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Sample records for infiltration system sizing

  1. Integrated loading rate determination for wastewater infiltration system sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Jenssen, P.D. . Centre for Soil and Environmental Research); Siegrist, R.L. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the principal parameters used in wastewater system design is the hydraulic loading rate. Historically the determination of the loading rate has been a straight forward process involving selection of a rate based on soil texture or water percolation rate. Research and experience over the past decade has provided additional insight into the complex processes occurring within wastewater-amended soil systems and has suggested the fallacy of this approach. A mean grain size vs. sorting (MESO) diagram constitutes a new basis for soil classification for wastewater infiltration system design. Crude characterization of the soil hydraulic properties is possible according to the MESO Diagram and loading rate as well as certain purification aspects can be assessed from the diagram. In this paper, an approach is described based on the MESO Diagram that integrates soil properties and wastewater pretreatment to yield a loading rate. 53 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Multizone infiltration monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Wortman, D.N.; Burch, J.; Judkoff, R.

    1982-06-01

    A multizone infiltration monitoring system (MIMS) using a single tracer gas has been developed. MIMS measures zonal infiltration and exfiltration as well as interzonal air movement rates. The system has been used at the 4-zone test house at the SERI interim field site, and this paper presents preliminary results. The present system can determine zonal infiltration rates, and the results show significant differences in infiltration rates for the various zones.

  3. Effect of various binning methods and ROI sizes on the accuracy of the automatic classification system for differentiation between diffuse infiltrative lung diseases on the basis of texture features at HRCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namkug; Seo, Joon Beom; Sung, Yu Sub; Park, Bum-Woo; Lee, Youngjoo; Park, Seong Hoon; Lee, Young Kyung; Kang, Suk-Ho

    2008-03-01

    To find optimal binning, variable binning size linear binning (LB) and non-linear binning (NLB) methods were tested. In case of small binning size (Q <= 10), NLB shows significant better accuracy than the LB. K-means NLB (Q = 26) is statistically significant better than every LB. To find optimal binning method and ROI size of the automatic classification system for differentiation between diffuse infiltrative lung diseases on the basis of textural analysis at HRCT Six-hundred circular regions of interest (ROI) with 10, 20, and 30 pixel diameter, comprising of each 100 ROIs representing six regional disease patterns (normal, NL; ground-glass opacity, GGO; reticular opacity, RO; honeycombing, HC; emphysema, EMPH; and consolidation, CONS) were marked by an experienced radiologist from HRCT images. Histogram (mean) and co-occurrence matrix (mean and SD of angular second moment, contrast, correlation, entropy, and inverse difference momentum) features were employed to test binning and ROI effects. To find optimal binning, variable binning size LB (bin size Q: 4~30, 32, 64, 128, 144, 196, 256, 384) and NLB (Q: 4~30) methods (K-means, and Fuzzy C-means clustering) were tested. For automated classification, a SVM classifier was implemented. To assess cross-validation of the system, a five-folding method was used. Each test was repeatedly performed twenty times. Overall accuracies with every combination of variable ROIs, and binning sizes were statistically compared. In case of small binning size (Q <= 10), NLB shows significant better accuracy than the LB. K-means NLB (Q = 26) is statistically significant better than every LB. In case of 30x30 ROI size and most of binning size, the K-means method showed better than other NLB and LB methods. When optimal binning and other parameters were set, overall sensitivity of the classifier was 92.85%. The sensitivity and specificity of the system for each class were as follows: NL, 95%, 97.9%; GGO, 80%, 98.9%; RO 85%, 96.9%; HC, 94

  4. Modelling of percolation rate of stormwater from underground infiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Burszta-Adamiak, Ewa; Lomotowski, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Underground or surface stormwater storage tank systems that enable the infiltration of water into the ground are basic elements used in Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS). So far, the design methods for such facilities have not taken into account the phenomenon of ground clogging during stormwater infiltration. Top layer sealing of the filter bed influences the infiltration rate of water into the ground. This study presents an original mathematical model describing changes in the infiltration rate variability in the phases of filling and emptying the storage and infiltration tank systems, which enables the determination of the degree of top ground layer clogging. The input data for modelling were obtained from studies conducted on experimental sites on objects constructed on a semi-technological scale. The experiment conducted has proven that the application of the model developed for the phase of water infiltration enables us to estimate the degree of module clogging. However, this method is more suitable for reservoirs embedded in more permeable soils than for those located in cohesive soils. PMID:24292460

  5. Vegetation on the Soil Infiltration System Treating Livestock Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Shinji; Fujikawa, Yoko; Fukui, Masami; Hamasaki, Tastuhide; Sugahara, Masataka

    In the overland flow wastewater treatments and the constructed wetlands, the purification by soil infiltration units is enhanced using vegetation. However, wetland plants (i.e. cattail (Typha latifolia)) and trees, rather than agronomic crops, have been used in conventional systems. We carried out laboratory-scale soil infiltration experiments using two forage crops, tall fescue (Festuca araundinacea) and white clover (Trifolium repens) while using livestock wastewater for irrigation. The purpose of the study was to clarify the amount of accumulation of available phosphorus and exchangeable cations in the soil and its effect on the plant growth. The application of livestock wastewater increased available phosphorus, and exchangeable potassium and sodium in the upper soil. The soil sodification, examined based on exchangeable sodium ratio and plant growth, was not very significant after 10 months of livestock wastewater application. Growing forage crops on the soil infiltration system may be a promising technology to improve crop production and treatment efficacy.

  6. Formation of nanometer-size wires using infiltration into latent nuclear tracks

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Felter, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    Nanometer-size wires having a cross-sectional dimension of less than 8 nm with controllable lengths and diameters are produced by infiltrating latent nuclear or ion tracks formed in trackable materials with atomic species. The trackable materials and atomic species are essentially insoluble in each other, thus the wires are formed by thermally driven, self-assembly of the atomic species during annealing, or re-crystallization, of the damage in the latent tracks. Unlike conventional ion track lithography, the inventive method does not require etching of the latent tracks.

  7. Biliary Ascariasis Mimicking Colonic Tumor Infiltration of the Biliary System.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Deepak; Mittal, Gyanendra; Kumar, Sushil; Manjunath, Suraj; Sharma, Navneet; Gupta, Mahesh

    2015-09-01

    Ascariasis is a common problem in developing countries with poor hygiene and sanitation. It is endemic in India and usually seen in the northern states. Biliary ascariasis is an uncommon cause of obstructive jaundice. We present a case of carcinoma of hepatic flexure of colon in which the patient developed biliary ascariasis and posed a diagnostic challenge as it mimicked tumor infiltration of the biliary system. PMID:27217679

  8. Infiltration measurements and modeling in a soil-vertical drain system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammecker, Claude; Siltecho, Siwaporn; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Lassabatere, Laurent; Robain, Henri; Winiarski, Thierry; Trelo-ges, Vidaya; Suvannang, Nopmanee

    2016-04-01

    Severe water logging problems occur in rubber tree plantations in NE Thailand during the rainy season and create adverse conditions for the development of the trees. Moreover this situation contributes to a waste of scarce rainfall and reduce it's efficiency, as 50% is lost by hypodermic water flow and superficial runoff. The presence of a clayey layer at 1m depth with low permeability, hindering the water infiltration that led to the occurrence of a perched water table. In order to drawdown the water level of the perched water table and to increase the efficiency of the rainfall by storing water in the underlying bedrock a vertical drainage system was developed. In order to test the feasibility of this solution we chose to use the numerical modelling of water flow in soil and to test different set-ups (size and spacing between the drains). The objective of this study was to characterise the hydraulic properties and of the soil-drain system in a rubber tree plantation. Therefore an experiment was set up in rubber tree plantation at Ban Non Tun, Khon Kaen Province (Northeast of Thailand). Infiltration experiments around the vertical drains with single ring of 1m diameter, were conducted in three different locations to measure infiltration rate. The infiltration experiments were also monitored with two complementary geophysical methods (ERT and GPR) to asses the progression ans at the geometry of the wetting front. The model Hydrus2D was used to adjust the computed infiltration curves and water level in the drain to the experimental data, by fitting effective unsaturated hydrodynamic parameters for the drain. These parameters were used to calibrate the model and to perform further predictive numerical simulations.

  9. Geochemical stability of phosphorus solids below septic system infiltration beds.

    PubMed

    Zurawsky, M A; Robertson, W D; Ptacek, C J; Schiff, S L

    2004-09-01

    Review of 10 mature septic system plumes in Ontario, revealed that phosphorus (P) attenuation commonly occurred close to the infiltration pipes, resulting in discrete narrow intervals enriched in P by a factor of 2-4 (. MSc thesis, Dept. Earth Sci., University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont.; Ground Water 36 (1995) 1000; J. Contam. Hydrol. 33 (1998) 405). Although these attenuation reactions appeared to be sustainable under present conditions, the potential for remobilization of this P mass, should geochemical conditions change, is unknown. To test the stability of these P solids, dynamic flow column tests were carried out using sediments from three of the previously studied sites (Cambridge, Langton and Muskoka) focusing on sediments from the 'High-P' and underlying (Below) zones. Tests were continued for 166-266 pore volumes (PVs), during which time varying degrees of water saturation were maintained. During saturated flow conditions, relatively high concentrations of PO4 were eluted from the Cambridge and Langton High-P zones (up to 4 and 9 mg/l P, respectively), accompanied by elevated concentrations of Fe (up to 1.4 mg/l) and Mn (up to 4 mg/l) and lower values of Eh (<150 mV). The Below zones from Cambridge and Langton, however, maintained lower concentrations of P (generally<2 mg/l), Fe (<0.2 mg/l) and Mn (<1 mg/l) and maintained higher Eh (>250 mV) during saturated flow conditions. During unsaturated flow, P and Fe declined dramatically in the High-P zones (P<1 mg/l, Fe<0.2 mg/l), whereas concentrations remained about the same during saturated and unsaturated flow in the Below zones. This behavior is at least partly attributed to the development of reducing conditions during saturated flow in the High-P zones, leading to reductive dissolution of Fe (III)-P solids present in the sediments. Reducing conditions did not develop in the Below zones apparently because of lower sediment organic carbon (OC) contents (0.03-0.04 wt.%) compared to the High-P zones (0

  10. Geochemical stability of phosphorus solids below septic system infiltration beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurawsky, M. A.; Robertson, W. D.; Ptacek, C. J.; Schiff, S. L.

    2004-09-01

    Review of 10 mature septic system plumes in Ontario, revealed that phosphorus (P) attenuation commonly occurred close to the infiltration pipes, resulting in discrete narrow intervals enriched in P by a factor of 2-4 ( Wood, J.S.A. 1993. MSc thesis, Dept. Earth Sci., University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont.; Ground Water 36 (1995) 1000; J. Contam. Hydrol. 33 (1998) 405). Although these attenuation reactions appeared to be sustainable under present conditions, the potential for remobilization of this P mass, should geochemical conditions change, is unknown. To test the stability of these P solids, dynamic flow column tests were carried out using sediments from three of the previously studied sites (Cambridge, Langton and Muskoka) focusing on sediments from the 'High-P' and underlying (Below) zones. Tests were continued for 166-266 pore volumes (PVs), during which time varying degrees of water saturation were maintained. During saturated flow conditions, relatively high concentrations of PO 4 were eluted from the Cambridge and Langton High-P zones (up to 4 and 9 mg/l P, respectively), accompanied by elevated concentrations of Fe (up to 1.4 mg/l) and Mn (up to 4 mg/l) and lower values of Eh (<150 mV). The Below zones from Cambridge and Langton, however, maintained lower concentrations of P (generally<2 mg/l), Fe (<0.2 mg/l) and Mn (<1 mg/l) and maintained higher Eh (>250 mV) during saturated flow conditions. During unsaturated flow, P and Fe declined dramatically in the High-P zones (P<1 mg/l, Fe<0.2 mg/l), whereas concentrations remained about the same during saturated and unsaturated flow in the Below zones. This behavior is at least partly attributed to the development of reducing conditions during saturated flow in the High-P zones, leading to reductive dissolution of Fe (III)-P solids present in the sediments. Reducing conditions did not develop in the Below zones apparently because of lower sediment organic carbon (OC) contents (0.03-0.04 wt.%) compared to the

  11. Model evaluation of denitrification under rapid infiltration basin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Maryam; Imhoff, Paul T.; Andres, A. Scott; Finsterle, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems (RIBS) are used for disposing reclaimed wastewater into soil to achieve additional treatment before it recharges groundwater. Effluent from most new sequenced batch reactor wastewater treatment plants is completely nitrified, and denitrification (DNF) is the main reaction for N removal. To characterize effects of complex surface and subsurface flow patterns caused by non-uniform flooding on DNF, a coupled overland flow-vadose zone model is implemented in the multiphase flow and reactive transport simulator TOUGHREACT. DNF is simulated in two representative soils varying the application cycle, hydraulic loading rate, wastewater quality, water table depth, and subsurface heterogeneity. Simulations using the conventional specified flux boundary condition under-predict DNF by as much as 450% in sand and 230% in loamy sand compared to predictions from the coupled overland flow-vadose zone model, indicating that simulating coupled flow is critical for predicting DNF in cases where hydraulic loading rates are not sufficient to spread the wastewater over the whole basin. Smaller ratios of wetting to drying time and larger hydraulic loading rates result in greater water saturations, more anoxic conditions, and faster water transport in the vadose zone, leading to greater DNF. These results in combination with those from different water table depths explain why reported DNF varied with soil type and water table depth in previous field investigations. Across all simulations, cumulative percent DNF varies between 2 and 49%, indicating that NO3 removal in RIBS may vary widely depending on operational procedures and subsurface conditions. These modeling results improve understanding of DNF in RIBS and suggest operational procedures that may improve NO3 removal.

  12. Model evaluation of denitrification under rapid infiltration basin systems.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Maryam; Imhoff, Paul T; Andres, A Scott; Finsterle, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems (RIBS) are used for disposing reclaimed wastewater into soil to achieve additional treatment before it recharges groundwater. Effluent from most new sequenced batch reactor wastewater treatment plants is completely nitrified, and denitrification (DNF) is the main reaction for N removal. To characterize effects of complex surface and subsurface flow patterns caused by non-uniform flooding on DNF, a coupled overland flow-vadose zone model is implemented in the multiphase flow and reactive transport simulator TOUGHREACT. DNF is simulated in two representative soils varying the application cycle, hydraulic loading rate, wastewater quality, water table depth, and subsurface heterogeneity. Simulations using the conventional specified flux boundary condition under-predict DNF by as much as 450% in sand and 230% in loamy sand compared to predictions from the coupled overland flow-vadose zone model, indicating that simulating coupled flow is critical for predicting DNF in cases where hydraulic loading rates are not sufficient to spread the wastewater over the whole basin. Smaller ratios of wetting to drying time and larger hydraulic loading rates result in greater water saturations, more anoxic conditions, and faster water transport in the vadose zone, leading to greater DNF. These results in combination with those from different water table depths explain why reported DNF varied with soil type and water table depth in previous field investigations. Across all simulations, cumulative percent DNF varies between 2 and 49%, indicating that NO₃ removal in RIBS may vary widely depending on operational procedures and subsurface conditions. These modeling results improve understanding of DNF in RIBS and suggest operational procedures that may improve NO₃ removal. PMID:23835290

  13. Evaluation of Surface Infiltration Testing Procedures in Permeable Pavement Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ASTM method (ASTM C1701) for measuring infiltration rate of in-place pervious concrete provides limited guidance on how to select testing locations, so research is needed to evaluate how testing sites should be selected and how results should be interpreted to assess surface ...

  14. Methods to Use Surface Infiltration Tests in Permeable Pavement Systems to Determine Maintenance Frequency

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, there is limited guidance on selecting test sites to measure surface infiltration rates in permeable pavement systems to determine maintenance frequency. The ASTM method (ASTM C1701) for measuring infiltration rate of in-place pervious concrete suggest to either (1) p...

  15. Using a Virtual Experiment to Analyze Infiltration Process from Point to Grid-cell Size Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrological science requires the emergence of a consistent theoretical corpus driving the relationships between dominant physical processes at different spatial and temporal scales. However, the strong spatial heterogeneities and non-linearities of these processes make difficult the development of multiscale conceptualizations. Therefore, scaling understanding is a key issue to advance this science. This work is focused on the use of virtual experiments to address the scaling of vertical infiltration from a physically based model at point scale to a simplified physically meaningful modeling approach at grid-cell scale. Numerical simulations have the advantage of deal with a wide range of boundary and initial conditions against field experimentation. The aim of the work was to show the utility of numerical simulations to discover relationships between the hydrological parameters at both scales, and to use this synthetic experience as a media to teach the complex nature of this hydrological process. The Green-Ampt model was used to represent vertical infiltration at point scale; and a conceptual storage model was employed to simulate the infiltration process at the grid-cell scale. Lognormal and beta probability distribution functions were assumed to represent the heterogeneity of soil hydraulic parameters at point scale. The linkages between point scale parameters and the grid-cell scale parameters were established by inverse simulations based on the mass balance equation and the averaging of the flow at the point scale. Results have shown numerical stability issues for particular conditions and have revealed the complex nature of the non-linear relationships between models' parameters at both scales and indicate that the parameterization of point scale processes at the coarser scale is governed by the amplification of non-linear effects. The findings of these simulations have been used by the students to identify potential research questions on scale issues

  16. Posterior Deep Infiltrating Endometriotic Nodules: Operative Considerations according to Lesion Size, Location, and Geometry, during One's Learning Curve.

    PubMed

    Protopapas, Athanasios; Giannoulis, Georgios; Chatzipapas, Ioannis; Athanasiou, Stavros; Grigoriadis, Themistoklis; Haidopoulos, Dimitrios; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Antsaklis, Aris

    2014-01-01

    We conducted this prospective cohort study to standardize our laparoscopic technique of excision of posterior deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) nodules, according to their size, location, and geometry, including 36 patients who were grouped, according to principal pelvic expansion of the nodule, into groups with central (group 1) and lateral (group 2) lesions, and according to nodule size, into ≤2 cm (group A) and >2 cm (group B) lesions, respectively. In cases of group 1 the following operative steps were more frequently performed compared to those of group 2: suspension of the rectosigmoid, colpectomy, and placement of bowel wall reinforcement sutures. The opposite was true regarding suspension of the adnexa, systematic ureteric dissection, and removal of the diseased pelvic peritoneum. When grouping patients according to nodule size, almost all of the examined parameters were more frequently applied to patients of group B: adnexal suspension, suspension of the rectosigmoid, systematic ureteric dissection, division of uterine vein, colpectomy, and placement of bowel wall reinforcement sutures. Nodule size was the single most important determinant of duration of surgery. In conclusion, during the building-up of one's learning curve of laparoscopic excision of posterior DIE nodules, technique standardization is very important to avoid complications. PMID:24579050

  17. Posterior Deep Infiltrating Endometriotic Nodules: Operative Considerations according to Lesion Size, Location, and Geometry, during One's Learning Curve

    PubMed Central

    Giannoulis, Georgios; Chatzipapas, Ioannis; Athanasiou, Stavros; Haidopoulos, Dimitrios; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Antsaklis, Aris

    2014-01-01

    We conducted this prospective cohort study to standardize our laparoscopic technique of excision of posterior deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) nodules, according to their size, location, and geometry, including 36 patients who were grouped, according to principal pelvic expansion of the nodule, into groups with central (group 1) and lateral (group 2) lesions, and according to nodule size, into ≤2 cm (group A) and >2 cm (group B) lesions, respectively. In cases of group 1 the following operative steps were more frequently performed compared to those of group 2: suspension of the rectosigmoid, colpectomy, and placement of bowel wall reinforcement sutures. The opposite was true regarding suspension of the adnexa, systematic ureteric dissection, and removal of the diseased pelvic peritoneum. When grouping patients according to nodule size, almost all of the examined parameters were more frequently applied to patients of group B: adnexal suspension, suspension of the rectosigmoid, systematic ureteric dissection, division of uterine vein, colpectomy, and placement of bowel wall reinforcement sutures. Nodule size was the single most important determinant of duration of surgery. In conclusion, during the building-up of one's learning curve of laparoscopic excision of posterior DIE nodules, technique standardization is very important to avoid complications. PMID:24579050

  18. Infiltrative Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Bejar, David; Colombo, Paolo C; Latif, Farhana; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana

    2015-01-01

    Infiltrative cardiomyopathies can result from a wide spectrum of both inherited and acquired conditions with varying systemic manifestations. They portend an adverse prognosis, with only a few exceptions (ie, glycogen storage disease), where early diagnosis can result in potentially curative treatment. The extent of cardiac abnormalities varies based on the degree of infiltration and results in increased ventricular wall thickness, chamber dilatation, and disruption of the conduction system. These changes often lead to the development of heart failure, atrioventricular (AV) block, and ventricular arrhythmia. Because these diseases are relatively rare, a high degree of clinical suspicion is important for diagnosis. Electrocardiography and echocardiography are helpful, but advanced techniques including cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear imaging are increasingly preferred. Treatment is dependent on the etiology and extent of the disease and involves medications, device therapy, and, in some cases, organ transplantation. Cardiac amyloid is the archetype of the infiltrative cardiomyopathies and is discussed in great detail in this review. PMID:26244036

  19. Groundwater infiltration, surface water inflow and sewerage exfiltration considering hydrodynamic conditions in sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Karpf, Christian; Hoeft, Stefan; Scheffer, Claudia; Fuchs, Lothar; Krebs, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Sewer systems are closely interlinked with groundwater and surface water. Due to leaks and regular openings in the sewer system (e.g. combined sewer overflow structures with sometimes reverse pressure conditions), groundwater infiltration and surface water inflow as well as exfiltration of sewage take place and cannot be avoided. In the paper a new hydrodynamic sewer network modelling approach will be presented, which includes--besides precipitation--hydrographs of groundwater and surface water as essential boundary conditions. The concept of the modelling approach and the models to describe the infiltration, inflow and exfiltration fluxes are described. The model application to the sewerage system of the City of Dresden during a flood event with complex conditions shows that the processes of infiltration, exfiltration and surface water inflows can be described with a higher reliability and accuracy, showing that surface water inflow causes a pronounced system reaction. Further, according to the simulation results, a high sensitivity of exfiltration rates on the in-sewer water levels and a relatively low influence of the dynamic conditions on the infiltration rates were found. PMID:21902021

  20. Multicriteria decision-aid method to evaluate the performance of stormwater infiltration systems over the time.

    PubMed

    Moura, P; Barraud, S; Baptista, M B; Malard, F

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, stormwater infiltration systems are frequently used because of their ability to reduce flows and volumes in downstream sewers, decrease overflows in surface waters and make it possible to recharge groundwater. Moreover, they come in various forms with different uses. Despite these advantages the long term sustainability of these systems is questionable and their real performances have to be assessed taking into account various and sometimes conflicting aspects. To address this problem a decision support system is proposed. It is based on a multicriteria method built to help managers to evaluate the performance of an existing infiltration system at different stages of its lifespan and identify whether it performs correctly or not, according to environmental, socio-economic, technical and sanitary aspects. The paper presents successively: the performance indicators and the way they were built, the multicriteria method to identify if the system works properly and a case study. PMID:22105120

  1. Biochar and activated carbon for enhanced trace organic contaminant retention in stormwater infiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Bridget A; Im, Eugenia A; Werner, David; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-05-19

    To assess the effectiveness of biochar and activated carbon (AC) for enhanced trace organic contaminant (TOrC) retention in stormwater infiltration systems, an approach combining forward-prediction modeling and laboratory verification experiments was employed. Batch and column tests were conducted using representative TOrCs and synthetic stormwater. Based on batch screening tests, two commercially available biochars (BN-biochar and MCG-biochar) and an AC were investigated. The AC exhibited the strongest sorption, followed by MCG-biochar and BN-biochar. Langmuir isotherms provided better fits to equilibrium data than Freundlich isotherms. Due to superior sorption kinetics, 0.2 wt % MCG-biochar in saturated sand columns retained TOrCs more effectively than 1.0 wt % BN-biochar. A forward-prediction intraparticle diffusion model based on the Langmuir isotherm adequately predicted column results when calibrated using only batch parameters, as indicated by a Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis. Case study simulations estimated that an infiltration basin amended with F300-AC or MCG-biochar could obtain sorption-retarded breakthrough times for atrazine of 54 or 5.8 years, respectively, at a 1 in./h infiltration rate. These results indicate that biochars or ACs with superior sorption capacity and kinetics can enhance TOrC retention in infiltration systems, and performance under various conditions can be predicted using results from batch tests. PMID:25909951

  2. Representing frozen soil and its effect on infiltration in Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, G. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Presence of ice in soil would reduce infiltration and increase surface runoff. Field studies in local-scale open areas showed that soil infiltration capacity is normally reduced due to the presence of ice. However, many filed studies showed that there are weak or no clear effects of frozen soil on infiltration and runoff generation especially in forested areas at large scales. Many land surface models (LSMs) for use in large scale Earth System Models show that explicitly including soil ice in LSMs degrades the simulation of runoff in cold regions. In this talk, I will present the current status of representations of soil water phase change and its thermal effects in LSMs and more specifically on a parameterization scheme for infiltration under frozen soil conditions for large-scale applications guided by runoff observations. This scheme computes vertical water fluxes by introducing the concept of a fractional permeable area (of a model grid), resulting in schemes for computing matric potential and saturated hydraulic conductivity under presence of ice. The scheme produced favorable simulations of runoff and terrestrial water storages (TWS) when compared with observed discharge and monthly TWS derived from gravity signals of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites. This scheme is now adopted by some major LSMs for weather predictions and climate projections.

  3. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  4. Brookhaven air infiltration measurement system (BNL/AIMS) description and application

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W.; Cote, E.A.; Wieser, R.F.

    1983-08-01

    A unique capability to measure part-per-quadrillion concentrations of a family of perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) is presented. Together with our unique PFT source and passive sampler, measurement of average air exchange and infiltration rate can be determined for periods as short as 12 hours. A more expensive programmable sampler can provide information on a frequency of as little as once per minute for each of its 23 sampling tubes. The principal of AIMS is based on the applicable steady-state assumption that the average concentration (e.g., in pL/L) of a tracer vapor in a chamber (i.e., a building or room) is equal to the emission rate of the tracer source (e.g., in pL/min) divided by the air leakage or infiltration rate (e.g., in L/min). Knowing the source rate and measuring the average concentration then provides a means to calculate the air leakage rate. Extending this technique to a multichamber concept, in which a different type of PFT source is deployed in each chamber of a building, allows the calculation of not only the infiltration rates in each chamber but also the air exchange rates between chambers as well. Since both the PFT source and the passive sampler, a miniature Capillary Adsorption Tube Sampler (CATS), are about the size of a cigarette, inexpensive, and reusable, the BNL/AIMS is a very cost-effective means (if not the only means) for determining these air exchange rates.

  5. Changes of pore systems and infiltration analysis in two degraded soils after rock fragment addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, Laura; Coppola, Antonio; De Mascellis, Roberto; Basile, Angelo; Mele, Giacomo; Terribile, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Many soils in arid and semi-arid environments contain high amounts of rock fragments as a result of both natural soil forming processes and human activities. The amount, dimension and shape of rock fragment strongly influence soil structure development and therefore many soil processes (e.g. infiltration, water storage, solute transport, etc.). The aim of this work was to test the effects on both infiltration process and soil pore formation following an addition of rock fragments. The test was performed on two different soils: a clayey soil (Alfisol) and a clay loamy soil (Entisol) showing both a natural compact structure and water stagnation problems in field. Three concentrations of 4-8mm rock fragments (15%, 25% and 35%) were added to air-dried soils and the repacked samples have been subject to nine wet/dry cycles in order to induce soil structure formation and its stabilization. The process of infiltration was monitored at -12 cm of pressure heads imposed at the soil surface and kept constant for a certain time by a tension infiltrometer. Moreover, k(h) was determined imposing -9, -6,-3 and -1 cm at soil surface and applying a steady-state solution. After the hydrological measurements the soil samples were resin-impregnated and images of vertical sections of the samples, acquired at 20µm resolution, were analyzed in order to quantify the pore size distribution. This latter was calculated using the "successive opening" approach. The Entisol samples showed similar infiltration curves I(t) among the 4 treatments, with higher percentage of stones (i.e. 25 and 35%) showing a faster rising in the early-time (< 2 min) infiltration; the Alfisol samples are spread, showing a higher variability: limiting the analysis to the first three, despite they show a similar shape, the higher the stones content the lower the cumulated infiltration. The behavior of the 35% sample diverges from the others: it shows a fast rising step at the very early time (< 2 min) followed by a

  6. Local infiltration of rabies immunoglobulins without systemic intramuscular administration: An alternative cost effective approach for passive immunization against rabies

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Omesh Kumar; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Gaunta, Pyare Lal; Belludi, Ashwin Yajaman

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Presently the dose of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) which is an integral part of rabies post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is calculated based on body weight though the recommendation is to infiltrate the wound(s). This practice demands large quantities of RIG which may be unaffordable to many patients. In this background, we conducted this study to know if the quantity and cost of RIG can be reduced by restricting passive immunization to local infiltration alone and avoiding systemic intramuscular administration based on the available scientific evidence. Two hundred and sixty nine category III patients bitten by suspect or confirmed rabid dogs/animals were infiltrated with equine rabies immunoglobulin (ERIGs) in and around the wound. The quantity of ERIG used was proportionate to the size and number of wounds irrespective of their body weight. They were followed with a regular course of rabies vaccination by intra-dermal route. As against 363 vials of RIGs required for all these cases as per current recommendation based on body weight, they required only 42 vials of 5ml RIG. Minimum dose of RIGs given was 0.25 ml and maximum dose given was 8 ml. On an average 1.26 ml of RIGs was required per patient that costs Rs. 150 ($3). All the patients were followed for 9 months and they were healthy and normal at the end of observation period. With local infiltration, that required small quantities of RIG, the RIGs could be made available to all patients in times of short supply in the market. A total of 30 (11%) serum samples of patients were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and all showed antibody titers >0.5 IU/mL by day 14. In no case the dose was higher than that required based on body weight and no immunosuppression resulted. To conclude, this pilot study shows that local infiltration of RIG need to be considered in times of non-availability in the market or unaffordability by poor patients

  7. Local infiltration of rabies immunoglobulins without systemic intramuscular administration: An alternative cost effective approach for passive immunization against rabies.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Omesh Kumar; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Gaunta, Pyare Lal; Belludi, Ashwin Yajaman

    2016-03-01

    Presently the dose of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) which is an integral part of rabies post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is calculated based on body weight though the recommendation is to infiltrate the wound(s). This practice demands large quantities of RIG which may be unaffordable to many patients. In this background, we conducted this study to know if the quantity and cost of RIG can be reduced by restricting passive immunization to local infiltration alone and avoiding systemic intramuscular administration based on the available scientific evidence. Two hundred and sixty nine category III patients bitten by suspect or confirmed rabid dogs/animals were infiltrated with equine rabies immunoglobulin (ERIGs) in and around the wound. The quantity of ERIG used was proportionate to the size and number of wounds irrespective of their body weight. They were followed with a regular course of rabies vaccination by intra-dermal route. As against 363 vials of RIGs required for all these cases as per current recommendation based on body weight, they required only 42 vials of 5ml RIG. Minimum dose of RIGs given was 0.25 ml and maximum dose given was 8 ml. On an average 1.26 ml of RIGs was required per patient that costs Rs. 150 ($3). All the patients were followed for 9 months and they were healthy and normal at the end of observation period. With local infiltration, that required small quantities of RIG, the RIGs could be made available to all patients in times of short supply in the market. A total of 30 (11%) serum samples of patients were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and all showed antibody titers >0.5 IU/mL by day 14. In no case the dose was higher than that required based on body weight and no immunosuppression resulted. To conclude, this pilot study shows that local infiltration of RIG need to be considered in times of non-availability in the market or unaffordability by poor patients. This

  8. Application of Modular Modeling System to Predict Evaporation, Infiltration, Air Temperature, and Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, Johnny; Birgan, Latricia J.; Tsegaye, Teferi; Coleman, Tommy; Soman, Vishwas

    1997-01-01

    Models are used for numerous application including hydrology. The Modular Modeling System (MMS) is one of the few that can simulate a hydrology process. MMS was tested and used to compare infiltration, soil moisture, daily temperature, and potential and actual evaporation for the Elinsboro sandy loam soil and the Mattapex silty loam soil in the Microwave Radiometer Experiment of Soil Moisture Sensing at Beltsville Agriculture Research Test Site in Maryland. An input file for each location was created to nut the model. Graphs were plotted, and it was observed that the model gave a good representation for evaporation for both plots. In comparing the two plots, it was noted that infiltration and soil moisture tend to peak around the same time, temperature peaks in July and August and the peak evaporation was observed on September 15 and July 4 for the Elinsboro Mattapex plot respectively. MMS can be used successfully to predict hydrological processes as long as the proper input parameters are available.

  9. Dead level contours and infiltration pits for risk mitigation in smallholder cropping systems of southern Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mupangwa, W.; Twomlow, S.; Walker, S.

    The persistent droughts, dry spells, and chronic food insecurity in semi-arid areas necessitate the introduction of more robust rainwater harvesting and soil water management technologies. The study reported here was conducted to assess the influence of dead level contours and infiltration pits on in-field soil water dynamics over two growing seasons. A transect consisting of six access tubes, spaced at 5 m interval, was established across each dead level contour with or without an infiltration pit before the onset of the rains. Two access tubes were installed upslope of the contour while four tubes were installed on the downslope side. Dead level contours with infiltration pits captured more rainwater than dead level contours only resulting in more lateral soil water movement. Significant lateral soil water movement was detected at 3 m downslope following rainfall events of 60-70 mm/day. The 0.2-0.6 m soil layer benefited more from the lateral soil water movement at all the farms. Our results suggest that dead level contours have to be constructed at 3-8 m spacing for crops to benefit from the captured rainwater. It is probably worth exploring strip cropping of food and fodder crops on the downslope of the dead level contours and infiltration pits using the current design of these between-field structures. With the advent of in situ rainwater harvesting techniques included in some conservation agriculture practices it will benefit smallholder cropping systems in semi-arid areas if these between-field structures are promoted concurrently with other sustainable land management systems such as conservation agriculture.

  10. Effect of particle size on droplet infiltration into hydrophobic porous media as a model of water repellent soil.

    PubMed

    Hamlett, Christopher A E; Shirtcliffe, Neil J; McHale, Glen; Ahn, Sujung; Bryant, Robert; Doerr, Stefan H; Newton, Michael I

    2011-11-15

    The wettability of soil is of great importance for plants and soil biota, and in determining the risk for preferential flow, surface runoff, flooding,and soil erosion. The molarity of ethanol droplet (MED) test is widely used for quantifying the severity of water repellency in soils that show reduced wettability and is assumed to be independent of soil particle size. The minimum ethanol concentration at which droplet penetration occurs within a short time (≤ 10 s) provides an estimate of the initial advancing contact angle at which spontaneous wetting is expected. In this study, we test the assumption of particle size independence using a simple model of soil, represented by layers of small (~0.2-2 mm) diameter beads that predict the effect of changing bead radius in the top layer on capillary driven imbibition. Experimental results using a three-layer bead system show broad agreement with the model and demonstrate a dependence of the MED test on particle size. The results show that the critical initial advancing contact angle for penetration can be considerably less than 90° and varies with particle size, demonstrating that a key assumption currently used in the MED testing of soil is not necessarily valid. PMID:22011323

  11. Estimating biozone hydraulic conductivity in wastewater soil-infiltration systems using inverse numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R; McCray, John E

    2007-06-01

    During operation of an onsite wastewater treatment system, a low-permeability biozone develops at the infiltrative surface (IS) during application of wastewater to soil. Inverse numerical-model simulations were used to estimate the biozone saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(biozone)) under variably saturated conditions for 29 wastewater infiltration test cells installed in a sandy loam field soil. Test cells employed two loading rates (4 and 8cm/day) and 3 IS designs: open chamber, gravel, and synthetic bundles. The ratio of K(biozone) to the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the natural soil (K(s)) was used to quantify the reductions in the IS hydraulic conductivity. A smaller value of K(biozone)/K(s,) reflects a greater reduction in hydraulic conductivity. The IS hydraulic conductivity was reduced by 1-3 orders of magnitude. The reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity was primarily influenced by wastewater loading rate and IS type and not by the K(s) of the native soil. The higher loading rate yielded greater reductions in IS hydraulic conductivity than the lower loading rate for bundle and gravel cells, but the difference was not statistically significant for chamber cells. Bundle and gravel cells exhibited a greater reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity than chamber cells at the higher loading rates, while the difference between gravel and bundle systems was not statistically significant. At the lower rate, bundle cells exhibited generally lower K(biozone)/K(s) values, but not at a statistically significant level, while gravel and chamber cells were statistically similar. Gravel cells exhibited the greatest variability in measured values, which may complicate design efforts based on K(biozone) evaluations for these systems. These results suggest that chamber systems may provide for a more robust design, particularly for high or variable wastewater infiltration rates. PMID:17449084

  12. Spatial variability of steady-state infiltration into a two-layer soil system on burned hillslopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinner, D.A.; Moody, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Rainfall-runoff simulations were conducted to estimate the characteristics of the steady-state infiltration rate into 1-m2 north- and south-facing hillslope plots burned by a wildfire in October 2003. Soil profiles in the plots consisted of a two-layer system composed of an ash on top of sandy mineral soil. Multiple rainfall rates (18.4-51.2 mm h-1) were used during 14 short-duration (30 min) and 2 long-duration simulations (2-4 h). Steady state was reached in 7-26 min. Observed spatially-averaged steady-state infiltration rates ranged from 18.2 to 23.8 mm h-1 for north-facing and from 17.9 to 36.0 mm h-1 for south-facing plots. Three different theoretical spatial distribution models of steady-state infiltration rate were fit to the measurements of rainfall rate and steady-state discharge to provided estimates of the spatial average (19.2-22.2 mm h-1) and the coefficient of variation (0.11-0.40) of infiltration rates, overland flow contributing area (74-90% of the plot area), and infiltration threshold (19.0-26 mm h-1). Tensiometer measurements indicated a downward moving pressure wave and suggest that infiltration-excess overland flow is the runoff process on these burned hillslope with a two-layer system. Moreover, the results indicate that the ash layer is wettable, may restrict water flow into the underlying layer, and increase the infiltration threshold; whereas, the underlying mineral soil, though coarser, limits the infiltration rate. These results of the spatial variability of steady-state infiltration can be used to develop physically-based rainfall-runoff models for burned areas with a two-layer soil system. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Mobilization of bacteria in a bioinfilitration system during intermittent infiltration of stormwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, A.; Mohanty, S. K.; Torkelson, A. A.; Nelson, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    Green infrastructure, like bioinfintration systems in rain gardens, is increasingly being used in urban centers to harvest stormwater for reuse or groundwater replenishment, but the fate of stormwater contaminants in these systems is not well understood. The present study compared the ability of a bioinfiltration system packed with sand and a geomaterial (iron oxide coated sand, IOCS) to remove model bacterial pathogens (Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis) under intermittent flow conditions. Experiments were carried out in two phases: (1) saturated columns packed with either sand or IOCS were contaminated by injecting synthetic stormwater with bacteria followed by injection of uncontaminated stormwater and (2) the mobilization of sequestered bacteria by intermittent infiltration of stormwater was examined by pausing infiltration and allowing columns to drained under gravity, and then reapplying uncontaminated stormwater; results were compared to a column subjected to the same intermittent flow conditions but not allowed to drain. Intermittent flow mobilized a greater fraction of sequestered bacteria when the column was allowed to drain suggesting mobilizing by scouring by the air-water interface. A smaller fraction of sequestered bacteria were mobilized from IOCS than sand indicating that irreversible attachment on the IOCS surface reduced mobilization of bacteria during rewetting. Presence of NOM in stormwater increase the amount of bacteria mobilized from IOCS during intermittent flow. The result of the study indicates that use of geomedia such as IOCS that promotes irreversible attachment of bacteria and maintaining saturated condition could minimize the mobilization of bacteria from bioinfiltration systems.

  14. Residuejams and their effect on Infiltration, Runoff and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) in Furrow Irrigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailapalli, D. R.; Wallender, W. W.; Horwath, W.; Ma, S.; Lazicki, P.

    2007-12-01

    Crop residue, which consists of small debris of different sizes, is an important resource in agricultural ecosystems. It plays a vital role in conservation tillage as a best management practice (BMP) for reducing runoff, sediment, nutrient and pesticide transport from irrigated fields. In furrow irrigation, the predominant irrigation method in the world, as irrigation or winter runoff water moves along a furrow, it lifts the unanchored residue and transports across the field. The complex interaction of multiple residue pieces (debris) with itself, the soil matrix, and the fluid cause jams to form along the furrow. The residuejams can be thought of logjams in fluvial rivers or channels which help in increasing channel roughness to reduce flow velocities and shear stress along eroding banks. The logjams also create a hydraulic shadow, a low-velocity zone for some distance upstream that allows sediment to settle out and stabilize. Similarly, the residuejams help in formation of catchments, which promote increased infiltration and settlement of sediments along the furrow. The infiltration and residue interaction with the soil-water influence the runoff, sediment, nutrient and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export. The reduction of DOC export is critical to enhancing drinking water resources by reducing reactive sources of DOC that form carcinogenic by-products in the disinfection process. Hence, investigation of geomorphology of the residuejams is essential to understand their impact on infiltration, runoff and DOC concentration. This study focuses on the formation of residuejams and their effect on the infiltration, runoff and DOC concentration from 122 m long furrow plots with cover crop (CC), no-till (NT) and standard tillage (ST). These treatments (CC, NT and ST) were replicated three times using randomized complete block design and the plots initially, had 10, 32 and 42% of residue cover (sunflower residue on ST and NT; sunflower and wheat residue on CC plot

  15. Infiltration Pattern of Blood Monocytes into the Central Nervous System during Experimental Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Menasria, Rafik; Canivet, Coraline; Piret, Jocelyne; Boivin, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and distribution of infiltrating blood monocytes into the central nervous system and their involvement in the cerebral immune response together with resident macrophages, namely microglia, were evaluated in experimental herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (HSE). To distinguish microglia from blood monocyte-derived macrophages, chimeras were generated by conditioning C57BL/6 recipient mice with chemotherapy regimen followed by transplantation of bone morrow-derived cells that expressed the green fluorescent protein. Mice were infected intranasally with a sub-lethal dose of HSV-1 (1.2x106 plaque forming units). Brains were harvested prior to and on days 4, 6, 8 and 10 post-infection for flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry analysis. The amounts of neutrophils (P<0.05) and «Ly6Chi» inflammatory monocytes (P<0.001) significantly increased in the CNS compared to non-infected controls on day 6 post-infection, which corresponded to more severe clinical signs of HSE. Levels decreased on day 8 for both leukocytes subpopulations (P<0.05 for inflammatory monocytes compared to non-infected controls) to reach baseline levels on day 10 following infection. The percentage of «Ly6Clow» patrolling monocytes significantly increased (P<0.01) at a later time point (day 8), which correlated with the resolution phase of HSE. Histological analysis demonstrated that blood leukocytes colonized mostly the olfactory bulb and the brainstem, which corresponded to regions where HSV-1 particles were detected. Furthermore, infiltrating cells from the monocytic lineage could differentiate into activated local tissue macrophages that express the microglia marker, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1. The lack of albumin detection in the brain parenchyma of infected mice showed that the infiltration of blood leukocytes was not necessarily related to a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier but could be the result of a functional recruitment. Thus, our findings suggest

  16. Infiltration Pattern of Blood Monocytes into the Central Nervous System during Experimental Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Menasria, Rafik; Canivet, Coraline; Piret, Jocelyne; Boivin, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and distribution of infiltrating blood monocytes into the central nervous system and their involvement in the cerebral immune response together with resident macrophages, namely microglia, were evaluated in experimental herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (HSE). To distinguish microglia from blood monocyte-derived macrophages, chimeras were generated by conditioning C57BL/6 recipient mice with chemotherapy regimen followed by transplantation of bone morrow-derived cells that expressed the green fluorescent protein. Mice were infected intranasally with a sub-lethal dose of HSV-1 (1.2 x 10(6) plaque forming units). Brains were harvested prior to and on days 4, 6, 8 and 10 post-infection for flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry analysis. The amounts of neutrophils (P < 0.05) and "Ly6C hi" inflammatory monocytes (P < 0.001) significantly increased in the CNS compared to non-infected controls on day 6 post-infection, which corresponded to more severe clinical signs of HSE. Levels decreased on day 8 for both leukocytes subpopulations (P < 0.05 for inflammatory monocytes compared to non-infected controls) to reach baseline levels on day 10 following infection. The percentage of "Ly6C low" patrolling monocytes significantly increased (P < 0.01) at a later time point (day 8), which correlated with the resolution phase of HSE. Histological analysis demonstrated that blood leukocytes colonized mostly the olfactory bulb and the brainstem, which corresponded to regions where HSV-1 particles were detected. Furthermore, infiltrating cells from the monocytic lineage could differentiate into activated local tissue macrophages that express the microglia marker, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1. The lack of albumin detection in the brain parenchyma of infected mice showed that the infiltration of blood leukocytes was not necessarily related to a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier but could be the result of a functional recruitment. Thus, our

  17. Surface growth for molten silicon infiltration into carbon millimeter-sized channels: Lattice-Boltzmann simulations, experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, Danilo; Camarano, Antonio; Molina, José Miguel; Ortona, Alberto; Narciso, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The process of liquid silicon (Si) infiltration is investigated for channels with radii from 0.25[mm] to 0.75[mm] drilled in compact carbon (C) preforms. The advantage of this setup is that the study of the phenomenon results can be simplified. For comparison purposes, attempts are made in order to work out a framework for evaluating the accuracy of simulations. The approach relies on dimensionless numbers involving the properties of the surface reaction. It turns out that complex hydrodynamic behavior derived from second Newton law can be made consistent with Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations. The experiments give clear evidence that the growth of silicon carbide (SiC) proceeds in two different stages and basic mechanisms are highlighted. LB simulations prove to be an effective tool for the description of the growing phase. Namely, essential experimental constraints can be implemented. As a result, the existing models are useful to gain more insight on the process of reactive infiltration into porous media in the first stage of penetration, i.e. up to pore closure because of surface growth. A way allowing one to implement the resistance from chemical reaction in Darcy law is also proposed.

  18. Stable isotopes of water as a natural tracer for infiltration into urban sewer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracht, O.; Gresch, M.; de Bénédittis, J.; Prigiobbe, V.; Gujer, W.

    2003-04-01

    An adequate understanding of the hydraulic interaction between leaky sewers and groundwater is essential for the sustainable management of both sewer systems and aquifers in urbanized areas. Undesirable infiltration of groundwater into sewers can contribute over 50% of the total discharge and is detrimental to treatment plant efficiency. On the other hand, in many European cities groundwater surface levels seem to be particularly controlled by the drainage effect of permeable sewer systems. However, nowadays methods for the quantification of these exchange processes are still subject to considerable uncertainties due to their underlying assumptions. The frequently used assumption that the night time minimum in the diurnal wastewater hydrograph is equal to the "parasitic discharge" has to be reconsidered to today's patterns of human life as well as to the long residence time of wastewater in the sewer networks of modern cities. The suitability of stable water isotopes as a natural tracer to differentiate the origin of water in the sewer ("real" wastewater or infiltrating groundwater) is currently investigated in three different catchment areas. The studies are carried out within the framework of the European research project APUSS (Assessing Infiltration and Exfiltration on the Performance of Urban Sewer Systems): 1) The village of Rümlang (Zürich, Switzerland) is predominantly served with drinking water from the Lake Zürich. A large fraction of the lakes water is derived from precipitation in the Alps. This drinking water represents the intrinsic provenience of the wastewater with an δ18O value around -11,5 per mill and δ^2H value around -82 per mill vs. SMOW. In contrast, the local groundwater is originating from precipitation in a moderate altitude of about 450 m above sea level and shows comparatively enriched mean δ18O values of -9,7 per mill and δ^2H values of -70 per mill with only small natural variations. The isotopic separation between these

  19. EXCERPTS FROM CONTROL OF INFILTRATION AND INFLOW INTO SEWER SYSTEMS AND PREVENTION AND CORRECTION OF EXCESSIVE INFILTRATION AND INFLOW INTO SEWER SYSTEMS: A MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a result of a national study of the sources and prevention of infiltration and inflow, a Manual of Practice was proposed. The Manual is intended to serve as a guide to local officials in evaluating their construction practices, conducting surveys to determine the extent and lo...

  20. Numerical Studies of Infiltration Dynamics of Liquid-Copper and Silicon/Solid-Carbon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, K.; Sha, J. J.; Lei, Zhen-Kun; Maqsood, A.; Mujahid, M.

    2014-06-01

    Mathematical modeling of infiltration dynamics of liquid Cu-Si alloy into porous carbon is presented. Two-dimensional infiltration equations are developed using the Washburn equation in the limit of both interface and diffusion control, for situations where the capillary radius decreases either linear or parabolic, and the contact angles are assumed to exponentially decrease with time during infiltration. One major manufacturing process for the Cu-Si/C composites is liquid melt infiltration. This article focuses on nonequilibrium wetting effects and offers a fundamental approach to these complex kinetic phenomena.

  1. Effects of intermittent aeration on pollutants removal in subsurface wastewater infiltration system.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Fei, Hexin; Song, Siyu; Yuan, Fang; Yu, Long

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the pollutant removal performances in two pilot-scale subsurface wastewater infiltration systems (SWISs) with and without intermittent aeration were investigated. Matrix oxidation reduction potential (ORP) results showed that intermittent aeration well developed aerobic conditions in upper matrix and anoxic or anaerobic conditions in the subsequent sections, which resulted in high NH4(+)-N and TN removal. Moreover, intermittent aeration increased removal rates of COD and TP. Microbial populations and enzyme activities analysis proved that intermittent aeration not only obviously boosted the growth and reproduction of bacteria, fungus, actinomyces, nitrifying bacteria and denitrifying bacteria, but also successfully increased nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NIR) in the depth of 80 and 110 cm. The results suggest that the intermittent aeration could be a widespread research and application strategy for achieving the high removal performance in SWISs. PMID:26004389

  2. Absence, Legitimacy and System Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, R. Oliver

    As school systems grow both vertically and horizontally, they face forces tending both to unify (centripetal) and to disunify (centrifugal). A viable system growth involves a blend of both forces on both vertical and horizontal dimensions. It is often assumed that the disunifying impact of centrifugal forces is of such proportion that the…

  3. APSAS; an Automated Particle Size Analysis System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; Eliason, A.H.; Fredericks, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Automated Particle Size Analysis System integrates a settling tube and an electroresistance multichannel particle-size analyzer (Coulter Counter) with a Pro-Comp/gg microcomputer and a Hewlett Packard 2100 MX(HP 2100 MX) minicomputer. This system and its associated software digitize the raw sediment grain-size data, combine the coarse- and fine-fraction data into complete grain-size distributions, perform method of moments and inclusive graphics statistics, verbally classify the sediment, generate histogram and cumulative frequency plots, and transfer the results into a data-retrieval system. This system saves time and labor and affords greater reliability, resolution, and reproducibility than conventional methods do.

  4. Photovoltaic systems sizing for Algeria

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, A.H.; Driss, B.A.; Amimeur, R.; Lorenzo, E.

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an optimization method applicable to stand-alone photovoltaic systems as a function of its reliability. For a given loss-of-load probability (LLP), there are many combinations of battery capacity and photovoltaic array peak power. The problem consists in determining the couple which corresponds to a minimum total system cost. The method has been applied to various areas all over Algeria taking into account various climatic zones. The parameter used to define the different climatic zones is the clearness index KT for all the considered sites. The period of the simulation system is 10 years. 5 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Decreasing IV Infiltrates in the Pediatric Patient--System-Based Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Major, Tracie Wilt; Huey, Tricia K

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous infiltrates pose tremendous risk for the hospitalized pediatric patient. Infiltrate events increase hospital-acquired harm, the number of painful procedures, use of supplies, length of stay, and nursing time; it threatens relationships essential in patient- and family-centered care. The goal of this quality improvement project was to achieve a 10% decrease in the baseline infiltrate rate on two inpatient units and in the overall infiltrate rate across all of the pediatric units. A Lean Six Sigma methodology was used to guide project activities. Improvement strategies focused on evidence-based education, intravenous (IV) catheter securement, and family engagement. A comparative purposive sample was used to evaluate the pre- and post-implementation period to determine if desired project success measures were achieved. Data analysis revealed positive results across all units, with the number of events (n = 51 pre; n = 19 post) and the infiltration rates (13.5 pre; 7.1 post) decreasing over a three-month period. A decrease was also noted in the overall percent of IVs that infiltrated in the first 24 hours (45% pre; 42% post). A statistically significant increase (t = 15.16; p < 0.001) was noted in nurses' education pre- and post-assessment survey scores. The family engagement strategy revealed overall parental responses to be 88% positive. By decreasing infiltrates, quality of care improved, resulting in the delivery of safe, effective, and patient-centered IV therapy. PMID:27019937

  6. Sizing up the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebke, Heidi; Rogers, Meredith Park; Nargund-Joshi, Vanashri

    2011-01-01

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS 1993) states that by the end of fifth grade, students should understand that a model, such as those depicting the solar system, is a smaller version of the real product, making it easier to physically work with and therefore learn from. However, for students and even adults,…

  7. Improved cellular infiltration into nanofibrous electrospun cross-linked gelatin scaffolds templated with micrometer sized polyethylene glycol fibers

    PubMed Central

    Skotak, Maciej; Ragusa, Jorge; Gonzalez, Daniela; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2011-01-01

    Gelatin-based nanofibrous scaffolds with a mean fiber diameter of 300 nm were prepared with and without micrometer-sized polyethylene glycol (PEG) fibers that served as sacrificial templates. Upon fabrication of the scaffolds via electrospinning, the gelatin fibers were crosslinked with glutaraldehyde, and the PEG templates were removed using tert-butanol to yield nanofibrous scaffolds with pore diameters ranging from 10 to 100 µm, as estimated with mercury intrusion porosimetry. Non-templated gelatin-based nanofibrous matrices had an average pore size of 1 µm. Fibroblasts were seeded onto both types of the gelatin-based nanfibrous surfaces and cultured for 14 days. For comparative purposes, chitosan-based and polyurethane (PU)-based macroporous scaffolds with pore sizes of 100 µm and 170 µm, respectively, also were included. The number of cells as a function of the depth into the scaffold was judged and quantitatively assessed using nuclei staining. Cell penetration up to a depth of 250 µm and 90 µm was noted in gelatin scaffolds prepared with sacrificial templates and gelatin-only nanofibrous scaffolds. Noticeably, scaffold preparation protocol presented here allowed the structural integrity to be maintained even with high template content (95 %) and can be easily extended towards other classes of electrospun polymer matrices for tissue engineering. PMID:21931195

  8. OPTIMIZATION OF NITROGEN REMOVAL BY RAPID INFILTRATION. VOLUME 1. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION AND EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment performance of three rapid infiltration basins receiving primary treated municipal wastewater is evaluated for optimum total nitrogen control using a series of manual operational techniques and by remote control computer operation. Three types of loading sequences were ...

  9. Spacesuit Soft Upper Torso Sizing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graziosi, David; Splawn, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The passive sizing system consists of a series of low-profile pulleys attached to the front and back of the shoulder bearings on a spacesuit soft upper torso (SUT), textile cord or stainless steel cable, and a modified commercial ratchet mechanism. The cord/cable is routed through the pulleys and attached to the ratchet mechanism mounted on the front of the spacesuit within reach of the suited subject. Upon actuating the ratchet mechanism, the shoulder bearing breadth is changed, providing variable upper torso sizing. The active system consists of a series of pressurizable nastic cells embedded into the fabric layers of a spacesuit SUT. These cells are integrated to the front and back of the SUT and are connected to an air source with a variable regulator. When inflated, the nastic cells provide a change in the overall shoulder bearing breadth of the spacesuit and thus, torso sizing. The research focused on the development of a high-performance sizing and actuation system. This technology has application as a suit-sizing mechanism to allow easier suit entry and more accurate suit fit with fewer torso sizes than the existing EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) suit system. This advanced SUT will support NASA s Advanced EMU Evolutionary Concept of a two-sizes-fit-all upper torso for replacement of the current EMU hard upper torso (HUT). Both the passive and nastic sizing system approaches provide astronauts with real-time upper torso sizing, which translates into a more comfortable suit, providing enhanced fit resulting in improved crewmember performance during extravehicular activity. These systems will also benefit NASA by reducing flight logistics as well as overall suit system cost. The nastic sizing system approach provides additional structural redundancy over existing SUT designs by embedding additional coated fabric and uncoated fabric layers. Two sizing systems were selected to build into a prototype SUT: one active and one passive. From manned testing, it

  10. Ammonia Oxidizers in a Pilot-Scale Multilayer Rapid Infiltration System for Domestic Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Yingli; Xu, Meiying; Zhong, Yuming; Yang, Yongqiang; Chen, Fanrong; Guo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A pilot-scale multilayer rapid infiltration system (MRIS) for domestic wastewater treatment was established and efficient removal of ammonia and chemical oxygen demand (COD) was achieved in this study. The microbial community composition and abundance of ammonia oxidizers were investigated. Efficient biofilms of ammonia oxidizers in the stationary phase (packing material) was formed successfully in the MRIS without special inoculation. DGGE and phylogenetic analyses revealed that proteobacteria dominated in the MRIS. Relative abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) showed contrary tendency. In the flowing phase (water effluent), AOA diversity was significantly correlated with the concentration of dissolve oxygen (DO), NO3-N and NH3-N. AOB abundance was significantly correlated with the concentration of DO and chemical oxygen demand (COD). NH3-N and COD were identified as the key factors to shape AOB community structure, while no variable significantly correlated with that of AOA. AOA might play an important role in the MRIS. This study could reveal key environmental factors affecting the community composition and abundance of ammonia oxidizers in the MRIS. PMID:25479611

  11. Ammonia oxidizers in a pilot-scale multilayer rapid infiltration system for domestic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yingli; Xu, Meiying; Zhong, Yuming; Yang, Yongqiang; Chen, Fanrong; Guo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A pilot-scale multilayer rapid infiltration system (MRIS) for domestic wastewater treatment was established and efficient removal of ammonia and chemical oxygen demand (COD) was achieved in this study. The microbial community composition and abundance of ammonia oxidizers were investigated. Efficient biofilms of ammonia oxidizers in the stationary phase (packing material) was formed successfully in the MRIS without special inoculation. DGGE and phylogenetic analyses revealed that proteobacteria dominated in the MRIS. Relative abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) showed contrary tendency. In the flowing phase (water effluent), AOA diversity was significantly correlated with the concentration of dissolve oxygen (DO), NO3-N and NH3-N. AOB abundance was significantly correlated with the concentration of DO and chemical oxygen demand (COD). NH3-N and COD were identified as the key factors to shape AOB community structure, while no variable significantly correlated with that of AOA. AOA might play an important role in the MRIS. This study could reveal key environmental factors affecting the community composition and abundance of ammonia oxidizers in the MRIS. PMID:25479611

  12. Comparison of drop size distributions from two droplet sizing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, John R.; Ide, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison between the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and the combined measurements from Particle Measuring Systems' Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and the Optical Array Probe was conducted in an icing wind tunnel using NASA Icing Research Tunnel spray nozzles to produce the supercooled water droplet cloud. Clouds having a range of volume median diameters from 10 to greater than 50 microns were used for the instrument comparisons. A volume median diameter was calculated from combining the droplet distributions of the Optical Array Probe and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe. A comparison of the combined volume median diameters and the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer volume median diameters showed agreement from 10 microns up to 30 microns. Typical drop size distributions from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer, the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe, and Optical Array Probe are presented for several median volume diameters. A comparison of the distributions illustrates regions of the distributions where there is good agreement and other regions where there are discrepancies between the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and the Particle Measuring Systems' droplet size instruments.

  13. Center pivot simulator for evaluating system design and management effects on infiltration and erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 4-wheeled commercial irrigation boom was modified for use in investigating center pivot design and management effects on infiltration, runoff and erosion of specific soil types. The center pivot simulator used a hydraulic winch attached to the front of a tractor for mobilization and controlled tra...

  14. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Lee, Elizabeth; Kallam, Alekhya; Majumdar, Partha; Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J.; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James; Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  15. Robotic system for glovebox size reduction

    SciTech Connect

    KWOK,KWAN S.; MCDONALD,MICHAEL J.

    2000-03-02

    The Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center (ISRC) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing technologies for glovebox size reduction in the DOE nuclear complex. A study was performed for Kaiser-Hill (KH) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) on the available technologies for size reducing the glovebox lines that require size reduction in place. Currently, the baseline approach to these glovebox lines is manual operations using conventional mechanical cutting methods. The study has been completed and resulted in a concept of the robotic system for in-situ size reduction. The concept makes use of commercially available robots that are used in the automotive industry. The commercially available industrial robots provide high reliability and availability that are required for environmental remediation in the DOE complex. Additionally, the costs of commercial robots are about one-fourth that of the custom made robots for environmental remediation. The reason for the lower costs and the higher reliability is that there are thousands of commercial robots made annually, whereas there are only a few custom robots made for environmental remediation every year. This paper will describe the engineering analysis approach used in the design of the robotic system for glovebox size reduction.

