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Sample records for inflammatory demyelinating lesions

  1. Astrocytes as potential targets to suppress inflammatory demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    De Keyser, Jacques; Laureys, Guy; Demol, Frauke; Wilczak, Nadine; Mostert, Jop; Clinckers, Ralph

    2010-11-01

    A hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) is the occurrence of focal inflammatory demyelinating lesions in the central nervous system. The prevailing view that activated anti-myelin T cells inherently mediate these lesions has been challenged after observations that these T cells, which are part of the normal immune repertoire, can also intermittently become activated in healthy people and subjects with other diseases. Astrocytes in the white matter of subjects with MS are deficient in beta(2) adrenergic receptors. Stimulation of beta(2) adrenergic receptors increases cAMP, leading to activation of protein kinase A (PKA). beta(2) adrenergic receptor deficiency will reduce the suppressive action of PKA on coactivator class II transactivator (CIITA), which is a key regulator of interferon gamma-induced major histocompatibility (MHC) class II molecule transcription. The expression of MHC class II may deviate astrocytes to function as facultative antigen presenting cells, which can then initiate the inflammatory cascade. In a proof of concept study in MS subjects it was shown that fluoxetine, which activates PKA in astrocytes, reduced the development of focal inflammatory lesions. If confirmed and extended by additional studies, suppressing the antigen presenting capacity of astrocytes could be a novel therapeutic option for the treatment of MS. PMID:20178822

  2. Demyelinative chiamal lesions.

    PubMed

    Spector, R H; Glaser, J S; Schatz, N J

    1980-12-01

    To clarify the clinical syndrome of demyelinative chiasmal involvement, six case histories were analyzed and the literature was reviewed. This entitity is characterized by especial predilection for women in the third to fifth decades; visual deficites of a chiasmal pattern that may be modest to marked, with a generallly good prognosis for functional recovery; and other signs and symptoms, not necessarily severe, of scattered lesions of the neuraxis. Neuroradiological studies, especially laminography of the sellar area and computerized tomography, must be employed to rule out a suprasellar mass lesion. The efficacy of systemic corticosteroid therapy is moot, but it seems reasonable to use such agents during acute stages, especially where vision is severely reduced on both sides. PMID:7447764

  3. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Chronic Inflammatory polyneuropathies are an important group of neuromuscular disorders that present chronically and progress over more than 8 weeks, being referred to as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Despite tremendous progress in elucidating disease pathogenesis, the exact triggering event remains unknown. Our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of CIDP and its variants continues to expand, resulting in improved opportunities for identification and treatment. Most clinical neurologists will be involved in the management of patients with these disorders, and should be familiar with available therapies for CIDP. We review the distinctive clinical, laboratory, and electro-diagnostic features that aid in diagnosis. We emphasize the importance of clinical patterns that define treatment responsiveness and the most appropriate therapies in order to improve prognosis. PMID:23564314

  4. Tumefactive Demyelinating Lesions in Multiple Sclerosis and Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Meredith C; Cameron, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are rare consequences of central nervous system (CNS) idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Tumefactive demyelinating lesions pose a diagnostic challenge because they can mimic tumors and abscesses and because they can be caused by a heterogeneous range of disorders. This article reviews the recent literature on the clinical presentation; radiographic features; prognosis; and management of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and the rare variants of multiple sclerosis including Schilder's disease, Marburg acute multiple sclerosis, and Balo's concentric sclerosis. PMID:26847090

