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Sample records for inflammatory acne vulgaris

  1. Acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Ganceviciene, Ruta; Dessinioti, Clio; Feldman, Steven R; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease - rather than a natural part of the life cycle as colloquially viewed - of the pilosebaceous unit (comprising the hair follicle, hair shaft and sebaceous gland) and is among the most common dermatological conditions worldwide. Some of the key mechanisms involved in the development of acne include disturbed sebaceous gland activity associated with hyperseborrhoea (that is, increased sebum production) and alterations in sebum fatty acid composition, dysregulation of the hormone microenvironment, interaction with neuropeptides, follicular hyperkeratinization, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immunity. Grading of acne involves lesion counting and photographic methods. However, there is a lack of consensus on the exact grading criteria, which hampers the conduction and comparison of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating treatments. Prevention of acne relies on the successful management of modifiable risk factors, such as underlying systemic diseases and lifestyle factors. Several treatments are available, but guidelines suffer from a lack of data to make evidence-based recommendations. In addition, the complex combination treatment regimens required to target different aspects of acne pathophysiology lead to poor adherence, which undermines treatment success. Acne commonly causes scarring and reduces the quality of life of patients. New treatment options with a shift towards targeting the early processes involved in acne development instead of suppressing the effects of end products will enhance our ability to improve the outcomes for patients with acne. PMID:27189872

  2. A small peptide with therapeutic potential for inflammatory acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiye; Mu, Lixian; Tang, Jing; Duan, Zilei; Wang, Fengyu; Wei, Lin; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    A designed peptide named LZ1 with 15 amino acid residues containing strong antimicrobial activity against bacteria pathogens of acne vulgaris including Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus. Especially, it exerted strong anti-P. acnes ability. The minimal inhibitory concentration against three strains of P. acnes was only 0.6 µg/ml, which is 4 times lower than that of clindamycin. In experimental mice skin colonization model, LZ1 significantly reduced the number of P. acnes colonized on the ear, P. acnes-induced ear swelling, and inflammatory cell infiltration. It ameliorated inflammation induced by P. acnes by inhibiting the secretion of inflammatory factors including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β. LZ1 showed little cytotoxicity on human keratinocyte and hemolytic activity on human blood red cells. Furthermore, LZ1 was very stable in human plasma. Combined with its potential bactericidal and anti-inflammatory properties, simple structure and high stability, LZ1 might be an ideal candidate for the treatment of acne. PMID:24013774

  3. Antimicrobial Property of Lauric Acid Against Propionibacterium acnes: Its Therapeutic Potential for Inflammatory Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Kao, Mandy C.; Fang, Jia-You; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Zhang, Liangfang; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The strong bactericidal properties of lauric acid (C12:0), a middle chain-free fatty acid commonly found in natural products, have been shown in a number of studies. However, it has not been demonstrated whether lauric acid can be used for acne treatment as a natural antibiotic against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), which promotes follicular inflammation (inflammatory acne). This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of lauric acid against P. acnes both in vitro and in vivo. Incubation of the skin bacteria P. acnes, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) with lauric acid yielded minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values against the bacterial growth over 15 times lower than those of benzoyl peroxide (BPO). The lower MIC values of lauric acid indicate stronger antimicrobial properties than that of BPO. The detected values of half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of lauric acid on P. acnes, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis growth indicate that P. acnes is the most sensitive to lauric acid among these bacteria. In addition, lauric acid did not induce cytotoxicity to human sebocytes. Notably, both intradermal injection and epicutaneous application of lauric acid effectively decreased the number of P. acnes colonized with mouse ears, thereby relieving P. acnes-induced ear swelling and granulomatous inflammation. The obtained data highlight the potential of using lauric acid as an alternative treatment for antibiotic therapy of acne vulgaris. PMID:19387482

  4. Acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Ertuğrul H.

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit and it is observed equally in both sexes and nearly all races. It generally begins at puberty, but the healing period is variable. There is no known etiological factor, except genetic tendency. Androgens play a very limited role in some female patients. The effects of cosmetics, foods and drinks are also discussible and too limited. There are four factors in acne pathogenesis: Increase of the sebum excretionKeratinization of infrainfundibulumBacterial colonization of the follicleInflammation It is mainly observed on the face and back, shoulders and chest. Initial lesions are comedons. Papules, pustules and cysts of severe types follow it. The most important factor in treatment is a very good patient-physician communication. Topical or systemic treatment or both can be used depending on the severity of acne. Benzoyl peroxyde, azelaic acid, AHA’s antibiotics, retinoic acid and derivatives are the topical choices. For systemic treatment antibiotics are the most commonly used medicines, but isotretinoine has a very spesific place with the possibility of permanent healing. All kind of treatments need approximately six months for a good result. PMID:26078626

  5. Acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Williams, Hywel C; Dellavalle, Robert P; Garner, Sarah

    2012-01-28

    Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit resulting from androgen-induced increased sebum production, altered keratinisation, inflammation, and bacterial colonisation of hair follicles on the face, neck, chest, and back by Propionibacterium acnes. Although early colonisation with P acnes and family history might have important roles in the disease, exactly what triggers acne and how treatment affects the course of the disease remain unclear. Other factors such as diet have been implicated, but not proven. Facial scarring due to acne affects up to 20% of teenagers. Acne can persist into adulthood, with detrimental effects on self-esteem. There is no ideal treatment for acne, although a suitable regimen for reducing lesions can be found for most patients. Good quality evidence on comparative effectiveness of common topical and systemic acne therapies is scarce. Topical therapies including benzoyl peroxide, retinoids, and antibiotics when used in combination usually improve control of mild to moderate acne. Treatment with combined oral contraceptives can help women with acne. Patients with more severe inflammatory acne usually need oral antibiotics combined with topical benzoyl peroxide to decrease antibiotic-resistant organisms. Oral isotretinoin is the most effective therapy and is used early in severe disease, although its use is limited by teratogenicity and other side-effects. Availability, adverse effects, and cost, limit the use of photodynamic therapy. New research is needed into the therapeutic comparative effectiveness and safety of the many products available, and to better understand the natural history, subtypes, and triggers of acne. PMID:21880356

  6. Topical taurine bromamine, a new candidate in the treatment of moderate inflammatory acne vulgaris: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Wojas-Pelc, Anna; Walczewska, Maria; Lipko-Godlewska, Sylwia; Jachowicz, Renata; Maciejewska, Aldona; Białecka, Anna; Kasprowicz, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Taurine bromamine (TauBr), the product of taurine and hypobromous acid (HOBr), exerts anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties. Recently we have shown that Propionibacterium acnes, a potential pathogenic agent of acne, is extremely sensitive to TauBr. As topical antibiotics are associated with the emergence of resistant bacteria, TauBr seems to be a good candidate for topical therapy for acne vulgaris. In our double blind investigation, the efficacy and safety of 3.5 mM TauBr cream was evaluated. 1% Clindamycin gel (Clindacin T), one of the most common topical agents in the treatment of acne vulgaris, was used as a control. Forty patients with mild to moderate inflammatory facial acne vulgaris were randomly treated with either TauBr or clindamycin for 6 weeks, twice-a-day. More than 80% of the patients markedly improved with both treatments, without any adverse effects observed. Both TauBr and clindamycin produced a significant reduction in inflammatory skin lesion counts (papules/ pustules). After 6 weeks, comparable reductions of acne lesions, 65% and 68%, were observed in the TauBr and clindamycin groups, respectively. In conclusion, these data support our concept that TauBr can be used as a topical agent in the treatment of acne vulgaris, especially in patients who have already developed antibiotic resistance. PMID:18573718

  7. Review of the innate immune response in acne vulgaris: activation of Toll-like receptor 2 in acne triggers inflammatory cytokine responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jenny

    2005-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common disorder that affects 40-50 million people in the USA alone. The pathogenesis of acne is multifactorial, including hormonal, microbiological and immunological mechanisms. One of the factors that contributes to the pathogenesis of acne is Propionibacterium acnes; yet, the molecular mechanism by which P. acnes induces inflammation is not known. Recent studies have demonstrated that microbial agents trigger cytokine responses via Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs are pattern recognition receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns conserved among microorganisms and elicit immune responses. We investigated whether TLR2 mediates P. acnes-induced cytokine production in acne. Using transfectant cells we found that TLR2 was sufficient for NF-kappaB activation in response to P. acnes. In addition, peritoneal macrophages from wild-type, TLR6 knockout and TLR1 knockout mice, but not TLR2 knockout mice, produced IL-6 in response to P. acnes.P. acnes induced activation of IL-12 and IL-8 production by primary human monocytes, and this cytokine production was inhibited by anti-TLR2-blocking antibody. Finally, in acne lesions, TLR2 was expressed on the cell surface of macrophages surrounding pilosebaceous follicles. These data suggest that P. acnes triggers inflammatory cytokine responses in acne by activation of TLR2. As such, TLR2 may provide a novel target for the treatment of this common skin disease. PMID:16205063

  8. [Acne vulgaris: endocrine aspects].

    PubMed

    Dekkers, O M; Thio, B H; Romijn, J A; Smit, J W A

    2006-06-10

    Androgens play an important part in the development of acne vulgaris. Androgen levels in patients with acne are higher than those in controls and people with the androgen insensitivity syndrome do not develop acne. Local factors other than androgen plasma levels, also play a part in the development of acne. The skin contains enzymes that convert precursor hormones to the more potent androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Androgen synthesis can therefore be regulated locally. The effects of androgens on the skin are the result of circulating androgens and enzyme activity in local tissues and androgen receptors. Acne is a clinical manifestation of some endocrine diseases. The polycystic ovary syndrome has the highest prevalence. In women with acne that persists after puberty, in 10-200% of cases polycystic ovary syndrome is later diagnosed. The mechanism of hormonal anti-acne therapy may work by blocking the androgen-production (oestrogens) or by blocking the androgen receptor (cyproterone, spironolactone). PMID:16821451

  9. Epidemiology of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Bhate, K; Williams, H C

    2013-03-01

    Despite acne being an almost universal condition in younger people, relatively little is known about its epidemiology. We sought to review what is known about the distribution and causes of acne by conducting a systematic review of relevant epidemiological studies. We searched Medline and Embase to the end of November 2011. The role of Propionibacterium acnes in pathogenesis is unclear: antibiotics have a direct antimicrobial as well as an anti-inflammatory effect. Moderate-to-severe acne affects around 20% of young people and severity correlates with pubertal maturity. Acne may be presenting at a younger age because of earlier puberty. It is unclear if ethnicity is truly associated with acne. Black individuals are more prone to postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and specific subtypes such as 'pomade acne'. Acne persists into the 20s and 30s in around 64% and 43% of individuals, respectively. The heritability of acne is almost 80% in first-degree relatives. Acne occurs earlier and is more severe in those with a positive family history. Suicidal ideation is more common in those with severe compared with mild acne. In the U.S.A., the cost of acne is over 3 billion dollars per year in terms of treatment and loss of productivity. A systematic review in 2005 found no clear evidence of dietary components increasing acne risk. One small randomized controlled trial showed that low glycaemic index (GI) diets can lower acne severity. A possible association between dairy food intake and acne requires closer scrutiny. Natural sunlight or poor hygiene are not associated. The association between smoking and acne is probably due to confounding. Validated core outcomes in future studies will help in combining future evidence. PMID:23210645

  10. Treatment of inflammatory facial acne vulgaris in Chinese patients with the 1450-nm diode laser: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huaxu; Dang, Yongyan; Wang, Zhan; Ma, Li; Ren, Qiushi

    2007-02-01

    The 1450-nm diode laser has been found to be effective for the treatment of inflammatory acne in USA, Europe and Japan. However, there is no report on its efficacy in Chinese acne vulgaris patients. We conduct this pilot study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the 1450-nm diode laser in the treatment of inflammatory facial acne vulgaris in Chinese patients. Nineteen patients with inflammatory facial acne were treated with the 1450-nm diode laser at 4- to 6-week intervals. Clinical photographs and lesion counts were obtained at baseline and after each treatment. Subjective evaluation of response to treatment and pain was assessed using a questionnaire. In our study, clinical improvement was seen in all patients and was generally dramatic. Lesion counts decreased 34% after one treatment (p<0.01), 56% after two treatments (p<0.01), and 81% after three treatments (p<0.01). However, the treatment-related pain was comparatively hard to be tolerated in Chinese patitents, and the other main adverse effect was the hyper-pigmentation after treatments (36.84%, 7/19).

  11. Acne vulgaris in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schnopp, C; Mempel, M

    2011-08-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common inflammatory skin disease originating from the pilosebaceous unit. Peak incidence is at puberty, but acne can affect all age groups. Prepubertal acne is rare, but important to recognize as diagnostic and therapeutic procedures differ from pubertal acne. Acne neonatorum is a mild, self-limiting disease, whereas acne infantum commonly presents with moderate to severe lesions and high risk of scarring thus requiring early intervention. Mid-childhood or prepubertal acne raises the suspicion of hyperandrogenemia, further investigations are indicated to rule out underlying disease. The same applies to any patient with very severe acne, acne not responding to therapy or unusual clinical presentation. Etiopathogenesis of acne is not yet fully understood. Familiy history is the most important risk factor to develop severe acne and scarring. The relevance of life style factors such as smoking or diet is controversial. Lately high carbohydrate diet and dairy products have been implicated as aggravating factors. Mild acne normally responds to topical monotherapy, in moderate disease combination of two synergistically acting substances (e.g. benzoyl peroxid plus antibiotic, benzoyl peroxid plus retinoid, retinoid plus antibiotic, benzoyl peroxid plus azelaic acid) will improve clinical response. Retinoids and/or benzoylperoxid have been shown to be effective in maintenance therapy. In patients with severe disease or high risk of scarring systemic therapy with antibiotics, oral contraceptives with antiandrogenic properties and in particularly isotretinoin as most effective acne treatment should be considered early to avoid physical and emotional scars. PMID:21909065

  12. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases. PMID:26264195

  13. Antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects of Syzygium jambos L. (Alston) and isolated compounds on acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acne vulgaris is a chronic skin disorder leading to inflammation as a result of the production of reactive oxygen species due to the active involvement of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in the infection site of the skin. The current study was designed to assess the potential of the leaf extract of Syzygium jambos L. (Alston) and its compounds for antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activity against the pathogenic P. acnes. Methods The broth dilution method was used to assess the antibacterial activity. The cytotoxicity investigation on mouse melanocyte (B16-F10) and human leukemic monocyte lymphoma (U937) cells was done using sodium 3’-[1-(phenyl amino-carbonyl)-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis-[4-methoxy-6-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid hydrate (XTT) reagent. The non-toxic concentrations of the samples was investigated for the suppression of cytokines interleukin 8 (IL 8) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF α) by testing the supernatants in the co-culture of the human U937 cells and heat killed P. acnes using enzyme immunoassay kits (ELISA). The statistical analysis was done using the Graph Pad Prism 4 program. Results Bioassay guided isolation of ethanol extract of the leaves of S. jambos led to the isolation of three known compounds namely; squalene, an anacardic acid analogue and ursolic acid which are reported for the first time from this plant. The ethanol extract of S. jambos and one of the isolated compound namely, anacardic acid analogue were able to inhibit the growth of P. acnes with a noteworthy minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 31.3 and 7.9 μg/ml, respectively. The ethanol extract and three commercially acquired compounds namely; myricetin, myricitrin, gallic acid exhibited significant antioxidant activity with fifty percent inhibitory concentration (IC50) ranging between 0.8-1.9 μg/ml which was comparable to that of vitamin C, the reference antioxidant agent. The plant extract, compounds ursolic acid and myricitrin (commercially

  14. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    trials in two meta-analyses, with two trials in each meta-analysis. The categories of CAM included herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping therapy, diet, purified bee venom (PBV), and tea tree oil. A pharmaceutical company funded one trial; the other trials did not report their funding sources. Our main primary outcome was ’Improvement of clinical signs assessed through skin lesion counts’, which we have reported as ’Change in inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesion counts’, ’Change of total skin lesion counts’, ’Skin lesion scores’, and ’Change of acne severity score’. For ’Change in inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesion counts’, we combined 2 studies that compared a low- with a high-glycaemic-load diet (LGLD, HGLD) at 12 weeks and found no clear evidence of a difference between the groups in change in non-inflammatory lesion counts (mean difference (MD) −3.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) −10.07 to 2.29, P = 0.10, 75 participants, 2 trials, low quality of evidence). However, although data from 1 of these 2 trials showed benefit of LGLD for reducing inflammatory lesions (MD −7.60, 95% CI −13.52 to −1.68, 43 participants, 1 trial) and total skin lesion counts (MD −8.10, 95% CI −14.89 to −1.31, 43 participants, 1 trial) for people with acne vulgaris, data regarding inflammatory and total lesion counts from the other study were incomplete and unusable in synthesis. Data from a single trial showed potential benefit of tea tree oil compared with placebo in improving total skin lesion counts (MD −7.53, 95% CI −10.40 to −4.66, 60 participants, 1 trial, low quality of evidence) and acne severity scores (MD −5.75, 95% CI −9.51 to −1.99, 60 participants, 1 trial). Another trial showed pollen bee venom to be better than control in reducing numbers of skin lesions (MD −1.17, 95% CI −2.06 to −0.28, 12 participants, 1 trial). Results from the other 31 trials showed inconsisten

  15. [Acne vulgaris. Role of cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Korting, H C; Borelli, C; Schöllmann, C

    2010-02-01

    Appropriate cosmetics for skin cleansing are capable of contributing to a reduction of especially inflammatory lesions in acne-prone patients and to support pharmacological intervention in patients with manifest acne. Cleansing of acne-prone skin should employ acidified synthetic cleansers with a pH of 5.5 rather than soap. Furthermore, the ingredients of certain skin care products, i.e. nicotinamide, lactic acid, triethyl acetate/ethyllineolate, and prebiotic plant extracts, affect different mechanisms of acne pathogenesis and therefore may contribute to a decrease in acne lesions. At least some of these ingredients underscore the concept of evidence-based cosmetics. In contrast, the problem of acne lesions caused by comedogenic ingredients in cosmetics today is negligible. PMID:20107752

  16. Use of tazarotene foam for the treatment of acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Gregoriou, Stamatis; Kritsotaki, Eleftheria; Katoulis, Alexandros; Rigopoulos, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common inflammatory chronic disease of the pilosebaceous unit. It often requires long-term treatment, resulting in increased demand for topical medications that are popular with patients in order to achieve long-term compliance. Tazarotene foam 0.1% is a novel formulation of tazarotene. We review efficacy and tolerability studies of the new formulation, and suggest a possible place for the product in the management of acne vulgaris. PMID:24920932

  17. Photodynamic therapy of acne vulgaris.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershova, Ekaterina Y.; Karimova, Lubov N.; Kharnas, Sergey S.; Kuzmin, Sergey G.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) was tested for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Patients with acne were treated with ALA plus red light. Ten percent water solution of ALA was applied with 1,5-2 h occlusion and then 18-45 J/cm2 630 nm light was given. Bacterial endogenous porphyrins fluorescence also was used for acne therapy. Treatment control and diagnostics was realized by fluorescence spectra and fluorescence image. Light sources and diagnostic systems were used: semiconductor laser (λ=630 nm, Pmax=1W), (LPhT-630-01-BIOSPEC); LED system for PDT and diagnostics with fluorescent imager (λ=635 nm, P=2W, p=50 mW/cm2), (UFPh-630-01-BIOSPEC); high sensitivity CCD video camera with narrow-band wavelength filter (central wavelength 630 nm); laser electronic spectrum analyzer for fluorescent diagnostics and photodynamic therapy monitoring (LESA-01-BIOSPEC). Protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) and endogenous porphyrins concentrations were measured by fluorescence at wavelength, correspondingly, 700 nm and 650 nm. It was shown that topical ALA is converted into PP IX in hair follicles, sebaceous glands and acne scars. The amount of resulting PP IX is sufficient for effective PDT. There was good clinical response and considerable clearance of acne lesion. ALA-PDT also had good cosmetic effect in treatment acne scars. PDT with ALA and red light assist in opening corked pores, destroying Propionibacterium acnes and decreasing sebum secretion. PDT treatment associated with several adverse effects: oedema and/or erytema for 3-5 days after PDT, epidermal exfoliation from 5th to 10th day and slight pigmentation during 1 month after PDT. ALA-PDT is effective for acne and can be used despite several side effects.

  18. Sunflower Seed and Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Mohebbipour, Alireza; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Mansouri, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regardless of the overall association between diet and acne which cannot be easily ignored, there might be an association between specific nutrients and acne development or improvement. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dietary intake of sunflower seeds on acne severity and the pattern of acne lesions. Patients and Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 50 patients aged 15 - 30 years old with acne vulgaris were enrolled through consecutive convenient sampling, in a dermatology clinic in Ardabil, Iran. They were randomly allocated into two trial arms. Those in the control group were asked to stop eating sunflower seeds if they did before. In the intervention group, they consumed 25 g sunflower-containing food daily for seven days. The primary outcome of interest was 10% increase/decrease in the baseline acne severity index (ASI), sustained to the end of the follow-up period on day 14. Results: The mean ASI did not change significantly through the study period in the control group, but it increased in the sunflower group from 62 at the baseline to 86.8 after two weeks (P < 0.001). The ASI mean change was 24.8 in the sunflower group compared to 4.9 in the control group (P < 0.001). The global acne grading score (GAGS) did not significantly change in any of the groups and the difference in the change of GAGS was not significant between the groups (2.4 in the sunflower group versus 1.6 in the control group). Twenty two subjects (88%) in the sunflower group versus 9 (36%) in the control group had at least 10% increment in ASI throughout the follow-up period (P < 0.001). The relative risk of developing the primary outcome in taking the sunflower seed intervention was 2.4 (95% CI: 1.4 - 4.2). The observed risk difference was 0.52 (95% CI: 0.29 - 0.75). Conclusions: Sunflower seed intake appears to aggravate acne vulgaris; however, further evidence is needed to ban sunflower seed intake in patients with acne. Considering the

  19. Topical and oral antibiotics for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotics, both oral and topical, have been an integral component of the management of acne vulgaris (AV) for approximately 6 decades. Originally thought to be effective for AV due to their ability to inhibit proliferation of Propionibacterium acnes, it is now believed that at least some antibiotics also exert anti-inflammatory effects that provide additional therapeutic benefit. To add, an increase in strains of P acnes and other exposed bacteria that are less sensitive to antibiotics used to treat AV have emerged, with resistance directly correlated geographically with the magnitude of antibiotic use. Although antibiotics still remain part of the therapeutic armamentarium for AV treatment, current recommendations support the following when used to treat AV: 1) monotherapy use should be avoided; 2) use benzoyl peroxide concomitantly to reduce emergence of resistant P acnes strains; 3) oral antibiotics should be used in combination with a topical regimen for moderate-to-severe inflammatory AV; and 4) use oral antibiotics over a limited duration to achieve control of inflammatory AV with an exit plan in place to discontinue their use as soon as possible. When selecting an oral antibiotic to treat AV, potential adverse effects are important to consider. PMID:27416309

  20. Treatment of acne vulgaris with fractional radiofrequency microneedling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Tae; Lee, Kang Hoon; Sim, Hyung Jun; Suh, Kee Suck; Jang, Min Soo

    2014-07-01

    Fractional radiofrequency microneedling is a novel radiofrequency technique that uses insulated microneedles to deliver energy to the deep dermis at the point of penetration without destruction of the epidermis. It has been used for the treatment of various dermatological conditions including wrinkles, atrophic scars and hypertrophic scars. There have been few studies evaluating the efficacy of fractional radiofrequency microneedling in the treatment of acne, and none measuring objective parameters like the number of inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions or sebum excretion levels. The safety and efficacy of fractional radiofrequency microneedling in the treatment of acne vulgaris was investigated. In a prospective clinical trial, 25 patients with moderate to severe acne were treated with fractional radiofrequency microneedling. The procedure was carried out three times at 1-month intervals. Acne lesion count, subjective satisfaction score, sebum excretion level and adverse effects were assessed at baseline and at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the first treatment as well as 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the last treatment. Number of acne lesions (inflammatory and non-inflammatory) decreased. Sebum excretion and subjective satisfaction were more favorable at every time point compared with the baseline values (P < 0.05). Inflammatory lesions responded better than non-inflammatory lesions (P < 0.05). Adverse effects such as pinpoint bleeding, pain and erythema were noted, but were transient and not severe enough to stop treatment. Fractional radiofrequency microneedling is a safe and effective treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:24807263

  1. TNFα gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Kornélia; Tax, Gábor; Teodorescu-Brinzeu, Dragos; Koreck, Andrea; Kemény, Lajos

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in acne pathogenesis, and pro-inflammatory cytokines are key factors in these events. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a central molecule coded by a gene that shows high level of genetic polymorphisms especially in its promoter region. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the TNFα gene have been shown to be associated with an increased risk to develop chronic inflammatory diseases. In order to find out if known TNFα regulatory SNPs (-1031T>C, -857C>T, -863C>A, -308G>A, -238G>A) have a role in the development of the inflammatory reactions in acne vulgaris, we analyzed our genomic collection in a retrospective case-control study using the PCR-RFLP method, and we compared the resulting genotype and allele frequencies. There were no significant differences in the observed genotype or allele frequencies between the control and acne group in case of the -1031, -863, -238 SNPs; however, the TNFα -857 minor T allele was found to act as a protective factor in our study population in acne, and a higher occurrence of the minor -308 A allele in female acne patients was also noted. Genetic variants of the TNFα gene may affect the risk of acne vulgaris. Our results can help to elucidate the molecular events leading to acne development. PMID:20386917

  2. ICG laser therapy of acne vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.; Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Odoevskaya, Olga D.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.

    2004-07-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) laser radiation due to its high penetration depth is widely used in phototherapy. In application to skin appendages a high selectivity of laser treatment is needed to prevent light action on surrounding tissues. Indocyanine Green (ICG) dye may provide a high selectivity of treatment due to effective ICG uploading by a target and its narrow band of considerable absorption just at the wavelength of the NIR diode laser. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy of the NIR diode laser phototherapy in combination with topical application of ICG suggested for soft and thermal treatment of acne vulgaris. 28 volunteers with facile or back-located acne were enrolled. Skin sites of subjects were stained by ICG and irradiated by NIR laser-diode light (803 or 809 nm). Untreated, only stained and only light irradiated skin areas served as controls. For soft acne treatment, the low-intensity (803 nm, 10 - 50 mW/cm2, 5-10 min) or the medium-intensity (809 nm, 150 - 190 mW/cm2, 15 min) protocols were used. The single and multiple (up to 8-9) treatments were provided. The individual acne lesions were photothermally treated at 18 W/cm2 (803 nm, 0.5 sec) without skin surface cooling or at 200 W/cm2 (809 nm, 0.5 sec) with cooling. The results of the observations during 1-2 months after the completion of the treatment have shown that only in the case of the multiple-wise treatment a combined action of ICG and NIR irradiation reduces inflammation and improves skin state during a month without any side effects. At high power densities (up to 200 W/cm2) ICG stained acne inflammatory elements were destructed for light exposures of 0.5 sec. Based on the concept that hair follicle, especially sebaceous gland, can be intensively and selectively stained by ICG due to dye diffusion through pilosebaceous canal and its fast uptake by living microorganisms, by vital keratinocytes of epithelium of the canal and sebaceous duct, and by rapidly proliferating

  3. Insulin resistance in severe acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Kemeriz, Funda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acne vulgaris is a pilosebaceous gland disease that usually affects people from puberty to young adulthood. It is seen especially on the face, neck, trunk and arms. Its severity differs from patient to patient and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. The main pathogenic factors of acne are high sebaceous gland secretion, follicular hyperproliferation, high androgen effects, propionibacterium acnes colonization and inflammation. Diet is always thought a probable reason for acne and many studies are done about acne and diet. Aim To determine the effect of insulin resistance in severe acne vulgaris. Material and methods Two hundred and forty-three acne vulgaris patients and 156 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. The blood levels of insulin and glucose were measured. Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) Index was calculated. The values were compared with the control group. Results All of the patients were in the severe acne group according to their scores on the global acne scoring scale. While fasting blood glucose levels were not different between the groups (p > 0.05, 82.91 ±9.76 vs. 80.26 ±8.33), the fasting insulin levels were significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group (p < 0.001, 14.01 ±11.94 vs. 9.12 ±3.53). Additionally, there was a highly significant difference between the patient and control groups in terms of HOMA values (p < 0.001, 2.87 ±2.56 vs. 1.63 ±0.65). Conclusions These results suggest that insulin resistance may have a role in the pathogenesis of acne. PMID:26366152

  4. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update

    PubMed Central

    Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women. PMID:27621661

  5. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update.

    PubMed

    Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women. PMID:27621661

  6. The importance of photoprotection and moisturization in treating acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Bowe, Whitney P; Kircik, Leon H

    2014-08-01

    Skin care products are recognized by dermatologists as critical adjunctive therapeutic modalities for patients suffering from acne vulgaris (AV). Prescribing an acne medication without reviewing a patient's skin care regimen can lead to poor compliance, intolerable side effects, and resulting patient and physician frustration. Striking that delicate balance between maintaining the skin barrier while controlling oil and shine has always been a challenge when treating this chronic inflammatory condition, and it necessitates a unique set of ingredients and formulation. Cetaphil® DermaControl™ Moisturizer SPF 30 (Galderma Laboratories, L.P., Fort Worth, Texas) is a new generation of skin care specifically designed for acne-prone skin and acne-affected skin. Both Cetaphil® DermaControl™ Foam Wash and Cetaphil DermaControl Moisturizer SPF 30 incorporate pharmacologically tested, state-of-the-art ingredients and technologies that studies have shown impart substantial benefits to AV patients. PMID:25116982

  7. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Arican, Ozer; Belge Kurutas, Ergul; Sasmaz, Sezai

    2005-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the common dermatological diseases and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. In this study, we aim to determine the effects of oxidative stress in acne vulgaris. Forty-three consecutive acne patients and 46 controls were enrolled. The parameters of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the venous blood of cases were measured spectrophotometrically. The values compared with control group, the relation between the severity and distribution of acne, and the correlation of each enzyme level were researched. CAT and G6PD levels in patients were found to be statistically decreased, and SOD and MDA levels were found to be statistically increased (P < .001). However, any statistical difference and correlation could not be found between the severity and distribution of lesions and the mean levels of enzymes. In addition, we found that each enzyme is correlated with one another. Our findings show that oxidative stress exists in the acne patients. It will be useful to apply at least one antioxidant featured drug along with the combined acne treatment. PMID:16489259

  8. Addressing Free Radical Oxidation in Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Criscito, Maressa C.; Schlesinger, Todd E.; Verdicchio, Robert; Szoke, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Comparatively little attention has been paid to the role of free radical oxidation in acne vulgaris. Here, using the traditional abnormalities cited for acne, the authors address the role of free radical oxidation throughout the pathogenesis by detailing the chemistry that may contribute to clinical changes. To probe the effects of free radical oxidation and test an antioxidant, they conducted a preliminary study of topically applied vitamin E. Methods: Seventeen patients with mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris were evaluated over an eight-week period in two private dermatology practices in this open-label study. All patients enrolled were on the same baseline regimen of salicylic acid and benzoyl peroxide. This regimen was then supplemented with topical vitamin E in sunflower seed oil. Results: At the end of the eight-week period, all patients demonstrated clinical improvement, as indicated by a reduction in the number of lesions and global mean difference. A statistically significant reduction was noted as early as Week 2. Enrolled patients also expressed a positive experience due to good tolerability and easy application. Conclusion: Although the exact pathogenesis of acne vulgaris remains unknown, the presence of excessive reactive oxygen species can be implicated in each of the major abnormalities involved. This presence, along with the positive results of the authors’ preliminary study, demonstrates the need for more exploration on the use of topical antioxidants in limiting free radical oxidation in the acne model. This paper is designed to stimulate academic discussion regarding a new way of thinking about the disease state of acne. PMID:26962389

  9. Aqueous extract of dried fruit of Berberis vulgaris L. in acne vulgaris, a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fouladi, Rohollah F

    2012-12-01

    Berberis vulgaris L. (barberry) is a very well-known herb in traditional medicine. Apart from its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, the antilipogenic effect of barberry on the sebaceous glands in animals may further suggest it could be employed as an anti-acne agent. This study examined the effect of oral aqueous extract of barberry on acne vulgaris. Adolescents aged 12-17 years with moderate to severe acne vulgaris were randomly given oral gelatin capsules containing either aqueous extract of dried barberry (600 mg daily for 4 weeks, n = 25) or placebo (n = 24). Counts of facial noninflamed, inflamed, and total acne lesions, as well as the Michaelson's acne severity score were documented at baseline and at weeks 2 and 4. Both groups were comparable in terms of the patients' characteristics and baseline variables. After 4 weeks, the mean number of noninflamed, inflamed, and total lesions as well as mean Michaelson's acne severity score declined significantly by 43.25 ± 10.88% (median: 42.11%), 44.53 ± 11.78% (median: 45.45%), 44.64 ± 8.46% (median: 46.15%), and 44.38 ± 8.25% (median: 44.07%), respectively, among the extract receivers (p <.001 for all the changes). Similar changes were not significant in the placebo group. No notable complication or side effect was reported in relation to barberry. In conclusion, oral aqueous extract of dried barberry is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective choice in teenagers with moderate to severe acne vulgaris. PMID:23038982

  10. Comparative Efficacy and Tolerability of Dapsone 5% Gel in Adult Versus Adolescent Females with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Kircik, Leon; Gallagher, Conor J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the response to dapsone 5% gel was similar in adolescent girls and adult women with facial acne vulgaris. Design and setting: Subgroup analysis of female subjects with acne vulgaris receiving active treatment enrolled in two randomized, double-blind Phase 3 clinical trials. Treatment: Twice-daily applications of dapsone 5% gel over 12 weeks. Participants: Adolescent (12-17 years of age) and adult (≥18 years of age) females. Measurements: At baseline and at Weeks 2,4,6,8, and 12, subjects were evaluated using the global acne assessment score and by counts of inflammatory, noninflammatory, and total acne vulgaris lesions. Adverse events were monitored. Results: A total of 347 adolescent and 434 adult women were included in the subgroup analysis. At Week 12, dapsone 5% gel significantly reduced mean global acne assessment score in both subgroups (p<0.001); however, the proportion of subjects with clinical success (no or minimal acne based on global acne assessment score) at Week 12 was greater in adult women (53.5%) versus adolescent females (45.3%, p=0.022). Significantly greater percentage reductions in both noninflammatory (p<0.0001) and total lesion counts (p=0.0008) were observed in the adult group as compared to the adolescent group. Percentage reductions from baseline in inflammatory lesions were similar in both groups. No major safety issues and no previously unrecognized safety signals were noted. Conclusion: This subgroup analysis of female patients indicates that dapsone 5% gel twice daily is effective in reducing inflammatory and noninflammatory acne vulgaris lesions in both adolescent and adult women, and is safe in these subgroups. Overall, these data suggest that efficacy of dapsone 5% gel twice daily for facial acne vulgaris may be greater in the adult female population. PMID:25610522

  11. Passive Immunoprotection Targeting a Secreted CAMP Factor of Propionibacterium acnes as a Novel Immunotherapeutic for Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Zhu, Wenhong; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacteria play a key role in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. Although our previous studies have demonstrated that vaccines targeting a surface sialidase or bacterial particles exhibit a preventive effect against P. acnes, the lack of therapeutic activities and incapability of neutralizing secretory virulence factors motivate us to generate novel immunotherapeutics. In this study, we develop an immunotherapeutic antibody to secretory Christie-Atkins-Munch-Peterson (CAMP) factor of P. acnes. Via agroinfiltration, P. acnes CAMP factor was encapsulated into the leaves of radishes. ICR mice intranasally immunized with whole leaves expressing CAMP factor successfully produced neutralizing antibodies that efficiently attenuated P. acnes-induced ear swelling and production of macrophage-inflammatory protein-2. Passive neutralization of CAMP factor enhanced immunity to eradicate P. acnes at the infection site without influencing bacterial growth elsewhere. We propose that CAMP factor is a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of various P. acnes-associated diseases and highlight the concept of neutralizing P. acnes virulence without disturbing the bacterial commensalism in human micorbiome. PMID:21354482

  12. Indocyanine green-laser thermolysis of acne vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.

    2005-08-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) laser radiation due to its high penetration depth is widely used in phototherapy and photothermolysis. In application to skin appendages a high selectivity of laser treatment is needed to prevent light action on surrounding tissues. Indocyanine Green (ICG) dye may provide a high selectivity of treatment due to effective ICG uploading by a target and its narrow band of considerable absorption just at the wavelength of the NIR diode laser. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy of the NIR diode laser photothermolysis in combination with topical application of ICG suggested for treatment of acne vulgaris. Two volunteers with back-located acne were enrolled. Skin sites of subjects were stained by ICG and irradiated by NIR laser-diode light (803 or 809 nm). The individual acne lesions were photothermally treated at 18 W/cm2 (803 nm, 0.5 sec) without skin surface cooling or at 200 W/cm2 (809 nm, 0.5 sec) with cooling. The results of the observations during a month after the treatment have shown that ICG stained acne inflammatory elements were destructed for light exposures of 0.5 sec.