  16. Sulfur-infiltrated porous carbon microspheres with controllable multi-modal pore size distribution for high energy lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Cunyu; Liu, Lianjun; Zhao, Huilei; Krall, Andy; Wen, Zhenhai; Chen, Junhong; Hurley, Patrick; Jiang, Junwei; Li, Ying

    2013-12-01

    Sulfur has received increasing attention as a cathode material for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries due to its high theoretical specific capacity. However, the commercialization of Li-S batteries is limited by the challenges of poor electrical conductivity of sulfur, dissolution of the polysulfide intermediates into the electrolyte, and volume expansion of sulfur during cycling. Herein, we report the fabrication of novel-structured porous carbon microspheres with a controllable multi-modal pore size distribution, i.e., a combination of interconnected micropores, mesopores and macropores. Cathodes made of sulfur infiltrated in such a hierarchical carbon framework provide several advantages: (1) a continuous and high surface area carbon network for enhanced electrical conductivity and high sulfur loading; (2) macropores and large mesopores bridged by small mesopores to provide good electrolyte accessibility and fast Li ion transport and to accommodate volume expansion of sulfur; and (3) small mesopores and micropores to improve carbon/sulfur interaction and to help trap polysulfides. An initial discharge capacity at 1278 mA h g-1 and capacity retention at 70.7% (904 mA h g-1) after 100 cycles at a high rate (1 C) were achieved. The material fabrication process is relatively simple and easily scalable.Sulfur has received increasing attention as a cathode material for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries due to its high theoretical specific capacity. However, the commercialization of Li-S batteries is limited by the challenges of poor electrical conductivity of sulfur, dissolution of the polysulfide intermediates into the electrolyte, and volume expansion of sulfur during cycling. Herein, we report the fabrication of novel-structured porous carbon microspheres with a controllable multi-modal pore size distribution, i.e., a combination of interconnected micropores, mesopores and macropores. Cathodes made of sulfur infiltrated in such a hierarchical carbon framework provide

  17. Study on nitrogen removal enhanced by shunt distributing wastewater in a constructed subsurface infiltration system under intermittent operation mode.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghua; Li, Haibo; Sun, Tieheng; Wang, Xin

    2011-05-15

    Subsurface wastewater infiltration system is an efficient and economic technology in treating small scattered sewage. The removal rates are generally satisfactory in terms of COD, BOD(5), TP and SS removal; while nitrogen removal is deficient in most of the present operating SWIS due to the different requirements for the presence of oxygen for nitrification and denitrification processes. To study the enhanced nitrogen removal technologies, two pilot subsurface wastewater infiltration systems were constructed in a village in Shenyang, China. The filled matrix was a mixture of 5% activated sludge, 65% brown soil and 30% coal slag in volume ratio for both systems. Intermittent operation mode was applied in to supply sufficient oxygen to accomplish the nitrification; meanwhile sewage was supplemented as the carbon source to the lower part in to denitrify. The constructed subsurface wastewater infiltration systems worked successfully under wetting-drying ratio of 1:1 with hydraulic loading of 0.081 m(3)/(m(2)d) for over 4 months. Carbon source was supplemented with shunt ratio of 1:1 and shunt position at the depth of 0.5m. The experimental results showed that intermittent operation mode and carbon source supplementation could significantly enhance the nitrogen removal efficiency with little influence on COD and TP removal. The average removal efficiencies for NH(3)-N and TN were 87.7 ± 1.4 and 70.1 ± 1.0%, increased by 12.5 ± 1.0 and 8.6 ± 0.7%, respectively. PMID:21402440

  18. A method for evaluating the evolution of clogging: application to the Pampulha Campus infiltration system (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Barraud, S; Gonzalez-Merchan, C; Nascimento, N; Moura, P; Silva, A

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the hydraulic performance of stormwater infiltration trenches, a study was undertaken to assess clogging and its distribution between the bottom and the sides. The method used was based on the calibration of the hydraulic resistance event by event according to Bouwer's model and applied to a demonstration trench in Belo-Horizonte monitored in the framework of the European Project Switch. The calibration was performed by minimizing the distance between measured and modeled infiltration flow rates and by using continuous measurements of rainfall, inflow, water temperature and depth in the trench. The study showed that the methodology and particularly Bouwer's model was able to produce satisfactory results. It revealed a significant clogging evolution within a year, with global resistance increasing by a factor of 9. A significant difference between the bottom and the sides was observed; the bottom being more rapidly prone to clogging. Sudden fluctuations of the hydraulic resistance of the bottom were found that could be explained by very high concentrations of total suspended solids from inflows (about 2,000 mg/L). Clogging of the sides evolves over the time but with a very low rate. PMID:24647190

  19. Soil Infiltration Characteristics in Agroforestry Systems and Their Relationships with the Temporal Distribution of Rainfall on the Loess Plateau in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lai; Zhong, Chonggao; Gao, Pengxiang; Xi, Weimin; Zhang, Shuoxin

    2015-01-01

    Many previous studies have shown that land use patterns are the main factors influencing soil infiltration. Thus, increasing soil infiltration and reducing runoff are crucial for soil and water conservation, especially in semi-arid environments. To explore the effects of agroforestry systems on soil infiltration and associated properties in a semi-arid area of the Loess Plateau in China, we compared three plant systems: a walnut (Juglans regia) monoculture system (JRMS), a wheat (Triticum aestivum) monoculture system (TAMS), and a walnut-wheat alley cropping system (JTACS) over a period of 11 years. Our results showed that the JTACS facilitated infiltration, and its infiltration rate temporal distribution showed a stronger relationship coupled with the rainfall temporal distribution compared with the two monoculture systems during the growing season. However, the effect of JTACS on the infiltration capacity was only significant in shallow soil layer, i.e., the 0–40 cm soil depth. Within JTACS, the speed of the wetting front’s downward movement was significantly faster than that in the two monoculture systems when the amount of rainfall and its intensity were higher. The soil infiltration rate was improved, and the two peaks of soil infiltration rate temporal distribution and the rainfall temporal distribution coupled in rainy season in the alley cropping system, which has an important significance in soil and water conservation. The results of this empirical study provide new insights into the sustainability of agroforestry, which may help farmers select rational planting patterns in this region, as well as other regions with similar climatic and environmental characteristics throughout the world. PMID:25893832

  20. Soil Infiltration Characteristics in Agroforestry Systems and Their Relationships with the Temporal Distribution of Rainfall on the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lai; Zhong, Chonggao; Gao, Pengxiang; Xi, Weimin; Zhang, Shuoxin

    2015-01-01

    Many previous studies have shown that land use patterns are the main factors influencing soil infiltration. Thus, increasing soil infiltration and reducing runoff are crucial for soil and water conservation, especially in semi-arid environments. To explore the effects of agroforestry systems on soil infiltration and associated properties in a semi-arid area of the Loess Plateau in China, we compared three plant systems: a walnut (Juglans regia) monoculture system (JRMS), a wheat (Triticum aestivum) monoculture system (TAMS), and a walnut-wheat alley cropping system (JTACS) over a period of 11 years. Our results showed that the JTACS facilitated infiltration, and its infiltration rate temporal distribution showed a stronger relationship coupled with the rainfall temporal distribution compared with the two monoculture systems during the growing season. However, the effect of JTACS on the infiltration capacity was only significant in shallow soil layer, i.e., the 0-40 cm soil depth. Within JTACS, the speed of the wetting front's downward movement was significantly faster than that in the two monoculture systems when the amount of rainfall and its intensity were higher. The soil infiltration rate was improved, and the two peaks of soil infiltration rate temporal distribution and the rainfall temporal distribution coupled in rainy season in the alley cropping system, which has an important significance in soil and water conservation. The results of this empirical study provide new insights into the sustainability of agroforestry, which may help farmers select rational planting patterns in this region, as well as other regions with similar climatic and environmental characteristics throughout the world. PMID:25893832

  1. Dynamically variable spot size laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R. (Inventor); Hurst, John F. (Inventor); Middleton, James R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A Dynamically Variable Spot Size (DVSS) laser system for bonding metal components includes an elongated housing containing a light entry aperture coupled to a laser beam transmission cable and a light exit aperture. A plurality of lenses contained within the housing focus a laser beam from the light entry aperture through the light exit aperture. The lenses may be dynamically adjusted to vary the spot size of the laser. A plurality of interoperable safety devices, including a manually depressible interlock switch, an internal proximity sensor, a remotely operated potentiometer, a remotely activated toggle and a power supply interlock, prevent activation of the laser and DVSS laser system if each safety device does not provide a closed circuit. The remotely operated potentiometer also provides continuous variability in laser energy output.

  2. Using artificial sweeteners to identify contamination sources and infiltration zones in a coupled river-aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichler, Andrea; Muellegger, Christian; Hofmann, Thilo

    2014-05-01

    In shallow or unconfined aquifers the infiltration of contaminated river water might be a major threat to groundwater quality. Thus, the identification of possible contamination sources in coupled surface- and groundwater systems is of paramount importance to ensure water quality. Micropollutants like artificial sweeteners are promising markers for domestic waste water in natural water bodies. Compounds, such as artificial sweeteners, might enter the aquatic environment via discharge of waste water treatment plants, leaky sewer systems or septic tanks and are ubiquitously found in waste water receiving waters. The hereby presented field study aims at the (1) identification of contamination sources and (2) delineation of infiltration zones in a connected river-aquifer system. River bank filtrate in the groundwater body was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively using a combined approach of hydrochemical analysis and artificial sweeteners (acesulfame ACE) as waste water markers. The investigated aquifer lies within a mesoscale alpine head water catchment and is used for drinking water production. It is hypothesized that a large proportion of the groundwater flux originates from bank filtrate of a nearby losing stream. Water sampling campaigns in March and July 2012 confirmed the occurrence of artificial sweeteners at the investigated site. The municipal waste water treatment plant was identified as point-source for ACE in the river network. In the aquifer ACE was present in more than 80% of the monitoring wells. In addition, water samples were classified according to their hydrochemical composition, identifying two predominant types of water in the aquifer: (1) groundwater influenced by bank filtrate and (2) groundwater originating from local recharge. In combination with ACE concentrations a third type of water could be discriminated: (3) groundwater influence by bank filtrate but infiltrated prior to the waste water treatment plant. Moreover, the presence of ACE

  3. Analysis of Infiltration Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    R. McCurley

    2003-10-27

    The primary objectives of this uncertainty analysis are: (1) to develop and justify a set of uncertain parameters along with associated distributions; and (2) to use the developed uncertain parameter distributions and the results from selected analog site calculations done in ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Modern and Potential Future Climates'' (USGS 2001 [160355]) to obtain the net infiltration weighting factors for the glacial transition climate. These weighting factors are applied to unsaturated zone (UZ) flow fields in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA), as outlined in the ''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approach'' (BSC 2002 [160146], Section 3.1) as a method for the treatment of uncertainty. This report is a scientific analysis because no new and mathematical physical models are developed herein, and it is based on the use of the models developed in or for ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Modern and Potential Future Climates'' (USGS 2001 [160355]). Any use of the term model refers to those developed in the infiltration numerical model report. TSPA License Application (LA) has included three distinct climate regimes in the comprehensive repository performance analysis for Yucca Mountain: present-day, monsoon, and glacial transition. Each climate regime was characterized using three infiltration-rate maps, including a lower- and upper-bound and a mean value (equal to the average of the two boundary values). For each of these maps, which were obtained based on analog site climate data, a spatially averaged value was also calculated by the USGS. For a more detailed discussion of these infiltration-rate maps, see ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Modern and Potential Future Climates'' (USGS 2001 [160355]). For this Scientific Analysis Report, spatially averaged values were calculated for the lower-bound, mean, and upper-bound climate analogs only for the glacial transition climate regime, within the

  4. Size and complexity in model financial systems.

    PubMed

    Arinaminpathy, Nimalan; Kapadia, Sujit; May, Robert M

    2012-11-01

    The global financial crisis has precipitated an increasing appreciation of the need for a systemic perspective toward financial stability. For example: What role do large banks play in systemic risk? How should capital adequacy standards recognize this role? How is stability shaped by concentration and diversification in the financial system? We explore these questions using a deliberately simplified, dynamic model of a banking system that combines three different channels for direct transmission of contagion from one bank to another: liquidity hoarding, asset price contagion, and the propagation of defaults via counterparty credit risk. Importantly, we also introduce a mechanism for capturing how swings in "confidence" in the system may contribute to instability. Our results highlight that the importance of relatively large, well-connected banks in system stability scales more than proportionately with their size: the impact of their collapse arises not only from their connectivity, but also from their effect on confidence in the system. Imposing tougher capital requirements on larger banks than smaller ones can thus enhance the resilience of the system. Moreover, these effects are more pronounced in more concentrated systems, and continue to apply, even when allowing for potential diversification benefits that may be realized by larger banks. We discuss some tentative implications for policy, as well as conceptual analogies in ecosystem stability and in the control of infectious diseases. PMID:23091020

  5. Size and complexity in model financial systems

    PubMed Central

    Arinaminpathy, Nimalan; Kapadia, Sujit; May, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    The global financial crisis has precipitated an increasing appreciation of the need for a systemic perspective toward financial stability. For example: What role do large banks play in systemic risk? How should capital adequacy standards recognize this role? How is stability shaped by concentration and diversification in the financial system? We explore these questions using a deliberately simplified, dynamic model of a banking system that combines three different channels for direct transmission of contagion from one bank to another: liquidity hoarding, asset price contagion, and the propagation of defaults via counterparty credit risk. Importantly, we also introduce a mechanism for capturing how swings in “confidence” in the system may contribute to instability. Our results highlight that the importance of relatively large, well-connected banks in system stability scales more than proportionately with their size: the impact of their collapse arises not only from their connectivity, but also from their effect on confidence in the system. Imposing tougher capital requirements on larger banks than smaller ones can thus enhance the resilience of the system. Moreover, these effects are more pronounced in more concentrated systems, and continue to apply, even when allowing for potential diversification benefits that may be realized by larger banks. We discuss some tentative implications for policy, as well as conceptual analogies in ecosystem stability and in the control of infectious diseases. PMID:23091020

  6. Stormwater quality of spring-summer-fall effluent from three partial-infiltration permeable pavement systems and conventional asphalt pavement.

    PubMed

    Drake, Jennifer; Bradford, Andrea; Van Seters, Tim

    2014-06-15

    This study examined the spring, summer and fall water quality performance of three partial-infiltration permeable pavement (PP) systems and a conventional asphalt pavement in Ontario. The study, conducted between 2010 and 2012, compared the water quality of effluent from two Interlocking Permeable Concrete Pavements (AquaPave(®) and Eco-Optiloc(®)) and a Hydromedia(®) Pervious Concrete pavement with runoff from an Asphalt control pavement. The usage of permeable pavements can mitigate the impact of urbanization on receiving surface water systems through quantity control and stormwater treatment. The PP systems provided excellent stormwater treatment for petroleum hydrocarbons, total suspended solids, metals (copper, iron, manganese and zinc) and nutrients (total-nitrogen and total-phosphorus) by reducing event mean concentrations (EMC) as well as total pollutant loadings. The PPs significantly reduced the concentration and loading of ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3), nitrite (NO2(-)) and organic-nitrogen (Org-N) but increased the concentration and loading of nitrate (NO3(-)). The PP systems had mixed performances for the treatment of phosphate (PO4(3-)). The PP systems increased the concentration of sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl) but EMCs remained well below recommended levels for drinking water quality. Relative to the observed runoff, winter road salt was released more slowly from the PP systems resulting in elevated spring and early-summer Cl and Na concentrations in effluent. PP materials were found to introduce dissolved solids into the infiltrating stormwater. The release of these pollutants was verified by additional laboratory scale testing of the individual pavement and aggregate materials at the University of Guelph. Pollutant concentrations were greatest during the first few months after construction and declined rapidly over the course of the study. PMID:24681366

  7. RAPID INFILTRATION WASTEWATER TREATMENT FOR SMALL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid infiltration treatment performance of three infiltration basins receiving primary treated municipal wastewater is evaluated for optimum total nitrogen control using a series of manual operational techniques and by remote control computer operation of a sprinkler system. Thr...

  8. Burkitt Lymphoma with Initial Clinical Presentation due to Infiltration of the Central Nervous System and Eye Orbits

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, Gustavo Bittencourt; Machado, Dequitier Carvalho; de Oliveira, Celso Estevão; Lacerda, Letícia da Silva; de Oliveira, Romulo Varella; de França Silva, Monique; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 17 Final Diagnosis: Burkitt lymphoma Symptoms: Anisocoria, ipsilateral ptosis, opthalmoparesis, paresis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Oncology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Burkitt lymphoma rarely affects the central nervous system and ocular region. Under these conditions, computed tomography and (particularly) magnetic resonance imaging of the skull increase the diagnostic accuracy, as they objectively show the topography of lesions and the effect of neoplasia on structures. Case Report: We report here the case of a 17-year-old male whose initial clinical manifestations were related to neurological impairment and to the ocular musculature and ocular innervation. The diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma with leukemization and infiltration of the central nervous system was confirmed. Conclusions: In this case, it is important to recognize that the neuroimaging findings were fundamentally important in indicating the initial form of the disease and in directing the appropriate clinical management. PMID:25243420

  9. Size limitations in semicircular duct systems

    PubMed

    Muller

    1999-06-01

    The present article discusses mechanical requirements and limitations which are applicable to the construction of the system of semicircular ducts, especially to its size. The simplified case of a single, uniform duct system has been considered which can be described by a second order equation of motion. The principal functional quantities for this rotation-sensor are: (1) response speed; (2) sensitivity; and (3) regular flow. The response speed of a single, uniform semicircular duct is characterized by the short time constant (T2) which is dependent on the duct radius (r). Its estimated range is from 0.04 ms in the smallest to 140 ms in the largest known labyrinth. The sensitivity is characterized by the maximal endolymph displacement after a step stimulus (xmax). Its estimated range is from 0.0016 &mgr;m to 5.97 mm (6.56 decades!), assuming an input angular velocity of omega=1 rad s-1. The Reynolds number is a measure for an undisturbed laminar flow. Its estimated range varies from 7.38.10(-4)to 45.1 for omega=1 rad s-1. The above data follow from graphs in which, for a single uniform duct, circuit radius (R) is plotted against duct radius (r) for labyrinths of 233 species belonging to different vertebrate-groups. A relation R =38.9. r1.60was determined. The smallest labyrinth was found in a carp larva (Cyprinus), the largest in a whale shark (Rhincodon). Large whales possess labyrinths of average mammalian size. It is revealed that semicircular duct size is bound by requirements concerning regular flow and by a too low response speed for large labyrinths, and by a too low sensitivity for small labyrinths. Other important quantities are mechanical amplification factors which are a consequence of more complex vestibular constructions than a single uniform duct circuit. Allometric relationships are interpreted as compromises between the quantities mentioned. A hypothesis for the relatively large semicircular duct sizes of fishes, especially Elasmobranchii, compared

  10. Reduced Boil-Off System Sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, Monica C.; Plachta, David W.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is currently developing cryogenic propellant storage and transfer systems for future space exploration and scientific discovery missions by addressing the need to raise the technology readiness level of cryogenic fluid management technologies. Cryogenic propellants are baselined in many propulsion systems due to their inherently high specific impulse; however, their low boiling points can cause substantial boil-off losses over time. Recent efforts such as the Reduced Boil-off Testing and the Active Thermal Control Scaling Study provide important information on the benefit of an active cooling system applied to LH2 propellant storage. Findings show that zero-boil off technologies can reduce overall mass in LH2 storage systems when low Earth orbit loiter periods extend beyond two months. A significant part of this mass reduction is realized by integrating two stages of cooling: a 20 K stage to intercept heat at the tank surface, and a 90 K stage to reduce the heat entering the less efficient 20 K stage. A missing element in previous studies, which is addressed in this paper, is the development of a direct method for sizing the 90 K cooling stage. Such a method requires calculation of the heat entering both the 90 K and 20 K stages as compared to the overall system masses, and is reliant upon the temperature distribution, performance, and unique design characteristics of the system in question. By utilizing the known conductance of a system without active thermal control, the heat being intercepted by a 90 K stage can be calculated to find the resultant lift and mass of each active thermal control stage. Integral to this is the thermal conductance of the cooling straps and the broad area cooling shield, key parts of the 90 K stage. Additionally, a trade study is performed to show the ability of the 90 K cooling stage to reduce the lift on the 20 K cryocooler stage, which is considerably less developed and efficient than 90 K cryocoolers.

  11. Micro-size polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, W. G.; Pipkin, J. L.; Anson, J. F.; Casciano, D. A.; Burns, E. R.

    1987-09-01

    The development and characterization of a micro-size two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system is described. Some of the techniques which have evolved with use of the system are also discussed. This apparatus has unique features which provide advantages over other small scale units. Up to ten first- and second-dimension gels can be processed simultaneously with excellent resolution of protein regions. Consistent reproducibility is possible from protein samples as small as 400 ng and individual protein regions as small as 1 pg can be visualized by silver staining of the two-dimensional gels. Similar sensitivities are achieved in autoradiographs of 3H-labeled proteins extracted from the nuclei of cultured cells. The application of this system in conjunction with flow cytometric examination of nuclear DNA and electrostatic cell sorting of specific cell nuclei to provide homogeneous sample populations, allows subtle variations in isotope incorporation in proteins to be detected; whereas many times in generalized tissue samples these changes are masked. Also, these techniques elucidate the effects of external stimuli (chemicals, drugs, or environment) on protein synthesis and phosphorylation for analyses and comparison. Fabrication drawings are available upon request.

  12. Performance of organics and nitrogen removal in subsurface wastewater infiltration systems by intermittent aeration and shunt distributing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Yuan, Fang; Yu, Long; Huang, Linli; Fei, Hexin; Cheng, Fan; Zhang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Organics and nitrogen removal in four subsurface wastewater infiltration systems (SWISs), named SWIS A (without intermittent aeration and shunt distributing wastewater), SWIS B (with intermittent aeration), SWIS C (with shunt distributing wastewater) and SWIS D (with intermittent aeration and shunt distributing wastewater) was investigated. High average removal rates of 92.3% for COD, 90.2% for NH4-N and 88.1% for TN were achieved simultaneously in SWIS D compared with SWIS A, B and C. The excellent TN removal of SWIS D was due to intermittent aeration provided sufficient oxygen for nitrification in upper matrix and the favorable anoxic or anaerobic environment for denitrification in subsequent matrix, and moreover, shunt distributing wastewater provided sufficient carbon source for denitrification process. The results indicated that intermittent artificial aeration combined with shunt distributing wastewater could achieve high organics and nitrogen removal in SWISs. PMID:27039353

  13. System size expansion for systems with an absorbing state.

    PubMed

    Di Patti, Francesca; Azaele, Sandro; Banavar, Jayanth R; Maritan, Amos

    2011-01-01

    The well-known van Kampen system size expansion, while of rather general applicability, is shown to fail to reproduce some qualitative features of the time evolution for systems with an absorbing state, apart from a transient initial time interval. We generalize the van Kampen ansatz by introducing a new prescription leading to non-Gaussian fluctuations around the absorbing state. The two expansion predictions are explicitly compared for the infinite range voter model with speciation as a paradigmatic model with an absorbing state. The new expansion, both for a finite size system in the large time limit and at finite time in the large size limit, converges to the exact solution as obtained in a numerical implementation using the Gillespie algorithm. Furthermore, the predicted lifetime distribution is shown to have the correct asymptotic behavior. PMID:21405654

  14. Wetted-perimeter dependent furrow infiltration and its implication for the hydraulic analysis of furrow irrigation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article discusses a methodology, derived from the two-dimensional Richards equation, for estimating furrow infiltration. The method was originally derived assuming a constant pressure head at the infiltrating surface. Application of the methodology to cases where the pressure head is variable ...

  15. Systemic leukopenia, evaluation of laminar leukocyte infiltration and laminar lesions in horses with naturally occurring colic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Laskoski, Luciane Maria; Locatelli-Dittrich, Rosangela; Valadão, Carlos Augusto Araújo; Deconto, Ivan; Gonçalves, Kamila Alcala; Montiani-Ferreira, Fabiano; Brum, Juliana Sperotto; de Brito, Harald Fernando Vicente; de Sousa, Renato Silva

    2015-08-01

    The present study was aimed at identifying laminar lesions and leukocyte infiltration in hoof laminar tissue of horses with colic syndrome and its correlation with the total leukocyte count before death. Six healthy horses were used as control group (CG), and eighteen horses with lethal gastrointestinal disease were divided into two groups: leukopenic group (LG) with seven leukopenic horses, and non-leukopenic group (NLG) with 11 horses with total leukocyte count within reference range for the species. Leukocyte infiltration was examined by immunohistochemistry. Laminar lesions were observed in both LG and NLG, with no differences in severity between them. LG showed increase of the leukocyte infiltration in the hoof laminar tissue, when compared to CG and NLG. Horses with severe colic syndrome (LG and NLG) developed intense laminar lesions without clinical signs of laminitis, with increased leukocyte infiltration. However, the LG demonstrated an even higher increase of leukocyte infiltration compared to both CG and NLG. PMID:26267083

  16. Infiltration Flow Path Distributions in Unsaturated Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, T. K.; Olson, K. R.; Wan, J.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial distributions of infiltration flow paths through rock formations are complex networks that determine flow velocities, control rates of natural geochemical reactions in the subsurface, as well as rates of contaminant transport to underlying groundwater. Despite these important consequences, distributions of infiltration paths and locally fast seepage rates through rocks are not well understood. Laboratory-based studies on fractured rocks cannot easily be conducted on systems large enough to include sufficient fracture network complexity, so that inferences of field-scale flux distributions cannot be reliably made. Field-based studies to date have permitted quantification of only a small fraction of the flow distribution, typically while imposing extremely high fluxes, and therefore have not allowed comprehensive delineation of flow distributions expected under natural recharge. Based on hydraulic scaling considerations, we hypothesize that unsaturated flow path distributions in rock deposits will be similar to those occurring in fractured rock formations under low overall infiltration rates. Talus rock deposits and mine waste rock piles control flow and transport into their respective underlying groundwaters. All of these reasons motivated infiltration experiments in rock packs. Experiments have been conducted on 4 different rock types and system scales ranging from 1 to 46 rock layers. Our experiments showed that infiltration through rocks conforms to no previously reported behavior in soils, and that flow paths do not progressively converge into fewer and fewer flow paths. Instead, a fundamentally different hydraulic structure develops, having an exponential (geometric) flux distribution, with the characteristic scale determined by the characteristic rock size. Although the phenomena are very different, the evolution of flow path distributions and local seepage rate distributions is predictable based on a statistical mechanical model for energy

  17. The Effect Of Pixel Size On The Detection Rate Of Early Pulmonary Sarcoidosis In Digital Chest Radiographic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMahon, Heber; Vyborny, Carl; Powell, Gregory; Doi, Kunio; Metz, Charles E.

    1984-08-01

    In digital radiography the pixel size used determines the potential spatial resolution of the system. The need for spatial resolution varies depending on the subject matter imaged. In many areas, including the chest, the minimum spatial resolution requirements have not been determined. Sarcoidosis is a disease which frequently causes subtle interstitial infiltrates in the lungs. As the initial step in an investigation designed to determine the minimum pixel size required in digital chest radiographic systems, we have studied 1 mm pixel digitized images on patients with early pulmonary sarcoidosis. The results of this preliminary study suggest that neither mild interstitial pulmonary infiltrates nor other abnormalities such as pneumothoraces may be detected reliably with 1 mm pixel digital images.

  18. A numerical study of infiltration and solidification/remelting of pure metal in a porous preform

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, X.; Khan, J.A.; Hawkins, L.E.

    1995-12-31

    Infiltration and solidification/remelting of pure metal in a preform is modeled numerically. The preform is assumed to be two-dimensional porous media. It is also assumed that under the action of constant applied pressure, the flow of liquid metal through the preform is within the range of the validity of Darcy`s Law. The distinguishing feature of this flow and heat transfer problem is the existence of two moving fronts--the infiltration front and the phase-change front. The governing momentum and energy equations are cast into a Body-Fitted Coordinate (BFC) system to track the transient positions of both fronts during the infiltration process. For the sake of generality the parameters that govern the infiltration process are non-dimensionalized. The dimensionless groups which govern the infiltration process include the applied pressure difference ({Psi}{sub 1}), the melting temperature ({theta}{sub m}), the preform permeability ratio, the porosity ({phi}), and the geometric sizes (inlet gate size {delta}, and the preform aspect ratio L/H). A computational code has been developed to solve the problem and is verified using the available published results. The key parameters describing the physical phenomenon (infiltration front, remelting front, total infiltration time and remelting region size) are presented as a function of the operating variables (i.e., {Psi}{sub 1}, {theta}{sub m}, {phi}, {omega} and {delta}). The results can be used to optimize the infiltration processing of Metal-Matrix Composites and other related manufacturing processes.

  19. Melt infiltration of silicon carbide compacts. I - Study of infiltration dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, Rajiv; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    1992-01-01

    Countergravity, pressure-assisted infiltration with a 2014 Al alloy of suitably tamped porous compacts of platelet shaped single crystals of alpha (hexagonal) silicon carbide was used to measure particulate wettability and infiltration kinetics under dynamic conditions relevant to pressure casting of composites. A threshold pressure P(th) for ingression of the infiltrant was identified based on the experimental penetration length versus pressure profiles for a range of experimental variables which included infiltration pressure, infiltration time, SiC size and SiC surface chemistry. The results showed that P(th) decreased whereas the penetration length increased with increasing SiC size and infiltration time. Cu-coated SiC led to lower P(th) and larger penetration lengths compared to uncoated SiC under identical conditions. These observations have been discussed in the light of theoretical models of infiltration and the kinetics of wetting.

  20. Infiltration into Fractured Bedrock

    SciTech Connect

    Salve, Rohit; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Jones, Robert

    2007-09-01

    One potential consequence of global climate change and rapid changes in land use is an increased risk of flooding. Proper understanding of floodwater infiltration thus becomes a crucial component of our preparedness to meet the environmental challenges of projected climate change. In this paper, we present the results of a long-term infiltration experiment performed on fractured ash flow tuff. Water was released from a 3 x 4 m{sup 2} infiltration plot (divided into 12 square subplots) with a head of {approx}0.04 m, over a period of {approx}800 days. This experiment revealed peculiar infiltration patterns not amenable to current infiltration models, which were originally developed for infiltration into soils over a short duration. In particular, we observed that in part of the infiltration plot, the infiltration rate abruptly increased a few weeks into the infiltration tests. We suggest that these anomalies result from increases in fracture permeability during infiltration, which may be caused by swelling of clay fillings and/or erosion of infill debris. Interaction of the infiltration water with subsurface natural cavities (lithophysal cavities) could also contribute to such anomalies. This paper provides a conceptual model that partly describes the observed infiltration patterns in fractured rock and highlights some of the pitfalls associated with direct extension of soil infiltration models to fractured rock over a long period.

  1. Pollutants removal in subsurface infiltration systems by shunt distributing wastewater with/without intermittent aeration under different shunt ratios.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Linli; Yu, Long; Zheng, Fanping; Cheng, Fan; Zhang, Jiadi

    2016-10-01

    Matrix dissolved oxygen (DO), removal of COD, TP and nitrogen in subsurface infiltration systems (SISs), named SIS A (without intermittent aeration and shunt distributing wastewater), SIS B (with shunt distributing wastewater) and SIS C (with intermittent aeration and shunt distributing wastewater) were investigated. Aerobic conditions were developed in 50cm depth and anoxic or anaerobic conditions were not changed in 80 and 110cm depth by intermittent aeration. Under appropriate shunt ratios, shunt distributing wastewater improved denitrification and had little influence on COD, TP and NH3-N removal. Under the optimal shunt ratio of 1:2 for SIS C, high average removal rates of COD (90.06%), TP (93.17%), NH3-N (88.20%) and TN (85.79%) were obtained, which were higher than those in SIS A (COD: 82.56%, TP: 92.76%, NH3-N: 71.08%, TN: 49.24%) and SIS B (COD: 81.12%, TP: 92.58%, NH3-N: 69.14%, TN: 58.73%) under the optimal shunt ratio of 1:3. PMID:27347804

  2. Physics and Size in Biological Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George

    1989-01-01

    Described is the subject of biological scaling for physics teachers including examples and in-depth reading. Topics are elements of scaling, terminal velocities, Lilliputian and Brobdingnagian, brain evolution, dolphin echolocation, surface tension, gravity change, food and oxygen, and seeing. Ten references on physics and size, and ten questions…

  3. Geological modeling and infiltration pattern of a karstic system based upon crossed geophysical methods and image-guided inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Lea; Jardani, Abderrahim; Fournier, Matthieu; Massei, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Karstic aquifers represent an important part of the water resources worldwide. Though they have been widely studied on many aspects, their geological and hydrogeological modeling is still complex. Geophysical methods can provide useful subsurface information for the characterization and mapping of karstic systems, especially when not accessible by speleology. The site investigated in this study is a sinkhole-spring system, with small diameter conduits that run within a chalk aquifer (Norville, in Upper Normandy, France). This site was investigated using several geophysical methods: electrical tomography, self-potential, mise-à-la-masse methods, and electromagnetic method (EM34). Coupling those results with boreholes data, a 3D geological model of the hydrogeological basin was established, including tectonic features as well as infiltration structures (sinkhole, covered dolines). The direction of the karstic conduits near the main sinkhole could be established, and the major fault was shown to be a hydraulic barrier. Also the average concentration of dolines on the basin could be estimated, as well as their depth. At last, several hypotheses could be made concerning the location of the main conduit network between the sinkhole and the spring, using previous hydrodynamic study of the site along with geophysical data. In order to validate the 3D geological model, an image-guided inversion of the apparent resistivity data was used. With this approach it is possible to use geological cross sections to constrain the inversion of apparent resistivity data, preserving both discontinuities and coherences in the inversion of the resistivity data. This method was used on the major fault, enabling to choose one geological interpretation over another (fault block structure near the fault, rather than important folding). The constrained inversion was also applied on covered dolines, to validate the interpretation of their shape and depth. Key words: Magnetic and electrical

  4. 40 CFR 35.927-1 - Infiltration/inflow analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Infiltration/inflow analysis. 35.927-1... Infiltration/inflow analysis. (a) The infiltration/inflow analysis shall demonstrate the nonexistence or possible existence of excessive infiltration/inflow in the sewer system. The analysis should identify...

  5. 40 CFR 35.927-1 - Infiltration/inflow analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Infiltration/inflow analysis. 35.927-1... Infiltration/inflow analysis. (a) The infiltration/inflow analysis shall demonstrate the nonexistence or possible existence of excessive infiltration/inflow in the sewer system. The analysis should identify...

  6. Assessing potential impacts of a wastewater rapid infiltration basin system on groundwater quality: a delaware case study.

    PubMed

    Andres, A S; Sims, J Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Rapid infiltration basin systems (RIBS) are receiving increased interest for domestic wastewater disposal in rural areas. They rely on natural treatment processes to filter pollutants and use extremely high effluent loading rates, much greater than natural precipitation, applied to a small geographic area instead of disposal to surface water. Concerns exist today that adopting RIBS in areas with shallow groundwater and sandy soils may increase ground and surface water pollution. We conducted a field study of RIBS effects on N and P concentrations in soils and groundwater at Cape Henlopen State Park, Delaware, where a RIBS designed and operated following USEPA guidance has been used for >25 yr. Site and wastewater characteristics (water table of 8 m, Fe- and Al-oxide coatings on soils, organic-rich effluent) were favorable for denitrification and P sorption; however, we found high P saturation, reduced soil P sorption capacity, and significant total P accumulation at depths >1.5 m, factors that could lead to dissolved P leaching. Very low soil inorganic N levels suggest that wastewater N was converted rapidly to NO-N and leached from the RIBS. Extensive groundwater monitoring supported these concerns and showed rapid offsite transport of N and P at concentrations similar to the effluent. Results suggest that high hydraulic loads and preferential flow led to flow velocities that were too large, and contact times between effluent and soils that were too short, for effective N and P attenuation processes. These findings indicate the need for better site characterization and facility designs to reduce and monitor contaminant loss from RIBS in similar settings. PMID:23673831

  7. Soil properties controlling infiltration in volcanic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neris, Jonay; Tejedor, Marisa; Jiménez, Concepción

    2013-04-01

    Soil water infiltration is an important process whose behaviour depends on external factors and soil properties that vary depending on the type of soil. The soil parameters affecting the infiltration capacity of six soil orders all formed on volcanic materials (andisols, vertisols, alfisols, aridisols, inceptisols, and entisols) and contribute to the differences between them were studied in this paper. A total of 108 sites were selected on the island of Tenerife (Spain). The main soil properties were analysed and the steady-state infiltration rate measured using a double-ring infiltrometer. The relationship between the soil properties and infiltration was modelled using statistical Principal Components Analysis and regressions. The research concludes that the relation between structural development and texture play a decisive role. The high structural development of non-vitric andisols, due to the high organic matter and short-range-order mineral content, leads to an extremely fast infiltration rate. The structural instability and fine texture of aridisols produce low infiltration. In less developed soils (entisols and vitric andisols) where aggregate formation is minimal or non-existent, the coarse grain size is the relevant factor determining their very fast and extremely fast infiltration. In vertisols and alfisols, which have strong aggregation but low stability, clay type and content play an important role and lead to a moderate and moderately fast steady-state infiltration rate, respectively. In the most typic inceptisols, with moderate structural development and stability, the balance of the properties is largely responsible for the intermediate infiltration rate observed.

  8. System for inspecting large size structural components

    DOEpatents

    Birks, Albert S.; Skorpik, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for inspecting large scale structural components such as concrete walls or the like. The system includes a mobile gamma radiation source and a mobile gamma radiation detector. The source and detector are constructed and arranged for simultaneous movement along parallel paths in alignment with one another on opposite sides of a structural component being inspected. A control system provides signals which coordinate the movements of the source and detector and receives and records the radiation level data developed by the detector as a function of source and detector positions. The radiation level data is then analyzed to identify areas containing defects corresponding to unexpected variations in the radiation levels detected.

  9. Solar power satellite system sizing tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Monford, L. G.

    1981-01-01

    Technical and economic tradeoffs of smaller solar power satellite systems configured with larger antennas, reduced output power, and smaller rectennas, are considered. The differential costs in electricity for seven antenna/rectenna configurations operating at 2.45 GHz and five satellite systems operating at 5.8 GHz are calculated. Two 2.45 GHz configurations dependent upon the ionospheric power density limit are chosen as examples. If the ionospheric limit could be increased to 54 mW sq/cm from the present 23 mW sq/cm level, a 1.53 km antenna satellite operating at 2.45 GHz would provide 5.05 GW of output power from a 6.8 km diameter rectenna. This system gives a 54 percent reduction in rectenna area relative to the reference solar power satellite system at a modest 17 percent increase in electricity costs. At 5.8 GHz, an 0.75 km antenna providing 2.72 GW of power from a 5.8 km diameter rectenna is selected for analysis. This configuration would have a 67 percent reduction in rectenna area at a 36 percent increase in electricity costs. Ionospheric, atmospheric, and thermal limitations are discussed. Antenna patterns for three configurations to show the relative main beam and sidelobe characteristics are included.

  10. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-03-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma. PMID:24892564

  11. Microcanonical analysis of a finite-size nonequilibrium system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julian

    2016-05-01

    Microcanonical analysis is a powerful method that can be used to generalize the concept of phase transitions to finite-size systems. However, microcanonical analysis has only been applied to equilibrium systems. I show that it is possible to conduct the microcanonical analysis of a finite-size nonequilibrium system by generalizing the concept of microcanonical entropy. A one-dimensional asymmetric diffusion process is studied as an example for which such a generalized entropy can be explicitly found, and the microcanonical method is used to define a generalized phase transition for the finite-size nonequilibrium system.

  12. Therapy with Recombinant T-cell Receptor Ligand reduces infarct size and infiltrating inflammatory cells in brain after middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dziennis, Suzan; Mader, Sarah; Akiyoshi, Kozaburo; Ren, Xuefang; Ayala, Patricia; Burrows, Gregory G.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Herson, Paco S.; Hurn, Patricia D.; Offner, Halina

    2011-01-01

    Stroke induces a biphasic effect on the peripheral immune response that involves early activation of peripheral leukocytes followed by severe immunosuppression and atrophy of the spleen. Peripheral immune cells, including T lymphocytes, migrate to the brain and exacerbate the developing infarct. Recombinant T-cell receptor (TCR) Ligand (RTL)551 is designed as a partial TCR agonist for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-reactive T cells and has demonstrated the capacity to limit infarct volume and inflammation in brain when administered to mice undergoing middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The goal of this study was to determine if RTL551 could retain protection when given within the therapeutically relevant 4h time window currently in clinical practice for stroke patients. RTL551 was administered subcutaneously 4h after MCAO, with repeated doses every 24h until the time of euthanasia. Cell numbers were assessed in the brain, blood, spleen and lymph nodes and infarct size was measured after 24 and 96h reperfusion. RTL551 reduced infarct size in both cortex and striatum at 24h and in cortex at 96h after MCAO and inhibited the accumulation of inflammatory cells in brain at both time points. At 24h post-MCAO, RTL551 reduced the frequency of the activation marker, CD44, on T-cells in blood and in the ischemic hemisphere. Moreover, RTL551 reduced expression of the chemokine receptors, CCR5 in lymph nodes and spleen, and CCR7 in the blood and lymph nodes. These data demonstrate effective treatment of experimental stroke with RTL551 within a therapeutically relevant 4h time window through immune regulation of myelin-reactive inflammatory T-cells. PMID:21472429

  13. Nine-size system for chemical defense gloves. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Robinette, K.M.; Annis, J.F.

    1986-07-01

    The purpose of this effort was to meet the need for improved sizing of chemical defense gloves for Air Force men and women. A nine-size system was developed from available hand data. The development process and size values are presented in this report. Some summary statistics and regression equations are provided to aid investigators who may wish to make modifications. Although the anthropometric sizing system outlined in this report is statistically sound, it is experimental. The authors recommend that anthropometric fit-testing be conducted prior to full-scale glove production.

  14. Electron beam size measurements in the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.K.; Burov, A.V.; Bolshakov, T.B.; Shemyakin, A.; Seletskiy, S.M.; /Rochester U.

    2005-09-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide maximum cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable apertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper will focus on results of these measurements of the beam size and the difficulties in making those measurements.

  15. Electron Beam Size Measurements in the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T. K.; Burov, A. V.; Bolshakov, T. B.; Shemyakin, A.; Seletskiy, S. M.

    2006-03-20

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide maximum cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable apertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper will focus on results of these measurements of the beam size and the difficulties in making those measurements.

  16. A stochastic method for stand-alone photovoltaic system sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Cabral, Claudia Valeria Tavora; Filho, Delly Oliveira; Martins, Jose Helvecio; Toledo, Olga Moraes

    2010-09-15

    Photovoltaic systems utilize solar energy to generate electrical energy to meet load demands. Optimal sizing of these systems includes the characterization of solar radiation. Solar radiation at the Earth's surface has random characteristics and has been the focus of various academic studies. The objective of this study was to stochastically analyze parameters involved in the sizing of photovoltaic generators and develop a methodology for sizing of stand-alone photovoltaic systems. Energy storage for isolated systems and solar radiation were analyzed stochastically due to their random behavior. For the development of the methodology proposed stochastic analysis were studied including the Markov chain and beta probability density function. The obtained results were compared with those for sizing of stand-alone using from the Sandia method (deterministic), in which the stochastic model presented more reliable values. Both models present advantages and disadvantages; however, the stochastic one is more complex and provides more reliable and realistic results. (author)

  17. Using Bitmaps for Medium Sized Information Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookstein, A.; Klein, S. T.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the theoretical framework of a retrieval system that uses data structures called bitmaps to improve search algorithms for medium-sized systems. Information retrieval systems that contain the full text of the documents are discussed, and the use of inverted files such as concordances for small texts is explained. (24 references) (LRW)

  18. Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cheryl B.; Conger, Bruce C.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Bue, Grant C.; Rouen, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    An effort was initiated by NASA/JSC in 2001 to develop an Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT) for the sizing of Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) architecture and studies. Its intent was to support space suit development efforts and to aid in conceptual designs for future human exploration missions. Its basis was the Life Support Options Performance Program (LSOPP), a spacesuit and portable life support system (PLSS) sizing program developed for NASA/JSC circa 1990. EVAS_SAT estimates the mass, power, and volume characteristics for user-defined EVAS architectures, including Suit Systems, Airlock Systems, Tools and Translation Aids, and Vehicle Support equipment. The tool has undergone annual changes and has been updated as new data have become available. Certain sizing algorithms have been developed based on industry standards, while others are based on the LSOPP sizing routines. The sizing algorithms used by EVAS_SAT are preliminary. Because EVAS_SAT was designed for use by members of the EVA community, subsystem familiarity on the part of the intended user group and in the analysis of results is assumed. The current EVAS_SAT is operated within Microsoft Excel 2003 using a Visual Basic interface system.

  19. Habitual Size and Projective Size: The Logic of Spatial Systems in Children's Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange-Kuttner, C.

    2009-01-01

    The current study analyzed figure size modification in different types of spatial context (C. Lange-Kuttner, 1997, 2004) for sequence and practice effects. Children of 7, 9, and 11 years of age, as well as 17-year-olds, drew figures in a series of ready-made spatial axes systems, which (a) logically increased in dimensional complexity as in child…

  20. Fire, Water and the Earth Below: Quantifying the Geochemical Signature of Fire in Infiltration Water and their Impacts on Underlying Karst Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupingna, A.

    2015-12-01

    Fires are natural hazards that affect communities globally and while many studies about their effects on environments such as forests and woodlands have been extensively researched, the effects of fire on karst is a topic that is not well understood. The sensitivity of caves to environmental changes make karst systems natural record keepers of environmental events and have been used as proxies for paleo environmental studies in recent times. Building on from this, karsts could potentially also be used to extend currently known fire histories beyond recorded events further back in time. Identifying quantifiable signatures in infiltration water characteristics from the burnt environments and how they are altered as they travel from a soil dominated medium (overlying soil) to a carbonate dominated medium (underlying karst system), is the key identifying fire signatures in the caves through which these waters flow. Multiple infiltration experiments conducted using a soil column set up (soil profiles from burnt environment) amended to represent a subsurface cave system (Fig. 1), have been conducted to measure chemical composition, organic matter, carbon dioxide concentrations, pH, electronic conductivity and alkalinity after a controlled fire over the test site at Yarrangobilly Caves in the Snowy Mountains, NSW. Recurring trends in the variables of the infiltration water could be identified and used to identify a fire signature originating from surface to cave. The fire event on which this paper is based is a cool controlled fire over Yarrangobilly Caves, very similar to back burning practises undertaken in regions prone to wildfires globally. In saying this, samples from hotspots that had experienced higher temperatures, had also been collected for this experiment to simulate the effects of hotter wildfires on the underlying karst systems. Figure 1: Soil column with isolated chamber containing limestone used to represent a subsurface karst environment

  1. Propulsion system filter sizing considerations for the Galileo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Guernsey, Carl S.; Callas, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Filtration capacity of the Galileo propulsion system has been investigated. Ground testing of flight spare components has been conducted to determine the representative number and size distribution of particulate matter collected in flow tests. For these tests and for filter qualification tests, a number of effects were examined. The influence of gravitational particle settling on ground test results vs the flight environment was considered. Centrifugal effects inherent in the test apparatus and/or the propulsion system could have an influence. Variability among particle sizing techniques was explored. The influence of size distribution, particle shape, and density in the choice of a particulate test material was studied. Characteristics for AC Coarse Dust (an industry standard filter test media), microscopic polymer beads, and aluminum oxide particulate test matter are listed. Filtration tests were conducted using AC Coarse Dust and mixtures containing components of AC Coarse Dust. These results are expected to be useful data for filter sizing of future spacecraft.

  2. Isotopic evidence for the infiltration of mantle and metamorphic CO2-H2O fluids from below in faulted rocks from the San Andreas Fault System

    SciTech Connect

    Pili, E.; Kennedy, B.M.; Conrad, M.E.; Gratier, J.-P.

    2010-12-15

    To characterize the origin of the fluids involved in the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system, we carried out an isotope study of exhumed faulted rocks from deformation zones, vein fillings and their hosts and the fluid inclusions associated with these materials. Samples were collected from segments along the SAF system selected to provide a depth profile from upper to lower crust. In all, 75 samples from various structures and lithologies from 13 localities were analyzed for noble gas, carbon, and oxygen isotope compositions. Fluid inclusions exhibit helium isotope ratios ({sup 3}He/{sup 4}He) of 0.1-2.5 times the ratio in air, indicating that past fluids percolating through the SAF system contained mantle helium contributions of at least 35%, similar to what has been measured in present-day ground waters associated with the fault (Kennedy et al., 1997). Calcite is the predominant vein mineral and is a common accessory mineral in deformation zones. A systematic variation of C- and O-isotope compositions of carbonates from veins, deformation zones and their hosts suggests percolation by external fluids of similar compositions and origin with the amount of fluid infiltration increasing from host rocks to vein to deformation zones. The isotopic trend observed for carbonates in veins and deformation zones follows that shown by carbonates in host limestones, marbles, and other host rocks, increasing with increasing contribution of deep metamorphic crustal volatiles. At each crustal level, the composition of the infiltrating fluids is thus buffered by deeper metamorphic sources. A negative correlation between calcite {delta}{sup 13}C and fluid inclusion {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He is consistent with a mantle origin for a fraction of the infiltrating CO{sub 2}. Noble gas and stable isotope systematics show consistent evidence for the involvement of mantle-derived fluids combined with infiltration of deep metamorphic H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} in faulting, supporting the involvement of

  3. A system for aerodynamically sizing ultrafine environmental radioactive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Olawoyin, L.

    1995-09-01

    The unattached environmental radioactive particles/clusters, produced mainly by {sup 222}Rn in indoor air, are usually few nanometers in size. The inhalation of these radioactive clusters can lead to deposition of radioactivity on the mucosal surface of the tracheobronchial tree. The ultimate size of the cluster together with the flow characteristics will determine the depositional site in the human lung and thus, the extent of damage that can be caused. Thus, there exists the need for the determination of the size of the radioactive clusters. However, the existing particle measuring device have low resolution in the sub-nanometer range. In this research, a system for the alternative detection and measurement of the size of particles/cluster in the less than 2 nm range have been developed. The system is a one stage impactor which has a solid state spectrometer as its impaction plate. It`s major feature is the nozzle-to-plate separation, L. The particle size collected changes with L and thus, particle size spectroscopy is achieved by varying L. The number of collected particles is determined by alpha spectroscopy. The size-discriminating ability of the system was tested with laboratory generated radon particles and it was subsequently used to characterize the physical (size) changes associated with the interaction of radon progeny with water vapor and short chain alcohols in various support gases. The theory of both traditional and high velocity jet impactors together with the design and evaluation of the system developed in this study are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The major results obtained in the course of the study are also presented.

  4. Convergence of Topological Entanglement Entropy for Finite Size Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Clare; Herrera, Raul; Rezayi, Edward

    2014-03-01

    Quantum information theoretic concepts have been widely used to study topological phases of condensed matter, the prime examples of which are fractional quantum Hall states. Interest in these phases is driven in part by their potential use in fault-tolerant topological quantum computation. In particular, quantum entanglement has proven to be a useful tool to probe topological order. We present numerical studies for some model fractional quantum Hall states in spherical and toroidal geometries. We implement bipartitioning of the system with both orbital and real space cuts for small size systems. Additionally, we compare the topological entanglement entropies obtained from low-order Renyi entropies to the expected value to determine whether our results converge for small sizes. We extend these studies to generic Hamiltonians and discuss the prospect of obtaining the topological entanglement entropy from finite size calculations in these systems.

  5. Micro-size optical fibre strain interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, Nezih; Xiao, Gaozhi; Guo, Honglei

    2008-03-01

    Within several countries, the military is undergoing significant economic pressure to extend the use of its air fleet beyond its established design life. The availability of low weight, small size, reliable and cost-effective technologies to detect and monitor incipient damage and to alert prior to catastrophic failures is critical to sustain operational effectiveness. To enable the implementation of distributed and highly multiplexed optical fiber sensors networks to aerospace platforms, the data acquisition (interrogation) system has to meet small size and low weight requirements. This paper reports on our current development of micro-sized Echelle Diffractive Gratings (EDG) based interrogation system for strain monitoring of serially multiplexed fibre Bragg grating sensors. The operation principle of the interrogator and its suitability for strain measurements is demonstrated. Static load measurements obtained using this system are compared to those acquired using a optical multi-wavelength meter and are found to have strong correlation.

  6. Regulation of Inhibition of Neutrophil Infiltration by the Two-Component Regulatory System CovRS in Subcutaneous Murine Infection with Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinquan; Zhu, Hui; Feng, Wenchao; Liu, Mengyao; Song, Yingli; Zhang, Xiaolan; Zhou, Yang; Bei, Weicheng

    2013-01-01

    Hypervirulent invasive group A streptococcus (GAS) isolates inhibit neutrophil infiltration more than pharyngitis isolates do, and the molecular basis of this difference is not well understood. This study was designed to first determine whether natural null mutation of the two-component regulatory system CovRS is responsible for the enhancement of the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment seen in hypervirulent GAS. Next, we examined the role of CovRS-regulated interleukin-8/CXC chemokine peptidase (SpyCEP), C5a peptidase (ScpA), and platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (SsE) in the enhanced innate immune evasion. Invasive isolate MGAS5005 induces less neutrophil infiltration and produced a greater lesion area than pharyngitis isolate MGAS2221 in subcutaneous infections of mice. It is known that MGAS5005, but not MGAS2221, has a natural 1-bp deletion in the covS gene. Replacement of covSΔ1bp in MGAS5005 with wild-type covS resulted in the MGAS2221 phenotype. Deletion of covS from MGAS2221 resulted in the MGAS5005 phenotype. Tests of single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the MGAS5005 sse, spyCEP, and scpA genes found that SsE plays a more important role than SpyCEP and ScpA in the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment and that SsE, SpyCEP, and ScpA do not have synergistic effects on innate immune evasion by MGAS5005. Deletion of sse, but not spyCEP or scpA, of MGAS2221 enhances neutrophil recruitment. Thus, covS null mutations can cause substantial inhibition of neutrophil recruitment by enhancing the expression of the chemoattractant-degrading virulence factors, and SsE, but not SpyCEP or ScpA, is required for CovRS-regulated GAS inhibition of neutrophil infiltration. PMID:23319556

  7. Infiltration flux distributions in unsaturated rock deposits andtheir potential implications for fractured rock formations

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Olson, Keith R.; Wan, Jiamin

    2004-11-01

    Although water infiltration through unconsolidated rocks and fractured rock formations control flow and transport to groundwater, spatial distributions of flow paths are poorly understood. Infiltration experiments conducted on packs of rocks showed that a well-constrained distribution of fluxes develops despite differences in rock type (angular diabase and sandstone, and subangular serpentinite), rock size (30 to 200mm), and packing (up to 42 rock layers). Fluxes stabilize into a geometric (exponential) distribution that keeps about half of the system depleted of flow, retains a small fraction of high flow regions, and has a characteristic scale determined by the rock size. Modification of a statistical mechanical model shows that gravity-directed, random flowpaths evolve to the observed flux distribution, and that it represents the most probable distribution. Key similarities between infiltration in rock deposits and fractured rock formations indicate that the geometric flow distribution may also apply in the latter systems.

  8. Pneumatic System for Concentration of Micrometer-Size Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David; Cooper, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    A report describes a size-sorting method to separate and concentrate micrometer- size dust from a broad size range of particles without using sieves, fluids, or other processes that may modify the composition or the surface properties of the dust. The system consists of four processing units connected in series by tubing. Samples of dry particulates such as lunar soil are introduced into the first unit, a fluidized bed. The flow of introduced nitrogen fluidizes the particulates and preferentially moves the finer grain sizes on to the next unit, a flat plate impactor, followed by a cyclone separator, followed by a Nuclepore polycarbonate filter to collect the dust. By varying the gas flow rate and the sizes of various orifices in the system, the size of the final and intermediate particles can be varied to provide the desired products. The dust can be collected from the filter. In addition, electron microscope grids can be placed on the Nuclepore filter for direct sampling followed by electron microscope characterization of the dust without further handling.

  9. Cellular Manufacturing System with Dynamic Lot Size Material Handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khannan, M. S. A.; Maruf, A.; Wangsaputra, R.; Sutrisno, S.; Wibawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    Material Handling take as important role in Cellular Manufacturing System (CMS) design. In several study at CMS design material handling was assumed per pieces or with constant lot size. In real industrial practice, lot size may change during rolling period to cope with demand changes. This study develops CMS Model with Dynamic Lot Size Material Handling. Integer Linear Programming is used to solve the problem. Objective function of this model is minimizing total expected cost consisting machinery depreciation cost, operating costs, inter-cell material handling cost, intra-cell material handling cost, machine relocation costs, setup costs, and production planning cost. This model determines optimum cell formation and optimum lot size. Numerical examples are elaborated in the paper to ilustrate the characterictic of the model.

  10. Air encapsulation during infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Herkelrath, W.N.; Murphy, F.

    1988-01-01

    A series of field and laboratory experiments were performed to measure the effects of air encapsulation within the soil's transmission zone upon several infiltration properties. In the field, infiltration rates were measured using a double-cap infiltrometer and soil-water contents were measured using time-domain reflectometry (TDR). In the laboratory, infiltration experiments were peformed using repacked soil columns using TDR and CO 2 flooding. Results suggest that a significant portion of the total encapsulated air resided in interconnected pores within the soil's transmission zone. For the time scale considered, this residual air caused the effective hydraulic conductivity of the transmission zone to remain at a level no greater than 20% of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil. -from Authors

  11. A procedure for sizing propulsion system filter capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Guernsey, S.

    1992-01-01

    A propulsion system filter has the function of protecting downstream components from propellant-borne particulate matter. A the same time, it must be designed with sufficient capacity to ensure that it will not clog during the life of the spacecraft. This capacity can be quantitatively calculated by means of the procedure described here. Previous work has presented limited data which suggest that filter clogging is a function of the number and size of ingested particles. Cleaning specifications for propusion system components are also normally given in terms of the number and size of particles removed by the flow of test fluid. It is proposed here that the filter capacity be given in terms of the number and size of particles, which in turn may be convected to an equivalent quantity of test dust.

  12. A highly efficient tumor-infiltrating MDSC differentiation system for discovery of anti-neoplastic targets, which circumvents the need for tumor establishment in mice.

    PubMed

    Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Gato, Maria; Caliendo, Fabio; Kochan, Grazyna; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Van der Jeught, Kevin; Arce, Frederick; Guerrero-Setas, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquin; Santamaria, Enrique; Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2014-09-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) exhibit potent immunosuppressive activities in cancer. MDSCs infiltrate tumors and strongly inhibit cancer-specific cytotoxic T cells. Their mechanism of differentiation and identification of MDSC-specific therapeutic targets are major areas of interest. We have devised a highly efficient and rapid method to produce very large numbers of melanoma-infiltrating MDSCs ex vivo without inducing tumors in mice. These MDSCs were used to study their differentiation, immunosuppressive activities and were compared to non-neoplastic counterparts and conventional dendritic cells using unbiased systems biology approaches. Differentially activated/deactivated pathways caused by cell type differences and by the melanoma tumor environment were identified. MDSCs increased the expression of trafficking receptors to sites of inflammation, endocytosis, changed lipid metabolism, and up-regulated detoxification pathways such as the expression of P450 reductase. These studies uncovered more than 60 potential novel therapeutic targets. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that P450 reductase is the target of pro-drugs such as Paclitaxel, which depletes MDSCs following chemotherapy in animal models of melanoma and in human patients. Conversely, P450 reductase protects MDSCs against the cytotoxic actions of other chemotherapy drugs such as Irinotecan, which is ineffective for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25151659

  13. A highly efficient tumor-infiltrating MDSC differentiation system for discovery of anti-neoplastic targets, which circumvents the need for tumor establishment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Gato, Maria; Caliendo, Fabio; Kochan, Grazyna; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Van der Jeught, Kevin; Arce, Frederick; Guerrero-Setas, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquin; Santamaria, Enrique; Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) exhibit potent immunosuppressive activities in cancer. MDSCs infiltrate tumors and strongly inhibit cancer-specific cytotoxic T cells. Their mechanism of differentiation and identification of MDSC-specific therapeutic targets are major areas of interest. We have devised a highly efficient and rapid method to produce very large numbers of melanoma-infiltrating MDSCs ex vivo without inducing tumors in mice. These MDSCs were used to study their differentiation, immunosuppressive activities and were compared to non-neoplastic counterparts and conventional dendritic cells using unbiased systems biology approaches. Differentially activated/deactivated pathways caused by cell type differences and by the melanoma tumor environment were identified. MDSCs increased the expression of trafficking receptors to sites of inflammation, endocytosis, changed lipid metabolism, and up-regulated detoxification pathways such as the expression of P450 reductase. These studies uncovered more than 60 potential novel therapeutic targets. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that P450 reductase is the target of pro-drugs such as Paclitaxel, which depletes MDSCs following chemotherapy in animal models of melanoma and in human patients. Conversely, P450 reductase protects MDSCs against the cytotoxic actions of other chemotherapy drugs such as Irinotecan, which is ineffective for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25151659

  14. An expert system based software sizing tool, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, David

    1990-01-01

    A software tool was developed for predicting the size of a future computer program at an early stage in its development. The system is intended to enable a user who is not expert in Software Engineering to estimate software size in lines of source code with an accuracy similar to that of an expert, based on the program's functional specifications. The project was planned as a knowledge based system with a field prototype as the goal of Phase 2 and a commercial system planned for Phase 3. The researchers used techniques from Artificial Intelligence and knowledge from human experts and existing software from NASA's COSMIC database. They devised a classification scheme for the software specifications, and a small set of generic software components that represent complexity and apply to large classes of programs. The specifications are converted to generic components by a set of rules and the generic components are input to a nonlinear sizing function which makes the final prediction. The system developed for this project predicted code sizes from the database with a bias factor of 1.06 and a fluctuation factor of 1.77, an accuracy similar to that of human experts but without their significant optimistic bias.

  15. Cascades in the Threshold Model for varying system sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karampourniotis, Panagiotis; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Szymanski, Boleslaw; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2015-03-01

    A classical model in opinion dynamics is the Threshold Model (TM) aiming to model the spread of a new opinion based on the social drive of peer pressure. Under the TM a node adopts a new opinion only when the fraction of its first neighbors possessing that opinion exceeds a pre-assigned threshold. Cascades in the TM depend on multiple parameters, such as the number and selection strategy of the initially active nodes (initiators), and the threshold distribution of the nodes. For a uniform threshold in the network there is a critical fraction of initiators for which a transition from small to large cascades occurs, which for ER graphs is largerly independent of the system size. Here, we study the spread contribution of each newly assigned initiator under the TM for different initiator selection strategies for synthetic graphs of various sizes. We observe that for ER graphs when large cascades occur, the spread contribution of the added initiator on the transition point is independent of the system size, while the contribution of the rest of the initiators converges to zero at infinite system size. This property is used for the identification of large transitions for various threshold distributions. Supported in part by ARL NS-CTA, ARO, ONR, and DARPA.

  16. Porous body infiltrating method

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2002-01-01

    A mixture is formed that comprises at least some to about 10 wt % boron nitride and silicon. A body comprising a component that is wetted by or reacts with silicon is contacted with the mixture and the contacted body is infiltrated with silicon from the mixture.

  17. Reactive Melt Infiltration Of Silicon Into Porous Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, Donald R.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    1994-01-01

    Report describes study of synthesis of silicon carbide and related ceramics by reactive melt infiltration of silicon and silicon/molybdenum alloys into porous carbon preforms. Reactive melt infiltration has potential for making components in nearly net shape, performed in less time and at lower temperature. Object of study to determine effect of initial pore volume fraction, pore size, and infiltration material on quality of resultant product.

  18. Habitat patch size and mating system as determinants of social group size in coral-dwelling fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, V. J.; Munday, P. L.; Jones, G. P.

    2007-03-01

    It is thought that the size and dispersion of habitat patches can determine the size and composition of animal social groups, however, this has rarely been tested. The relationship between group size, the mating system, and habitat patch size in six species of coral-dwelling gobies was examined. For all species, there was a positive correlation between coral colony size and social group size, however the strength of this relationship varied among species. Paragobiodon xanthosomus exhibited the strongest relationship and a manipulative field experiment confirmed that coral colony size limited group size in this species. For other species including Paragobiodon melanosomus and Eviota bifasciata, either a highly conservative mating system ( P. melanosomus), or increased mobility ( E. bifasciata) appeared to disrupt the relationship between habitat patch size and group size. There was no consistent relationship between the mating system exhibited and group size among the species investigated. These results demonstrate that habitat patch size, mobility, and mating systems can interact in complex ways to structure group size even among closely related species.

  19. Micadur: Compact insulation system for medium-sized turbo generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aare, V.; Schuler, R. H.

    1981-12-01

    A high voltage, Class F, vacuum pressure impregnated insulation system for wound stator cores of the medium size turbogenerators is described. With this total impregnation technique the insulation process has been revolutionized. The excellent characteristics of this synthetic resin insulation system have made it possible to redesign the end winding support system for decisive improvement in reliability. This has been confirmed by operating experience in recent years. Test procedures were modified to suit the new insulation process and new repair procedures have been developed.

  20. Stormwater infiltration trenches: a conceptual modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Freni, Gabriele; Mannina, Giorgio; Viviani, Gaspare

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, limitations linked to traditional urban drainage schemes have been pointed out and new approaches are developing introducing more natural methods for retaining and/or disposing of stormwater. These mitigation measures are generally called Best Management Practices or Sustainable Urban Drainage System and they include practices such as infiltration and storage tanks in order to reduce the peak flow and retain part of the polluting components. The introduction of such practices in urban drainage systems entails an upgrade of existing modelling frameworks in order to evaluate their efficiency in mitigating the impact of urban drainage systems on receiving water bodies. While storage tank modelling approaches are quite well documented in literature, some gaps are still present about infiltration facilities mainly dependent on the complexity of the involved physical processes. In this study, a simplified conceptual modelling approach for the simulation of the infiltration trenches is presented. The model enables to assess the performance of infiltration trenches. The main goal is to develop a model that can be employed for the assessment of the mitigation efficiency of infiltration trenches in an integrated urban drainage context. Particular care was given to the simulation of infiltration structures considering the performance reduction due to clogging phenomena. The proposed model has been compared with other simplified modelling approaches and with a physically based model adopted as benchmark. The model performed better compared to other approaches considering both unclogged facilities and the effect of clogging. On the basis of a long-term simulation of six years of rain data, the performance and the effectiveness of an infiltration trench measure are assessed. The study confirmed the important role played by the clogging phenomenon on such infiltration structures. PMID:19587416

  1. Analysis of rainfall infiltration law in unsaturated soil slope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-rong; Qian, Ya-jun; Wang, Zhang-chun; Zhao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    In the study of unsaturated soil slope stability under rainfall infiltration, it is worth continuing to explore how much rainfall infiltrates into the slope in a rain process, and the amount of rainfall infiltrating into slope is the important factor influencing the stability. Therefore, rainfall infiltration capacity is an important issue of unsaturated seepage analysis for slope. On the basis of previous studies, rainfall infiltration law of unsaturated soil slope is analyzed. Considering the characteristics of slope and rainfall, the key factors affecting rainfall infiltration of slope, including hydraulic properties, water storage capacity (θs - θr), soil types, rainfall intensities, and antecedent and subsequent infiltration rates on unsaturated soil slope, are discussed by using theory analysis and numerical simulation technology. Based on critical factors changing, this paper presents three calculation models of rainfall infiltrability for unsaturated slope, including (1) infiltration model considering rainfall intensity; (2) effective rainfall model considering antecedent rainfall; (3) infiltration model considering comprehensive factors. Based on the technology of system response, the relationship of rainfall and infiltration is described, and the prototype of regression model of rainfall infiltration is given, in order to determine the amount of rain penetration during a rain process. PMID:24672332

  2. Analysis of Rainfall Infiltration Law in Unsaturated Soil Slope

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gui-rong; Qian, Ya-jun; Wang, Zhang-chun; Zhao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    In the study of unsaturated soil slope stability under rainfall infiltration, it is worth continuing to explore how much rainfall infiltrates into the slope in a rain process, and the amount of rainfall infiltrating into slope is the important factor influencing the stability. Therefore, rainfall infiltration capacity is an important issue of unsaturated seepage analysis for slope. On the basis of previous studies, rainfall infiltration law of unsaturated soil slope is analyzed. Considering the characteristics of slope and rainfall, the key factors affecting rainfall infiltration of slope, including hydraulic properties, water storage capacity (θs - θr), soil types, rainfall intensities, and antecedent and subsequent infiltration rates on unsaturated soil slope, are discussed by using theory analysis and numerical simulation technology. Based on critical factors changing, this paper presents three calculation models of rainfall infiltrability for unsaturated slope, including (1) infiltration model considering rainfall intensity; (2) effective rainfall model considering antecedent rainfall; (3) infiltration model considering comprehensive factors. Based on the technology of system response, the relationship of rainfall and infiltration is described, and the prototype of regression model of rainfall infiltration is given, in order to determine the amount of rain penetration during a rain process. PMID:24672332

  3. Central nervous system infiltrates are characterized by features of ongoing B cell-related immune activity in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Batoulis, Helena; Wunsch, Marie; Birkenheier, Johannes; Rottlaender, Andrea; Gorboulev, Valentin; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-05-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) lymphoid follicle-like aggregates have been reported in the meninges of patients. Here we investigated the functional relevance of B cell infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS) in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a B cell-dependent mouse model of MS. In chronic EAE, B cell aggregates were characterized by the presence of CXCL13(+) and germinal center CD10(+) B cells. Germline transcripts were expressed in the CNS and particularly related to TH17-associated isotypes. We also observed B cells with restricted VH gene usage that differed from clones found in the spleen. Finally, we detected CNS-restricted spreading of the antigen-specific B cell response towards a myelin and a neuronal autoantigen. These data imply the development of autonomous B cell-mediated autoimmunity in the CNS in EAE - a concept that might also apply to MS itself. PMID:25796192

  4. Chlorine stable isotopes in sedimentary systems: does size matter?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Max

    2004-01-01

    Stable isotope abundances vary because of size differences. The chlorine stable isotope system was one of the first described theoretically, but had a slow, disappointment strewn development, relative to other elements. Method improvement gave only small, but significant, differences in compositions of geological materials. Eventually, brines and groundwater chlorides gave larger differences. Physical processes like diffusion and adsorption, probably are the main controls of groundwater compositions. Recent work on anthropogenic groundwater contaminants shows variations resulting from manufacturing processes; implying possibilities of tracing sources.