  5. Inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Muley, Suraj Ashok; Parry, Gareth J

    2009-05-01

    Early and effective treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is important to minimize axonal degeneration that occurs secondary to demyelination. The disease course is invariably chronic, so long-term treatment is often required, and adverse effects and costs are important considerations in devising a treatment plan. CIDP responds to prednisone, but long-term treatment can result in significant adverse effects. Azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporine can be used as steroid-sparing agents and may facilitate more rapid and successful tapering of prednisone. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and plasma exchange are also effective in the treatment of CIDP and can be used in patients who are unresponsive to prednisone or develop steroid-related adverse effects. IVIg may also be used as a first-line treatment, but its cost can be a limiting factor. A few uncontrolled studies have suggested that pulsed weekly methylprednisolone is both effective and well tolerated in the long-term treatment of CIDP. Treatments based on rituximab or cyclophosphamide have also been used in resistant disease. Variants of CIDP have been described on the basis of their association with specific antibodies or immunoglobulins and their response to specific immunomodulatory treatments. Multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block responds to IVIg in the majority of patients. However, weakness may slowly worsen over time, and some patients become unresponsive. Anecdotal reports suggest that rituximab may be useful in patients who develop progressive disease. Placebo-controlled trials in anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy suggest that rituximab is effective and, with a combination of prednisone and cyclophosphamide, numbness and strength may improve. Other treatments that may be effective include plasma exchange and IVIg. Treatment is generally started with prednisone, IVIg, or plasma exchange. Rituximab and cyclophosphamide are used only

  6. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathey, Emily K; Pollard, John D

    2013-10-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is the commonest treatable neuropathy in the western world. Untreated it may result in severe disability but if diagnosed and treated early there is effective treatment for the majority of patients. Typical CIDP is readily recognised but the diagnosis of other subgroups can be more challenging. The pathology of polyradiculoneuropathies such as CIDP characteristically affects the most proximal regions of the peripheral nervous system, nerve roots and major plexuses. It is important to test these regions with electrodiagnostic studies since routine neurophysiology may not encounter regions of pathology. Although accepted as an autoimmune disorder with an underlying immunopathology involving T cell and B cell responses, there is no agreement on major target antigens; however recent studies have highlighted a role for molecules in non compact myelin which play an essential role in the formation and maintenance of the nodal structures and hence in the function of ion channels central to saltatory conduction. Controlled trials have proven the efficacy of corticosteroid, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange in the short term and intravenous immunoglobulin also in the long term. Immunosuppressive agents are widely used but their efficacy has not been proven in controlled trials. Recent trials have shown the importance of attempting treatment withdrawal in patients apparently in remission to conserve treatments that are very expensive and in short supply, since a significant proportion of patients may enter long lasting remission following short term therapy. For the relatively small group of patients who do not respond to these first line therapies new agents including monoclonal antibodies may have a role. PMID:23146613

  7. Review: the architecture of inflammatory demyelinating lesions: implications for studies on pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lassmann, H

    2011-12-01

    Recent technological advances provided the chance to analyse the molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of lesions in human disease. A major prerequisite for such studies is, however, that the pathological material used is exactly defined and characterized. In multiple sclerosis (MS), this is difficult, as several types of active lesions exist, depending upon the stage of the disease, the age and location of these lesions and the inter-individual differences between patients. In addition, within an active lesion, different closely adjacent zones are present reflecting initial tissue injury, debris removal or repair. Here evidence is reviewed, showing that distinct subareas of active MS lesions reflect different pathological hallmarks of lesion evolution. These data provide the basis for our understanding of the pathogenesis of tissue injury in MS and imply that studies on MS pathogenesis have to rely on a clear definition of the lesions analysed and have to focus on specific lesion areas, isolated by microdissection. In addition, these data also imply that molecules, identified in these studies, must be confirmed and validated in the correct context of lesion initiation and/or progression. PMID:21696413

  8. Atypical inflammatory demyelinating syndromes of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Todd A; Reddel, Stephen W; Barnett, Michael H; Palace, Jacqueline; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Weinshenker, Brian G

    2016-08-01

    Atypical inflammatory demyelinating syndromes are rare disorders that differ from multiple sclerosis owing to unusual clinical or MRI findings or poor response to treatments used for multiple sclerosis. These syndromes include neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, tumefactive demyelination, Baló's concentric sclerosis, Schilder's disease, and Marburg's multiple sclerosis. The overlapping features of these syndromes with multiple sclerosis and with each other complicate diagnosis and their categorisation as distinct or related conditions. Recognition of these syndromes is crucial because they differ from multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating and non-demyelinating conditions in their prognosis and treatment. Advances in MRI, pathology, and immunobiology are needed to increase understanding of these syndromes, including the extent to which some of them represent distinct entities, and to assist with improvements in their diagnosis and management. PMID:27478954

