the patients' medical records had been readily applied to computer analysis using the SPSS reporting system. The abstract can be utilized both for the facilitation of patient management and as a means for obtaining a standardized, objective, retrospective review of clinical data. Through the evaluation and standardization of the therapeutic techniques frequently utilized by physicians, the treatment of infertile couples should be improved. Such an approach is essential for anyone involved in today's health care system. PMID:563807

  7. Infertility: Medical and Social Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report illustrates a range of options for Congressional action in nine principal areas of public policy related to infertility: (1) collecting data on reproductive health; (2) preventing infertility; (3) information to inform and protect consumers; (4) providing access to infertility services; (5) reproductive health of veterans; (6) transfer…

  8. Managing Endometriosis Associated Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Suneeta; Barnhart, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Endometriosis is associated with infertility; however the etiology of this association is unclear, thus complicating management. Several mechanisms of pathogenesis have been proposed, however no one theory has been implicated. Medical therapy can be helpful in managing symptoms, but does not improve pregnancy rates. The role of surgical treatment remains controversial. There is little data regarding ovulation induction treatments for endometriosis only, while superovulation with intrauterine insemination has shown modest improvement in pregnancy rates in women who may have endometriosis. The most effective treatment for endometriosis-associated infertility is in-vitro fertilization. Recent focus on proteomics and genetics of the disease may aid in optimizing treatment options. PMID:22031261

  9. [Mental disorders and female infertility].

    PubMed

    Schweiger, U; Wischmann, T; Strowitzki, T

    2012-11-01

    Approximately 5-10% of women in the reproductive years are affected by infertility which is associated with depression, anxiety and disturbed eating behavior. Part of this association can be explained by the emotional stress resulting from infertility. As mental disorders, such as depressive disorder or eating disorders are also prospectively associated with infertility, a bidirectional relationship is assumed. A special relationship exists between mental disorders and the main causes of ovulatory infertility, hypothalamic amenorrhea and polycystic ovary disease. The results of pilot studies support the assumption that psychotherapy may constitute an important component of the treatment of infertility. PMID:23052895

  10. Parenting after Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  11. ACR appropriateness Criteria® infertility.

    PubMed

    Wall, Darci J; Javitt, Marcia C; Glanc, Phyllis; Bhosale, Priyadarshani R; Harisinghani, Mukesh G; Harris, Robert D; Khati, Nadia J; Mitchell, Donald G; Nyberg, David A; Pandharipande, Pari V; Pannu, Harpreet K; Shipp, Thomas D; Siegel, Cary Lynn; Simpson, Lynn; Wong-You-Cheong, Jade J; Zelop, Carolyn M

    2015-03-01

    Appropriate imaging for women undergoing infertility workup depends upon the clinician's suspicion for potential causes of infertility. Transvaginal US is the preferred modality to assess the ovaries for features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the leading cause of anovulatory infertility. For women who have a history or clinical suspicion of endometriosis, which affects at least one third of women with infertility, both MRI and pelvic US can provide valuable information. If tubal occlusion is suspected, whether due to endometriosis, previous pelvic inflammatory disease, or other cause, hysterosalpingogram (HSG) is the preferred method of evaluation. To assess for anatomic causes of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) such as Müllerian anomalies, synechiae, and leiomyomas, saline infusion sonohysterography, MRI and 3-D US are most appropriate. Up to 10% of women suffering recurrent pregnancy loss have a congenital Müllerian anomaly. When assessment of the pituitary gland is indicated, MRI is the imaging exam of choice.The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:25706363

  12. Fertility and Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; And Others

    In this report, emphasis is placed on major research developments in the reproductive sciences, their impact on the health of individuals as well as on that of society, and on current trends that may provide new opportunities for future research in fertility and infertility. In the first section, major developments in the reproductive sciences are…

  13. Treatment of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Gianpiero D; Kocent, Justin; Monahan, Devin; Neri, Queenie V; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2014-01-01

    Major difficulties exist in the accurate and meaningful diagnosis of male reproductive dysfunction, and our understanding of the epidemiology and etiology of male infertility has proven quite complex.The numerous spermatozoa produced in mammals and other species provides some degree of protection against adverse environmental conditions represented by physical and chemical factors that can reduce reproductive function and increase gonadal damage even resulting in testicular cancer or congenital malformations. The wide fluctuations of sperm production in men, both geographical and temporal, may reflect disparate environmental exposures, occurring on differing genetic backgrounds, in varying psychosocial conditions, and leading to the diversified observed outcomes.Sperm analysis is still the cornerstone in diagnosis of male factor infertility, indeed, individually compromised semen paramaters while adequately address therapeutic practices is progressively flanked by additional tests. Administration of drugs, IUI, correction of varicocele, and, to a certain extent, IVF although they may not be capable of restoring fertility itself often result in childbearing. PMID:24782020

  14. Lived experience of infertile men with male infertility cause

    PubMed Central

    Fahami, Fariba; Quchani, Samaneh Hosseini; Ehsanpour, Soheila; Boroujeni, Ali Zargham

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 15 percent of all the couples are involuntarily childless in reproductive ages. The ability to reproduce and give birth to a child is an important part of the human beings life; thus, infertility can cause anxiety for the infertile people. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate men's experiences from male infertility. METHODS: This was a descriptive phenomenological study. The data were collected using in-depth interview of ten infertile men. The interviews were taped and then transcribed on the paper for analyzing through seven-step Colaizzi method. Considering that in qualitative studies, study population is not considered, therefore there was no limitation in location for collecting the data and the participants selected from the infertile men of the society. RESULTS: Four main concepts were obtained in association with infertility phenomenon: individual stress, challenges in communication, problems associated with treatment process and the effects of beliefs and religious attitude. CONCLUSIONS: According to the results of this study, it seems that all the different life aspects of infertile were affected by infertility. Thus, designing and conducting conductive and supportive programs plays an important role for providing better care for infertile men. PMID:22069398

  15. Adolescent Varicoceles and Infertility.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jessica T; Misseri, Rosalia

    2015-12-01

    Varicoceles are associated with testicular atrophy and abnormal spermatogenesis. Varicocele-related testicular damage is thought to be progressive in nature. Adult varicoceles are common in men with infertility, and varicocele repair in this population has demonstrated improved semen parameters and paternity outcomes. However, without solid objective endpoints (reproducible semen analyses, paternity), the indications for adolescent varicocele repair remain controversial. Given the controversy surrounding adolescent varicocele management, it is not surprising that surveys of pediatric urologists have revealed a lack of consensus on diagnostic approaches, treatment decisions, and operative approaches. PMID:26568496

  16. Strategies for Counseling Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniluk, Judith C.

    1991-01-01

    Presents specific intervention strategies that may serve to reinforce infertility experience as opportunity for personal and marital growth. Concludes through counseling clients may complete much of the emotional work required to reach a point of resolution and acceptance of their infertility. (Author/ABL)

  17. A Biopsychosocial Theory of Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrity, Deborah A.

    2001-01-01

    Briefly reviews the literature on infertility and its emotional, physical, existential, and relational effects on individuals, couples, and families. Life crisis and biopsychosocial theories are discussed as they apply to persons struggling with infertility issues. In addition, stage models derived from a biopsychosocial perspective are presented.…

  18. Epidemiology of infertility: social problems of the infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Araoye, Margaret O

    2003-06-01

    Infertility is of public health importance in Nigeria and many other developing nations because of its high prevalence and especially due to its serious social implications. A review of the epidemiology of infertility in Nigeria and other parts of Sub-Saharan Africa is presented and socio-cultural issues including the social impact on couples are discussed. The major cause of infertility in Africa is infection--STDs, post-abortal and puerperal sepsis. Beliefs about causes, and failure of orthodox methods of treatment have led many couples to seek solution from traditional doctors and faith healers without success. Infertility causes marital disharmony, which often leads to divorce. Women are often blamed for the infertility and men engage in polygyny in an attempt to have children. The couple can also suffer stress from the management of the infertility. Adoption is not popular and assisted reproduction has medico-legal implications. Preventive measures are suggested, including counselling at every stage of the management. PMID:14529236

  19. What Infertility Treatments Are Available?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Males Fertility Treatments for Females Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Treatments for Diseases That Cause Infertility Other FAQs ... medications to embryo implantation through assisted reproductive technology (ART). There are treatments that are specifically for men ...

  20. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Harton, Gary L; Tempest, Helen G

    2012-01-01

    Infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family. Despite this, the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered. Nevertheless, more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified. This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically: chromosomal aneuploidy, structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions. Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans. Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin, but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts. Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm. Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed, as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases. Clinical recommendations where possible will be made, as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility. PMID:22120929

  1. Preconceived notions : the social construction of male infertility

    E-print Network

    Barnes, Liberty Elizabeth Walther

    2011-01-01

    feelings of depression due to their “infertility. ” Some menand depression suffered by infertile women. Infertility isInfertility research over the past thirty years has captured the devastation, depression,

  2. Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PATIENT FACT SHEET Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility When a couple has trouble having a baby, ... to find out what may be causing your infertility. Semen analysis Semen analysis is probably the first ...

  3. Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Reproductive Medicine 7 Things Only Someone Dealing With Infertility Understands From: Headlines in Reproductive Medicine Cervical cancer ... societies. Latest Additions: Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility Robotic surgery The Intrauterine Device (IUD): A Long- ...

  4. Infertility: A Crisis with No Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Robert R.; Koraleski, Stephanie

    1990-01-01

    Discusses helpful ways for mental health counselors to work with infertile clients, explaining nature of infertility, psychological crisis it provokes, common reactions of infertile clients, and strategies to help clients cope. Discusses specific strategies for assessing clients' potential for suicide or self-destructive acts and improving their…

  5. Infertility and Life Satisfaction among Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillan, Julia; Stone, Rosalie A. Torres; Greil, Arthur L.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from a random sample of 580 midwestern women, the authors explore the association between lifetime infertility and life satisfaction. Past research shows lower life satisfaction among those seeking help for infertility. The authors find no direct effects of lifetime infertility, regardless of perception of a problem, on life…

  6. Childlessness: Strategies for Coping with Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woollett, Anne

    1985-01-01

    Examines the coping strategies adopted by 50 infertile men and women. All interviewed had sought medical help, and many became knowledgeable about reproduction and infertility. Redefining the problem and managing negative concepts about infertility were other coping strategies. Seeking social support, positive identities, and other ways of meeting…

  7. Sex and Intimacy among Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greil, Arthur; And Others

    Infertility is a widespread health problem in the United States, affecting anywhere from 10 to 15 percent and perhaps even a greater percentage of U.S. couples. Infertility can have far-reaching effects on life satisfaction, well-being, and psychological adjustment. This paper presents an analysis of sex and intimacy among infertile couples based…

  8. Infertility: An Unanticipated and Prolonged Life Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Linda; Gilbert, Mary S.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews literature on infertility with a focus on myths and misunderstandings about the causes of infertility; a description of the crisis of infertility including common psychological responses; the additional psychological complexity introduced by medical procedures and reproductive technology; and suggestions for mental health counselors.…

  9. Psychobiological profiles in infertile men.

    PubMed

    Hubert, W; Hellhammer, D H; Freischem, C W

    1985-01-01

    To investigate the psychosomatic impact in male infertility, we analysed relationships among psychological (life events, personality attitudes) and biological (gonadotrophins, sex steroids, seminal parameters) variables in 101 husbands of barren couples. In patients with subnormal fertility parameters, personality attitudes were not different from those of a reference group of the questionnaire (FAPK) used in this study. However, patients with high scores on test scales such as regression, hypochondria, or emotional vacuity showed better fertility characteristics. These results agree with previously reported data, suggesting that social assertiveness and extraversion but not introversion and depression are associated with male infertility. PMID:3925136

  10. Hysterosalpingographic evaluation of primary and secondary infertility

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Muhammad Usman; Anwar, Saleha; Mahmood, Syed

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the pathological patterns of fallopian tubes and uterus on hysterosalpingogrphy (HSG) examination in cases of infertility. Methods: Two years retrospective charts review of patients referred to our centre for HSG evaluation of infertility, from July 2008 to July 2010. Results: Four thousand one hundred eight hysterosalpingograms were carried out at our centre during the study period. Out of these, 1999 (48.6%) were primary infertility cases while the 2109 (51.3%) were of secondary infertility. Mean age of presentation for primary infertility was 30 years and 35 years for secondary infertility. Bilateral free peritoneal spill was noted in 60% of cases. Unilateral tubal blockage was present in 15% and bilateral tubal blockage in 10% of patients. Bilateral hydrosalpinx was present in 10% of patients and unilateral loculated spill was found in 5% of patients with primary infertility. Patients with uterine congenital anomalies were also evaluated and the frequency of bicornuate uterus was 4%, unicornuate uterus was 2% and uterine didelphys was 0.2%. Conclusions: Infertile patients who underwent HSG were mostly in older age group with secondary infertility being slightly more common emphasizing early work up and care. Most of the patients with primary infertility had normal HSG examination. To our knowledge this is the largest data for HSG to be presented from Pakistan.

  11. The Infertility Experience: Biopsychosocial Effects and Suggestions for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Kathryn J.; Baldo, Tracy D.

    2004-01-01

    Infertility affects many individuals and couples. This article begins with a case study of a couple who have experienced infertility yet do not identify infertility as their presenting problem. Clients and counselors alike often overlook infertility. This article offers an overview of the biology of infertility and its psychological and…

  12. The changing prevalence of infertility.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, Felice; Serour, Gamal I; Chapron, Charles

    2013-12-01

    Infertility is a major, multifaceted issue worldwide whose prevalence is increasing in both high- and low-income countries. The reasons are numerous, and may differ among world regions, but lifestyle and nutritional factors, epidemic infections, and sexually transmitted diseases are major determinants in most latitudes. Three other reasons may explain the increasing incidence of infertility. First, owing to the widespread use of contraception, the choice of delaying the first pregnancy until the third decade of life places men and women at higher risk for sexually transmitted diseases, and women at higher risk for uterine fibroids, endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and chronic anovulation. Second, prolonged exposure to chronic stress and environmental pollutants may play a critical role in decreasing fertility. Third, gonadotoxic oncologic treatments allow many patients to survive cancer, at the cost of their fertility. This consideration may justify the development of treatments that preserve fertility. PMID:24112745

  13. [Sophrology: a different tool for infertile couples].

    PubMed

    Heymès, O; Forges, T; Guillet-May, F; Zaccabri, A; Dandachi, N; Monnier, P

    2006-12-01

    Because of the high degree of complexity of assisted reproduction techniques (ART), the human and conscious dimensions of infertility problems are often neglected. Different strategies may help infertile couples coping with infertility and related treatments; among these, Caycedian sophrology relies on the cognitive, emotional, and somatic aspects of consciousness. In the present article, the authors report on their experience with sophrologic support for infertile patients by a midwife qualified in caycedian sophrology. Overall, since 1988, 310 couples have benefied from this kind of support, with an average of 10 sophrologic trainings per patient. Whereas some couples consider sophrology as a short time training to better cope with any particular aspect of their infertility treatment, others want to undertake more profound work on their body scheme. The authors wish to call the attention of ART professionals to this kind of medical support for infertile couples, and also to the particular role of midwives with sophrologic competence in an ART center. PMID:17151535

  14. The conventional management of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Lenzi, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    Although the male reproductive function is impaired in about half of infertile couples, the evaluation of male infertility is underrated or neglected even today. In addition to a physical examination and imaging techniques, semen analysis as well as endocrine and genetic analyses should be part of the routine investigation. Few disorders have become subjects of rational treatment of the infertile male, even though, as examples, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is treatable by gonadotropins and obstructive azoospermia by reconstructive surgery. Early treatment of maldescended testes and sexually transmitted diseases can prevent infertility. Similar pregnancy rates from patients with varicocele following surgery or counseling demonstrate the important role of the physician in the treatment of infertility. In the age of evidence-based medicine, most empirical treatments have been demonstrated to be ineffective. Instead, symptomatic treatment by assisted reproductive techniques has become a central tool to overcome otherwise untreatable male infertility. PMID:24079474

  15. The Chinese experience of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Lee, T Y; Chu, T Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experiences of Chinese men who were diagnosed as infertile. Thirty men who had experienced infertility were interviewed in or near the clinic of a large general teaching hospital located in Taiwan. The interviews were analyzed using content analysis. Five categories were generated from the interview data: emotional response after hearing the diagnosis; seeking possible explanations for the diagnosis; using alternative treatments other than those of Western medicine; stressfrom the discovery of the infertility secret by family, relatives, and friends; and grief for discontinuation of the family heritage. Men in this study described infertility as a frustrating and stressful experience. Findings from this study can add to the knowledge base on infertility and contribute to recommendations for improving the ways that health professionals guide, counsel, and support men who are infertile. PMID:11675797

  16. Beyond the Mechanics of Infertility: Perspectives on the Social Psychology of Infertility and Involuntary Childlessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Anne Martin; Matthews, Ralph

    1986-01-01

    Examines the social and social psychological implications of infertility and involuntary childlessness. Examines the clinical and popular literature on the correlates and causes of infertility and the social psychological consequences of infertility. Suggests ways that family practitioners and researchers might overcome some of the limitations.…

  17. Social correlates of female infertility in Uzbekistan.

    PubMed

    Jumayev, Izatulla; Harun-Or-Rashid, Md; Rustamov, Oybek; Zakirova, Nodira; Kasuya, Hideki; Sakamoto, Junichi

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this matched case-control study was to investigate the social correlates of primary infertility among females aged 35 years or less. The study was conducted in the Clinics of Samarkand Medical Institute, Uzbekistan, among 120 infertile and 120 healthy women matched by age, residential area, and occupation from January to June 2009. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire. Median duration of infertility was 10.0 months (interquartile range = 6.0-13.0). The rate of remarriage was 3.5 times higher among infertile women compared with healthy subjects. Insufficient family income, poor quality of life, life stress, and discontentment with daily routines as well as 'bad' relationships with family members (husband, mother- and father-in-law) were significant correlates of female infertility. Infertile women were more likely to underestimate the importance of sexual intimacy, and a negative attitude to sex. Female infertility is associated with various social correlates leading to higher remarriage rates and to further complicating the problem of infertility. Thus, a correction of women's basic attitudes and their relationships to their surrounding social habitat should be an essential component of any program of infertility management. PMID:23092100

  18. Eastern medicine approaches to male infertility.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Zhang, Yuehui; Ma, Hongli; Ng, Ernest H Y; Wu, Xiao-Ke

    2013-07-01

    Male factor is a common cause of infertility and the male partner must be systematically evaluated in the workup of every infertile couple. Various Eastern medical strategies have been tried with variable success. This article describes the clinical effects of Eastern medicine approaches including acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, massage, yoga, tai chi, and qi gong, which could improve the sperm parameters and motility, genital inflammatory conditions, as well as immune system disorders, sexual dysfunction, and varicocele. Acupuncture reduces inflammation, increases sperm motility, improves semen parameters, modulates the immune system, and improves sexual and ejaculatory dysfunction in male infertility. The clinical effects may be mediated via activation of somatic afferent nerves innervating the skin and muscle. Chinese herbal medicines may also exert helpful effects in male infertility, and it is worth noting that some herbal drugs may result in male infertility. Massage also exerts positive effects in male infertility. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of clinical effects are unclear. Tai chi, qi gong, and yoga have not been investigated in male infertility, but it has been reported to regulate endocrine and central or autonomic nervous systems. In conclusion, Eastern medical approaches have beneficial on reproductive effects in male infertility. However, future well-designed, randomized, clinical control trials are needed to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and mechanisms of Eastern medical approaches for male infertility. PMID:23775386

  19. Ethical and Psychosocial Impact of Female Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Leyser-Whalen, Ophra; Temple, Jeff R.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript reviews research from the past year on the ethical and psychosocial impact of infertility on women and men. We discuss several issues surrounding ovarian stimulation, particularly high-order multiple births, egg banking (especially for research purposes), and diminished ovarian reserve. We also present recent work on distress and counseling, which includes greater attention to subgroups of infertile women. More research on issues confronting men has emerged recently, and we outline these with regard to their relationships with infertile women, or as the infertility patient. Last, we outline some ethical issues posed by newer procedures of fertility preservation and uterine transplant. PMID:23336092

  20. Request for Infertility Treatment Expense Reimbursement Employee Name: ____________________________ Dartmouth ID: ______________

    E-print Network

    Bucci, David J.

    Request for Infertility Treatment Expense Reimbursement Employee Name-mail #12;Information about the Infertility Treatment Reimbursement Benefit: Description of Benefit of infertility treatments and associated services. This benefit is available to regular benefits

  1. Genetics Home Reference: CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CATSPER-Related Male Infertility Health Topic: Assisted Reproductive Technology RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association: Semen Analysis You might also find information on the diagnosis or management of CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility in Educational ...

  2. Domestic violence in Iranian infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhan, Zohre; Ozgoli, Giti; Azar, Mahyar; Alavimajd, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Millions of men and women suffer from infertility worldwide. In many cultures, infertile women are at risk of social and emotional problems. Infertility may affect the public health in many countries. Domestic violence is the intentional use of physical force, power or threat against oneself, another person or another group or community which leads to injury, death, mental harm, lack of development or deprivation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of domestic violence against infertile women who referred to the infertility centres of Tehran, Iran in 2011. Methods: This was cross- sectional descriptive study conducted on 400 infertile women who were selected through convenient sampling method. The questionnaire used in this study included two sections: a demographic section with questions about demographic characteristics of the infertile women and their husbands; and the domestic violence questionnaire with questions about physical, emotional and sexual violence. Data were analysed by SPSS16; descriptive statistics, Spearman’s test, t- test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression were used for data analysis. Results: Four hundred women with the average age of 30.50 ± 6.16 years participated in the study; of whom, 34.7% experienced domestic violence physical violence (5.3%), emotional violence (74.3%) and sexual violence (47.3%). Domestic violence was significantly associated with unwanted marriage, number of IVFs, drug abuse, emotional status of the women, smoking and addiction or drug abuse of the spouse, mental and physical diseases of the husband (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Many of the current problems in this society, particularly in families are due to the transition of the society from a traditional model to a modern one. The majority of the infertile women experience violence in Iran. Domestic violence against infertile women is a problem that should not be ignored. Clinicians should identify abused women. Providing counseling services to women in infertility treatment centers is suggested to prevent domestic violence against infertile women. PMID:25695010

  3. www.livestrong.org Female Infertility

    E-print Network

    Brent, Roger

    www.livestrong.org Female Infertility Some female cancer survivors find that they are not able take steps before treatment to preserve your fertility. For survivors who have already completed treatment, there are other options for having children. Female Infertility Some female cancer survivors find

  4. Pastoral Care to the Infertile Couple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louw, D. J.

    This paper examines the crisis of infertility in the context of the biological or instinctual, cultural, and religious root of parenting. A therapeutic approach to the problem of infertility suggests that pastoral care should make a thorough diagnosis of the correlation between the motivation for parenting, role expectations in the social and…

  5. Choices and Motivations of Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Balen, Frank; Verdurmen, Jacqueline; Ketting, Evert

    1997-01-01

    Infertile couples' (N=131) consideration of options for dealing with infertility (medical help, adoption, fostering, alternative medicine, and focusing on other life goals) is studied. Options were related to specific motivations including altruistic motives for adoption or foster care. Results, timing of choices, and motivations are discussed.…

  6. Is Infertility Associated with Childhood Autism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grether, Judith K.; Qian, Yinge; Croughan, Mary S.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Schembri, Michael; Camarano, Loretta; Croen, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns persist about a possible link between infertility and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Interpretation of existing studies is limited by racial/ethnic homogeneity of study populations and other factors. Using a case-control design, we evaluated infertility history and treatment documented in medical records of members of Kaiser…

  7. Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... such as intrauterine insemination (IUI) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) Medicines to treat infections and clotting disorders ... not include advanced techniques such as in vitro fertilization (IVF).

  8. Social and Cultural Aspects of Infertility in Mozambique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrits, Trudie

    1997-01-01

    The sociocultural aspects of infertility among members of the matrilineal ethnic group Macua are studied. Strategies applied by infertile women, the use of traditional healers versus modern hospital, and explanations given for infertility are presented. Solutions attempted, social consequences of infertility, and recommendations for culturally…

  9. Variations in Antioxidant Genes and Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bolan; Huang, Zhaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from both endogenous and environmental resources, which in turn may cause defective spermatogenesis and male infertility. Antioxidant genes, which include catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione S-transferase (GST), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), play important roles in spermatogenesis and normal sperm function. In this review, we discuss the association between variations in major antioxidant genes and male infertility. Numerous studies have suggested that genetic disruption or functional polymorphisms in these antioxidant genes are associated with a higher risk for male infertility, which include low sperm quality, oligoasthenoteratozoospermia, oligozoospermia, and subfertility. The synergistic effects of environmental ROS and functional polymorphisms on antioxidant genes that result in male infertility have also been reported. Therefore, variants in antioxidant genes, which independently or synergistically occur with environmental ROS, affect spermatogenesis and contribute to the occurrence of male infertility. Large cohort and multiple center-based population studies to identify new antioxidant genetic variants that increase susceptibility to male infertility as well as validate its potential as genetic markers for diagnosis and risk assessment for male infertility for precise clinical approaches are warranted. PMID:26618172

  10. [When the unconscious is not infertile].

    PubMed

    Griner-Abraham, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Among infertile couples who are undergoing the process of medically assisted reproduction, those for whom no biological cause for their infertility has been detected are offered a meeting with a liaison psychiatry team. They can then continue consultations with a psychiatrist in private practice. These consultations confront the couples with the various conflicts, injuries and impulses, buried in their unconscious which can cause symptoms of infertility. What is at play for these men and women and for the structure of each couple in its singularity? PMID:25751913

  11. Investigation and Management of Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Vallely, John F.

    1983-01-01

    Infertility is rarely due only to the male or female partner. Usually each partner's fertility is in some way diminished. Male infertility may be related to deficiencies in spermatogenesis or sperm transport. Accurate diagnosis can be achieved only by a careful evaluation including precise semen analyses and, where indicated, gonadotropin and other assays. Treatment may be specific for physical or endocrine deficits, but is often empirical. Factors other than the sperm count, such as emission of sperm mainly at the beginning of ejaculation, low seminal volume with good quality sperm, excessive seminal viscosity, pyospermia, and idiopathic oligospermia, may be responsible for infertility. These may respond to simple measures. Understanding and empathy for the infertile couple is of the utmost importance. PMID:21283272

  12. Perspective in infertility: the ovarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Silvestris, Erica; D'Oronzo, Stella; Cafforio, Paola; D'Amato, Giuseppe; Loverro, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is a medical and social condition that affects millions of women worldwide and is today considered so far as a new disease. A considerable progress has been recently pursued in the field of the reproductive medicine and the infertility treatment may account for novel and modern procedures such as in vitro oocyte fertilization, egg donation, pregnancy surrogacy and preimplantation diagnosis. However, great interest has lately been reserved to the ovarian stem cells (OSCs) whose existence in woman ovaries has been proven. OSCs are thus suitable for developmental studies in infertility and in other clinical applications as endocrine derangements due to premature ovarian failure, or for infertility treatment after cancer chemotherapies, as well as in restoring the hormonal balance in postmenopausal age. PMID:26250560

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of azoospermia or severe oligospermia. What are the genetic changes related to Y chromosome infertility? As its ... Center . Where can I find general information about genetic conditions? The Handbook provides basic information about genetics ...

  14. Endometriosis and Infertility: Can Surgery Help?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Website of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Endometriosis and Infertility: Can Surgery Help? This fact sheet ... with The Society of Reproductive Surgeons What is endometriosis? Endometriosis is when tissue is found outside the ...

  15. Gestational surrogacy: Viewpoint of Iranian infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Azad; Sattarzadeh, Nilofar; Gholizadeh, Leila; Sheikhalipour, Zahra; Allahbakhshian, Atefeh; Hassankhani, Hadi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surrogacy is a popular form of assisted reproductive technology of which only gestational form is approved by most of the religious scholars in Iran. Little evidence exists about the Iranian infertile women's viewpoint regarding gestational surrogacy. AIM: To assess the viewpoint of Iranian infertile women toward gestational surrogacy. SETTING AND DESIGN: This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study sample consisted of 238 infertile women who were selected using the eligible sampling method. Data were collected by using a researcher developed questionnaire that included 25 items based on a five-point Likert scale. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Data analysis was conducted by SPSS statistical software using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Viewpoint of 214 women (89.9%) was positive. 36 (15.1%) women considered gestational surrogacy against their religious beliefs; 170 women (71.4%) did not assume the commissioning couple as owners of the baby; 160 women (67.2%) said that children who were born through surrogacy would better not know about it; and 174 women (73.1%) believed that children born through surrogacy will face mental problems. CONCLUSION: Iranian infertile women have positive viewpoint regarding the surrogacy. However, to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile women, further efforts are needed. PMID:22346081

  16. Psychopathology, emotional aspects and psychological counselling in infertility: a review.

    PubMed

    De Berardis, D; Mazza, M; Marini, S; Del Nibletto, L; Serroni, N; Pino, M C; Valchera, A; Ortolani, C; Ciarrocchi, F; Martinotti, G; Di Giannantonio, M

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, infertility has been variably defined. Infertility affects approximately 80 million people from all parts of the world. An important area of discussion has been represented by the possible causal link between psychopathology and infertility. In the past, the prevalence of psychiatric problems among infertile couples was estimated to be 25-60%. The incidence of depression and anxiety in infertile couples is significantly high than in fertile controls and in the general population respectively. Infertility has been linked to obsessive-compulsive symptoms, psychoticism, substance abuse and eating disorders. Psychological impact of infertility is greater in women than in men. Additionally, authors found that infertile patients were more alexithymic than healthy controls. In relation to the different needs, different psychological therapeutic interventions may be indicated. Psychological counseling can provide valuable assistance in dealing with infertility treatments and their eventual failures. PMID:24999571

  17. [Sport, infertility and erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Gulino, G; Sasso, F; D'Onofrio, A; Palermo, G; Di Luigi, F; Sacco, E; Pinto, F; Bassi, P F

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades a growing interest has been dedicated to prevention, diagnosis and therapy of male genital pathologies, such as varicocele, infertility and erectile dysfunction in the population involved in sport activities. High incidence (up to 30%) of varicocele has been reported in a population of athletes and up to 60-80% in the subgroup of body-builders. The incidence of varicocele specifically increases with hours of training, in a linear model. Controversial data come from literature about the effects of physical activity on fertility, with prevalence of trials demonstrating worsening of seminal parameters. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that physical stress in healthy male athletes can interfere with LH levels. Bicycling is one of the major risk factors for erectile dysfunction, with incidence of 13-24%. This is due to the prolonged compression of perineal arteries leading to reduced chronic penile perfusion. Bioengineering studies have been the basis for industry to produce specifically shaped saddles that significantly reduce and minimize compressive effects. Finally, high frequency of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in cyclists has been related to increased incidence of erectile dysfunction in comparison with normal population. PMID:20890868

  18. British South Asian communities and infertility services.

    PubMed

    Culley, Lorraine A; Hudson, Nicky; Rapport, Frances L; Katbamna, Savita; Johnson, Mark R D

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents key findings from the first major study of the provision of infertility services to South Asian communities in the UK. The research aimed to explore the social meanings of infertility and to examine the experiences of couples receiving fertility treatment. Focus groups with people from Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Indian communities (n = 93) revealed a strongly pro-natalist ideology and a relatively limited knowledge of infertility and treatments. Interviews with 50 participants from the same communities revealed a general satisfaction with secondary level infertility services. However, a minority felt inadequately informed about their condition, tests undertaken and treatment options; only one-third were given any written information about treatment; many were concerned about delays and waiting times; a minority felt that staff could be more sympathetic in their response to 'failed' treatment and several couples suggested that additional emotional support would be helpful. No information or resources were available in any South Asian language and the arrangements for communication support for non-English speakers were generally less than adequate. There was little evidence of the use of data on ethnic or religious background in infertility clinics. Recommendations for policy and practice are proposed. PMID:16581720

  19. Infertility Peer Support Groups are held on the 3rd

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    Infertility Peer Support Groups are held on the 3rd Thursday of every month (Couples Welcome!) Come groups to people with problems of infertility and education and assistance to associated professionals

  20. Infertility in Malawi: exploring its impact and social consequences 

    E-print Network

    de Kok, Christina

    Infertility is a serious personal, social and public health issue in developing countries such as Malawi. Infertility is often a ‘hidden’ problem in this context as the policy and service emphasis is on issues like infant ...

  1. What Treatment Options Are Available for Male Infertility?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Publications What treatment options are available for male infertility? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... deliver a live-born infant, in most cases, infertility has no other outward symptoms. The evaluation of ...

  2. Genetic Cause of Infertility Associated with Uterine Fibroids

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Advances Supported Networks, Programs & Initiatives Genetic Cause of Infertility Associated with Uterine Fibroids Skip sharing on social ... To determine whether TSC genes were involved in infertility related to fibroids, scientists funded by the Fertility ...

  3. How Common is Male Infertility, and What Are Its Causes?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Trials Resources and Publications How common is male infertility, and what are its causes? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Infertility is defined clinically in women and men who ...

  4. Roles and Role Conflict of Women in Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Janet R.

    1979-01-01

    Explores the experience of role conflict for women in infertile couples. Findings lead to an understanding of infertility as part of an interactional system for dealing with potentially intolerable sources of role conflict. (Author)

  5. Male Infertility Might Signal Higher Odds of Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155748.html Male Infertility Might Signal Higher Odds of Testicular Cancer Abnormally ... men who underwent semen analysis as part of infertility treatment between 1996 and 2011. They were compared ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Sensorineural deafness and male infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and male infertility is unknown. What are the genetic changes related to sensorineural deafness and male infertility? ... Center . Where can I find general information about genetic conditions? The Handbook provides basic information about genetics ...

  7. Religion, infertility and assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Dutney, Andrew

    2007-02-01

    This chapter describes religion in general before discussing the centrality of its concern for family formation. In light of this, the impact of infertility on religious people is considered. Recognizing religion's cautiously positive attitude towards assisted reproductive technology (ART) as a potential ally in the project of family formation and the relief of infertility, two areas that have caused concern for the religions are discussed: perceived threats to marriage and the sanctity of the human embryo. Throughout the chapter, illustrations are drawn from particular religions, including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism. There are striking similarities in their concerns and in the range of their responses to ART. Ways in which medical personnel should take into account the religious dimensions of the experience of infertility in their care for patients are suggested. PMID:17110170

  8. Impact of obesity on infertility in women

    PubMed Central

    Da?, Zeynep Özcan; Dilbaz, Berna

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and overweight are increasing and have become an epidemic worldwide. Obesity has detrimental influences on all systems, including reproductive health. The prevalence of obesity in infertile women is high, and it is well known that there is an association between obesity and infertility. The relationship between obesity and reproductive functions is still being explored. Overweight women have a higher incidence of menstrual dysfunction and anovulation. Overweight and obese women are at a high risk for reproductive health. The risk of subfecundity and infertility, conception rates, miscarriage rates, and pregnancy complications are increased in these women. They have poor reproductive outcomes in natural as well as assisted conception. These poor reproductive outcomes include assisted reproduction such as ovulation induction, in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI), and ovum donation cycles. Weight loss has beneficial effects on the reproductive outcomes in these patients. PMID:26097395

  9. Infertility and the provision of infertility medical services in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, Willem; Cooke, Ian; Dyer, Silke; Serour, Gamal; Devroey, Paul

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Worldwide more than 70 million couples suffer from infertility, the majority being residents of developing countries. Negative consequences of childlessness are experienced to a greater degree in developing countries when compared with Western societies. Bilateral tubal occlusion due to sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy-related infections is the most common cause of infertility in developing countries, a condition that is potentially treatable with assisted reproductive technologies (ART). New reproductive technologies are either unavailable or very costly in developing countries. This review provides a comprehensive survey of all important papers on the issue of infertility in developing countries. METHODS Medline, PubMed, Excerpta Medica and EMBASE searches identified relevant papers published between 1978 and 2007 and the keywords used were the combinations of ‘affordable, assisted reproduction, ART, developing countries, health services, infertility, IVF, simplified methods, traditional health care'. RESULTS The exact prevalence of infertility in developing countries is unknown due to a lack of registration and well-performed studies. On the other hand, the implementation of appropriate infertility treatment is currently not a main goal for most international non-profit organizations. Keystones in the successful implementation of infertility care in low-resource settings include simplification of diagnostic and ART procedures, minimizing the complication rate of interventions, providing training-courses for health-care workers and incorporating infertility treatment into sexual and reproductive health-care programmes. CONCLUSIONS Although recognizing the importance of education and prevention, we believe that for the reasons of social justice, infertility treatment in developing countries requires greater attention at National and International levels. PMID:18820005

  10. Clomiphene citrate in the management of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lauren W; Ryan, Amanda R; Meacham, Randall B

    2013-07-01

    Clomiphene citrate, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has been used to treat infertility in women and men for 50 years. In men, clomiphene citrate has been employed in the management of unexplained infertility, oligo and asthenospermia, hypogonadism, and nonobstructive azoospermia. The available evidence reveals mixed results and suggests that clomiphene citrate may be appropriate for the management of male infertility in specific clinical scenarios. Further research is needed to clarify when clomiphene citrate is indicated in the treatment of male infertility. PMID:23775379

  11. Exploration of Infertile Couples’ Support Requirements: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari, Fatemeh; Ghahiri, Ataollah; Habibi, Mojtaba; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to high prevalence of infertility, increasing demand for infertility treatment, and provision of high quality of fertility care, it is necessary for healthcare professionals to explore infertile couples’ expectations and needs. Identification of these needs can be a prerequisite to plan the effective supportive interventions. The current study was, therefore, conducted in an attempt to explore and to understand infertile couples’ experiences and needs. Materials and Methods This is a qualitative study based on a content analysis ap- proach. The participants included 26 infertile couples (17 men and 26 women) and 7 members of medical personnel (3 gynecologists and 4 midwives) as the key informants. The infertile couples were selected from patients attending public and private infertility treatment centers and private offices of infertility specialists in Isfahan and Rasht, Iran, during 2012-2013. They were selected through purposive sampling method with maximum variation. In-depth unstructured interviews and field notes were used for data gathering among infertile couples. The data from medical personnel was collected through semi-structured interviews. The interview data were analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results Data analysis revealed four main categories of infertile couples’ needs, including: i. Infertility and social support, ii. Infertility and financial support, iii. Infertility and spiritual support and iv. Infertility and informational support. The main theme of all these categories was assistance and support. Conclusion The study showed that in addition to treatment and medical needs, infertile couples encounter various challenges in different emotional, psychosocial, communicative, cognitive, spiritual, and economic aspects that can affect various areas of their life and lead to new concerns, problems, and demands. Thus, addressing infertile couples’ needs and expectations alongside their medical treatments as well as provision of psychosocial services by development of patient-centered approaches and couple-based interventions can improve their quality of life and treatment results and also relieve their negative psychosocial consequences. PMID:25918596

  12. CATSPER2, a human autosomal nonsyndromic male infertility gene

    E-print Network

    Lancet, Doron

    ARTICLE CATSPER2, a human autosomal nonsyndromic male infertility gene Nili Avidan1 , Hannah Tamary in spermatozoa) may explain the observed deafness and male infertility phenotypes. To the best of our knowledge associated with nonsyndromic male infertility. European Journal of Human Genetics (2003) 11, 497­502. doi:10

  13. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Treat Infertility Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Eifert, Georg H.

    2011-01-01

    Women and men diagnosed with infertility experience a variety of infertility-related stressors, including changes to their family and social networks, strain on their sexual relationship, and difficulties and unexpected challenges in their relationship. Infertility stress is linked with depression and psychological distress, and can lead to…

  14. Frustrated Fertility: Infertility and Psychological Distress among Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillan, Julia; Greil, Arthur L.; White, Lynn; Jacob, Mary Casey

    2003-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that women who have experienced infertility report higher psychological distress. Examines whether roles or resources condition the effects of infertility or whether its effects are limited to childless women. Infertility combined with involuntary childlessness is associated with significantly greater distress. For women in…

  15. Sexual behavior of infertile women: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Bokaie, Mahshid; Simbar, Masoumeh; Yassini Ardekani, Seyed Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility makes an essential challenge to the sexual life of couples, especially infertile women. When pregnancy does not happen, infertile women think that sexual intercourse is not fruitful and sexual desire became reduce gradually. Infertile women progressively forget that their sexual relationship is also a response to their natural need. Objective: This qualitative study was conducted to explore the infertility consequences in the sexual behavior of infertile women. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative content analysis study; and it was part of a widespread study, used a sequential mixed-method and conducted from August 2014 until February 2015. A purposeful sampling was used to recruit infertile women who had referred to Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility. Data gathering techniques employed in this research included in-depth semi structured open face-to-face interviews and field notes. Credibility, transferability, confirm ability, and dependability were assessed for the rigor of the data collection. Results: Totally, 15 infertile women and 8 key informants were interviewed. Data analysis showed four themes about impact of infertility on female sexual behavior: 1/ Impact of infertility drugs on couple sexual behavior, 2/ Impact of assisted reproductive technologies on female sexual behavior, 3/ Timed intercourse during infertility and 4/ The psychological impact of infertility on sexual behavior. Conclusion: Some of Iranian infertile women could cope with their problems, but some of them were very affected by infertility drugs and assisted reproductive technologies procedures. Psychosexual counseling before medical treatment could help them to have a better sexual life. PMID:26644793

  16. Characteristics of the Biopsychosocial Crisis of Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Ellen Piel

    1987-01-01

    Presents a framework for understanding the crisis of infertility which is characterized by extensive anxiety, damaged self-esteem, grief, uncertainty about the future, and estranged relationships with each other and with family and friends. Proposes some interventions appropriate to helpers from a variety of disciplines. (ABB)

  17. Coping Processes of Couples Experiencing Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Newton, Christopher R.; Rosen, Karen H.; Schulman, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the coping processes of couples experiencing infertility. Participants included 420 couples referred for advanced reproductive treatments. Couples were divided into groups based on the frequency of their use of eight coping strategies. Findings suggest that coping processes, which are beneficial to individuals, may be…

  18. Melatonin hormone profile in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Awad, Hosni; Halawa, Fawzy; Mostafa, Taymour; Atta, Hazem

    2006-06-01

    Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland. There is much controversy about its relationship to the male reproductive process. In this study, seminal plasma as well as the serum melatonin levels were studied in different infertile male groups and were correlated with their semen parameters and hormonal levels. One hundred twenty male cases subdivided into six equal groups were consecutively included; fertile normozoospermic men, oligoasthenozoospermia (OA), OA with leucocytospermia, OA with varicocele, non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) with high serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and NOA with normal FSH. Semen analysis, estimation of melatonin, FSH, testosterone (T) and prolactin (PRL) hormone was carried out. Mean level of serum melatonin was higher than its corresponding seminal concentrations in all investigated groups with a positive correlation between their levels (r = 0.532, p = 0.01). Serum and seminal plasma melatonin levels in all infertile groups were reduced significantly compared with their levels in the fertile group. The lowest concentrations were in OA with leucocytospermia group. Melatonin in both serum and semen demonstrated significant correlation with sperm motility (r = 607, 0.623 respectively, p = 0.01). Serum melatonin correlated positively with serum PRL (r = 0.611, p = 0.01). It may be concluded that melatonin may be involved in the modulation of reproductive neuroendocrine axis in male infertility. Also, low levels of melatonin in semen were observed in infertile groups having reduced sperm motility, leucocytospermia, varicocele and NOA. PMID:16371109

  19. [CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH INFERTILITY].

    PubMed

    Pylyp, L Y; Spinenko, L O; Verhoglyad, N V; Kashevarova, O O; Zukin, V D

    2015-01-01

    To assess the frequency and structure of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with infertility, a retrospective analysis of cytogenetic studies of 3414 patients (1741 females and 1673 males), referred to the Clinic of reproductive medicine "Nadiya" from 2007 to 2012, was performed. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 2.37% patients: 2.79% in males and 1.95% in females. Balanced structural chromosomal abnormalities prevailed over numerical abnormalities and corresponded to 80.2% of all chromosomal abnormalities detected in the studied group. Sex chromosome abnormalities made up 23.5% of chromosomal pathology (19/81) and included gonosomal aneuploidies in 84% of cases (16/19) and structural abnormalities of chromosome Y in 16% of cases (3/19). The low level sex chromosome mosaicism was detected with the frequency of 0.55%. Our results highlight the importance of cytogenetic studies in patients seeking infertility treatment by assisted reproductive technologies, since an abnormal finding not only provide a firm diagnosis to couples with infertility, but also influences significantly the approach to infertility treatment in such patients. PMID:26214903

  20. Infertility and childlessness: a qualitative study of the experiences of infertile couples in Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infertility is a global reproductive health issue that affects many individuals and couples. Despite the high prevalence of infertility in Ghana, no study has been done on the experiences of infertile couples in Northern Ghana. This study therefore explored the experiences of infertile couples in Northern Ghana using the Upper West Region as a case study. Methods We interviewed fifteen childless couples, forty-five couples with children, and eight key informants using a semi-structured interview guide. We also carried out three focus group discussions; one for childless women, one for women with children and one for men with children. The data were transcribed, coded, arranged and analyzed for categories and themes. Results Infertile couples are socially stigmatised and excluded from leadership roles in their communities. Couples without children are denied membership in the ancestral world thereby losing the opportunity to live again. Both males and females are engaged in sex with multiple partners to prove their fertility. Conclusions Both men and women suffer from the social effects of childlessness. The desire to have biological children in a pronatalist society results in unhealthy practices. Health policy makers and gender advocates should be more concerned about infertility. PMID:23517021

  1. A survey on depression among infertile women in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The desire of many young women to become parents may be influenced by the premium placed on children by society. In Africa, children are highly valued for social, cultural and economic reasons. Infertile and childless women in Africa are therefore confronted with a series of societal discrimination and stigmatization which may lead to psychological disorders such as anxiety and depression. Even though some research has been done on the prevalence of infertility in Ghana, very little is known about the psychological impact of childlessness among infertile women. The present study aimed to examine prevalence and severity of depression in relation to age, type of infertility and duration of infertility in Ghanaian infertile women. Methods A total of 100 infertile women who met the selection criteria and had agreed to participate in the study were interviewed using the Beck Depression Inventory questionnaire from December 2012 to April 2013 at the Tamale Teaching Hospital, Tamale/Ghana. Data concerning socio-demographic characteristics such as age, monthly income, duration of infertility, marital status, educational level, number of previous conception, number of previous children, religion, as well as occupation of the respondents were recorded. Results The prevalence of depression among the women was 62.0% with the level of depression showing a significant positive correlation with age of the women and the duration of infertility. The level of depression was significantly higher among subjects with low or no formal education and among the unemployed. Women with primary infertility also presented with high depression scores as measured by BDI. Conclusions In conclusion, the prevalence of depression among the infertile women is high, especially among infertile women age 26 and above, those who are less educated, those with primary infertility, as well as those who have been diagnosed as infertile for more than 3 years. Interventions to decrease and prevent the development of severe depression among these patients should be considered. PMID:24612693

  2. An epidemiologic survey on the causes of infertility in patients referred to infertility center in Fatemieh Hospital in Hamadan

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Seyedeh Zahra; Parsa, Parisa; Darvish, Nooshin; Mokhtari, Sahar; Yavangi, Mahnaz; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is considered as a major health care problem of different communities. The high prevalence of this issue doubled its importance. A significant proportion of infertility have been related to environmental conditions and also acquired risk factors. Different environmental conditions emphasized the need to study the different causes of infertility in each area. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency causes of infertility in infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional descriptive study 1200 infertile men and women that were referred to infertility clinic of Fatemieh Hospital during 2010 to 2011, were examined. This center is the only governmental center for infertility in Hamadan. Sampling was based on census method. Information about the patients was obtained from medical examinations and laboratory findings. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics such as frequencies and the mean were used. Results: The prevalence of primary and secondary infertility was 69.5% and 30.5% respectively. Among the various causes of infertility women factors (88.6%) had the highest regard. In the causes of female infertility, menstrual disorders, diseases (obesity, thyroid diseases, and diabetes), ovulation dysfunction, uterine factor, fallopian tubes and cervical factor had the highest prevalence respectively. The causes of male infertility based on their frequency included semen fluid abnormalities, genetic factors, vascular abnormalities, and anti-spermatogenesis factors, respectively. Conclusion: Etiology pattern of infertility in our study is similar with the many other patterns that have been reported by the World Health Organization. However, frequency of menstrual disorders is much higher than other studies that require further consideration. PMID:26568755

  3. Frequency and epidemiologic aspects of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Sohrabvand, Farnaz; Jafari, Mohammad; Shariat, Mamak; Haghollahi, Fedyeh; Lotfi, Mandana

    2015-01-01

    According to different geographical conditions, human health in different sub-regions of the world and cultural differences, the male factor infertility has heterogeneous causes in the world. This study was performed in an attempt to clarify the associated factors which might play a role in this respect in a group of Iranian infertile men. This study was a cross - sectional, descriptive and retrospective study. The information was obtained from the men who had attended the clinic from March 2004-2006. The factors which were studied in this research are the demographic characteristics, smoking, addiction, alcohol drinking, and exposure to lead, cimetidine and history of surgery. In 23.7 % of couples the cause of infertility was pure male factor and in 19.3 % of them the problem was related to male and female factor both. The most important associated factors for male factor included smoking (29%) and history of varicocele operation (22%). Since the quality of individual and social life is related to fertility state, it seems that more comprehensive studies on factors affecting male fertility at the community level are justified and recommended. PMID:25871021

  4. CHLAMYDIAL INFECTION, PLASMA PEROXIDATION AND OBESITY IN TUBAL INFERTILITY

    PubMed Central

    Nsonwu-Anyanwu, A.C.; Charles-Davies, M.A.; Oni, A.A.; Taiwo, V.O.; Bello, F.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Genital tract infections and obesity are both sources of oxidative stress. Alterations in immune and antioxidant parameters may arise from this or from an indeterminate autoimmune mechanism. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the association of Chlamydial infection, obesity and oxidative response with tubal infertility in Nigerian women. Methods: It was a case-control study of 40 women with tubal infertility and 32 fertile women, respectively, recruited from the Infertility and Family Planning Clinics respectively, of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Anthropometric indices were measured in each subject and endocervical swabs were taken to screen for current genital tract infection. Antioxidant, hormonal and immunologic analysis were performed on serum. Results: None of the subjects had current genital tract infections. Chlamydia trachomatis IgG positivity was significantly higher in infertile than in fertile subjects [OR 4.33; 95%CI (0.078-0.681)]. No significant variations were observed in the anthropometric indices, antioxidant parameters and hormones between infertile and the fertile women. Body mass index correlated positively with oxidative stress in infertile subjects. Waist and hip circumferences correlated negatively with oestradiol in women with tubal infertility. Conclusion: Chlamydial infection is associated with tubal factor infertility, however, obesity seems to increase oxidative stress and reduce fertility potential in women with tubal factor infertility. PMID:25161489

  5. Constructing infertility in Malawi: Management of interpersonal, normative and moral issues in talk 

    E-print Network

    de Kok, Bregje Christina

    2007-01-01

    This study examines social constructions of infertility in Malawi. The literature on infertility consists of epidemiological studies, describing patterns of infertility in terms of its incidence, causes and health seeking ...

  6. From precocious puberty to infertility: metabolic control of the reproductive function

    E-print Network

    Abraham, Nader G.

    From precocious puberty to infertility: metabolic control of the reproductive function Jennifer W and reproductive dysfunction. Indeed, leptin-deficient patients become hyperphagic, massively obese, and infertile

  7. www.livestrong.org.livestrong.org Male InfertilityMale Infertility

    E-print Network

    Brent, Roger

    professional for more information. Please read the Suggestions (http://www.livestrong.org/Get-Help/Learn-About-Cancer/Cancer-Support. Please read the Suggestions (http://www.livestrong.org/Get-Help/Learn-About-Cancer/Cancer-Support-Cancer/Cancer-Support-Topics/Physical-Effects-of-Cancer/Male-Infertility#a#a) sections for questions

  8. A Comparative Study of Serum and Follicular Fluid Leptin Concentrations among Explained Infertile, Unexplained Infertile and Fertile Women

    PubMed Central

    Kamyabi, Zahra; Gholamalizade, Tayebe

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between metabolism and reproduction has been always considered as an important topic in female endocrinology. It seems that leptin is one of the involved factors in infertility. Leptin, in addition to regulating body weight plays an important role in regulation of endocrine, reproductive and immune systems. The aim of this stduy is to compare serum and follicular fluid leptin concentrations in order to find the role of leptin level in infertility. Materials and Methods This case-control study was performed from September 2010 to March 2013. A total of 90 women referred to the Infertility Center of Afzalipour Hos- pital, Kerman, Iran, and divided into three equal groups (n=30/per group) of explained infertile (including 4 subgroups), unexplained infertile and normal fertile (control group). The three groups were matched in regard to demographic features [age: 20-40 years and body mass index (BMI): 20-25]. In order to determine leptin level, blood sample and fol- licular fluid were taken one hour prior and at the time of follicular puncture, respectively. Serum and follicular fluid leptin levels were measured using enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Data were analyzed using descriptive-analytic tests, like Mann- Whitney and Kruskal Wallis tests, through Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16. Results In explained infertile and fertile groups, as opposed to unexplained infertile group, mean leptin level was lower in follicular fluid than in serum. Mean follicular fluid leptin concentration in women with unexplained infertility was higher com- pared to the other two groups. Women with unexplained infertility had lower level of serum leptin in comparison to the other two groups. Follicular fluid leptin level in all subgroups of explained infertile group was lower as compared to unexplained and fertile women. Conclusion The results suggested that high leptin level of follicular fluid is one of the main factors involved in infertility. PMID:26246872

  9. Associations of Psychosocial Factors with the Stress of Infertility Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Myra G.; Forthofer, Melinda S.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial factors thought to be associated with perceived stress over the course of infertility treatment. The research was based on secondary analysis of data from the Study of Marriage, Family, and Life Quality with a sample of 128 people who completed an infertility-related stress instrument at all three measurement…

  10. Predictors of Psychological Distress among Infertility Clinic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Kelly A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigated predictors of psychological distress among infertility clinic patients. Analyses indicated that infertile men and women reported greater psychological distress than the general population. Self-blame and avoidance coping significantly predicted psychological distress among men and women. Increased age and childlessness added to…

  11. Psychotherapy for Infertility: A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach for Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Lisa B.; Wark, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Describes a cognitive-behavioral model for treating couples' negative reactions to infertility. After a discussion of why the cognitive-behavioral approach can competently address the goals of couples coping with infertility, three phases of treatment are outlined: assessment, therapy, and closure. Areas for assessment include spouses, marital…

  12. Infertility in the Gambia: Traditional and Modern Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundby, Johanne

    1997-01-01

    A population survey was undertaken to study infertility in Gambia. All infertile women in 24 randomly selected enumeration areas were assessed. Problems faced, coping mechanisms employed, and types of health care available were examined. Patterns of consultation with traditional versus formal health care and rural/urban differences were uncovered…

  13. Themes of Hope and Healing: Infertile Couples' Experiences of Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniluk, Judith C.; Hurtig-Mitchell, Joss

    2003-01-01

    Using qualitative approach, authors explored the experiences of becoming parents through adoption after unsuccessful infertility treatments. Analysis of data revealed three overarching themes. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for counselors who work with infertile couples considering adoption, clients engaged in adoption…

  14. Infertility: A Review of Physical and Emotional Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kredentser, Jeremy V.

    1986-01-01

    Infertility affects 15% of couples. The primary causes are poor sperm production, ovulation defects, and fallopian tube obstruction, which can be detected by a simple, logical investigation. Infertility and its investigation precipitate characteristic emotional responses that require care by an informed, sensitive physician. PMID:21267117

  15. Females become infertile as the stored sperm's oxygen radicals increase

    E-print Network

    Richner, Heinz

    Females become infertile as the stored sperm's oxygen radicals increase Klaus Reinhardt1,2,3 & Anne-vitro studies suggest that oxidative sperm damage causes infertility. Oxidative sperm damage can be reduced via should evolve frequently, especially during female sperm storage. However, in-vivo evidence linking

  16. Infertility Evaluation and Treatment among Women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Lawrence M.; Craig, Benjamin M.; Plosker, Shayne M.; Reed, Damon R.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the characteristics of women seeking infertility evaluation and treatment. Design Cross-sectional survey based on in-person interviews, followed by two-step hurdle analysis. Participants 4,558 married or cohabitating women ages 25–44 Setting U.S. household population of women based on the 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth Intervention None Main Outcome Measure(s) Likelihood of seeking preliminary infertility evaluation. Likelihood of seeking infertility treatment once evaluated. Treatment type provided. Results 623 women (13.7%) reported seeking infertility evaluation, of which 328 reported undergoing subsequent infertility treatment. Age at marriage, marital status, education, health insurance status, race/ethnicity, and religion were associated with the likelihood of seeking infertility evaluation. For example, the predicted probability that a non-White woman who married at 25 will seek evaluation was 12%. This probability increased to 34% for White women with a graduate degree who married at age 30. Among women who are evaluated, income, employment status, and ethnicity correlated strongly with the likelihood of seeking infertility treatment. Infertility drug therapy was the most frequent treatment used. Reproductive surgery and in vitro fertilization (IVF) were used the least. Conclusions The use of infertility services is not random and understanding the socio-demographic factors correlated with use may assist new couples with family planning. Roughly 50% of the women evaluated for infertility progressed to treatment, and only a small proportion were treated with more advanced assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) such as IVF therapy. Future research aimed at improving access to effective healthcare treatments within the boundaries of affordability is warranted. PMID:23849845

  17. Cytokines in the blood and semen of infertile patients

    PubMed Central

    Havrylyuk, Anna; Chopyak, Valentyna; Boyko, Yaryna; Kril, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines have been important mediators of the immunity and can be involved in numerous processes in the male genital tract including acting as immunomodulatory elements within the male gonad. The aims of this study were: 1) to detect pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in the control group and subgroups of infertile men; and 2) to set up the practical recommendations concerning determination of cytokine levels for the male infertility diagnosis. Observations were performed in a group of 82 men: healthy controls (n = 27) and infertile patients (n = 55). The male infertility group was further subdivided into patients with: varicocele (n = 22), idiopathic infertility (n = 13) and partners of couples with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA; n = 20). Semen analysis was determined following WHO criteria. The cytokine interleukin 1? (IL-1?), IL-6, IL-10, IL-18; tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?), interferon g (IFN-g) and transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1) contents in serum and seminal plasma were determined by quantitative ELISA. An interesting marker of male infertility appears to be TGF-?1 (blood) significantly elevated in idiopathically infertile males and in the RSA group. Besides elevated TGF-?1 in a group of idiopathic infertility significantly elevated IL-10, IL-18, IFN-g (blood) and statistically decreased IL-1? while increased IFN-g were revealed in seminal plasma compared to healthy controls. We may postulate novel cytokine micropatterns for patients with different background of infertility. Therefore, circulating cytokines: IL-1?, IL-10, IL-18, TGF-?1, IFN-g and IL-1?, IFN-g and TGF-?1 in seminal plasma should be extended in evaluation of specific types of male infertility. PMID:26648778

  18. Possible fetal determinants of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Juul, Anders; Almstrup, Kristian; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Jensen, Tina K; Jørgensen, Niels; Main, Katharina M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Toppari, Jorma; Skakkebæk, Niels E

    2014-09-01

    Although common reproductive problems, such as male infertility and testicular cancer, present in adult life, strong evidence exists that these reproductive disorders might have a fetal origin. The evidence is derived not only from large epidemiological studies that show birth-cohort effects with regard to testicular cancer, levels of testosterone and semen quality, but also from histopathological observations. Many infertile men have histological signs of testicular dysgenesis, including Sertoli-cell-only tubules, immature undifferentiated Sertoli cells, microliths and Leydig cell nodules. The most severe gonadal symptoms occur in patients with disorders of sexual development (DSDs) who have genetic mutations, in whom even sex reversal of individuals with a 46,XY DSD can occur. However, patients with severe DSDs might represent only a small proportion of DSD cases, with milder forms of testicular dysgenesis potentially induced by exposure to environmental and lifestyle factors. Interestingly, maternal smoking during pregnancy has a stronger effect on spermatogenesis than a man's own smoking. Other lifestyle factors such as alcohol consumption and obesity might also have a role. However, increasing indirect evidence exists that exposure to ubiquitous endocrine disrupting chemicals, present at measurable concentrations in individuals, might affect development of human fetal testis. If confirmed, health policies to prevent male reproductive problems should not only target adult men, but also pregnant women and their children. PMID:24935122

  19. Developments in infertility counselling and its accreditation.

    PubMed

    Monach, Jim

    2013-03-01

    Infertility counselling was placed in a unique position by the passage of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 and the requirement that couples being treated should be offered counselling. However professional counselling was, and largely still is, at a stage at which there was no universal agreement on the knowledge, standards or qualifications required for practice. Nevertheless, infertility counselling became the first example of counselling to be required by statute, beyond the more generalised requirement in adoption birth records access. Counselling is intended to describe skilled talking therapy offered by a professional with specific training and qualifications directed to helping individuals and couples to achieve goals they own themselves. The therapeutic intervention of counselling is primarily directed to helping clients in a stressful situation to deploy their own coping skills effectively and thus make the difficult choices inseparable from ART. Counselling outcome research consistently demonstrates the effectiveness of the sort of counselling delivered in assisted conception units with mild-moderate anxiety and depression delivered by skilled and experienced practitioners. This article reviews the role of counsellors as members of the assisted conception clinical team and the status of regulation and accreditation in this very new profession. PMID:23548094

  20. Effect of fertility and infertility on longevity.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Shelley

    2015-05-01

    Changing demographic trends and projections of the survival and fertility rates of each generation have been a topic of great interest to not only demographers and epidemiologists but also to evolutionary biologists and reproductive endocrinologists. Compelling evolutionary theories suggest that there is an inverse association between fertility and longevity. Multiple historic, demographic, and current studies have since been conducted to test this theory, but the results have been inconclusive. The average number of children born to each woman has been declining progressively in developed countries during recent decades. This is in part due to changes in the behavior of couples but also to environmental factors. While improved accessibility to assisted reproductive technology can relieve some of the burden of infertility on these couples and lessen the problem of low total fertility rates in many developed countries, it is not enough to overcome the overall decrease in total fertility rates that we have witnessed in recent decades. This article critically reviews some important studies and provides an overview of this ongoing debate, while highlighting the relevance of trying to understand the possible mechanisms that may link fertility and infertility to longevity. PMID:25934598

  1. [Infertility: psychological-psychopathological consequences and cognitive-behavioural interventions].