  13. Immunohistochemical study of desmosomes in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Knaggs, H E; Hughes, B R; Morris, C; Wood, E J; Holland, D B; Cunliffe, W J

    1994-06-01

    Desmosomes contribute towards adhesion between adjacent keratinocytes. In acne vulgaris, increased intercellular adhesion is thought to contribute to the retention of keratinocytes within the follicular lumen during comedogenesis. Therefore, the distribution of different desmosomal components was investigated in normal and acne subjects. Biopsies were cryostat-sectioned (6 microns), and stained with antibodies to different desmosomal components: desmoplakin 1/2, desmoglein 1, desmocollin 3a/3b, and a late desmosomal antigen, G36-19. Desmoplakin 1/2, desmoglein 1 and desmocollin 3a/3b shared a similar distribution in follicles from control skin, from acne-affected skin, and in non-inflamed lesions. All three proteins were expressed around the periphery of keratinocytes of all the intrafollicular epidermis, except the basal lamina and the upper stratum corneum. In inflamed lesions, the expression of desmoglein 1 and desmocollin 3a/3b was diminished; in 12.5%, staining for these two proteins was completely abolished, and in 81.25% of the lesions investigated the staining was patchy. The antibody G36-19 bound to an antigen in the upper granular layer in the infundibular epidermis. No differences were noted in the staining pattern of the follicular epithelia of controls, non-inflamed, and inflamed lesions. This study, using monoclonal antibodies, did not identify any changes in the desmosomal components which might explain the increased adhesion between follicular keratinocytes during comedogenesis. PMID:8011498

  14. Alexithymia and Acne Vulgaris: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Baykir, Murat; Ateş, Gülfem; Ekşioğlu, Meral

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess relationship between alexithymia and acne vulgaris in young people. Methods A hundred and eleven subjects between 15 and 25 years of age referred to out-patient clinic of dermatology with acne and 78 subjects applied to family physician for complaints other than acne were included in patient and control groups of the study, respectively. A questionnaire to determine demographic characteristics, an acne classification to determine severity of acne and Toronto Alexithymic Scale (TAS) to assess alexithymia were used. Results The mean scores of TAS were 52.7±10.8 and 51.7±10.7 in patient and control groups, respectively. Alexitymia was determined in 23.4% of the subjects in acne group and in 24.4% of control group. No significant differences were found between groups in terms of alexithymia, intermediate alexitymia and three-factors of TAS. Conclusion Alexithymia does not appear to be related to acne vulgaris. PMID:22216042

  15. Significance of diet in treated and untreated acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kucharska, Alicja; Szmurło, Agnieszka; Sińska, Beata

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between diet and acne is highly controversial. Several studies during the last decade have led dermatologists to reflect on a potential link between diet and acne. This article presents the latest findings on a potential impact that diet can have on pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. The association between diet and acne can no longer be dismissed. Compelling evidence shows that high glycemic load diets may exacerbate acne. Dairy ingestion appears to be weakly associated with acne and the roles of omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fiber, antioxidants, vitamin A, zinc and iodine remain to be elucidated. The question of what the impact of diet is on the course of acne vulgaris still remains unclear. PMID:27279815

  16. Significance of diet in treated and untreated acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Szmurło, Agnieszka; Sińska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between diet and acne is highly controversial. Several studies during the last decade have led dermatologists to reflect on a potential link between diet and acne. This article presents the latest findings on a potential impact that diet can have on pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. The association between diet and acne can no longer be dismissed. Compelling evidence shows that high glycemic load diets may exacerbate acne. Dairy ingestion appears to be weakly associated with acne and the roles of omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fiber, antioxidants, vitamin A, zinc and iodine remain to be elucidated. The question of what the impact of diet is on the course of acne vulgaris still remains unclear. PMID:27279815

  17. Acne vulgaris: nutritional factors may be influencing psychological sequelae.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Martin; Logan, Alan C

    2007-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a distressing skin condition which can carry with it significant psychological disability. Patients with acne are more likely to experience anger and are at increased risk of depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation. Certain nutrients which have been implicated as influencing the pathophysiology of acne have also been identified as important mediators of human cognition, behavior and emotions. Zinc, folic acid, selenium, chromium and omega-3 fatty acids are all examples of nutrients which have been shown to influence depression, anger and/or anxiety. These same nutrients, along with systemic oxidative stress and an altered intestinal microflora have been implicated in acne vulgaris. It is our contention that certain nutritional factors, a weakened antioxidant defense system and altered intestinal microflora may interplay to increase the risk of psychological sequelae in acne vulgaris. PMID:17448607

  18. Effect of the Glycemic Index of Carbohydrates on Acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Rebecca C.; Lee, Stephen; Choi, James Y. J.; Atkinson, Fiona S.; Stockmann, Karola S.; Petocz, Peter; Brand-Miller, Jennie C.

    2010-01-01

    Acne vulgaris may be improved by dietary factors that increase insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that a low-glycemic index diet would improve facial acne severity and insulin sensitivity. Fifty-eight adolescent males (mean age ± standard deviation 16.5 ± 1.0 y and body mass index 23.1 ± 3.5 kg/m2) were alternately allocated to high or low glycemic index diets. Severity of inflammatory lesions on the face, insulin sensitivity (homeostasis modeling assessment of insulin resistance), androgens and insulin-like growth factor-1 and its binding proteins were assessed at baseline and at eight weeks, a period corresponding to the school term. Forty-three subjects (n = 23 low glycemic index and n = 20 high glycemic index) completed the study. Diets differed significantly in glycemic index (mean ± standard error of the mean, low glycemic index 51 ± 1 vs. high glycemic index 61 ± 2, p = 0.0002), but not in macronutrient distribution or fiber content. Facial acne improved on both diets (low glycemic index −26 ± 6%, p = 0.0004 and high glycemic index −16 ± 7%, p = 0.01), but differences between diets did not reach significance. Change in insulin sensitivity was not different between diets (low glycemic index 0.2 ± 0.1 and high glycemic index 0.1 ± 0.1, p = 0.60) and did not correlate with change in acne severity (Pearson correlation r = −0.196, p = 0.244). Longer time frames, greater reductions in glycemic load or/and weight loss may be necessary to detect improvements in acne among adolescent boys. PMID:22253996

  19. Topical, Biological and Clinical Challenges in the Management of Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hammadi, Anwar; Al-Ismaily, Abla; Al-Ali, Sameer; Ramadurai, Rajesh; Jain, Rishi; McKinley-Grant, Lynn; Mughal, Tariq I.

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the most common chronic inflammatory skin disorders among adolescents and young adults. It is associated with substantial morbidity and, rarely, with mortality. The exact worldwide incidence and prevalence are currently unknown. Current challenges involve improving understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of acne vulgaris and developing a practical treatment consensus. Expert panel discussions were held in 2013 and 2014 among a group of scientists and clinicians from the Omani and United Arab Emirate Dermatology Societies to ascertain the current optimal management of acne vulgaris, identify clinically relevant end-points and construct suitable methodology for future clinical trial designs. This article reviews the discussions of these sessions and recent literature on this topic. PMID:27226905

  20. Topical, Biological and Clinical Challenges in the Management of Patients with Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Al-Hammadi, Anwar; Al-Ismaily, Abla; Al-Ali, Sameer; Ramadurai, Rajesh; Jain, Rishi; McKinley-Grant, Lynn; Mughal, Tariq I

    2016-05-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the most common chronic inflammatory skin disorders among adolescents and young adults. It is associated with substantial morbidity and, rarely, with mortality. The exact worldwide incidence and prevalence are currently unknown. Current challenges involve improving understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of acne vulgaris and developing a practical treatment consensus. Expert panel discussions were held in 2013 and 2014 among a group of scientists and clinicians from the Omani and United Arab Emirate Dermatology Societies to ascertain the current optimal management of acne vulgaris, identify clinically relevant end-points and construct suitable methodology for future clinical trial designs. This article reviews the discussions of these sessions and recent literature on this topic. PMID:27226905

  1. The epidemiology of acne vulgaris in late adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Darren D; Umari, Tamara; Dunnick, Cory A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Importance Acne vulgaris is the most common skin condition affecting late adolescents across the globe. Although prior studies have evaluated epidemiologic patterns of acne vulgaris in various ethnicities and regions, adequate understanding of the worldwide burden of the disease associated with patients in their late adolescence (15–19-year olds) remains lacking. Objective To assess the global burden of the disease associated with acne vulgaris for late adolescents (15–19-year olds) and provide an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for acne in this population. Design Database summary study. Setting Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 database. Participants Global Burden of Disease regions comprised countries with prevalence of acne vulgaris between the ages of 15 and 19 years. Main outcomes and measures Geographic region-level disability-adjusted life year rates (per 100,000 persons) associated with acne vulgaris in years 1990 through 2010. Median percentage change in disability-adjusted life year rates was estimated for each region across the specified study period. Conclusion and relevance Acne vulgaris-associated disease burden exhibits global distribution and has continued to grow in prevalence over time within this population. This continued growth suggests an unmet dermatologic need worldwide for this disorder and potential opportunities for improved access and delivery of dermatologic care. Our analysis of the literature reveals numerous opportunities for enhanced patient care. To that end, we highlight some of the effective and promising treatments currently available and address important factors, such as sex, nationality, genetics, pathophysiology, and diet, as they relate to acne vulgaris in late adolescence. PMID:26955297

  2. Treatment considerations for inflammatory acne: clinical evidence for adapalene 0.1% in combination therapies.

    PubMed

    Thiboutot, Diane M; Gollnick, Harald P

    2006-09-01

    Acne vulgaris is an exceptionally common, chronic, and recurring disease. It involves multiple etiological factors including follicular hyperkeratinization, increased sebum production, Propionibacterium acnes proliferation, and inflammation. Presently, oral isotretinoin is the only single agent that is effective against all 4 major pathophysiologic features. However, this drug is also responsible for several serious side effects, including teratogenicity. Therefore, it should be used in only the most severe cases and alternative treatment approaches for inflammatory acne, such as initial combination therapy, should be considered first. Combination therapy in inflammatory acne simultaneously targets multiple pathogenic factors. Current guidelines recommend early initiation of combination therapy with a topical retinoid and antimicrobials for mild to moderate inflammatory acne and topical retinoids with oral antibiotics (with or without the use of benzoyl peroxide) for moderate to severe cases of acne, followed by maintenance therapy with topical retinoids. This review evaluates the rationale and clinical evidence for the use of adapalene in combination therapy for inflammatory acne. PMID:16989194

  3. Propionibacterium acnes CAMP Factor and Host Acid Sphingomyelinase Contribute to Bacterial Virulence: Potential Targets for Inflammatory Acne Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Tang, De-chu C.; Zhang, Liangfang; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Background In the progression of acne vulgaris, the disruption of follicular epithelia by an over-growth of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) permits the bacteria to spread and become in contact with various skin and immune cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We have demonstrated in the present study that the Christie, Atkins, Munch-Peterson (CAMP) factor of P. acnes is a secretory protein with co-hemolytic activity with sphingomyelinase that can confer cytotoxicity to HaCaT keratinocytes and RAW264.7 macrophages. The CAMP factor from bacteria and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) from the host cells were simultaneously present in the culture supernatant only when the cells were co-cultured with P. acnes. Either anti-CAMP factor serum or desipramine, a selective ASMase inhibitor, significantly abrogated the P. acnes-induced cell death of HaCaT and RAW264.7 cells. Intradermal injection of ICR mouse ears with live P. acnes induced considerable ear inflammation, macrophage infiltration, and an increase in cellular soluble ASMase. Suppression of ASMase by systemic treatment with desipramine significantly reduced inflammatory reaction induced by intradermal injection with P. acnes, suggesting the contribution of host ASMase in P. acnes-induced inflammatory reaction in vivo. Vaccination of mice with CAMP factor elicited a protective immunity against P. acnes-induced ear inflammation, indicating the involvement of CAMP factor in P. acnes-induced inflammation. Most notably, suppression of both bacterial CAMP factor and host ASMase using vaccination and specific antibody injection, respectively, cooperatively alleviated P. acnes-induced inflammation. Conclusions/Significance These findings envision a novel infectious mechanism by which P. acnes CAMP factor may hijack host ASMase to amplify bacterial virulence to degrade and invade host cells. This work has identified both CAMP factor and ASMase as potential molecular targets for the development of drugs and vaccines against

  4. Acne vulgaris, mental health and omega-3 fatty acids: a report of cases.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mark G; Kim, Katherine; Logan, Alan C

    2008-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition, one that is associated with significant psychological disability. The psychological impairments in acne include higher rates of depression, anxiety, anger and suicidal thoughts. Despite a paucity of clinical research, patients with skin conditions and/or mental health disorders are frequent consumers of dietary supplements. An overlap may exist between nutrients that potentially have both anti-acne and mood regulating properties; examples include omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil, chromium, zinc and selenium. Here we report on five cases of acne treated with eicosapentaenoic acid and antioxidant nutrients. Self-administration of these nutrients may have improved inflammatory acne lesions and global aspects of well-being; the observations suggest a need for controlled trials. PMID:18851733

  5. Correlation between the Severity and Type of Acne Lesions with Serum Zinc Levels in Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Rostami Mogaddam, Majid; Safavi Ardabili, Nastaran; Soflaee, Maedeh

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common cutaneous disorder affecting adolescents and young adults. Some studies have reported an association between serum zinc levels and acne vulgaris. We aimed to evaluate the serum zinc level in patients with acne vulgaris and compare it with healthy controls. One hundred patients with acne vulgaris and 100 healthy controls were referred to our clinic. Acne severity was classified according to Global Acne Grading System (GAGS). Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to measure serum zinc levels. Mean serum level of zinc in acne patients and controls was 81.31 ± 17.63 μg/dl and 82.63 ± 17.49 μg/dl, respectively. Although the mean serum zinc level was lower in acne group, it was not statistically significant (P = 0.598). There was a correlation between serum zinc levels with severity and type of acne lesions. The results of our study suggest that zinc levels may be related to the severity and type of acne lesions in patients with acne vulgaris. Relative decrease of serum zinc level in acne patients suggests a role for zinc in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. PMID:25157359

  6. Acne, vulgaris on the back (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Acne frequently occurs on the back. Here, there are 2 to 6 millimeter wide erythematous (red) pustules ... Permanent scarring may follow a severe case of acne. Men are more often affected on their shoulders ...

  7. A Benzoyl Peroxide-Sulfur Cream for Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Pace, William E.

    1965-01-01

    Benzoyl peroxide, a powerful, non-toxic, oxidizing agent, combined with sulfur in an oil-in-water emulsion base, was used to treat 286 patients with acne vulgaris. This esthetically acceptable, easily compounded, inexpensive medication consistently induced prompt suppression of acne lesions of all types and eliminated the need for x-ray, ultraviolet light and routine systemic antibiotic therapy. Contact allergic sensitivity, which developed in 2.5% of patients, was the only adverse reaction encountered. PMID:14328040

  8. Clinical implications of lipid peroxidation in acne vulgaris: old wine in new bottles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common dermatological disorder, one that is frequently associated with depression, anxiety and other psychological sequelae. In recent years there has been an increasing focus on the extent to which oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of acne. Emerging studies have shown that patients with acne are under increased cutaneous and systemic oxidative stress. Indeed, there are indications that lipid peroxidation itself is a match that lights an inflammatory cascade in acne. The notion that lipid peroxidation is a 'starter gun' in acne is not a new one; here we review the nearly 50-year-old lipid peroxidation theory and provide a historical perspective to the contemporary investigations and clinical implications. In addition, we present a novel hypothesis in which lipid peroxidation may be priming an increased susceptibility to co-morbid depression and anxiety in those with acne. The emerging research on the systemic burden of oxidative stress in acne sheds further light on the brain-skin axis. The recent findings also suggest potential avenues of approach for the treatment of acne via specific nutrients, dietary modifications, oral and topical interventions. PMID:21143923

  9. Gallium-67-citrate uptake in a case of acne vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Kipper, M.S.; Taylor, A.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1981-09-01

    A case of increased Ga-67 uptake in a patient with active acne vulgaris is reported. The scan was requested in a search for metastatic testicular carcinoma or bleomycin pulmonary toxicity. Careful clinical evaluation including physical examination was necessary in order to avoid an erroneous scan interpretation.

  10. Kids These Days: Urine as a Home Remedy for Acne Vulgaris?

    PubMed Central

    Totri, Christine R.; Matiz, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine therapies are gaining popularity among patients, aided by modern media outlets that facilitate easy and rapid dissemination of information. “Urine therapy” is one such complementary and alternative medicine and is described by its proponents as a wonder therapy for inflammatory conditions, such as acne vulgaris. As with other complementary and alternative medicines, healthcare providers should be mindful of the use of urine therapy and its potential implications for patients who may utilize it. PMID:26557221

  11. Body Image Disturbance in Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Bowe, Whitney P.; Crerand, Canice E.; Margolis, David J.; Shalita, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial outcome measures, which attempt to examine acne from the patient's perspective, have become increasingly important in dermatology research. One such measure is the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire. The authors' primary aim was to determine the validity and internal consistency of the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire in patients with acne vulgaris. The secondary aim was to investigate the relationship between body image disturbance and quality of life. This cross-sectional investigation included 52 consecutive acne patients presenting to an outpatient dermatology clinic. Subjects completed the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire, Skindex-16, and other body image and psychosocial functioning measures. An objective assessment of acne was performed. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire was internally consistent and converged with other known body image indices. Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire scores also correlated with Skindex-16 scores, confirming that quality of life and body image are related psychosocial constructs. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire appears to be an accurate instrument that can assess appearance-related concern and impairment in patients with acne vulgaris. Limitations include a small sample size and the cross-sectional design. PMID:21779418

  12. Body image disturbance in patients with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Bowe, Whitney P; Doyle, Amanda K; Crerand, Canice E; Margolis, David J; Shalita, Alan R

    2011-07-01

    Psychosocial outcome measures, which attempt to examine acne from the patient's perspective, have become increasingly important in dermatology research. One such measure is the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire. The authors' primary aim was to determine the validity and internal consistency of the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire in patients with acne vulgaris. The secondary aim was to investigate the relationship between body image disturbance and quality of life. This cross-sectional investigation included 52 consecutive acne patients presenting to an outpatient dermatology clinic. Subjects completed the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire, Skindex-16, and other body image and psychosocial functioning measures. An objective assessment of acne was performed. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire was internally consistent and converged with other known body image indices. Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire scores also correlated with Skindex-16 scores, confirming that quality of life and body image are related psychosocial constructs. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire appears to be an accurate instrument that can assess appearance-related concern and impairment in patients with acne vulgaris. Limitations include a small sample size and the cross-sectional design. PMID:21779418

  13. [Effective and safe pharmacotherapy of acne vulgaris and treatment of sun-damaged skin].

    PubMed

    Fendrich, Z; Jandová, E; Finsterlová, M

    2000-03-01

    An inevitable condition for the pharmacist is a basic knowledge of dermatological changes which are prominent in acne and solar impairment of the skin to be able to recommend in a qualified manner an effective and safe treatment to the patient. However, sufferers of the more serious forms of acne should always be referred to their general practitioner, or preferentially a dermatologist. Acne vulgaris is an androgen-induced disorder, but three major mechanisms for the development of the disease have been identified: hypertrophy of the sebaceous gland, hyperkatosis of the follicular epithelium, and proliferation of microbial flora, particularly Propionibacterium acnes. The basis of all lesions is the microcomedone which is developed into the ripe comedone. Inflammatory lesions are thought to be due to proliferation of P. acnes. In the selfmedication of common acne, benzoyl peroxide, which in a 5-10% lotion exerts antimicrobial and keratolytic properties, proved to be useful. Patients appreciate a lot its instant effect which is visible after just one day of treatment. Salicylic acid is another effective drug, which, when used on the long-term basis, has comedolytic properties; it reduces the number of microcomedones and counteracts plugging of the follicles. In addition, in healthy young women who take oral contraception, a triphasic combined oral preparations of contraceptives with newer progestins, notably with norgestimmate, which is practically free of androgenic effects, are recommended with advantage for the treatment of moderate acne vulgaris without any adverse effects. Solar impairment of the skin, the so-called solar ageing, is clinically indistinguishable from biological ageing. Changes connected with solar impairment appear mostly in the dermis, where solar elastosis develops, the skin gets drier and wrinkle formation appears. For the treatment, hydroxy acids are recommended, namely salicylic acid, which is very effective, because in combination with a

  14. Quality of life issues for South Africans with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mosam, A; Vawda, N B; Gordhan, A H; Nkwanyana, N; Aboobaker, J

    2005-01-01

    The adverse effects of acne on the psyche have been established in patients from 'first world' countries. There has been no in depth study in predominantly black patients from Africa addressing this issue. This was a prospective cross-sectional study of acne patients attending a dermatology unit in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A questionnaire was completed and acne graded by the Global Acne Grading scale. Psychological morbidity and quality of life (QOL) were assessed by the General Health Questionnaire and Dermatology Specific Quality of Life Questionnaires, respectively. We found that clinical severity was not associated with patient perception or psychological distress. The QOL measures such as feelings, social activities, performance at work or school, activities of daily living and overall mental health were found to be associated with distress with associated P-values of 0.0002, 0.0168, 0.0032, 0.033 and < 0.0001, respectively. The severity of acne was not associated with psychological distress. Painful and bleeding lesions were associated with distress levels; P = 0.042 and P = 0.019, respectively. In conclusion, South African patients with acne vulgaris suffer significant psychological distress, which affects the quality of their lives. PMID:15663491

  15. Newer approaches to the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Simonart, Thierry

    2012-12-01

    The multifactorial etiology of acne vulgaris makes it challenging to treat. Current treatments include topical retinoids, benzoyl peroxide, topical and systemic antibiotics, azelaic acid, and systemic isotretinoin. Adjunctive and/or emerging approaches include topical dapsone, taurine bromamine, resveratrol, chemical peels, optical treatments, as well as complementary and alternative medications. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the therapies available for acne and their latest developments, including new treatment strategies (i.e. re-evaluation of the use of oral antibiotics and avoidance of topical antibiotic monotherapy, use of subantimicrobial antibiotic dosing, use of low-dose isotretinoin, optical treatments), new formulations (microsponges, liposomes, nanoemulsions, aerosol foams), new combinations (fixed-combination products of topical retinoids and topical antibiotics [essentially clindamycin] or benzoyl peroxide), new agents (topical dapsone, taurine bromamine, resveratrol) and their rationale and likely place in treatment. Acne vaccines, topical natural antimicrobial peptides, and lauric acid represent other promising therapies. PMID:22920095

  16. Intense pulsed light versus photodynamic therapy using liposomal methylene blue gel for the treatment of truncal acne vulgaris: a comparative randomized split body study.

    PubMed

    Moftah, Nayera Hassan; Ibrahim, Shady Mahmoud; Wahba, Nadine Hassan

    2016-05-01

    Acne vulgaris is an extremely common skin condition. It often leads to negative psychological consequences. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using intense pulsed light has been introduced for effective treatment of acne. The objective was to study the effect of PDT in truncal acne vulgaris using liposomal methylene blue (LMB) versus IPL alone. Thirty-five patients with varying degrees of acne were treated with topical 0.1 % LMB hydrogel applied on the randomly selected one side of the back, and after 60 min the entire back was exposed to IPL. The procedure was done once weekly for three sessions and patients were re-evaluated 1 month after the third session by two independent dermatologists. Acne severity was graded using the Burton scale. Patient satisfaction using Cardiff Acne Disability Index (CADI) was recorded before and after treatment. On LMB-pretreated side, inflammatory acne lesion counts were significantly decreased by 56.40 % compared with 34.06 % on IPL alone. Marked improvement was seen on LMB-pretreated side in 11.5 % of patients compared with 2.8 % on IPL alone. There was a correlation between CADI score and overall improvement. Our study concluded that LMB-IPL is more effective than IPL alone, safe with tolerable pain in the treatment of acne vulgaris on the back. LMB-IPL is more effective than IPL alone, safe with tolerable pain in the treatment of acne vulgaris on the back. PMID:26993345

  17. The role of topical dermocosmetics in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Araviiskaia, E; Dréno, B

    2016-06-01

    Acne is a common chronic inflammatory disease and treatment modalities based on acne severity are well established. The role of dermocosmetics in dermatology, and in particular acne, is becoming more important as more research elucidates the mechanisms of action of products in the pathogenesis of acne. Dermocosmetics have the potential to be used as monotherapy or in combination with medical treatment. Therefore, it has become important for dermatologists to understand dermocosmetics to effectively and appropriately advise patients on their use. The objective of this review was to provide new insights into the role of traditional and novel ingredients in dermocosmetics for the treatment of acne, based on the authors' objective assessment of the published literature. The type of products discussed include: those which have a sebostatic effect, such as topical antioxidants and niacinamide; agents targeting abnormal keratinization, such as salicylic acid, lipo-hydroxy acid, alpha-hydroxy acids, retinol-based products and linoleic acid; agents targeting Propionibacterium acnes, such as lauric acid; and anti-inflammatory agents such as nicotinamide, alpha-linolenic acid and zinc salts. Despite the scientific advances in understanding these cosmetic ingredients, there still remains a lack of rigorous controlled studies in this area. PMID:26916232

  18. Imaging inflammatory acne: lesion detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cula, Gabriela O.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    It is known that effectiveness of acne treatment increases when the lesions are detected earlier, before they could progress into mature wound-like lesions, which lead to scarring and discoloration. However, little is known about the evolution of acne from early signs until after the lesion heals. In this work we computationally characterize the evolution of inflammatory acne lesions, based on analyzing cross-polarized images that document acne-prone facial skin over time. Taking skin images over time, and being able to follow skin features in these images present serious challenges, due to change in the appearance of skin, difficulty in repositioning the subject, involuntary movement such as breathing. A computational technique for automatic detection of lesions by separating the background normal skin from the acne lesions, based on fitting Gaussian distributions to the intensity histograms, is presented. In order to track and quantify the evolution of lesions, in terms of the degree of progress or regress, we designed a study to capture facial skin images from an acne-prone young individual, followed over the course of 3 different time points. Based on the behavior of the lesions between two consecutive time points, the automatically detected lesions are classified in four categories: new lesions, resolved lesions (i.e. lesions that disappear completely), lesions that are progressing, and lesions that are regressing (i.e. lesions in the process of healing). The classification our methods achieve correlates well with visual inspection of a trained human grader.

  19. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties of nostocionone isolated from Nostoc commune Vauch and its derivatives against Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Tsuchida, Akihiro; Muramatsu, Yuji; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Ando, Masashi; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki; Koketsu, Mamoru

    2014-06-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is the primary pathogenic agent responsible for acne vulgaris on the skin and hair follicles. Overgrowth of this bacterium inhibits growth and promotes follicular inflammation, with an associated increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine production. P. acnes has therefore been considered the main target for the prevention and medical treatment of acne vulgaris. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro anti-P. acnes and anti-inflammatory properties of 6 compounds isolated from Nostoc commune. One of these compounds, nostocionone (Nost), and one of its derivatives, NostD3 [(1E,4E)-1-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5-(2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-enyl)penta-1,4-dien-3-one], significantly inhibited P. acnes growth. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of Nost and NostD3 on heat-killed (hk) P. acnes-induced inflammation in macrophages. Both Nost and NostD3 suppressed hk P. acnes-induced nitric oxide (NO) production through the suppression of inducible NO synthase expression, following inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B. Taken together, our findings suggested that both Nost and NostD3 were promising agents for the treatment of acne vulgaris, and that NostD3 showed higher efficacy than Nost. PMID:24699048

  20. Intense Pulsed light Versus 1,064 Long-Pulsed Neodymium: Yttrium–Aluminum– Garnet Laser in the Treatment of Facial Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Essam Elden; Tawfik, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Laser and light-based procedures provide a good and safe modality for treatment of active acne lesions when used properly. Aim To compare the clinical efficacy of intense pulsed light (IPL) versus 1,064 long-pulsed Neodymium:Yttrium–Aluminum– Garnet (Nd: YAG) in treatment of facial acne vulgaris. Materials and Methods Seventy four patients recruited between June 2013 and August 2014 was enrolled in this controlled, single-blind, split-face clinical trial. All participants received 3 sessions of IPL on the right side of the face and 1,064-nm Nd:YAG on the left side of the face at 4-weeks intervals. Final assessment was made by comparison of the changes in the count of inflammatory acne lesions (inflammatory papules, pustules, nodules and cyst) and non-inflammatory acne lesions (Comedones) and the acne severity score between both therapies, based on standardized photography. Results At the final visit, the inflammatory acne lesions were reduced on the IPL and 1,064-nm Nd:YAG treated sides by 67.1% and 70.2% respectively (p<0.05 for each), while non inflammatory acne lesions were reduced by 18.3% and 19.3% respectively (p>0.05 for each). For both therapies, there was significant difference in the improvement on inflammatory acne lesions in comparison to non-inflammatory lesions (p<0.05 for each). There was no significant difference in the efficacy of the two therapies in reducing the percentage of both types of acne lesions count from baseline to the end of the study (p>0.05 for each). Conclusion Both IPL and 1,064-nm Nd:YAG laser are effective in treatment of inflammatory facial acne vulgaris. There is no significant difference between the effects of both therapies on facial acne lesions.

  1. Evolving perspectives on the etiology and pathogenesis of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Del Rosso, James Q; Mancini, Anthony J; Cook-Bolden, Fran; Stein Gold, Linda; Desai, Seemal; Weiss, Jonathan; Pariser, David; Zeichner, Joshua; Bhatia, Neal; Kircik, Leon

    2015-03-01

    As the pathophysiology of acne is complex and multifactorial, the continued influx of new basic science and clinical information requires careful analysis before drawing conclusions about what truly contributes to the development and progression of this chronic disease. Our objective is to review the latest evidence and highlight a number of important perspectives on the pathophysiology of acne. An improved understanding of acne pathogenesis should lead to more rational therapy and a better understanding of the role of P acnes opens new perspectives for the development of new treatments and management. Further research may be directed at targeting receptors, adhesion molecules, cytokines, chemokines or other pro-inflammatory targets implicated in the activation of immune detection and response (i.e., toll-like receptors [TLRs], protease-activated receptors [PARs]) that appear to contribute to the pathophysiology of acne. Therapeutic options that reduce the need for topical and/or oral antibiotic therapy for acne are welcome as bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a clinically relevant concern both in the United States and globally. PMID:25738848

  2. Quality of life, self-esteem and psychosocial factors in adolescents with acne vulgaris*

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Gustavo Nunes; dos Santos, Laís Araújo; Sobral Filho, Jader Freire

    2015-01-01

    Background Dermatological diseases, among which acne vulgaris, have psychological impact on the affected generating feelings of guilt, shame and social isolation. Objectives To compare quality of life, self-esteem and other psychosocial variables amongst adolescents with and without acne vulgaris, and between levels of severity. Methods Cross-sectional observational study in a sample of 355 high school students from the city of João Pessoa. Data collection was performed with questionnaires and clinical-dermatological evaluation. The primary variables were the incidence of AV; quality of life, set by the Children's Dermatology Quality of Life Index and Dermatology Quality of Life Index; and self-esteem, measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. For calculation of statistical tests, we used the SPSS 20.0 software, considering p=0.05. Results The sample, with an average age of 16, showed 89.3% prevalence of acne vulgaris. The most prevalent psychosocial issue was "afraid that acne will never cease", present in 58% of affected youth. The median score of Quality of Life in Children's Dermatology Index was different amongst students with and without acne vulgaris (p=0.003), as well as the Quality of Life in Dermatology (p=0.038) scores, so that students with acne vulgaris have worse QoL. There was a correlation between the severity of acne vulgaris and worse quality of life. Self-esteem was not significantly associated with the occurrence or severity of acne vulgaris. Conclusions acne vulgaris assumes significance in view of its high prevalence and the effect on quality of life of adolescents, more severe at the more pronounced stages of disease (p<0.001). The psychosocial impact of acne vulgaris should be valued in the management of patients with this condition. PMID:26560206

  3. Suppression of Propionibacterium acnes Infection and the Associated Inflammatory Response by the Antimicrobial Peptide P5 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Sunhyo; Han, Hyo Mi; Song, Peter I.