  5. Automatic milking systems, farm size, and milk production.

    PubMed

    Rotz, C A; Coiner, C U; Soder, K J

    2003-12-01

    Automatic milking systems (AMS) offer relief from the demanding routine of milking. Although many AMS are in use in Europe and a few are used in the United States, the potential benefit for American farms is uncertain. A farm-simulation model was used to determine the long-term, whole-farm effect of implementing AMS on farm sizes of 30 to 270 cows. Highest farm net return to management and unpaid factors was when AMS were used at maximal milking capacity. Adding stalls to increase milking frequency and possibly increase production generally did not improve net return. Compared with new traditional milking systems, the greatest potential economic benefit was a single-stall AMS on a farm size of 60 cows at a moderate milk production level (8600 kg/cow). On other farm sizes using single-stall type robotic units, losses in annual net return of 0 dollars to 300 dollars/cow were projected, with the greatest losses on larger farms and at high milk production (10,900 kg/cow). Systems with one robot serving multiple stalls provided a greater net return than single-stall systems, and this net return was competitive with traditional parlors for 50- to 130-cow farm sizes. The potential benefit of AMS was improved by 100 dollars/cow per year if the AMS increased production an additional 5%. A 20% reduction in initial equipment cost or doubling milking labor cost also improved annual net return of an AMS by up to 100 dollars/cow. Annual net return was reduced by 110 dollars/cow, though, if the economic life of the AMS was reduced by 3 yr for a more rapid depreciation than that normally used with traditional milking systems. Thus, under current assumptions, the economic return for an AMS was similar to that of new parlor systems on smaller farms when the milking capacity of the AMS was well matched to herd size and milk production level. PMID:14740859

  6. 40 CFR 142.303 - Which size public water systems can receive a small system variance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Which size public water systems can... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Variances for Small System General Provisions § 142.303 Which size public water systems...

  7. Resin infiltration transfer technique

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David V.; Baranwal, Rita

    2009-12-08

    A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

  8. Tool for Sizing Analysis of the Advanced Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hue-Hsie Jannivine; Brown, Cheryl B.; Jeng, Frank J.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced Life Support Sizing Analysis Tool (ALSSAT) is a computer model for sizing and analyzing designs of environmental-control and life support systems (ECLSS) for spacecraft and surface habitats involved in the exploration of Mars and Moon. It performs conceptual designs of advanced life support (ALS) subsystems that utilize physicochemical and biological processes to recycle air and water, and process wastes in order to reduce the need of resource resupply. By assuming steady-state operations, ALSSAT is a means of investigating combinations of such subsystems technologies and thereby assisting in determining the most cost-effective technology combination available. In fact, ALSSAT can perform sizing analysis of the ALS subsystems that are operated dynamically or steady in nature. Using the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet software with Visual Basic programming language, ALSSAT has been developed to perform multiple-case trade studies based on the calculated ECLSS mass, volume, power, and Equivalent System Mass, as well as parametric studies by varying the input parameters. ALSSAT s modular format is specifically designed for the ease of future maintenance and upgrades.

  9. Study of circulating immune complex size in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Tung, K S; DeHoratius, R J; Williams, R C

    1981-01-01

    The molecular size of circulating immune complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus was determined by the C1q solid-phase assay after the sera were fractionated by sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation. Circulating immune complexes in patients with membranous glomerulonephritis were uniformly large, sedimenting exclusively above 19S, whereas the immune complexes in patients with cerebritis were small, at or just above 7S. In lupus patients with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis and patients without renal involvement, immune complexes of both large and small sizes were found. Of patients without renal involvement, more circulating immune complexes were associated with active disease (n = 22, prevalence = 82%, mean level = 24 standard deviations) than with inactive disease (n = 17, prevalence = 41%, mean level = 41%, mean level = 6 . 5 standard deviations). In patients with clinical evidence for renal involvement, circulating immune complexes were detected in all of five patients with membranous glomerulonephritis, in 88% of 17 patients with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis and in one of four patients with mesangial nephritis. Thus, in addition to the finding of an overall positive correlation between disease activity and circulating immune complex levels, circulating immune complexes of certain general molecular size ranges appear to be associated with different clinical manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7285395

  10. Response of infiltration capacity to thinning treatment in Japanese cypress plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, M.; Onda, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Forest management practice such as thinning treatment changes the physical structure of stands and canopy and ecohydrology in the forest system, resulting in the change of runoff and hydrological processes in watershed scale. Understory vegetation is a major factor controlling infiltration rate in a forested hillslope because it can reduce the raindrop impact to surface soil, trap the litter, and form the macropore in surface soil. In unmanaged Japanese cypress forest, understory vegetation has decreased because of high stand density and low light conditions, resulting in low infiltration due to surface sealing and crusting and overland flow generation. In such forest, improvement of infiltration capacity is expected by the recovery of understory vegetation after a thinning treatment, but the effect of the practice on infiltration has never been evaluated due to the lack of infiltration measurement in situ. The objective of this study is to elucidate the response of infiltration capacity to thinning treatment in Japanese cypress plantation. Rainfall simulation experiments on a plot-scale were conducted on 21 forested hillslopes experienced by various thinning treatments in Japanese cypress plantation in Yamaguchi Prefecture, western Japan. The average values of infiltration capacity in the unthinned and thinned plots were 51 and 152 mm/h, respectively. The relative light intensity of the thinned plots was higher than that of the unthinned plots. The cover percentages and dry weights of understory vegetation and litter of the thinned plots were greater than those of the unthinned plots. The organic matter content, bulk density, and soil particle size distribution of surface soil (4-cm in depth) had little difference between the unthinned and thinned plots, indicating that the physical properties of surface soil were less likely to change after a thinning treatment. These results suggest that above-ground biomass can increase with the light condition of forest floor

  11. A novel hybrid (wind-photovoltaic) system sizing procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Hocaoglu, Fatih O.; Gerek, Oemer N.; Kurban, Mehmet

    2009-11-15

    Wind-photovoltaic hybrid system (WPHS) utilization is becoming popular due to increasing energy costs and decreasing prices of turbines and photovoltaic (PV) panels. However, prior to construction of a renewable generation station, it is necessary to determine the optimum number of PV panels and wind turbines for minimal cost during continuity of generated energy to meet the desired consumption. In fact, the traditional sizing procedures find optimum number of the PV modules and wind turbines subject to minimum cost. However, the optimum battery capacity is either not taken into account, or it is found by a full search between all probable solution spaces which requires extensive computation. In this study, a novel description of the production/consumption phenomenon is proposed, and a new sizing procedure is developed. Using this procedure, optimum battery capacity, together with optimum number of PV modules and wind turbines subject to minimum cost can be obtained with good accuracy. (author)

  12. Groundwater Mounding Beneath Stormwater Infiltration Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmer, M.; Thompson, A. M.; Misra, D.

    2007-12-01

    An accurate understanding of groundwater mound formation is important in the proper design of stormwater infiltration basins since these basins are often required to recharge a portion of pre-development infiltration volume. Mound formation due to localized recharge may reduce the infiltration rate of the basin and the ability of the soil to filter pollutants. The goal of this research was to understand groundwater mounding and the potential for contaminant transport resulting from recharge beneath stormwater infiltration basins. A 0.10 ha infiltration basin serving a 9.4 ha residential subdivision in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin was used in this study. Subsurface conditions included sand and gravel material and a groundwater table at 2.3 m below grade. Three storm events, 4.9 cm, 2.8 cm, and 4.3 cm, between August 2006 and April 2007 were modeled using the two-dimensional numerical model HYDRUS. The calibrated model was used to evaluate hypothetical basin operation scenarios for various basin sizes, soil types, ponding depths, and water table depths. The groundwater mound intersected the basin floor in most scenarios with loamy sand and sandy loam soils, an unsaturated thickness of 1.52 m, and a ponding depth of 0.61 m. No groundwater table response was observed with ponding depths less than 0.31 m with an unsaturated zone thickness of 6.09 m. The mound height was most sensitive to hydraulic conductivity and unsaturated zone thickness. A 7.6 cm sediment layer delayed the time to reach maximum mound height, but had a minimal effect on the magnitude of the mound. Mound heights increased as infiltration basin size increased.

  13. System Size Resonance Associated with Canard Phenomenon in a Biological Cell System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Juan; Li, Hong-ying; Hou, Zhong-huai; Xin, Hou-wen

    2008-12-01

    The influence of internal noise on the calcium oscillations is studied. It is found that stochastic calcium oscillations occur when the internal noise is considered, while the corresponding deterministic dynamics only yields a steady state. Also, the performance of such oscillations shows two maxima with the variation of the system size, indicating the occurrence of system size resonance. This behavior is found to be intimately connected with the canard phenomenon. Interestingly, it is also found that one of the optimal system sizes matches well with the real cell size, and such a match is robust to the variation of the control parameters.

  14. System Size, Energy, Pseudorapidity, and Centrality Dependence of Elliptic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Chetluru, V.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harnarine, I.; Hauer, M.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, W.; Lin, W. T.; Loizides, C.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Reed, C.; Richardson, E.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Szostak, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Walters, P.; Wenger, E.; Willhelm, D.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wyngaardt, S.; Wysłouch, B.

    2007-06-01

    This Letter presents measurements of the elliptic flow of charged particles as a function of pseudorapidity and centrality from Cu-Cu collisions at 62.4 and 200 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow in Cu-Cu collisions is found to be significant even for the most central events. For comparison with the Au-Au results, it is found that the detailed way in which the collision geometry (eccentricity) is estimated is of critical importance when scaling out system-size effects. A new form of eccentricity, called the participant eccentricity, is introduced which yields a scaled elliptic flow in the Cu-Cu system that has the same relative magnitude and qualitative features as that in the Au-Au system.

  15. Phase field modeling of microstructure evolution of electrocatalyst-infiltrated solid oxide fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Linyun; Li, Qun; Hu, Jiamian; Lee, Shiwoo; Gerdes, Kirk; Chen, Long-Qing

    2015-02-01

    A phase field model is developed to examine microstructural evolution of an infiltrated solid oxide fuel cell cathode. It is employed to generate the three-phase backbone microstructures and morphology of infiltrate nano-particles [La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSM)]. Two-phase Y2O3 + ZrO2 and LSM backbones composed of 0.5-1 μm particles are first generated and then seeded with infiltrate, and evolution is compared for starting infiltrate particle diameters of 5 nm and 10 nm. The computed lifetime triple phase boundary (3PB) density of the infiltrated cathode is then compared to the cathode backbone. Results indicate that initial coarsening of infiltrate nano-particles is the primary evolution process, and infiltrate coarsening is the majority contributor to 3PB reduction. However, at all times, the infiltrated cathode possesses significantly greater 3PB length than even the uncoarsened backbone. Infiltrate particle size effects indicate that the smaller particle size produces greater 3PB length for the same infiltration amount, consistent with intuition. A maximum 3PB enhancement is reached when increasing infiltrate particle loading, and the maximum enhancement depends on infiltrate particle size. It is found that architectural degradation modes will insignificantly affect the lifetime performance of infiltrated cathodes. This work suggests that lifetime optimized particle size/loading combinations are identifiable, and can be precise if additional fundamental data become available.

  16. Salary Management System for Small and Medium-sized Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhang; Guangli, Xu; Yuhuan, Zhang; Yilong, Lei

    Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) in the process of wage entry, calculation, the total number are needed to be done manually in the past, the data volume is quite large, processing speed is low, and it is easy to make error, which is resulting in low efficiency. The main purpose of writing this paper is to present the basis of salary management system, establish a scientific database, the computer payroll system, using the computer instead of a lot of past manual work in order to reduce duplication of staff labor, it will improve working efficiency.This system combines the actual needs of SMEs, through in-depth study and practice of the C/S mode, PowerBuilder10.0 development tools, databases and SQL language, Completed a payroll system needs analysis, database design, application design and development work. Wages, departments, units and personnel database file are included in this system, and have data management, department management, personnel management and other functions, through the control and management of the database query, add, delete, modify, and other functions can be realized. This system is reasonable design, a more complete function, stable operation has been tested to meet the basic needs of the work.

  17. Polymer infiltration studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchello, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    Polymer infiltration investigations were directed toward development of methods by which to produce advanced composite material for automated part fabrication utilizing textile and robotic technology in the manufacture of subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Significant progress was made during the project on the preparation of carbon fiber composites using advanced polymer resins. The findings and results of the project are summarized in the attached paper entitled 'Powder-Coated Towpreg: Avenues to Near Net Shape Fabrication of High Performance Composite.' Also attached to this report is the second of two patent applications submitted as a result of these studies.

  18. Eosinophilic Liver Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa Rivera, Ivonne; Toro, Doris H.; Gutierrez, Jose; Acosta, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic liver infiltration is a commonly encountered focal eosinophil-related inflammation with or without necrosis, which can be seen on computed tomography (CT) in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Although this entity has a relatively benign course, it is related to numerable conditions for which diagnosis may be challenging and requires substantial diagnostic work-up for proper management and care of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a 1-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain with multiple ill-defined liver hypodensities associated with significant eosinophilia. PMID:26504883

  19. Polymer infiltration studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchello, Joseph M.

    1991-01-01

    Progress was made on the preparation of carbon fiber composites using advanced polymer resins. Processes reported include powder towpreg process, weaving towpreg made from dry powder prepreg, composite from powder coated towpreg, and toughening of polyimide resin (PMR) composites by semi-interpenetrating networks. Several important areas of polymer infiltration into fiber bundles will be researched. Preparation to towpreg for textile preform weaving and braiding and for automated tow placement is a major goal, as are the continued development of prepregging technology and the various aspects of composite part fabrication.

  20. Analysis of local chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate combined with systemic inflammation improves prognostication in stage II colon cancer independent of standard clinicopathologic criteria.

    PubMed

    Turner, Natalie; Wong, Hui-Li; Templeton, Arnoud; Tripathy, Sagarika; Whiti Rogers, Te; Croxford, Matthew; Jones, Ian; Sinnathamby, Mathuranthakan; Desai, Jayesh; Tie, Jeanne; Bae, Susie; Christie, Michael; Gibbs, Peter; Tran, Ben

    2016-02-01

    In Stage II colon cancer, multiple independent studies have shown that a dense intratumoural immune infiltrate (local inflammation) is associated with improved outcomes, while systemic inflammation, measured by various markers, has been associated with poorer outcomes. However, previous studies have not considered the interaction between local and systemic inflammation, nor have they assessed the type of inflammatory response compared with standard clinicopathologic criteria. In order to evaluate the potential clinical utility of inflammatory markers in Stage II colon cancer, we examined local and systemic inflammation in a consecutive series of patients with resected Stage II colon cancer between 2000 and 2010 who were identified from a prospective clinical database. Increased intratumoural chronic inflammatory cell (CIC) density, as assessed by pathologist review of hematoxylin and eosin stained slides, was used to represent local inflammation. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) >5, as calculated from pre-operative full blood counts, was used to represent systemic inflammation. In 396 eligible patients identified, there was a non-significant inverse relationship between local and systemic inflammation. Increased CIC density was significantly associated with improved overall (HR 0.45, p = 0.001) and recurrence-free survival (HR 0.37, p = 0.003). High NLR was significantly associated with poorer overall survival (HR 2.56, p < 0.001). The combination of these markers further stratified prognosis independent of standard high-risk criteria, with a dominant systemic inflammatory response (low CIC/high NLR) associated with the worst outcome (5-year overall survival 55.8%). With further validation this simple, inexpensive combined inflammatory biomarker might assist in patient selection for adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage II colon cancer. PMID:26270488

  1. Poloxamer 407/188 binary thermosensitive hydrogels as delivery systems for infiltrative local anesthesia: Physico-chemical characterization and pharmacological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Akkari, Alessandra C S; Papini, Juliana Z Boava; Garcia, Gabriella K; Franco, Margareth K K Dias; Cavalcanti, Leide P; Gasperini, Antonio; Alkschbirs, Melissa Inger; Yokaichyia, Fabiano; de Paula, Eneida; Tófoli, Giovana R; de Araujo, Daniele R

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we reported the development and the physico-chemical characterization of poloxamer 407 (PL407) and poloxamer 188 (PL188) binary systems as hydrogels for delivering ropivacaine (RVC), as drug model, and investigate their use in infiltrative local anesthesia for applications on the treatment of post-operative pain. We studied drug-micelle interaction and micellization process by light scattering and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the sol-gel transition and hydrogel supramolecular structure by small-angle-X-ray scattering (SAXS) and morphological evaluation by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). In addition, we have presented the investigation of drug release mechanisms, in vitro/in vivo toxic and analgesic effects. Micellar dimensions evaluation showed the formation of PL407-PL188 mixed micelles and the drug incorporation, as well as the DSC studies showed increased enthalpy values for micelles formation after addition of PL 188 and RVC, indicating changes on self-assembly and the mixed micelles formation evoked by drug incorporation. SAXS studies revealed that the phase organization in hexagonal structure was not affected by RVC insertion into the hydrogels, maintaining their supramolecular structure. SEM analysis showed similar patterns after RVC addition. The RVC release followed the Higuchi model, modulated by the PL final concentration and the insertion of PL 188 into the system. Furthermore, the association PL407-PL188 induced lower in vitro cytotoxic effects, increased the duration of analgesia, in a single-dose model study, without evoking in vivo inflammation signs after local injection. PMID:27524024

  2. Optimization strategy for element sizing in hybrid power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Real, Alejandro J.; Arce, Alicia; Bordons, Carlos

    This paper presents a procedure to evaluate the optimal element sizing of hybrid power systems. In order to generalize the problem, this work exploits the "energy hub" formulation previously presented in the literature, defining an energy hub as an interface among energy producers, consumers and the transportation infrastructure. The resulting optimization minimizes an objective function which is based on costs and efficiencies of the system elements, while taking into account the hub model, energy and power constraints and estimated operational conditions, such as energy prices, input power flow availability and output energy demand. The resulting optimal architecture also constitutes a framework for further real-time control designs. Moreover, an example of a hybrid storage system is considered. In particular, the architecture of a hybrid plant incorporating a wind generator, batteries and intermediate hydrogen storage is optimized, based on real wind data and averaged residential demands, also taking into account possible estimation errors. The hydrogen system integrates an electrolyzer, a fuel cell stack and hydrogen tanks. The resulting optimal cost of such hybrid power plant is compared with the equivalent hydrogen-only and battery-only systems, showing improvements in investment costs of almost 30% in the worst case.

  3. Chronic synovitis with marked infiltration of granulocytes in a patient with an unusual development of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Meijers, K A; Eulderink, F; van de Putte, L B; Wiersema-van Gogh, H; de Vries, E; Cats, A

    1979-01-01

    The case described concerns a patient initially presenting the clinical symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, including the presence of nodules, and slowly developing into systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Besides the signs of chronic inflammation in the synovial tissue, many granulocytes and PAS-positive macrophages were present. At electronmicroscopy the basal membranes of the vessels were multilaminated and the endothelial cells enlarged while many macrophages contained large clumps of electrondense material which could easily be interpreted as rough endoplasmatic reticulum (RER) of plasma cells. Immunoflourescence studies showed deposition of immunoglobulins and complement in the vessel walls of the synovium, thus suggesting an immune-complex pathogenesis. PMID:506490

  4. Lorentz force infiltration of fibrous preforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Richard M.; Mortensen, Andreas

    1991-12-01

    A new process for the production of metal matrix composites, whereby molten metal is forced into the interstices of a fibrous preform using electromagnetic body forces, is presented. These forces are created by subjecting the molten matrix to a concentrated transient magnetic field which, in turn, induces intense eddy currents in the melt. This gives rise to Lorentz forces which propel the metal into the preform. Equations governing the mechanics of Lorentz force infiltration of an axisymmetric preform surrounded by molten metal are solved numerically. A finite difference algorithm is applied to solve Maxwell's equation of electromagnetic field propagation and to determine the flux density as a function of radial position. The resulting Lorentz force is then calculated and balanced with the inertial, fluid friction and capillary forces, taking preform compression into account, to predict infiltration velocity and cumulative infiltration distance. Apparatuses were designed and constructed to infiltrate cylindrical preforms of 24 vol pct 3-μm-diameter chopped alumina fiber preforms with commercial purity aluminum. Two capacitor banks were charged from 1 to 4 kV and rapidly discharged to produce magnetic pulses of up to 4 tesla peak, at frequencies of 2 to 3 kHz in the infiltrating furnace. A commercial MAGNEFORM unit was also used to produce fields of up to 5 tesla at 5.6 kHz.-Sound composite samples were produced, to a depth of 1.8 mm into the preforms, with little or no breakage of fibers. Good agreement between theoretical model predictions and experimentally measured infiltration depths was demonstrated. Primary process variables for a given matrix-preform system, were the number of discharges, the magnetic pulse intensity and frequency, and the melt ring thickness. The model predicts a pulse frequency below which infiltration does not occur and an optimum frequency for maximum infiltration depth. Successive pulses are predicted to produce only slightly

  5. Electrical resistivity imaging study of near-surface infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampousis, Angelos

    High resolution electrical resistivity images (ERI method) were obtained during vadose zone infiltration experiments on agricultural soils in cooperation with Cornell University's Agricultural Stewardship Program, Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, Extension Education Center, Riverhead, New York [ as well as Cornell University's Long Island Horticultural Research & Extension Center (LIHREC) in Riverhead, New York]. One natural soil was also studied. Infiltration was monitored by means of image analysis of two-dimensional array resistivity generated by a Syscal Kid Switch resistivity system (Griffiths et al., 1990). The data was inverted with the computer program RES2DINV (Loke, 2004). The agricultural soils considered were Riverhead sandy loam (RdA), Haven loam (HaA), and Bridgehampton silt loam (BgA). The natural site was located in the Catskill Mountains of New York State. The soils there are classified as Schoharie silty clay loam. The electrical images of the three sites were compared against established soil properties, including particle size distribution, available water capacity, and soluble salts (from the literature), as well as against site-specific soil samples and penetrometer data, which were collected along with the geophysical measurements. This research evaluates the potential of acquiring high resolution, non-destructive measurements of infiltration in the uppermost 1.5 meter of the vadose zone. The results demonstrate that resistivity differences can detect infiltration in soils typical of the north-eastern United States. Temporal and spatial variations of soil water content in the upper 1.5 meters (relevant to agriculture) of the subsurface can be monitored successfully and non-destructively with ERI. The sensitivity of the method is higher in subsurface environments that demonstrate high overall apparent resistivity values (e.g. high sand content). Under conditions of increased soil heterogeneity, instead of the formation of a continuous

  6. Opioid growth factor and low-dose naltrexone impair central nervous system infiltration by CD4 + T lymphocytes in established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Leslie A; Waldner, Hanspeter; Zagon, Ian S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), characterized by infiltrating myelin-reactive T lymphocytes and demyelinating lesions. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the animal model widely utilized to study MS. EAE is mediated by CD4(+) T cells and can be induced in EAE-susceptible mice through immunization with a myelin antigen, such as proteolipid protein 139-151 (PLP139-151) in SJL mice. In this PLP-induced EAE model, autoreactive CD4(+) T cells migrate from peripheral tissues into the CNS where they are reactivated resulting in CNS damage. Th1 and Th17 cells produce the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and IL-17, respectively, that have been shown to have pathogenic roles in EAE and MS. Anti-inflammatory Th2, IL-4 secreting cells, have been indicated to inhibit EAE exacerbation. However, given the inflammatory environment of EAE, Th2 effector cells are outnumbered by Th1/Th17 cells. Regulatory CD4(+) T cells suppress immune reactions and have been demonstrated to be dysfunctional in MS patients. Opioid growth factor (OGF), chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin, is a negative growth factor that interacts with the OGF receptor. The OGF-OGFr axis can be activated through exogenous administration of OGF or a low dosage of naltrexone (LDN), an opioid antagonist. We have previously demonstrated that modulation of the OGF-OGFr axis results in alleviation from relapse-remitting EAE, and that CNS-infiltrating CD3(+) T cells are diminished with exogenous OGF or intermittent blockade with LDN administration. In this paper, we aimed to determine whether OGF or LDN alter the Th effector responses of CD4(+) T lymphocytes within the CNS in established EAE. We report in these studies that the numbers of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in the CNS of EAE mice are decreased following treatment with OGF for five days but not LDN. However, modulation of the OGF-OGFr axis did not result in changes to CD4(+) Th effector cell responses

  7. Research study of droplet sizing technology leading to the development of an advanced droplet sizing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, C. F.; Smart, A. E.; Espinosa, V. E.

    1985-01-01

    An instrument to measure the size and velocity of droplets was developed. The instrument uses one of two techniques, as appropriate. In the first technique two small laser beams of one color identify the center of a larger laser beam of a different color. This defines a region of almost uniform intensity where the light scattered by the individual droplets can be related to their size. The first technique uses the visibility of a Doppler burst and validates it against the peak intensity of the signal's pedestal. Results are presented for monodisperse, bimodal, trimodal, and polydisperse sprays produced by the Berglund-Liu droplet generator and a pressure nozzle. Size distributions of a given spray obtained using three different size ranges show excellent self-consistency in the overlapping region. Measurements of sprays of known characteristics exhibit errors in the order of 10%. The principles of operation and design criteria of the instrument are discussed in great detail.

  8. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice lacking glial fibrillary acidic protein is characterized by a more severe clinical course and an infiltrative central nervous system lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Liedtke, W.; Edelmann, W.; Chiu, F. C.; Kucherlapati, R.; Raine, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    Insights into the role of the astrocyte intermediate filament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), have only recently emerged with reports on subtle abnormalities in GFAP-deficient mice, including the documentation of defective long-term maintenance of central nervous system myelination. Here, we extend these observations by examining the astroglial response in GFAP-/- mice with autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for multiple sclerosis. Clinically, the monophasic disease was more severe in GFAP-/- mice than in wild-type littermates despite increased remyelination in the former. More in keeping with the clinical course was the observation of an infiltrative EAE lesion in GFAP-/- mice. GFAP-/- astrocytes had a reduced cytoarchitectural stability as evidenced by less abundant and irregularly spaced hemidesmosomes. The blunt GFAP-/- astrocyte processes possessed intermediate filaments consisting mainly of vimentin, though to a lesser degree than in the wild-type. In contrast, in wild-type littermates, GFAP was most abundant and nestin occurred at lower levels. Taken together, the present study introduces the novel concepts that GFAP plays an important role in the control of clinical disease associated with formation of a clearly defined edge to the EAE lesion and that GFAP is operative in the regulation of the intermediate filament components in reactive fibrillary astrogliosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9422542

  9. Effect of hydraulic loading rate on pollutant removal efficiency in subsurface infiltration system under intermittent operation and micro-power aeration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongqiang; Zhan, Xuan; Wu, Shijun; Kang, Mingliang; Guo, Jianan; Chen, Fanrong

    2016-04-01

    The low hydraulic loading rate (HLR) greatly restricts the wide application of subsurface wastewater infiltration system (SWIS) in densely populated areas. To increase the HLR, an innovative SWIS was developed using cyclic operation mode. In each cycle, a wastewater feeding period is followed by a drying period, in which the aeration is conducted by a medium-pressure fan. Results indicated that the removal rate of TOC and NH4(+)-N were more than 85% at HLR of 0.5m(3)/m(2)d, whereas the TN removal rate was lower than 20%, indicating that the aeration was efficient and denitrification process was largely limited in the SWIS. When HLR decreased from 0.5 to 0.2m(3)/m(2)d, the pollutant removal efficiency enhanced slightly except for TN. Overall, the intermittent operation and micro-power aeration, combined with shunting the pollutant loading were really helpful for SWIS to achieve higher HLR, which offers a reference for the design of innovative SWIS. PMID:26826957

  10. Size-exclusion chromatography system for macromolecular interaction analysis

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.

    1988-01-01

    A low pressure, microcomputer controlled system employing high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) allows for precise analysis of the interaction of two reversibly associating macromolecules such as proteins. Since a macromolecular complex migrates faster than its components during size-exclusion chromatography, the difference between the elution profile of a mixture of two macromolecules and the summation of the elution profiles of the two components provides a quantifiable indication of the degree of molecular interaction. This delta profile is used to qualitatively reveal the presence or absence of significant interaction or to rank the relative degree of interaction in comparing samples and, in combination with a computer simulation, is further used to quantify the magnitude of the interaction in an arrangement wherein a microcomputer is coupled to analytical instrumentation in a novel manner.

  11. System size dependence of particle production at the SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Blume, C.

    2012-05-15

    Recent results on the system size dependence of net-baryon and hyperon production as measured at the CERN SPS are discussed. The observed N{sub part} dependences of yields, but also of dynamical properties, such as average transverse momenta, can be described in the context of the core corona approach. Other observables, such as antiproton yields and net-protons at forward rapidities, do not follow the predictions of this model. Possible implications for a search for a critical point in the QCD phase diagram are discussed. Event-by-event fluctuations of the relative core to corona source contributions might influence fluctuation observables (e.g., multiplicity fluctuations). The magnitude of this effect is investigated.

  12. Infiltration kinetics of fibrous preform

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Toshio; Nishida, Yoshinori

    1994-12-31

    The infiltration kinetics of fibrous preform was investigated in the case of aluminum matrix composites by pressure infiltration method. Pressure was applied mechanically by a punch, and the pressure change and the punch speed were measured during the infiltration of molten aluminum into SiC whisker preforms. To analyze the correlation between applied pressure and infiltration front in the preform, the distribution of hardness along the infiltration direction in the composites was measured and the distribution of volume fraction was calculated from the hardness. A theoretical expression is derived to describe fluid flow in the preform during the infiltration, on the condition that the pressure on the preform surface starts to rise from zero and when the applied pressure exceeds the compressive strength of preform, deformation starts. The starting point of deformation and the distribution of volume fraction in the composites can be calculated by the theory and proved by experiments.

  13. Polymer infiltration studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchello, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress was made in several areas on the preparation of carbon fiber composites using advanced polymer resins. Polymer infiltration studies dealt with ways of preparing composite materials from advanced polymer resins and carbon fibers. This effort is comprised of an integrated approach to the process of composite part fabrication. The goal is to produce advanced composite materials for automated part fabrication using textile and robotics technology in the manufacture of subsonic and supersonic aircraft. The object is achieved through investigations at the NASA Langley Research Center and by stimulating technology transfer between contract researchers and the aircraft industry. Covered here are literature reviews, a status report on individual projects, current and planned research, publications, and scheduled technical presentations.

  14. Estimating the Limits of Infiltration in the Urban Appalachian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavin, S. M.; Bain, D.; Hopkins, K. G.; Pfeil-McCullough, E. K.; Copeland, E.

    2014-12-01

    Green infrastructure in urbanized areas commonly uses infiltration systems, such as rain gardens, swales and trenches, to convey surface runoff from impervious surfaces into surrounding soils. However, precipitation inputs can exceed soil infiltration rates, creating a limit to infiltration-based storm water management, particularly in urban areas covered by impervious surfaces. Given the limited availability and varied quality of soil infiltration rate data, we synthesized information from national databases, available field test data, and applicable literature to characterize soil infiltration rate distributions, focusing on Allegheny County, Pennsylvania as a case study. A range of impervious cover conditions was defined by sampling available GIS data (e.g., LiDAR and street edge lines) with analysis windows placed randomly across urbanization gradients. Changes in effective precipitation caused by impervious cover were calculated across these gradients and compared to infiltration rate distributions to identify thresholds in impervious coverage where these limits are exceeded. Many studies have demonstrated the effects of urbanization on infiltration, but the identification of these thresholds will clarify interactions between impervious cover and soil infiltration. These methods can help identify sections of urban areas that require augmentation of infiltration-based systems with additional infrastructural strategies, especially as green infrastructure moves beyond low impact development towards more frequent application during infilling of existing urban systems.

  15. Parametric Study of Reactive Melt Infiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Colella, Phillip

    2000-01-01

    Reactive melt infiltration is viewed as a promising means of achieving near-net shape manufacturing with quick processing time and at low cost. Since the reactants and products are, in general, of varying density, overall conservation of mass dictates that there is a force related to chemical conversion which can directly influence infiltration behavior. In effect, the driving pressure forces may compete with the forces from chemical conversion, affecting the advancement of the front. We have developed a two-dimensional numerical code to examine these effects, using reaction-formed silicon carbide as a model system for this process. We have examined a range of initial porosities, pore radii, and reaction rates in order to investigate their effects on infiltration dynamics.

  16. Evaluation of an Infiltration Model with Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Serrana, M.; Gulliver, J. S.; Nieber, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    This research goal is to develop and demonstrate the means by which roadside drainage ditches and filter strips can be assigned the appropriate volume reduction credits by infiltration. These vegetated surfaces convey stormwater, infiltrate runoff, and filter and/or settle solids, and are often placed along roads and other impermeable surfaces. Infiltration rates are typically calculated by assuming that water flows as sheet flow over the slope. However, for most intensities water flow occurs in narrow and shallow micro-channels and concentrates in depressions. This channelization reduces the fraction of the soil surface covered with the water coming from the road. The non-uniform distribution of water along a hillslope directly affects infiltration. First, laboratory and field experiments have been conducted to characterize the spatial pattern of flow for stormwater runoff entering onto the surface of a sloped surface in a drainage ditch. In the laboratory experiments different micro-topographies were tested over bare sandy loam soil: a smooth surface, and three and five parallel rills. All the surfaces experienced erosion; the initially smooth surface developed a system of channels over time that increased runoff generation. On average, the initially smooth surfaces infiltrated 10% more volume than the initially rilled surfaces. The field experiments were performed in the side slope of established roadside drainage ditches. Three rates of runoff from a road surface into the swale slope were tested, representing runoff from 1, 2, and 10-year storm events. The average percentage of input runoff water infiltrated in the 32 experiments was 67%, with a 21% standard deviation. Multiple measurements of saturated hydraulic conductivity were conducted to account for its spatial variability. Second, a rate-based coupled infiltration and overland model has been designed that calculates stormwater infiltration efficiency of swales. The Green-Ampt-Mein-Larson assumptions were

  17. 40 CFR 142.303 - Which size public water systems can receive a small system variance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Which size public water systems can receive a small system variance? 142.303 Section 142.303 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Variances for Small System...

  18. Infiltration of CCR2+Ly6Chigh Proinflammatory Monocytes and Neutrophils into the Central Nervous System Is Modulated by Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in a Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; St-Pierre, Stéphanie; Roy, Patrick; Morley, Barbara J; Hao, Junwei; Simard, Alain R

    2016-03-01

    Myeloid cells, including proinflammatory monocytes and neutrophils, have important roles in the pathology of multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). These cells infiltrate the CNS in the early stages of disease development and contribute to the inflammatory response that is associated with symptom severity. It is thus crucial to identify and understand new mechanisms that can regulate the CNS infiltration of proinflammatory myeloid cells. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been increasingly studied for their immune-regulatory properties. In this study, we assessed the ability of nicotine, an nAChR ligand, to modulate proinflammatory myeloid cell numbers within the bone marrow, spleen, blood, and CNS of EAE mice. We found that nicotine significantly inhibits the infiltration of proinflammatory monocytes and neutrophils into the CNS at time points where these cells are known to play critical roles in disease pathology. In contrast, nicotine does not affect the expansion of other monocytes. We also show that nicotine exerts these effects by acting on α7 and α9 nAChR subtypes. Finally, mRNA transcript levels for CCL2 and CXCL2, chemokines involved in the chemotaxis of proinflammatory monocytes and neutrophils, respectively, are reduced in the brain of nicotine-treated EAE mice before the massive infiltration of these cells. Taken together, our data provide evidence that nAChRs can regulate proinflammatory cell infiltration into the CNS, which could be of significant value for the treatment of neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:26810225

  19. Infiltration of CCR2+Ly6Chigh Proinflammatory Monocytes and Neutrophils into the Central Nervous System Is Modulated by Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in a Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; St-Pierre, Stéphanie; Roy, Patrick; Morley, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells, including proinflammatory monocytes and neutrophils, have important roles in the pathology of multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). These cells infiltrate the CNS in the early stages of disease development and contribute to the inflammatory response that is associated with symptom severity. It is thus crucial to identify and understand new mechanisms that can regulate the CNS infiltration of proinflammatory myeloid cells. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been increasingly studied for their immune-regulatory properties. In this study, we assessed the ability of nicotine, an nAChR ligand, to modulate proinflammatory myeloid cell numbers within the bone marrow, spleen, blood, and CNS of EAE mice. We found that nicotine significantly inhibits the infiltration of proinflammatory monocytes and neutrophils into the CNS at time points where these cells are known to play critical roles in disease pathology. In contrast, nicotine does not affect the expansion of other monocytes. We also show that nicotine exerts these effects by acting on α7 and α9 nAChR subtypes. Finally, mRNA transcript levels for CCL2 and CXCL2, chemokines involved in the chemotaxis of proinflammatory monocytes and neutrophils, respectively, are reduced in the brain of nicotine-treated EAE mice before the massive infiltration of these cells. Taken together, our data provide evidence that nAChRs can regulate proinflammatory cell infiltration into the CNS, which could be of significant value for the treatment of neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:26810225

  20. Rain Gardens: Stormwater Infiltrating Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrological dynamics and changes in stormwater nutrient concentrations within rain gardens were studied by introducing captured stormwater runoff to rain gardens at EPA’s Urban Water Research Facility in Edison, New Jersey. The runoff used in these experiments was collected...

  1. Initial comparisons of modular-sized, integrated utility systems and conventional systems for several building types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, H. E.; Monford, L. G., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study of the application of a modular integrated utility system to six typical building types are compared with the application of a conventional utility system to the same facilities. The effects of varying the size and climatic location of the buildings and the size of the powerplants are presented. Construction details of the six building types (garden apartments, a high rise office building, high rise apartments, a shopping center, a high school, and a hospital) and typical site and floor plans are provided. The environmental effects, the unit size determination, and the market potential are discussed. The cost effectiveness of the various design options is not considered.

  2. Displacement of nonwetting liquids from unsaturated sands by water infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, T.M.; Overcamp, T.J.

    1998-09-01

    Accidental spills of nonwetting or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) onto land can lead to ground water contamination. Once a spill has occurred, liquid infiltrates downward under the influence of gravity. As the infiltration continues, capillary forces retain a portion of the immiscible liquid within the pore spaces. After infiltration ceases, the liquid remaining within the pores is termed the residual liquid, which is frequently expressed as a percentage of the total pore volume. The quantity of residual liquid retained depends on soil and liquid properties. Xylene was spilled onto moist glass beads or various moist sands and water was trickled onto the columns every eight hours for periods up to 10 days. The xylene residual in the columns with water infiltration decreased compared to those of control columns, indicating a downward displacement of xylene. The extent of displacement increased with increasing size of the porous media and with increasing amounts of water infiltration.

  3. Infiltration kinetics of aluminum in silicon carbide compacts. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.R.; Olson, D.L.

    1987-07-01

    Although metal-matrix composites have been fabricated by various techniques, the most successful are solid state processes such as powder metallurgy and diffusion bonding. Liquid-metal processes such as compucasting, pultrusion, and infiltration, while less successful, are potentially more economical. The advantages of producing silicon carbide-aluminum matrix composites by liquid-metal infiltration techniques can not be fully realized without an improved understanding of the infiltration behavior and the fiber/matrix bonding mechanisms. This paper reports on infiltration models which consider the physical properties of the liquid and preform (either porous compact or capillary/tube bundle). These properties include viscosity, density, surface tension, and wettability (pore shape and size in the case of the porous compact). The models have been assessed in terms of their ability to predict infiltration behavior from known physical properties of the materials.

  4. Fast RPA and GW calculations: cubic system size scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresse, Georg

    The random phase approximation (RPA) to the correlation energy and the related GW approximation are among the most promising methods to obtain accurate correlation energy differences and QP energies from diagrammatic perturbation theory at reasonable computational cost. The calculations are, however, usually one to two orders of magnitude more demanding than conventional density functional theory calculations. Here, we show that a cubic system size scaling can be readily obtained reducing the computation time by one to two orders of magnitude for large systems. Furthermore, the scaling with respect to the number of k points used to sample the Brillouin zone can be reduced to linear order. In combination, this allows accurate and very well-converged single-point RPA and GW calculations, with a time complexity that is roughly on par or better than for self-consistent Hartree-Fock and hybrid-functional calculations. Furthermore, the talk discusses the relation between the RPA correlation energy and the GW approximation: the self-energy is the derivative of the RPA correlation energy with respect to the Green's function. The calculated self-energy can be used to compute QP-energies in the GW approximation, any first derivative of the total energy, as well as corrections to the correlation energy from the changes of the charge density when switching from DFT to a many-body body description (GW singles energy contribution).

  5. On the melt infiltration of copper coated silicon carbide with an aluminium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure-assisted infiltration of porous compacts of Cu coated and uncoated single crystals of platelet shaped alpha (hexagonal) SiC was used to study infiltration dynamics and particulate wettability with a 2014 Al alloy. The infiltration lengths were measured for a range of experimental variables which included infiltration pressure, infiltration time, and SiC size. A threshold pressure (P(th)) for flow initiation through compacts was identified from an analysis of infiltration data; P(th) decreased while penetration lengths increased with increasing SiC size (more fundamentally, due to changes in interparticle pore size) and with increasing infiltration times. Cu coated SiC led to lower P(th) and 60-80 percent larger penetration lengths compared to uncoated SiC under identical processing conditions.

  6. Turbidite systems in deep-water basin margins classified by grain size and feeder system

    SciTech Connect

    Reading, H.G. ); Richards, M. )

    1994-05-01

    Depositional system in deep-water basin margins can be classified on the basis of grain size and feeder system into 12 classes: mud-rich, mud/sand-rich, sand-rich, and gravel-rich [open quotes]point-source submarine fans,[close quotes] mud-rich, mud/sand-rich, sand-rich, and gravel-rich [open quotes]multiple-source submarine ramps;[close quotes] and mud-rich, mud/sand-rich, sand-rich, and gravel-rich [open quotes]linear-source slope aprons.[close quotes] The size and stability of channels and the organization of the depositional sequences decreases toward a linear source as does the length:width ratio of the system. As grain size increases, so does slope gradient, impersistence of channel systems, and tendency for channels to migrate. As grain size diminishes, there is an increase in the size of the source area, the size of the depositional system, the downcurrent length, the persistence and size of flows, fan channels, channel-levee systems, and in the tendency to meander and for major slumps and sheet sands to reach the lower fan and basin plan. The exact positioning of any one depositional system within the scheme cannot always be precise and the position may be altered by changes in tectonic, climate, supply, and sea level. The models derived from each system are sufficiently different to significantly affect the nature of petroleum prospectivity and reservoir pattern. Understanding and recognizing this variability is crucial to all elements of the exploration-production chain. In exploration, initial evaluations of prospectivity and commerciality rely on the accurate stratigraphic prediction of reservoir facies, architecture, and trapping styles. For field appraisal and reservoir development, a similar appreciation of variability aids reservoir description by capturing the distribution and architecture of reservoir and nonreservoir facies and their impact on reservoir delineation, reservoir behavior, and production performance. 161 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Model description of storage and infiltration functions of infiltration facilities for urban runoff analysis by a distributed model.

    PubMed

    Furumai, H; Jinadasa, H K P K; Murakami, M; Nakajima, F; Aryal, R K

    2005-01-01

    Although there have been simulation researches focusing on reduction of stormwater peak flow by introduced infiltration facilities, model simulation of dynamic runoff behavior is still limited for frequently occurring rainfall events with weak intensity. Therefore, dynamic simulation was carried out in two urban drainages with infiltration facilities incorporated with a distributed model using two methods for describing functions of infiltration facilities. A method adjusting effective rainfall model gave poor simulation of runoff behavior in light rainfalls. Another method considering dynamic change of storage capacity as well as infiltration rate gave satisfactory estimation of the runoff in both drainages. In addition, assumption of facility clogging improved the agreement between measured and simulated hydrographs in small and medium-sized rainfall. Therefore, the proposed method might be useful for quantifying the secondary effects of the infiltration facilities on groundwater recharge and urban non-point pollutant trapping as well as runoff reduction. PMID:16248180

  8. Infiltrating angiolipoma with phlebolith formation.

    PubMed

    De Orchis, D; Ozonoff, M B

    1986-01-01

    Angiolipomas are uncommon benign soft tissue tumors with both fatty and vascular components; they may be encapsulated or locally invasive. Three cases are reported in which phleboliths were present within infiltrating angiolipomas. The demonstration of phleboliths in a lipoma suggests the diagnosis of infiltrating angiolipoma rather than the usual encapsulated lipoma. PMID:3764475

  9. The effects of antecedent dry days on the nitrogen removal in layered soil infiltration systems for storm run-off control.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kang-Woo; Yoon, Min-Hyuk; Song, Kyung-Guen; Ahn, Kyu-Hong

    2011-01-01

    The effects of antecedent dry days (ADD) on nitrogen removal efficiency were investigated in soil infiltration systems, with three distinguishable layers: mulch layer (ML), coarse soil layer (CSL) and fine soil layer (FSL). Two sets of lab-scale columns with loamy CSL (C1) and sandy CSL (C2) were dosed with synthetic run-off, carrying chemical oxygen demand of 100 mg L(-1) and total nitrogen of 13 mg L(-1). The intermittent dosing cycle was stepwise adjusted for 5, 10 and 20 days. The influent ammonium and organic nitrogen were adsorbed to the entire depth in C1, while dominantly to the FSL in C2. In both columns, the effluent ammonium concentration increased while the organic nitrogen concentration decreased, as ADD increased from 5 to 20 days. The effluent of C1 always showed nitrate concentration exceeding influent, caused by nitrification, by increasing amounts as ADD increased. However, the wash-out of nitrate in C1 was not distinct in terms of mass since the effluent flow rate was only 25% of the influent. In contrast, efficient reduction (>95%) of nitrate loading was observed in C2 under ADD of 5 and 10 days, because of insignificant nitrification in the CSL and denitrification in the FSL. However, for the ADD of 20 days, a significant nitrate wash-out appeared in C2 as well, possibly because of the re-aeration by the decreasing water content in the FSL. Consequently, the total nitrogen load escaping with the effluent was always smaller in C2, supporting the effectiveness of sandy CSL over loamy FSL for nitrogen removal under various ADDs. PMID:21879550

  10. 40 CFR 35.927-1 - Infiltration/inflow analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.927-1... estimated total costs for transportation and treatment of the infiltration/inflow. Cost-effectiveness... presence, flow rate, and type of infiltration/inflow conditions which exist in the sewer system. (b)...

  11. 40 CFR 35.927-1 - Infiltration/inflow analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.927-1... estimated total costs for transportation and treatment of the infiltration/inflow. Cost-effectiveness... presence, flow rate, and type of infiltration/inflow conditions which exist in the sewer system. (b)...

  12. 40 CFR 35.927-1 - Infiltration/inflow analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.927-1... estimated total costs for transportation and treatment of the infiltration/inflow. Cost-effectiveness... presence, flow rate, and type of infiltration/inflow conditions which exist in the sewer system. (b)...

  13. Infiltrative Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaopeng; Fu, Xu; Deng, Min; Chen, Jun; He, Jian; Shi, Jiong; Qiu, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Data on infiltrative hepatocellular carcinoma (iHCC) receiving hepatectomy are unclear. Our study assessed the outcomes, effects of anatomical resection, and prognostic factors in a cohort of Chinese patients with iHCC undergoing hepatectomy. Data from 47 patients with iHCC undergoing hepatectomy were analyzed in a retrospective study. Independent prognostic factors of overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. Correlations between microvascular invasion (MVI) and clinicopathological features were assessed using the χ2 test, Student t test, or the Mann–Whitney U test. Survival outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The median OS was 27.37 months and the 1-year RFS rate were 61.7%. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level was not a specific parameter in iHCC patients undergoing hepatectomy. Anatomic resection was significantly associated with increased RFS (P = 0.007). Patients showing MVI were observed with decreased RFS (P < 0.001). A high lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level was significantly associated with decreased OS and RFS (P = 0.003 and P = 0.020, respectively). MVI was shown correlated with the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and LDH. Subgroup analysis indicated that in mild MVI group, survival outcome was significantly more favorable in patients with high LDH level (P = 0.019). iHCC patients are related with higher MVI rate and patients may still derive survival benefit from anatomic resection at early and intermediate stages. MVI classification could be used to identify iHCC patients with a poorer survival, especially those with a high preoperative LDH level. PMID:27175659

  14. Leptin and the Systems Neuroscience of Meal Size Control

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Harvey J.

    2009-01-01

    The development of effective pharmacotherapy for obesity will benefit from a more complete understanding of the neural pathways and the neurochemical signals whose actions result in the reduction of the size of meals. This review examines the neural control of meal size and the integration of two principal sources of that control - satiation signals arising from the gastrointestinal tract and CNS leptin signaling. Four types of integrations that are central to the control of meal size are described and each involves the neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the dorsal hindbrain. Data discussed show that NTS neurons integrate information arising from: [1] ascending GI-derived vagal afferent projections, [2] descending neuropeptidergic projections from leptin-activated arcuate and paraventricular nucleus neurons, [3] leptin signaling in NTS neurons themselves and [4] melanocortinergic projections from NTS and hypothalamic POMC neurons to NTS neurons and via melanocortinergic modulation of vagal afferent nerve terminals. PMID:19836413

  15. A MODFLOW Infiltration Device Package for Simulating Storm Water Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Jan; Christensen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a MODFLOW Infiltration Device (INFD) Package that can simulate infiltration devices and their two-way interaction with groundwater. The INFD Package relies on a water balance including inflow of storm water, leakage-like seepage through the device faces, overflow, and change in storage. The water balance for the device can be simulated in multiple INFD time steps within a single MODFLOW time step, and infiltration from the device can be routed through the unsaturated zone to the groundwater table. A benchmark test shows that the INFD Package's analytical solution for stage computes exact results for transient behavior. To achieve similar accuracy by the numerical solution of the MODFLOW Surface-Water Routing (SWR1) Process requires many small time steps. Furthermore, the INFD Package includes an improved representation of flow through the INFD sides that results in lower infiltration rates than simulated by SWR1. The INFD Package is also demonstrated in a transient simulation of a hypothetical catchment where two devices interact differently with groundwater. This simulation demonstrates that device and groundwater interaction depends on the thickness of the unsaturated zone because a shallow groundwater table (a likely result from storm water infiltration itself) may occupy retention volume, whereas a thick unsaturated zone may cause a phase shift and a change of amplitude in groundwater table response to a change of infiltration. We thus find that the INFD Package accommodates the simulation of infiltration devices and groundwater in an integrated manner on small as well as large spatial and temporal scales. PMID:25187115

  16. Lot sizing and unequal-sized shipment policy for an integrated production-inventory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, B. C.; Sharma, S.

    2014-05-01

    This article develops a single-manufacturer single-retailer production-inventory model in which the manufacturer delivers the retailer's ordered quantity in unequal shipments. The manufacturer's production process is imperfect and it may produce some defective items during a production run. The retailer performs a screening process immediately after receiving the order from the manufacturer. The expected average total cost of the integrated production-inventory system is derived using renewal theory and a solution procedure is suggested to determine the optimal production and shipment policy. An extensive numerical study based on different sets of parameter values is conducted and the optimal results so obtained are analysed to examine the relative performance of the models under equal and unequal shipment policies.

  17. Microwave assisted chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this program is to develop a new process for the fabrication of ceramic matrix composites by chemical vapor infiltration. This period has been devoted in part to the exploration of material systems suitable for MACVI processing. A number of potential processing schemes are possible using combinations of absorbing and transparent material as composite components. This includes the use of an absorbing preform (nicalon fiber) combined with a transparent matrix (silicon nitride). Composites 5 cm in diameter by 1 cm. thick have been fabricated to densities of 65% theoretical. Processing times for these materials are under 20 hours. Higher densities will require additional microwave power now possible with the new reactor. The most effective MACVI scheme will involve the use of a transparent fiber with an absorbing matrix. The hot spot will be initiated by appropriate treatment of the central region of the preform. To this end alumna fibers with pretreatments to control thermal gradients has been explored. Nextel 610 fibers have been effectively pretreated carbon coating resulting in preferential heating in the interior of the preform. Possible matrix materials include siliconized silicon carbide, doped silicon carbide, alumna and zirconia. A patent for MACVI has been issued 10/19/93.

  18. INITIAL SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jihye; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Kim, Juhan

    2013-01-10

    Despite the importance of their size evolution in understanding the dynamical evolution of globular clusters (GCs) of the Milky Way, studies that focus specifically on this issue are rare. Based on the advanced, realistic Fokker-Planck (FP) approach, we theoretically predict the initial size distribution (SD) of the Galactic GCs along with their initial mass function and radial distribution. Over one thousand FP calculations in a wide parameter space have pinpointed the best-fit initial conditions for the SD, mass function, and radial distribution. Our best-fit model shows that the initial SD of the Galactic GCs is of larger dispersion than today's SD, and that the typical projected half-light radius of the initial GCs is {approx}4.6 pc, which is 1.8 times larger than that of the present-day GCs ({approx}2.5 pc). Their large size signifies greater susceptibility to the Galactic tides: the total mass of destroyed GCs reaches 3-5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun }, several times larger than previous estimates. Our result challenges a recent view that the Milky Way GCs were born compact on the sub-pc scale, and rather implies that (1) the initial GCs were generally larger than the typical size of the present-day GCs, (2) the initially large GCs mostly shrank and/or disrupted as a result of the galactic tides, and (3) the initially small GCs expanded by two-body relaxation, and later shrank by the galactic tides.

  19. Groundwater contamination from stormwater infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, R.; Clark, S.; Parmer, K.

    1995-10-01

    The research summarized here was conducted during the first year of a 3-yr cooperative agreement (CR819573) to identify and control stormwater toxicants, especially those adversely affecting groundwater. The purpose of this research effort was to review the groundwater contamination literature as it relates to stormwater. Prior to urbanization groundwater is recharged by rainfall-runoff and snowmelt infiltrating through pervious surfaces including grasslands and woods. This infiltrating water is relatively uncontaminated. Urbanization, however, reduces the permeable soil surface area through which recharge by infiltration occurs. This results in much less groundwater recharge and greatly increased surface runoff. In addition the waters available for recharge carry increased quantities of pollutants. With urbanization, waters having elevated contaminant concentrations also recharge groundwater including effluent from domestic septic tanks, wastewater from percolation basins and industrial waste injection wells, infiltrating stormwater, and infiltrating water from agricultural irrigation. The areas of main concern that are covered by this paper are: the source of the pollutants, stormwater constituents having a high potential to contaminate groundwater, and the treatment necessary for stormwater.

  20. Modeling the establishment of preferential flow during infiltration in a heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Slimene, Erij; Lassabatere, Laurent; Winiarski, Thierry; Gourdon, Remy

    2015-04-01

    Large cities are mostly situated in areas close to water resources in order to meet the water needs of their populations. Alluvial soils harbor large aquifers that are used to supply water, the Rhone-Alpes region being a good illustration. However, the increase of soil sealing has led to the development of best management practices such as infiltration basins which are aimed at infiltrating stormwater in order to reduce the amount of water collected and treated in usual systems. Yet, these infiltration basins are mainly settled over highly permeable geologic formations so as to ensure water infiltration and a proper functioning of these infiltration basins. Most of these formations are strongly heterogeneous, since they are made of different materials with contrasting sedimentological properties (e.g. particle size distribution) and transfer properties. This paper addresses flow modeling during the infiltration phase in the vadose zone underneath infiltration basins settled over a strongly heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit. In particular, we want to pinpoint numerically the worst conditions with regards to preferential flow, in terms of initial hydric conditions (initial water contents) and imposed flow rates. For this purpose, a numerical study is proposed on the basis of previous studies offering a sedimentological description of the subsoil with the detail of its architecture and a precise description of the different lithofacies and their hydraulic properties. Considering this, we worked on a section (13.5m long and 2.5m high) for which a complete sedimentological and hydraulic description had already been performed. Water infiltration was modeled for different initial and boundary conditions (mostly the values of the flux imposed at surface). At first, different numerical tests and adjustments have been made including mesh optimization with regards to both accuracy and computation time. Following these tests, the "tight" mesh has been validated since it

  1. Removal of phosphorus by the core-shell bio-ceramic/Zn-layered double hydroxides (LDHs) composites for municipal wastewater treatment in constructed rapid infiltration system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangling; Guo, Lu; Huang, Hualing; Jiang, Yinghe; Li, Meng; Leng, Yujie

    2016-06-01

    Constructed rapid infiltration systems (CRIS) are a reasonable option for treating wastewater, owing to their simplicity, low cost and low energy consumption. Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), novel materials with high surface area and anion exchange capacity, faced the problem of the application in CRIS due to the powdered form. To overcome this shortcoming, Zn-LDHs (FeZn-LDHs, CoZn-LDHs, AlZn-LDHs) were prepared by co-precipitation method and in-situ coated on the surface of the natural bio-ceramic to synthesize the core-shell bio-ceramic/Zn-LDHs composites. Characterization by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (XRFS) indicated that the Zn-LDHs were successful loaded on the natural bio-ceramic. Column tests experiments indicated that the bio-ceramic/Zn-LDHs efficiently enhanced the removal performance of phosphorus. The efficiently removal rates of bio-ceramic/FeZn-LDHs were 71.58% for total phosphorous (TP), 74.91% for total dissolved phosphorous (TDP), 82.31% for soluble reactive phosphorous (SRP) and 67.58% for particulate phosphorus (PP). Compared with the natural bio-ceramic, the average removal rates were enhanced by 32.20% (TP), 41.33% (TDP), 49.06% (SRP) and 10.50% (PP), respectively. Adsorption data of phosphate were better described by the Freundlich model for the bio-ceramic/Zn-LDHs and natural bio-ceramic, except for the bio-ceramic/CoZn-LDHs. The maximum adsorption capacity of bio-ceramic/AlZn-LDHs (769.23 mg/kg) was 1.77 times of the natural bio-ceramic (434.78 mg/kg). The effective desorption of phosphate could achieve by using a mixed solution of 5 M NaCl + 0.1 M NaOH, it outperformed the natural bio-ceramic of 18.95% for FeZn-LDHs, 7.59% for CoZn-LDHs and 12.66% for AlZn-LDHs. The kinetic data of the bio-ceramic/Zn-LDHs were better described by the pseudo-second-order equation. Compared the removal amount of phosphate by the natural bio-ceramic, the physical effects were improved little, but the chemical

  2. Humic substance formation during wastewater infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L. ); Hildmann-Smed, R.; Filip, Z.K. , Langen . Inst. fuer Wasser-, Boden- und Lufthygiene); Jenssen, P.D. . Centre for Soil and Environmental Research)

    1991-01-01

    Soil infiltration of wastewater effluents is a widely practiced method of treatment and disposal/reuse throughout the world. Renovation of the wastewater results from a wide variety of complex physicochemical and biological processes. One set of processes is speculated to involve the accumulation of organic matter by filtration and sorption followed by formation of humic substances. This humic substance formation can effect the performance of soil treatment systems by contributing to soil pore clogging and reduction in hydraulic capacity, and by yielding reactive substances and an enhancement of purification processes. While there has been a wealth of research into the nature and genesis of humic substances in terrestrial environments, there has been limited research of humic substance formation during soil infiltration of wastewater. The purpose of the research reported herein was to determine if humic substances can form under conditions typical of those present during wastewater infiltration into natural soil systems. This work was conducted during 1989 to 1990 as a collaborative effort between the Centre for Soil and Environmental Research, located in Aas, Norway and the Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene located in Langen, West Germany. 11 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Comparison of unstable water infiltration in porous media in 2D and 3D experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, C.; Neuweiler, I.; Lehmann, P.; Papafotiou, A.; Vontobel, P.; Hartmann, S.

    2010-05-01

    Water infiltration into unsaturated soil is an important process for groundwater recharge and thus for water balance of natural hydrosystems. The characteristics of infiltration patterns depend on porous media properties and initial moisture content. Infiltration fronts into soil can be unstable in layered media with fine over dry coarse material. To predict arrival times of infiltration fronts and average water content in upscaled models, it is necessary to understand occurrence of instabilities. The unstable flow behavior is not captured by standard models and finger characteristics have mostly been investigated experimentally. Most experiments in the past were carried out in 2D setups and it is not clear how the results of such studies relate to real 3D systems. The aim of this study is to compare development and finger characteristics of unstable infiltration in 2D and 3D setups. We carried out laboratory experiments on fast infiltration in 2D and 3D setups and measured water content in porous media with neutron transmission technology at the NEUTRA beam line at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. The 2D experiments were carried out in a glass sandbox (260 mm high, 75 mm wide and 11 mm deep). For the 3D experiments aluminum cylindrical column (150 mm in height and 100 mm in diameter) were used. Both columns were filled homogeneously with coarse quartz sand (grain size 0.7 - 1.2 mm) below fine sand layer (0.1 - 0.3 mm) of 20 - 30 mm thickness. Two dimensional projection images of water content with spatial resolution of 125 microns were deduced from neutron images every 2 second. For the 3D setup water content distribution was reconstructed in 3D to monitor water content inside the fingers over time. Water content and finger-width (15 - 23 mm) were similar for 2D and 3D setups. In both cases water content was maximum when the front passes and was decreasing afterwards (indicating "overshoot" behavior). Also the water content difference between values after

  4. Economic lot sizing in a production system with random demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shine-Der; Yang, Chin-Ming; Lan, Shu-Chuan

    2016-04-01

    An extended economic production quantity model that copes with random demand is developed in this paper. A unique feature of the proposed study is the consideration of transient shortage during the production stage, which has not been explicitly analysed in existing literature. The considered costs include set-up cost for the batch production, inventory carrying cost during the production and depletion stages in one replenishment cycle, and shortage cost when demand cannot be satisfied from the shop floor immediately. Based on renewal reward process, a per-unit-time expected cost model is developed and analysed. Under some mild condition, it can be shown that the approximate cost function is convex. Computational experiments have demonstrated that the average reduction in total cost is significant when the proposed lot sizing policy is compared with those with deterministic demand.

  5. Development of Deployment System for Small Size Solar Sail Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Osamu; Sawada, Hirotaka; Hanaoka, Fuminori; Kawaguchi, Junichiro; Shirasawa, Yoji; Sugita, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Sakamoto, Hiraku; Funase, Ryu

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is studying the feasibility of using the solar power sail as a new propulsion engine for deep space exploration missions. In this paper, the sail shape and equipment layout for missions utilizing small-sized solar power sails are proposed. The two-stage deployment method of the sail is also proposed. The sail need to be deployed statically at the first stage, and two types of deployment mechanisms are introduced. On the other hand the second stage of the deployment can be performed dynamically, and the oscillating motion of the membrane is converged by tethers connecting the membrane to the main body. The deployment motions are analyzed by numerical simulations using multi-particle models in order to verify the deployment. They are compared with the results calculated by finite element method models. The numerical simulation results are discussed from the technological viewpoint of the sail deployment dynamics and mechanisms.

  6. An Approximate Ablative Thermal Protection System Sizing Tool for Entry System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    A computer tool to perform entry vehicle ablative thermal protection systems sizing has been developed. Two options for calculating the thermal response are incorporated into the tool. One, an industry-standard, high-fidelity ablation and thermal response program was integrated into the tool, making use of simulated trajectory data to calculate its boundary conditions at the ablating surface. Second, an approximate method that uses heat of ablation data to estimate heat shield recession during entry has been coupled to a one-dimensional finite-difference calculation that calculates the in-depth thermal response. The in-depth solution accounts for material decomposition, but does not account for pyrolysis gas energy absorption through the material. Engineering correlations are used to estimate stagnation point convective and radiative heating as a function of time. The sizing tool calculates recovery enthalpy, wall enthalpy, surface pressure, and heat transfer coefficient. Verification of this tool is performed by comparison to past thermal protection system sizings for the Mars Pathfinder and Stardust entry systems and calculations are performed for an Apollo capsule entering the atmosphere at lunar and Mars return speeds.