    PubMed

    Mitsi, C; Efthimiou, K

    2014-01-01

    Infertility primarily refers to the biological inability of a man or a woman to contribute to conception. Infertility may also refer to the state of a woman who is unable to carry a pregnancy to full term, however other causes can be found in both sexes. The diagnosis of infertility and the concurrent medical treatment are rather stressful events for the couple and can provoke a number of negative symptoms such as depression, anxiety and psychosomatic symptoms which may interfere with the medical therapeutic procedures especially with the in-vitro fertilisation technique. The relationship between infertility and psychological factors has not been explored fully and are still under research. However current findings can be summarized in three basic hypotheses; namely, the effect of psychological factors on the appearance of infertility, the psychological consequences of infertility at the couple, and the reciprocal relation of psychological factors and infertility. Stress and anxiety activate the hypothalamic-adrenal axis (HPA), and this activation can disturb the hormones of fertility. The presence of depressive/anxiety symptoms seems to have a negative impact on the treatment of infertility and sometimes can be a risk factor for lower pregnancy rate. There is a possibility that psychological complaints could develop, prior, during and after the diagnosis of infertility and may interfere with the fertilisation therapy. Should such psychological complaints develop it is suggested that psychotherapeutic treatment is used in conjunction with the treatment approach of infertility, e.g. IVF. The above mentioned suggestion is supported by a large number of researchers and current research efforts focus on different psychotherapeutic interventions such as Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) has shown during research its superiority compared to other psychotherapeutic interventions and that could be an effective way to decrease the depressive and anxiety symptoms during several stages of the infertility treatment. Moreover Cognitive-Behavioural Group Therapy seems to strengthen the infertile couple's ability to deal with possible changes and the stress during the infertility treatment. It has also been reported in the research community that the use of CBT can improve the pregnancy rate. However, this finding should be viewed with caution due to its insufficient body of evidence and methodological problems incurred. PMID:25630548

  2. Why Sexually Transmitted Infections Tend to Cause Infertility: An Evolutionary Hypothesis

    E-print Network

    Müller, Viktor

    Opinion Why Sexually Transmitted Infections Tend to Cause Infertility: An Evolutionary Hypothesis infections (STIs) to cause infertility is likely to reflect an evolutionary adaptation of the patho- gens. We-induced infertility in other species. STIs are a common cause of human infertility worldwide (Box 1). While several

  3. Infertility and Parenthood: Does Becoming a Parent Increase Well-Being?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined parenthood among 174 infertile couples and 74 presumed fertile couples. Infertile women who became parents experienced greater global well-being but diminished marital well-being, compared with infertile women who had not become parents. Infertile men who became parents experienced same negative effects that wives reported but did not…

  4. Psychosocial Predictors of Life Quality: How Are They Affected by Infertility, Gender, and Parenthood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Longitudinally examined effects of infertility on marital and global life quality with 174 infertile couples and 74 fertile couples. By third interview, 42% of infertile couples and 36% of fertile couples were parents. Psychosocial predictors of life quality were highly similar for members of infertile and fertile couples and for couples with and…

  5. The experience of infertility: A review of recent literature

    PubMed Central

    Greil, Arthur L.; Slauson-Blevins, Kathleen; McQuillan, Julia

    2011-01-01

    About 10 years ago Greil published a review and critique of the literature on the socio-psychological impact of infertility. He found at the time that most scholars treated infertility as a medical condition with psychological consequences rather than as a socially constructed reality. This article examines research published since the last review. More studies now place infertility within larger social contexts and social scientific frameworks although clinical emphases persist. Methodological problems remain but important improvements are also evident. We identify two vigorous research traditions in the social scientific study of infertility. One tradition uses primarily quantitative techniques to study clinic patients in order to improve service delivery and to assess the need for psychological counseling. The other tradition uses primarily qualitative research to capture the experiences of infertile people in a sociocultural context. We conclude that more attention is now being paid to the ways in which the experience of infertility is shaped by social context. We call for continued progress in the development of a distinctly sociological approach to infertility and for the continued integration of the two research traditions identified here. PMID:20003036

  6. TGF?3 (TGFB3) polymorphism is associated with male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Dro?dzik, Marek; Kaczmarek, Maciej; Malinowski, Damian; Bro?, Urszula; Kazienko, Anna; Kurzawa, Rafa?; Kurzawski, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    Factors affecting the blood-testis barrier function may be involved in testicular damage and male infertility. Two cytokines play an important role in the barrier regulation, namely transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-?3) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-?). The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between TGF-?3 (TGFB3) and TNF-? (TNF) gene polymorphisms and male infertility. A total of 846 subjects, 423 diagnosed with male infertility and 423 fertile men were enrolled. TGFB3 (rs2268626:T?>?C, rs3917158:C?>?T, rs2284792:A?>?G, rs2268625:T?>?C, rs3917187:C?>?T) and TNF (rs1800629:-308G?>?A) gene polymorphisms were genotyped. No association between TNF genotype and infertility was observed. As for TGFB3, the genotypes distribution was similar in infertile and fertile men. However, rs2284792 minor allele frequency was significantly higher among infertile subjects. Heterozygous rs2284792 AG genotype was associated with increased odds for infertility [OR?=?1.40 (95% CI 1.05–1.86), p?=?0.021] and similar results were observed for G allele carrier status [OR?=?1.40 (95% CI 1.06–1.84), p?=?0.017]. Heterozygosity in TGFB3 rs3917158 was also associated with the infertility [OR?=?1.37 (95% CI 1.01–1.87), p?=?0.041]. The TGFB3 variant genotypes were associated with lower spermatozoa motility parameters in fertile men. The results indicate that variants in TGFB3 gene may be associated with male infertility. However, the findings require further replication and validation. PMID:26612435

  7. Endometrial osseous metaplasia: an unusual cause of infertility.

    PubMed

    Garg, Deepika; Bekker, Genia; Akselrod, Faina; Narasimhulu, Deepa Maheswari

    2015-01-01

    Osseous metaplasia of the endometrium is a rare disorder associated with the presence of bone in the uterine endometrium. Most patients with this condition presenting with infertility do so owing to the presence of a foreign body in the endometrium. We report a case of a 38-year-old woman who presented with secondary infertility due to osseous metaplasia in the endometrial cavity. She conceived spontaneously after hysteroscopic removal of the bony fragments from the uterus. Uterine osseous metaplasia is a rare cause of infertility that can be easily managed by hysteroscopic removal of the bony fragments, which results in return of fertility. PMID:25837325

  8. [The psychosocial consequences of infertility and fertility treatment].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lone; Sejbæk, Camilla Sandal

    2012-10-01

    Infertility and its treatment are severe, chronic, low-control stressors. Among women unsuccessful treatment is associated with increased risk of developing depressive symptoms. Among men infertility is associated with more negative emotional responses. Lifelong involuntary childlessness is associated with reduced mental well-being. It is recommended in the future to integrate mental health professionals at fertility clinics in Denmark in order to secure that also the psychosocial consequences of infertility and fertility treatment are taken care of with the highest professional standard based on scientific knowledge within this field. PMID:23050687

  9. Androgen receptor roles in spermatogenesis and infertility.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Laura; Smith, Lee B

    2015-08-01

    Androgens such as testosterone are steroid hormones essential for normal male reproductive development and function. Mutations of androgen receptors (AR) are often found in patients with disorders of male reproductive development, and milder mutations may be responsible for some cases of male infertility. Androgens exert their action through AR and its signalling in the testis is essential for spermatogenesis. AR is not expressed in the developing germ cell lineage so is thought to exert its effects through testicular Sertoli and peri-tubular myoid (PTM) cells. AR signalling in spermatogenesis has been investigated in rodent models where testosterone levels are chemically supressed or models with transgenic disruption of AR. These models have pinpointed the steps of spermatogenesis that require AR signalling, specifically maintenance of spermatogonial numbers, blood-testis barrier integrity, completion of meiosis, adhesion of spermatids and spermiation, together these studies detail the essential nature of androgens in the promotion of male fertility. PMID:26303086

  10. The emotional-psychological consequences of infertility among infertile women seeking treatment: Results of a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpoor-Azghdy, Seyede Batool; Simbar, Masoumeh; Vedadhir, Abouali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a major life event that brings about social and psychological problems. The type and rate these problems in the context of socio-cultural of different geographical areas and sex of people is different. Objective: The aim of this qualitative study was to explain the psychological consequences of infertility in Iranian infertile women seeking treatment. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was done using qualitative content analysis on 25 women affected by primary and secondary infertility with no surviving children in 2012. They were purposefully selected with maximum sample variation from a large Fertility Health Research Center in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected using 32 semi-structured interviews and analyzed by the conventional content analysis method. Results: The findings of this study include four main themes: 1. Cognitive reactions of infertility (mental engagement; psychological turmoil). 2. Cognitive reactions to therapy process (psychological turmoil; being difficult to control in some situations; reduced self-esteem; feelings of failure). 3. Emotional-affective reactions of infertility (fear, anxiety and worry; loneliness and guilt; grief and depression; regret). 4. Emotional-affective reactions to therapy process (fear, anxiety and worry; fatigue and helplessness; grief and depression; hopelessness). Conclusion: This study revealed that Iranian infertile women seeking treatment face several psychological-emotional problems with devastating effects on the mental health and well-being of the infertile individuals and couples, while the infertility is often treated as a biomedical issue in Iranian context with less attention on the mental-emotional, social and cultural aspects. This article extracted from Ph.D. thesis. (Seyede Batool Hasanpoor-Azghady) PMID:24799871

  11. Dioxins in the semen of men with infertility.

    PubMed

    Galimova, E F; Amirova, Z K; Galimov, Sh N

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess ejaculate contamination by polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans in male infertility. The database of 168 infertile and 49 fertile men was included in the study. Dioxin content was determined using gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC/HRMS). In the ejaculate of infertile men, the content of dioxins and furans was 2.2-2.3 times higher than in fertile donors. The maximum level of the most toxic dioxin congener was detected in pathospermia. Contamination of semen of infertile men by polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans supports the hypothesis about the relationship between environmental factors and reproductive health. PMID:24894758

  12. Gene Linked to Excess Male Hormones in Female Infertility Disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... April 15, 2014 Gene linked to excess male hormones in female infertility disorder Discovery by NIH-supported ... may lead to the overproduction of androgens — male hormones similar to testosterone — occurring in women with polycystic ...

  13. [THE VARICOCELE ENIGMA: "BACKGROUND NOISE" OR COMMON MALE INFERTILITY ETIOLOGY?].

    PubMed

    Gat, Itai; Madgar, Igael

    2015-05-01

    Infertility derived from mate etiology is a health problem which has increased over the last decades. Varicocele is a common cause for mate infertility with incidence of 35% and 75% among males with primary and secondary infertility, respectively, compared to 10%-15% among the general population. VaricoceLe is defined as dilated and entangled pampiniform plexus and internal spermatic veins located in the spermatic cord. The effect of varicocele on male infertility was controversial due to lack of published data uniformity and high standard studies. During recent years several published researches supplied reliable evidence regarding the influence of varicocele on mate infertility, treatment options and appropriate indications. Adequate patient selection significantly improves the chances for spontaneous pregnancy. Treatment varies between surgical veins ligation by various means and embolization by the endovascular approlch of the dilated veins. The current article summarizes updated treatment indications, advantages and drawbacks of the optional approaches and describes the considerations for choosing the optimal treatment for the infertile couple due to varicocele. PMID:26168642

  14. The relationship of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and male infertility.

    PubMed Central

    Greendale, G A; Haas, S T; Holbrook, K; Walsh, B; Schachter, J; Phillips, R S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Infertility affects at least 2 million couples in the United States. One third of infertility is attributed to male causes, but the etiology of most male infertility remains obscure. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between Chlamydia trachomatis and unexplained infertility in men. METHODS. Questionnaires and serum were collected prospectively from 52 case subjects (men from couples with explicitly defined idiopathic infertility) and 79 control subjects (first-time expectant fathers). RESULTS. Case subjects were significantly more likely than control subjects to be seropositive for antibody to C trachomatis at a titer of 1:64 or higher. By test of trend, higher titers were associated with higher odds ratios. Adjustment for age of either partner at initiation of pregnancy attempt, race, income, previous genitourinary symptoms or diagnoses, number of previous sexual partners, and barrier contraceptive use had no significant effect on the estimate of the odds ratio. One half of the men who were antibody positive had no history of genitourinary symptoms. CONCLUSIONS. Our results suggest an association between infection with C trachomatis in men and unexplained infertility and imply that infection is frequently asymptomatic. PMID:8328623

  15. [Association study of telomere length with idiopathic male infertility].

    PubMed

    Shuyuan, Liu; Changjun, Zhang; Haiying, Peng; Xiaoqin, Huang; Hao, Sun; Keqin, Lin; Kai, Huang; Jiayou, Chu; Zhaoqing, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Telomeres are evolutionary conserved, multifunctional DNA-protein complexes located at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomeres maintain chromosome stability and genome integrity and also play an important role in meiosis which aid in synapsis, homologous recombination, and segregation. Sperm telomere has been reported to play an important role in fertilization and embryo development. Nowadays, the association between telomere and reproduction is one of the major areas of interest, however whether sperm telomere associated with male infertility is not clear. In this study, in order to find out the association between Chinese idiopathic infertility and sperm telomere length, we analyzed the difference of sperm telomere length between idiopathic infertile men and normal fertile men, as well as the correlations between sperm telomere length and human semen characteristics. We analyzed 126 Chinese idiopathic infertile men and 138 normal fertile men for sperm telomere length by using quantitative PCR. We found that the relative sperm mean telomere length of infertile men was significantly shorter than that of fertile men (2.894 ± 0.115 vs. 4.016 ± 0.603, P=5.097 x 10??). Both sperm count and semen progressive motility are related with telomere length. Our results suggest that sperm telomere length is associated with idiopathic male infertility of China and we proposed the possibility that shorter telomeres in sperm chromosome will reduce spermatogenesis and sperm functions, which finally affected the fertility of male. PMID:26582527

  16. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khatami, Saeid Reza; Galehdari, Hamid; Rasekh, Abdorrahman; Mombeini, Hayat; Konar, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background The androgen receptor (AR) gene contains a polymorphic trinucleotide repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in its N-terminal transactivation domain (N- TAD). We aimed to find a correlation between the length of this polymorphic tract and azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12) of azoospermia or oligozoospermia resulting from Y chromosome microdele- tions were excluded from our study. The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was determined in 72 patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and in 72 fertile controls, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results Microdeletions were detected in 14.3% (n=12) patients suffering severe oligozoospermia. The mean CAG repeat length was 18.99 ± 0.35 (range, 11-26) and 19.96 ± 0.54 (range, 12-25) in infertile males and controls, respectively. Also in the infertile group, the most common allele was 19 (26.38%), while in controls, it was 25 (22.22%). Conclusion Y chromosome microdeletions could be one of the main reasons of male infertility living in Khuzestan Province, while there was no correlation between CAG length in AR gene with azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. PMID:26246877

  17. Symptoms: Menopause, Infertility, and Sexual Health.

    PubMed

    Barton, Debra L; Ganz, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    By 2022, the number of survivors is expected to grow to nearly 18 million. Therefore, addressing acute and chronic negative sequelae of a cancer diagnosis and its treatments becomes a health imperative. For women with a history of breast cancer, one of the common goals of treatment and prevention of recurrence is to reduce circulating concentrations of estradiol, especially in women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Hormone deprivation after a diagnosis of breast cancer impacts physiological targets other than in the breast tissue and can result in unwanted side effects, all of which can negatively impact quality of life and function and cause distress. Symptoms that are most strongly linked by evidence to hormone changes after cancer diagnosis and treatment include hot flashes, night sweats, sleep changes, fatigue, mood changes, and diminishing sexual function, including vaginal atrophy (decreased arousal, dryness and dyspareunia), infertility, decreased desire and negative self-image. Weight gain and resulting body image changes are often concomitants of the abrupt onset of treatment-induced menopause. The purpose of this chapter is to briefly review what is known about the advent of premature menopause in women treated for breast cancer, menopausal symptoms that are exacerbated by endocrine treatments for breast cancer, and the associated concerns of hot flashes and related menopausal symptoms, sexual health and fertility issues. We will discuss limitations in the current research and propose strategies that address current limitations in order to move the science forward. PMID:26059933

  18. Varicocele-Induced Infertility in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Razi, Mazdak; Malekinejad, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Varicocele is characterized by abnormal tortuosity and dilation of the veins of the pampiniform plexus within the spermatic cord. Although several reports show the mechanisms by which the varicocele exerts its infertility impact, the exact pathophysiology for varicocele-induced inflammation and its relationship with testicular endocrine disruption remain largely unknown. This review article will update previous findings by discussing the pathophysiology of long term-induced varicocele in rats. Testicular endocrine disruption in experimentally-induced varicocele, new findings related to biochemical alterations in germinal epithelium, and sperm cells apoptosis are highlighted. Recent observations show that varicocele down-regulates first and second maturation divisions, results in Leydig and Sertoli cell inflammation, and increases immune cell infiltration in the testes of the rat as an animal model. Ultimately, previous findings of our laboratory have revealed that varicocele decreased sperm motility, viability and severe DNA damage. Damage in sperm significantly lowers the animal's fertility potential. Varicocele not only exerts its pathologic impact by lowering the testicular antioxidant capacity but it also down-regulates first and second maturation divisions by exerting biochemical alterations such as reducing the intracytoplasmic carbohydrate ratio in germinal epithelium. PMID:26246871

  19. Varicocele-Induced Infertility in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Mazdak; Malekinejad, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Varicocele is characterized by abnormal tortuosity and dilation of the veins of the pampiniform plexus within the spermatic cord. Although several reports show the mechanisms by which the varicocele exerts its infertility impact, the exact pathophysiology for varicocele-induced inflammation and its relationship with testicular endocrine disruption remain largely unknown. This review article will update previous findings by discussing the pathophysiology of long term-induced varicocele in rats. Testicular endocrine disruption in experimentally-induced varicocele, new findings related to biochemical alterations in germinal epithelium, and sperm cells apoptosis are highlighted. Recent observations show that varicocele down-regulates first and second maturation divisions, results in Leydig and Sertoli cell inflammation, and increases immune cell infiltration in the testes of the rat as an animal model. Ultimately, previous findings of our laboratory have revealed that varicocele decreased sperm motility, viability and severe DNA damage. Damage in sperm significantly lowers the animal’s fertility potential. Varicocele not only exerts its pathologic impact by lowering the testicular antioxidant capacity but it also down-regulates first and second maturation divisions by exerting biochemical alterations such as reducing the intracytoplasmic carbohydrate ratio in germinal epithelium. PMID:26246871

  20. Nanobacteria may be linked to testicular microlithiasis in infertility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Hua; Lu, Gen-Sheng; Shen, Xue-Cheng; Zhou, Zhan-Song; Fang, Qiang; Zhang, Xin; Li, Long-Kun; Jin, Xi-Yu; Song, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Testicular microlithiasis (TM) in infertility is an uncommon pathologic condition of unclear etiology that is characterized by calcium deposits within the seminiferous tubules. Nanobacteria (NB), as novel microorganisms mediating tissue calcification, have been discovered in some diseases. In this study, we hypothesized that NB may participate in the pathogenesis of TM, particularly in infertility. Seventeen infertility patients with TM detected by scrotal color Doppler ultrasonography and 17 infertility patients without TM as controls were enrolled in the study. The NB were isolated and cultured from semen samples and urine samples. After 3 to 6 weeks of culture, 10 of 17 (58.8%) semen samples and 2 urine samples from infertile patients with TM showed the growth of white granular microbes that firmly attached to the bottom of the culture flask and were visible to the naked eye. In the control group, only 1 of 17 (5.9%) semen samples from infertile patients without TM showed the growth of white granular microbes. The cultured microbes were identified by indirect immunofluorescent staining (IIFS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and 16s rRNA gene expression. IIFS and TEM revealed NB to be coccoid and 100 to 500 nm in diameter. The BLAST result revealed that the 16s rRNA gene sequence from the cultured microbes was 97% the same as that of the known NB. Our results showed that NB may be linked to the development of TM, which may provide a potential target for the diagnosis and treatment of infertility with TM. PMID:19779212

  1. Quality and quantity of infertility care in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Fatima, P; Ishrat, S; Rahman, D; Banu, J; Deeba, F; Begum, N; Anwary, S A; Hossain, H B

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is an important health issue which has been neglected in the developing countries. First test-tube babies (triplet) in Bangladesh were born on 30th May, 2001. Although there is no tertiary level infertility center in the public sector, several private centers have come up with the facilities. The objective of the study was to find i) the quality and quantity of infertility care in Bangladesh and ii) the cause of infertility in the attending patients iii) the treatment seeking behaviors iv) and the reasons for not taking treatment among the attending patients. There are now 10 tertiary level Infertility centers in Bangladesh. The information was collected in a preformed datasheet about the facilities and the profile of the patients and the treatment seeking behavior of the attending patients. Out of the ten centers two centers refused to respond and did not disclose their data. Around 16700 new patients are enrolled in a year in the responsive clinics. Five percent (5%) of the patients underwent ART, 7% of the patients gave only one visit, 84% of the patients completed their evaluation, 76% of the patients took treatment. Causes of infertility in the patients taking treatment were male factor in 36.4%, bilateral tubal block in 20.2%, PCOS and anovulation in 31.7%, endometriosis in 19.6%, unexplained in 10.95, combined in 3.5%, ovarian failure in 1.4%, testicular failure in 0.33%, congenital anomaly in 0.3%. The main reason for not taking treatment was financial constrainment. The quality and quantity of infertility care is dependent on the available resources and on the use of the resources by the patients. In developing countries the resources are merging and confined to specified areas which cannot meet the demand of their population. The study gives us the idea of the need and the demand of the services in the country. PMID:25725670

  2. SUFFERING INFERTILITY: THE IMPACT OF INFERTILITY ON WOMEN’S LIFE EXPERIENCES IN TWO NIGERIAN COMMUNITIES

    PubMed Central

    LARSEN, ULLA; HOLLOS, MARIDA; OBONO, OKA; WHITEHOUSE, BRUCE

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the experiences of women with infertility in two Nigerian communities with different systems of descent and historically different levels of infertility. First, the paper focuses on the life experiences of individual women across the two communities and second, it compares these experiences with those of their fertile counterparts, in each community. In doing this, women who are childless are distinguished from those with subfertility and compared with high-fertility women. The research is based on interdisciplinary research conducted among the Ijo and Yakurr people of southern Nigeria, which included a survey of approximately 100 childless and subfertile women and a matching sample of 100 fertile women as well as in-depth ethnographic interviews with childless and subfertile women in two communities: Amakiri in Delta State and Lopon in Cross River State. The findings indicate that while there are variations in the extent to which childlessness is considered to be problematic, the necessity for a woman to have a child remains basic in this region. PMID:20561392

  3. The biology of infertility: research advances and clinical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Matzuk, Martin M; Lamb, Dolores J

    2013-01-01

    Reproduction is required for the survival of all mammalian species, and thousands of essential ‘sex’ genes are conserved through evolution. Basic research helps to define these genes and the mechanisms responsible for the development, function and regulation of the male and female reproductive systems. However, many infertile couples continue to be labeled with the diagnosis of idiopathic infertility or given descriptive diagnoses that do not provide a cause for their defect. For other individuals with a known etiology, effective cures are lacking, although their infertility is often bypassed with assisted reproductive technologies (ART), some accompanied by safety or ethical concerns. Certainly, progress in the field of reproduction has been realized in the twenty-first century with advances in the understanding of the regulation of fertility, with the production of over 400 mutant mouse models with a reproductive phenotype and with the promise of regenerative gonadal stem cells. Indeed, the past six years have witnessed a virtual explosion in the identification of gene mutations or polymorphisms that cause or are linked to human infertility. Translation of these findings to the clinic remains slow, however, as do new methods to diagnose and treat infertile couples. Additionally, new approaches to contraception remain elusive. Nevertheless, the basic and clinical advances in the understanding of the molecular controls of reproduction are impressive and will ultimately improve patient care. PMID:18989307

  4. [Infertility over forty: Pros and cons of IVF].

    PubMed

    Belaisch-Allart, J; Maget, V; Mayenga, J-M; Grefenstette, I; Chouraqui, A; Belaid, Y; Kulski, O

    2015-09-01

    The population attempting pregnancy and having babies is ageing. The declining fertility potential and the late age of motherhood are increasing significantly the number of patients over forty consulting infertility specialists. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) cannot compensate the natural decline in fertility with age. In France, in public hospital, ART is free of charge for women until 43 years, over 43, social insurance does not reimburse ART. Hence, 43 years is the usual limit, but between 40 and 42 is ART useful? The answer varies according to physicians, couples or society. On medical level, the etiology of the infertility must be taken into account. If there is an explanation to infertility (male or tubal infertility) ART is better than abstention. If the infertility is only due to age the question is raised. In France, the reimbursement by the society of a technique with very low results is discussed. However efficacy is not absolutely compulsory in Medicine. On the opposite to give false hopes may be discussed too. To obtain a reasonable consensus is rather difficult. PMID:26297163

  5. Empirical medical therapy in idiopathic male infertility: Promise or panacea?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Hung

    2014-01-01

    Male factors account for 20%-50% of cases of infertility and in 25% of cases, the etiology of male infertility is unknown. Effective treatments are well-established for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, male accessory gland infection, retrograde ejaculation, and positive antisperm antibody. However, the appropriate treatment for idiopathic male infertility is unclear. Empirical medical treatment (EMT) has been used in men with idiopathic infertility and can be divided into two categories based on the mode of action: hormonal treatment and antioxidant supplementation. Hormonal medications consist of gonadotropins, androgens, estrogen receptor blockers, and aromatase inhibitors. Antioxidants such as vitamins, zinc, and carnitines have also been widely used to reduce oxidative stress-induced spermatozoa damage. Although scientifically acceptable evidence of EMT is limited because of the lack of large, randomized, controlled studies, recent systematic reviews with meta-analyses have shown that the administration of gonadotropins, anti-estrogens, and oral antioxidants results in a significant increase in the live birth rate compared with control treatments. Therefore, all physicians who treat infertility should bear in mind that EMT can improve semen parameters and subsequent fertility potential through natural intercourse. PMID:25309854

  6. Microbiota of the seminal fluid from healthy and infertile men

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dongsheng; Zhou, Xia; Zhong, Xue; Settles, Matt; Herring, Jessica; Wang, Li; Abdo, Zaid; Forney, Larry J.; Xu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore potential causes of male infertility by determining the composition and structure of commensal bacterial communities in seminal fluids. Design: Microscopy of gram stained semen samples and classification of 16S rRNA gene sequences to determine the species composition of semen bacterial communities. Setting(s): Clinical andrology laboratory and academic research laboratories. Patient(s): 19 sperm donors and 58 infertility patients. Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): Classification of 16S rRNA gene sequences, clustering of seminal microbial communities, and multiple statistical tests. Result(s): High numbers of diverse kinds of bacteria were present in most samples of both sperm donors and infertility patients. The bacterial communities varied widely between subjects, but they could be clustered into six groups based on similarities in composition and the rank abundances of taxa. Overall there were no significant differences between sperm donors and infertility patients. However, multiple statistical tests showed a significant negative association between sperm quality and the presence of Anaerococcus. The results also indicated that many of the bacterial taxa identified in semen also occur in the vaginal communities of some women, especially those with bacterial vaginosis, which suggests heterosexual sex partners may share bacteria. Conclusion(s): Diverse kinds of bacteria were present in the human semen, there were no significant differences between sperm donors and infertility patients, The presence of Anaerococcus might be a biomarker for low sperm quality. PMID:23993888

  7. Epigenetic germline mosaicism in infertile men.

    PubMed

    Laurentino, Sandra; Beygo, Jasmin; Nordhoff, Verena; Kliesch, Sabine; Wistuba, Joachim; Borgmann, Jennifer; Buiting, Karin; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Gromoll, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed either from the paternal or the maternal allele, because the other allele has been silenced in the mother's or father's germline. Imprints are characterized by DNA methylation at cytosine phosphate guanine sites. Recently, abnormal sperm parameters and male infertility have been linked to aberrant methylation patterns of imprinted genes in sperm DNA. However, these studies did not account for possible epigenetic heterogeneity in sperm. We have investigated whether spermatozoa are a homogeneous cell population regarding DNA methylation of imprinted genes. Swim-up sperm was obtained from 45 men with normal (n = 19) and abnormal (n = 26) sperm parameters. DNA methylation of the imprinted gene KCNQ1OT1 was measured in multiple pools of 10 spermatozoa by a highly sensitive pyrosequencing-based oligo-sperm methylation assay (OSMA). DNA methylation of four imprinted genes (KCNQ1OT1, MEST, H19 and MEG3) was further analysed by deep bisulfite sequencing, which allows analysis at the single-cell level. Using OSMA, we found a significantly increased variation in the DNA methylation values of the maternally methylated gene KCNQ1OT1 in samples with abnormal sperm parameters. DBS showed that normozoospermic samples had a homogenous pattern of DNA methylation, whereas oligoasthenozoospermic samples contained discrete populations of spermatozoa with either normal or abnormal methylation patterns. Aberrant methylation of H19 appears to occur preferentially on the maternally inherited allele. Our results demonstrate the presence of epigenetic mosaicism in the semen of oligoasthenozoospermic men, which probably results from errors in imprint erasure. PMID:25336341

  8. For Unexplained Infertility, Breast Cancer Drug No Better Than Standard Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154775.html For Unexplained Infertility, Breast Cancer Drug No Better Than Standard Treatment ... cancer drug that is sometimes used to treat infertility may reduce a couple's risk of having a ...

  9. Varicocele as a source of male infertility – current treatment techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dobro?ski, Piotr Artur; Radziszewski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    To establish the extent of varicocele as the cause of infertility in men and compare the various techniques of treatment. We searched PubMed and the Cochrane Library database using varicocele, male infertility, varicocelectomy as keywords. Varicocele seems to be a growing problem considered to be one of the most common causes of male infertility in recent times. Nevertheless, its role remains unclear. The best treatment option seems to be microscopic surgery – the most effective and linked to rare surgical complications. But the greatest clinical problem remains the selection of patients to treat – recently it is believed that varicocelectomy is a possibly advisable option in patients with clinical varicocele and seminal parameter impairment [1]. More high-quality, multicenter, long-term randomized controlled trials (RCT's) are required to verify the findings. PMID:26568883

  10. Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Decreasing male fertility has been observed for the past fifty years. Examples of affected reproductive parameters include decreases in sperm count and sperm quality and increases in testicular cancer, cryptorchidism and hypospadias. Exposures to environmental toxicants during fetal development and early postnatal life have been shown to promote infertility. Environmental exposures inducing epigenetic changes related to male infertility range from life style, occupational exposures, environmental toxicants and nutrition. Exposures during fetal gonadal sex determination have been shown to alter the epigenetic programming of the germline that then can transmit this altered epigenetic information to subsequent generations in the absence of any exposures. This environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease will be a component of the etiology of male infertility. PMID:25104619

  11. Male infertility: the role of imaging in diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, T; Sidhu, P S; Wilkins, C J

    2012-01-01

    The investigation of male infertility is assuming greater importance, with male factors implicated as a causal factor in up to half of infertile couples. Following routine history, examination and blood tests, imaging is frequently utilised in order to assess the scrotal contents for testicular volume and morphology. Additionally, this may give indirect evidence of the presence of possible reversible pathology in the form of obstructive azoospermia. Further imaging in the form of transrectal ultrasound and MRI is then often able to categorise the level of obstruction and facilitate treatment planning without resort to more invasive imaging such as vasography. Ultrasound guidance of therapy such as sperm or cyst aspiration and vasal cannulation may also be performed. This article reviews the imaging modalities used in the investigation of male infertility, and illustrates normal and abnormal findings that may be demonstrated. PMID:22763036

  12. Effect of Palm Pollen on Sperm Parameters of Infertile Man.

    PubMed

    Rasekh, Athar; Jashni, Hojjatollah Karimi; Rahmanian, Karamatollah; Jahromi, Abdolreza Sotoodeh

    2015-04-01

    There is a rapidly growing trend in the consumption of herbal remedies in the developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of orally administered Date Palm Pollen (DPP) on the results of semen analysis in adult infertile men. Forty infertile men participated in our study. They were treated by Pollen powder 120 mg kg(-1) in gelatinous capsules every other day, for two months. Before and at the end of therapy, the semen was collected after masturbation and sperm numbers, motility and morphology were determined. Our findings revealed that consumption of DPP improved the sperm count. The treatment was significantly increased sperm motility, morphology and forward progressive motility. Date palm pollen seems to cure male infertility by improving the quality of sperm parameters. PMID:26506651

  13. Influence of polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase T1 on Chinese infertile patients with varicocele.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qifei; Xing, Junping; Xue, Wei; Sun, Jianhua; Wang, Xinyang; Jin, Xiaojuan

    2009-03-01

    To investigate the influence of glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) gene polymorphism on Chinese infertile patients with varicocele, 63 infertile patients with varicocele and 54 healthy fertile controls were recruited in this case-control study. Our results show that oxidative damage may be the cause of infertility in patients with varicocele, and GSTT1 null genotype predisposes to over oxidative damage to spermatocytes of infertile patients with varicocele. PMID:18163994

  14. Associated Factors with Male Infertility: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza Hafezi; Yasemi, Masood; Peyman, Hadi; Khajavikhan, Javaher; Yaghoubi, Monireh; Bimanand, Lida

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Sperm analysis is an important step to evaluate and diagnose male’s infertility. The present study aimed to determine associated factors with males’ infertility by using semen analysis. Materials and Methods: In this study 96 men were evaluated who attended to the infertility clinics of Ilam province, western Iran between May 2010 to May 2011. Semen analysis was done using the Weili Dynamic Sperm Analysis software adapted to the WHO classification. Based on movement and speed characters, sperms were classified to either A, B, C or D classes. Participants were stratified into two groups that called “Oligospermia (OS)” with sperm counts of less than 20 million in mL (n=48) and “Non-Oligospermia (NOS)” with values more than determined cutoff point (n=48). Results: The Mean age ±SD for OS and NOS group were 29.9 ±5.1 y and 31.17 ±5.24 y, respectively (p>0.05). Overall, 62.5% of OS and 31.2% of NOS were clinically infertile (OR=3.6, CI, 1.5-8.5, p=0.01). A significant difference was found between job and live ratio(A+B+C) in NOS group (F=2.8, p<0.05). Conclusion: Prevalence of infertility was higher in the OS men compared to the NOS group. The main risk factors in the OS group were History of Varicocele surgery and residence site of patients that are totally similar to the NOS men. Further case-control studies and clinical trials are recommended to recognize infertility causes in men. PMID:25386439

  15. Psychiatric Morbidity in Infertility Patients in a Tertiary Care Setup

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Pankaj; Rastogi, Rajesh; Gandhi, Raghu; Kapoor, Rohit; Sachdeva, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    Context Infertility is regarded as a trigger for psychological morbidity. Infertile couples often suffer from anxiety, depression and lack of self confidence. Aims To study the demographic factors associated with infertility in a tertiary care setup and to determine the level of anxiety and depression associated with it by using standardized scales. The study protocol also included studying the various coping strategies employed by these patient groups. Settings and Design Case control study. Materials and Methods A prestructured questionnaire based study conducted for a span of 6 months. The study population included the patients attending the infertility and the family planning outpatient department. We applied the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) and the Becks Depression Inventory (BDI). Brief COPE Inventory was applied to look for the various coping measures that are employed by the anxious and depressed patients. Statistical Analysis Data analysis was done using SPSS ver20. Results A total of 280 study subjects were included in the study; which included 140 women from the infertility clinic and 140 from the family planning OPD. A total of 56.4% (79/140) of the females were found to be suffering from depression and 68.9% (96/140) of the females were found to be suffering from anxiety and depression both. Seven risk factors were found to be significant for depression based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scale and 6 risk factors were found to be significant based on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The most common coping method employed by depressed women was venting 72.2% (57/79) followed by behavioural disengagement 70.9% (56/79); whereas the most important coping method employed by the anxious and depressed women was behavioural disengagement 71.9% (69/96). Conclusion Anxiety and depression is common among patients suffering from infertility and measures should be taken to alleviate it. PMID:26500988

  16. Increased egg infertility associated with translocating inbred takahe (Porphyrio hochstetteri) to island refuges in New Zealand

    E-print Network

    Jamieson, Ian

    Increased egg infertility associated with translocating inbred takahe (Porphyrio hochstetteri infertility than birds that have remained within their natural habitat range. For takahe, whether breeders had success. The coecient of inbreeding was high for island takahe but high infertility and low juvenile

  17. What Are the Issues Confronting Infertile Women? A Qualitative and Quantitative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammerli, Katja; Znoj, Hansjorg; Berger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a stressful experience, yet little is known about the specific issues confronting infertile women. In the present study, researchers sought to identify themes important to infertile women and examine possible associations with mental health levels. Using qualitative content analysis, researchers analyzed the email messages of 57…

  18. Infertility: Towards an Awareness of a Need among Family Life Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Nancy L.; Christopher, F. Scott

    1984-01-01

    Discusses emotional problems related to infertility investigation and treatment. Reviews causes and treatment of infertility, coping patterns, and the role of counselors and family life educators in easing the crises of infertility and facilitating successful resolution of associated emotional problems. (JAC)

  19. The Effect of Social Coping Resources and Growth-Fostering Relationships on Infertility Stress in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Donna M.; Myers, Jane E.

    2002-01-01

    The experience of infertility often results in multiple stresses and needs for coping in these women. Study examines the relationship between the uses of social coping resources, growth-fostering relationships, and infertility stress. Results support the use of social coping resources for coping with infertility stress. (Contains 62 references and…

  20. Genetic and epigenetic factors: Role in male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, M. B.; Kumar, K.; Dada, R.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute upto 15%–30% cases of male infertility. Formation of spermatozoa occurs in a sequential manner with mitotic, meiotic, and postmeiotic differentiation phases each of which is controlled by an intricate genetic program. Genes control a variety of physiologic processes, such as hypothalamus–pituitary–gonadal axis, germ cell development, and differentiation. In the era of assisted reproduction technology, it is important to understand the genetic basis of infertility to provide maximum adapted therapeutics and counseling to the couple. PMID:21716934

  1. Infertility: from a personal to a public health problem.

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, A T; Bernstein, J

    1999-01-01

    The inability to conceive a child is most often viewed as a private matter, but public health perspectives and skills can contribute greatly to our knowledge about infertility, and the development of effective and rational public policy for prevention, access to health care, and regulation of new technologies. We offer a primer of public health aspects of infertility in an effort to encourage the broad spectrum of public health professionals to become more knowledgeable about these topics and join in the national debate about preventive strategies, cost-benefit assessment, resource allocation, and ethics. Images p494-a p495-a p499-a p506-a PMID:10670617

  2. Relationship between infertility-related stress and emotional distress and marital satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Gana, Kamel; Jakubowska, Sylwia

    2014-08-19

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive effects of infertility-related stress on psychological distress and marital satisfaction. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate a nonrecursive model hypothesizing the impact of infertility-related stress on both emotional distress and marital dissatisfaction, which were supposed to have a reciprocal influence on each other. The model was estimated using data from a sample of 150 infertile patients (78 males and 72 females). Findings confirmed the predictive effects of infertility-related stress on both emotional and marital distress. However, infertility-related stress was found to have more impact on emotional distress than on marital satisfaction. PMID:25139894

  3. Level of male infertility in the Ghanaian city of Tema.

    PubMed

    Martin-Odoom, A; Brown, C A; Adjei, D N

    2015-11-01

    Infertility among couples is a sensitive issue in Ghana; females are mostly blamed. Most male infertility cases are generally due to low sperm counts (oligozoospermia), poor sperm quality - characterised by poor sperm motility (asthenozoospermia) - or a combination of both (oligoasthenozoospermia). This is a retrospective study from January 1995 to December 2005 which determined the level and type of male infertility in and around the city of Tema. Seminal fluid analysis reports of male clients who visited the Adom Medical Laboratory in Tema were extracted from laboratory data and analysed. Our study involved 2795 males in the age range of 24-36 years. In 1995, 75% of the total samples analysed had sperm concentrations ranging from 21 to 350 million sperms/ml and showed a decreasing trend to 41% in 2005. Samples with sperm concentrations below 20 million sperms/ml in 1995 increased from 20.5% to 57.6% in 2005; those with active motility > 45% decreased from 27 (30.7%) in 1995 to zero (0%) in 2005, whilst samples with > 50% non-motile sperms increased from 47 (53.4%) in 1995 to 449 (87.7%) in 2005. Male infertility in the samples analysed was due to a combination of oligozoospermia and asthenozoospermia. PMID:25774722

  4. Male infertility risk factors in a French military population.

    PubMed

    Velez de la Calle, J F; Rachou, E; le Martelot, M T; Ducot, B; Multigner, L; Thonneau, P F

    2001-03-01

    We investigated infertility risk factors by conducting a population-based case-control study in the military population of the French town of Brest. Sixty couples who had sought medical advice for infertility of more than 12 months duration (cases) were compared with 165 couples who had had a child (controls). All the men in these couples had been employed by the military. The infertility risk factors studied were male and female medical factors, occupational and environmental exposures. We obtained age-adjusted odds ratios of 7.4 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4--39.5] for testis surgery, and 13.0 for varicocele (95% CI: 1.4--120.3) in men. In logistic regression, the age-adjusted odds ratio for men who had worked in a nuclear submarine was found to be 2.0 (95% CI: 1.0--3.7), and that for heat exposure was 4.5 (95% CI: 1.9--10.6). One limitation of this study is the lack of exposure measurements, especially for potential exposure to nuclear radiation (type of reactor used in nuclear-powered submarines, inability to obtain personal dosimeters worn by military personnel working in nuclear submarines). In conclusion, this study suggests that in this military population, having worked as a submariner in a nuclear-powered submarine, and having worked in very hot conditions, should be considered as risk factors for infertility. PMID:11228215

  5. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis
    New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000

    Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa:
    Potential for Infertility Research

    David Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3
    1Reproductive ...

  6. Gender and Infertility: A Relational Approach To Counseling Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Donna M.; Myers, Jane E.

    2000-01-01

    The Relational Model (J. V. Jordan, 1995) of women's development is a theory that explains women's development in a context of relationships, specifically relationships that promote growth for self and others. This model is applied to counseling women who are experiencing infertility, and a case presentation is provided to illustrate the approach.…

  7. Cultural Considerations in Counseling Couples Who Experience Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    Infertility creates challenges affecting various aspects of couples' intimate lives. Practices regarding reproduction are often shaped by cultural messages. Culturally sensitive treatment methods help counselors provide effective therapy to couples with fertility problems. This article describes cultural influences, challenges, and counseling…

  8. Incorporating Ideological Context in Counseling Couples Experiencing Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Judith A.; Panchal, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the influence of ideological values on couples' experience of infertility. Contextual issues are considered in terms of how they influence medical decision making as well as emotional factors. Strength-based counseling interventions that attend to couples' diverse values are described. Last, implications for counselors,…

  9. Five Medical Treatment Stages of Infertility: Implications for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrity, Deborah A.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the marital happiness, state/trait anxiety, coping techniques, and types of support received for a national sample of men and women experiencing the infertility medical process. Suggests that counselors should be aware that medical treatment affects the distress level of the individual and couple and the types of coping used. Further…

  10. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Infertile Men from Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Suganya, Jaganathan; Kujur, Smita B; Selvaraj, Kamala; Suruli, Muthiah S.; Haripriya, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Male infertility has been associated with aneuploidies and structural chromosomal abnormalities, Yq microdeletions and specific gene mutations and/or polymorphisms. Besides genetic factors, any block in sperm delivery, endocrine disorders, testicular tumours, infectious diseases, medications, lifestyle factors and environmental toxins can also play a causative role. This study aimed to determine the constitutional karyotype in infertile males having normal female partners in a south Indian population. Materials and Methods A total of 180 men with a complaint of primary infertility ranging from 1 to 25 years were screened for chromosomal abnormalities through conventional analysis of GTG-banded metaphases from cultured lymphocytes. Results Four individuals were diagnosed to have Klinefelter syndrome. Two cases exhibited reciprocal translocations and one showed a maternally inherited insertion. Polymorphisms were seen in sixty-seven patients (37.2%). Conclusion The occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities in 4.6% and variants involving the heterochromatic regions of Y, chromosome 9 and the acrocentric chromosomes in 38.2% of the infertile men with an abnormal seminogram strongly reiterates the inclusion of routine cytogenetic testing and counselling in the diagnostic work-up prior to the use of assisted reproduction technologies. PMID:26393143

  11. Spermatozoa protein alterations in infertile men with bilateral varicocele.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Cui, Zhihong; Ayaz, Ahmet; Gupta, Sajal; Willard, Belinda; Gopalan, Banu; Sabanegh, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Among infertile men, a diagnosis of unilateral varicocele is made in 90% of varicocele cases and bilateral in the remaining varicocele cases. However, there are reports of under-diagnosis of bilateral varicocele among infertile men and that its prevalence is greater than 10%. In this prospective study, we aimed to examine the differentially expressed proteins (DEP) extracted from spermatozoa cells of patients with bilateral varicocele and fertile donors. Subjects consisted of 17 men diagnosed with bilateral varicocele and 10 proven fertile men as healthy controls. Using the LTQ-orbitrap elite hybrid mass spectrometry system, proteomic analysis was done on pooled samples from 3 patients with bilateral varicocele and 5 fertile men. From these samples, 73 DEP were identified of which 58 proteins were differentially expressed, with 7 proteins unique to the bilateral varicocele group and 8 proteins to the fertile control group. Majority of the DEPs were observed to be associated with metabolic processes, stress responses, oxidoreductase activity, enzyme regulation, and immune system processes. Seven DEP were involved in sperm function such as capacitation, motility, and sperm-zona binding. Proteins TEKT3 and TCP11 were validated by Western blot analysis and may serve as potential biomarkers for bilateral varicocele. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time the presence of DEP and identified proteins with distinct reproductive functions which are altered in infertile men with bilateral varicocele. Functional proteomic profiling provides insight into the mechanistic implications of bilateral varicocele-associated male infertility. PMID:25999357

  12. Infertility Care Among OEF/OIF/OND Women Veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs

    PubMed Central

    Mattocks, Kristin; Kroll-Desrosiers, Aimee; Zephyrin, Laurie; Katon, Jodie; Weitlauf, Julie; Bastian, Lori; Haskell, Sally; Brandt, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing number of young women Veterans seek reproductive health care through the VA, yet little is known regarding the provision of infertility care for this population. The VA provides a range of infertility services for Veterans including artificial insemination, but does not provide in vitro fertilization. This study will be the first to characterize infertility care among OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans using VA care. Methods We analyzed data from the OEF/OIF/OND roster file from the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC)—Contingency Tracking System Deployment file of military discharges from October 1, 2001–December 30, 2010, which includes 68,442 women Veterans between the ages of 18 and 45 who utilized VA health care after separating from military service. We examined the receipt of infertility diagnoses and care using ICD-9 and CPT codes. Results Less than 2% (n = 1323) of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received an infertility diagnosis during the study period. Compared with women VA users without infertility diagnosis, those with infertility diagnosis were younger, obese, black, or Hispanic, have a service-connected disability rating, a positive screen for military sexual trauma, and a mental health diagnosis. Overall, 22% of women with an infertility diagnosis received an infertility assessment or treatment. Thirty-nine percent of women Veterans receiving infertility assessment or treatment received this care from non-VA providers. Conclusions Overall, a small proportion of OEF/OIF/OND women Veterans received infertility diagnoses from the VA during the study period, and an even smaller proportion received infertility treatment. Nearly 40% of those who received infertility treatments received these treatments from non-VA providers, indicating that the VA may need to examine the training and resources needed to provide this care within the VA. Understanding women’s use of VA infertility services is an important component of understanding VA’s commitment to comprehensive medical care for women Veterans. PMID:25767979

  13. A Prospective Study of Depression and Anxiety in Female Fertility Preservation and Infertility Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Angela K.; Klock, Susan C.; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Hirshfeld-Cytron, Jennifer; Smith, Kristin N.; Kazer, Ralph R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prospectively assess anxiety, depression, coping, and appraisal in female fertility preservation patients compared to infertile patients. Design Prospective pre- and post-treatment survey. Setting Academic medical center. Patients 47 women with cancer (FP) and 91 age-matched infertile patients. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Depression, anxiety, coping, infertility–related stress, appraisal of treatment, and medical outcomes. Results FP patients reported more symptoms of anxiety and depression than infertile patients, but infertile patients’ symptoms worsened over time. 44% of FP and 14% of infertile patients’ scores exceeded the clinical cut-off for depression at pre-treatment. The interval between surveys and medical treatment data did not predict changes in mood symptoms. Coping strategies and infertility-related stress did not differ between groups and avoidant coping predicted higher depression and anxiety scores. Conclusion FP patients reported more anxiety and depression than infertile patients at enrollment in treatment, with more than one third of FP patients reporting clinically significant depressive symptoms. However, infertile patients’ anxiety and depressive symptoms increased across treatment. This increase was not related to time between registration for IVF and oocyte retrieval or the medical aspects of treatment. FP and infertile patients should be provided psychological consultation prior to treatment to identify mood and anxiety symptoms and to refer patients for counseling as needed to prevent worsening of symptoms. PMID:25154674

  14. The Impact of Emotionally Focused Therapy on Emotional Distress in Infertile Couples

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Marzieh; Shairi, Mohammad Reza; Roshan, Rasoul; Rahimi, Changiz Rahimi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study investigated the effect of emotionally focused therapy (EFT) on factors contributing to emotional distress among infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, the subjects consisted of 12 Iranian couples: six infertile men and six infertile women. They were assessed as depressed, anxious and stressful individuals using depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS). The subjects were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental group with six couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women) received EFT, while the control group with similar number of couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women) was deprived of the treatment. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding job, educational level, income, age, marriage and infertility duration. The pre- and post-test comparisons of DASS subscales showed that level of depression, anxiety and stress among couples with EFT instruction was significantly less than those without such in- structions (p<0.0001). Conclusion Emotionally focused therapy could reduce the rate of depression, anxiety and stress in infertile couples, regardless of the man or woman as the cause of infertility. PMID:24520504

  15. Male Reproductive Cancers and Infertility: A Mutual Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Tvrda, Eva; Agarwal, Ashok; Alkuhaimi, Nawaf

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive dysfunction and malignancies related to the male gender represent a serious health concern, whose incidence has significantly risen over the past years. Prior to treatment, testicular or prostate cancer patients often display poor semen characteristics similar to subfertile or infertile patients. This fact is underscored by cases where the malignancy is often diagnosed in males who undergo a general fertility screening. This review aims to examine the associations between male infertility and reproductive cancers focusing on common etiologies and biological mechanisms underlining these pathologies. Furthermore, we discuss compelling epidemiological data hypothesizing that male reproductive failure may act as a precursor of future andrological malignancies, including testicular or prostate cancer, thus providing a stimulus for a more specific research in male reproductive health and emphasizing the importance of this relation for physicians taking care of male patients with a reproductive disease. PMID:25837470

  16. The treatment of normospermic infertility by gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT).

    PubMed

    Yovich, J L; Matson, P L; Blackledge, D G; Turner, S R; Richardson, P A; Yovich, J M; Edirisinghe, W R

    1988-04-01

    Gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) was applied in 207 treatment cycles in 73 couples. The pregnancy rate in cycles with only one (2/21, 9.5%) or two (2/29, 6.9%) oocytes transferred was significantly less than that in which four oocytes (36/116, 31.0%) were replaced. The collection of more than four oocytes did not influence the pregnancy rate in that treatment cycle. The overall pregnancy rate was 24.2% (50 of 207) and was similar in the four infertility groups studied (non-occlusive tubal disorders, endometriosis, cervical factor and unexplained infertility) with 28 (56%) of the pregnancies delivered at greater than or equal to 20 weeks. The pregnancy wastage included 4 (8%) ectopic pregnancies and 3 (6%) late pregnancy losses. The 12 multiple pregnancies occurred following the transfer of three and four oocytes. PMID:3382609

  17. Infertility and miscarriage: common pathways in manifestation and management.

    PubMed

    Agenor, Angena; Bhattacharya, Sohinee

    2015-07-01

    The relationship between miscarriage and fertility is complex. While most healthcare settings treat miscarriage as a problem of subfertility in assisted reproduction units, others believe that miscarriage occurs in super-fertile women. Infertile women undergoing assisted reproduction are at a greater risk of having a miscarriage especially at an advanced age compared with women conceiving naturally. Aberrant expression of immunological factors and chromosomal abnormalities underlie both infertility and miscarriage. Common risk factors include increased maternal age, obesity, smoking, alcohol, pre-existing medical conditions and anatomical abnormalities of the reproductive system. Management pathways of both conditions may be similar with pre-implantation genetic testing and assisted reproductive technology used in both conditions. This paper discusses the synergies and differences between the two conditions in terms of their epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, risk factors and management strategies. The two conditions are related as degrees of severity of reproductive failure with common pathways in manifestation and management. PMID:26238301

  18. Treatment strategies for the infertile polycystic ovary syndrome patient.

    PubMed

    Tannus, Samer; Burke, Yechiel Z; Kol, Shahar

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age. Infertility is a prevalent presenting feature of PCOS, and approximately 75% of these women suffer infertility due to anovulation. Lifestyle modification is considered the first-line treatment and is associated with improved endocrine profile. Clomiphene citrate (CC) should be considered as the first line pharmacologic therapy for ovulation induction. In women who are CC resistant, second-line treatment should be considered, as adding metformin, laparoscopic ovarian drilling or treatment with gonadotropins. In CC treatment failure, Letrozole could be an alternative or treatment with gonadotropins. IVF is considered the third-line treatment; the 'short', antagonist-based protocol is the preferred option for PCOS patients, as it is associated with lower risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (specifically by using a gonadotropin--releasing hormone agonist as ovulation trigger), but with comparable outcomes as the long protocol. PMID:26626234

  19. Infertility evaluation and treatment according to Jewish law.

    PubMed

    Schenker, J G

    1997-02-01

    The Jewish attitude toward infertility can be learned from the fact that the first commandment of God to Adam was "be fruitful and multiply". When evaluating an infertile couple according to the Halakha (Hebrew law), one should first evaluate the female factor. If pathology is found, one may proceed to investigate the male factor, inadequate or abnormal production, ejaculation, or deposition of spermatozoa. The basic fact that allows in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer (ET) to be considered in the rabbinical literature at all is that the oocyte and the sperm originate from the wife and the husband, respectively. For many centuries Jewish religious authorities have discussed the principle involved in artificial insemination from a donor. The discussions are based on ancient sources in the Talmud and the codes of Jewish law is prohibited for a variety of reasons e.g. incest, lack of genealogy, and the problem of inheritance. In the case of egg donation the problem that arises is who should be considered the mother, the donor of the oocyte or the one in whose uterus the embryo develops, the one who gives birth. Jewish law states that the child is related to the woman who finished its formation, the one who gave birth. The Jewish religion does not forbid the practice of surrogate motherhood in the case of full surrogacy. From the religious point of view, the child will belong to the father who gave the sperm and to the woman who gave birth. Creating and inducing a preimplantation in embryo in vitro for fertility research should be allowed if there is a real chance that the sperm owner may benefit and have a child as a result of this research. Nowadays, assisted reproductive technology is a common practice in the treatment of infertility. Nevertheless, different religious arguments of the world's religions impose limitations on the therapeutic approach to infertility. PMID:9138953

  20. [48,XXYY men with azoospermia: how to manage infertility?].

    PubMed

    Roche, C; Sonigo, C; Benmiloud-Tandjaoui, N; Boujenah, J; Benzacken, B; Poncelet, C; Hugues, J-N

    2014-01-01

    48,XXYY syndrome is a rare form of sex chromosomal aneuploidy. Usually considered as a variant of Klinefelter syndrome because of shared features (azoospermia, tall stature, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism), it is a separate entity because diagnostic is currently made in prepubertal boy with neuro-psychological disorders. We here report the case of a 48,XXYY patient consulting for adult infertility and the indication to perform testicular sperm extraction is discussed. PMID:24934769

  1. Perceptions and Experiences of Women in Karachi, Pakistan Regarding Secondary Infertility: Results from a Community-Based Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sami, Neelofar; Saeed Ali, Tazeen

    2012-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is 22% with primary infertility at 4% and secondary infertility at 18%. This study explored perceptions and experiences of women in Karachi, Pakistan regarding the causes, treatment-seeking behavior for and consequences of secondary infertility. Methods. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with married women explored their perceptions and experiences for issues related to secondary infertility. Results. The knowledge of women about the causes and scientific treatment options for infertility was limited resulting in inclination for traditional unsafe health care. Infertility was stated to result in marital instability, stigmatization and abuse specially for women with no live child. Conclusions. Since infertility can have a serious effect on both the psychological well-being and the social status of women in Pakistan, effective interventions are the need of the day. There is a dire need for health education and counseling to be integrated into infertility management plans. PMID:22474450

  2. Mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase 4 disruption causes male infertility.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Manuela; Förster, Heidi; Boersma, Auke; Seiler, Alexander; Wehnes, Helga; Sinowatz, Fred; Neumüller, Christine; Deutsch, Manuel J; Walch, Axel; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Wurst, Wolfgang; Ursini, Fulvio; Roveri, Antonella; Maleszewski, Marek; Maiorino, Matilde; Conrad, Marcus

    2009-09-01

    Selenium is linked to male fertility. Glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4), first described as an antioxidant enzyme, is the predominant selenoenzyme in testis and has been suspected of being vital for spermatogenesis. Cytosolic, mitochondrial, and nuclear isoforms are all encoded by the same gene. While disruption of entire GPx4 causes early embryonic lethality in mice, inactivation of nuclear GPx4 does not impair embryonic development or fertility. Here, we show that deletion of mitochondrial GPx4 (mGPx4) allows both normal embryogenesis and postnatal development, but causes male infertility. Infertility was associated with impaired sperm quality and severe structural abnormalities in the midpiece of spermatozoa. Knockout sperm display higher protein thiol content and recapitulate features typical of severe selenodeficiency. Interestingly, male infertility induced by mGPx4 depletion could be bypassed by intracytoplasmic sperm injection. We also show for the first time that mGPx4 is the prevailing GPx4 product in male germ cells and that mGPx4 disruption has no effect on proliferation or apoptosis of germinal or somatic tissue. Our study finally establishes that mitochondrial GPx4 confers the vital role of selenium in mammalian male fertility and identifies cytosolic GPx4 as the only GPx4 isoform being essential for embryonic development and apoptosis regulation. PMID:19417079

  3. Trace elements in seminal plasma of men from infertile couples

    PubMed Central

    Szynkowska, Ma?gorzata I.; Motak-Pochrz?st, Hanna; Pawlaczyk, Aleksandra; Sypniewski, Stanis?aw

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An analysis of lead, zinc, cadmium and other trace elements in semen of men from infertile couples was performed to determine the association between abnormal semen parameters and enviromental or occupational exposure to some trace metals. Material and methods Presence of manganese, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, tin and lead was measured in seminal plasma of 34 men from infertile couples using spectrometry with time-of-flight analysis. Correlations among sperm parameters and trace metals were determined using cluster analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results Abnormally high concentrations of lead, cadmium, zinc and cobalt were found in 23 seminal plasma of men from infertile couples. The most consistent evidence was determined for an association between high cadmium concentration in seminal plasma and sperm count, motility and morphology below reference limits (p < 0.01). A correlation of significantly increased tin level and reduced sperm count in semen of men with limited fertility potential was observed (p = 0.04). Conclusions In our study we observed a correlation of tin level with sperm count in semen of men with limited fertility potential. PMID:26170853

  4. Treatment of infertility in men with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Brackett, Nancy L; Lynne, Charles M; Ibrahim, Emad; Ohl, Dana A; Sønksen, Jens

    2010-03-01

    Most men with spinal cord injury (SCI) are infertile. Erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities contribute to the problem. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injections of alprostadil, penile prostheses, and vacuum constriction devices. In anejaculatory patients who wish to father children, semen retrieval is necessary. Penile vibratory stimulation is recommended as the first line of treatment. Patients who fail penile vibratory stimulation can be referred for electroejaculation. If this approach is not possible, prostate massage is an alternative. Surgical sperm retrieval should be considered as a last resort when other methods fail. Most men with SCI have a unique semen profile characterized by normal sperm count but abnormally low sperm motility. Scientific investigations indicate that accessory gland dysfunction and abnormal semen constituents contribute to the problem. Despite abnormalities, sperm from men with SCI can successfully induce pregnancy. In selected couples, the simple method of intravaginal insemination is a viable option. Another option is intrauterine insemination. The efficacy of intrauterine insemination increases as the total motile sperm count inseminated increases. In vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection are options in cases of extremely low total motile sperm count. Reproductive outcomes for SCI male factor infertility are similar to outcomes for general male factor infertility. PMID:20157304

  5. Hypothetical link between infertility and genetically modified food.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingxia; Li, Bin; Yuan, Wenzhen; Zhao, Lihui; Zhang, Xuehong

    2014-01-01

    It is speculated that genetically modified food (GMF)/genetically modified organism (GMO) is responsible for infertility development. The risk linked with a wide use of GMFs/GMOs offers the basic elements for social criticism. However, to date, it has not been justified whether the bad effects are directly resulted from products of genetic modifications or trans-genesis process. Extensive experience with the risk assessment of whole foods has been applied recently on the safety and nutritional testing of GMFs/GMOs. Investigations have tested the safety of GMFs including sub-acute, chronic, reproductive, multi-generation and carcinogenicity studies. We extrapolated the potential risks associated with GMFs/GMOs on reproduction, and analyzed the multi-aspect linked between infertility and GMFs/GMOs. It could be conjectured that GMFs/GMOs could be potential hazard on reproduction, linking to the development of infertility through influencing the endocrine metabolism, endometriosis. However, little evidence shows the impaction on embryo or reproductive related tumor due to the limited literatures, and needs further research. The article presents some related patents on GMFs/GMOs, and some methods for tracking GMOs. PMID:25342149

  6. The anxiety of infertility: the role of the nurses in the fertility clinic.

    PubMed

    Allan, Helen Therese

    2013-03-01

    This paper discusses the effects of anxiety and depression on infertile people as they undergo infertility investigations and treatments, and explores what nurses may do to assist them to cope with this anxiety. There is an extensive literature on the psychosocial effects of infertility on couples, women and men separately and their children, but the nursing and midwifery literature lacks an in-depth exploration of the psychological and emotional consequences of infertility for infertile people. The paper concludes by arguing that nurses and midwives need to undertake research into their practice in fertility care, that is, caring for infertile people as they undergo assisted reproductive technologies and, to this end, suggests sources of research funding. PMID:23548092

  7. Meiotic recombination and male infertility: from basic science to clinical reality?

    PubMed

    Hann, Michael C; Lau, Patricio E; Tempest, Helen G

    2011-03-01

    Infertility is a common problem that affects approximately 15% of the population. Although many advances have been made in the treatment of infertility, the molecular and genetic causes of male infertility remain largely elusive. This review will present a summary of our current knowledge on the genetic origin of male infertility and the key events of male meiosis. It focuses on chromosome synapsis and meiotic recombination and the problems that arise when errors in these processes occur, specifically meiotic arrest and chromosome aneuploidy, the leading cause of pregnancy loss in humans. In addition, meiosis-specific candidate genes will be discussed, including a discussion on why we have been largely unsuccessful at identifying disease-causing mutations in infertile men. Finally clinical applications of sperm aneuploidy screening will be touched upon along with future prospective clinical tests to better characterize male infertility in a move towards personalized medicine. PMID:21297654

  8. Evaluation of the melatonin and oxidative stress markers level in serum of fertile and infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani Rad, Sara; Abbasalizadeh, Shamsi; Ghorbani Haghjo, Amir; Sadagheyani, Mehzad; Montaseri, Azadeh; Soleimani Rad, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is defined as the inability to achieve the pregnancy within a year of unprotected intercourse. Infertility is a complex issue and different factors such as stress oxidative can be involved in this problem. So, any attempt to neutralize oxidative stress would be helpful in the treatment of infertility. Melatonin is a known scavenger of free radicals. Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the level of melatonin and its correlation with oxidative biomarkers in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: The participants including fertile and infertile women were divided into two groups of 30 people. Blood sampling was performed and sera were collected. The level of Malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and melatonin were detected. Data were analyzed using T-test and their correlation was assessed using Spearman test. Results: Serum melatonin from fertile women was higher than infertile women but the difference was not significant (p= 0.46). MDA level in fertile women was significantly lower than infertile women (p<0.001) and the level of TAC in fertile women was significantly higher than infertile women (p<0.001). Spearman test revealed a significant and direct correlation between melatonin and TAC in fertile and infertile women and a significant but reverse correlation between melatonin and MDA in infertile and fertile women. Conclusion: Differences in the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in fertile and infertile individuals have been reported. This study revealed a significant correlation between melatonin and oxidative stress biomarkers, concluding that melatonin level could be involved in infertility. PMID:26494992

  9. Tubal factor infertility: diagnosis and management in the era of assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Dun, Erica C; Nezhat, Ceana H

    2012-12-01

    Tubal factor infertility accounts for a large portion of female factor infertility. The most prevalent cause of tubal factor infertility is pelvic inflammatory disease and acute salpingitis. The diagnosis of tubal occlusion can be established by a combination of clinical suspicion based on patient history and diagnostic tests, such as hysterosalpingogram, sonohysterosalpingography, and laparoscopy with chromopertubation. Depending on several patient factors, tubal microsurgery or more commonly in vitro fertilization with its improving success rates are the recommended treatment options. PMID:23182560

  10. In vitro fertilization for male infertility: when and how?

    PubMed

    Hall, J; Fishel, S

    1997-12-01

    The first observation that in vitro fertilization (IVF) was useful for treating oligozoospermia and oligoasthenozoospermia was reported by Fishel and Edwards in 1982. This was followed by a series of cases indicating the value of IVF in such cases. Conventional IVF has been modified and refined to achieve increased rates of conception in cases of male factor infertility. Methods such as high insemination concentration IVF for the treatment of teratozoospermia and microscopic IVF for the treatment of oligozoospermia have had some impact on fertilization and pregnancy rates; however, reports of success are varied. The recent advent of micromanipulation and, in particular, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has overshadowed the use of these modified IVF procedures. Because of the high fertilization and pregnancy rates achieved with ICSI, other micromanipulation techniques (subzonal insemination and partial zona dissection) have been abandoned; there have also been suggestions that other more conventional techniques, i.e. IVF, should also be abandoned and that ICSI become the sole technique for the treatment of infertility. The rapid increase in the number of centres using ICSI has led to extreme pressure for individual units to achieve high fertilization and pregnancy rates and there is a temptation to assign all patients to ICSI treatment. It is important that, in this highly competitive environment, new techniques are not applied haphazardly and reduced to the mere injection of gametes and achievement of pregnancy regardless of the cause of infertility. In his 1986 IVF--Historical Perspective, Fishel quoted Auguste Comte: 'to understand science it is necessary to know its history'. IVF has much recent history in animal and also human work. Although ICSI is the most significant therapeutic advance in male infertility treatment, its application to human IVF is only 4 years old, with a paucity of animal studies on which to rely. For this reason IVF still plays a very important role in the treatment of male factor infertility and should only be ruled out when it has failed previously or the number of available sperm is limited. PMID:9692012