  9. Inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration in early multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Charil, Arnaud; Filippi, Massimo

    2007-08-15

    A number of recent magnetic resonance imaging studies have challenged the classical view of multiple sclerosis (MS) as a "two-stage" disease where an early inflammatory demyelinating phase with focal macroscopic lesions formed in the white matter (WM) of the central nervous system is followed by a late neurodegenerative phase, which is believed to be a mere consequence of repeated inflammatory insults and irreversible demyelination. These studies have consistently shown the presence of diffuse normal-appearing WM damage, marked gray matter involvement and significant cortical functional reorganization, as well as the occurrence of the neurodegenerative component of MS from the earliest clinical stages of the disease with only a partial relation to MRI markers of inflammatory demyelination. The present review argues that MS can no longer be viewed as a "two-stage" disease, which suggests that the two pathological components are dissociated in time, but rather as a "simultaneous two-component" disease, where the relative contributions of the various pathological processes of the disease to the development of "fixed" disability, their relationship and their evolution over time need to be clarified. This new view of MS should inform the development of future research protocols to define its actual physiopathology and prompt the institution of early treatment which should ideally target not only inflammatory demyelination, but also the neurodegenerative aspects of the disease, as well as promote neuroprotection and enhance reparative mechanisms and adaptive functional reorganization of the cortex. PMID:17397873

  10. MNGIE neuropathy: five cases mimicking chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bedlack, Richard S; Vu, Tuan; Hammans, Simon; Sparr, Steven A; Myers, Bennett; Morgenlander, Joel; Hirano, Michio

    2004-03-01

    We report five patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) who had demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The MNGIE neuropathy had clinical and electrodiagnostic features typical of acquired, rather than inherited, etiologies. In fact, three patients were actually treated for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We discuss findings that may help distinguish patients with MNGIE from those with CIDP. PMID:14981734

  11. Progressive chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a child with central nervous system involvement and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Barisić, Nina; Horvath, Rita; Grković, Lana; Mihelcić, Dina; Luetić, Tomislav

    2006-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic disorder, manifesting with monophasic or relapsing course. Progressive course is rare in children. The article presents a boy with progressive generalized muscle weakness and areflexia since the age of two, developed after viral infection. Electromyoneurography showed severe neurogenic lesion, with myopathic pattern in proximal muscles. Increased serum ganglioside antibody titers (anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b) were registered. Sural nerve biopsy revealed demyelination and onion bulbs. Inflammatory perivascular CD3 positive infiltrates were present in muscle and nerve biopsies. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical atrophy, hyperintensities of the white matter and gray matter hypointensities. Improvement occurred on intravenous immune globulins and methylprednisolone treatment. Demyelination might develop in central and peripheral nervous system associated with inflammatory myopathy in patients with progressive course of CIDP. PMID:17243577

  12. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Amanda C.; Donofrio, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common treatable chronic autoimmune neuropathy. Multiple diagnostic criteria have been established, with the primary goal of identifying neurophysiologic hallmarks of acquired demyelination. Treatment modalities have expanded to include numerous immuno-modulatory therapies, although the best evidence continues to be for corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg). This review describes the pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CIDP. PMID:23117943

  13. Cervical demyelinating lesion presenting with choreoathetoid movements and dystonia.

    PubMed

    de Pasqua, Silvia; Cevoli, Sabina; Calbucci, Fabio; Liguori, Rocco

    2016-09-15

    Pseudoathetosis and dystonia are rare manifestations of spinal cord disease that have been already reported in lesions involving the posterior columns at the cervical level. We report two patients with a cervical demyelinating lesion at C3-C4 level presenting with hand dystonia and pseudoathetoid movements. The movement disorder disappeared after steroid treatment. The cases we described highlight the importance of identifying secondary causes of movement disorders that can be reversible with appropriate therapy. PMID:27538633