  7. An Approximate Ablative Thermal Protection System Sizing Tool for Entry System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    A computer tool to perform entry vehicle ablative thermal protection systems sizing has been developed. Two options for calculating the thermal response are incorporated into the tool. One, an industry-standard, high-fidelity ablation and thermal response program was integrated into the tool, making use of simulated trajectory data to calculate its boundary conditions at the ablating surface. Second, an approximate method that uses heat of ablation data to estimate heat shield recession during entry has been coupled to a one-dimensional finite-difference calculation that calculates the in-depth thermal response. The in-depth solution accounts for material decomposition, but does not account for pyrolysis gas energy absorption through the material. Engineering correlations are used to estimate stagnation point convective and radiative heating as a function of time. The sizing tool calculates recovery enthalpy, wall enthalpy, surface pressure, and heat transfer coefficient. Verification of this tool is performed by comparison to past thermal protection system sizings for the Mars Pathfinder and Stardust entry systems and calculations are performed for an Apollo capsule entering the atmosphere at lunar and Mars return speeds.

  8. The alternative complement component factor B regulates UV-induced oedema, systemic suppression of contact and delayed hypersensitivity, and mast cell infiltration into the skin.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Scott N; Hammond, Kirsten J L; Chan, Carling Y-Y; Rogers, Linda J; Beaugie, Clare; Rana, Sabita; Marsh-Wakefield, Felix; Thurman, Joshua M; Halliday, Gary M

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths in sunlight are the prime cause of skin cancer in humans with both the UVA and UVB wavebands making a contribution to photocarcinogenesis. UV has many different biological effects on the skin that contribute to carcinogenesis, including suppression of adaptive immunity, sunburn and altering the migration of mast cells into and away from irradiated skin. Many molecular mechanisms have been identified as contributing to skin responses to UV. Recently, using gene set enrichment analysis of microarray data, we identified the alternative complement pathway with a central role for factor B (fB) in UVA-induced immunosuppression. In the current study we used mice genetically deficient in fB (fB-/- mice) to study the functional role of the alternative complement pathway in skin responses to UV. We found that fB is required for not only UVA but also UVB-induced immunosuppression and solar-simulated UV induction of the oedemal component of sunburn. Factor B-/- mice had a larger number of resident skin mast cells than control mice, but unlike the controls did not respond to UV by increasing mast cell infiltration into the skin. This study provides evidence for a function role for fB in skin responses to UV radiation. Factor B regulates UVA and UVB induced immunosuppression, UV induced oedema and mast cell infiltration into the skin. The alternative complement pathway is therefore an important regulator of skin responses to UV. PMID:25645888

  9. Metallic Rotor Sizing and Performance Model for Flywheel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Camille J.; Kraft, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing flywheel system requirements and designs for terrestrial and spacecraft applications. Several generations of flywheels have been designed and tested at GRC using in-house expertise in motors, magnetic bearings, controls, materials and power electronics. The maturation of a flywheel system from the concept phase to the preliminary design phase is accompanied by maturation of the Integrated Systems Performance model, where estimating relationships are replaced by physics based analytical techniques. The modeling can incorporate results from engineering model testing and emerging detail from the design process.

  10. Hydrazine engine start system air start performance and controls sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.T.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrazine has been used as an energy source in many applications to fuel in-flight main engine starting. In a current application, an existing hydrazine engine start system (ESS) design was adapted to meet new fuel control requirements. This paper presents a brief system description, historical context, and the motivating factors for the hydrazine controls changes and three case studies of controls design and analysis from the ESS program. 4 refs.

  11. Oil droplet size determination in complex flavor delivery systems by diffusion NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fieber, Wolfgang; Hafner, Valeria; Normand, Valéry

    2011-04-15

    Droplet size distribution of flavor oils in two different solid flavor delivery systems were determined with pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy: yeast encapsulation system, a spray dried flavor encapsulation system based on empty yeast cells, and glassy encapsulation system, an extruded solid water soluble carbohydrate delivery system. The oil droplet sizes are limited by the yeast cell walls in the yeast encapsulation system and the size distribution is unimodal according to images from transmission electron microscopy. The droplet size determination with diffusion NMR is based on the Murday and Cotts theory of restricted diffusion of liquids in geometrical confinements. Good fits of the diffusion data could be obtained by applying a unimodal, log-normal size distribution model and average droplet sizes of about 2 μm were found that correspond approximately to the inner diameter of the yeast cells. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a multimodal droplet size distribution in the glassy extruded delivery systems. To fit the NMR data a bimodal log-normal distribution function with five independent fitting parameters was implemented that yielded consistent and robust results. The two size populations were found in the micron and sub-micron range, respectively. The method was sufficiently accurate to depict variation of droplet size distributions in glassy encapsulation systems of different formulation. PMID:21316700

  12. Correlation effects during liquid infiltration into hydrophobic nanoporous media

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, V. D. Belogorlov, A. A.; Byrkin, V. A.; Lisichkin, G. V.; Tronin, V. N.; Troyan, V. I.

    2011-03-15

    To explain the thermal effects observed during the infiltration of a nonwetting liquid into a disordered nanoporous medium, we have constructed a model that includes correlation effects in a disordered medium. It is based on analytical methods of the percolation theory. The infiltration of a porous medium is considered as the infiltration of pores in an infinite cluster of interconnected pores. Using the model of randomly situated spheres (RSS), we have been able to take into account the correlation effect of the spatial arrangement and connectivity of pores in the medium. The other correlation effect of the mutual arrangement of filled and empty pores on the shell of an infinite percolation cluster of filled pores determines the infiltration fluctuation probability. This probability has been calculated analytically. Allowance for these correlation effects during infiltration and defiltration makes it possible to suggest a physical mechanism of the contact angle hysteresis and to calculate the dependences of the contact angles on the degree of infiltration, porosity of the medium, and temperature. Based on the suggested model, we have managed to describe the temperature dependences of the infiltration and defiltration pressures and the thermal effects that accompany the absorption of energy by disordered porous medium-nonwetting liquid systems with various porosities in a unified way.

  13. Reducing Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) of Perception Systems in Small Autonomous Aerial Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Gross, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The objectives are to examine recent trends in the reduction of size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements of sensor systems for environmental perception and to explore new technology that may overcome limitations in current systems. Improving perception systems to facilitate situation awareness is critical in the move to introduce increasing autonomy in aerial systems. Whether the autonomy is in the current state-of-the-art of increasing automation or is enabling cognitive decisions that facilitate adaptive behavior, collection of environmental information and fusion of that information into knowledge that can direct actuation is imperative to decisions resulting in appropriate behavior. Artificial sensory systems such as cameras, radar, LIDAR, and acoustic sensors have been in use on aircraft for many years but, due to the large size and weight of the airplane and electrical power made available through powerful engines, the SWaP requirements of these sensors was inconsequential. With the proliferation of Remote Piloted Vehicles (RPV), the trend is in significant reduction in SWaP of the vehicles. This requires at least an equivalent reduction in SWaP for the sensory systems. A survey of some currently available sensor systems and changing technology will reveal the trend toward reduction of SWaP of these systems and will predict future reductions. A new technology will be introduced that provides an example of a desirable new trend. A new device replaces multiple conventional sensory devices facilitating synchronization, localization, altimetry, collision avoidance, terrain mapping, and data communication in a single integrated, small form-factor, extremely lightweight, and low power device that it is practical for integration into small autonomous vehicles and can facilitate cooperative behavior. The technology is based on Ultra WideBand (UWB) radio using short pulses of energy rather than continuous sine waves. The characteristics of UWB yield several

  14. Conjunction of Multizone Infiltration Specialists (COMIS) fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Feustel, H.E.; Rayner-Hooson, A.

    1990-05-01

    The COMIS workshop (Conjunction of Multizone Infiltration Specialists) was a joint research effort to develop a multizone infiltration mode. This workshop (October 1988--September 1989) was hosted by the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Applied Science Division. The task of the workshop was to develop a detailed multizone infiltration program taking crack flow, HVAC-systems, single-sided ventilation and transport mechanism through large openings into account. This work was accomplished not by investigating into numerical description of physical phenomena but by reviewing the literature for the best suitable algorithm. The numerical description of physical phenomena is clearly a task of IEA-Annex XX Air Flow Patterns in Buildings,'' which will be finished in September 1991. Multigas tracer measurements and wind tunnel data will be used to check the model. The agenda integrated all participants' contributions into a single model containing a large library of modules. The user-friendly program is aimed at researchers and building professionals. From its announcement in December 1986, COMIS was well received by the research community. Due to the internationality of the group, several national and international research programmes were co-ordinated with the COMIS workshop. Colleagues for France, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, People's Republic of China, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States of America were working together on the development of the model. Even though this kind of co-operation is well known in other fields of research, e.g., high energy physics; for the field of building physics it is a new approach. This document contains an overview about infiltration modelling as well as the physics and the mathematics behind the COMIS model. 91 refs., 38 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Space Heating Load Estimation Procedure for CHP Systems sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocale, P.; Pagliarini, G.; Rainieri, S.

    2015-11-01

    Due to its environmental and energy benefits, the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) represents certainly an important measure to improve energy efficiency of buildings. Since the energy performance of the CHP systems strongly depends on the fraction of the useful cogenerated heat (i.e. the cogenerated heat that is actually used to meet building thermal demand), in building applications of CHP, it is necessary to know the space heating and cooling loads profile to optimise the system efficiency. When the heating load profile is unknown or difficult to calculate with a sufficient accuracy, as may occur for existing buildings, it can be estimated from the cumulated energy uses by adopting the loads estimation procedure (h-LEP). With the aim to evaluate the useful fraction of the cogenerated heat for different operating conditions in terms of buildings characteristics, weather data and system capacity, the h-LEP is here implemented with a single climate variable: the hourly average dry- bulb temperature. The proposed procedure have been validated resorting to the TRNSYS simulation tool. The results, obtained by considering a building for hospital use, reveal that the useful fraction of the cogenerated heat can be estimated with an average accuracy of ± 3%, within the range of operative conditions considered in the present study.

  16. The development of internet based ship design support system for small and medium sized shipyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sung-Chul; Lee, Soon-Sup; Kang, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Kyung-Ho

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, a prototype of ship basic planning system is implemented for the small and medium sized shipyards based on the internet technology and concurrent engineering concept. The system is designed from the user requirements. Consequently, standardized development environment and tools are selected. These tools are used for the system development to define and evaluate core application technologies. The system will contribute to increasing competitiveness of small and medium sized shipyards in the 21st century industrial en-vironment.

  17. Influence of particle size on performance of a pilot-scale fixed-bed gasification system.

    PubMed

    Yin, Renzhan; Liu, Ronghou; Wu, Jinkai; Wu, Xiaowu; Sun, Chen; Wu, Ceng

    2012-09-01

    The effect of particle size on the gasification performance of a pilot-scale (25 kg/h) downdraft fixed bed gasification system was investigated using prunings from peach trees at five different size fractions (below 1, 1-2, 2-4, 4-6 and 6-8 cm). The gas and hydrocarbon compositions were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. With increasing particle size, gas yield increased while tar and dust content decreased. The lower heating value of the gas decreased slightly with particle size. At a smaller particle size, more hydrocarbons were detected in the producer gas. Hydrogen and carbon dioxide contents increased with the decrease in particle size, reaching 16.09% and 14.36% at particle size below 1cm, respectively. Prunings with a particle size of 1-2 cm were favorable for gasification in the downdraft gasifier used in this study. PMID:22728176

  18. Optimal size for emergence of self-replicating polymer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoshiya J.; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    A biological system consists of a variety of polymers that are synthesized from monomers by catalysis, which exists only for some long polymers. It is important to elucidate the emergence and sustenance of such autocatalytic polymerization. We analyze here the stochastic polymerization reaction dynamics to investigate the transition time from a state with almost no catalysts to a state with sufficient catalysts. We found an optimal volume that minimizes this transition time, which agrees with the inverse of the catalyst concentration at the unstable fixed point that separates the two states, as is theoretically explained. Relevance to the origin of life is also discussed.

  19. Optimal sizing of heating systems that store and use thermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersh, H. N.

    1981-06-01

    An analysis of the factors that enter into the sizing of thermal energy storage (TES) space heating systems is given. These TES systems, having to fulfill the same thermal comfort functions as conventional space heating systems, have different operating characteristics and more severe constraints, and therefore require different and more critical sizing procedures. Thermal energy storage heating systems offer social and private benefits, and the achievement of these benefits depends in large part on proper sizing. Proper sizing is a probabilistic rather than a deterministic procedure, and is utility-specific as well. Analysis of experimental data obtained in field studies of TEST in New England provided information on the accuracy of equipment-sizing procedures used by vendors and on the consequences of undersizing and oversizing. Based on simulation studies and other techniques, additional useful sizing information was developed. The information implies the need for an upward adjustment of the sizing factor if the sizing is to be optimal for US climatological conditions and living habits. A summary and a general theoretical analysis of the information presented in this report are then combined to provide guidelines for optimally sizing TES systems.

  20. Multidisciplinary optimization of aeroservoelastic systems using reduced-size models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpel, Mordechay

    1992-01-01

    Efficient analytical and computational tools for simultaneous optimal design of the structural and control components of aeroservoelastic systems are presented. The optimization objective is to achieve aircraft performance requirements and sufficient flutter and control stability margins with a minimal weight penalty and without violating the design constraints. Analytical sensitivity derivatives facilitate an efficient optimization process which allows a relatively large number of design variables. Standard finite element and unsteady aerodynamic routines are used to construct a modal data base. Minimum State aerodynamic approximations and dynamic residualization methods are used to construct a high accuracy, low order aeroservoelastic model. Sensitivity derivatives of flutter dynamic pressure, control stability margins and control effectiveness with respect to structural and control design variables are presented. The performance requirements are utilized by equality constraints which affect the sensitivity derivatives. A gradient-based optimization algorithm is used to minimize an overall cost function. A realistic numerical example of a composite wing with four controls is used to demonstrate the modeling technique, the optimization process, and their accuracy and efficiency.

  1. Wetting and infiltration of graphite materials by molten silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.G.; Hausner, H.

    1995-02-01

    Wetting-assisted infiltration without the application of external pressure has advantages for the production of complex shaped metal-ceramic composites to near net shape with very low residual porosity. A class of fibrous Si/SiC composites was formed by infiltrating molten silicon into densely packed carbon fibers in preformed shapes. The liquid silicon/solid carbon system may be considered to be a model for reactive wetting and infiltration which is accompanied by the heterogeneous chemical reaction between silicon and carbon to form a solid SiC product layer at the silicon/carbon interface. The wetting behavior of various carbon materials by molten silicon has been extensively investigated recently with the sessile drop method. Some results of this investigation will be reported in the present paper. Attention will be paid to the surface roughness of the substrates on the wetting behavior. The eventual infiltration of silicon into the graphites will be discussed with relation to the wetting.

  2. Thermoeconomic optimal sizing for ice storage system in partial storage control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Joo, Y.J.; Choi, B.Y.; Kwon, S.C.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes optimal sizing of ice storage and chiller system through parametric simulation for a commercial office building with peak cooling load of 600 tons. As an optimality criterion, the minimization of the annualized capital cost and fuel exergy costs on the basis of thermoeconomic analysis was chosen. This paper considers encapsulated ice storage system in chiller-downstream arrangement with chiller-priority control and storage-priority control strategies. Minimal required chiller sizes of the system for each control strategy are determined with storage fraction from 40% to 60%. The design condition, which has minimum cost, lies on the curve of the set of required chiller size and storage fraction. The optimal sizing is defined in this paper as the choice of size of chiller and storage tank, which leads to minimization of the annualized cost per exergy unit of product for the system.

  3. Cooperative storage of shared files in a parallel computing system with dynamic block size

    DOEpatents

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Grider, Gary

    2015-11-10

    Improved techniques are provided for parallel writing of data to a shared object in a parallel computing system. A method is provided for storing data generated by a plurality of parallel processes to a shared object in a parallel computing system. The method is performed by at least one of the processes and comprises: dynamically determining a block size for storing the data; exchanging a determined amount of the data with at least one additional process to achieve a block of the data having the dynamically determined block size; and writing the block of the data having the dynamically determined block size to a file system. The determined block size comprises, e.g., a total amount of the data to be stored divided by the number of parallel processes. The file system comprises, for example, a log structured virtual parallel file system, such as a Parallel Log-Structured File System (PLFS).

  4. Automated System for Kinetic Analysis of Particle Size Distributions for Pharmaceutically Relevant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Green, John-Bruce D.; Carter, Phillip W.; Zhang, Yingqing; Patel, Dipa; Kotha, Priyanka

    2014-01-01

    Detailing the kinetics of particle formation for pharmaceutically relevant solutions is challenging, especially when considering the combination of formulations, containers, and timescales of clinical importance. This paper describes a method for using commercial software Automate with a stream-selector valve capable of sampling container solutions from within an environmental chamber. The tool was built to monitor changes in particle size distributions via instrumental particle counters but can be adapted to other solution-based sensors. The tool and methodology were demonstrated to be highly effective for measuring dynamic changes in emulsion globule distributions as a function of storage and mixing conditions important for parenteral nutrition. Higher levels of agitation induced the fastest growth of large globules (≥5 μm) while the gentler conditions actually showed a decrease in the number of these large globules. The same methodology recorded calcium phosphate precipitation kinetics as a function of [Ca2+] and pH. This automated system is readily adaptable to a wide range of pharmaceutically relevant systems where the particle size is expected to vary with time. This instrumentation can dramatically reduce the time and resources needed to probe complex formulation issues while providing new insights for monitoring the kinetics as a function of key variables. PMID:25140276

  5. Converging Nuclear Magnetic Shielding Calculations with Respect to Basis and System Size in Protein Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Joshua D.; Neubauer, Thomas J.; Caulkins, Bethany G.; Mueller, Leonard J.; Beran, Gregory J. O.

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio chemical shielding calculations greatly facilitate the interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts in biological systems, but the large sizes of these systems requires approximations in the chemical models used to represent them. Achieving good convergence in the predicted chemical shieldings is necessary before one can unravel how other complex structural and dynamical factors affect the NMR measurements. Here, we investigate how to balance trade-offs between using a better basis set or a larger cluster model for predicting the chemical shieldings of the substrates in two representative examples of protein-substrate systems involving different domains in tryptophan synthase: the N-(4′-trifluoromethoxybenzoyl)-2-aminoethyl phosphate (F9) ligand which binds in the α active site, and the 2-aminophenol (2AP) quinonoid intermediate formed in the β active site. We first demonstrate that a chemically intuitive three-layer, locally dense basis model that uses a large basis on the substrate, a medium triple-zeta basis to describe its hydrogen-bonding partners and/or surrounding van derWaals cavity, and a crude basis set for more distant atoms provides chemical shieldings in good agreement with much more expensive large basis calculations. Second, long-range quantum mechanical interactions are important, and one can accurately estimate them as a small-basis correction to larger-basis calculations on a smaller cluster. The combination of these approaches enables one to perform density functional theory NMR chemical shift calculations in protein systems that are well-converged with respect to both basis set and cluster size. PMID:25993979

  6. [Corneal infiltrates after keratoplasty caused by tissue inclusions of corn starch glove powder. An intraoperative complication].

    PubMed

    Mittelviefhaus, H

    1993-12-01

    Corneal infiltrations after keratoplasty may be the first sign of postoperative infection. We report on our findings of unusual corneal infiltrations, which were caused by contamination of the corneal tissue with remnants of latex glove powder. The diagnosis was proved by the specific distribution pattern and the clinical course. Infiltrates of decreasing size were observed in the area of all four temporarily supporting single-stitch sutures of the transplant and at the first stitches of the permanent running corneal sutures. There is no treatment necessary, but the infiltrates have to be differentiated from infection. Improvement of operative habits and techniques can avoid this complication. PMID:8124042

  7. GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION POTENTIAL FROM STORMWATER INFILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior to urbanization, ground water recharge resulted from infiltration of precipitation through pervious surfaces, including grasslands and woods. This infiltration water was relatively uncontaminated. With urbanization, the permeable soil surface area through which recharge by...

  8. Determination of the blur size of a radiographic system from density reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Liu, Jun; Jing, Yue-feng; Zhang, Xuan; Shi, Jiang-jun; Xiao, Bo

    2015-07-01

    Blurring is a serious problem in hydrotest experiments with high-energy X-ray radiography. We propose a new method that determines the blur size of a radiographic system from density reconstruction. First, we test the method on a simulated image whose blur is known in advance. Then, we apply the method to obtain the blur size of a realistic radiographic system from an experimental image produced by the system. Finally, we verify the obtained blur size via a radiographic experiment on a step object.

  9. Improved Cellular Infiltration in Electrospun Fiber via Engineered Porosity

    PubMed Central

    NAM, JIN; HUANG, YAN; AGARWAL, SUDHA; LANNUTTI, JOHN

    2016-01-01

    Small pore sizes inherent to electrospun matrices can hinder efficient cellular ingrowth. To facilitate infiltration while retaining its extracellular matrix-like character, electrospinning was combined with salt leaching to produce a scaffold having deliberate, engineered delaminations. We made elegant use of a specific randomizing component of the electrospinning process, the Taylor Cone and the falling fiber beneath it, to produce a uniform, well-spread distribution of salt particles. After 3 weeks of culture, up to 4 mm of cellular infiltration was observed, along with cellular coverage of up to 70% within the delaminations. To our knowledge, this represents the first observation of extensive cellular infiltration of electrospun matrices. Infiltration appears to be driven primarily by localized proliferation rather than coordinated cellular locomotion. Cells also moved from the salt-generated porosity into the surrounding electrospun fiber matrix. Given that the details of salt deposition (amount, size, and number density) are far from optimized, the result provides a convincing illustration of the ability of mammalian cells to interact with appropriately tailored electrospun matrices. These layered structures can be precisely fabricated by varying the deposition interval and particle size conceivably to produce in vivo-like gradients in porosity such that the resulting scaffolds better resemble the desired final structure. PMID:17536926

  10. Local treatment of a pleural mesothelioma tumor with ONCOS-102 induces a systemic antitumor CD8+ T-cell response, prominent infiltration of CD8+ lymphocytes and Th1 type polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ranki, Tuuli; Joensuu, Timo; Jäger, Elke; Karbach, Julia; Wahle, Claudia; Kairemo, Kalevi; Alanko, Tuomo; Partanen, Kaarina; Turkki, Riku; Linder, Nina; Lundin, Johan; Ristimäki, Ari; Kankainen, Matti; Hemminki, Akseli; Backman, Charlotta; Dienel, Kasper; von Euler, Mikael; Haavisto, Elina; Hakonen, Tiina; Juhila, Juuso; Jaderberg, Magnus; Priha, Petri; Vassilev, Lotta; Vuolanto, Antti; Pesonen, Sari

    2014-01-01

    Late stage cancer is often associated with reduced immune recognition and a highly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. The presence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and specific gene-signatures prior to treatment are linked to good prognosis, while the opposite is true for extensive immunosuppression. The use of adenoviruses as cancer vaccines is a form of active immunotherapy to initialise a tumor-specific immune response that targets the patient's unique tumor antigen repertoire. We report a case of a 68-year-old male with asbestos-related malignant pleural mesothelioma who was treated in a Phase I study with a granulocyte-macrophage colony‑stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-expressing oncolytic adenovirus, Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF (ONCOS-102). The treatment resulted in prominent infiltration of CD8+ lymphocytes to tumor, marked induction of systemic antitumor CD8+ T-cells and induction of Th1-type polarization in the tumor. These results indicate that ONCOS-102 treatment sensitizes tumors to other immunotherapies by inducing a T-cell positive phenotype to an initially T-cell negative tumor. PMID:25941579

  11. Improved infiltration of stem cells on electrospun nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Shabani, Iman; Haddadi-Asl, Vahid; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Babaeijandaghi, Farshad; Soleimani, Masoud

    2009-04-24

    Nanofibrous scaffolds have been recently used in the field of tissue engineering because of their nano-size structure which promotes cell attachment, function, proliferation and infiltration. In this study, nanofibrous polyethersulfone (PES) scaffolds was prepared via electrospinning. The scaffolds were surface modified by plasma treatment and collagen grafting. The surface changes then investigated by contact angle measurements and FTIR-ATR. The results proved grafting of the collagen on nanofibers surface and increased hydrophilicity after plasma treatment and collagen grafting. The cell interaction study was done using stem cells because of their ability to differentiate to different kinds of cell lines. The cells had normal morphology on nanofibers and showed very high infiltration through collagen grafted PES nanofibers. This infiltration capability is very useful and needed to make 3D scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  12. Development of Size Modification of Human Figure Drawings in Spatial Axes Systems of Varying Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange-Kuttner, C.

    1997-01-01

    Investigated intra-individual development of ability to modify the size of a human figure drawing. Found through longitudinal data that children between ages 7 and 9 were able to reduce drawing size. Discovered that the larger the figure initially, the more complex the level of spatial axes system, and the more persons in the picture, the greater…

  13. 24 CFR 3280.505 - Air infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Air infiltration. 3280.505 Section... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.505 Air infiltration. (a) Envelope air infiltration. The opaque envelope shall be designed and constructed to limit...

  14. 24 CFR 3280.505 - Air infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Air infiltration. 3280.505 Section... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.505 Air infiltration. (a) Envelope air infiltration. The opaque envelope shall be designed and constructed to limit...

  15. 24 CFR 3280.505 - Air infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Air infiltration. 3280.505 Section... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.505 Air infiltration. (a) Envelope air infiltration. The opaque envelope shall be designed and constructed to limit...

  16. Tumor infiltrating immune cells in gliomas and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Miranda, David; Ruiz, Laura; Sousa, Pablo; Ciudad, Juana; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells are part of a complex microenvironment that promotes and/or regulates tumor development and growth. Depending on the type of cells and their functional interactions, immune cells may play a key role in suppressing the tumor or in providing support for tumor growth, with relevant effects on patient behavior. In recent years, important advances have been achieved in the characterization of immune cell infiltrates in central nervous system (CNS) tumors, but their role in tumorigenesis and patient behavior still remain poorly understood. Overall, these studies have shown significant but variable levels of infiltration of CNS tumors by macrophage/microglial cells (TAM) and to a less extent also lymphocytes (particularly T-cells and NK cells, and less frequently also B-cells). Of note, TAM infiltrate gliomas at moderate numbers where they frequently show an immune suppressive phenotype and functional behavior; in contrast, infiltration by TAM may be very pronounced in meningiomas, particularly in cases that carry isolated monosomy 22, where the immune infiltrates also contain greater numbers of cytotoxic T and NK-cells associated with an enhanced anti-tumoral immune response. In line with this, the presence of regulatory T cells, is usually limited to a small fraction of all meningiomas, while frequently found in gliomas. Despite these differences between gliomas and meningiomas, both tumors show heterogeneous levels of infiltration by immune cells with variable functionality. In this review we summarize current knowledge about tumor-infiltrating immune cells in the two most common types of CNS tumors-gliomas and meningiomas-, as well as the role that such immune cells may play in the tumor microenvironment in controlling and/or promoting tumor development, growth and control. PMID:26216710

  17. Simulating bioclogging effects on dynamic riverbed permeability and infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomer, Michelle E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Maier, Ulrich; Schmidt, Christian; Thullner, Martin; Ulrich, Craig; Flipo, Nicolas; Rubin, Yoram

    2016-04-01

    Bioclogging in rivers can detrimentally impact aquifer recharge. This is particularly so in dry regions, where losing rivers are common, and where disconnection between surface water and groundwater (leading to the development of an unsaturated zone) can occur. Reduction in riverbed permeability due to biomass growth is a time-variable parameter that is often neglected, yet permeability reduction from bioclogging can introduce order of magnitude changes in seepage fluxes from rivers over short (i.e., monthly) timescales. To address the combined effects of bioclogging and disconnection on infiltration, we developed numerical representations of bioclogging processes within a one-dimensional, variably saturated flow model representing losing-connected and losing-disconnected rivers. We tested these formulations using a synthetic case study informed with biological data obtained from the Russian River, California, USA. Our findings show that modeled biomass growth reduced seepage for losing-connected and losing-disconnected rivers. However, for rivers undergoing disconnection, infiltration declines occurred only after the system was fully disconnected. Before full disconnection, biologically induced permeability declines were not significant enough to offset the infiltration gains introduced by disconnection. The two effects combine to lead to a characteristic infiltration curve where peak infiltration magnitude and timing is controlled by permeability declines relative to hydraulic gradient gains. Biomass growth was found to hasten the onset of full disconnection; a condition we term `effective disconnection'. Our results show that river infiltration can respond dynamically to bioclogging and subsequent permeability declines that are highly dependent on river connection status.

  18. Optimal system size for complex dynamics in random neural networks near criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Wainrib, Gilles; García del Molino, Luis Carlos

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we consider a model of dynamical agents coupled through a random connectivity matrix, as introduced by Sompolinsky et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61(3), 259–262 (1988)] in the context of random neural networks. When system size is infinite, it is known that increasing the disorder parameter induces a phase transition leading to chaotic dynamics. We observe and investigate here a novel phenomenon in the sub-critical regime for finite size systems: the probability of observing complex dynamics is maximal for an intermediate system size when the disorder is close enough to criticality. We give a more general explanation of this type of system size resonance in the framework of extreme values theory for eigenvalues of random matrices.

  19. Fiber optic system for in-vivo sizing of proteins in animal eye lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Ansari, Rafat R.; DellaVecchia, Michael A.; Dubin, Stephen

    1995-05-01

    A compact fiber optic system, utilizing a lensless backscatter fiber optic probe, and a semiconductor laser is used as a non-invasive tool for in vivo characterization of the proteins in the eye lens of several animals. The system exploits the extremely sensitive technique of dynamic light scattering, which uses a laser beam to probe the temporal characteristics of the proteins present in eye lens fluid. The technique, with appropriate electronics and signal processing provides a rapid means of determining the size of the (alpha) -crystallin in the protein-water system. Changes in the size of the protein molecules can be tracked over the age of the eye lens; an abrupt increase in size is associated with the early cataractous formation. This paper describes the fiber optic system and discusses results obtained from measurements made on sedated rabbits, pigs and cats. A clear difference in the size of the (alpha) -crystallin of normal and cataractous lenses is observed.

  20. Anthropometry and the comparison of garment size systems in some European countries.

    PubMed

    Ujević, Darko; Szirovicza, Lajos; Karabegović, Isak

    2005-06-01

    This work points to the relevance of regional and state systems of garment sizes. High quality, garment size systems, garment design and economy are currently the focal points, which belie the outdated strategy of competitiveness based on product cost. The average body dimensions have considerably changed in the last decades. We have investigated these differences in a number of European countries and compared the garment size systems. A concrete example is provided by the hind part of women's trousers and comparisons have been made. The conclusion is that most countries still possess their own official garment size systems, which differ in many aspects from the others. In addition, larger firms in some countries use their internal standards, which vary to some extent. The conclusion based on research is that they depend on the function and purpose of the garment, on trends in fashion, on the design and on the economy of production. PMID:16117302

  1. Rift Valley Fever Virus Encephalitis Is Associated with an Ineffective Systemic Immune Response and Activated T Cell Infiltration into the CNS in an Immunocompetent Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Kimberly A.; McElroy, Anita K.; Jones, Tara L.; Zaki, Sherif R.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes outbreaks of severe disease in livestock and humans throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. In people, RVFV generally causes a self-limiting febrile illness but in a subset of individuals, it progresses to more serious disease. One manifestation is a delayed-onset encephalitis that can be fatal or leave the afflicted with long-term neurologic sequelae. In order to design targeted interventions, the basic pathogenesis of RVFV encephalitis must be better understood. Methodology/Principal Findings To characterize the host immune responses and viral kinetics associated with fatal and nonfatal infections, mice were infected with an attenuated RVFV lacking NSs (ΔNSs) that causes lethal disease only when administered intranasally (IN). Following IN infection, C57BL/6 mice developed severe neurologic disease and succumbed 7–9 days post-infection. In contrast, inoculation of ΔNSs virus subcutaneously in the footpad (FP) resulted in a subclinical infection characterized by a robust immune response with rapid antibody production and strong T cell responses. IN-inoculated mice had delayed antibody responses and failed to clear virus from the periphery. Severe neurological signs and obtundation characterized end stage-disease in IN-inoculated mice, and within the CNS, the development of peak virus RNA loads coincided with strong proinflammatory responses and infiltration of activated T cells. Interestingly, depletion of T cells did not significantly alter survival, suggesting that neurologic disease is not a by-product of an aberrant immune response. Conclusions/Significance Comparison of fatal (IN-inoculated) and nonfatal (FP-inoculated) ΔNSs RVFV infections in the mouse model highlighted the role of the host immune response in controlling viral replication and therefore determining clinical outcome. There was no evidence to suggest that neurologic disease is immune-mediated in RVFV infection. These results provide

  2. Future humidity trends over the western United States in the CMIP5 global climate models and variable infiltration capacity hydrological modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, D. W.; Westerling, A. L.; Oyler, J.

    2013-05-01

    Global climate models predict relative humidity (RH) in the western US will decrease at a rate of about 0.1-0.6 percentage points per decade, albeit with seasonal differences (most drying in spring and summer), geographical variability (greater declines in the interior), stronger reductions for greater anthropogenic radiative forcing, and notable spread among the models. Although atmospheric moisture content increases, this is more than compensated for by higher air temperatures, leading to declining RH. Fine-scale hydrological simulations driven by the global model results should reproduce these trends. It is shown that the MT-CLIM meteorological algorithms used by the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model, when driven by daily Tmin, Tmax, and precipitation (a configuration used in numerous published studies), do not preserve the original global model's humidity trends. Trends are biased positive in the interior western US, so that strong RH decreases are changed to weak decreases, and weak decreases are changed to increases. This happens because the MT-CLIM algorithms VIC incorporates infer an overly large positive trend in atmospheric moisture content in this region, likely due to an underestimate of the effect of increasing aridity on RH. The result could downplay the effects of decreasing RH on plants and wildfire. RH trends along the coast have a weak negative bias due to neglect of the ocean's moderating influence. A numerical experiment where the values of Tdew are altered to compensate for the RH error suggests that eliminating the atmospheric moisture bias could, in and of itself, decrease runoff up to 14% in high-altitude regions east of the Sierra Nevada and Cascades, and reduce estimated Colorado River runoff at Lees Ferry up to 4% by the end of the century. It could also increase the probability of large fires in the northern and central US Rocky Mountains by 13 to 60%.

  3. Helmet Exhalation Capture System (HECS) Sizing Evaluation for an Advanced Space Suit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Waguespack, Glenn M.; Paul, Thomas H.; Conger, Bruce C.

    2008-01-01

    As part of NASA s initiative to develop an advanced portable life support system (PLSS), a baseline schematic has been chosen that includes gaseous oxygen in a closed circuit ventilation configuration. Supply oxygen enters the suit at the back of the helmet and return gases pass over the astronaut s body to be extracted at the astronaut s wrists and ankles through the liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG). The extracted gases are then treated using a rapid cycling amine (RCA) system for carbon dioxide and water removal and activated carbon for trace gas removal before being mixed with makeup oxygen and reintroduced into the helmet. Thermal control is provided by a suit water membrane evaporator (SWME). As an extension of the original schematic development, NASA evaluated several Helmet Exhalation Capture System (HECS) configurations as alternatives to the baseline. The HECS configurations incorporate the use of full contact masks or non-contact masks to reduce flow requirements within the PLSS ventilation subsystem. The primary scope of this study was to compare the alternatives based on mass and volume considerations; however other design issues were also briefly investigated. This paper summarizes the results of this sizing analysis task.

  4. ON THE RELATIVE SIZES OF PLANETS WITHIN KEPLER MULTIPLE-CANDIDATE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ciardi, David R.; Gautier, T. N. III; Howell, Steve B.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.

    2013-01-20

    We present a study of the relative sizes of planets within the multiple-candidate systems discovered with the Kepler mission. We have compared the size of each planet to the size of every other planet within a given planetary system after correcting the sample for detection and geometric biases. We find that for planet pairs for which one or both objects are approximately Neptune-sized or larger, the larger planet is most often the planet with the longer period. No such size-location correlation is seen for pairs of planets when both planets are smaller than Neptune. Specifically, if at least one planet in a planet pair has a radius of {approx}> 3 R {sub Circled-Plus }, 68% {+-} 6% of the planet pairs have the inner planet smaller than the outer planet, while no preferred sequential ordering of the planets is observed if both planets in a pair are smaller than {approx}< 3 R {sub Circled-Plus }.

  5. Assessment of Available Particle Size Data to Support an Analysis of the Waste Feed Delivery System Transfer System

    SciTech Connect

    JEWETT, J.R.

    2000-08-10

    Available data pertaining to size distribution of the particulates in Hanford underground tank waste have been reviewed. Although considerable differences exist between measurement methods, it may be stated with 95% confidence that the median particle size does not exceed 275 {micro}m in at least 95% of the ten tanks selected as sources of HLW feed for Phase 1 vitrification in the RPP. This particle size is recommended as a design basis for the WFD transfer system.

  6. Reactive melt infiltration of silicon-molybdenum alloys into microporous carbon preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Behrendt, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    Investigations on the reactive melt infiltration of silicon-1.7 and 3.2 at.% molybdenum alloys into microporous carbon preforms have been carried out by modeling, differential thermal analysis (DTA), and melt infiltration experiments. These results indicate that the pore volume fraction of the carbon preform is a very important parameter in determining the final composition of the reaction-formed silicon carbide and the secondary phases. Various undesirable melt infiltration results, e.g. choking-off, specimen cracking, silicon veins, and lake formation, and their correlation with inadequate preform properties are presented. The liquid silicon-carbon reaction exotherm temperatures are influenced by the pore and carbon particle size of the preform and the compositions of infiltrants. Room temperature flexural strength and fracture toughness of materials made by the silicon-3.2 at.% molybdenum alloy infiltration of medium pore size preforms are also discussed.

  7. Infiltrative lung diseases in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Freymond, N; Cottin, V; Cordier, J F

    2011-03-01

    Pregnancy may affect the diagnosis, management, and outcome of infiltrative lung disease (ILD). Conversely, ILD may affect pregnancy. ILD may occur as a result of drugs administered commonly or specifically during pregnancy. Most ILDs predominate in patients older than 40 years and are thus rare in pregnant women. During pregnancy ILD may arise de novo and preexisting ILD may be exacerbated or significantly worsened. Some ILDs generally do not alter the management of pregnancy, labor, or delivery. Preexisting ILD no longer contraindicates pregnancy systematically, but thorough evaluation of ILD before pregnancy is required to identify potential contraindications and adapt monitoring. PMID:21277455

  8. Quantum jump model for a system with a finite-size environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suomela, S.; Kutvonen, A.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-06-01

    Measuring the thermodynamic properties of open quantum systems poses a major challenge. A calorimetric detection has been proposed as a feasible experimental scheme to measure work and fluctuation relations in open quantum systems. However, the detection requires a finite size for the environment, which influences the system dynamics. This process cannot be modeled with the standard stochastic approaches. We develop a quantum jump model suitable for systems coupled to a finite-size environment. We use the method to study the common fluctuation relations and prove that they are satisfied.

  9. Research on a simulation-based ship production support system for middle-sized shipbuilding companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young Joo; Woo, Jong Hun; Shin, Jong Gye

    2009-12-01

    Today, many middle-sized shipbuilding companies in Korea are experiencing strong competition from shipbuilding companies in other nations. This competition is particularly affecting small- and middle-sized shipyards, rather than the major shipyards that have their own support systems and development capabilities. The acquisition of techniques that would enable maximization of production efficiency and minimization of the gap between planning and execution would increase the competitiveness of small- and middle-sized Korean shipyards. In this paper, research on a simulation-based support system for ship production management, which can be applied to the shipbuilding processes of middle-sized shipbuilding companies, is presented. The simulation research includes layout optimization, load balancing, work stage operation planning, block logistics, and integrated material management. Each item is integrated into a network system with a value chain that includes all shipbuilding processes.

  10. A study of void size growth in nonequilibrium stochastic systems of point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, Dmitrii O.; Kharchenko, Vasyl O.; Bashtova, Anna I.

    2016-05-01

    We study properties of voids growth dynamics in a stochastic system of point defects in solids under nonequilibrium conditions (sustained irradiation). It is shown that fluctuations of defect production rate (external noise) increase the critical void radius comparing to a deterministic system. An automodel regime of void size growth in a stochastic system is studied in detail. Considering a homogeneous system, it is found that external noise does not change the universality of the void size distribution function; the mean void size evolves according to classical nucleation theory. The noise increases the mean void size and spreads the void size distribution. Studying dynamics of spatially extended systems it was shown that vacancies remaining in a matrix phase are able to organize into vacancy enriched domains due to an instability caused by an elastic lattice deformation. It is shown that dynamics of voids growth is defined by void sinks strength with void size growth exponent varying from 1/3 up to 1/2.

  11. Performance analysis and kernel size study of the Lynx real-time operating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan-Kwei; Gibson, James S.; Fernquist, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper analyzes the Lynx real-time operating system (LynxOS), which has been selected as the operating system for the Space Station Freedom Data Management System (DMS). The features of LynxOS are compared to other Unix-based operating system (OS). The tools for measuring the performance of LynxOS, which include a high-speed digital timer/counter board, a device driver program, and an application program, are analyzed. The timings for interrupt response, process creation and deletion, threads, semaphores, shared memory, and signals are measured. The memory size of the DMS Embedded Data Processor (EDP) is limited. Besides, virtual memory is not suitable for real-time applications because page swap timing may not be deterministic. Therefore, the DMS software, including LynxOS, has to fit in the main memory of an EDP. To reduce the LynxOS kernel size, the following steps are taken: analyzing the factors that influence the kernel size; identifying the modules of LynxOS that may not be needed in an EDP; adjusting the system parameters of LynxOS; reconfiguring the device drivers used in the LynxOS; and analyzing the symbol table. The reductions in kernel disk size, kernel memory size and total kernel size reduction from each step mentioned above are listed and analyzed.

  12. SEWER INFILTRATION AND INFLOW CONTROL PRODUCT AND EQUIPMENT GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report lists and discusses new and existing equipment, materials, and practices available to prevent the entry of unwanted water into the sewer system from infiltration and inflow, and thereby needlessly usurping the capacity of the sewerage system. The report has six section...

  13. Simulating Infiltration at the Large-Scale Ponded Infiltration Test, INEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Andre Unger; Ardyth Simmons, Gudmundur Bodvarsson

    2001-05-31

    This work involved using ITOUGH2 to simulate the Large-Scale Ponded Infiltration Test (LPIT) at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in order to calibrate parameters controlling the infiltration of water in fractured basalt using a dual-permeability modeling approach. This supports the higher objective of building confidence in the use of the dual-permeability approach for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock systems. In particular, the objective of this work is to be able to understand transport of radionuclides at INEEL and subsequently at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A 3-D dual-permeability mesh representing the geological conditions at the LPIT was constructed as shown by the cross-section on Figure 1a. The geology consisted of surficial sediments, two separate basalt flows (A and B basalts) underlain by a low permeability sedimentary interbed (BC interbed), with a lower C basalt constituting the bottom of the model. Water was allowed to infiltrate from the pond and then pool on top of the sedimentary interbed. Water pressure and {sup 75}Se breakthroughs were simulated at four wells screened within the fractured basalt on top of the sedimentary interbed (B04N11, C04C11, B06N11, C06C11) along two radial angles and at two radial distances. Model results were calibrated to field data using ITOUGH2.

  14. Asymptotic investigation of the nonlinear boundary value dynamic problem for the systems with finite sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, I.V.; Danishevsky, V.V.

    1994-12-31

    Asymptotic approaches for nonlinear dynamics of continual system are developed well for the infinite in spatial variables. For the systems with finite sizes we have an infinite number of resonance, and Poincare-Lighthill-Go method does riot work. Using of averaging procedure or method of multiple scales leads to the infinite systems of nonlinear algebraic or ordinary differential equations systems and then using truncation method. which does not gives possibility to obtain all important properties of the solutions.

  15. Production of limit size nanoliposomal systems with potential utility as ultra-small drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Zhigaltsev, Igor V; Tam, Ying K; Leung, Alex K K; Cullis, Pieter R

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies from this group have shown that limit size lipid-based systems - defined as the smallest achievable aggregates compatible with the packing properties of their molecular constituents - can be efficiently produced using rapid microfluidic mixing technique. In this work, it is shown that similar procedures can be employed for the production of homogeneously sized unilamellar vesicular systems of 30-40 nm size range. These vesicles can be remotely loaded with the protonable drug doxorubicin and exhibit adequate drug retention properties in vitro and in vivo. In particular, it is demonstrated that whereas sub-40 nm lipid nanoparticle (LNP) systems consisting entirely of long-chain saturated phosphatidylcholines cannot be produced, the presence of such lipids may have a beneficial effect on the retention properties of limit size systems consisting of mixed lipid components. Specifically, a 33-nm diameter doxorubicin-loaded LNP system composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC), 1,2-dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol, and PEGylated lipid (DSPE-PEG2000) demonstrated adequate, stable drug retention in the circulation, with a half-life for drug release of ∼12 h. These results indicate that microfluidic mixing is the technique of choice for the production of bilayer LNP systems with sizes less than 50 nm that could lead to development of a novel class of ultra-small drug delivery vehicles. PMID:25856305

  16. Split-mouth and parallel-arm trials to compare pain with intraosseous anaesthesia delivered by the computerised Quicksleeper system and conventional infiltration anaesthesia in paediatric oral healthcare: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Smaïl-Faugeron, Violaine; Muller-Bolla, Michèle; Sixou, Jean-Louis; Courson, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Local anaesthesia is commonly used in paediatric oral healthcare. Infiltration anaesthesia is the most frequently used, but recent developments in anaesthesia techniques have introduced an alternative: intraosseous anaesthesia. We propose to perform a split-mouth and parallel-arm multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing the pain caused by the insertion of the needle for the injection of conventional infiltration anaesthesia, and intraosseous anaesthesia by the computerised QuickSleeper system, in children and adolescents. Methods and analysis Inclusion criteria are patients 7–15 years old with at least 2 first permanent molars belonging to the same dental arch (for the split-mouth RCT) or with a first permanent molar (for the parallel-arm RCT) requiring conservative or endodontic treatment limited to pulpotomy. The setting of this study is the Department of Paediatric Dentistry at 3 University dental hospitals in France. The primary outcome measure will be pain reported by the patient on a visual analogue scale concerning the insertion of the needle and the injection/infiltration. Secondary outcomes are latency, need for additional anaesthesia during the treatment and pain felt during the treatment. We will use a computer-generated permuted-block randomisation sequence for allocation to anaesthesia groups. The random sequences will be stratified by centre (and by dental arch for the parallel-arm RCT). Only participants will be blinded to group assignment. Data will be analysed by the intent-to-treat principle. In all, 160 patients will be included (30 in the split-mouth RCT, 130 in the parallel-arm RCT). Ethics and dissemination This protocol has been approved by the French ethics committee for the protection of people (Comité de Protection des Personnes, Ile de France I) and will be conducted in full accordance with accepted ethical principles. Findings will be reported in scientific publications and at research conferences, and in

  17. Measurements of size-segregated emission particles by a sampling system based on the cascade impactor

    SciTech Connect

    Janja Tursic; Irena Grgic; Axel Berner; Jaroslav Skantar; Igor Cuhalev

    2008-02-01

    A special sampling system for measurements of size-segregated particles directly at the source of emission was designed and constructed. The central part of this system is a low-pressure cascade impactor with 10 collection stages for the size ranges between 15 nm and 16 {mu}m. Its capability and suitability was proven by sampling particles at the stack (100{sup o}C) of a coal-fired power station in Slovenia. These measurements showed very reasonable results in comparison with a commercial cascade impactor for PM10 and PM2.5 and with a plane device for total suspended particulate matter (TSP). The best agreement with the measurements made by a commercial impactor was found for concentrations of TSP above 10 mg m{sup -3}, i.e., the average PM2.5/PM10 ratios obtained by a commercial impactor and by our impactor were 0.78 and 0.80, respectively. Analysis of selected elements in size-segregated emission particles additionally confirmed the suitability of our system. The measurements showed that the mass size distributions were generally bimodal, with the most pronounced mass peak in the 1-2 {mu}m size range. The first results of elemental mass size distributions showed some distinctive differences in comparison to the most common ambient anthropogenic sources (i.e., traffic emissions). For example, trace elements, like Pb, Cd, As, and V, typically related to traffic emissions, are usually more abundant in particles less than 1 {mu}m in size, whereas in our specific case they were found at about 2 {mu}m. Thus, these mass size distributions can be used as a signature of this source. Simultaneous measurements of size-segregated particles at the source and in the surrounding environment can therefore significantly increase the sensitivity of the contribution of a specific source to the actual ambient concentrations. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Experimental validation of a critical domain size in reaction–diffusion systems with Escherichia coli populations

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    In a one-variable, finite size reaction–diffusion system, the existence of a minimal domain size required for the existence of a non-zero steady state is predicted, provided that the reaction–diffusion variable has a fixed value of zero at the boundaries of the domain (Dirichlet boundary conditions). This type of reaction diffusion model can be applied in population biology, in which the finite domain of the system represents a refuge where individuals can live normally immersed in a desert, or region where the conditions are so unfavourable that individuals cannot live in it. Building on a suggestion by Kenkre and Kuperman, and using non-chemotactic E. coli populations and a quasi-one-dimensional experimental design, we were able to find a minimal size (approximately 0.8 cm) for a refuge immersed in a region irradiated with intense UV light. The observed minimal size is in reasonable agreement with theory. PMID:16849196

  19. Infiltration front monitoring using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxarango, Laurent; Audebert, Marine; Guyard, Helene; Clement, Remi

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) geophysical method is commonly used to identify the spatial distribution of electrical resisitivity in the soil at the field scale. Recent progress in commercial acquisition systems allows repeating fast acquisitions (10 min) in order to monitor a 3D dynamic phenomenon. Since the ERT method is sensitive to moisture content variations, it can thus be used to delineate the infiltration shape during water infiltration. In heterogeneous conditions, the 3D infiltration shape is a crucial information because it could differ significantly from the homogeneous behavior. In a first step, the ERT method is validated at small scale (<1m) studying a suction infiltrometer test. The experiment is carried out in a pit filled with a homogenous silty-sandy soil. It is instrumented by 17 resistivity probes and 3 commercial capacitive moisture content probes to provide local measurements of the moisture content variation. The Multiple Inversion and Clustering Strategy (MICS) (Audebert et al 2014) is used to delineate the infiltration patern. A satisfying agreement between infiltration delineation and sensor measurements is obtained with a few centimeter accuracy on the moisture front location. In a second step, the same methodology is applied at a larger scale (> 10m). Two examples of leachate injection monitoring in municipal solid waste landfills are used to put forward benefits and limitations of the ERT-MICS method. Effective infiltration porosities in a range between 3% and 8% support the assumption of a flow in heterogeneous media. Audebert, M., R. Clément, N. Touze-Foltz, T. Günther, S. Moreau, and C. Duquennoi (2014), Time-lapse ERT interpretation methodology for leachate injection monitoring based on multiple inversions and a clustering strategy (MICS), Journal of Applied Geophysics, 111, 320-333. Keywords: ERT, infiltration front, field survey

  20. Systematic study of finite-size effects in quantum Monte Carlo calculations of real metallic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Azadi, Sam Foulkes, W. M. C.

    2015-09-14

    We present a systematic and comprehensive study of finite-size effects in diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations of metals. Several previously introduced schemes for correcting finite-size errors are compared for accuracy and efficiency, and practical improvements are introduced. In particular, we test a simple but efficient method of finite-size correction based on an accurate combination of twist averaging and density functional theory. Our diffusion quantum Monte Carlo results for lithium and aluminum, as examples of metallic systems, demonstrate excellent agreement between all of the approaches considered.

  1. Enhanced triple-phase boundary density in infiltrated electrodes for solid oxide fuel cells demonstrated by high-resolution tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Masashi; Lomberg, Marina; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Brandon, Nigel P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper, for the first time, demonstrates the three-dimensional imaging of nano-particle infiltrated Ni-GDC (gadolinia-doped ceria) electrodes using focused ion beam tomography. Microstructural parameters of the actual electrode microstructure are quantified, such as volume fraction, TPB density and mean particle/pore sizes. These microstructural parameters reveal that the infiltrated electrodes have eight times larger TPB density than conventional electrodes fabricated by powder mixing and sintering methods. Comparison between the infiltrated electrodes and conventional electrodes indicates that the infiltrated electrodes have a greater potential to independently control metal particle size, porosity and TPB density, which is a significant advantage in developing design optimized electrode microstructures.

  2. Stress-Dependent Matrix Cracking in 2D Woven SiC-Fiber Reinforced Melt-Infiltrated SiC Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2003-01-01

    The matrix cracking of a variety of SiC/SiC composites has been characterized for a wide range of constituent variation. These composites were fabricated by the 2-dimensional lay-up of 0/90 five-harness satin fabric consisting of Sylramic fiber tows that were then chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) with BN, CVI with SiC, slurry infiltrated with SiC particles followed by molten infiltration of Si. The composites varied in number of plies, the number of tows per length, thickness, and the size of the tows. This resulted in composites with a fiber volume fraction in the loading direction that ranged from 0.12 to 0.20. Matrix cracking was monitored with modal acoustic emission in order to estimate the stress-dependent distribution of matrix cracks. It was found that the general matrix crack properties of this system could be fairly well characterized by assuming that no matrix cracks originated in the load-bearing fiber, interphase, chemical vapor infiltrated Sic tow-minicomposites, i.e., all matrix cracks originate in the 90 degree tow-minicomposites or the large unreinforced Sic-Si matrix regions. Also, it was determined that the larger tow size composites had a much narrower stress range for matrix cracking compared to the standard tow size composites.

  3. Firm Size, a Self-Organized Critical Phenomenon: Evidence from the Dynamical Systems Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Akhilesh

    This research draws upon a recent innovation in the dynamical systems literature called the theory of self -organized criticality (SOC) (Bak, Tang, and Wiesenfeld 1988) to develop a computational model of a firm's size by relating its internal and the external sub-systems. As a holistic paradigm, the theory of SOC implies that a firm as a composite system of many degrees of freedom naturally evolves to a critical state in which a minor event starts a chain reaction that can affect either a part or the system as a whole. Thus, the global features of a firm cannot be understood by analyzing its individual parts separately. The causal framework builds upon a constant capital resource to support a volume of production at the existing level of efficiency. The critical size is defined as the production level at which the average product of a firm's factors of production attains its maximum value. The non -linearity is inferred by a change in the nature of relations at the border of criticality, between size and the two performance variables, viz., the operating efficiency and the financial efficiency. The effect of breaching the critical size is examined on the stock price reactions. Consistent with the theory of SOC, it is hypothesized that the temporal response of a firm breaching the level of critical size should behave as a flicker noise (1/f) process. The flicker noise is characterized by correlations extended over a wide range of time scales, indicating some sort of cooperative effect among a firm's degrees of freedom. It is further hypothesized that a firm's size evolves to a spatial structure with scale-invariant, self-similar (fractal) properties. The system is said to be self-organized inasmuch as it naturally evolves to the state of criticality without any detailed specifications of the initial conditions. In this respect, the critical state is an attractor of the firm's dynamics. Another set of hypotheses examines the relations between the size and the

  4. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2016-07-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  5. [Soil infiltration characteristics under main vegetation types in Anji County of Zhejiang Province].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dao-Ping; Chen, San-Xiong; Zhang, Jin-Chi; Xie, Li; Jiang, Jiang

    2007-03-01

    The study on the soil infiltration under different main vegetation types in Anji County of Zhejiang Province showed that the characteristics of soil infiltration differed significantly with land use type, and the test eight vegetation types could be classified into four groups, based on soil infiltration capability. The first group, deciduous broadleaved forest, had the strongest soil infiltration capability, and the second group with a stronger soil infiltration capability was composed of grass, pine forest, shrub community and tea bush. Bamboo and evergreen broadleaved forest were classified into the third group with a relatively strong soil infiltration capability, while bare land belonged to the fourth group because of the bad soil structure and poorest soil infiltration capability. The comprehensive parameters of soil infiltration (alpha) and root (beta) were obtained by principal component analysis, and the regression model of alpha and beta could be described as alpha = 0. 1708ebeta -0. 3122. Soil infiltration capability was greatly affected by soil physical and chemical characteristics and root system. Fine roots (< or = 1 mm in diameter) played effective roles on the improvement of soil physical and chemical properties, and the increase of soil infiltration capability was closely related to the amount of the fine roots. PMID:17552181

  6. Breadboard sized photo-acoustic spectroscopy system using an FPGA based lock-in amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, John F.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Giza, Mark M.

    2015-05-01

    Over the past several years we have developed a photo-acoustic spectroscopic (PAS) technique for trace gas detection that is capable of parts per trillion (ppt) detection limits. The desire to reduce the size of the system has led to several efforts that have reduced the size of the various components of the system. We have reduced the dimensions of the resonant cell to micrometer scale (MEMS). We have worked with Daylight Solutions to reduce the size of the tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) used in the system. In this paper we demonstrate the reduction in size of the entire system to a 12" x 12" footprint. We do this by implementing the lock-in amplifier on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) demonstration board that is also capable of acting as the system controller and data output device. We briefly describe the digital lock-in amplifier and sketch our implementation on the FPGA. We go on to compare the spectroscopic data we collected using this system with data we collected using a large rack mounted Stanford Research Systems SR830 lock-in amplifier and a PC.

  7. Autonomous bed-sediment imaging-systems for revealing temporal variability of grain size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel; Rubin, David M.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Hatcher, Gerald; Chezar, Henry; Wyland, Robert; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a remotely operated video microscope system, designed to provide high-resolution images of seabed sediments. Two versions were developed, which differ in how they raise the camera from the seabed. The first used hydraulics and the second used the energy associated with wave orbital motion. Images were analyzed using automated frequency-domain methods, which following a rigorous partially supervised quality control procedure, yielded estimates to within 20% of the true size as determined by on-screen manual measurements of grains. Long-term grain-size variability at a sandy inner shelf site offshore of Santa Cruz, California, USA, was investigated using the hydraulic system. Eighteen months of high frequency (min to h), high-resolution (μm) images were collected, and grain size distributions compiled. The data constitutes the longest known high-frequency record of seabed-grain size at this sample frequency, at any location. Short-term grain-size variability of sand in an energetic surf zone at Praa Sands, Cornwall, UK was investigated using the ‘wave-powered’ system. The data are the first high-frequency record of grain size at a single location of a highly mobile and evolving bed in a natural surf zone. Using this technology, it is now possible to measure bed-sediment-grain size at a time-scale comparable with flow conditions. Results suggest models of sediment transport at sandy, wave-dominated, nearshore locations should allow for substantial changes in grain-size distribution over time-scales as short as a few hours.

  8. Density-functional errors in ionization potential with increasing system size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittleton, Sarah R.; Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.; Johnson, Erin R.

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the effects of molecular size on the accuracy of density-functional ionization potentials for a set of 28 hydrocarbons, including series of alkanes, alkenes, and oligoacenes. As the system size increases, delocalization error introduces a systematic underestimation of the ionization potential, which is rationalized by considering the fractional-charge behavior of the electronic energies. The computation of the ionization potential with many density-functional approximations is not size-extensive due to excessive delocalization of the incipient positive charge. While inclusion of exact exchange reduces the observed errors, system-specific tuning of long-range corrected functionals does not generally improve accuracy. These results emphasize that good performance of a functional for small molecules is not necessarily transferable to larger systems.

  9. Density-functional errors in ionization potential with increasing system size

    SciTech Connect

    Whittleton, Sarah R.; Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.; Johnson, Erin R.

    2015-05-14

    This work investigates the effects of molecular size on the accuracy of density-functional ionization potentials for a set of 28 hydrocarbons, including series of alkanes, alkenes, and oligoacenes. As the system size increases, delocalization error introduces a systematic underestimation of the ionization potential, which is rationalized by considering the fractional-charge behavior of the electronic energies. The computation of the ionization potential with many density-functional approximations is not size-extensive due to excessive delocalization of the incipient positive charge. While inclusion of exact exchange reduces the observed errors, system-specific tuning of long-range corrected functionals does not generally improve accuracy. These results emphasize that good performance of a functional for small molecules is not necessarily transferable to larger systems.

  10. Infiltration in soils with a saturated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogarth, W. L.; Lockington, D. A.; Barry, D. A.; Parlange, M. B.; Haverkamp, R.; Parlange, J.-Y.

    2013-05-01

    An earlier infiltration equation relied on curve fitting of infiltration data for the determination of one of the parameters, which limits its usefulness in practice. This handicap is removed here, and the parameter is now evaluated by linking it directly to soil-water properties. The new predictions of infiltration using this evaluation are quite accurate. Positions and shapes of soil-water profiles are also examined in detail and found to be predicted analytically with great precision.

  11. Experimental evaluation of four infiltration models for calcareous soil irrigated with treated untreated grey water and fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaibeh, M. A.; Eltaif, N. I.; Alrababah, M. A.; Alhamad, M. N.

    2009-04-01

    Infiltration is vital for both irrigated and rainfed agriculture. The knowledge of infiltration characteristics of a soil is the basic information required for designing an efficient irrigation system. The objective of the present study was to model soil infiltration using four models: Green and Ampt, Horton, Kostaikov and modified Kostiakov. Infiltration tests were conducted on field plot irrigated with treated, untreated greywater and fresh water. The field water infiltration data used in these models were based on double ring infiltrometer tests conducted for 4 h. The algebraic parameters of the infiltration models and nonlinear least squares regression were fitted using measured infiltration time [I (t)] data. Among process-based infiltration models, the Horton model performed best and matched the measured I (t) data with lower sum of squares (SS).

  12. Zipf's Law Leads to Heaps' Law: Analyzing Their Relation in Finite-Size Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Linyuan; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Tao

    2010-01-01

    Background Zipf's law and Heaps' law are observed in disparate complex systems. Of particular interests, these two laws often appear together. Many theoretical models and analyses are performed to understand their co-occurrence in real systems, but it still lacks a clear picture about their relation. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that the Heaps' law can be considered as a derivative phenomenon if the system obeys the Zipf's law. Furthermore, we refine the known approximate solution of the Heaps' exponent provided the Zipf's exponent. We show that the approximate solution is indeed an asymptotic solution for infinite systems, while in the finite-size system the Heaps' exponent is sensitive to the system size. Extensive empirical analysis on tens of disparate systems demonstrates that our refined results can better capture the relation between the Zipf's and Heaps' exponents. Conclusions/Significance The present analysis provides a clear picture about the relation between the Zipf's law and Heaps' law without the help of any specific stochastic model, namely the Heaps' law is indeed a derivative phenomenon from the Zipf's law. The presented numerical method gives considerably better estimation of the Heaps' exponent given the Zipf's exponent and the system size. Our analysis provides some insights and implications of real complex systems. For example, one can naturally obtained a better explanation of the accelerated growth of scale-free networks. PMID:21152034

  13. Model slope infiltration experiments for shallow landslides early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiano, E.; Greco, R.; Guida, A.; Olivares, L.; Picarelli, L.

    2009-04-01

    Occurrence of fast landslides has become more and more dangerous during the last decades, due to the increased density of settlements, industrial plants and infrastructures. Such problem is particularly worrying in Campania (Southern Italy), where the fast population growth led a diffuse building activity without planning: indeed, recent flowslides caused hundreds of victims and heavy damages to buildings, roads and other infrastructures. Large mountainous areas in Campania are mantled by loose pyroclastic granular soils up to a depth of a few meters from top soil surface. These soils have usually a grain size that falls in the domain of silty sands, including pumice interbeds (gravelly sands), with saturated hydraulic conductivities up to the order of 10-1 cm/min. Such deposits often cover steep slopes, which stability is guaranteed by the apparent cohesion due to suction under unsaturated conditions, that are the most common conditions for these slopes [Olivares and Picarelli, 2001]. Whereas rainfall infiltration causes soil to approach saturation, suction vanishes and slope failure may occur. Besides soil physical properties, landslide triggering is influenced by several factors, such as rainfall intensity, soil initial moisture and suction, slope inclination, boundary conditions. Whereas slope failure occurs with soil close to being saturated, landslide may develop in form of fast and destructive flowslide. Calibration of reliable mathematical models of such a complex phenomenon requires availability of experimental observations of the major variables of interest, such as soil moisture and suction, soil deformation and displacements, pore water pressure, during the entire process of infiltration until slope failure. Due to the sudden trigger and extremely rapid propagation of such type of landslides, such data sets are rarely available for natural slopes where flowslides occurred. As a consequence landslide risk assessment and early warning in Campania rely on

  14. Trap-size scaling in confined-particle systems at quantum transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Campostrini, Massimo; Vicari, Ettore

    2010-02-15

    We develop a trap-size scaling theory for trapped particle systems at quantum transitions. As a theoretical laboratory, we consider a quantum XY chain in an external transverse field acting as a trap for the spinless fermions of its quadratic Hamiltonian representation. We discuss trap-size scaling at the Mott insulator to superfluid transition in the Bose-Hubbard model. We present exact and accurate numerical results for the XY chain and for the low-density Mott transition in the hard-core limit of the one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model. Our results are relevant for systems of cold atomic gases in optical lattices.