  11. Chromosomal Aberrations and Polymorphic Evaluation in Males with Primary Infertility from Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Pokale, Yamini S.; Jadhav, Ajinkya M.; Gangane, Suresh D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives: The chromosomal abnormalities are one of the important causes of male infertility. In view of the genetic risks for the next generation, the importance of careful evaluation of karyotype is essential. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men with primary infertility from Indian population. Materials and Methods: The 78 infertile men with primary infertility, out of which 26 men were azoospermic, 19 men were oligospermic, 4 men were asthenospermic and 29 men were oligoasthenospermic were studied. Karyoptying was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes by using the Giemsa trypsin banding (GTG) banding technique. Additional data was collected from published studies in Indian population leading to a total of 1814 cases. Results: Chromosome analysis of 78 infertile males showed major chromosome abnormalities in 10.2%, with 6.4% in autosomal chromosome abnormalities and 3.8% in sex chromosome abnormalities. The incidence of major chromosome abnormalities in oligospermic males were 21% and azoospermic males were 15.4 %. Chromosomal polymorphic variants were identified to be 16.7%. Combining the data from other published studies identified 153/ 1814 (8.4%) infertile men of chromosomal abnormalities; with 10.8% in azoospermia, 7.3% in oligospermia and 7.3% in oligoasthenoteratospermic from India. Interpretation and Conclusion: The overall high prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in infertile males suggests that the conventional chromosomal analysis is an important investigative tool for male infertility, especially prior to use of any assisted reproductive techniques. PMID:25478430

  12. Exploration of the counseling needs of infertile couples: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari, Fatemeh; Ghahiri, Ataollah; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Habibi, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Identification of the main needs of infertile patients is essential to provision of appropriate supportive services and care based on their needs. Thus, the present study aims to explore infertile couples’ counseling needs. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out with an inductive qualitative content analysis approach during 2012–2013. The participants of this study included 26 Iranian infertile couples and 7 medical personnel (3 gynecologists and 4 midwives). The infertile couples were selected through purposive sampling and considering maximal variation from patients attending state-run and private infertility treatment centers as well as infertility specialists, offices in Isfahan and Rasht, Iran. Unstructured in-depth interviews and field notes were utilized for data gathering and replying to this research main question, “What are the counseling needs of infertile couples?” The data from medical personnel was collected through semi-structured interviews. Data analysis was carried out through conventional content analysis. Results: Data analysis revealed two main themes. The first theme was “a need for psychological counseling,” which included four subthemes: Emotional distress management, sexual counseling, marital counseling, and family counseling. The second theme was “a need for guidance and information throughout treatment process,” which included three subthemes: Treatment counseling, financial counseling, and legal counseling. Conclusions: The counseling needs of infertile couples are varied, and they require various psychosocial support and counseling interventions. The participants of this study identified clearly the significance of psychological counseling and information throughout the long and onerous journey of infertility and its treatment. PMID:26457091

  13. Analysis of the serum reproductive system related autoantibodies of infertility patients in Tianjin region of China

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yan; Xu, Yanying; Wang, Jianmei; Wang, Fang; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yujuan; Zhang, Bumei

    2015-01-01

    Object: Reproductive system related autoantibodies have been proposed to be associated with natural infertility. However, large scale systematic analysis of these of antibodies has not been conducted. The aim of this study is to analyze the positive rate of antisperm antibody (ASAb), anti-endometrium antibody (EMAb), anti-ovary antibody (AOAb), anti-zona pellucida antibody (AZP) and anticardiolipin antibody (ACA) in infertility patients in Tianjin region of China. Methods: 1305 male and 1711 female primary infertility patients and 1100 female secondary infertility patients were included in this study, as well as 627 healthy female controls. The above autoantibodies were tested and the positive rates in each group were calculated. Results: the positive rate of ASAb were significantly higher in primary infertility female than that in male, further analysis revealed that primary infertility population all exhibit significant higher positive rate of EMAb, AOAb, AZP and ACA compared with control group. Furthermore, the positive rates of all the antibodies in primary infertility female were significantly higher than those in secondary infertility female. Conclusions: Our study thus indicates that these autoantibodies might be associated with immunological related primary infertility and may have clinical significance in its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26550366

  14. Infertility: Why can't we classify this inability as disability?

    PubMed Central

    Khetarpal, Abha; Singh, Satendra

    2012-01-01

    Disability is a complex phenomenon. It reflects an interaction between features of a person's body and features of the society in which he or she lives. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), lays stress on the functional as well as the structural problem of a person. All the definitions of disability also include the disorders of the reproductive and endocrine system. So infertility and impotency should also be included in the category of disability. It affects the participation in areas of life and can have a disabling affect on an individual. Like any other disability the couple has to adapt and integrate infertility in their sense of self thus infertility comes as a major life crisis. Medically, infertility, in most cases, is considered to be the result of a physical impairment or a genetic abnormality. Socially, couples are incapable of their reproductive or parental roles. On social level, infertility in most cultures remains associated with social stigma and taboo just like the social model of disability. Couples who are unable to reproduce may be looked down upon due to social stigmatisation. Infertility can lead to divorces and separation leading to a broken family life. Without labelling infertility as a disability, it is difficult for the people to access services and welfare benefits offered by the government. Infertility treatments are highly sophisticated so they are very expensive and are even not covered by insurance and government aid. In the light of all this it becomes imperative to categorise infertility as disability. PMID:22848333

  15. Effect of Infertility on the Quality of Life, A Cross- Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf; Direkvand-Moghadam, Azadeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility is a major life crisis which causes serious mental problems and stressful experience of infertile couples. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare the quality of life in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: In a cross - sectional study compared the quality of life in 450 women attending both public and private health centers in Ilam, western of Iran, in 2013. Participants were divided in two groups’ fertilities and infertilities women. Data was collected by trained research midwives using demographic and SF-36 questionnaires. SPSS software Package 16 was used to analyze the data of this project. Differences were regarded statistically significant with an alpha error of 0.05. Results: Significant difference was reported in mean age between fertile and infertile women (p=0.003). Mean scores of all Mental dimensions of quality of life were higher in fertile women in comparison with infertile women. This difference was statistically significant (58.35±19.43 vs 56.56±13.18 respectively) (p= 0.000).The mean score of all physical dimensions have not statistically significant difference in fertile and infertile women (79.77± 23.19 vs 74.96±23.45 respectively) (p= 0.441). Conclusion: In most infertile women, the mean score of Mental dimensions of quality of life is lower in comparison with fertile women, therefore, it is necessary the used of counseling and treatment programs in infertile women. PMID:25478412

  16. Clinical management and therapeutic outcome of infertile couples in southeast Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Menuba, Ifeanyi E; Ugwu, Emmanuel O; Obi, Samuel N; Lawani, Lucky O; Onwuka, Chidinma I

    2014-01-01

    Background Infertility is highly prevalent in Nigeria and most infertile couples in southeast Nigeria are offered conventional forms of treatment, which consist mainly of ovulation induction and tubal surgery, due to limited availability and high cost of endoscopic and assisted reproductive technologies like laparoscopy and in vitro fertilization. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of infertility, outcome of infertility investigation, and the treatment outcome of infertile couples following therapeutic interventions in southeast Nigeria over a 12-month period. Methods This was a prospective cross-sectional study of 218 consecutive infertile couples presenting for infertility management at the infertility clinics of two tertiary health institutions in Enugu, southeast Nigeria. Infertility investigations were carried out on these couples using the available conventional diagnostic facilities. Following the results of the investigations/diagnosis, conventional treatment was offered to the couples as appropriate. Data analysis was both descriptive and inferential at 95% confidence level. Results The mean age of the women was 33.5±4.62 (range: 15–49) years. Most (58.3% [n=127]) were nulliparous. The prevalence of infertility was 12.1%. Infertility was primary in 28.4% (n=62) and secondary in 71.6% (n=156). Female etiologic factors were responsible in 32.1% (n=70), male factors in 26.1% (n=57), and a combination of male/female factors in 29.4% (n=64). The etiology was unknown in 12.4% (n=27). Tubal factors 23.8 % (n=52) and ovulation failures 26.1% (n=57) are common female factors implicated. Pregnancy rate following treatment was 16.7% (n=28). Multivariate regression analysis indicates that younger age of ?30 years, duration of infertility ?5 years, and female factor infertility were associated with higher pregnancy outcome following treatment. Conclusion The prevalence of infertility is high and pregnancy rate following conventional treatment is poor. There is a need to improve facilities for managing infertility as well as making artificial reproductive techniques readily available, accessible, and affordable. PMID:25328391

  17. Comparison of lifestyle in fertile and infertile couples in Kermanshah during 2013

    PubMed Central

    Khosrorad, Tahereh; Dolatian, Mahrokh; Riazi, Hedyeh; Mahmoodi, Zohreh; Alavimajd, Hamid; Shahsavari, Soodeh; Bakhtiari, Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a major reproductive health in gynecology. According to the world health organization, there are currently 50-80 million infertile couples in the world. Objective: Considering the critical effects of lifestyle on reproductive health, this study aimed to compare the lifestyle of fertile and infertile couples in Kermanshah during 2013. Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive cross sectional study that was done on 216 fertile and infertile couples attending Infertility Center and six medical centers that were selected through the convenience sampling. Data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire containing demographic and fertility-related information and also lifestyle items on nutrition, physical activity, perceived social support, responsibility for health, and inappropriate health behaviors. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression analysis, independent t, chi-square and Generalized Estimating equation were performed to analyze the data. Results: Fertile and infertile women (86.1% and 73. 1% respectively, p= 0. 03) as well as fertile and infertile men were significantly different in terms of physical activity (87% and 96.3% p<0.001, respectively) and perceived social support (p<0.001). Moreover, there was a significant difference between fertile and infertile women in nutrition (p<0.001). Similar differences were observed in responsibility for health and inappropriate health behaviors between fertile and infertile men. However, all of the dimensions of lifestyle, except nutrition, were significantly different between fertile and infertile couples. Conclusion: As lifestyle plays a crucial role in reproductive health, the inappropriate lifestyle of infertile couples has to be modified through effective measures such as awareness promotion, behavioral changes, and development of a healthy environment. PMID:26568759

  18. Thyroid Hormones and Prolactin Levels in Infertile Women in Southern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Udoh, Alphonsus Ekpe; Essien, Okon Ekwerre; Isong, Idongesit Kokoabasi Paul; Gali, Rebecca Mtaku; Archibong, Edim Eyo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Human infertility is a complex global health problem. It has multiple social consequences which are especially profound for thyroid hormones in infertility with the aim of determining the degree of association of thyroid hormones with hyperprolactinemia in our population. Materials and Methods: The serum levels of prolactin, T3, T4 and TSH were determined in 90 hyperprolactinemic infertile women, 90 normoprolactinemic infertile women and 50 fertile women. The hormones were assayed using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay kits. Statistical Analysis: Analysis of variance and Pearson’s correlation were used to analyze the data, with the significant p-level set at 0.05. Results: A significantly higher mean serum prolactin and TSH were observed among the infertile groups compared to the fertile controls (p<0.05). The mean serum T3 and T4 were significantly lower in the hyperprolactinemic infertile women compared to the fertile controls (p<0.05). The mean TSH and T3 of normoprolactinemic infertile women and controls were comparable (p>0.05). However, the mean T4 was significantly lower in normoprolactinemic infertile women compared to the fertile controls (p<0.05). In all the groups, TSH correlated inversely with T3 and T4, while T3 correlated positively with T4. It was only in the control group that prolactin correlated positively and significantly with TSH. Conclusion: It is therefore concluded that hyperprolactinemia with thyroid dysfunction may be a major contributory hormonal factor in infertility among infertile women and as such, estimation of prolactin, T3, T4 and TSH should be included in the workup for infertile women especially those with hyperprolactinaemia. PMID:25954648

  19. Impaired E-cadherin expression in human spermatozoa in a male factor infertility subset signifies E-cadherin-mediated

    E-print Network

    Abraham, Nader G.

    Impaired E-cadherin expression in human spermatozoa in a male factor infertility subset signifies E in a human male infertility disorder points towards genetic defects causing failure in gamete interactions. Ó

  20. Genetics of male infertility: from research to clinic.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Csilla; Escamilla, Antoni Riera; Chianese, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Male infertility is a multifactorial complex disease with highly heterogeneous phenotypic representation and in at least 15% of cases, this condition is related to known genetic disorders, including both chromosomal and single-gene alterations. In about 40% of primary testicular failure, the etiology remains unknown and a portion of them is likely to be caused by not yet identified genetic anomalies. During the last 10 years, the search for 'hidden' genetic factors was largely unsuccessful in identifying recurrent genetic factors with potential clinical application. The armamentarium of diagnostic tests has been implemented only by the screening for Y chromosome-linked gr/gr deletion in those populations for which consistent data with risk estimate are available. On the other hand, it is clearly demonstrated by both single nucleotide polymorphisms and comparative genomic hybridization arrays, that there is a rare variant burden (especially relevant concerning deletions) in men with impaired spermatogenesis. In the era of next generation sequencing (NGS), we expect to expand our diagnostic skills, since mutations in several hundred genes can potentially lead to infertility and each of them is likely responsible for only a small fraction of cases. In this regard, system biology, which allows revealing possible gene interactions and common biological pathways, will provide an informative tool for NGS data interpretation. Although these novel approaches will certainly help in discovering 'hidden' genetic factors, a more comprehensive picture of the etiopathogenesis of idiopathic male infertility will only be achieved by a parallel investigation of the complex world of gene environmental interaction and epigenetics. PMID:26447148

  1. An evidence-based evaluation of endometriosis-associated infertility.

    PubMed

    Pritts, Elizabeth A; Taylor, Robert N

    2003-09-01

    Although endometriosis is associated with infertility, a clear causal relationship has yet to be established, unless adhesive disease is found. Despite this indirect association, multiple theories have been promulgated and studies are currently underway to investigate theoretic pathogenetic mechanisms. The data regarding the treatment of endometriosis-associated infertility are limited and conflicting; however, some general preliminary conclusions can be drawn. It seems that, with early-stage disease, surgical treatment increases pregnancy rates. Using the US Preventive Services Task Force classification scheme, the evidence in support of this finding is of the highest quality, or level I. Surgical treatment for moderate and severe disease also confers benefit, although the evidence in support of this treatment is of lesser quality, level II-3 by the scheme. Medical treatment, particularly if it induces an anovulatory state, has no benefit and may delay fertility. This evidence is again of the highest quality, with a classification of level I. Although assisted reproductive technologies are of benefit regarding fertility for women with endometriosis, the IVF evidence is inconclusive, with both treatments being evaluated by at least one randomized, controlled trial conferring a level I classification to the evidence. It is unclear at this time whether endometriomas have an impact on IVF outcome. The evidence consists of only a few lower-quality studies, with a classification level of II-2. Despite the haziness of current insight into the treatment of endometriosis-associated infertility, well-designed clinical trials and basic mechanistic investigations are underway in many reproductive medicine centers. As the data from these scientific inquiries emerge, clinicians will have a clearer view of effective treatment regimens for endometriosis. PMID:14560892

  2. Might uterus transplantation be an option for uterine factor infertility?

    PubMed Central

    Akar, Münire Erman

    2015-01-01

    Current data on uterus allotransplantation research has been reviewed and summarized. Over the past 15 years, progress in uterus transplantation research has increased dramatically. As a consequence, the first pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation in rats have been reported. The technique has been better defined. Although clinical pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation has been reported in humans, there are still many questions to be answered before clinical application. Gestational surrogacy still remains an important option for being a genetic parent in selected cases with uterine factor infertility. PMID:25788850

  3. Prospective Changes in Infertile Patients using Nonlinear Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yuko; Tomiyama, Tatsuhiro; Matsubayashi, Hidehiko; Tsukamoto, Asami; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi

    2011-06-01

    We measured pulse waves in 22 infertile women from the beginning of in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) through to pregnancy testing. The largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) and autonomic nerve balance in the pregnancy group were significantly lower than that in the non-pregnancy group. In this study, we measured plethysmograms of four women who became pregnant and 18 who did not, ten times from each. We calculated LLE and a value for the autonomic nerve balance; from this analysis, we conclude that a mental state that allows for the possibility of becoming pregnant is necessary for a successful pregnancy.

  4. Survey of the Situation of Infertile Women Seeking In Vitro Fertilization Treatment in China

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xuan; Wang, Gongxian; Liu, Sisun; Zhang, Jing; Zeng, Fang; Qiu, Yun; Huang, Xiaojin

    2013-01-01

    Background. In previous studies, people's knowledge of reproductive health and infertile women's psychological states was surveyed in several countries. However, there has been limited information concerning the psychological states of infertile women seeking treatment and the outcomes of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in China. Methods. Infertile women were asked to complete short questionnaires on the day that their oocytes were retrieved; these questionnaires covered the durations of their infertility, levels of education, sources of pressure, and psychological states. Data concerning IVF outcomes were provided by embryologists and clinicians. The correlations between the duration of infertility and educational level, psychological state and education level, and psychological state and outcome of IVF were analyzed in the cohort study. Results. The duration of infertility in more than half of the females was longer than 5 years. Compared with less-educated women, women with higher levels of education sought treatment earlier and their rates of depressive symptoms were lower. There is an association between negative emotions and outcome of IVF. Conclusions. The survey of the situations of infertile women seeking IVF treatment in China indicates the importance of popularizing knowledge concerning reproductive health. Improving medical conditions, reducing the costs of treatment, and developing social culture will aid in relieving the stress of infertile women and improving assisted reproductive treatment. PMID:24369006

  5. Acceptability of artificial donor insemination among infertile couples in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ugwu, Emmanuel O; Odoh, Godwin U; Obi, Samuel N; Ezugwu, Frank O

    2014-01-01

    Background Male factor infertility presents one of the greatest challenges with respect to infertility treatment in Africa. Artificial insemination by donor semen (AID) is a cost-effective option for infertile couples, but its practice may be influenced by sociocultural considerations. The purpose of this study was to determine the awareness and acceptability of AID among infertile couples in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria, and identify the sociocultural factors associated with its practices. Methods Questionnaires were administered to a cross-section of 200 consecutive infertile couples accessing care at the infertility clinics of two tertiary health institutions in Enugu, Nigeria, between April 1, 2012 and January 31, 2013. Results Among the 384 respondents, the level of awareness and acceptability of AID were 46.6% (179/384) and 43% (77/179), respectively. The acceptability rate was significantly higher among female respondents, women with primary infertility, and those whose infertility had lasted for 5 years and beyond (P<0.05). The major reasons for nonacceptance of AID were religious conviction (34.7%, n=33), cultural concern (17.9%, n=17), fear of contracting an infection (17.9%, n=17), and fear of possibility of failure of the procedure (12.6%, n=12). Conclusion Health education and public enlightenment are advocated to increase awareness and dispel the current misconceptions about AID in our environment. PMID:24611022

  6. Infertility in Women: Hysterosalpingographic Assessment of the Fallopian Tubes in Lagos, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Fabamwo, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Tubal disease constitutes a major factor in infertility especially in developing countries. This study was undertaken to assess the hysterosalpingographic patterns seen in infertile patients in an urban centre in Lagos. Two hundred and twenty patients who reported from the gynaecology clinic to the radiology department of Lagos State University…

  7. Motherhood and Female Labor Supply in the Developing World: Evidence from Infertility Shocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguero, Jorge M.; Marks, Mindy S.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new instrument for family size, infertility, to investigate the causal relationship between children and female labor force participation. Infertility mimics an experiment where nature assigns an upper bound for family size, independent of a woman's background. This new instrument allows us to investigate the differential labor…

  8. An Exploratory Study of the Psychological Correlates of Infertility on Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Fahje, Kristin Kons

    1989-01-01

    Investigated effect of various factors related to infertility on women's (N=31) self-esteem and concomitant incidence of depression. Results support positive relationship between infertile women's self-esteem and their internal locus of control, self-esteem and subjective satisfaction with their social support, and general satisfaction with social…

  9. A Holistic Approach to the Treatment of the Crisis of Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresnick, Ellen R.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the importance of assessing the impact infertility has on couples/individuals and understanding the relevance of this impact in the context of psychological treatment. Infertility's negative impact can be minimized by therapeutic intervention. Three psychological-behavioral categories for couples are posited, with case studies. (Author)

  10. Effect of Infertility on Sexual Function: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf; Direkvand-Moghadam, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sexual dysfunction is an important psychological disorder that may increase in infertile couples. Aim To evaluate the effect of infertility on sexual function in women attending in private and public institutions in Ilam during 2013. Materials and Methods In a cross - sectional study evaluated the sexual function among 384 women attending in health care centers of Ilam western of Iran during 2013. Participants were divided in two groups, fertilities and infertilities women. Data was collected by trained research midwives using demographic and FSFI questionnaires. SPSS software Package 16 was used to analyse the data of this project. Differences were regarded statistically significant with an alpha error of 0.05. Results The mean age was 29.29 ± 6.7 years in fertile and 31.74 ± 8.07 in infertile women. Significant difference was reported in mean age between fertile and infertile women (p=0.014). The Mean± SD of all demissions of female sexual function was difference between fertile and infertile women. Sexual function was lower in infertile women. Conclusion All dimensions of sexual function were lower in infertile women in compared with fertile women. Further research should be done on this subject and ways to address such problems should be found. PMID:26155520

  11. Economic aspects of infertility care: a challenge for researchers and clinicians.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    Infertility care has improved remarkably over the last few decades and has received growing attention from health care providers. Several treatments, including expensive options such as Assisted Reproductive Techniques, are now widely available for routine clinical use. In most cases, adoption of these treatments has occurred without robust cost-effective analyses. IVF for unexplained infertility and ICSI in the absence of semen abnormalities are two examples of this gradual technology creep. More in-depth economic analyses in the field of infertility are undoubtedly warranted. However, performing these analyses is challenging because infertility care poses a number of unique challenges. Studies of cost-effectiveness are open to criticism because there is a lack of consensus about the outcomes of choice and the appropriate perspective. The use of quality adjusted life years (QALYs) to allow comparisons with other clinical conditions is also controversial because the value associated with infertility care cannot be easily captured in QALYs. Moreover, their use triggers the crucial question of whose QALYs merit consideration-an individual's, a couple's or a child's. In conclusion, economic analysis in infertility represents a peculiar but crucial challenge. If management of infertility is to become an integral part of publicly or privately funded health care systems worldwide, better quality data and a shared vision about the costs and benefits of infertility treatments are needed. PMID:26141712

  12. The use of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics in identifying biomarkers of male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Jason R.; Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that male factors contribute to approximately 50% of all infertility, the mechanisms underlying their origin are unknown. Currently, clinicians rely primarily on semen analyses to predict male reproductive potential and chart treatment success. Even when invasive procedures are performed, the causes of male infertility frequently remain elusive. Recently, the advent of new technologies has spurred the search for novel male infertility biomarkers, and the detection of genes, proteins or metabolites unique to the infertile male holds much promise. The concept that a cost-effective, non-invasive and accurate set of biomarkers can be identified to diagnose male infertility is tantalizing. This review focuses on the various methodologies employed in the discovery of novel biomarkers along with their findings. Specific attention is paid to recent advances in the fields of genetics, proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:23415969

  13. Nature versus nurture--plant resources in management of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Dama, Madhukar Shivajirao; Akhand, Pratap Singh; Rajender, Singh

    2010-01-01

    Male infertility, apart from being a multi-factorial disorder, has no defined etiology in almost half of the infertile men. The complex etiology demands a complex remedy which can heal several ailments together. Currently available specific treatments are largely inefficient in infertility treatment. Medicinal plants present a repertoire capable of providing varied constituents which could be helpful in infertility management. However, the literature on the same is scanty and we have not explored even 1 percent of the available plant resources. Herein, we present a systematic review of clinical and experimental data on the use of Indian medicinal herbs in the treatment of male infertility. Literature suggests that most of the medicinal herbs exhibit a three dimensional effect of reducing oxidative/psychological stress, fatigue and promoting libido. This review is oriented to identify and highlight aphrodisiac, adaptogenic, anti-oxidant and nutritional properties of these plants and aims at promoting exploration of these valuable medicinal resources. PMID:20515771

  14. Mutations in DNAH1, which Encodes an Inner Arm Heavy Chain Dynein, Lead to Male Infertility from Multiple

    E-print Network

    Thierry-Mieg, Nicolas

    REPORT Mutations in DNAH1, which Encodes an Inner Arm Heavy Chain Dynein, Lead to Male Infertility with infertility and a male factor is involved in approximately half the cases. A genetic etiology is likely in most cases yet only few genes have been formally correlated with male infertility. Homozygosity mapping

  15. A potential tool for diagnosis of male infertility: Plasma metabolomics based on GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinyi; Wang, Yang; Yun, Yonghuan; Xia, Zian; Lu, Hongmei; Luo, Jiekun; Liang, Yizeng

    2016-01-15

    Male infertility has become an important public health problem worldwide. Nowadays the diagnosis of male infertility frequently depends on the results of semen quality or requires more invasive surgical intervention. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a novel approach for early diagnosis of male infertility. According to the presence or absence of normal sexual function, the male infertility is classified into two phenotypes, erectile dysfunction (ED) and semen abnormalities (SA). The aim of this study was to investigate the GC-MS plasma profiles of infertile male having erectile dysfunction (ED) and having semen abnormalities (SA) and discover the potential biomarkers. The plasma samples from healthy controls (HC) (n=61) and infertility patients with ED (n=26) or with SA (n=44) were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for discrimination and screening potential biomarkers. The partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed on GC-MS dataset. The results showed that HC could be discriminated from infertile cases having SA (AUC=86.96%, sensitivity=78.69%, specificity=84.09%, accuracy=80.95%) and infertile cases having ED (AUC=94.33%, sensitivity=80.33%, specificity=100%, accuracy=87.36%). Some potential biomarkers were successfully discovered by two commonly used variable selection methods, variable importance on projection (VIP) and original coefficients of PLS-DA (?). 1,5-Anhydro-sorbitol and ?-hydroxyisovaleric acid were identified as the potential biomarkers for distinguishing HC from the male infertility patients. Meanwhile, lactate, glutamate and cholesterol were the found to be the important variables to distinguish between patients with erectile dysfunction from those with semen abnormalities. The plasma metabolomics may be developed as a novel approach for fast, noninvasive, and acceptable diagnosis and characterization of male infertility. PMID:26592580

  16. Human Papillomavirus Infection, Infertility, and Assisted Reproductive Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Nigel; Kucharczyk, Katherine M.; Estes, Jaclyn L.; Gerber, Rachel S.; Lekovich, Jovana P.; Elias, Rony T.; Spandorfer, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection common among men and women across all geographic and socioeconomic subgroups worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that HPV infection may affect fertility and alter the efficacy of assisted reproductive technologies. In men, HPV infection can affect sperm parameters, specifically motility. HPV-infected sperm can transmit viral DNA to oocytes, which may be expressed in the developing blastocyst. HPV can increase trophoblastic apoptosis and reduce the endometrial implantation of trophoblastic cells, thus increasing the theoretical risk of miscarriage. Vertical transmission of HPV during pregnancy may be involved in the pathophysiology of preterm rupture of membranes and spontaneous preterm birth. In patients undergoing intrauterine insemination for idiopathic infertility, HPV infection confers a lower pregnancy rate. In contrast, the evidence regarding any detrimental impact of HPV infection on IVF outcomes is inconclusive. It has been suggested that vaccination could potentially counter HPV-related sperm impairment, trophoblastic apoptosis, and spontaneous miscarriages; however, these conclusions are based on in vitro studies rather than large-scale epidemiological studies. Improvement in the understanding of HPV sperm infection mechanisms and HPV transmission into the oocyte and developing blastocyst may help explain idiopathic causes of infertility and miscarriage. PMID:26609434

  17. Serum oestradiol levels in male partners of infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Hagiuda, J; Ishikawa, H; Marumo, K

    2015-08-01

    A prospective clinical study was performed in the reproduction centre of Ichikawa General Hospital (Chiba, Japan) to investigate the relationship between sperm quality and serum oestradiol (E2) level in male partners of infertile couples. The semen parameters and blood samples were assessed in relation to several variables, including body mass index (BMI) and serum oestradiol (E2) levels. Four hundred and nine male partners of infertile couples aged 22-55 years (mean: 36.5 years) were referred to the reproduction centre. In total, 143 patients (35.0%) were included in the low E2 level group (18 pg ml(-1) ? E2). Serum E2 levels were slightly correlated with testosterone levels, BMI and serum FSH levels. Total motile sperm count and morphology were decreased in low E2 level group. In multivariate analysis, serum testosterone, E2 levels, existence of varicocele and age were risk factors for decreased semen quality. Serum E2 might be associated with BMI, serum testosterone level and spermatogenesis. PMID:25059733

  18. The management of infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Homburg, Roy

    2003-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome [PCOS] is the commonest cause of anovulatory infertility. Treatment modes available are numerous mainly relying on ovarian stimulation with FSH, a reduction in insulin concentrations and a decrease in LH levels as the basis of the therapeutic principles. Clomiphene citrate is still the first line treatment and if unsuccessful is usually followed by direct FSH stimulation. This should be given in a low dose protocol, essential to avoid the otherwise prevalent complications of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and multiple pregnancies. The addition of a GnRH agonists, while very useful during IVF/ET, adds little to ovulation induction success whereas the position of GnRH antagonists is not yet clear. Hyperinsulinemia is the commonest contributor to the state of anovulation and its reduction, by weight loss or insulin sensitizing agents such as metformin, will alone often restore ovulation or will improve results when used in combination with other agents. Laparoscopic ovarian drilling is proving equally as successful as FSH for the induction of ovulation, particularly in thin patients with high LH concentrations. Aromatase inhibitors are presently being examined and may replace clomiphene in the future. When all else has failed, IVF/ET produces excellent results. In conclusion, there are very few women suffering from anovulatory infertility associated with PCOS who cannot be successfully treated today. PMID:14617367

  19. Joint effect of glutathione S-transferase genotypes and cigarette smoking on idiopathic male infertility.

    PubMed

    Yarosh, S L; Kokhtenko, E V; Churnosov, M I; Solodilova, M A; Polonikov, A V

    2015-11-01

    Inconsistent results of association studies investigated the role of glutathione S-transferase genes in idiopathic male infertility may be explained by ethnical differences in gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. In this study, we investigated a joint contribution of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 gene polymorphisms and cigarette smoking to the risk of idiopathic infertility in Russian men. DNA samples from 203 infertile and 227 fertile men were genotyped by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (GSTP1 I105V) methods. The GSTP1 genotype 105IV was associated with increased risk of male infertility (OR = 1.50 95% CI 1.02-2.20 P = 0.04). Genotype combinations GSTP1 105II/GSTT1 del (G1), GSTM1 del/GSTT1 del (G2) and GSTM1 + /GSTT1 del (G3) were associated with decreased risk of male infertility (P ? 0.003), whereas a genotype combination GSTP1 105IV/GSTT1 + (G4) was associated with increased disease risk (P = 0.001). The genotype combinations G3 and G4 showed a significant association with infertility in smokers; however, nonsmokers carriers did show the disease risk. In conclusion, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes are collectively involved in the development of idiopathic male infertility and their phenotypic effects on the disease risk are potentiated by cigarette smoking. PMID:25348056

  20. Genetic variants in TP53 and MDM2 associated with male infertility in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cong; Liu, Wei; Ji, Gui-Xiang; Gu, Ai-Hua; Qu, Jian-Hua; Song, Ling; Wang, Xin-Ru

    2012-01-01

    The TP53, a transcriptional regulator and tumor suppressor, is functionally important in spermatogenesis. MDM2 is a key regulator of the p53 pathway and modulates p53 activity. Both proteins have been functionally linked to germ cell apoptosis, which may affect human infertility, but very little is known on how common polymorphisms in these genes may influence germ cell apoptosis and the risk of male infertility. Thus, this study was designed to test whether three previously described polymorphisms 72Arg>Pro (rs1042522) and the Ex2+19C>T (rs2287498) in TP53, and the 5? untranslated region (5? UTR) 309T>G (rs937283) in MDM2, are associated with idiopathic male infertility in a Chinese population. The three polymorphisms were genotyped using OpenArray assay in a hospital-based case–control study, including 580 infertile patients and 580 fertile controls. Our analyses revealed that TP53 Ex2+19C>T and MDM2 309T>G polymorphisms are associated with male infertility. Furthermore, we detected a nearly statistically significant additive interaction between TP53 rs2287498 and MDM2 rs937283 for the development of male infertility (Pinteraction=0.055). In summary, this study found preliminary evidence, demonstrating that genetic variants in genes of the TP53 pathway are risk factors for male infertility. PMID:22773013

  1. Idiopathic Male Infertility Is Strongly Associated with Aberrant Promoter Methylation of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR)

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yufeng; Niu, Xiaobing; Lu, Chuncheng; Xia, Yankai; Song, Ling; Wang, Shoulin; Wang, Xinru

    2010-01-01

    Background Abnormal germline DNA methylation in males has been proposed as a possible mechanism compromising spermatogenesis of some men currently diagnosed with idiopathic infertility. Previous studies have been focused on imprinted genes with DNA methylation in poor quality human sperms. However, recent but limited data have revealed that sperm methylation abnormalities may involve large numbers of genes or shown that genes that are not imprinted are also affected. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and bisulfite sequencing method, we examined methylation patterns of the promoter of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene (NG_013351: 1538–1719) in sperm DNA obtained from 94 idiopathic infertile men and 54 normal fertile controls. Subjects with idiopathic infertility were further divided into groups of normozoospermia and oligozoospermia. Overall, 45% (41/94) of idiopathic infertile males had MTHFR hypermethylation (both hemimethylation and full methylation), compared with 15% of fertile controls (P<0.05). Subjects with higher methylation level of MTHFR were more likely to have idiopathic male infertility (P-value for trend ?=?0.0007). Comparing the two groups of idiopathic infertile subjects with different sperm concentrations, a higher methylation pattern was found in the group with oligozoospermia. Conclusions Hypermethylation of the promoter of MTHFR gene in sperms is associated with idiopathic male infertility. The functional relevance of hypermathylation of MTHFR to male fertility warrants further investigation. PMID:21085488

  2. Therapeutic vaccines: hope therapy and its effects on psychiatric symptoms among infertile women.

    PubMed

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Abdolahifard, Khadije; Jahromi, Masoumeh Golestan

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a life crisis which leads to serious psychological problems. The present study aims to investigate the effects of hope therapy as a psychological intervention on psychological distresses among infertile women. The present study was an experimental one. The study population included infertile women referring to gynecology clinics. Women who lived in Jahrom and could take part in psychotherapy sessions, had no chronic physical or mental disorders, suffered from primary infertility, had infertility unknown causes and had no history of miscarriage and stillbirth were selected through convenience sampling method and were divided into control and intervention groups (n=61). Women in the intervention group participated in eight 2-hour sessions for a period of 2 months. Study results revealed that there was a significant difference between the two groups after the intervention. Besides, there was a significant difference between the two groups through paired T-test (p<0.05). Furthermore, results of ANCOVA showed that after eliminating demographic variables, the intervention was effective in the total mean difference of the study groups. It means that the difference between the two groups was resulted from intervention.Hope therapy as a positive psychological approach can improve infertile women's general health and subsequently improve family's health. Therefore, in addition to assisted reproductive techniques, hope therapy is recommended to be presented to infertile people in order to improve the quality of their life and help them adapt with their problems. PMID:24373279

  3. Role of genetic mutations in folate-related enzyme genes on Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kang; Zhao, Ruizhe; Shen, Min; Ye, Jiaxin; Li, Xiao; Huang, Yuan; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Several studies showed that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes might be associated with male infertility; however, the results were still inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G mutations and the MTHFR haplotype with the risk of male infertility. Overall, a total of 37 studies were selected. Our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T mutation was a risk factor for male infertility in both azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients, especially in Asian population. Men carrying the MTHFR TC haplotype were most liable to suffer infertility while those with CC haplotype had lowest risk. On the other hand, the MTHFR A1298C mutation was not related to male infertility. MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G were potential candidates in the pathogenesis of male infertility, but more case-control studies were required to avoid false-positive outcomes. All of these results were confirmed by the trial sequential analysis. Finally, our meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis proved that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes played a significant role in male infertility. PMID:26549413

  4. Prevention of Chlamydia-induced infertility by inhibition of local caspase activity.

    PubMed

    Igietseme, Joseph U; Omosun, Yusuf; Partin, James; Goldstein, Jason; He, Qing; Joseph, Kahaliah; Ellerson, Debra; Ansari, Uzma; Eko, Francis O; Bandea, Claudiu; Zhong, Guangming; Black, Carolyn M

    2013-04-01

    Tubal factor infertility (TFI) represents 36% of female infertility and genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) is a major cause. Although TFI is associated with host inflammatory responses to bacterial components, the molecular pathogenesis of Chlamydia-induced infertility remains poorly understood. We investigated the hypothesis that activation of specific cysteine proteases, the caspases, during C. trachomatis genital infection causes the disruption of key fertility-promoting molecules required for embryo development and implantation. We analyzed the effect of caspase inhibition on infertility and the integrity of Dicer, a caspase-sensitive, fertility-promoting ribonuclease III enzyme, and key micro-RNAs in the reproductive system. Genital infection with the inflammation- and caspase-inducing, wild-type C. trachomatis serovar L2 led to infertility, but the noninflammation-inducing, plasmid-free strain did not. We confirmed that caspase-mediated apoptotic tissue destruction may contribute to chlamydial pathogenesis. Caspase-1 or -3 deficiency, or local administration of the pan caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK into normal mice protected against Chlamydia-induced infertility. Finally, the oviducts of infected infertile mice showed evidence of caspase-mediated cleavage inactivation of Dicer and alteration in critical miRNAs that regulate growth, differentiation, and development, including mir-21. These results provide new insight into the molecular pathogenesis of TFI with significant implications for new strategies for treatment and prevention of chlamydial complications. PMID:23303804

  5. Pregnancy Outcome after Office Microhysteroscopy in Women with Unexplained Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Seyam, Emaduldin Mostafa; Hassan, Momen Mohamed; Mohamed Sayed Gad, Mohamed Tawfeek; Mahmoud, Hazem Salah; Ibrahim, Mostafa Gamal

    2015-01-01

    Background Hysteroscopy offers diagnostic accuracy and the ability to treat uterine pathology. The current study aimed to review the findings and feasibility of the proposed office-based diagnostic and operative microhysteroscopy in previously diagnosed wom- en with unexplained infertility and to evaluate the post-microhysteroscopic pregnancy outcome in a-year follow-up period. Materials and Methods This prospective controlled study was conducted between 2006 and 2013. Two hundreds women with unexplained infertility were randomized into two groups: A. study group including 100 women recruited for office micohysteroscopic session and B. control group including 100 without the proposed microhysteroscopic intervention. A malleable fiberoptic 2-mm, 0 and 30 degrees angled hysteroscopy along with an operative channel for grasping forceps, scissors, or coaxial bipolar electrode were used for both diagnostic and operative indications. The findings, complications, and patient tolerance were recorded. A-year follow-up of pregnancy outcome for both groups was also performed. Results Seventy cases (70%) of patients had a normal uterine cavity. Twenty wom- en (20%) had endometrial polyps. Other pathology included submucous myomas in 3 cases (3%), intrauterine adhesions in 3 cases (3%), polypoid endometrium in 3 cases (3%), and bicornuate uterus in one case (1%). The pathological findings were treated in all patients without complication. Also a-year follow-up of the to- tal developing cumulative pregnancy rate (CPR) was evaluated in groups A and B (control). Group A revealed the total CPR of 28.5%, among which 25% in women without pathology, 40% in women with endometrial polyps, 23% in women with adhesions, 33% in women with polypoid endometrium, and 21% in those with bi- cornuate uterus. However, A-year follow-up of spontaneous pregnancy outcome in group B showed a total CPR of 15%. Conclusion Women tolerance, safety, and feasibility of simultaneous operative correc- tion make the proposed office microhysteroscopy an ideal and routine procedure in order to diagnose and to treat missed intrauterine abnormalities, especially in cases with un- explained infertility, with additional improvement of the pregnancy outcome after the procedure. PMID:26246874

  6. The Effect of Marital Violence on Infertility Distress among A Sample of Turkish Women

    PubMed Central

    Akyüz, Aygül; ?ahiner, Gönül; Seven, Memnun; Bak?r, Bilal

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between marital violence and distress level among women with a diagnosis of infertility. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 married women diagnosed as primary infertile who applied to an in vitro fertilization (IVF) center in Turkey, between September and December 2009. A descriptive information questionnaire developed by the researcher was used for data collection. In addition, an infertility distress scale (IDS) for determining the severity effect of infertility and the scale for marital violence against women (SDVW) for determining level of marital violence against the women were used. Results: The total IDS score of the study sample was 37.76 ± 10.53. There was no significant relationship between the age and education level of the women and the total IDS score. The total IDS score was higher in women who did not work and those being treated for infertility for more than three years. The total SDVW score of the study sample was 67.0 ± 8.26. The total SDVW score was higher in women who had been trying to have a child for more than six years and had received infertility treatment for longer than three years. The employment status of the women and physical, emotional, and sexual violence scores had a statistically significant relationship with the IDS scores. The emotional violence score was found to have the highest significance among the variables affecting total IDS score. Conclusion: Marital violence is a factor increasing the distress of infertile women. Healthcare staff serving infertile couples should consider the possibility of domestic violence against women as a factor affecting the psychological infertility distress level. PMID:24696770

  7. Metabolomic analysis reveals a unique urinary pattern in normozoospermic infertile men.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Mu, Xiaoli; Xia, Yankai; Martin, Francis L; Hang, Wei; Liu, Liangpo; Tian, Meiping; Huang, Qingyu; Shen, Heqing

    2014-06-01

    Normozoospermic infertility has become a common and important health problem worldwide. We designed this metabolomic case-control study to investigate the possible mechanism and urinary biomarkers of normozoospermic infertility. Normozoospermic infertile cases (n = 71) and fertile controls (n = 47) were recruited. A urinary metabolome pattern could discriminate normozoospermic infertile cases from fertile controls. A total of 37 potential biomarkers were identified; these have functionally important roles in energy production, antioxidation, and hormone regulation in spermatogenesis. This gave rise to a combined biomarker pattern of leukotriene E4, 3-hydroxypalmitoylcarnitine, aspartate, xanthosine, and methoxytryptophan pointing to a diagnostic capability (AUC = 0.901, sensitivity = 85.7%, and specificity = 86.8%) in a ROC model; these markers may highlight keynote events of normozoospermic infertility. Stalled medium- and long-chain fatty acid metabolism with improved ketone body metabolism, plus decreased levels of malate and aspartate could result in citrate cycle alterations via a malate-aspartate shuttle in ATP generation in spermatogenesis. Inhibitory alterations in the normal hormone-secreting activity in spermatogenesis were suggested in normozoospermic infertility. Folate deficiency and oxidative stress may jointly impact infertile patients. The disruption of eicosanoid metabolism and xanthine oxidase system, which were tightly associated with energy metabolism and oxidative stress, was also a potential underlying mechanism. In addition, depression might be associated with normozoospermic infertility via neural activity-related metabolites. This study suggests that the urinary metabolome can be used to differentiate normozoospermic infertile men from fertile individuals. Potential metabolic biomarkers derived from these analyses might be used to diagnose what remains a somewhat idiopathic condition and provide functional insights into its pathogenesis. PMID:24796210

  8. Knowledge, perceptions and myths regarding infertility among selected adult population in Pakistan: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The reported prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is approximately 22% with 4% primary and 18% secondary infertility. Infertility is not only a medical but also a social problem in our society as cultural customs and perceived religious dictums may equate infertility with failure on a personal, interpersonal, or social level. It is imperative that people have adequate knowledge about infertility so couples can seek timely medical care and misconceptions can be rectified. We aim to assess the knowledge, perception and myths regarding infertility and suggest ways to improve it. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out by interviewing a sample of 447 adults who were accompanying the patients at two tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. They were interviewed one-on-one with the help of a pretested questionnaire drafted by the team after a thorough literature review and in consultation with infertility specialists. Results The correct knowledge of infertility was found to be limited amongst the participants. Only 25% correctly identified when infertility is pathological and only 46% knew about the fertile period in women's cycle. People are misinformed that use of IUCD (53%) and OCPs (61%) may cause infertility. Beliefs in evil forces and supernatural powers as a cause of infertility are still prevalent especially amongst people with lower level of education. Seeking alternative treatment for infertility remains a popular option for 28% of the participant as a primary preference and 75% as a secondary preference. IVF remains an unfamiliar (78%) and an unacceptable option (55%). Conclusions Knowledge about infertility is limited in the population and a lot of misconceptions and myths are prevalent in the society. Alternative medicine is a popular option for seeking infertility treatment. The cultural and religious perspective about assisted reproductive technologies is unclear, which has resulted in its reduced acceptability. PMID:21970548

  9. Mitochondrial DNA mutations may not be frequent in asthenospermic infertile men.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junkai; Chen, Jie; Cui, Xingang; Liu, Yushan; Yin, Lei; Li, Yao; Chen, Lu; Xu, Danfeng; Gao, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA were implicated to be associated with male infertility. Due to its high mutation rate, mtDNA defects may occur at any nucleotide of its 16,569 bp sequence. In this study, we analyzed a recent paper concerning the role of mtDNA variations in asthenospermic infertile men, we found that mtDNA mutation was a frequent event in male infertility. However, some polymorphisms in gene encoding mt-tRNAs were mislabelled as "pathogenic mutations". We also discussed the potential pitfalls and mistakes in mitochondrial medicine studies. PMID:25103428

  10. Infertility caused by tubal blockage: An ayurvedic appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Shukla (Upadhyaya), Kamayani; Karunagoda, Kaumadi; Dei, L. P.

    2010-01-01

    Tubal blockage is one of the most important factors for female infertility. This condition is not described in Ayurvedic classics, as the fallopian tube itself is not mentioned directly there. The present study is an effort to understand the disease according to Ayurvedic principles. Correlating fallopian tubes with the Artavavaha (Artava-bija-vaha) Srotas, its block is compared with the Sanga Srotodushti of this Srotas. Charak's opinion that the diseases are innumerable and newly discovered ones should be understood in terms of Prakriti, Adhishthana, Linga, and Aayatana, is followed, to describe this disease. An effort has been made to evaluate the role of all the three Doshas in producing blockage, with classification of the disease done as per the Dasha Roganika. PMID:22131704

  11. The Invention of Infertility in the Classical Greek World:

    PubMed Central

    Flemming, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Summary The article examines the understandings of, and responses to, reproductive failure in the classical Greek world. It discusses explanations and treatments for non-procreation in a range of ancient Greek medical texts, focusing on the writings of the Hippocratic Corpus, which devote considerable energy to matters of fertility and generation, and places them alongside the availability of a divine approach to dealing with reproductive disruption, the possibility of asking various deities, including the specialist healing god Asclepius, for assistance in having children. Though the relations between these options are complex, they combine to produce a rich remedial array for those struggling with childlessness, the possibility that any impediment to procreation can be removed. Classical Greece, rather than the nineteenth century, or even 1978, is thus the time when “infertility,” understood as an essentially reversible somatic state, was invented. PMID:24362276

  12. Halachic infertility: rabbis, doctors, and the struggle over professional boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ivry, Tsipy

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes a public controversy surrounding the hormonal treatment of infertility associated with observance of rabbinic law to illuminate the reach of rabbi-doctor relations in a local configuration of religion and biomedicine that I call "kosher medicine." I combine a historical perspective on the evolution of religious laws governing menstruation, and the rabbi-doctor relations with a contemporary ethnography of these relations and laws to illuminate the interplay of continuities, discontinuities, tradition, and modernity and their uses and abuses in the contemporary mode of interpenetration between observant Judaism and biomedicine. The controversy highlights asymmetric permeations into biomedical and rabbinic professional domains. Collaborations persist as long as doctors who declare their incompetence in rabbinic law accommodate to demands of rabbis who are expert in it and also claim competence to challenge medical decisions. Once a doctor demonstrates competence in rabbinic law to challenge rabbinic directives a crisis develops. PMID:23557006

  13. Novel methods of treating ovarian infertility in older and POF women, testicular infertility, and other human functional diseases.

    PubMed

    Bukovsky, Antonin

    2015-01-01

    In vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) technologies are facing with growing demands of older women to conceive. Although ovarian stem cells (OSCs) of older women are capable of producing in vitro fresh oocyte-like cells (OLCs), such cells cannot respond to IVM and IVF due to the lack of granulosa cells required for their maturation. Follicular renewal is also dependent on support of circulating blood mononuclear cells. They induce intermediary stages of meiosis (metaphase I chromosomal duplication and crossover, anaphase, telophase, and cytokinesis) in newly emerging ovarian germ cells, as for the first time demonstrated here, induce formation of granulosa cells, and stimulate follicular growth and development. A pretreatment of OSC culture with mononuclear cells collected from blood of a young healthy fertile woman may cause differentiation of bipotential OSCs into both developing germ and granulosa cells. A small blood volume replacement may enable treatment of ovarian infertility in vivo. The transferred mononuclear cells may temporarily rejuvenate virtually all tissues, including improvement of the function of endocrine tissues. Formation of new follicles and their development may be sufficient for IVM and IVF. The novel proposed in vitro approaches may be used as a second possibility. Infertility of human males affects almost a half of the infertility cases worldwide. Small blood volume replacement from young healthy fertile men may also be easy approach for the improvement of sperm quality in older or other affected men. In addition, body rejuvenation by small blood volume replacement from young healthy individuals of the same sex could represent a decline of in vitro methodology in favor of in vivo treatment for human functional diseases. Here we propose for the first time that blood mononuclear cells are essential for rejuvenation of those tissues, where immune system components participate in an appropriate division and differentiation of tissue stem cells. If needed, small blood volume replacement from distinct young healthy individuals could be utilized in six month intervals for repair of young altered or aged reproductive and other tissue functions. Systemic and local use of honey bee propolis tincture is an alternative option for functional rejuvenation of some tissues. PMID:25889983

  14. Excess cholesterol induces mouse egg activation and may cause female infertility

    E-print Network

    Yesilaltay, Ayce

    The HDL receptor scavenger receptor, class B type I (SR-BI) controls the structure and fate of plasma HDL. Female SR-BI KO mice are infertile, apparently because of their abnormal cholesterol-enriched HDL particles. We ...

  15. A hierarchy of needs? Embryo donation, in vitro fertilisation and the provision of infertility counselling

    PubMed Central

    Machin, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the paper is to examine how those working in, using and regulating assisted conception clinics discussed infertility counselling and its provision within the context of embryo donation and in vitro fertilisation. Method 35 participants were recruited for semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. All data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results The thematic analysis revealed recurring themes based upon the portrayals of infertility counselling, embryo donation and in vitro fertilisation. Conclusions This paper suggests that an implicit hierarchy exists around those using assisted conception techniques and their infertility counselling requirements, which was dependent upon the assisted conception technique used. As a result, some people using assisted conception techniques felt that their needs had been overlooked due to this covert hierarchy. Practice implications Those working in, using or regulating assisted conception clinics should not view infertility counselling as restricted to treatments involving donation, or solely for people within the clinical system. PMID:21035297

  16. Differential protein expression in seminal plasma from fertile and infertile males

    PubMed Central

    Cadavid J, Angela P.; Alvarez, Angela; Markert, Udo R.; Maya, Walter Cardona

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to analyze human seminal plasma proteins in association with male fertility status using the proteomic mass spectrometry technology Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight (SELDI-TOF-MS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Semen analysis was performed using conventional methods. Protein profiles of the seminal plasma were obtained by SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry over a strong anion exchanger, ProteinChip® Q10 array. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: We found statistically significant differences in motility and sperm count between fertile and infertile men. In addition, we observed ten seminal proteins that are significantly up-regulated in the infertile group. In conclusion, comparison of seminal plasma proteome in fertile and infertile men provides new aspects in the physiology of male fertility and might help in identifying novel markers of male infertility. PMID:25395747

  17. The risk of infertility and delayed conception associated with exposures in the Danish workplace

    SciTech Connect

    Rachootin, P.; Olsen, J.

    1983-05-01

    The association between infertility and a number of occupations and occupational exposures was examined in a case-control study utilizing data collected from medical records and mailed questionnaires. The results suggest that male exposure to heat and female exposure to noise, textile dyes and lead, mercury, and cadmium are associated with infertility. Further research is needed to examine the entire spectrum of abnormal reproductive and developmental outcomes of exposure to these agents and to identify their full effects.

  18. Improving the Reporting of Clinical Trials of Infertility Treatments (IMPRINT): modifying the CONSORT statement.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials testing infertility treatments often do not report on the major outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians and the public (such as live birth) nor on the harms, including maternal risks during pregnancy and fetal anomalies. This is complicated by the multiple participants in infertility trials which may include a woman (mother), a man (father), and a third individual if successful, their offspring (child), who is also the desired outcome of treatment. The primary outcome of interest and many adverse events occur after cessation of infertility treatment and during pregnancy and the puerperium, which creates a unique burden of follow-up for clinical trial investigators and participants. In 2013, because of the inconsistencies in trial reporting and the unique aspects of infertility trials not adequately addressed by existing Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statements, we convened a consensus conference in Harbin, China, with the aim of planning modifications to the CONSORT checklist to improve the quality of reporting of clinical trials testing infertility treatment. The consensus group recommended that the preferred primary outcome of all infertility trials is live birth (defined as any delivery of a live infant after ?20 weeks' gestation) or cumulative live birth, defined as the live birth per women over a defined time period (or number of treatment cycles). In addition, harms to all participants should be systematically collected and reported, including during the intervention, any resulting pregnancy, and the neonatal period. Routine information should be collected and reported on both male and female participants in the trial. We propose to track the change in quality that these guidelines may produce in published trials testing infertility treatments. Our ultimate goal is to increase the transparency of benefits and risks of infertility treatments to provide better medical care to affected individuals and couples. PMID:25225072

  19. Improving the Reporting of Clinical Trials of Infertility Treatments (IMPRINT): modifying the CONSORT statement†‡

    PubMed Central

    Legro, Richard S.; Wu, Xiaoke; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Farquhar, Cynthia; Fauser, Bart C.J.M.; Mol, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials testing infertility treatments often do not report on the major outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians and the public (such as live birth) nor on the harms, including maternal risks during pregnancy and fetal anomalies. This is complicated by the multiple participants in infertility trials which may include a woman (mother), a man (father), and result in a third individual if successful, their offspring (child), who is also the desired outcome of treatment. The primary outcome of interest and many adverse events occur after cessation of infertility treatment and during pregnancy and the puerperium, which create a unique burden of follow-up for clinical trial investigators and participants. In 2013, because of the inconsistencies in trial reporting and the unique aspects of infertility trials not adequately addressed by existing Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statements, we convened a consensus conference in Harbin, China, with the aim of planning modifications to the CONSORT checklist to improve the quality of reporting of clinical trials testing infertility treatment. The consensus group recommended that the preferred primary outcome of all infertility trials is live birth (defined as any delivery of a live infant ?20 weeks gestations) or cumulative live birth, defined as the live birth per women over a defined time period (or number of treatment cycles). In addition, harms to all participants should be systematically collected and reported, including during the intervention, any resulting pregnancy, and during the neonatal period. Routine information should be collected and reported on both male and female participants in the trial. We propose to track the change in quality that these guidelines may produce in published trials testing infertility treatments. Our ultimate goal is to increase the transparency of benefits and risks of infertility treatments to provide better medical care to affected individuals and couples. PMID:25217611

  20. Sexuality, Self-Esteem and Partnership Quality in Infertile Women and Men.

    PubMed

    Wischmann, T; Schilling, K; Toth, B; Rösner, S; Strowitzki, T; Wohlfarth, K; Kentenich, H

    2014-08-01

    Introduction: Infertile couples often report quality-of-life impairments, especially in terms of sexuality, self-esteem and partnership quality. So far, there have been no systematic studies of the sex lives and behaviour of infertile women and men before and after the emergence of their mutual desire for a child. Materials and Methods: From February 2010 to August 2010 all couples starting treatment either at Heidelberg University's Women's Hospital or at the Fertility Center Berlin were asked to fill out the Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR). A total of n?=?158 women and n?=?153 men participated in the study. Results: Decreasing tendencies were observable for both partners in the domains Sexual Relationship Satisfaction and Confidence and in the subscales Self-Esteem and Overall Relationship Satisfaction. There were especially clear indications of a loss of spontaneous sexuality during the experience of infertility. We were also able to establish that infertility has a negative impact on women's self-esteem. Discussion: The results of this study indicate that SEAR can be used as a feasible instrument for identifying infertile women and men whose infertility has a negative effect on their relationship quality and/or sex lives. PMID:25221344

  1. The genetics of human infertility by functional interrogation of SNPs in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priti; Schimenti, John C

    2015-08-18

    Infertility is a prevalent health issue, affecting ?15% of couples of childbearing age. Nearly one-half of idiopathic infertility cases are thought to have a genetic basis, but the underlying causes are largely unknown. Traditional methods for studying inheritance, such as genome-wide association studies and linkage analyses, have been confounded by the genetic and phenotypic complexity of reproductive processes. Here we describe an association- and linkage-free approach to identify segregating infertility alleles, in which CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing is used to model putatively deleterious nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) in the mouse orthologs of fertility genes. Mice bearing "humanized" alleles of four essential meiosis genes, each predicted to be deleterious by most of the commonly used algorithms for analyzing functional SNP consequences, were examined for fertility and reproductive defects. Only a Cdk2 allele mimicking SNP rs3087335, which alters an inhibitory WEE1 protein kinase phosphorylation site, caused infertility and revealed a novel function in regulating spermatogonial stem cell maintenance. Our data indicate that segregating infertility alleles exist in human populations. Furthermore, whereas computational prediction of SNP effects is useful for identifying candidate causal mutations for diverse diseases, this study underscores the need for in vivo functional evaluation of physiological consequences. This approach can revolutionize personalized reproductive genetics by establishing a permanent reference of benign vs. infertile alleles. PMID:26240362

  2. Perceptions of Infertility Risks Among Female Pediatric Cancer Survivors Following Gonadotoxic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gilleland Marchak, Jordan; Elchuri, Swati V; Vangile, Kristen; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Mertens, Ann C; Meacham, Lillian R

    2015-07-01

    Research has established that childhood cancer treatments can place survivors at risk for reproductive health problems, yet little is known about pediatric survivors' perceptions of their risk for infertility and worry about future family planning. The purpose of this study was to explore factors that affect awareness of risk for and worry about infertility among female pediatric cancer survivors aged 10 to 21 (N=48) and their parents (N=41) following exposure to treatments associated with reproductive late effects. The majority of female childhood cancer survivors (71%) and their parents (95%) reported worry about infertility following gonadotoxic therapy. Cross-sectional data indicated that survivors' awareness of risk for and worry about infertility increase during adolescence, whereas parents' awareness of risk and worry generally remain constant throughout their daughters' development. Survivor worry about infertility was predicted by a variety of factors, yet parent worry about infertility was only associated with increased gonadotoxic radiation exposure. Overall, these findings reinforce the necessity of developmentally appropriate education about reproductive health risks and fertility preservation options across the continuum of pediatric oncology care from diagnosis to survivorship. PMID:25985237

  3. The mediator role of emotion regulation processes on infertility-related stress.

    PubMed

    Galhardo, Ana; Cunha, M; Pinto-Gouveia, J; Matos, M

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate gender differences regarding the mediator role of self-compassion and self-judgment on the effects of external shame, internal shame, dyadic adjustment, on infertility-related stress. One hundred and sixty-two women and 147 men with a primary infertility diagnosis completed the following set of self-report measures: Others as Shamer, Experience of Shame Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Self-Compassion Scale, and Fertility Problem Inventory. Path analyses results revealed that in women self-compassion fully mediated the effect of internal shame on infertility-related stress and partially mediated the effect of dyadic adjustment on this variable, while external shame had only a direct effect. In men self-judgment fully mediated the effect of external and internal shame on infertility-related stress. Dyadic adjustment had only a direct effect on infertility-related stress. In conclusion, there is a distinct role of self-compassion and self-judgment on the relationship between shame and infertility-related stress in men and women. Such differences should be taken into account in psychological interventions with these patients. Future research is warranted to further support our results. PMID:23821009

  4. The Social Consequences of Infertility among Iranian Women: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpoor-Azghdy, Syedeh Batool; Simbar, Masoumeh; Vedadhir, Abouali

    2015-01-01

    Background Infertility may prevent couples to achieve the desired social roles and lead to some social and psychological problems. This study aimed to explain the social consequences of infertility in Iranian women seeking treatment. Materials and Methods A qualitative content analysis was conducted based on 32 semi-structured interviews with 25 women affected by primary and secondary infertility with no surviving children. The participants were purposefully selected with maximum variability from a fertility health research center in Tehran, Iran, from January to October 2012. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the conventional content analysis method. Results Our findings indicate that the consequences of infertility are divided into five main categories: 1. violence including psychological violence and domestic physical violence, 2. marital instability or uncertainty, 3. social isolation including avoiding certain people or certain social events and self-imposed isolation from family and friends, 4. social exclusion and partial deprivation including being disregarded by family members and relatives and reducing social interactions with the infertile woman and 5. social alienation. Conclusion This study reveals that Iranian women with fertility issues seeking treatment face several social problems that could have devastating effects on the quality of their lives. It is, therefore, recommended that, in Iran, infertility is only considered as a biomedical issue of a couple and pay further attention to its sociocultural dimensions and consequences. PMID:25780523

  5. X chromosome aneuploidy in infertile women: Analysis by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.A.; Moix, I.; Mermillod, B.

    1994-09-01

    Up to 1 in 3 couples have a problem of infertility at some time in their lives. Sex chromosome anomalies are found in 5-10% of couples, with mosaic aneuploidy being a common finding in primary infertility. Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA), in contrast, is frequently associated with autosomal structural anomalies. We hypothesized that low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy was associated with primary infertility but not with RSA. Three groups were studied: women from couples with primary infertillity (n=26); women with three or more spontaneous abortions (n=22); and age-matched normally fertile women (at least two pregnancies; n=28). Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine X chromosome ploidy in 100 nuclei per patient, using a contig of three cosmids from MAO locus (kindly donated by W. Berger, Nijmegen). A control probe (chr. 15 centromere) was simultaneously hybridized, and only nuclei containing two control signals were scored for the X chromosome. The mean numbers of nuclei with two X chromosome signals were the same in all groups (Welch equality of means test: p>0.97). However, there is a significant difference between the variances of the primary infertile and RSA groups (Levene`s test: p=0.025 after Bonferrone correction for multiple testing). This provides preliminary support for the hypothesis of an association between primary infertility and low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy.

  6. Comparison of Sperm Parameters in Patients with Infertility Induced by Genital Infection versus Varicocele

    PubMed Central

    Pajovic, Bogdan; Dimitrovski, Antonio; Radojevic, Nemanja; Vukovic, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Male infertility is a common and complex problem and, despite much research in this field, the major cause of infertility unfortunately remains unknown. Genital infection and varicocele are important causes of infertility. Aims: To compare the influence of genital infection and varicocele individually on male infertility based on semen analysis. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: The study included 120 infertile patients divided into two groups according to the presence of genital infection or varicocele. The first group included 60 examinees with proven genital infection, but without varicocele formation. The second included 60 patients with varicocele, regardless of the varicocele grade, but without genital infection. The fertile parameters were compared and an assessment was performed on the impact on quality of spermatogenesis due to infection and varicocele. Results: There is a statistically significant difference regarding abnormal forms of spermatozoids (45.94±9.79 vs. 25.27±6.54) and progressive motility (8.15±1.24 vs. 24.95±7.2), between two groups of patients. However, acidity of ejaculates, minimum sperm concentration, total spermatozoid motility and ejaculate volume showed no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: The study showed a stronger negative influence of genital infection on fertile parameters over varicocele. The significance of our study is the lack of contemporary researches comparing varicocele and genital infection influence on male infertility individually. PMID:26185712

  7. [Cases of Leydig cell tumor in male infertility].