    2015-01-01

    The cutaneous inflammation associated with acne vulgaris is caused by the anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium acnes through activation of the innate immune system in the skin. Current standard treatments for acne have limitations that include adverse effects and poor efficacy in many patients, making development of a more effective therapy highly desirable. In the present study, we demonstrate the protective effects of a novel customized α-helical cationic peptide, P5, against P. acnes-induced inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Application of P5 significantly reduced expression of two inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-α in P. acnes-treated primary human keratinocytes, where P5 appeared to act in part by binding to bacterial lipoteichoic acid, thereby suppressing TLR2-to-NF-κB signaling. In addition, in a mouse model of acne vulgaris, P5 exerted both anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects against P. acnes, but exerted no cytotoxic effects against skin cells. These results demonstrate that P5, and perhaps other cationic antimicrobial peptides, offer the unique ability to reduce numbers P. acnes cells in the skin and to inhibit the inflammation they trigger. This suggests these peptides could potentially be used to effectively treat acne without adversely affecting the skin. PMID:26197393

  4. Suppression of Propionibacterium acnes Infection and the Associated Inflammatory Response by the Antimicrobial Peptide P5 in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sunhyo; Han, Hyo Mi; Song, Peter I; Armstrong, Cheryl A; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-01-01

    The cutaneous inflammation associated with acne vulgaris is caused by the anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium acnes through activation of the innate immune system in the skin. Current standard treatments for acne have limitations that include adverse effects and poor efficacy in many patients, making development of a more effective therapy highly desirable. In the present study, we demonstrate the protective effects of a novel customized α-helical cationic peptide, P5, against P. acnes-induced inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Application of P5 significantly reduced expression of two inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-α in P. acnes-treated primary human keratinocytes, where P5 appeared to act in part by binding to bacterial lipoteichoic acid, thereby suppressing TLR2-to-NF-κB signaling. In addition, in a mouse model of acne vulgaris, P5 exerted both anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects against P. acnes, but exerted no cytotoxic effects against skin cells. These results demonstrate that P5, and perhaps other cationic antimicrobial peptides, offer the unique ability to reduce numbers P. acnes cells in the skin and to inhibit the inflammation they trigger. This suggests these peptides could potentially be used to effectively treat acne without adversely affecting the skin. PMID:26197393

  5. Psychosocial Aspects of Acne Vulgaris: A Community-based Study with Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Do, Jeong Eun; Cho, Sun-Mi; In, Sung-Il; Lim, Ki-Young; Lee, Sungnack

    2009-01-01

    Background Acne vulgaris is a distressing condition that affects the majority of adolescents, but the impact of acne vulgaris on the psychological aspects in this age group is poorly understood. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of acne, and the level of emotional, social, and functional impairments among Korean adolescents with acne. Methods Five hundred four middle school students (13~16 years) participated. The severity of acne was graded by visual examination using the Korean Acne Grading System. Self-reported questionnaires, including subjective acne severity rating, the Self Image Questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Questionnaire, the Index of Peer Relations, and the Beck Depression Inventory were used to assess psychologic status. Results There was a prevalence of acne in 78.9% of the study samples, with 10.2% of students having moderate-to-severe acne. Acne was more prevalent and severe in boys than girls. Participants with severe acne and girls had higher levels of emotional and social impairments. The longer the acne persisted, the more stress the students felt. The degree of stress and extent of self-image impairment were related to subjective severity more than objective grading. Conclusion Acne is a common disorder among Korean adolescents and appears to have a considerable impact on mental health. Dermatologists should be aware of the importance of basic psychosomatic treatment in conjunction with early medical, educational intervention in the management of acne. PMID:20523769

  6. Effects of fish oil supplementation on inflammatory acne

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Given that acne is a rare condition in societies with higher consumption of omega-3 (n-3) relative to omega-6 (n-6) fatty acids, supplementation with n-3 may suppress inflammatory cytokine production and thereby reduce acne severity. Methods 13 individuals with inflammatory acne were given three grams of fish oil containing 930 mg of EPA to their unchanged diet and existing acne remedies for 12 weeks. Acne was assessed using an overall severity grading scale, total inflammatory lesion counts, and colorimetry. Findings There was no significant change in acne grading and inflammatory counts at week 12 compared to baseline. However, there was a broad range of response to the intervention on an individual basis. The results showed that acne severity improved in 8 individuals, worsened in 4, and remained unchanged in 1. Interestingly, among the individuals who showed improvement, 7 were classified as having moderate to severe acne at baseline, while 3 of the 4 whose acne deteriorated were classified as having mild acne. Conclusion There is some evidence that fish oil supplementation is associated with an improvement in overall acne severity, especially for individuals with moderate to severe acne. Divergent responses to fish oil in our pilot study indicates that dietary and supplemental lipids are worthy of further investigation in acne. PMID:23206895

  7. Antimicrobial and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Endophytic Fungi Talaromyces wortmannii Extracts against Acne-Inducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schwendinger, Katja; Kreiseder, Birgit; Wiederstein, Martina; Pretsch, Dagmar; Genov, Miroslav; Hollaus, Ralph; Zinssmeister, Daniela; Debbab, Abdesamad; Hundsberger, Harald; Eger, Andreas; Proksch, Peter; Wiesner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common skin disease, causing significant psychosocial problems such as anxiety and depression similar to a chronic illness for those afflicted. Currently, obtainable agents for acne treatment have limited use. Thus, development of novel agents to treat this disease is a high medical need. The anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium acnes has been implicated in the inflammatory phase of acne vulgaris by activating pro-inflammatory mediators such as the interleukin-8 (IL-8) via the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Talaromyces wortmannii is an endophytic fungus, which is known to produce high bioactive natural compounds. We hypothesize that compound C but also the crude extract from T. wortmannii may possess both antibacterial activity especially against P. acnes and also anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression and P. acnes-induced IL-8 release. Treatment of keratinocytes (HaCaT) with P. acnes significantly increased NF-κB and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, as well as IL-8 release. Compound C inhibited P. acnes-mediated activation of NF-κB and AP-1 by inhibiting IκB degradation and the phosphorylation of ERK and JNK MAP kinases, and IL-8 release in a dose-dependent manner. Based on these results, compound C has effective antimicrobial activity against P. acnes and anti-inflammatory activity, and we suggest that this substance or the crude extract are alternative treatments for antibiotic/anti-inflammatory therapy for acne vulgaris. PMID:24887557

  8. A randomized controlled study for the treatment of acne vulgaris using high-intensity 414 nm solid state diode arrays.

    PubMed

    Ash, Caerwyn; Harrison, Anna; Drew, Samantha; Whittall, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of acne vulgaris poses a challenge to the dermatologist, and the disease causes emotional anxiety for the patient. The treatment of acne vulgaris may be well-suited to home-use applications, where sufferers may be too embarrassed to seek medical treatment. This randomized controlled study is designed to quantify the effectiveness of using a blue light device in a therapy combined with proprietary creams, in the investigation of a self-treatment regimen. A total of 41 adults with mild-to-moderate facial inflammatory acne were recruited. The subjects were randomly assigned to combination blue light therapy (n = 26) or control (n = 15). Photography was used for qualitative assessment of lesion counts, at weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. All subjects in the treatment cohort achieved a reduction in their inflammatory lesion counts after 12 weeks. The mean inflammatory lesion counts reduced by 50.02% in the treatment cohort, and increased by 2.45% in the control cohort. The reduction in inflammatory lesions was typically observable at week-3, and maximal between weeks 8 and 12. The treatment is free of pain and side-effects. The blue light device offers a valuable alternative to antibiotics and potentially irritating topical treatments. Blue light phototherapy, using a narrow-band LED light source, appears to be a safe and effective additional therapy for mild to moderate acne. PMID:25594129

  9. TNF -308 G/A Polymorphism and Risk of Acne Vulgaris: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Kang; Wu, Wen-Juan; Qi, Jue; He, Li; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Background The -308 G/A polymorphism in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) gene has been implicated in the risk of acne vulgaris, but the results are inconclusive. The present meta-analysis aimed to investigate the overall association between the -308 G/A polymorphism and acne vulgaris risk. Methods We searched in Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science and CNKI for studies evaluating the association between the -308 G/A gene polymorphism and acne vulgaris risk. Data were extracted and statistical analysis was performed using STATA 12.0 software. Results A total of five publications involving 1553 subjects (728 acne vulgaris cases and 825 controls) were included in this meta-analysis. Combined analysis revealed a significant association between this polymorphism and acne vulgaris risk under recessive model (OR = 2.73, 95% CI: 1.37–5.44, p = 0.004 for AA vs. AG + GG). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity showed that the acne vulgaris risk associated with the -308 G/A gene polymorphism was significantly elevated among Caucasians under recessive model (OR = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.13–4.86, p = 0.023). Conclusion This meta-analysis suggests that the -308 G/A polymorphism in the TNF gene contributes to acne vulgaris risk, especially in Caucasian populations. Further studies among different ethnicity populations are needed to validate these findings. PMID:24498378

  10. Assessment of Life Quality Index Among Patients with Acne Vulgaris in a Suburban Population

    PubMed Central

    Hazarika, Neirita; Rajaprabha, Radha K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Acne vulgaris affects about 85% of adolescents, often extending into adulthood. Psychosocial impact of acne on health-related quality of life (QoL) has been identified, but it remains under-evaluated, especially in Indian patients. This study was aimed to assess the impact of acne and its sequelae on the QoL. Materials and Methods: This was a hospital-based, prospective, cross-sectional study done between June and November 2014 on 114 consenting patients above 15 years of age with acne vulgaris. Acne vulgaris and its sequelae were graded, and QoL was assessed by using Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire. Results: Most cases (64%) were between 15 and 20 years. Females (57%) outnumbered males. Facial lesions (61.4%) and grade II acne were most common. Mean DLQI score was 7.22. DLQI scores were statistically influenced by the age of the patient, duration and grade of acne, acne scar, and postacne hyperpigmentation. Conclusion: This study showed significant impairment of QoL in acne patients. Assurance and counseling along with early treatment of acne vulgaris are important to reduce disease-related psychosocial sequelae and increase the efficacy of treatment. PMID:27057015

  11. Oral Spironolactone in Post-teenage Female Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Grace K.

    2012-01-01

    Oral spironolactone has been used for over two decades in the dermatological setting. Although it is not generally considered a primary option in the management of female patients with acne vulgaris, the increase in office visits by post-teenage women with acne vulgaris has recently placed a spotlight on the use of this agent in this subgroup of patients. This article reviews the literature focusing on the use of oral spironolactone in this subset of women with acne vulgaris, including discussions of the recommended starting dose, expected response time, adjustments in therapy, potential adverse effects, and patient monitoring. PMID:22468178

  12. Inflammatory Acne Treatment: Review of Current and New Topical Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris (AV) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by the presence of comedones, papules, pustules, and nodules. Consensus guidelines recommend the use of combination therapy using different drugs with complementary mechanisms of action to best address as many acne pathogenic factors as possible at the same time. Topical acne medications exist as individual agents that may be combined in physician-recommended regimens or as pre-formulated fixed-dose combination products. In addition, there are several new and promising topical therapies currently being developed that work by different mechanisms of action from traditionally used acne therapies. The following review will cover commonly used drugs, newcomers to the market, and what the future holds for the topical treatment of AV. PMID:26741391

  13. Decreased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ level and signalling in sebaceous glands of patients with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Dozsa, A; Mihaly, J; Dezso, B; Csizmadia, E; Keresztessy, T; Marko, L; Rühl, R; Remenyik, E; Nagy, L

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the altered lipid metabolism-related transcriptional events occuring in sebaceous glands of patients with acne vulgaris. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, a lipid-activated transcription factor, is implicated in differentiation and lipid metabolism of sebocytes. We have observed that PPARγ and its target genes, ADRP (adipose differentiation related protein) and PGAR (PPARγ angioprotein related protein) are expressed at lower levels in sebocytes from patients with acne than in those from healthy controls (HCs) Furthermore, endogenous PPARγ activator lipids such as arachidonic acid-derived keto-metabolites (e.g. 5KETE, 12KETE) are increased in acne-involved and nonacne-involved skin of patients with acne, compared with skin from healthy individuals. Our findings highlight the possible anti-inflammatory role of endogenous ligand-activated PPARγ signaling in human sebocyte biology, and suggest that modulating PPARγ- expression and thereby signaling might be a promising strategy for the clinical management of acne vulgaris. PMID:26800853

  14. Effects of isotretinoin on body mass index, serum adiponectin, leptin, and ghrelin levels in acne vulgaris patients

    PubMed Central

    Ayvaz, Havva Hilal; Ozturk, Gulfer; Ergin, Can; Akıs, Havva Kaya; Gonul, Muzeyyen; Arzuhal, Ercan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Isotretinoin has been successfully used for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Aim To investigate the effects of isotretinoin on body mass index (BMI), to determine whether isotretinoin causes any changes in serum adiponectin, leptin, and ghrelin levels in acne vulgaris patients, and to correlate variables. Material and methods Thirty-two patients were included in this study. Oral isotretinoin was begun at a dose of 0.5–0.6 mg/kg and raised to 0.6–0.75 mg/kg. Pretreatment and posttreatment third-month BMI and adiponectin, leptin, and ghrelin serum levels were measured. Results The pre- and posttreatment BMI values were not significantly different. In addition, serum adiponectin and leptin levels were significantly increased following isotretinoin therapy while serum ghrelin levels were not different. Conclusions Isotretinoin may exert its anti-inflammatory activity by increasing leptin and adiponectin levels. PMID:27605902

  15. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris: A Review of Recent Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Hamid; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Shahinfard, Najmeh; Moradi Nafchi, Atefeh; Saberianpour, Shirin; Rafieian Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Context: Acne vulgaris affects about 85% of teenagers and may continue to adulthood. There are about two million visits to physicians per year for teenagers and the direct cost of acne treatment in the US exceeds $1 billion per year. Evidence Acquisition: A wide variety of treatment regimens exist for acne vulgaris including benzoil peroxide, retinoids, isotretinoids, keratolytic soaps, alpha hydroxy acids, azelaic acid, salicilic acid as well as hormonal, anti-androgen or antiseborrheic treatments. However, none of these methods is free of side effects and their exact role in therapy is not clear. In this paper apart from presenting the possible causes of acne vulgaris and its available drugs, recently published papers about medicinal plants used in the treatment of acne vulgaris were reviewed. Results: Consumption of alternative and complementary medicine, including medicinal plants, is increasing and is common amongst patients affected by acne and infectious skin diseases. Medicinal plants have a long history of use and have been shown to possess low side effects. These plants are a reliable source for preparation of new drugs. Conclusions: Many plants seem to have inhibitory effects on the growth of bacteria, fungi and viruses in vitro. However, there are a few clinical evidences about the effectiveness and safety of these plants in the treatment of acne and other skin infections. PMID:26862380

  16. Antimicrobial activities of ozenoxacin against isolates of propionibacteria and staphylococci from Japanese patients with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akiko; Ikeda, Fumiaki; Kanayama, Shoji; Okamoto, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Tatsumi; Ishii, Ritsuko; Fujikawa, Akira; Takei, Katsuaki; Kawashima, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    Ozenoxacin, a novel non-fluorinated topical quinolone, was assessed for in vitro antimicrobial activity against clinical isolates of propionibacteria and staphylococci according to the broth microdilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The isolates used in this study were collected from Japanese patients with acne vulgaris during a period from 2012 to 2013. The MIC90s of ozenoxacin against Propionibacterium acnes (n=266), Propionibacterium granulosum (n=10), Staphylococcus aureus (n=23), Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=229) and other coagulase-negative staphylococci (n=82) were ≤0.06, ≤0.06, ≤0.06, 0.125 and ≤0.06 µg ml-1, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of ozenoxacin against the clinical isolates of propionibacteria and staphylococci was greater than that of five reference antimicrobial agents which have been used for the treatment of acne vulgaris. The MICs of ozenoxacin were correlated with those of nadifloxacin in P. acnes and S. epidermidis isolates. However, the MICs of ozenoxacin were 0.25-0.5 µg ml-1 and 0.5-8 µg ml-1 against nadifloxacin-resistant P. acnes (MIC: ≥8 µg ml-1; n=8) and S. epidermidis (MIC: ≥64 µg ml-1; n=10), respectively. These results indicated the potent antimicrobial activity against P. acnes and S. epidermidis isolates resistant to nadifloxacin. Topical ozenoxacin could represent an alternative therapeutic drug for acne vulgaris based on its potent antimicrobial activity against the isolates of propionibacteria and staphylococci from acne patients. PMID:27305898

  17. Severity and impact of acne vulgaris on the quality of life of adolescents in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogedegbe, Evelyn E; Henshaw, Eshan B

    2014-01-01

    Background Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition, which affects most adolescents at some point in their lives. It has been found to have a significant impact on their psychological well-being and has been associated with depression and suicide ideation. Many studies have assessed the impact of acne vulgaris on the quality of life (QoL) in different population subgroups around the world, but there is a dearth of reports from the African subcontinent. This study thus seeks to assess the severity of acne vulgaris and determine its effect on the QoL of adolescents in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods In a cross-sectional survey employing a two-stage sampling method, the severity of acne vulgaris and its impact on the QoL of adolescents attending a senior secondary school in Lagos, Nigeria was assessed using the Global Acne Grading Scale (GAGS) and the Cardiff Acne Disability Index (CADI), respectively. The correlation between the results of the GAGS and CADI was also determined. Results One hundred and sixty adolescent students with acne were recruited, with males accounting for 51.9% and females 48.1%. The mean and standard deviation of the GAGS severity scores were 11.3±5.4 for males and 11.9±5.4 for females. Only one student had severe acne vulgaris (GAGS, 31–38), 10% moderate (GAGS, 19–30), and 89.4% mild (GAGS, 1–18). The overall CADI score was 3.4±3.0, which suggests mild impairment in QoL; however, the solitary student with severe acne had severe QoL impairment. There was a weak positive correlation between the GAGS and the CADI score. Conclusion Most adolescents in our study had mild acne vulgaris, and the overall impact on their QoL was mild. However, the correlation between the psychosocial impact and acne severity was weak. There is a need for similar studies in other parts of the country and for further studies to determine the adequacy of the existing instruments in assessing the impact of acne vulgaris in Nigerian adolescents. PMID:25525376

  18. Use of Oral Contraceptives for Management of Acne Vulgaris: Practical Considerations in Real World Practice.

    PubMed

    Harper, Julie C

    2016-04-01

    Acne vulgaris may be effectively treated with combination oral contraceptive pills (COCs) in women. COCs may be useful in any woman with acne in the absence of known contraindications. When prescribing a COC to a woman who also desires contraception, the risks of the COC are compared with the risks associated with pregnancy. When prescribing a COC to a woman who does not desire contraception, the risks of the COC must be weighed against the risks associated with acne. COCs may take 3 cycles of use to show an effect in acne lesion count reductions. PMID:27015775

  19. Evaluation and Management of Refractory Acne Vulgaris in Adolescent and Adult Men.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Morgan

    2016-04-01

    Acne vulgaris alters the normal skin physiology, impairing stratum corneum and transepidermal water loss. A male's normal skin physiologic state is different than a female's and may have implications when choosing treatment when the skin is altered in a disease state. Transepidermal water loss, pH, and sebum production are different between the sexes. Several underlying conditions present in male acne patients at several ages that may require a more in-depth evaluation. As knowledge of the pathogenesis of acne expands, the differences in skin physiology between the sexes may alter the manner in which male patients with acne medications are approached. PMID:27015780

  20. Successful treatment of mild to moderate acne vulgaris with Dr Michaels® (also branded as Zitinex®) topical products family: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Tirant, M; Bayer, P; Coburn, M; Anderson, P; Donnelly, B; Kennedy, T; Gaibor, J; Arora, M; Clews, L; Walmsley, S; Hercogovấ, J; Fioranelli, M; Gianfaldoni, S; Chokoeva, A A; Tchernev, G; Novotny, F; Roccia, M G; Maximov, G K; França, K; Lotti, T

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is an epidemic inflammatory skin disease of multi-factorial origin, frequently seen in adolescents and often persisting or occurring through to adulthood. Acne vulgaris is a nearly universal skin disease afflicting 79-95% of the adolescent population in westernized societies and is a significant cause of psychological morbidity in affected patients. Despite the various treatment options available for acne, there is still a need for a safe and effective option. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) product family in the treatment of papulo-pustular acne. 25 patients (17 female/8 male), aged 15-22, with a mild to moderate papulo-pustular acne, localized on the face and on the trunk, were included in this study. None of the patients had used any other kind of treatment in the 3 months prior to commencing this study. All of the patients were treated with Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) facial exfoliating cleanser, activator formula, a cream, PSC 200 and PSC 900 oral supplements. Application time of Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) products was 12 weeks. The treatment was been evaluated clinically at 0, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. All of the patients showed an improvement in all parameters of their acne (comedones, papules, pustules, hyperpigmentation and scars). The acne lesions and erythema had mostly resolved. The hyperpigmentation and pitted scarring had significantly reduced also, with the skin appearing smoother. The treatment was well tolerated and no side effects have been described. Our study demonstrates that the Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) facial exfoliating cleanser, activator formula, cream and oral supplements PSC 200 and PSC 900 are an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of moderately severe acne vulgaris. Moreover, it highlights the safety profile of the Dr Michaels® (Zitinex®) product family in a case of acne compared to traditional first-line treatments. PMID:27498658

  1. Acne Vulgaris and Quality of Life Among Young Adults in South India

    PubMed Central

    Durai, Priya Cinna T; Nair, Dhanya G

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic condition affecting more than 85% of adolescents and young adults. It is one of the most common diseases affecting humanity and its impact on quality of life (QoL) is important. The impact of acne on QoL in Indian patients remains undocumented. The study was undertaken to detect the impact of acne vulgaris and related factors that may influence the QoL. Materials and Methods: This was a hospital-based, prospective, cross-sectional, prestructured, questionnaire-based study done on 140 consenting individuals, who attended the Dermatology outpatient department. Acne vulgaris was graded using simple grading system. QoL was measured using a combination of skin disease-specific (Dermatological Life Quality Index (DLQI)) and acne-specific (Cardiff Acne Disability Index (CADI)) questionnaires. Results: Majority of our study population were students (103, 73.6%). Face (139, 99.3%) was the commonest site of acne and comedones 133, 95% were the commonest type of lesion. Most of the individuals 66, 47.1% were observed to have grade 1 acne. The mean DLQI score was 6.91 and the mean CADI score was 5.2. Association between the scores was statistically significant. Age, occupation, marital status, family, and treatment history played a role in affecting the QoL. Diet, smoking, and alcohol did not influence the QoL. Conclusion: Though acne had impact on patient's QoL, it was less severe in our study. It is important for health professionals to incorporate QoL measurements when managing acne patients to provide better and appropriate care. PMID:25657394

  2. Management of acne vulgaris with hormonal therapies in adult female patients.

    PubMed

    Husein-ElAhmed, Husein

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common condition affecting up of 93% of adolescents. Although rare, this disease may persist in adulthood. In adult women with acne (those older than 25 years old), this condition is particularly relevant because of the refractory to conventional therapies, which makes acne a challenge for dermatologists in this group of patients. In order to its potential risk for chronicity and the involvement of visible anatomical sites such as face and upper torso, acne has been associated with a wide spectrum of psychological and social dysfunction such as depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, somatization, and social inhibition. In particular, adult women with acne have been shown to be adversely impacted by the effect of acne on their quality of life. For the last four decades, dermatologists have used hormonal therapies for the management of acne vulgaris in adult women, which are considered a rational choice given the severity and chronicity of this condition in this group of patients. The aim of this work is to review the hormonal drugs for management of acne. PMID:25845307

  3. Efficacy of mupirocin and rifampin used with standard treatment in the management of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Khorvash, Farzin; Abdi, Fatemeh; H Kashani, Hessam; Fatemi Naeini, Farahnaz; Khorvash, Fariborz

    2013-01-01

    The multiple etiologic factors involved in acne make the use of various medications necessary to treat the condition. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of mupirocin and rifampin used with standard treatment in the management of acne vulgaris. In a multicentre, randomized controlled, triple-blinded study, a total of 105 acne patients, with a clinical diagnosis of moderate to severe acne,were randomizedly divided into three groups (35 per group), for treatment of acne. The first group was treated with standard treatment alone, the second group received mupirocin plus standard treatment and the third group received rifampin plus standard treatment.There were three study visits according to Global Acne Grading System (GAGS): at baseline and weeks 6 and 12. The absolute changes of GAGS score from baseline to week 6 and 12 demonstrated a reduction in the mean score of GAGS in the three treatment groups (p < 0.001). Due to the difference between GAGS score at the baseline of study, the data were adjusted using the general linear model. The findings showed that all of the treatments significantly improved acne lesions. Nevertheless, none of the treatments was shown to be more effective than the others (p = 0.9). The three treatments were well tolerated, and no serious adverse events were reported. These findings provide evidence on the efficacy of combining mupirocin and rifampin with standard treatment in the management of acne vulgaris, although none of the treatments had superior efficacy compared with the others. PMID:24250593

  4. Staphylococcal LTA-Induced miR-143 Inhibits Propionibacterium acnes-Mediated Inflammatory Response in Skin.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaoli; Li, Zhiheng; Liu, Kewei; Wu, Yelin; Jiang, Deming; Lai, Yuping

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) plays a critical role in modulating cutaneous inflammatory responses in skin. Although S. epidermidis has been shown to co-colonize with Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in acne lesions, it is unclear whether S. epidermidis is involved in the regulation of P. acnes-induced inflammatory responses. In this study, we demonstrated that S. epidermidis inhibited P. acnes-induced inflammation in skin. P. acnes induced the expression of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α via the activation of toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 in both keratinocytes and mouse ears. Staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid activated TLR2 to induce miR-143 in keratinocytes, and miR-143, in turn, directly targeted 3' UTR of TLR2 to decrease the stability of TLR2 mRNA and then decreased TLR2 protein, thus inhibiting P. acnes-induced proinflammatory cytokines. The inhibitory effect of miR-143 was further confirmed in vivo as the administration of miR-143 antagomir into mouse ears abrogated the inhibitory effect of lipoteichoic acid on P. acnes-induced inflammation in skin. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid inhibits P. acnes-induced inflammation via the induction of miR-143, and suggest that local modulation of inflammatory responses by S. epidermidis at the site of acne vulgaris might be a beneficial therapeutic strategy for management of P. acnes-induced inflammation. PMID:26739093

  5. A status report on topical tazarotene in the management of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Tanghetti, Emil

    2013-03-01

    Tazarotene is a synthetic retinoid that, depending on the concentration and vehicle, is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the topical treatment of acne vulgaris (AV) and plaque psoriasis. Tazarotene is also used as adjunctive treatment for specified clinical manifestations of chronically photodamaged skin (facial fine wrinkling, mottled facial hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation, and benign facial lentigines), along with comprehensive skin care and photoprotection from sunlight. The gel formulation was released in the United States in 1997, with the cream formulation made available in 2000. Multiple studies are available supporting the effective and safe use of topical tazarotene for each of its indications. This article provides an overview of the pharmacology of topically applied tazarotene, discussing in particular up-to-date information on the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of topical tazarotene for AV, including monotherapy and combination therapy studies. Topical tazarotene 0.1% in both formulations is highly effective in reducing both inflammatory and noninflammatory acne lesions, and can be used in combination with other topical agents, including formulations containing benzoyl peroxide or dapsone 5% gel. Although many patients tolerate the use of topical tazarotene without significant issues or concerns, some patients experience application-site tolerability reactions, which can usually be managed with proper skin care and are less frequent with the cream formulation. PMID:23545935

  6. Human beta defensin-1 and -2 expression in human pilosebaceous units: upregulation in acne vulgaris lesions.

    PubMed

    Chronnell, C M; Ghali, L R; Ali, R S; Quinn, A G; Holland, D B; Bull, J J; Cunliffe, W J; McKay, I A; Philpott, M P; Müller-Röver, S

    2001-11-01

    A rich residential microflora is harboured by the distal outer root sheath of the hair follicle and the hair canal - normally without causing skin diseases. Although the basic mechanisms involved in the development of inflammation during acne vulgaris remain unclear, microbial agents might play an important role in this process. In this study we have analyzed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry the expression patterns of two antimicrobial peptides, human beta defensin-1 and human beta defensin-2, in healthy human hair follicles as well as in perilesional and intralesional skin of acne vulgaris lesions such as comedones, papules, and pustules. Strong defensin-1 and defensin-2 immunoreactivity was found in all suprabasal layers of the epidermis, the distal outer root sheath of the hair follicle, and the pilosebaceous duct. Marked defensin-1 and defensin-2 immunoreactivity was also found in the sebaceous gland and in the basal layer of the central outer root sheath including the bulge region. The majority of acne biopsies displayed a marked upregulation of defensin-2 immunoreactivity in the lesional and perilesional epithelium - in particular in pustules - and a less marked upregulation of defensin-1 immunoreactivity. The upregulation of beta-defensin expression in acne vulgaris lesions compared to controls suggests that beta-defensins may be involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. PMID:11710922

  7. Advantage of soybean isoflavone as antiandrogen on acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Riyanto, Puguh; Subchan, Prasetyowati; Lelyana, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris (AV) is the commonest skin disorder, whereas soybean isoflavone had been proved as antiandrogen that is it can inhibit the enzyme 3ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase,17ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 5α-reductase. The purpose of this study is to prove the advantage of soybean isoflavone as antiandrogen on AV. Methods: this study is a clinical study using randomized pretest-posttest control group design. This study is a study with 40 samples randomized into 2 groups, i.e. placebo group and 160 mgs of isoflavone group, the duration is 12 weeks, conducted a double-blind manner. The dependent variabel is total of AV lesion, whereas the intermediate variable is DHT that will be examined using ELISA. Defferential test and multivariate analysis were performed on dependent, independent and intermediate variables. Results: This study found that the difference in mean of total AV lesion before treatment was not significant (p: 0.099), whereas after treatment it differed significantly (p: 0.000), with significant delta difference (p: 0.000). Difference of mean DHT level before treatment was not significant (p: 0.574), whereas after treatment it differed significantly (p: 0.000), with significant delta difference (p: 0.000). Delta of DHT (p: 0.003) (r: 0.736) had significant influence on delta of total AV lesion (P < 0.05). Conclusion: This study concludes that supplementation with 160 mgs/day of soybean isoflavone can reduce total AV lesion as a result of decreased DHT level. PMID:26413190

  8. A single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial evaluating the effect of face washing on acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joanna Mimi; Lew, Vincent K; Kimball, Alexa B

    2006-01-01

    Despite the common recommendation to wash the face twice daily with a mild cleanser, there is little published evidence to support the practice. Indeed, while the general public believes that cleaner skin will result in fewer blemishes, dermatologists often warn that overwashing and scrubbing can exacerbate the condition. To clarify the effect of frequency of face washing on acne vulgaris, we designed a single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial to be conducted on males with mild to moderate acne vulgaris. Subjects washed their faces twice daily for 2 weeks with a standard mild cleanser before being randomized to one of three study arms, in which face washing was to be done once, twice, or four times a day for 6 weeks. At the end of the study no statistically significant differences were noted between groups. However, significant improvements in both open comedones and total noninflammatory lesions were observed in the group washing twice a day. Worsening of acne condition was observed in the study group washing once a day, with significant increases in erythema, papules, and total inflammatory lesions. We concluded that slight support exists, both in terms of efficacy and convenience, for the recommendation to wash the face twice daily with a mild cleanser. However, excessive face washing may not be as culpable as previously thought. PMID:17014635

  9. Acne

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Body Looking and feeling your best Acne Acne Whether you call them pimples, zits, or acne, ... treatments? What doesn’t cause acne? What causes acne? top Acne happens when your pores get clogged ...

  10. Rosmarinus officinalis extract suppresses Propionibacterium acnes-induced inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Chuang, Lu-Te; Lien, Tsung-Jung; Liing, Yau-Rong; Chen, Wei-Yu; Tsai, Po-Jung

    2013-04-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a key pathogen involved in the progression of acne inflammation. The development of a new agent possessing antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity against P. acnes is therefore of interest. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract on P. acnes-induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that ethanolic rosemary extract (ERE) significantly suppressed the secretion and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in P. acnes-stimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. In an in vivo mouse model, concomitant intradermal injection of ERE attenuated the P. acnes-induced ear swelling and granulomatous inflammation. Since ERE suppressed the P. acnes-induced nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation and mRNA expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, the suppressive effect of ERE might be due, at least partially, to diminished NF-κB activation and TLR2-mediated signaling pathways. Furthermore, three major constituents of ERE, carnosol, carnosic acid, and rosmarinic acid, exerted different immumodulatory activities in vitro. In brief, rosmarinic acid significantly suppressed IL-8 production, while the other two compounds inhibited IL-1β production. Further study is needed to explore the role of bioactive compounds of rosemary in mitigation of P. acnes-induced inflammation. PMID:23514231

  11. Pulsed azithromycin treatment is as effective and safe as 2-week-longer daily doxycycline treatment of acne vulgaris: a randomized, double-blind, noninferiority study.

    PubMed

    Maleszka, Romuald; Turek-Urasinska, Katarzyna; Oremus, Marijana; Vukovic, Jacinta; Barsic, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy and safety of azithromycin and doxycycline for the treatment of moderate acne vulgaris were evaluated (240 patients) in both intention-to-treat and per-protocol populations. The evaluation of clinical efficacy was based on the change in the number of facial inflammatory lesions from baseline to the end of treatment, and noninferiority was defined by the upper 95% confidence limit of the difference between two treatments being less than 9. Reduction in the number of lesions was similar with both azithromycin and doxycycline treatments (27 +/- 12 and 30 +/- 12, respectively) in both groups. Also, the upper 95% confidence limit of 5 inflammatory lesions has satisfied the noninferiority criterion. The incidence of adverse events did not differ between the two treatment groups. The shorter and simpler treatment schedule of azithromycin had similar efficacy and safety as doxycycline in the treatment of moderate acne vulgaris, confirming noninferiority of azithromycin as compared with doxycycline. PMID:21548512

  12. [Roaccutan in the therapy of severe manifestations of acne vulgaris and rosacea].

    PubMed

    Gromova, S A; Samgin, M A; Kolesnikov, Iu Iu

    1989-01-01

    Roakkutan was used in the treatment of 49 patients with severe acne vulgaris and 8 patients with rosacea. The treatment was highly effective. The primary and maintenance daily doses of the drug are suggested and the terms of therapy defined. PMID:2534455

  13. Acne: What's New.

    PubMed

    Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-06-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the most prevalent skin conditions. Antibiotics, when considered, are most effective in combination with other therapies, and limited evidence suggests that submicrobial doses of antibiotics may improve acne without increasing the risk for antibiotic resistance. A small but significant risk for inflammatory bowel disease has also been identified in children treated with multiple courses of antibiotics. New topical agents are expanding therapeutic options for acne. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S114-S116. PMID:27538054

  14. Relationship between acne vulgaris and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in a clinical sample of women.