  15. Polyaminoacid nanocapsules for drug delivery to the lymphatic system: Effect of the particle size.

    PubMed

    Abellan-Pose, Raquel; Teijeiro-Valiño, Carmen; Santander-Ortega, Manuel J; Borrajo, Erea; Vidal, Anxo; Garcia-Fuentes, Marcos; Csaba, Noémi; Alonso, María José

    2016-07-25

    Previous work by our group showed the possibility to reduce the toxicity of docetaxel upon its encapsulation in polyaminoacid nanocapsules with a size of 200nm. The objective of this study was to elucidate whether a reduction in the nanocapsules size might facilitate their access to the lymphatic system. To do so, we analyzed the effect of several formulation parameters on the characteristics of polyglutamic acid, PEGylated polyglutamic acid and polyasparagine nanocapsules. From these experiments, we could identify the best conditions to produce nanocapsules with a small size (close to 100nm) and adequate capacity to encapsulate and sustain the release of the antitumor drug docetaxel. Moreover, the results of the stability study made evident the critical role of the polyaminoacid shell on the colloidal stability of the nanocapsules in biologically relevant media. Finally, we studied the influence of the particle size (100nm vs. 200nm) on the biodistribution of PGA-PEG nanocapsules following subcutaneous injection. The results showed that the 100 nm-size nanocapsules accumulate faster in the lymph nodes, than those with a size of 200nm. In summary, these data suggest the potential of 100nm-size polyaminoacid nanocapsules as lymphatic drug delivery carriers. PMID:27210735

  16. Pore geometry, avalanching, and subsurface flow: A sand infiltration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardson, R.; Hunt, J. R.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2009-12-01

    The deposition of sand into gravel riverbeds has been well-documented, along with its negative impacts on developing salmon eggs and riverbank extraction for water supplies. Dam releases may be used on regulated rivers to flush the bed of fine sediment, but it is not generally known how deep the sand deposit extends or how much sand is there. One-dimensional (plane-bed) experiments consistently show that the depth of infiltration is a function of the sand and gravel grain size distributions and that the saturation sand fraction is near 8-10%. However, precise empirical relationships developed in individual studies do poorly at predicting the results of other experiments. Furthermore, no infiltration model includes the effect of flow conditions in the water column, although flow conditions clearly impact the deposit characteristics. We propose a mechanistic model for the infiltration of fine sediment and compare its predictions to the results of two recent infiltration experiments. This model is based on geometric arguments about pore and particle shape and five mechanisms: particle settling, particle capture, subsurface avalanching, average subsurface flow, and subsurface pressure fluctuations. The model successfully predicts for both experiments the fraction of sand deposited and the shape of that deposit as a function of depth.

  17. System-size effects at the isotropic-nematic transition from computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Miguel, Enrique

    1993-05-01

    We present a computer-simulation study regarding the effect of system size on the isotropic-nematic transition in a molecular fluid model. Systems of 256, 500, and 864 molecules interacting through the Gay-Berne model are analyzed along an isotherm by using molecular dynamics in the NVT ensemble. For the three system sizes under consideration, the system exhibits a weak first-order isotropic-nematic transition. The transition densities are calculated by using thermodynamic integration. We find that the transition shifts to higher densities as the number of particles N increases. In addition, the transition weakens as N gets larger. These results are used to extract information on the transition properties in the infinite-system limit. The N dependence of thermodynamic properties are estimated from the simulation results and are compared with theoretical predictions.

  18. A system-of-systems perspective for simultaneous UAV sizing and allocation using design of experiments and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bociaga, Michael L.

    Traditional approaches to aircraft sizing focus on maximizing the performance of the individual airframe as a standalone system. Customers, such as the Department of Defense, have recently looked more towards all-encompassing solutions to large problems by using a System-of-Systems approach instead of maximizing capability from a single aircraft or similar monolithic system. Shrinking budgets call for making the most efficient use of existing assets and addressing capability gaps in broad frameworks. The result is that optimizing the aircraft alone may not provide the customer with needed capabilities. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) performing Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions provide an example of systems designed to operate with other independent systems as part of a system-of-systems. In this research, a fleet of UAVs will provide wildfire detection in high terrain. The research investigates how to allocate existing systems along with a number of yet-to-be-defined UAVs. In this manner, the new UAVs may not be optimal for individual aircraft-based performance metrics, but they will enhance the capabilities of the fleet. Such a large, complex problem requires decomposition into a resource allocation problem using a Design of Experiments (DoE) to select configurations of UAV fleets to test by simulation using STK's Aircraft Mission Modeler software package at the System-of-Systems level, and an aircraft sizing sub-problem using an SQP algorithm and the Breguet endurance equation to size the new UAV. The STK output is modeled using main effects and a response surface that shows the tradeoff between cost and coverage, enabling the customer to select the optimal allocation of existing and new UAVs and determine the key characteristics of the new UAVs that fit into this fleet. The new UAV sized for this specific mission, but from a System-of-Systems perspective, complements the UAV fleet, enhancing the capabilities of the System-of-Systems

  19. Research of Rainwater Infiltration in Eastern Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudáková, Gabriela; Zeleňáková, Martina; Tometz, Ladislav

    2015-11-01

    Today precipitation water in the majority of built up and other sealed surface areas no longer reach the water circulation system via natural routes. This can lead to long-term changes to the soil and water resources, reduce the natural local regeneration of the groundwater and have effects on the chemical and biological conditions above and below the ground surface. Reasonable rainwater management leads to maintain or recover a sound and sustainable water cycle. The purpose of this paper is to present objectives and monitoring of a drainage project in Eastern Slovakia, in Kosice city. The paper focuses on percolation facilities in the research area of campus of Technical University and measurements connected with rainwater infiltration.

  20. Infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water in Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, William C.; Thiros, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    The ground-water hydrology of Panguitch Valley and adjacent areas, south-central Utah, was studied during 1988-90. One objective of the study was to measure ground-water recharge from infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water. Water-level and soil-moisture data were used to estimate travel times for water moving down through the soil profile, and to compare quantities of water reaching the water table after application of flood and sprinkler irrigation. During this study, estimates of travel times from land surface to the water table ranged from 11 days in June 1989 to 2 days in September 1989. Estimates of irrigation water recharging the ground-water system ranged from 25 to 75 percent of the water applied to the flood-irrigated field. Virtually no recharge was apparent for the sprinkler-irrigated field.

  1. Size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) for a prototype orthopedic cone-beam CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Samuel; Packard, Nathan; Yorkston, John

    2014-03-01

    Patient specific dose evaluation and reporting is becoming increasingly important for x-ray imaging systems. Even imaging systems with lower patient dose such as CBCT scanners for extremities can benefit from accurate and size-specific dose assessment and reporting. This paper presents CTDI dose measurements performed on a prototype CBCT extremity imaging system across a range of body part sizes (5, 10, 16, and 20 cm effective diameter) and kVp (70, 80, and 90 kVp - with 0.1 mm Cu added filtration). The ratio of the CTDI measurements for the 5, 10, and 20 cm phantoms to the CTDI measurements for the 16 cm phantom were calculated and results were compared to size-specific dose estimates conversion factors (AAPM Report 204), which were evaluated on a conventional CT scanner. Due to the short scan nature of the system (220 degree acquisition angle), the dependence of CTDI values on the initial angular orientation of the phantom with respect to the imager was also evaluated. The study demonstrated that for a 220 degree acquisition sequence, the initial angular position of the conventional CTDI phantom with respect to the scanner does not significantly affect CTDI measurements (varying by less than 2% overall across the range of possible initial angular positions). The size-specific conversion factor was found to be comparable to the Report 204 factors for the large phantom size (20 cm) but lower, by up to 12%, for the 5 cm phantom (i.e., 1.35 for CBCT vs 1.54 for CT). The factors dependence on kVp was minimal, but dependence on kVp was most significant for smaller diameters. These results indicate that specific conversion factors need to be used for CBCT systems with short scans in order to provide more accurate dose reporting across the range of body sizes found in extremity scanners.

  2. On the sizes of neutral hydrogen regions giving rise to damped Lyα absorption systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, E. M.; Turnshek, D. A.; Rao, S.

    2009-08-01

    Using quasi-stellar object (QSO) absorption-line spectra obtained along closely spaced sightlines, we examine the transverse sizes of regions containing large columns of neutral hydrogen gas at redshifts z ~ 1.5. The observations are primarily of intervening damped Lyα (DLA) and sub-DLA absorption-line systems in gravitationally lensed QSOs. In particular, Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopy of the four-component Cloverleaf QSO (H1413+1143) reveals three new DLA/sub-DLA systems at z ~ 1.44, 1.49 and 1.66. A neutral hydrogen column density of NHI >= 2 × 1020atomscm-2 is required for a system to be classified as a DLA, but none of the three systems has an HI column density above the DLA threshold in all four components. Over component separations <1.4 arcsec in the Cloverleaf, corresponding to transverse sizes of ~5-12h-170kpc, the HI column densities typically change by factors of ~2-40. Similar observations of other QSOs containing absorption systems in the DLA regime are summarized from the literature. In addition to establishing approximate sizes for DLA regions, the results have implications for their volume-averaged HI gas number densities and neutral gas masses. By combining our results on DLA absorber sizes with published results on the sizes of lower column density QSO absorbers, which however arise in very ionized regions, we infer the useful relation that the typical transverse size of an absorber in the redshift interval z ~ [1, 2] is Sabs ~ 11h-170[NHI/1020]-1/4kpc. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. E-mail: emonier@brockport.edu

  3. Systemic granuloma observed in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar raised to market size in a freshwater recirculation aquaculture system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic granuloma was observed in sampled adult Atlantic salmon Salmo salar raised to harvest size in a freshwater recirculation aquaculture system. The prevalence of this condition was estimated at 10-20% of the population, with affected individuals grossly demonstrating pathology in varying degre...

  4. Settlement-Size Scaling among Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherer Settlement Systems in the New World

    PubMed Central

    Haas, W. Randall; Klink, Cynthia J.; Maggard, Greg J.; Aldenderfer, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Settlement size predicts extreme variation in the rates and magnitudes of many social and ecological processes in human societies. Yet, the factors that drive human settlement-size variation remain poorly understood. Size variation among economically integrated settlements tends to be heavy tailed such that the smallest settlements are extremely common and the largest settlements extremely large and rare. The upper tail of this size distribution is often formalized mathematically as a power-law function. Explanations for this scaling structure in human settlement systems tend to emphasize complex socioeconomic processes including agriculture, manufacturing, and warfare—behaviors that tend to differentially nucleate and disperse populations hierarchically among settlements. But, the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size variation requires such complex behaviors remains unclear. By examining the settlement patterns of eight prehistoric New World hunter-gatherer settlement systems spanning three distinct environmental contexts, this analysis explores the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size scaling depends on the aforementioned socioeconomic complexities. Surprisingly, the analysis finds that power-law models offer plausible and parsimonious statistical descriptions of prehistoric hunter-gatherer settlement-size variation. This finding reveals that incipient forms of hierarchical settlement structure may have preceded socioeconomic complexity in human societies and points to a need for additional research to explicate how mobile foragers came to exhibit settlement patterns that are more commonly associated with hierarchical organization. We propose that hunter-gatherer mobility with preferential attachment to previously occupied locations may account for the observed structure in site-size variation. PMID:26536241

  5. Settlement-Size Scaling among Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherer Settlement Systems in the New World.

    PubMed

    Haas, W Randall; Klink, Cynthia J; Maggard, Greg J; Aldenderfer, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Settlement size predicts extreme variation in the rates and magnitudes of many social and ecological processes in human societies. Yet, the factors that drive human settlement-size variation remain poorly understood. Size variation among economically integrated settlements tends to be heavy tailed such that the smallest settlements are extremely common and the largest settlements extremely large and rare. The upper tail of this size distribution is often formalized mathematically as a power-law function. Explanations for this scaling structure in human settlement systems tend to emphasize complex socioeconomic processes including agriculture, manufacturing, and warfare-behaviors that tend to differentially nucleate and disperse populations hierarchically among settlements. But, the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size variation requires such complex behaviors remains unclear. By examining the settlement patterns of eight prehistoric New World hunter-gatherer settlement systems spanning three distinct environmental contexts, this analysis explores the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size scaling depends on the aforementioned socioeconomic complexities. Surprisingly, the analysis finds that power-law models offer plausible and parsimonious statistical descriptions of prehistoric hunter-gatherer settlement-size variation. This finding reveals that incipient forms of hierarchical settlement structure may have preceded socioeconomic complexity in human societies and points to a need for additional research to explicate how mobile foragers came to exhibit settlement patterns that are more commonly associated with hierarchical organization. We propose that hunter-gatherer mobility with preferential attachment to previously occupied locations may account for the observed structure in site-size variation. PMID:26536241

  6. Stand-alone flat-plate photovoltaic power systems: System sizing and life-cycle costing methodology for Federal agencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borden, C. S.; Volkmer, K.; Cochrane, E. H.; Lawson, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    A simple methodology to estimate photovoltaic system size and life-cycle costs in stand-alone applications is presented. It is designed to assist engineers at Government agencies in determining the feasibility of using small stand-alone photovoltaic systems to supply ac or dc power to the load. Photovoltaic system design considerations are presented as well as the equations for sizing the flat-plate array and the battery storage to meet the required load. Cost effectiveness of a candidate photovoltaic system is based on comparison with the life-cycle cost of alternative systems. Examples of alternative systems addressed are batteries, diesel generators, the utility grid, and other renewable energy systems.

  7. Grain Size Estimation of Superalloy Inconel 718 After Upset Forging by a Fuzzy Inference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, Luis; Cavazos, Alberto; Colás, Rafael

    2009-12-01

    A fuzzy logic inference system was designed to predict the grain size of Inconel 718 alloy after upset forging. The system takes as input the original grain size, temperature, and reduction rate at forging and predicts the final grain size at room temperature. It is assumed that the system takes into account the effects that the heterogeneity of deformation and grain growth exerts in this particular material. Experimental trials were conducted in a factory that relies on upset forging to produce preforms for ring rolling. The grain size was reported as ASTM number, as this value is used on site. A first attempt was carried out using a series of 15 empirically based set of rules; the estimation error with these was above two ASTM numbers; which is considered to be very high. The system was modified and expanded to take into account 28 rules; the estimation error of this new system resulted to be close to one ASTM number, which is considered to be adequate for the prediction.

  8. Differential responses of nitrate reducer community size, structure, and activity to tillage systems.

    PubMed

    Chèneby, D; Brauman, A; Rabary, B; Philippot, L

    2009-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine how the size, structure, and activity of the nitrate reducer community were affected by adoption of a conservative tillage system as an alternative to conventional tillage. The experimental field, established in Madagascar in 1991, consists of plots subjected to conventional tillage or direct-seeding mulch-based cropping systems (DM), both amended with three different fertilization regimes. Comparisons of size, structure, and activity of the nitrate reducer community in samples collected from the top layer in 2005 and 2006 revealed that all characteristics of this functional community were affected by the tillage system, with increased nitrate reduction activity and numbers of nitrate reducers under DM. Nitrate reduction activity was also stimulated by combined organic and mineral fertilization but not by organic fertilization alone. In contrast, both negative and positive effects of combined organic and mineral fertilization on the size of the nitrate reducer community were observed. The size of the nitrate reducer community was a significant predictor of the nitrate reduction rates except in one treatment, which highlighted the inherent complexities in understanding the relationships the between size, diversity, and structure of functional microbial communities along environmental gradients. PMID:19304827

  9. The diffuse infiltrative lymphocytosis syndrome (DILS). A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ghrenassia, Etienne; Martis, Nihal; Boyer, Julien; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Mekinian, Arsène; Coppo, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The Diffuse Infiltrative Lymphocytosis Syndrome (DILS) is a rare multisystemic syndrome described in HIV-infected patients. It is characterised by CD8(+) T-cell lymphocytosis associated with a CD8(+) T-cell infiltration of multiple organs. DILS is usually seen in uncontrolled or untreated HIV infection but can also manifest itself independently of CD4(+) T-cell counts. The syndrome may present as a Sjögren-like disease that generally associates sicca signs with bilateral parotiditis, lymphadenopathy, and extraglandular organ involvement. The latter may affect the lungs, nervous system, liver, kidneys, and digestive tract. Anomalies of the respiratory system are often identified as lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. Facial nerve palsy, aseptic meningitis or polyneuropathy are among the more frequent neurological features. Hepatic lymphocytic infiltration, lymphocytic interstitial nephropathy and digestive tract lymphocytic infiltration account for more rarely noted complications. Sicca syndrome, organomegaly and/or organ dysfunction associated with polyclonal CD8(+) T-cell organ-infiltration are greatly suggestive of DILS in people living with HIV. Labial salivary gland biopsy is therefore helpful when the focus score is equal or greater than 1 (or Chisholm Score ≥ 3). Primary Sjögren syndrome, chronic HCV or HTLV1 infection, graft versus host disease, IgG4-related disease, and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome are among the differential diagnoses that need to be considered. Treatment consists in highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), which is usually effective in resolving clinical signs and symptoms. Steroids, however, may also be occasionally required when organ infiltration does not respond to HAART. This review should provide an insight into this rare entity complicating the course of HIV infection. PMID:25660200

  10. Connecting bacterial colonization to physical and biochemical changes in a sand box infiltration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubol, S.; Freixa, A.; Carles-Brangarí, A.; Fernàndez-Garcia, D.; Romaní, A. M.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2014-09-01

    Infiltration through sediments is linked to complex biogeochemical processes occurring at small spatial scales, often leading to a progressive reduction in infiltration rates due to microbial growth and/or mechanical clogging. Unraveling the linkage between microbial dynamics and water infiltration in a heterogeneous medium is of concern in artificial recharge ponds and natural infiltration systems. We present an 84-day laboratory infiltration experiment that aims at studying the temporal variation of selected biogeochemical parameters at different depths along the infiltration path. The experimental setup consists of a 1.2 m high tank packed with a heterogeneous soil and instrumented with arrays of sensors as well as soil and liquid samplers. Results indicate that: (i) microbial processes are responsible for infiltration reduction, enhancing the spatially heterogeneous distribution of infiltration rates with time, (ii) bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are present at all monitored depths, indicating the potential for deep biological clogging, (iii) bacteria functioning and richness exhibit depth zonation after the system reaches a mature state and (iv) the retention curve changes towards highest saturation by the end of the experiment. The increase in water holding capacity is largest at depth, where the presence of EPS is noticeable. The reduction in time of the quantity of water infiltrating along the tank can only be accounted for with a truly interdisciplinary approach involving physical, chemical and biological processes.

  11. Climate change impacts in multispecies systems: drought alters food web size structure in a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Guy; Brown, Lee E; Edwards, Francois K; Hudson, Lawrence N; Milner, Alexander M; Reuman, Daniel C; Ledger, Mark E

    2012-11-01

    Experimental data from intergenerational field manipulations of entire food webs are scarce, yet such approaches are essential for gauging impacts of environmental change in natural systems. We imposed 2 years of intermittent drought on stream channels in a replicated field trial, to measure food web responses to simulated climate change. Drought triggered widespread losses of species and links, with larger taxa and those that were rare for their size, many of which were predatory, being especially vulnerable. Many network properties, including size-scaling relationships within food chains, changed in response to drought. Other properties, such as connectance, were unaffected. These findings highlight the need for detailed experimental data from different organizational levels, from pairwise links to the entire food web. The loss of not only large species, but also those that were rare for their size, provides a newly refined way to gauge likely impacts that may be applied more generally to other systems and/or impacts. PMID:23007087

  12. The effect of food portion sizes on the obesity prevention using system dynamics modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Norhaslinda Zainal; Zulkepli, Jafri Hj; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

    2014-09-01

    The rise in income and population growth have increased the demand for food and induced changes in food habits, food purchasing and consumption patterns in Malaysia. With this transition, one of the plausible causes of weight gain and obesity is the frequent consumption of outside food which is synonymous with bigger portion size. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to develop a system dynamics model to analyse the effect of reducing food portion size on weight and obesity prevention. This study combines the different strands of knowledge comprise of nutrition, physical activity and body metabolism. These elements are synthesized into a system dynamics model called SIMULObese. Findings from this study suggested that changes in eating behavior should not emphasize only on limiting the food portion size consumption. The efforts should also consider other eating events such as controlling the meal frequency and limiting intake of high-calorie food in developing guidelines to prevent obesity.

  13. REPORT ON COMPUTER TOOLS FOR PREDICTING RAINFALL DERIVED INFILTRATION/INFLOW IN SANITARY SEWER SYSTEMS AND SWMM MODELING FOR SSO CONTROL PLANNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nation's sanitary-sewer infrastructure is aging, with some sewers dating back over 100 years. Nationwide, there are more than 19,500 municipal sanitary-sewer collection systems serving an estimated 150 million people and about 40,000 SSO events per year. Because of concerns o...

  14. A new database sub-system for grain-size analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckow, Axel

    2013-04-01

    Detailed grain-size analyses of large depth profiles for palaeoclimate studies create large amounts of data. For instance (Novothny et al., 2011) presented a depth profile of grain-size analyses with 2 cm resolution and a total depth of more than 15 m, where each sample was measured with 5 repetitions on a Beckman Coulter LS13320 with 116 channels. This adds up to a total of more than four million numbers. Such amounts of data are not easily post-processed by spreadsheets or standard software; also MS Access databases would face serious performance problems. The poster describes a database sub-system dedicated to grain-size analyses. It expands the LabData database and laboratory management system published by Suckow and Dumke (2001). This compatibility with a very flexible database system provides ease to import the grain-size data, as well as the overall infrastructure of also storing geographic context and the ability to organize content like comprising several samples into one set or project. It also allows easy export and direct plot generation of final data in MS Excel. The sub-system allows automated import of raw data from the Beckman Coulter LS13320 Laser Diffraction Particle Size Analyzer. During post processing MS Excel is used as a data display, but no number crunching is implemented in Excel. Raw grain size spectra can be exported and controlled as Number- Surface- and Volume-fractions, while single spectra can be locked for further post-processing. From the spectra the usual statistical values (i.e. mean, median) can be computed as well as fractions larger than a grain size, smaller than a grain size, fractions between any two grain sizes or any ratio of such values. These deduced values can be easily exported into Excel for one or more depth profiles. However, such a reprocessing for large amounts of data also allows new display possibilities: normally depth profiles of grain-size data are displayed only with summarized parameters like the clay

  15. Carbon Storage in Soil Size Fractions Under Two Cacao Agroforestry Systems in Bahia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gama-Rodrigues, Emanuela F.; Ramachandran Nair, P. K.; Nair, Vimala D.; Gama-Rodrigues, Antonio C.; Baligar, Virupax C.; Machado, Regina C. R.

    2010-02-01

    Shaded perennial agroforestry systems contain relatively high quantities of soil carbon (C) resulting from continuous deposition of plant residues; however, the extent to which the C is sequestered in soil will depend on the extent of physical protection of soil organic C (SOC). The main objective of this study was to characterize SOC storage in relation to soil fraction-size classes in cacao ( Theobroma cacao L.) agroforestry systems (AFSs). Two shaded cacao systems and an adjacent natural forest in reddish-yellow Oxisols in Bahia, Brazil were selected. Soil samples were collected from four depth classes to 1 m depth and separated by wet-sieving into three fraction-size classes (>250 μm, 250-53 μm, and <53 μm)—corresponding to macroaggregate, microaggregate, and silt-and-clay size fractions—and analyzed for C content. The total SOC stock did not vary among systems (mean: 302 Mg/ha). On average, 72% of SOC was in macroaggregate-size, 20% in microaggregate-size, and 8% in silt-and-clay size fractions in soil. Sonication of aggregates showed that occlusion of C in soil aggregates could be a major mechanism of C protection in these soils. Considering the low level of soil disturbances in cacao AFSs, the C contained in the macroaggregate fraction might become stabilized in the soil. The study shows the role of cacao AFSs in mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG) emission through accumulation and retention of high amounts of organic C in the soils and suggests the potential benefit of this environmental service to the nearly 6 million cacao farmers worldwide.

  16. Habitat complexity does not promote coexistence in a size-structured intraguild predation system.

    PubMed

    Reichstein, Birte; Schröder, Arne; Persson, Lennart; De Roos, André M

    2013-01-01

    Size-dependent interactions and habitat complexity have been identified as important factors affecting the persistence of intraguild predation (IGP) systems. Habitat complexity has been suggested to promote intraguild (IG) prey and intraguild predator coexistence through weakening trophic interactions particularly the predation link. Here, we experimentally investigate the effects of habitat complexity on coexistence and invasion success of differently sized IG-predators in a size-structured IGP system consisting of the IG-predator Poecilia reticulata and a resident Heterandria formosa IG-prey population. The experiments included medium-long and long-term invasion experiments, predator-prey experiments and competition experiments to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the effect of prey refuges. Habitat complexity did not promote the coexistence of IG-predator and IG-prey, although the predation link was substantially weakened. However, the presence of habitat structure affected the invasion success of large IG-predators negatively and the invasion success of small IG-predators positively. The effect of refuges on size-dependent invasion success could be related to a major decrease in the IG-predator's capture rate and a shift in the size distribution of IG-predator juveniles. In summary, habitat complexity had two main effects: (i) the predation link was diminished, resulting in a more competition driven system and (ii) the overall competitive abilities of the two species were equalized, but coexistence was not promoted. Our results suggest that in a size-structured IGP system, individual level mechanisms may gain in importance over species level mechanisms in the presence of habitat complexity. PMID:23004014

  17. Developing an interactive portion size assessment system (IPSAS) for use with children.

    PubMed

    Foster, E; Hawkins, A; Simpson, E; Adamson, A J

    2014-01-01

    Novel methods of assessing dietary intake are required to reduce the participant burden in dietary surveys, improve participation rates and thereby improve the representativeness of the sample and minimise the impact of measuring dietary intake on a subject's food intake during the recording period. One method of reducing the burden placed on participants in recording dietary intake is to replace weighing of foods with estimation of portion size using tools such as food photographs. The interactive portion size assessment system (IPSAS) is an interactive portion size assessment system for use in assessing portion sizes of foods consumed by children aged 18 months to 16 years. The system is computer-based and is designed to be administered during an interview for a food diary or 24-h recall. The portion sizes depicted are age-specific and based on the weights of foods served to children during the UK National Diet and Nutrition Surveys. The system displays digital images of food used to estimate the amount of each food served to the child and the amount of any food left over. Foods are categorised within the system using a three-tier structure. Twenty-seven food group icons are used with two further drop-down menus to select first the food group, then the food category and, finally, the actual food product. Each food is linked to UK food composition codes and all photographs are linked to the weight of the food depicted. Nutritional output is via a companion database. The present study describes the development of the IPSAS and the structure of the system. PMID:23682796

  18. Teaching Medium-Sized ERP Systems - A Problem-Based Learning Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Axel; Matzner, Martin

    In order to increase the diversity in IS education, we discuss an approach for teaching medium-sized ERP systems in master courses. Many of today's IS curricula are biased toward large ERP packages. Nevertheless, these ERP systems are only a part of the ERP market. Hence, this chapter describes a course outline for a course on medium-sized ERP systems. Students had to study, analyze, and compare five different ERP systems during a semester. The chapter introduces a procedure model and scenario for setting up similar courses at other universities. Furthermore, it describes some of the students' outcomes and evaluates the contribution of the course with regard to a practical but also academic IS education.

  19. A programmable palm-size gas analyzer for use in micro-autonomous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordenker, Robert J. M.; Wise, Kensall D.

    2012-06-01

    Gas analysis systems having small size, low power, and high selectivity are badly needed for defense (detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents), homeland security, health care, and environmental applications. This paper presents a palm-size gas chromatography system having analysis times of 5-50sec, detection limits less than 1ppb, and an average power dissipation less than one watt. It uses no consumables. The three-chip fluidic system consists of a preconcentrator, a 25cm-3m separation column, and a chemi-resistive detector and is supported by a microcomputer and circuitry for programmable temperature control. The entire system, including the mini-pump and battery, occupies less than 200cc and is configured for use on autonomous robotic vehicles.

  20. System and measurement method for binocular pupillometry to study pupil size variability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An objective and noninvasive examination of pupil size variability can be used to assess the activity of the autonomous nervous system. We designed a system that enables binocular, fast, and accurate recordings of different types of pupil variabilities, which are synchronous with other biosignals. This type of measurement system is needed to extend the scope of pupillometry applications. Methods In the proposed system, the left and right eyes are independently and interchangeably illuminated to generate alternating images, which are successively acquired by a single camera. The system is composed of four functional modules: the image acquisition module, the image processing unit, the light stimulator, and the controller. The proposed image processing algorithm approximates the shape of the pupil using the best-fit ellipse. The user control panel (controller) precisely sets the stimuli parameters and controls the entire measurement procedure. Results The computer-based binocular system records the pupil size during the pupil light reflexes (direct and indirect) and spontaneous pupil size fluctuations, at a sampling rate up to 75 Hz, with a resolution better than 0.02 mm. Our initial laboratory tests confirmed that the new system is fast and precise (system accuracy better than 0.5% and repeatability better than 4%). Conclusions The proposed system’s unique geometry and construction, and the method it uses to detect images from each eye, allows us to monitor the right and left eyes using a single camera with no overlap between the images. The system does not require a very experienced operator, because it is relatively simple and easy to use. Importantly, it is comfortable for the subjects. Additionally, the presented system can operate with other bio-measurement systems using a synchronous signal. These system capabilities can expand the scope of pupillometry research applications. PMID:24899167

  1. Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

  2. Similarities and Singularities: A Comparative Analysis of the Organizational Size of Canadian School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Derek J.; Allison, Patricia A.

    To construct a descriptive analysis of national school system size categories suitable to facilitate cross-provincial comparisons in future research, data concerning the number of students, schools, teachers, and school and central office administrators as reported in 1986-87, excluding Quebec, were obtained from Statistics Canada. Enrollment and…

  3. Solar Energy: System Sizing, Design, and Retrofit: Student Material. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younger, Charles; Orsak, Charles G., Jr.

    Designed for student use in "System Sizing, Design, and Retrofit," one of 11 courses in a 2-year associate degree program in solar technology, this manual provides readings, exercises, worksheets, bibliographies, and illustrations for 13 course modules. The manual, which corresponds to an instructor guide for the same course, covers the following…

  4. 77 FR 49991 - Small Business Size Standards; Adoption of 2012 North American Industry Classification System for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ..., replacing the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) System, effective October 1, 2000 (65 FR 30836 (May 5... modification, NAICS 2002 (66 FR 3825 (January 16, 2001)), into its table of size standards, effective October 1, 2002 (67 FR 52597 (August 13, 2002)). SBA incorporated the second modification, NAICS 2007 (71 FR...

  5. Monoclonal antibody BrE-3 participation in a multivariate prognostic model for infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Chan, C M; Baratta, F S; Ozzello, L; Ceriani, R L

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MoAb) BrE-3, an anti-human milk fat globule (HMFG) MoAb, is used here as a novel prognostic indicator for survival and relapse time in patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. A scoring system (4-Score method) was developed to this effect that measured, in a statistically reliable fashion, the level of expression of the epitope for MoAb BrE-3 in the cytoplasm and membranes of breast carcinoma cells in paraffin-embedded sections. In univariate analysis, data obtained by the 4-Score Method as well as data from traditional prognostic indicators (tumor size, axillary node status, and grade of differentiation) were found to be associated with patient survival and relapse. In multivariate analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards regression model, levels of expression of BrE-3 epitope plus tumor size and axillary node status were weighted and combined in an Individual Linear Composite Prognostic Score (ILCPS) that had a high level of association with survival and relapse time in this sample model of patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. This level of association was found to be higher than the level of association for any other combination of traditional or 4-Score method variables. The level of expression of BrE-3 significantly adds to the prognostic capacity of traditional prognostic markers for infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. PMID:7981443

  6. Investigation of Size and Morphology of Chitosan Nanoparticles Used in Drug Delivery System Employing Chemometric Technique

    PubMed Central

    Khanmohammadi, Mohammadreza; Elmizadeh, Hamideh; Ghasemi, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    The polymeric nanoparticles are prepared from biocompatible polymers in size between 10-1000 nm. Chitosan is a biocompatible polymer that - can be utilized as drug delivery systems. In this study, chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized using an optimized spontaneous emulsification method. Determining particle size and morphology are two critical parameters in nanotechnology. The aim of this study is to introduce methodology based on relation between particle size and diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy technique. Partial least squares (PLS) technique was used to estimate the average particle size based on DRIFT spectra. Forty two different chitosan nanoparticle samples with different particle sizes were analyzed using DRIFT spectrometry and the obtained data were processed by PLS. Results obtained from the real samples were compared to those obtained using field emission scanning electron microscope(FE-SEM) as a reference method. It was observed that PLS could correctly predict the average particle size of synthesized sample. Nanoparticles and their morphological state were determined by FE-SEM. Based on morphological characteristics analyzing with proposed method the samples were separated into two groups of "appropriate" and "inappropriate". Chemometrics methods such as principal component analysis, cluster analysis (CA) and linear discriminate analysis (LDA) were used to classify chitosan nanoparticles in terms of morphology. The percent of correctly classified samples using LDA were 100 %and 90% for training and test sets, respectively. PMID:26330855

  7. Inter and intra-system size variability of reverse shoulder arthroplasty polyethylene inserts

    PubMed Central

    Teeter, Matthew G.; Dawson, Matthew T.; Athwal, George S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: As the incidence of reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) increases, so will the revision burden. At times, the revision surgeon may be faced with a well-fixed component on one side of the joint and revision implants from a different manufacturer. The ability to use glenoid and humeral implants from different manufacturers could simplify the revision procedure. This study hypothesized that across a range of RSA systems, some implants would demonstrate high size compatibility and others would demonstrate low compatibility. Materials and Methods: Six polyethylene inserts each from eight reverse total shoulder arthroplasty systems were examined (48 total inserts). All inserts were scanned using a laboratory micro-computed tomography scanner at 50 μm isotropic voxel spacing, and their surface geometries were reconstructed. The different implant geometries were co-registered, and the three-dimensional (3D) variability between the articular surfaces of the different implant systems was measured. Intrasystem manufacturing variability was also determined by measuring the 3D variability of inserts from the same system. Results: The intersystem polyethylene articular surface deviations between same-size systems were not significantly different (P = 0.61) and were a mean maximum of 60 ± 16 μm (range: 30-80 μm). Intrasystem manufacturing variability was equivalent between all but two models, averaging 49 ± 17 μm (range: 23-99 μm). Discussion: Differences in articular geometry between same-size inserts from different systems were on the same scale as intrasystem manufacturing variability, suggesting that different implant systems of the same nominal diameter could potentially be used interchangeably in revision or extenuating circumstances. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that surgeons can theoretically interchange same-sized implant components from the different RSA systems tested when conducting revisions. PMID:26980984

  8. Interactive computer graphics system for structural sizing and analysis of aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendavid, D.; Pipano, A.; Raibstein, A.; Somekh, E.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized system for preliminary sizing and analysis of aircraft wing and fuselage structures was described. The system is based upon repeated application of analytical program modules, which are interactively interfaced and sequence-controlled during the iterative design process with the aid of design-oriented graphics software modules. The entire process is initiated and controlled via low-cost interactive graphics terminals driven by a remote computer in a time-sharing mode.

  9. Infiltration into soils: Conceptual approaches and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, Shmuel

    2013-04-01

    Infiltration is a key process in aspects of hydrology, agricultural and civil engineering, irrigation design, and soil and water conservation. It is complex, depending on soil and rainfall properties and initial and boundary conditions within the flow domain. During the last century, a great deal of effort has been invested to understand the physics of infiltration and to develop quantitative predictors of infiltration dynamics. Jean-Yves Parlange and Wilfried Brutsaert have made seminal contributions, especially in the area of infiltration theory and related analytical solutions to the flow equations. This review retraces the landmark discoveries and the evolution of the conceptual approaches and the mathematical solutions applied to the problem of infiltration into porous media, highlighting the pivotal contributions of Parlange and Brutsaert. A historical retrospective of physical models of infiltration is followed by the presentation of mathematical methods leading to analytical solutions of the flow equations. This review then addresses the time compression approximation developed to estimate infiltration at the transition between preponding and postponding conditions. Finally, the effects of special conditions, such as the presence of air and heterogeneity in soil properties, on infiltration are considered.

  10. 24 CFR 3280.505 - Air infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.505 Air infiltration... gain due to infiltration as much as possible without impinging on health and comfort and within...

  11. 24 CFR 3280.505 - Air infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.505 Air infiltration... gain due to infiltration as much as possible without impinging on health and comfort and within...

  12. Infiltration Model for Center Pivot Sprinkler Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The marked reduction in infiltration rate caused by formation of a soil surface seal due to water droplet impact on bare soil is a well known phenomenon but is rarely considered in infiltration models, especially under center pivot irrigation. The objective of this study was to develop a soil infil...

  13. Three-dimensional speckle size in generalized optical systems with limiting apertures.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jennifer E; Kelly, Damien P; Sheridan, John T

    2009-08-01

    Correlation properties of speckle fields at the output of quadratic phase systems with hard square and circular apertures are examined. Using the linear canonical transform and ABCD ray matrix techniques to describe these general optical systems, we first derive analytical formulas for determining axial and lateral speckle sizes. Then using a numerical technique, we extend the analysis so that the correlation properties of nonaxial speckles can also be considered. Using some simple optical systems as examples, we demonstrate how this approach may be conveniently applied. The results of this analysis apply broadly both to the design of metrology systems and to speckle control schemes. PMID:19649124

  14. SIMULATION OF NET INFILTRATION FOR MODERN AND POTENTIAL FUTURE CLIMATES

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Heveal

    2000-06-16

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes enhancements made to the infiltration model documented in Flint et al. (1996) and documents an analysis using the enhanced model to generate spatial and temporal distributions over a model domain encompassing the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada. Net infiltration is the component of infiltrated precipitation, snowmelt, or surface water run-on that has percolated below the zone of evapotranspiration as defined by the depth of the effective root zone, the average depth below the ground surface (at a given location) from which water is removed by evapotranspiration. The estimates of net infiltration are used for defining the upper boundary condition for the site-scale 3-dimensional Unsaturated-Zone Ground Water Flow and Transport (UZ flow and transport) Model (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The UZ flow and transport model is one of several process models abstracted by the Total System Performance Assessment model to evaluate expected performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in terms of radionuclide transport (CRWMS M&O 1998). The net-infiltration model is important for assessing potential repository-system performance because output from this model provides the upper boundary condition for the UZ flow and transport model that is used to generate flow fields for evaluating potential radionuclide transport through the unsaturated zone. Estimates of net infiltration are provided as raster-based, 2-dimensional grids of spatially distributed, time-averaged rates for three different climate stages estimated as likely conditions for the next 10,000 years beyond the present. Each climate stage is represented using a lower bound, a mean, and an upper bound climate and corresponding net-infiltration scenario for representing uncertainty in the characterization of daily climate conditions for each climate stage, as well as potential climate variability within each climate stage. The set of nine raster grid maps provide spatially

  15. Multi-objective optimization of water quality, pumps operation, and storage sizing of water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Wojciech; Ostfeld, Avi

    2013-01-30

    A multi-objective methodology utilizing the Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm (SPEA2) linked to EPANET for trading-off pumping costs, water quality, and tanks sizing of water distribution systems is developed and demonstrated. The model integrates variable speed pumps for modeling the pumps operation, two water quality objectives (one based on chlorine disinfectant concentrations and one on water age), and tanks sizing cost which are assumed to vary with location and diameter. The water distribution system is subject to extended period simulations, variable energy tariffs, Kirchhoff's laws 1 and 2 for continuity of flow and pressure, tanks water level closure constraints, and storage-reliability requirements. EPANET Example 3 is employed for demonstrating the methodology on two multi-objective models, which differ in the imposed water quality objective (i.e., either with disinfectant or water age considerations). Three-fold Pareto optimal fronts are presented. Sensitivity analysis on the storage-reliability constraint, its influence on pumping cost, water quality, and tank sizing are explored. The contribution of this study is in tailoring design (tank sizing), pumps operational costs, water quality of two types, and reliability through residual storage requirements, in a single multi-objective framework. The model was found to be stable in generating multi-objective three-fold Pareto fronts, while producing explainable engineering outcomes. The model can be used as a decision tool for both pumps operation, water quality, required storage for reliability considerations, and tank sizing decision-making. PMID:23262407

  16. Influence of the energy management on the sizing of Electrical Energy Storage Systems in an aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devillers, Nathalie; Péra, Marie-Cécile; Bienaimé, Daniel; Grojo, Marie-Laure

    2014-12-01

    In an aircraft, Electrical Energy Storage Systems (EESS) are used as support to other sources in few mission phases in order to ensure the energy availability. They are also used as electrical smoothing devices in order to guarantee the required levels of reliability, stability and quality for an embedded electrical network. This paper deals with the association of two EESS: supercapacitors and secondary battery, which exhibit complementary properties. In this paper, a sizing method for both EESS is developed by taking into account their hybridization and their characteristics (such as capacity or depth-of-discharge) so as to minimize the global storage system weight. Moreover, an energy management based on a frequency approach is implemented to dispatch the power between all the sources. The influence of this management on the sizing is studied. Indeed the cut-off frequency of the low-pass filter is used as a setting parameter of the sizing algorithm. Finally, the sizing validity is assessed and discussed according to temperature constraints. Although battery performances are reduced at low temperature, the sizing determined with the algorithm at 20 °C is still valid on all the temperature range thanks to an adaptation of the energy management parameter.

  17. Capillary infiltration rates into porous media with applications to Silcomp processing

    SciTech Connect

    Einset, E.O.

    1996-02-01

    The rate of capillary rise of a liquid into a porous medium made up of consolidated particulates is analyzed. The infiltration distance is parabolic in time and can be modeled using the Washburn analysis. The effective pore radius is measured to be one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the particle size, particle spacing, and the median pore size as measured by mercury porosimetry. This result is interpreted using a modification of the Washburn model which models the porous medium as a single pore with varying diameter. Using a two-sized single pore model, the predicted infiltration rate is consistent with the measured values. In applying the two-sized single pore model to the reactive capillary infiltration of silicon into a carbonaceous preform in the Silcomp process, the effect of pore closure by the conversion of carbon to SiC is predicted. Using pore closure dimensions measured in a partial infiltration experiment, a decrease in the infiltration rate constant is predicted and is consistent with the measured infiltration rate.

  18. Can Effective Synthetic Vision System Displays be Implemented on Limited Size Display Spaces?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, J. Raymond, Jr.; Glaab, Lou J.; Prinzel, Lance J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2004-01-01

    The Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) element of the NASA Aviation Safety Program is striving to eliminate poor visibility as a causal factor in aircraft accidents, and to enhance operational capabilities of all types or aircraft. To accomplish these safety and situation awareness improvements, the SVS concepts are designed to provide a clear view of the world ahead through the display of computer generated imagery derived from an onboard database of terrain, obstacle and airport information. An important issue for the SVS concept is whether useful and effective Synthetic Vision System (SVS) displays can be implemented on limited size display spaces as would be required to implement this technology on older aircraft with physically smaller instrument spaces. In this study, prototype SVS displays were put on the following display sizes: (a) size "A' (e.g. 757 EADI), (b) form factor "D" (e.g. 777 PFD), and (c) new size "X" (Rectangular flat-panel, approximately 20 x 25 cm). Testing was conducted in a high-resolution graphics simulation facility at NASA Langley Research Center. Specific issues under test included the display size as noted above, the field-of-view (FOV) to be shown on the display and directly related to FOV is the degree of minification of the displayed image or picture. Using simulated approaches with display size and FOV conditions held constant no significant differences by these factors were found. Preferred FOV based on performance was determined by using approaches during which pilots could select FOV. Mean preference ratings for FOV were in the following order: (1) 30 deg., (2) Unity, (3) 60 deg., and (4) 90 deg., and held true for all display sizes tested. Limitations of the present study and future research directions are discussed.

  19. Comparison of soil infiltration rates in burned and unburned mountainous watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Deborah A.; Moody, John A.

    2001-10-01

    Steady-state infiltration measurements were made at mountainous sites in New Mexico and Colorado, USA, with volcanic and granitic soils after wildfires and at comparable unburned sites. We measured infiltration in the New Mexico volcanic soils under two vegetation types, ponderosa pine and mixed conifer, and in the Colorado granitic soils under ponderosa pine vegetation. These measurements were made within high-severity burn areas using a portable infiltrometer with a 0·017 m2 infiltration area and artificial rainfall rates ranging from 97 to 440 mm h-1. Steady-state infiltration rates were less at all burned sites relative to unburned sites. The volcanic soil with ponderosa pine vegetation showed the greatest difference in infiltration rates with a ratio of steady-state infiltration rate in burned sites to unburned soils equal to 0·15. Volcanic soils with mixed conifer vegetation had a ratio (burned to unburned soils) of at most 0·38, and granitic soils with ponderosa pine vegetation had a ratio of 0·38. Steady-state infiltration rates on unburned volcanic and granitic soils with ponderosa pine vegetation are not statistically different. We present data on the particle-size distribution at all the study sites and examples of wetting patterns produced during the infiltration experiments. Published in 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Comparison of soil infiltration rates in burned and unburned mountainous watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, D.A.; Moody, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Steady-state infiltration measurements were made at mountainous sites in New Mexico and Colorado, USA, with volcanic and granitic soils after wildfires and at comparable unburned sites. We measured infiltration in the New Mexico volcanic soils under two vegetation types, ponderosa pine and mixed conifer, and in the Colorado granitic soils under ponderosa pine vegetation. These measurements were made within high-severity burn areas using a portable infiltrometer with a 0.017 m2 infiltration area and artificial rainfall rates ranging from 97 to 440 mm h-1. Steady-state infiltration rates were less at all burned sites relative to unburned sites. The volcanic soil with ponderosa pine vegetation showed the greatest difference in infiltration rates with a ratio of steady-state infiltration rate in burned sites to unburned soils equal to 0.15. Volcanic soils with mixed conifer vegetation had a ratio (burned to unburned soils) of at most 0.38, and granitic soils with ponderosa pine vegetation had a ratio of 0.38. Steady-state infiltration rates on unburned volcanic and granitic soils with ponderosa pine vegetation are not statistically different. We present data on the particle-size distribution at all the study sites and examples of wetting patterns produced during the infiltration experiments. Published in 2001 by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  1. Expert System For Flexible Palletizing Of Mixed Size And Weight Parcels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazouz, A. Kader; Shell, Richard L.; Hall, E. L.

    1988-02-01

    Stacking boxes of mixed size and weight is a tedious task requiring intelligence. It requires the ability to recognize that boxes are available to be stacked, the recognition of different box types, the selection of a grasping point for picking up the box and most importantly, a determination of where to stack the box on a partially loaded pallet. The purpose of this paper is to describe an expert system for determining how to stack a set of mixed size and weight boxes and provide control information to a robot to perform actual palletizing. A prototype system has been developed using an expert programming language and an industrial robot work cell. The system has been tested with actual food parcels weighing up to 50 pounds and performs very well. The formation of flat regions is one of the many rules implemented in the expert system. The system also works at speeds comparable to human speeds. The study demonstrates, in large measure, the feasibility of the use of expert system AI techniques and industrial robots for palletizing mixed size weight parcels in a general workhousing application.

  2. Nanoparticle distribution during systemic inflammation is size-dependent and organ-specific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.-H.; Lundy, D. J.; Toh, E. K.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Shih, C.; Chen, P.; Chang, H.-C.; Lai, J. J.; Stayton, P. S.; Hoffman, A. S.; Hsieh, P. C.-H.

    2015-09-01

    This study comprehensively investigates the changing biodistribution of fluorescent-labelled polystyrene latex bead nanoparticles in a mouse model of inflammation. Since inflammation alters systemic circulatory properties, increases vessel permeability and modulates the immune system, we theorised that systemic inflammation would alter nanoparticle distribution within the body. This has implications for prospective nanocarrier-based therapies targeting inflammatory diseases. Low dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial endotoxin, was used to induce an inflammatory response, and 20 nm, 100 nm or 500 nm polystyrene nanoparticles were administered after 16 hours. HPLC analysis was used to accurately quantify nanoparticle retention by each vital organ, and tissue sections revealed the precise locations of nanoparticle deposition within key tissues. During inflammation, nanoparticles of all sizes redistributed, particularly to the marginal zones of the spleen. We found that LPS-induced inflammation induces splenic macrophage polarisation and alters leukocyte uptake of nanoparticles, with size-dependent effects. In addition, spleen vasculature becomes significantly more permeable following LPS treatment. We conclude that systemic inflammation affects nanoparticle distribution by multiple mechanisms, in a size dependent manner.This study comprehensively investigates the changing biodistribution of fluorescent-labelled polystyrene latex bead nanoparticles in a mouse model of inflammation. Since inflammation alters systemic circulatory properties, increases vessel permeability and modulates the immune system, we theorised that systemic inflammation would alter nanoparticle distribution within the body. This has implications for prospective nanocarrier-based therapies targeting inflammatory diseases. Low dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial endotoxin, was used to induce an inflammatory response, and 20 nm, 100 nm or 500 nm polystyrene nanoparticles were administered

  3. The Interannual Stability of Cumulative Frequency Distributions for Convective System Size and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Molinari, John; Thorncroft, Chris D,

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of convective system populations in West Africa and the western Pacific tropical cyclone basin were analyzed to investigate whether interannual variability in convective activity in tropical continental and oceanic environments is driven by variations in the number of events during the wet season or by favoring large and/or intense convective systems. Convective systems were defined from TRMM data as a cluster of pixels with an 85 GHz polarization-corrected brightness temperature below 255 K and with an area at least 64 km 2. The study database consisted of convective systems in West Africa from May Sep for 1998-2007 and in the western Pacific from May Nov 1998-2007. Annual cumulative frequency distributions for system minimum brightness temperature and system area were constructed for both regions. For both regions, there were no statistically significant differences among the annual curves for system minimum brightness temperature. There were two groups of system area curves, split by the TRMM altitude boost in 2001. Within each set, there was no statistically significant interannual variability. Sub-setting the database revealed some sensitivity in distribution shape to the size of the sampling area, length of sample period, and climate zone. From a regional perspective, the stability of the cumulative frequency distributions implied that the probability that a convective system would attain a particular size or intensity does not change interannually. Variability in the number of convective events appeared to be more important in determining whether a year is wetter or drier than normal.

  4. Poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds of highly controlled porosity and interconnectivity derived from co-continuous polymer blends: model bead and cell infiltration behavior.

    PubMed

    Ghavidel Mehr, Nima; Li, Xian; Ariganello, Marianne B; Hoemann, Caroline D; Favis, Basil D

    2014-09-01

    Porous structures destined for tissue engineering applications should ideally show controlled and narrow pore size distributions with fully interconnected pores. This study focuses on the development of novel poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) structures with fully connected pores of 84, 116, 141, and 162 μm average diameter, from melt blending of PCL with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) at the co-continuous composition, followed by static annealing and selective extraction of PEO. Our results demonstrate a low onset concentration for PEO continuity and a broad region of phase inversion. A novel in vitro assay was used to compare scaffold infiltration by 10-μm diameter polystyrene beads intended to mimic trypsinized human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs). Beads showed a linear increase in the extent of scaffold infiltration with increasing pore size, whereas BMSCs infiltrated 162 and 141 μm pores, below which the cells aggregated and adhered near the seeding area with low infiltration into the porous device. While providing a baseline for non-aggregated systems, the beads closely mimic trypsinized cells at pore sizes equal to or larger than 141 μm, where optimal retention and distribution of hBMSCs are detected. A cytotoxicity assay using L929 cells showed that these scaffolds were cytocompatible and no cell necrosis was detected. This study shows that a melt blending approach produces porous PCL scaffolds of highly controlled pore size, narrow size distribution and complete interconnectivity, while the bead model system reveals the baseline potential for a homogeneous, non-aggregated distribution of hBMSCs at all penetration depths. PMID:24962985

  5. Modelling multiphase dynamics during infiltration using a pore network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzavaras, Jannis; Arns, Ji-Youns; Max, Koehne; Hans-Joerg, Vogel

    2013-04-01

    We present an implementation of water infiltration into a pore network model where the local water pressures is continuously updated during the transient process. The network geometry is designed to represent structured soil which is different from simple granular porous media in some respect: Pores are more elongated and less isometric and the pore size distribution is much wider and structured hierarchically. To reproduce these properties, the classical concept of pore-bodies and throats is replaced by direct measurements of pore topology and the pores below the minimal pore size of the network model are represented by a continuous network of water saturated micro pores. The latter ensures that the water phase is always continuous which affects the propagation of the water potential during infiltration. The network model is based on cylindrical pores and considers capillary and gravitational forces. The propagation of interfaces is calculated for each time step by repeatedly solving the complete set of linear equation arising from Kirchhoff's law based on mass balance at each node of the network. This is done using the public domain package ITPack. The successive overrelaxation (SOR) and the Jacobi conjugate gradient (JCG) method proved to be more robust and faster than other solvers tested for the complex topology. The model accounts for entrapped air which is assumed to be incompressible. We present first results demonstrating the impact of external forcing (i.e infiltration rate) and pore topology on the dynamics of water-gas interfaces, the volume of entrapped air and hysteresis.

  6. Fundamental Physical Limits for the Size of Future Planetary Surface Exploration Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, F.; Hobbs, S. E.; Honstvet, I.; Snelling, M.

    2004-04-01

    With the current interest in the potential use of Nanotechnology for spacecraft, it becomes increasingly likely that environmental sensor probes, such as the "lab-on-a-chip" concept, will take advantage of this technology and become orders of magnitude smaller than current sensor systems. This paper begins to investigate how small these systems could theoretically become, and what are the governing laws and limiting factors that determine that minimum size. The investigation focuses on the three primary subsystems for a sensor network of this nature Sensing, Information Processing and Communication. In general, there are few fundamental physical laws that limit the size of the sensor system. Limits tend to be driven by factors other than the laws of physics. These include user requirements, such as the acceptable probability of error, and the potential external environment.

  7. The measurement system of nanoparticle size distribution from dynamic light scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenmei; Wang, Yajing; Shen, Jin; Liu, Wei; Sun, Xianming

    2014-05-01

    The measurement and analysis system of nanoparticle size distribution was developed by using virtual instrument technology, where the photon counting technology was applied in the system to replace the correlator; a high speed photon counter was designed with seamlessly counting technology to reduce the system cost and increase the accuracy. The data of nanoparticle dynamic light scattering (DLS) were analyzed in the mixed program of MATLAB and LabVIEW, where the autocorrelation functions of light scattering signals of 100 nm unimodal as well as 90 nm and 300 nm bimodal particles were inversed by truncated singular value decomposition arithmetic. Experiment results show that the peak position, peak width and symmetry of particle size distributions (PSDs) are very close to the real particles.

  8. Many-body localization in disorder-free systems: The importance of finite-size constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papić, Z.; Stoudenmire, E. Miles; Abanin, Dmitry A.

    2015-11-01

    Recently it has been suggested that many-body localization (MBL) can occur in translation-invariant systems, and candidate 1D models have been proposed. We find that such models, in contrast to MBL systems with quenched disorder, typically exhibit much more severe finite-size effects due to the presence of two or more vastly different energy scales. In a finite system, this can artificially split the density of states (DOS) into bands separated by large gaps. We argue for such models to faithfully represent the thermodynamic limit behavior, the ratio of relevant coupling must exceed a certain system-size depedent cutoff, chosen such that various bands in the DOS overlap one another. Setting the parameters this way to minimize finite-size effects, we study several translation-invariant MBL candidate models using exact diagonalization. Based on diagnostics including entanglement and local observables, we observe thermal (ergodic), rather than MBL-like behavior. Our results suggest that MBL in translation-invariant systems with two or more very different energy scales is less robust than perturbative arguments suggest, possibly pointing to the importance of non-perturbative effects which induce delocalization in the thermodynamic limit.

  9. Finite-size effects on return interval distributions for weakest-link-scaling systems.

    PubMed

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T; Petrakis, Manolis P; Kaniadakis, Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    The Weibull distribution is a commonly used model for the strength of brittle materials and earthquake return intervals. Deviations from Weibull scaling, however, have been observed in earthquake return intervals and the fracture strength of quasibrittle materials. We investigate weakest-link scaling in finite-size systems and deviations of empirical return interval distributions from the Weibull distribution function. Our analysis employs the ansatz that the survival probability function of a system with complex interactions among its units can be expressed as the product of the survival probability functions for an ensemble of representative volume elements (RVEs). We show that if the system comprises a finite number of RVEs, it obeys the κ-Weibull distribution. The upper tail of the κ-Weibull distribution declines as a power law in contrast with Weibull scaling. The hazard rate function of the κ-Weibull distribution decreases linearly after a waiting time τ(c) ∝ n(1/m), where m is the Weibull modulus and n is the system size in terms of representative volume elements. We conduct statistical analysis of experimental data and simulations which show that the κ Weibull provides competitive fits to the return interval distributions of seismic data and of avalanches in a fiber bundle model. In conclusion, using theoretical and statistical analysis of real and simulated data, we demonstrate that the κ-Weibull distribution is a useful model for extreme-event return intervals in finite-size systems. PMID:25353774

  10. Influence of propulsion system size, shape, and location on supersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, E.; Roe, M. H.; Tyson, R. M.; Mairs, R. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of various propulsion system parameters on the characteristics of a supersonic transport were investigated. The effects of arbitrarily scaling engine size on wave drag, friction drag, drag-due-to-lift, wing sizing, airplane balance, and airplane weight were studied. These evaluations were made for two families of nacelle shapes, resulting from typical turbojet and turbofan installations. Also examined were effects of nacelle location, and the wing camber plane deformations required to cancel the nacelle interference pressure field at cruise Mach number (2.7 M) were determined. The most drag-sensitive parameter is found to be nacelle shape. Similarly, wing deformation requirements are found to be primarily affected by nacelle shape. Effects of engine size variations are noted primarily in airplane gross weight.

  11. Evolution of crystal sizes in the series of dissolution and precipitation events in open magma systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakin, A. G.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2008-11-01

    We propose a model that describes the evolution of crystal sizes and crystal size distributions (CSD) of igneous phenocrysts in a sequence of dissolution and crystallization events. This model is based on the assumption that crystal dissolution is rate-limited by diffusion in melt while crystal growth is controlled by the slower kinetic of new nucleation and growth. As a result, the dissolution rate is inversely proportional to crystal size coming into effect through the curvature of the crystal's surface, but the growth rate does not depend on the crystal size. Closed-form analytical solution of equation for CSD is obtained. We apply results of modeling to quartz and zircon, two prime minerals in silicic igneous systems that are widely used in geochemical and isotopic investigations. The time-series of multiple solution-reprecipitation episodes generate concave-downward CSDs and this result fits well with experimental and natural observations on the abundant concave-down CSD in silicic igneous rocks. We suggest that maturation of crystal populations with sizes above several micrometers can not be caused by a size effect on the solubility of the crystals (Ostwald ripening), but is rather driven by thermal oscillations in experiments and in nature. The model predicts that mean crystal size increases with time proportionally to ˜ t0.20, which is very close to the published experimental results for quartz maturation with the exponent of 0.19-0.22. Our proposed model gives an opportunity to use natural CSDs for interpretation of pre-eruptive magma history, when solubilities and diffusion data are available for constituent elements of the dissolving mineral. In particular, we present time estimates for maturing zircon populations in large volume ignimbrites and estimate that it takes 100-1000 yrs to mature an initially exponential CSD to a lognormal CSD.

  12. A vent sizing program with particular reference to hybrid runaway reaction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, J.C.; Noronha, J.A.; Torres, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    VSSPH (Vent Sizing Software Program for Hybrid System) is a software program designed to yield rapid evaluation of emergency requirements requirements for a general class of hybrid system runaway reaction - a system which generate both condensable vapor and noncondensable gases. The calculational method is based on transient numerical solutions as well as analytical solutions. This program only requires a few key input parameters as well as physical properties. The program also incorporates the latest two-phase pipe flow model based on the {omega} methodology. This paper describes the model construction and summarizes the results of sample runs. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Requirements and Sizing Investigation for the Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System Trace Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.; Paul, Heather L.; Waguespack, Glenn M.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation summarized the results of a trade study that evaluated whether trace contaminant control within the Constellation Spacesuit PLSS could be achieved without a Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) by relying on suit leakage, ullage loss from the carbon dioxide and humidity control system, and other factors. Mallory Jennings and Dr. Glenn Waguespack studied trace contaminant generation rates to verify that values reflected the latest designs for Constellation spacesuit system pressure garment materials and PLSS hardware. They also calculated TCCS sizing and conducted a literature survey to review the latest developments in trace contaminant technologies.

  14. [Predictors of bacterial excretion in patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Volchegorskiĭ, I A; Novoselov, P N; Bolotov, A A

    2009-01-01

    An association of bacterial excretion with the magnitude of the X-ray and clinical symptoms of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis, with the intensity of concomitant anxiety-depression disorders and the results of complex laboratory peripheral blood tests was studied in 100 patients with this condition. The fact that M. tuberculosis was present in the sputum was shown to be linked to the significant increase in the size of tuberculous infiltrates, the extent of decay in the latter, their connection with the root of the lung, the spread of excretion foci, and the intensity of cough and bloody expectoration. The similar trend was demonstrated in the degree of situational anxiety, depressive indecision, and pessimism, as well as in the values of leukocytosis and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The predictive informative value of a set of findings is illustrated by the discriminant function equation that allows the correct prediction of bacterial excretion in 76.8% of cases. PMID:20095373

  15. Impact of runoff infiltration on contaminant accumulation and transport in the soil/filter media of Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Tedoldi, Damien; Chebbo, Ghassan; Pierlot, Daniel; Kovacs, Yves; Gromaire, Marie-Christine

    2016-11-01

    The increasing use of Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) for stormwater management raises some concerns about the fate of ubiquitous runoff micropollutants in soils and their potential threat to groundwater. This question may be addressed either experimentally, by sampling and analyzing SUDS soil after a given operating time, or with a modeling approach to simulate the fate and transport of contaminants. After briefly reminding the processes responsible for the retention, degradation, or leaching of several urban-sourced contaminants in soils, this paper presents the state of the art about both experimental and modeling assessments. In spite of noteworthy differences in the sampling protocols, the soil parameters chosen as explanatory variables, and the methods used to evaluate the site-specific initial concentrations, most investigations undoubtedly evidenced a significant accumulation of metals and/or hydrocarbons in SUDS soils, which in the majority of the cases appears to be restricted to the upper 10 to 30cm. These results may suggest that SUDS exhibit an interesting potential for pollution control, but antinomic observations have also been made in several specific cases, and the inter-site concentration variability is still difficult to appraise. There seems to be no consensus regarding the level of complexity to be used in models. However, the available data deriving from experimental studies is generally limited to the contamination profiles and a few parameters of the soil, as a result of which "complex" models (including colloid-facilitated transport for example) appear to be difficult to validate before using them for predictive evaluations. PMID:27432725

  16. Landslide triggering by rain infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Landsliding in response to rainfall involves physical processes that operate on disparate timescales. Relationships between these timescales guide development of a mathematical model that uses reduced forms of Richards equation to evaluate effects of rainfall infiltration on landslide occurrence, timing, depth, and acceleration in diverse situations. The longest pertinent timescale is A/D0, where D0 is the maximum hydraulic diffusivity of the soil and A is the catchment area that potentially affects groundwater pressures at a prospective landslide slip surface location with areal coordinates x, y and depth H. Times greater than A/D0 are necessary for establishment of steady background water pressures that develop at (x, y, H) in response to rainfall averaged over periods that commonly range from days to many decades. These steady groundwater pressures influence the propensity for landsliding at (x, y, H), but they do not trigger slope failure. Failure results from rainfall over a typically shorter timescale H2/D0 associated with transient pore pressure transmission during and following storms. Commonly, this timescale ranges from minutes to months. The shortest timescale affecting landslide responses to rainfall is √(H/g), where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration. Postfailure landslide motion occurs on this timescale, which indicates that the thinnest landslides accelerate most quickly if all other factors are constant. Effects of hydrologic processes on landslide processes across these diverse timescales are encapsulated by a response function, R(t*) = √(t*/π) exp (-1/t*) - erfc (1/√t*), which depends only on normalized time, t*. Use of R(t*) in conjunction with topographic data, rainfall intensity and duration information, an infinite-slope failure criterion, and Newton's second law predicts the timing, depth, and acceleration of rainfall-triggered landslides. Data from contrasting landslides that exhibit rapid, shallow motion and slow, deep

  17. Unifying latitudinal gradients in range size and richness across marine and terrestrial systems.

    PubMed

    Tomašových, Adam; Kennedy, Jonathan D; Betzner, Tristan J; Kuehnle, Nicole Bitler; Edie, Stewart; Kim, Sora; Supriya, K; White, Alexander E; Rahbek, Carsten; Huang, Shan; Price, Trevor D; Jablonski, David

    2016-05-11

    Many marine and terrestrial clades show similar latitudinal gradients in species richness, but opposite gradients in range size-on land, ranges are the smallest in the tropics, whereas in the sea, ranges are the largest in the tropics. Therefore, richness gradients in marine and terrestrial systems do not arise from a shared latitudinal arrangement of species range sizes. Comparing terrestrial birds and marine bivalves, we find that gradients in range size are concordant at the level of genera. Here, both groups show a nested pattern in which narrow-ranging genera are confined to the tropics and broad-ranging genera extend across much of the gradient. We find that (i) genus range size and its variation with latitude is closely associated with per-genus species richness and (ii) broad-ranging genera contain more species both within and outside of the tropics when compared with tropical- or temperate-only genera. Within-genus species diversification thus promotes genus expansion to novel latitudes. Despite underlying differences in the species range-size gradients, species-rich genera are more likely to produce a descendant that extends its range relative to the ancestor's range. These results unify species richness gradients with those of genera, implying that birds and bivalves share similar latitudinal dynamics in net species diversification. PMID:27147094

  18. Net-Infiltration Map of the Navajo Sandstone Outcrop Area in Western Washington County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, Victor M.; McKinney, Tim S.