  14. Structural brain lesions in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Dolapcioglu, Can; Dolapcioglu, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications or manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease deserve particular attention because symptomatic conditions can require early diagnosis and treatment, whereas unexplained manifestations might be linked with pathogenic mechanisms. This review focuses on both symptomatic and asymptomatic brain lesions detectable on imaging studies, as well as their frequency and potential mechanisms. A direct causal relationship between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and asymptomatic structural brain changes has not been demonstrated, but several possible explanations, including vasculitis, thromboembolism and malnutrition, have been proposed. IBD is associated with a tendency for thromboembolisms; therefore, cerebrovascular thromboembolism represents the most frequent and grave CNS complication. Vasculitis, demyelinating conditions and CNS infections are among the other CNS manifestations of the disease. Biological agents also represent a risk factor, particularly for demyelination. Identification of the nature and potential mechanisms of brain lesions detectable on imaging studies would shed further light on the disease process and could improve patient care through early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26600970

  15. Immunopathophysiology of pediatric CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Rostasy, Kevin; Brück, Wolfgang; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-08-30

    Elucidating pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the spectrum of pediatric-onset CNS demyelinating diseases, particularly those that may distinguish multiple sclerosis (MS) from other entities, promises to both improve diagnostics and guide more-informed therapeutic decisions. Observations that pediatric- and adult-onset MS share the same genetic and environmental risk factors support the view that these conditions represent essentially the same illness manifesting at different ages. Nonetheless, special consideration must be given when CNS inflammation manifests in early life, at a time when multiple organs (including immune and nervous systems) are actively maturing. CSF analysis in pediatric-onset MS points to chronic CNS inflammation, supported by observations from limited pathologic material available for study. Emerging results implicate abnormalities in both effector and regulatory T cell subsets, and potentially immune senescence, in children with MS. Although CNS-directed antibodies (including antibodies recognizing myelin antigens; Kir4.1) can be documented in pediatric-onset MS, their pathophysiologic significance (as in adults) remains unclear. This is in contrast to the presence of serum and/or CSF antibodies recognizing aquaporin-4, which, when measured using validated cell-based assays, supports the diagnosis of a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, distinct from MS. Presence of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies documented with similar cell-based assays may also be associated with pathophysiologically distinct disease phenotypes in children. The substantial impact of pediatric-onset MS on normal brain development and function underscores the importance of elucidating both the immunobiology and neurobiology of disease. Ongoing efforts are aimed at developing and validating biological measures that define pathophysiologically distinct monophasic and chronic forms of pediatric CNS demyelination. PMID:27572856

  16. Lesion Expansion in Experimental Demyelination Animal Models and Multiple Sclerosis Lesions.

    PubMed

    Große-Veldmann, René; Becker, Birte; Amor, Sandra; van der Valk, Paul; Beyer, Cordian; Kipp, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Gray matter pathology is an important aspect of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis and disease progression. In a recent study, we were able to demonstrate that the higher myelin content in the white matter parts of the brain is an important variable in the neuroinflammatory response during demyelinating events. Whether higher white matter myelination contributes to lesion development and progression is not known. Here, we compared lesion size of intra-cortical vs. white matter MS lesions. Furthermore, dynamics of lesion development was compared in the cuprizone and lysophosphatidylcholine models. We provide clear evidence that in the human brain, white matter lesions are significantly increased in size as compared to intra-cortical gray matter lesions. In addition, studies using the cuprizone mouse model revealed that the autonomous progression of white matter lesions is more severe compared to that in the gray matter. Focal demyelination revealed that the application of equal amounts of lysophosphatidylcholine results in more severe demyelination in the white compared to the gray matter. In summary, lesion progression is most intense in myelin-rich white matter regions, irrespective of the initial lesion trigger mechanism. A better understanding of myelin debris-triggered lesion expansion will pave the way for the development of new protective strategies in the future. PMID:26363796