    PubMed

    Chovelidze, Sh G; Kochiashvili, D K; Gogeshvili, G G; Getta, Tieri; Lababidi, Alim

    2007-02-01

    1745 patients at the Department of Urology of Tenon Hospital (Paris, France) from 1990 to 2006 and at the department of urology of Tbilisi State Medical University (Georgia) during last several months have been examined and counseled on male infertility. Leydig cell tumor was found in 4 patients, among them 3 by palpation and testicle echography, fourth patient (at the age of 33) with bilateral varicocele (III stage at the left, II stage at the right) was more interesting for us. Leydig cell tumor was found out at the scrotum exploration. Oligoteratozoospermia (OATS) has been distinguished from his spermogram. Microsurgical bilateral correction of varicocele and scrotum exploration, and double-sided double biopsy of testicle have been carried out. During examination of the left testis the hardly palpable node has been found out in the lower pole. We became compelled to make enlarged incision of tunica alba of the testicle lower pole. After that it was found out the solid, well encapsulated and yellow-brown node (8 mm in diameter). The node enucleation away from tumor by 0.5 cm has been carried out. Exact histological investigation confirmed the presence of Leydig cell tumor. In 6 years after surgical operation the tumor node 1.8 mm in diameter has been found out in right (contra lateral) testis. The patient was urgently operated, ex-tempo investigation confirmed the presence of Leydig cell tumor in right testicle--high orchidectomy at the right has been carried out. Now, patient has not any symptoms of disease during 3.5 years of observation. Given case shows that the enucleation of Leydig cell tumor proves to be equivalent alternative of orchidectomy, which is suggested by many authors. Taking into account the presence of encapsulation and tumor benignity it is important to have opportunity of the testicle preservation due to infertility problems. However, this tactics must be carried out under strong observation due to the opportunity of relapse even in several days after surgical operation. PMID:17404447

  8. Acid soil infertility effects on peanut yields and yield components

    SciTech Connect

    Blamey, F.P.C.

    1983-01-01

    The interpretation of soil amelioration experiments with peanuts is made difficult by the unpredictibility of the crop and by the many factors altered when ameliorating acid soils. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of lime and gypsum applications on peanut kernel yield via the three first order yield components, pods per ha, kernels per pod, and kernel mass. On an acid medium sandy loam soil (typic Plinthustult), liming resulted in a highly significant kernel yield increase of 117% whereas gypsum applications were of no significant benefit. As indicated by path coefficient analysis, an increase in the number of pods per ha was markedly more important in increasing yield than an increase in either the number of kernels per pod or kernel mass. Furthermore, exch. Al was found to be particularly detrimental to pod number. It was postulated that poor peanut yields resulting from acid soil infertility were mainly due to the depressive effect of exch. Al on pod number. Exch. Ca appeared to play a secondary role by ameliorating the adverse effects of exch. Al.

  9. Clinical management of infertile men with nonobstructive azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sandro C

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of men with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) seeking fertility has been a challenge for andrologists, urologists, and reproductive medicine specialists alike. This review presents a personal perspective on the clinical management of NOA, including the lessons learned over 15 years dealing with this male infertility condition. A five-consecutive-step algorithm is proposed to manage such patients. First, a differential diagnosis of azoospermia is made to confirm/establish that NOA is due to spermatogenic failure. Second, genetic testing is carried out not only to detect the males in whom NOA is caused by microdeletions of the long arm of the Y chromosome, but also to counsel the affected patients about their chances of having success in sperm retrieval. Third, it is determined whether any intervention prior to a surgical retrieval attempt may be used to increase sperm production. Fourth, the most effective and efficient retrieval method is selected to search for testicular sperm. Lastly, state-of-art laboratory techniques are applied in the handling of retrieved gametes and cultivating the embryos resulting from sperm injections. A coordinated multidisciplinary effort is key to offer the best possible chance of achieving a biological offspring to males with NOA. PMID:25677138

  10. Fellowship training and board certification in reproductive endocrinology and infertility.

    PubMed

    Gambone, Joseph C; Segars, James H; Cedars, Marcelle; Schlaff, William D

    2015-07-01

    Reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) is one of the original officially recognized subspecialties in obstetrics and gynecology and among the earlier subspecialties in medicine. Recognized by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1972, fellowship programs are now 3 years in length following an obstetrics and gynecology residency. Originally focused on endocrine problems related to reproductive function, the assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have recently become the larger part of training during REI fellowships. It is likely that the subspecialty of REI strengthens the specialty of obstetrics and gynecology and enhances the educational experience of residents in the field. The value of training and certification in REI is most evident in the remarkable and consistent improvement in the success of ART procedures, particularly in vitro fertilization. The requirement for documented research activity during REI fellowships is likely to stimulate a more rapid adoption (translation) of newer research findings into clinical care after training. Although mandatory reporting of outcomes has been proposed as a reason for this improvement the rapid translation of reproductive research into clinical practice is likely to be a major cause. Looking forward, REI training should emphasize and strengthen education and research into the endocrine, environmental, and genetic aspects of female and male reproduction to improve the reproductive health and fertility of all women. PMID:26048151

  11. Infertility in reproductive-age female cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jennifer M; Kelvin, Joanne Frankel; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2015-05-15

    Improved survival rates among reproductive-age females diagnosed with cancer have increased the focus on long-term quality of life, including maintenance of the ability to conceive biological children. Cancer-directed therapies such as high-dose alkylating agents and radiation to the pelvis, which deplete ovarian reserve, radiation to the brain, which affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and surgical resection of reproductive structures can decrease the likelihood of having biological children. Standard fertility preservation strategies such as embryo and oocyte cryopreservation before the onset of therapy offer the opportunity to conserve fertility, but they may not be feasible because of the urgency to start cancer therapy, financial limitations, and a lack of access to reproductive endocrinologists. Ovarian tissue freezing is considered experimental, with limited data related to pregnancies, but it minimizes treatment delay. Studies evaluating gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues have had mixed results, although a recent randomized, prospective study in women with breast cancer demonstrated a protective effect. Fertility preservation programs are increasingly being developed within cancer programs. In this article, we describe risks to infertility and options for preservation, raise psychosocial and ethical issues, and propose elements for establishing an effective fertility preservation program. PMID:25649243

  12. Infertility among couples in a population-based study in Iran: prevalence and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Safarinejad, Mohammad Reza

    2008-06-01

    To explore the prevalence and risk factors of infertility in Iran, a total of 12 285 ever-married women aged 15-50 years old and their husbands (if available) were interviewed by 82 female general practitioners and answered a self-administered questionnaire on several aspects of infertility. They were identified from the national population in 30 counties, and invited to a confidential interview. Data were obtained about their age, education, marital status, toxic habits, medical history, disabilities and illnesses, help-seeking, economy, ethnicity, geographic location, contraceptive use and age at which they had first intercourse. This study used the definition of childlessness proposed by World Health Organization: 'the woman has never conceived despite cohabitation and exposure to pregnancy for a period of 2 years'. The overall prevalence of infertility was 8% (95% CI: 3.2-15.0). The weighted national estimate of primary infertility was 4.6% (95% CI: 3.6-5.2). There was a pronounced regional pattern in the levels of primary infertility. The primary infertility increased significantly from 2.6 to 4.3 to 5.5% for the 1985-1989, 1990-1994 and 1995-2000 marriage cohorts. The prevalence of secondary infertility was 3.4% (95% CI: 2.4-5.1). Overall the prevalence of infertility falls within a relatively wide range being high in the Southern counties, and low in the Northern counties. The probability of first pregnancy at the end of 2 years of marriage was 0.78 for all ever-married women. The prevalence of infertility increased with age (linear chi-square 198.012, 1 d.f., p = 0.01). The age pattern of infertility also varies quite markedly across the counties analysed. No effect of race was detected; neither the intercept (analysis of covariance p = 0.36) nor the slope of the age relationship was influenced by race (analysis of covariance p = 0.41). Infertility were observed as significantly higher in the presence of history of tubo-ovarian surgery [odds ratio (OR): 1.43; 95% CI: 1.28-2.23; p = 0.01], salpingitis (OR: 2.34; 95% CI: 1.31-4.3; p = 0.016), ectopic pregnancy (OR: 2.45; 95% CI: 1.90-3.44; p = 0.04), varicocele (OR: 2.85; 95% CI: 1.61-5.20; p = 0.01) and cryptorchidism (OR: 3.81; 95% CI: 2.51-4.28; p = 0.031). This study provides a quantitative estimate of the prevalence and main risk factors for infertility in Iranian couples. Yet, further studies on the cause of primary and secondary infertility and geographical variations in the incidence and prevalence of infertility in Iran are needed. PMID:17488339

  13. Screening for Y-chromosome microdeletions in a population of infertile males in the Gaza Strip

    PubMed Central

    Shaqalaih, Ashraf J.; Abu Halima, Masood S.; Ashour, Mohammed J.; Sharif, Fadel A.

    2009-01-01

    Infertility is an extraordinary public health problem in the Arab world, as it affects about 15% of couples seeking children. The male partner is responsible for infertility in approximately half of these cases. Classic microdeletions of the Y-chromosome involving the azoospermia factor (AZF) regions are known to be associated with spermatogenic impairment, and non-obstructive azoospermia must be differentiated on the basis of endocrine evaluation and testicular biopsy. Partial AZFc deletions remain controversial because there is no clear agreement regarding their role in spermatogenic failure. In the current study, 50 fertile males (controls) and 125 patients with primary idiopathic male infertility were studied in order to describe the frequency of Y-chromosome mirodeletions among male infertility patients in the Gaza Strip-Palestine area. No Y chromosome classical microdeletions could be detected in any of the 125 infertile men, suggesting that ethnic factors, genetic background, and Y chromosome haplogroups are key factors in such deletions. On the other hand, six gr/gr and one b1/b3 AZFc partial deletions were detected in the infertile population. The gr/gr deletion was also noted in relatives of four of the six patients with this deletion, and in one of the fertile controls. In conclusion, our study shows that the incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in our population is rare; these data suggest that other genetic, epigenetic, nutritional and/or local factors are responsible for impairments in semen parameters observed in this Gazan population. We further hypothesise that the gr/gr deletion is not associated with male infertility, at least in this sub-group. PMID:20485582

  14. Sperm chromatin structure assay results in Nigerian men with unexplained infertility

    PubMed Central

    Kolade, Charles Oluwabukunmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several publications have established a relationship between sperm DNA damage and male factor infertility, based on data from America, Europe, and Asia. This study aimed to compare the extent of sperm DNA damage in sperm samples from Nigerian men with unexplained infertility and in sperm samples from a fertile group composed of sperm donors who had successfully impregnated a female partner naturally or through assisted conception. Methods A total of 404 men underwent male fertility evaluation at Androcare Laboratories and Cryobank participated in this study. Semen analysis and a sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) were performed on all subjects. Results The men in the unexplained infertility group were slightly older than the men in the fertile sperm group (36±10 years vs. 32±6 years, p=0.051). No significant difference was observed between the two groups in semen analysis parameters (p?0.05). Men in the unexplained infertility group with normal semen parameters had a significantly higher DNA fragmentation index (DFI) than men in the fertile sperm group (27.5%±7.0% vs. 14.1%±5.3%, p<0.05). In the unexplained infertility group, 63% of the men had a DFI greater than 20%, compared to 4% in the fertile sperm group. In the unexplained infertility group, 15.2% of the subjects had a DFI greater than 30%, compared to 1% in the fertile sperm group. Conclusion Our study showed that the SCSA may be a more reliable predictor of fertility potential than traditional semen analysis in cases of unexplained infertility. PMID:26473109

  15. Oxidative stress induced sperm DNA damage, a possible reason for male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Hosen, Md Bayejid; Islam, Md Rakibul; Begum, Firoza; Kabir, Yearul; Howlader, M Zakir Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sperm DNA damage is an important factor in the etiology of male infertility. Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of oxidative stress induced sperm DNA damage with the pathogenesis of male infertility. Materials and Methods: The study comprised a total of 66 subjects, including fertile men (n=25) and infertile men (n=41) matched by age. Seminal malondialdehyde (MDA), phospholipid hydroperoxide (PHP), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant status (TAS) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxy guanosine (8-OHdG) were estimated by spectrophotometric and ELISA based methods and the association with the sperm parameters was assessed. Results: The percentages of motile and morphologically normal cells were significantly lower (p < 0.001, p <0.001, respectivly) in infertile men. Seminal levels of MDA, PHP and 8-OHdG were significantly higher (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p=0. 02, respectively) while the SOD and TAS were significantly lower (p=0. 0003, p< 0.001, respectively) in infertile men. Sperm parameters were negatively correlated with MDA, PHP and 8-OHdG while positively correlated with SOD and TAS. A positive correlation of 8-OHdG with MDA and PHP and a negative correlation with TAS and SOD were also found. Conclusion: These results suggested that oxidative stress induced sperm DNA damage might have a critical effect on the etiology of infertility. Therefore, evaluation of oxidative status, antioxidant defense systems and DNA damage, together with sperm parameters might be a useful tool for diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. PMID:26568756

  16. A Survey on Oocyte Donation: Turkish Fertile and Infertile Women’s Opinions

    PubMed Central

    Akyuz, Aygul; Sever, Nese; Karasahin, Emre; Guvenc, Gulten; Cek, Suzan

    2014-01-01

    Background There are various treatment options for infertility, and new techniques are also being developed as it is an important healthcare problem affecting approximately 15-20% of married couples. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of infor- mation of fertile and infertile Turkish women on oocyte donation in order to understand their awareness of the legal, ethical, social and religious issues regarding this technique and to compare these two groups in terms of these variables. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study included infertile women being treated at the assisted reproductive technologies (ART) program of a university hos- pital and women who had presented at the gynecology outpatients department of the same university for routine check-ups and who had no previous history of infertility. After consulting with specialists in the field and searching the related literature, a data collection form having 22 questions for infertile women and 18 questions for fertile women was prepared. Results The women were asked whether they would use the oocytes of another woman if necessary. The results showed that 67.6% of the fertile women said they would never want to use this method, while 63.9% of the infertile women stated they may accept to use this method under certain conditions (two distinct answers appeared in the answers, some women stated they would prefer donated oocytes from close relatives, while others stated they would prefer oocytes from total strangers), such as from a close relative or from someone they do not know at all. Conclusion Infertile women mentioned that they could use illegal routes if necessary to have a child at much higher rates than stated by fertile women. This shows that desire to have a child is a strong source of motivation in Turkey. PMID:25379158

  17. Infertility and breast cancer: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gammon, M D; Thompson, W D

    1990-10-01

    To investigate whether a history of infertility affects a woman's risk of developing breast cancer, the authors analyzed case-control data collected between 1980 and 1982 as part of the Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study. The 4,730 cases were women aged 20-54 years with a first diagnosis of breast cancer ascertained from eight population-based cancer registries; the 4,688 controls were women randomly selected from the general population of these same eight areas. After controlling for age, age at first birth, and parity, the odds ratio (OR) for breast cancer associated with infertility was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-1.15) among gravid women. Controlling for age, the odds ratio was 0.82 (95% CI 0.59-1.14) among nulligravid women. Women who reported that the reason for their infertility was a problem with their ovaries had a risk similar to that for women without a history of infertility (OR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.48-1.24). Women whose physicians reported that the reason for their infertility was anovulation or Stein-Leventhal syndrome also had risks similar to those for women without a history of infertility (OR = 1.26 (95% CI 0.67-2.34) and OR = 1.13 (95% CI 0.46-2.78), respectively). Menopausal status, age at menarche, history of spontaneous abortions, drinking or smoking behavior, use of exogenous hormones, or family history of breast cancer did not appreciably alter the observed odds ratios. If infertility has an effect on breast cancer that is independent of age at first birth, then the effect is small. PMID:2403111

  18. Treatment of infertility associated with deep endometriosis: definition of therapeutic balances.

    PubMed

    Somigliana, Edgardo; Garcia-Velasco, Juan Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Deep endometriosis is a demanding condition that is associated with infertility. However, evidence supporting a direct link between deep endometriosis and infertility is weak. In fact, infertility in affected patients is more likely to be explained by the strong association between deep endometriosis and adhesions, superficial endometriotic implants, ovarian endometriomas, and adenomyosis. The purported beneficial effects of surgery on infertility are mainly based on the 40%-42% pregnancy rate (PR) after surgery observed in published case series. However, this level of evidence is questionable and overestimates the benefits of the intervention. Even if comparative studies are lacking, IVF may be a valid alternative. The procedure may be less effective in affected women compared with other indications and it is not without additional deep endometriosis-related risks. Some case reports suggest that lesions might progress during IVF causing ureteral or intestinal complications or can decidualize during pregnancy causing intestinal perforation, pneumothorax, and pelvic vessels rupture. Finally, in the decision-making process, physicians should also consider that women with a history of deep endometriosis may face an increased risk of pregnancy complications. In conclusion, clear recommendation for the management of infertile women with deep endometriosis cannot be extrapolated from the literature. The therapeutic decision should be based on a comprehensive evaluation that includes clinical history, instrumental findings, pain symptoms, risks of pregnancy complications, and the woman's wishes. PMID:26342244

  19. A retrospective chromosome studies among Iranian infertile women: Report of 21 years

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Cyrus; Khaleghian, Malihea; Farzanfar, Farideh

    2013-01-01

    Background: The infertility is an important health problem, affecting about 15% of couples. The important role of genetic factors in pathogenesis of infertility is now increasingly recognized. The value of karyotyping women in the routine work-out of couples referred for sterility has long been recommended. Objective: The aim of this study was to define the frequency of all chromosomal aberrations among women which referred to our department due to infertility during the 21-year period. Materials and Methods: In this 21-year retrospective study, for the first time, we investigated 896 women which referred to our department due to infertility during 1986 to 2006. For chromosome analysis, heparinized peripheral blood samples were cultured, harvested and banded according to standard methods. Results: Out of 896 patients, 710 patients (79.24%) had a normal karyotype, and 186 patients (20.76%) showed abnormal karyotype. Among the abnormal ones 48 patients (25.81%) showed Turner's syndrome (45,X), and 45 patients (24.19%) were sex reversal with 46,XY karyotype. The rest of 93 patients (50%) revealed a wide range of chromosome abnormalities. Conclusion: Our results emphasized the importance of the standard cytogenetic methods in assessing the genetic characteristics of infertile females, which allows detecting a variety of somatic chromosome abnormalities, because some of these may interfere with the success of reproduction. PMID:24639762

  20. The effect of mirtazapine on cisplatin-induced oxidative damage and infertility in rat ovaries.

    PubMed

    Altuner, Durdu; Gulaboglu, Mine; Yapca, Omer Erkan; Cetin, Nihal

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin causes infertility due to ovarian toxicity. The toxicity mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests oxidative stress. In this study, the effect of mirtazapine on cisplatin-induced infertility and oxidative stress in rats was investigated. 64 female rats were divided into 4 groups of 16. Except for the controls that received physiologic saline only, all were administered with cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p.) and mirtazapine (15 mg/kg p.o.) or mirtazapine (30 mg/kg p.o.) for 10 days. After this period, six rats from each group were randomly selected, and malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), nitric oxide (NO), total gluthatione (tGSH), gluthatione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and 8-hydroxy-2 deoxyguanine (8-OH Gua) levels were measured in their ovarian tissues. Reproductive functions of the remaining rats were examined for 6 months. The MDA, MPO, NO groups and 8-OH Gua levels were higher in the cisplatin-treated groups than the controls, which was not observed in the mirtazapine and cisplatin groups. GSH, GPx, and SOD levels were reduced by cisplatin, which was prevented by mirtazapine. Cisplatin caused infertility by 70%. The infertility rates were, respectively, 40% and 10% for the 15 and 30 mg/kg mirtazapine administered groups. In conclusion, oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in the rat ovary tissue causes infertility in the female rats. Mirtazapine reverses this in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:23737712

  1. Effect of lifestyle on quality of life of couples receiving infertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Teskereci, Gamze; Oncel, Selma

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of lifestyle on the quality of life among couples undergoing infertility treatment. The research universe consisted of 200 couples undergoing infertility treatment in Akdeniz University's Center of Reproductive Endocrinology and Assisted Reproductive Techniques. The data collection tools the authors used were a personal information form requesting sociodemographic characteristics and history of infertility, the SF-36 Quality of Life Scale, and the Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors Scale. This study revealed that the quality of life of the women in the study was lower than that of the men. The authors also found that the couples' quality of life was reduced by variables such as advanced age, low education level, unemployment status, lower income, long duration of infertility, high body mass index, history of andrological surgery, and previous experience of assisted reproduction techniques three or more times. Last, it was determined that the couples' quality of life improved as their healthy lifestyle behaviors increased. Demonstrating positive health behavior is likely to improve the quality of life of couples undergoing infertility treatment. PMID:23631703

  2. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Infertile Women Referring for Assisted Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Pagliardini, Luca; Vigano', Paola; Molgora, Michela; Persico, Paola; Salonia, Andrea; Vailati, Simona Helda; Paffoni, Alessio; Somigliana, Edgardo; Papaleo, Enrico; Candiani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the vitamin D status of infertile women is the first step in understanding hypovitaminosis impact on reproductive potential. We sought to determine vitamin D profiles of women attending an infertility center and to investigate non-dietary determinants of vitamin D status in this population. In this cross-sectional analysis, a cohort of 1072 women (mean age ± standard deviation 36.3 ± 4.4 years) attending an academic infertility center was used to examine serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in relation to demographic characteristics, seasons and general health risk factors. Both unadjusted and adjusted levels of serum 25(OH)D were examined. Median 25(OH)D concentration was below 30 ng/mL for 89% of the entire year. Over the whole year, 6.5% of patients had 25(OH)D levels ?10 ng/mL, 40.1% ?20 ng/mL, and 77.4% ?30 ng/mL. Global solar radiation was weakly correlated with 25(OH)D levels. At multivariable analysis, 25(OH)D levels were inversely associated with BMI; conversely, 25(OH)D levels were positively associated with height and endometriosis history. Serum 25(OH)D levels are highly deficient in women seeking medical help for couple's infertility. Levels are significantly associated with body composition, seasonal modifications and causes of infertility. Importantly, this deficiency status may last during pregnancy with more severe consequences. PMID:26633484

  3. Metabolomics Analysis of Seminal Plasma in Infertile Males with Kidney-Yang Deficiency: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang; Hu, Chao; Dai, Jican; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an important treatment for male infertility, and its application to therapy is dependent on differentiation of TCM syndromes. This study aims to investigate the changes in metabolites and metabolic pathways in infertile males with Kidney-Yang Deficiency syndrome (KYDS) via metabolomics approaches. Seminal plasma samples were collected from 18 infertile males with KYDS and 18 fertile males. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry were used to characterize metabolomics profiles. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA), and pathway analysis were used for pattern recognition and metabolite identification. PCA and PLS-DA results differentiated the two groups of patients. Forty-one discriminating metabolites (18 in positive mode and 23 in negative mode) were identified. Seven metabolites were related to five potential metabolic pathways associated with biosynthesis and metabolism of aromatic amino acids, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and sphingolipid metabolism. The changes in metabolic pathways may play an important role in the origin of KYDS-associated male infertility. Metabolomics analysis of seminal plasma may be used to differentiate TCM syndromes of infertile males, but further research must be conducted. PMID:25945117

  4. Local Signaling Environments and Human Male Infertility: What Can Be Learned from Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Nalam, Roopa L.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2011-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most prevalent public health problems facing young adult males in today’s society. A clear, treatable cause of infertility cannot be determined in a large number of these patients, and a growing body of evidence suggests that infertility in many of these men may be due to genetic causes. Studies utilizing animal models, and most importantly, mouse knockout technology, have been integral not only for the study of normal spermatogenesis but also for identifying proteins essential for this process, which in turn are candidate genes for causing human male infertility. Successful spermatogenesis depends on a delicate balance of local signaling factors, and this review focuses specifically on the genes that encode these factors. Normal functioning of all testicular cell types is not only essential for normal fertility but, as recently hypothesized, may also be crucial to prevent germ cell oncogenesis. Analysis of these processes using mouse models in vivo has provided investigators with an invaluable tool to effectively translate basic science research to the research of human disease and infertility. PMID:20456819

  5. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Infertile Women Referring for Assisted Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Pagliardini, Luca; Vigano’, Paola; Molgora, Michela; Persico, Paola; Salonia, Andrea; Vailati, Simona Helda; Paffoni, Alessio; Somigliana, Edgardo; Papaleo, Enrico; Candiani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the vitamin D status of infertile women is the first step in understanding hypovitaminosis impact on reproductive potential. We sought to determine vitamin D profiles of women attending an infertility center and to investigate non-dietary determinants of vitamin D status in this population. In this cross-sectional analysis, a cohort of 1072 women (mean age ± standard deviation 36.3 ± 4.4 years) attending an academic infertility center was used to examine serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in relation to demographic characteristics, seasons and general health risk factors. Both unadjusted and adjusted levels of serum 25(OH)D were examined. Median 25(OH)D concentration was below 30 ng/mL for 89% of the entire year. Over the whole year, 6.5% of patients had 25(OH)D levels ?10 ng/mL, 40.1% ?20 ng/mL, and 77.4% ?30 ng/mL. Global solar radiation was weakly correlated with 25(OH)D levels. At multivariable analysis, 25(OH)D levels were inversely associated with BMI; conversely, 25(OH)D levels were positively associated with height and endometriosis history. Serum 25(OH)D levels are highly deficient in women seeking medical help for couple’s infertility. Levels are significantly associated with body composition, seasonal modifications and causes of infertility. Importantly, this deficiency status may last during pregnancy with more severe consequences. PMID:26633484

  6. Semen quality, testicular B-mode and Doppler ultrasound, and serum testosterone concentrations in dogs with established infertility.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Mírley Barbosa; England, Gary C W; Mota Filho, Antônio Cavalcante; Ackermann, Camila Louise; Sousa, Carmen Vládia Soares; de Carvalho, Gabriela Guedelha; Silva, Herlon Victor Rodrigues; Pinto, José Nicodemos; Linhares, Jussiara Candeira Spíndola; Oba, Eunice; da Silva, Lúcia Daniel Machado

    2015-09-15

    Retrospective examination of breeding records enabled the identification of 10 dogs of normal fertility and 10 dogs with established infertility of at least 12 months of duration. Comparisons of testicular palpation, semen evaluation, testicular ultrasound examination, Doppler ultrasound measurement of testicular artery blood flow, and measurement of serum testosterone concentration were made between the two groups over weekly examinations performed on three occasions. There were no differences in testicular volume (cm(3)) between the two groups (fertile right testis = 10.77 ± 1.66; fertile left testis = 12.17 ± 2.22); (infertile right testis = 10.25 ± 3.33; infertile left testis = 11.37 ± 3.30), although the infertile dogs all had subjectively softer testes compared with the fertile dogs. Infertile dogs were either azoospermic or when they ejaculated, they had lower sperm concentration, sperm motility, and percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa than fertile dogs. Furthermore, infertile dogs had reduced sperm membrane integrity measured via the hypoosmotic swelling test. Infertile dogs had significantly lower basal serum testosterone concentrations (1.40 ± 0.62 ng/mL) than fertile dogs (1.81 ± 0.87 ng/mL; P < 0.05). There were subjective differences in testicular echogenicity in some of the infertile dogs, and important differences in testicular artery blood flow with lower peak systolic and end-diastolic velocities measured in the distal supratesticular artery, marginal testicular artery, and intratesticular artery of infertile dogs (P < 0.05). Notably, resistance index and pulsatility index did not differ between infertile and fertile dogs. These findings report important differences between infertile and fertile dogs which may be detected within an expanded breeding soundness examination. PMID:26116053

  7. Early stage management of ovarian endometrioma to prevent infertility

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, I.; Puttemans, P.; Gordts, Sy.; Campo, R.; Gordts, S.; Benagiano, G.

    2013-01-01

    There are now convincing data showing that cystectomy of the endometrioma is not only no cure of infertility, but may harm follicle reserve. The question arises why is cystectomy for an endometrioma, in contrast with other benign cysts, a risk for follicle reserve and how can ovarian damage be prevented. Surgical specimens of ovaries with endometrioma in situ show in the majority of cases manifestly a combined extra-ovarian and intra-ovarian pathology with the cortex invaginated to form a pseudocyst. The extra-ovarian pathology includes endometrial lining of the cortex, bleeding and adhesions with surrounding tissues. The intra-ovarian pathology is characterized by microscopic stromal implants, fibrosis, smooth muscle metaplasia and arteriosclerosis, all affecting follicle reserve in the endometrioma bed. Clinically, ovarioscopy allows differential diagnosis (e.g. luteal cyst) and evaluation of the degree of fibrosis and darkening of the cortical wall. Transvaginal colour Doppler sonography can demonstrate the presence and extent of devascularisation in the endometrioma bed. Given this reality, surgery should be based on evaluation of the pathology of the endometrioma bed, but not on the mere size of the chocolate cyst. The main clinical problem is indeed the delayed diagnosis and consequently advanced irreversible cortical damage. Therefore, the sooner endometriomas are diagnosed, the better, because it increases the chances that vascularisation of the endometrioma bed is preserved. Finally, ablation, but not excision is the treatment of choice. The diagnosis of endometriosis is traditionally based on laparoscopy, but in a sexually active adolescent transvaginal endoscopy can be proposed. PMID:24753958

  8. Sexual dysfunction and infertility as late effects of cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Schover, Leslie R; van der Kaaij, Marleen; van Dorst, Eleonora; Creutzberg, Carien; Huyghe, Eric; Kiserud, Cecilie E

    2014-06-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common consequence of cancer treatment, affecting at least half of men and women treated for pelvic malignancies and over a quarter of people with other types of cancer. Problems are usually linked to damage to nerves, blood vessels, and hormones that underlie normal sexual function. Sexual dysfunction also may be associated with depression, anxiety, relationship conflict, and loss of self-esteem. Innovations in cancer treatment such as robotic surgery or more targeted radiation therapy have not had the anticipated result of reducing sexual dysfunction. Some new and effective cancer treatments, including aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer or chemoradiation for anal cancer also have very severe sexual morbidity. Cancer-related infertility is an issue for younger patients, who comprise a much smaller percentage of total cancer survivors. However, the long-term emotional impact of being unable to have a child after cancer can be extremely distressing. Advances in knowledge about how cancer treatments may damage fertility, as well as newer techniques to preserve fertility, offer hope to patients who have not completed their childbearing at cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately, surveys in industrialised nations confirm that many cancer patients are still not informed about potential changes to their sexual function or fertility, and all modalities of fertility preservation remain underutilised. After cancer treatment, many patients continue to have unmet needs for information about restoring sexual function or becoming a parent. Although more research is needed on optimal clinical practice, current studies suggest a multidisciplinary approach, including both medical and psychosocial treatment options. PMID:26217165

  9. Sexual dysfunction and infertility as late effects of cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schover, Leslie R.; van der Kaaij, Marleen; van Dorst, Eleonora; Creutzberg, Carien; Huyghe, Eric; Kiserud, Cecilie E.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common consequence of cancer treatment, affecting at least half of men and women treated for pelvic malignancies and over a quarter of people with other types of cancer. Problems are usually linked to damage to nerves, blood vessels, and hormones that underlie normal sexual function. Sexual dysfunction also may be associated with depression, anxiety, relationship conflict, and loss of self-esteem. Innovations in cancer treatment such as robotic surgery or more targeted radiation therapy have not had the anticipated result of reducing sexual dysfunction. Some new and effective cancer treatments, including aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer or chemoradiation for anal cancer also have very severe sexual morbidity. Cancer-related infertility is an issue for younger patients, who comprise a much smaller percentage of total cancer survivors. However, the long-term emotional impact of being unable to have a child after cancer can be extremely distressing. Advances in knowledge about how cancer treatments may damage fertility, as well as newer techniques to preserve fertility, offer hope to patients who have not completed their childbearing at cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately, surveys in industrialised nations confirm that many cancer patients are still not informed about potential changes to their sexual function or fertility, and all modalities of fertility preservation remain underutilised. After cancer treatment, many patients continue to have unmet needs for information about restoring sexual function or becoming a parent. Although more research is needed on optimal clinical practice, current studies suggest a multidisciplinary approach, including both medical and psychosocial treatment options. PMID:26217165

  10. Specific antibodies to porcine zona pellucida detected by quantitative radioimmunoassay in both fertile and infertile women

    SciTech Connect

    Kurachi, H.; Wakimoto, H.; Sakumoto, T.; Aono, T.; Kurachi, K.

    1984-02-01

    The specific radioimmunoassay system was developed for the titration of the antibodies to porcine zona pellucida (ZP) in human sera by using /sup 125/I-labeled purified porcine ZP as antigen, which is known to have cross-reactivity with human ZP. The antibodies in human sera were detected in 3 of 11 (27%) women with unexplained infertility, in 16 of 48 (33%) amenorrheic patients, in 4 of 12 (33%) fertile women, and in 3 of 10 (30%) men. Moreover, antibody titers in infertile women were no higher than those in fertile women and in men. These results seem to suggest that the antibodies in human sera that cross-react with porcine ZP may not be an important factor in causing infertility in women.

  11. Human Seminal Plasma Proteome Study: A Search for Male Infertility Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Davalieva, K; Kiprijanovska, S; Noveski, P; Plaseski, T; Kocevska, B; Plaseska-Karanfilska, D

    2012-01-01

    Seminal plasma is a potential source of biomarkers for many disorders of the male reproductive system including male infertility. Knowledge of the peptide and protein components of seminal fluid is accumulating especially with the appearance of high-throughput MS-based techniques. Of special interest in the field of male infertility biomarkers, is the identification and characterization of differentially expressed proteins in seminal plasma of men with normal and impaired spermatogenesis. However, the data obtained until now is still quite heterogeneous and with small percentage of overlap between independent studies. Extensive comparative analysis of seminal plasma proteome is still needed in order to establish a potential link between seminal plasma proteins and male infertility. PMID:24052741

  12. Markers of oxidative stress in follicular fluid of women with endometriosis and tubal infertility undergoing IVF.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhay K; Chattopadhyay, Ratna; Chakravarty, Baidyanath; Chaudhury, Koel

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative stress and trace elements in the oocytes environment is explored in endometriosis and impact on in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome assessed. Follicular fluid was aspirated at the time of oocyte retrieval from endometriosis (n=200) and tubal infertility (n=140) and the analytes measured using spectroscopy and HPLC. Increased concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), lipid peroxidation (LPO), iron, lead, cadmium and reduced levels of total antioxidant capacity (TAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), vitamins A, C, E, copper, zinc and selenium was observed compared to tubal infertility. Increased ROS and NO in endometriosis and tubal infertility associated with poor oocytes and embryo quality. Increased levels of ROS, NO, LPO, cadmium and lead were observed in women who did not become pregnant compared to women who did. Intrafollicular zinc levels were higher in women with endometriosis who subsequently became pregnant following IVF. PMID:23994512

  13. Unexplained infertility as primary presentation of celiac disease, a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ghadir, Mohammadreza; Iranikhah, Abolfazl; Jandaghi, Mahboubeh; Joukar, Farahnaz; Sedigh-Rahimabadi, Massih; Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz

    2011-01-01

    Background: Celiac sprue (gluten sensitive enteropathy) is an autoimmune disease which is hereditary and its pathology mainly bases on immunologic intolerance to gluten. It has a vast variety of signs and symptoms and its clinical features range from a silent disease to a typical gastrointestinal disorder. In this study we reviewed and summarized some other related issues about this disease and its relation with infertility. Case: The case is a 26 years old lady who had referred to a gynecologist because of infertility for 2 years and later it revealed that she has celiac sprue. Conclusion: Screening for its silent or subtle types especially among suspicious cases such as unexplained infertility seems to be a cost effective action. Meanwhile, in time administration of a gluten-free diet can lead to an almost complete cure. PMID:25587261

  14. Looking at Infertility Treatment through The Lens of The Meaning of Life: The Effect of Group Logotherapy on Psychological Distress in Infertile Women

    PubMed Central

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Khodabakshi Koolee, Anahita

    2013-01-01

    Background: Women in particular suffer from psychological stress when diagnosed with infertility. Psychosocial interventions are known to not only prevent and lessen various mental problems, but also to play a positive role in physical health and pregnancy rates. The aim of this study is to determine the unique impact of spiritual psychotherapy on concerns about infertility and their perceived psychological stresses. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial. The study population included nearly 800 infertile couples who attended the Maternity and Gynecology Clinic of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Jahrom, Iran. We enrolled65 people who were randomly divided into two groups, experimental (n=33)and control (n=32). The experimental group received spiritual group psychotherapy counseling for 12 sessions, 2 hours per week for a 3 months period. The control group did not receive any intervention, but due to ethical considerations, we gave a presentation (one session) about infertility treatment for this group after the research process was completed. We used two questionnaires to obtain data, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Data analysis was done by descriptive and analytic statistics using SPSS 16 software. Results: Psychological intervention in the treatment group significantly decreased the PSWQ (p=0.004). There were significant differences in the mean score of the PSWQ in both groups as determined by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA; p=0.009). Psychological intervention in the treatment group decreased the level of perceived stress, when compared with the control group. According to ANCOVA there were significant differences between the mean PSS scores of both groups (p=0.01). Conclusion: Logotherapy is related to stress reduction and can decrease psychiatric symptoms of worry and perceived stress. This approach tends to improve an infertile person's ability to deal with their problem of finding the meaning of life. Thus it can be concluded that logotherapy along with other treatment methods, is a useful approach for infertile couples (Registration Number:IRCT201108247407N2). PMID:24520444

  15. Immunolocalisation of phosphorylated STAT3, interleukin 11 and leukaemia inhibitory factor in endometrium of women with unexplained infertility during the implantation window

    E-print Network

    Dimitriadis, Evdokia; Sharkey, Andrew M; Tan, Yee-Lee; Salamonsen, Lois A; Sherwin, J Robert A

    2007-11-29

    glandular epithelium into the uterine lumen where they could act on the blast- ocyst or the endometrial luminal epithelium to facilitate blastocyst attachment and implantation. In addition, in some women with endometriosis associ- ated infertility, IL-11... who had partners with male factor infertility were not included in the study. The women with infertility did not have ovulation or tubal patency defects and endometriosis. All infertile patients and controls had negative laparoscopies. All women...

  16. Elevated antithyroid peroxidase antibodies indicating Hashimoto's thyroiditis are associated with the treatment response in infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ott, Johannes; Aust, Stefanie; Kurz, Christine; Nouri, Kazem; Wirth, Stefan; Huber, Johannes C; Mayerhofer, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    In infertile women suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies values exceeding the upper level of normal were found in significantly more clomiphene citrate resistant patients compared clomiphene citrate responders and metformin responders. Thus, elevated antiTPO levels are associated with poor treatment response in infertile women who suffer from PCOS. PMID:20638057

  17. Women's Perceptions of Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Failed Infertility Treatment on Marital and Sexual Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepe, Margaret V.; Byrne, T. Jean

    1991-01-01

    Examined immediate and long-term effects of infertility treatment on the marital and sexual relationship, as perceived by women (n=40) who failed to become pregnant during treatment. Results indicated infertility treatment significantly affected both marital and sexual satisfaction after treatment was terminated, as well as during treatment. (ABL)

  18. How Husbands Cope When Pregnancy Fails: A Longitudinal Study of Infertility and Psychosocial Generativity. Working Paper No. 167.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snarey, John; And Others

    The experience of marital infertility is a major biosocial life crisis that also represents a serious threat to the development of psychosocial generativity. Psychological studies of the consequences of involuntary infertility, however, are rare. A study was undertaken to identify variations in the coping patterns used by men who have experienced…

  19. Infertility and Subjective Well-Being: The Mediating Roles of Self-Esteem, Internal Control, and Interpersonal Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined relationship between self-esteem, perceived control, interpersonal conflict between spouses, global and intimacy life quality, and stress produced by infertility in 185 married infertile couples. Found that fertility problem stress had indirect negative effects on life quality via its mediating effects on self-esteem, internal control,…

  20. The association of PON1 192 Q/R polymorphism and the risk of female infertility.

    PubMed

    Mashayekhi, F; Behrouzi, S; Yousefi, M; Salehi, Z

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system defined by the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. Both environmental and genetic factors are involved in female infertility. Paraoxonase (PON) is an oxidant enzyme which plays an important role in various diseases and is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and lipid metabolism. The present study was aimed to evaluate the PON1 192 Q/R gene polymorphism in female infertility. Samples were obtained from 150 patients diagnosed with female infertility and 150 controls subjects and genotyped by Polymerase Chain Reaction—Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR—RFLP). The PON genotype frequencies amongst the 70 cases were C/C=40%, C/T=52.8% and T/T=7.2%; the C and T allele frequencies were 66% and 34%, respectively. The PON genotype frequencies amongst the 73 controls were C/C=45.20%, C/T=50.70% and T/T=4.1%; the C and T allele frequencies were 70% and 30%, respectively. We observed a significant difference in the genotype distributions of PON1 192 Q/R polymorphism between patients and controls (P= 0.03). Our findings revealed that individuals with the variant QR had a significant decrease risk of female infertility (OR= 0.55, 95% CI= 0.33 - 0.91, P= 0.019). The data from this study indicates that the PON1 192 Q/R polymorphism may be associated with decreased risk of female infertility. Although more studies should be considered with larger number of patients and control subjects to confirm our results. PMID:26025407

  1. Prevalence; Characteristics and Management of Endometriosis Amongst Infertile Women: A One Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaddagi, Rashmi A; Aggarwal, Rohina; Choudhary, Sumesh; Sharma, Urmila; Patel, Ushma

    2015-01-01

    Background Endometriosis appears to affect every aspect of a women’s reproductive system resulting in infertility and spontaneous pregnancy loss. This study aims to find out the prevalence & clinical characteristics of endometriosis amongst infertile women. Settings and Design A Hospital based retrospective study over a period of one year. Materials and Methods It is a retrospective study conducted in the gynaecology department in Institute of Kidney Diseases & Research Centre; Ahmedabad from April 2012 to March 2013 amongst women with a primary complaint of infertility (Primary/Secondary).A total of 372 patients underwent diagnostic hysterolaparoscopy and of these 180 patients who had laparoscopic evidence of endometriosis was included in the study. All of these patients and their findings were analysed with respect to the clinical signs and symptoms. The outcome after appropriate management was analysed in subsequent follow up. Statistical Analysis All collected data was entered into the SPSS version 20. Categorical data are expressed in frequency or percentage. Chi-Square test and Fisher-Exact test has been performed to carry out p-value for categorical data. P-value <0.05 shows statistically significant difference. Results The frequency of endometriosis among women with infertility subjected to diagnostic hysterolaparoscopy was found to be 48.38%. Statistical significant association with severity of disease was associated with symptoms like dysmenorrhea, chronic pelvic pain, restricted uterine mobility and adnexal tenderness. (p <0.01) Ultrasound finding of endometrioma with ground glas appearance also had statistical significant association with staging of disease (p <0.01). Conclusion Endometriosis amongst infertile women is increasingly being detected due to greater use of laparoscopy in evaluation of infertility.Though most signs do not correlate with severity of disease however the presence of restricted uterine mobility, adnexal tenderness & chronic pelvic pain should always raise the suspicion of endometriosis. Laparoscopy remains the gold standard for diagnosing and staging endometriosis. PMID:26266170

  2. Identification of human candidate genes for male infertility by digital differential display.

    PubMed

    Olesen, C; Hansen, C; Bendsen, E; Byskov, A G; Schwinger, E; Lopez-Pajares, I; Jensen, P K; Kristoffersson, U; Schubert, R; Van Assche, E; Wahlstroem, J; Lespinasse, J; Tommerup, N

    2001-01-01

    Evidence for the importance of genetic factors in male fertility is accumulating. In the literature and the Mendelian Cytogenetics Network database, 265 cases of infertile males with balanced reciprocal translocations have been described. The candidacy for infertility of 14 testis-expressed transcripts (TETs) were examined by comparing their chromosomal mapping position to the position of balanced reciprocal translocation breakpoints found in the 265 infertile males. The 14 TETs were selected by using digital differential display (electronic subtraction) to search for apparently testis-specific transcripts in the TIGR database. The testis specificity of the 14 TETs was further examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on adult and fetal tissues showing that four TETs (TET1 to TET4) were testis-expressed only, six TETs (TET5 to TET10) appeared to be differentially expressed and the remaining four TETs (TET11 to TET14) were ubiquitously expressed. Interestingly, the two tesis expressed-only transcripts, TET1 and TET2, mapped to chromosomal regions where seven and six translocation breakpoints have been reported in infertile males respectively. Furthermore, one ubiquitously, but predominantly testis-expressed, transcript, TET11, mapped to 1p32-33, where 13 translocation breakpoints have been found in infertile males. Interestingly, the mouse mutation, skeletal fusions with sterility, sks, maps to the syntenic region in the mouse genome. Another transcript, TET7, was the human homologue of rat Tpx-1, which functions in the specific interaction of spermatogenic cells with Sertoli cells. TPX-1 maps to 6p21 where three cases of chromosomal breakpoints in infertile males have been reported. Finally, TET8 was a novel transcript which in the fetal stage is testis-specific, but in the adult is expressed in multiple tissues, including testis. We named this novel transcript fetal and adult testis-expressed transcript (FATE). PMID:11134355

  3. Service utilization patterns for presumed infertile women in the Islamic Republic of Iran, 2004-2005.

    PubMed

    Ardalan, Ali; Vahidi, Serajeldin; Mohammad, Kazem; Russel, Mehdi

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the utilization pattern of infertility health and medical services can assist health system managers in providing better and more efficient care to affected population. This study aims to investigate the patterns in the utilization of infertility services in Iran.We performed a survey of 10 783 women in 28 provinces from 2004 to 2005. We used a systematic sampling method to draw a total of 400 clusters, the probability for selection being proportional to the size of the urban and rural population in each province. The categorization of the woman as "presumed infertile" was based on her own report of infertility at some time during her married life. We also studied the measures taken for the latest episode of presumed infertility. For each of these measures, we recorded the reason(s), the year in which it was taken, and the time interval separating it from contraceptive discontinuation. Data analysis, using the software package STATA 8.0, included descriptive statistics and computation of 95% confidence intervals (CI) as well as chi(2) and logistic regression procedures adapted to the complex sampling design.A total of 1592 women had presumed infertility at some period after their marriage (14.8%, CI0.95 = 13.8-15.7%), and 1291 subjects had taken measures to deal with the problem (81.1%, CI0.95 = 78.7-83.5%). These rates did not show any significant differences between urban and rural women (p > 0.05). In 70% of these cases, the first measure was a visit to a specialist physician and in 70% the woman had sought care in the private sector. Visits to specialists and private health care facilities had increased over the last three decades, with fewer visits to general practitioners (GPs) and midwives and less use of self-medication or traditional/local therapies. The most common motive for those who had not taken any treatment was their unwillingness to have their problem known and discussed by others (29.3%). The determinants of treatment-seeking behavior were current primary infertility (OR = 4.15, CI0.95 = 2.53-6.80), higher education (OR = 1.39, CI0.95 = 1.04-1.86) and living with husband (OR = 1.83, CI0.95 = 1.01-3.32).The current study is the first attempt to present a population-based pattern of service utilization by infertile women in Iran. It shows that for these patients, the first contact with the health system takes the form of a visit to a specialist physician, and is more likely to involve the private sector. PMID:20066667

  4. The problem of infertility in high fertility populations: Meanings, consequences and coping mechanisms in two Nigerian communities

    PubMed Central

    Hollos, Marida; Larsen, Ulla; Obono, Oka; Whitehouse, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how socio-economic contexts shape local meanings of infertility, how the prevalence of infertility affects these meanings, and how the above affect community responses, life experiences and infertility treatment-seeking behaviors in two African communities. The paper is based on interdisciplinary research conducted among the Ijo and the Yakurr people of southern Nigeria that included a survey of approximately 100 infertile women and a matching sample of 100 fertile women, as well as in-depth ethnographic interviews with infertile and fertile women in two communities: Amakiri in Delta State and Lopon in Cross River State. In-depth interview results show that female infertility is more problematic among the Ijo in Amakiri, where kinship is patrilineal (traced through the father's side), than among the Yakurr in Lopon, where kinship is double unilineal (traced through both parents). Childless women in Ijo society are not only disadvantaged economically but are prevented from attaining full adult womanhood. They therefore leave the community more often than other members. In Lopon there is also a strong preoccupation with fertility as a central fact of life, but infertile women receive support from maternal kin as well as voluntary associations serving as support groups. Our survey data confirm that there are significant differences between the life experiences of infertile and fertile women and between the infertile women of the two communities. The overall findings indicate that while there are variations in the extent to which infertility is considered problematic, the necessity for a woman to have a child remains basic in this region. Motherhood continues to define an individual woman's treatment in the community, her self-respect and her understanding of womanhood. PMID:19356835

  5. Male infertility in long-term survivors of pediatric cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Wasilewski-Masker, K; Seidel, K D; Leisenring, W; Mertens, A C; Shnorhavorian, M; Ritenour, C W; Stovall, M; Green, D M; Sklar, C A; Armstrong, G T; Robison, L L; Meacham, L R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of male infertility and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors. Methods Within the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, 1622 survivors and 274 siblings completed the Male Health Questionnaire. The analysis was restricted to survivors (938/1622; 57.8%) and siblings (174/274; 63.5%) who tried to become pregnant. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the prevalence of self-reported infertility were calculated using generalized linear models for demographic variables and treatment-related factors to account for correlation among survivors and siblings of the same family. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Among those who provided self-report data, the prevalence of infertility was 46.0% in survivors versus 17.5% in siblings (RR=2.64, 95% CI 1.88-3.70, p < 0.001). Of survivors who met the definition for infertility, 37% had reported at least one pregnancy with a female partner that resulted in a live birth. In a multivariable analysis, risk factors for infertility included an alkylating agent dose score (AAD) ? 3 (RR= 2.13, 95% CI 1.69-2.68 for AAD ? 3 versus AAD<3), surgical excision of any organ of the genital tract (RR=1.63, 95% CI 1.20-2.21), testicular radiation ? 4Gy (RR=1.99, 95% CI 1.52-2.61), and exposure to bleomycin (RR=1.55, 95% CI 1.20-2.01). Conclusion Many survivors who experience infertility father their own children suggesting episodes of both fertility and infertility. This and the novel association of infertility with bleomycin warrant further investigation. Implications for Cancer Survivors Though infertility is common, male survivors reporting infertility often father their own children. Bleomycin may pose some fertility risk. PMID:24711092

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Infertility: Cultural and Religious Influences in a Multicultural Canadian Setting

    PubMed Central

    Read, Suzanne C.; Carrier, Marie-Eve; Whitley, Rob; Gold, Ian; Tulandi, Togas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To explore the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for infertility in a multicultural healthcare setting and to compare Western and non-Western infertility patients' reasons for using CAM and the meanings they attribute to CAM use. Design: Qualitative semi-structured interviews using thematic analysis. Settings/location: Two infertility clinics in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Participants: An ethnoculturally varied sample of 32 heterosexual infertile couples. Results: CAM used included lifestyle changes (e.g., changing diet, exercise), alternative medicine (e.g., acupuncture, herbal medicines), and religious methods (e.g., prayers, religious talismans). Patients expressed three attitudes toward CAM: desperate hope, casual optimism, and amused skepticism. Participants' CAM use was consistent with cultural traditions of health and fertility: Westerners relied primarily on biomedicine and used CAM mainly for relaxation, whereas non-Westerners' CAM use was often influenced by culture-specific knowledge of health, illness and fertility. Conclusions: Understanding patients' CAM use may help clinicians provide culturally sensitive, patient-centered care. PMID:25127071

  7. Coenzyme Q10, ?-Tocopherol, and Oxidative Stress Could Be Important Metabolic Biomarkers of Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Kucharská, Jarmila; Dubravicky, Jozef; Mojto, Viliam; Singh, Ram B.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress, decreased antioxidant capacity, and impaired sperm mitochondrial function are the main factors contributing to male infertility. The goal of the present study was to assess the effect of the per os treatment with Carni-Q-Nol (440?mg L-carnitine fumarate + 30?mg ubiquinol + 75?IU vitamin E + 12?mg vitamin C in each softsule) in infertile men on sperm parameters, concentration of antioxidants (coenzyme Q10,??CoQ10-TOTAL, ?, and ?-tocopherols), and oxidative stress in blood plasma and seminal fluid. Forty infertile men were supplemented daily with two or three Carni-Q-Nol softsules. After 3 and 6 months of treatment, improved sperm density was observed (by 48.9% and 80.9%, resp.) and after 3-month treatment the sperm pathology decreased by 25.8%. Concentrations of CoQ10-TOTAL (ubiquinone + ubiquinol) and ?-tocopherol were significantly increased and the oxidative stress was decreased. In conclusion, the effect of supplementary therapy with Carni-Q-Nol showed benefits on sperm function in men, resulting in 45% pregnancies of their women. We assume that assessment of oxidative stress, CoQ10-TOTAL, and ?-tocopherol in blood plasma and seminal fluid could be important metabolic biomarkers in both diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. PMID:25810566

  8. Coenzyme Q??, ?-tocopherol, and oxidative stress could be important metabolic biomarkers of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Gvozdjáková, Anna; Kucharská, Jarmila; Dubravicky, Jozef; Mojto, Viliam; Singh, Ram B

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress, decreased antioxidant capacity, and impaired sperm mitochondrial function are the main factors contributing to male infertility. The goal of the present study was to assess the effect of the per os treatment with Carni-Q-Nol (440?mg L-carnitine fumarate + 30?mg ubiquinol + 75?IU vitamin E + 12?mg vitamin C in each softsule) in infertile men on sperm parameters, concentration of antioxidants (coenzyme Q10,??CoQ(10-TOTAL), ?, and ?-tocopherols), and oxidative stress in blood plasma and seminal fluid. Forty infertile men were supplemented daily with two or three Carni-Q-Nol softsules. After 3 and 6 months of treatment, improved sperm density was observed (by 48.9% and 80.9%, resp.) and after 3-month treatment the sperm pathology decreased by 25.8%. Concentrations of CoQ(10-TOTAL) (ubiquinone + ubiquinol) and ?-tocopherol were significantly increased and the oxidative stress was decreased. In conclusion, the effect of supplementary therapy with Carni-Q-Nol showed benefits on sperm function in men, resulting in 45% pregnancies of their women. We assume that assessment of oxidative stress, CoQ(10-TOTAL), and ?-tocopherol in blood plasma and seminal fluid could be important metabolic biomarkers in both diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. PMID:25810566

  9. Lessons learned from the implementation of an online infertility community into an IVF clinic's daily practice.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Johanna W M; Faber, Marjan J; Cohlen, Ben J; Van Oers, Anne; Nelen, WillianNe L D M; Kremer, Jan A M

    2015-12-01

    The Internet is expected to innovate healthcare, in particular patient-centredness of care. Within fertility care, information provision, communication with healthcare providers and support from peers are important components of patient-centred care. An online infertility community added to an in vitro fertilisation or IVF clinic's practice provides tools to healthcare providers to meet these. This study's online infertility community facilitates peer-to-peer support, information provision to patients and patient provider communication within one clinic. Unfortunately, these interventions often fail to become part of clinical routines. The analysis of a first introduction into usual care can provide lessons for the implementation in everyday health practice. The aim was to explore experiences of professionals and patients with the implementation of an infertility community into a clinic's care practice. We performed semi-structured interviews with both professionals and patients to collect these experiences. These interviews were analyzed using the Normalisation Process Model. Assignment of a community manager, multidisciplinary division of tasks, clear instructions to staff in advance and periodical evaluations could contribute to the integration of this online community. Interviews with patients provided insights into the possible impact on daily care. This study provides lessons to healthcare providers on the implementation of an online infertility community into their practice. PMID:26167659

  10. Infertile Individuals’ Marital Relationship Status, Happiness, and Mental Health: A Causal Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi Forooshany, Seyed Habiballah; Yazdkhasti, Fariba; Safari Hajataghaie, Saiede; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background This study examined the causal model of relation between marital relation- ship status, happiness, and mental health in infertile individuals. Materials and Methods In this descriptive study, 155 subjects (men: 52 and women: 78), who had been visited in one of the infertility Centers, voluntarily participated in a self-evaluation. Golombok Rust Inventory of Marital Status, Oxford Happiness Ques- tionnaire, and General Health Questionnaire were used as instruments of the study. Data was analyzed by SPSS17 and Amos 5 software using descriptive statistics, independent sample t test, and path analysis. Results Disregarding the gender factor, marital relationship status was directly related to happiness (p<0.05) and happiness was directly related to mental health, (p<0.05). Also, indirect relation between marital relationship status and mental health was significant (p<0.05). These results were confirmed in women participants but in men participants only the direct relation between happiness and mental health was significant (p<0.05). Conclusion Based on goodness of model fit in fitness indexes, happiness had a mediator role in relation between marital relationship status and mental health in infertile individu- als disregarding the gender factor. Also, considering the gender factor, only in infertile women, marital relationship status can directly and indirectly affect happiness and mental health. PMID:25379161

  11. Specifying the Effects of Religion on Medical Helpseeking: The Case of Infertility

    PubMed Central

    McQuillan, Julia; Benjamins, Maureen; Johnson, David R; Johnson, Katherine M; Heinz, Chelsea R

    2010-01-01

    Several recent studies have examined the connection between religion and medical service utilization. This relationship is complicated because religiosity may be associated with beliefs that either promote or hinder medical helpseeking. The current study uses structural equation modeling to examine the relationship between religion and fertility-related helpseeking using a probability sample of 2,183 infertile women in the United States. We found that although religiosity is not directly associated with helpseeking for infertility, it is indirectly associated through mediating variables that operate in opposing directions. More specifically, religiosity is associated with greater belief in the importance of motherhood, which in turn is associated with increased likelihood of helpseeking. Religiosity is also associated with greater ethical concerns about infertility treatment, which are associated with decreased likelihood of helpseeking. Additionally, the relationships are not linear throughout the helpseeking process. Thus, the influence of religiosity on infertility helpseeking is indirect and complex. These findings support the growing consensus that religiously-based behaviours and beliefs are associated with levels of health service utilization. PMID:20547437

  12. Another functional frame-shift polymorphism of DEFB126 (rs11467497) associated with male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Shiwei; Shi, Changgeng; Chen, Guowu; Zheng, Ju-fen; Wu, Bin; Diao, Hua; Ji, Lindan; Gu, Yihua; Xin, Aijie; Wu, Yancheng; Zhou, Weijin; Miao, Maohua; Xu, Limin; Li, Zheng; Yuan, Yao; Wang, Peng; Shi, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    DEFB126 rs140685149 mutation was shown to cause sperm dysfunction and subfertility. Indel rs11467497 is another 4-nucleotide frame-shift mutation (151bp upstream of rs140685149) that leads to the premature termination of translation and the expression of peptide truncated at the carboxyl terminus. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive association study to check the contribution of rs140685149 and rs11467497 to male infertility. Our results confirmed the previous findings that there was no association between rs140685149 and sperm motility. In contrast, we found a significant association of another indel rs11467497 with male infertility. Moreover, rs11467497 was shown to be associated with higher number of round cells in the infertile males with low sperm motility. Surprisingly, the two mutations commonly existed in the sperm donors (n = 672), suggesting a potential application of the two indels in the screening for eligible sperm donors. Western blotting assays showed the sperms with rs140685149 2-nt deletion tended to have unstable DEFB126 protein in contrast of no DEFB126 protein expressed in the sperms with rs11467497 4-nt deletion, suggesting a more severe consequence caused by rs11467497 mutation. In conclusion, our study presented a significant contribution of another functional frame-shift polymorphism of DEFB126 (rs11467497) to male infertility. PMID:25721098

  13. Proteome analysis for profiling infertility markers in male mouse sperm after carbon ion radiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong Yan; Zhang, Hong

    2013-04-01

    Ion radiation or radiotherapy is used to treat male patients with oligozoospermia, azoospermia, temporarily infertility, or even permanent infertility. The present study aims to investigate the potential infertility mechanism of sperm in mice after carbon ion radiation (CIR). The caudal epididymal sperm of male mice whole-body irradiated with carbon ion beam (0.5Gy and 4Gy) were used 7 days after irradiation. A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis approach was employed to investigate the changes in protein expression in the caudal edididymal sperm. Spot detection and matching were performed using the PDQuest 8.0 software. The criteria used to select spots for the analysis were more than a threefold difference in protein quantities (normalized spot volume), which allowed the detection of six differentially expressed proteins. Protein identification was performed using MALDI-TOF-TOF. Six specific proteins were identified by searching the NCBI protein sequence database. Among these proteins, HSP 70-2, PLC, GPX4, ?-tubulin, and GAPDHS were associated with sperm motility, which can affect fertility. ?-tubulin is important in axoneme migration flagellar movement and regulation, and GAPDHS is related to sperm energy supply. We analyzed their expressions using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. The changes in sperm protein expression after CIR are mainly associated with motility. These proteins are potential markers for the mechanisms of infertility in space or radiotherapy. PMID:23435181

  14. 'Everybody is moving on': infertility, relationality and the aesthetics of family among British-Pakistani Muslims.

    PubMed

    Hampshire, Katherine R; Blell, Mwenza T; Simpson, Bob

    2012-04-01

    It is now widely recognised that experiences of infertility are socially and culturally contingent. Drawing on reproductive narratives of 108 British-Pakistani Muslims living in Northeast England (collected from 2007 to 2010), we show that subjective experiences of infertility in this population can take many forms, from 'straightforward' childlessness to concerns about inability to fulfil a range of reproductive expectations, desires and obligations, regarding timing, gender balance and number of offspring. Extended family relations are pivotal in the processes through which reproduction (or lack thereof) becomes defined as problematic. Changing family aesthetics can thus shape individuals' experiences of infertility in important ways. A growing emphasis on conjugal relationships for some couples offers a greater range of reproductive possibilities (enabling, for example, a period of voluntary childlessness). For others, increasing nuclearisation of family life reduces the possibilities for extended families to 'plug the gap' by providing proxy-children and a normalised social role for infertile couples. Moreover, such social roles may be time-limited, creating serious challenges for the long-term childless, who find themselves caught 'betwixt and between' two disparate sets of values. PMID:22349077

  15. Long-Term Adjustment of Infertile Couples Following Unsuccessful Medical Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniluk, Judith C.; Tench, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    A 33-month longitudinal study was conducted with 38 infertile couples making the transition to biological childlessness after unsuccessful fertility treatments. Changes in their levels of psychological distress; marital, sexual, and life satisfaction; and self-esteem were examined. Increased self-esteem and decreased sexual satisfaction were…

  16. Excess cholesterol induces mouse egg activation and may cause female infertility

    PubMed Central

    Yesilaltay, Ayce; Dokshin, Gregoriy A.; Busso, Dolores; Wang, Li; Galiani, Dalia; Chavarria, Tony; Vasile, Eliza; Quilaqueo, Linda; Orellana, Juan Andrés; Walzer, Dalia; Shalgi, Ruth; Dekel, Nava; Albertini, David F.; Rigotti, Attilio; Page, David C.; Krieger, Monty

    2014-01-01

    The HDL receptor scavenger receptor, class B type I (SR-BI) controls the structure and fate of plasma HDL. Female SR-BI KO mice are infertile, apparently because of their abnormal cholesterol-enriched HDL particles. We examined the growth and meiotic progression of SR-BI KO oocytes and found that they underwent normal germinal vesicle breakdown; however, SR-BI KO eggs, which had accumulated excess cholesterol in vivo, spontaneously activated, and they escaped metaphase II (MII) arrest and progressed to pronuclear, MIII, and anaphase/telophase III stages. Eggs from fertile WT mice were activated when loaded in vitro with excess cholesterol by a cholesterol/methyl-?-cyclodextrin complex, phenocopying SR-BI KO oocytes. In vitro cholesterol loading of eggs induced reduction in maturation promoting factor and MAPK activities, elevation of intracellular calcium, extrusion of a second polar body, and progression to meiotic stages beyond MII. These results suggest that the infertility of SR-BI KO females is caused, at least in part, by excess cholesterol in eggs inducing premature activation and that cholesterol can activate WT mouse eggs to escape from MII arrest. Analysis of SR-BI KO female infertility raises the possibility that abnormalities in cholesterol metabolism might underlie some cases of human female infertility of unknown etiology. PMID:25368174

  17. Infertility and Crisis: Self-Discovery and Healing through Poetry Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, Anne

    1992-01-01

    Offers a personal narrative on how the author's own poetry helped her cope with the crisis of infertility, serving as a tool for self-discovery and healing. Suggests that specific advantages of poetry writing within the context of psychotherapy include problem solving; expression of feelings; insight; couple communication; and individual and…

  18. Partnered Decisions? U.S. Couples and Medical Help-Seeking for Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Katherine M.; Johnson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    We examined male partners' influence on the decision to seek medical help for infertility using the National Study of Fertility Barriers. Building upon an existing help-seeking framework, we incorporated characteristics of both partners from 219 heterosexual couples who had ever perceived a fertility problem. In logistic regression analyses, we…

  19. Couple Infertility: From the Perspective of the Close-Relationship Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Barbara S.