    2007-01-01

    As populations grow in the arid southwestern United States and desert bedrock aquifers are increasingly targeted for future development, understanding and quantifying the spatial variability of net infiltration and recharge becomes critically important for inventorying ground-water resources and mapping contamination vulnerability. A Geographic Information System (GIS)-based model utilizing readily available soils, topographic, precipitation, and outcrop data has been developed for predicting net infiltration to exposed and soil-covered areas of the Navajo Sandstone outcrop of southwestern Utah. The Navajo Sandstone is an important regional bedrock aquifer. The GIS model determines the net-infiltration percentage of precipitation by using an empirical equation. This relation is derived from least squares linear regression between three surficial parameters (soil coarseness, topographic slope, and downgradient distance from outcrop) and the percentage of estimated net infiltration based on environmental tracer data from excavations and boreholes at Sand Hollow Reservoir in the southeastern part of the study area. Processed GIS raster layers are applied as parameters in the empirical equation for determining net infiltration for soil-covered areas as a percentage of precipitation. This net-infiltration percentage is multiplied by average annual Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) precipitation data to obtain an infiltration rate for each model cell. Additionally, net infiltration on exposed outcrop areas is set to 10 percent of precipitation on the basis of borehole net-infiltration estimates. Soils and outcrop net-infiltration rates are merged to form a final map. Areas of low, medium, and high potential for ground-water recharge have been identified, and estimates of net infiltration range from 0.1 to 66 millimeters per year (mm/yr). Estimated net-infiltration rates of less than 10 mm/yr are considered low, rates of 10 to 50 mm

  19. Viral nervous necrosis virus persistently replicates in the central nervous system of asymptomatic gilthead seabream and promotes a transient inflammatory response followed by the infiltration of IgM+ B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    López-Muñoz, Azucena; Sepulcre, María P; García-Moreno, Diana; Fuentes, Inmaculada; Béjar, Julia; Manchado, Manuel; Álvarez, M Carmen; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano

    2012-07-01

    The viral nervous necrosis virus (VNNV) is the causal agent of viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER), a worldwide fish disease that is responsible for high mortality in both marine and freshwater species. Infected fish suffer from encephalitis, which leads to abnormal swimming behavior and extensive cellular vacuolation and neuronal degeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) and retina. The marine fish gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) does not develop VER but it is an asymptomatic carrier of VNNV. In this study, we report that VNNV was able to replicate and persist for up to 3 months in the CNS of the gilthead seabream without causing any neural damage. In addition, we found an early inflammatory response in the CNS that was characterized by the induction of genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines, a delayed but persistent induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and the infiltration of IgM(+) B lymphocytes, suggesting that local adaptive immunity played a major role in the control of VNNV in the CNS of this species. PMID:22402274

  20. Optimization of Domestic-Size Renewable Energy System Designs Suitable for Cold Climate Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Itoro Etim; Sasaki, Masafumi; Endoh, Noboru

    Five different kinds of domestic-size renewable energy system configurations for very cold climate regions were investigated. From detailed numerical modeling and system simulations, it was found that the consumption of fuel oil for the auxiliary boiler in residential-type households can almost be eliminated with a renewable energy system that incorporates photovoltaic panel arrays for electricity generation and two storage tanks: a well-insulated electric water storage tank that services the hot water loads, and a compact boiler/geothermal heat pump tank for room heating during very cold seasons. A reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) of about 28% was achieved for this system compared to an equivalent conventional system. The near elimination of the use of fuel oil in this system makes it very promising for very cold climate regions in terms of energy savings because the running cost is not so dependent on the unstable nature of global oil prices.

  1. The impact of BPO on cost reduction in mid-sized health care systems.

    PubMed

    Perry, Andy; Kocakülâh, Mehmet C

    2010-01-01

    At the convergence of two politico-economic "hot topics" of the day--outsourcing and the cost of health care-lie opportunities for mid-sized health systems to innovate, collaborate, and reduce overhead. Competition in the retail health care market can serve as both an impetus and an inhibitor to such measures, though. Here we are going to address the motivations, influences, opportunities, and limitations facing mid-sized, US non-profit health systems in business process outsourcing (BPO). Advocates cite numerous benefits to BPO, particularly in cost reduction and strategy optimization. BPO can elicit cost savings due to specialization among provider firms, returns to scale and technology, standardization and automation, and gains in resource arbitrage (off-shoring capabilities). BPO can also free an organization of non-critical tasks and focus resources on core competencies (treating patients). The surge in BPO utilization has rarely extended to the back-office functions of many mid-sized health systems. Health care providers, still a largely fragmented bunch with many rural, independent non-profit systems, have not experienced the consolidation and organizational scale growth to make BPO as attractive as other industries. Smaller firms, spurning merger and acquisition pressure from large, tertiary health systems, often wish to retain their autonomy and identity; hence, they face a competitive cost disadvantage compared to their larger competitors. This article examines the functional areas for these health systems in which BPO is not currently utilized and dissects the various methods available in which to practice BPO. We assess the ongoing adoption of BPO in these areas as well as the barriers to adoption, and identify the key processes that best represent opportunity for success. An emphasis is placed on a collaborative model with other health systems compared to a single system, unilateral BPO arrangement. PMID:22329330

  2. Dynamic load management and optimum sizing of stand-alone hybrid PV/wind system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplani, E.; Ntafogiannis, P.; Pappas, K.; Diamantopoulos, N.

    2015-12-01

    Simulation algorithms for the sizing of stand-alone hybrid PV/Wind systems are a powerful tool in evaluating the optimum configuration that would cover the energy demand with a predefined reliability level at the lowest cost. Several parameters such as the interval of the simulation (day, day-night, hourly) and the consumption profile may significantly affect the optimum configuration. This paper examines the effect of these parameters within an optimum sizing simulation algorithm developed. The effect of these parameters was particularly evident at low battery capacities, which involve optimum configurations resulting in minimum cost. Furthermore, shift-able loads in the hourly-based weekly profile assumed in this study were identified, and a dynamic load management functionality was developed. In this approach, loads that could be shifted through time were dynamically allocated during periods of excess energy production by the hybrid PV/Wind system. The results showed an increase in system reliability from 95% to 97% when load shifting was introduced. Finally, sizing the system for only the static (non-shift-able loads) proved to withstand the addition of the extra shift-able loads while retaining the 95% reliability level when the load management functionality was introduced. Thus, a smaller installation with lower cost is achieved.

  3. KOI-3158: The oldest known system of terrestrial-size planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campante, T. L.; Barclay, T.; Swift, J. J.; Huber, D.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Cochran, W.; Burke, C. J.; Isaacson, H.; Quintana, E. V.; Davies, G. R.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Ragozzine, D.; Riddle, R.; Baranec, C.; Basu, S.; Chaplin, W. J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Bedding, T. R.; Handberg, R.; Stello, D.; Brewer, J. M.; Hekker, S.; Karoff, C.; Kolbl, R.; Law, N. M.; Lundkvist, M.; Miglio, A.; Rowe, J. F.; Santos, N. C.; Van Laerhoven, C.; Arentoft, T.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Fischer, D. A.; Kawaler, S. D.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lund, M. N.; Marcy, G. W.; Sousa, S. G.; Sozzetti, A.; White, T. R.

    2015-09-01

    The first discoveries of exoplanets around Sun-like stars have fueled efforts to find ever smaller worlds evocative of Earth and other terrestrial planets in the Solar System. While gas-giant planets appear to form preferentially around metal-rich stars, small planets (with radii less than four Earth radii) can form under a wide range of metallicities. This implies that small, including Earth-size, planets may have readily formed at earlier epochs in the Universe's history when metals were far less abundant. We report Kepler spacecraft observations of KOI-3158, a metal-poor Sun-like star from the old population of the Galactic thick disk, which hosts five planets with sizes between Mercury and Venus. We used asteroseismology to directly measure a precise age of 11.2 ± 1.0 Gyr for the host star, indicating that KOI-3158 formed when the Universe was less than 20 % of its current age and making it the oldest known system of terrestrial-size planets. We thus show that Earth-size planets have formed throughout most of the Universe's 13.8-billion-year history, providing scope for the existence of ancient life in the Galaxy.

  4. Involvement of V-ATPase in the regulation of cell size in the fly's visual system.

    PubMed

    Pyza, E; Borycz, J; Giebultowicz, J M; Meinertzhagen, I A

    2004-11-01

    In the fly's visual system, two classes of lamina interneuron, L1 and L2, cyclically change both their size and shape in a rhythm that is circadian. Several neurotransmitters and the lamina's glial cells are known to be involved in regulating these rhythms. Moreover, vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in the optic lobe is thought also to participate in such regulation. We have detected V-ATPase-like immunoreactivity in the heads of both Drosophilla melanogaster and Musca domestica using antibodies raised against either the B- or H-subunits of V-ATPase from D. melanogaster or against the B-subunit from two other insect species Culex quinquefasciatus and Manduca sexta. In the visual systems of both fly species V-ATPase was localized immunocytochemically to the compound eye photoreceptors. In D. melanogaster immunoreactivity oscillated during the day and night and under constant darkness the signal was stronger during the subjective night than the subjective day. In turn, blocking V-ATPase by injecting a V-ATPase blocker, bafilomycin, in M. domestica increased the axon sizes of L1 and L2, but only when bafilomycin was applied during the night. As a result bafilomycin abolished the day/night difference in axon size in L1 and L2, their sizes being similar during the day and night. PMID:15607501

  5. Intraspecific variation in space use, group size, and mating systems of caviomorph rodents

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Christine R.; Burger, Joseph Robert

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in social systems is widely recognized across many taxa, and specific models, including polygamy potential, resource defense, and resource dispersion, have been developed to explain the relationship between ecological variation and social organization. Although mammals from temperate North America and Eurasia have provided many insights into this relationship, rodents from the Neotropics and temperate South America have largely been ignored. In this review we focus on reports documenting intraspecific variation in spacing systems, group size, and mating systems of caviomorphs. This large group of New World hystricognath rodents occupies a diverse array of habitats; thus, members of the same species potentially exhibit different social systems in response to different ecological conditions. Spatial patterns vary in response to a diverse array of factors, including predation, food availability, population density, and soil characteristics. Changes in group size typically correlate with changes in resource availability, particularly food. Mating systems generally reflect the ability of males to control access to females, which may depend on population density or food distribution. In general, social organization in caviomorphs fits predictions of resource-based models; however, most studies have been purely observational, involving small numbers of animals over short time periods and reporting qualitative rather than quantitative levels of ecological correlates. In future studies the use of molecular techniques and controlled, experimental manipulations can increase our understanding of intraspecific variation in caviomorph social systems. This understudied group of rodents offers excellent opportunities to provide insights into the influence of ecological conditions on behavior such as social systems. PMID:22328790

  6. Geophysical methods for monitoring infiltration in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquet, Yves; Pessel, Marc; Saintenoy, Albane

    2015-04-01

    Geophysics provides useful tools for monitoring water infiltration in soil essentially because they are non-invasive and have a good time-resolution. We present some results obtained on different soils using two geophysical techniques: electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Infiltration in a loamy soil was monitored using a 2D Wenner array set up under a tension disc infiltrometer. A good imaging of the infiltration bulb below the infiltrometer could be achieved provided a sufficient resistivity contrast between the wet and the dry soil zones. ERT data could be used to invert soil hydraulic properties. However, we found that the information provided by the ERT could be of limited importance in regard to the information provided by the infiltration rate dynamics if the ERT spatial resolution is not small enough to capture the details of the infiltration front at the limit between the wet and dry soil zones. GPR was found to be a good tool to monitor the progression of the infiltration front in a sandy soil. By combining a water transport simulation model (HYDRUS-1D), a method for transforming water content into dielectric permittivity values (CRIM), and an electromagnetic wave propagation model (GprMax), the Mualem-van Genuchten hydraulic parameters could be retrieved from radargrams obtained under constant or falling head infiltration experiments. Both ERT and GPR methods have pros and cons. Time and spatial resolutions are of prime importance to achieve a sufficient sensitivity to all soil hydraulic parameters. Two exploration fields are suggested: the combination of different geophysical methods to explore infiltration in heterogeneous soils, and the development of integrated infiltrometers that allow geophysical measurements while monitoring water infiltration rate in soil.

  7. The fluorescence spectroscopy of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM): a tool to characterize rapid infiltration flows and vulnerability in karst systems. Application to the Lez hydrosystem (Hérault, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiers, M.; Batiot-Guilhe, C.; Seidel, J.; Bicalho, C. C.; Perrette, Y.; Jourde, H.

    2011-12-01

    Due to the fundamental role the DOM plays in the pollutant transport, this tracer is already used in different aquatic systems but very few studies concern karst systems. Water transit times and recharge period can be estimated using the fluorescence property of DOM. The aim of this study is to apply this approach in order to improve the karst aquifers functioning and to obtain essential information to preserve water resource. This method was applied to the Lez karst hydrosystem which belong to the MEDYCYSS observatory (Multi scalE observatory of flooD dYnamiCs and hYdrodynamicS in karSt). Its main outlet, the Lez spring, supplies drinking water to the city of Montpellier (France). Since March 2006, the hydrodynamic and hydrochemical parameters of the karstic spring have been monitored (turbidity, temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, major and trace elements, Total Organic Carbon :TOC, DOM and bacteria). The DOM fluorescence was measured with a spectrofluorimeter using the Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM). Each EEM was generated with an excitation from 220 to 450 nm, detecting the emission spectra between 250 and 550 nm. The fluorescence spectra are characterized by 3 excitation-emission domains. Two correspond to humic compounds fluorophores (H1, H2) with a pedogenic origin (mature OM). The third region of fluorescence is related to protein-like compounds (P1) with a pedogenic (fresh OM) or an anthropogenic origin. The Fluorescence Intensity (FI) of these three domains increases with the spring discharge and is correlated with rapid infiltration flow markers (especially TOC and turbidity). So FI can be used as a tracer of infiltration flows in karst systems. Moreover, FI peaks emitted by P1 are also correlated to peaks of faecal coliforms. The survival time of these bacteria is lower than one week in a karst aquifer. Consequently, fluorophore P1 is a tracer of short transit time and anthropic contamination. FI emitted by H1 and H2 are related to the

  8. Meltwater pathways and grain size transformation in a Pleistocene Mediterranean glacial-fluvial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, Kathryn; Woodward, Jamie; Hughes, Philip

    2013-04-01

    The Pleistocene sedimentary records of Mount Orjen, western Montenegro, have been used to investigate changes in grain size characteristics of fine sediments transported from the glaciated mountains to the fluvial systems downstream. Understanding the particle size characteristics of the fine sediments transported by these cold stage river systems is important for several reasons. The braided rivers draining the glaciated mountains of the western Balkans may have been an important source of loess for example. It is also important to establish the grain size signature of suspended sediment delivered to the marine environment to aid land-marine correlations. The fine-grained component of the tills is dominated by glacially-comminuted limestone particles. Detailed particle size analysis of the fine sediment matrix component (<63 μm) of glacial till and alluvial deposits has been undertaken using multiple samples at 12 sites surrounding the Orjen massif. This limestone karst terrain includes a range of meltwater pathways and depositional contexts, including: river valleys, alluvial fans, poljes, and ice marginal settings. 35 U-series ages and soil development indices have been used to develop a robust geochronology for the Pleistocene records Two dominant surface meltwater and sediment pathways have been identified around Mount Orjen. The particle size distributions reveal that these transportation routes can have distinctive sedimentological signatures. Type 1 pathways deliver meltwater and sediments downstream via bedrock gorges. In these settings, the fine grained alluvial matrix presents a largely bimodal particle size distribution (PSD). Type 2 pathways represent meltwater channels draining directly from the ice margin. Alluvial sediments within these environments more closely resemble the normally distributed PSD of the glacial tills. The transition to bimodal PSDs, downstream of Type 1 meltwater routes, suggests that the glacially-comminuted sediments are

  9. Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.P.; Devlin, D.J.; Barbero, R.S.

    1992-12-31

    Chemical vapor infiltration in carbon fiber bundles is studied under isothermal conditions over the temperature range 1000--1090 C at a nominal pressure of 300 Torr. Pyrolytic decomposition of methane is used in the infiltration experiments with carbon weight gain data obtained continuously from thermogravimetric analysis. The sensitivity of the infiltration dynamics to initial yarn porosity and to spatial variations in fiber positioning are explored. Results indicate that small changes in initial porosity can have significant impact on the weight gain above the solid phase percolation threshold.

  10. Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.P.; Devlin, D.J.; Barbero, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration in carbon fiber bundles is studied under isothermal conditions over the temperature range 1000--1090 C at a nominal pressure of 300 Torr. Pyrolytic decomposition of methane is used in the infiltration experiments with carbon weight gain data obtained continuously from thermogravimetric analysis. The sensitivity of the infiltration dynamics to initial yarn porosity and to spatial variations in fiber positioning are explored. Results indicate that small changes in initial porosity can have significant impact on the weight gain above the solid phase percolation threshold.

  11. Size-selective extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a microemulsion system using cyclodextrins

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot, N.B.; Prenni, A.J.; Warner, I.M. ); Ndou, T.T. )

    1993-03-15

    A procedure for the size-selective extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from an oil-in-water microemulsion system is reported. This extraction is achieved through a precipitation/extraction process involving cyclodextrins (CDs) and select PAHs in the microemulsion. Results are confirmed by fluorescence analysis of supernatant and precipitate. The size relationship between the PAH and CD cavity appears to be a major factor in the selectivity of the process. For example, after extraction with [beta]-CD, the fluorescence intensity of naphthalene in the microemulsion is reduced to 3.7% of its original value, whereas with [alpha]- or [gamma]-CD the intensity remains unchanged. In studies of a model system, the microemulsion involves a three- component mixture of PAHs; [alpha]-, [beta]-, and [gamma]-CD are investigated for their extraction capabilities for these three PAHs.

  12. Climate change impacts in multispecies systems: drought alters food web size structure in a field experiment

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Guy; Brown, Lee E.; Edwards, Francois K.; Hudson, Lawrence N.; Milner, Alexander M.; Reuman, Daniel C.; Ledger, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental data from intergenerational field manipulations of entire food webs are scarce, yet such approaches are essential for gauging impacts of environmental change in natural systems. We imposed 2 years of intermittent drought on stream channels in a replicated field trial, to measure food web responses to simulated climate change. Drought triggered widespread losses of species and links, with larger taxa and those that were rare for their size, many of which were predatory, being especially vulnerable. Many network properties, including size–scaling relationships within food chains, changed in response to drought. Other properties, such as connectance, were unaffected. These findings highlight the need for detailed experimental data from different organizational levels, from pairwise links to the entire food web. The loss of not only large species, but also those that were rare for their size, provides a newly refined way to gauge likely impacts that may be applied more generally to other systems and/or impacts. PMID:23007087

  13. Multiobjective optimal unit sizing of hybrid power generation systems utilizing photovoltaic and wind energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Ryohei; Ito, Koichi . Dept. of Energy Systems Engineering); Yuasa, Yoshiro . Technical Research Center)

    1994-11-01

    A deterministic approach to optimal unit sizing is presented for hybrid power generation systems utilizing photovoltaic and wind energy. Device capacities and electric contract demand are determined so as to minimize the annual total cost and annual energy consumption from the viewpoints of economy and energy saving or reduction in NO[sub x] and CO[sub 2] emission, respectively. This optimization problem is considered as a multiobjective one, and a discrete set of Pareto optimal solutions is derived numerically by using the weighting method. Two systems interconnected with the electric power grid are investigated: one has the option of reverse electricity flow into the grid, and the other has no option. By carrying out some case studies, the tradeoff relationships between the two objectives as well as the optimal values of device capacities are clarified. The influence of electricity deficit on unit sizing is also investigated.

  14. Reactive-infiltration instability in radial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzki, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    A planar dissolution front propagating through a homogeneous porous matrix is unstable with respect to small variations in local permeability; regions of high permeability dissolve faster because of enhanced transport of reactants, which leads to increased rippling of the front. This phenomenon, usually referred to known as reactive-infiltration instability is an important mechanism for pattern development in geology, with a range of morphologies and scales, from cave systems running for hundreds of miles to laboratory acidization on the scale of centimeters. In general, this instability is characterized by two length scales: the diffusive length (D/v) and the reactant penetration length (v/r), where v is the Darcy velocity, D - the diffusion constant and r - the dissolution rate. If the latter scale is much smaller than the former one can adopt the so-called thin front limit, where the interface is treated as a discontinuity in porosity, with a completely dissolved phase on one side and an undissolved phase on the other. Linear stability analysis for this case has been carried out by Chadam et al. [1], and the corresponding dispersion relation shows that long wavelengths are unstable, whereas short wavelengths are stabilized by diffusion. In their derivation, Chadam et al. have considered a linear geometry with a uniform pressure gradient applied along one of the directions. However, in many cases (e.g. in the acidization techniques used in oil industry) the reactive fluids are injected through a well and thus the relevant geometry is radial rather than linear. Motivated by this, we have carried out the linear stability analysis of the reactive-infiltration problem in radial geometry, with the fluid injection at the centre of the system. We stay within the thin-front limit and derive the corresponding dispersion relation, which shows the stable regions for both the long-wavelength and short-wavelength modes, and the unstable region in between. Next, we study how

  15. An Ancient Extrasolar System with Five Sub-Earth-size Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campante, T. L.; Barclay, T.; Swift, J. J.; Huber, D.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Cochran, W.; Burke, C. J.; Isaacson, H.; Quintana, E. V.; Davies, G. R.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Ragozzine, D.; Riddle, R.; Baranec, C.; Basu, S.; Chaplin, W. J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Bedding, T. R.; Handberg, R.; Stello, D.; Brewer, J. M.; Hekker, S.; Karoff, C.; Kolbl, R.; Law, N. M.; Lundkvist, M.; Miglio, A.; Rowe, J. F.; Santos, N. C.; Van Laerhoven, C.; Arentoft, T.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Fischer, D. A.; Kawaler, S. D.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lund, M. N.; Marcy, G. W.; Sousa, S. G.; Sozzetti, A.; White, T. R.

    2015-02-01

    The chemical composition of stars hosting small exoplanets (with radii less than four Earth radii) appears to be more diverse than that of gas-giant hosts, which tend to be metal-rich. This implies that small, including Earth-size, planets may have readily formed at earlier epochs in the universe's history when metals were more scarce. We report Kepler spacecraft observations of Kepler-444, a metal-poor Sun-like star from the old population of the Galactic thick disk and the host to a compact system of five transiting planets with sizes between those of Mercury and Venus. We validate this system as a true five-planet system orbiting the target star and provide a detailed characterization of its planetary and orbital parameters based on an analysis of the transit photometry. Kepler-444 is the densest star with detected solar-like oscillations. We use asteroseismology to directly measure a precise age of 11.2 ± 1.0 Gyr for the host star, indicating that Kepler-444 formed when the universe was less than 20% of its current age and making it the oldest known system of terrestrial-size planets. We thus show that Earth-size planets have formed throughout most of the universe's 13.8 billion year history, leaving open the possibility for the existence of ancient life in the Galaxy. The age of Kepler-444 not only suggests that thick-disk stars were among the hosts to the first Galactic planets, but may also help to pinpoint the beginning of the era of planet formation.

  16. AN ANCIENT EXTRASOLAR SYSTEM WITH FIVE SUB-EARTH-SIZE PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Campante, T. L.; Davies, G. R.; Chaplin, W. J.; Handberg, R.; Barclay, T.; Huber, D.; Burke, C. J.; Quintana, E. V.; Swift, J. J.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Cochran, W.; Isaacson, H.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Bedding, T. R.; Ragozzine, D.; Riddle, R.; Baranec, C.; Basu, S.; and others

    2015-02-01

    The chemical composition of stars hosting small exoplanets (with radii less than four Earth radii) appears to be more diverse than that of gas-giant hosts, which tend to be metal-rich. This implies that small, including Earth-size, planets may have readily formed at earlier epochs in the universe's history when metals were more scarce. We report Kepler spacecraft observations of Kepler-444, a metal-poor Sun-like star from the old population of the Galactic thick disk and the host to a compact system of five transiting planets with sizes between those of Mercury and Venus. We validate this system as a true five-planet system orbiting the target star and provide a detailed characterization of its planetary and orbital parameters based on an analysis of the transit photometry. Kepler-444 is the densest star with detected solar-like oscillations. We use asteroseismology to directly measure a precise age of 11.2 ± 1.0 Gyr for the host star, indicating that Kepler-444 formed when the universe was less than 20% of its current age and making it the oldest known system of terrestrial-size planets. We thus show that Earth-size planets have formed throughout most of the universe's 13.8 billion year history, leaving open the possibility for the existence of ancient life in the Galaxy. The age of Kepler-444 not only suggests that thick-disk stars were among the hosts to the first Galactic planets, but may also help to pinpoint the beginning of the era of planet formation.

  17. The Lixiscope: a Pocket-size X-ray Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    A Low Intensity X ray Imaging device with the acronym LIXISCOPE is described. The Lixiscope has a small format and is powered only by a 2.7V battery. The high inherent gain of the Lixiscope permits the use of radioactive sources in lieu of X-ray machines in some fluoroscopic applications. In this mode of operation the complete X ray imaging system is truly portable and pocket-sized.

  18. An optical system for communication and sensing in millimetre-sized swarming microrobots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, P.; Scholz, O.; Knoll, T.; Menciassi, A.; Dario, P.

    2009-01-01

    Microrobotic technology underlines the concept of top-down fabrication of autonomous or semi-autonomous robotic systems, with the final aim to produce autonomous micromachines. For millimetre-sized robots, all the sub-component modules must be conceived and designed as minimal components able to accomplish a specific basic task, and each of them consequently represents a fundamental part in the whole microrobotic system. Communication and sensing modules, in particular, are indispensable to the microrobot in order to physically interact with its neighbours and the surrounding environment, a fundamental feature for multi-agent or swarm robotic systems. At present, there exist no communication and sensing modules suitable to be integrated in millimetre-sized microrobots that fulfil the requirements of the application discussed in this paper. The objective of the paper is to present the development of an integrated and scalable miniaturized optical system for communication and sensing in swarming microrobots that are among the smallest ever reported. The system consists of optoelectronic devices in a die form, which are assembled on a substrate and encompassed in a mirroring polymeric structure. The final experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the optical module, and potential methods for further improving the system performance are finally proposed.

  19. Hydrogeochemical transport modeling of the infiltration of tertiary treated wastewater in a dune area, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbohede, Alexander; Wallis, Ilka; Van Houtte, Emmanuel; Van Ranst, Eric

    2013-09-01

    Managed artificial recharge (MAR) is a well-established practice for augmentation of depleted groundwater resources or for environmental benefit. At the St-André MAR site in the Belgian dune area, groundwater resources are optimised through re-use of highly treated wastewater by means of infiltration ponds. The very high quality of the infiltration water sets this system apart from other MAR systems. The low total dissolved solid (TDS) content in the infiltration water (less than 50 mg/L) compared to the dune aquifer (500 mg/L) triggers a number of reactions, increasing the TDS through soil-aquifer passage. Multi-component reactive transport modelling was applied to analyse the geochemical processes that occur. Carbonate dissolution is the main process increasing the TDS of the infiltration water. Oxic aquifer conditions prevail between the infiltration ponds and the extraction wells. This is driven by the high flow velocities, leaving no time to consume O2 between the ponds and extraction wells. Cation exchange is important when infiltration water is replaced by native dune water or when significant changes in infiltration-water quality occur. The seasonal variation of O2 and temperature in the infiltration water are the main drivers for seasonal changes in the concentration of all major ions.

  20. INFILTRATION THROUGH DISTURBED URBAN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior research by Pitt (1987) examined runoff losses from paved and roofed surfaces in urban areas and showed significant losses at these surfaces during the small and moderate sized events of most interest for water quality evaluations. However, Pitt and Durrans (1995) also exa...

  1. "Sticky Business": the Influence of Surface Biofilm on Particle Deposition and Infiltration in Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salant, N. L.; Hassan, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    filamentous assemblages are collected from nearby channels and used to replace the surface layer of flume substrate. Low-profile forms are cultivated on a cobble-gravel substrate in an artificial stream system and tested at each of three growth stages. Immediately following a dose of fine particles (< 125 µm ground silica), short-term rates of particle deposition are determined by continuous measurements of near-bed particle concentrations. Hourly vertical concentration, grain size profiles, and 3-D velocity profiles are measured for the duration of the experiment (8h). Infiltration rate is determined from bed samplers sealed from the flow at 1, 2, 4, and 8 hours. At the end of each experiment, three surface samples are collected and analyzed for ash-weight, ash-free dry weight, and chlorophyll a. Four stratified bed samples and samplers are removed, dried, sieved and weighed to determine the amount and depth of fine particle infiltration into the bed with time and surface condition. Preliminary results indicate that particle deposition is significantly enhanced by biofilm presence relative to surfaces without biofilm; this effect is greater for mucilaginous forms. However, near-bed shear stresses and velocity profiles are not significantly altered by either mucilaginous or filamentous forms; bed topography has a dominant effect. Results also indicate that particle deposition is more strongly influenced by surface condition (e.g. particle size, biofilm presence) than by flow level or duration. Particle infiltration below the surface, however, is more a function of pore space and flow level than biofilm coverage on the streambed surface.

  2. Scalable Heuristics for Planning, Placement and Sizing of Flexible AC Transmission System Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, Vladmir; Backhaus, Scott N.; Chertkov, Michael

    2015-07-02

    Aiming to relieve transmission grid congestion and improve or extend feasibility domain of the operations, we build optimization heuristics, generalizing standard AC Optimal Power Flow (OPF), for placement and sizing of Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices of the Series Compensation (SC) and Static VAR Compensation (SVC) type. One use of these devices is in resolving the case when the AC OPF solution does not exist because of congestion. Another application is developing a long-term investment strategy for placement and sizing of the SC and SVC devices to reduce operational cost and improve power system operation. SC and SVC devices are represented by modification of the transmission line inductances and reactive power nodal corrections respectively. We find one placement and sizing of FACTs devices for multiple scenarios and optimal settings for each scenario simultaneously. Our solution of the nonlinear and nonconvex generalized AC-OPF consists of building a convergent sequence of convex optimizations containing only linear constraints and shows good computational scaling to larger systems. The approach is illustrated on single- and multi-scenario examples of the Matpower case-30 model.

  3. Implications of access hole size on tank waste retrieval system design and cost

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, S.M.; Kwon, D.S.; Burks, B.L.; Stoughton, R.S.; Evans, M.S.

    1994-05-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Robotics Technology Development Program has been investigating the application of robotics technology to the retrieval of waste from single-shell storage tanks for several years. The use of a large, ``long-reach`` manipulator to position and orient a variety of tools and other equipment has been recommended. The objective of this study is to determine the appropriate access hole size for the tank waste retrieval system installation. Previous reports on the impact of access hole size on manipulator performance are summarized. In addition, the practical limitation for access hole size based on structural limitations of the waste storage tanks, the state-of-the-art size limitations for the installation of new risers, the radiation safety implications of various access hole sizes, and overall system cost implications are considered. Basic conclusions include: (1) overall cost of remediation will; be dominated by the costs of the balance of plant and time required to perform the task rather than the cost of manipulator hardware or the cost of installing a riser, (2) the most desirable solution from a manipulator controls point of view is to make the manipulator as stiff as possible and have as high as possible a natural frequency, which implies a large access hole diameter, (3) beyond some diameter; simple, uniform cross-section elements become less advantageous from a weight standpoint and alternative structures should be considered, and (4) additional shielding and contamination control measures would be required for larger holes. Parametric studies summarized in this report considered 3,790,000 1 (1,000,000 gal) tanks, while initial applications are likely to be for 2,840,000 1 (750,000 gal) tanks. Therefore, the calculations should be somewhat conservative, recognizing the limitations of the specific conditions considered.

  4. On the physics of unstable infiltration, seepage, and gravity drainage in partially saturated tuffs.

    PubMed

    Faybishenko, B; Bodvarsson, G S; Salve, R

    2003-01-01

    To improve understanding of the physics of dynamic instabilities in unsaturated flow processes within the Paintbrush nonwelded unit (PTn) and the middle nonlithophysal portion of the Topopah Spring welded tuff unit (TSw) of Yucca Mountain, we analyzed data from a series of infiltration tests carried out at two sites (Alcove 4 and Alcove 6) in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), using analytical and empirical functions. The analysis of infiltration rates measured at both sites showed three temporal scales of infiltration rate: (1) a macro-scale trend of overall decreasing flow, (2) a meso-scale trend of fast and slow motion exhibiting three-stage variations of the flow rate (decreasing, increasing, and [again] decreasing flow rate, as observed in soils in the presence of entrapped air), and (3) micro-scale (high frequency) fluctuations. Infiltration tests in the nonwelded unit at Alcove 4 indicate that this unit may effectively dampen episodic fast infiltration events; however, well-known Kostyakov, Horton, and Philip equations do not satisfactorily describe the observed trends of the infiltration rate. Instead, a Weibull distribution model can most accurately describe experimentally determined time trends of the infiltration rate. Infiltration tests in highly permeable, fractured, welded tuff at Alcove 6 indicate that the infiltration rate exhibits pulsation, which may have been caused by multiple threshold effects and water-air redistribution between fractures and matrix. The empirical relationships between the extrinsic seepage from fractures, matrix imbibition, and gravity drainage versus the infiltration rate, as well as scaling and self-similarity for the leading edge of the water front are the hallmark of the nonlinear dynamic processes in water flow under episodic infiltration through fractured tuff. Based on the analysis of experimental data, we propose a conceptual model of a dynamic fracture flow and fracture-matrix interaction in fractured tuff

  5. On the physics of unstable infiltration, seepage, and gravity drainage in partially saturated tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, B.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Salve, R.

    2002-04-01

    To improve understanding of the physics of dynamic instabilities in unsaturated flow processes within the Paintbrush nonwelded unit (PTn) and the middle nonlithophysal portion of the Tonopah Spring welded tuff unit (TSw) of Yucca Mountain, we analyzed data from a series of infiltration tests carried out at two sites (Alcove 4 and Alcove 6) in the Exploratory Studies Facility, using analytical and empirical functions. The analysis of infiltration rates measured at both sites showed three temporal scales of infiltration rate: (1) a macro-scale trend of overall decreasing flow, (2) a meso-scale trend of fast and slow motion exhibiting three-stage variations of the flow rate (decreasing, increasing, and [again] decreasing flow rate, as observed in soils in the presence of entrapped air), and (3) micro-scale (high frequency) fluctuations. Infiltration tests in the nonwelded unit at Alcove 4 indicate that this unit may effectively dampen episodic fast infiltration events; however, well-known Kostyakov, Horton, and Philip equations do not satisfactorily describe the observed trends of the infiltration rate. Instead, a Weibull distribution model can most accurately describe experimentally determined time trends of the infiltration rate. Infiltration tests in highly permeable, fractured, welded tuff at Alcove 6 indicate that the infiltration rate exhibits pulsation, which may have been caused by multiple threshold effects and water-air redistribution between fractures and matrix. The empirical relationships between the extrinsic seepage from fractures, matrix imbibition, and gravity drainage versus the infiltration rate, as well as scaling and self-similarity for the leading edge of the water front are the hallmark of the nonlinear dynamic processes in water flow under episodic infiltration through fractured tuff. Based on the analysis of experimental data, we propose a conceptual model of a dynamic fracture flow and fracture-matrix interaction in fractured tuff

  6. On the physics of unstable infiltration, seepage, and gravity drainage in partially saturated tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faybishenko, B.; Bodvarsson, G. S.; Salve, R.

    2003-05-01

    To improve understanding of the physics of dynamic instabilities in unsaturated flow processes within the Paintbrush nonwelded unit (PTn) and the middle nonlithophysal portion of the Topopah Spring welded tuff unit (TSw) of Yucca Mountain, we analyzed data from a series of infiltration tests carried out at two sites (Alcove 4 and Alcove 6) in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), using analytical and empirical functions. The analysis of infiltration rates measured at both sites showed three temporal scales of infiltration rate: (1) a macro-scale trend of overall decreasing flow, (2) a meso-scale trend of fast and slow motion exhibiting three-stage variations of the flow rate (decreasing, increasing, and [again] decreasing flow rate, as observed in soils in the presence of entrapped air), and (3) micro-scale (high frequency) fluctuations. Infiltration tests in the nonwelded unit at Alcove 4 indicate that this unit may effectively dampen episodic fast infiltration events; however, well-known Kostyakov, Horton, and Philip equations do not satisfactorily describe the observed trends of the infiltration rate. Instead, a Weibull distribution model can most accurately describe experimentally determined time trends of the infiltration rate. Infiltration tests in highly permeable, fractured, welded tuff at Alcove 6 indicate that the infiltration rate exhibits pulsation, which may have been caused by multiple threshold effects and water-air redistribution between fractures and matrix. The empirical relationships between the extrinsic seepage from fractures, matrix imbibition, and gravity drainage versus the infiltration rate, as well as scaling and self-similarity for the leading edge of the water front are the hallmark of the nonlinear dynamic processes in water flow under episodic infiltration through fractured tuff. Based on the analysis of experimental data, we propose a conceptual model of a dynamic fracture flow and fracture-matrix interaction in fractured tuff

  7. A theoretical approach for estimation of ultimate size of bimetallic nanocomposites synthesized in microemulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabat, Alireza; Saydi, Hassan

    2012-12-01

    In this research a new idea for prediction of ultimate sizes of bimetallic nanocomposites synthesized in water-in-oil microemulsion system is proposed. In this method, by modifying Tabor Winterton approximation equation, an effective Hamaker constant was introduced. This effective Hamaker constant was applied in the van der Waals attractive interaction energy. The obtained effective van der Waals interaction energy was used as attractive contribution in the total interaction energy. The modified interaction energy was applied successfully to predict some bimetallic nanoparticles, at different mass fraction, synthesized in microemulsion system of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT)/isooctane.

  8. Infiltration formulas by curve number procedure.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.

    1982-01-01

    The Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number procedure for estimating runoff volume is examined in terms of the validity and applicability of the derived infiltration equations. -from ASCE Publications Abstracts

  9. Mathematical Analysis and Optimization of Infiltration Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H.-C.; Gottlieb, D.; Marion, M.; Sheldon, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A variety of infiltration techniques can be used to fabricate solid materials, particularly composites. In general these processes can be described with at least one time dependent partial differential equation describing the evolution of the solid phase, coupled to one or more partial differential equations describing mass transport through a porous structure. This paper presents a detailed mathematical analysis of a relatively simple set of equations which is used to describe chemical vapor infiltration. The results demonstrate that the process is controlled by only two parameters, alpha and beta. The optimization problem associated with minimizing the infiltration time is also considered. Allowing alpha and beta to vary with time leads to significant reductions in the infiltration time, compared with the conventional case where alpha and beta are treated as constants.

  10. Dosimetric implications of the infiltrated injection

    SciTech Connect

    Castronovo, F.P.; McKusick, K.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Following inadvertent infiltration of a radiopharmaceutical, there is variable and uncertain uptake in target tissue. Concomitantly, there is also a concern for the radiation dose to the infiltrated site. This investigation determined the clearance and radiation burdens from various radiopharmaceutical infiltrates in a rat model. Nine separate sites were studied for: Tc-99m microspheres; Tc-99m MDP; Ga-67 citrate; and Tl-201 chloride. Following sc injection on the shaven posteriors of anesthetized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, gamma camera and computer data were collected up to 24 hours. The resulting data were expressed semilogarithmically as the mean (N = 9) of the ''% retained at site'' as a f(time) after injection. Nonparticulate agents showed a tri-exponential release pattern from each site, whereas the microspheres remained for an extended period of time. Using these pharma-cokinetic curves, the % remaining at each site for various times, and rems/mCi per lcc infiltrate was determined.

  11. Managing landscape disturbances to increase watershed infiltration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural land undergoing conversion to conventional urban development can drastically increase runoff and degrade water quality. A study of landscape management for improving watershed infiltration was conducted using readily available runoff data from experimental watersheds. This article focus...

  12. Interactions between landscape types and infiltration fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurinova, N.

    2014-12-01

    Type of landscape is a complex characteristic include several factors which has strong influence on volume of infiltration flux. These factors are geomorphogy characteristics, soil type of vadozone, deep of ground water level, type of plants and meteorological conditions. This research are presented results of simulating water movement in one-dimensional variably saturated media for different types of landscape nearby Zvenigorod town (Moscow Region, Russia) in reserve part of Moscow River Valley. There was taking into account 11 different type of landscape. On basis of this 11 model were simulated. Examined models shown the high influence of plants type and ground water levels on infiltration recharge. The most high infiltration recharge was received for second fluvial terrace with forest, sandy soil and ground water level at 10 m deep. For a flood plain was receive the lowest value of infiltration recharge and the highest value of evaporation.

  13. The Interannual Stability of Cumulative Frequency Distributions for Convective System Size and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Molinari, John; Thorncroft, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of convective system populations in West Africa and the western Pacific tropical cyclone basin were analyzed to investigate whether interannual variability in convective activity in tropical continental and oceanic environments is driven by variations in the number of events during the wet season or by favoring large and/or intense convective systems. Convective systems were defined from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data as a cluster of pixels with an 85-GHz polarization-corrected brightness temperature below 255 K and with an area of at least 64 square kilometers. The study database consisted of convective systems in West Africa from May to September 1998-2007, and in the western Pacific from May to November 1998-2007. Annual cumulative frequency distributions for system minimum brightness temperature and system area were constructed for both regions. For both regions, there were no statistically significant differences between the annual curves for system minimum brightness temperature. There were two groups of system area curves, split by the TRMM altitude boost in 2001. Within each set, there was no statistically significant interannual variability. Subsetting the database revealed some sensitivity in distribution shape to the size of the sampling area, the length of the sample period, and the climate zone. From a regional perspective, the stability of the cumulative frequency distributions implied that the probability that a convective system would attain a particular size or intensity does not change interannually. Variability in the number of convective events appeared to be more important in determining whether a year is either wetter or drier than normal.

  14. Liberation as a function of size reduction in the coal-ash-pyrite system

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of crushing on the liberation behavior of the coal-ash-pyrite system was investigated. To facilitate evaluation of this complex system, a classification system was developed to describe the different types of feed assemblages and their relationship to the liberation behavior. The liberation behavior of the different species was described in terms of fractional yields within a given size range. Fractional yield is defined as the yield of the designed product in a given size interval. Experimental data were generated to assess liberation in the coal-ash-pyrite system following crushing with a smooth roll crusher, hammer mills, rod mill, jaw crusher and rotary breaker. These data were then used to test the various mathematical models proposed in the literature. The available models were generally found to be inadequate, unless modified. However, a simple negative exponential model was developed which was found to fit the data well and can be used to simulate yields of coal and pyrite out of either whole coal or narrow specific gravity feeds. Furthermore, it was found to apply in other systems such as that of galena-sphalerite-gangue.

  15. Size influences the effect of hydrophobic nanoparticles on lung surfactant model systems.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mridula V; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Koshkina, Olga; Maskos, Michael; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The alveolar lung surfactant (LS) is a complex lipid protein mixture that forms an interfacial monolayer reducing the surface tension to near zero values and thus preventing the lungs from collapse. Due to the expanding field of nanotechnology and the corresponding unavoidable exposure of human beings from the air, it is crucial to study the potential effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on the structural organization of the lung surfactant system. In the present study, we investigated both, the domain structure in pure DPPC monolayers as well as in lung surfactant model systems. In the pure lipid system we found that two different sized hydrophobic polymeric nanoparticles with diameter of ~12 nm and ~136 nm have contrasting effect on the functional and structural behavior. The small nanoparticles inserted into fluid domains at the LE-LC phase transition are not visibly disturbing the phase transition but disrupting the domain morphology of the LE phase. The large nanoparticles led to an expanded isotherm and to a significant decrease in the line tension and thus to a drastic disruption of the domain structures at a much lower number of nanoparticles with respect to the lipid. The surface activity of the model LS films again showed drastic variations due to presence of different sized NPs illustrated by the film balance isotherms and the atomic force microscopy. AFM revealed laterally profuse multilayer protrusion formation on compression but only in the presence of 136 nm sized nanoparticles. Moreover we investigated the vesicle insertion process into a preformed monolayer. A severe inhibition was observed only in the presence of ~136 nm NPs compared to minor effects in the presence of ~12 nm NPs. Our study clearly shows that the size of the nanoparticles made of the same material determines the interaction with biological membranes. PMID:24411261

  16. Preventing Molecular and Particulate Infiltration in a Confined Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Contaminants from an instrument's self-generated sources or from sources external to the instrument may degrade its critical surfaces and/or create an environment which limits the instrument's intended performance. Analyses have been carried out on a method to investigate the required purging flow of clean, dry gas to prevent the ingestion of external contaminants into the instrument container volume. The pressure to be maintained and the required flow are examined in terms of their effectiveness in preventing gaseous and particulate contaminant ingestion and abatement of self-generated contaminants in the volume. The required venting area or the existing volume venting area is correlated to the volume to be purged, the allowable pressure differential across the volume, the external contaminant partial pressure, and the sizes of the ambient particulates. The diffusion of external water vapor into the volume while it was being purged was experimentally obtained in terms of an infiltration time constant. That data and the acceptable fraction of the outside pressure into the volume indicate the required flow of purge gas expressed in terms of volume change per unit time. The exclusion of particulates is based on the incoming velocity of the particles and the exit flow speed and density of the purge gas. The purging flow pressures needed to maintain the required flows through the vent passages are indicated. The purge gas must prevent or limit the entrance of the external contaminants to the critical locations of the instrument. It should also prevent self- contamination from surfaces, reduce material outgassing, and sweep out the outgassed products. Systems and facilities that can benefit from purging may be optical equipment, clinical facilities, manufacturing facilities, clean rooms, and other systems requiring clean environments.

  17. Modeled and measured infiltration: Phase II. A detailed case study of three homes; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Palmiter, L.; Bond, T.

    1994-01-01

    The primary purpose of this work was to investigate the impacts of wind, temperature and mechanical systems on infiltration in real homes, with a view toward resolving infiltration modeling problems raised in recent studies. This report contains results from the second phase of an ongoing project. In Phase I, detailed infiltration and pressure measurements were made by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on four homes in the Pacific Northwest. In this phase, similar measurements were made on an additional three homes, chosen for maximal wind exposure. For the reader`s convenience the summary tables in this report contain data from all seven homes in a uniform format. The predictions of two natural infiltration models (LBL and AIM-2) were compared in detail with one another and the measured data. An improved method of calculating the height parameter for both models is proposed. A modification of the LBL wind model is also proposed. A simple model is presented to incorporate the infiltration effects of exhaust and supply ventilation systems and unbalanced flows due to duct leakage. An unbalanced flow to the conditioned space induces approximately one-half of its magnitude in additional infiltration when it is small relative to natural infiltration. Forced-air distribution systems were investigated in detail. Air handlers and associated duct leakage can have large effects on living-zone infiltration rates; for these homes the median increase in overall infiltration was 21%, based on a runtime of six hours per day. Closing even a single bedroom door can cause a major increase in infiltration when the air handler runs. The bias due to use of a time-averaged concentration tracer technique (i.e., the perfluorocarbon (PFT) method) was assessed and found to be small for the living zones, and large for the wind-dominated, ventilated crawl space and attic zones.

  18. A field method for measurement of infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, A.I.

    1963-01-01

    The determination of infiltration--the downward entry of water into a soil (or sediment)--is receiving increasing attention in hydrologic studies because of the need for more quantitative data on all phases of the hydrologic cycle. A measure of infiltration, the infiltration rate, is usually determined in the field by flooding basins or furrows, sprinkling, or measuring water entry from cylinders (infiltrometer rings). Rates determined by ponding in large areas are considered most reliable, but the high cost usually dictates that infiltrometer rings, preferably 2 feet in diameter or larger, be used. The hydrology of subsurface materials is critical in the study of infiltration. The zone controlling the rate of infiltration is usually the least permeable zone. Many other factors affect infiltration rate--the sediment (soil) structure, the condition of the sediment surface, the distribution of soil moisture or soil- moisture tension, the chemical and physical nature of the sediments, the head of applied water, the depth to ground water, the chemical quality and the turbidity of the applied water, the temperature of the water and the sediments, the percentage of entrapped air in the sediments, the atmospheric pressure, the length of time of application of water, the biological activity in the sediments, and the type of equipment or method used. It is concluded that specific values of the infiltration rate for a particular type of sediment are probably nonexistent and that measured rates are primarily for comparative use. A standard field-test method for determining infiltration rates by means of single- or double-ring infiltrometers is described and the construction, installation, and operation of the infiltrometers are discussed in detail.

  19. The Visual System's Intrinsic Bias and Knowledge of Size Mediate Perceived Size and Location in the Dark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Liu; He, Zijiang J.; Ooi, Teng Leng

    2013-01-01

    Dimly lit targets in the dark are perceived as located about an implicit slanted surface that delineates the visual system's intrinsic bias (Ooi, Wu, & He, 2001). If the intrinsic bias reflects the internal model of visual space--as proposed here--its influence should extend beyond target localization. Our first 2 experiments demonstrated that…

  20. Retrofit photovoltaic systems for intermediate sized applications-A design and market study

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, G.T.; Hagely, J.R.

    1982-09-01

    An assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting a significant portion of the existing intermediate sector building/application inventory with photovoltaic systems is presented. The assessment includes the development of detailed engineering and architectural designs as well as cost estimates for 12 representative installations. Promising applications include retail stores, warehouses, office buildings, religious buildings, shopping centers, education buildings, hospitals, and industrial sites. A market study indicates that there is a national inventory of 1.5 to 2.0 million feasible intermediate sector applications, with the majority being in the 20 to 400 kW size range. The present cost of the major systems components and the cost of necessary building modifications are the primary current barriers to the realization of a large retrofit photovoltaic system market. The development of standardized modular system designs and installation techniques are feasible ways to minimize costs.

  1. Requirements and Sizing Investigation for Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System Trace Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Waguespack, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    The Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS), located within the ventilation loop of the Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS), is responsible for removing hazardous trace contaminants from the space suit ventilation flow. This paper summarizes the results of a trade study that evaluated if trace contaminant control could be accomplished without a TCCS, relying on suit leakage, ullage loss from the carbon dioxide and humidity control system, and other factors. Trace contaminant generation rates were revisited to verify that values reflect the latest designs for Constellation Space Suit System (CSSS) pressure garment materials and PLSS hardware. Additionally, TCCS sizing calculations were performed and a literature survey was conducted to review the latest developments in trace contaminant technologies.

  2. Compressed air energy storage system reservoir size for a wind energy baseload power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Wind generated electricity can be transformed from an intermittent to a baseload resource using an oversized wind farm in conjunction with a compressed air energy storage (CAES) system. The size of the storage reservoir for the CAES system (solution mined salt cavern or porous media) as a function of the wind speed autocorrelation time (C) has been examined using a Monte Carlo simulation for a wind class 4 (wind power density 450 W m{sup -2} at 50 m hub height) wind regime with a Weibull k factor of 2.5. For values of C typically found for winds over the US Great Plains, the storage reservoir must have a 60 to 80 hour capacity. Since underground reservoirs account for only a small fraction of total system cost, this larger storage reservoir has a negligible effect on the cost of energy from the wind energy baseload system. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Exact NMR simulation of protein-size spin systems using tensor train formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savostyanov, D. V.; Dolgov, S. V.; Werner, J. M.; Kuprov, Ilya

    2014-08-01

    We introduce a new method, based on alternating optimization, for compact representation of spin Hamiltonians and solution of linear systems of algebraic equations in the tensor train format. We demonstrate the method's utility by simulating, without approximations, a N15 NMR spectrum of ubiquitin—a protein containing several hundred interacting nuclear spins. Existing simulation algorithms for the spin system and the NMR experiment in question either require significant approximations or scale exponentially with the spin system size. We compare the proposed method to the Spinach package that uses heuristic restricted state space techniques to achieve polynomial complexity scaling. When the spin system topology is close to a linear chain (e.g., for the backbone of a protein), the tensor train representation is more compact and can be computed faster than the sparse representation using restricted state spaces.

  4. Photonic crystal waveguide created by selective infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas Bedoya, A.; Domachuk, P.; Grillet, C.; Monat, C.; Mägi, E. C.; Li, E.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2012-06-01

    The marriage of photonics and microfluidics ("optofluidics") uses the inherent mobility of fluids to reversibly tune photonic structures beyond traditional fabrication methods by infiltrating voids in said structures. Photonic crystals (PhCs) strongly control light on the wavelength scale and are well suited to optofluidic tuning because their periodic airhole microstructure is a natural candidate for housing liquids. The infiltration of a single row of holes in the PhC matrix modifies the effective refractive index allowing optical modes to be guided by the PhC bandgap. In this work we present the first experimental demonstration of a reconfigurable single mode W1 photonic crystal defect waveguide created by selective liquid infiltration. We modified a hexagonal silicon planar photonic crystal membrane by selectively filling a single row of air holes with ~300nm resolution, using high refractive index ionic liquid. The modification creates optical confinement in the infiltrated region and allows propagation of a single optical waveguide mode. We describe the challenges arising from the infiltration process and the liquid/solid surface interaction in the photonic crystal. We include a detailed comparison between analytic and numerical modeling and experimental results, and introduce a new approach to create an offset photonic crystal cavity by varying the nature of the selective infiltration process.

  5. Role of runoff-infiltration partitioning and resolved overland flow on land-atmosphere feedbacks: A case-study with the WRF-Hydro coupled modeling system for West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, Joel; Wagner, Seven; Rummler, Thomas; Fersch, Benjamin; Bliefernicht, Jan; Andresen, Sabine; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of land-atmosphere feedbacks requires detailed representation of land processes in atmospheric models. Our focus here is on runoff-infiltration partitioning and resolved overland flow. In the standard version of WRF, runoff-infiltration partitioning is described as a purely vertical process. In WRF-Hydro, runoff is enhanced with lateral water flows. The study region is the Sissili catchment (12800 km2) in West Africa and the study period March 2003 - February 2004. Our WRF setup includes an outer and inner domain at 10 and 2 km resolution covering the West African and Sissili region, respectively. In our WRF-Hydro setup the inner domain is coupled with a sub-grid at 500 m resolution to compute overland and river flow. Model results are compared with TRMM precipitation, MTE evapotranspiration, CCI soil moisture, CRU temperature, and streamflow observation. The role of runoff infiltration partitioning and resolved overland flow on land-atmosphere feedbacks is addressed with a sensitivity analysis of WRF results to the runoff-infiltration partitioning parameter and a comparison between WRF and WRF-Hydro results, respectively. In the outer domain, precipitation is sensitive to runoff-infiltration partitioning at the scale of the Sissili area (~100x100 km2), but not of area A (500x2500 km2). In the inner domain, where precipitation patterns are mainly prescribed by lateral boundary conditions, sensitivity is small, but additionally resolved overland flow here clearly increases infiltration and evapotranspiration at the beginning of the wet season when soils are still dry. Our WRF-Hydro setup shows potential for joint atmospheric and terrestrial water balance studies, and reproduces observed daily discharge with a Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient of 0.43.

  6. Improvements in Thermal Protection Sizing Capabilities for TCAT: Conceptual Design for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.; Izon, Stephen James

    2002-01-01

    The Thermal Calculation Analysis Tool (TCAT), originally developed for the Space Systems Design Lab at the Georgia Institute of Technology, is a conceptual design tool capable of integrating aeroheating analysis into conceptual reusable launch vehicle design. It provides Thermal Protection System (TPS) unit thicknesses and acreage percentages based on the geometry of the vehicle and a reference trajectory to be used in calculation of the total cost and weight of the vehicle design. TCAT has proven to be reasonably accurate at calculating the TPS unit weights for in-flight trajectories; however, it does not have the capability of sizing TPS materials above cryogenic fuel tanks for ground hold operations. During ground hold operations, the vehicle is held for a brief period (generally about two hours) during which heat transfer from the TPS materials to the cryogenic fuel occurs. If too much heat is extracted from the TPS material, the surface temperature may fall below the freezing point of water, thereby freezing any condensation that may be present at the surface of the TPS. Condensation or ice on the surface of the vehicle is potentially hazardous to the mission and can also damage the TPS. It is questionable whether or not the TPS thicknesses provided by the aeroheating analysis would be sufficiently thick to insulate the surface of the TPS from the heat transfer to the fuel. Therefore, a design tool has been developed that is capable of sizing TPS materials at these cryogenic fuel tank locations to augment TCAT's TPS sizing capabilities.

  7. New observations directly measuring the full continuous sizes of high redshift damped Lya systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Jeff; O'Meara, John

    2016-01-01

    The formation and evolution of galaxies requires large reservoirs of cold, neutral gas. The damped Lyman-α systems (DLAs), seen in absorption towards distant quasars and gamma ray bursts, are predicted to be the dominant reservoirs for this gas. Detailed properties of DLAs have been studied extensively for decades with great success. However, their size, fundamental in understanding their nature, has remained elusive, as quasar and gamma ray burst sightlines only probe comparatively tiny areas of the foreground DLAs. Here, we introduce a new approach to measure the full extent of DLAs in the sightlines to extended background sources. We present the discovery of z ~ 2 DLAs with column densities as high as log N(HI) = 21.1 ±0.4 cm-2 covering 90-100% of the luminous extent of background galaxies. Estimates of the sizes of the background galaxies range from a minimum of a few kpc2, to ˜100 kpc2, and demonstrate that high-column density neutral gas can span continuous areas 108-1010 times larger than previously explored in quasar or gamma ray burst sightlines. The DLAs are from our pilot survey that searches Lyman break and Lyman continuum galaxies at high redshift. The low luminosities, large sizes, and mass contents (~106-109 M⊙) implied by the early data suggest that DLAs contain the necessary fuel for galaxies, with many systems consistent with relatively massive, low-luminosity primeval galaxies.

  8. Granule size distributions after twin-screw granulation - Do not forget the feeding systems.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Thommes, M; Rasenack, N; Moll, K-P; Krumme, M; Kleinebudde, P

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of qualitatively different powder feeder performances on resulting granule size distributions after twin-screw granulation of a highly drug loaded, hydrophobic mixture and a mannitol powder. It was shown that powder feeder related problems usually cannot be identified by trusting in the values given by the feeder. Therefore, a newly developed model for the evaluation of the performance of powder feeders was introduced and it was tried to connect this model to residence time distributions in twin-screw granulation processes. The influence of feeder performances on resulting granule size distributions varied, depending on the applied screw configuration and the used powder. Regarding the hydrophobic and highly drug loaded formulation, which was granulated at an L/S-ratio of 0.5, a pure conveying screw and a medium kneading configuration, consisting of 60° kneading blocks were negatively influenced by poor feeder settings. For optimal settings more narrow distributions could be obtained. For an extensive kneading configuration good and poor settings resulted in mono-modal granule size distributions but were differing in the overall size. Mannitol, a model substance for a liquid sensitive formulation was granulated at an L/S-ratio of 0.075. It was even more important to maintain optimal feeding as mannitol was highly affected by poor feeder performances. Even an extensive kneading configuration could not level the errors in powder feeder performance, resulting in qualitatively different granule size distributions. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of detailed knowledge about applied feeding systems to gain optimal performance in twin-screw granulation. PMID:27224854

  9. Densification of a powder-metal skeleton by transient liquid-phase infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Adam; Sachs, Emanuel; Kernan, Brian; Posco, Samuel Allen; Rafflenbful, Lukas

    2004-02-01

    Transient liquid-phase infiltration (TLI) is a new method for densifying a powder-metal skeleton that produces a final part of homogeneous composition without significant dimensional change, offering advantages over traditional infiltration and full-density sintering. Fabrication of direct metal parts with complex geometry is possible using TLI in conjunction with solid freeform fabrication (SFF) processes such as three-dimensional printing, which produce net-shape powder-metal skeletons directly from computer-aided design models. The TLI method uses an infiltrant material similar in composition to the skeleton, but also containing a melting-point depressant (MPD), which allows the liquid metal to fill the skeleton void space and later facilitates homogenization. The materials requirements for such a system are discussed, and four experimental material systems were developed with final compositions of approximately Ni-40 wt pct Cu, Ni-4 wt pct Si, Fe-3 wt pct Si, and Fe-12 wt pct Cr-1 wt pct C, with copper, silicon, and carbon serving as the MPDs. Infiltration techniques include gating the introduction of liquid, saturating the melt to prevent erosion, and controlling variations in bulk composition along the infiltration path. Infiltration lengths exceeded 200 mm in the two nickel systems and exceeded 100 mm in the two iron systems. After infiltration, various heat treatments were conducted and mechanical properties were tested, including the tensile, hardness, and impact strength.

  10. PSO-Based Smart Grid Application for Sizing and Optimization of Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed A; Eltamaly, Ali M; Alolah, Abdulrahman I

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces an optimal sizing algorithm for a hybrid renewable energy system using smart grid load management application based on the available generation. This algorithm aims to maximize the system energy production and meet the load demand with minimum cost and highest reliability. This system is formed by photovoltaic array, wind turbines, storage batteries, and diesel generator as a backup source of energy. Demand profile shaping as one of the smart grid applications is introduced in this paper using load shifting-based load priority. Particle swarm optimization is used in this algorithm to determine the optimum size of the system components. The results obtained from this algorithm are compared with those from the iterative optimization technique to assess the adequacy of the proposed algorithm. The study in this paper is performed in some of the remote areas in Saudi Arabia and can be expanded to any similar regions around the world. Numerous valuable results are extracted from this study that could help researchers and decision makers. PMID:27513000

  11. PSO-Based Smart Grid Application for Sizing and Optimization of Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mohamed A.; Eltamaly, Ali M.; Alolah, Abdulrahman I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces an optimal sizing algorithm for a hybrid renewable energy system using smart grid load management application based on the available generation. This algorithm aims to maximize the system energy production and meet the load demand with minimum cost and highest reliability. This system is formed by photovoltaic array, wind turbines, storage batteries, and diesel generator as a backup source of energy. Demand profile shaping as one of the smart grid applications is introduced in this paper using load shifting-based load priority. Particle swarm optimization is used in this algorithm to determine the optimum size of the system components. The results obtained from this algorithm are compared with those from the iterative optimization technique to assess the adequacy of the proposed algorithm. The study in this paper is performed in some of the remote areas in Saudi Arabia and can be expanded to any similar regions around the world. Numerous valuable results are extracted from this study that could help researchers and decision makers. PMID:27513000

  12. Miniature Light Scattering Systems For On-Line Process Particle Size And Velocity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert G.; Burnett, J. G.; Chow, K.; Rarity, J. G.

    1989-03-01

    Light scattering techniques for velocity and particle size analysis are well established research and industrial tools. In general, light scattering instruments have been large and expensive, requiring skilled operation. We have constructed and tested a range of light scattering instruments in miniature form using the recently available range of new semiconductor laser diodes, avalanche and PIN photodiodes and optical fibres. Thus is has been possible to demonstrate laser Doppler and transit anemometers for turbulent flow analysis and dynamic light scattering instruments for particle size analysis all of which are small and cheap enough to be of value in on-line process monitoring and control. We describe the critically important features of the new technologies used, and how we have coupled new devices together into systems for industrial applications of importance eg biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, automobile, aerospace, chemicals, etc.

  13. Finite size effects in epidemic spreading: the problem of overpopulated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganczarek, Wojciech

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we analyze the impact of network size on the dynamics of epidemic spreading. In particular, we investigate the pace of infection in overpopulated systems. In order to do that, we design a model for epidemic spreading on a finite complex network with a restriction to at most one contamination per time step, which can serve as a model for sexually transmitted diseases spreading in some student communes. Because of the highly discrete character of the process, the analysis cannot use the continuous approximation widely exploited for most models. Using a discrete approach, we investigate the epidemic threshold and the quasi-stationary distribution. The main results are two theorems about the mixing time for the process: it scales like the logarithm of the network size and it is proportional to the inverse of the distance from the epidemic threshold.