  17. Multifocal inflammatory demyelination in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and treatment complications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Qiang; Ringrose, Jennifer; Gross, Donald; Emery, Derek; Blevins, Gregg; Power, Christopher

    2016-08-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are both autoimmune diseases that share similar pathogenesis, but the development of MS in RA patients without the treatment of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha is rarely reported, which might be attributed to the use of other medications with potential immunosuppressive effects in the treatment of RA. Since MS can be clinically silent and autopsy examination of the central nervous system in RA patients is rarely described, the association of MS with RA may be possibly under-recognized. We report an autopsy case revealing multifocal inflammatory demyelination in a RA patient who had a prolonged use of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine resulting in hydroxychloroquine-induced myopathies and heart failure. The neuropathological features of this case are consistent with MS, although there are some altered inflammatory demyelinating features such as relatively smaller lesions and less infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly T-cells. Our present case, in combination with literature review, suggests that the RA treatment especially with hydroxychloroquine and methotrexate is likely to alter the characteristics of inflammatory demyelination and disease course. PMID:27423608

  18. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sung, Woo Kyung; Jeong, Jin Uk; Bang, Ki Tae; Shin, Jong Ho; Yoo, Ji Hyung; Kim, Nak Min; Park, Jun Hyung; Kim, Joo Heon

    2015-06-01

    A 58-yr-old man presented with leg edema and subacute weakness of his bilateral lower extremities. Urinary and serum immunoelectrophoresis revealed the presence of lambda-type Bence Jones proteins. He was ultimately diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). A renal biopsy specimen showed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN), which was randomly arranged as 12-20 m nonbranching fibrils in the basement membranes. Immunofluorescence studies were negative for immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgM, IgA, C3, and kappa light chains in the capillary walls and mesangial areas. A Congo red stain for amyloid was negative. Electromyography and nerve conduction velocity examinations results were compatible with the presence of demyelinating polyneuropathy. This case showed a rare combination of FGN, without Ig deposition, and MGUS combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). PMID:26484033

  19. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Woo Kyung; Jeong, Jin Uk; Bang, Ki Tae; Shin, Jong Ho; Yoo, Ji Hyung; Kim, Nak Min; Park, Jun Hyung; Kim, Joo Heon

    2015-01-01

    A 58-yr-old man presented with leg edema and subacute weakness of his bilateral lower extremities. Urinary and serum immunoelectrophoresis revealed the presence of lambda-type Bence Jones proteins. He was ultimately diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). A renal biopsy specimen showed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN), which was randomly arranged as 12–20 m nonbranching fibrils in the basement membranes. Immunofluorescence studies were negative for immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgM, IgA, C3, and kappa light chains in the capillary walls and mesangial areas. A Congo red stain for amyloid was negative. Electromyography and nerve conduction velocity examinations results were compatible with the presence of demyelinating polyneuropathy. This case showed a rare combination of FGN, without Ig deposition, and MGUS combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). PMID:26484033

  20. Treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy with methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    Fialho, D; Chan, Y‐C; Allen, D C; Reilly, M M; Hughes, R A C

    2006-01-01

    We discovered many reports of other immunosuppressive drugs being used in adults with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) but none of methotrexate. As weekly low dose oral methotrexate is safe, effective, and well tolerated in other diseases, we treated 10 patients with otherwise treatment resistant CIDP. Seven showed improvement in strength by at least two points on the MRC sum score and three worsened. Only two showed an improvement in disability and both were also receiving corticosteroids. We discuss the difficulty of detecting an improvement in treatment resistant CIDP and propose methotrexate as a suitable agent for testing in a randomised trial. PMID:16543541