    PubMed

    Bilgic, Ayhan; Bilgic, Özlem; Çolak, Rukiye Sivri; Altınyazar, Hilmi Cevdet

    2016-04-01

    Acne vulgaris has recently been reported to be associated with elevated rates of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in epidemiological studies. This report examines childhood and current attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in a clinical sample of female adults. Ninety-one women with acne vulgaris and 53 controls were included in this study. The aforementioned symptoms were measured in participants. No significant differences were found between patients and controls in any of the measurements. Contrary to the findings of epidemiological studies, this study did not uncover a link between acne vulgaris and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. PMID:27192533

  15. Relationship between acne vulgaris and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in a clinical sample of women*

    PubMed Central

    Bilgic, Ayhan; Bilgic, Özlem; Çolak, Rukiye Sivri; Altınyazar, Hilmi Cevdet

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris has recently been reported to be associated with elevated rates of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in epidemiological studies. This report examines childhood and current attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in a clinical sample of female adults. Ninety-one women with acne vulgaris and 53 controls were included in this study. The aforementioned symptoms were measured in participants. No significant differences were found between patients and controls in any of the measurements. Contrary to the findings of epidemiological studies, this study did not uncover a link between acne vulgaris and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder PMID:27192533

  16. Top Ten List of Clinical Pearls in the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Layton, Alison M

    2016-04-01

    Acne represents the most common inflammatory dermatosis seen worldwide and is the leading reason for seeing a dermatologist. This article provides some tips for managing acne in a safe and effective manner to minimize the physical and psychological scars that can result from acne. Tips include how to optimize available treatment regimens according to the evidence base and target therapy to pathophysiologic factors, while also tailoring treatments to patient expectation and needs. Attention is given to minimizing the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in acne patients and beyond. PMID:27015774

  17. The utility of benzoyl peroxide in hydrophase base (Brevoxyl) in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2006-04-01

    Available for more than 5 decades, benzoyl peroxide has been a "workhorse" of acne therapy. The benefits of this agent include reduction in Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) with decrease in inflammatory lesions, efficacy as both "leave on" and cleanser formulations and reduced emergence of antibiotic-resistant P. acnes strains. As the effect of benzoyl peroxide on P. acnes is a direct toxic effect rather than as a "true" antibiotic, resistance to benzoyl peroxide does not occur and has never been reported. Benzoyl peroxide in hydrophase base (Brevoxyl Creamy Washes and Gels) has shown significant efficacy in the treatment of acne, with lower irritancy than other benzoyl peroxide preparations. It is felt that the low irritancy of this product is related to a unique delivery vehicle containing dimethyl isosorbide, which dissolves benzoyl peroxide crystals on the skin. Clinical studies demonstrating the efficacy and safety of benzoyl peroxide in hydrophase base will be reviewed. PMID:16673802

  18. Treatment of Acne Vulgaris With Salicylic Acid Chemical Peel and Pulsed Dye Laser: A Split Face, Rater-Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lekakh, Olga; Mahoney, Anne Marie; Novice, Karlee; Kamalpour, Julia; Sadeghian, Azeen; Mondo, Dana; Kalnicky, Cathy; Guo, Rong; Peterson, Anthony; Tung, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pulsed dye laser (PDL) has been used to treat acne lesions and scar erythema by interrupting superficial vasculature. Salicylic acid chemical peels are employed chiefly due to their lipophilic, comedolytic, and anti-inflammatory properties. Although studies have looked at peels and laser therapy independently in acne management, we examined these treatments in combination. Our primary objective was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of concurrent use of salicylic acid peels with PDL versus salicylic acid peels alone in the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris. Methods: Adult patients with moderate to severe acne were included. Subjects received a total of 3 treatments at 3-week intervals. Per randomized split-face treatment, at week 0, one half of the subject’s face was treated with PDL (595 nm) followed by whole face application of a 30% salicylic acid peel. At weeks 3 and 6, the treatments were repeated. At 0 and 9 weeks, patients were assessed with the Global Evaluation Acne (GEA) scale and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire. Results: Nineteen subjects were enrolled, and 18 completed the study. Significant improvement in acne was seen in both the combined (laser and peel) and chemical peel alone treatment arms (P < .0005 and P = .001). Using the GEA scale score, compared to week 0, the mean difference in acne improvement at week 9 was -1.61 in the combination therapy group versus -1.11 in the peel only group. Based on the GEA scale scoring, a statistically significant greater difference in acne improvement was seen, from week 0 to week 9, in the combination treatment group compared with the peel only group (P = .003). Conclusion: While acne subjects had significant benefit from the salicylic acid peel alone, they experienced greater significant benefit from PDL treatment used in conjunction with salicylic acid peels. The adjunctive utilization of PDL to salicylic acid peel therapy can lead to better outcomes in acne

  19. Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zaenglein, Andrea L; Pathy, Arun L; Schlosser, Bethanee J; Alikhan, Ali; Baldwin, Hilary E; Berson, Diane S; Bowe, Whitney P; Graber, Emmy M; Harper, Julie C; Kang, Sewon; Keri, Jonette E; Leyden, James J; Reynolds, Rachel V; Silverberg, Nanette B; Stein Gold, Linda F; Tollefson, Megha M; Weiss, Jonathan S; Dolan, Nancy C; Sagan, Andrew A; Stern, Mackenzie; Boyer, Kevin M; Bhushan, Reva

    2016-05-01

    Acne is one of the most common disorders treated by dermatologists and other health care providers. While it most often affects adolescents, it is not uncommon in adults and can also be seen in children. This evidence-based guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in its management. Issues from grading of acne to the topical and systemic management of the disease are reviewed. Suggestions on use are provided based on available evidence. PMID:26897386

  20. Tretinoin Nanogel 0.025% Versus Conventional Gel 0.025% in Patients with Acne Vulgaris: A Randomized, Active Controlled, Multicentre, Parallel Group, Phase IV Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekhar, B S; Anitha, M.; Ruparelia, Mukesh; Vaidya, Pradyumna; Aamir, Riyaz; Shah, Sunil; Thilak, S; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev; Pal, Sandeep; Saraswat, Abir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Conventional topical tretinoin formulation is often associated with local adverse events. Nanogel formulation of tretinoin has good physical stability and enables good penetration of tretinoin into the pilo-sebaceous glands. Aim: The present study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of a nanogel formulation of tretinoin as compared to its conventional gel formulation in the treatment of acne vulgaris of the face. Materials and Methods: This randomized, active controlled, multicentric, phase IV clinical trial evaluated the treatment of patients with acne vulgaris of the face by the two gel formulations locally applied once daily at night for 12 wk. Acne lesion counts (inflammatory, non-inflammatory & total) and severity grading were carried out on the monthly scheduled visits along with the tolerability assessments. Results: A total of 207 patients were randomized in the study. Reductions in the total (72.9% vs. 65.0%; p = 0.03) and inflammatory (78.1% vs. 66.9%; p = 0.02) acne lesions were reported to be significantly greater with the nanogel formulation as compared to the conventional gel formulation. Local adverse events were significantly less (p = 0.04) in the nanogel group (13.3%) as compared to the conventional gel group (24.7%). Dryness was the most common adverse event reported in both the treatment groups while peeling of skin, burning sensation and photosensitivity were reported in patients using the conventional gel only. Conclusion: In the treatment of acne vulgaris of the face, tretinoin nanogel formulation appears to be more effective and better tolerated than the conventional gel formulation. PMID:25738069

  1. Characterization of a new acne vulgaris treatment device combining light and thermal treatment methods

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Yeail; Kang, Heesung; Choi, Eung Ho; Nelson, J. Stuart; Jung, Byungjo

    2012-01-01

    Background/purpose Conventional treatment methods for acne vulgaris have various side effects such as the development of bacterial resistance, phototoxicity, vertigo, gastro-intestinal problems, and drug eruptions. To minimize such side effects, light and thermal methods have been alternately suggested. This study characterized a new acne vulgaris treatment device (AVTD) that combines both light and thermal methods and evaluated its clinical efficacy. Methods We characterized the thermal and light properties of the AVTD itself and evaluated its thermal characteristics in ex vivo porcine skin samples. The Arrhenius equation was used to calculate the skin thermal injury coefficient to confirm the skin safety of the AVTD. Finally, the clinical efficacy of the AVDT was evaluated by analyzing cross-polarization and erythema index images, which were obtained from 13 volunteers undergoing treatment with the AVTD. Results The temperature of the AVTD itself was maintained at 49.1 °C on the tip and 39.7 °C in the porcine skin samples. The peak intensity of the light-emitting diode (LED) light was observed at 468 nm. The skin safety of the AVTD was confirmed and 84.2% of the volunteers presented positive treatment results. Conclusion The treatment of acne using the AVTD resulted in a high treatment rate in a clinical study, minimizing side effects. On the basis of these results, we can be sure that the AVTD may be effectively used for the treatment of acne vulgaris. PMID:21585558

  2. Topical retinoids for acne.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Lindsey; Bonati, Lauren Meshkov; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2016-06-01

    Topical retinoids are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of acne vulgaris in nonpregnant, nonlactating patients 12 years of age and older. Their efficacy, safety, and tolerability are well documented for inflammatory and noninflammatory acne with studies repeatedly demonstrating a decrease in the number of lesions, significant improvement in acne severity, improvement in the cosmetic appearance of acne, and the prevention of acne lesions through microcomedone formation. There is some variability between prescription retinoid products regarding efficacy, safety, and tolerability; with erythema, peeling, and dryness being common, potential side effects. Due to their efficacious and safe profile, topical retinoids remain the first-line treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:27416308

  3. Treatment of acne vulgaris and prevention of acne scarring: canadian consensus guidelines.

    PubMed

    Madden, W S; Landells, I D; Poulin, Y; Searles, G E; Smith, K C; Tan, J K; Toole, J; Zip, C M; Degreef, H

    2000-06-01

    Acne affects approximately 95% of the population at some point during their lifetime.1 This common disorder can range from mild to severe forms, cause sometimes extensive scarring, and can last well into the fourth and fifth decades. Effective therapeutic agents are available to both treat acne and prevent ongoing disease. Despite this, dermatologists frequently see patients with significant acne scarring because many patients delay seeking medical attention for acne and many practitioners procrastinate over using effective antiscarring options. In patients who already demonstrate scarring, repeated courses of antibiotics only result in recurring acne and additional scarring. This, in turn, exacerbates the despair and other adverse psychosocial effects of the disease. There are a variety of agents and devices to help acne patients with scarring. However, successful treatment cannot be guaranteed, and in most cases residual scarring will be evident. Thus, the most effective way of managing acne scarring is to prevent its occurrence in the first place. Although we currently have a number of effective antiacne agents to control the disease, such as antibiotics and hormonal agents, isotretinoina is the only agent that has been shown to induce long-term drug-free remission and curative potential. PMID:11749902

  4. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines by a soluble factor of Propionibacterium acnes: implications for chronic inflammatory acne.

    PubMed

    Vowels, B R; Yang, S; Leyden, J J

    1995-08-01

    Although many cytokines have been implicated in the development and persistence of inflammatory immune responses, it is unknown if any of these are important in inflammatory acne. This study investigated the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-1 beta, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by human monocytic cell lines, ThP-1 and U937, and by freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from acne patients. Both Propionibacterium acnes and supernatants obtained from 72-h P. acnes cultures could induce significant concentrations of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-8 by both cell lines and by peripheral blood mononuclear cells as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There was no significant difference between acne and non-acne subjects. Endotoxin quantification and addition of polymyxin B to assays indicated no lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination. P. acnes supernatant was fractionated into components with molecular weights of < 3,000, < 10,000, and < 30,000 and assayed for the ability to induce IL-8 and TNF production in ThP-1 cells. Nearly 90% of the original activity was found in the < 30,000-molecular-weight fraction, 50% was in the < 10,000-molecular-weight fraction, and only 15% remained in the < 3,000-molecular-weight fraction. The effluent from the < 3,000-molecular-weight fraction contained about 70% activity, indicating that the inducing factor was not retained in the membrane. Incubation of P. acnes supernatant with various concentrations of mutanolysin or lysozyme resulted in a loss of 60% of the original activity. The addition of jimson lectin, which binds peptidoglycan, resulted in a loss of 70% of the activity in a dose-response manner, whereas peanut lectin had little or no effect on the activity. Heating of the P. acnes supernatant to 65 degrees C also had no effect on the activity. Blocking of CD14, a receptor for both LPS and peptidoglycan, reduced cytokine production by > 50%, suggesting that

  5. Thyroid abnormalities in patients previously treated with irradiation for acne vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, D.B.; Grammes, C.F.; Starkey, R.H.; Monsaert, R.P.; Sunderlin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    Of 1,203 patients who received radiation treatment for acne vulgaris between 1940 and 1968, 302 patients were recalled and examined, 121 at Geisinger Medical Center and the remainder by their local physicians. Radiation records were reviewed on all patients. Lead-rubber and cones had been used as shielding. Mean age at the time of exposure was 21 years and mean total exposure was 692 R. Palpable nodular thyroid disease was found in eight patients (2.6%). Of these, thyroid carcinoma was detected in two patients (0.66%). Although the number of patients examined was small, the incidence of carcinomas was unexpectedly high. We conclude that follow-up examination is worthwhile for patients previously treated by irradiation for acne vulgaris.

  6. Thyroid abnormalities in patients previously treated with irradiation for acne vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, D.B.; Grammes, C.F.; Starkey, R.H.; Monsaert, R.P.; Sunderlin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    Of 1203 patients who received radiation treatment for acne vulgaris between 1940 and 1968, 302 were recalled and examined, 121 at Geisinger Medical Center and the remainder by their local physicians. Radiation records were reviewed on all patients. Lead-rubber and cones had been used as shielding. Mean age at the time of exposure was 21 years and mean total exposure was 692 R. Palpable nodular thyroid disease was found in eight patients (2.6%). Of these, thyroid carcinoma was detected in two patients (0.66%). Although the number of patients examined was small, the incidence of carcinomas was unexpectedly high. The authors conclude that follow-up examination is worthwhile for patients previously treated by irradiation for acne vulgaris.

  7. A dermocosmetic containing bakuchiol, Ginkgo biloba extract and mannitol improves the efficacy of adapalene in patients with acne vulgaris: result from a controlled randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Poláková, Katarína; Fauger, Aurélie; Sayag, Michèle; Jourdan, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne vulgaris is an inflammatory disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. Aim To confirm that BGM (bakuchiol, Ginkgo biloba extract, and mannitol) complex increases the established clinical efficacy of adapalene 0.1% gel in patients with acne. Methods A clinical trial was conducted in acne patients. A total of 111 subjects received adapalene 0.1% gel and BGM complex or vehicle cream for 2 months. Assessments comprised Investigator Global Assessment (IGA), global efficacy, seborrhea intensity, inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions, and subject perception, as well as overall safety and local tolerance and quality of life. Results At the end of the trial, inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions, IGA, global efficacy, and seborrhea intensity had significantly improved in both treatment groups. Differences were statistically significant (P<0.05) in favor of BGM complex for inflammatory lesions as well as IGA and seborrhea intensity. Global efficacy assessments and subject perception confirmed the superiority of BGM complex-including treatment over the comparative combination. Quality of life had improved more with the active combination than with the vehicle combination. In the active group, four subjects had to interrupt temporarily BGM complex and 12 adapalene compared to seven subjects interrupting the vehicle and eleven adapalene in the vehicle group. One subject withdrew from the trial due to an allergy to adapalene. The majority of all events were mild. Conclusion BGM complex improves the treatment outcome of adapalene 0.1% gel in patients with acne vulgaris. Overall, safety and local tolerance of BGM complex were good. PMID:25914553

  8. Efficacy of local application of an Unani formulation in acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Shabiya; Zulkifle, Mohd.; Ansari, Abdul Haseeb; Shahnawaz

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Buthūr-i-Labaniyya (Acne vulgaris) is affecting up to 80% of adolescents and many adults at different stages of life. It is one of the commonest skin disorders which appears on cheeks and nose as white eruptions that seems like solidified milk drops. These eruptions are treated by drugs having properties of tajfīf wa taḥlīl (desiccant and resolving), as mentioned by Ibne Sina. Daood Antaki in his book Tazkira Oolulalbab recommends the local application of a paste of Shonīz (nigella sativa), Naushādar (ammonium chloride) and Būra Armani mixed with Sirka (vinegar) for effective treatment of Acne vulgaris. Methods: The study was observational self comparison before and after treatment, conducted in the OPD of the hospital which is part of the National Institute of Unani Medicine, Bangalore. The duration of study was one year. 40 Female patients with combination of comedones, papules, pustules and nodules were recruited for this purpose. The test drug, Shonīz, Būra Armani, Naushadar powder, mixed with sirka were applied locally for one month with taqlīl-i-ghidhā tadābīr (low calorie index diet). All subjects were assessed on the basis of changes in subjective and objective parameters. Results: The response of test drugs was statistically highly significant (P < 0.01) by using ANOVA repeated measure test, there was also relief in subjective parameters. Subjects reported a reduction of 82.6%, 80.9%, 66.6% in tenderness, itching and irritation respectively. Interpretation and Conclusion: The present study reveals that the test drug formulation is safe and effective in treating Acne vulgaris if used along with low calorie index diet. No side effects of drugs were reported, therefore the trial formulation can be recommended to manage Acne vulgaris of mild to severe degree as a therapy. PMID:26865747

  9. Effect of dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acid and gamma-linolenic acid on acne vulgaris: a randomised, double-blind, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Yoon; Kwon, Hyuck Hoon; Hong, Jong Soo; Yoon, Ji Young; Park, Mi Sun; Jang, Mi Young; Suh, Dae Hun

    2014-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical efficacy, safety, and histological changes induced by dietary omega-3 fatty acid and γ-linoleic acid in acne vulgaris. A 10-week, randomised, controlled parallel dietary intervention study was performed in 45 participants with mild to moderate acne, which were allocated to either an omega-3 fatty acid group (2,000 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid), a γ-linoleic acid group (borage oil containing 400 mg γ-linoleic acid), or a control group. After 10 weeks of omega-3 fatty acid or γ-linoleic acid supplementation, inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions decreased significantly. Patient subjective assessment of improvement showed a similar result. Heamatoxylin & eosin staining of acne lesions demonstrated reductions in inflammation and immunohistochemical staining intensity for interleukin-8. No severe adverse effect was reported. This study shows for the first time that omega-3 fatty acid and γ-linoleic acid could be used as adjuvant treatments for acne patients. PMID:24553997

  10. Sub-group Analyses from a Trial of a Fixed Combination of Clindamycin Phosphate 1.2% and Benzoyl Peroxide 3.75% Gel for the Treatment of Moderate-to-severe Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Korotzer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris is commonplace and can be difficult to manage. Providing an effective and well-tolerated treatment may lead to improved adherence, increased patient satisfaction, and improved clinical outcomes. Methods: A review of efficacy, safety, and cutaneous tolerability of clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel in 498 patients with moderate-to-severe acne vulgaris enrolled in a multicenter Phase III study randomized to receive active or vehicle once daily for 12 weeks, including the most recent post-hoc analyses. Results: Significantly superior reductions in lesion counts were observed with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel from Week 4, with median percent reductions in inflammatory and noninflammatory lesions from baseline of 68.4 and 57.9 percent, respectively (bothp<0.001 versus vehicle). More than half (55.1%) of the severe acne vulgaris patients treated with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel achieved ≥2-grade improvement from baseline in their Evaluator’s Global Severity Score, and almost a third of the adolescent acne vulgaris patients (32.4%) achieved at least a marked improvement in their acne vulgaris as early as Week 2. In adult female acne overall treatments success was achieved in 52.7 percent of patients treated with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel. Overall, and in the specific subpopulations, clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel was well-tolerated with a similar adverse event profile to vehicle. Limitations: Post-hoc analyses from a single clinical trial with demographic imbalances that could potentially confound the results. Conclusion: Clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel appears to be effective in treating acne across various clinically relevant sub-groups. PMID:26705445

  11. Clinical and sebumetric evaluation of topical emulsions in the treatment of acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Naveed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Numerous plant products described in the scientific literature show distinct activities on the skin, such as moisturizing, antioxidant, sunscreen, anti-acne and depigmentation. Aim The main objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of emulsion formulations containing plant extracts (Hippophae rhamnoides and Cassia fistula) and placebo (without plant extracts) on acne patients. Material and methods A single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, split-face study was designed. Two groups of 25 patients each (aged 18–37 years) with grade I and grade II acne vulgaris received active formulations on the left side of their cheeks and placebo on the right side of their cheeks twice daily for 12 weeks. Prior to the study, signed consent was obtained from each patient. The anti-bacterial activity of the extracts and formulations was tested in vitro. The skin sebum contents of patients were evaluated by the sebumeter® and subjectively using a clinical evaluation before and after treatment of 12 weeks. One way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used in the statistical analysis. Results A significant (p ≤ 0.05) decrease in the level of sebum contents was observed in both groups who used formulations (F1 and F2) containing the plant extract. The difference between pre- and post-treatment levels of sebum contents was statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05). Formulations containing plant extracts were found effective in the reduction of skin sebum contents (anti-acne effects) sebumetrically as well as clinically when compared to placebo (F3). Conclusions Formulations with 5% plant extracts could be effective, safe, and well-tolerated topical medications for grade I and grade II acne vulgaris. PMID:25254008

  12. Acne: a new model of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory skin disease.

    PubMed

    Antiga, E; Verdelli, A; Bonciani, D; Bonciolini, V; Caproni, M; Fabbri, P

    2015-04-01

    Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the sebaceous-pilosebaceous unit. Interestingly, inflammation can be detected by histopathological examination and immuohistochemical analysis even in the apparently non-inflammatory acneic lesions, such as comedones. In the last years, it has been clearly demonstrated that acne development is linked to the combination of predisposing genetic factors and environmental triggers, among which a prominent role is played by the follicular colonization by Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes). P. acnes displays several activities able to promote the development of acne skin lesions, including the promotion of follicular hyperkeratinisation, the induction of sebogenesis, and the stimulation of an inflammatory response by the secretion of proinflammatory molecules and by the activation of innate immunity, that is followed by a P. acnes-specific adaptive immune response. In addition, P. acnes-independent inflammation mediated by androgens or by a neurogenic activation, followed by the secretion in the skin of pro-inflammatory neuropeptides, can occur in acne lesions. In conclusion, acne can be considered as a model of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory skin disease, characterized by an innate immune response that is not able to control P. acnes followed by a Th1-mediated adaptive immune response, that becomes self-maintaining independently from P. acnes itself. PMID:25876146

  13. Is switching retinoids a sound strategy for the treatment of acne vulgaris?

    PubMed

    Gold, Linda Stein; Colón, Luz E; Johnson, Lori A; Gottschalk, Ronald W

    2008-06-01

    Topical retinoids, such as adapalene gel and tazarotene cream, are considered first-line therapy for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Dermatologists often initiate adapalene gel treatment first, due to its good tolerability, followed by a switch to tazarotene cream in an effort to improve or hasten efficacy outcomes. The goal of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of 2 daily regimens for the treatment of acne: adapalene 0.1% gel for 12 weeks and adapalene 0.1% gel for 6 weeks followed by tazarotene 0.1% cream for 6 weeks. The primary efficacy outcome was the percent of reduction in total lesion counts posttreatment. Subjects ages 12 to 35 years with acne vulgaris were selected to participate in a 12-week, randomized, evaluator-blind study of once-daily therapy with adapalene 0.1% gel (n=101) or "switch therapy," adapalene 0.1% gel followed by tazarotene 0.1% cream (n=100). Adapalene-treated subjects achieved similar percent reductions in total lesion counts at week 12 compared to subjects receiving switch therapy, demonstrating the noninferiority of adapalene gel treatment (median difference: -3.57%; lower confidence limit [LCL]: -11.25). Adapalene gel was associated with fewer reports of cutaneous irritation, particularly for scaling and stinging/burning, and fewer treatment-related adverse events compared to switch therapy. The results of this study indicate that daily therapy with adapalene 0.1% gel for 12 weeks was noninferior to switch therapy. PMID:18575221

  14. In vivo assessment of the efficacy of an innovative face care system in subjects with mild acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Scherdin, U; Presto, S; Rippke, F; Nielsen, J; Strassner, M; Imadojemun, A; Gärtner, E; Herpens, A; Korting, H C; Bielfeldt, S

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of our studies was to verify efficacy and skin compatibility of a medical face care system containing 2% lactic acid (LA) as active ingredient in a specially designed vehicle (Follicle Targeting System) in adult subjects with mild acne vulgaris. The first study (46 patients) demonstrated superiority of 2% LA in comparison to 2% salicylic acid with respect to number of comedones and inflammatory lesions. The second study evaluated 90 patients receiving distinct combinations of face care products (Eucerin) Impure Skin, Hamburg, Germany), i.e. cleansing gel, facial tonic (2% LA) and cream gel (2% LA). All treatments were performed twice daily over a 12 weeks period. Lesion counts, cyanoacrylate biopsies and determination of quality of life by questionnaires were performed at different timepoints. A reduction of comedones by 56% corresponding to an 46% increase of quality of life index was demonstrated in patients applying cleansing gel, facial tonic and cream gel. For the first time we were able to show a significant improvement concerning the quality of life after using a new face care line. Especially adults with mild forms of acne may benefit from this effective skin care regimen. PMID:18492134

  15. Acne vulgaris, probiotics and the gut-brain-skin axis: from anecdote to translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Bowe, W; Patel, N B; Logan, A C

    2014-06-01

    Acne vulgaris has long been postulated to feature a gastrointestinal mechanism, dating back 80 years to dermatologists John H. Stokes and Donald M. Pillsbury. They hypothesised that emotional states (e.g. depression and anxiety) could alter normal intestinal microbiota, increase intestinal permeability, and contribute to systemic inflammation. They were also among the first to propose the use of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus cultures. In recent years, aspects of this gut-brain-skin theory have been further validated via modern scientific investigations. It is evident that gut microbes and oral probiotics could be linked to the skin, and particularly acne severity, by their ability to influence systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, glycaemic control, tissue lipid content, and even mood. This intricate relationship between gut microbiota and the skin may also be influenced by diet, a current area of intense scrutiny by those who study acne. Here we provide a historical background to the gut-brain-skin theory in acne, followed by a summary of contemporary investigations and clinical implications. PMID:23886975

  16. Topical application of ALA PDT for the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Wang, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Ling-Lin; Su, Lina; Guo, Ming-Xia; Huang, Zheng

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)- medicated photodynamic therapy (ALA PDT) for the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris. Methods: Sixteen Chinese patients with moderate to severe facial acne were treated with 1-3 courses of ALA PDT. ALA cream (3%) was freshly prepared and applied to acne lesions for 3-4 h. The lesions were irradiated by a 635 nm diode laser at dose levels of 60 - 80 J/cm2 at 100 mW/cm2. Clinical assessments were conducted before and after treatment up to 3 months. Results: All patents showed response to ALA PDT. Complete clearance was seen in 10 patients (62.5%) and partial clearance in 6 patients (37.5%). One case showed recurrence after complete clearance at 2 months and another two showed recurrence after complete clearance at 3 months. However, the number of new lesions were significantly reduced. Adverse effects were minimal. Conclusions: The results of this preliminary clinical study is encouraging. ALA PDT is a simple, safe and useful therapeutic option for the treatment of moderate to severe acne. Further studies to evaluate the treatment with a larger number of patients and for a longer period of follow-up are needed.

  17. Acne

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Acne Overview What is acne? Acne is a skin problem that occurs when the hair follicles of your skin are blocked by ... plugged hair follicles and cause more skin irritation. Acne can occur anywhere on skin, but is most ...

  18. Profile of clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/benzoyl peroxide 3.75% aqueous gel for the treatment of acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common and chronic skin disease, and is a frequent source of morbidity for affected patients. Treatment of acne vulgaris is often difficult due to the multifactorial nature of this disease. Combination therapy, such as that containing clindamycin and benzoyl peroxide, has become the standard of care. Several fixed formulations of clindamycin 1% and benzoyl peroxide of varying concentrations are available and have been used with considerable success. The major limitation is irritation and dryness from higher concentrations of benzoyl peroxide, and a combination providing optimal efficacy and tolerability has yet to be determined. Recently, a clindamycin and benzoyl peroxide 3.75% fixed combination formulation was developed. Studies have suggested that this formulation may be a safe and effective treatment regimen for patients with acne vulgaris. Here, we provide a brief review of acne pathogenesis, benzoyl peroxide and clindamycin, and profile a new Clindamycin-BP 3.75% fixed combination gel for the treatment of moderate-to-severe acne vulgaris. PMID:26604811

  19. Role of hormones and blood lipids in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris in non-obese, non-hirsute females

    PubMed Central

    Bakry, Ola Ahmed; El Shazly, Rania Mohamed Azmy; El Farargy, Shawky Mahmoud; Kotb, Dalia

    2014-01-01

    Context: Acne vulgaris (AV) is a common disease affecting all ages and ethnic groups. Androgens, skin and serum lipids, inflammatory signaling and regulatory neuropeptides seem to be involved in this multi-factorial process. Aim: The aim of this work was to determine hormonal levels and lipid profile in non-obese, non-hirsute females with AV. Subjects and Methods: A total of 60 non-obese, non-hirsute female cases with different grades of AV and 60 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers were included. Measurement of serum total and free testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), estradiol and progesterone and blood lipids was done during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Results: Total testosterone, free testosterone (FT) and progesterone levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001 for all) while estradiol levels (P < 0.001) and SHBG (P < 0.01) were significantly lower in cases than controls. Total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001 for both) while high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A-1 (ApoA-1) levels were significantly lower (P < 0.001 for both) in cases than controls. Higher values of FT (P = 0.03) and SHBG (P = 0.02) and lower values of estradiol (P = 0.04) levels were significantly in favor of severe acne. Higher values of cholesterol (P < 0.001) and LDL-C (P = 0.03) and lower values of HDL-C (P = 0.01) and ApoA-1 (P = 0.02) levels were significantly associated with severe acne. Conclusion: Changes in hormone levels and lipid profile in non-obese and non-hirsute females with AV should be considered in disease pathogenesis and in treatment prescription of these patients. PMID:25506579

  20. Ten tips for treating acne vulgaris in Fitzpatrick skin types IV-VI.

    PubMed

    Spann, Candace Thornton

    2011-06-01

    During the 21st century, people with skin of color will account for a large portion of the US population. According to race projections from the US Census Bureau, persons of African American, Hispanic, Asian and Native American descent will make up nearly half of the total US population by the year 2050. Because of our changing demographics, it is important that all dermatologists become comfortable in treating skin of color. This article provides 10 practical pearls for management of acne vulgaris in patients with Fitzpatrick skin types IV-VI. PMID:21637906

  1. South-East Asia study alliance guidelines on the management of acne vulgaris in South-East Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Goh, Chee Leok; Abad-Casintahan, Flordeliz; Aw, Derrick Chen Wee; Baba, Roshidah; Chan, Lee Chin; Hung, Nguyen Thanh; Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Leong, Hoe Nam; Medina-Oblepias, Marie Socouer; Noppakun, Nopadon; Sitohang, Irma Bernadette; Sugito, Titi Lestari; Wong, Su-Ni

    2015-10-01

    The management of acne in South-East Asia is unique, as Asian skin and local variables require a clinical approach unlike that utilized in other parts of the world. There are different treatment guidelines per country in the region, and a group of leading dermatologists from these countries convened to review these guidelines, discuss current practices and recent advances, and formulate consensus guidelines to harmonize the management of acne vulgaris in the region. Emphasis has been placed on formulating recommendations to impede the development of antibiotic resistance in Propionibacterium acnes. The group adopted the Acne Consensus Conference system for grading acne severity. The group recommends that patients may be treated with topical medications including retinoids, benzoyl peroxide (BPO), salicylic acid, a combination of retinoid and BPO, or a combination of retinoids and BPO with or without antibiotics for mild acne; topical retinoid with topical BPO and a oral antibiotic for moderate acne; and oral isotretinoin if the patient fails first-line treatment (a 6- or 8-week trial of combined oral antibiotics and topical retinoids with BPO) for severe acne. Maintenance acne treatment using topical retinoids with or without BPO is recommended. To prevent the development of antibiotic resistance, topical antibiotics should not be used as monotherapy or used simultaneously with oral antibiotics. Skin care, comprised of cleansing, moisturizing and sun protection, is likewise recommended. Patient education and good communication is recommended to improve adherence, and advice should be given about the characteristics of the skin care products patients should use. PMID:26211507

  2. Prevalence of acne vulgaris in Chinese adolescents and adults: a community-based study of 17,345 subjects in six cities.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yiwei; Wang, Tinglin; Zhou, Cheng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ding, Xiaolan; Tian, Shan; Liu, Ying; Peng, Guanghui; Xue, Shuqi; Zhou, June; Wang, Renli; Meng, Xuemei; Pei, Guangde; Bai, Yunhua; Liu, Qing; Li, Hang; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2012-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition in adolescents. The prevalence of acne is thought to vary between ethnic groups and countries. A large-scale community-based study was performed in six cities in China to determine the prevalence and possible risk factors for acne in the Chinese population. A total of 17,345 inhabitants were included in this study. Of these, 1,399 were found to have acne. No acne was found in subjects under 10 years of age, and only 1.6% in the 10-year-old group had acne. Prevalence then increased rapidly with age, up to 46.8% in the 19-year-old group. After that, it declined gradually with age. Acne was rare in people over 50 years of age. In subjects in their late teens and 20s, acne was more prevalent in males, while in those over 30 years of age it was more prevalent in females. In subjects with acne, 68.4% had mild; 26.0% had moderate and 5.6% had severe acne. In adult acne, persistent acne was much more common (83.3%) than late-onset acne (16.7%). Smoking and drinking were found to be associated with adolescent acne, while no association was found between diet and acne. These results suggest that the prevalence of acne in the Chinese population is lower than that in Caucasian populations, and that adult acne is not uncommon in Chinese subjects. PMID:21710106

  3. The long-term effect of 1550 nm erbium:glass fractional laser in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yale; Zeng, Weihui; Hu, Die; Jha, Smita; Ge, Qin; Geng, Songmei; Xiao, Shengxiang; Hu, Guanglei; Wang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the short-term and long-term effects of the 1550 nm erbium:glass (Er:glass) fractional laser in the treatment of facial acne vulgaris. Forty-five (9 male and 36 female) acne patients were treated 4 times at 4-week intervals with the following parameters: 169 spot density and 15-30 mJ/cm(2) fluence. There was no control group. The laser spots were adjustable (maximum overlap: 20%) according to the treatment area, and delivered in rows in order to cover all the face. Clinical photographs were taken. The IGA scores and lesion counts were performed for each treatment. Their current state was obtained by phone call follow-up to determine the long-term effect and photographs were offered by themselves or taken in hospital. After four treatments, all patients had an obvious reduction of lesion counts and IGA score and the peak lesion counts decreased to 67.7% after the initial four treatment sessions. For long-term effect, 8 patients lost follow-up, hence 37 patients were followed-up. 8 patients were 2-year follow up, 27 at the 1-year follow-up, and all patients at the half-year follow-up. The mean percent reduction was 72% at the half-year follow-up, 79 at the 1-year follow-up and 75% at the 2-year follow-up. Side effects and complications were limited to transient erythema and edema, and few patients suffered from transient acne flare-ups and sensitivity. All patients responded that their skin was less prone to oiliness. In conclusion, acne can be successfully treated by 1550 nm Er:glass fractional laser, with few side effects and prolonged acne clearing. PMID:26796708

  4. Interaction and efficacy of Keigai-rengyo-to extract and acupuncture in male patients with acne vulgaris: A study protocol for a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In consideration of patients seeking to use traditional Chinese medicine, an evidence-based potentiality for safe and effective use of herbal medicine and acupuncture in treatment of acne vulgaris has been suggested. However, despite common use of a combination of herbal medicine and acupuncture in clinical practice, the current level of evidence is insufficient to draw a conclusion for an interaction and efficacy of herbal medicine and acupuncture. Therefore, considering these methodological flaws, this study was designed to assess the interaction and efficacy of an available herbal medicine, Keigai-rengyo-to extract (KRTE), and acupuncture for treatment of acne using the 2 × 2 factorial design and the feasibility of a large clinical trial. Methods/Design A randomized, assessor single blinded, 2 × 2 factorial pilot trial will be conducted. Forty four participants with acne vulgaris will be randomized into one of four groups: waiting list group (WL), KRTE only group (KO), acupuncture only group (AO), and KRTE and acupuncture combined treatment group (KA). After randomization, a total of 8 sessions of acupuncture treatment will be performed twice a week in the AO- and KA groups, respectively. Patients in the KO- and KA groups will be prescribed KRTE 3 times a day at a dose of 7.4 g after meals for 4 weeks. The following outcome measurements will be used in examination of subjects: the mean percentage change and the count change of inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions, the Skindex 29, visual analogue scale (VAS) and investigator global assessment (IGA) from baseline to the end of the trial. Trial Registration The trial is registered with the Clinical Research Information Service (CRiS), Republic of Korea: KCT0000071. PMID:21418585

  5. Acne

    MedlinePlus

    Acne is a common skin disease that causes pimples. Pimples form when hair follicles under your skin ... neck, back, chest, and shoulders. Anyone can get acne, but it is common in teenagers and young ...