  14. Point estimation of soil water infiltration process using Artificial Neural Networks for some calcareous soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parchami-Araghi, Farzin; Mirlatifi, Seyed Majid; Ghorbani Dashtaki, Shoja; Mahdian, Mohmmad Hossein

    2013-02-01

    SummaryInfiltration process is one of the most important components of the hydrological cycle. The direct measurement of infiltration is laborious, time consuming, expensive, and often involves large spatial and temporal variability. Thus, any indirect estimation of this process is quite helpful. The main objective of this study was to predict the cumulative infiltration at specific time steps, using readily available soil data and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). 210 double ring infiltration data were collected from different regions of Iran. Basic soil properties of the two upper pedogenic layers (A and B horizons) including initial soil water content, soil water contents at field capacity (-33 kPa) and permanent wilting point (-1500 kPa), bulk density, particle-size distributions, organic carbon, gravel content (>2 mm size), and CaCO3 content were determined. The feedforward multilayer perceptron ANN model was used to predict the cumulative infiltration at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, and 270 min after the start of the infiltration experiment and at the time of the basic infiltration rate. The developed ANN models were categorized to type I and type II ANN models. The basic soil properties of the first upper soil horizon were hierarchically used as inputs to develop type I ANN models. In contrast, the type II ANN models were developed while the available soil properties of the two upper soil horizons were implemented as inputs using principal component analysis technique. Results of the reliability test for the developed ANN models indicated that type I ANN models with a RMSE of 1.136-9.312 cm had the best performance in estimating the cumulative infiltration. Type I ANN models with the mean RMSD of 6.307 cm had the best performance in estimating the cumulative infiltration curve (CIC). Results indicated that at the 1% probability level, ANNs-derived CIC can be accepted as one of the replications of a reliable infiltration experiment

  15. Relevance of system size to the steady-state properties of tapped granular systems.

    PubMed

    Gago, Paula A; Maza, Diego; Pugnaloni, Luis A

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the steady-state packing fraction ϕ and force moment tensor Σ of quasi-two-dimensional granular columns subjected to tapping. Systems of different height h and width L are considered. We find that ϕ and Σ, which describe the macroscopic state of the system, are insensitive to L for L>50d (with d the grain diameter). However, results for granular columns of different heights cannot be conciliated. This suggests that comparison between results of different laboratories on this type of experiments can be done only for systems of same height. We show that a parameter ɛ=1+(Aω)2/(2gh), with A and ω the amplitude and frequency of the tap and g the acceleration of gravity, can be defined to characterize the tap intensity. This parameter is based on the effective flight of the granular bed, which takes into account the h dependency. When ϕ is plotted as a function of ɛ, the data collapses for systems of different h. However, this parameter alone is unable to determine the steady state to be reached since different Σ can be observed for a given ɛ if different column heights are considered. PMID:25871103

  16. Ubiquity of density slope oscillations in the central regions of galaxy and cluster-sized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Anthony M.; Williams, Liliya L. R.; Hjorth, Jens

    2016-05-01

    One usually thinks of a radial density profile as having a monotonically changing logarithmic slope, such as in NFW or Einasto profiles. However, in two different classes of commonly used systems, this is often not the case. These classes exhibit non-monotonic changes in their density profile slopes which we call oscillations for short. We analyze these two unrelated classes separately. Class 1 consists of systems that have density oscillations and that are defined through their distribution function f(E), or differential energy distribution N(E), such as isothermal spheres, King profiles, or DARKexp, a theoretically derived model for relaxed collisionless systems. Systems defined through f(E) or N(E) generally have density slope oscillations. Class 1 system oscillations can be found at small, intermediate, or large radii but we focus on a limited set of Class 1 systems that have oscillations in the central regions, usually at log(r/r‑2) lesssim ‑2, where r‑2 is the largest radius where dlog(ρ)/dlog(r) = ‑2. We show that the shape of their N(E) can roughly predict the amplitude of oscillations. Class 2 systems which are a product of dynamical evolution, consist of observed and simulated galaxies and clusters, and pure dark matter halos. Oscillations in the density profile slope seem pervasive in the central regions of Class 2 systems. We argue that in these systems, slope oscillations are an indication that a system is not fully relaxed. We show that these oscillations can be reproduced by small modifications to N(E) of DARKexp. These affect a small fraction of systems' mass and are confined to log(r/r‑2) lesssim 0. The size of these modifications serves as a potential diagnostic for quantifying how far a system is from being relaxed.

  17. Simplified modeling for infiltration and radon entry

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    Air leakage in the envelopes of residential buildings is the primary mechanism for provided ventilation to those buildings. For radon the same mechanisms that drive the ventilation, drive the radon entry This paper attempts to provide a simplified physical model that can be used to understand the interactions between the building leakage distribution, the forces that drive infiltration and ventilation, and indoor radon concentrations, Combining both ventilation and entry modeling together allows an estimation of Radon concentration and exposure to be made and demonstrates how changes in the envelope or ventilation system would affect it. This paper will develop simplified modeling approaches for estimating both ventilation rate and radon entry rate based on the air tightness of the envelope and the driving forces. These approaches will use conventional leakage values (i.e. effective leakage area ) to quantify the air tightness and include natural and mechanical driving forces. This paper will introduce a simplified parameter, the Radon Leakage Area, that quantifies the resistance to radon entry. To be practical for dwellings, modeling of the occupant exposures to indoor pollutants must be simple to use and not require unreasonable input data. This paper presents the derivation of the simplified physical model, and applies that model to representative situations to explore the tendencies to be expected under different circumstances.

  18. THE SIZE, DENSITY, AND FORMATION OF THE ORCUS-VANTH SYSTEM IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. E.; Ragozzine, D.; Fraser, W. C.; Stansberry, J.

    2010-06-15

    The Kuiper Belt object (KBO) Orcus and its satellite Vanth form an unusual system in the Kuiper Belt. While most large KBOs have small satellites in circular orbits and smaller KBOs and their satellites tend to be much closer in size, Orcus sits in between these two regimes. Orcus is among the largest objects known in the Kuiper Belt, but the relative size of Vanth is much larger than that of the tiny satellites of the other large objects. Here, we characterize the physical and orbital characteristics of the Orcus-Vanth system in an attempt to distinguish discuss possible formation scenarios. From Hubble Space Telescope observations, we find that Orcus and Vanth have different visible colors and that Vanth does not share the water ice absorption feature seen in the infrared spectrum of Orcus. We also find that Vanth has a nearly face-on circular orbit with a period of 9.5393 {+-} 0.0001 days and semimajor axis of 8980 {+-} 20 km, implying a system mass of (6.32 {+-} 0.01) x 10{sup 20} kg or 3.8% the mass of dwarf planet Eris. From Spitzer Space Telescope observations, we find that the thermal emission is consistent with a single body with diameter 940 {+-} 70 km and a geometric albedo of 0.28 {+-} 0.04. Assuming equal densities and albedos, this measurement implies sizes of Orcus and Vanth of 900 and 280 km, respectively, and a mass ratio of 33. Assuming a factor of 2 lower albedo for the non-icy Vanth, however, implies sizes of 860 km and 380 km and a mass ratio of 12. The measured density depends on the assumed albedo ratio of the two objects but is approximately 1.5 {+-} 0.3 g cm{sup -3}, midway between typical densities measured for larger and smaller objects. The orbit and mass ratio is consistent with formation from a giant impact and subsequent outward tidal evolution, and even consistent with the system having now achieved a double synchronous state. Because of the large angle between the plane of the heliocentric orbit of Orcus and the plane of the orbit

  19. Studies on the reactive melt infiltration of silicon and silicon-molybdenum alloys in porous carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Behrendt, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    Investigations on the reactive melt infiltration of silicon and silicon-1.7 and 3.2 at percent molybdenum alloys into porous carbon preforms have been carried out by process modeling, differential thermal analysis (DTA) and melt infiltration experiments. These results indicate that the initial pore volume fraction of the porous carbon preform is a critical parameter in determining the final composition of the raction-formed silicon carbide and other residual phases. The pore size of the carbon preform is very detrimental to the exotherm temperatures due to liquid silicon-carbon reactions encountered during the reactive melt infiltration process. A possible mechanism for the liquid silicon-porous (glassy) carbon reaction has been proposed. The composition and microstructure of the reaction-formed silicon carbide has been discussed in terms of carbon preform microstructures, infiltration materials, and temperatures.

  20. Studies on the reactive melt infiltration of silicon and silicon-molybdenum alloys in porous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.; Behrendt, D.R.

    1992-09-01

    Investigations on the reactive melt infiltration of silicon and silicon-1.7 and 3.2 at percent molybdenum alloys into porous carbon preforms have been carried out by process modeling, differential thermal analysis (DTA) and melt infiltration experiments. These results indicate that the initial pore volume fraction of the porous carbon preform is a critical parameter in determining the final composition of the reaction-formed silicon carbide and other residual phases. The pore size of the carbon preform is very detrimental to the exotherm temperatures due to liquid silicon-carbon reactions encountered during the reactive melt infiltration process. A possible mechanism for the liquid silicon-porous (glassy) carbon reaction has been proposed. The composition and microstructure of the reaction-formed silicon carbide has been discussed in terms of carbon preform microstructures, infiltration materials, and temperatures.

  1. 13 CFR 121.201 - What size standards has SBA identified by North American Industry Classification System codes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... identified by North American Industry Classification System codes? 121.201 Section 121.201 Business Credit... has SBA identified by North American Industry Classification System codes? The size standards... a concern and its affiliates to be considered small. Small Business Size Standards by NAICS...

  2. 13 CFR 121.201 - What size standards has SBA identified by North American Industry Classification System codes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... identified by North American Industry Classification System codes? 121.201 Section 121.201 Business Credit... has SBA identified by North American Industry Classification System codes? The size standards... a concern and its affiliates to be considered small. Small Business Size Standards by NAICS...

  3. 13 CFR 121.201 - What size standards has SBA identified by North American Industry Classification System codes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... identified by North American Industry Classification System codes? 121.201 Section 121.201 Business Credit... has SBA identified by North American Industry Classification System codes? The size standards... a concern and its affiliates to be considered small. Small Business Size Standards by NAICS...

  4. Optimal Size for Maximal Energy Efficiency in Information Processing of Biological Systems Due to Bistability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Liu, Li-Wei; Wang, Long-Fei; Yue, Yuan; Yu, Lian-Chun

    2015-11-01

    Energy efficiency is closely related to the evolution of biological systems and is important to their information processing. In this paper, we calculated the excitation probability of a simple model of a bistable biological unit in response to pulsatile inputs, and its spontaneous excitation rate due to noise perturbation. Then we analytically calculated the mutual information, energy cost, and energy efficiency of an array of these bistable units. We found that the optimal number of units could maximize this array's energy efficiency in encoding pulse inputs, which depends on the fixed energy cost. We conclude that demand for energy efficiency in biological systems may strongly influence the size of these systems under the pressure of natural selection.

  5. Unusual sclerosing orbital pseudotumor infiltrating orbits and maxillofacial regions.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Huseyin; Aralaşmak, Ayşe; Yılmaz, Temel Fatih; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor (IOP) is a benign inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. Bilateral massive orbital involvement and extraorbital extension of the IOP is very rare. We present an unusual case of IOP with bilateral massive orbital infiltration extending into maxillofacial regions and discuss its distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that help to exclude other entities during differential diagnoses. PMID:24991481

  6. Unusual Sclerosing Orbital Pseudotumor Infiltrating Orbits and Maxillofacial Regions

    PubMed Central

    Toprak, Huseyin; Aralaşmak, Ayşe; Yılmaz, Temel Fatih; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor (IOP) is a benign inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. Bilateral massive orbital involvement and extraorbital extension of the IOP is very rare. We present an unusual case of IOP with bilateral massive orbital infiltration extending into maxillofacial regions and discuss its distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that help to exclude other entities during differential diagnoses. PMID:24991481

  7. Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Logue, Jennifer; Singer, Brett

    2010-06-01

    The prevailing residential ventilation standard in North America, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specifies volumetric airflow requirements as a function of the overall size of the home and the number of bedrooms, assumes a fixed, minimal amount of infiltration, and requires mechanical ventilation to achieve the remainder. The standard allows for infiltration credits and intermittent ventilation patterns that can be shown to provide comparable performance. Whole-house ventilation methods have a substantial effect on time-varying indoor pollutant concentrations. If alternatives specified by Standard 62.2, such as intermittent ventilation, are used, short-term pollutant concentrations could exceed acute health standards even if chronic health standards are met.The authors present a methodology for comparing ASHRAE- and non-ASHRAE-specified ventilation scenarios on relative indoor pollutant concentrations. We use numerical modeling to compare the maximum time-averaged concentrations for acute exposure relevant (1-hour, 8-hour, 24-hour ) and chronic exposure relevant (1-year) time periods for four different ventilation scenarios in six climates with a range of normalized leakage values. The results suggest that long-term concentrations are the most important metric for assessing the effectiveness of whole-house ventilation systems in meeting exposure standards and that, if chronic health exposure standards are met, acute standards will also be met.

  8. Measurement of size error in industrial CT system with Calotte cube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DaoDang; Chen, XiXi; Wang, FuMin; Shi, YuShu; Kong, Ming; Zhao, Jun

    2015-02-01

    A measurement method with calotte cube was proposed to realize the high-precision calibration of size error in industrial computer tomography (CT) system. Using the traceability of calotte cube, the measurement of the repeatability error, probing error and length measurement error of industrial CT system was carried out to increase the acceptance of CT as a metrological method. The main error factors, including the material absorption, projection number and integration time and so on, had been studied in detail. Experimental results show that the proposed measurement method provides a feasible way to measure the size error of industrial CT system. Compared with the measurement results with invar 27- sphere gauge, a high accuracy in the order of microns is realized with the proposed method based on calotte cube. Differing from the invar 27-sphere gauge method, the material particularity of calotte cube (material of metallic titanium) could introduce beam hardening effect, the study on the influence of material absorption and structural specificity on the measurement, which provides significant reference for the measurement of metallic samples, is necessary.

  9. Size distribution of heavy metal aerosols in cooling and spray dryer system

    SciTech Connect

    Wey, M.Y.; Yang, J.T.; Peng, C.Y.; Chiang, B.C.

    1999-11-01

    The cooling process prior to treating flue gas and the spray dryer process that removes acid components in flue gas are believed to influence the mass and elemental size distributions of heavy metal in fly ash. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the mass and elemental size distributions of heavy metals in fly ash produced from a fluidized bed incineration and a water cooling or spray dryer flue gas treatment system. The operating parameters investigated included (1) the controlling temperature in the gas cooling system; (2) the controlling temperature in the spray dryer system; (3) the addition of organic chlorides; and (4) the addition of inorganic chloride. The experimental results indicated that the water cooling process and spray dryer process increase the amount of coarse fly ash and increase the total concentration of metal in fly ash. The amounts of fine fly ash and the total concentration of metal in fine fly ash increase with decreasing temperature during the water cooling process. However, the amounts of fine fly ash and the total concentration of metal in fine fly ash decrease with decreasing temperature during the spray dryer process.

  10. Communication: System-size scaling of Boltzmann and alternate Gibbs entropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose M. G.; Rubi, J. Miguel

    2014-05-01

    It has recurrently been proposed that the Boltzmann textbook definition of entropy S(E) = k ln Ω(E) in terms of the number of microstates Ω(E) with energy E should be replaced by the expression S_G (E) = kln sumnolimits_{E^' < E} {Ω (E^')} examined by Gibbs. Here, we show that SG either is equivalent to S in the macroscopic limit or becomes independent of the energy exponentially fast as the system size increases. The resulting exponential scaling makes the realistic use of SG unfeasible and leads in general to temperatures that are inconsistent with the notions of hot and cold.

  11. The minimal habitat size for spreading in a weak competition system with two free boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hong

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we focus on the dynamics for a Lotka-Volterra type weak competition system with two free boundaries, where free boundaries which may intersect each other as time evolves are used to describe the spreading of two competing species, respectively. In the weak competition case, the dynamics of this model can be classified into four cases, which forms a spreading-vanishing quartering. The notion of the minimal habitat size for spreading is introduced to determine if species can always spread. Some sufficient conditions for spreading and vanishing are established. Also, when spreading occurs, some rough estimates for spreading speed and the long-time behavior of solutions are established.

  12. Functional Complex Point-Defect Structure in a Huge-Size-Mismatch System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Shibata, Naoya; Oba, Fumiyasu; Taniguchi, Takashi; Findlay, Scott D.; Tanaka, Isao; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2013-02-01

    Cubic boron nitride is a promising system for photonics and optoelectronics. Determining the inclusion mechanisms for dopants with a large size mismatch, such as luminous rare-earth elements, is prerequisite to understanding their functional properties and to effective doping control. Combining evidence from subangstrom resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, imaging simulations, and first-principles calculations, we show that cationic Ce3+ single dopants are not located at cationic B sites but rather at anionic N sites surrounded by B-site vacancies.

  13. Antigen inhalation as a triggering factor in systemic small-sized-vessel vasculitis. Four cases.

    PubMed

    Mouthon, L; Khaled, M; Cohen, P; Subra, J F; Guillevin, L

    2001-04-01

    In order to identify small-sized-vessel vasculitis occurring immediately after massive inhalation of particles which could be considered antigenic, we performed a retrospective review of patients who consulted our Department of Internal Medicine between 1980 and 1998 and were diagnosed as having small-vessel vasculitis that developed immediately after massive exposure to inhaled particles. Four patients, 27 to 55 years old, presented with small-sized-vessel vasculitis (one with Wegener's granulomatosis and three with Churg-Strauss syndrome) which developed after massive inhalation of particles. Clinical manifestations occurred from a few hours to 10 days after inhalation of diesel fumes, cereal dust, flour or cereal dust and/or pigeon droppings. Three patients remain disease-free 8, 9 and 18 years after discontinuing treatment. One patient remains well after 3 years on low-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide therapy. Our data suggest that primary antigens can cause small-sized-vessel vasculitides. Identifying such etiological factors could improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of systemic vasculitides and prevent relapses due to similar antigenic exposure. PMID:11431572

  14. A Simple Infiltration Method for Determining Hydraulic Conductivities at Various Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Hsu, K.

    2010-12-01

    Soil hydraulic properties usually show high spatial variation. Most infiltration methods assume a uniform hydraulic conductivity and rely on the attainment of a steady state flow rate of water into the soil. In this study, a falling head infiltration method is developed to determine hydraulic conductivities at various depths. Water content sensors at various depths are required to add to the classical ponded infiltration test. The falling head infiltration theory proposed by Philip [1992a] is extended to multiple steps in the proposed method. The Green-Ampt model is used to physically approximate the movement of the wetting front. General analytical solutions for infiltration depth and saturated hydraulic conductivity are derived for a multi-layer soil. The falling head infiltration method is compared to the constant head infiltration method for a homogeneous soil. The results show that the falling head infiltration method is more efficient in water use than is the constant head infiltration method. Then, the proposed method is demonstrated for a two-layer soil system. Numerical experiment results show that with measured variations of water content, the effective arrival time of the wetting front can be well approximated by the average of the start and finish times of the change in water content to obtain the hydraulic conductivity. The calculated hydraulic conductivity is the harmonic mean of the layer soil, and thus hydraulic conductivities at various depths can be estimated sequentially from the top down. The multi-step falling head infiltration method was applied to a sandbox experiment in the laboratory. The experimental results are consistent with the hydraulic conductivity obtained using the constant head ponded infiltration method. The multi-step falling head infiltration method also shows a consistent decrease of hydraulic conductivity in the sand column. The proposed method is less laborious and more versatile than the constant head ponded infiltration

  15. Soil particle-size dependent partitioning behavior of pesticides within water-soil-cationic surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Keller, Arturo A

    2008-08-01

    Cationic surfactants have been proposed for enhanced sorption zones to contain hydrophobic organic compound (HOC) contamination. Benzalkonium chloride (BC), a cationic surfactant, was selected to study the particle-size dependent sorption behavior of the surfactant and its role in the immobilization of two hydrophobic pesticides (atrazine and diuron) within soil-water-surfactant systems for this application. Five different soils were considered in this study. Our results showed significant particle-size dependent behavior for surfactant sorption and pesticide immobilization in the presence of the sorbed cationic surfactant. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the bulk soils and their size fractions (clay, silt, and sand fractions) determined BC sorption capacity. In the absence of BC the sand fractions were the least effective sorbent for the pesticides compared with silts and clays. However, at relatively low BC mass sorbed (<10,000mg/kg) to any of the soil fractions, well below sorption saturation, the sand fractions became more effective sorbents for either pesticide than the clay and silt fractions. The pesticide partitioning coefficient onto sorbed BC (K(ss)) was not constant. Particle CEC, availability of CEC sites for sorption of the cationic surfactant, and the amount of the BC sorbed determined the phase of K(ss). The maximum K(ss) occurred before BC saturation sorption capacity was reached and at different % CEC occupancy for the different size fractions. For the clay fractions, the maximum K(ss) occurred at lower % CEC occupancy ( approximately 30-40%) than for the silt and sand fractions. The maximal K(ss) for the sand fractions occurred at the highest % CEC occupancy among all fractions ( approximately 50-60%). These findings suggest that for an in situ surfactant-enhanced sorption zone it may be better to operate well below the saturation sorption of the cationic surfactant. This would enhance sorption of the HOCs onto the immobile fractions (silt

  16. Size reduction of high- and low-moisture corn stalks by linear knife grid system

    SciTech Connect

    Womac, A.R.; Igathinathane, C.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Narayan, S.

    2009-04-01

    High- and low-moisture corn stalks were tested using a linear knife grid size reduction device developed for first-stage size reduction. The device was used in conjunction with a universal test machine that quantified shearing stress and energy characteristics for forcing a bed of corn stalks through a grid of sharp knives. No published engineering performance data for corn stover with similar devices are available to optimize performance; however, commercial knife grid systems exist for forage size reduction. From the force displacement data, mean and maximum ultimate shear stresses, cumulative and peak mass-based cutting energies for corn stalks, and mean new surface area-based cutting energies were determined from 4 5 refill runs at two moisture contents (78.8% and 11.3% wet basis), three knife grid spacings (25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm), and three bed depths (50.8, 101.6, and 152.4 mm). In general, the results indicated that peak failure load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied directly with bed depth and inversely with knife grid spacing. Mean separation analysis established that high- and low-moisture conditions and bed depths 101.6 mm did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) for ultimate stress and cutting energy values, but knife grid spacing were significantly different. Linear knife grid cutting energy requirements for both moisture conditions of corn stalks were much smaller than reported cutting energy requirements. Ultimate shear stress and cutting energy results of this research should aid the engineering design of commercial scale linear knife gird size reduction equipment for various biomass feedstocks.

  17. Synthetic Coal Slag Infiltration into Varying Refractory Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Tetsuya K; Thomas, Hugh; Bennett, James P; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2012-10-01

    The infiltrations of synthetic coal slag into 99%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 85%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–15%SiO{sub 2}, and 90%Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}–10%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} refractories with a temperature gradient induced along the penetration direction were compared to one another. The infiltrating slag was synthesized with a composition that is representative of an average of the ash contents from U S coal feedstock. Experiments were conducted with a hot-face temperature of 1450°C in a CO/CO{sub 2} atmosphere. Minimal penetration was observed in the 90%Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}–10%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} material because interactions between the refractory and the slag produced a protective layer of FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, which impeded slag flow into the bulk of the refractory. After 5 h, the 99%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample exhibited an average penetration of 12.7 mm whereas the 85%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–15%SiO{sub 2} sample showed 3.8 mm. Slag infiltrated into the 99%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 85%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–15%SiO{sub 2} refractory systems by dissolving the respective refractories' matrix materials, which consist of fine Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles and an amorphous alumino-silicate phase. Due to enrichment in SiO{sub 2}, a network-former, infiltration into the 85%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–15%SiO{sub 2} system yielded a higher viscosity slag and hence, a shallower penetration depth. The results suggest that slag infiltration can be limited by interactions with the refractory through the formation of either a solid layer that physically impedes fluid flow or a more viscous slag that retards infiltration.

  18. Hybrid neural intelligent system to predict business failure in small-to-medium-size enterprises.

    PubMed

    Borrajo, M Lourdes; Baruque, Bruno; Corchado, Emilio; Bajo, Javier; Corchado, Juan M

    2011-08-01

    During the last years there has been a growing need of developing innovative tools that can help small to medium sized enterprises to predict business failure as well as financial crisis. In this study we present a novel hybrid intelligent system aimed at monitoring the modus operandi of the companies and predicting possible failures. This system is implemented by means of a neural-based multi-agent system that models the different actors of the companies as agents. The core of the multi-agent system is a type of agent that incorporates a case-based reasoning system and automates the business control process and failure prediction. The stages of the case-based reasoning system are implemented by means of web services: the retrieval stage uses an innovative weighted voting summarization of self-organizing maps ensembles-based method and the reuse stage is implemented by means of a radial basis function neural network. An initial prototype was developed and the results obtained related to small and medium enterprises in a real scenario are presented. PMID:21809475

  19. The cultural evolution of human communication systems in different sized populations: usability trumps learnability.

    PubMed

    Fay, Nicolas; Ellison, T Mark

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the intergenerational transfer of human communication systems. It tests if human communication systems evolve to be easy to learn or easy to use (or both), and how population size affects learnability and usability. Using an experimental-semiotic task, we find that human communication systems evolve to be easier to use (production efficiency and reproduction fidelity), but harder to learn (identification accuracy) for a second generation of naïve participants. Thus, usability trumps learnability. In addition, the communication systems that evolve in larger populations exhibit distinct advantages over those that evolve in smaller populations: the learnability loss (from the Initial signs) is more muted and the usability benefits are more pronounced. The usability benefits for human communication systems that evolve in a small and large population is explained through guided variation reducing sign complexity. The enhanced performance of the communication systems that evolve in larger populations is explained by the operation of a content bias acting on the larger pool of competing signs. The content bias selects for information-efficient iconic signs that aid learnability and enhance usability. PMID:23967243

  20. Greatly increased toughness of infiltrated spider silk.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Mo; Pippel, Eckhard; Gösele, Ulrich; Dresbach, Christian; Qin, Yong; Chandran, C Vinod; Bräuniger, Thomas; Hause, Gerd; Knez, Mato

    2009-04-24

    In nature, tiny amounts of inorganic impurities, such as metals, are incorporated in the protein structures of some biomaterials and lead to unusual mechanical properties of those materials. A desire to produce these biomimicking new materials has stimulated materials scientists, and diverse approaches have been attempted. In contrast, research to improve the mechanical properties of biomaterials themselves by direct metal incorporation into inner protein structures has rarely been tried because of the difficulty of developing a method that can infiltrate metals into biomaterials, resulting in a metal-incorporated protein matrix. We demonstrated that metals can be intentionally infiltrated into inner protein structures of biomaterials through multiple pulsed vapor-phase infiltration performed with equipment conventionally used for atomic layer deposition (ALD). We infiltrated zinc (Zn), titanium (Ti), or aluminum (Al), combined with water from corresponding ALD precursors, into spider dragline silks and observed greatly improved toughness of the resulting silks. The presence of the infiltrated metals such as Al or Ti was verified by energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra measured inside the treated silks. This result of enhanced toughness of spider silk could potentially serve as a model for a more general approach to enhance the strength and toughness of other biomaterials. PMID:19390040

  1. Electron Percolation In Copper Infiltrated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krcho, Stanislav

    2015-11-01

    The work describes the dependence of the electrical conductivity of carbon materials infiltrated with copper in a vacuum-pressure autoclave on copper concentration and on the effective pore radius of the carbon skeleton. In comparison with non-infiltrated material the electrical conductivity of copper infiltrated composite increased almost 500 times. If the composite contained less than 7.2 vol% of Cu, a linear dependence of the electrical conductivity upon cupper content was observed. If infiltrated carbon contained more than 7.2 vol% of Cu, the dependence was nonlinear - the curve could be described by a power formula (x - xc)t. This is a typical formula describing the electron percolation process in regions containing higher Cu fraction than the critical one. The maximum measured electrical conductivity was 396 × 104 Ω-1 m-1 for copper concentration 27.6 vol%. Experiments and analysis of the electrical conductivity showed that electron percolation occurred in carbon materials infiltrated by copper when the copper volume exceeded the critical concentration. The analysis also showed a sharp increase of electrical conductivity in composites with copper concentration higher than the threshold, where the effective radius of carbon skeleton pores decreased to 350 nanometres.

  2. Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of ventilation is to dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant could be exposed to. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. ASHRAE Standards including standards 62, 119, and 136 have all considered the contribution of infiltration in various ways, using methods and data from 20 years ago. The vast majority of homes in the United States and indeed the world are ventilated through natural means such as infiltration caused by air leakage. Newer homes in the western world are tight and require mechanical ventilation. As we seek to provide acceptable indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate norunder-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to correctly evaluate the contribution infiltration makes to both energy consumption and equivalent ventilation. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 specifies how much mechanical ventilation is considered necessary to provide acceptable indoor air quality, but that standard is weak on how infiltration can contribute towards meeting the total requirement. In the past ASHRAE Standard 136 was used to do this, but new theoretical approaches and expanded weather data have made that standard out of date. This article will describe how to properly treat infiltration as an equivalent ventilation approach and then use new data and these new approaches to demonstrate how these calculations might be done both in general and to update Standard 136.

  3. System-size independence of directed flow measured at the BNL relativistic heavy-ion collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    We measure directed flow (v{sub 1}) for charged particles in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}), transverse momentum (p{sub t}), and collision centrality, based on data from the STAR experiment. We find that the directed flow depends on the incident energy but, contrary to all available model implementations, not on the size of the colliding system at a given centrality. We extend the validity of the limiting fragmentation concept to v{sub 1} in different collision systems, and investigate possible explanations for the observed sign change in v{sub 1}(p{sub t}).

  4. System-size independence of directed flow at the RelativisticHeavy-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2008-09-20

    We measure directed flow (v{sub 1}) for charged particles in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}), transverse momentum (p{sub t}) and collision centrality, based on data from the STAR experiment. We find that the directed flow depends on the incident energy but, contrary to all available model implementations, not on the size of the colliding system at a given centrality. We extend the validity of the limiting fragmentation concept to v{sub 1} in different collision systems, and investigate possible explanations for the observed sign change in v{sub 1}(p{sub t}).

  5. Minimum size for a nanoscale temperature discriminator based on a thermochemical system.

    PubMed

    Gorecki, J; Nowakowski, B; Gorecka, J N; Lemarchand, A

    2016-02-14

    What are the limits of size reduction for information processing devices based on chemical reactions? In this paper, we partially answer this question. We show that a thermochemical system can be used to design a discriminator of the parameters associated with oscillations of the ambient temperature. Depending on the amplitude and frequency of the oscillations, the system exhibits sharp transitions between different types of its time evolutions. This phenomenon can be used to discriminate between different parameter values describing the oscillating environment. We investigate the reliability of the thermochemical discriminator as a function of the number of molecules involved in the reactions. A stochastic model of chemical reactions and heat exchange with the neighborhood, in which the number of molecules explicitly appears, is introduced. For the selected values of the parameters, thermochemical discriminators operating with less than 10(5) molecules appear to be unreliable. PMID:26807977

  6. Method of Minimizing Size of Heat Rejection Systems for Thermoelectric Coolers to Cool Detectors in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    A thermal design concept of attaching the thermoelectric cooler (TEC) hot side directly to the radiator and maximizing the number of TECs to cool multiple detectors in space is presented. It minimizes the temperature drop between the TECs and radiator. An ethane constant conductance heat pipe transfers heat from the detectors to a TEC cold plate which the cold side of the TECs is attached to. This thermal design concept minimizes the size of TEC heat rejection systems. Hence it reduces the problem of accommodating the radiator within a required envelope. It also reduces the mass of the TEC heat rejection system. Thermal testing of a demonstration unit in vacuum verified the thermal performance of the thermal design concept.

  7. Portfolio of automated trading systems: complexity and learning set size issues.

    PubMed

    Raudys, Sarunas

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we consider using profit/loss histories of multiple automated trading systems (ATSs) as N input variables in portfolio management. By means of multivariate statistical analysis and simulation studies, we analyze the influences of sample size (L) and input dimensionality on the accuracy of determining the portfolio weights. We find that degradation in portfolio performance due to inexact estimation of N means and N(N - 1)/2 correlations is proportional to N/L; however, estimation of N variances does not worsen the result. To reduce unhelpful sample size/dimensionality effects, we perform a clustering of N time series and split them into a small number of blocks. Each block is composed of mutually correlated ATSs. It generates an expert trading agent based on a nontrainable 1/N portfolio rule. To increase the diversity of the expert agents, we use training sets of different lengths for clustering. In the output of the portfolio management system, the regularized mean-variance framework-based fusion agent is developed in each walk-forward step of an out-of-sample portfolio validation experiment. Experiments with the real financial data (2003-2012) confirm the effectiveness of the suggested approach. PMID:24808317

  8. New empirical correlations for sizing adiabatic capillary tubes in refrigeration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shodiya, S.; Aahar, A. A.; Henry, N.; Darus, A. N.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents new empirical correlations that have been developed for sizing adiabatic capillary tubes used in small vapor compression refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. A numerical model which is based on the basic equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy was developed. Colebrook's formulation was used to determine the single phase friction factor. The two-phase viscosity models - Cicchitti et al., Dukler et al. and McAdam et al. were used based on the recommendation from literature to determine the two-phase viscosity factor. The developed numerical model was validated using the experimental data from literature. The numerical model was used to study the effects of relevant parameters on capillary tube length and the results showed that the length of capillary tube increase with increase in condensing temperature, subcooling, and inner diameter of tube but decrease with increase in surface roughness and mass flow rate. Thereafter, empirical correlation of the capillary tube length with the five dependent variables was presented. The empirical models are validated using experimental data from literature. Different from the previous studies, the empirical models have a large set of refrigerants and wide operating conditions. The developed correlation can be used as an effective tool for sizing adiabatic capillary tube with system models working with alternative refrigerants.

  9. Evaluating shock absorption behavior of small-sized systems under programmable electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagtap, Piyush; Kumar, Praveen

    2014-11-01

    A simple ball-drop impact tester is developed for studying the dynamic response of hierarchical, complex, small-sized systems and materials. The developed algorithm and set-up have provisions for applying programmable potential difference along the height of a test specimen during an impact loading; this enables us to conduct experiments on various materials and smart structures whose mechanical behavior is sensitive to electric field. The software-hardware system allows not only acquisition of dynamic force-time data at very fast sampling rate (up to 2 × 106 samples/s), but also application of a pre-set potential difference (up to ±10 V) across a test specimen for a duration determined by feedback from the force-time data. We illustrate the functioning of the set-up by studying the effect of electric field on the energy absorption capability of carbon nanotube foams of 5 × 5 × 1.2 mm3 size under impact conditions.

  10. Evaluating shock absorption behavior of small-sized systems under programmable electric field.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, Piyush; Kumar, Praveen

    2014-11-01

    A simple ball-drop impact tester is developed for studying the dynamic response of hierarchical, complex, small-sized systems and materials. The developed algorithm and set-up have provisions for applying programmable potential difference along the height of a test specimen during an impact loading; this enables us to conduct experiments on various materials and smart structures whose mechanical behavior is sensitive to electric field. The software-hardware system allows not only acquisition of dynamic force-time data at very fast sampling rate (up to 2 × 10(6) samples/s), but also application of a pre-set potential difference (up to ±10 V) across a test specimen for a duration determined by feedback from the force-time data. We illustrate the functioning of the set-up by studying the effect of electric field on the energy absorption capability of carbon nanotube foams of 5 × 5 × 1.2 mm(3) size under impact conditions. PMID:25430120

  11. Spatial and temporal variations of ponded infiltration in a grid of permanent infiltration rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votrubová, Jana; Dohnal, Michal; Dušek, Jaromír; Vogel, Tomáš; Tesař, Miroslav; Císlerová, Milena

    2016-04-01

    The soil at Liz experimental site (Volynka headwater catchment, Sumava Mountains, southern Bohemia) has been subject to a long term research on the soil infiltration properties since 2003. For this purpose, 18 permanent infiltration rings were installed at a gently sloped grass-covered experimental plot (300 sq.m). Using this set-up, the single-ring ponded infiltration experiments have been conducted annually. Since 2005, a procedure of repeating the same ponded infiltration experiments in two successive days has been implemented. For the soil type of the study area (sandy loam developed upon gneiss bedrock), a large spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties had been reported before. The focus of the present study has been primarily the temporal variability of the soil infiltration properties. Results of a supplementary dye-tracer experiment conducted in 2005 demonstrate that in the soil studied the infiltration process is strongly dominated by preferential flow. As expected, infiltration rates varied considerably among the infiltration ring. With regard to the impact of the initial soil moisture conditions, general decrease of the infiltration rates observed on two subsequent days was detected. Surprisingly, the spatial variations between separate measuring points were vastly overridden by a huge overall increase of the infiltration rates observed throughout the years. The observed variability of the experimental data was further examined in numerical simulations of hypothetical scenarios reflecting possible variations of soil profile and experimental set-up. Axisymmetric 3D simulations were performed using S2D code. The dual-continuum model was able to describe part of the variability of infiltration curves associated with soil structure heterogeneity. None of the tested factors could explain the wide range of infiltration rate variations observed. Nevertheless, better agreement between simulated and observed infiltration characteristics could be achieved

  12. Reactive Melt Infiltration of Silicon-Niobium Alloys in Microporous Carbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Behrendt, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the reactive melt infiltration of silicon-niobium alloys in microporous carbon preforms prepared by the pyrolysis of a polymer precursor have been carried out using modeling, Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), and melt infiltration. Mercury porosimetry results indicate a very narrow pore size distribution with virtually all the porosity within the carbon preforms open to infiltrants. The morphology and amount of the residual phases (niobium disilicide and silicon) in the infiltrated material can be tailored according to requirements by careful control of the properties (pore size and pore volume) of the porous carbon preforms and alloy composition. The average room temperature four-point flexural strength of a reaction-formed silicon carbide material (made by the infiltration of medium pore size carbon preform with Si - 5 at. % Nb alloy) is 290 +/- 40 MPa (42 +/- 6 ksi) and the fracture toughness is 3.7 +/- 0.3 MPa square root of m. The flexural strength decreases at high temperatures due to relaxation of residual thermal stresses and the presence of free silicon in the material.

  13. Carbon storage of different soil-size fractions in Florida silvopastoral systems.

    PubMed

    Haile, Solomon G; Nair, P K Ramachandran; Nair, Vimala D

    2008-01-01

    Compared with open (treeless) pasture systems, silvopastoral agroforestry systems that integrate trees into pasture production systems are likely to enhance soil carbon (C) sequestration in deeper soil layers. To test this hypothesis, total soil C contents at six soil depths (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-50, 50-75, and 75-125 cm) were determined in silvopastoral systems with slash pine (Pinus elliottii) + bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) and an adjacent open pasture (OP) with bahiagrass at four sites, representing Spodosols and Ultisols, in Florida. Soil samples from each layer were fractionated into three classes (250-2000, 53-250, and <53 microm), and the C contents in each were determined. Averaged across four sites and all depths, the total soil organic carbon (SOC) content was higher by 33% in silvopastures near trees (SP-T) and by 28% in the alleys between tree rows (SP-A) than in adjacent open pastures. It was higher by 39% in SP-A and 20% in SP-T than in open pastures in the largest fraction size (250-2000 microm) and by 12.3 and 18.8%, respectively, in the intermediate size fraction (53-250 microm). The highest SOC increase (up to 45 kg m(-2)) in whole soil of silvopasture compared with OP was at the 75- to 125-cm depth at the Spodosol sites. The results support the hypothesis that, compared with open pastures, silvopastures contain more C in deeper soil layers under similar ecological settings, possibly as a consequence of a major input to soil organic matter from decomposition of dead tree-roots. PMID:18689740

  14. Grain size and shape analysis of the AD 1226 tephra layer, Reykjanes volcanic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ösp Magnúsdóttir, Agnes; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Larsen, Guðrún; Tumi Guðmunsson, Magnús; Sigurgeirsson, Magnús Á.

    2014-05-01

    Recent explosive eruptions in Iceland have drawn attention to long range tephra transport in the atmosphere. In Iceland tephra forming explosion eruptions are frequent, due to abundance of water. However, the volcanism on the island is principally basaltic. Volcanism along the Reykjanes Peninsula is divided into five distinct volcanic systems. Volcano-tectonic activity within these systems is periodic, with recurrence intervals in the range of 1 ka. Last volcano-tectonic sequence began around AD 940, shortly after settlement of Iceland, and lasted through AD 1340. During this period activity was characterized by basaltic fissure eruptions. Furthermore, this activity period on the Reykjanes peninsula began within the eastern most volcanic system and gradually moved towards the west across the peninsula. The 1226 eruption was a basaltic fissure eruption with in the Reykjanes volcanic system. The eruption began on land and gradually progressed towards the SW until the volcanic fissure extended into the sea. Water-magma interaction changed the eruption from effusive into explosive forming the largest tephra layer on the peninsula. Due to its close proximity to the Keflavik international airport and that of the capital of Iceland it is important to get an insight into, the characteristics, generation and distribution of such tephra deposits. In this eruption the tephra produced had an approximate volume of 0.1 km3 and covered an area of some 3500 km2 within the 0.5 cm isopach. Total grain size distribution of this tephra layer will be presented along with analysis of principal grain shapes of the finer portion of the tephra layer as a function of distance from the source. The tephra grain size is dominated by particles finer than 1 millimeter with an almost complete absence of large grains independent of distance from the source. Comprehensive understanding of the characteristics of tephra generated in this eruption can help us to understand hazards posed by future

  15. Opal photonic crystals infiltrated with chalcogenide glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Astratov, V. N.; Adawi, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Tikhomirov, V. K.; Lyubin, V.; Lidzey, D. G.; Ariu, M.; Reynolds, A. L.

    2001-06-25

    Composite opal structures for nonlinear applications are obtained by infiltration with chalcogenide glasses As{sub 2}S{sub 3} and AsSe by precipitation from solution. Analysis of spatially resolved optical spectra reveals that the glass aggregates into submillimeter areas inside the opal. These areas exhibit large shifts in the optical stop bands by up to 80 nm, and by comparison with modelling are shown to have uniform glass filling factors of opal pores up to 40%. Characterization of the domain structure of the opals prior to infiltration by large area angle-resolved spectroscopy is an important step in the analysis of the properties of the infiltrated regions. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Applications of finite-size scaling for atomic and non-equilibrium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antillon, Edwin A.

    We apply the theory of Finite-size scaling (FSS) to an atomic and a non-equilibrium system in order to extract critical parameters. In atomic systems, we look at the energy dependence on the binding charge near threshold between bound and free states, where we seek the critical nuclear charge for stability. We use different ab initio methods, such as Hartree-Fock, Density Functional Theory, and exact formulations implemented numerically with the finite-element method (FEM). Using Finite-size scaling formalism, where in this case the size of the system is related to the number of elements used in the basis expansion of the wavefunction, we predict critical parameters in the large basis limit. Results prove to be in good agreement with previous Slater-basis set calculations and demonstrate that this combined approach provides a promising first-principles approach to describe quantum phase transitions for materials and extended systems. In the second part we look at non-equilibrium one-dimensional model known as the raise and peel model describing a growing surface which grows locally and has non-local desorption. For a specific values of adsorption ( ua) and desorption (ud) the model shows interesting features. At ua = ud, the model is described by a conformal field theory (with conformal charge c = 0) and its stationary probability can be mapped to the ground state of a quantum chain and can also be related a two dimensional statistical model. For ua ≥ ud, the model shows a scale invariant phase in the avalanche distribution. In this work we study the surface dynamics by looking at avalanche distributions using FSS formalism and explore the effect of changing the boundary conditions of the model. The model shows the same universality for the cases with and with our the wall for an odd number of tiles removed, but we find a new exponent in the presence of a wall for an even number of avalanches released. We provide new conjecture for the probability distribution of

  17. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J.; Starr, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  18. Primary cardiac lymphoma mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is a rare malignancy which has been described as thickened myocardium due to the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes and accompanying intracardiac masses. Here, we report a case of a primary cardiac lymphoma without demonstrable intracardiac masses, mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy. A 40-year-old male presented with exertional dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having restrictive cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LV systolic function. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma was confirmed. After appropriate chemotherapy, he recovered his systolic function fully. PMID:23248217

  19. Simulations of sizing and comfort improvements for residential forced-air heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, I.S.; Degenetais, G.; Siegel, J.A.

    2002-05-01

    the use of this tool to perform detailed residential HVAC system simulations. The simulations have been verified by comparison to measured results in several houses over a wide range of weather conditions and HVAC system performance. After the verification was completed, more than 350 cooling and 450 heating simulations were performed. These simulations covered a range of HVAC system performance parameters and California climate conditions (that range from hot dry deserts to cold mountain regions). The results of the simulations were used to show the large increases in HVAC system performance that can be attained by improving the HVAC duct distribution systems and by better sizing of residential HVAC equipment. The simulations demonstrated that improved systems can deliver improved heating or cooling to the conditioned space, maintain equal or better comfort while reducing peak demand and the installed equipment capacity (and therefore capital costs).

  20. Pressureless infiltration of aluminum metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Y.; Nukami, T.; Flemings, M.C.

    1995-08-01

    Pressureless infiltration of ceramic preforms by molten aluminum is described. The preforms are SiC with varying amounts of particulate Al, Ti, and Ni. Infiltrants employed are pure Al and Al-12.5 wt pct Si. It is shown that a pressure differential within the preform is required for infiltration, and measurements are made of pressure changes in the preforms during infiltration. Results indicate that atmospheric pressure is essential for infiltration but that capillarity may play a role as well.

  1. Modeling and sizing optimization of hybrid photovoltaic/wind power generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanpanah, Mohammad-Ali

    2014-03-01

    The rapid industrialization and growth of world's human population have resulted in the unprecedented increase in the demand for energy and in particular electricity. Depletion of fossil fuels and impacts of global warming caused widespread attention using renewable energy sources, especially wind and solar energies. Energy security under varying weather conditions and the corresponding system cost are the two major issues in designing hybrid power generation systems. In this paper, the match evaluation method (MEM) is developed based on renewable energy supply/demand match evaluation criteria to size the proposed system in lowest cost. This work is undertaken with triple objective function: inequality coefficient, correlation coefficient, and annualized cost of system. It provides optimum capacity of as many numbers of supplies as required to match with a load demand in lowest investment, so it can handle large-scale design problems. Meteorological data were collected from the city of Zabol, located in south-east of Iran, as a case study. Six types of wind turbine and also six types of PV modules, with different output powers and costs, are considered for this optimization procedure. A battery storage system is used to even out irregularities in meteorological data. A multi-objective particle swarm optimization algorithm has been used for the prediction of an optimized set of design based on the MEM technique. The results of this study are valuable for evaluating the performance of future stand-alone hybrid power system. It is worth mentioning that the proposed methodology can be effectively employed for any composition of hybrid energy systems in any locations taking into account the meteorological data and the consumer's demand.

  2. Construction of a Full-size Component of the ICRH System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovani, S.; Sassi, M.; Coppi, B.

    2012-10-01

    The ICRH system is an important component of the Ignitor project and all efforts have been made to ensure that its design takes into account the construction experience gained in the most advanced laboratories. The system is designed to operate over a frequency range 80-120 MHz, which is consistent with the use of magnetic fields in the range 9-13 T. The maximum delivered power ranges from 8 MW (at 80 MHz) to 6 MW (at 120 MHz) distributed over 4 ports. Since the transition from a detailed design to the actual construction is not without surprises we have constructed a full size prototype of the VTL between the port flange and the antenna straps, with the external support and precise guiding system. The innovative quick latching system located at the end of the coaxial cable was successfully tested, providing perfect interference with the spring Be-Cu electrical contacts. Special care was given to the finishing of the inox surfaces, and to the TIG welds. Vacuum levels of 10-6, compatible with the limit of material degassing, and electrical tests up to 12 kV without discharges have been obtained. A revision of the other key components of the Ignitor machine has been undertaken, taking into account the experience gained in the fabrication of the corresponding prototypes.

  3. Linking structural and functional connectivity in a simple runoff-runon model over soils with heterogeneous infiltrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harel, M.; Mouche, E.

    2012-12-01

    Runoff production on a hillslope during a rainfall event may be simplified as follows. Given a soil of constant infiltrability I, which is the maximum amount of water that the soil can infiltrate, and a constant rainfall intensity R, runoff is observed wherever R is greater than I. The infiltration rate equals the infiltrability where runoff is produced, R otherwise. When ponding time, topography, and overall spatial and temporal variations of physical parameters, such as R and I, are neglected, the runoff equation remains simple. In this study, we consider soils of spatially variable infiltrability. As runoff can re-infiltrate on down-slope areas of higher infiltrabilities (runon process), the resulting process is highly non-linear. The stationary runoff equation is: Qn+1 = max (Qn + (R - In)*Δx , 0) where Qn is the runoff arriving on pixel n of size Δx [L2/T], R and In the rainfall intensity and infiltrability on that same pixel [L/T]. The non-linearity is due to the dependence of infiltration on R and Qn, that is runon. This re-infiltration process generates patterns of runoff along the slope, patterns that organise and connect differently to each other depending on the rainfall intensity and the nature of the soil heterogeneity. In order to characterize the runoff patterns and their connectivity, we use the connectivity function defined by Allard (1993) in Geostatistics. Our aim is to assess, in a stochastic framework, the runoff organization on 1D and 2D slopes with random infiltrabilities (log-normal, exponential and bimodal distributions) by means of numerical simulations. Firstly, we show how runoff is produced and organized in patterns along a 2D slope according to the infiltrability distribution. We specifically illustrate and discuss the link between the statistical nature of the infiltrability and that of the flow-rate, with a special focus on the relations between the connectivities of both fields: the structural connectivity (infiltrability patterns

  4. Optimal Sizing of Energy Storage and Photovoltaic Power Systems for Demand Charge Mitigation (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, J.; Simpson, M.

    2013-10-01

    Commercial facility utility bills are often a strong function of demand charges -- a fee proportional to peak power demand rather than total energy consumed. In some instances, demand charges can constitute more than 50% of a commercial customer's monthly electricity cost. While installation of behind-the-meter solar power generation decreases energy costs, its variability makes it likely to leave the peak load -- and thereby demand charges -- unaffected. This then makes demand charges an even larger fraction of remaining electricity costs. Adding controllable behind-the-meter energy storage can more predictably affect building peak demand, thus reducing electricity costs. Due to the high cost of energy storage technology, the size and operation of an energy storage system providing demand charge management (DCM) service must be optimized to yield a positive return on investment (ROI). The peak demand reduction achievable with an energy storage system depends heavily on a facility's load profile, so the optimal configuration will be specific to both the customer and the amount of installed solar power capacity. We explore the sensitivity of DCM value to the power and energy levels of installed solar power and energy storage systems. An optimal peak load reduction control algorithm for energy storage systems will be introduced and applied to historic solar power data and meter load data from multiple facilities for a broad range of energy storage system configurations. For each scenario, the peak load reduction and electricity cost savings will be computed. From this, we will identify a favorable energy storage system configuration that maximizes ROI.

  5. Model slope infiltration experiments for shallow landslides early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiano, E.; Greco, R.; Guida, A.; Olivares, L.; Picarelli, L.

    2009-04-01

    Occurrence of fast landslides has become more and more dangerous during the last decades, due to the increased density of settlements, industrial plants and infrastructures. Such problem is particularly worrying in Campania (Southern Italy), where the fast population growth led a diffuse building activity without planning: indeed, recent flowslides caused hundreds of victims and heavy damages to buildings, roads and other infrastructures. Large mountainous areas in Campania are mantled by loose pyroclastic granular soils up to a depth of a few meters from top soil surface. These soils have usually a grain size that falls in the domain of silty sands, including pumice interbeds (gravelly sands), with saturated hydraulic conductivities up to the order of 10-1 cm/min. Such deposits often cover steep slopes, which stability is guaranteed by the apparent cohesion due to suction under unsaturated conditions, that are the most common conditions for these slopes [Olivares and Picarelli, 2001]. Whereas rainfall infiltration causes soil to approach saturation, suction vanishes and slope failure may occur. Besides soil physical properties, landslide triggering is influenced by several factors, such as rainfall intensity, soil initial moisture and suction, slope inclination, boundary conditions. Whereas slope failure occurs with soil close to being saturated, landslide may develop in form of fast and destructive flowslide. Calibration of reliable mathematical models of such a complex phenomenon requires availability of experimental observations of the major variables of interest, such as soil moisture and suction, soil deformation and displacements, pore water pressure, during the entire process of infiltration until slope failure. Due to the sudden trigger and extremely rapid propagation of such type of landslides, such data sets are rarely available for natural slopes where flowslides occurred. As a consequence landslide risk assessment and early warning in Campania rely on

  6. Modeling Engineered Approaches to Enhance Denitrification under Rapid Infiltration Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, P. T.; Akhavan, M.; Finsterle, S.; Andres, S.

    2012-12-01

    Rapid Infiltration Basin Systems (RIBS) use the controlled application of treated wastewater to soil to remove wastewater constituents before recharging groundwater. Because wastewater from new wastewater treatment plants is often enriched in NO3, denitrification (DNF) is the most important process for nitrogen removal. Two key requirements for DNF in the subsurface are the absence of molecular oxygen and an adequate supply of carbon to serve as a substrate for heterotrophic bacteria. These requirements can be met by adjusting the wastewater application to maximize anaerobic conditions beneath the infiltration basin, and by incorporating a carbon source layer, where carbon is supplied to infiltrating wastewater by dissolution from a solid matrix, e.g., woodchips. To examine the interplay between alternative wastewater application approaches and the length and thickness of the carbon source layer on DNF, a series of simulations were conducted in two soil types using TOUGHREACT. Because RIBS are often overdesigned, basins may be only partially flooded such that overland flow within the basin controls the infiltration area. For this reason, TOUGHREACT was modified to include both overland and subsurface flow. Simulations with the coupled overland flow-vadose zone model predict uneven water distribution over the basins, a condition that significantly affects DNF. Smaller ratios of wetting to drying time, i.e., shorter but more intense flooding periods, result in greater water saturations, shorter residence times and lower oxygen concentrations in the vadose zone, ultimately resulting in greater DNF. While the addition of a carbon source layer at the bottom of the RIBS is essential for supplying needed carbon, flow bypassing around this carbon layer, which is typically of lower permeability than the surrounding soil, can be problematic. These simulations demonstrate the interplay between the selection of wastewater application approach and carbon source layer design on

  7. Histologic Assessment of Intratumoral Lymphoplasmacytic Infiltration Is Useful in Predicting Prognosis of Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Akimasa; Shibahara, Junji; Misumi, Kento; Arita, Junichi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Fukayama, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the clinicopathologic significance of intratumoral lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in a large cohort of patients with solitary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Based on examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, significant infiltration was defined as dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, either multifocal or diffuse, in 2 or more fields under low-power magnification. Of 544 cases, 216 (39.7%) were positive for significant infiltration (HCC-LI group), while 328 (60.3%) were negative (HCC-NLI group). There were no significant between-group differences in patient age, sex, or background etiology. The lower incidence of Child-Pugh stage B (P = 0.001) and lower level of indocyanine green retention rate at 15 minutes (P < 0.001) in the HCC-LI group indicated better liver function in this group. Histologically, tumors were significantly smaller in size in the HCC-LI group than in the HCC-NLI group (P < 0.001). In addition, prominent neutrophilic infiltration, interstitial fibrosis and tumor steatosis were significantly more frequent (P < 0.001) in the HCC-LI group, while tumor necrosis was significantly less frequent (P = 0.008). Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed that overall and recurrence-free survival were significantly better in the HCC-LI group (P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that intratumoral lymphoplasmacytic infiltration was independently prognostic of both overall and recurrence-free survival (P < 0.001), with absence of infiltration showing high Cox-hazard ratios for poor prognosis. In conclusion, intratumoral lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, as determined by assessment of hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides, was significantly associated with the clinical and pathologic features of HCC and has profound prognostic importance. PMID:27195977

  8. Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Timothy C.; Wham, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

  9. Instrument Development of Real Time Holographic Water Drop Size Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Springston, Stephen

    2007-02-09

    BNL participated with multiple correspondences with Physical Optics Corporation (POC) on the design considerations of an airbome instrument. A pod for extemal deployment ofthe POC unit on the DOE Research Aircraft Facility (RAF), an instrumented, Grumman G-1 aircraft was loaned to POC. BNL proposed evaluation flight tests between the POC unit and the BNL Cloud Aerosol Probe Spectrometer (CAPS) as a reference method. BNL's involvement is described in the semi-annual report ofPOC to DOE. Because of unanticipated technical and engineering difficulties, POC was unable to fit their instrument into an aircraft pod. As a result they are now focusing on a ground-based version first. A prototype laboratory version of the Real-Time Holographic Water Drop Size Measurement (WDSM) System has been constructed.

  10. Beam-energy and system-size dependence of dynamical net charge fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moira, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Dictel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, J.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2009-02-01

    We present measurements of net charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at sNN=19.6, 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, Cu+Cu collisions at sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV, and p+p collisions at s=200 GeV using the dynamical net charge fluctuations measure ν+-,dyn. We observe that the dynamical fluctuations are nonzero at all energies and exhibit a modest dependence on beam energy. A weak system size dependence is also observed. We examine the collision centrality dependence of the net charge fluctuations and find that dynamical net charge fluctuations violate 1/Nch scaling but display approximate 1/Npart scaling. We also study the azimuthal and rapidity dependence of the net charge correlation strength and observe strong dependence on the azimuthal angular range and pseudorapidity widths integrated to measure the correlation.

  11. Fully anharmonic IR and Raman spectra of medium-size molecular systems: accuracy and interpretation†

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Computation of full infrared (IR) and Raman spectra (including absolute intensities and transition energies) for medium- and large-sized molecular systems beyond the harmonic approximation is one of the most interesting challenges of contemporary computational chemistry. Contrary to common beliefs, low-order perturbation theory is able to deliver results of high accuracy (actually often better than those issuing from current direct dynamics approaches) provided that anharmonic resonances are properly managed. This perspective sketches the recent developments in our research group toward the development a robust and user-friendly virtual spectrometer rooted into the second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) and usable also by non-specialists essentially as a black-box procedure. Several examples are explicitly worked out in order to illustrate the features of our computational tool together with the most important ongoing developments. PMID:24346191

  12. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuyu

    2012-12-31

    difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation.

  13. An Infiltration Exercise for Introductory Soil Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbarick, K. A.; Ippolito, J. A.; Butters, G.; Sorge, G. M.

    2005-01-01

    One of the largest challenges in teaching introductory soil science is explaining the dynamics of soil infiltration. To aid students in understanding the concept and to further engage them in active learning in the soils laboratory course, we developed an exercise using Decagon Mini-Disk Infiltrometers with a tension head (h[subscript o]) of 2 cm.…

  14. Nano-ceria pre-infiltration improves La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3-x infiltrated Solid Oxide Fuel Cell cathode performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burye, Theodore E.; Nicholas, Jason D.

    2015-12-01

    Here, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermo-gravimetric analysis experiments show that the pre-infiltration of Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (GDC) nano-particles reduces the average size of La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3-x (LSCF) produced from the subsequent infiltration of precursor nitrate solutions containing the surfactant Triton X-100 or the chelating agent citric acid. In contrast, GDC pre-infiltration has no effect on the average size of LSCF particles produced from precursor solutions containing only lanthanum, strontium, cobalt, and iron nitrate. Consistent with the observed particle size trends, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements show that GDC pre-infiltration improves the performance of Triton X-100 Derived (TXD) LSCF-GDC cathodes and Citric Acid Derived (CAD) LSCF-GDC cathodes, but has no effect on the performance of Pure Nitrate Derived (PND) LSCF-GDC cathodes. In particular, TXD LSCF-GDC cathodes with more than ∼5 vol% of GDC pre-infiltration display average LSCF particle sizes of 21 nm and open-circuit polarization resistance values of 0.10 Ωcm2 at 540 °C, compared to 48 nm and 640 °C without GDC pre-infiltration. Results suggest that this 100 °C reduction in cathode operating temperature is caused solely by LSCF particle size reductions. 7.4 vol% GDC pre-infiltrated TXD LSCF-GDC cathodes also display lower 540 °C degradation rates than conventionally infiltrated PND LSCF-GDC cathodes.

  15. Nano-ceria pre-infiltration improves La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3-x infiltrated Solid Oxide Fuel Cell cathode performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burye, Theodore E.; Nicholas, Jason D.

    2015-12-01

    Here, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermo-gravimetric analysis experiments show that the pre-infiltration of Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (GDC) nano-particles reduces the average size of La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3-x (LSCF) produced from the subsequent infiltration of precursor nitrate solutions containing the surfactant Triton X-100 or the chelating agent citric acid. In contrast, GDC pre-infiltration has no effect on the average size of LSCF particles produced from precursor solutions containing only lanthanum, strontium, cobalt, and iron nitrate. Consistent with the observed particle size trends, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements show that GDC pre-infiltration improves the performance of Triton X-100 Derived (TXD) LSCF-GDC cathodes and Citric Acid Derived (CAD) LSCF-GDC cathodes, but has no effect on the performance of Pure Nitrate Derived (PND) LSCF-GDC cathodes. In particular, TXD LSCF-GDC cathodes with more than ˜5 vol% of GDC pre-infiltration display average LSCF particle sizes of 21 nm and open-circuit polarization resistance values of 0.10 Ωcm2 at 540 °C, compared to 48 nm and 640 °C without GDC pre-infiltration. Results suggest that this 100 °C reduction in cathode operating temperature is caused solely by LSCF particle size reductions. 7.4 vol% GDC pre-infiltrated TXD LSCF-GDC cathodes also display lower 540 °C degradation rates than conventionally infiltrated PND LSCF-GDC cathodes.

  16. Learning and liking an artificial musical system: Effects of set size and repeated exposure

    PubMed Central

    Loui, Psyche; Wessel, David

    2009-01-01

    We report an investigation of humans' musical learning ability using a novel musical system. We designed an artificial musical system based on the Bohlen-Pierce scale, a scale very different from Western music. Melodies were composed from chord progressions in the new scale by applying the rules of a finite-state grammar. After exposing participants to sets of melodies, we conducted listening tests to assess learning, including recognition tests, generalization tests, and subjective preference ratings. In Experiment 1, participants were presented with 15 melodies 27 times each. Forced choice results showed that participants were able to recognize previously encountered melodies and generalize their knowledge to new melodies, suggesting internalization of the musical grammar. Preference ratings showed no differentiation among familiar, new, and ungrammatical melodies. In Experiment 2, participants were given 10 melodies 40 times each. Results showed superior recognition but unsuccessful generalization. Additionally, preference ratings were significantly higher for familiar melodies. Results from the two experiments suggest that humans can internalize the grammatical structure of a new musical system following exposure to a sufficiently large set size of melodies, but musical preference results from repeated exposure to a small number of items. This dissociation between grammar learning and preference will be further discussed. PMID:20151034

  17. TELICS—A Telescope Instrument Control System for Small/Medium Sized Astronomical Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Mudit K.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Burse, Mahesh P.; Chordia, Pravin A.; Chillal, Kalpesh S.; Mestry, Vilas B.; Das, Hillol K.; Kohok, Abhay A.

    2009-10-01

    For any modern astronomical observatory, it is essential to have an efficient interface between the telescope and its back-end instruments. However, for small and medium-sized observatories, this requirement is often limited by tight financial constraints. Therefore a simple yet versatile and low-cost control system is required for such observatories to minimize cost and effort. Here we report the development of a modern, multipurpose instrument control system TELICS (Telescope Instrument Control System) to integrate the controls of various instruments and devices mounted on the telescope. TELICS consists of an embedded hardware unit known as a common control unit (CCU) in combination with Linux-based data acquisition and user interface. The hardware of the CCU is built around the ATmega 128 microcontroller (Atmel Corp.) and is designed with a backplane, master-slave architecture. A Qt-based graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed and the back-end application software is based on C/C++. TELICS provides feedback mechanisms that give the operator good visibility and a quick-look display of the status and modes of instruments as well as data. TELICS has been used for regular science observations since 2008 March on the 2 m, f/10 IUCAA Telescope located at Girawali in Pune, India.

  18. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on the Rheology of Dispersed Systems.

    PubMed

    Luckham; Ukeje

    1999-12-15

    The rheological properties of aqueous polystyrene latex dispersions from three synthetic batches, with nearly the same z-average particle sizes, 400 nm, but varying degrees of polydispersity, 0.085, 0.301, and 0.485, respectively, were systematically investigated using steady-state shear and oscillatory shear measurements. The particles were sized with photon correlation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy and were stabilized sterically with PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer (Synperonic F127). Results from steady-state shear measurements show that the viscosities of the systems exhibit shear-thinning behavior at high solid fractions. However, the degree of shear thinning depends on the breadth of particle size distribution, with the narrowest distribution suspension exhibiting the highest degree of shear thinning. The Herschel-Bulkley relationship best describes the flow curves. The relative viscosities as a function of volume fraction data were compared, and it was found that the broadest distribution suspension had the lowest viscosity for a given volume fraction. In addition, the data were fitted to the Krieger-Dougherty equation for hard spheres. A reasonable agreement of theory with experiment is observed, particularly and surprisingly for the very broad distribution. However, when the contribution to the volume due to the adsorbed polymer layer is considered, the agreement between experiment and theory becomes closer for all the suspensions, although the agreement for the broad distribution suspension is now worse. Fitting the Dougherty-Krieger theory to the experimental data based on our experimental maximum packing fractions gives very good agreement for all the systems studied. From oscillatory shear measurements, the moduli were obtained as a function of frequency at various latex volume fractions. The results show general change of the dispersions from viscous (G" > G') at low volume fractions (0.25-0.30) to moderately elastic (G' > G") at

  19. Effects of explosively venting aerosol-sized particles through earth-containment systems on the cloud-stabilization height

    SciTech Connect

    Dyckes, G.W.

    1980-07-01

    A method of approximating the cloud stabilization height for aerosol-sized particles vented explosively through earth containment systems is presented. The calculated values for stabilization heights are in fair agreement with those obtained experimentally.