    1990-01-01

    Presents Close-Relationship Model as comprehensive framework in which to examine interrelated nature of causes and effects of infertility on marital relationship. Includes these factors: physical and psychological characteristics of both partners; joint, couple characteristics; physical and social environment; and relationship itself. Discusses…

  20. USING DNA MICROARRAYS TO CHARACTERIZE GENE EXPRESSION IN TESTES OF FERTILE AND INFERTILE HUMANS AND MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    USING DNA MICROARRAYS TO CHARACTERIZE GENE EXPRESSION
    IN TESTES OF FERTILE AND INFERTILE HUMANS AND MICE

    John C. Rockett1, J. Christopher Luft1, J. Brian Garges1, M. Stacey Ricci2, Pasquale Patrizio2, Norman B. Hecht2 and David J. Dix1
    Reproductive Toxicology Divisio...

  1. Evaluation of sperm retrieval rate with bilateral testicular sperm extraction in infertile patients with azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Moein, Mohammad Reza; Moein, Mahmoud Reza; Ghasemzadeh, Jalal; Pourmasoumi, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Background: About 10% to 15% of infertile men have azoospermia, which could be obstructive or non-obstructive. Diagnostic biopsy from the testis and recently testicular sperm extraction (TESE) are the most precise investigations in these patients. Testicular biopsy can be done unilaterally or bilaterally. The worth of unilateral or bilateral testicular biopsy in men with azoospermia is controversial. Objective: To evaluate the necessity of bilateral diagnostic biopsy from the testis in new era of diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the results of testis biopsy in 419 azoospermic men, referred to Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility from 2009-2013. Patients with known obstructive azoospermia were excluded from the study. Results: In totally, 254 infertile men (60.6%) were underwent unilateral TESE, which in 175 patients (88.4%) sperm were extracted from their testes successfully. Bilateral testis biopsy was done in 165 patients (39.4%) which in 37 patients (22.4%), sperm were found in their testes tissues. Conclusion: Due to the low probability of positive bilateral TESE results especially when we can’t found sperm in the first side, we recommend that physicians re-evaluate the risk and benefit of this procedure in era of newer and more precise technique of sperm retrieval like micro TESE.

  2. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH AND SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa: Potential for Infertility Research and Screening
    David Miller1, David Dix2, Robert Reid3, Susan Wykes3 and Stephen Krawetz3
    1Reproductive Biology Group, University of Leeds, UK
    2Reproductive Toxicology Division, U.S. Environmenta...

  3. Bisphenol-A and Female Infertility: A Possible Role of Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Xiaona; Chen, Dan; He, Yonghua; Zhu, Wenting; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol-A (BPA) is widely used and ubiquitous in the environment. Animal studies indicate that BPA affects reproduction, however, the gene-environment interaction mechanism(s) involved in this association remains unclear. We performed a literature review to summarize the evidence on this topic. Methods: A comprehensive search was conducted in PubMed using as keywords BPA, gene, infertility and female reproduction. Full-text articles in both human and animals published in English prior to December 2014 were selected. Results: Evidence shows that BPA can interfere with endocrine function of hypothalamic-pituitary axis, such as by changing gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) secretion in hypothalamus and promoting pituitary proliferation. Such actions affect puberty, ovulation and may even result in infertility. Ovary, uterus and other reproductive organs are also targets of BPA. BPA exposure impairs the structure and functions of female reproductive system in different times of life cycle and may contribute to infertility. Both epidemiological and experimental evidences demonstrate that BPA affects reproduction-related gene expression and epigenetic modification that are closely associated with infertility. The detrimental effects on reproduction may be lifelong and transgenerational. Conclusions: Evidence on gene-environment interactions, especially from human studies, is still limited. Further research on this topic is warranted. PMID:26371021

  4. BabyZone Getting Pregnant Infertility Late Fertility Fertile Future: Women May Become More

    E-print Network

    Lummaa, Virpi

    BabyZone Getting Pregnant Infertility Late Fertility Fertile Future: Women May Become More Fertile generations of "late age" women to become pregnant. Published in the August 2010 issue of the American in Their 40s by Jacqueline Tourville The Scoop Women in their 40s who spontaneously conceive may be changing

  5. Terminal Mannose Residues in Seminal Plasma Glycoproteins of Infertile Men Compared to Fertile Donors

    PubMed Central

    Olejnik, Beata; Jarz?b, Anna; Kratz, Ewa M.; Zimmer, Mariusz; Gamian, Andrzej; Ferens-Sieczkowska, Miros?awa

    2015-01-01

    The impact of seminal plasma components on the fertilization outcomes in humans is still under question. The increasing number of couples facing problems with conception raises the need for predictive biomarkers. Detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms accompanying fertilization remains another challenge. Carbohydrate–protein recognition may be of key importance in this complex field. In this study, we analyzed the unique glycosylation pattern of seminal plasma proteins, the display of high-mannose and hybrid-type oligosaccharides, by means of their reactivity with mannose-specific Galanthus nivalis lectin. Normozoospermic infertile subjects presented decreased amounts of lectin-reactive glycoepitopes compared to fertile donors and infertile patients with abnormal semen parameters. Glycoproteins containing unveiled mannose were isolated in affinity chromatography, and 17 glycoproteins were identified in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The N-glycome of the isolated glycoproteins was examined in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Eleven out of 27 identified oligosaccharides expressed terminal mannose residues, responsible for lectin binding. We suggest that lowered content of high-mannose and hybrid type glycans in normozoospermic infertile patients may be associated with impaired sperm protection from preterm capacitation and should be considered in the search for new infertility markers. PMID:26147424

  6. The psychological profile and affective response of women diagnosed with unexplained infertility undergoing in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Aisenberg Romano, Gabi; Ravid, Hila; Zaig, Inbar; Schreiber, Shaul; Azem, Foad; Shachar, Izhak; Bloch, Miki

    2012-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that unexplained infertility may be related to specific personality and coping styles. We studied two groups of women with explained infertility (EIF, n?=?63) and unexplained infertility (UIF, n?=?42) undergoing an in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle. Women completed personality and coping style questionnaires prior to the onset of the cycle, and state depression and anxiety scales before and at two additional time points during the cycle. Almost no in-between group differences were found at any of the measured time points in regards to the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 validity and clinical scales, Illness Cognitions and Life Orientation Test, or for the situational measures. The few differences found suggest a more adaptive, better coping, and functioning defensive system in women with EIF. In conclusion, we did not find any clinically significant personality differences or differences in depression or anxiety levels between women with EIF and UIF during an IVF cycle. Minor differences found are probably a reaction to the ambiguous medical situation with its uncertain prognosis, amplifying certain traits which are not specific to one psychological structure but rather to the common experience shared by the group. The results of this study do not support the possibility that personality traits are involved in the pathophysiology of unexplained infertility. PMID:22847827

  7. Traditional Chinese medical herbs staged therapy in infertile women with endometriosis: a clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhaorong; Lian, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a common gynecological disease defined as the presence of endometrioid tissue (glands and stroma) outside the uterus. About 30 to 40% patients with endometriosis are infertile. In traditional Chinese medical system, endometriosis associated infertility is mostly caused by kidney deficiency and blood stasis. The herb of reinforcing kidney and removing blood stasis is designed to treat the disease. Material and methods: All the 80 up-to-standard patients were divided into two different groups exactly according to the random principle. They were treated with hormone and traditional Chinese medical herb separately. After half year’s therapy, all the patients received one year’s follow-up. Their transvaginal ultrasonographic changes, serum hormone levels and pregnancy rate were recorded to analysis the effect. Results: No significant difference happened in two groups’ demographic and clinical characteristics (P > 0.05). After the treatment, the effect on serum hormone levels and specific markers are significant (P < 0.05). The transvaginal ultrasonographic changes were positive, too. The text on hepatic and renal function confirmed to the safety of the herb. Compared to hormone therapy, the traditional Chinese medical herb is safe and effective for endometriosis patients with infertility. Conclusion: Compared with hormone therapy, traditional Chinese medical herb’s two-staged therapy is effective and safe for endometriosis patients with infertility. PMID:26550373

  8. [A case of male infertility caused by drug-induced hyperprolactinemia].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Teppei; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Kobayashi, Masataka; Kato, Yoshitake; Yumura, Yasushi; Noguchi, Kazumi; Iwasaki, Akira

    2013-01-01

    A 46-year-old man complaining of infertility was referred to our hospital. He was diagnosed with oligozoospermia, asthenozoospermia and hyperprolactinemia probably induced by sulpiride for depression, because semen quality gradually improved after cessation of sulpiride administration. Five months after the cessation, his serum prolactin level declined to the normal level, and his wife achieved spontaneous pregnancy. PMID:23412129

  9. Interpersonal psychotherapy versus brief supportive therapy for depressed infertile women: first pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Koszycki, Diana; Bisserbe, Jean-Claude; Blier, Pierre; Bradwejn, Jacques; Markowitz, John

    2012-06-01

    Infertility is strongly associated with depression, yet treatment research for depressed infertile women is sparse. This study tested for the first time the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), the evidence-based antidepressant intervention with the greatest peripartum research support, as treatment for depressed women facing fertility problems. Patients who met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder of at least moderate severity were randomized to either 12 sessions of IPT (n?=?15) or brief supportive psychotherapy (BSP; n?=?16), our control intervention. Eighty percent of IPT and 63 % of BSP patients completed the 12 sessions of therapy. Patients in both treatments improved. IPT produced a greater response rate than BSP, with more than two-thirds of women achieving a >50 % reduction in scores on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). IPT also tended to have lower posttreatment scores on the Beck Depression Inventory, Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale, and anxiety subscale of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, with between-group effect sizes ranging from 0.61 to 0.76. Gains persisted at 6-month follow-up. This pilot trial suggests that IPT is a promising treatment for depression in the context of infertility and that it may fare better than a rigorous active control condition. Should subsequent randomized controlled trials support these findings, this will inform clinical practice and take an important step in assuring optimal care for depressed women struggling with infertility. PMID:22526405

  10. The Efficiency of a Group-Specific Mandated Benefit Revisited: The Effect of Infertility Mandates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahey, Joanna N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the labor market effects of state health insurance mandates that increase the cost of employing a demographically identifiable group. State mandates requiring that health insurance plans cover infertility treatment raise the relative cost of insuring older women of child-bearing age. Empirically, wages in this group are…

  11. Genetic screening and evaluation for chromosomal abnormalities of infertile males in Jilin Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Fan, H-T; Zhang, Q-S; Wang, X-Y; Yang, X; Tian, W-J; Li, R-W

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormality is the most common genetic cause of male infertility, particularly in cases of azoospermia, oligozoospermia, and recurrent spontaneous abortion. Chromosomal rearrangement may interrupt an important gene or exert position effects. The functionality of genes at specific breakpoints, perhaps with a specific role in spermatogenesis, may be altered by such rearrangements. Structural chromosome abnormalities are furthermore known to increase the risk of pregnancy loss. In this study, we aimed to assess chromosomal defects in infertile men from Jilin Province, China, by genetic screening and to evaluate the relationship between structural chromosome abnormalities and male infertility. The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities among the study participants (receiving genetic counseling in Jilin Province, China) was 10.55%. The most common chromosome abnormality was Klinefelter syndrome, and the study findings suggested that azoospermia and oligospermia may result from structural chromosomal abnormalities. Chromosome 1 was shown to be most commonly involved in male infertility and balanced chromosomal translocation was identified as one of the causes of recurrent spontaneous abortion. Chromosomes 4, 7, and 10 were the most commonly involved chromosomes in male partners of women experiencing repeated abortion. PMID:26662410

  12. Stem cell therapeutic possibilities: future therapeutic options for male-factor and female-factor infertility?

    PubMed

    Easley, Charles A; Simerly, Calvin R; Schatten, Gerald

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in assisted reproduction treatment have enabled some couples with severe infertility issues to conceive, but the methods are not successful in all cases. Notwithstanding the significant financial burden of assisted reproduction treatment, the emotional scars from an inability to conceive a child enacts a greater toll on affected couples. While methods have circumvented some root causes for male and female infertility, often the underlying causes cannot be treated, thus true cures for restoring a patient's fertility are limited. Furthermore, the procedures are only available if the affected patients are able to produce gametes. Patients rendered sterile by medical interventions, exposure to toxicants or genetic causes are unable to utilize assisted reproduction to conceive a child - and often resort to donors, where permitted. Stem cells represent a future potential avenue for allowing these sterile patients to produce offspring. Advances in stem cell biology indicate that stem cell replacement therapies or in-vitro differentiation may be on the horizon to treat and could cure male and female infertility, although significant challenges need to be met before this technology can reach clinical practice. This article discusses these advances and describes the impact that these advances may have on treating infertility. PMID:23664220

  13. VALUING REDUCTIONS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SOURCES OF INFERTILITY RISK USING THE EFFICIENT HOUSEHOLD FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an increasing body evidence suggesting that a broad range of pollutants have the potential to alter human endocrine systems. One disturbing consequence of exposures to these endocrine disruptors is that they may significantly increase the incidence of infertility in exp...

  14. Association of azoospermia factor region deletions in infertile male subjects among Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Hussein, A A; Vasudevan, R; Patimah, I; Prashant, N; Nora, F A

    2015-03-01

    Azoospermia factor region (AZF) deletions (AZFa, AZFb, AZFc and AZFd) in the Y chromosome were analysed in male infertility subjects in various populations with conflicting results. This study comprised of 54 infertile males and 63 fertile controls, and the frequency of AZFa, AZFb, AZFc and AZFd deletions were determined using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as well as real-time PCR-high resolution melting analysis-based methods. The results of this study showed that, three of 54 cases (5.55%) had AZF (a, b and c) deletions (two had AZFc and one had AZFa deletions). Four cases were found to have AZFd deletions (7.4%) with two of them being associated with AZFc deletions (P = 0.028). The frequency of AZF (a, b and c) deletions in Malaysian infertile male subjects was found to be comparable with other populations. AZFd deletions were found to be significant (P < 0.05) in male infertility and it may be associated with other types of AZF deletions. PMID:24528375

  15. Hippo signaling disruption and Akt stimulation of ovarian follicles for infertility treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Cheng, Yuan; Suzuki, Nao; Deguchi, Masashi; Sato, Yorino; Takae, Seido; Ho, Chi-hong; Kawamura, Nanami; Tamura, Midori; Hashimoto, Shu; Sugishita, Yodo; Morimoto, Yoshiharu; Hosoi, Yoshihiko; Yoshioka, Nobuhito; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Hsueh, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) and polycystic ovarian syndrome are ovarian diseases causing infertility. Although there is no effective treatment for POI, therapies for polycystic ovarian syndrome include ovarian wedge resection or laser drilling to induce follicle growth. Underlying mechanisms for these disruptive procedures are unclear. Here, we explored the role of the conserved Hippo signaling pathway that serves to maintain optimal size across organs and species. We found that fragmentation of murine ovaries promoted actin polymerization and disrupted ovarian Hippo signaling, leading to increased expression of downstream growth factors, promotion of follicle growth, and the generation of mature oocytes. In addition to elucidating mechanisms underlying follicle growth elicited by ovarian damage, we further demonstrated additive follicle growth when ovarian fragmentation was combined with Akt stimulator treatments. We then extended results to treatment of infertility in POI patients via disruption of Hippo signaling by fragmenting ovaries followed by Akt stimulator treatment and autografting. We successfully promoted follicle growth, retrieved mature oocytes, and performed in vitro fertilization. Following embryo transfer, a healthy baby was delivered. The ovarian fragmentation–in vitro activation approach is not only valuable for treating infertility of POI patients but could also be useful for middle-aged infertile women, cancer patients undergoing sterilizing treatments, and other conditions of diminished ovarian reserve. PMID:24082083

  16. The obese patient with infertility: a practical approach to diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Moran, L J; Norman, R J

    2002-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are serious and prevalent conditions in Western countries and carry many health consequences, including reproductive dysfunction. In particular, excess fat in the abdominal area is strongly related to disorders of the reproductive system. Moderate weight loss and reduction of abdominal fat improves menstrual regularity, ovulation, and infertility in women. This may be etiologically related to insulin resistance, particularly in a subset of infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome. As such, weight loss should be promoted as an initial treatment option for obese women with infertility. However, the most effective method for achieving and maintaining weight loss is unclear. Gradual weight loss is best achieved through a sensible eating plan that can be maintained over long periods of time. The likelihood of maintaining weight loss is increased when diet is combined with regular exercise, cognitive behavior therapy, and a supportive group environment. Adoption of these principles in a primary healthcare setting can therefore aid in treatment of infertility related to obesity. PMID:12557812

  17. Terminal Mannose Residues in Seminal Plasma Glycoproteins of Infertile Men Compared to Fertile Donors.

    PubMed

    Olejnik, Beata; Jarz?b, Anna; Kratz, Ewa M; Zimmer, Mariusz; Gamian, Andrzej; Ferens-Sieczkowska, Miros?awa

    2015-01-01

    The impact of seminal plasma components on the fertilization outcomes in humans is still under question. The increasing number of couples facing problems with conception raises the need for predictive biomarkers. Detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms accompanying fertilization remains another challenge. Carbohydrate-protein recognition may be of key importance in this complex field. In this study, we analyzed the unique glycosylation pattern of seminal plasma proteins, the display of high-mannose and hybrid-type oligosaccharides, by means of their reactivity with mannose-specific Galanthus nivalis lectin. Normozoospermic infertile subjects presented decreased amounts of lectin-reactive glycoepitopes compared to fertile donors and infertile patients with abnormal semen parameters. Glycoproteins containing unveiled mannose were isolated in affinity chromatography, and 17 glycoproteins were identified in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The N-glycome of the isolated glycoproteins was examined in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Eleven out of 27 identified oligosaccharides expressed terminal mannose residues, responsible for lectin binding. We suggest that lowered content of high-mannose and hybrid type glycans in normozoospermic infertile patients may be associated with impaired sperm protection from preterm capacitation and should be considered in the search for new infertility markers. PMID:26147424

  18. Body image and its relationship with sexual function and marital adjustment in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Karamidehkordi, Akram; Roudsari, Robab Latifnejad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Body image is related to cognitive, emotional, and physical aspects of women's life. Therefore, it is expected to have an important role in women's sexual health and marital adjustment too. This issue seems to be salient in infertile women who suffer from psychological consequences of infertility. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship of body image with sexual function and marital adjustment in infertile women in 2011 in Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods: This correlational study was performed on 130 infertile women who referred to Montaserieh Infertility Research Centre in Mashhad, Iran. Subjects were selected using convenient sampling method. To collect data, valid and reliable questionnaires including demographic and infertility-related data tool, modified Younesi Body Image Questionnaire, Rosen Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), and Spanier Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) were used. Data analysis was performed by SPSS software using Student's t-test, correlation, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey post-hoc test. Results: The mean scores of body image, sexual function, and marital adjustment in women were 308.1 ± 45.8, 27.23 ± 3.80, and 113.8 ± 19.73, respectively. There was a direct correlation between overall body image and subscales of sexual function including sexual arousal (P = 0.003), sexual desire (P = 0.024), vaginal moisture (P = 0.001), orgasm (P < 0.001), sexual satisfaction (P < 0.001), and dyspareunia (P = 0.007). A direct correlation was also observed between overall body image and subscales of marital adjustment including agreement and consent (P < 0.001), satisfaction with life (P < 0.001), continuity of life (P = 0.007), and expressing emotions within the family environment (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Improved sexual function and marital adjustment in cases with higher body image provides evidence that one of the solutions to reduce sexual dysfunction and marital dispute in infertile women could be planning educational and counseling programs to improve women's body image. PMID:25949252

  19. Global access to infertility care in developing countries: a case of human rights, equity and social justice

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, W.

    2011-01-01

    According to WHO data more than 180 million couples in developing countries suffer from primary or secondary infertility. The social stigma of childlessness still leads to isolation and abandonment in many developing countries. Differences between the developed and developing world are emerging because of the different availability in infertility care and different socio-cultural value surrounding procreation and childlessness. Although reproductive health education and prevention of infertility are number one priorities, the need for accessible diagnostic procedures and new reproductive technologies (ART) is very high. The success and sustainability of ART in resource-poor settings will depend to a large extend on our ability to optimise these techniques in terms of availability, affordability and effectiveness. Accessible infertility treatment can only be successfully introduced in developing countries if socio-cultural and economic prerequisites are fulfilled and governments can be persuaded to support their introduction. We have to liaise with the relevant authorities to discuss the strengthening of infertility services, at the core of which lies the integration of infertility, contraceptive and maternal health services within public health care structures. After a fascinating period of more than 30 years of IVF, only a small part of the world population benefits from these new technologies. Time has come to give equitable access to effective and safe infertility care in resource-poor countries as well. PMID:24753875

  20. A population-based study on infertility and its influencing factors in four selected provinces in Iran (2008-2010)

    PubMed Central

    Rostami Dovom, Marzieh; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Abedini, Mehrandokht; Amirshekari, Golshan; Hashemi, Somayeh; Noroozzadeh, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infertility has a varied impact on multiple dimensions of health and functioning of women. Objective: We aimed to identify the burden of infertility and its influencing factors based on a population based study conducted in four provinces of Iran. Materials and Methods: A sample of 1126 women, aged 18-45 years, was selected using the multi stage, stratified probability sampling procedure; those met the eligibility criteria were invited for further comprehensive interview. This study used the definition of infertility proposed by World Health Organization “the woman has never conceived despite cohabitation and exposure to pregnancy for a period of 1 year”. Results : The overall prevalence of lifetime infertility and current primary infertility were 21.1% (95% CI: 18.4- 23.8) and 6.4% (95% CI: 4.8-8) respectively. The probability of first pregnancy at the end of 2 years of marriage was 94% for all ever-married women. Infertility were observed as significantly higher among women age 31-35 (OR: 4.6; 95% CI: 1.9-11.5; p=0.001) and women with more than 9 years of education (OR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.5-3.3; p<0.0001). Conclusion: The necessities of modern living have compelled many women to postpone childbearing to their late reproductive years; however they must be informed of being at risk of infertility with ageing. PMID:25408706

  1. Seminal Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and its relationship to infertility in Egyptian patients with varicocele.

    PubMed

    Eid, A A; Younan, D N

    2015-11-01

    Germ cell apoptosis has been proposed as one of the mechanisms by which varicocele can influence fertility. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between seminal tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) levels and male infertility in patients with varicocele. This study included 112 males: 30 fertile males with varicocele, 44 infertile males with varicocele and 38 healthy fertile control subjects without varicocele. Semen analysis was performed, and serum levels of reproductive hormones were measured. Seminal TRAIL levels in the infertile varicocele group were significantly higher than in the fertile varicocele and the control groups (P = 0.014). A significant negative correlation was found between seminal TRAIL and progressive (P < 0.001) and total motility scores (P < 0.001) in the infertile varicocele group. A significant negative correlation was also detected between seminal TRAIL levels and normal sperm morphology in the fertile varicocele (P = 0.007) and infertile varicocele patients (P = 0.047). Seminal TRAIL was significantly correlated with varicocele grade whether the patients were fertile (P = 0.001) or infertile (P = 0.035). Seminal TRAIL may thus have a potential role in varicocele-associated male infertility through its negative effect on sperm motility and morphology. PMID:25351208

  2. Association between DNMT3L polymorphic variants and the risk of endometriosis-associated infertility.

    PubMed

    Mostowska, Adrianna; Szczepa?ska, Malgorzata; Wirstlein, Przemyslaw; Skrzypczak, Jana; Jagodzi?ski, Pawe? P

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is considered to be an epigenetic disease. It has previously been reported that the DNA methyltransferase 3-like (DNMT3L) rs8129776 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) contributes to endometrioma. In the present study, high?resolution melting curve analysis was used to investigate the risks associated with the DNMT3L c.910?635A/G (rs8129776), c.832C/T (rs7354779), c.812C/T (rs113593938) and c.344+62C/T (rs2276248) SNPs on stage I?II endometriosis?associated infertility. Included in the present study were patients presenting with stage I?II endometriosis?associated infertility (n=154) and a control cohort of healthy patients with confirmed fertility (n=383). No significant association between the above?listed DNMT3L SNPs and the development of endometriosis?associated infertility was identified. The lowest P?values generated from trend analysis were observed in the DNMT3L c.832C/T (rs7354779) SNP (Ptrend=0.114). Furthermore, haplotype analyses of the DNMT3L SNPs failed to reveal any risk association between the development of endometriosis?associated infertility and the above?listed polymorphisms, even when the SNPs were present in combinations. Finally, a meta?analysis was performed to examine the association between the DNMT3L rs8129776 SNP and the development of endometrioma, from which no association between the two was identified. On the basis of these results, the present study has demonstrated that variations in the DNMT3L gene do not contribute to stage I-II endometriosis-associated infertility. PMID:26647998

  3. Preliminary study of blood methylmercury effects on reproductive hormones and relevant factors among infertile and pregnant women in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hsiao-Ling; Wei, Hsiao-Jui; Chen, Po-Hsi; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Chien, Ling-Chu

    2015-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is the most poisonous mercury species and an endocrine-disrupting chemical that could cause reproductive and developmental harm effects in animals. In this study, we recruited 310 infertile women and 57 pregnant women and investigated their blood MeHg levels. The distribution of blood reproductive hormone, selenium and zinc levels, and the difference of relevant factors by the reference level of blood MeHg (5.8 ?g/L) of infertile women were further examined. Results showed that greater percentages of sashimi consumption, frequencies of Chinese herbal medicine use, alcohol consumption, and lack of physical activity were observed in infertile women than those for pregnant women. Blood MeHg concentration was significantly greater in infertile than that in pregnant women. Significant concentration differences for FSH and LH by the dichotomized reference level of blood MeHg (5.8 ?g/L) in infertile women were not observed, which may stem from that these reproductive hormones in participated infertile women were mostly in the normal reference range. Consumption of fish and sashimi represented the major source of MeHg exposure in infertile women. MeHg levels were elevated in infertile women, and consistent with fish consumption frequency. Compared to the referent level of blood MeHg levels <5.8 ?g/L, the elevated blood MeHg levels (?5.8 ?g/L) in infertile women were 3.35 and 4.42 folds risk in categorized frequencies of fish consumption 1-2 meals per week and more than 3 meals per week, respectively. The obtained results provide evidences and help updating the advisory of fish consumption and improving women's reproductive health. PMID:26002048

  4. Differences in blood and semen oxidative status in fertile and infertile men, and their relationship with sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Serena; Tagliamonte, Maria Chiara; Catalani, Simona; Primiterra, Mariangela; Canestrari, Franco; De Stefani, Silvia; Palini, Simone; Bulletti, Carlo

    2012-09-01

    Oxidative stress plays a fundamental role in the aetiology of male infertility by negatively affecting sperm quality and function. Assessment of blood and seminal plasma oxidative profiles might be a valuable tool to improve evaluation of sperm reproductive capacity and functional competence. This study examined the lipid-soluble antioxidant profile and levels of lipid peroxidation both in blood and seminal plasma samples of infertile and fertile males, in relation to semen parameters. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and vitamin E concentrations were significantly (P<0.05) lower in seminal plasma of infertile men compared with fertile subjects; concurrently, a significant accumulation of malondialdehyde was found in infertile patients (P=0.032 compared with controls), which was negatively correlated with sperm motility and morphology. In blood samples, infertile men presented lower concentrations of TAC, carotenoids and vitamin E than fertile subjects; TAC and carotenoids were positively correlated with sperm motility, morphology and concentration. Finally, blood TAC and vitamin E concentrations were positively correlated with the corresponding seminal values, confirming the close relationship between blood and semen antioxidants. All these results indicated the possibility of using not only seminal antioxidants but also blood antioxidants as biochemical markers to support sperm quality evaluation. Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been widely recognized as one of the major causes of male infertility; indeed, excessive ROS production can negatively impact sperm quality and function. The assessment of blood and seminal plasma oxidative profiles has been suggested as a valuable tool to improve the evaluation of sperm reproductive capacity and functional competence in infertile men. With this in mind, in the present study we examined the lipid soluble antioxidant profile (carotenoids and vitamins A and E) and the levels of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde; MDA) both in blood and seminal plasma samples of infertile and fertile males, in correlation with semen parameters namely motility, morphology and concentration. As a result, we obtained evidence that the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and the concentrations of vitamin E of seminal plasma samples were significantly lower in infertile men than in fertile subjects; at the same time, a significant accumulation of MDA was found in infertile patients. MDA, in turn, negatively correlated with sperm motility and morphology, thus confirming that oxidative damage to lipids impairs sperm quality. In blood samples, infertile men presented lower TAC and lower concentrations of carotenoids and vitamin E than fertile subjects; interestingly, TAC and carotenoid concentrations were positively correlated with sperm motility, morphology, and concentration, confirming the close relationship between blood antioxidants and sperm quality. In conclusion, all these results suggested that the examination of blood and semen oxidative profiles might furnish useful information on sperm quality and function in infertile men. PMID:22818093

  5. National, Regional, and Global Trends in Infertility Prevalence Since 1990: A Systematic Analysis of 277 Health Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Boerma, Ties; Vanderpoel, Sheryl; Stevens, Gretchen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Global, regional, and national estimates of prevalence of and tends in infertility are needed to target prevention and treatment efforts. By applying a consistent algorithm to demographic and reproductive surveys available from developed and developing countries, we estimate infertility prevalence and trends, 1990 to 2010, by country and region. Methods and Findings We accessed and analyzed household survey data from 277 demographic and reproductive health surveys using a consistent algorithm to calculate infertility. We used a demographic infertility measure with live birth as the outcome and a 5-y exposure period based on union status, contraceptive use, and desire for a child. We corrected for biases arising from the use of incomplete information on past union status and contraceptive use. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate prevalence of and trends in infertility in 190 countries and territories. In 2010, among women 20–44 y of age who were exposed to the risk of pregnancy, 1.9% (95% uncertainty interval 1.7%, 2.2%) were unable to attain a live birth (primary infertility). Out of women who had had at least one live birth and were exposed to the risk of pregnancy, 10.5% (9.5%, 11.7%) were unable to have another child (secondary infertility). Infertility prevalence was highest in South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa/Middle East, and Central/Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Levels of infertility in 2010 were similar to those in 1990 in most world regions, apart from declines in primary and secondary infertility in Sub-Saharan Africa and primary infertility in South Asia (posterior probability [pp] ?0.99). Although there were no statistically significant changes in the prevalence of infertility in most regions amongst women who were exposed to the risk of pregnancy, reduced child-seeking behavior resulted in a reduction of primary infertility among all women from 1.6% to 1.5% (pp?=?0.90) and a reduction of secondary infertility among all women from 3.9% to 3.0% (pp>0.99) from 1990 to 2010. Due to population growth, however, the absolute number of couples affected by infertility increased from 42.0 million (39.6 million, 44.8 million) in 1990 to 48.5 million (45.0 million, 52.6 million) in 2010. Limitations of the study include gaps in survey data for some countries and the use of proxies to determine exposure to pregnancy. Conclusions We analyzed demographic and reproductive household survey data to reveal global patterns and trends in infertility. Independent from population growth and worldwide declines in the preferred number of children, we found little evidence of changes in infertility over two decades, apart from in the regions of Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Further research is needed to identify the etiological causes of these patterns and trends. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23271957

  6. The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Group Therapy on Marital Satisfaction and General Health in Woman With Infertility.

    PubMed

    Abedi Shargh, Najmeh; Bakhshani, Nour Mohammad; Mohebbi, Mohammad Davoud; Mahmudian, Khadije; Ahovan, Masood; Mokhtari, Mojgan; Gangali, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Infertility affects around 80 million people around the world and it has been estimated that psychological problems in infertile couples is within the range of 25-60%. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of Mindfulness-based cognitive group therapy on consciousness regarding marital satisfaction and general health in woman with infertility. Recent work is a clinical trial with a pre/posttest plan for control group. Covering 60 women who were selected by in access method and arranged randomly in interference (30) and control (30) groups. Before and after implementation of independent variable, all subjects were measured in both groups using Enrich questionnaire and marital satisfaction questionnaire. Results of covariance analysis of posttest, after controlling the scores of pretest illustrated the meaningful difference of marital satisfaction and mental health scores in interference and control groups after treatment and the fact that MBCT treatment in infertile women revealed that this method has an appropriate contribution to improvement of marital satisfaction and mental health. Necessary trainings for infertile people through consultation services can improve their mental health and marital satisfaction and significantly help reducing infertile couples' problems. PMID:26493418

  7. [The psychic state of women suffering infertility in the old reproductive age].

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, D B; Ermolenko, K S; Solov'eva, A V

    2013-01-01

    A total 60 infertile women aged 36-42 years treated by ART were examined to evaluate their psychic condition using CES-D and Spielberg-Khanin scales, SF-36 questionnaire. 15 (25%) patients were found (CES-D) to have mild depressive disorder; it was more pronounced in one woman. More than half of the patients exhibited enhanced anxiety, with 32 (53.3%) and 19 (31.6%) having generalized and strong anxiety respectively. Estimation of the quality of life revealed difficulties in maintaining social contacts up to complete isolation, low self-assessment of psychic health and prospects for recovery. It is concluded that comprehensive diagnostics and combined treatment are needed to manage infertile women of old reproductive age with the use of both traditional and psychocorrective methods. PMID:24417066

  8. Female Reproductive Hormones and Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Genital Chlamydia Infection in Tubal Factor Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Nsonwu-Anyanwu, Augusta Chinyere; Charles-Davies, Mabel Ayebantoyo; Taiwo, Victor Olusegun; Li, Bin; Oni, Anthony Alabar; Bello, Folashade Adenike

    2015-01-01

    Background Genital Chlamydia infection (GCI) and the associated pathologies have been implicated in tubal infertility. Though the actual pathologic mechanisms are still uncertain, oxidative stress and other factors have been implicated. The purpose of the study was to determine the possible contribution of female reproductive hormones and biomarkers of oxidative stress in genital Chlamydial infection to tubal occlusion. Methods This prospective case control study was carried out by recruiting 150 age matched women grouped into infertile Chlamydia positive women (n = 50), fertile Chlamydia positive women (n = 50) and fertile Chlamydia negative women as controls (n = 50). High vaginal swabs and endocervical swabs were collected for screening Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Treponema pallidum, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. Sera were collected for estimation of Chlamydia trachomatis antibody, female reproductive hormones [Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), Luteinizing Hormone (LH), Oestradiol (E2), Progesterone (P4), Prolactin (PRL)] and biomarkers of oxidative stress [Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC) and 8-hydroxyl-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)] by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Data were analyzed using chi square, analysis of variance and LSD Post hoc to determine mean differences at p = 0.05. Results Among women with GCI, higher levels of LH and 8-OHdG were observed in infertile Chlamydia positive women compared to fertile Chlamydia positive women (p < 0.05). Higher levels of LH and 8-OHdG and lower TAC levels were observed in infertile Chlamydia positive women compared to fertile Chlamydia negative controls (p < 0.05). Conclusion Mechanisms including oxidative DNA damage and reduced antioxidant capacity may be involved in the pathology of Chlamydia induced tubal damage. PMID:25927024

  9. A rare case of respiratory disorders associated with two autosomal recessive diseases and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sergio López; Scigliano, Sergio; Menga, Guillermo; Demiceu, Sergio; Palaoro, Luis Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The study of nasal ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and ultrastructure may contribute to the understanding of pathognomonic cases of male infertility associated with defects in sperm motility. This study was designed to report a particular case of male infertility, characterized by the association of two respiratory autosomal recessive genetic diseases (alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency [AAT-D] and primary ciliary dyskinesia [PCD]). A 39-year-old patient with complete sperm immotility, AAT-D, and bronchiectasis was studied in the Laboratory of Male Fertility, the Department of Urology, the Respiratory Center of a Pediatric Hospital, and in the Department of Clinical Medicine of a Rehabilitation Respiratory Hospital. Family history, physical examination, hormonal analysis, microbial assays, semen analysis, nasal ciliary function, and structure study by digital high-speed video photography and transmission electron microscopy are described. A noninvasive nasal biopsy to retrieve ciliated epithelium lining the inferior surface of the inferior nasal turbinates was performed and CBF was determined. Beat pattern was slightly curved and rigid, not wide, and metacronic in all the observed fields analyzed. CBF was 8.2 Hz in average (reference value, 10–15 Hz) Ultrastructural assay revealed absence of the inner dynein arms in 97% of the cilia observed. The final infertility accurate diagnosis was achieved by the study of nasal CBF and ultrastructure contributing to the patient health management and genetic counseling while deciding fatherhood. Beyond this particular case, the present report may open a new field of studies in male infertility, mainly in cases of asthenozoospermia. PMID:23772318

  10. Y choromosomal microdeletion screening in the workup of male infertility and its current status in India.

    PubMed

    Suganthi, Ramaswamy; Vijesh, Vijayabhavanath Vijayakumaran; Vandana, Nambiar; Fathima Ali Benazir, Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an essential stage in human male gamete development, which is regulated by many Y chromosome specific genes. Most of these genes are centred in a specific region located on the long arm of the human Y chromosome known as the azoospermia factor region (AZF). Deletion events are common in Y chromosome because of its peculiar structural organization. Astonishingly, among the several known genetic causes of male infertility, Y chromosomal microdeletions emerged as the most frequent structural chromosome anomaly associated with the quantitative reduction of sperm. The development of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) like intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE) helps to bypass the natural barriers of fertilization, but it increases the concern about the transmission of genetic defects. Experimental evidence suggested that the men with Y chromosomal microdeletions vertically transmitted their deletion as well as related fertility disorders to their offspring via these ART techniques. In India, infertility is on alarming rise. ART centres have opened up in virtually every state but still most of the infertility centres in India do not choose to perform Y chromosomal microdeletion diagnosis because of some advanced theoretical reasons. Moreover, there is no consensus among the clinicians about the diagnosis and management of Y chromosomal microdeletion defects. The current review discusses thoroughly the role of Y chromosome microdeletion screening in the workup of male infertility, its significance as a diagnostic test, novel approaches for screening Y deletions and finally a systematic review on the current status of Y chromosome microdeletion deletion screening in India. PMID:24520494

  11. Y Choromosomal Microdeletion Screening in The Workup of Male Infertility and Its Current Status in India

    PubMed Central

    Suganthi, Ramaswamy; Vijesh, Vijayabhavanath Vijayakumaran; Vandana, Nambiar; Fathima Ali Benazir, Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an essential stage in human male gamete development, which is regulated by many Y chromosome specific genes. Most of these genes are centred in a specific region located on the long arm of the human Y chromosome known as the azoospermia factor region (AZF). Deletion events are common in Y chromosome because of its peculiar structural organization. Astonishingly, among the several known genetic causes of male infertility, Y chromosomal microdeletions emerged as the most frequent structural chromosome anomaly associated with the quantitative reduction of sperm. The development of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) like intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE) helps to bypass the natural barriers of fertilization, but it increases the concern about the transmission of genetic defects. Experimental evidence suggested that the men with Y chromosomal microdeletions vertically transmitted their deletion as well as related fertility disorders to their offspring via these ART techniques. In India, infertility is on alarming rise. ART centres have opened up in virtually every state but still most of the infertility centres in India do not choose to perform Y chromosomal microdeletion diagnosis because of some advanced theoretical reasons. Moreover, there is no consensus among the clinicians about the diagnosis and management of Y chromosomal microdeletion defects. The current review discusses thoroughly the role of Y chromosome microdeletion screening in the workup of male infertility, its significance as a diagnostic test, novel approaches for screening Y deletions and finally a systematic review on the current status of Y chromosome microdeletion deletion screening in India. PMID:24520494

  12. FSH treatment of male idiopathic infertility improves pregnancy rate: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Santi, D; Granata, A R M; Simoni, M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to comprehensively evaluate whether FSH administration to the male partner of infertile couples improves pregnancy rate, spontaneously and/or after assisted reproductive techniques (ART). Methods Meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials in which FSH was administered for male idiopathic infertility, compared with placebo or no treatment. Randomization was not considered as an inclusion criterion. Results We found 15 controlled clinical studies (614 men treated with FSH and 661 treated with placebo or untreated). Concerning the type of FSH, eight studies used recombinant FSH, whereas seven studies used purified FSH. Nine studies evaluated spontaneous pregnancy rate, resulting in an overall odds ratio (OR) of about 4.5 (CI: 2.17–9.33). Eight studies evaluated pregnancy rate after ART, showing a significant OR of 1.60 (CI: 1.08–2.37). Sub-dividing studies according to the FSH preparations (purified/recombinant), pregnancy rate improvement remained significant for each preparation. Eleven studies considered sperm quality after FSH treatment, finding a significant improvement of sperm concentration (2.66×106/ml, CI: 0.47–4.84), but not of concentration of sperm with progressive motility (1.22×106/ml, CI: ?0.07 to 2.52). Three trials evaluated testicular volume, showing a non-significant increase in men treated (1.35?ml, CI: ?0.44 to 3.14). Conclusion The results of controlled clinical trials available in the literature indicate an improvement of pregnancy rate after FSH administration to the male partner of infertile couples, both spontaneously and after ART. However, the heterogeneity of studies, the high risk of bias and the lack of precise criteria to guide FSH administration limit the strength of these results. Future studies should be designed to identify the markers of FSH response which are helpful in the decision-making process. Meanwhile, the use of FSH in the treatment of male infertility should be cautious. PMID:26113521

  13. Psychosocial and contextual determinants of health among infertile women: a cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Batool, Shahida Syeda; de Visser, Richard Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of emotional intelligence, social support and contextual factors on the general health of infertile women. A sample of involuntarily childless women aged 25-45 living in the UK (n?=?148) and Pakistan (n?=?164) completed a self-administered questionnaire. Although there were no significant differences in total scores on the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), British women reported greater anxiety, insomnia and social dysfunction, and Pakistani women reported greater depression and somatic symptoms. Important differences in putative correlates of GHQ scores were found between the samples. British women reported significantly greater emotional satisfaction, greater satisfaction with medical information, greater satisfaction with medical care, and greater actual received support Pakistani women reported greater emotional intelligence. Regression analysis to identify correlates of higher GHQ scores revealed that greater received social support was a common correlate of better GHQ scores among British and Pakistani women. Additional correlates of better GHQ scores among British women were greater emotional intelligence and more emotional satisfaction in their relationships (overall R(2) = 0.41). Additional correlates among Pakistani women were greater education, greater perceived available social support and a nuclear family system rather than an extended family (overall R(2) =0. 40). Results suggest that psychological facets of infertility should be addressed as part of a holistic approach to the care of infertile women. They highlight a need to improve social support and to incorporate emotional intelligence training in therapeutic interventions to improve the psychological well-being of infertile women. PMID:24479424

  14. Aberrant Expression of Dynein light chain 1 (DYNLT1) is Associated with Human Male Factor Infertility.

    PubMed

    Indu, Sivankutty; Sekhar, Sreeja C; Sengottaiyan, Jeeva; Kumar, Anil; Pillai, Sathy M; Laloraya, Malini; Kumar, Pradeep G

    2015-12-01

    DYNLT1 is a member of a gene family identified within the t-complex of the mouse, which has been linked with male germ cell development and function in the mouse and the fly. Though defects in the expression of this gene are associated with male sterility in both these models, there has been no study examining its association with spermatogenic defects in human males. In this study, we evaluated the levels of DYNLT1 and its expression product in the germ cells of fertile human males and males suffering from spermatogenic defects. We screened fertile (n = 14), asthenozoospermic (n = 15), oligozoospermic (n = 20) and teratozoospermic (n = 23) males using PCR and Western blot analysis. Semiquantitative PCR indicated either undetectable or significantly lower levels of expression of DYNLT1 in the germ cells from several patients from across the three infertility syndrome groups, when compared with that of fertile controls. DYNLT1 was localized on head, mid-piece, and tail segments of spermatozoa from fertile males. Spermatozoa from infertile males presented either a total absence of DYNLT1 or its absence in the tail region. Majority of the infertile individuals showed negligible levels of localization of DYNLT1 on the spermatozoa. Overexpression of DYNLT1 in GC1-spg cell line resulted in the up-regulation of several cytoskeletal proteins and molecular chaperones involved in cell cycle regulation. Defective expression of DYNLT1 was associated with male factor infertility syndromes in our study population. Proteome level changes in GC1-spg cells overexpressing DYNLT1 were suggestive of its possible function in germ cell development. We have discussed the implications of these observations in the light of the known functions of DYNLT1, which included protein trafficking, membrane vesiculation, cell cycle regulation, and stem cell differentiation. PMID:26432663

  15. Association of androgen receptor GGN repeat length polymorphism and male infertility in Khuzestan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Mohamad; Khatami, Saied Reza; Galehdari, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Androgens play critical role in secondary sexual and male gonads differentiations such as spermatogenesis, via androgen receptor. The human androgen receptor (AR) encoding gene contains two regions with three nucleotide polymorphic repeats (CAG and GGN) in the first exon. Unlike the CAG repeats, the GGN has been less studied because of technical difficulties, so the functional role of these polymorphic repeats is still unclear. Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate any relationship between GGN repeat length in the first exon of AR gene and idiopathic male infertility in southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: This is the first study on GGN repeat of AR gene in infertile male in Khuzestan, Iran. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to categorize GGN repeat lengths in 72 infertile and 72 fertile men. Afterwards we sequenced the PCR products to determine the exact length of GGN repeat in each category. Our samples included 36 azoospermic and 36 oligozoospermic men as cases and 72 fertile men as control group. Results: We found that the numbers of repeats in the cases range from 18 to 25, while in the controls this range is from 20 to 28. The results showed a significant relation between the length of GGN repeat and fertility (p=0.015). The most frequent alleles were alleles with 24 and 25 repeats respectively in case and control groups. On the other hand no significant differences were found between Arab and non-Arab cases by considering GGN repeat lengths (p=0.234). Conclusion: Due to our results, there is a significant association between the presence of allele with 24 repeats and susceptibility to male infertility. Therefore this polymorphism should be considered in future studies to clarify etiology of disorders related to androgen receptor activity. PMID:26221130

  16. Effect of infertility treatment and pregnancy-related hormones on breast cell proliferation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Anne; Matthews, Laura; Zelivianski, Stanislav; Hardy, Ashley; Jeruss, Jacqueline S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Breast cancer development involves a series of mutations in a heterogeneous group of proto-oncogenes/tumor suppressor genes that alter mammary cells to create a microenvironment permissive to tumorigenesis. Exposure to hormones during infertility treatment may have a mutagenic effect on normal mammary epithelial cells, high-risk breast lesions and early-stage breast cancers. Our goal was to understand the association between infertility treatment and normal and cancerous breast cell proliferation. METHODS MCF-10A normal mammary cells and the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 [estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, well differentiated] and HCC 1937 (ER-negative, aggressive, BRCA1 mutation) were treated with the weak ER activator clomiphene citrate and hormones that are increased during infertility treatment. Direct effects of treatment on cell proliferation and colony growth were determined. RESULTS While clomiphene citrate had no effect on MCF-10A cells or MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it decreased proliferation of HCC 1937 versus untreated cells (P= 0.003). Estrogen had no effect on either MCF-10A or HCC 1937 cells but, as expected, increased cell proliferation (20–100 nM; P?0.002) and colony growth (10–30 nM; P< 0.0001) of MCF-7 cells versus control. Conversely, progesterone decreased both proliferation (P= 0.001) and colony growth (P= 0.01) of MCF-10A cells, inhibited colony size of MCF-7 cells (P= 0.01) and decreased proliferation of HCC 1937 cells (P= 0.008) versus control. hCG (100 mIU/ml) decreased both proliferation (P ? 0.01) and colony growth (P ? 0.002) of all three cell lines. CONCLUSIONS Although these data are preclinical, they support possible indirect estrogenic effects of infertility regimens on ER-positive breast cancer cells and validate the potential protective effect of pregnancy-related exposure to hCG. PMID:22081245

  17. Higher SOD1 Gene Expression in Cumulus Cells From Infertile Women With Moderate and Severe Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Donabela, Flávia Cappello; Meola, Juliana; Padovan, Cristiana Carolina; de Paz, Cláudia Cristina Paro; Navarro, Paula Andrea

    2015-11-01

    It is questioned whether worsening of oocyte quality and oxidative stress (OS) are involved in the pathogenesis of infertility related to endometriosis and in compromised intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes. Cumulus cells (CCs) protect oocytes from entering apoptosis induced by OS. Thus, we carried out a case-control study comparing expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), and glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4; genes encoding for the main antioxidant enzymes) in CCs from mature oocytes of 26 infertile patients with minimal/mild endometriosis, 14 patients with moderate/severe endometriosis, and 41 controls undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for ICSI, using real-time polymerase chain reaction. As a secondary objective, we investigated the interaction between the expression of these genes and clinical pregnancy (CP) by a statistical model. Only infertile women with moderate/severe endometriosis showed increased expression of the SOD1 in CCs compared to women with minimal/mild endometriosis and controls, with a positive interaction between increased expression and the occurrence of CP, suggesting that SOD1 might be a potential biomarker of CP following ICSI. PMID:25947891

  18. Infertility in the hyperplasic ovary of freshwater planarians: the role of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Harrath, Abdel Halim; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Mansour, Lamjed; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Sirotkin, Alexander V; Al Omar, Suliman Y; Arfah, Maha; Al Anazi, Mohamed S; Alhazza, Ibrahim M; Nyengaard, Jens R; Alwasel, Saleh

    2014-11-01

    Ex-fissiparous planarians produce infertile cocoons or, in very rare cases, cocoons with very low fertility. Here, we describe the features of programmed cell death (PCD) occurring in the hyperplasic ovary of the ex-fissiparous freshwater planarian Dugesia arabica that may explain this infertility. Based on TEM results, we demonstrate a novel extensive co-clustering of cytoplasmic organelles, such as lysosomes and microtubules, and their fusion with autophagosomes during the early stage of oocyte cell death occurring through an autophagic pattern. During a later stage of cell death, the generation of apoptotic vesicles in the cytoplasm can be observed. The immunohistochemical labeling supports the ultrastructural results because it has been shown that the proapoptotic protein bax was more highly expressed in the hyperplasic ovary than in the normal one, whereas the anti-apoptotic protein bcl2 was slightly more highly expressed in the normal ovary compared to the hyperplasic one. TUNEL analysis of the hyperplasic ovary confirmed that the nuclei of the majority of differentiating oocytes were TUNEL-positive, whereas the nuclei of oogonia and young oocytes were TUNEL-negative; in the normal ovary, oocytes are TUNEL-negative. Considering all of these data, we suggest that the cell death mechanism of differentiating oocytes in the hyperplasic ovary of freshwater planarians is one of the most important factors that cause ex-fissiparous planarian infertility. We propose that autophagy precedes apoptosis during oogenesis, whereas apoptotic features can be observed later. PMID:25107610

  19. An Update on Surgical versus Expectant Management of Ovarian Endometriomas in Infertile Women

    PubMed Central

    Keyhan, Sanaz; Hughes, Claude; Price, Thomas; Muasher, Suheil

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian endometriomas are a common manifestation of endometriosis that can represent a more severe stage of the disease. There is much debate over the treatment of these cysts in infertile women, particularly before use of assisted reproductive technologies. Evidence exists that supports surgical excision of ovarian endometriomas, as well as evidence that cautions against surgical intervention. Certain factors need to be examined closely before proceeding with surgery or continuing with expectant management. These include the patient's symptoms, age, ovarian reserve, size and laterality of the cyst, prior surgical treatment, and level of suspicion for malignancy. The most recent evidence appears to suggest that certain patient profiles may benefit from proceeding directly to in vitro fertilization (IVF). These include symptomatic infertile patients, especially those that are older, those that have diminished ovarian reserve, those that have bilateral endometriomas, or those that have had prior surgical treatment. Although endometriomas can be detrimental to the ovarian reserve, surgical therapy may further lower a woman's ovarian reserve. Nevertheless, the presence of an endometrioma does not appear to adversely affect IVF outcomes, and surgical excision of endometriomas does not appear to improve IVF outcomes. Regardless of treatment plan, infertile patients with endometriomas must be counseled appropriately before choosing either treatment path. PMID:26240817

  20. Endometrial sonographic characters predicting pregnancy following recurrent clomiphene induction in unexplained infertility.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Ahmed Y

    2008-12-01

    Patients with unexplained infertility managed repeatedly with clomiphene citrate need parameters to predict pregnancy to save them further unsuccessful trials and shorten their treatment to pregnancy interval. Ovulation was induced in 226 unexplained infertility patients, who had three previous failed cycles, with 100 mg clomiphene citrate (CC) from days 3 to 7 of the cycle. Human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) injection (10,000 IU i.m.) was given and timed intercourse was recommended when a leading follicle reached >17 mm and serum oestradiol exceeded 200 pg/ml. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that endometrial thickness >11.60 mm was associated with the lowest, while values >5.50 mm were associated with the highest chance of pregnancy. An endometrial thickness of 7.05 mm showed the best sensitivity and specificity. Patients with endometrial thickness <7.05 mm (n = 98) had significantly more clinical pregnancies (28.6 versus 8.9%), fewer days until HCG injection, thicker endometrium, higher serum progesterone measured on days 20-22 and more triple layer endometria than patients with endometrial thickness > or =7.05 mm (n = 56). It is concluded that endometrial thickness range of 5.50-8.25 mm and triple layer endometrium are highly predictive for pregnancy in patients with unexplained infertility induced with CC after repeated failures. Endometrial thickness of 11.60 mm was associated with a low chance of pregnancy. PMID:19079963

  1. Glutathione S-transferase Mu-1 gene polymorphism in Egyptian patients with idiopathic male infertility.

    PubMed

    Roshdy, O H; Hussein, T M; Zakaria, N H; Sabry, A A

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether an association exists between glutathione S-transferase Mu-1 (GSTM1) gene polymorphism and idiopathic male infertility. Sixty men with primary idiopathic infertility and 60 fertile men, serving as controls, were recruited for the study. The polymorphism was analysed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. The frequency of GSTM1 null genotype was observed to be higher in infertile men 40% in comparison with 33.3% in the fertile men, but this difference was not statistically significant. There was statistically significant difference between cases and controls as regards GSTM1 genotype distribution ((MC) P = 0.006*) in GSTM1-positive men. Patients with the GSTM1 null genotype had significantly lower sperm concentrations and total sperm count when compared with patients with GSTM1-positive genotype. In the control group, men with GSTM1 null genotype had significantly lower sperm concentrations but not total sperm count when compared with men with GSTM1-positive genotype. The results of this study suggest a possible negative effect of GSTM1 null genotype on the spermatogenic potential of the testis. PMID:25130880

  2. Decision for disclosure: The experiences of Iranian infertile couples undergoing assisted reproductive donation procedures.

    PubMed

    Hadizadeh-Talasaz, Fatemeh; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Simbar, Masoumeh

    2015-12-01

    Controversy surrounding disclosure among the recipients of assisted reproductive donation procedures is escalating worldwide, but little research has been conducted in this topic. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of infertile couples undergoing assisted reproductive donation procedures. In this exploratory qualitative study, 32 patients (nine couples and 14 women) who were candidates to use donor eggs, donor embryos or surrogacy, and 5 members of infertility treatment team including gynaecologists, midwives and psychologist (total 37) were purposively selected from the Montaserieh Infertility Research Centre at Mashhad, Iran in 2012 and interviewed using a semi-structured in-depth method. Data were analysed using conventional qualitative content analysis with MAXqda software. One overarching theme, entitled 'experiencing uncertainty surrounding the disclosure to others' was identified from the data. This theme contained two subthemes including 'Couples' decisions to not disclose to others' and 'Couples' decisions to disclose to others'. Five categories formed the first subtheme, and the second subtheme emerged from four categories which are discussed in this paper. The main reason for secrecy was concern over societal negative views about assisted reproductive donation procedures. This worry deprived the couples from support from family and friends and as a result requires them to tolerate psychological pressure when using such procedures. PMID:26428703

  3. Effect of psychological stress on fertility hormones and seminal quality in male partners of infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Bhongade, M B; Prasad, S; Jiloha, R C; Ray, P C; Mohapatra, S; Koner, B C

    2015-04-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of psychological stress on male fertility hormones and seminal quality in male partner of infertile couples. Seventy male partners of infertile couples were evaluated for level of psychological stress using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) questionnaire, serum total testosterone, luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) by electrochemiluminescence assay and serum GnRH by ELISA. Seminal analysis was performed as per WHO guideline. Nineteen (27%) of them had HADS anxiety and depression score ?8 (abnormal HADS score). The persons having abnormal HADS had lower serum total testosterone, higher serum FSH and LH than those of persons having normal HADS. Serum total testosterone correlated negatively with HADS, but LH and FSH correlated positively. There was no change in GnRH with the change in stress or testosterone levels. Sperm count, motility and morphologically normal spermatozoa were lower in persons having abnormal HADS. Sperm count correlated positively with total testosterone and negatively with FSH and LH. Abnormal sperm motility and morphology were related to lower testosterone and higher LH and FSH levels. Psychological stress primarily lowers serum total testosterone level with secondary rise in serum LH and FSH levels altering seminal quality. Stress management is warranted for male infertility cases. PMID:24673246

  4. Women in limbo: life course consequences of infertility in a Nigerian community.

    PubMed

    Hollos, Marida; Whitehouse, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    Infertility is a devastating problem around the world, particularly in the high fertility context of sub-Saharan Africa. Regardless of its medical origins, infertility causes African women personal grief and economic deprivation.This research was conducted among the Ijo who are organized into exogamous patrilineal descent groups. Women who marry into a patrilineage are perceived as bearers of sons who will eventually take their place in the lineage's genealogy. Women only figure in the lineage structure as mothers.In addition to extensive ethnographic research in this community, the paper is based on a combination of surveys of 246 women and interviews of 25 fertile and 25 infertile women.Women who have never given birth were characterized as “useless”. Some managed to accumulate wealth or attained education but most feared a marginal old age. Respect was given to women who have had even one child, even if that child died. The biological process of gestation confers an adult status on women allowing them to undergo initiation and to function as mature individuals. In the life course the most prominent periods of suffering are the transition from the stages of ereso (girl) to erera (mature woman), and in the period of old age. PMID:25116234

  5. Perception of control, coping and psychological stress of infertile women undergoing IVF.

    PubMed

    Gourounti, Kleanthi; Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Potamianos, Grigorios; Lykeridou, Katerina; Schmidt, Lone; Vaslamatzis, Grigorios

    2012-06-01

    The study aimed to examine: (i) the association between perception of infertility controllability and coping strategies; and (ii) the association between perception of infertility controllability and coping strategies to psychological distress, applying multivariate statistical techniques to control for the effects of demographic variables. This cross-sectional study included 137 women with fertility problems undergoing IVF in a public hospital. All participants completed questionnaires that measured fertility-related stress, state anxiety, depressive symptomatology, perception of control and coping strategies. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated between all study variables, followed by hierarchical multiple linear regression. Low perception of personal and treatment controllability was associated with frequent use of avoidance coping and high perception of treatment controllability was positively associated with problem-focused coping. Multivariate analysis showed that, when controlling for demographic factors, low perception of personal control and avoidance coping were positively associated with fertility-related stress and state anxiety, and problem-appraisal coping was negatively and significantly associated with fertility-related stress and depressive symptomatology scores. The findings of this study merit the understanding of the role of control perception and coping in psychological stress of infertile women to identify beforehand those women who might be at risk of experiencing high stress and in need of support. PMID:22503340

  6. Sperm DNA Fragmentation and Standard Semen Parameters in Algerian Infertile Male Partners

    PubMed Central

    Boushaba, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To date, standard semen parameters have been the only parameters investigated in sperm samples of infertile men in Algeria. We investigated, for the first time, semen parameters according to sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) in these subjects. Materials and Methods SDF was determined by a validated sperm chromatin dispersion test in 26 infertile men. Patients were split into two groups according to the SDF level estimated by the DNA fragmentation index (DFI): the low fragmentation group (LFG; LFG with DFI ?18%) and high fragmentation group (HFG; HFG with DFI >18%). The standard semen parameters were measured in both groups. Results We found that semen concentration and motility were negatively correlated with DFI (r=-0.65, r=-0.45, respectively; p<0.05), while morphology and semen volume were not correlated with it (r=0.24, r=-0.18, respectively; p>0.05). Comparison of the sperm concentration revealed that it was significantly higher in LFG than in HFG (37.57%±13.16% vs. 7.32%±3.59%, respectively; p<0.05), whereas no significant difference was observed regarding sperm motility and morphology. Conclusions Our findings suggest that SDF correlates well with both sperm motility and concentration but not with morphology. Thus, we conclude that SDF evaluation provides additional information regarding sperm quality, and should be used as a complementary test for assessing semen characteristics in infertile males. PMID:25927056

  7. Correlation between sperm ultrastructure in infertile patients with abnormal sperm morphology and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    He, M; Tan, L

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the correlation between sperm ultrastructure in infertile patients with abnormal sperm morphology and DNA damage. Three unusual sperm morphologies were selected for the experimental group namely case 1 (95% headless sperm), case 2 (98% headless sperm), and case 3 (100% headless sperm), and the control group consisted of 2 subjects (20 and 15% headless sperm). For case 1, the patient was negative for sexually transmitted diseases and had normal semen plasma biochemistry, reproductive hormones, peripheral blood chromosomes, and azoospermia factor (AZF). The aneuploid rate of sperm chromosomes was 0.6%, and DNA damage index of sperm nuclei was 84.4%. The partner of this patient did not get pregnant after artificial reproductive technology assistance. For case 2, the aneuploid rate of sperm chromosomes was 0.8% and DNA damage index of sperm nuclei was 95%. This patient and his spouse did not choose assisted reproduction. For case 3, reproductive hormones, peripheral blood chromosomes and AZF were normal and the aneuploid rate of sperm chromosomes was 0.2%. The wife of this patient gave birth to a healthy baby after ova removal, fertilization and transplantation. For the control group, the aneuploid rate of sperm chromosomes and DNA damage index of sperm nuclei were approximately 0.3 and 30%, respectively. To sum up, sperm ultrastructure of infertile patients suffering from unusual sperm morphology is associated with DNA damage to some extent and can cause infertility. However, pregnancy is still possible through intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:26681047

  8. ‘At the hospital I learnt the truth’: diagnosing male infertility in rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Fiona R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how men's reproductive bodies are problematised in rural northern Malawi as access to biomedically defined diagnoses of the health of men's sperm contribute to the visibility of male infertility. Ethnographic research with infertile and fertile men explored pathways into the sexual health and fertility services offered in district hospitals, men's clinical engagements and masculine imaginaries. The research suggested that men's willingness to be referred for semen analysis is an extension of intensive and persistent help-seeking for childlessness instigated by couples and encouraged by families. Within the laboratory, acceptable social arrangements for semen sample collection are negotiated between male clients and laboratory staff, which emphasise heterosexual and marital virility. Following diagnosis, counselling by clinical officers, without any significant therapeutic interventions, focuses on compassion in marriage. This paper considers: what is the role of semen analysis within public health facilities and why do men participate? How do men experience an infertility diagnosis and what do they and their partners do with this knowledge? In addition, how do these practices shape gendered relationships in families and communities? The analysis builds on Inhorn's (2012) concept of ‘emergent masculinities’ to better understand the connections between male subjectivities, medical technologies and the globalisation of male reproductive health, as they relate to men's lives in rural Malawi. PMID:25175293

  9. Correlation between chromosomal polymorphisms and male infertility in a Northeast Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Li, L L; Peng, D; Wang, R X; Zhu, H B; Wang, W J; Liu, R Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between chromosomal polymorphisms and male infertility. The patients were diagnosed with azoospermia or oligospermiaby a semen analysis. Chromosomal analysis was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from the patients, with standard G-banding and C-banding. Y chromosome microdeletions were detected by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The parents of 35 polymorphic probands were also subjected to chromosomal analysis, and their detailed reproductive histories were surveyed. The frequency of autosomal polymorphisms did not differ significantly among the infertile patients and fertile control individuals. The frequency of the Yqh-variant increased with the decrease in sperm count; this appeared at a significantly higher frequency in the azoospermia group (57.2 vs 24.3 vs 0%). The results of PCR amplification indicated that 32.14% of the patients with Yqh ± had microdeletions in the Y chromosome. The parents of the probands with the same chromosomal polymorphisms as the probands (among the 35 recalled families) did not show any adverse reproductive history. We observed no significant correlations between autosomal polymorphisms and male infertility. However, we observed a significant increase in the frequency of Yqh- in the azoospermic patients. This may be attributed to Y chromosome microdeletions, although the association between Y chromosome microdeletions and Y chromosome variants remains to be elucidated. PMID:26634509