  6. Oral Spironolactone in Post-teenage Female Patients with Acne Vulgaris: Practical Considerations for the Clinician Based on Current Data and Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Kim, Grace K; Del Rosso, James Q

    2012-03-01

    Oral spironolactone has been used for over two decades in the dermatological setting. Although it is not generally considered a primary option in the management of female patients with acne vulgaris, the increase in office visits by post-teenage women with acne vulgaris has recently placed a spotlight on the use of this agent in this subgroup of patients. This article reviews the literature focusing on the use of oral spironolactone in this subset of women with acne vulgaris, including discussions of the recommended starting dose, expected response time, adjustments in therapy, potential adverse effects, and patient monitoring. PMID:22468178

  7. Antiandrogenic Therapy with Ciproterone Acetate in Female Patients Who Suffer from Both Androgenetic Alopecia and Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    CONEAC, ANDREI; MURESAN, ADRIANA; ORASAN, MEDA SANDRA

    2014-01-01

    Background. Androgenetic Alopecia in Women (AGA) occurs due to an underlying susceptibility of hair follicles to androgenic miniaturization, caused by androgens. Clinically, AGA is characterized by progressive hair loss, with a marked hair thinning in the fronto-parietal area so that the scalp can be easily seen. Acne vulgaris is androgen-dependent and often affects the skin that has an increased number of oil glands: face, back and chest. Although the sebaceous glands are present on the scalp too, it is very rare to get acne at this site, as the hair acts as a wig and allows the sebum to drain and does not block the pores. Both AGA and Acne Vulgaris are signs of hyperandrogenism. Cyproterone acetate/ethinyl estradiol (2mg/0.035mg) products are authorized for the treatment of androgenetic symptoms in women, such as acne, seborrhea, mild forms of hirsutism and androgenetic alopecia. Our study had a double purpose: - To evaluate the result of the study regimen Melleva 35 (one pill per day, for 3 consecutive months) in patients with moderate to severe acne, suffering also from Androgenetic Alopecia;- To establish the efficacy of the drug on acne and alopecia improvement, both from the doctor’s and patient’s point of view. Patients and methods. After being informed of the aims and procedures of the study, participants provided a written informed consent. A number of 35 female subjects with moderate to severe acne vulgaris remained in the study. The subjects had also been diagnosed as suffering from AGA, on the basis of clinical criteria, including the pattern of hair loss and trichoscopy assessment. Results 83% of study subjects reported that their hair did not continue to fall after 3 months of antiandrogen therapy. The females were evaluated using trichoscopy and the doctor noticed hair regrowth in 77% of the cases. Regarding the improvement of acne lesions after the treatment, 40% of study subjects recorded good improvement and 26% recorded excellent results

  8. The impact of acne vulgaris on quality of life and psychic health in young adolescents in Greece. Results of a population survey*

    PubMed Central

    Tasoula, Eleni; Gregoriou, Stamatis; Chalikias, John; Lazarou, Dimitris; Danopoulou, Ifigenia; Katsambas, Andreas; Rigopoulos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acne vulgaris can severely affect social and psychological functioning. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of acne vulgaris and its severity on Quality of Life of young adolescents in Greece. METHODS We conducted a questionnaire based survey among 1560 adolescent between the ages of 11 and 19 years old and 1531 of these were completed. Adolescents with acne filled all the questions including the Children Dermatology Life Quality Index. Adolescents without acne filled the questions about age, family history of acne, stress and smoking. Data were analyzed with Pearson Chi Square test. RESULTS Acne prevalence was 51.2% affecting both sexes equally. Self reported mild acne was present in 71.2% and moderate-severe acne in 28.8% of the study population. The mean age of the study population was 15.77y. The median score of Children Dermatology Life Quality Index was 4.02. The impact of acne on quality of life is associated with the severity of the acne (p<0.0001). Patients with moderate/severe acne experience greater psychosocial and emotional impairment (p<0.0001). Body image is modified proportionally to the severity of acne (p<0.0001). Symptoms and treatment of acne are factors that also influence their quality of life. Girls and boys are equally affected. Stress and heredity are correlated with acne and its severity (p<0.0001). We didn't find any correlation between smoking and acne. CONCLUSION Acne affects Quality of Life of young adolescents in Greece. The impact is proportional to the severity of acne. More severe acne is associated with greater effect on quality of life with implications for self esteem, body image and relationships with others. PMID:23197205

  9. Contraceptive use in acne.

    PubMed

    Lam, Charlene; Zaenglein, Andrea L

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is an inflammatory disorder of the pilosebaceous follicle. It is well established that androgen hormones play a major role in sebum production and excretion, and are vital in the pathogenesis of acne. Isotretinoin notwithstanding, hormonal therapies such as combined oral contraceptives (COCs) and spironolactone are the only treatments that can affect sebum production and the androgen component of acne. Contraceptives are also used during isotretinoin therapy for pregnancy prevention. It is important for a dermatologist to be familiar with all the available methods of contraception to provide essential counseling to patients. The aim of this paper is to review the role of hormones in acne pathogenesis, discuss the use of hormonal therapies for acne, and detail various alternative contraceptive methods in relation to isotretinoin treatment and pregnancy prevention. PMID:25017461

  10. Acne

    MedlinePlus

    ... can try different ones to see which helps. Products with benzoyl peroxide (say: BEN-zoil peh - ROK - side) or salicylic (say: sal-uh-SIL - ick) acid in them are usually pretty helpful for treating acne. Benzoyl peroxide kills the bacteria that can lead to acne and it also ...

  11. Frequency and characteristics of acne-related post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation.

    PubMed

    Abad-Casintahan, Flordeliz; Chow, Steven Kim Weng; Goh, Chee Leok; Kubba, Raj; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Noppakun, Nopadon; See, JoAnn; Suh, Dae Hun; Xiang, Li Hong Flora; Kang, Sewon

    2016-07-01

    In patients with darker skin types (Fitzpatrick phototypes III-VI), acne is often accompanied by post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH). Further, acne-related pigmentation can pose a greater concern for the patient than the acne lesions. There has been little formal study of this acne-related PIH. Recently, the Asian Acne Board - an international group of dermatologists with interest in acne research - made a preliminary evaluation of the frequency and characteristics of PIH in seven Asian countries. A total of 324 sequential acne subjects were evaluated for the presence of PIH. The majority (80.2%) of subjects had mild to moderate acne and there were more females than males (63.0% vs 37.0%). In this population of patients consulting a dermatologist for acne, 58.2% (188/324) had PIH. The results also showed that pigmentation problems are often long lasting: at least 1 year for more than half of subjects and 5 years or longer in 22.3%. In accordance with our clinical experience, patients reported that PIH is quite bothersome, often as bothersome or more so than the acne itself and sometimes more problematic. Excoriation was commonly reported by patients, and may represent a modifiable risk factor that could potentially be improved by patient education. PMID:26813513

  12. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Loaded with Retinoic Acid and Lauric Acid as an Alternative for Topical Treatment of Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elton Luiz; Carneiro, Guilherme; De Araújo, Lidiane Advíncula; Trindade, Mariana de Jesus Vaz; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Oréfice, Rodrigo Lambert; Farias, Luis de Macêdo; De Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Dos Santos, Simone Gonçalves; Goulart, Gisele Assis Castro; Alves, Ricardo José; Ferreira, Lucas Antônio Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapy is the first choice for the treatment of mild to moderate acne and all-trans retinoic acid is one of the most used drugs. The combination of retinoids and antimicrobials is an innovative approach for acne therapy. Recently, lauric acid, a saturated fatty acid, has shown strong antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes. However, topical application of retinoic acid is followed by high incidence of side-effects, including erythema and irritation. Solid lipid nanoparticles represent an alternative to overcome these side-effects. This work aims to develop solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with retinoic acid and lauric acid and evaluate their antibacterial activity. The influence of lipophilic stearylamine on the characteristics of solid lipid nanoparticles was investigated. Solid lipid nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The in vitro inhibitory activity of retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles was evaluated against Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. High encapsulation efficiency was obtained at initial time (94 ± 7% and 100 ± 4% for retinoic acid and lauric acid, respectively) and it was demonstrated that lauric acid-loaded-solid lipid nanoparticles provided the incorporation of retinoic acid. However, the presence of stearylamine is necessary to ensure stability of encapsulation. Moreover, retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles showed growth inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus, representing an interesting alternative for the topical therapy of acne vulgaris. PMID:26328443

  13. The efficacy and safety of amoxicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and spironolactone for treatment-resistant acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Turowski, Cheryl Bansal; James, William D

    2007-01-01

    In situations where acne has proved resistant to other systemic agents or they are not indicated and isotretinoin is not desired by patients, the authors find amoxicillin, TMP-SMX, and spironolactone, alone or in combination, useful alternatives. In women who have acne, spironolactone can be used, and in patients who have sulfa allergy, amoxicillin can be used. It is important to continue alternate topical therapy along with these interventions to augment the improvement and to assist in the eventual discontinuance of oral medication. All of the authors' patients were using topical therapy concomitantly and, although this may have contributed to improvement, the authors believe the addition of amoxicillin, TMP-SMX, or spironolactone contributes to the majority of improvement. Tetrospective chart analysis provides supportive data for amoxicillin, TMP-SMX, and spironolactone in the treatment of refractory acne vulgaris. PMID:18159900

  14. Clinical efficacy of 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy in the treatment of moderate to severe facial acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XIANGQI; SONG, HONGTAO; CHEN, SHENGPING; ZHANG, JING; NIU, GAOXIANG; LIU, XIANGNONG

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is considered as a therapeutic challenge in terms of managing ongoing symptoms and preventing scar formation. Although there are many available treatments for alleviating acne, therapies for resistant or moderate-to-severe forms have been limited to systemic agents that are accompanied by potentially severe side-effects. While, aminolevulinic acid (ALA) photodynamic therapy (PDT) has increasingly been used as a simple and safe therapeutic option of acne vulgaris, the clinical efficacy requires confirmation in further studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of 5-ALA-PDT in the treatment of moderate-to-severe facial acne vulgaris. A total of 50 patients with moderate-to-severe facial acne were enrolled in the study and randomly divided equally into a therapy group and a control group. In the therapy group, the patients were treated with 5% 5-ALA for 1.5 h, followed by three 20-min doses of infrared radiation once a week; in the control group, the patients were treated with three 20 min doses of infrared radiation without 5-ALA once a week. Both treatments lasted for 3 weeks. The clinical efficacy was determined by evaluating acne lesion counts at weeks 0, 2, 4 and 6. Total efficacy rate (TER) was the primary endpoint of the study, and was defined as the proportion of the patients whose treatment effectiveness evaluation was cured (≥90% of skin lesions improved) and excellent (60–89% improvement). Adverse effects were recorded throughout the study. The study was completed by 24 patients in the therapy group and 23 patients in the control group. The numbers of acne lesions significantly decreased. The TER of the therapy group was significantly higher than that of the control group at weeks 4 and 6. Adverse effects were observed in 12 patients of the therapy group and 2 patients of the control group. In the therapy group the most common adverse effect was a burning sensation (n=7), followed by transient

  15. Acne (Acne Vulgaris)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2006-2013 Logical Images, Inc. All rights reserved. Advertising Notice This Site and third parties who place ... would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral ...

  16. Acne

    MedlinePlus

    ... a prescription. A product containing benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid often clears the skin. This does not mean ... retinoid, prescription-strength benzoyl peroxide, antibiotic, or even salicylic acid. Your dermatologist will determine what you need. Acne ...

  17. Acne

    MedlinePlus

    ... products may contain benzoyl peroxide, sulfur, resorcinol, or salicylic acid. They work by killing bacteria, drying up skin ... Prescription formulas of benzoyl peroxide, sulfur, resorcinol, or salicylic acid Topical azelaic acid For women whose acne is ...

  18. The Relationship of Proper Skin Cleansing to Pathophysiology, Clinical Benefits, and the Concomitant Use of Prescription Topical Therapies in Patients with Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jacquelyn

    2016-04-01

    Patients often perceive the cause of their acne to be related to a lack of proper cleansing, therefore many patients attempt to treat their acne either alone or with prescription therapy by frequent aggressive cleansing with harsh cleansing agents. Altered epidermal barrier function, inflammation, and Propionibacterium acnes are related to acne vulgaris (AV) pathophysiology; proper cleansing can favorably modulate the development of AV. The available clinical studies support gentle cleansing in AV by showing the ability to contribute to improving AV lesion counts and severity and minimizing the irritation seen with topical AV therapies such as retinoids and BP. PMID:27015773

  19. Clindamycin phosphate 1.2% / tretinoin 0.025%: a novel fixed-dose combination treatment for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ochsendorf, F

    2015-06-01

    The Global Alliance to Improve Outcomes in Acne Group recommends retinoid-based combination therapy as first-line therapy and the preferred treatment approach for almost all acne patients except those with the most severe disease. Clindamycin 1% (as clindamycin phosphate 1.2%)/tretinoin 0.025% (Clin-RA) is a new fixed-dose retinoid-based combination therapy. The aqueous-based gel formulation of Clin-RA was designed to minimize skin irritation and optimize adherence with the therapy. It contains both solubilized and crystalline tretinoin which allows the retinoid to be slowly released onto the skin surface and decreases the potential for cutaneous irritation. A pooled analysis of three pivotal studies involving 4550 acne patients showed that Clin-RA is well tolerated and effective at treating both inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions. The onset of action of Clin-RA is rapid occurring within 2 weeks of treatment initiation. It is not associated with acne flaring or an increase in clindamycin-resistant Propionibacterium acnes counts. Clin-RA is considered as effective as adapalene 0.1%/benzoyl peroxide (BPO) 2.5%, whereas Clin-RA has a more favourable tolerability profile. Clin-RA may be more effective than clindamycin 1%/BPO 5% at treating non-inflammatory acne lesions since the latter does not contain a retinoid to target comedones. Clin-RA is also easy for patients to handle and apply, and has the advantage of not containing BPO which can bleach hair and fabrics. Taken together, the profile of Clin-RA suggests Clin-RA to be a first-line treatment for patients with facial acne. PMID:26059820

  20. Efficacy and Tolerability of a Combined 445nm and 630nm Over-the-counter Light Therapy Mask with and without Topical Salicylic Acid versus Topical Benzoyl Peroxide for the Treatment of Mild-to-moderate Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Nicole; Macri, Angela; Manway, Mitchell; Paparone, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of a combined 445nm/630nm light therapy mask for the treatment of mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris with and without topical 1% salicylic acid with retinol versus 2.5% benzoyl peroxide. Design: A 12-week evaluator-blinded, randomized study. Subjects were randomized to be treated with the 445nm/630nm light therapy mask alone, benzoyl peroxide, or 445nm/630nm light therapy mask with topical 1% salicylic acid with retinol. Participants: Healthy male and female subjects 12 to 35 years old with Fitzpatrick skin types I to VI and mild-to-moderate facial acne vulgaris. Measurements: The primary endpoint was the change in the number of inflammatory acne lesions after 12 weeks of treatment. Secondary endpoints included the change in noninflammatory acne lesions, change in total acne lesions, change in Investigator Global Acne Assessments, and overall responder rate. Results: 445nm/630nm light therapy mask-treated subjects showed a 24.4-percent improvement in inflammatory acne lesions (p<0.01) versus 17.2 percent (p<0.05) and 22.7 percent (p<0.01) in benzoyl peroxide and 445nm/630nm light therapy mask with topical 1% salicylic acid with retinol, respectively, a 19.5-percent improvement in noninflammatory lesions (p<0.001) versus 6.3 and 4.8 percent for benzoyl peroxide and 445nm/630nm light therapy mask with topical 1% salicylic acid with retinol, respectively. Subjects in the 445nm/630nm light therapy mask group also achieved a 19.0-percent improvement in the Investigator Global Acne Assessment (p<0.001) versus 4.7 percent in benzoyl peroxide and 13.9 percent in 445nm/630nm light therapy mask with topical 1% salicylic acid with retinol (p<0.01). Treatments were well-tolerated overall with trends toward less early irritation in the 445nm/630nm light therapy mask group. Conclusion: 445nm/630nm light therapy mask appears to be a safe and effective therapy for mild-to-moderate acne. PMID:27354885

  1. Propionibacterium acnes promotes Th17 and Th17/Th1 responses in acne patients.

    PubMed

    Kistowska, Magdalena; Meier, Barbara; Proust, Tatiana; Feldmeyer, Laurence; Cozzio, Antonio; Kuendig, Thomas; Contassot, Emmanuel; French, Lars E

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive commensal bacterium thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. Although the ability of P. acnes in the initiation of pro-inflammatory responses is well documented, little is known about adaptive immune responses to this bacterium. The observation that infiltrating immune cells consist mainly of CD4(+) T cells in the perifollicular space of early acne lesions suggests that helper T cells may be involved in immune responses caused by the intra-follicular colonization of P. acnes. A recent report showing that P. acnes can induce IL-17 production by T cells suggests that acne might be a T helper type 17 (Th17)-mediated disease. In line with this, we show in this work that, in addition to IL-17A, both Th1 and Th17 effector cytokines, transcription factors, and chemokine receptors are strongly upregulated in acne lesions. Furthermore, we found that, in addition to Th17, P. acnes can promote mixed Th17/Th1 responses by inducing the concomitant secretion of IL-17A and IFN-γ from specific CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Finally, we show that both P. acnes-specific Th17 and Th17/Th1 cells can be found in the peripheral blood of patients suffering from acne and, at lower frequencies, in healthy individuals. We therefore identified P. acnes-responding Th17/Th1 cells as, to our knowledge, a previously unreported CD4(+) subpopulation involved in inflammatory acne. PMID:25010142

  2. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in patients with acne vulgaris and its association with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Toossi, Parviz; Azizian, Zahra; Yavari, Hassan; Fakhim, Tannaz Hoseinzade; Amini, Seyed Hadi Sadat; Enamzade, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Since vitamin D is a recent known immunoregulatory factor in some diseases which are addressed in immune system disorders such as SLE, [psoriasis] and others. Objective To determine the serum levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 [25(OH)D] in patients with acne vulgaris and its association with clinical features. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted over months. This study included 39 patients with acne vulgaris and 40 healthy controls. Subjects who did not use alcohol, vitamin D supplements, oral steroids or PUVA and/or NBUVB for more than three months were included. Serum 25(OH)D levels were measured. Baseline demographics, family history and comorbidities like PCO were recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 16.0.0. Results The median concentration of 25(OH)D was 8.4 ng/mL (range: 1.4–99) in patients and 10.4 ng/mL (range: 3.1–56.7) in controls, with no statistical significant difference. PCOS was a significant predictor of the occurrence of acne vulgaris (OR=6.25; 95% CI: 1.52–25.66; p=0.01). There were no significant associations between severity of disease and serum 25(OH)D levels (rs=−0.12, p=0.45), age (rs=−0.28, p=0.09), BMI (rs=−0.12, p=0.46), age at onset of disease (rs=−0.08, p=0.63) and duration of disease (rs=−0.10, p=0.54). Conclusion Based on the previous studies this is highly suspected that vitamin D would be a prominent factor in acne patients and more performances with bigger sample size could be useful to get positive results. PMID:26811702

  3. Effect of Automated Online Counseling on Clinical Outcomes and Quality of Life Among Adolescents With Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Tuong, William; Wang, Audrey S.; Armstrong, April W.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Effective patient education is necessary for treating patients with acne vulgaris. Automated online counseling simulates face-to-face encounters and may be a useful tool to deliver education. OBJECTIVE To compare the effectiveness of a standard educational website with that of an automated-counseling website in improving clinical outcomes and quality of life among adolescents with acne. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized clinical trial conducted between March 27, 2014, and June 27, 2014, including a 12-week follow-up in a local inner-city high school. Ninety-eight students aged at least 13 years with mild to moderate acne were eligible for participation. A per-protocol analysis of the evaluable population was conducted on clinical outcome data. INTERVENTIONS Participants viewed either a standard educational website or an automated-counseling website. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was the total acne lesion count. Secondary measures included the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) scores and general skin care behavior. RESULTS Forty-nine participants were randomized to each group. At baseline, the mean (SD) total acne lesion count was not significantly different between the standard-website group and the automated-counseling–website group (21.33 [10.81] vs 25.33 [12.45]; P = .10). Improvement in the mean (SD) acne lesion count was not significantly different between the standard-website group and the automated-counseling–website group (0.20 [9.26] vs 3.90 [12.19]; P = .10). The mean (SD) improvement in CDLQI score for the standard-website group was not significantly different from that of the automated-counseling–website group (0.17 [2.64] vs 0.39 [2.94]; P = .71). After 12 weeks, a greater proportion of participants in the automated-counseling–website group maintained or adopted a recommended anti-acne skin care routine compared with the standard-website group (43% vs 22%; P = .03). CONCLUSIONS AND

  4. Acne

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, David A.

    1979-01-01

    The cause of acne is still obscure, but genetic predisposition, sebaceous overactivity, overgrowth of bacterial flora and exposure to comedogenic substances are all significant factors. Acne lesions occur mainly in sebaceous follicles, which are characterized by deep follicular canals and large sebaceous glands. The associated seborrhea is not due to a circulatory excess of androgens but may be caused by a local amplification of androgenic activity. This, in turn, may be due to large numbers of androgen receptors and a high concentration of enzymes such as 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, within the sebaceous gland itself. Hyperkeratosis of the retention type in the pilary infrainfundibulum obstructs the outflow of sebum and keratin flakes. This favors the proliferation of Propionibacterium acnes which may initiate inflammation in microcomedos and lead to formation of pustules, papules or nodules. Topical therapy with tretinoin, benzoyl peroxide and antibiotics such as clindamycin is widely used today. Oral tetracyclines and other chemotherapeutic agents remain necessary in severe cases. PMID:161830

  5. The Role of Skin Care as an Integral Component in the Management of Acne Vulgaris: Part 1: The Importance of Cleanser and Moisturizer Ingredients, Design, and Product Selection

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common facial skin disorder accounting for approximately 10 percent of all visits to ambulatory dermatology practices across the United States annually. Over time, greater attention has been directed to the roles of multiple epidermal barrier functions in various dermatological disorders, especially the stratum corneum permeability barrier and antimicrobial barrier. As a result, it has become readily apparent that professional direction of skin care is very important in the overall management of acne vulgaris. This article discusses several reasons that support the importance of incorporating specified skin care recommendations and instructions into the overall management plan for acne vulgaris. In addition, the article reviews formulation characteristics and some of the scientific data on two commercially available products that are recommended for use as a skin care regimen in patients with acne-prone and acne-affected skin, a foam wash and a moisturizer with a sun protection factor 30 broad spectrum photoprotection rating. The rationale for inclusion of specific ingredients are discussed along with an overview of research results including use in patients with acne vulgaris. PMID:24765221

  6. The Role of Skin Care as an Integral Component in the Management of Acne Vulgaris: Part 2: Tolerability and Performance of a Designated Skin Care Regimen Using a Foam Wash and Moisturizer SPF 30 in Patients with Acne Vulgaris Undergoing Active Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Staci

    2013-01-01

    Proper skin care is considered to be an important component of the total management plan for patients with acne vulgaris. A 28-day, open-label study provided both practical and scientific information on a designated skin care regimen in subjects with acne vulgaris. The cutaneous tolerability overall performance, and assessment of objective parameters evaluating the epidermal permeability barrier were documented with use of a specific foaming skin cleanser and a moisturizer with an SPF 30 broad spectrum rating in actively treated subjects with acne vulgaris. The results were favorable overall with the regimen shown to be nonirritating based on investigator and subject assessments, with high subject satisfaction and cosmetic acceptability ratings reported for both the foaming skin cleanser and the moisturizer with an SPF 30 broad spectrum rating. Objective instrumental testing of transepidermal water loss and epidermal hydration support that this skin care regimen assists in correcting epidermal permeability barrier dysfunctions that are innately present in acne vulgaris, worsened during a flare, and are known to be associated with many medications used to treat acne vulgaris. The recommendation of a specified skin care regimen incorporated into the overall management of acne vulgaris simplifies and standardizes the program for the patient, demonstrates a high level of interest by the clinician, and reduces the risk of the patient self-acquiring facial skin care products that may increase skin irritation. PMID:24765222

  7. Spironolactone loaded nanostructured lipid carrier gel for effective treatment of mild and moderate acne vulgaris: A randomized, double-blind, prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Kelidari, Hamid Reza; Saeedi, Majid; Hajheydari, Zohreh; Akbari, Jafar; Morteza-Semnani, Katayoun; Akhtari, Javad; Valizadeh, Hadi; Asare-Addo, Kofi; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Spironolactone (SP) known as an anti-androgen drug, has been proven to be effective in treatment of acne. The quest to minimize the unnecessary systemic side effects associated with the oral drug administration of spironolactone, has led to a growing interest of loading SP on lipid nanoparticles to deliver the drug in a topical formulation. The aim of the current investigation was to prepare and compare the performance of SP loaded nanostructured lipid carrier (SP-NLC) and SP alcoholic gels (SP-ALC) on two groups of respective patient populations, group A and group B in the treatment of mild to moderate acne vulgaris. The results showed that SP-NLCs were spherical in shape with an average diameter of ∼240nm. The polydispersity index (PI) and zeta potential of these nanoparticles were 0.286 and -21.4 respectively. The gels showed non-Newtonian independent pseudoplastic and shear thinning behavior. The SP-NLCs was not toxic to fibroblast cell strains at the 24 and 48h periods. Results showed that the mean number of total lesions (37.66±9.27) and non-inflammatory lesions (29.26±7.99) in group A significantly decreased to 20.31±6.58 (p<0.05) and to 13.95±5.22 (p<0.05) respectively. A similar pattern was observed for group B where the mean number of total lesions and non-inflammatory lesions reduced from 33.73±9.40 to 19.13±5.53 (p<0.05) and from 25.65±8.12 to 13.45±4.48 (p<0.05) respectively. The total lesion count (TLC) was significantly decreased from 37.16±9.28 to 19.63±6.36 (for group A; p<0.071) and 32.60±9.32 to 18.33±5.55 (for group B; p<0.05) respectively. After treatment with SP-NLC for 8 weeks, the water content of the skin significantly (p<0.05) increased from 37.44±8.85 to 45.69±19.34 instrumental units. Therefore, the SP-NLC gel may help in controlling acne vulgaris with skin care benefits. PMID:27248464

  8. Impact of acne vulgaris on quality of life and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Hosthota, Abhineetha; Bondade, Swapna; Basavaraja, Vinay

    2016-08-01

    The psychological impact of acne is determined by various factors including age, sex, personality, grade of disease, scarring, and environmental and ethnic background. Apart from managing the clinical manifestations of acne, clinicians also have to deal with the psychological aspects of the disease by assessing patients' quality of life (QOL) and self-esteem. These measures will aid in better management of acne patients. This study examined the relationship between acne and QOL and self-esteem. The results showed that acne severity may have a considerable adverse impact on QOL and self-esteem. Dermatologists need to emphasize the psychosocial sequelae of acne through awareness programs and encourage medical treatment along with basic psychosomatic remedies in the management of acne. PMID:27622255

  9. Safety and Efficacy of Low-Dose Isotretinoin in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Parinitha K; Bhat, Ramesh M; Nandakishore, B; Dandakeri, Sukumar; Martis, Jacintha; Kamath, Ganesh H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Isotretinoin is indicated for moderate to severe cases of acne which are unresponsive to conventional therapy. The classical recommended dose is 0.5 to 1.0 mg/kg/day. As the side effects are dose related, low-dose isotretinoin therapy for acne is an attractive option; however, but little data exists on the safety and efficacy of this strategy. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, non-comparative study, 50 participants, both male and female, having moderate to severe acne vulgaris were enrolled and treated with isotretinoin at a dose of 20 mg/day (approximately 0.3-0.4 mg/kg/day), for a period of 3 months. Participants were evaluated by means of clinical and laboratory investigations before starting isotretinoin. Investigations were repeated at the end of the first and third months following completion of treatment, and participants were followed up for 6 months to look for any relapse. Results: At the end of the treatment, very good results were observed in 90% of participants. Cheilitis was the most common among the side effects observed and was seen in 98% of the participants. One participant developed vitiligo as a side effect, which is a new finding, and has not reported in literature before. Elevated serum lipid levels were observed in 6% of the participants, and relapse occurred in 4% of the participants over a 6 month follow up period. Conclusion: Three months of treatment with low-dose isotretinoin (20 mg/day) was found to be effective in the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris, with a low incidence of serious side effects. This dose also was more economical than the higher doses. PMID:24891681

  10. Comparison of topical 5% nicotinamid gel versus 2% clindamycin gel in the treatment of the mild-moderate acne vulgaris: A double-blinded randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradi, Zabiolah; Iraji, Farib; Siadat, Amir Hossein; Ghorbaini, Azamosadat

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris is considered one of the most common disorders for which patients seek dermatologic care. In the current study, we evaluated efficacy of the 5% nicotinamide gel versus 2% clindamycin gel in the treatment of the mild-moderate acne vulgaris. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized, controlled clinical trial that was performed in 2009-2010. Sixty female patients with mild or moderate acne vulgaris were recurited to be treated either with 5% nicotinamide or 2% clindamycin gel for 8 weeks. Acne severity index (ASI) was used to evaluate response to treatment and SPSS software was used to analyze the data. Results: The mean of ASI at the baseline was 16.85 ± 8.5 and 18.2 ± 12.27 in nicotinamide gel and clindamycin gel, respectively (P > 0.05). The mean of ASI was significantly decreased compared with baseline ASI during the time in both groups (P < 0.0001). However, there was not a significant difference regarding reduction of ASI between the nicotinamide and clindamycin gel (P = 0.583). Conclusion: Five percent nicotinamide gel is as effective as 2% clindamycin gel for treatment of mild to moderate acne vulgaris. No side effect was observed during the treatment. PMID:23914212

  11. Therapeutic and Aesthetic Uses of Photodynamic Therapy Part two of a five-part series: Lasers and Light Treatments for Acne Vulgaris Promising Therapies.

    PubMed

    Gold, Michael H

    2008-09-01

    Acne vulgaris remains one of the most common dermatologic disorders. Clinicians are always searching for new therapies to utilize in their therapeutic armamentarium for this common skin concern. We have many medical therapies at our disposal and these have proven useful in many cases in controlling the disease process. However, some patients need or want other therapies, and laser and light treatments for acne vulgaris have become popular over the past several years. This manuscript will review some of these promising therapies. PMID:21203359

  12. Multicenter study for efficacy and safety evaluation of a fixeddose combination gel with adapalen 0.1% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% (Epiduo® for the treatment of acne vulgaris in Brazilian population*

    PubMed Central

    Sittart, José Alexandre de Souza; da Costa, Adilson; Mulinari-Brenner, Fabiane; Follador, Ivonise; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna; de Castro, Lia Cândida Miranda

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The current options for the treatment of acne vulgaris present many mechanisms of action. For several times, dermatologists try topical agents combinations, looking for better results. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the efficacy, tolerability and safety of a topical, fixed-dose combination of adapalene 0.1% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel for the treatment of acne vulgaris in the Brazilian population. METHODS This is a multicenter, open-label and interventionist study. Patients applied 1.0 g of the fixed-dose combination of adapalene 0.1% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel on the face, once daily at bedtime, during 12 weeks. Lesions were counted in all of the appointments, and the degree of acne severity, overall improvement, tolerability and safety were evaluated in each visit. RESULTS From 79 recruited patients, 73 concluded the study. There was significant, fast and progressive reduction of non-inflammatory, inflammatory and total number of lesions. At the end of the study, 75.3% of patients had a reduction of >50% in non-inflammatory lesions, 69.9% in inflammatory lesions and 78.1% in total number of lesions. Of the 73 patients, 71.2% had good to excellent response and 87.6% had satisfactory to good response. In the first week of treatment, erythema, burning, scaling and dryness of the skin were frequent complaints, but, from second week on, these signals and symptoms have reduced. CONCLUSION The fixed-dose combination of adapalene 0.1% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel is effective, safe, well tolerated and apparently improves patient compliance with the treatment. PMID:27168522

  13. [Acne tarda. Acne in adults].