  20. Combining Saturnian Craters and Kuiper Belt Observations to Build an Outer Solar System Impactor Size-Frequency Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minton, D. A.; Richardson, J. E.; Thomas, P.; Kirchoff, M.; Schwamb, M. E.

    2012-05-01

    Using Cassini mission imagery of the icy satellites of Saturn, numerical simulations, and telescopic observation data we produce a model size frequency distribution for outer solar system impactors spanning tens of meters to thousands of kilometers.

  1. Combining Saturnian Craters and Kuiper Belt Observations to Build an Outer Solar System Impactor Size-Frequency Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minton, D. A.; Richardson, J. E.; Thomas, P.; Kirchoff, M.; Schwamb, M. E.

    2012-03-01

    Using Cassini mission imagery of the icy satellites of Saturn, numerical simulations, and telescopic observation data we produce a model size frequency distribution for outer solar system impactors spanning tens of meters to thousands of kilometers.

  2. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed preprocessing supply system designs

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, jr., David J.; Langholtz, Matthew H.; Tan, Eric; Jacobson, Jacob; Schwab, Amy; Wu, May; Argo, Andrew; Brandt, Craig C.; Cafferty, Kara; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Dutta, Abhijit; Eaton, Laurence M.; Searcy, Erin

    2014-03-31

    The 2011 US Billion-Ton Update estimates that by 2030 there will be enough agricultural and forest resources to sustainably provide at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, enough to displace approximately 30% of the country's current petroleum consumption. A portion of these resources are inaccessible at current cost targets with conventional feedstock supply systems because of their remoteness or low yields. Reliable analyses and projections of US biofuels production depend on assumptions about the supply system and biorefinery capacity, which, in turn, depend upon economic value, feedstock logistics, and sustainability. A cross-functional team has examined combinations of advances in feedstock supply systems and biorefinery capacities with rigorous design information, improved crop yield and agronomic practices, and improved estimates of sustainable biomass availability. A previous report on biochemical refinery capacity noted that under advanced feedstock logistic supply systems that include depots and pre-processing operations there are cost advantages that support larger biorefineries up to 10 000 DMT/day facilities compared to the smaller 2000 DMT/day facilities. This report focuses on analyzing conventional versus advanced depot biomass supply systems for a thermochemical conversion and refinery sizing based on woody biomass. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the economies of scale enabled by advanced logistics offsets much of the added logistics costs from additional depot processing and transportation, resulting in a small overall increase to the minimum ethanol selling price compared to the conventional logistic supply system. While the overall costs do increase slightly for the advanced logistic supply systems, the ability to mitigate moisture and ash in the system will improve the storage and conversion processes. In addition, being able to draw on feedstocks from further distances will decrease the risk of biomass supply to the

  3. Disinfection of secondary effluents by infiltration percolation.

    PubMed

    Makni, H

    2001-01-01

    Among the most attractive applications of reclaimed wastewater are: irrigation of public parks, sports fields, golf courses and market gardening. These uses require advanced wastewater treatment including disinfection. According to WHO guidelines (1989) and current rules and regulations in Tunisia, faecal coliform levels have to be reduced to < 10(3) or 10(2) CFU/100 mL. In Tunisia, most wastewater plants are only secondary treatment and, in order to meet health related regulations, the effluents need to be disinfected. However, it is usual for secondary effluents to need filtration prior to disinfection. Effectiveness of conventional disinfection processes, such as chlorination and UV radiation, are dependent upon the oxidation level and the levels of suspended solids of the treated water. Ozonation is relatively expensive and energy consuming. The consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of conventional techniques, their reliability, investment needs and operational costs will lead to the use of less sophisticated alternative techniques for certain facilities. Among alternative techniques, soil aquifer treatment and infiltration percolation through sand beds have been studied in Arizona, Israel, France, Spain and Morocco. Infiltration percolation plants have been intermittently fed with secondary or high quality primary effluents which percolated through 1.5-2 m unsaturated coarse sand and were recovered by under-drains. In such infiltration percolation facilities, microorganisms were eliminated through numerous physical, physicochemical and biological inter-related processes (mechanical filtration, adsorption and microbial degradation respectively). Efficiency of faecal coliform removal was dependent upon the water detention times in the filtering medium and on the oxidation of the filtered water. Effluents of Sfax town aerated ponds were infiltrated through 1.5 m deep sand columns in order to determine the performance of infiltration percolation in the

  4. Immunophenotypic features of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes from mammary carcinomas in female dogs associated with prognostic factors and survival rates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The immune system plays an important role in the multifactorial biologic system during the development of neoplasias. However, the involvement of the inflammatory response in the promotion/control of malignant cells is still controversial, and the cell subsets and the mechanisms involved are poorly investigated. The goal of this study was to characterize the clinical-pathological status and the immunophenotyping profile of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and their association with the animal survival rates in canine mammary carcinomas. Methods Fifty-one animals with mammary carcinomas, classified as carcinomas in mixed tumors-MC-BMT = 31 and carcinomas-MC = 20 were submitted to systematic clinical-pathological analysis (tumor size; presence of lymph node and pulmonary metastasis; clinical stage; histological grade; inflammatory distribution and intensity as well as the lymphocytic infiltrate intensity) and survival rates. Twenty-four animals (MC-BMT = 16 and MC = 8) were elected to the immunophenotypic study performed by flow cytometry. Results Data analysis demonstrated that clinical stage II-IV and histological grade was I more frequent in MC-BMT as compared to MC. Univariate analysis demonstrated that the intensity of inflammation (moderate/intense) and the proportion of CD4+ (≥ 66.7%) or CD8+ T-cells (<33.3%) were not associated with worse survival rate. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that only lymphocytic infiltrate intensity ≥ 600 (P = 0.02) remained as independent prognostic factor. Despite the clinical manifestation, the lymphocytes represented the predominant cell type in the tumor infiltrate. The percentage of T-cells was higher in animals with MC-BMT without metastasis, while the percentage of B-lymphocytes was greater in animals with metastasized MC-BMT (P < 0.05). The relative percentage of CD4+ T-cells was significantly greater in metastasized tumors (both MC-BMT and MC), (P < 0.05) while the proportion of CD8+ T-cells was higher in

  5. Stir mixing and pressureless infiltration synthesis of aluminum alloy metal matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Benjamin Franklin

    2009-12-01

    Pressureless liquid metal infiltration of suitably packed compacts of spherical shaped 47 nm size 70:30 Delta:Gamma Al2O3 mixed with a 7/2 ratio of elemental Al and Mg powders was used to study (i) the kinetics of pressureless infiltration processing of Al2O 3 nanoparticle-A206 alloy composites, (ii) the optimal processing variables to maximize material property responses, (iii) the development of multimodal microstructures in terms of feature size. The major experimental variables included: infiltration temperature (850 to 950°C), infiltration time (1--5 hours), and powder composition (0--50 wt% Al2O 3). All experiments were conducted under UHP nitrogen atmosphere. Under the conditions studied, compacts with a maximum of 20 wt% nanoparticles were successfully infiltrated with A206 alloy aluminum, and the degree of infiltration measured by the percentage of residual porosity depended on infiltration time, temperature and nanoparticle content. By examining responses including percent porosity, and macrohardness, empirical models for correlating processing conditions with material properties and microstructure were developed. The addition of increasing weight percentage of Al2O3 nanoparticles resulted in a decrease in the coefficient of thermal expansion greater than that predicted by the rule of mixtures due to the mechanical constraint of the nanoparticles on the matrix. Likewise, the damping capacity of the 10 wt% and 20 wt% reinforced nanocomposites increased with increasing weight percentage up to 280% greater than the base alloy. The key microstructural observations in the pressureless infiltrated composites include: (1) a bimodal structure of micro-scale grains, exhibiting Al-Cu-Mg precipitates dispersed within the grains; (2) amorphous and crystalline interfaces between the Al-alloy grains and the nanocomposite regions; (3) infiltrated nanoparticle agglomerates having nanoscale channels forming a nanoscale substructure; (4) mixed nanoscale reinforcements of

  6. Infiltration characteristics of non-aqueous phase liquids in undisturbed loessal soil cores.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunqiang; Shao, Ming'an

    2009-01-01

    The widespread contamination of soils and aquifers by non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL), such as crude oil, poses serious environmental and health hazards globally. Understanding the infiltration characteristics of NAPL in soil is crucial in mitigating or remediating soil contamination. The infiltration characteristics of crude and diesel oils into undisturbed loessal soil cores, collected in polymethyl methacrylate cylindrical columns, were investigated under a constant fluid head (3 cm) of either crude oil or diesel oil. The infiltration rate of both crude and diesel oils decreased exponentially as wetting depth increased with time. Soil core size and bulk density both had significant effects on NAPL infiltration through the undisturbed soil cores; a smaller core size or a greater bulk density could reduce oil penetration to depth. Compacting soil in areas susceptible to oil spills may be an effective stratage to reduce contamination. The infiltration of NAPL into soil cores was spatially anisotropic and heterogeneous, thus recording the data at four points on the soil core is a good stratage to improve the accuracy of experimental results. Our results revealed that crude and diesel oils, rather than their components, have a practical value for remediation of contaminated loessal soils. PMID:19999998

  7. The gravitational lens candidate HE 1104-1805 and the size of absorption systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smette, A.; Robertson, J. G.; Shaver, P. A.; Reimers, D.; Wisotzki, L.; Koehler, T.

    1995-10-01

    1.2A resolution spectra over the range 3175-7575A have been obtained for the two components of the gravitational lens candidate HE 1104-1805 (z=2.31, m_B_=16.7 and 18.6, separation =3.0arcsec; cf. Wisotzki et al. 1993), with the aim of setting limits on the sizes of the clouds producing the Ly-α, C IV, and Mg II absorption systems. The Ly-α absorption lines are strongly correlated in equivalent width, suggesting that the two lines of sight pass through the same clouds in all cases, and there are no significant differences in velocities within =~10km/s between corresponding pairs of lines. From the 72 Lyα lines with W_rest_>0.085A (and λ>3395A) detected at 5σ in A and 3σ in B we statistically derive a 2σ lower limit of 100h_50_^-1^kpc for the diameter of spherical Ly-α clouds, assuming that the lens redshift z_L_>1, H_0_=50h_50_km/s/Mpc, q_0_=0.5, and {LAMBDA}=0. Similarly, 2σ lower limits of 100, 60 and 20h_50_^-1^kpc are obtained for the region inside the clouds giving rise to lines with W_rest_>0.17, 0.32 and 0.60A respectively. These values and the strong correlation between Ly-α cloud line equivalent widths are hardly compatible with the spherical mini-halo model. For the systems causing the C IV and Mg II absorption lines, we find 2σ lower limits of 28 and 22h_50_^-1^kpc respectively for W_rest_>0..3A. Again the equivalent widths of corresponding lines are correlated, though some lines are not seen in both spectra; the redshift differences between corresponding pairs of lines are small. A damped Ly-α system is present in one spectrum (A) but not in the other (B), indicating a typical size of the order of the separation of the two lines of sight at that redshift (z_abs_=1.6616), ~8-25h_50_^-1^kpc depending on the actual geometry of the system. Some high-ionization lines in this system have similar characteristics in both spectra, while all low-ionization lines are much weaker in the spectrum of B. This suggests that, while the region causing the low

  8. Design of a Particle Shadowgraph Velocimetry and Size (PSVS) System to Determine Particle Size and Density Distributions (PSDD) in Hanford Nuclear Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, Matthew S.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Howe, Daniel T.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ

    2012-01-10

    An accurate particle size and density distribution (PSDD) for nuclear tank wastes is an essential piece of information that helps determine the engineering requirements for a host of waste management unit operations including tank mixing, pipeline transport, and filtration. The existing approach has involved a laborious approach in which individual particles are identified using SEM/XRD methods and the density of these materials obtained from the technical literature. Further, some methods simply approximate individual particle densities by assuming chemical composition rather than actual measurements of particle density. A particle shadowgraph velocimetry and size (PSVS) system has been designed to obtain representative PSDDs for a broad range of Hanford tank waste materials existing as both individual particles and agglomerates. The PSVS utilizes optical hardware, a temperature controlled settling column, and particle introduction chamber to accurately and reproducibly obtain images of settling particles. Image analysis software then provides a highly accurate determination of both particle terminal velocity and equivalent spherical particle diameter. The particle/agglomerate density is then calculated from Newton’s terminal settling theory. The PSVS was designed to accurately image particle/agglomerate sizes between 10-1000µm and particle/agglomerate densities ranging from 1.4-11.5g/cm3 where the maximum terminal velocity does not exceed 20cm/s. Preliminary testing was completed and results were in good agreement with terminal settling theory. Recent results of this method development are presented, as well as experimental design, and future proposed work.

  9. Semi-automated nanoprecipitation-system--an option for operator independent, scalable and size adjustable nanoparticle synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rietscher, René; Thum, Carolin; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Schneider, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The preparation of nano-sized carrier systems increasingly moved into focus of pharmaceutical research and industry in the past decades. Besides the drug load and properties of the selected polymer/lipid, the size of such particles is one of the most important parameters regarding their use as efficient drug delivery systems. However, the preparation of nanoparticles with different sizes in a controlled manner is challenging, especially in terms of reproducibility and scale-up possibility. To overcome these hurdles we developed a system relying on nanoprecipitation, which meets all these requirements of an operator independent, scalable and size-adjustable nanoparticle synthesis-the Semi-Automated Nanoprecipitation-System. This system enables the adaption of the particle size to specific needs based on the process parameters-injection rate, flow rate and polymer concentration-identified within this study. The basic set-up is composed of a syringe pump and a gear pump for a precise control of the flow and injection speed of the system. Furthermore, a home-made tube-straightener guarantees a curvature-free injection point. Thus it could be shown that the production of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles from 150 to 600 nm with a narrow size distribution in a controlled semi-automatic manner is possible. PMID:25547536

  10. Combined geophysical methods for mapping infiltration pathways at the Aurora Water Aquifer recharge and recovery site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper, Cameron A.

    Although aquifer recharge and recovery systems are a sustainable, decentralized, low cost, and low energy approach for the reclamation, treatment, and storage of post- treatment wastewater, they can suffer from poor infiltration rates and the development of a near-surface clogging layer within infiltration ponds. One such aquifer recharge and recovery system, the Aurora Water site in Colorado, U.S.A, functions at about 25% of its predicted capacity to recharge floodplain deposits by flooding infiltration ponds with post-treatment wastewater extracted from river bank aquifers along the South Platte River. The underwater self-potential method was developed to survey self-potential signals at the ground surface in a flooded infiltration pond for mapping infiltration pathways. A method for using heat as a groundwater tracer within the infiltration pond used an array of in situ high-resolution temperature sensing probes. Both relatively positive and negative underwater self-potential anomalies are consistent with observed recovery well pumping rates and specific discharge estimates from temperature data. Results from electrical resistivity tomography and electromagnetics surveys provide consistent electrical conductivity distributions associated with sediment textures. A lab method was developed for resistivity tests of near-surface sediment samples. Forward numerical modeling synthesizes the geophysical information to best match observed self- potential anomalies and provide permeability distributions, which is important for effective aquifer recharge and recovery system design, and optimization strategy development.

  11. Riverbed Bioclogging and the Effects on Infiltration and Carbon Flux under Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomer, M. E.; Hubbard, S. S.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Maier, U.; Schmidt, C.; Thullner, M.; Ulrich, C.; Flipo, N.; Rubin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In California and other regions with Mediterranean climates, losing rivers are common and can introduce dynamic feedbacks affecting total transport of infiltration and nutrients, as well as unsaturated zone formation. Permeability decline from hyporheic zone bioclogging is one such feedback mechanism that is thought to highly depend on the initial grain size distribution during each seasonal cycle. Variability from the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) can influence the initial grain size distribution demonstrating a large scale climate-control on biogeochemical fluxes. To address these questions, we simulated biological growth and carbon dynamics using 1D and 2D MIN3P numerical models, allowing a range of initial grains size distributions to represent ENSO control of riverbed scour. We quantified microbial growth and total carbon and infiltration fluxes. Our results showed that infiltration declines due to bioclogging were greatest in higher permeability sediments (typical of El Niño with greater probability of bankfull discharge). However, in these higher permeability sediments, cumulative carbon fluxes and infiltration volumes were lower than more drought-like, La Niña conditions (less probability of riverbed scour). Additionally, we found the initial sediment grain size distribution exerted strong control on the location of the bioclogging hotspot when an unsaturated zone developed. Our results demonstrate a flow and nutrient transport feedback mechanism where bioclogging and carbon cycling become limited from ENSO controlled initial conditions. These results provide a new understanding of nutrient cycling and hotspot bioclogging in losing rivers worldwide.

  12. Time-lapse Measurements of Electrical Resistivities to Characterise Snowmelt Infiltration Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, H. K.; Du Saire, M.; Binley, A.; Baker, J.

    2006-12-01

    During snowmelt Oslo airport has on repeated occations experienced the formation of large meltwater ponds due to impermeable ice forming below the snowcover. The airport is situated on a large glacial outwash plane with coarse sandy gravely sediments, hence the area normaly has a high infiltration capacity. Focussed infiltration can cause fast transport of contaminants to the groundwater, hence improved understanding of the processes determining where and how the focussed infiltration takes place is important. Previously the melting process has been monitored successfully on a small scale (4 m2) using a two dimensional grid of permanently installed electrodes (French and Binley, 2004). In the present work snowmelt infiltration was monitored by time-lapse measurements of electrical resistivity using grounded electrodes on 4 and 20 m2 plots and a capacitively coupled resistivity system (Ohmmapper, Geometrics) on a larger scale. While the smaller scale systems provide 3D images the capacitively coupled system was used to monitor changes in two dimensional vertical sections in a retention pond adjacent to one of the runways. The area covered by 4 lines was 170 m by 340 m. The initial data were collected late in the spring (2006) during the final stages of the snowmelt. The lines were repeated later in the year when the soil profile was dryer. The lines show good consistency in the description of the general geology of the subsurface and the time-lapse changes describe the infiltration pattern that occurred during snowmelt and subsequent drainage. The surveys provide useful information about the differences in spatial distribution of snowmelt infiltration at different scales. And there are good indications that capacitively coupled resistivity surveys can be used to describe infiltration processes at relatively large spacio-temporal scales. References French, H. and A. Binley, 2004, Snowmelt infiltration: monitoring temporal and spatial variability using time- lapse

  13. Inference for Stochastic Chemical Kinetics Using Moment Equations and System Size Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Philipp; Kazeroonian, Atefeh; Theis, Fabian J.; Grima, Ramon; Hasenauer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative mechanistic models are valuable tools for disentangling biochemical pathways and for achieving a comprehensive understanding of biological systems. However, to be quantitative the parameters of these models have to be estimated from experimental data. In the presence of significant stochastic fluctuations this is a challenging task as stochastic simulations are usually too time-consuming and a macroscopic description using reaction rate equations (RREs) is no longer accurate. In this manuscript, we therefore consider moment-closure approximation (MA) and the system size expansion (SSE), which approximate the statistical moments of stochastic processes and tend to be more precise than macroscopic descriptions. We introduce gradient-based parameter optimization methods and uncertainty analysis methods for MA and SSE. Efficiency and reliability of the methods are assessed using simulation examples as well as by an application to data for Epo-induced JAK/STAT signaling. The application revealed that even if merely population-average data are available, MA and SSE improve parameter identifiability in comparison to RRE. Furthermore, the simulation examples revealed that the resulting estimates are more reliable for an intermediate volume regime. In this regime the estimation error is reduced and we propose methods to determine the regime boundaries. These results illustrate that inference using MA and SSE is feasible and possesses a high sensitivity. PMID:27447730

  14. Inference for Stochastic Chemical Kinetics Using Moment Equations and System Size Expansion.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Fabian; Thomas, Philipp; Kazeroonian, Atefeh; Theis, Fabian J; Grima, Ramon; Hasenauer, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative mechanistic models are valuable tools for disentangling biochemical pathways and for achieving a comprehensive understanding of biological systems. However, to be quantitative the parameters of these models have to be estimated from experimental data. In the presence of significant stochastic fluctuations this is a challenging task as stochastic simulations are usually too time-consuming and a macroscopic description using reaction rate equations (RREs) is no longer accurate. In this manuscript, we therefore consider moment-closure approximation (MA) and the system size expansion (SSE), which approximate the statistical moments of stochastic processes and tend to be more precise than macroscopic descriptions. We introduce gradient-based parameter optimization methods and uncertainty analysis methods for MA and SSE. Efficiency and reliability of the methods are assessed using simulation examples as well as by an application to data for Epo-induced JAK/STAT signaling. The application revealed that even if merely population-average data are available, MA and SSE improve parameter identifiability in comparison to RRE. Furthermore, the simulation examples revealed that the resulting estimates are more reliable for an intermediate volume regime. In this regime the estimation error is reduced and we propose methods to determine the regime boundaries. These results illustrate that inference using MA and SSE is feasible and possesses a high sensitivity. PMID:27447730

  15. Design of a Reconfigurable Robotic System for Flexoextension Fitted to Hand Fingers Size.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pereyra, J Felipe; Castillo-Castaneda, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing demand for assistance in rehabilitation therapies for hand movements, a robotic system is proposed to mobilize the hand fingers in flexion and extension exercises. The robotic system is composed by four, type slider-crank, mechanisms that have the ability to fit the user fingers length from the index to the little finger, through the adjustment of only one link for each mechanism. The trajectory developed by each mechanism corresponds to the natural flexoextension path of each finger. The amplitude of the rotations for metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) varies from 0 to 90° and the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) varies from 0 to 60°; the joint rotations are coordinated naturally. The four R-RRT mechanisms orientation allows a 15° abduction movement for index, ring, and little fingers. The kinematic analysis of this mechanism was developed in order to assure that the displacement speed and smooth acceleration into the desired range of motion and the simulation results are presented. The reconfiguration of mechanisms covers about 95% of hand sizes of a group of Mexican adult population. Maximum trajectory tracking error is less than 3% in full range of movement and it can be compensated by the additional rotation of finger joints without injury to the user. PMID:27524880

  16. Design of a Reconfigurable Robotic System for Flexoextension Fitted to Hand Fingers Size

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Castaneda, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing demand for assistance in rehabilitation therapies for hand movements, a robotic system is proposed to mobilize the hand fingers in flexion and extension exercises. The robotic system is composed by four, type slider-crank, mechanisms that have the ability to fit the user fingers length from the index to the little finger, through the adjustment of only one link for each mechanism. The trajectory developed by each mechanism corresponds to the natural flexoextension path of each finger. The amplitude of the rotations for metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) varies from 0 to 90° and the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) varies from 0 to 60°; the joint rotations are coordinated naturally. The four R-RRT mechanisms orientation allows a 15° abduction movement for index, ring, and little fingers. The kinematic analysis of this mechanism was developed in order to assure that the displacement speed and smooth acceleration into the desired range of motion and the simulation results are presented. The reconfiguration of mechanisms covers about 95% of hand sizes of a group of Mexican adult population. Maximum trajectory tracking error is less than 3% in full range of movement and it can be compensated by the additional rotation of finger joints without injury to the user. PMID:27524880

  17. Improving feature size uniformity from interference lithography systems with non-uniform intensity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, En-Chiang; Mikolas, David; Lin, Pao-Te; Schenk, Tony; Wu, Chien-Li; Sung, Cheng-Kuo; Fu, Chien-Chung

    2013-11-01

    The non-uniform intensity profile of Gaussian-like laser beams used in interference lithography (IL) leads to a non-uniform dose and feature size distribution across the sample. Previously described methods to improve dose uniformity are reviewed. However, here we examine the behavior of the non-uniformity from the viewpoint of photoresist response rather than the IL system configuration. Samples with a fixed intra-sample dose profile were exposed with an increasing average dose. A line/space pattern with a period of 240 nm across an area of 2 × 2 cm2 was produced using IL on identical samples using a HeCd laser operated at 325 nm and a Lloyd’s mirror IL system. A binary model of photoresist response predicts that the absolute range of line widths in nanometers should be significantly reduced as the overall sample dose is increased. We have experimentally verified a reduction in the range of line widths within a given sample from 50 to 16 nm as the overall dose is increased by only 60%. This resulted in a drop in the narrowest line width from 120 to 65 nm. An etch process is demonstrated to increase the line width by generating a wider secondary chrome hard mask from the narrowly patterned primary chrome hard mask. The subsequent fabrication of a silicon nanoimprint mold is used as a demonstration of the technique.

  18. Modeling Nitrogen Losses under Rapid Infiltration Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, M.; Imhoff, P. T.; Andres, A. S.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-12-01

    Rapid Infiltration Basin System (RIBS) is one of the major land treatment techniques used for wastewater treatment and reuse of recovered treated wastewater. In this system, wastewater that is treated using primary, secondary, or advanced treatment techniques is applied at high rates to shallow basins constructed in permeable deposits of soil or sand, with further treatment occurring in soil and the vadose zone before the water recharges groundwater. Because the influent wastewater is usually enriched in nitrogen (N) compounds, there is particular concern that RIBS may contaminant groundwater or nearby surface waters if not designed and operated properly. In most of the new sequenced batch reactor (SBR) wastewater treatment plants, N is found in the form of nitrate in the discharged wastewater, so denitrification (DNF) is the main reaction in N removal. The absence of molecular oxygen is one of the required conditions for DNF. During RIBS operation, application of wastewater is cyclic and typically consists of a flooding period followed by days or weeks of drying. Key operational parameters include the ratio of wetting to drying time and the hydraulic loading rate, which affect water saturation and air content in the vadose zone and as a result have an impact on DNF. Wastewater is typically distributed at a limited number of discharge points in RIBS and basins are not usually completely flooded which result in non-homogeneous distribution of wastewater and unusual surface water flow patterns. For this reason, we couple overland flow within RIBS with subsurface flow to investigate the influence of non-uniform application of wastewater on DNF. No modeling effort has been done for understanding this aspect of RIBS performance previously. TOUGH2/ iTOUGH2, a general-purpose numerical simulation program for multi-phase fluid flow in porous media, is used for modeling fluid movement. Water saturation is used as a surrogate parameter to evaluate oxygen limitations in the

  19. A Multi-Transducer Near Field Acoustic Levitation System for Noncontact Transportation of Large-Sized Planar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Takafumi; Koike, Yoshikazu; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki; Hashimoto, Yoshiki

    2000-05-01

    A new noncontact transportation system, which consists of multiple ultrasonic transducers and operates based on near-field acoustic levitation, is proposed to transport a large-sized planar object such as a glass substrate for liquid crystal devices. Using the proposed systems consisting of two and three transducers, the suspension characteristics of the levitated objects are studied as functions of both size difference and angles between the vibration systems and the levitated object. As a result, the holding force is proved to increase as the angle increases and is maximum when the horizontal dimensions of the system and the object coincide.

  20. Impact of Childbearing Decisions on Family Size of Korean Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) predominantly affects women in their reproductive years and has a significant impact on childbearing. We investigated the influence of personal decision on family size among Korean women with SLE and factors that affect the decisions. A case-control study comparing childbearing history and decisions of 112 SLE patients and 135 controls was performed. Women with SLE participating in the Network for Lupus Clinical Research in South Korea and matching controls between ages of 18-45, who are/were married or living with a partner were included. Data regarding socio-demographics, reproductive history, and childbearing decisions were collected through a survey using a standardized questionnaire and medical record review. More women with SLE reported at least one pregnancy (85.7% vs. 71.9%, P = 0.009) or at least one live birth (85.7% vs. 71.9%, P = 0.003) compared with controls. Mean number of pregnancies was significantly higher (2.4 ± 1.6 vs. 1.4 ± 1.3, P < 0.001), and mean number of live births was significantly lower in women with SLE (1.2 ± 0.8 vs. 1.6 ± 0.8, P < 0.001). Significantly more women with SLE made the decision not to have children compared with controls (54.5% vs. 40.7%, P = 0.031), and health-related concerns were the major cause of the decision. Other socio-demographic factors did not influence the decision to limit childbearing in SLE women. The disease-related concerns had significant impact on family size and childbearing decisions among Korean women with SLE. PMID:27134494

  1. Impact of Childbearing Decisions on Family Size of Korean Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Je; Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Suh, Chang-Hee; Park, Yong-Wook; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bang, So-Young; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Kang, Young Mo; Lee, Won Kyung; Park, Hyesook; Lee, Jisoo

    2016-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) predominantly affects women in their reproductive years and has a significant impact on childbearing. We investigated the influence of personal decision on family size among Korean women with SLE and factors that affect the decisions. A case-control study comparing childbearing history and decisions of 112 SLE patients and 135 controls was performed. Women with SLE participating in the Network for Lupus Clinical Research in South Korea and matching controls between ages of 18-45, who are/were married or living with a partner were included. Data regarding socio-demographics, reproductive history, and childbearing decisions were collected through a survey using a standardized questionnaire and medical record review. More women with SLE reported at least one pregnancy (85.7% vs. 71.9%, P = 0.009) or at least one live birth (85.7% vs. 71.9%, P = 0.003) compared with controls. Mean number of pregnancies was significantly higher (2.4 ± 1.6 vs. 1.4 ± 1.3, P < 0.001), and mean number of live births was significantly lower in women with SLE (1.2 ± 0.8 vs. 1.6 ± 0.8, P < 0.001). Significantly more women with SLE made the decision not to have children compared with controls (54.5% vs. 40.7%, P = 0.031), and health-related concerns were the major cause of the decision. Other socio-demographic factors did not influence the decision to limit childbearing in SLE women. The disease-related concerns had significant impact on family size and childbearing decisions among Korean women with SLE. PMID:27134494

  2. Superior model for fault tolerance computation in designing nano-sized circuit systems

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, N. S. S. Muthuvalu, M. S.; Asirvadam, V. S.

    2014-10-24

    As CMOS technology scales nano-metrically, reliability turns out to be a decisive subject in the design methodology of nano-sized circuit systems. As a result, several computational approaches have been developed to compute and evaluate reliability of desired nano-electronic circuits. The process of computing reliability becomes very troublesome and time consuming as the computational complexity build ups with the desired circuit size. Therefore, being able to measure reliability instantly and superiorly is fast becoming necessary in designing modern logic integrated circuits. For this purpose, the paper firstly looks into the development of an automated reliability evaluation tool based on the generalization of Probabilistic Gate Model (PGM) and Boolean Difference-based Error Calculator (BDEC) models. The Matlab-based tool allows users to significantly speed-up the task of reliability analysis for very large number of nano-electronic circuits. Secondly, by using the developed automated tool, the paper explores into a comparative study involving reliability computation and evaluation by PGM and, BDEC models for different implementations of same functionality circuits. Based on the reliability analysis, BDEC gives exact and transparent reliability measures, but as the complexity of the same functionality circuits with respect to gate error increases, reliability measure by BDEC tends to be lower than the reliability measure by PGM. The lesser reliability measure by BDEC is well explained in this paper using distribution of different signal input patterns overtime for same functionality circuits. Simulation results conclude that the reliability measure by BDEC depends not only on faulty gates but it also depends on circuit topology, probability of input signals being one or zero and also probability of error on signal lines.

  3. Superior model for fault tolerance computation in designing nano-sized circuit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N. S. S.; Asirvadam, V. S.; Muthuvalu, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    As CMOS technology scales nano-metrically, reliability turns out to be a decisive subject in the design methodology of nano-sized circuit systems. As a result, several computational approaches have been developed to compute and evaluate reliability of desired nano-electronic circuits. The process of computing reliability becomes very troublesome and time consuming as the computational complexity build ups with the desired circuit size. Therefore, being able to measure reliability instantly and superiorly is fast becoming necessary in designing modern logic integrated circuits. For this purpose, the paper firstly looks into the development of an automated reliability evaluation tool based on the generalization of Probabilistic Gate Model (PGM) and Boolean Difference-based Error Calculator (BDEC) models. The Matlab-based tool allows users to significantly speed-up the task of reliability analysis for very large number of nano-electronic circuits. Secondly, by using the developed automated tool, the paper explores into a comparative study involving reliability computation and evaluation by PGM and, BDEC models for different implementations of same functionality circuits. Based on the reliability analysis, BDEC gives exact and transparent reliability measures, but as the complexity of the same functionality circuits with respect to gate error increases, reliability measure by BDEC tends to be lower than the reliability measure by PGM. The lesser reliability measure by BDEC is well explained in this paper using distribution of different signal input patterns overtime for same functionality circuits. Simulation results conclude that the reliability measure by BDEC depends not only on faulty gates but it also depends on circuit topology, probability of input signals being one or zero and also probability of error on signal lines.

  4. New Double-Infiltration Methodology to Prepare PCL-PS Core-Shell Nanocylinders Inside Anodic Aluminum Oxide Templates.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Belén; Blaszczyk-Lezak, Iwona; Mijangos, Carmen; Palacios, Jordana K; Müller, Alejandro J

    2016-08-01

    Melt nanomolding of core-shell nanocylinders of different sizes, employing anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, is reported here for the first time. The core-shell nanostructures are achieved by a new melt double-infiltration technique. During the first infiltration step, polystyrene (PS) nanotubes are produced by an adequate choice of AAO nanopore diameter size. In the second step, PCL is infiltrated inside the PS nanotubes, as its melting point (and infiltration temperature) is lower than the glass transition temperature of PS. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements verified the complete double-infiltration of the polymers. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments show that the infiltrated PCL undergoes a confined fractionated crystallization with two crystallization steps located at temperatures that depend on which surface is in contact with the PCL nanocylinders (i.e., alumina or PS). The melt double-infiltration methodology represents a novel approach to study the effect of the surrounding surface on polymer crystallization under confinement. PMID:27420298

  5. Development of a System to Measure Austenite Grain Size of Plate Steel Using Laser-Based Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, C. S.; Hong, S. T.; Yi, J. K.; Choi, S. G.; Oh, K. J.; Nagata, Y.; Yamada, H.; Hamada, N.

    2007-03-21

    A measurement system for austenite grain size of plate steel using laser-based ultrasonics has been developed. At first, the relationship between the ultrasonic attenuation coefficients using longitudinal waves and austenite grain size of samples was investigated in the laboratory experiments. According to the experimental results, the ultrasonic attenuation coefficients showed a good correlation with actual austenite grain sizes. For the next step, the system was installed in a hot rolling pilot plant of plate steel, and it was verified that the austenite grain size could be measured even in the environment of a hot rolling pilot plant. In the experiments, it was also confirmed that the fiber delivery system could deliver Nd:YAG laser beam of 810 mJ/pulse and ultrasonic signals could be obtained successfully.

  6. Optimization of bundle infiltration in the forced chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.

    1995-10-01

    A two-step forced-flow, thermal-gradient, chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) was proposed to reduced processing time while maintaining uniformly high densities. GTCVI, a finite-volume computer code developed specifically for the FCVI process was used to model thermal gradient effects on processing time and density. An optimum thermal gradient was determined and used to process material with uniformly infiltrated bundles.

  7. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

    2003-06-16

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral

  8. Optimization and Evaluation of a Novel Size Based Circulating Tumor Cell Isolation System

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Mao, Xueying; Imrali, Ahmet; Syed, Ferrial; Mutsvangwa, Katherine; Berney, Daniel; Cathcart, Paul; Hines, John; Shamash, Jonathan; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from peripheral blood has the potential to provide a far easier “liquid biopsy” than tumor tissue biopsies, to monitor tumor cell populations during disease progression and in response to therapies. Many CTC isolation technologies have been developed. We optimized the Parsortix system, an epitope independent, size and compressibility-based platform for CTCs isolation, making it possible to harvest CTCs at the speed and sample volume comparable to standard CellSearch system. We captured more than half of cancer cells from different cancer cell lines spiked in blood samples from healthy donors using this system. Cell loss during immunostaining of cells transferred and fixed on the slides is a major problem for analyzing rare cell samples. We developed a novel cell transfer and fixation method to retain >90% of cells on the slide after the immunofluorescence process without affecting signal strength and specificity. Using this optimized method, we evaluated the Parsortix system for CTC harvest in prostate cancer patients in comparison to immunobead based CTC isolation systems IsoFlux and CellSearch. We harvested a similar number (p = 0.33) of cytokeratin (CK) positive CTCs using Parsortix and IsoFlux from 7.5 mL blood samples of 10 prostate cancer patients (an average of 33.8 and 37.6 respectively). The purity of the CTCs harvested by Parsortix at 3.1% was significantly higher than IsoFlux at 1.0% (p = 0.02). Parsortix harvested significantly more CK positive CTCs than CellSearch (p = 0.04) in seven prostate cancer patient samples, where both systems were utilized (an average of 32.1 and 10.1 respectively). We also captured CTC clusters using Parsortix. Using four-color immunofluorescence we found that 85.8% of PC3 cells expressed EpCAM, 91.7% expressed CK and 2.5% cells lacked both epithelial markers. Interestingly, 95.6% of PC3 cells expressed Vimentin, including those cells that lacked both epithelial marker

  9. Optimization and Evaluation of a Novel Size Based Circulating Tumor Cell Isolation System.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Mao, Xueying; Imrali, Ahmet; Syed, Ferrial; Mutsvangwa, Katherine; Berney, Daniel; Cathcart, Paul; Hines, John; Shamash, Jonathan; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from peripheral blood has the potential to provide a far easier "liquid biopsy" than tumor tissue biopsies, to monitor tumor cell populations during disease progression and in response to therapies. Many CTC isolation technologies have been developed. We optimized the Parsortix system, an epitope independent, size and compressibility-based platform for CTCs isolation, making it possible to harvest CTCs at the speed and sample volume comparable to standard CellSearch system. We captured more than half of cancer cells from different cancer cell lines spiked in blood samples from healthy donors using this system. Cell loss during immunostaining of cells transferred and fixed on the slides is a major problem for analyzing rare cell samples. We developed a novel cell transfer and fixation method to retain >90% of cells on the slide after the immunofluorescence process without affecting signal strength and specificity. Using this optimized method, we evaluated the Parsortix system for CTC harvest in prostate cancer patients in comparison to immunobead based CTC isolation systems IsoFlux and CellSearch. We harvested a similar number (p = 0.33) of cytokeratin (CK) positive CTCs using Parsortix and IsoFlux from 7.5 mL blood samples of 10 prostate cancer patients (an average of 33.8 and 37.6 respectively). The purity of the CTCs harvested by Parsortix at 3.1% was significantly higher than IsoFlux at 1.0% (p = 0.02). Parsortix harvested significantly more CK positive CTCs than CellSearch (p = 0.04) in seven prostate cancer patient samples, where both systems were utilized (an average of 32.1 and 10.1 respectively). We also captured CTC clusters using Parsortix. Using four-color immunofluorescence we found that 85.8% of PC3 cells expressed EpCAM, 91.7% expressed CK and 2.5% cells lacked both epithelial markers. Interestingly, 95.6% of PC3 cells expressed Vimentin, including those cells that lacked both epithelial marker expression

  10. Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates

    SciTech Connect

    D. Levitt

    2004-11-09

    The purpose of this model report is to document the infiltration model used to estimate upper-bound, mean, and lower-bound spatially-distributed average annual net infiltration rates for present-day and potential future climates at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Net infiltration is the component of infiltrated precipitation, snowmelt, or surface water run-on that has percolated below the zone of evapotranspiration as defined by the depth of the effective root zone. The estimates of net infiltration are primarily used for defining the upper boundary condition for the site-scale three-dimensional unsaturated zone (UZ) model. The UZ flow model is one of several process models abstracted by the total system performance assessment (TSPA) model used to evaluate performance of the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The net-infiltration model is important for assessing repository-system performance because output from this model provides the upper boundary condition for the UZ flow model used to generate flow fields; water percolating downward from the UZ will be the principal means by which radionuclides are potentially released to the saturated zone (SZ). The SZ is the principal pathway to the biosphere where the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) is exposed to radionuclides.

  11. Modelling spatial distribution of soil steady state infiltration rate in an urban park (Vingis Parkas, Vilnius, Lithuania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerda, Artemi; Depellegrin, Daniel; Misiune, Ieva; Bogunovic, Igor; Menchov, Oleksandr

    2016-04-01

    Within the hydrological process, infiltration is a key component as control the partitioning of the rainfall into runoff or soil water (Cerdà, 1997). And the infiltration process is determining the fate of the soil development and the human impact in the soil system (Brevik et al., 2015). On forest soils, the infiltration use to be high due to the macropore flow, which drainages the surface runoff usually generated by the hydrophobic response of soil reach in organic matter (Hewelke et al., 2015) or as a consequence of forest fires (Jordán et al., 2010; Pereira et al., 2014) due to the development of water repellent substances (Mao et al., 2015), which are mainly associated to the ash (Pereira et al., 2014; Pereira et al., 2015). To understand the role the infiltration plays in the soil development and the runoff generation is important, and also is necessary to understand how some factors such as vegetation, crust, stones, litter, mulches… play in the hydrological, erosional and pedological system (Cerdà, 2001; Keesstra, 2007; Liu et al., 2014; Bisantino et al., 2015; Cassinari et al., 2015, Cerdà et al., 2015; Mohawesh et al., 2015; Terribile et al., 2015). The well-know importance of the infiltration process did not resulted in the research on the infiltration on urban areas, although there is where the infiltration is more altered. Water infiltration is extremely important in urbanized areas, since the majority of the surfaces are sealed by concrete, asphalt and other materials. Soil sealing increases exponentially the impacts of flash floods and reduces soil infiltration capacity. This decreases importantly one of the most important services provided by soil: water storage and infiltration. In this context, the existence of green areas and urban parks are of major importance to mitigate the impact of human settlements in soil water infiltration. The aim of this work is to assess the spatial distribution of steady-state soil water infiltration in the

  12. Imaging diagnosis-infiltrative lipoma causing spinal cord and lumbar nerve root compression in a dog.

    PubMed

    Agut, Amalia; Anson, Agustina; Navarro, Antonio; Murciano, Jose; Soler, Marta; Belda, Eliseo; Pallares, Francisco J; Laredo, Francisco G

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old, male, fox terrier dog presented with an abnormal gait of the left pelvic limb. Computed tomography revealed a large, homogeneous, hypoattenuating, noncontrast enhancing mass within the left epaxial muscles that invaded the L5-6 vertebral canal and caused spinal cord compression. Imaging findings were consistent with an infiltrative lipoma. The mass was removed and a left hemilaminectomy was performed in the affected area. Histopathology confirmed the mass to be an infiltrative lipoma. The dog recovered and regained neurologic function within 2 weeks. Computed tomography assisted preoperative planning by characterizing the shape, size, and location of the mass. PMID:23578297

  13. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT NO. 1: CLIMATE AND INFILTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2004-05-01

    For the past 20 years, extensive field, laboratory, and modeling investigations have been performed at Yucca Mountain, which have led to the development of a number of conceptual models of infiltration and climate for the Yucca Mountain region around the repository site (Flint, A.L. et al. 2001; Wang and Bodvarsson 2003). Evaluating the amount of infiltrating water entering the subsurface is important, because this water may affect the percolation flux, which, in turn, controls seepage into the waste emplacement drifts and radionuclide transport from the repository to the water table. Forecasting of climatic data indicates that during the next 10,000 years at Yucca Mountain, the present-day climate should persist for 400 to 600 years, followed by a warmer and much wetter monsoon climate for 900 to 1,400 years, and by a cooler and wetter glacial-transition climate for the remaining 8,000 to 8,700 years. The analysis of climatic forecasting indicates that long-term climate conditions are generally predictable from a past climate sequence, while short-term climate conditions and weather predictions may be more variable and uncertain. The use of past climate sequences to bound future climate sequences involves several types of uncertainties, such as (1) uncertainty in the timing of future climate, (2) uncertainty in the methodology of climatic forecasting, and (3) uncertainty in the earth's future physical processes. Some of the uncertainties of the climatic forecasting are epistemic (reducible) and aleatoric (irreducible). Because of the size of the model domain, INFIL treats many flow processes in a simplified manner. For example, uptake of water by roots occurs according to the ''distributed model'', in which available water in each soil layer is withdrawn in proportion to the root density in that layer, multiplied by the total evapotranspirative demand. Runoff is calculated simply as the excess of precipitation over a sum of infiltration and water storage in the

  14. Passive Microwave Observation of Soil Water Infiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Rawls, Walter J.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Parlange, Marc B.

    1997-01-01

    Infiltration is a time varying process of water entry into soil. Experiments were conducted here using truck based microwave radiometers to observe small plots during and following sprinkler irrigation. Experiments were conducted on a sandy loam soil in 1994 and a silt loam in 1995. Sandy loam soils typically have higher infiltration capabilities than clays. For the sandy loam the observed brightness temperature (TB) quickly reached a nominally constant value during irrigation. When the irrigation was stopped the TB began to increase as drainage took place. The irrigation rates in 1995 with the silt loam soil exceeded the saturated conductivity of the soil. During irrigation the TB values exhibited a pattern that suggests the occurrence of coherent reflection, a rarely observed phenomena under natural conditions. These results suggested the existence of a sharp dielectric boundary (wet over dry soil) that was increasing in depth with time.

  15. Instructor's Manual for Teaching and Practical Courses on Design of Systems and Sizing, Installation and Operation of Systems for Solar Heating and Cooling of Residential Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins. Solar Energy Applications Lab.

    Presented are guidelines for instructors of two courses in the design, installation, and operation of solar heating and cooling systems. These courses are: (1) Design of Systems, and (2) Sizing, Installation, and Operation of Systems. Limited in scope to active solar systems for residential buildings, these courses place primary emphasis upon…

  16. Delivery after Operation for Deeply Infiltrating Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Allerstorfer, Christina; Enzelsberger, Simon H.; Shebl, Omar Josef; Mayer, Richard Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Background. It has been suggested that, during pregnancy, endometriosis can cause a variety of disease-related complications. Objectives. The purpose of the study was to find out if women with histologically confirmed endometriosis do have a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcome and if they suffer from a higher rate of complications during labor. Study Design. 51 women who underwent surgery because of deeply infiltrating endometriosis in the General Hospital Linz and the Women's General Hospital Linz and who gave birth in the Women's General Hospital Linz after the surgery were included in our survey. Results. 31 women (60.8%) had a spontaneous delivery and in 20 women (39.2%) a caesarean section was performed. There were no cases of third- and fourth-degree perineal lacerations. Collectively there were 4 cases (7.8%) of preterm delivery and one case (2.0%) of premature rupture of membranes. In two women (6.5%) a retained placenta was diagnosed. Conclusions. Our study is the first description on delivery modes after surgery for deeply infiltrating endometriosis. We did not find an elevated risk for perineal or vaginal laceration in women with a history of surgery for deeply infiltrating endometriosis, even when a resection of the rectum or of the posterior vaginal wall had been performed. PMID:27517050

  17. Rainwater Channelization and Infiltration in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare; Wei, Yuli; Barrois, Remi; Durian, Douglas; Dreyfus, Remi; Compass Team

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the formation of fingered flow in dry granular media under simulated rainfall using a quasi-2D experimental set-up composed of a random close packing of mono-disperse glass beads. We determine effects of grain diameter and surface wetting properties on the formation and infiltration of water channels. For hydrophilic granular media, rainwater initially infiltrates a shallow top layer of soil creating a uniform horizontal wetting front before instabilities occur and grow to form water channels. For hydrophobic media, rainwater ponds on the soil surface rather than infiltrates and water channels may still occur at a later time when the hydraulic pressure of the ponding water exceeds the capillary repellency of the soil. We probe the kinetics of the fingering instabilities that serve as precursors for the growth and drainage of water channels. We also examine the effects of several different methods on improving rainwater channelization such as varying the level of pre-saturation, modifying the soil surface flatness, and adding superabsorbent hydrogel particles.

  18. Delivery after Operation for Deeply Infiltrating Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Allerstorfer, Christina; Oppelt, Peter; Enzelsberger, Simon H; Shamiyeh, Andreas; Schimetta, Wolfgang; Shebl, Omar Josef; Mayer, Richard Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Background. It has been suggested that, during pregnancy, endometriosis can cause a variety of disease-related complications. Objectives. The purpose of the study was to find out if women with histologically confirmed endometriosis do have a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcome and if they suffer from a higher rate of complications during labor. Study Design. 51 women who underwent surgery because of deeply infiltrating endometriosis in the General Hospital Linz and the Women's General Hospital Linz and who gave birth in the Women's General Hospital Linz after the surgery were included in our survey. Results. 31 women (60.8%) had a spontaneous delivery and in 20 women (39.2%) a caesarean section was performed. There were no cases of third- and fourth-degree perineal lacerations. Collectively there were 4 cases (7.8%) of preterm delivery and one case (2.0%) of premature rupture of membranes. In two women (6.5%) a retained placenta was diagnosed. Conclusions. Our study is the first description on delivery modes after surgery for deeply infiltrating endometriosis. We did not find an elevated risk for perineal or vaginal laceration in women with a history of surgery for deeply infiltrating endometriosis, even when a resection of the rectum or of the posterior vaginal wall had been performed. PMID:27517050

  19. Infiltration rate measurement by active perfluorocarbon monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Menzies, K.T.; Pong, C.M.; Randel, M.A. )

    1987-01-01

    The rate of air infiltration in homes and buildings is a significant factor affecting the magnitude of human exposure to air pollutants in the indoor environment. Several techniques have been utilized for the determination of air infiltration. These include building pressurization and tracer analysis, e.g., SF/sub 6/. Dietz and Cote at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have developed a simple, steady-state tracer kit that can be utilized by homeowners. This kit includes a source(s) of perfluorocarbon, i.e., perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH) or perfluorodimethylcyclohexane (PDCH), and a passive sampling tube containing Ambersorb XE-347. Typically, the sampling tube is deployed for several days and then returned to a laboratory for analysis by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/electron capture detection. The authors developed an alternative sampling and analysis technique for PMCH/PDCH in homes. In order to facilitate monitoring of short-term infiltration rates (i.e., less than one day) they developed an active sorbent sampling method and solvent desorption/gas chromatography/electron capture detection analytical method. The method is based on the collection of PMCH on charcoal. The method validation, which is discussed in this article, includes analytical method development, selection of a solid sorbent, determination of desorption efficiency, analysis of breakthrough, testing of storage stability, and assessment of precision and accuracy in both the laboratory and field environment.

  20. Beam-energy and system-size dependence of dynamical net charge fluctuations.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of IIlinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements of net charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 19.6, 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV, and p+p collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV using the dynamical net charge fluctuations measure {nu}{sub +-,dyn}. We observe that the dynamical fluctuations are nonzero at all energies and exhibit a modest dependence on beam energy. A weak system size dependence is also observed. We examine the collision centrality dependence of the net charge fluctuations and find that dynamical net charge fluctuations violate 1/N{sub ch} scaling but display approximate 1/N{sub part} scaling. We also study the azimuthal and rapidity dependence of the net charge correlation strength and observe strong dependence on the azimuthal angular range and pseudorapidity widths integrated to measure the correlation.

  1. Analysis of starch in food systems by high-performance size exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ovando-Martínez, Maribel; Whitney, Kristin; Simsek, Senay

    2013-02-01

    Starch has unique physicochemical characteristics among food carbohydrates. Starch contributes to the physicochemical attributes of food products made from roots, legumes, cereals, and fruits. It occurs naturally as distinct particles, called granules. Most starch granules are a mixture of 2 sugar polymers: a highly branched polysaccharide named amylopectin and a basically linear polysaccharide named amylose. The starch contained in food products undergoes changes during processing, which causes changes in the starch molecular weight and amylose to amylopectin ratio. The objective of this study was to develop a new, simple, 1-step, and accurate method for simultaneous determination of amylose and amylopectin ratio as well as weight-averaged molecular weights of starch in food products. Starch from bread flour, canned peas, corn flake cereal, snack crackers, canned kidney beans, pasta, potato chips, and white bread was extracted by dissolving in KOH, urea, and precipitation with ethanol. Starch samples were solubilized and analyzed on a high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) system. To verify the identity of the peaks, fractions were collected and soluble starch and beta-glucan assays were performed additional to gas chromatography analysis. We found that all the fractions contain only glucose and soluble starch assay is correlated to the HPSEC fractionation. This new method can be used to determine amylose amylopectin ratio and weight-averaged molecular weight of starch from various food products using as low as 25 mg dry samples. PMID:23330715

  2. Continuous improvement of the quality reporting system of a medium-size company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Anthony; Onuh, Spencer

    2001-10-01

    Many companies are faced with quality improvement issues on a daily basis but their response to this problem varies. This paper discusses the improvement in the defect reporting system at a medium sized manufacturing company following the appointment of an experienced, motivated, design engineer to be dedicated to that task. It sets out the situation that the engineer inherited and details the changes that were incorporated; it assesses which were successful and which failed. Following a survey of current literature, it was seen that there is little written specifically on the subject of audited defect reporting. It is felt that this study goes some way to filling that void. A successful survey of engineering companies in Southern Hampshire reinforces the principle findings, that the emphasising of the Check part of Demming's Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle is a novel approach to the Quality Improvement Process, and that it has reduced the cost of rework by an audited 80% in a period of two years.

  3. Linking magma composition with volcano size and eruptive style in basaltic monogenetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, I. E.; McGee, L. E.; Cronin, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magma composition, volcano size and eruptive style (together with vent locations) are the definitive parameters of basaltic monogenetic systems. These variables are not independent, but the relationships between them are complex. Monogenetic volcano fields that episodically erupt small-volume, discrete magma batches such as the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF, northern New Zealand), typically represent primary mantle melts variably modified by near source processes. In such cases, where the volume of magma is small, eruption styles are strongly controlled by the interaction of magma with the surficial environment and this is determined by both magma volume and its rise rate. The magmatic compositional extremes of primitive magmas in the AVF define a spectrum ranging from strongly silica-undersaturated nephelinite to sub-alkalic basalt. Nephelinites are low SiO2 (~40 wt.%), highly incompatible-element enriched compositions, representing very low degrees of partial melting (<2%) in the asthenospheric mantle. Higher SiO2 (~48 wt.%) sub-alkalic compositions have lower incompatible element contents representing higher degrees of melting (~<5%) at slightly shallower depths. Geochemical modeling indicates that all of these magmas are sourced within the same general mantle region at depths of 80-70 km. The two compositional extremes also define extremes in volume of magma and ultimately magma flux at the surface. The surficial environment of the AVF is characterized by highly water saturated sediments of variable competency and many pressurized aquifer systems. Where there is a combination of small volumes and low flux rates, environmental factors dominate and phreatomagmatic explosive eruptions ensue, forming tuff cones, rings and maars. Larger volumes and flux rates result in dry eruptions forming cinder cones and lava fields. Thus at a fundamental level defining magma source characteristics and temporal or spatial variation in these (such as cyclic or evolutionary trends

  4. Mission Sizing and Trade Studies for Low Ballistic Coefficient Entry Systems to Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumyo; Smith, Brandon; Prabhu, Dinesh; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2012-01-01

    The U.S and the U.S.S.R. have sent seventeen successful atmospheric entry missions to Venus. Past missions to Venus have utilized rigid aeroshell systems for entry. This rigid aeroshell paradigm sets performance limitations since the size of the entry vehicle is constrained by the fairing diameter of the launch vehicle. This has limited ballistic coefficients (beta) to well above 100 kg/m2 for the entry vehicles. In order to maximize the science payload and minimize the Thermal Protection System (TPS) mass, these missions have entered at very steep entry flight path angles (gamma). Due to Venus thick atmosphere and the steep-gamma, high- conditions, these entry vehicles have been exposed to very high heat flux, very high pressures and extreme decelerations (upwards of 100 g's). Deployable aeroshells avoid the launch vehicle fairing diameter constraint by expanding to a larger diameter after the launch. Due to the potentially larger wetted area, deployable aeroshells achieve lower ballistic coefficients (well below 100 kg/m2), and if they are flown at shallower flight path angles, the entry vehicle can access trajectories with far lower decelerations (50-60 g's), peak heat fluxes (400 W/cm2) and peak pressures. The structural and TPS mass of the shallow-gamma, low-beta deployables are lower than their steep-gamma, high-beta rigid aeroshell counterparts at larger diameters, contributing to lower areal densities and potentially higher payload mass fractions. For example, at large diameters, deployables may attain aeroshell areal densities of 10 kg/m2 as opposed to 50 kg/m2 for rigid aeroshells. However, the low-beta, shallow-gamma paradigm also raises issues, such as the possibility of skip-out during entry. The shallow-gamma could also increase the landing footprint of the vehicle. Furthermore, the deployable entry systems may be flexible, so there could be fluid-structure interaction, especially in the high altitude, low-density regimes. The need for precision in

  5. 13 CFR 121.201 - What size standards has SBA identified by North American Industry Classification System codes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... identified by North American Industry Classification System codes? 121.201 Section 121.201 Business Credit... has SBA identified by North American Industry Classification System codes? Link to an amendment... affiliates to be considered small. Small Business Size Standards by NAICS Industry NAICS codes NAICS...

  6. 13 CFR 121.201 - What size standards has SBA identified by North American Industry Classification System codes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... identified by North American Industry Classification System codes? 121.201 Section 121.201 Business Credit... has SBA identified by North American Industry Classification System codes? Link to an amendment... affiliates to be considered small. Small Business Size Standards by NAICS Industry NAICS codes NAICS...

  7. 46 CFR 108.437 - Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment. 108.437 Section 108.437 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide...

  8. Acousto-optic Imaging System for In-situ Measurement of the High Temperature Distribution in Micron-size Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machikhin, Alexander S.; Zinin, Pavel V.; Shurygin, Alexander V.

    We developed a unique acousto-optic imaging system for in-situ measurement of high temperature distribution on micron-size specimens. The system was designed to measure temperature distribution inside minerals and functional material phases subjected to high pressure and high temperatures in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) heated by a high powered laser.

  9. 46 CFR 108.437 - Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment. 108.437 Section 108.437 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide...

  10. 46 CFR 108.437 - Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe sizes and discharge rates for enclosed ventilation systems for rotating electrical equipment. 108.437 Section 108.437 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide...

  11. 31 CFR 205.17 - Are funds transfers delayed by automated payment systems restrictions based on the size and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... automated payment systems restrictions based on the size and timing of the drawdown request subject to this... (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE RULES AND PROCEDURES FOR... Treasury-State Agreement § 205.17 Are funds transfers delayed by automated payment systems...

  12. 31 CFR 205.17 - Are funds transfers delayed by automated payment systems restrictions based on the size and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... automated payment systems restrictions based on the size and timing of the drawdown request subject to this... (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE RULES AND PROCEDURES FOR... Treasury-State Agreement § 205.17 Are funds transfers delayed by automated payment systems...

  13. 31 CFR 205.17 - Are funds transfers delayed by automated payment systems restrictions based on the size and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... automated payment systems restrictions based on the size and timing of the drawdown request subject to this... (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE RULES AND PROCEDURES FOR... Treasury-State Agreement § 205.17 Are funds transfers delayed by automated payment systems...

  14. 31 CFR 205.17 - Are funds transfers delayed by automated payment systems restrictions based on the size and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... automated payment systems restrictions based on the size and timing of the drawdown request subject to this... (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE FISCAL SERVICE RULES AND PROCEDURES FOR... Treasury-State Agreement § 205.17 Are funds transfers delayed by automated payment systems...

  15. 31 CFR 205.17 - Are funds transfers delayed by automated payment systems restrictions based on the size and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... automated payment systems restrictions based on the size and timing of the drawdown request subject to this... (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE RULES AND PROCEDURES FOR... Treasury-State Agreement § 205.17 Are funds transfers delayed by automated payment systems...

  16. Differences in Lsh gene control over systemic Leishmania major and Leishmania donovani or Leishmania mexicana mexicana infections are caused by differential targeting to infiltrating and resident liver macrophage populations.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E V; Singleton, A M; Blackwell, J M

    1988-01-01

    Earlier studies had shown that the viscerotropic NIH 173 strain of cutaneous Leishmania major fails to come under Lsh gene control. Visceral Leishmania donovani LV9 and another viscerotropic cutaneous strain, Leishmania mexicana mexicana LV4, are controlled by Lsh. The results of double-infection experiments presented here show that expression of Lsh resistance against L. mexicana mexicana was enhanced in the presence of L. donovani, whereas L. major still failed to come under Lsh gene control, even in the presence of L. donovani. Prior irradiation (850 rads) of mice showed that in the absence of infiltrating monocytes, Lsh did exert some influence over L. major. The presence of a higher infiltrate of fresh monocytes after L. major infection was confirmed in liver macrophage populations isolated from mice after infection in vivo and in liver cryosections immunostained with monoclonal antibody M1/70 directed against the type 3 complement receptor CR3. The results support the hypothesis that Lsh is expressed maximally in the resident tissue macrophages and poorly in the immature macrophages preferentially infected by L. major amastigotes. Images PMID:3356462

  17. Performance analysis of a model-sized superconducting DC transmission system based VSC-HVDC transmission technologies using RTDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Minh-Chau; Ju, Chang-Hyeon; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Jin-Geun; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun

    2012-08-01

    The combination of a high temperature superconducting DC power cable and a voltage source converter based HVDC (VSC-HVDC) creates a new option for transmitting power with multiple collection and distribution points for long distance and bulk power transmissions. It offers some greater advantages compared with HVAC or conventional HVDC transmission systems, and it is well suited for the grid integration of renewable energy sources in existing distribution or transmission systems. For this reason, a superconducting DC transmission system based HVDC transmission technologies is planned to be set up in the Jeju power system, Korea. Before applying this system to a real power system on Jeju Island, system analysis should be performed through a real time test. In this paper, a model-sized superconducting VSC-HVDC system, which consists of a small model-sized VSC-HVDC connected to a 2 m YBCO HTS DC model cable, is implemented. The authors have performed the real-time simulation method that incorporates the model-sized superconducting VSC-HVDC system into the simulated Jeju power system using Real Time Digital Simulator (RTDS). The performance analysis of the superconducting VSC-HVDC systems has been verified by the proposed test platform and the results were discussed in detail.

  18. Calibration-free device sizing using an inverse geometry x-ray system

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Speidel, Michael A.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) can be used to support device size selection for cardiovascular interventions. The accuracy of QCA measurements using conventional x-ray fluoroscopy depends on proper calibration using a reference object and avoiding vessel foreshortening. The authors have developed a novel interventional device sizing method using the inverse geometry scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) fluoroscopy system. The proposed method can measure the diameter and length of vessel segments without imaging a reference object and when vessels appear foreshortened. Methods: SBDX creates multiple tomosynthetic x-ray images corresponding to planes through the patient volume. The structures that lie in the plane are in focus and the features above and below the plane are blurred. Three-dimensional localization of the vessel edges was performed by examining the degree of blurring at each image plane. A 3D vessel centerline was created and used to determine vessel magnification and angulation relative to the image planes. Diameter measurements were performed using a model-based method and length measurements were calculated from the 3D centerline. Phantom validation was performed by measuring the diameter and length of vessel segments with nominal diameters ranging from 0.5 to 2.8 mm and nominal lengths of 42 mm. The phantoms were imaged at a range of positions between the source and the detector ({+-}16 cm relative to isocenter) and with a range of foreshortening angles (0 deg. - 75 deg.). Results: Changes in vessel phantom position created magnifications ranging from 87% to 118% relative to isocenter magnification. Average diameter errors were less than 0.15 mm. Average length measurements were within 1% (0.3 mm) of the true length. No trends were observed between measurement accuracy and magnification. Changes in vessel phantom orientation resulted in decreased apparent length down to 28% of the original nonforeshortened length. Average diameter

  19. TWO NEARBY SUB-EARTH-SIZED EXOPLANET CANDIDATES IN THE GJ 436 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Kevin B.; Harrington, Joseph; Lust, Nate B.; Blecic, Jasmina; Hardy, Ryan A.; Cubillos, Patricio; Campo, Christopher J.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Montagnier, Guillaume; Moses, Julianne I.; Visscher, Channon

    2012-08-10

    We report the detection of UCF-1.01, a strong exoplanet candidate with a radius 0.66 {+-} 0.04 times that of Earth (R{sub Circled-Plus }). This sub-Earth-sized planet transits the nearby M-dwarf star GJ 436 with a period of 1.365862 {+-} 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} days. We also report evidence of a 0.65 {+-} 0.06 R{sub Circled-Plus} exoplanet candidate (labeled UCF-1.02) orbiting the same star with an undetermined period. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we measure the dimming of light as the planets pass in front of their parent star to assess their sizes and orbital parameters. If confirmed today, UCF-1.01 and UCF-1.02 would be designated GJ 436c and GJ 436d, respectively, and would be part of the first multiple-transiting-planet system outside of the Kepler field. Assuming Earth-like densities of 5.515 g cm{sup -3}, we predict both candidates to have similar masses ({approx}0.28 Earth-masses, M{sub Circled-Plus }, 2.6 Mars-masses) and surface gravities of {approx}0.65 g (where g is the gravity on Earth). UCF-1.01's equilibrium temperature (T{sub eq}, where emitted and absorbed radiation balance for an equivalent blackbody) is 860 K, making the planet unlikely to harbor life as on Earth. Its weak gravitational field and close proximity to its host star imply that UCF-1.01 is unlikely to have retained its original atmosphere; however, a transient atmosphere is possible if recent impacts or tidal heating were to supply volatiles to the surface. We also present additional observations of GJ 436b during secondary eclipse. The 3.6 {mu}m light curve shows indications of stellar activity, making a reliable secondary eclipse measurement impossible. A second non-detection at 4.5 {mu}m supports our previous work in which we find a methane-deficient and carbon monoxide-rich dayside atmosphere.

  20. Spray adjuvant effects on droplet