  10. Oral antioxidant treatment partly improves integrity of human sperm DNA in infertile grade I varicocele patients.

    PubMed

    Gual-Frau, Josep; Abad, Carlos; Amengual, María J; Hannaoui, Naim; Checa, Miguel A; Ribas-Maynou, Jordi; Lozano, Iris; Nikolaou, Alexandros; Benet, Jordi; García-Peiró, Agustín; Prats, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Infertile males with varicocele have the highest percentage of sperm cells with damaged DNA, compared to other infertile groups. Antioxidant treatment is known to enhance the integrity of sperm DNA; however, there are no data on the effects in varicocele patients. We thus investigated the potential benefits of antioxidant treatment specifically in grade I varicocele males. Twenty infertile patients with grade I varicocele were given multivitamins (1500 mg L-Carnitine, 60 mg vitamin C, 20 mg coenzyme Q10, 10 mg vitamin E, 200 ?g vitamin B9, 1 ?g vitamin B12, 10 mg zinc, 50 ?g selenium) daily for three months. Semen parameters including total sperm count, concentration, progressive motility, vitality, and morphology were determined before and after treatment. In addition, sperm DNA fragmentation and the amount of highly degraded sperm cells were analyzed by Sperm Chromatin Dispersion. After treatment, patients showed an average relative reduction of 22.1% in sperm DNA fragmentation (p = 0.02) and had 31.3% fewer highly degraded sperm cells (p = 0.07). Total numbers of sperm cells were increased (p = 0.04), but other semen parameters were unaffected. These data suggest that sperm DNA integrity in grade I varicocele patients may be improved by oral antioxidant treatment. PMID:26090928

  11. Genome rearrangements and pervasive meiotic drive cause hybrid infertility in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zanders, Sarah E; Eickbush, Michael T; Yu, Jonathan S; Kang, Ji-Won; Fowler, Kyle R; Smith, Gerald R; Malik, Harmit Singh

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid sterility is one of the earliest postzygotic isolating mechanisms to evolve between two recently diverged species. Here we identify causes underlying hybrid infertility of two recently diverged fission yeast species Schizosaccharomyces pombe and S. kambucha, which mate to form viable hybrid diploids that efficiently complete meiosis, but generate few viable gametes. We find that chromosomal rearrangements and related recombination defects are major but not sole causes of hybrid infertility. At least three distinct meiotic drive alleles, one on each S. kambucha chromosome, independently contribute to hybrid infertility by causing nonrandom spore death. Two of these driving loci are linked by a chromosomal translocation and thus constitute a novel type of paired meiotic drive complex. Our study reveals how quickly multiple barriers to fertility can arise. In addition, it provides further support for models in which genetic conflicts, such as those caused by meiotic drive alleles, can drive speciation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02630.001 PMID:24963140

  12. Current management of tubal infertility: from hysterosalpingography to ultrasonography and surgery

    PubMed Central

    Briceag, I; Costache, A; Purcarea, VL; Cergan, R; Dumitru, M; Briceag, I; Sajin, M; Ispas, AT

    2015-01-01

    Rationale. The development of IVF techniques has diminished the importance of tubal infertility but recent discoveries shed a new light on reproductive tubal surgery prior to any IVF cycle. Objective. To adapt current state of the art recommendations concerning tubal factor infertility to actual possibilities in Romanian healthcare system and to grow the awareness of fellow fertility specialists and general practitioners to the improved outcomes of novel management and treatment modalities. Methods and results. 67 free full text articles centered on the subject of management in tubal infertility were identified in international databases. Four articles described general diagnosis using data from medical history, 21 works approached the diagnosis through hysterosalpingography, 14 papers introduced the use of different sonographic procedures, 8 files analyzed the importance of exploratory laparoscopy and 20 articles reviewed different treatment modalities. Discussions. Current data show that active implementation of the large scale use of tubal surgery prior to any IVF cycle will reduce up to 30% the costs associated with obtaining a viable pregnancy in cases with tubal factor sterility. PMID:25866571

  13. Infertility caused by male partners with genetic defects in Sichuan Province of China.

    PubMed

    Quan, Q; Li, T J; Ding, X P; Wei, J; Li, L X; Fu, L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect chromosomal aberrations and azoospermia factor (AZF) microdeletions in male patients with reproductive problems and to summarize related clinical features to provide reliable information for evaluating prenatal and preimplantation diagnoses. A large cohort of 5083 men with various phenotypes of male infertility was analyzed via G-banding karyotyping, and Origin 8.0 was used to analyze the prevalence of abnormalities. Additionally, patients with azoospermia, oligozoospermia, and oligoasthenozoospermia were analyzed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction to detect microdeletion in the AZF. We identified 387 patients with abnormal karyotypes, and the ratio was 7.61%. Among them were 175 patients with Klinefelter's syndrome, which was the most common numerical chromosomal abnormality and accounted for 45.22% of all chromosomal aberrations. The frequencies of increased satellites, balanced translocations, and Robertsonian translocations were 6.47, 7.00, and 3.62%, respectively. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction performed in 810 cases with azoospermia, oligozoospermia, and oligoasthenozoospermia found a ratio of AZF microdeletions of 4.94%. The finding suggests that chromosomal abnormalities and AZF deletion are main factors that result in male infertility. Detecting these common genetic variations is necessary in infertile men seeking assisted reproductive technology. PMID:24390997

  14. Definitions and the Experience of Fertility Problems: Infertile and Sub-fertile Women, Childless Mothers, and Honorary Mothers in Two Southern Nigerian Communities

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Bruce; Hollos, Marida

    2015-01-01

    Although infertility causes women considerable grief, social stigma, and economic deprivation, scholars have paid little attention to infertility’s definitions that may depart from the standard Western usage and how such definitions influence the way women experience the condition. This article, by listening to individual women’s experiences of infertility in two Nigerian communities, examines these definitions and differentiates between culturally salient categories of infertility. In distinguishing between different kinds of childless women and those with low fertility, we intend to enhance understandings of infertility by considering women’s subjective understandings of the condition and thus moving beyond the current medical definition. By comparing women’s experiences in two different ethnic groups in Nigeria, we show how distinct forms of kinship structures and social organizations shape the ways low fertility is defined, managed, and experienced. PMID:24578250

  15. Effect of smoking on reproductive hormones and semen parameters of infertile Saudi Arabians

    PubMed Central

    Al-Turki, Haifa A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this retrospective study is to look into the effect of smoking on semen and hormonal profile of Saudi Arabians attending infertility clinics. Materials and Methods: Medical record numbers of patients who attended infertility clinics and who underwent full assessment were identified rom Quadramed system and out-patient log books between January 2010 and December 2012. The standard protocol of the patients include full history, age, number of years of marriage personal habits of smoking, alcohol consumption, primary or secondary infertility. Standard laboratory tests which were performed, included, complete blood picture, random blood sugar, testosterone, follicle stimulation hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin level and semen analysis; volume, count, progressive motility and morphology. The data was entered in the database and analyzed. Results: During the study period, 279 patients attended and infertility clinic and only 258 gave the sample for analysis. The average age of patients in the smoking group was 34.23 ± 7.66 and in the nonsmokers 34.07 ± 7.92 years. Primary infertility was more common in smokers versus nonsmokers P < 0.001 confidence interval (CI)< ?44.0705, total serum testosterone level was lower 383.8 ± 239.5 versus 422.5 ± 139.2 ng/dL (0.009 CI< ?9.9415), serum prolactin level was higher 18.68 ± 13.28 versus 12.85 ± 12.34 ng/mL (0.001 CI < 8.3794). The average volume of the semen among the smokers was 2.8 ± 1.35 mL and in nonsmokers it was 3.08 ± 0.76 mL (P < 0.008 CI< ?0.123). The mean progressive motility in smokers was 31.5 ± 23.1 compared to nonsmokers 40.05 ± 25.43% (0.002 CI< ?3.2962) and total sperm count was 119.52 ± 114.12 and 139.71 ± 104.82 million/mL (0.07 CI < 1.4657). Conclusions: This study shows that the effect of smoking is dramatic reduction in the hormonal levels and semen parameters. It is recommended that smoking men undergoing fertility treatment should stop smoking to increase their chances of having offspring. PMID:25657547

  16. MTHFR 677C>T Polymorphism Increases the Male Infertility Risk: A Meta-Analysis Involving 26 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Mancheng; Dong, Wenjing; He, Tingyu; Shi, Zhirong; Huang, Guiying; Ren, Rui; Huang, Sichong; Qiu, Shaopeng; Yuan, Runqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism may be a risk factor for male infertility. However, the epidemiologic studies showed inconsistent results regarding MTHFR polymorphism and the risk of male infertility. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of published case-control studies to re-examine the controversy. Methods Electronic searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were conducted to select eligible literatures for this meta-analysis (updated to June 19, 2014). According to our inclusion criteria and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS), only high quality studies that observed the association between MTHFR polymorphism and male infertility risk were included. Crude odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to assess the strength of association between the MTHFR polymorphism and male infertility risk. Results Twenty-six studies involving 5,575 cases and 5,447 controls were recruited. Overall, MTHFR 677C>T polymorphism showed significant associations with male infertility risk in both fixed effects (CT+TT vs. CC: OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.23–1.46) and random effects models (CT+TT vs. CC: OR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.19–1.62). Further, when stratified by ethnicity, sperm concentration and control sources, the similar results were observed in Asians, Caucasians, Azoo or OAT subgroup and both in population-based and hospital-based controls. Nevertheless, no significant association was only observed in oligo subgroup. Conclusions Our results indicated that the MTHFR polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of male infertility. Further well-designed analytical studies are necessary to confirm our conclusions and evaluate gene-environment interactions with male infertility risk. PMID:25793386

  17. Association of GSTM1 and GSTT1 Genes with the Susceptibility to Male Infertility: Result from a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Hou-Qun; Qi, Yue; Pu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Shuo-Ran

    2013-01-01

    The deletion polymorphisms of the glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) genes were considered as candidates for genetic susceptibility factors of male infertility. Previous studies concerning the relationship between the null genotype of the two genes and male infertility have been reported in recent years. However, the results remain elusive. A meta-analysis was performed to estimate the relationship between the deletion polymorphism of the GSTM1 or GSTT1 gene, and male infertility in this study. Sixteen studies concerning the GSTM1 gene, including 2174 cases and 1861 controls, and 13 case–control studies on the GSTT1 gene with a total number of 1992 cases and 1617 controls were processed. The results showed that the null genotype of the GSTM1 gene was associated with male infertility in the overall populations (P=0.003, OR=1.40, 95%CI=1.12–1.75), especially in Caucasian (P=0.012, OR=1.50, 95%CI=1.09–2.07) as well as Chinese (P=0.001, OR=1.55, 95%CI=1.19–2.03). The null genotype of the GSTT1 gene was strongly related to male infertility only in Chinese (P=0.000, OR=1.70, 95%CI=1.34–2.14). These results indicated that the null genotype of the GSTM1 gene might contribute to the susceptibility of male infertility, whereas the null genotype of the GSTT1 gene may be a genetic susceptibility factor of male infertility for the Chinese. PMID:23631429

  18. Microarray analysis of microRNA expression patterns in the semen of infertile men with semen abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Te; Cheng, Weiwei; Gao, Yongtao; Wang, Hui; Liu, Zhixue

    2012-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in tissue development and the pathology of many diseases, however, the effects and roles of miRNAs in the development of semen abnormalities in infertile males have not yet been investigated. In this study, we analyzed and compared the miRNA expression profiles of abnormal semen from 86 infertile males with normal semen from 86 healthy males using an miRNA microarray. In total, 52 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the abnormal semen of infertile males and the normal semen of healthy males. The differential expression of selected miRNAs was validated by real time qRT-PCR and northern blotting: miR-574-5p, miR-297, miR-122, miR-1275, miR-373, miR-185 and miR-193b were upregulated (fold change>1.5, p<0.001) and miR-100, miR-512-3p, miR-16, miR-19b, miR-23b and miR-26a were downregulated (fold change<0.667, p<0.001) in the semen of infertile males with semen abnormalities. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into specific miRNAs that are associated with semen abnormalities in infertile males. PMID:22735917

  19. Association between Serum Paraoxonase 1 Activities (PONase/AREase) and L55M Polymorphism in Risk of Female Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Motovali-Bashi, Majid; Sedaghat, Saeid; Dehghanian, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Background: The risk of developing female infertility has been associated with gene polymorphisms that decrease the activity of enzymes involved in systemic Oxidative Stress (OS). In this study, PON1 L55M polymorphism for association with susceptibility to infertility was investigated among Iranian female population. Methods: Samples from 120 Iranian females [20 endometriosis; 30 Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCO); 70 controls] were analyzed and PCR-RFLP assay was used to determine the PON1 rs854560 (L55M) frequencies. The paraoxonase (PONase) and arilesterase (AREase) activities of PON1 enzyme were also assessed in order to investigate the association between serum PON1 activities, female infertility, and PON1 L55M polymorphism. Results: The women with a MM genotype (p=0.021; OR=2.55) showed more possibilities of experiencing infertility than those with a LM genotype (p=0.039; OR=1.91). According to LSD test, endometriosis subjects had significantly lower paraoxonase enzyme activity compared to control group (p=0.0024; CI=95%). No significant difference was found in women with PCOS for both PONase and AREase activity in comparison with control group (p=0.469; CI=95%). Furthermore, PON1 activities were the highest in LL genotype followed by LM and then MM genotype (MMinfertility.

  20. Cocaine Use in the Infertile Male Population: A Marker for Conditions Resulting in Subfertility

    PubMed Central

    Samplaski, Mary K.; Bachir, Bassel G.; Lo, Kirk C.; Grober, Ethan D.; Lau, Susan; Jarvi, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We sought to evaluate the incidence and effect of cocaine use in the infertile male population. Materials and Methods Men presenting for fertility evaluation reporting cocaine usage were identified via prospectively collected database. Data were analyzed for usage patterns, reproductive history, associated drug use and medical conditions, hormonal and semen parameters. Results Thirty-eight out of 4,400 (0.9%) men reported cocaine use. Most used cocaine every 3 months or less. Compared with non-cocaine using men, cocaine users reported more recreational drug use (89 vs. 9.2%), marijuana use (78.9 vs. 11.4%), chlamydia (10.5 vs. 3%), herpes (7.9 vs. 2.5%), and tobacco use (55.3 vs. 19.5%). After excluding men with causes for azoospermia, the mean semen parameters for cocaine users were: volume 2.47 ± 1.02 ml; concentration 53.55 ± 84.04 × 106/ml; motility 15.72 ± 12.26%; total motile sperm count 76.67 ± 180.30 × 106. Conclusions Few (< 1%) men in our infertile population reported the use of cocaine, and the frequency of use was low. Given the low use rates and limitations of reporting bias, it is difficult to determine the direct effect of cocaine use on male fertility. However, while infrequent cocaine use seems to have limited impact on semen parameters, men reporting cocaine use represent a different cohort of men than the overall infertile population, with higher rates of concurrent substance abuse, tobacco use and infections, all of which may negatively impact their fertility. Reported cocaine users should be screened for concurrent drug use and infections. PMID:26195962

  1. Congenital Malformations among Babies Born Following Letrozole or Clomiphene for Infertility Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Ghosh, Sanghamitra; Singh, Soma; Chakravarty, Astha; Ganesh, Ashalatha; Rajani, Shweta; Chakravarty, B. N.

    2014-01-01

    Context Clomiphene citrate (CC) is the first line drug for ovulation induction but because of its peripheral antiestrogenic effect, letrozole was introduced as the 2nd line drug. It lacks the peripheral antiestrogenic effect and is associated with similar or even higher pregnancy rates. Since letrozole is a drug for breast cancer, its use for the purpose of ovulation induction became controversial in the light of studies indicating an increased incidence of congenital malformations. Aims To evaluate and compare the incidence of congenital malformations among offsprings of infertile couples who conceived naturally or with clomiphene citrate or letrozole treatment. Settings and Design A retrospective cohort study done at a tertiary infertility centre. Methods and Material A total of 623 children born to infertile women who conceived naturally or following clomiphene citrate or letrozole treatment were included in this study. Subjects were sorted out from medical files of both mother and newborn and follow up study was done based on the information provided by parents through telephonic conversations. Babies with suspected anomaly were called and examined by specialists for the presence of major and minor congenital malformations. Other outcomes like multiple pregnancy rate and birth weight were also studied. Results Overall, congenital malformations, chromosomal abnormalities were found in 5 out of 171 (2.9%) babies in natural conception group and 5 out of 201 babies in the letrozole group (2.5%) and in 10 of 251 babies in the CC group (3.9%). Conclusions There was no significant difference in the overall rate of congenital malformations among children born to mothers who conceived naturally or after letrozole or CC treatment. Key Messages Congenital malformations have been found to be comparable following natural conception, letrozole and clomiphene citrate. Thus, the undue fear against letrozole may be uncalled for. PMID:25272289

  2. Analysis of the correlation between sperm DNA integrity and conventional semen parameters in infertile men

    PubMed Central

    Aydos, Oya Sena; Yükselten, Yunus; Kaplan, Fuat; Sunguro?lu, Asuman; Aydos, Kaan

    2015-01-01

    Objective A male factor is responsible in approximately 30–40% of couples receiving infertility treatment. Routinely, such couples undergo semen analysis including parameters such as sperm count, motility and morphology. Generally, the analysis of sperm DNA damage, shown to have a significant clinical importance by many studies, is recognized as an advanced test that is not included in routine infertility tests. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection method, commonly employed in the current infertility treatment protocols, lowers the fertilization rate, however, fertilization can occur even with a damaged DNA which is known to pose a risk in the subsequent pregnancy period. The relation between sperm morphology and the degree of sperm DNA damage has not yet been understood clearly. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between routine semen analysis and sperm DNA integrity assay, another advanced but costly method. Material and methods The degree of DNA damage was compared with the results of semen analysis, based on the WHO criteria, in 399 male patients who received comet assay for sperm DNA integrity. The statistical correlation analyses were performed with Windows SPPS statistical package program. Results Accordingly, the sperm DNA damage was found to be correlated with all 3 parameters (sperm count, forward motility, and morphology) examined by the semen analysis (p<0.001). Total sperm DNA Damage Count was 226, 216, and 210 arbitrary units in patients with a sperm count <15 mil/mL, forward moving motility <32%, and normal morphology <4%, respectively. The difference with the normal individuals was statistically significant (p<0.001). Conclusion In light of the comet assay results, higher degree of sperm DNA damage is associated with significant impairment of all seminal parameters. PMID:26623148

  3. Comparison of oxidative stress/DNA damage in semen and blood of fertile and infertile men.

    PubMed

    Guz, Jolanta; Gackowski, Daniel; Foksinski, Marek; Rozalski, Rafal; Zarakowska, Ewelina; Siomek, Agnieszka; Szpila, Anna; Kotzbach, Marcin; Kotzbach, Roman; Olinski, Ryszard

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal spermatozoa frequently display typical features of oxidative stress, i.e. excessive level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depleted antioxidant capacity. Moreover, it has been found that a high level of oxidatively damaged DNA is associated with abnormal spermatozoa and male infertility. Therefore, the aim of our study was the comparison of oxidative stress/DNA damage in semen and blood of fertile and infertile men. The broad range of parameters which describe oxidative stress and oxidatively damaged DNA and repair were analyzed in the blood plasma and seminal plasma of groups of fertile and infertile subjects. These parameters include: (i) 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) levels in urine; (ii) 8-oxodG level in DNA isolated from leukocytes and spermatozoa; (iii) antioxidant vitamins (A, C and E) and uric acid. Urinary excretion of 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua and the level of oxidatively damaged DNA in leukocytes as well as the level of antioxidant vitamins were analyzed using HPLC and HPLC/GC/MS methods. The results of our study demonstrate that 8-oxodG level significantly correlated with every parameter which describe sperm quality: sperm count, motility and morphology. Moreover, the data indicate a higher level of 8-oxodG in sperm DNA compared with DNA of surrogate tissue (leukocytes) in infertile men as well as in healthy control group. For the whole study population the median values of 8-oxodG/10(6) dG were respectively 7.85 and 5.87 (p=0.000000002). Since 8-oxodG level in sperm DNA is inversely correlated with urinary excretion rate of 8-oxoGua, which is the product of OGG1 activity, we hypothesize that integrity of spermatozoa DNA may be highly dependent on OGG1 activity. No relationship between the whole body oxidative stress and that of sperm plasma was found, which suggests that the redox status of semen may be rather independent on this characteristic for other tissues. PMID:23874641

  4. Trends in procedures for infertility and caesarean sections: was NICE disinvestment guidance implemented? NICE recommendation reminders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) clinical guidelines and subsequent NICE issued ‘recommendation reminders’ advocate discontinuing two fertility procedures and caesarean sections in women with hepatitis. We assess whether NICE guidance in 2004 and recommendation reminders were associated with a change in the rate of clinical procedures performed. Methods Routine inpatient Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data were extracted from the HES database for 1st April 1998 to 31st March 2010 using OPCS procedure codes for varicocele operations in infertile men, endometrial biopsies in infertile women and caesarean sections in women with hepatitis B or C. We used Joinpoint regression to identify points in time when the trend in procedure rates changed markedly, to identify any influence of the release of NICE guidance. Results Between 1998-2010, planned caesarean sections in women with and without hepatitis B or C increased yearly (annual percentage change (APC) 4.9%, 95% CI 2.1% to 7.7%) in women with hepatitis, compared with women without (APC 4.0% [95% CI 2.7% to 5.3%] up to 2001, APC -0.6% [95% CI -2.8% to 1.8%] up to 2004 and 1.3% [95% CI 0.8% to 1.8%] up to 2010). In infertile women under 40 years of age, endometrial biopsies for investigation of infertility increased, APC 6.0% (95% CI 3.6% to 8.4%) up to 2003, APC 1.5% (95% CI -4.3% to 7.7%) to 2007 followed by APC 12.8% (95% CI 1.0% to 26.0%) to 2010. Varicocele procedures remained relatively static between 1998 and 2010 (APC -0.5%, 95% CI -2.3% to 1.3%). Conclusions There was no decline in use of the three studied procedures, contrary to NICE guidance, and no change in uptake associated with the timing of NICE guidance or recommendation reminders. ‘Do not do’ recommendation reminders may be ineffective at improving clinical practice or achieving disinvestment. PMID:23388377

  5. The Effectiveness of Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy on Sexual Satisfaction and Marital Adjustment of Infertile Couples with Marital Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Ali Akbar; Najafi, Maryam; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Javidi, Nasirudin; Hoseini Kamkar, Elnaz; Mahboubi, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation is to determine the efficacy of emotionally focused couples therapy (EFT-C) on enhancement of marital adjustment in infertile couples. Materials and Methods This was a semi-experimental study with a pre- and post-test design. We selected 30 infertile couples (60 subjects) by purposive sampling. Couples were randomly assigned to two groups, sample and control. Each group consisted of 15 couples who had marital maladjustment and low sexual satisfaction. Couples answered the marital adjustment and sexual satisfaction questionnaires at baseline after which the sample group received 10 sessions of EFT-C. Results Results of pre-test and post-test showed that EFT-C significantly impacted marital adjustment and sexual satisfaction. Conclusion EFT-C had a significant effect on enhancement of satisfaction, cohesion and affectional expression. This approach impacted physical and emotional sexual satisfaction of infertile couples. PMID:26644864

  6. Polymorphisms in Protamine 1 and Protamine 2 predict the risk of male infertility: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weijun; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Wu, Qiuyue; Li, Tianfu; Zhang, Cui; Li, Weiwei; Zhang, Mingchao; Xia, Xinyi

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the association between polymorphisms in protamine 1 and 2 genes and male infertility risk, with inconsistent results to date. This meta-analysis based on the 13 published case-control studies, including 7350 cases and 6167 controls, was performed to further establish the potential association between the 6 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs35576928, rs737008, rs35262993, rs2301365, rs1646022, rs2070923) in protamines 1 and 2 and male infertility. The -190C?>?A (rs2301365) polymorphism was identified as a risk factor for male infertility under all models. Interestingly, rs1646022 and rs737008 polymorphisms exerted protective effects against male sterility in Asian and population-based under some models. No associations between the remaining SNPs and male sterility were observed. PMID:26472740

  7. Treatment of Infertility in Men with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) with the Method of Intrauterine Insemination

    PubMed Central

    Elezaj, Shkelzen; Gashi, Zafer; Zeqiraj, Afrim; Grabanica, Driton; Shllaku, Anton; Gruda, Bujar; Musaj, Vesel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to determine the effect of PTSD on changing the quality of sperm in veterans with PTSD, and the percentage of successful procedures intrauterine insemination (IUI) as a first-line treatment of male infertility patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Patients and methods: The study is designed as a prospective observational study. The study was started from February 2013 until May of 2014. Our study included a total of 51 patients who were treatment for infertility in private Hospital for gynecology, endocrinology and infertility, IVF Center in Peja, and those who were outpatients treated for chronic PTSD in the Polyclinic, Biolab-Zafi, in Klina the Republic of Kosovo. All subjects divide into two groups; The first, consisting of 21 respondents to the participants of the war in Kosovo, which was established diagnosis of PTSD. The second group of 30 who have not lived in Kosovo for the time War, and without signs of PTSD. Results: Subjects with PTSD were somewhat older than the control group (p = 0.235) but it was not a significant difference (44.5 ± 5.6 vs 43.8 ± 2.3). When the question of type of infertility, secondary infertility is significantly higher in patients with PTSD (62% vs 20%). The total number of sperm and semen volume no significant differences between the two groups (p > 0.05). Sperm motility showed a significant reduction in cases of PTSD (p <0.0001), from observation semen parameters were found more abnormal forms of spermatozoa in the ejaculate cases with PSD (p < 0.0001) (Table 2). The percentage of pregnancies IUI procedure was slightly higher in patients with PTSD than the control group without PTSD (19% vs. 16.6%). Conclusion: A combination of analytical oriented psychotherapy techniques and assisted reproductive techniques (ART) such as IUI procedures, increases the chances for healing infertility in patients with PTSD. PMID:26622087

  8. Investigating the Relationships among Stressors, Stress Level, and Mental Symptoms for Infertile Patients: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Liang, Wen-Miin; Yang, Tung-Chuan; Lee, Young-Chang; Wang, Chia-Woei

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients with infertility are a high risk group in depression and anxiety. However, an existing theoretically and empirically validated model of stressors, stress, and mental symptoms specific for infertile patients is still a void. This study aimed to determine the related factors and their relational structures that affect the level of depressive and anxiety symptoms among infertile patients. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 400 infertility outpatients seeking reproduction treatments in three teaching hospitals across Taiwan participated in the structured questionnaire survey in 2011. The hypothesized model comprising 10 latent variables was tested by Structural Equation Modeling using AMOS 17. Results Goodness-of-fit indexes, including ?2/DF = 1.871, PGFI = 0.746, PNFI = 0.764, and others, confirmed the modified model fit the data well. Marital stressor, importance of children, guilt-and-blame, and social stressor showed a direct effect on perceived stress. Instead of being a factor of stress, social support was directly and positively related to self-esteem. Perceived stress and self-esteem were the two major mediators for the relationships between stressors and mental symptoms. Increase in social support and self-esteem led to decrease in mental symptoms among the infertile patients. Conclusions The relational structures were identified and named as the Stressors Stress Symptoms Model, clinically applied to predict anxiety and depression from various stressors. Assessing sources and level of infertility-related stress and implementing culturally-sensitive counseling with an emphasis on positive personal value may assist in preventing the severity of depression and anxiety. PMID:26484531

  9. Biomedical infertility care in sub-Saharan Africa: a social science review of current practices, experiences and view points

    PubMed Central

    Gerrits, T.; Shaw, M.

    2010-01-01

    Some sort of infertility treatments, including the use of advanced reproductive technologies (ARTs), is nowadays provided at several places in sub-Saharan Africa. Yet, to date only a few studies have actually looked into the way these treatments are offered, used and experienced. In this review article the authors present and discuss empirical study findings that give insight into the way biomedical infertility care is provided, considered, experienced and/or used in sub-Saharan African countries. They concentrate on four themes that were often referred to in the reviewed studies and underline the importance of taking into account the local sociocultural context and notions when developing and implementing infertility care, namely: counselling, male involvement, acceptability of ARTs and the use of donor material (semen and embryos). In the conclusion the authors emphasize the importance of preventing infertility as part of integrated reproductive health programs and the need to improve the quality of (low tech) infertility care in the public health sector by means of standardized guidelines, training of health staff and improved counselling. In addition, from a reproductive rights perspective, they support initiatives to introduce low cost ARTs to treat tubal factor related infertility. They also point to potential unintended side effects of the introduction of ARTs and the use of donor material in the sub-Saharan African context, affecting gender inequity and inequity between citizens from different social classes, and argue that such effects should be acknowledged and avoided by all possible means. Finally, they present an agenda for future social science research on this topic in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25013712

  10. HPV-DNA sperm infection and infertility: from a systematic literature review to a possible clinical management proposal.

    PubMed

    Foresta, C; Noventa, M; De Toni, L; Gizzo, S; Garolla, A

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the implications of human papillomavirus (HPV) sperm infection on male fertility, impairment of sperm parameters, and possible alteration of sperm nuclear status and to identify a possible effective management of infertile men with HPV sperm infection. We employed a systematic review and clinical management proposal at the Centers for Reproductive and Health care for treating infertile male patients with HPV infection. Literature search was carried out in electronic databases in the last two decades. We focused our attention on: (i) HPV sperm prevalence (ii) HPV-related alteration of sperm parameters; (iii) molecular mechanisms of HPV semen infection and infertility. The main outcome measures were HPV prevalence in infertile male patients and semen parameters. The prevalence of HPV sperm infection ranges between 2 and 31% in men from general population and between 10 and 35.7% in men affected by unexplained infertility. The presence of HPV in semen is associated with an impairment of sperm motility and the presence of anti-sperm antibodies. The molecular mechanisms underlying impairment of sperm motility apparatus need further evaluations. A greater attention should be applied to assess HPV sperm infection, particularly in men undergoing assisted reproduction techniques cycle for male infertility or sperm banking. It would be useful to perform HPV test and fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis for HPV in semen from these patients both at first admission, to define the possible presence and localization of semen infection, and after 6 months, to assess the possible virus clearance retrieval on normal sperm parameters. PMID:25270519

  11. Treatment of Infertility in Men with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) with the Method of Intrauterine Insemination

    PubMed Central

    Elezaj, Shkelzen; Gashi, Zafer; Zeqiraj, Afrim; Grabanica, Driton; Shllaku, Anton; Gruda, Bujar; Musaj, Vesel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to determine the effect of PTSD on changing the quality of sperm in veterans with PTSD, and the percentage of successful procedures intrauterine insemination (IUI) as a first-line treatment of male infertility patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Patients and methods: The study is designed as a prospective observational study. The study was started from February 2013 until May of 2014. Our study included a total of 51 patients who were treatment for infertility in private Hospital for gynecology, endocrinology and infertility, IVF Center in Peja, and those who were outpatients treated for chronic PTSD in the Polyclinic, Biolab-Zafi, in Klina the Republic of Kosovo. All subjects divide into two groups; The first, consisting of 21 respondents to the participants of the war in Kosovo, which was established diagnosis of PTSD. The second group of 30 who have not lived in Kosovo for the time War, and without signs of PTSD. Results: Subjects with PTSD were somewhat older than the control group (p = 0.235) but it was not a significant difference (44.5 ± 5.6 vs 43.8 ± 2.3). When the question of type of infertility, secondary infertility is significantly higher in patients with PTSD (62% vs 20%) (Table 2). The total number of sperm and semen volume no significant differences between the two groups (p > 0.05). Sperm motility showed a significant reduction in cases of PTSD (p <0.0001), from observation semen parameters were found more abnormal forms of spermatozoa in the ejaculate cases with PTSD (p < 0.0001) (Table 2). The percentage of pregnancies IUI procedure was slightly higher in patients with PTSD than the control group without PTSD (19% vs. 16.6%). Conclusion: A combination of analytical oriented psychotherapy techniques and assisted reproductive techniques (ART) such as IUI procedures, increases the chances for healing infertility in patients with PTSD. PMID:26543314

  12. The Use of In Vitro Fertilization in the Management of Male Infertility: What the Urologist Needs to Know

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Sahar M; Arnett, Daniel M; Meacham, Randall B

    2013-01-01

    Infertility affects approximately 10% to 20% of reproductive-age couples, many of whom may present initially to a urologist. Some couples may be treated medically to increase spontaneous conception rates; however, many will require more aggressive management with in vitro fertilization (IVF) and/or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). IVF involves ovarian stimulation, oocyte retrieval, and fertilization outside of the body; ICSI involves injecting one sperm into the oocyte to promote fertilization. Here we provide a brief overview of IVF and ICSI along with a discussion of the risks involved to facilitate the counseling and care of the infertile couple. PMID:24659912

  13. The use of in vitro fertilization in the management of male infertility: what the urologist needs to know.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Sahar M; Arnett, Daniel M; Meacham, Randall B

    2013-01-01

    Infertility affects approximately 10% to 20% of reproductive-age couples, many of whom may present initially to a urologist. Some couples may be treated medically to increase spontaneous conception rates; however, many will require more aggressive management with in vitro fertilization (IVF) and/or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). IVF involves ovarian stimulation, oocyte retrieval, and fertilization outside of the body; ICSI involves injecting one sperm into the oocyte to promote fertilization. Here we provide a brief overview of IVF and ICSI along with a discussion of the risks involved to facilitate the counseling and care of the infertile couple. PMID:24659912

  14. Diagnostic efficacy of a real time-PCR assay for Chlamydia trachomatis infection in infertile women in north India

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Benu; Rawre, Jyoti; Ghosh, Arnab; Malhotra, Neena; Ahmed, Mir Muneer; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Chaudhry, Rama

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Little is known about the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in Indian women with infertility. To improve the diagnosis of C. trachomatis infection in developing countries, there is an urgent need to establish cost-effective molecular test with high sensitivity and specificity. This study was conducted to determine the diagnostic utility of a real time-PCR assay for detention of C. trachomatis infection in infertile women attending an infertility clinic in north India. The in house real time-PCR assay was also compared with a commercial real-time PCR based detection system. Method: Endocervical swabs, collected from 200 infertile women were tested for C. trachomatis by three different PCR assays viz. in-house real time-PCR targeting the cryptic plasmid using published primers, along with omp1 gene and cryptic plasmid based conventional PCR assays. Specimens were also subjected to direct fluorescence assay (DFA) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) Performance of in-house real time-PCR was compared with that of COBAS Taqman C. trachomatis Test, version 2.0 on all in-house real time-PCR positive sample and 30 consecutive negative samples. Results: C. trachomatis infection was found in 13.5 per cent (27/200) infertile women by in-house real time-PCR, 11.5 per cent (23/200) by cryptic plasmid and/or omp1 gene based conventional PCR, 9 per cent (18/200) by DFA and 6.5 per cent (7/200) by EIA. The in-house real time-PCR exhibited a sensitivity and specificity of 100 per cent, considering COBAS Taqman CT Test as the gold standard. The negative and positive predictive values of the in-house real time-PCR were 100 per cent. The in-house real time-PCR could detect as low as 10 copies of C. trachomatis DNA per reaction. Interpretation & conclusions: In-house real time-PCR targeting the cryptic plasmid of C. trachomatis exhibited an excellent sensitivity and specificity similar to that of COBAS Taqman CT Test, v2.0 for detection of C. trachomatis infection in women attending an infertility clinic. In an effort to prevent Chlamydia infection associated infertility, we recommend screening of women with infertility due to C. trachomatis infection by in-house molecular method as a cost-effective solution in resource limited settings. PMID:25297359

  15. FSHR gene Thr307Ala and Asn680Ser polymorphisms in infertile men: an association study in North China and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, X Q; Xu, S M; Wang, Y Q; Li, Q; Wang, Z Q; Zhang, C L; Shen, Y

    2015-01-01

    Male infertility is a complex multifactorial and polygenic disease, and genetic factors play an important role in its formation and development. Recently, the association between follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene polymorphisms and male infertility risk has attracted widespread attention due to the unique biological functions of FSH. The aim of this study was to further explore the associations between the Thr307Ala and Asn680Ser polymorphisms of the FSHR gene and male infertility. A case-control study of 212 infertile and 164 fertile men from North China was performed. FSHR polymorphism genotypes were obtained through direct DNA sequencing. A meta-analysis was also performed. In the single-site association analysis, no significant associations were identified between FSHR Thr307Ala and Asn680Ser polymorphisms and male infertility (P > 0.05). However, we found that the combined genotypic frequency of Thr/Ala + Asn/Asn was higher in infertile patients than in controls (6.6 vs 1.8%; odds ratio (OR) = 3.795; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.072-13.434, P = 0.027). In the meta-analysis, there was also no evidence of FSHR polymorphism (rs 6165 and rs 6168) association with male infertility (P > 0.05). However, we found that the combined genotypes Thr/Thr + Asn/Asn had an increased risk of male infertility (OR = 1.238; 95%CI: 1.001-1.537, P = 0.049). Our studies further confirmed reports that there were no significant associations between the FSHR Thr307Ala and Asn680Ser polymorphisms and male infertility risk. However, a combined FSHR genotype showed significant association with male infertility. PMID:26125757

  16. Multiplex PCR based screening for micro/partial deletions in the AZF region of Y-chromosome in severe oligozoospermic and azoospermic infertile men in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Motovali-Bashi, Majid; Rezaei, Zahra; Dehghanian, Fariba; Rezaei, Halimeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a health problem which affects about 10-20% of married couples. Male factor infertility is involved approximately 50% of infertile couples. Most of male infertility is regarding to deletions in the male-specific region of the Y chromosome. Objective: In this study, the occurrence of deletions in the AZF region and association between infertility and paternal age were investigated in Iranian men population. Materials and Methods: To assess the occurrence of Y chromosomal microdeletions and partial deletions of the AZF region, 100 infertile men and 100 controls with normal spermatogenesis were analyzed. AZFa, AZFb, AZFc and partial deletions within the AZFc region were analyzed using multiplex PCR method. Finally, the association between paternal age and male infertility was evaluated. Results: No AZFa, AZFb or AZFc deletions were found in the control group. Seven infertile men had deletions as the following: one AZFb, five AZFc, and one AZFab. Partial deletions of AZFc (gr/gr) in 9 of the 100 infertile men (9/100, 9%) and 1 partial AZFc deletions (gr/gr) in the control group (1/100, 1%) were observed. In addition, five b2/b3 deletions in five azoospermic subjects (5/100, 5%) and 2 partial AZFc deletions (b2/b3) in the control group (2/100, 2%) were identified. Moreover, the risk of male infertility was influenced by the paternal age. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested that the frequency of Y chromosome AZF microdeletions increased in subjects with severe spermatogenic failure and gr/gr deletion associated with spermatogenic failure. PMID:26568761

  17. Benzo(A)pyrene (BaP) treatment results in complete infertility in female pigeons

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, J.L.; Darrow, D.; Eaton, J.; Baird, M.B. )

    1991-03-11

    BaP is a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and a common environmental pollutant. Show Racer and White Carneau female pigeons injected weekly with BaP for 3 for 5 months were completely infertile, with ovaries appearing necrotic or oxidized. Fertility in benzo(e)pyrene (BeP, a noncarcinogenic PAH) treated birds was the same as for corn oil treated controls, as was embryo development. Thus, infertility in BaP treated birds appears to be related to its structure-carcinogenic potential. There was no readily apparent affect of BaP treatment on testes from male birds. In order to determine whether BaP metabolites covalently bind to DNA in the ovaries of these birds, pigeons were injected with BaP or BeP, controls were injected with corn oil. Animals were sacrificed 24h later, the ovaries or testes removed, and the DNA isolated and analyzed for PAH-DNA adducts by {sup 32}P-post labeling assay. One major and one minor PAH-DNA adduct was found in ovaries and testes from BaP treated birds. However, no PAH adducts were found in BeP treated or control animals. Thus, problems with fertility may arise because of the alteration in DNA by BaP metabolite binding in ovaries where rapid cell growth occurs during egg production.

  18. Treatment of infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: approach to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Anderson Sanches; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Navarro, Paula Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome represents 80% of anovulatory infertility cases. Treatment initially includes preconception guidelines, such as lifestyle changes (weight loss), folic acid therapy to prevent the risk of fetal neural tube defects and halting the consumption of tobacco and alcohol. The first-line pharmacological treatment for inducing ovulation consists of a clomiphene citrate treatment for timed intercourse. The second-line pharmacological treatment includes the administration of exogenous gonadotropins or laparoscopic ovarian surgery (ovarian drilling). Ovulation induction using clomiphene citrate or gonadotropins is effective with cumulative live birth rates of approximately 70%. Ovarian drilling should be performed when laparoscopy is indicated; this procedure is typically effective in approximately 50% of cases. Finally, a high-complexity reproduction treatment (in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection) is the third-line treatment and is recommended when the previous interventions fail. This option is also the first choice in cases of bilateral tubal occlusion or semen alterations that impair the occurrence of natural pregnancy. Evidence for the routine use of metformin in infertility treatment of anovulatory women with polycystic ovary syndrome is not available. Aromatase inhibitors are promising and longer term studies are necessary to prove their safety. PMID:26602525

  19. Presence of aerobic micro-organisms and their influence on basic semen parameters in infertile men.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, E; Marchlewska, K; Oszukowska, E; Walczak-Jedrzejowska, R; Swierczynska-Cieplucha, A; Kula, K; Slowikowska-Hilczer, J

    2015-09-01

    Urogenital tract infections in males are one of the significant etiological factors in infertility. In this prospective study, 72 patients with abnormal semen parameters or any other symptoms of urogenital tract infection were examined. Semen analysis according to the WHO 2010 manual was performed together with microbial assessment: aerobic bacteria culture, Chlamydia antigen test, Candida culture, Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma-specific culture. In total, 69.4% of semen samples were positive for at least one micro-organism. Ureaplasma sp. was the most common micro-organism found in 33% of semen samples of infertile patients with suspected male genital tract infection. The 2nd most common micro-organisms were Enterococcus faecalis (12.5%) and Escherichia coli (12.5%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (7%), Chlamydia trachomatis (7%) and Candida sp. (5.6%). Generally, bacteria were sensitive to at least one of the antibiotics tested. No statistically significant relationship was observed between the presence of aerobic micro-organisms in semen and basic semen parameters: volume, pH, concentration, total count, motility, vitality and morphology. PMID:25209133

  20. Treatment of infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: approach to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Melo, Anderson Sanches; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Navarro, Paula Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome represents 80% of anovulatory infertility cases. Treatment initially includes preconception guidelines, such as lifestyle changes (weight loss), folic acid therapy to prevent the risk of fetal neural tube defects and halting the consumption of tobacco and alcohol. The first-line pharmacological treatment for inducing ovulation consists of a clomiphene citrate treatment for timed intercourse. The second-line pharmacological treatment includes the administration of exogenous gonadotropins or laparoscopic ovarian surgery (ovarian drilling). Ovulation induction using clomiphene citrate or gonadotropins is effective with cumulative live birth rates of approximately 70%. Ovarian drilling should be performed when laparoscopy is indicated; this procedure is typically effective in approximately 50% of cases. Finally, a high-complexity reproduction treatment (in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection) is the third-line treatment and is recommended when the previous interventions fail. This option is also the first choice in cases of bilateral tubal occlusion or semen alterations that impair the occurrence of natural pregnancy. Evidence for the routine use of metformin in infertility treatment of anovulatory women with polycystic ovary syndrome is not available. Aromatase inhibitors are promising and longer term studies are necessary to prove their safety. PMID:26602525

  1. Knockdown of hypothalamic RFRP3 prevents chronic stress-induced infertility and embryo resorption.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Anna C; Muroy, Sandra E; Zhao, Sheng; Bentley, George E; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Whereas it is well established that chronic stress induces female reproductive dysfunction, whether stress negatively impacts fertility and fecundity when applied prior to mating and pregnancy has not been explored. In this study, we show that stress that concludes 4 days prior to mating results in persistent and marked reproductive dysfunction, with fewer successful copulation events, fewer pregnancies in those that successfully mated, and increased embryo resorption. Chronic stress exposure led to elevated expression of the hypothalamic inhibitory peptide, RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP3), in regularly cycling females. Remarkably, genetic silencing of RFRP3 during stress using an inducible-targeted shRNA completely alleviates stress-induced infertility in female rats, resulting in mating and pregnancy success rates indistinguishable from non-stress controls. We show that chronic stress has long-term effects on pregnancy success, even post-stressor, that are mediated by RFRP3. This points to RFRP3 as a potential clinically relevant single target for stress-induced infertility. PMID:25581095

  2. Deletion of the tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in Sertoli cells causes infertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaopeng; Tang, Zhenzhou; Li, Yang; Liu, Wensheng; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Bingyan; Tian, Yingpu; Zhao, Yinan; Ran, Hao; Liu, Wenjie; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Shuai, Jianwei; Wang, Haibin; Lu, Zhongxian

    2015-01-01

    The male's ability to reproduce is completely dependent on Sertoli cells. However, the mechanisms governing the functional integrity of Sertoli cells have remained largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Shp2 in Sertoli cells results in infertility in mice. In Shp2 knockout mice (SCSKO), a normal population of Sertoli cells was observed, but the blood-testis barrier (BTB) was not formed. Shp2 ablation initiated the untimely and excessive differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) by disturbing the expression of paracrine factors. As a consequence, the process of spermatogenesis was disrupted, and the germ cells were depleted. Furthermore, Shp2 deletion impaired the cell junctions of the primary Sertoli cells and failed to support the clonal formation of SSCs co-cultured with SCSKO Sertoli cells. As expected, Shp2 restoration largely restores the cell junctions of the primary Sertoli cells and the clonal formation of SSCs. To identify the underlying mechanism, we further demonstrated that the absence of Shp2 suppressed Erk phosphorylation, and thus, the expression of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)- and testosterone-induced target genes. These results collectively suggest that Shp2 is a critical signaling protein that is required to maintain Sertoli cell function and could serve as a novel target for male infertility therapies. PMID:26265072

  3. Association of the MTHFR A1298C Variant with Unexplained Severe Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Eloualid, Abdelmajid; Abidi, Omar; Charif, Majida; El houate, Brahim; Benrahma, Houda; Louanjli, Noureddine; Chadli, Elbakkay; Ajjemami, Maria; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken; Rhaissi, Houria; Rouba, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is one of the main regulatory enzymes involved in folate metabolism, DNA synthesis and remethylation reactions. The influence of MTHFR variants on male infertility is not completely understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the distribution of the MTHFR C677T and A1298C variants using PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) in a case group consisting of 344 men with unexplained reduced sperm counts compared to 617 ancestry-matched fertile or normozoospermic controls. The Chi square test was used to analyze the genotype distributions of MTHFR polymorphisms. Our data indicated a lack of association of the C677T variant with infertility. However, the homozygous (C/C) A1298C polymorphism of the MTHFR gene was present at a statistically high significance in severe oligozoospermia group compared with controls (OR?=?3.372, 95% confidence interval CI?=?1.27–8.238; p?=?0.01431). The genotype distribution of the A1298C variants showed significant deviation from the expected Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, suggesting that purifying selection may be acting on the 1298CC genotype. Further studies are necessary to determine the influence of the environment, especially the consumption of diet folate on sperm counts of men with different MTHFR variants. PMID:22457816

  4. A Rare Case of Flare-Up of PID in Infertility Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Leena; Wadhwa, Sanjana N.; Jindal, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Case Presentation. Mrs. X, 35 years old, case of primary infertility, was diagnosed to have genital tuberculosis on the basis of PCR positive and hysterolaparoscopy findings and received category I ATT for 6 months. Following ATT completion, her USG revealed no evidence of tuboovarian mass or hydrosalpinx. Since her tubes were patent, she underwent 3 cycles of ovulation induction and 2 cycles of IUI. The women presented with acute PID, five days after IUI, and was conservatively managed. She again presented 24 days after IUI with persistent low grade fever and abdominal pain. Suspecting relapse of genital tuberculosis, she was started on category II ATT. She had acute episodes of high grade fever with chills 2 weeks after starting ATT and MRI revealed bilateral TO masses suggestive of pyosalpinx. Emergency laparotomy was done, pus was drained, and cyst wall was removed and HPE was suggestive of chronic inflammation with few granulation tissues. ATT was continued for one year and the woman improved. Conclusion. The possibility of flare-up of PID (pelvic inflammatory disease) in treated case of tuberculosis undergoing infertility management should be kept in mind and aggressive management should be done. PMID:26600959

  5. Comparison of hysterosalpingography and transvaginal hydrolaparoscopy in patients with tubal factor infertility: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Fatma; Sad?k, Salih; Güler, Ahmet; T?nar, ?ivekar; Ta?k?n, Ömür

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the usefulness, diagnostic accuracy, and cost-effectiveness of transvaginal hydrolaparoscopy (THL) in infertile women with abnormal hysterosalpingogram (HSG) results without obvious pelvic pathology. Material and methods Thirty infertile women (age: 20–40 years) who had tubal pathology in HSG were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent THL instead of standard laparoscopy. A cost analysis was performed comparing HSG and THL methods. Results In comparison of the HSG of cases by considering the chromopertubation results by THL, the sensitivity and specificity of HSG were 85.1% and 56%, respectively. The reasons for preferring standard laparoscopy rather than THL were: failure in accessing of Douglas (n = 3), insufficient monitoring of pelvis (n = 1), hydrosalpinx (n = 1), and intense peritubal adhesion (n = 1), which were 10%, 3%, 3%, and 3%, respectively. The complication rate was 3.8%. Cost analysis of the procedures showed that the total cost of the THL group was 34.8% lower than the HSG group. Conclusions In the elective patients group, THL is more feasible than HSG. Transvaginal hydrolaparoscopy is effective, simple and safe, avoiding the cost, possible complications, time and postoperative patient discomfort compared to conventional laparoscopy. PMID:25097685

  6. Brokers, consumers and the internet: how North American consumers navigate their infertility journeys.

    PubMed

    Speier, Amy R

    2011-11-01

    North Americans who suffer infertility often reach an end to treatment options at home, whether it is due to a lack of egg donors in Canada or the high cost of treatment in the USA. Patients navigate their way onto the internet, seeking support and other options. As women and couples 'do the research' online, they conduct endless Google searches, come across IVF brokers, join support groups, read blogs and meet others on the road of infertility. This paper considers the journeys that North American patients make to clinics in Moravia, Czech Republic. Along these travels, patients engage with support groups, other patients, IVF brokers and clinic co-ordinators. Since the distance travelled between North America and Europe is extensive, reproductive travels may be arranged by clinical staff, travel brokers and patients. Acting as consumers, North Americans make different 'choices' along their journeys – the use of a broker, if and when they should join online communities, which clinic to visit and where to stay. This study focuses on the question of how patient choices often determine the success of brokers and clinics, thus influencing the structure of cross-border reproductive care in the Czech Republic. PMID:21955489

  7. Infertility, Pregnancy Loss and Adverse Birth Outcomes in Relation to Maternal Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Exposure.

    PubMed

    Meeker, John D; Benedict, Merle D

    2013-02-01

    A substantial proportion of the etiology involved in female infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes remains idiopathic. Recent scientific research has suggested a role for environmental factors in these conditions. Secondhand tobacco smoke (STS) contains a number of known or suspected reproductive toxins, and human exposure to STS is prevalent worldwide. Robust evidence exists for the toxic effects of active smoking on fertility and pregnancy, but studies of passive exposure are much more limited in number. While the association between maternal STS exposure and declined birth weight has been fairly well-documented, only recently have epidemiologic studies begun to provide suggestive evidence for delayed conception, altered menstrual cycling, early pregnancy loss (e.g. spontaneous abortion), preterm delivery, and congenital malformations in relation to STS exposure. There is also new evidence that developmental exposures to tobacco smoke may be associated with reproductive effects in adulthood. To date, most studies have estimated maternal STS exposure through self-report even though exposure biomarkers are less prone to error and recall bias. In addition to utilizing biomarkers of STS exposure, future studies should aim to identify vital windows of STS exposure, important environmental co-exposures, individual susceptibility factors, and specific STS constituents associated with female infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The role of paternal exposures/factors should also be investigated. PMID:23888128

  8. Infertility, Pregnancy Loss and Adverse Birth Outcomes in Relation to Maternal Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, John D.; Benedict, Merle D.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial proportion of the etiology involved in female infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes remains idiopathic. Recent scientific research has suggested a role for environmental factors in these conditions. Secondhand tobacco smoke (STS) contains a number of known or suspected reproductive toxins, and human exposure to STS is prevalent worldwide. Robust evidence exists for the toxic effects of active smoking on fertility and pregnancy, but studies of passive exposure are much more limited in number. While the association between maternal STS exposure and declined birth weight has been fairly well-documented, only recently have epidemiologic studies begun to provide suggestive evidence for delayed conception, altered menstrual cycling, early pregnancy loss (e.g. spontaneous abortion), preterm delivery, and congenital malformations in relation to STS exposure. There is also new evidence that developmental exposures to tobacco smoke may be associated with reproductive effects in adulthood. To date, most studies have estimated maternal STS exposure through self-report even though exposure biomarkers are less prone to error and recall bias. In addition to utilizing biomarkers of STS exposure, future studies should aim to identify vital windows of STS exposure, important environmental co-exposures, individual susceptibility factors, and specific STS constituents associated with female infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The role of paternal exposures/factors should also be investigated. PMID:23888128

  9. German genes and Turkish traits: ethnicity, infertility, and reproductive politics in Germany.

    PubMed

    Vanderlinden, Lisa K

    2009-07-01

    This ethnographic study uses the lens of ethnic difference to examine the experience of infertility and the cultural politics of belonging in modern Germany. The data are derived from participant observation and interviews conducted with forty-one ethnic Germans and thirty-three German Turks undergoing biomedical treatment for infertility at a fertility clinic in Berlin (1998-2000). Through their illness narratives, men and women symbolically link their loss of biological parenthood to losses in other life arenas, such as gender identity, social status and cultural acceptance. Results reveal that while both German Turks and ethnic Germans experience disruption and social suffering from their inability to conform to procreative norms, German Turkish sufferers exhibit higher levels of distress, which directly relates to their dual stigma as outsiders in both German Turkish culture and mainstream German culture. The findings suggest that the tensions surrounding individual reproductive practices are reflective of larger national tensions regarding the constitution of the body politic in an increasingly multicultural Germany. PMID:19520473

  10. Deletion of the tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 in Sertoli cells causes infertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaopeng; Tang, Zhenzhou; Li, Yang; Liu, Wensheng; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Bingyan; Tian, Yingpu; Zhao, Yinan; Ran, Hao; Liu, Wenjie; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Shuai, Jianwei; Wang, Haibin; Lu, Zhongxian

    2015-01-01

    The male’s ability to reproduce is completely dependent on Sertoli cells. However, the mechanisms governing the functional integrity of Sertoli cells have remained largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Shp2 in Sertoli cells results in infertility in mice. In Shp2 knockout mice (SCSKO), a normal population of Sertoli cells was observed, but the blood-testis barrier (BTB) was not formed. Shp2 ablation initiated the untimely and excessive differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) by disturbing the expression of paracrine factors. As a consequence, the process of spermatogenesis was disrupted, and the germ cells were depleted. Furthermore, Shp2 deletion impaired the cell junctions of the primary Sertoli cells and failed to support the clonal formation of SSCs co-cultured with SCSKO Sertoli cells. As expected, Shp2 restoration largely restores the cell junctions of the primary Sertoli cells and the clonal formation of SSCs. To identify the underlying mechanism, we further demonstrated that the absence of Shp2 suppressed Erk phosphorylation, and thus, the expression of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)- and testosterone-induced target genes. These results collectively suggest that Shp2 is a critical signaling protein that is required to maintain Sertoli cell function and could serve as a novel target for male infertility therapies. PMID:26265072

  11. Treating Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Opinions Practice Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal Practice Management Coding Patient Safety Council Health Info Technology Professional Liability Managing Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality ...

  12. Evaluating Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Opinions Practice Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal Practice Management Coding Patient Safety Council Health Info Technology Professional Liability Managing Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality ...

  13. Evaluating Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... discharge, pelvic pain, and disorders that can affect reproduction, such as thyroid disease. If you have a ... partner also will be asked questions about your sexual history: • Methods of birth control • How long you ...

  14. Male Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... delivers the sperm into the woman's body. The male reproductive system makes, stores, and transports sperm. Chemicals in your body called hormones control this. Sperm and male sex hormone (testosterone) are made in the 2 ...

  15. Infertility FAQ's

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prevented or minimized by limiting the number of embryos that are transferred back to the uterus. For example, transfer of a single embryo, rather than multiple embryos, greatly reduces the chances ...

  16. Male Infertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... inside of the scrotum warmer and can reduce sperm production by the testicle on the same side. ... in a man’s reproductive system Certain medicines Low sperm count Sperm that are abnormally shaped or that ...

  17. TEX11 is mutated in infertile men with azoospermia and regulates genome-wide recombination rates in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fang; Silber, Sherman; Leu, N Adrian; Oates, Robert D; Marszalek, Janet D; Skaletsky, Helen; Brown, Laura G; Rozen, Steve; Page, David C; Wang, P Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide recombination is essential for genome stability, evolution, and speciation. Mouse Tex11, an X-linked meiosis-specific gene, promotes meiotic recombination and chromosomal synapsis. Here, we report that TEX11 is mutated in infertile men with non-obstructive azoospermia and that an analogous mutation in the mouse impairs meiosis. Genetic screening of a large cohort of idiopathic infertile men reveals that TEX11 mutations, including frameshift and splicing acceptor site mutations, cause infertility in 1% of azoospermic men. Functional evaluation of three analogous human TEX11 missense mutations in transgenic mouse models identified one mutation (V748A) as a potential infertility allele and found two mutations non-causative. In the mouse model, an intronless autosomal Tex11 transgene functionally substitutes for the X-linked Tex11 gene, providing genetic evidence for the X-to-autosomal retrotransposition evolution phenomenon. Furthermore, we find that TEX11 protein levels modulate genome-wide recombination rates in both sexes. These studies indicate that TEX11 alleles affecting expression level or substituting single amino acids may contribute to variations in recombination rates between sexes and among individuals in humans. PMID:26136358

  18. Development of embryos from natural cycle in-vitro fertilization: impact of medium type and female infertility factors.

    PubMed

    Monks, N J; Turner, K; Hooper, M A; Kumar, A; Verma, S; Lenton, E A

    1993-02-01

    Single embryos derived from natural cycle in-vitro fertilization (IVF) were graded during the pre-transfer culture period using morphological criteria. Most embryos developed well in culture with 96% showing continuing division and 68% showing good morphological appearance, although embryo quality tended to decline with an increased incidence of fragmentation and uneven cleavage as division proceeded. Both the pregnancy rate and the distribution of embryo grades were similar among four different culture media used, suggesting that choice of medium had little impact on outcome. In contrast, there were marked differences in pregnancy rate according to the type of infertility, which was not reflected in a decrease in embryo quality. However, although embryos from patients with tubal infertility implanted and formed viable pregnancies irrespective of morphological appearance, only 'good' quality embryos from patients with non-tubal (or 'unexplained') infertility were able to implant. Thus the appearance of the embryo derived from natural cycle IVF in women with unexplained infertility may be of clinical relevance. PMID:8473432

  19. GENE ARRAYS FOR ELUCIDATING MECHANISTIC DATA FROM MODELS OF MALE INFERTILITY AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURE IN MICE, RATS AND HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene arrays for elucidating mechanistic data from models of male infertility and chemical exposure in mice, rats and humans
    John C. Rockett and David J. Dix
    Gamete and Early Embryo Biology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects ...

  20. The Role of Parenting in Men's Psychosocial Development: A Longitudinal Study of Early Adulthood Infertility and Midlife Generativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snarey, John; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A longitudinal study investigated variations in the coping patterns of 52 married men who experienced infertility problems in their first marriage. Styles of coping considered were initial substitutes, subsequent parenting resolutions, and final marital outcomes and the impact of these variations on the men's subsequent success in achieving…

  1. Quality of life in women with infertility via the FertiQoL and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales.