    PubMed

    Jansen, T; Janßen, O E; Plewig, G

    2013-04-01

    Acne is one of the most common skin diseases in the general population, especially among adolescents. Acne tarda (adult acne) is defined as acne that develops (late-onset acne) or continues (persistent acne) after 25 years of age. The disease is more common in women. The clinical features are quite specific: inflammatory acne in the lower facial region or macrocomedones (microcysts) spread over the face. Involvement of the trunk is much more common in men. The etiology of acne tarda is still controversial, as cosmetics, drugs, smoking, stress, diet, and endocrine abnormalities have been implicated. Women with acne tarda and other symptoms of hyperandrogenism have a high probability of endocrine abnormalities such as polycystic ovary syndrome. Treatment is similar to that of acne in adolescence. Long-term treatment over years or decades may be required. PMID:23576169

  14. Effect of sequential application of topical adapalene and clindamycin phosphate in the treatment of Japanese patients with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yasuo; Munehiro, Asuka; Shirahige, Yoshie; Nakai, Kozo; Katsuura, Junko; Moriue, Tetsuya; Murakami, Yumi; Matsunaka, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Kozo

    2012-02-01

    The efficacy of combined therapy with a retinoid and antibiotic for Japanese patients with acne vulgaris remains to be established. Further, maintenance strategies limiting the use of topical retinoids must be identified. The objectives of this study are to determine the efficacy of sequential application of topical adapalene and clindamycin phosphate and to assess the impact of this regimen on patients' quality of life. Sixty-six patients were recruited. The regimen comprised two phases. For the 4-week initial treatment, 1% clindamycin phosphate gel was applied twice daily and 0.1% adapalene gel, once. In the 4-week maintenance phase, patients were randomly assigned to the OD group (adapalene applied once daily) or the TW group (adapalene applied once daily on 2 days per week). The acne severity score, lesion counts, microcomedone count, and sebum amount were measured. Quality of life (QOL) was assessed using Skindex-16. All parameters improved significantly by week 4 of initial treatment. No statistically significant differences were found in the improvement of clinical findings between the groups. All QOL scores improved significantly and did not significantly differ between the groups. Our regimen may enable clinical control of acne in Japanese patients and improve their QOL. For limiting retinoid use, weekly application of adapalene during maintenance is suitable. PMID:21254867

  15. Short-term combination therapy and long-term relapse prevention in the treatment of severe acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jerry; Stein Gold, Linda; Schlessinger, Joel; Brodell, Robert; Jones, Terry; Cruz, Alma; Kerrouche, Nabil; Jarratt, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Few long-term treatment regimens for severe acne vulgaris have been investigated in clinical trials. Data were combined from two consecutive, randomized, double-blind, controlled studies to evaluate the efficacy, safety and subject satisfaction of four nine-month regimens in severe acne vulgaris treatment. Subjects were first randomized to receive doxycycline (DCN) and adapalene 0.1% - benzoyl peroxide 2.5% (A/BPO) or vehicle once daily for 12 weeks. Subjects who had at least 50% global improvement were subsequently randomized to receive A/BPO or its vehicle once daily for 24 weeks. Over nine months, there were four regimens: A/BPO and DCN followed by A/BPO, vehicle and DCN followed by A/BPO, A/BPO and DCN followed by vehicle, and vehicle and DCN followed by vehicle. Among the four regimens, A/BPO and DCN followed by A/BPO led to the highest percentage of subjects rated "clear" or "almost clear" (50.0% vs. 40.4%, 26.2% and 25.0%, respectively), biggest reduction in total lesion counts (76% vs. 70%, 51% and 47%, respectively) and greatest subject satisfaction (85.0% vs. 75.5%, 63.3% and 52.4%, respectively) at week 36. It provided a faster onset of action compared to groups started with vehicle and DCN (P<.05 at week 2). Subjects receiving A/BPO and DCN followed by vehicle experienced deterioration once the active treatment was discontinued. All regimens were safe and well-tolerated. In conclusion, efficacious initial therapy and long-term treatment are both important. An initial combination therapy with adapalene-BPO and DCN followed by longer-term adapalene-BPO treatment is an efficacious and satisfactory new regimen for severe acne subjects. PMID:22270198

  16. Use of Optical Fiber Imported Intra-Tissue Photodynamic Therapy for Treatment of Moderate to Severe Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Yuan, Dan; Liu, Wei; Chen, Jin; Lin, Xinyu; Cheng, Shi; Li, Fumin; Duan, Xiling

    2016-01-01

    Background To treat moderate to severe acne vulgaris, we developed an optical fiber imported intra-tissue photodynamic therapy: the optical fiber irradiation 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (OFI-ALA-PDT). The aim of this study was to compare the treatment effect and tolerability of OFI-ALA-PDT versus traditional ALA-PDT in the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris. Material/Methods 60 patients with facial acne enrolled into this study were randomly divided into an OFI-ALA-PDT group and a traditional ALA-PDT group, with 30 patients in each group. The difference between these 2 groups was the red light irradiation methods used. In the OFI-ALA-PDT group we used intra-tissue irradiation (import the red light directly into the target lesion with optical fiber) for 5 min, while the traditional ALA-PDT group received whole-face irradiation for 20 min. All patients received 1 irradiation every 7 to 10 days for a total of 6 irradiations. Treatment effects and adverse reactions were recorded after the 4th and 6th irradiation, and at 4, 8, 16 weeks after the entire treatment. Results After the 4th irradiation, significantly different effective rates were observed in these groups (90.0% for the OFI-ALA-PDT group and 66.7% for the control group). However, no significant difference in effective rate was recorded in the later observations. There were 182 adverse reactions in the OFI-ALA-PDT group and 497 in the control group, which showed a significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusions OFI-ALA-PDT showed improved treatment effective rate in the early stage of irradiation, and it had fewer adverse reactions. PMID:26839152

  17. Effects of Adapalene-Benzoyl Peroxide Combination Gel in Treatment or Maintenance Therapy of Moderate or Severe Acne Vulgaris: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rongying

    2014-01-01

    Background An antibiotic-free, fixed-dose combination gel with adapalene (A) 0.1% and benzoyl peroxide (BPO) 2.5% has been developed for treatment of acne vulgaris. Objective To compare the clinical outcomes of A-BPO combination gel with vehicle gel for treatment or maintenance therapy of patients with acne vulgaris. Methods An electronic search of the database PubMed (1966 to September 2012), Embase (1984 to September 2012), and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL; 3rd Quarter, 2012) was undertaken to identify relevant studies. Main clinical outcomes were success rate, treatment-related adverse events (AEs), AEs leading to discontinuation, satisfaction with the effectiveness, and overall satisfaction. Results Six studies were finally included in this meta-analysis. The A-BPO group yielded better clinical outcomes regarding the success rate (p<0.00001), satisfaction with the effectiveness of treatment (p=0.005), and overall satisfaction (p=0.005) compared to the vehicle group. The incidence of treatment-related AEs in the A-BPO group was comparable with that of vehicle group (p=0.09), while the A-BPO group was associated with a slightly increase in the incidence of AEs leading to discontinuation when compared with the vehicle group (p=0.02). Conclusion A-BPO combination gel yields better clinical outcomes including success rate, satisfaction with the effectiveness, and overall satisfaction compared to vehicle gel, despite an increased incidence of AEs leading to discontinuation. The A-BPO combination agent most likely contributes to the treatment of moderate acne vulgaris rather than severe acne vulgaris, but it may be useful in maintenance therapy of patients with severe acne vulgaris. PMID:24648685

  18. Physical Modalities (Devices) in the Management of Acne.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Mark S; Swenson, Nicole; Macri, Angela

    2016-04-01

    Treatment options for acne vulgaris are enhanced by laser and light therapy. Both visible and laser light are effective treatments for acne. Visible light and many lasers target Propionibacterium acnes porphyrins while others act as anti-inflammatory mediators or reduce sebaceous gland activity. Compared with topical and systemic therapies, laser and light therapies have few if any side effects and appear to be safe during pregnancy. If patients prefer at home light treatments, several devices are currently available and have been shown to have efficacy. Ultimately, combining laser and light with topical therapy may well become the mainstay of acne treatment. PMID:27015782

  19. Concurrent hidradenitis suppurativa, inflammatory acne, dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, and pyoderma gangrenosum in a 16-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Koshelev, Misha V; Garrison, Paige A; Wright, Teresa S

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old boy who presented to our clinic with concomitant hidradenitis suppurativa, inflammatory acne, dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, and pyoderma gangrenosum. Recent reports describe the co-occurrence of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa. This case further expands the spectrum of concomitant pyoderma gangrenosum and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. PMID:24118007

  20. Clinical and histological effect of a low glycaemic load diet in treatment of acne vulgaris in Korean patients: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuck Hoon; Yoon, Ji Young; Hong, Jong Soo; Jung, Jae Yoon; Park, Mi Sun; Suh, Dae Hun

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies have suggested that dietary factors, specifically glycaemic load, may be involved in the pathogenesis of acne. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and histological effects on acne lesions of a low glycaemic load diet. A total of 32 patients with mild to moderate acne were randomly assigned to either a low glycaemic load diet or a control group diet, and completed a 10-week, parallel dietary intervention trial. Results indicate successful lowering of the glycaemic load. Subjects within the low glycaemic group demonstrated significant clinical improvement in the number of both non-inflammatory and inflammatory acne lesions. Histopathological examination of skin samples revealed several characteristics, including reduced size of sebaceous glands, decreased inflammation, and reduced expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1, and interleukin-8 in the low glycaemic load group. A reduction in glycaemic load of the diet for 10 weeks resulted in improvements in acne. PMID:22678562

  1. Evaluation of the Quantitative and Qualitative Alterations in the Fatty Acid Contents of the Sebum of Patients with Inflammatory Acne during Treatment with Systemic Lymecycline and/or Oral Fatty Acid Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira Talarico, Aline; Parra Duarte, Carla de Oliveira; Silva Pereira, Caroline; de Souza Weimann, Ellem Tatiani; Sabino de Matos, Lissa; Della Coletta, Livia Carolina; Fidelis, Maria Carolina; Vasconcellos, Cidia

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acne is a dermatosis that involves an altered sebum pattern. Objectives. (1) To evaluate if a treatment based on antibiotics (lymecycline) can alter fatty acids contents of the sebum of patients with acne; (2) to evaluate if oral supplementation of fatty acids can interfere with fatty acids contents of the sebum of patients with acne; (3) to evaluate if there is any interaction in fatty acids contents of the sebum of patients with acne when they use both antibiotics and oral supplementation of fatty acids. Methods. Forty-five male volunteers with inflammatory acne vulgaris were treated with 300 mg of lymecycline per day, with 540 mg of γ-linolenic acid, 1,200 mg of linoleic acid, and 510 mg of oleic acid per day, or with both regimens for 90 days. Every 30 days, a sample of sebum from the forehead was collected for fatty acids' chromatographic analysis. Results. Twelve fatty acids studied exhibited some kind of pattern changes during the study: C12:0, C14:0, C15:0, C16:1, C18:0, C18:1n9c+C18:1n9t, C18:2n6t, C18:3n6, C18:3n3, C20:1, C22:0, and C24:0. Conclusions. The daily administration of lymecycline and/or specific fatty acids may slightly influence some fatty acids levels present in the sebum of patients with inflammatory acne vulgaris. PMID:24191156

  2. Effects of Isotretinoin on the Platelet Counts and the Mean Platelet Volume in Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Ugur Bilgin, Aynur

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to evaluate the platelet counts and the mean platelet volume in patients who received isotretinoin for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Method. A total of 110 patients were included in this retrospective study. Complete blood count parameters were recorded prior to and three-months following the treatment. Results. Both platelet counts and the mean platelet volume were significantly decreased following the treatment. No significant differences were noted on the levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit, and white blood cell count. Conclusion. Platelet counts and mean platelet volume significantly decreased following isotretinoin treatment. Since the decrease of platelet counts and the mean platelet volume was seen concomitantly, it is concluded that the effect of isotretinoin was through the suppression of bone marrow. PMID:24605049

  3. Efficacy, Safety, and Subject Satisfaction of a Specified Skin Care Regimen to Cleanse, Medicate, Moisturize, and Protect the Skin of Patients Under Treatment for Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.; Gold, Michael; Rueda, Maria José; Brandt, Staci; Winkelman, Warren J.

    2015-01-01

    Optimal management of acne vulgaris requires incorporation of several components including patient education, selection of a rational therapeutic regimen, dedicated adherence with the program by the patient, and integration of proper skin care. Unfortunately, the latter component is often overlooked or not emphasized strongly enough to the patient. Proper skin care may reduce potential irritation that can be associated with topical acne medications and prevents the patient from unknowingly using skin care products that can actually sabotage their treatment. This article reviews the effectiveness, skin tolerability, safety, and patient satisfaction of an open label study in which a specified skin care regimen is used in combination with topical therapy. The study was designed to mirror “real world” management of facial acne vulgaris clinical practice. The skin care regimen used in this study included a brand foam wash and a brand moisturizer with SPF 30 photoprotection, both of which contain ingredients that are included to provide benefits for acne-prone and acne-affected skin. PMID:25610521

  4. Efficacy, safety, and subject satisfaction of a specified skin care regimen to cleanse, medicate, moisturize, and protect the skin of patients under treatment for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Gold, Michael; Rueda, Maria José; Brandt, Staci; Winkelman, Warren J

    2015-01-01

    Optimal management of acne vulgaris requires incorporation of several components including patient education, selection of a rational therapeutic regimen, dedicated adherence with the program by the patient, and integration of proper skin care. Unfortunately, the latter component is often overlooked or not emphasized strongly enough to the patient. Proper skin care may reduce potential irritation that can be associated with topical acne medications and prevents the patient from unknowingly using skin care products that can actually sabotage their treatment. This article reviews the effectiveness, skin tolerability, safety, and patient satisfaction of an open label study in which a specified skin care regimen is used in combination with topical therapy. The study was designed to mirror "real world" management of facial acne vulgaris clinical practice. The skin care regimen used in this study included a brand foam wash and a brand moisturizer with SPF 30 photoprotection, both of which contain ingredients that are included to provide benefits for acne-prone and acne-affected skin. PMID:25610521

  5. Treatment of Acne in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chien, Anna L; Qi, Ji; Rainer, Barbara; Sachs, Dana L; Helfrich, Yolanda R

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common disease of the pilosebaceous unit and affects adolescents and adults. Because high-quality guidelines regarding treatment of acne in pregnancy are scarce, management of this condition can be challenging. We describe the safety profile of common therapies and outline approaches based on available evidence. Topical azelaic acid or benzoyl peroxide can be recommended as baseline therapy. A combination of topical erythromycin or clindamycin with benzoyl peroxide is recommended for inflammatory acne. Oral erythromycin or cephalexin is generally considered safe for moderate to severe inflammatory acne when used for a few weeks. A short course of oral prednisolone may be useful for treating fulminant nodular cystic acne after the first trimester. In general, topical and oral antibiotics should not be used as monotherapy, but combined with topical benzoyl peroxide to decrease bacterial resistance. Oral retinoids are teratogenic and absolutely contraindicated for women who are pregnant or considering pregnancy. Although some complementary therapies including micronutrients and nonpharmacologic treatments seem to be well tolerated, limited data exist regarding their safety and efficacy, and they are not currently recommended during pregnancy. The risk-to-benefit ratio, efficacy, acceptability, and costs are considerations when choosing a treatment for acne in pregnancy. PMID:26957383

  6. Acne - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Acne vulgaris - self-care; Cystic acne - self-care; Pimples - self-care; Zits - self-care ... If daily skin care does not clear up blemishes, try over-the-counter acne medicines that you apply to your skin. These products ...

  7. Trends in the Frequency of Original Research in Acne Vulgaris, Rosacea, Dermatitis, Psoriasis, Skin Cancer, and Skin Infections, 1970–2010

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young M; Wu, Jashin J

    2015-01-01

    Context: Medical journals have allowed researchers to share their latest discoveries, especially in the most common diseases affecting patients worldwide. Objective: To analyze trends in the frequency of original research into common dermatologic diseases from 1970 to 2010. Design: A retrospective review of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology and the Archives of Dermatology was performed using the MEDLINE database. All original research articles published between 1970 and 2010, by quinquennium, dealing with acne vulgaris, rosacea, skin cancer, dermatitis, psoriasis, or skin infections were included. Main Outcome Measure: Total number of publications dealing with each dermatologic topic considered. Results: The frequency of research into acne vulgaris and rosacea decreased from 24% in 1970 to 5.1% in 2010. Psoriasis research increased in frequency from 17.6% to 26.5% from 2000 to 2010, and skin cancer research increased from 4% in 1970 to 48% in 2010. Conclusions: Topics that experienced early advancements in research, such as acne vulgaris and rosacea, demonstrated a decreasing trend in the frequency of publication. Published psoriasis research has increased in frequency since 2000, most likely because of the discovery of biologics. Finally, skin cancer research has continued to increase in frequency of publication, paralleling the increasing incidence of skin cancer. PMID:25663204

  8. Drospirenone/ethinylestradiol 3mg/20microg (24/4 day regimen): a review of its use in contraception, premenstrual dysphoric disorder and moderate acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Caroline; Wellington, Keri; Moen, Marit D; Robinson, Dean M

    2007-01-01

    Drospirenone 3mg with ethinylestradiol 20microg (Yaz) is a low-dose combined oral contraceptive (COC) administered in a regimen of 24 days of active tablets followed by a short hormone-free interval (4 days; 24/4 regimen). Drospirenone, unlike other synthetic progestogens used in COCs, is a 17alpha-spirolactone derivative and a 17alpha-spironolactone analogue with antimineralocorticoid and antiandrogenic properties. Drospirenone/ethinylestradiol 3mg/20microg (24/4) is approved in the US for the prevention of pregnancy in women, for the treatment of the symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and for the treatment of moderate acne vulgaris in women who wish to use an oral contraceptive for contraception.Drospirenone/ethinylestradiol 3mg/20microg (24/4) provided 99% contraceptive protection over 1 year of treatment in two large studies. The same treatment regimen over three treatment cycles also significantly improved the emotional and physical symptoms associated with PMDD, and improved moderate acne vulgaris over six treatment cycles in double-blind trials. It was generally well tolerated, with adverse events generally typical of those experienced with other COCs and which were most likely to occur in the first few cycles. Clinical trials indicate that drospirenone/ethinylestradiol 3mg/20microg (24/4) is a good long-term contraceptive option, and additionally offers relief of symptoms that characterise PMDD and has a favourable effect on moderate acne vulgaris. PMID:17683173

  9. Integrated cooling-vacuum-assisted 1540-nm erbium:glass laser is effective in treating mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Politi, Y; Levi, A; Enk, C D; Lapidoth, M

    2015-12-01

    Acne treatment by a mid-infrared laser may be unsatisfactory due to deeply situated acne-affected sebaceous glands which serve as its target. Skin manipulation by vacuum and contact cooling may improve laser-skin interaction, reduce pain sensation, and increase overall safety and efficacy. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of acne treatment using an integrated cooling-vacuum-assisted 1540-nm erbium:glass laser, a prospective interventional study was conducted. It included 12 patients (seven men and five women) suffering from mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris. The device utilizes a mid-infrared 1540-nm laser (Alma Lasers Ltd. Caesarea, Israel), which is integrated with combined cooling-vacuum-assisted technology. An acne lesion is initially manipulated upon contact by a vacuum-cooling-assisted tip, followed by three to four stacked laser pulses (500-600 mJ, 4 mm spot size, and frequency of 2 Hz). Patients underwent four to six treatment sessions with a 2-week interval and were followed-up 1 and 3 months after the last treatment. Clinical photographs were taken by high-resolution digital camera before and after treatment. Clinical evaluation was performed by two independent dermatologists, and results were graded on a scale of 0 (exacerbation) to 4 (76-100 % improvement). Patients' and physicians' satisfaction was also recorded. Pain perception and adverse effects were evaluated as well. All patients demonstrated a moderate to significant improvement (average score of 3.6 and 2.0 within 1 and 3 months, respectively, following last treatment session). No side effects, besides a transient erythema, were observed. Cooling-vacuum-assisted 1540-nm laser is safe and effective for the treatment of acne vulgaris. PMID:26428932

  10. Fractional Microneedling Radiofrequency Treatment for Acne-related Post-inflammatory Erythema.

    PubMed

    Min, Seonguk; Park, Seon Yong; Yoon, Ji Young; Kwon, Hyuck Hoon; Suh, Dae Hun

    2016-01-01

    Post-inflammatory erythema is a common result of acne inflammation and is cosmetically unacceptable without effective treatment. Fractional microneedling radiofrequency (FMR) has potential for treatment of post-inflammatory erythema. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this treatment. A retrospective chart review was undertaken of 25 patients treated with 2 sessions of radiofrequency at 4-week intervals and 27 patients treated with oral antibiotics and/or topical agents. Efficacy was assessed through an investigator's global assessment of photographs, and the analysis of erythema with image analysis software and photometric devices. Histological changes resulting from the treatment were evaluated by skin biopsy. FMR treatment resulted in significant improvements in erythema with no severe adverse effects. Histological study revealed a reduction in vascular markers and inflammation. FMR is a safe and effective treatment for post-inflammatory erythema, with potential anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenetic properties. PMID:26059315

  11. Low-dose Vitamin “A” Tablets–treatment of Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Kotori, Merita Grajqevci

    2015-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of isotretinoin at 0.5 to 1.0 mg/kg per day in the treatment of acne is well established and considered safe, although it is sometimes not easily tolerated because of its cutaneous side effects. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of low-dose isotretinoin in the treatment of acne. Methods: In this prospective, non comparative, open-label study, 50 patients, both male and female, with moderate acne were enrolled and treated with isotretinoin at 20 mg/d (approximately 0.3-0.4 mg/kg per day) for 3 months. The patients were divided into two age groups: 12 to 20 and 21 to 35 years old. Patients were evaluated at 2-month intervals by means of clinical and laboratory examinations. A 4-year follow-up was also carried out. Results: At the end of the treatment phase, good results were observed in 90.8% of the patients aged 12 to 20 years, and in 89.6% of the patients aged 21 to 35 years. Failure of the treatment occurred in 5.2% and 7.4% of the two groups, respectively. Three patients dropped out of the study because of lack of compliance, and another patient discontinued participation because of a laboratory side effect. During the 2-year follow-up period, relapses of the acne occurred in 3.9% of the patients aged 12 to 20 years and in 5.9% of the patients aged 21 to 35 years. Elevated serum lipid levels (up to 20% higher than the upper limit of normal value) were found in 4.2% of the patients and abnormal (acne, with a low incidence of severe side effects and at a lower cost than higher doses. PMID:25870473

  12. Randomized tolerability analysis of clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-tretinoin 0.025% gel used with benzoyl peroxide wash 4% for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana; Potts, Aaron; Alió Saenz, Alessandra B

    2010-12-01

    The multiple etiologic factors involved in acne vulgaris make the use of several medications necessary to treat the condition. Use of a fixed combination of clindamycin phosphate 1.2% and tretinoin 0.025% in conjunction with a benzoyl peroxide (BPO) wash 4% targets several pathologic factors simultaneously and mitigates the potential for clindamycin-induced Propionibacterium acnes-resistant strains. New formulations may allow such regimens to be effectively used without overly reduced tolerability resulting from the irritation potential of tretinoin and BPO. This randomized, single-blind study investigated the local tolerability, irritation potential, and safety of an aqueous-based gel (clindamycin phosphate 7.2%-tretinoin 0.025% [CT gel]) when used in conjunction with a BPO wash 4% in participants with mild to moderate acne vulgaris. Participants applied the CT gel once daily in the evening for 4 weeks in conjunction with once-daily morning use of either BPO wash 4% or nonmedicated soap-free cleanser lotion (SFC). Local tolerability and irritation potential were assessed by participants and investigators using separate 6-point scales. The frequency and severity of dryness, scaling, erythema, burning/stinging, and itching increased during the first week of treatment in both treatment arms but decreased thereafter. Local tolerability reactions were slightly more frequent in the CT gel + BPO wash group versus the CT gel + SFC group at week 1 but were generally mild and improved within 1 to 2 weeks. In conclusion, therapy with CT gel + BPO wash appears safe and well-tolerated in participants with mild to moderate acne vulgaris. PMID:21284283

  13. Depression screening using health questionnaires in patients receiving oral isotretinoin for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Schrom, Kory; Nagy, Terri; Mostow, Eliot

    2016-07-01

    Isotretinoin is used to treat severe and recalcitrant acne. Possible side effects include depression, suicide, and suicidal ideation; however, other studies suggest isotretinoin may improve mood and quality of life. Although iPLEDGE consenting warns about the risk of depression and suicidal ideation, there is no recommendation for screening tools. The patient health questionnaire-2 and the patient health questionnaire-9 are validated instruments that enable dermatologists to efficiently screen for depression before and after isotretinoin is initiated. PMID:27317530

  14. Multicenter randomized controlled trial on combination therapy with 0.1% adapalene gel and oral antibiotics for acne vulgaris: comparison of the efficacy of adapalene gel alone and in combination with oral faropenem.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nobukazu; Kawashima, Makoto

    2012-06-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial in patients with acne vulgaris with moderate to severe inflammatory lesions. The patients were assigned to the following three treatment groups: group A received monotherapy with 0.1% topical adapalene gel for 4 weeks; group B received combination therapy with 0.1% topical adapalene gel and 600 mg oral faropenem for 2 weeks followed by 0.1% topical adapalene gel alone for 2 weeks; and group C received combination therapy with 0.1% topical adapalene gel and 600 mg oral faropenem for 4 weeks. The result of the analysis indicated that the percentage reduction in inflammatory lesion counts after 2 weeks of treatment was significantly higher in groups B and C than in group A (P < 0.05). After 4 weeks of treatment, group C showed significantly higher percentage reduction in inflammatory lesion counts than in groups A and B (P < 0.05), whereas no significant difference was noted between the latter two groups. Adverse reactions included dryness and irritation at the adapalene application sites that were observed in 10.1% of cases (16/158 patients) and diarrhea and loose stool because of oral faropenem that were observed in 7.5% of cases (8/106 patients). Taken together, our results suggest that combination therapy with oral antibiotics and adapalene results in earlier improvement in patients with moderate to severe inflammatory acne compared to the application of adapalene alone, and that 4 weeks of the combination therapy is preferable to 2 weeks of treatment. PMID:22168326

  15. Efficacy of oral antibiotics on acne vulgaris and their effects on quality of life: a multicenter randomized controlled trial using minocycline, roxithromycin and faropenem.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nobukazu; Kawashima, Makoto

    2011-02-01

    There are few clinical studies which compare the efficacy and patient satisfaction for oral antibiotics to treat inflammatory acne. To clarify the difference between oral antibiotics, acne patients with moderate to severe inflammatory eruptions were randomized into three groups, and each patient was given minocycline (MINO), roxithromycin (RXM) or faropenem (FRPM) for 4 weeks, followed by 4 weeks of observation without any oral antibiotics. We estimated the reduction rate of inflammatory lesion counts, the scale of Skindex-16 which represents patient quality of life (QOL), and minimum inhibitory concentrations required to inhibit the growth of 90% of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from acne patients (MIC(90) ). In all three groups, inflammatory lesion counts, and emotional and total score of Skindex-16 were significantly improved (P<0.05) after 4 weeks treatment, and these effects were maintained for the following 4 weeks. Dizziness/nausea in two patients (4.1%) of the MINO group and diarrhea in three patients (5.9%) of the FRPM group were observed. There was no significant difference of percentage reduction in inflammatory lesion counts and incident rates of side-effects between these three oral antibiotics. MIC(90) of MINO was 0.25 μg/mL before and after treatment, but MIC(90) of RXM had increased from 0.25 μg/mL to more than 32 μg/mL after treatment. MIC(90) of FRPM was 0.06 μg/mL or less for all strains before and after treatment. Our randomized controlled clinical trial suggested that MINO, RXM and FRPM were efficient to improve inflammatory acne and patient QOL, and there was no significant difference between them. PMID:21269305

  16. Assessment of a new biological complex efficacy on dysseborrhea, inflammation, and Propionibacterium acnes proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Trompezinski, Sandra; Weber, Sophie; Cadars, Benoît; Larue, Florence; Ardiet, Nathalie; Chavagnac-Bonneville, Marlène; Sayag, Michèle; Jourdan, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acne vulgaris is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit triggered by Propionibacterium acnes. A bakuchiol, Ginkgo biloba extract, and mannitol (BGM) complex has been developed to provide patients with acne with a specific dermocosmetic to be used adjunctively with conventional treatments. Objective The aim of these studies was to assess the antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative potential of BGM complex and its individual compounds as well as its impact on sebum composition. Methods The antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative potential of BGM complex and its compounds was assessed through in vitro, ex vivo, and clinical studies. The clinical benefit of BGM complex formulated in a cream was assessed in subjects prone to acne through sebum composition analysis and photometric assessments. Results Results from the studies showed that the BGM complex has significant antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative properties. At similar concentrations, bakuchiol has up to twice the antioxidative potential than vitamin E. In subjects, BGM complex regulated the sebum composition in acne patients by increasing the level of sapienic and linolenic acid and reducing the level of oleic acid. The reduced number of porphyrins on the skin surface showed that it is also effective against P. acnes. Conclusion BGM complex provides a complete adjunctive care in patients with acne by targeting etiopathogenic factors of acne: dysseborrhea, inflammation, and P. acnes proliferation. PMID:27621660

  17. Clindamycin Phosphate 1.2%/Tretinoin 0.025% Gel for the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris: Which Patients are Most Likely to Benefit the Most?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/tretinoin 0.025% gel is a topical combination formulation used once daily for the treatment of acne vulgaris, with approval in the United States for patients >12 years of age. Three 12-week, randomized, vehicle-controlled, pivotal trials included > 1,800 actively treated subjects. In addition, an open-label, 52-week study was also completed with 442 subjects enrolled. The skin tolerability, safety, and efficacy of clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/tretinoin 0.025% gel applied once daily is well-established based on data from pivotal studies and analyses in other subsequent publications including from pooled analysis of results from 4,550 subjects. This article discusses results from the pivotal 12-week, Phase 3 studies of clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/tretinoin 0.025% gel applied once daily in 845 subjects with mild, moderate, or severe facial acne vulgaris and differentiates patterns of therapeutic response using study endpoint successes defined as clear, almost clear, or at least a 2-grade improvement in the AV severity rating. PMID:26155323

  18. Acne and systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Lolis, Margarita S; Bowe, Whitney P; Shalita, Alan R

    2009-11-01

    Acne is the most common disease of the skin. It affects 85% of teenagers, 42.5% of men, and 50.9% of women between the ages of 20 and 30 years.96,97 The role of hormones, particularly as a trigger of sebum production and sebaceous growth and differentiation, is well known. Excess production of hormones, specifically androgens, GH, IGF-1, insulin, CRH, and glucocorticoids, is associated with increased rates of acne development. Acne may be a feature in many endocrine disorders, including polycystic ovary disease, Cushing syndrome, CAH, androgen-secreting tumors, and acromegaly. Other nonendocrine diseases associated with acne include Apert syndrome, SAPHO syndrome, Behçet syndrome and PAPA syndrome. Acne medicamentosa is the development of acne vulgaris or an acneiform eruption with the use of certain medications. These medications include testosterone, progesterone,steroids, lithium, phenytoin, isoniazid, vitamins B2, B6, and B12, halogens, and epidermal growth factor inhibitors. Management of acne medicamentosa includes standard acne therapy. Discontinuation of the offending drug may be necessary in recalcitrant cases. Basic therapeutic interventions for acne include topical therapy, systemic antibiotics,hormonal agents, isotretinoin, and physical treatments. Generally, the severity of acne lesions determines the type of acne regimen necessary. The emergence of drug-resistant P acnes and adverse side effects are current limitations to effective acne management. PMID:19932324

  19. Acne mechanica.

    PubMed

    Mills, O H; Kligman, A

    1975-04-01

    The term acne mechanica designates local exacerbations due to pressure, friction, rubbing, squeezing, or stretching. Examples are given of various physical traumata that provoke lesions in acne patients. The precipitating causes of stress are diverse, they include articles of clothing (tight straps and belts), recreational accouterments (football shoulder pads), or occupational pressure (rubbing of back in truck drivers). Sealing acne-bearing skin under adhesive for two weeks regularly induced new inflammatory lesions, which derived from the rupture of microcomedones that are not visible to the naked eye. PMID:123732

  20. Comparison of clinical efficacies of sodium ascorbyl phosphate, retinol and their combination in acne treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruamrak, C; Lourith, N; Natakankitkul, S

    2009-02-01

    Acne vulgaris impairs the appearance of an individual and causes psychological irritation. Inflammatory acne lesion is caused by multifactor incorporates in each step of acne pathogenesis. In an attempt to archive inflammatory lesion treatment with the promise of prevention of acne vulgaris, randomized and double-blind studies on the comparison of the efficacies of topical formulations containing 5% sodium ascorbyl phosphate (SAP) and 0.2% retinol, separately as well as in combination application, were conducted. The resulting data showed that SAP reduced the inflammatory lesion by 20.14% and 48.82% within 4 and 8 weeks respectively. Application of the formulation containing retinol slightly improved the treatment efficacy as the lesion reduced by 21.79% and 49.50% after 4 and 8 weeks respectively. The combination treatment significantly reduced the inflammatory lesion by 29.28% after 4 weeks and 63.10% after 8 weeks of application. The most effective treatment was by using the combination of 5% SAP and 0.2% retinol, which incorporated the synergistic effects on lipid peroxidation and sebaceous gland function in addition to the enhancement of SAP permeability by the desquamation of stratum corneum influenced by retinol, keratin plug removal and anti-inflammatory effect of retinol. This study promises for the development of cosmetic products to overcome aesthetic and psychological problems caused by acne vulgaris. PMID:19134126

  1. Psychosocial judgements and perceptions of adolescents with acne vulgaris: A blinded, controlled comparison of adult and peer evaluations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of the current survey was to evaluate how teenagers and adults view teens with acne as compared to those with smooth, clear skin. We also surveyed teens and adults about their experiences with acne. Methods We hypothesized that teens with acne would be perceived in a more negative fashion as compared to teens with smooth, clear skin. We presented digitally altered photographs to our responders and asked how they perceived the two groups. No mention was made of acne. In the first survey (n = 1,002), both adults and teens provided their impressions on photo images of teenagers with either clear skin or acne. In the second survey (n = 1,006), the adults and teens also answered questions about their own experiences with acne. Results Survey 1. With respect to impressions of photo images, the first thing teens and adults noticed about a person with acne was their skin (65% and 75%, respectively). Teenagers with acne were perceived most often by other teens and adults (teen responder %, adult responder %) as being shy (39%, 43%), nerdy (31%, 21%), stressed (24%, 20%), lonely (23%, 22%), boring (15%, 6%), unkempt (13%, 7%), unhealthy (12%, 8%), introverted (9%, 23%), and rebellious (7%, 5%). Survey 2. Most teenagers with acne (64%) felt embarrassed by it and thought that getting acne was the most difficult aspect of puberty (55%). Teenagers with acne reported lower self-confidence or shyness (71%); difficulty finding dates (43%), problems making friends (24%), challenges with school (21%), and trouble getting a job (7%). Conclusions Teens with smooth, clear skin were rated higher on every favorable characteristic and lower on every unfavorable characteristic by both teens and adults. In most cases, the first thing that respondents noticed was the skin of teens with acne. Teenagers and adults alike perceived other teens with acne as generally being shy, less socially active, more likely to be bullied, and less successful in terms of finding a job

  2. Inhibition of Pro-inflammatory Mediators and Cytokines by Chlorella Vulgaris Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Sibi, G.; Rabina, Santa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro anti-inflammatory activities of solvent fractions from Chlorella vulgaris by inhibiting the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines. Methods: Methanolic extracts (80%) of C. vulgaris were prepared and partitioned with solvents of increasing polarity viz., n-hexane, chloroform, ethanol, and water. Various concentrations of the fractions were tested for cytotoxicity in RAW 264.7 cells using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the concentrations inducing cell growth inhibition by about 50% (IC50) were chosen for further studies. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated RAW 264.7 cells were treated with varying concentrations of C. vulgaris fractions and examined for its effects on nitric oxide (NO) production by Griess assay. The release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using Celecoxib and polymyxin B as positive controls. Results: MTT assay revealed all the solvent fractions that inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. Of all the extracts, 80% methanolic extract exhibited the strongest anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting NO production (P < 0.01), PGE2 (P < 0.05), TNF-α, and IL-6 (P < 0.001) release in LPS induced RAW 264.7 cells. Both hexane and chloroform fractions recorded a significant (P < 0.05) and dose-dependent inhibition of LPS induced inflammatory mediators and cytokines in vitro. The anti-inflammatory effect of ethanol and aqueous extracts was not significant in the study. Conclusion: The significant inhibition of inflammatory mediators and cytokines by fractions from C. vulgaris suggests that this microalga would be a potential source of developing anti-inflammatory agents and a good alternate for conventional steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. SUMMARY C. vulgaris extracts have potential anti-inflammatory