  1. Autoantibodies against vinculin in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Minako; Sawai, Setsu; Satoh, Mamoru; Mori, Masahiro; Kazami, Takahiro; Misawa, Sonoko; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Ishibashi, Masumi; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Kado, Sayaka; Kodera, Yoshio; Nomura, Fumio; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-10-15

    To identify the target molecules of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), we used proteomic-based approach in the extracted proteins from porcine cauda equina. Two of 31 CIDP patients had markedly elevated serum autoantibodies against vinculin, a cell adhesion protein. Both of the patients with anti-vinculin antibodies had similar clinical manifestation, which are compatible with those of "typical" CIDP. Immunocytochemistry showed that vinculin was stained at the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerves by serum samples. Our results suggest that vinculin is a possible immunological target molecule in a subpopulation of typical CIDP patients. PMID:26439954

  2. Progesterone and nestorone promote myelin regeneration in chronic demyelinating lesions of corpus callosum and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    El-Etr, Martine; Rame, Marion; Boucher, Celine; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Kumar, Narender; Liere, Philippe; Pianos, Antoine; Schumacher, Michael; Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis affects mainly women and consists in intermittent or chronic damages to the myelin sheaths, focal inflammation, and axonal degeneration. Current therapies are limited to immunomodulators and antiinflammatory drugs, but there is no efficient treatment for stimulating the endogenous capacity of myelin repair. Progesterone and synthetic progestins have been shown in animal models of demyelination to attenuate myelin loss, reduce clinical symptoms severity, modulate inflammatory responses and partially reverse the age-dependent decline in remyelination. Moreover, progesterone has been demonstrated to promote myelin formation in organotypic cultures of cerebellar slices. In the present study, we show that progesterone and the synthetic 19-nor-progesterone derivative Nestorone® promote the repair of severe chronic demyelinating lesions induced by feeding cuprizone to female mice for up to 12 weeks. Progesterone and Nestorone increase the density of NG2(+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and CA II(+) mature oligodendrocytes and enhance the formation of myelin basic protein (MBP)- and proteolipid protein (PLP)-immunoreactive myelin. However, while demyelination in response to cuprizone was less marked in corpus callosum than in cerebral cortex, remyelination appeared earlier in the former. The remyelinating effect of progesterone was progesterone receptor (PR)-dependent, as it was absent in PR-knockout mice. Progesterone and Nestorone also decreased (but did not suppress) neuroinflammatory responses, specifically astrocyte and microglial cell activation. Therefore, some progestogens are promising therapeutic candidates for promoting the regeneration of myelin. PMID:25092805

  3. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from pathology to phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mathey, Emily K; Park, Susanna B; Hughes, Richard A C; Pollard, John D; Armati, Patricia J; Barnett, Michael H; Taylor, Bruce V; Dyck, P James B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy S-Y

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory neuropathy, classically characterised by a slowly progressive onset and symmetrical, sensorimotor involvement. However, there are many phenotypic variants, suggesting that CIDP may not be a discrete disease entity but rather a spectrum of related conditions. While the abiding theory of CIDP pathogenesis is that cell-mediated and humoral mechanisms act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves, the relative contributions of T cell and autoantibody responses remain largely undefined. In animal models of spontaneous inflammatory neuropathy, T cell responses to defined myelin antigens are responsible. In other human inflammatory neuropathies, there is evidence of antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin or nodal antigens. In this review, the roles of the cellular and humoral immune systems in the pathogenesis of CIDP will be discussed. In time, it is anticipated that delineation of clinical phenotypes and the underlying disease mechanisms might help guide diagnostic and individualised treatment strategies for CIDP. PMID:25677463