    PubMed

    Kahyaoglu Sut, Hatice; Balkanli Kaplan, Petek

    2014-09-28

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between quality of life, anxiety, and depression in female patients with infertility. This was a cross-sectional study with 89 women with infertility. Patients completed a questionnaire that included demographic data, the FertiQoL scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The average total FertiQoL score was 66.0?±?14.5. There were negative correlations between the treatment and core FertiQoL scores and the Hospital Anxiety-Depression subscale scores. The attempted conception duration was negatively correlated with the total and core (emotional, mind-body, and social subscales) scores of the FertiQoL. The number of in vitro fertilizations was negatively correlated with the total, core (mind-body subscale), and treatment (tolerability subscale) scores of the FertiQoL. In conclusion, infertility significantly reduces quality of life in women by increasing their anxiety and depression levels. Thus, healthcare professionals should consider quality of life with a holistic approach when examining and treating women with infertility. PMID:25263133

  2. Successful Pregnancy in a Couple with Severe Male Factor Infertility after Selection of Sperm with Cytoplasmic Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Bellish, Jenna; McCulloh, David H.; Ahmad, Khaliq; McGovern, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    We present live births resulting from two separate IVF cycles in a couple in which ICSI was performed with sperm specifically selected for presence of small cytoplasmic droplets. These cycles followed previous cycles using standard sperm selection methods in which very poor embryo development and no pregnancies ensued. The male partner was diagnosed with severe male factor infertility including elevated DNA fragmentation. PMID:26273482

  3. The Effectiveness of Emotionally Focused Therapy on Enhancing Marital Adjustment and Quality of Life among Infertile Couples with Marital Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Maryam; Soleimani, Ali Akbar; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Javidi, Nasirudin; Kamkar, Elnaz Hoseini

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of emotionally fo- cused therapy (EFT-C) on promoting marital adjustment of infertile couples with marital conflicts by improving quality of life. Materials and Methods This is a semi-experimental study with a pre- and post–test design in which 30 infertile couples (60 individuals) were chosen by purposive sampling. Couples were randomly divided into two groups, sample and control, of 15 couples each. Next, couples in the sample population answered questionnaires for marital adjustment, sexual satisfaction and quality of life after which they received 10 sessions of EFT-C. Results Pre- and post-tests showed that EFT-C had a significant effect on marital adjust- ment and quality of life. Conclusion According to the results, EFT-C had a significant, positive effect on en- hancement of marital adjustment. Life quality of infertile couples significantly increased via application of EFT-C. This approach improved the physical, psychological and social relationships of infertile couples and enhanced their social environment. PMID:26246883

  4. Healthy Adolescent Girls’ Perceptions of Cancer-Related Infertility Having cancer doesn’t change wanting a baby: Healthy adolescent girls’ perceptions of cancer-related infertility

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Murphy, Devin; Wang, Hua; Sawczyn, Kelly K.; Knapp, Caprice

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to determine healthy adolescents’ perceptions of cancer and fertility. A secondary goal of the study was to test items related to the development of a health related quality of life tool with healthy controls to determine if the participants shared a common understanding of the items, response options and confirm face and content validity. Methodology Four focus groups of two age groups were held with healthy adolescent females: 12-14 (N=11) and 15-18 (N=14). Results Adolescents in both age groups expressed significant concerns regarding potential infertility from cancer treatment, hereditary transmission and the impact it would have on their future. Differences emerged in language preferences among older adolescents who preferred more open-ended statements. Conclusions Fertility concerns and desires for future motherhood can be accurately assessed using the 10 statements tested, and clinicians should be made aware of the differences between younger and older adolescents to facilitate effective communication. This research suggests adolescents have predetermined expectations for becoming future parents and their concerns about fertility and childbearing are present prior to becoming a patient. PMID:23332480

  5. CAG-repeat variant in the polymerase ? gene and male infertility in the Chinese population: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-Yuan; Zhang, Chang-Jun; Peng, Hai-Ying; Yao, Yu-Feng; Shi, Lei; Chen, Jin-Bao; Lin, Ke-Qin; Yu, Liang; Shi, Li; Huang, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Hao; Chu, Jia-You

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have reported a relationship between the length of the CAG-repeat in the polymerase ? (POLG) gene and male infertility. However, other studies have not reproduced this result. In our study, the POLG-CAG-repeat length was analyzed in 535 healthy individuals from six Chinese Han populations living in different provinces. The frequencies of 10-CAG alleles and genotypes were high (97.38 and 94.13%, respectively), with no significant difference among the six Chinese Han populations. Furthermore, we determined the distribution of the POLG-CAG-repeat in 150 infertile men and 126 fertile men. Our study suggested that the distributions of POLG-CAG-repeat alleles and genotypes were not significantly different between infertile (95.67 and 92.67%, respectively) and fertile men (97.22 and 94.44%, respectively). In a subsequent meta-analysis, combining our data with data from previous studies, a comparison of the CAG-repeat alleles in fertile versus infertile men showed no obvious risk for male infertility associated with any particular allele (pooled odds ratio (OR)=0.94; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60–1.48). The significance level was not attained with any of the following genetic models: homozygote comparison (not 10/not 10 versus 10/10: OR=1.34; 95% CI: 0.66–2.72), heterozygote comparison (10/not 10 versus 10/10: OR=1.04; 95% CI: 0.78–1.38), dominant model comparison (not 10/not 10+10/not 10 versus 10/10: OR=1.08; 95% CI: 0.79–1.47) and recessive genetic comparison (not 10/not 10 versus 10/not 10+10/10: OR=1.31; 95% CI: 0.68–2.55). In conclusion, there is no significant difference of the frequencies of POLG-CAG-repeat variants among six Chinese Han populations, and this polymorphism may not be associated with Chinese male infertility. On the basis of a meta-analysis, there is no obvious association between CAG-repeat variants of the POLG gene and male infertility. PMID:21102476

  6. A Comparison of Pattern of Pregnancy Loss in Women with Infertility Undergoing IVF and Women with Unexplained Recurrent Miscarriages Who Conceive Spontaneously

    PubMed Central

    Tamhankar, Vidya A.; Liu, Beiyu; Yan, Junhao; Li, Tin-Chiu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Women with infertility and recurrent miscarriages may have an overlapping etiology. The aim of this study was to compare the pregnancy loss in pregnancies after IVF treatment with spontaneous pregnancies in women with recurrent miscarriages and to assess differences related to cause of infertility. Methods. The outcome from 1220 IVF pregnancies (Group I) was compared with 611 spontaneous pregnancies (Group II) in women with recurrent miscarriages. Subgroup analysis was performed in Group I based on cause of infertility: tubal factor (392 pregnancies); male factor (610 pregnancies); and unexplained infertility (218 pregnancies). Results. The clinical pregnancy loss rate in Group I (14.3%) was significantly lower than that of Group II (25.8%, p < 0.001) and this was independent of the cause of infertility. However the timing of pregnancy loss was similar between Groups I and II. The clinical pregnancy loss rate in Group I was similar in different causes of infertility. Conclusions. The clinical pregnancy loss rate following IVF treatment is lower than that of women with unexplained recurrent miscarriages who conceived spontaneously. This difference persists whether the infertility is secondary to tubal factors, male factors, or unexplained cause. PMID:26576157

  7. Seminal, ultrasound and psychobiological parameters correlate with metabolic syndrome in male members of infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Lotti, F; Corona, G; Degli Innocenti, S; Filimberti, E; Scognamiglio, V; Vignozzi, L; Forti, G; Maggi, M

    2013-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a diagnostic category which identifies subjects at high risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, erectile dysfunction (ED) and male hypogonadism. However, MetS impact on male infertility has been poorly studied. We systematically evaluated possible associations between MetS and clinical characteristics in men with couple infertility. Out of 367 consecutive subjects, 351 men without genetic abnormalities were studied. MetS was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation&American Heart Association/National Heart,Lung, and Blood Institute classification. All men underwent physical, hormonal, seminal and scrotal ultrasound evaluation. Erectile and ejaculatory functions were assessed by International Index of Erectile Function-15 erectile function domain (IIEF-15-EFD) and Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT), respectively, while psychological symptoms by Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire. Out of 351 patients, 27 (7.7%) fulfilled MetS criteria. Among ultrasound features, in an age-adjusted logistic model, only testis inhomogeneity was significantly associated with increasing MetS factors (HR = 1.36 [1.09-1.70]; p < 0.01). In an age-adjusted model, MetS was associated with a stepwise decline in total testosterone (TT) (B = -1.25 ± 0.33; p < 0.0001), without a concomitant rise in gonadotropins. At univariate analysis, progressive motility and normal morphology were negatively related to the number of MetS components (both p < 0.0001), but when age and TT were introduced in a multivariate model, only sperm morphology retained a significant association (B = -1.418 ± 0.42; p = 0.001). The risk of ED (IIEF-15-EFD score <26) increased as a function of the number of MetS factors, even after adjusting for age and TT (HR = 1.45[1.08-1.95]; p < 0.02). No association between PEDT score and MetS was observed. Finally, after adjusting for age and TT, somatization and depressive symptoms were associated with increasing MetS components (B = 0.66 ± 0.03, p < 0.05; B = 0.69 ± 0.03, p < 0.02; respectively). In conclusion, in men with couple infertility, MetS is associated with hypogonadism, poor sperm morphology, testis ultrasound inhomogeneity, ED, somatization and depression. Recognizing MetS could help patients to improve not only fertility but also sexual and overall health. PMID:23315971

  8. Differential Genes Expression between Fertile and Infertile Spermatozoa Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Sandeep Kumar; Gupta, Nishi; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Rajender, Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background It was believed earlier that spermatozoa have no traces of RNA because of loss of most of the cytoplasm. Recent studies have revealed the presence of about 3000 different kinds of mRNAs in ejaculated spermatozoa. However, the correlation of transcriptome profile with infertility remains obscure. Methods Total RNA from sperm (after exclusion of somatic cells) of 60 men consisting of individuals with known fertility (n=20), idiopathic infertility (normozoospermic patients, n=20), and asthenozoospermia (n=20) was isolated. After RNA quality check on Bioanalyzer, AffymetrixGeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST Array was used for expression profiling, which consisted of >30,000 coding transcripts and >11,000 long intergenic non-coding transcripts. Results Comparison between all three groups revealed that two thousand and eighty one transcripts were differentially expressed. Analysis of these transcripts showed that some transcripts [ribosomal proteins (RPS25, RPS11, RPS13, RPL30, RPL34, RPL27, RPS5), HINT1, HSP90AB1, SRSF9, EIF4G2, ILF2] were up-regulated in the normozoospermic group, but down-regulated in the asthenozoospermic group in comparison to the control group. Some transcripts were specific to the normozoospermic group (up-regulated: CAPNS1, FAM153C, ARF1, CFL1, RPL19, USP22; down-regulated: ZNF90, SMNDC1, c14orf126, HNRNPK), while some were specific to the asthenozoospermic group (up-regulated: RPL24, HNRNPM, RPL4, PRPF8, HTN3, RPL11, RPL28, RPS16, SLC25A3, C2orf24, RHOA, GDI2, NONO, PARK7; down-regulated: HNRNPC, SMARCAD1, RPS24, RPS24, RPS27A, KIFAP3). A number of differentially expressed transcripts in spermatozoa were related to reproduction (n = 58) and development (n= 210). Some of these transcripts were related to heat shock proteins (DNAJB4, DNAJB14), testis specific genes (TCP11, TESK1, TSPYL1, ADAD1), and Y-chromosome genes (DAZ1, TSPYL1). Conclusion A complex RNA population in spermatozoa consisted of coding and non-coding RNAs. A number of transcripts that participate in a host of cellular processes, including reproduction and development were differentially expressed between fertile and infertile individuals. Differences between comparison groups suggest that sperm RNA has strong potential of acting as markers for fertility evaluation. PMID:25973848

  9. Assessment of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of infertile men using sperm karyotyping and multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Moosani, N.; Martin, R.H.

    1994-09-01

    Individuals with male factor infertility resulting from idiopathic oligo-, astheno- or teratozoospermia are frequently offered IVF in an attempt to increase their chances of having a child. A concern remains whether these infertile males have an elevated risk of transmitting chromosomal abnormalities to their offspring. Sperm chromosomal complements from these men were assayed using the human sperm/hamster oocyte fusion system and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on sperm nuclei. For each of 5 infertile patients, 100 sperm karyotypes were analyzed and multicolour FISH analysis was performed on a minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei for each chromosome-specific DNA probe for chromosomes 1 (pUC1.77), 12 (D12Z3), X (XC) and Y (DYZ3). As a group, the infertile patients showed increased frequencies of both numerical ({chi}{sup 2}=17.26, {proportional_to} <0.001) and total abnormalities ({chi}{sup 2}=7.78, {proportional_to} <0.01) relative to control donors when assessed by sperm karyotypes. Analysis of sperm nuclei by FISH indicated a significant increase in the frequency of disomy for chromosome 1 in three of the five patients as compared to control donors ({chi}{sup 2}>8.35, {proportional_to} <0.005). In addition, the frequency of XY disomy was significantly higher in four of the five patients studied by FISH ({chi}{sup 2}>10.58, {proportional_to}<0.005), suggesting that mis-segregation caused by the failure of the XY bivalent to pair may play a role in idiopathic male infertility.

  10. Interactions between Urinary 4-tert-Octylphenol Levels and Metabolism Enzyme Gene Variants on Idiopathic Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Tang, Rong; Chen, Xiaojiao; Du, Guizhen; Lu, Chuncheng; Meeker, John D.; Zhou, Zuomin; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru

    2013-01-01

    Octylphenol (OP) and Trichlorophenol (TCP) act as endocrine disruptors and have effects on male reproductive function. We studied the interactions between 4-tert-Octylphenol (4-t-OP), 4-n- Octylphenol (4-n-OP), 2,3,4-Trichlorophenol (2,3,4-TCP), 2,4,5-Trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP) urinary exposure levels and polymorphisms in selected xenobiotic metabolism enzyme genes among 589 idiopathic male infertile patients and 396 controls in a Han-Chinese population. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was used to measure alkylphenols and chlorophenols in urine. Polymorphisms were genotyped using the SNPstream platform and the Taqman method. Among four phenols that were detected, we found that only exposure to 4-t-OP increased the risk of male infertility (Ptrend?=?1.70×10?7). The strongest interaction was between 4-t-OP and rs4918758 in CYP2C9 (Pinter?=?6.05×10?7). It presented a significant monotonic increase in risk estimates for male infertility with increasing 4-t-OP exposure levels among men with TC/CC genotype (low level compared with non-exposed, odds ratio (OR)?=?2.26, 95% confidence intervals (CI)?=?1.06, 4.83; high level compared with non-exposed, OR?=?9.22, 95% CI?=?2.78, 30.59), but no associations observed among men with TT genotype. We also found interactions between 4-t-OP and rs4986894 in CYP2C19, and between rs1048943 in CYP1A1, on male infertile risk (Pinter?=?8.09×10?7, Pinter?=?3.73×10?4, respectively).We observed notable interactions between 4-t-OP exposure and metabolism enzyme gene polymorphisms on idiopathic infertility in Han-Chinese men. PMID:23555028

  11. Male Infertility Workup Needs Additional Testing of Expressed Prostatic Secretion and/or Post-Massage Urine

    PubMed Central

    Punab, Margus; Kullisaar, Tiiu; Mändar, Reet

    2013-01-01

    The male factor accounts for almost 50% of infertility cases. Inflammation may reduce semen quality via several pathways, including oxidative stress (OxS). As male infertility routinely is assessed using semen analysis only, the possible presence of non-leukocytospermic asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis may be overlooked. We compared local and systemic OxS levels in male partners of infertile couples with different inflammation patterns in their genital tract and/or oligospermia. Subjects (n=143) were grouped according to inflammation in their semen, expressed prostatic secretion (EPS), and/or post-massage urine (post-M). Systemic (8-isoprostanes in urine) and local (diene conjugates and total antioxidant capacity in seminal plasma) OxS was measured The levels of OxS markers were significantly elevated in both severe inflammation groups – leukocytospermic men and subjects whose inflammation was limited only to EPS and/or post-M. Comparison between oligospermic and non-oligospermic men with genital tract inflammation, and oligozoospermic men with or without inflammation in the genital tract indicated that inflammation but not oligospermia status had significant impact on the measured OxS markers. Hence, a high leukocyte count in prostate-specific materials (EPS, post-M), even in absence of clear leukocytopsermia, is an important source of local and systemic OxS that may be associated with male infertility and affect general health. We suggest including the tests for detection of inflammation of the prostate into the workup of infertile men as was suggested in the WHO 1993 recommendation. PMID:24349358

  12. Sleepwalking Into Infertility: The Need for a Public Health Approach Toward Advanced Maternal Age.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Marie-Eve; Ravitsky, Vardit

    2015-11-01

    In Western countries today, a growing number of women delay motherhood until their late 30s and even 40s, as they invest time in pursuing education and career goals before starting a family. This social trend results from greater gender equality and expanded opportunities for women and is influenced by the availability of contraception and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). However, advanced maternal age is associated with increased health risks, including infertility. While individual medical solutions such as ART and elective egg freezing can promote reproductive autonomy, they entail significant risks and limitations. We thus argue that women should be better informed regarding the risks of advanced maternal age and ART, and that these individual solutions need to be supplemented by a public health approach, including policy measures that provide women with the opportunity to start a family earlier in life without sacrificing personal career goals. PMID:26575814

  13. Conventional and color Doppler transvaginal sonography in gynecologic infertility. Current clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, A C; Kepple, D M; Vasquez, J

    1992-07-01

    TVS affords accurate follicular monitoring and guidance for follicular aspiration. The role of TVS in assessing the adequacy of the endometrium is still undergoing investigation. Our studies suggest that there is a statistically significant difference in the pregnancy rate when the endometrium has a multilayered appearance. Infertility patients who successfully achieve pregnancy should be monitored with TVS because of a higher incidence of ectopic pregnancy, anembryonic gestation, and spontaneous abortion. TVS has a secondary role in evaluating certain uterine malformations and tubal disorders. With TV-CDS it is also possible to evaluate physiologic parameters such as adnexal and uterine blood flow. The role of TV-CDS in the anatomic and physiologic evaluation of early pregnancy is now being established. PMID:1631278

  14. The role of gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) in the treatment of oligospermic infertility.

    PubMed

    Matson, P L; Blackledge, D G; Richardson, P A; Turner, S R; Yovich, J M; Yovich, J L

    1987-10-01

    Gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) was used to treat 32 couples where the male partner was oligospermic (less than 12 X 10(6) motile spermatozoa per milliliter of semen). Initially, 100,000 motile spermatozoa were transferred per fallopian tube and no pregnancies were achieved in 11 cases. The technique was then modified so that a maximal number of motile spermatozoa were transferred (range, 0.11 to 0.90 X 10(6) spermatozoa) and 6 of 21 (29%) pregnancies resulted, with 325,000 spermatozoa being the lowest number associated with pregnancy. It appears that the modified GIFT technique, whereby an increased number of motile spermatozoa are replaced with the oocytes, is an effective therapy in the treatment of oligospermic infertility. PMID:3653417

  15. The invention of infertility in the classical Greek world: medicine, divinity, and gender.

    PubMed

    Flemming, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    The article examines the understandings of, and responses to, reproductive failure in the classical Greek world. It discusses explanations and treatments for non-procreation in a range of ancient Greek medical texts, focusing on the writings of the Hippocratic Corpus, which devote considerable energy to matters of fertility and generation, and places them alongside the availability of a divine approach to dealing with reproductive disruption, the possibility of asking various deities, including the specialist healing god Asclepius, for assistance in having children. Though the relations between these options are complex, they combine to produce a rich remedial array for those struggling with childlessness, the possibility that any impediment to procreation can be removed. Classical Greece, rather than the nineteenth century, or even 1978, is thus the time when "infertility," understood as an essentially reversible somatic state, was invented. PMID:24362276

  16. [Disorders of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal system as a cause of infertility in hyperprolactinemia].

    PubMed

    Stepanskaia, N V; Ovsiannikova, T V; Pshenichnikova, T Ia

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe hypothalamopituitary functional status of females with infertility in combination with hyperprolactinemia. To this end, changes in prolactin, LH, FSH and TSH in response to the administration of releasing hormones (Gn--RH and TRH) and the dopamine antagonist metoclopramide were assessed in 28 patients with hyperprolactinemic amenorrhea and 5 normal cycling women. Lactotrophs were found to be resistant to functional tests, the resistance increasing as the prolactin level went up. Gonadotrophic and thyrotrophic response to functional tests, on the contrary, increased with the progress of hyperprolactinemia. A conclusion is drawn that stable hyperprolactinemia is a result of disturbance in lactotrophic receptor apparatus, for which reason lactotrophs are no longer sensitive to dophamine inhibiting effect on prolactin secretion. PMID:1837659

  17. Surgical Management of Endometrial Polyps in Infertile Women: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Nigel; Petrini, Allison C.; Lekovich, Jovana P.; Elias, Rony T.; Spandorfer, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial polyps are benign localized lesions of the endometrium, which are commonly seen in women of reproductive age. Observational studies have suggested a detrimental effect of endometrial polyps on fertility. The natural course of endometrial polyps remains unclear. Expectant management of small and asymptomatic polyps is reasonable in many cases. However, surgical resection of endometrial polyps is recommended in infertile patients prior to treatment in order to increase natural conception or assisted reproductive pregnancy rates. There is mixed evidence regarding the resection of newly diagnosed endometrial polyps during ovarian stimulation to improve the outcomes of fresh in vitro fertilization cycles. Hysteroscopy polypectomy remains the gold standard for surgical treatment. Evidence regarding the cost and efficacy of different methods for hysteroscopic resection of endometrial polyps in the office and outpatient surgical settings has begun to emerge. PMID:26301260

  18. Unilateral ovarian and fallopian tube agenesis in an infertile patient with a normal uterus

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, BINGYA; YANG, CHUNBO; SAHEBALLY, ZAYD; JIN, HANGMEI

    2014-01-01

    Congenital agenesis of the unilateral adnexa is a condition that has rarely been described in the literature. The current study presents the case of a 26-year-old female who was admitted to the Department of Gynecology at the Women’s Hospital of Zhejiang University (Hangzhou, Zhejiang) for primary infertility. The patient was diagnosed with unilateral ovarian and fallopian tubal agenesis, without malformations of the uterus and urinary tract, during diagnostic laparoscopy and hysteroscopy. A literature review was conducted with the aim of determining the possible causes of these anomalies. However, the etiology of the adnexal anomaly remained unclear, although torsion or congenital defects were the most likely explanation. Therefore, the observations of the present study indicate that contralateral tubal pathologies may contribute to sterility. PMID:25120609

  19. [Exploration into rules of combined Chinese and Western medical treatment on immune infertility].

    PubMed

    Yao, Dan-ni; Chen, Wen-yu; Xiao, Ying

    2010-03-01

    In order to explore the rules of combined Chinese and Western medical treatment on immune infertility, the study was carried out by searching relative primary documents from databases and 26 articles (dealing with 5865 cases) were screened out. Excel was used to perform the frequency analysis on the Western drugs and 27 Chinese recipes emerging in the documents separately. It was discovered that the combined use of Chinese and Western medicines has its superiority. Low dose glucocorticoids together with vitamine is the main Western treatment used, and dexamethasone is the most frequently used preparation of glucocorticoids. Among the 72 Chinese drugs presented in the 27 Chinese recipes, 13 appeared for more than 1800 times, they were Angelica sinensis, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Radix Paeoniae Rubra, Radix Astragali, Poria, Carthamus tinctorius, Phellodendron amurense, Scutellaria baicalensis, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Rehmannia glutinosa, Cuscuta chinensis, Radix Paeoniae Alba and Radix Glycyrrhiza. PMID:20535936

  20. Pathophysiology of varicocele in male infertility in the era of assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Koji; Matsuyama, Hideyasu; Takihara, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Varicocele is the most common and treatable cause of male infertility. Studies of a rat experimental left varicocele model and human testicular biopsy samples have shown the involvement of various factors in its pathophysiology. Among them, oxidative stress plays a major role in impairing spermatogenesis and sperm function. Therefore, in addition to palpation, scrotal ultrasonography and color Doppler ultrasound, evaluation of testicular oxidative stress (e.g. scrotal temperature is a surrogate parameter) is recommended to enable diagnosis and suitable treatment of varicocele. Varicocelectomy increases the fertilization, pregnancy and live birth rates, indicating improved sperm function; it is therefore important even in couples undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Routine sperm-function tests are warranted to monitor the sperm quality after varicocelectomy and consequent improvement in the outcomes of assisted reproductive technology. Furthermore, the indications of varicocelectomy in assisted reproductive technology should be widened. PMID:22417329

  1. The "omics" of human male infertility: integrating big data in a systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Carrell, D T; Aston, K I; Oliva, R; Emery, B R; De Jonge, C J

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process in which >2300 genes are temporally and spatially regulated to form a terminally differentiated sperm cell that must maintain the ability to contribute to a totipotent embryo which can successfully differentiate into a healthy individual. This process is dependent on fidelity of the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, and proteome of the spermatogonia, supporting cells, and the resulting sperm cell. Infertility and/or disease risk may increase in the offspring if abnormalities are present. This review highlights the recent advances in our understanding of these processes in light of the "omics revolution". We briefly review each of these areas, as well as highlight areas of future study and needs to advance further. PMID:26661835

  2. Separation-Type Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Chip for Detecting Male Infertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seung-Mo; Ju, Jin-Kyoung; Ahn, Yoomin; Hwang, Seung Young

    2008-06-01

    A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) biochip is presented in this paper. In this PCR chip, the glass substrate integrated with the microheater and microsensor is separable from the reaction chamber where the sample is injected, which now makes repeated reuse of the glass substrate possible. The heat transfer efficiency and target gene amplification of the proposed separable PCR chip was compared with that of the conventional united PCR chip. The results showed that the sex-determining Y chromosome (SRY) gene PCR for detecting male infertility was successfully performed in the separable chip. However, repeated multiplex PCR was successful for only two genes, SPGY1 and SRY, but not for gene SY586. Future work is needed for a multiplex PCR with more than three genes.

  3. SPACA1-deficient male mice are infertile with abnormally shaped sperm heads reminiscent of globozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Inoue, Naokazu; Isotani, Ayako; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru

    2012-10-01

    SPACA1 is a membrane protein that localizes in the equatorial segment of spermatozoa in mammals and is reported to function in sperm-egg fusion. We produced a Spaca1 gene-disrupted mouse line and found that the male mice were infertile. The cause of this sterility was abnormal shaping of the sperm head reminiscent of globozoospermia in humans. Disruption of Spaca1 led to the disappearance of the nuclear plate, a dense lining of the nuclear envelope facing the inner acrosomal membrane. This coincided with the failure of acrosomal expansion during spermiogenesis and resulted in the degeneration and disappearance of the acrosome in mature spermatozoa. Thus, these findings clarify part of the cascade leading to globozoospermia. PMID:22949614

  4. Animal models of physiologic markers of male reproduction: genetically defined infertile mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chubb, C.

    1987-10-01

    The present report focuses on novel animal models of male infertility: genetically defined mice bearing single-gene mutations that induce infertility. The primary goal of the investigations was to identify the reproductive defects in these mutant mice. The phenotypic effects of the gene mutations were deciphered by comparing the mutant mice to their normal siblings. Initially testicular steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis were investigated. The physiologic markers for testicular steroidogenesis were steroid secretion by testes perifused in vitro, seminal vesicle weight, and Leydig cell histology. Spermatogenesis was evaluated by the enumeration of homogenization-resistant sperm/spermatids in testes and by morphometric analyses of germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium. If testicular function appeared normal, the authors investigated the sexual behavior of the mice. The parameters of male sexual behavior that were quantified included mount patency, mount frequency, intromission latency, thrusts per intromission, ejaculation latency, and ejaculation duration. Females of pairs breeding under normal circumstances were monitored for the presence of vaginal plugs and pregnancies. The patency of the ejaculatory process was determined by quantifying sperm in the female reproductive tract after sexual behavior tests. Sperm function was studied by quantitatively determining sperm motility during videomicroscopic observation. Also, the ability of epididymal sperm to function within the uterine environment was analyzed by determining sperm capacity to initiate pregnancy after artificial insemination. Together, the experimental results permitted the grouping of the gene mutations into three general categories. They propose that the same biological markers used in the reported studies can be implemented in the assessment of the impact that environmental toxins may have on male reproduction.

  5. High Resolution X Chromosome-Specific Array-CGH Detects New CNVs in Infertile Males

    PubMed Central

    Krausz, Csilla; Giachini, Claudia; Lo Giacco, Deborah; Daguin, Fabrice; Chianese, Chiara; Ars, Elisabet; Ruiz-Castane, Eduard; Forti, Gianni; Rossi, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Context The role of CNVs in male infertility is poorly defined, and only those linked to the Y chromosome have been the object of extensive research. Although it has been predicted that the X chromosome is also enriched in spermatogenesis genes, no clinically relevant gene mutations have been identified so far. Objectives In order to advance our understanding of the role of X-linked genetic factors in male infertility, we applied high resolution X chromosome specific array-CGH in 199 men with different sperm count followed by the analysis of selected, patient-specific deletions in large groups of cases and normozoospermic controls. Results We identified 73 CNVs, among which 55 are novel, providing the largest collection of X-linked CNVs in relation to spermatogenesis. We found 12 patient-specific deletions with potential clinical implication. Cancer Testis Antigen gene family members were the most frequently affected genes, and represent new genetic targets in relationship with altered spermatogenesis. One of the most relevant findings of our study is the significantly higher global burden of deletions in patients compared to controls due to an excessive rate of deletions/person (0.57 versus 0.21, respectively; p?=?8.785×10?6) and to a higher mean sequence loss/person (11.79 Kb and 8.13 Kb, respectively; p?=?3.435×10?4). Conclusions By the analysis of the X chromosome at the highest resolution available to date, in a large group of subjects with known sperm count we observed a deletion burden in relation to spermatogenic impairment and the lack of highly recurrent deletions on the X chromosome. We identified a number of potentially important patient-specific CNVs and candidate spermatogenesis genes, which represent novel targets for future investigations. PMID:23056185

  6. Microscopic Varicocelectomy Significantly Decreases the Sperm DNA Fragmentation Index in Patients with Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Kadioglu, Teoman Cem; Aliyev, Emin; Celtik, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Background. Varicocele is associated with high levels of DNA damage in spermatozoa due to oxidative stress and elevated levels of sperm DNA fragmentation, which has been currently proposed to be an essential additional diagnostic test to be recommended for patients with clinical varicocele. The aim of this study was to evaluate the parameters of semen and the DNA fragmentation index (DFI) in patients with varicocele before and after varicocelectomy. Methods. The details of 92 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed from January 2010 to December 2012. The sperm samples were evaluated according to the World Health Organization Guidelines. Sperm DNA damage, characterized as DFI, was evaluated by sperm chromatin structure assay using flow cytometry. Results. There was a statistically significant improvement in the semen concentration, the total motile count, the total normal sperm count, and the sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI; the percentage of sperm with denatured DNA) after varicocelectomy. There was a large decrease in DFI from a preoperative mean of 42.6% to a postoperative mean of 20.5% (P < 0.001). A higher preoperative DFI was associated with a larger decrease in postoperative DFI, and significant negative correlations were observed between the DFI and sperm motility (r = ?0.42, P < 0.01). Conclusion. Our data suggest that varicocelectomy can improve multiple semen parameters and sperm DNA damage in infertile men with varicocele. The patients with preoperative defects in those parameters showed greater improvement postoperatively. Further research in this area is needed to understand the exact mechanisms of DNA damage in infertile men with varicocele. PMID:24712000

  7. Clinical Outcomes of In Vitro Fertilization among Chinese Infertile Couples Treated for Syphilis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Xiaomiao; Yuan, Ping; Fang, Tingfeng; Ouyang, Nengyong; Li, Ruiqi; Ou, Songbang; Wang, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    To compare the clinical outcomes of infertile patients with and without syphilis after in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET), in this case-control study, 320 infertile couples were enrolled and divided into syphilis (n = 160) and control groups (n = 160). The primary IVF outcomes were the clinical pregnancy rate and the birth of a healthy baby. All syphilis patients received the standard anti-syphilis treatment before undergoing IVF/ICSI. Our results showed that the endometrial thickness of the syphilis group was greater than that of the control group following hCG injection (16.9±5.4 vs. 13.0±4.7 mm, P<0.001). The numbers of normally fertilized eggs and normally cleaved fertilized eggs and the implantation rate were 6.8±4.8, 6.3±4.7 and 24.2%, respectively, for the syphilis group and 8.3±4.6, 8.1±4.6 and 34.4%, respectively, for the control group, and these values were significantly different between the groups. The clinical pregnancy rate was lower in the syphilis group compared with that in the control group (43.8% vs. 55.6%, P = 0.03). Lower offspring birth weight was observed in the infected male group compared with those in the infected female (2.7±0.4 vs. 3.0±0.4 kg, P = 0.01) and infected couple groups (2.7±0.4 vs. 3.1±0.5 kg, P = 0.007). Therefore, syphilis infection reduces the clinical pregnancy rate after IVF/ICSI. PMID:26208116

  8. Impact of partial DAZ1/2 deletion and partial DAZ3/4 deletion on male infertility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuening; Li, Muyan; Xiao, Feifan; Teng, Ruobing; Zhang, Chengdong; Lan, Aihua; Gu, Kailong; Li, Jiatong; Wang, Di; Li, Hongtao; Jiang, Li; Zeng, Siping; He, Min; Huang, Yi; Guo, Peifen; Zhang, Xinhua; Yang, Xiaoli

    2015-10-15

    This study aims to investigate the effect of the partial DAZ1/2 deletion and partial DAZ3/4 deletion on male infertility through a comprehensive literature search. All case-control studies related to partial DAZ1/2 and DAZ3/4 deletions and male infertility risk were included in our study. Odd ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association and its precision, respectively. Eleven partial DAZ1/2 deletion and nine partial DAZ3/4 deletion studies were included. Partial DAZ1/2 deletion was significantly associated with male infertility risk in the overall analysis (ORs=2.58, 95%CI: 1.60-4.18, I(2)=62.1%). Moreover, in the subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity, partial DAZ1/2 deletion was significantly associated with male infertility risk in the East Asian populations under the random effect model (ORs=2.96, 95%CI: 1.87-4.71, I(2)=51.3%). Meanwhile, the analysis suggested that partial DAZ3/4 deletion was not associated with male infertility risk in East-Asian ethnicity (ORs=1.02, 95%CI: 0.54-1.92, I(2)=71.3%), but not in Non-East Asian under the random effect model (ORs=3.56, 95%CI: 1.13-11.23, I(2)=0.0%,). More interestingly, partial DAZ1/2 deletion was associated with azoospermia (ORs=2.63, 95%CI: 1.19-5.81, I(2)=64.7%) and oligozoospermia (ORs=2.53, 95%CI: 1.40-4.57, I(2)=51.8%), but partial DAZ3/4 deletion was not associated with azoospermia (ORs=0.71, 95%CI: 0.23-2.22, I(2)=71.7%,) and oligozoospermia (ORs=1.21, 95%CI: 0.65-2.24, I(2)=55.5%). In our meta-analysis, partial DAZ1/2 deletion is a risk factor for male infertility and different ethnicities have different influences, whereas partial DAZ3/4 deletion has no effect on fertility but partial DAZ3/4 deletion might have an impact on Non-East Asian male. PMID:26232607

  9. Emotional reaction to diagnosis of infertility in Kuwait and successful clients' perception of nurses' role during treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The unfulfilled desire of millions of infertile couples worldwide to have their own biological children results in emotional distress. This study evaluated the emotional reactions of couples attending a combined infertility clinic in Kuwait and successful clients' perception of nurses. Methods Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. The first phase was by structured interview using two standardized psychological scales: the 25-item Hopkins Symptom Checklist and Modified Fertility Adjustment Scale. Data were collected from 268 couples attending the combined infertility clinic, between October 2002 and September 2007. The second phase was a semi-structured interview of 10 clients who got pregnant following treatment. The interview explored their feelings and perception of the nurses' role. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed. Results The average duration of infertility was 4 years; 65.7% of the women and 76.1% of men suffered from primary infertility. Emotional reactions experienced were: anxiety in women (12.7%) and men (6%), depression in women (5.2%) and men (14.9%) and reduced libido in women (6.7%) and men (29.9%). Also in men, 14.9% experienced premature ejaculation, 5.2% weak ejaculation and 7.9% had impotence although 4.9% were transient. In the semi-structured interviews, the emotions expressed were similar and in addition to anger, feelings of devastation, powerlessness, sense of failure and frustration. In the survey, 12.7% of the men were found to show more anxiety than women (6%). Although all the 10 women interviewed confirmed they were anxious; only 4 of their partners were reported to be sad or anxious. Successful clients' perception of nurses' roles included nurses carrying out basic nursing procedures, communicating, educating about investigative and treatment procedures, providing emotional support by listening, encouraging, reassuring and being empathetic. Conclusions This study illuminates the emotional reactions of infertile clients. Fertility nurses in Kuwait can provide emotional support through communication. The need for additional and continuous training for nurses employed in fertility settings in Kuwait is paramount. PMID:20298604

  10. The Analysis of Sialylation, N-Glycan Branching, and Expression of O-Glycans in Seminal Plasma of Infertile Men

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Ewa M.; Ka?u?a, Anna; Zimmer, Mariusz; Ferens-Sieczkowska, Miros?awa

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates are known to mediate some events involved in successful fertilization. Although some studies on the glycosylation of seminal plasma proteins are available, the total glycan profile was rarely analyzed as a feature influencing fertilization potential. In this work we aimed to compare some glycosylation traits in seminal plasma glycoproteins of fertile and infertile men. The following findings emerge from our studies: (1) in human seminal plasma the presence and alterations of O-linked glycans were observed; (2) the expression of SNA-reactive sialic acid significantly differs between asthenozoospermia and both normozoospermic (fertile and infertile) groups; (3) the expression of PHA-L-reactive highly branched N-glycans was significantly lower in oligozoospermic patients than in both normozoospermic groups. Indication of the appropriate lectins that would enable the possibly precise determination of the glycan profile seems to be a good supplement to mass spectrum analysis. Extension of the lectin panel is useful for the further research. PMID:25892842

  11. The decision-making process for the fate of frozen embryos by Japanese infertile women: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found that the decision-making process for stored unused frozen embryos involves much emotional burden influenced by socio-cultural factors. This study aims to ascertain how Japanese patients make a decision on the fate of their frozen embryos: whether to continue storage discard or donate to research. Methods Ten Japanese women who continued storage, 5 who discarded and 16 who donated to research were recruited from our infertility clinic. Tape-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed for emergent themes. Results A model of patients’ decision-making processes for the fate of frozen embryos was developed, with a common emergent theme, “coming to terms with infertility” resulting in either acceptance or postponing acceptance of their infertility. The model consisted of 5 steps: 1) the embryo-transfer moratorium was sustained, 2) the “Mottainai”- embryo and having another child were considered; 3) cost reasonability was taken into account; 4) partner’s opinion was confirmed to finally decide whether to continue or discontinue storage. Those discontinuing, then contemplated 5): the effect of donation. Great emotional conflict was expressed in the theme, steps 2, 4, and 5. Conclusions Patients’ 5 step decision-making process for the fate of frozen embryos was profoundly affected by various Japanese cultural values and moral standards. At the end of their decision, patients used culturally inherent values and standards to come to terms with their infertility. While there is much philosophical discussion on the moral status of the embryo worldwide, this study, with actual views of patients who own them, will make a significant contribution to empirical ethics from the practical viewpoint. PMID:22607034

  12. A diet containing the soy phytoestrogen genistein causes infertility in female rats partially deficient in UDP glucuronyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Seppen, Jurgen

    2012-11-01

    Soy beans contain genistein, a natural compound that has estrogenic effects because it binds the estrogen receptor with relatively high affinity. Genistein is therefore the most important environmental estrogen in the human diet. Detoxification of genistein is mediated through conjugation by UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1 and 2 (UGT1 and UGT2) isoenzymes. Gunn rats have a genetic deficiency in UGT1 activity, UGT2 activities are not affected. Because our Gunn rats stopped breeding after the animal chow was changed to a type with much higher soy content, we examined the mechanism behind this soy diet induced infertility. Gunn and control rats were fed diets with and without genistein. In these rats, plasma levels of genistein and metabolites, fertility and reproductive parameters were determined. Enzyme assays showed reduced genistein UGT activity in Gunn rats, as compared to wild type rats. Female Gunn rats were completely infertile on a genistein diet, wild type rats were fertile. Genistein diet caused a persistent estrus, lowered serum progesterone and inhibited development of corpora lutea in Gunn rats. Concentrations of total genistein in Gunn and control rat plasma were identical and within the range observed in humans after soy consumption. However, Gunn rat plasma contained 25% unconjugated genistein, compared to 3.6% in control rats. This study shows that, under conditions of reduced glucuronidation, dietary genistein exhibits a strongly increased estrogenic effect. Because polymorphisms that reduce UGT1 expression are prevalent in the human population, these results suggest a cautionary attitude towards the consumption of large amounts of soy or soy supplements. -- Highlights: ? Gunn rats are partially deficient in detoxification by UDP glucuronyltransferases. ? Female Gunn rats are infertile on a soy containing diet. ? Soy contains genistein, a potent phytoestrogen. ? Inefficient glucuronidation of genistein causes female infertility.

  13. Detection of structural and numerical chomosomal abnormalities by ACM-FISH analysis in sperm of oligozoospermic infertility patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, T E; Brinkworth, M H; Hill, F; Sloter, E; Kamischke, A; Marchetti, F; Nieschlag, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2003-11-10

    Modern reproductive technologies are enabling the treatment of infertile men with severe disturbances of spermatogenesis. The possibility of elevated frequencies of genetically and chromosomally defective sperm has become an issue of concern with the increased usage of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), which can enable men with severely impaired sperm production to father children. Several papers have been published about aneuploidy in oligozoospermic patients, but relatively little is known about chromosome structural aberrations in the sperm of these patients. We examined sperm from infertile, oligozoospermic individuals for structural and numerical chromosomal abnormalities using a multicolor ACM FISH assay that utilizes DNA probes specific for three regions of chromosome 1 to detect human sperm that carry numerical chromosomal abnormalities plus two categories of structural aberrations: duplications and deletions of 1pter and 1cen, and chromosomal breaks within the 1cen-1q12 region. There was a significant increase in the average frequencies of sperm with duplications and deletions in the infertility patients compared with the healthy concurrent controls. There was also a significantly elevated level of breaks within the 1cen-1q12 region. There was no evidence for an increase in chromosome-1 disomy, or in diploidy. Our data reveal that oligozoospermia is associated with chromosomal structural abnormalities suggesting that, oligozoospermic men carry a higher burden of transmissible, chromosome damage. The findings raise the possibility of elevated levels of transmissible chromosomal defects following ICSI treatment.

  14. Glutathione-S-transferase-oxidative stress relationship in the internal spermatic vein blood of infertile men with varicocele.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, T; Rashed, L A; Zeidan, A S; Hosni, A

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to assess glutathione-S-transferase (GST) enzyme- oxidative stress (OS) relationship in the internal spermatic vein (ISV) of infertile men associated with varicocele (Vx). Ninety five infertile oligoasthenoteratozoospemic (OAT) men associated with Vx were subjected to history taking, clinical examination and semen analysis. During inguinal varicocelectomy, GST, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were estimated in the blood samples drawn from ISV and median cubital veins. The mean levels of GST, GPx were significantly decreased and the mean level of GPx was significantly increased in the ISV compared with the peripheral blood. The mean level of GST and GPx in the ISV was significantly decreased, and the mean level of MDA was significantly increased in Vx grade III compared with Vx grade II cases. There was nonsignificant difference in the mean level of GST in the ISV in unilateral Vx cases compared with bilateral Vx cases. There was significant positive correlation of GST with sperm count, sperm motility, GPx and significant negative correlation with sperm abnormal forms, MDA. It is concluded that ISV of infertile men associated with Vx has decreased levels of GST compared with peripheral venous circulation that is correlated with both OS and Vx grade. PMID:24472021

  15. High HPV Infection Prevalence in Men from Infertile Couples and Lack of Relationship between Seminal HPV Infection and Sperm Quality

    PubMed Central

    Golob, Barbara; Verdenik, Ivan; Kolbezen Simoniti, Mojca; Vrta?nik Bokal, Eda; Zorn, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the most frequently sexually transmitted viruses and etiological agents of several human cancers. Controversial results of the role of HPV in infertile population on sperm parameters have been published. The aim of this study was to estimate the type-specific prevalence of HPV DNA infection of the external genitalia and semen in 340 Slovenian men from infertile couples and to establish the relationship between seminal HPV DNA infection and abnormal sperm parameters. Self-taken swabs of the entire penile surface and semen samples were collected, and HPV detection and genotyping were performed. HPV DNA was detected in 37.12% of external genitalia and in 13.61% of semen samples with high HPV type concordance of both sampling sites. The most prevalent HPV types in the male external genitalia were HPV-CP6108 and HPV-84. The most prevalent HPV types in semen were HPV-53 and HPV-CP6108. The prevalence of HPV infection between normozoospermic men and men with abnormal sperm parameters did not differ significantly. Sperm quality did not differ significantly between men with seminal HPV infection and uninfected men. In conclusion, the men from infertile couples are equally susceptible to HPV infection regardless of their fertile potential; seminal HPV infection does not impair sperm quality. PMID:24809062

  16. In-vitro fertilization, gamete donation and surrogacy: perceptions of women attending an infertility clinic in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bello, Folasade A; Akinajo, Opeyemi R; Olayemi, Oladapo

    2014-06-01

    Infertility affects 20% of couples in Nigeria. Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) offered in Nigeria include in-vitro fertilization (IVF), gamete donation and surrogacy. This cross-sectional questionnaire study aimed at assessing the acceptability of ART to women seeking infertility treatment at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Of the 307 respondents, 58.3% were aware of IVF and 59.3% would accept it as treatment; 35.2% would accept donor eggs and 24.7% would accept donor sperms-a smaller proportion anticipated acceptability by their husbands. Thirty five percent were aware of surrogacy, 37.8% would accept it as treatment; most preferring a stranger as a surrogate. Most felt surrogates should not be paid. Acceptance of ART was associated with older age, longer duration of infertility, previous failed treatment and women without other children. As chances of successful pregnancy are improved in younger individuals, counselling towards overcome barriers to accepting gamete donation and surrogacy should be instituted early. PMID:25022149

  17. Copy number variation and microdeletions of the Y chromosome linked genes and loci across different categories of Indian infertile males.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anju; Yadav, Sandeep Kumar; Misro, Man Mohan; Ahmad, Jamal; Ali, Sher

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed 34 azoospermic (AZ), 43 oligospermic (OS), and 40 infertile males with normal spermiogram (INS) together with 55 normal fertile males (NFM) from the Indian population. AZ showed more microdeletions in the AZFa and AZFb regions whereas oligospermic ones showed more microdeletions in the AZFc region. Frequency of the AZF partial deletions was higher in males with spermatogenic impairments than in INS. Significantly, SRY, DAZ and BPY2 genes showed copy number variation across different categories of the patients and much reduced copies of the DYZ1 repeat arrays compared to that in normal fertile males. Likewise, INS showed microdeletions, sequence and copy number variation of several Y linked genes and loci. In the context of infertility, STS deletions and copy number variations both were statistically significant (p?=?0.001). Thus, semen samples used during in vitro fertilization (IVF) and assisted reproductive technology (ART) must be assessed for the microdeletions of AZFa, b and c regions in addition to the affected genes reported herein. Present study is envisaged to be useful for DNA based diagnosis of different categories of the infertile males lending support to genetic counseling to the couples aspiring to avail assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:26638807

  18. Copy number variation and microdeletions of the Y chromosome linked genes and loci across different categories of Indian infertile males

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Anju; Yadav, Sandeep Kumar; Misro, Man Mohan; Ahmad, Jamal; Ali, Sher

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed 34 azoospermic (AZ), 43 oligospermic (OS), and 40 infertile males with normal spermiogram (INS) together with 55 normal fertile males (NFM) from the Indian population. AZ showed more microdeletions in the AZFa and AZFb regions whereas oligospermic ones showed more microdeletions in the AZFc region. Frequency of the AZF partial deletions was higher in males with spermatogenic impairments than in INS. Significantly, SRY, DAZ and BPY2 genes showed copy number variation across different categories of the patients and much reduced copies of the DYZ1 repeat arrays compared to that in normal fertile males. Likewise, INS showed microdeletions, sequence and copy number variation of several Y linked genes and loci. In the context of infertility, STS deletions and copy number variations both were statistically significant (p?=?0.001). Thus, semen samples used during in vitro fertilization (IVF) and assisted reproductive technology (ART) must be assessed for the microdeletions of AZFa, b and c regions in addition to the affected genes reported herein. Present study is envisaged to be useful for DNA based diagnosis of different categories of the infertile males lending support to genetic counseling to the couples aspiring to avail assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:26638807

  19. Surgery for endometriosis-associated infertility: do we exaggerate the magnitude of effect?

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, B.; Turki, R.; Lotfy, H.; Ranganathan, S.; Zahed, H.; Freeman, A.R.; Shilbayeh, Z.; Sassy, M.; Shalaby, M.; Malik, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Surgery remains the mainstay in the diagnosis and management of endometriosis. The number of surgeries performed for endometriosis worldwide is ever increasing, however do we have evidence for improvement of infertility after the surgery and do we exaggerate the magnitude of effect of surgery when we counsel our patients? The management of patients who failed the surgery could be by repeat surgery or assisted reproduction. What evidence do we have for patients who fail assisted reproduction and what is their best chance for achieving pregnancy? Material and methods: In this study we reviewed the evidence-based practice pertaining to the outcome of surgery assisted infertility associated with endometriosis. Manuscripts published in PubMed and Science Direct as well as the bibliography cited in these articles were reviewed. Patients with peritoneal endometriosis with mild and severe disease were addressed separately. Patients who failed the primary surgery and managed by repeat or assisted reproduction technology were also evaluated. Patients who failed assisted reproduction and managed by surgery were also studied to determine of the best course of action. Results: In patients with minimal and mild pelvic endometriosis, excision or ablation of the peritoneal endometriosis increases the pregnancy rate. In women with severe endometriosis, controlled trials suggested an improvement of pregnancy rate. In women with ovarian endometrioma 4 cm or larger ovarian cystectomy increases the pregnancy rate, decreases the recurrence rate, but is associated with decrease in ovarian reserve. In patients who have failed the primary surgery, assisted reproduction appears to be significantly more effective than repeat surgery. In patients who failed assisted reproduction, the management remains to be extremely controversial. Surgery in expert hands might result in significant improvement in pregnancy rate. Conclusion: In women with minimal and mild endometriosis, surgical excision or ablation of endometriosis is recommended as first line with doubling the pregnancy rate. In patients with moderate and severe endometriosis surgical excision also is recommended as first line. In patients who failed to conceive spontaneously after surgery, assisted reproduction is more effective than repeat surgery. Following surgery, the ovarian reserve may be reduced as determined by Anti Mullerian Hormone. The antral follicle count is not significantly reduced. In women with large endometriomas > 4 cm the ovarian endometrioma should be removed. In women who have failed assisted reproduction, further management remains controversial in the present time. PMID:26177374

  20. Seipin deficiency increases chromocenter fragmentation and disrupts acrosome formation leading to male infertility

    PubMed Central

    El Zowalaty, A E; Baumann, C; Li, R; Chen, W; De La Fuente, R; Ye, X

    2015-01-01

    The Berardinelli–Seip congenital lipodystrophy type 2 (Bscl2, seipin) gene is involved in adipogenesis. Bscl2?/? males were infertile but had normal mating behavior. Both Bscl2?/? cauda epididymis sperm count and sperm motility were ~20 × less than control. Bscl2?/? seminiferous tubules had relatively normal presence of spermatogonia and spermatocytes but had reduced spermatids and sperm. Spatiotemporal expression analyses in Bscl2+/+ testes demonstrated prominent Bscl2 transcriptional activity in spermatocytes with a plateau reached around postnatal day 28. Seipin protein localization was most abundant in postmeiotic spermatids, suggesting translational repression of Bscl2 mRNA in spermatocytes. In situ end-labeling plus detected increased spermatid apoptosis in Bscl2?/? testis and annexin V detected increased percentage of positive Bscl2?/? round spermatids compared with control. Immunofluorescence of marker proteins synaptonemal complex proteins 3 and 1 (SYCP3 and SYCP1), and H3K9me3 (histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 9) in germ cell spreads detected normal meiotic chromosome pairing and homologous chromosome synapsis in Bscl2?/? spermatocytes, but significantly increased percentages of round spermatids with chromocenter fragmentation and late spermatids and sperm with chromatin vacuoles, indicating defective chromatin condensation in Bscl2?/? spermatids. Bscl2?/? late spermatids were disorganized within the seminiferous epithelium, despite normal appearance of Sertoli cells detected by vimentin immunofluorescence. Peanut agglutinin staining revealed various abnormalities of acrosomes in Bscl2?/? late spermatids, including the absence, irregular-shaped, and fragmented acrosomes, indicating defective acrosome formation in Bscl2?/? late spermatids, which may affect late spermatid orientation in the seminiferous epithelium. Mitotracker strongly stained the midpiece of control sperm but only very weakly labeled the midpiece of Bscl2?/? sperm, indicating defective mitochondrial activity that most likely contributed to reduced Bscl2?/? sperm motility. These data demonstrate novel roles of seipin in spermatid chromatin integrity, acrosome formation, and mitochondrial activity. Increased spermatid apoptosis, increased chromocenter fragmentation, defective chromatin condensation, abnormal acrosome formation, and defective mitochondrial activity contributed to decreased sperm production and defective sperm that resulted in Bscl2?/? male infertility. PMID:26181198

  1. Plants used in Chinese medicine for the treatment of male infertility possess antioxidant and anti-oestrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Helen G; Homa, Sheryl T; Routledge, Edwin J; Garner, Anthony; Zhai, Xiao-Ping; Griffin, Darren K

    2008-01-01

    In this study Chinese herbs commonly used in the treatment of male infertility were investigated for relevant biochemical activity. Male factor infertility predominantly arises via barriers to, or defects in, spermatogenesis. The process of spermatogenesis is under strict endocrine control; in addition oxidative stress has been implicated in male infertility with significant levels of reactive oxygen species detected in 25% of infertile males. A total of 37 individual herbs and seven herb decoctions used in the treatment of male factor infertility were therefore tested for endocrine activity using a recombinant yeast based assay and antioxidant activity using the FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant potential) assay. Individual herbs tested did not show androgenic properties, 20 showed strong and 10 weak anti-oestrogenic activity (per g of dried herb tamoxifen equivalents ranged from 1.18-1280.66 mg and 0.06-0.98 mg, respectively). Oestrogenic responses were elicited for two herbs (85.30-550 microg oestradiol equivalents/g dried herb), with seven and three herbs exhibiting a strong or weak anti-androgenic response (per g of dried herb DHT equivalents ranged from 1.54-66.78 mg and 0.17-0.32 mg), respectively. Of these 37 herbs, strong (15 herbs), intermediate (7 herbs) and weak/no (15 herbs) antioxidant activity was detected (ranging from 0.912-1.26; 0.6-0.88 and 0-0.468 microg ascorbate equivalent/mg dried herb, respectively). The seven decoctions (previously used to treat patients) tested elicited strong (5 herbs) and weak (2 herbs) anti-oestrogenic responses (per g of dried herb tamoxifen equivalents ranged from 1.14-13.23 mg and 0.22-0.26 mg, respectively), but not oestrogenic, androgenic nor anti-androgenic, consistent with their individual composition. With regard to antioxidant activity the following responses were recorded: three strong, three intermediate and one weak (ranging from 1.02-1.2; 0.72-0.76 and 0.44 microg ascorbate equivalent/mg dried herb, respectively). The prospects for introducing Chinese herbal treatments into the Western-based medicine are discussed. PMID:18942026

  2. A Pilot Comparative Study of 26 Biochemical Markers in Seminal Plasma and Serum in Infertile Men

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Rui-Xiang; Lu, Jin-Chun; Zhang, Hong-Ye; Lü, Nian-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The relationships of the biochemical components in seminal plasma and serum, and their origins and physiological effects in male reproductive system have been poorly understood. Methods. Based on the calibration and quality control measures, 26 biochemical markers, in seminal plasma and serum samples from 36 male infertility patients with nonazoospermia were detected and compared. Results. Only PA was undetectable in all seminal plasma samples. There were significant differences of all other 24 biochemical markers in seminal plasma and serum (P < 0.05) except for UA (P = 0.214). There were rich proteins in seminal plasma, and globulin accounted for about 90%. There were also abundant enzymes in seminal plasma, and the activities of ALT, AST, AKP, GGT, LDH, CK, and ?HBDH in seminal plasma were significantly higher than those in serum while ADA was inversely lower. There were relatively low levels of Glu, TG, TC, and hsCRP in seminal plasma, but Glu was undetectable in 8 of 36 cases. Conclusions. The differences of the levels of biochemical markers in seminal plasma and serum might be associated with the selective secretion of testis, epididymis and male accessory glands, and the specific environment needed for sperm metabolism and function maintenance. PMID:26539526

  3. Detection of Infertility-related Neutralizing Antibodies with a Cell-free Microfluidic Method

    PubMed Central

    Eyer, Klaus; Root, Katharina; Verboket, Pascal E.; Dittrich, Petra S.

    2015-01-01

    The unwanted emergence of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against an endogenous or a therapeutic protein can result in deficiency diseases or therapy failure. Here, we developed a cell-free microfluidic method for the sensitive detection and quantification of nAbs in human serum that are associated with infertility. We used cell-derived vesicles containing the luteinizing hormone (LH)/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHHCGR) to detect nAbs against LH. The method exploits the entire cellular signal amplification mechanism, and facilitates the detection of as little as 0.44?nM of LH-nAb (Kd 1.5?nM) in human serum matrix within only 15?minutes. In addition, dose-response curves can be generated in less than 2?hours to evaluate the nAB concentration and dissociation constant. The developed system is devoid of problems associated with cell-based assays and we believe that this simple effect-directed analysis can be used in clinical environments, and is adaptable to other hormones or cytokines and their respective nAbs. PMID:26585778

  4. Preimplantation diagnosis after assisted reproduction techniques for genetically-determined male infertility.

    PubMed

    Gianaroli, L; Magli, M C; Ferraretti, A P; Iammarrone, E

    2000-11-01

    One hundred and thirty-six cycles with a poor prognosis for full-term pregnancy underwent preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of aneuploidy. The mean maternal age was 31.8 +/- 2.5 years. Only patients younger than 36 years were included in the study with the aim of evaluating whether sperm indices have an effect on the chromosomal constitution of preimplantation embryos. No differences were detected in the percentage of aneuploid embryos; however a higher incidence of monosomies and trisomies was found in MESA-TESE embryos compared to the group of normospermic patients. In addition, an increase in the proportion of gonosomal aneuploidy seemed to be associated with the severity of the male factor parameters. The rate of de-novo chromosomal abnormalities in embryos from patients with a normal karyotype suggested an increased frequency proportional to the severity of the male factor condition, the proportion of monosomic and trisomic embryos, and the percentage of gonosomal aneuploidy increased accordingly. In the case of couples with a male altered karyotype, comparable frequency of chromosomally abnormal embryos, and monosomy and trisomy were observed irrespective of semen indices, gonosomal aneuploidy was only observed in one case where the patient had a karyotype with gonosomal mosaicism. These data confirm that the severe male infertility condition determines an increase in the rate of de-novo abnormalities, as anticipate by the follow-up of the children born after ICSI. PMID:11097437

  5. Training in reproductive endocrinology and infertility and assisted reproductive technologies: options and worldwide needs.

    PubMed

    de Ziegler, Dominique; de Ziegler, Nathalie; Sean, Sokteang; Bajouh, Osama; Meldrum, David R

    2015-07-01

    Standardized, high-quality training in reproductive endocrinology, infertility, and assisted reproductive technologies (REI-ART) faces challenges owing to the high-tech nature of ART and the important country-to-country differences in clinical practice and regulations overseeing training. Moreover, while the training capacity of the classical by-fellowship training platforms is shrinking, an increasing demand for REI-ART specialists is coming from emerging countries. To meet this expanding need for REI-ART specialists, we propose a novel by-network model linking a reference training center to satellite practical training sites. Simulation should be used more extensively to achieve competency before initiating live clinical experience, analogous to the highly effective training systems that have been used in aviation for decades. Large ART databases that exist because of obligations to report ART activity and results constitute unique yet so far untapped sources for developing by-scenario simulation training models. Online training materials incorporating these state-of-the-art information technology tools could be developed as a means of fulfilling training needs worldwide. PMID:25999260

  6. Molecular analysis of mutations and polymorphisms in the CFTR gene in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Tamburino, L; Guglielmino, A; Venti, E; Chamayou, S

    2008-07-01

    Mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene and polymorphisms, such as the (TG)m and Tn polymorphic loci in intron 8 at the splice acceptor site of exon 9, can cause male infertility. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of the most prevalent cystic-fibrosis-causing mutations, the IVS8-Tn alleles and IVS8-TG12 variant in the presence of IVS8-5T in patients with altered semen parameters (group I with obstructive azoospermia, group II with secretory azoospermia and group III with severe oligozoospermia) compared with a control group with normozoospermia. CFTR mutations were found in 26.5% and 14.3% of chromosomes of patients of group I and II respectively (P < 0.001, P < 0.05). The frequency of the 5T allele was 23.5% in patients in group I (P < 0.01), and was linked exclusively with TG12 allele. The present study reports for the first time a high proportion of the 5T allele in patients in group III (9.2%, P < 0.05). These results underline the importance of performing molecular analysis of mutations and IVS8-Tn polymorphism in the CFTR gene and appropriate genetic counselling to all couples undergoing assisted reproductive technologies when the partner has azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia. PMID:18616886

  7. Two-stage hierarchical group testing for multiple infections with application to the Infertility Prevention Project

    PubMed Central

    Tebbs, Joshua M.; McMahan, Christopher S.; Bilder, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Screening for sexually transmitted diseases has benefited greatly from the use of group testing (pooled testing) to lower costs. With the development of assays that detect multiple infections, screening practices now involve testing pools of individuals for multiple infections simultaneously. Building on the research for single infection group testing procedures, we examine the performance of group testing for multiple infections. Our work is motivated by chlamydia and gonorrhea testing for the Infertility Prevention Project (IPP), a national program in the United States. We consider a two-stage pooling algorithm currently used to perform testing for the IPP. We first derive the operating characteristics of this algorithm for classification purposes (e.g., expected number of tests, misclassification probabilities, etc.) and identify pool sizes that minimize the expected number of tests. We then develop an expectation-maximization algorithm to estimate probabilities of infection using both group and individual retest responses. Our research shows that group testing can offer large cost savings when classifying individuals for multiple infections and can provide prevalence estimates that are actually more efficient than those from individual testing. PMID:24117173

  8. Two-stage hierarchical group testing for multiple infections with application to the infertility prevention project.

    PubMed

    Tebbs, Joshua M; McMahan, Christopher S; Bilder, Christopher R

    2013-12-01

    Screening for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) has benefited greatly from the use of group testing (pooled testing) to lower costs. With the development of assays that detect multiple infections, screening practices now involve testing pools of individuals for multiple infections simultaneously. Building on the research for single infection group testing procedures, we examine the performance of group testing for multiple infections. Our work is motivated by chlamydia and gonorrhea testing for the infertility prevention project (IPP), a national program in the United States. We consider a two-stage pooling algorithm currently used to perform testing for the IPP. We first derive the operating characteristics of this algorithm for classification purposes (e.g., expected number of tests, misclassification probabilities, etc.) and identify pool sizes that minimize the expected number of tests. We then develop an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to estimate probabilities of infection using both group and individual retest responses. Our research shows that group testing can offer large cost savings when classifying individuals for multiple infections and can provide prevalence estimates that are actually more efficient than those from individual testing. PMID:24117173

  9. Relation between male obesity and male infertility in a Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Hadjkacem Loukil, L; Hadjkacem, H; Bahloul, A; Ayadi, H

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is associated with significant disturbance in the hormonal milieu that can affect the reproductive system. Male infertility affects approximately 6% of reproductive-aged men. It has been suggested that overweight men or men with obese body mass index (BMI) experience prolonged time to pregnancy, although the influence of male BMI on fertility remains understudied. We hypothesised that BMI is inversely correlated with fertility, manifested by reduced sperm concentration and varicocele. Males of mean age 32.74 ± 6.96 years with semen analyses and self-reported BMI were included (n = 98). Patient parameters analysed included age, BMI, pubertal timing, the development of varicocele, and leutinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone (n = 18). The mean age of the study population was 32.74 ± 6.96 years. The incidence of azospermia, oligozoospermia, normospermia and the development of varicocele did not vary across BMI categories. Male obesity is not associated with the incidence of sperm concentration and the development of varicocele. PMID:24720635

  10. Endometriosis-Related Infertility: The Role of the Assisted Reproductive Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Surrey, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    The assisted reproductive technologies, particularly in vitro fertilization (IVF), represent the most efficient and successful means of overcoming infertility associated with endometriosis. Although older studies suggest that IVF outcomes are compromised in endometriosis patients, more contemporary reports show no differences compared to controls. The exception may be evidence of poorer outcomes and diminished ovarian response in women with advanced disease, particularly those with significant ovarian involvement or prior ovarian surgery. Prolonged pre-IVF cycle suppressive medical therapy, particularly gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists, appears to improve success rates in a subset of endometriosis patients. However, as of yet, there is no diagnostic marker to specifically identify those who would most benefit from this approach. Pre-IVF cycle surgical resection of nonovarian disease has not been consistently shown to improve outcomes with the possible exception of resection of deeply invasive disease, although the data is limited. Precycle resection of ovarian endometriomas does not have benefit and should only be performed for gynecologic indications. Indeed, there is a large body of evidence to suggest that this procedure may have a deleterious impact on ovarian reserve and response. A dearth of appropriately designed trials makes development of definitive treatment paradigms challenging. PMID:26240824

  11. Review on mechanisms of dairy summer infertility and implications for hormonal intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wakayo, B.U.; Brar, P.S.; Prabhakar, S.