  3. Isotretinoin for acne and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Watson, Kendra D; Miest, Rachel Y; Tollefson, Megha M

    2016-06-01

    Isotretinoin is a revolutionary medicine for the treatment of acne vulgaris, with new studies showing evidence of excellent clinical outcomes in treating rosacea. After 30 years of clinical experience, new insights are being gained into dosing strategies, recurrence prevention, and dose-related side effects. Previous controversial associations with inflammatory bowel diseases and mood disorders have hampered the use of this medication in some clinical situations, with new evidence disproving these claims. The teratogenicity of this medication mandates iPLEDGE compliance with government regulations. Clinicians should be knowledgeable about this medication including its side effects, teratogenicity, and its controversies in order to adequately counsel patients, dissuade fears, and obtain the best clinical outcome when treating acne and rosacea. PMID:27416313

  4. Microorganisms inhabiting follicular contents of facial acne are not only Propionibacterium but also Malassezia spp.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Numata, Shigeki; Yamada, Shunji; Yagami, Akiko; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2016-08-01

    To clarify the relationship between major cutaneous microorganisms (Propionibacterium, Staphylococcus and Malassezia spp.) and acne vulgaris (acne), we examined the microbiota quantitatively in the follicular contents of inflammatory acne and on the facial skin of patients with acne. Fifteen Japanese untreated acne outpatients were studied. The follicular contents from inflammatory acne lesions of the face were collected using a comedo extractor. The skin surface samples were obtained by the swab method from 10 cm(2) of facial skin. The microbiota was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. The microbiota in follicular contents was similar to that on the skin surface, namely, there were large populations of Propionibacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Malassezia spp. Moreover, the number of Malassezia spp. on the skin surface was correlated with that of inflammatory acne and that in follicular contents. This study clarified that there are large populations of Propionibacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Malassezia spp. in follicular contents. These results suggest the possibility that not only Propionibacterium acnes but also other cutaneous resident microorganisms are related to acne. Particularly, we considered that Malassezia spp. is closely related. PMID:26705192

  5. Cohort study on the treatment with dapsone 5% gel of mild to moderate inflammatory acne of the face in women.

    PubMed

    Lynde, Charles W; Andriessen, Anneke

    2014-01-01

    Topical dapsone 5% gel for the treatment of mild to moderate acne has been shown to be effective in randomized controlled studies. A total of 101 adult women with mild to moderate facial inflammatory acne participated in a 12-week cohort study to evaluate the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of dapsone gel 5% in this specific group who often complain of sensitive skin. The women were instructed to apply dapsone 5% gel twice daily after washing their face with a standard noncomedogenic soap-free cleanser. Treatment outcome was evaluated using physician-scored Global Acne Assessment Scale (GAAS) and patient-reported facial skin condition. Ninety-three women completed the study (6 were lost to follow-up and 2 had mild skin irritation). At 12 weeks, significant physician GAAS scores (t55 = 8.85, P = .001) and patient-reported lesion reductions were shown. Treatment success (GAAS 0 or 1) at 12 weeks was achieved in 69.4% (n = 75) of women (t94 = 4.17, P = .001), improving patient-reported quality-of-life aspects. Topical dapsone gel 5% was shown to be safe, minimally irritating, and effective in the treatment of mild to moderate inflammatory facial acne in adult women with sensitive skin. PMID:24720080

  6. Effects of Thymol and Carvacrol, Constituents of Thymus vulgaris L. Essential Oil, on the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Fachini-Queiroz, Fernanda Carolina; Kummer, Raquel; Estevão-Silva, Camila Fernanda; Carvalho, Maria Dalva de Barros; Cunha, Joice Maria; Grespan, Renata; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., Lamiaceae) is an aromatic and medicinal plant that has been used in folk medicine, phytopharmaceutical preparations, food preservatives, and as an aromatic ingredient. The effect of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) and its isolated constituents thymol and cavacrol (CVL) were studied in the following experimental models: ear edema, carrageenan-induced pleurisy, and chemotaxis in vitro. In the pleurisy model, TEO, CVL, and thymol significantly inhibited inflammatory edema. However, only TEO and CVL inhibited leukocyte migration. In the in vitro chemotaxis experiment, CVL inhibited leukocyte migration, whereas thymol exerted a potent chemoattractant effect. In the ear edema model, CVL (10 mg/ear), applied topically, reduced edema formation, exerting a topical anti-inflammatory effect. Thymol did not reduce edema formation but rather presented an irritative response, probably dependent on histamine and prostanoid release. Our data suggest that the antiinflammatory effects of TEO and CVL are attributable to the inhibition of inflammatory edema and leukocyte migration. PMID:22919415

  7. Dark chocolate exacerbates acne.

    PubMed

    Vongraviopap, Saivaree; Asawanonda, Pravit

    2016-05-01

    The effects of chocolate on acne exacerbations have recently been reevaluated. For so many years, it was thought that it had no role in worsening acne. To investigate whether 99% dark chocolate, when consumed in regular daily amounts, would cause acne to worsen in acne-prone male subjects, twenty-five acne prone male subjects were asked to consume 25 g of 99% dark chocolate daily for 4 weeks. Assessments which included Leeds revised acne scores as well as lesion counts took place weekly. Food frequency questionnaire was used, and daily activities were recorded. Statistically significant changes of acne scores and numbers of comedones and inflammatory papules were detected as early as 2 weeks into the study. At 4 weeks, the changes remained statistically significant compared to baseline. Dark chocolate when consumed in normal amounts for 4 weeks can exacerbate acne in male subjects with acne-prone skin. PMID:26711092

  8. Extended-release Formulation of Minocycline in the Treatment of Moderate-to-severe Acne Vulgaris in Patients Over the Age of 12 Years

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Oral antibiotics continue to play an important role in the treatment of moderate-to-severe acne. Minocycline is widely used in moderate-to-severe acne. Minocycline has anti-inflammatory properties, activity against Propionibacterium acnes and lipophilicity. An extended-release formulation of minocycline has been introduced. Extended-release minocycline is not bioequivalent to nonmodified release minocycline products and exhibits dose-proportional pharmacokinetics. Food or dairy products did not influence absorption. Efficacy is not dose-dependent, while the incidence of acute vestibular adverse events increases with dose suggesting an optimal dose of 1mg/kg. In two Phase 3 clinical trials, mean percent improvement in inflammatory lesions after 12 weeks of treatment with extended-release minocycline was 43.1 and 45.8 percent compared to 31.7 and 30.8 percent with placebo (P=0.001 and P<0.001, respectively) while the incidence of acute vestibular adverse events was comparable to placebo. PMID:23882310

  9. Monte Carlo study of skin optical clearing to enhance light penetration in the tissue: implications for photodynamic therapy of acne vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Genina, Elina A.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.

    2008-06-01

    Result of Monte Carlo simulations of skin optical clearing is presented. The model calculations were carried out with the aim of studying of spectral response of skin under immersion liquids action and calculation of enhancement of light penetration depth. In summary, we have shown that: 1) application of glucose, propylene glycol and glycerol produced significant decrease of light scattering in different skin layers; 2) maximal clearing effect will be obtained in case of optical clearing of skin dermis, however, absorbed light fraction in skin dermis changed insignificantly, independently on clearing agent and place it administration; 3) in contrast to it, the light absorbed fraction in skin adipose layer increased significantly in case of optical clearing of skin dermis. It is very important because it can be used for development of optical methods of obesity treatment; 4) optical clearing of superficial skin layers can be used for decreasing of power of light radiation used for treatment of acne vulgaris.

  10. Anti-allergic Inflammatory Triterpenoids Isolated from the Spikes of Prunella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Choia, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jeong Ah

    2016-01-01

    Twelve known triterpenoids (1-12) and two steroids (13 and 14) have been isolated from the spike of the plant Prunella vulgaris. Among them, 2α,3α,23-trihydroxyursa-12,20(30)-dien-28-oic acid (10) was isolated for the first time from this plant. All isolates were evaluated for their inhibitory effect on the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and release of histamine in human mast cells. β-Amyrin (5), 10, and euscaphic acid (12) showed suppression of histamine release with percentage inhibitions of 46.7, 57.9, and 54.2%, respectively. In addition, 5 and 10 showed strong inhibition of TNF-α and IL-6 in the test for pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that compounds 5 and 10 largely contribute to the anti-allergic inflammatory effect of P. vulgaris. PMID:26996013

  11. Anti-inflammatory activity of the leaf extacts of Gendarussa vulgaris Nees

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, TK Mohamed; Azeem, AK; Dilip, C; Sankar, C; Prasanth, NV; Duraisami, R

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the anti-inflammatory property of the leaf exacts of Gendarussa vulgaris (G. vulgaris) Nees. Methods G. vulgaris Nees of the family Apocynaceae is a medium sized tree grown in semishade or no shade and is common in the Ernad and Nilambur taluks of Kerala.Various parts of this plant have been used in the treatment of ulcers, sores, inflammation, dyspepsia, healing of wounds, etc. The present study aimed at the evaluation of anti-inflammatory property of the aqueous and alcoholic extracts of the leaves by both in vitro and in vivo methods. In vitro method was estimated by human red blood cell membrane stabilisation (HRBC) method and in vivo method was estimated on the carrageenan induced paw oedima. Results Both the methods showed significant anti-inflammatory property of the different extracts tested. Conclusions The alcoholic extract at a concentration of 300 mg/mL showed potent activity on comparing with the standard drug diclofenac sodium. PMID:23569746

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Aqueous Extract of Beta Vulgaris L.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Swati; Garg, Vipin Kumar; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The present study deals with the investigation of phytochemically evaluated aqueous extract of leaves of Beta vulgaris for its anti-inflammatory activity. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan induced rat paw oedema method for acute inflammation and cotton pellet granuloma method for chronic inflammation. The standard drug used was indomethacin (10 mg/kg) for both the models. In both methods, aqueous extract at a dose level of 1000 mg/kg has shown significant activity which is comparable to that of the standard PMID:24826006

  13. Biochemical effects, hypolipidemic and anti-inflammatory activities of Artemisia vulgaris extract in hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    El-Tantawy, Walid Hamdy

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate hypolipidemic and anti-inflammatory effects of Artemisia vulgaris extract in hypercholesterolemic rats. Hypercholesterolemia was induced by feeding of rats with high fat diet containing 3% cholesterol in olein oil, for 8 weeks. Feeding of rats with high fat diet for 8 weeks, leading to a significant increase in serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, malondialdehyde and nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α levels and a significant decrease in serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol level, liver hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity and paraoxonase-1 activities as compared to the normal control group. Treatment of high fat diet rats with Artemisia vulgaris extract for 4 weeks at a dose of 100 mg/kg per day, resulted in normalized serum lipid profile, a significant increase in paraoxonase-1 activity and decrease in serum malondialdehyde, nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α level as compared to high fat diet-treated animals. Also the extract caused a significant decrease in hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity as compared with both high fat diet-treated animals and control ones. In conclusion, Artemisia vulgaris extract has hypolipidemic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant properties; it may serve as a source for the prevention of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26236098

  14. NF-κB-targeted anti-inflammatory activity of Prunella vulgaris var. lilacina in macrophages RAW 264.7.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yu-Jin; Lee, Eun-Ju; Kim, Haeng-Ran; Hwang, Kyung-A

    2013-01-01

    Prunella vulgaris var. lilacina, a herbal medicine, has long been used in Korea for the treatment of sore throat, and to alleviate fever and accelerate wound healing. Although the therapeutic effect of P. vulgaris var. lilacina is likely associated with anti-inflammatory activity, the precise underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we sought to elucidate the possible mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory activity. We have investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of the various solvent fractions (hexane, butanol, chloroform and water) from the ethanol extract of P. vulgaris var. lilacina in activated macrophages. The hexane fraction exhibited higher anti-inflammatory activities, inducing inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA expression in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Moreover, the hexane fraction from P. vulgaris var. lilacina significantly inhibited the activation of the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p50 and p65 subunits. These results indicate that P. vulgaris var. lilacina has an anti-inflammatory capacity in vitro, suggesting that it could be a potential source of natural anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:24177568

  15. Proteomic identification of secreted proteins of Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes is a human skin commensal that resides preferentially within sebaceous follicles; however, it also exhibits many traits of an opportunistic pathogen, playing roles in a variety of inflammatory diseases such as acne vulgaris. To date, the underlying disease-causing mechanisms remain ill-defined and knowledge of P. acnes virulence factors remains scarce. Here, we identified proteins secreted during anaerobic cultivation of a range of skin and clinical P. acnes isolates, spanning the four known phylogenetic groups. Results Culture supernatant proteins of P. acnes were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and all Coomassie-stained spots were subsequently identified by MALDI mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). A set of 20 proteins was secreted in the mid-exponential growth phase by the majority of strains tested. Functional annotation revealed that many of these common proteins possess degrading activities, including glycoside hydrolases with similarities to endoglycoceramidase, β-N-acetylglucosaminidase and muramidase; esterases such as lysophospholipase and triacylglycerol lipase; and several proteases. Other secreted factors included Christie-Atkins-Munch-Petersen (CAMP) factors, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and several hypothetical proteins, a few of which are unique to P. acnes. Strain-specific differences were apparent, mostly in the secretion of putative adhesins, whose genes exhibit variable phase variation-like sequence signatures. Conclusions Our proteomic investigations have revealed that the P. acnes secretome harbors several proteins likely to play a role in host-tissue degradation and inflammation. Despite a large overlap between the secretomes of all four P. acnes phylotypes, distinct differences between predicted host-tissue interacting proteins were identified, providing potential insight into the differential virulence properties of P. acnes isolates

  16. Efficacy and Tolerability of a Fixed Combination of Clindamycin Phosphate (1.2%) and Benzoyl Peroxide (3.75%) Aqueous Gel in Moderate or Severe Adolescent Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acne is commonplace in adolescents and can be difficult to manage. Providing an effective and well-tolerated treatment may lead to improved adherence, increased patient satisfaction, and improved clinical outcomes. Methods: A post hoc analysis of efficacy and cutaneous tolerability in 289 adolescents (age range, 12 to <18 years) with moderate-to-severe acne who had been enrolled in a multicenter study and were randomized to receive either clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel or vehicle once daily for 12 weeks. Results: Significantly superior reductions in lesion counts were observed in the clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel group compared to vehicle from Week 4, with mean percent reductions in inflammatory and noninflammatory lesions from baseline of 59.9 percent and 50.5 percent, respectively (both P<0.001 versus vehicle). One-third of patients treated with clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel achieved ≥2-grade improvement from baseline in their Evaluator’s Global Severity Score (compared to 8.5% with vehicle, P<0.001) and 35 percent of patients reported clear or almost clear skin at Week 12 (compared to 12.8% with vehicle, P<0.001). Cutaneous tolerability was excellent with all mean scores ≤0.2 at Week 12 (where 1=mild). Conclusions: Clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel is an effective, safe, well-tolerated treatment for adolescents with moderate-to-severe acne. PMID:26029332

  17. Acne Myths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Acne Myths KidsHealth > For Kids > Acne Myths Print A ... get your acne under control. Myth: Stress causes acne. Fact: Are you worried that the big test ...

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Clindamycin Phosphate 1.2% and Tretinoin 0.025% Gel for the Treatment of Acne and Acne-induced Post-inflammatory Hyperpigmentation in Patients with Skin of Color

    PubMed Central

    Young, Cherie M.; Kindred, Chesahna; Taylor, Susan C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of a topical gel containing clindamycin 1.2% and tretinoin 0.025% for the treatment of acne and acne-induced postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) in darker skinned patients. Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Setting: Two United States clinical sites. Participants: Thirty-three patients 12 years of age or older with skin types IV to VI, mild-to-moderate facial acne, and PIH were enrolled. Measurements: Patients applied clindamycin phosphate/tretinoin gel or a nonmedicated vehicle each evening and a sun protection factor 30 sunscreen daily. Changes in skin erythema and hyperpigmentation were measured using a chromameter and photographic images. Efficacy was assessed using the Evaluators Global Acne Severity Scale, lesion counts, Post-inflammatory Hyperpigmentation Severity Scales and Patient’s Global Assessment Scale. Safety and tolerability were assessed by adverse event reports and a Safety Assessment Scale. Results: The mean (SD) baseline inflammatory lesion count was 11.9 (11.1) in clindamycin/tretinoin-treated patients, decreasing by 5.5 (6.56) after 12 weeks while the mean baseline inflammatory lesion count was 13.6 (11.15) in placebo-treated patients, decreasing by 4.1 (11.36) (p=0.05 for change from baseline, clindamycin/tretinoin vs. placebo). Clindamycin/tretinoin-treated patients generally demonstrated superior efficacy versus placebo treatment. The clindamycin/tretinoin topical gel was well tolerated, causing little or no irritation, although one patient withdrew due to periorbital edema of moderate severity possibly related to clindamycin/tretinoin gel. Conclusion: Although limited by small sample size, the results of this pilot study suggest clindamycin phosphate 1.2% and tretinoin 0.025% topical gel is a safe and effective option for treating mild-to-moderate acne in patients with skin of color. PMID:22798973

  19. Carrier-Based Drug Delivery System for Treatment of Acne

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Amber; Kumar Sonker, Avinesh

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 95% of the population suffers at some point in their lifetime from acne vulgaris. Acne is a multifactorial disease of the pilosebaceous unit. This inflammatory skin disorder is most common in adolescents but also affects neonates, prepubescent children, and adults. Topical conventional systems are associated with various side effects. Novel drug delivery systems have been used to reduce the side effect of drugs commonly used in the topical treatment of acne. Topical treatment of acne with active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) makes direct contact with the target site before entering the systemic circulation which reduces the systemic side effect of the parenteral or oral administration of drug. The objective of the present review is to discuss the conventional delivery systems available for acne, their drawbacks, and limitations. The advantages, disadvantages, and outcome of using various carrier-based delivery systems like liposomes, niosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and so forth, are explained. This paper emphasizes approaches to overcome the drawbacks and limitations associated with the conventional system and the advances and application that are poised to further enhance the efficacy of topical acne formulations, offering the possibility of simplified dosing regimen that may improve treatment outcomes using novel delivery system. PMID:24688376

  20. In Vitro Anti-inflammatory and Antimicrobial Activities of Azithromycin After Loaded in Chitosan- and Tween 20-Based Oil-in-Water Macroemulsion for Acne Management.

    PubMed

    Shunmugaperumal, Tamilvanan; Kaur, Varinder

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of the current investigation are (1) to prepare and characterize (particle size, surface charge (potential zeta), surface morphology by transmission electron microscopy, drug content, and drug release) the azithromycin (AZM, 100 mg)-loaded oil-in-water (o/w) macroemulsion, (2) to assess the toxicity of macroemulsion with or without AZM using RBC lysis test in comparison with AZM in phosphate buffer solution of pH 7.4, (3) to compare the in vitro antimicrobial activity (in Escherichia coli using zone inhibition assay) of AZM-loaded macroemulsion with its aqueous solution, and (4) to assess the in vitro anti-inflammatory effect (using egg albumin denaturation bioassay) of the AZM-loaded macroemulsion in comparison with diclofenac sodium in phosphate buffer solution of pH 7.4. The AZM-loaded macroemulsion possessed the dispersed oil droplets with a mean diameter value of 52.40 ± 1.55 μm. A reversal in the zeta potential value from negative (-2.16 ± 0.75 mV) to positive (+6.52 ± 0.96 mV) was noticed when AZM was added into the macroemulsion. At a 1:5 dilution ratio, 2.06 ± 0.03 mg of drug was released from macroemulsion followed by 1.01 ± 0.01 and 0.25 ± 0.08 mg, respectively, for 1:10 and 1:40 dilution ratios. Antimicrobial activity maintenance and significant reduction of RBC lysis property were noticed for AZM after loaded in the macroemulsion. However, an increment in the absorbance values for emulsion-treated samples in comparison to the control samples was noticed in the anti-inflammatory test. This speculates the potential of the AZM-loaded emulsion to manage inflammatory conditions produced at Acne vulgaris. PMID:26314246

  1. Moisturizers for Acne

    PubMed Central

    Chularojanamontri, Leena; Tuchinda, Papapit; Kulthanan, Kanokvalai

    2014-01-01

    Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit that affects almost all teenagers. Different treatments offer different modes of action, but aim to target acne pathology. Topical therapies, such as benzoyl peroxide, retinoids, antibiotics with alcohol-based preparations, and salicylic acid, can cause skin irritation resulting in a lack of patient adherence. Some physicians recommend patients use moisturizers as adjunctive treatment of acne, especially when either topical benzoyl peroxide or a retinoid is prescribed. Furthermore, some evidence shows that moisturizers can contribute independently to improve signs and symptoms of acne. Moisturizers contain three main properties, which are occlusive, humectant, and emollient effects. Currently, many moisturizers claim to be suitable for acne treatment. This article aims to provide a review of the active ingredients and properties of those moisturizers. Fifty-two moisturizers for acne were included for analysis. Most of the products (92%) have anti-inflammatory properties apart from occlusive, humectant, and emollient effects. Anti-acne medications, including salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, and retinol, were found respectively in 35, 10, and 8 percent of the moisturizer products containing anti-inflammatory properties. More than half of the products contain dimethicone and/or glycerin for its moisturizer property. Aloe vera and witch hazel are botanical anti-inflammatories that were commonly found in this study. Scientific data regarding some ingredients are discussed to provide a guide for physicians in selecting moisturizers for acne patients. PMID:24847408

  2. Resistin gene polymorphisms are associated with acne and serum lipid levels, providing a potential nexus between lipid metabolism and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Younis, Sidra; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Javed, Qamar

    2016-05-01

    Acne vu lgaris is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease causing social stigma and psychological effect on patients. We hypothesized that the genes that can affect both lipid metabolism and inflammation may be central for acne formation and present targets for treatment. Pro-inflammatory adipokine resistin, one such likely target, activates NFkB and JNK pathways inducing TLR-2, IL-1, IL-6, and TNFα genes. The polymorphisms in promoter and intron region of the resistin gene affect its expression levels. Therefore, we explored the association of resistin polymorphisms (RETN +299G > A and -420C > G) with pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. We used PCR-RFLP method to genotype at the two single nucleotide polymorphisms at RETN promoter in 530 acne patients vs. 550 age- and sex-matched control subjects. We also measured serum lipid levels in acne patients and associated these with RETN genotypes. We found that the RETN gene polymorphisms are strongly associated with acne vulgaris and the severity of acne symptoms. In females the variant allele frequencies of both SNPs are statistically higher in patients than in controls; in males frequency distribution does not reach significance. The haplotype containing both variant alleles is significantly more common in patients than in controls. We find no association of RETN SNPs with the acne types. Importantly, we found that the levels of HDL-C were significantly decreased in variant genotype of RETN. Our results show that the RETN polymorphisms expected to boost resistin expression increase the risk of developing acne. We suggest that resistin may provide an attractive target for treatment. PMID:26858108

  3. Important controversies associated with isotretinoin therapy for acne.

    PubMed

    Wolverton, Stephen E; Harper, Julie C

    2013-04-01

    Isotretinoin is a remarkably effective drug for severe, recalcitrant acne vulgaris. Soon after the drug's release in the early 1980s, a number of important adverse effects were reported subsequently leading to a variety of medical and medicolegal controversies. Three of these controversies will be highlighted concerning the putative role of isotretinoin in (1) depression and suicide, (2) inflammatory bowel disease, and (3) iPledge and pregnancy prevention programs. It appears that a very small subset of patients receiving isotretinoin for acne are at risk for depression, which is very manageable provided there is adequate patient awareness of the possibility, maximum communication between the patient and physician, and cessation of therapy if clinically important depression occurs (after which the depression rapidly resolves in a week or less). Multiple controlled studies actually suggest a very favorable effect of isotretinoin on depression and anxiety common in the population requiring isotretinoin. With regard to inflammatory bowel disease, in just one study, only ulcerative colitis association with isotretinoin reached statistical significance. The actual incidence of this association is strikingly low. Finally, it is clear that even the most recent pregnancy prevention program (iPledge) is no more successful than prior programs; there will likely always be a small number of female patients becoming pregnant while receiving isotretinoin for acne vulgaris. PMID:23559397

  4. New and emerging treatments in dermatology: acne.

    PubMed

    Katsambas, A; Dessinioti, C

    2008-01-01

    Topical retinoids, benzoyl peroxide, azelaic acid, and topical and oral antibiotics remain the milestone of treatment for mild to moderate acne vulgaris. Oral isotretinoin is useful for the treatment of severe nodular acne, treatment-resistant acne, and acne with a risk of physical or psychological scarring. Hormonal treatment in female acne is useful in resistant or late-onset acne. With increasing concerns regarding teratogenicity of isotretinoin and increasing antibiotic resistance, there is a clear need for therapeutic alternatives to these long-used treatments. Research in the pathogenesis of acne has allowed for new therapies and future perspectives regarding acne to evolve. They include low-dose long-term isotretinoin regimens, insulin-sensitizing agents, 5alpha-reductase type 1 inhibitors, topical photodynamic therapy, new combination formulations, dietary interventions, and antiinflammatory agents such as lipoxygenase inhibitors. PMID:18394082

  5. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) Analysis of Propionibacterium acnes Isolates From Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tim N.; Yu, Shu-Han; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Brüggemann, Holger; Sfanos, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Inflammation is commonly observed in radical prostatectomy specimens, and evidence suggests that inflammation may contribute to prostate carcinogenesis. Multiple microorganisms have been implicated in serving as a stimulus for prostatic inflammation. The pro-inflammatory anaerobe, Propionibacterium acnes, is ubiquitously found on human skin and is associated with the skin disease acne vulgaris. Recent studies have shown that P. acnes can be detected in prostatectomy specimens by bacterial culture or by culture-independent molecular techniques. METHODS Radical prostatectomy tissue samples were obtained from 30 prostate cancer patients and subject to both aerobic and anaerobic culture. Cultured species were identified by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Propionibacterium acnes isolates were typed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). RESULTS Our study confirmed that P. acnes can be readily cultured from prostatectomy tissues (7 of 30 cases, 23%). In some cases, multiple isolates of P. acnes were cultured as well as other Propionibacterium species, such as P. granulosum and P. avidum. Overall, 9 of 30 cases (30%) were positive for Propionibacterium spp. MLST analyses identified eight different sequence types (STs) among prostate-derived P. acnes isolates. These STs belong to two clonal complexes, namely CC36 (type I-2) and CC53/60 (type II), or are CC53/60-related singletons. CONCLUSIONS MLST typing results indicated that prostate-derived P. acnes isolates do not fall within the typical skin/acne STs, but rather are characteristic of STs associated with opportunistic infections and/or urethral flora. The MLST typing results argue against the likelihood that prostatectomy-derived P. acnes isolates represent contamination from skin flora. PMID:23184509

  6. Etanercept-induced cystic acne.

    PubMed

    Kashat, Maria; Caretti, Katherine; Kado, Jessica

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α antagonists are potent biologics used to treat a variety of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn disease, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis. These medications are known to have many side effects (eg, infusion reactions, cytopenia, risk for infection, heart failure); however, only a few cases of acne vulgaris have been associated with the use of these biologics, particularly infliximab and adalimumab. We report a rare case of etanercept-induced cystic acne. PMID:25101341

  7. Meeting the Challenges of Acne Treatment in Asian Patients: A Review of the Role of Dermocosmetics as Adjunctive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Chee Leok; Noppakun, Nopadon; Micali, Giuseppe; Azizan, Noor Zalmy; Boonchai, Waranya; Chan, Yung; Cheong, Wai Kwong; Chiu, Pin Chi; Etnawati, Kristiana; Gulmatico-Flores, Zharlah; Foong, Henry; Kubba, Raj; Paz-Lao, Purita; Lee, Yin Yin; Loo, Steven; Modi, Farida; Nguyen, Trong Hao; Pham, Thi Lan; Shih, Yi Hsien; Sitohang, Irma Bernadette; Wong, Su Ni

    2016-01-01

    Conventional acne treatment presents several challenges such as intolerable side effects and antibiotic resistance. Dermocosmetic products may be used to reduce these unwanted effects. Dermocosmetics include skin cleansers, topical sebum-controllers, skin antimicrobial/anti-inflammatory agents, moisturizers, sunscreens, and camouflage products. Appropriate use of these products may help augment the benefit of acne treatment, minimize side effects, and reduce the need for topical antibiotics. In Asia, there is currently limited scientific data on the application and recommendations for dermocosmetic use in acne vulgaris (AV). This article reviews the evidence on dermocosmetics for AV and provides practice recommendations as discussed during the 4(th) Asia-Pacific Acne Leaders' Summit held in Bangkok, Thailand, on 7 and 8 February 2015. Through a premeeting survey, a series of plenary lectures, a stepwise program of discussion sessions, and Medline article review, the Expert Panel set forth relevant recommendations on the role of dermocosmetics as adjunct for treating AV in Asian patients. PMID:27398008

  8. Meeting the Challenges of Acne Treatment in Asian Patients: A Review of the Role of Dermocosmetics as Adjunctive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Chee Leok; Noppakun, Nopadon; Micali, Giuseppe; Azizan, Noor Zalmy; Boonchai, Waranya; Chan, Yung; Cheong, Wai Kwong; Chiu, Pin Chi; Etnawati, Kristiana; Gulmatico-Flores, Zharlah; Foong, Henry; Kubba, Raj; Paz-Lao, Purita; Lee, Yin Yin; Loo, Steven; Modi, Farida; Nguyen, Trong Hao; Pham, Thi Lan; Shih, Yi Hsien; Sitohang, Irma Bernadette; Wong, Su Ni

    2016-01-01

    Conventional acne treatment presents several challenges such as intolerable side effects and antibiotic resistance. Dermocosmetic products may be used to reduce these unwanted effects. Dermocosmetics include skin cleansers, topical sebum-controllers, skin antimicrobial/anti-inflammatory agents, moisturizers, sunscreens, and camouflage products. Appropriate use of these products may help augment the benefit of acne treatment, minimize side effects, and reduce the need for topical antibiotics. In Asia, there is currently limited scientific data on the application and recommendations for dermocosmetic use in acne vulgaris (AV). This article reviews the evidence on dermocosmetics for AV and provides practice recommendations as discussed during the 4th Asia-Pacific Acne Leaders' Summit held in Bangkok, Thailand, on 7 and 8 February 2015. Through a premeeting survey, a series of plenary lectures, a stepwise program of discussion sessions, and Medline article review, the Expert Panel set forth relevant recommendations on the role of dermocosmetics as adjunct for treating AV in Asian patients. PMID:27398008

  9. Comparison of chloroxylenol 0.5% plus salicylic acid 2% cream and benzoyl peroxide 5% gel in the treatment of acne vulgaris: a randomized double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Boutli, F; Zioga, M; Koussidou, T; Ioannides, D; Mourellou, O

    2003-01-01

    A 12-week double-blind randomized study was performed to compare benzoyl peroxide 5% (BP) gel and chloroxylenol 0.5% plus salicylic acid 2% (PCMX + SA) cream (Nisal cream) for efficacy and adverse reactions. Thirty-seven volunteers participated in the study, 19 in the BP group and 18 in the PCMX + SA group. The patients applied the medication twice daily to the entire face. Clinical evaluation and lesion counts were obtained at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks. At week 12 both groups showed a marked improvement in both inflammatory and noninflammatory lesions (60% and 54% for the BP group and 62% and 56% for and 56% for the PCMX + SA group, respectively). Although PCMX + SA showed a slightly stronger keratolytic effect throughout the study period, there was no statistically significant difference in the reduction of the papulopustules or comedones between the two groups. Adverse effects such as erythema and photosensitivity were significantly fewer in the PCMX + SA group at week 12 (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.05, respectively). These results suggest that PCMX + SA cream is as effective as BP gel in the treatment of papulopustular and comedonal acne and that it is better tolerated. PMID:14708455

  10. Postadolescent acne in females.

    PubMed

    Holzmann, R; Shakery, K

    2014-01-01

    Acne in the adult female often presents as a chronic condition that can have a considerable negative psychological, social and emotional impact on the affected individual. Estimated prevalence rates of adult female acne vary widely according to study type. Case reports and clinical examinations estimate the prevalence of clinical acne at 10-12%, while survey estimates of physiological disease states are as high as 54%. Two subtypes of adult female acne may be defined according to time of onset: 'persistent' and 'late-onset', accounting for approximately 80 and 20% of cases, respectively. Postadolescent acne is generally mild-to-moderate in severity and presents with more inflammatory lesions and fewer comedones compared to adolescent acne. Furthermore, the impact of acne on the quality of life is often greater in adult females than in younger individuals. Despite these important differences, the key principles of acne treatment in the adult female do not differ significantly from those of other age groups. However, specific characteristics relating to the adult female should be considered when selecting a treatment regimen. PMID:24280643

  11. Linking diet to acne metabolomics, inflammation, and comedogenesis: an update.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, an epidemic inflammatory skin disease of adolescence, is closely related to Western diet. Three major food classes that promote acne are: 1) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, 2) milk and dairy products, 3) saturated fats including trans-fats and deficient ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Diet-induced insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1)-signaling is superimposed on elevated IGF-1 levels during puberty, thereby unmasking the impact of aberrant nutrigenomics on sebaceous gland homeostasis. Western diet provides abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), glutamine, and palmitic acid. Insulin and IGF-1 suppress the activity of the metabolic transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1). Insulin, IGF-1, BCAAs, glutamine, and palmitate activate the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), the key regulator of anabolism and lipogenesis. FoxO1 is a negative coregulator of androgen receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), liver X receptor-α, and sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), crucial transcription factors of sebaceous lipogenesis. mTORC1 stimulates the expression of PPARγ and SREBP-1c, promoting sebum production. SREBP-1c upregulates stearoyl-CoA- and Δ6-desaturase, enhancing the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids in sebum triglycerides. Diet-mediated aberrations in sebum quantity (hyperseborrhea) and composition (dysseborrhea) promote Propionibacterium acnes overgrowth and biofilm formation with overexpression of the virulence factor triglyceride lipase increasing follicular levels of free palmitate and oleate. Free palmitate functions as a "danger signal," stimulating toll-like receptor-2-mediated inflammasome activation with interleukin-1β release, Th17 differentiation, and interleukin-17-mediated keratinocyte proliferation. Oleate stimulates P. acnes adhesion, keratinocyte proliferation, and comedogenesis via interleukin-1α release. Thus, diet

  12. Linking diet to acne metabolomics, inflammation, and comedogenesis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, an epidemic inflammatory skin disease of adolescence, is closely related to Western diet. Three major food classes that promote acne are: 1) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, 2) milk and dairy products, 3) saturated fats including trans-fats and deficient ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Diet-induced insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1)-signaling is superimposed on elevated IGF-1 levels during puberty, thereby unmasking the impact of aberrant nutrigenomics on sebaceous gland homeostasis. Western diet provides abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), glutamine, and palmitic acid. Insulin and IGF-1 suppress the activity of the metabolic transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1). Insulin, IGF-1, BCAAs, glutamine, and palmitate activate the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), the key regulator of anabolism and lipogenesis. FoxO1 is a negative coregulator of androgen receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), liver X receptor-α, and sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), crucial transcription factors of sebaceous lipogenesis. mTORC1 stimulates the expression of PPARγ and SREBP-1c, promoting sebum production. SREBP-1c upregulates stearoyl-CoA- and Δ6-desaturase, enhancing the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids in sebum triglycerides. Diet-mediated aberrations in sebum quantity (hyperseborrhea) and composition (dysseborrhea) promote Propionibacterium acnes overgrowth and biofilm formation with overexpression of the virulence factor triglyceride lipase increasing follicular levels of free palmitate and oleate. Free palmitate functions as a “danger signal,” stimulating toll-like receptor-2-mediated inflammasome activation with interleukin-1β release, Th17 differentiation, and interleukin-17-mediated keratinocyte proliferation. Oleate stimulates P. acnes adhesion, keratinocyte proliferation, and comedogenesis via interleukin-1α release. Thus, diet

  13. Inflammatory Acne in the Asian Skin Type III Treated with a Square Pulse, Time Resolved Spectral Distribution IPL System: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims: Acne remains a severe problem for both patients and clinicians. Various approaches using photosurgery and phototherapy have been reported with varying degrees of success and robustness of results. An improved intense pulsed light (IPL) system has become available with interesting beam characteristic which might improve IPL treatment of inflammatory acne in the Asian skin, Fitzpatrick type III/IV. Subjects and Methods: The 18 study subjects comprised 15 females and 3 males with active mild to moderately severe inflammatory acne (mean age 25.3 ± 7.70 yr, range 17–47 yr, Burton scale 1-4, all Fitzpatrick type III Asian skin). They were treated once (8 subjects) or twice (10 subjects) with an IPL system offering both square pulse and time resolved spectral distribution technologies (420 nm cut-off filter, 30 ms pulse, 8 – 12 J/cm2, 2–3 passes). Clinical photography was taken at baseline and at 4 weeks after the final treatment. Percentage of acne clearance was assessed by an independent dermatological panel and graded from zero to 5, 5 being total clearance. Results: All subjects completed the study. Post-treatment side effects were mild and transient, with virtually no downtime or postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) experienced by any subject. All subjects had some improvement and no exacerbation was seen in any subject. Clearance was evaluated by the panel as grade 4 in 5 subjects, grade 3 in 8, grade 2 in 4 and grade 1 in 1, so that 14 of 18 subjects (78%) had clearance of at least 60%. Patient evaluation was in general slightly better than that of the panel. Conclusions: The special beam characteristics of the IPL system used in the present preliminary study achieved good to very good results in the treatment of acne in the Fitzpatrick type III Asian skin without PIH induction. The results suggested that acne treatment in the Asian skin using this system is both safe and effective, and merits larger population studies to further

  14. Properties of herbal extracts against Propionibacterium acnes for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Youn-Mook; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Yong Soo; Shin, Young Min; Jeong, Sung In; Jo, Sun-Young; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Park, Jong-seok; Nho, Young-Chang; Kim, Jong-Cheol; Kim, Seong-Jang; Shin, HeungSoo

    2012-10-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), one of the anaerobic bacterium, causes inflammatory acne. To find a novel medication for treating the inflammation caused by P. acnes, we investigated the anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of several herbal extracts against P. acnes. The aqueous extracts from five dried herbs, Phellodendron amurense Rupr., Paeonia lactiflora Pallas., Houttuynia cordata Thunb., Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., were prepared and mixed. In this experiment, 1 mg/ml of the herbal extract mixture caused a decrease in the growth of P. acnes and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6, in human monocytic THP-1 cells treated with heat-killed P. acnes. Therefore, this herbal extract mixture may possess both anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities against P. acnes and can be a novel therapeutic agent for treating inflammatory acne.