  4. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Stéphane; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Magy, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronic immune-mediated neuropathy: it is clinically heterogeneous (relapsing-remitting form, chronic progressive form, monophasic form or CIDP having a Guillain-Barré syndrome-like onset), but potentially treatable. Although its pathophysiology remains largely unknown, CIDP is considered an immune-mediated neuropathy. Therefore, many immunotherapies have been proposed in this peripheral nervous system disorder, the most known efficient treatments being intravenous immunoglobulin, corticosteroids and plasma exchange. However, these therapies remain unsatisfactory for many patients, so numerous other immunotherapeutic strategies have been evaluated, based on their immunosuppressant or immunomodulatory potency. We have performed a large review of the literature about treatment in CIDP, with a special emphasis on novel and alternative immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26809024

  5. Improving the management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jeffrey A; Bril, Vera

    2016-06-01

    This article considers several issues of current interest relating to the management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), including diagnostic pitfalls, differences between CIDP patients with and without concurrent diabetes mellitus and how to best measure treatment response in daily practice. Despite the availability of diagnostic criteria, many patients diagnosed with CIDP do not meet these criteria; reasons for misdiagnosis are discussed. There are no definitive predictors of treatment response in CIDP; however, certain clinical and electrophysiological characteristics may be helpful. Patients with CIDP and concurrent diabetes present an additional diagnostic challenge; the differences between these groups, including possible differences in response predictors are discussed. Finally, the most appropriate outcome measures for use in daily practice are considered. PMID:27230584

  6. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculo-neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nogués, Martín A; Varela, Francisco J; Seminario, Gisela; Insúa, María C; Bezrodnik, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired disease that may affect nerve roots and peripheral nerves. Despite its low incidence, diagnosis is particularly important because there are different effective treatments. Human immunoglobulin is one of the mainstays of the treatment. Although there are few studies up to date, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IgSC) has been proposed as an alternative to intravenous administration with similar efficacy. We present three cases with definite CIDP, classified according to the European Federation of Neurological Societies / Peripheral Nerve, Society (EFNS /PNS) criteria in which was used SCIgG as a treatment after success with the intravenous route. The Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale (ONLS) was used to estimate the changes in the muscular strength before and after treatment. PMID:26826992

  7. [Methylprednisolone pulse in treatment of childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Rafai, M A; Boulaajaj, F Z; Sekkat, Z; El Moutawakkil, B; Slassi, I

    2010-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in children is rare and treatment is based primarily on intravenous immunoglobulins or oral corticosteroids. Boluses of methylprednisolone (MP) are a possible alternative. We report 3 cases of CIDP in children with good outcome after MP pulse therapy. One male (7 years of age) and 2 females (4 and 5 years of age) presented with recurring episodes of functional impotence of both lower limbs and walking impairment, partially reversible without treatment. Clinical and electrophysiological data and the analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid were compatible with CIDP. MP pulses were administered: the total number of pulses varied from 5 to 8, very satisfactory progression on the clinical and electrophysiological pattern was noted, without recurrence in the 3 cases. Childhood CIDP presents clinical, electrophysiological outcome, and prognostic particularities, recurring readily, and the outcome is good. Boluses of MP are an alternative for treatment of these neuropathies in childhood. PMID:20709511

  8. Pathophysiology and biomarkers in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Svahn, J; Antoine, J-C; Camdessanché, J-P

    2014-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired dysimmune disorder characterized by strong heterogeneity in terms of clinical manifestations, prognostic and response to treatment. To date, its pathophysiology and potential target antigens are not totally identified despite substantial progress in the understanding of the involved molecular mechanisms. Recent researches in the field have underlined the importance of cell-mediated immunity (lymphocytesT CD4+, CD8+ and macrophages), the breakdown of blood-nerve barrier, a failure of T-cell regulation, and the disruption of nodal and paranodal organization at the node of Ranvier. This last point is possibly mediated by autoantibodies towards axoglial adhesion molecules which may disrupt sodium and potassium voltage-gated channels clustering leading to a failure of saltatory conduction and the apparition of conduction blocks. The purpose of this article is to overview the main pathophysiologic mechanisms and biomarkers identified in CIDP. PMID:25459126