    2015-01-01

    In dairy cows and buffaloes, summer heat stress (HS) reduces milk yield and delays return to pregnancy leading to financial loss. Clues for effective interventions against summer infertility (SI) lie in understanding the underlying mechanisms. This article reviews current knowledge on the mechanisms of bovine SI and their implication for hormonal management. Under HS dairy animals encounter anestrous, silent cycles and repeat breeding which extend their open period. These effects are attributed mainly to HS induced disturbances in luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, follicular dominance and estrogen secretion, ovulation and oocyte competence, luteal development and progesterone secretion, utero-placental function and embryo-fetal development. Hormonal timed artificial insemination protocols and LH support around estrous improved summer pregnancy rates by avoiding need for estrus detection, assisting follicular development and ovulation, enhancing quality oocytes and stimulating luteal function. Progesterone supplementation to enhance embryonic development did not produce significant improvement in summer pregnancy rates. There is need for evaluating integrated approaches combining hormones, metabolic modifier and cyto-protective agents. PMID:26623355

  12. Detection of Infertility-related Neutralizing Antibodies with a Cell-free Microfluidic Method.

    PubMed

    Eyer, Klaus; Root, Katharina; Verboket, Pascal E; Dittrich, Petra S

    2015-01-01

    The unwanted emergence of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against an endogenous or a therapeutic protein can result in deficiency diseases or therapy failure. Here, we developed a cell-free microfluidic method for the sensitive detection and quantification of nAbs in human serum that are associated with infertility. We used cell-derived vesicles containing the luteinizing hormone (LH)/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHHCGR) to detect nAbs against LH. The method exploits the entire cellular signal amplification mechanism, and facilitates the detection of as little as 0.44?nM of LH-nAb (Kd 1.5?nM) in human serum matrix within only 15?minutes. In addition, dose-response curves can be generated in less than 2?hours to evaluate the nAB concentration and dissociation constant. The developed system is devoid of problems associated with cell-based assays and we believe that this simple effect-directed analysis can be used in clinical environments, and is adaptable to other hormones or cytokines and their respective nAbs. PMID:26585778

  13. Aseptic vitrification of blastocysts from infertile patients, egg donors and after IVM.

    PubMed

    Vanderzwalmen, P; Ectors, F; Grobet, L; Prapas, Y; Panagiotidis, Y; Vanderzwalmen, S; Stecher, A; Frias, P; Liebermann, J; Zech, N H

    2009-11-01

    During embryo vitrification, it is advisable that cooling and storage should occur in a carrier device in which there is complete separation of the embryos from liquid nitrogen to ensure asepsis. The consequence of a reduction in the cooling rate resulting from the heat-insulating barrier aseptic devices has to be counteracted by gradually increasing intracellular concentrations of cryoprotectants without inducing a toxic effect. Blastocysts originating from couples with male and/or female factor infertility (group 1) or from oocyte donors (group 2) or from in-vitro matured oocytes (group 3) were gradually exposed to increasing concentrations of dimethylsulphoxide/ethylene glycol (5/5%, 10/10% and 20/20%) before aseptic vitrification using a specially designed carrier (VitriSafe), a modification of the open hemi-straw plug device. A total of 120 aseptic vitrification/warming cycles were performed in group 1, 91 in group 2 and 22 in group 3. Survival rates before embryo transfer, ongoing pregnancy and implantation rates were as follows: for group 1, 73, 43 and 26%; for group 2, 88, 53 and 34%; and for group 3, 69, 50 and 38%, respectively. In spite of reduced cooling rates due to aseptic vitrification conditions, a three-step exposure to cryoprotectant solutions protects the embryos effectively from cryo-injuries and guaranties high survival rates. PMID:20021718

  14. Ovarian stem cells--potential roles in infertility treatment and fertility preservation.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Cheryl E; Telfer, Evelyn E; Anderson, Richard A

    2013-11-01

    One of the principal beliefs in reproductive biology is that women have a finite ovarian reserve, which is fixed from the time they are born. This theory has been questioned recently by the discovery of ovarian stem cells which are purported to have the ability to form new oocytes under specific conditions post-natally. Almost a decade after their discovery, ovarian, or oogonial, stem cells (OSCs) have been isolated in mice and humans but remain the subject of much debate. Studies in mice have shown that these cells can be cultured to a mature oocyte stage in vitro, and when injected into germ-cell depleted ovary they can form follicles and have resulted in the birth of healthy offspring. There are few data from human OSCs but this finding would open the door to novel fertility preservation strategies for women with both age-related and premature ovarian insufficiency (POI). As the number of girls and young women surviving cancer increases worldwide, POI secondary to gonadotoxic treatments, such as chemotherapy, is becoming more common. The ideal fertility preservation approach would prevent delays in commencing life-saving treatment and avoid transplanting malignant cells back into a woman after treatment: OSCs may offer one route to achieving this. This review summarises our current understanding of OSCs and discusses their potential clinical application in infertility treatment and fertility preservation. PMID:23693139

  15. Impact of microwave at X-band in the aetiology of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Behari, J; Sisodia, Rashmi

    2012-09-01

    Reports of declining male fertility have renewed interest in assessing the role of environmental and occupational exposures to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in the aetiology of human infertility. Testicular functions are particularly susceptible to electromagnetic fields. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of 10-GHz EMF on male albino rat's reproductive system and to investigate the possible causative factor for such effect of exposure. The study was carried out in two groups of 70-day old adult male albino rats: a sham-exposed and a 10-GHz-exposed group (2 h a day for 45 days). Immediately after completion of the exposure, animals were sacrificed and sperms were extracted from the cauda and caput part of testis for the analysis of MDA, melatonin, and creatine kinase. Creatine kinase results revealed an increased level of phosphorylation that converts creatine to creatine phosphate in sperms after EMF exposure. EMF exposure also reduced the level of melatonin and MDA. It is concluded that microwave exposure could adversely affect male fertility by reducing availability of the above parameters. These results are indications of deleterious effects of these radiations on reproductive pattern of male rats. PMID:22897403

  16. Neutrophil NETs in reproduction: from infertility to preeclampsia and the possibility of fetal loss

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Sinuhe; Giaglis, Stavros; Hoesli, Irene; Hasler, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The intention of this review is to provide an overview of the potential role of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in mammalian reproduction. Neutrophil NETs appear to be involved in various stages of the reproductive cycle, starting with fertility and possibly ending with fetal loss. The first suggestion that NETs may play a role in pregnancy-related disorders was in preeclampsia, where vast numbers were detected in the intervillous space of affected placentae. The induction of NETosis involved an auto-inflammatory component, mediated by the increased release of placental micro-debris in preeclampsia. This report was the first indicating that NETs may be associated with a human pathology not involving infection. Subsequently, NETs have since then been implicated in bovine or equine infertility, in that semen may become entrapped in the female reproductive tract during their passage to the oocyte. In this instance interesting species-specific differences are apparent, in that equine sperm evade entrapment via expression of a DNAse-like molecule, whereas highly motile bovine sperm, once free from seminal plasma (SP) that promotes interaction with neutrophils, appear impervious to NETs entrapment. Although still in the realm of speculation it is plausible that NETs may be involved in recurrent fetal loss mediated by anti-phospholipid antibodies, or perhaps even in fetal abortion triggered by infections with microorganisms such as L. monocytogenes or B. abortus. PMID:23205021

  17. Novel aspects of human infertility: the role of the male factor.

    PubMed

    Havrylyuk, Anna; Chopyak, Valentina; Nakonechnyyj, Andrij; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    In the article new aspects of the 'male factor' and its role in early stages of pregnancy are described. Among others, genetic and immunogenetic (KIR/KAR, HLA) factors are underlined as well as immunological ones (e.g. microchimerism). A significant part of this review is dedicated to infectious agents and semen inflammation as well as to the TORCH syndrome and chlamydiosis, concentrating on the male part, in which there are a lot of unclarified consequences. The problem of somatic diseases and general homeostasis of the male and its influence on pregnancy with particular emphasis on previous cryptorchidism is also discussed. The role of sperm DNA integrity in the fertilization process as well as genetic polymorphisms on the male side is emphasised. Particularly, molecular aspects of HLA-G and HLA-C in developmental biology are raised. There is a discussion of the individual approach to assisted reproductive techniques, which cannot be treated as a panacea for infertility treatment, particularly considering early stages of embryonal and fetal development. PMID:26561850

  18. [Y-autosome translocation associated with male infertility: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yumura, Yasushi; Murase, Mariko; Katayama, Kayo; Segino, Miwa; Aizawa, Yoshino; Kuroda, Shin-No-Suke; Noguchi, Kazumi

    2012-06-01

    A 40-year-old man was referred to our hospital with a 12-year history of infertility. He was a well developed male weighing 78 kg with a height of 171 cm. Physical examinations revealed male habitus with normal adult pubic and axillary hair. The penis, epididymides, spermatic cords and prostate were normal. The right testis was about 15 ml in volume and left ne was approximately 12 ml, respectively. Repeated semen analyses showed azoospermia except for only one time when 4 immotile sperm were detected. The plasma levels of lactate hydrogenase, follicle stimulating hormone prolactin and testosterone were within normal limits. Chromosome analysis of peripheral lymphocytes revealed a balanced reciprocal translocation between the short arm of chromosome 12 and the long arm of the Y chromosome (46, X, t (Y ; 12) (q12 ; p13.3)). We performed microdissection testicular sperm extraction and retrieved 11 spermatozoa (10 progressive motile). Seminiferous epithelium showed maturation arrest at the stage of spermatid. Mean Johnsen's score count was 6. The etiology and clinical features of this rare disease were briefly discussed. PMID:22874512

  19. Waddlia chondrophila and Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies in screening infertile women for tubal pathology.

    PubMed

    Verweij, S P; Kebbi-Beghdadi, C; Land, J A; Ouburg, S; Morré, S A; Greub, G

    2015-01-01

    Since Waddlia chondrophila is closely related to Chlamydia trachomatis, we hypothesise that W. chondrophila may also be associated with tubal factor infertility (TFI) in women, a major complication of chronic C. trachomatis infection. Five hundred twenty serum samples were tested for anti-Waddlia antibodies by ELISA. Among the 520 investigated women, a total number of 142 (27.3%) has had laparoscopic diagnosis performed, and were either classified TFI positive or negative. Presence of high titres of W. chondrophila antibodies was linked to TFI (p < 0.0001; OR: 7.5; 95% CI: 3.3-17). Moreover, antibody positivity to both W. chondrophila and C. trachomatis-MOMP was strongly associated with TFI (p < 0.0001; OR: 21; 95% CI: 3.8-12E1). This association was much stronger than the statistical association of C. trachomatis-MOMP antibodies only (p < 0.0001; OR: 7.1; 95% CI: 3.7-14), suggesting that co-infection with W. chondrophila and C. trachomatis may lead to more severe reproductive sequelae and immune responses than single infection with either Chlamydiales members. PMID:26428856

  20. Understanding the Social Meaning of Infertility and Childbearing: A Qualitative Study of the Perception of Childbearing and Childlessness in Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Tabong, Philip Teg-Nefaah; Adongo, Philip Baba

    2013-01-01

    Background Infertility is a major medical condition that affects many married couples in sub-Saharan African and as such associated with several social meanings. This study therefore explored community's perception of childbearing and childlessness in Northern Ghana using the Upper West Region as a case study. Methods The study was exploratory and qualitative using in-depth and key informant interviews and focus group discussions. Fifteen marriage unions with infertility (childless), forty-five couples with children, and eight key informants were purposively sampled and interviewed using a semi-structured interview guides. Three focus group discussions were also carried out, one for childless women, one for women with children and one with men with children. The data collected were transcribed, coded, arranged, and analyzed for categories and themes and finally triangulated. Results The study revealed that infertility was caused by both social and biological factors. Socially couples could become infertile through supernatural causes such as bewitchment, and disobediences of social norms. Abortion, masturbation and use of contraceptives were also identified as causes of infertility. Most childless couples seek treatment from spiritualist, traditional healers and hospital. These sources of treatment are used simultaneously. Conclusion Childbearing is highly valued in the community and Childlessness is highly engendered, and stigmatised in this community with manifold social consequences. In such a community therefore, the concept of reproductive choice must encompass policies that make it possible for couples to aspire to have the number of children they wish. PMID:23342158

  1. The Mediational Role of Cognitive Emotion Regulation Strategies in the Relationship of Ego-strength and Adjustment to Infertility in Women

    PubMed Central

    Teimourpour, Negar; Besharat, Mohammad Ali; Rahiminezhad, Abbas; Hossein Rashidi, Batool; Gholamali Lavasani, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Infertility is considered as an intense and prolonged stressful experience. Despite of high prevalence of infertility and its emotional burden for couples and especially for women, the knowledge regarding psychological factors influencing adjustment to it is limited. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mediational role of cognitive emotion regulation strategies in the relationship of ego-strength and adjustment to infertility in women. Materials and methods: A total number of 275 women with primary infertility referring to Valie-asr Reproductive Health Research Center (Tehran Imam Khomeini Hospital) participated in the present study. Data was collected via demographic information questionnaire, Ego-Strength Scale (ESS), Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ) and Adjustment to Illness Scale (AIS). Data were analysed using Pearson correlation and path analysis methods Using SPSS (18) and LISREL (8.5) software. Results: Results indicated there are significant positive correlation between ego-strength and adjustment to infertility (r = 0.44, p < 0.01). Also Adjustment has significant positive correlation withadaptive emotion regulation strategies (r = 0.38, p < 0.01) and significant negative correlation with non-adaptive emotion regulation strategies (r = -0.43, p < 0.01). Results of path analysis indicated emotion regulation strategies mediate the relationship of ego-strength and adjustment. Conclusion: These results can be helpful in making preventive policies, identifying high risk patients and planning psychological interventions. PMID:26175758

  2. Induction of excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress in the Drosophila male accessory gland results in infertility.

    PubMed

    Chow, Clement Y; Avila, Frank W; Clark, Andrew G; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress occurs when misfolded proteins accumulate in the lumen of the ER. A cell responds to ER stress with the unfolded protein response (UPR), a complex program of transcriptional and translational changes aimed at clearing misfolded proteins. Secretory tissues and cells are particularly well adapted to respond to ER stress because their function requires high protein production and secretory load. The insect male accessory gland (AG) is a secretory tissue involved in male fertility. The AG secretes many seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) essential for male reproduction. Among adult Drosophila tissues, we find that genes upregulated by ER stress are most highly expressed in the AG, suggesting that the AG is already undergoing high levels of ER stress due to its normal secretory functions. We hypothesized that induction of excessive ER stress in the AG above basal levels, would perturb normal function and provide a genetic tool for studying AG and SFP biology. To test this, we genetically induced excessive ER stress in the AG by conditional 1) expression of a misfolded protein or 2) knockdown of the UPR regulatory protein, BiP. Both genetic manipulations induced excessive ER stress in the AG, as indicated by the increase in Xbp1 splicing, a marker of ER stress. Both models resulted in a large decrease in or loss of SFP production and male infertility. Sperm production, motility, and transfer appeared unaffected. The induction of strong ER stress in the insect male AG may provide a simple way for studying or manipulating male fertility, as it eliminates AG function while preserving sperm production. PMID:25742606

  3. Sensitization to wasp venom does not induce autoantibodies leading to infertility.

    PubMed

    Müller, Lorenz; Vogel, Monique; Stadler, Michael; Truffer, Renato; Rohner, Eliane; Stadler, Beda M

    2008-08-01

    Antigenic cross-reactivity has been described between the venom allergen (antigen 5) and mammalian testis proteins. Based on an allergen database we have previously shown that allergens can be represented by allergen motifs. A motif group was found containing venom antigen 5 sequences from different vespids. Using an optimized amino acid profile based on antigen 5 sequences for searching cross-reactive proteins, three human semen proteins belonging to the family of cysteine-rich secretory proteins (hCRISP) were found in the Swiss Protein database. To analyze antigenic cross-reactivity between antigen 5 and hCRISPs, antigen 5 from yellow jacket venom (Ves v 5) and two hCRISPs (CRISP-2 and -3) were chosen and produced as recombinant proteins in E. coli. A correlation was found between antibodies reacting with rVes v 5 and rhCRISP-2, -3 in a small human sera population indicating the presence of cross-reactive antibodies in human serum. Using intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), a therapeutic multidonor IgG preparation, cross-reactive antibodies were isolated that recognize rVes v 5, hCRISP-2 and -3 suggesting the presence of common epitopes between Ves v 5 and hCRISPs. However this cross-reactivity seems not to be linked to allergy to wasp venom as we could show no correlation between increasing CAP-class IgE level to wasp venom and IgG to sperm extract and hCRISPs. These data suggest that higher sensitization to wasp venom does not induce more antibodies against autoantigens and might not represent a higher risk to develop autoantibodies leading to infertility. PMID:18632155

  4. Induction of Excessive Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Drosophila Male Accessory Gland Results in Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Clement Y.; Avila, Frank W.; Clark, Andrew G.; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress occurs when misfolded proteins accumulate in the lumen of the ER. A cell responds to ER stress with the unfolded protein response (UPR), a complex program of transcriptional and translational changes aimed at clearing misfolded proteins. Secretory tissues and cells are particularly well adapted to respond to ER stress because their function requires high protein production and secretory load. The insect male accessory gland (AG) is a secretory tissue involved in male fertility. The AG secretes many seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) essential for male reproduction. Among adult Drosophila tissues, we find that genes upregulated by ER stress are most highly expressed in the AG, suggesting that the AG is already undergoing high levels of ER stress due to its normal secretory functions. We hypothesized that induction of excessive ER stress in the AG above basal levels, would perturb normal function and provide a genetic tool for studying AG and SFP biology. To test this, we genetically induced excessive ER stress in the AG by conditional 1) expression of a misfolded protein or 2) knockdown of the UPR regulatory protein, BiP. Both genetic manipulations induced excessive ER stress in the AG, as indicated by the increase in Xbp1 splicing, a marker of ER stress. Both models resulted in a large decrease in or loss of SFP production and male infertility. Sperm production, motility, and transfer appeared unaffected. The induction of strong ER stress in the insect male AG may provide a simple way for studying or manipulating male fertility, as it eliminates AG function while preserving sperm production. PMID:25742606

  5. Alterations in the steroid hormone receptor co-chaperone FKBPL are associated with male infertility: a case-control study

    E-print Network

    Sunnotel, Olaf; Hiripi, Laszlo; Lagan, Kevin; McDaid, Jennifer R.; De Leon, Johanny M.; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Crowe, Hannah; Kaluskar, Soniya; Ward, Michael; Scullion, Catherine; Campbell, Alan; Downes, C. S.; Hirst, David; Barton, David; Mocanu, Edgar; Tsujimura, Akira; Cox, Marc B.; Robson, Tracy; Walsh, Colum P.

    2010-03-08

    in the steroid hormone receptor co-chaperone FKBPL are associated with male infertility: a case-control study Olaf Sunnotel1†, Laszlo Hiripi1†, Kevin Lagan1, Jennifer R McDaid1, Johanny M De León2, Yasushi Miyagawa3, Hannah Crowe1, Soniya Kaluskar1, Michael Ward1... symptom and patients often show no mutations in the AR gene [5]. Defects in AR coactivators have already been implicated in one case of complete androgen resis- tance in humans [6] and in two sisters with partial resis- tance to multiple steroid hormones...

  6. Infertility and Reproductive Function in Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Pathophysiology, Advances in Management, and Recent Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lekarev, Oksana; Lin-Su, Karen; Vogiatzi, Maria G

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia have reduced fertility. However, reproductive outcomes have improved over the years. This review provides an update on the multiple pathologic processes that contribute to reduced fertility in both sexes, from alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis to the direct effect on gonadal function by elevated circulating adrenal androgens. In addition, elevated serum progesterone concentrations may hinder ovulation and embryo implantation in women, whereas in men testicular adrenal rest tumors can be a major cause of infertility. Suppression of adrenal androgen secretion represents the first line of therapy toward spontaneous conception in both sexes. PMID:26568487

  7. Serum copper, follicular stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, spermatic count, viability, progression and seminal zinc correlations in a human (male) infertility study

    SciTech Connect

    Sella, G.E.; Cunnane, S.C.; McInnes, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    The role of copper and its correlations to other parameters has been investigated in a male-fertility pilot study at a University infertility clinic in Montreal. Serum and semen Cu concentrations were determined in 100 men (age 25 to 54 years) referred to the clinic for infertility evaluation. The results of the significant correlations between serum Cu concentrations and male fertility parameters such as (1) the serum concentrations of the hormones FSH, LH and prolactin; (2) spermatozoal count, viability and progression and (3) seminal zinc concentrations are reported.

  8. The psychological well-being of infertile women after a failed IVF attempt: the effects of coping.

    PubMed

    Hynes, G J; Callan, V J; Terry, D J; Gallois, C

    1992-09-01

    One hundred infertile women and 73 female controls completed three measures of psychological well-being (depression, self-esteem and self-confidence) on two occasions (Times 1 and 2), coinciding with the beginning and end of a failed IVF attempt by the infertile women. At Time 2, the IVF women were also asked to indicate whether they had used a number of different coping responses, in relation to dealing with their failed IVF attempt. As predicted, IVF women were more depressed and had lower self-esteem than controls prior to the treatment cycle, and both before and after the treatment cycle they were less self-confident. After the failed IVF procedure, IVF women were more depressed and had lower levels of self-esteem than they did prior to the treatment cycle. In terms of the effects of coping on the post-attempt well-being of the IVF women, the use of problem-focused coping was associated with high levels of well-being, while the use of avoidance coping and seeking social support was associated with low levels of well-being. PMID:1390361

  9. Reduction of GnRH and infertility in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Papalexi, Eugenia; Persson, Anna; Björkqvist, Maria; Petersén, Asa; Woodman, Ben; Bates, Gillian P; Sundler, Frank; Mulder, Hindrik; Brundin, Patrik; Popovic, Natalija

    2005-09-01

    Reductions in testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels and reduced sexual functions have been reported in Huntington's disease (HD) patients. Atrophy of the reproductive organs and loss of fertility have also been observed in the R6/2 mouse, which is currently the most studied transgenic model of HD. In an effort to define the cause of infertility we studied the expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the medial septum, diagonal band of Broca and hypothalamus of R6/2 male mice during sexual maturation. We found a progressive reduction in the numbers of GnRH-immunoreactive neurons in the analysed brain areas of R6/2 mice starting at 5 weeks of age and becoming statistically significant with only 10% of the neurons remaining by 9 weeks of age. Atrophy of testes and seminal vesicles combined with a significant reduction in serum and testicular testosterone levels were detected in 12-week-old R6/2mice. These results suggest that infertility in the R6/2 males is due either to death of GnRH neurons or to a reduction in GnRH expression leading to a downstream impairment of the gonadotropic hormones. Gonadotropic hormone replacement did not mitigate weight loss or restore motor function in R6/2 males. PMID:16190907

  10. Human sperm and other seminal constituents in male infertile patients from arsenic and cadmium rich areas of Southern Assam.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Mahuya; Deb, Ishita; Sharma, Gauri Dutta; Kar, Kushal Kumar

    2013-08-01

    In the present study the occurrence of two heavy metals, arsenic and cadmium, have been reported in the drinking water and seminal plasma of infertile male patients as compared to a control group. The study originated from a survey of geogenic groundwater contamination with the heavy metals arsenic and cadmium in Southern Assam, India as an increase in the incidence of male infertility was being reported from these areas. According to WHO protocol, patients with sperm concentration < 20 x 10(6)/ml were selected as cases (oligozoospermic and azoospermic), and those with > 20 x 10(6)/ml, without any extreme pathological disorders and having fathered a child within 1-2 years of marriage were the control (normozoospermic) group. The study reports an inverse relationship between total sperm count and heavy metal content in drinking water as well as seminal plasma of the subjects. Moreover, a high correlation between altered semenological parameters and lower expression of accessory sex gland markers like fructose, acid phosphatase, and neutral ?-glucosidase in the seminal plasma of patients is reported. The study also highlights significant differences of the sperm function parameters like hypo-osmotic swelling, acrosome reaction, and nuclear chromatin decondensation in the patient group as compared to controls. These findings are significant as they address a likely association between heavy metal stress and altered sperm function as well as seminal enzyme inhibition. PMID:23651453

  11. Isolation and identification of sperm membrane antigens recognized by antisperm antibodies, and their possible role in immunological infertility disease.

    PubMed

    Bohring, C; Krause, E; Habermann, B; Krause, W

    2001-02-01

    Antisperm antibodies (ASA) are the main cause of immunological infertility, as they impair sperm function by binding to the sperm membrane. In this study, we isolated highly enriched sperm membrane proteins by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Isoelectric focusing, as a first dimension, was performed on precast DryStrip IPG 4-7. The second dimension was carried out on 12% sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gels. A total of 18 antigens were identified by the subsequent 2D Western blotting using ASA from seminal plasma samples of infertile patients. Six of the recognized proteins were isolated and analysed by means of mass spectrometry and peptide matching. They were identified as heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP70-2, the disulphide isomerase ER60, the inactive form of caspase-3 and two subunits of the proteasome (component 2 and zeta chain). The biochemical identification of these proteins will be helpful in understanding the mechanisms by which ASA impair both sperm function and fertilization. Thus, these proteins may also be useful in the development of reliable methods for ASA detection. PMID:11160836

  12. What is the role of hysteroscopic surgery in the management of female infertility? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Márcia Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    The position of hysteroscopy in current fertility practice is under debate. There are many randomized controlled trials on technical feasibility and patient compliance demonstrating that the procedure is well tolerated and effective in the treatment of intrauterine pathologies. However, no consensus on the effectiveness of hysteroscopic surgery in improving the prognosis of subfertile women is available. A literature review was performed to explore the available information regarding the role of hysteroscopy in the evaluation and management of female infertility as well as to ascertain evidence that treatment of these uterine abnormalities improves fertility. The debate regarding the role of hysteroscopic surgery in the management of female infertility remains as the published studies did not reach a consensus on the benefit of such an intervention in this setting. The randomized trials do not clearly demonstrate that surgical correction of all intrauterine abnormalities improves IVF outcome. However, published observational studies suggest a benefit for resection of submucosal leiomyomas, adhesions, and endometrial polyps in increasing pregnancy rates. More randomised controlled studies are needed to substantiate the effectiveness of the hysteroscopic removal of suspected intrauterine pathology in women with unexplained subfertility or prior to assisted reproductive technology. PMID:25374944

  13. What Is the Role of Hysteroscopic Surgery in the Management of Female Infertility? A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Márcia Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    The position of hysteroscopy in current fertility practice is under debate. There are many randomized controlled trials on technical feasibility and patient compliance demonstrating that the procedure is well tolerated and effective in the treatment of intrauterine pathologies. However, no consensus on the effectiveness of hysteroscopic surgery in improving the prognosis of subfertile women is available. A literature review was performed to explore the available information regarding the role of hysteroscopy in the evaluation and management of female infertility as well as to ascertain evidence that treatment of these uterine abnormalities improves fertility. The debate regarding the role of hysteroscopic surgery in the management of female infertility remains as the published studies did not reach a consensus on the benefit of such an intervention in this setting. The randomized trials do not clearly demonstrate that surgical correction of all intrauterine abnormalities improves IVF outcome. However, published observational studies suggest a benefit for resection of submucosal leiomyomas, adhesions, and endometrial polyps in increasing pregnancy rates. More randomised controlled studies are needed to substantiate the effectiveness of the hysteroscopic removal of suspected intrauterine pathology in women with unexplained subfertility or prior to assisted reproductive technology. PMID:25374944

  14. Improvement of sperm density in neem-oil induced infertile male albino rats by Ipomoea digitata Linn

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Ghanashyam Keshav; Mahajan, Raghunath Totaram; Mahajan, Arun Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Investigation has been carried out to validate folkloric claim of the potential of Ipomoea digitata (ID) based on reproductive health status in experimentally induced male albino rats. Materials and Methods: Emulsified neem oil fed albino rats were orally administered root powder of ID suspended in water for the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight for 40 days. Change in organ weight, sperm density and motility, serum hormonal levels and histomorphological changes were evaluated. Results: Significant increase in the sperm density and the sperm motility (P < 0.01) along with increase in the testis, and epididymes weight in neem-oil induced infertile rats treated with ID at both dose levels. This effect is vis-à-vis to serum hormonal levels. Presence of ?-sitosterol in the root of ID likely to enhance the process of spermatogenesis as it is evident from histomorphological studies. Conclusion: Results of the present investigation reveal that ID is a good candidate for the management of male infertility. PMID:26401398

  15. Oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and Infertility in Mice Deficient for miR-34b/c and miR-449 Loci

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kasper Dindler; Much, Christian; Azzi, Chiara; Perlas, Emerald; Morgan, Marcos; O'Carroll, Dónal

    2014-01-01

    Male fertility requires the continuous production of high quality motile spermatozoa in abundance. Alterations in all three metrics cause oligoasthenoteratozoospermia, the leading cause of human sub/infertility. Post-mitotic spermatogenesis inclusive of several meiotic stages and spermiogenesis (terminal spermatozoa differentiation) are transcriptionally inert, indicating the potential importance for the post-transcriptional microRNA (miRNA) gene-silencing pathway therein. We found the expression of miRNA generating enzyme Dicer within spermatogenesis peaks in meiosis with critical functions in spermatogenesis. In an expression screen we identified two miRNA loci of the miR-34 family (miR-34b/c and miR-449) that are specifically and highly expressed in post-mitotic male germ cells. A reduction in several miRNAs inclusive of miR-34b/c in spermatozoa has been causally associated with reduced fertility in humans. We found that deletion of both miR34b/c and miR-449 loci resulted in oligoasthenoteratozoospermia in mice. MiR-34bc/449-deficiency impairs both meiosis and the final stages of spermatozoa maturation. Analysis of miR-34bc?/?;449?/? pachytene spermatocytes revealed a small cohort of genes deregulated that were highly enriched for miR-34 family target genes. Our results identify the miR-34 family as the first functionally important miRNAs for spermatogenesis whose deregulation is causal to oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and infertility. PMID:25329700

  16. Identification and evaluation of an infertility-associated ZP3 epitope from the marsupial brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula).

    PubMed

    Cui, Xianlan; Duckworth, Janine A; Molinia, Frank C; Cowan, Phil E

    2010-02-10

    Immunologically based fertility control vaccines against zona pellucida (ZP) proteins are being developed in New Zealand for biocontrol of the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), an introduced Australian marsupial pest. We have shown that immunization of female possums with recombinant possum ZP3 protein (rZP3) reduced fertility by 79%. To enhance the specificity of possum immunocontraceptive vaccines, B-cell epitopes on possum ZP3 protein were mapped using sera of female possums immunized with possum rZP3 and subjected to a fertility trial. The amino acid sequence of the full-length possum ZP3 protein was used to synthesize a complete set of 83 (12-mer) biotinylated peptides each with an overlap of five amino acids with the neighboring peptides. The peptides were used in a modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to identify continuous epitopes recognized by antibodies in the sera of possums immunized with possum rZP3. Sixteen epitopes were identified on the possum ZP3 protein. Comparison of the ELISA binding patterns of these peptides to antibodies in the individual sera with the fertility status of rZP3-immunized possums identified only one epitope (amino acids 156-172) to be associated with infertility. However, female possums immunized with this epitope showed no significant reduction in fertility. The possible reasons for the failure of this potential infertility epitope are discussed. PMID:19969120

  17. Correlation of antispermatozoal antibody with infertility in immunized female rabbits using /sup 14/C-protein A in a filter radioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, L.A.; Metz, C.B.

    1986-09-01

    The meaningful detection of antisperm antibody in immunologically infertile females has been confounded by the many methods of assay that exist. With many of these methods there is poor correlation of assay results with infertility. In this report, female rabbits were rendered partially or completely infertile by immunization with sperm fractions. A filter radioassay for antisperm antibody was developed that consists of incubating 10(7) sperm with sperm from immunized rabbits and /sup 14/C-Protein A, a long-lived and versatile indirect radiolabel for many antibodies of the IgG class. The spermatozoa are washed by rapid vacuum filtration on polycarbonate membrane filters instead of by time-consuming centrifugation. The filters with the collected spermatozoa are then counted in a liquid scintillation counter. Sera from female rabbits isoimmunized with sperm antigens show a highly significant correlation (r = -0.904; p less than 0.001) between assay results and infertility as measured by the percentage of eggs that underwent cleavage after artificial insemination.

  18. The relationship between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase c.677TT genotype and oligozoospermia in infertile male patients living in the Trakya region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gurkan, H; Tozk?r, H; Göncü, E; Ulusal, S; Yazar, M

    2015-11-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), the key enzyme of the folate metabolic pathway, has been reported to be five times more active in the testicles compared to other organs in adult mice. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between MTHFR c.677C>T and c.1298A>C polymorphisms and infertility in nonobstructive azoospermic and oligozoospermic male patients living in the Trakya region of Turkey. The study population included 75 nonobstructive azoospermic and 62 oligozoospermic, nonconsanguineous patients who were referred to the Department of Medical Genetics of Trakya University between 01.03.2012 and 01.06.2013 due to infertility and who had been diagnosed based on clinical examinations and spermiograms. All of the patients had a normal karyotype without a Y chromosome microdeletion. Melting curve analysis with labelled probes and primers that were designed by the manufacturers and the real-time polymerase chain reaction method were used. The MTHFR c.677TT genotype frequency in the oligozoospermic infertile male patient group was greater than that of the fertile control group [odds ratio (OR) = 2.675 (95% CI: 0.979-7.305), (P < 0.048)]. The MTHFR c.677TT genotype may be a genetic risk factor for oligozoospermic infertile male patients who live in the Trakya region of Turkey. PMID:25428700

  19. The validity of testicular aspirate cytology and DNA image-analysis of the aspirate in the assessment of infertile men

    PubMed Central

    Abouhashem, Safwat E.; Saba, Isam; Mostafa, Salah; Abdalla, Alaa; Almaramhy, Hamdi; Mostafa, Mohamed; Elsayed, Deyab; Ibrahim, Ehab; Maroof, Aref; Eladl, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the possibility of using cytological examination and DNA image-analysis of testicular fine-needle aspirates instead of open surgical biopsy in the investigation of infertile men, as testicular biopsy has long been used for investigating infertility but the interpretation of histological slides is usually subjective. Patients and methods Thirty-three men (aged 22–36 years) were evaluated for infertility and underwent both open biopsy and fine-needle aspiration of their testes. Subsequently, the needle aspirates were assessed histopathologically and cytologically, and by DNA image cytometry. The percentages of haploid, diploid and tetraploid cells were determined for each patient. Results The cases were divided into four categories: (1) Complete spermatogenesis, with a DNA pattern of 1n > 2n > 4n; (2) Maturation arrest, with a DNA pattern of 2n > 4n with no haploid cells; (3) Sertoli cell-only syndrome, with a DNA pattern of only 2n, with no haploid or tetraploid cells; (4) Hypospermatogenesis, with a variable DNA pattern, i.e. mild with 1n > 2n, moderate with 2n > 1n > 4n, and marked where the DNA pattern was 2n > 4n > 1n. From the cytological and DNA image-analysis of the aspirate a diagnosis was possible that had a strong correlation with the histological diagnosis of the same case. From image analysis we could exclude interstitial cells, Sertoli cells and sperms on the static image, and differentiate between spermatozoa and spermatids based on morphological characteristics in the cytological smear. This technique can therefore be used to quantitatively determine the percentages of various cell types within the seminiferous tubules. By coupling image ploidy analysis and cytological examination of a cytological smear, spermatogenesis can be assessed accurately. Conclusion Image cytometry could be used to exclude interstitial cells, Sertoli cells and sperms on the static image and so produce an accurate assessment of spermatogenesis. A combination of ploidy and cell morphology characteristics in cytological smears provides an accurate, reproducible and easily used alternative to open testicular biopsy.

  20. Substantial prevalence of microdeletions of the Y-chromosome in infertile men with idiopathic azoospermia and oligozoospermia detected using a sequence-tagged site-based mapping strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Najmabadi, H.; Huang, V.; Bhasin, D.

    1996-04-01

    Genes on the long arm of Y (Yq), particularly within interval 6, are believed to play a critical role in human spermatogenesis. Cytogenetically detectable deletions of this region are associated with azoospermia in men, but are relatively uncommon. The objective of this study was to validate a sequence-tagged site (STS)-mapping strategy for the detection of Yq microdeletions and to use this method to determine the proportion of men with idiopathic azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia who carry microdeletions in Yq. STS mapping of a sufficiently large sample of infertile men should also help further localize the putative gene(s) involved in the pathogenesis of male infertility. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes of 16 normal fertile men, 7 normal fertile women, 60 infertile men, and 15 patients with the X-linked disorder, ichthyosis. PCR primers were synthesized for 26 STSs that span Yq interval 6. None of the 16 normal men of known fertility had microdeletions. Seven normal fertile women failed to amplify any of the 26 STSs, providing evidence of their Y specificity. No microdeletions were detected in any of the 15 patients with ichthyosis. Of the 60 infertile men typed with 26 STSs, 11 (18%; 10 azoospermic and 1 oligozoospermic) failed to amplify 1 or more STS. Interestingly, 4 of the 11 patients had microdeletions in a region that is outside the Yq region from which the DAZ (deleted in azoospermia gene region) gene was cloned. In an additional 3 patients, microdeletions were present both inside and outside the DAZ region. The physical locations of these microdeletions provide further support for the concept that a gene(s) on Yq deletion interval 6 plays an important role in spermatogenesis. The presence of deletions that do not overlap with the DAZ region suggests that genes other than the DAZ gene may also be implicated in the pathogenesis of some subsets of male infertility. 48 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. New single nucleotide polymorphism G5508A in the SEPT12 gene may be associated with idiopathic male infertility in Iranian men

    PubMed Central

    Shahhoseini, Maryam; Azad, Mahnaz; Sabbaghian, Marjan; Shafipour, Maryam; Akhoond, Mohammad Reza; Salman-Yazdi, Reza; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Gourabi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Male infertility is a multifactorial disorder, which affects approximately 10% of couples at childbearing age with substantial clinical and social impact. Genetic factors are associated with the susceptibility to spermatogenic impairment in humans. Recently, SEPT12 is reported as a critical gene for spermatogenesis. This gene encodes a testis specific member of Septin proteins, a family of polymerizing GTP-binding proteins. SEPT12 in association with other Septins is an essential annulus component in mature sperm. So, it is hypothesized that genetic alterations of SEPT12 may be concerned in male infertility. Objective: The objective of this research is exploration of new single nucleotide polymorphism G5508A in the SEPT12 gene association with idiopathic male infertility in Iranian men. Materials and Methods: In this case control study, 67 infertile men and 100 normal controls were analyzed for genetic alterations in the active site coding region of SEPT12, using polymerase chain reaction sequencing technique. Fisher exact test was used for statistical analysis and p<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Genotype analysis indicated that G5508A polymorphic SEPT12 alleles were distributed in three peaks of frequency in both control and diseases groups. Categorization of the alleles into (GG), (GA), (AA) types revealed a significant difference between infertile patients (azoospermic and asthenospermic) and normal controls (p=0.005). Conclusion: According to our finding we suggest that G5508A polymorphism in SEPT12 gene can affect spermatogenesis in men, the opinion needs more investigation in different populations. PMID:26568753

  2. Talking about links between sexually transmitted infections and infertility with college and university students from SE England, UK: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea are largely symptomless diseases which, left untreated, can result in serious complications including infertility. Fertility problems currently affect approximately one in seven couples in the UK and there is increasing demand for couples seeking reproductive technologies. Young people are at greatest risk of contracting STIs, therefore this study aimed to identify young people’s knowledge and beliefs about the link between untreated STIs and infertility. Methods Focus groups were conducted with participants aged 16–24 years old inclusive in college or university settings in the SE of England. Groups were quota sampled on the basis of age and gender. A topic guide was used. The data were analysed using a framework analysis approach. Results Ten single-sex focus groups were conducted with sixty participants: six groups of college students and four groups of university students. Participants were generally aware of the link between STIs and potential infertility and considered the discussion of this subject very relevant at their age. Knowledge about how and why STIs potentially lead to fertility complications was poor. The issues of blame relating to infertility following an STI emerged, although most participants did not think that access to free reproductive technologies after an untreated STI should be limited. Conclusions Young people would benefit from more education in order to improve their understanding of the long-term consequences of untreated STIs, such as infertility. Participants in our sample felt these were extremely relevant and important issues for them to understand alongside current education about STIs. PMID:24020982

  3. Preconception stress increases the risk of infertility: results from a couple-based prospective cohort study—the LIFE study

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, C.D.; Sundaram, R.; Maisog, J.M.; Sweeney, A.M.; Buck Louis, G.M.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are women's stress levels prospectively associated with fecundity and infertility? SUMMARY ANSWER Higher levels of stress as measured by salivary alpha-amylase are associated with a longer time-to-pregnancy (TTP) and an increased risk of infertility. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Data suggest that stress and reproduction are interrelated; however, the directionality of that association is unclear. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION In 2005–2009, we enrolled 501 couples in a prospective cohort study with preconception enrollment at two research sites (Michigan and Texas, USA). Couples were followed for up to 12 months as they tried to conceive and through pregnancy if it occurred. A total of 401 (80%) couples completed the study protocol and 373 (93%) had complete data available for this analysis. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Enrolled women collected saliva the morning following enrollment and then the morning following their first observed study menses for the measurement of cortisol and alpha-amylase, which are biomarkers of stress. TTP was measured in cycles. Covariate data were captured on both a baseline questionnaire and daily journals. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Among the 401 (80%) women who completed the protocol, 347 (87%) became pregnant and 54 (13%) did not. After adjustment for female age, race, income, and use of alcohol, caffeine and cigarettes while trying to conceive, women in the highest tertile of alpha-amylase exhibited a 29% reduction in fecundity (longer TTP) compared with women in the lowest tertile [fecundability odds ratios (FORs) = 0.71; 95% confidence interval (CI) = (0.51, 1.00); P < 0.05]. This reduction in fecundity translated into a >2-fold increased risk of infertility among these women [relative risk (RR) = 2.07; 95% CI = (1.04, 4.11)]. In contrast, we found no association between salivary cortisol and fecundability. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION Due to fiscal and logistical concerns, we were unable to collect repeated saliva samples and perceived stress questionnaire data throughout the duration of follow-up. Therefore, we were unable to examine whether stress levels increased as women continued to fail to get pregnant. Our ability to control for potential confounders using time-varying data from the daily journals, however, minimizes residual confounding. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS This is the first US study to demonstrate a prospective association between salivary stress biomarkers and TTP, and the first in the world to observe an association with infertility. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) This study was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (contracts #N01-HD-3-3355, N01-HD-3-3356, N01-HD-3358). There are no conflicts of interest to declare. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER Not applicable. PMID:24664130

  4. Assisted conception and South Asian communities in the UK: public perceptions of the use of donor gametes in infertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Culley, Lorraine; Hudson, Nicky; Rapport, Frances

    2013-03-01

    This paper explores 'public' attitudes to the use of donated gametes in infertility treatment amongst members of British South Asian communities in the UK. The study included 14 single-sex focus groups with a total of 100 participants of Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi origins in three English cities and 20 individual semi-structured interviews with key informants. It explores five themes from the data: childlessness and stigma; using sperm and using eggs; cultural connections; choosing gametes; religion and the use of donated gametes; and disclosure and the management of information. The paper demonstrates that the socio-cultural context of fertility treatment is highly relevant and those delivering services and those consulting the public need to be aware of cultural and gender differences. Third party assisted conception represents a challenge to received ideas of identity and has implications for social reproduction and kinship which go well beyond immediate conjugal relationships. PMID:23477468

  5. In Vitro Fertilization in Women With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Is as Successful as in Women From the General Infertility Population

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Sveta Shah; Pabby, Vikas; Dodge, Laura E.; Moragianni, Vasiliki A.; Hacker, Michele R.; Fox, Janis H.; Correia, Katharine; Missmer, Stacey A.; Ibrahim, Yetunde; Penzias, Alan S.; Burakoff, Robert; Friedman, Sonia; Cheifetz, Adam S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects women of reproductive age, so there are concerns about its effects on fertility. We investigated the success of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in patients with IBD compared with the general (non-IBD) IVF population. METHODS We conducted a matched retrospective cohort study of female patients with IBD who under-went IVF from 1998 through 2011 at 2 tertiary care centers. Patients were matched 4:1 to those without IBD (controls). The primary outcome was the cumulative rate of live births after up to 6 cycles of IVF. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of patients who became pregnant and the rate of live births for each cycle. RESULTS Forty-nine patients with Crohn’s disease (CD), 71 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 1 patient with IBD-unclassified, and 470 controls underwent IVF during the study period. The cumulative rate of live births was 53% for controls, 69% for patients with UC (P = .08 compared with controls), and 57% for patients with CD (P = .87 compared with controls). The incidence of pregnancy after the first cycle of IVF was similar among controls (40.9%), patients with UC (49.3%; P = .18), and patients with CD (42.9%; P = .79). Similarly, the incidence of live births after the first cycle of IVF was similar among controls (30.2%), patients with UC (33.8%; P = .54), and patients with CD (30.6%; P = .95). CONCLUSIONS Based on a matched cohort study, infertile women with IBD achieve rates of live births after IVF that are comparable with those of infertile women without IBD. PMID:25818081

  6. Protective effect of mirtazapine and hesperidin on cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative damage and infertility in rat ovaries.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Naglaa Fathi

    2015-12-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) causes infertility due to ovarian toxicity. The toxicity mechanism suggests oxidative stress. We assessed whether mirtazapine (MTZ) and hesperidin (HSP) could promote ovarian protection against damage due to CP chemotherapy. Female Wistar rats aged 14 weeks were used. Animals were divided into four groups: control vehicle group (n?=?8); CP group (n?=?8, rats received 150?mg/kg of CP, single intraperitoneal [i.p.] injection); CP?+?MTZ group (n?=?8, rats received same dose of CP?+?30?mg/kg of MTZ, orally, daily); and HSP?+?CP group (n?=?8, rats received same dose of CP?+?100?mg/kg of HSP, orally, daily). After eight days of medication, ovaries were removed and ovarian toxicity was assessed by counting follicles and corpora lutea. Nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were estimated in ovarian tissue. NO level, MDA level, and MPO activity were increased (P?infertility in the female rats. HSP and MTZ could reverse this effect and provide protection of fertility against CP-induced toxicity. PMID:25787947

  7. Blood serum and seminal plasma selenium, total antioxidant capacity and coenzyme q10 levels in relation to semen parameters in men with idiopathic infertility.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Mustafa; Sahin, Sadik; Durukan, Birol; Ozakpinar, Ozlem Bingol; Erdinc, Nese; Turkgeldi, Lale; Sofuoglu, Kenan; Karateke, Ates

    2014-06-01

    In this case-control study, we aimed to evaluate the serum and seminal plasma levels of Selenium (Se), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ-10) and determine their relationship with sperm concentration, motility, and morphology in men with idiopathic infertility. A total of 59 subjects were enrolled in the study. Forty four patients were diagnosed with idiopathic male infertility and had abnormal sperm parameters, and 15 subjects had normal sperm parameters with proven fertility. Serum Se, semen Se, and semen TAC levels were significantly different in the fertile and infertile groups (p<0.01, p<0.001, and p<0.001, respectively). However, serum TAC, serum, and seminal plasma CoQ-10 levels did not differ between fertile and infertile groups. When the levels of the measured parameters were compared in serum and seminal plasma, serum levels of Se were found to be correlated positively with the semen levels in all subjects included into the study (N=59) (r=0.46, p<0.01). A relationship was found between neither serum and semen levels of TAC nor between serum and semen levels of CoQ-10. Correlations among measured serum and semen parameters with sperm parameters demonstrated that both the serum and semen levels of Se were correlated positively with spermatozoa concentration, motility, and morphology. Additionally, seminal plasma levels of TAC correlated positively with all these sperm parameters. On the other hand, seminal plasma levels of CoQ-10 correlated only with sperm morphology but not with concentration or motility. No relationship was observed between serum levels of TAC or serum levels of CoQ-10 and sperm parameters. In conclusion, serum and seminal plasma Se deficiency may be a prominent determinant of abnormal sperm parameters and idiopathic male infertility. Measurement of serum Se levels may help determine nutritional status and antioxidant capacity in infertile patients, which may help distinguish those patients who will benefit from supplementation therapy. PMID:24752972

  8. Expression of a2 Vacuolar ATPase in Spermatozoa is Associated with Semen Quality and Chemokine-Cytokine Profiles in Infertile Men

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Kuniaki; Jaiswal, Mukesh Kumar; Ramu, Sivakumar; Jeyendran, Rajasinjham; Kwak-Kim, Joanne; Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Beaman, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of laboratory tests have been developed to determine properties of spermatozoa quality but few have been adopted into routine clinical use in place of the WHO semen analysis. We investigated whether Atp6v0a2 (a2 isoform of vacuolar ATPase) is associated with abnormal semen quality and changes in chemokine-cytokine profiles in infertile men. Patients and Methods Semen samples were collected from 35 healthy donors and 35 infertile men at the Andrology laboratory from August 2011 to June 2012. The levels of Atp6v0a2 mRNA and protein, and its localization in spermatozoa were determined. a2NTD (the N-terminal portion of Atp6v0a2) and secreted chemokine-cytokine profiles in seminal fluid were measured. Results Atp6v0a2 protein (P<0.05) and mRNA (P<0.05) in spermatozoa from infertile men were significantly lower than those from fertile men. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that Atp6v0a2 is mainly expressed in the acrosomal region. Infertile men’s seminal fluid had significantly lower G-CSF (P<0.01), GM-CSF (P<0.01), MCP-1 (P<0.05), MIP-1? (P<0.01) and TGF-?1 (P<0.01) levels when compared to the seminal fluid from fertile men. Seminal fluid a2NTD levels were significantly correlated with G-CSF (P<0.01), GM-CSF (P<0.01), MCP-1 (P<0.05), MIP-1? (P<0.01) and TGF-?1 (P<0.01) which are key molecules during the onset of pregnancy. Conclusion These results suggested that a critical level of Atp6v0a2 is required for the fertile spermatozoa and its decreased level in spermatozoa could be used to predict male infertility. This study provides a possibility that Atp6v0a2 could be potentially used as a diagnostic marker for the evaluation of male infertility. PMID:23936208

  9. "Now we feel like we did everything we could": A qualitative study into the experiences of Dutch patients who travelled to Belgium for infertility treatment

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoof, W.; De Sutter, P.; Pennings, G.

    2014-01-01

    Many Dutch infertility patients go to Belgium for treatment every year. This is the first qualitative interview study looking into the experiences and perspectives of Dutch patients who travel to Belgium for infertility treatment. We recruited 16 heterosexual couples and one single woman to ensure maximal diversity in age, distance to the clinic, type of treatment and number of previously failed cycles. The interview data was analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The central theme in the data was that going to Belgium was the next step. The Dutch patients believed that the quality of care was very high in Belgium and that in taking this step, they did everything they could to achieve a pregnancy. PMID:25593693

  10. Relationship of semen hyperviscosity with IL-6, TNF-?, IL-10 and ROS production in seminal plasma of infertile patients with prostatitis and prostato-vesiculitis.

    PubMed

    Castiglione, R; Salemi, M; Vicari, L O; Vicari, E

    2014-12-01

    Changes in levels of oxidative damage products in semen and their relationship to seminal fluid viscosity (SFV) have recently received increasing research interest. We analysed whether SFV was associated with ROS generation, levels of cytokines TNF-alpha (TNF-?), IL-6 and IL-10 and seminal leucocyte concentration, and whether ROS production was related to the extent of infections/inflammations at one (prostatitis) or two (prostato-vesiculitis) male accessory glands. We studied 169 infertile patients, with chronic bacterial prostatitis (PR, n = 74) and/or bilateral prostato-vesiculitis (PV, n = 95), as diagnosed by the ultrasound (US) criteria. Healthy fertile men (n = 42) served as controls. In the PV patient group, SFV, semen characteristics and ROS production had median values that were significantly higher than those found in PR patients and controls, although other sperm variables had values significantly lower than those found in PR patients or controls. In PV infertile patients, ROS generation and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels were higher than those found in PR infertile patients and controls, although seminal IL-10 levels in PV and PR patients were lower than those found in the controls. In PR patients, the levels of SFV were positively related to TNF-? (r = 0.67; P < 0.01), fMLP-stimulated ROS production in the 45% Percoll fraction (r = 0.687, P < 0.01) and the 90% Percoll fraction in basal condition (r = 0.695, P < 0.01), and after fMLP-stimulation (r = 0.688, P < 0.01). Thus, our data indicated that seminal hyperviscosity is associated with increased oxidative stress in infertile men and increased pro-inflammatory interleukins in patients with male accessory gland infection, more when the infection was extended to the seminal vesicles. PMID:24329571

  11. Decreased activity of superoxide dismutase in the seminal plasma of infertile men correlates with increased sperm deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation during the first hours after sperm donation.

    PubMed

    Wdowiak, Artur; Bakalczuk, Szymon; Bakalczuk, Grzegorz

    2015-07-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation varies between individuals and is more pronounced with increased patient age and time after sperm donation. The intensification of DNA fragmentation depends on the balance of the oxidoreductive system, which is regulated mainly by two enzymes - superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between sperm DNA fragmentation dynamics, fertility and seminal SOD and catalase activity. The study was conducted in 2013 and 2014 at the Non-Public Health Care Unit 'Ovum Reproduction and Andrology' in Lublin, Lublin, Poland, and covered 218 men aged 25-35 (85 fertile and 133 patients treated for infertility). Percentage of fragmented DNA was measured in a modified chromatin dispersion test at four time points after sperm donation (t = 0, 3, 6, 12 h). SOD and catalase activities were determined spectrophotometrically. We confirmed that the activity of SOD in the seminal plasma of men with reproductive disorders was lower compared with fertile men. Conversely, no significant correlations were found between fertility and catalase activity. Sperm DNA of infertile males was initially more fragmented than fertile male sperm DNA. SOD and catalase activity did not correlate with the degree of DNA fragmentation in fertile men. In men with reproductive disorders, the rate of DNA fragmentation was slow within first 3 h after sperm donation and then increased between 6 and 12 h. In this group of infertile men, those with higher SOD activity had a lower DNA fragmentation index (DFI) after 12 h, and a reduced rate of intensity of fragmentation from 6 to 12 h. Alternatively, higher catalase activity among men treated for infertility was accompanied by higher initial DFI and higher rate of DNA fragmentation from 6 to 12 h. These results highlight the importance of determining a proper time window between sperm donation and procedures of assisted reproductive technology. PMID:26198800

  12. Association of polymorphisms of A260G and A386G in DAZL gene with male infertility: a meta-analysis and systemic review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Wang, Xiao; Xu, Chang; Xiao, He; Zhang, Wen-Hao; Wang, Xing-Huan; Zhang, Xin-Hua

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the association of single nucleotide polymorphism 260 and 386 (SNP260 and SNP386) gene with male infertility, an electronic search was performed to identify case-control studies evaluating the relationship of SNP260 or SNP386 of deleted in azoospermia-like (DAZL) and male infertility. Review Manager 5 was used to process the meta-analysis and other statistical analysis. A total of 139 records were retrieved, of which 13 case-control studies with total 2715 patients and 1835 normozoospermic men were included. SNP260 was found not to play a functional role in male oligo/azoospermia either for Caucasians or for Asians. But for SNP386, models of allele (A/G), dominant (AA/AG + GG), co-dominant (AA/AG) and super-dominant (AA + GG/AG) had a strong correlation to spermatogenic failure with related odds ratio being 0.15 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.07 to 0.34, P < 0.00001), 0.16 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.35, P < 0.00001), 0.15 (95% CI 0.06 to 0.33, P < 0.00001) and 0.15 (95% CI 0.06 to 0.33, P < 0.00001), respectively. Moreover, this correlation was only found in the Chinese Han population (decreasing around 85% risk of oligo/azoospermia infertility) and not found in India, Japan, and Caucasian countries. Our analysis demonstrated that SNP260 of DAZL did not contribute to oligo/azoospermia while SNP386 was correlated to male infertility. However, this correlation was only found in China with a country-specific and ethnicity-specific manner. PMID:25994644

  13. The prevalence of common CFTR mutations in Iranian infertile men with non-CAVD obstructive azoospermia by using ARMS PCR techniques.

    PubMed

    Safinejad, Kyumars; Darbouy, Mojtaba; Kalantar, Sayed Mahdi; Zeinali, Sirus; Mirfakhraie, Reza; Yadegar, Leila; Houshmand, Masoud

    2011-10-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate five common cystic fibrosis trans-membrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations (?F508, G542X, R117H, W1282X and N1303K) in the Iranian infertile men with noncongenital absence of vas deferens (CAVD) obstructive azoospermia. METHODS: The common CFTR gene mutations were tested on blood samples from 53 infertile men with non-CAVD obstructive azoospermia and 50 normal men as control individuals. Genomic DNA is extracted from the whole blood and the common CFTR mutations have been detected by the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) techniques. RESULTS: The common CFTR mutations were found positive in 5/53)9.43%(for ?F508 and 4/53)7.55%(for G542X mutation of all patients tested. Also, no CFTR mutations were detected in the normal men. CONCLUSION: The common CFTR mutations were detected in 9/53(17%) infertile men with non-CAVD obstructive azoospermia. Pre-treatment CFTR mutation analysis remains critical to distinguish cystic fibrosis (CF) genotypes for men with non CAVD obstructive azoospermia. PMID:21976147

  14. Metformin administration in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome who receive gonadotropins for in vitro fertilization cycles: 10-year experience in a large infertile population.

    PubMed

    Palomba, Stefano; Falbo, Angela; Russo, Tiziana; Di Cello, Annalisa; Morelli, Michele; Orio, Francesco; Cappiello, Fulvio; Tolino, Achille; Zullo, Fulvio

    2012-02-01

    The study aim was to evaluate our personal experience regarding the use and the reproductive effect of metformin administration in a large population of infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) undergoing gonadotropins ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF). Infertile patients with PCOS undergoing gonadotropins ovarian stimulation with (metformin group, n = 191) or without (control group, n = 187) metformin and IVF were evaluated. Treatment characteristics, patients' data and reproductive outcomes were evaluated. In all cases, metformin with an immediate-release formulation was administered, and in most of cases it was given as pre- and co-treatment (74.9%) and at a dosage of 1700 mg/day (59.7%). Stimulation length and gonadotropins doses were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in metformin group than in control group. The number of dominant follicles on day of ovarian maturation triggering and peak oestradiol levels were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in metformin group than in control group. Cycle cancellation rate under metformin resulted significantly influenced by interaction with body mass index (BMI), age and basal follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels. Notwithstanding, metformin use in infertile PCOS patients who receive gonadotropins for IVF is not standardized, it seems to modulate the ovarian response to stimulation. This effect may benefit or harm on the basis of ovarian reserve and patients' characteristics. PMID:21770836

  15. Alterations in the human blood-epididymis barrier in obstructive azoospermia and the development of novel epididymal cell lines from infertile men.

    PubMed

    Dube, Evemie; Hermo, Louis; Chan, Peter T K; Cyr, Daniel G

    2010-10-01

    Post-testicular sperm maturation requires a specific luminal environment in the epididymis that is created, in part, by the blood-epididymis barrier. There is limited information on gene expression in the epididymis of infertile obstructive azoospermia (OA) patients due to the difficulty in obtaining tissues. The objectives of this study were to determine if epididymal tight junction proteins are altered in OA and to develop cell lines that could serve to elucidate alterations in the epididymis of infertile men. Epididymal claudin (CLDN) 1, CLDN4, and CLDN10 mRNA levels were altered in OA downstream from the obstruction site. Epithelial cell lines derived from the caput epididymidis of one OA patient were developed (infertile human caput epididymal cell line [IHCE]). IHCEs were composed of homogenous populations of diploid cells that ultrastructurally resembled in vivo principal cells. The cells expressed cytokeratin, SPAG11B, CLDN2, CLDN3, desmoplakin, and vimentin. However, the cells did not express several other epididymal markers (CRISP1, SPINLW1, NPC2, CD52, or DCXR) or junctional proteins (CDH1, CDH2, CLDN1, CLDN4, CLDN7, or CLDN8). Further studies using IHCE1 and transepithelial resistance indicated that the cells were unable to form tight junctions. Microarray analyses comparing gene expression in IHCE1 and a recently developed fertile human caput epididymal cell line revealed differential expression of genes encoding junctional proteins, cell junction regulators, and epididymal proteins. Together, these data indicate that epididymal cellular junctions appear to be altered in OA. PMID:20505168

  16. LINE-1 Mediated Insertion into Poc1a (Protein of Centriole 1 A) Causes Growth Insufficiency and Male Infertility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Geister, Krista A.; Brinkmeier, Michelle L.; Cheung, Leonard Y.; Wendt, Jennifer; Oatley, Melissa J.; Burgess, Daniel L.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Cavalcoli, James D.; Oatley, Jon M.; Camper, Sally A.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasias are a common, genetically heterogeneous cause of short stature that can result from disruptions in many cellular processes. We report the identification of the lesion responsible for skeletal dysplasia and male infertility in the spontaneous, recessive mouse mutant chagun. We determined that Poc1a, encoding protein of the centriole 1a, is disrupted by the insertion of a processed Cenpw cDNA, which is flanked by target site duplications, suggestive of a LINE-1 retrotransposon-mediated event. Mutant fibroblasts have impaired cilia formation and multipolar spindles. Male infertility is caused by defective spermatogenesis early in meiosis and progressive germ cell loss. Spermatogonial stem cell transplantation studies revealed that Poc1a is essential for normal function of both Sertoli cells and germ cells. The proliferative zone of the growth plate is small and disorganized because chondrocytes fail to re-align after cell division and undergo increased apoptosis. Poc1a and several other genes associated with centrosome function can affect the skeleton and lead to skeletal dysplasias and primordial dwarfisms. This mouse mutant reveals how centrosome dysfunction contributes to defects in skeletal growth and male infertility. PMID:26496357

  17. Hydrological setting of infertile species-rich wetland--a case study in the warm temperate Japan.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, A; Nakagoshi, N; Onda, Y

    2003-03-01

    The detailed groundwater flow and water chemistry to illustrate landscape structure of the infertile peatless mire by using piezometers and groundwater wells were measured. The instruments were installed in lines through a small spring-fed wetland underlying little peat from the hillslope to the valley bottom in southwestern Japan. Flow net and EC data clearly indicated that the wetland was situated in a high-EC groundwater upspring area. The low-productivity graminous vegetation was related with four hydrological factors such as: (1) high water level; (2) low-EC (< 25 micro S/cm) groundwater; (3) weakly upward hydraulic gradient; and (4) overflowing of negatively pressured groundwater. In other words, the "old or deep groundwater" constructed the foundation of slope-wetland, and maintained the high groundwater level. In contrast, overflowing "youthful groundwater" is supplied from head of slope-wetland preferentially through the shallow substratum. The plant communities of the peatless mire in southwestern Japan are similar to those of raised bog in northern cool temperate Japan. There have been some reports verifying that the underlying mineral substrata of such wetlands were quartzile rocks such as granite, rhyolite, chart and well-leached sand. Results showed (1) low cation availability affect the water acidity; (2) upward seepage of high-EC groundwater composed the foundation of the investigated peatless mire; and (3) the poor mineral condition seems to play a similar role to northern ombrotrophic (rain-fed) condition. PMID:12765272

  18. Exploring the Human Seminal Plasma Proteome: An Unexplored Gold Mine of Biomarker for Male Infertility and Male Reproduction Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gilany, Kambiz; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Savadi-Shiraz, Elham; Rezadoost, Hassan; Lakpour, Niknam

    2015-01-01

    Background The human seminal fluid is a complex body fluid. It is not known how many proteins are expressed in the seminal plasma; however in analog with the blood it is possible up to 10,000 proteins are expressed in the seminal plasma. The human seminal fluid is a rich source of potential biomarkers for male infertility and reproduction disorder. Methods In this review, the ongoing list of proteins identified from the human seminal fluid was collected. To date, 4188 redundant proteins of the seminal fluid are identified using different proteomics technology, including 2-DE, SDS-PAGE-LC-MS/MS, MudPIT. However, this was reduced to a database of 2168 non-redundant protein using UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot reviewed database. Results The core concept of proteome were analyzed including pI, MW, Amino Acids, Chromosome and PTM distribution in the human seminal plasma proteome. Additionally, the biological process, molecular function and KEGG pathway were investigated using DAVID software. Finally, the biomarker identified in different male reproductive system disorder was investigated using proteomics platforms so far. Conclusion In this study, an attempt was made to update the human seminal plasma proteome database. Our finding showed that human seminal plasma studies used to date seem to have converged on a set of proteins that are repeatedly identified in many studies and that represent only a small fraction of the entire human seminal plasma proteome. PMID:25927022

  19. Gender Role, Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation in CAIS ("XY-Women") Compared With Subfertile and Infertile 46,XX Women.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Franziska; Fliegner, Maike; Krupp, Kerstin; Rall, Katharina; Brucker, Sara; Richter-Appelt, Hertha

    2016-01-01

    The perception of gender development of individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) as unambiguously female has recently been challenged in both qualitative data and case reports of male gender identity. The aim of the mixed-method study presented was to examine the self-perception of CAIS individuals regarding different aspects of gender and to identify commonalities and differences in comparison with subfertile and infertile XX-chromosomal women with diagnoses of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKHS) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The study sample comprised 11 participants with CAIS, 49 with MRKHS, and 55 with PCOS. Gender identity was assessed by means of a multidimensional instrument, which showed significant differences between the CAIS group and the XX-chromosomal women. Other-than-female gender roles and neither-female-nor-male sexes/genders were reported only by individuals with CAIS. The percentage with a not exclusively androphile sexual orientation was unexceptionally high in the CAIS group compared to the prevalence in "normative" women and the clinical groups. The findings support the assumption made by Meyer-Bahlburg ( 2010 ) that gender outcome in people with CAIS is more variable than generally stated. Parents and professionals should thus be open to courses of gender development other than typically female in individuals with CAIS. PMID:26133743

  20. Effects of race/ethnicity on triple CGG counts in the FMR1 gene in infertile women and egg donors.

    PubMed

    Gleicher, Norbert; Weghofer, Andrea; Barad, David H

    2010-04-01

    This cross-sectional cohort study investigated 385 females (344 infertile women and 41 oocyte donors), the numbers of CGG repeats on the FMR1 gene and differences between races/ethnicities. Traditional definitions of neuropsychiatric risks are classified as common, intermediate, premutation and full mutation ranges. Normal CGG count range was here, however, defined by box and whisker plot as 26-32 repeats (median 30). Distribution of abnormal outliers in CGG counts from this normal range was then compared between women of Caucasian, African and Asian descent. African and Asian women demonstrated a higher prevalence of two normal count alleles (65%) than Caucasians (54.3%; P=0.03). Caucasians demonstrated the highest rate of allele abnormalities (43.3%) and were the only race/ethnicity also demonstrating abnormalities in both FMR1 alleles. Asian women demonstrated significantly fewer low outlier counts than Caucasians (P=0.002) and Africans (P=0.03). This study, thus, suggests significant racial/ethnic differences in triple CGG counts on the FMR1 gene between races/ethnicities. Since CGG counts on FMR1 are associated with ovarian reserve, these findings may reflect potential differences between races/ethnicities in ovarian function and female fertility reported in the literature. PMID:20149747