  15. Pediatric Acne: Clinical Patterns and Pearls.

    PubMed

    Maroñas-Jiménez, Lidia; Krakowski, Andrew C

    2016-04-01

    Acne vulgaris presenting from birth to preadolescence can be confusing to diagnose and even more challenging to evaluate and manage. The differential diagnosis of acne varies by age and, in some cases (especially when it presents in midchildhood), deserves a thorough evaluation to rule out underlying systemic abnormalities. Acne management strategies, including factors affecting adherence to the treatment regimen, may be influenced by the patient's age. This article presents an overview of the clinical presentations of acne by age and our approach to evaluation and management of this common condition. PMID:27015779

  16. In-vivo fluorescence detection and imaging of porphyrin-producing bacteria in the human skin and in the oral cavity for diagnosis of acne vulgaris, caries, and squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Hemmer, Joerg; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1994-05-01

    Certain bacteria are able to synthesize metal-free fluorescent porphyrins and can therefore be detected by sensitive autofluorescence measurements in the red spectral region. The porphyrin-producing bacterium Propionibacterium acnes, which is involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris, was localized in human skin. Spectrally resolved fluorescence images of bacteria distribution in the face were obtained by a slow-scan CCD camera combined with a tunable liquid crystal filter. The structured autofluorescence of dental caries and dental plaque in the red is caused by oral bacteria, like Bacteroides or Actinomyces odontolyticus. `Caries images' were created by time-gated imaging in the ns-region after ultrashort laser excitation. Time-gated measurements allow the suppression of backscattered light and non-porphyrin autofluorescence. Biopsies of oral squamous cell carcinoma exhibited red autofluorescence in necrotic regions and high concentrations of the porphyrin-producing bacterium Pseudomonas aerigunosa. These studies suggest that the temporal and spectral characteristics of bacterial autofluorescence can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases.

  17. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. PMID:26491364

  18. A multicenter, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 2 treatments in participants with mild to moderate acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana; Shalita, Alan R; Thiboutot, Diane; Oresajo, Christian; Yatskayer, Margarita; Raab, Susanna

    2012-06-01

    Acne treatment regimens have changed due to the recent over-the-counter (OTC) switch of all prescription benzoyl peroxide (BPO) topical preparations. The elimination of prescription single-agent BPO products means that dermatologists must select from a variety of OTC formulations to utilize the time-tested efficacy of BPO in the treatment of mild to moderate acne. Our research compared the efficacy and safety of an OTC BPO 5.5% formulation with lipohydroxy acid and tretinoin cream 0.025% with prescription clindamycin 1%-BPO 5% gel and tretinoin cream 0.025%. Parity was demonstrated between the 2 treatment regimens at 12 weeks. PMID:22838094

  19. A Review of Acne in Ethnic Skin

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Erica C.

    2010-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the most common conditions for which all patients, including those with skin of color (Fitzpatrick skin types IV–VI), seek dermatological care. The multifactorial pathogenesis of acne appears to be the same in ethnic patients as in Caucasians. However, there is controversy over whether certain skin biology characteristics, such as sebum production, differ in ethnic patients. Clinically, acne lesions can appear the same as those seen in Caucasians; however, histologically, all types of acne lesions in African Americans can be associated with intense inflammation including comedones, which can also have some degree of inflammation. It is the sequelae of the disease that are the distinguishing characteristics of acne in skin of color, namely postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and keloidal or hypertrophic scarring. Although the medical and surgical treatment options are the same, it is these features that should be kept in mind when designing a treatment regimen for acne in skin of color. PMID:20725545

  20. Acne Treatment Based on Selective Photothermolysis of Sebaceous Follicles with Topically Delivered Light-Absorbing Gold Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Paithankar, Dilip Y; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Farinelli, William A; Kositratna, Garuna; Blomgren, Richard D; Meyer, Todd J; Faupel, Linda J; Kauvar, Arielle N B; Lloyd, Jenifer R; Cheung, Wang L; Owczarek, Witold D; Suwalska, Anna M; Kochanska, Katarzyna B; Nawrocka, Agnieszka K; Paluchowska, Elwira B; Podolec, Katarzyna M; Pirowska, Magdalena M; Wojas-Pelc, Anna B; Anderson, R Rox

    2015-07-01

    The pathophysiology of acne vulgaris depends on active sebaceous glands, implying that selective destruction of sebaceous glands could be an effective treatment. We hypothesized that light-absorbing microparticles could be delivered into sebaceous glands, enabling local injury by optical pulses. A suspension of topically applied gold-coated silica microparticles exhibiting plasmon resonance with strong absorption at 800 nm was delivered into human pre-auricular and swine sebaceous glands in vivo, using mechanical vibration. After exposure to 10-50 J cm(-2), 30 milliseconds, 800 nm diode laser pulses, microscopy revealed preferential thermal injury to sebaceous follicles and glands, consistent with predictions from a computational model. Inflammation was mild; gold particles were not retained in swine skin 1 month after treatment, and uptake in other organs was negligible. Two independent prospective randomized controlled clinical trials were performed for treatment of moderate-to-severe facial acne, using unblinded and blinded assessments of disease severity. Each trial showed clinically and statistically significant improvement of inflammatory acne following three treatments given 1-2 weeks apart. In Trial 2, inflammatory lesions were significantly reduced at 12 weeks (P=0.015) and 16 weeks (P=0.04) compared with sham treatments. Optical microparticles enable selective photothermolysis of sebaceous glands. This appears to be a well-tolerated, effective treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:25748556

  1. Acne Treatment Based on Selective Photothermolysis of Sebaceous Follicles with Topically Delivered Light-Absorbing Gold Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Paithankar, Dilip Y; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Farinelli, William A; Kositratna, Garuna; Blomgren, Richard D; Meyer, Todd J; Faupel, Linda J; Kauvar, Arielle N B; Lloyd, Jenifer R; Cheung, Wang L; Owczarek, Witold D; Suwalska, Anna M; Kochanska, Katarzyna B; Nawrocka, Agnieszka K; Paluchowska, Elwira B; Podolec, Katarzyna M; Pirowska, Magdalena M; Wojas-Pelc, Anna B; Anderson, R Rox

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of acne vulgaris depends on active sebaceous glands, implying that selective destruction of sebaceous glands could be an effective treatment. We hypothesized that light-absorbing microparticles could be delivered into sebaceous glands, enabling local injury by optical pulses. A suspension of topically applied gold-coated silica microparticles exhibiting plasmon resonance with strong absorption at 800 nm was delivered into human pre-auricular and swine sebaceous glands in vivo, using mechanical vibration. After exposure to 10–50 J cm−2, 30 milliseconds, 800 nm diode laser pulses, microscopy revealed preferential thermal injury to sebaceous follicles and glands, consistent with predictions from a computational model. Inflammation was mild; gold particles were not retained in swine skin 1 month after treatment, and uptake in other organs was negligible. Two independent prospective randomized controlled clinical trials were performed for treatment of moderate-to-severe facial acne, using unblinded and blinded assessments of disease severity. Each trial showed clinically and statistically significant improvement of inflammatory acne following three treatments given 1–2 weeks apart. In Trial 2, inflammatory lesions were significantly reduced at 12 weeks (P=0.015) and 16 weeks (P=0.04) compared with sham treatments. Optical microparticles enable selective photothermolysis of sebaceous glands. This appears to be a well-tolerated, effective treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:25748556

  2. Treatment Modalities for Acne.

    PubMed

    Fox, Lizelle; Csongradi, Candice; Aucamp, Marique; du Plessis, Jeanetta; Gerber, Minja

    2016-01-01

    Acne is a common inflammatory skin disease which affects the pilosebaceous units of the skin. It can have severe psychological effects and can leave the patient with severe skin scarring. There are four well-recognized pathological factors responsible for acne which is also the target for acne therapy. In this review, different treatment options are discussed, including topical (i.e., retinoids, and antibiotics) and systemic (i.e., retinoids, antibiotics, and hormonal) treatments. Since the general public has been showing an increasing interest in more natural and generally safer treatment options, the use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) for treating acne was also discussed. The use of physical therapies such as comedone extraction, cryoslush therapy, cryotherapy, electrocauterization, intralesional corticosteroids and optical treatments are also mentioned. Acne has been extensively researched with regards to the disease mechanism as well as treatment options. However, due to the increasing resistance of Propionibacterium acnes towards the available antibiotics, there is a need for new treatment methods. Additionally, the lack of necessary evidence on the efficacy of CAM therapies makes it necessary for researchers to investigate these treatment options further. PMID:27529209

  3. Responsiveness of the Dermatology-specific Quality of Life (DSQL) instrument to treatment for acne vulgaris in a placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R; Rajagopalan, R

    1998-12-01

    The Dermatology-specific Quality of Life (DSQL) instrument is a new tool which has been developed to address the effects of skin disease and its treatment on physical and social functioning and self-perceptions. Previous reports have demonstrated its cross-sectional validity. The current study examines the DSQL's responsiveness to 12 weeks of acne treatment in a placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. The DSQL change scores were moderately correlated (r = 0.18 to 0.37) with treatment efficacy parameters including: dermatologist's rating of improvement of acne and a skin irritation score, and highly correlated with patient's global rating of acne severity. Within treatment groups, the DSQL discriminated clinically meaningful changes associated with small and moderate effect sizes. The DSQL total score showed statistically significant differences on nearly all comparisons with placebo. The DSQL dimension scores were sensitive to the most effective therapy compared to placebo. Responsiveness benchmarks are provided for small and moderatesized treatment effects. As a comprehensive instrument, the DSQL is a practical and psychometrically sound tool for use in clinical trials in dermatology. PMID:10097621

  4. Current approach to acne management: a community-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Baldwin, Hilary; Keri, Jonette; Mancini, Anthony; Gold, Linda Stein; Webster, Guy F

    2009-06-01

    During fall 2008, 10 roundtable discussions involving 70 practicing dermatologists and a physician assistant were conducted across the United States to address patient considerations and treatment strategies for acne vulgaris. A case study format was used to initiate discussion. This supplement is based on the issues raised during the roundtable discussions and at a final working session among the authors where suggestions, trends, and the consensus from each of the 10 roundtable discussions were reviewed regarding published, evidence-based recommendations for treating acne vulgaris. Effective treatment of acne vulgaris can prevent adverse emotional sequelae and physical scarring. We hope that the information presented herein will help guide our colleagues in improving the care of patients with acne vulgaris. PMID:19760893

  5. Safety Considerations and Monitoring in Patients Treated with Systemic Medications for Acne.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunhee; Skopit, Stanley

    2016-04-01

    Acne vulgaris, a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit, is one of the most commonly encountered conditions in dermatology practice. Effective treatment of acne vulgaris is important in that it can prevent psychosocial distress and physical scarring. Systemic therapeutic options are available for moderate to severe acne. It is imperative that the safe and effective treatment revolves around the health care provider's familiarity of side effects of various treatments. In this article, the side effects and monitoring guide for the most commonly prescribed systemic agents for acne vulgaris are reviewed. PMID:27015778

  6. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14–17 years in females and 16–19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  7. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14-17 years in females and 16-19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  8. When do efficacy outcomes in clinical trials correlate with clinical relevance? analysis of clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel in moderate to severe acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2016-07-01

    Acne vulgaris (AV) is a common skin disease that is challenging to successfully treat due to its complex underlying pathophysiology and chronicity. Unrealistic expectations based on the desire for rapid and complete clearance or local tolerability reactions related to topical medications often lead to incomplete adherence with therapy, premature treatment cessation, and poor therapeutic outcomes. Despite stressing to patients the importance of compliance and the lag time of several weeks before visible improvement may be noted with treatments for AV, data on evaluation of the time taken to achieve a clinically meaningful improvement of AV that may be perceived by clinicians and patients are limited. Clindamycin phosphate 1.2%-benzoyl peroxide 3.75% (clindamycin-BP 3.75%) gel has been shown in pivotal trials to be effective and well tolerated in patients with moderate to severe AV. This article reviews a new concept referred to as time to onset of action (TOA), which is described in detail and illustrated using the pivotal trial data with clindamycin-BP 3.75% gel for treatment of AV. PMID:27529706

  9. Acne in the adult female patient: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Kamangar, Faranak; Shinkai, Kanade

    2012-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common reason why adult women present to dermatologists and can be a clinical challenge to treat. It may also be an important sign of an underlying endocrine disease such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Although standard acne therapies can be successfully used to treat acne in adult female patients, hormonal treatment is a safe and effective therapeutic option that may provide an opportunity to better target acne in this population, even when other systemic therapies have failed. In this article, a practical approach to the adult female patient with acne will be reviewed to enhance the dermatologist's ability to use hormonal acne therapies and to better identify and evaluate patients with acne in the setting of a possible endocrine disorder. PMID:22994662

  10. Cutaneous Safety and Tolerability of a Fixed Combination Clindamycin (1.2%) and Benzoyl Peroxide (3.75%) Aqueous Gel in Moderate-to-severe Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cutaneous safety and tolerability of clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel in moderate-to-severe acne patients. Methods: A safety assessment of 498 patients with moderate-to-severe acne receiving clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel or vehicle for 12 weeks. Results: The vast majority (80-95%) of patients reported no cutaneous safety or tolerability problems throughout the study. Mean scores for both active and vehicle were all <1 (where l=mild) and reduced over the duration of the study. When scaling, erythema, itching, burning, or stinging was reported it was generally mild. Moderate or severe reactions to clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel were rare and generally seen early in treatment. There were eight reports (3.3%) of moderate erythema, four reports (1.7%) of moderate scaling, three reports (1.2%) of moderate itching, and one report of moderate burning (0.4%) at Week 4. There was one report (0.4%) of severe erythema and one report (0.4%) of severe burning (both at Week 4), with one report (0.4%) of severe stinging at Week 12. There were no substantive differences seen in cutaneous tolerability among treatment groups and younger patients tended to have milder reactions. Limitations: It is not possible to determine the contributions of the individual active ingredients. Conclusion: Clindamycin phosphate 1.2%/benzoyl peroxide 3.75% gel has a favorable safety and tolerability profile with very low incidence of moderate or severe reactions. PMID:26345297

  11. Acne Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... scars. Cryosurgery : This treatment freezes the scar tissue. Freezing the tissue causes it to die and gradually ... et al . “Which Type of Atrophic Acne Scar (Ice-pick, Boxcar, or Rolling) Responds to Nonablative Fractional ...

  12. Acne: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... the-counter medicines for acne. These medicines kill bacteria, dry up skin oil, and make your skin ... Antibiotics such as minocycline, doxycycline, and tetracycline reduce bacteria and inflammation, and can be used in combination ...

  13. [Back pain and acne conglobata: SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kühn, F; Fehr, S; Stoll, T

    2007-04-11

    We report on a young woman suffering from SAPHO syndrome with back pain and arthritis of the sternoclavicular joints. This inflammatory disorder of the osteoarticular system (synovitis, osteitis, and hyperostosis) is associated with severe acne or palmoplantar pustulosis. The patient was treated with pamidronate, NSAID and physiotherapy which improved the musculoskeletal symptoms completely. The acne was treated with isotretinoin. PMID:17506389

  14. Moisturizers for Acne: What are their Constituents?

    PubMed

    Chularojanamontri, Leena; Tuchinda, Papapit; Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Pongparit, Kamolwan

    2014-05-01

    Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit that affects almost all teenagers. Different treatments offer different modes of action, but aim to target acne pathology. Topical therapies, such as benzoyl peroxide, retinoids, antibiotics with alcohol-based preparations, and salicylic acid, can cause skin irritation resulting in a lack of patient adherence. Some physicians recommend patients use moisturizers as adjunctive treatment of acne, especially when either topical benzoyl peroxide or a retinoid is prescribed. Furthermore, some evidence shows that moisturizers can contribute independently to improve signs and symptoms of acne. Moisturizers contain three main properties, which are occlusive, humectant, and emollient effects. Currently, many moisturizers claim to be suitable for acne treatment. This article aims to provide a review of the active ingredients and properties of those moisturizers. Fifty-two moisturizers for acne were included for analysis. Most of the products (92%) have anti-inflammatory properties apart from occlusive, humectant, and emollient effects. Anti-acne medications, including salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, and retinol, were found respectively in 35, 10, and 8 percent of the moisturizer products containing anti-inflammatory properties. More than half of the products contain dimethicone and/or glycerin for its moisturizer property. Aloe vera and witch hazel are botanical anti-inflammatories that were commonly found in this study. Scientific data regarding some ingredients are discussed to provide a guide for physicians in selecting moisturizers for acne patients. PMID:24847408

  15. A brief primer on acne therapy for adolescents with skin of color.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    2013-07-01

    The majority of adolescents with skin of color in the United States and other westernized civilizations develop acne vulgaris. Indigenous populations of children and teenagers with skin of color may not develop acne when raised on a paleolithic diet, suggesting the Western diet is the rudiment of acne vulgaris. Differences exist in the presentation of and therapy for acne in teenagers with skin of color, largely due to the increased risk for hyperpigmentation, scarring, and keloid formation, as well as style- and skin care-related exacerbating factors. The primary goal of acne therapy in adolescents with skin of color is the prevention of long-term sequelae such as keloid formation. This article provides a brief overview of the treatment of acne vulgaris in adolescents with skin of color. PMID:23961520

  16. Repair of acne scars with Dermicol-P35.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin C

    2009-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a prevalent skin condition that can cause disfiguring residual scarring. While the complete removal of acne scars is unlikely, several treatments exist that can improve the appearance of acne scars. Dermal fillers offer a simple, nonsurgical corrective procedure that can provide improved skin texture. Dermicol-P35 (Evolence [Ortho Dermatologics, Skillman, NJ]) is a new, highly purified, ribose cross-linked, porcine collagen-based dermal filler that has demonstrated low immunogenicity and results that persist for at least 12 months. This article presents the aesthetic results of a male patient treated with Dermicol-P35 for severe facial acne scars. PMID:19577176

  17. A meta-analysis of association between acne ulgaris and Demodex infestation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ya-e; Hu, Li; Wu, Li-ping; Ma, Jun-xian

    2012-01-01

    Until now, etiology of acne vulgaris is still uncertain. Although clinicians usually deny the association between Demodex infestation and acne vulgaris, it has been proved in some clinical practices. To confirm the association between Demodex infestation and acne vulgaris, a meta-analysis was conducted. Predefined selection criteria were applied to search all published papers that analyzed the association between Demodex infestation and acne vulgaris (January 1950 to August 2011) in ISI Web of Knowledge, MEDLINE, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on fixed effects models or random effects models. We enrolled the 60 Chinese and 3 English papers in this meta-analysis, which covered Turkey and 25 different provinces/municipalities in China and 42 130 participants including students and residents, aged from 1 to 78 years. The pooled OR in random effects models is 2.80 (95% CI, 2.34–3.36). Stability is robust according to sensitivity analysis. The fail-safe number is 18 477, suggesting that at least 18 477 articles with negative conclusions would be needed to reverse the conclusion that acne vulgaris was related to Demodex infestation. So the effect of publication bias was insignificant and could be ignored. It was concluded that acne vulgaris is associated with Demodex infestation. This indicates that when regular treatments for acne vulgaris are ineffective, examination of Demodex mites and necessary acaricidal therapies should be considered. PMID:22374611

  18. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Annunziata, M. C.; D'Arco, V.; De Vita, V.; Lodi, G.; Mauriello, M. C.; Pastore, F.; Monfrecola, G.

    2010-01-01

    Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but several hypotheses have been proposed. There are numerous treatments: chemical peels, dermabrasion/microdermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, dermal grafting, needling and combined therapies for atrophic scars: silicone gels, intralesional steroid therapy, cryotherapy, and surgery for hypertrophic and keloidal lesions. This paper summarizes acne scar pathogenesis, classification and treatment options. PMID:20981308

  19. Should dermatologists prescribe hormonal contraceptives for acne?

    PubMed

    Harper, Julie C

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the primary factors contributing to the development of acne vulgaris is excess sebum. Sebaceous glands and sebum excretion are regulated, at least in part, by androgen hormones. Acne treatments that block this androgen effect include spironolactone and combination oral contraceptives (COC). Three COC are now FDA approved to treat moderate acne. Dermatologists must become experts at prescribing these hormonal contraceptives. Likewise, it is vital to be aware of contraindications to hormonal contraceptive therapy. Proper patient selection relies on an appropriate medical history and an assessment of blood pressure. A pelvic exam and/or Papanicolaou smear are not required prior to initiating therapy with a COC. It is important to counsel patients about potential adverse effects of COC pills and to establish appropriate expectations concerning acne improvement. PMID:19845722

  20. Formulation and evaluation of herbal anti-acne moisturizer.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Arun; Shama, Shaik Neelufar; Joy, Jyothi Mulanjananiyil; Reddy, Bobbu Sravya; Roja, Chirra

    2012-10-01

    The moisture content present in human skin makes it look young and the use of moisturizer results in fastening the moisture with a surface film of oil. Acne vulgaris is one of the most commonly seen diseases among the youth. The present study is focused on the use of herbs as moisturizer for acne treatment. The anti-acne moisturizer was formulated from herbal crude extracts and investigated the physico-chemical parameters as well as antibacterial activity of the formulation. The study revealed that ethanol extract of Andrographis paniculata, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Ocimum sanctum, Azadiracta indica and Green tea possessed the potential for inhibiting acne. It was observed that the optimal formula of anti-acne moisturizer was satisfactorily effective to control acne inducing bacteria i.e., Staphylococcus epidermis and Propionibacterium. The physico-chemical parameters of the formulation were also optimal with no signs of irritation. PMID:23010007

  1. Understanding innate immunity and inflammation in acne: implications for management.

    PubMed

    Dreno, B; Gollnick, H P M; Kang, S; Thiboutot, D; Bettoli, V; Torres, V; Leyden, J

    2015-06-01

    Acne has long been understood to have a complex physiological basis involving several main factors: hormonally-stimulated sebum production, abnormal keratinization of the pilosebaceous duct, and an inflammatory immune response to Propionibacterium acnes. Recent studies at the molecular and cellular level have begun clarifying how all of these factors interact, and the role of the innate immune system is better appreciated. Inflammation has been demonstrated in all acne lesions - the preclinical microcomedo, comedones, inflammatory lesions, 'post-inflammatory' erythema or hyperpigmentation, and scarring. Inflammation localized to the pilosebaceous unit can be considered the defining feature of acne and should be addressed via multiple therapeutic pathways. Clinicians tend to think oral antibiotics should be used to 'calm' inflammatory acne, but there is good evidence showing that topical retinoids also have anti-inflammatory properties as a class effect. For best therapeutic outcomes, most patients with acne should be treated first line with a topical retinoid plus an antimicrobial agent, as has been demonstrated in thousands of patients involved in clinical trials and recommended by the Global Alliance to Improve Outcomes in Acne for more than a decade. Moving away from reliance on antibiotic therapy for acne is particularly important in an era of worsening antimicrobial resistance and worldwide calls to reduce antibiotic use. Improved understanding about the role of P. acnes and the innate immune system in acne should help clinicians in designing efficacious treatment strategies. PMID:26059728

  2. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne ... eliminarse las marcas de acne? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of anthocyanins-rich extract from bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) on croton oil-induced ear edema and Propionibacterium acnes plus LPS-induced liver damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hui; Lv, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Guo-En; Li, Yi-Fang; Kurihara, Hiroshi; He, Rong-Rong

    2014-08-01

    Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) has been known to play a protective role in human health due to its high anthocyanin content. This study investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of bilberry extract (BE, containing 42.04% anthocyanin) on Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced liver injury and croton oil-induced ear edema in mice. Results showed that BE could effectively inhibit croton oil-induced ear edema and liver inflammation provoked by P. acnes plus LPS, as reflected by the reduced plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. These findings were confirmed by hepatic pathological examination. Moreover, BE administration markedly suppressed the increase of liver mRNA levels of iNOS, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and the protein levels of iNOS, TNF-α and NF-κB. In addition, liver malondialdehyde and NO contents were significantly reduced by BE treatment. These results indicated that BE has potent protective effects on acute and immunological inflammation, which might contribute to the study of the anti-inflammatory effects of natural products and healthy food. PMID:24548119

  4. Analysis of Complete Genomes of Propionibacterium acnes Reveals a Novel Plasmid and Increased Pseudogenes in an Acne Associated Strain

    PubMed Central

    Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel; Tomida, Shuta; Li, Huiying

    2013-01-01

    The human skin harbors a diverse community of bacteria, including the Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium acnes. P. acnes has historically been linked to the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris, a common skin disease affecting over 80% of all adolescents in the US. To gain insight into potential P. acnes pathogenic mechanisms, we previously sequenced the complete genome of a P. acnes strain HL096PA1 that is highly associated with acne. In this study, we compared its genome to the first published complete genome KPA171202. HL096PA1 harbors a linear plasmid, pIMPLE-HL096PA1. This is the first described P. acnes plasmid. We also observed a five-fold increase of pseudogenes in HL096PA1, several of which encode proteins in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. In addition, our analysis revealed a few island-like genomic regions that are unique to HL096PA1 and a large genomic inversion spanning the ribosomal operons. Together, these findings offer a basis for understanding P. acnes virulent properties, host adaptation mechanisms, and its potential role in acne pathogenesis at the strain level. Furthermore, the plasmid identified in HL096PA1 may potentially provide a new opportunity for P. acnes genetic manipulation and targeted therapy against specific disease-associated strains. PMID:23762865

  5. Nanoparticle Stabilized Liposomes for Acne Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Victoria

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease that affects over 40 million people in the United States alone. The main cause of acne vulgaris is Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), resides deep in the pores and follicles of the skin in order to feed on oil produced by the sebaceous glands. The liposome is a lipid based nanoparticle with numerous advantages over free drug molecules as an acne treatment alternative. Bare liposomes loaded with lauric acid (LipoLA) were found to show strong antimicrobial activity against P. acnes while generating minimal toxicity. However, the platform is limited by the spontaneous tendency of liposomes to fuse with each other. Attaching nanoparticles to the surface of liposomes can overcome this challenge by providing steric repulsion and reduce surface tension. Thus, carboxyl-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuC) were attached to the surface of liposomes (AuC-liposomes) loaded with doxycycline, a general tetracycline antibiotic. These particles were found to have a diameter of 120 nm and a zeta potential of 20.0 mV. Both fluorescent and antimicrobial studies demonstrated that based on electrostatic interaction, negatively charged AuC attached to the liposome's positively charged surface and stabilized liposomes in a neutral pH environment (pH = 7.4). Upon entering the skin's acidic environment (pH = 4), AuC detached from the liposome's surface and liposomes could fuse with P. acnes residing in the pores. Furthermore, toxicity studies showed that AuC-liposomes did not induce any significant toxicity, while two of the leading over-the-counter therapies, benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid, generated substantial skin irritation.

  6. Effective Treatments of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bingrong

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic scarring is often an unfortunate and permanent complication of acne vulgaris. It has high prevalence, significant impact on quality of life, and therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. The treatment of atrophic acne scars varies depending on the types of acne scars and the limitations of the treatment modalities in their ability to improve scars. Therefore, many options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, fat transplantation, other tissue augmenting agents, needling, subcision, and combined therapy. Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. In order to optimally treat a patient’s scar, we need to consider which treatment offers the most satisfactory result. There are also promising procedures in the future, such as stem cell therapy. In this article, the authors review the different treatment options of atrophic acne scars. This may be useful for selecting the best therapeutic strategy, whether it be single or combined therapy, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars while reducing or avoiding the side effects and complications. PMID:26029333

  7. Adolescent female acne: etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Olutunmbi, Yetunde; Paley, Kristina; English, Joseph C

    2008-08-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multifactorial condition often conferring significant psychosocial morbidity, affects an estimated 40 million people in the United States. The majority of these individuals are adolescents and young adults. The pathophysiology of the condition is still not fully known, but it is believed to be related in part to excess sebum production, follicular hyperkeratinization, microbial colonization by P acnes, and inflammation. Prior to initiating treatment in a female patient, a hyperandrogenic state must be considered and ruled out through history, physical exam, and laboratory evaluation if necessary. Treatment options are vast and include hormonal therapy among others. Hormonal therapies have long been noted to reduce acne lesions and offer a valuable adjuvant to standard therapy. Hormonal agents are thought to improve acne by blocking the androgen receptor and/or decreasing circulating androgens which leads to decreased sebum production. Hormonal treatment options include spironolactone, other antiandrogens, and oral contraceptives. The use of these agents to effectively treat acne has been demonstrated in several randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials. Optimal results are often achieved with combination therapy with the goal of targeting multiple pathogenic pathways in acne development. PMID:18656070

  8. Therapeutic agents and herbs in topical application for acne treatment.

    PubMed

    Kanlayavattanakul, M; Lourith, N

    2011-08-01

    Acne vulgaris suppresses an individual's self-confidence by causing distress with regard to physical appearance, which affects a significant number of individuals during puberty and is delineated by adolescence. Several treatments have been introduced to decrease the aesthetic and psychological problems caused by acne. The topical application of therapeutic agents has been found to be more feasible than hormonal treatment and laser therapy. The ingredients in topical acne treatments, particularly herbs and naturally derived compounds, have received considerable interest as they have fewer adverse effects than synthetic agents. PMID:21401650

  9. Enzymatic and hemolytic properties of Propionibacterium acnes and related bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hoeffler, U

    1977-12-01

    The production of chondroitin sulfatase, hyaluronidase, deoxyribonuclease, gelatinase, phosphatase, lecithinase, and hemolysins was examined in 95 strains of Propionibacterium acnes and four related species of anaerobic, respectively, microaerophilic coryneform bacteria (P. avidum, P. lymphophilum, P. granulosum, and Corynebacterium minutissimum). All enzymes could be demonstrated in at least one representative of the species tested. Those Propionibacterium species most frequently found in acne vulgaris lesions, i.e., P. acnes and P. granulosum, proved to be the most active organisms concerning the production of the enzymes tested. P. avidum, on the other hand, showed the highest rate of hemolytic activity. PMID:201661

  10. Update and future of systemic acne treatment.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, Christos C; Piquero-Martin, Jaime

    2003-01-01

    Systemic treatment is required in patients with moderate-to-severe acne, especially when acne scars start to occur. Antibiotics with anti-inflammatory properties, such as tetracyclines (oxytetracycline, tetracycline chloride, doxycycline, minocycline and limecycline) and macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin and azithromycin) are the agents of choice for papulopustular acne, even though the emerging resistant bacterial strains are minimizing their effect, especially regarding erythromycin. Systemic antibiotics should be administered during a period of 8-12 weeks. In severe papulopustular and in nodulocystic/conglobate acne, oral isotretinoin is the treatment of choice. Hormonal treatment represents an alternative regimen in female acne, whereas it is mandatory in resistant, severe pubertal or post-adolescent forms of the disease. Compounds with anti-androgenic properties include estrogens combined with progestins, such as ethinyl estradiol with cyproterone acetate, chlormadinone acetate, desogestrel, drospirenone, levonogestrel, norethindrone acetate, norgestimate, and other anti-androgens directly blocking the androgen receptor (flutamide) or inhibiting androgen activity at various levels, corticosteroids, spironolactone, cimetidine, and ketoconazole. After 3 months of treatment control of seborrhea and acne can be obtained. Low-dose corticosteroids (prednisone, prednisolone, or dexamethasone) are indicated in patients with adrenal hyperandrogenism or acne fulminans. New developments and future trends represent low-dose long-term isotretinoin regimens, new isotretinoin formulations (micronized isotretinoin), isotretinoin metabolites, combination treatments to reduce toxicity, insulin-sensitizing agents, 5alpha-reductase type 1 inhibitors, antisense oligonucleotide molecules, and, especially, new anti-inflammatory agents, such as lipoxygenase inhibitors. PMID:12566804