  9. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi, Farzad; Nafissi, Shahriar; Basiri, Keivan; Amiri, Mostafa; Soltanzadeh, Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Various forms of neuropathy are seen diabetic patients; chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) seems not to be infrequent neuropathy in patients suffering from diabetes and it seems to be more common than in the general population; on the contrary, some authorities do not support pathogenetic association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and CIDP. Also, there are some controversies on the subject of CIDP treatment in diabetic patients. Some studies showed that patients with CIDP-DM considerably had recovered following treatment with immunotherapeutic modalities like (Intravenous immunoglobulin) IVIG and conversely, some else have argued against the prescription of IVIG in this group and recommend treatment with corticosteroids and provided that resistant, rituximab may be beneficial. The main limitation in most studies is the inadequate number of cases and as a result, problematic decision making in treatment. This article represents an inclusive review of diabetic CIDP presentation and treatment. PMID:24174953

  10. Cause and prevention of demyelination in a model multiple sclerosis lesion

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Andrew L.; Tachrount, Mohamed; Kasti, Marianne; Laulund, Frida; Golay, Xavier; Smith, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Demyelination is a cardinal feature of multiple sclerosis, but it remains unclear why new lesions form, and whether they can be prevented. Neuropathological evidence suggests that demyelination can occur in the relative absence of lymphocytes, and with distinctive characteristics suggestive of a tissue energy deficit. The objective was to examine an experimental model of the early multiple sclerosis lesion and identify pathogenic mechanisms and opportunities for therapy. Methods Demyelinating lesions were induced in the rat spinal dorsal column by microinjection of lipopolysaccharide, and examined immunohistochemically at different stages of development. The efficacy of treatment with inspired oxygen for 2 days following lesion induction was evaluated. Results Demyelinating lesions were not centered on the injection site, but rather formed 1 week later at the white–gray matter border, preferentially including the ventral dorsal column watershed. Lesion formation was preceded by a transient early period of hypoxia and increased production of superoxide and nitric oxide. Oligodendrocyte numbers decreased at the site shortly afterward, prior to demyelination. Lesions formed at a site of inherent susceptibility to hypoxia, as revealed by exposure of naive animals to a hypoxic environment. Notably, raising the inspired oxygen (80%, normobaric) during the hypoxic period significantly reduced or prevented the demyelination. Interpretation Demyelination characteristic of at least some early multiple sclerosis lesions can arise at a vascular watershed following activation of innate immune mechanisms that provoke hypoxia, and superoxide and nitric oxide formation, all of which can compromise cellular energy sufficiency. Demyelination can be reduced or eliminated by increasing inspired oxygen to alleviate the transient hypoxia. Ann Neurol 2016;79:591–604 PMID:26814844

  11. Calreticulin and other components of endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat and human inflammatory demyelination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Calreticulin (CRT) is a chaperone protein, which aids correct folding of glycosylated proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Under conditions of ER stress, CRT is upregulated and may be displayed on the surface of cells or be secreted. This ‘ecto-CRT’ may activate the innate immune response or it may aid clearance of apoptotic cells. Our and other studies have demonstrated upregulation of ER stress markers CHOP, BiP, ATF4, XBP1 and phosphorylated e-IF2 alpha (p-eIF2 alpha) in biopsy and post-mortem human multiple sclerosis (MS) samples. We extend this work by analysing changes in expression of CRT, BiP, CHOP, XBP1 and p-eIF2 alpha in a rat model of inflammatory demyelination. Demyelination was induced in the spinal cord by intradermal injection of recombinant mouse MOG mixed with incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) at the base of the tail. Tissue samples were analysed by semi-quantitative scoring of immunohistochemically stained frozen tissue sections. Data generated following sampling of tissue from animals with spinal cord lesions, was compared to that obtained using tissue derived from IFA- or saline-injected controls. CRT present in rat serum and in a cohort of human serum derived from 14 multiple sclerosis patients and 11 healthy controls was measured by ELISA. Results Stained tissue scores revealed significantly (p<0.05) increased amounts of CRT, CHOP and p-eIF2 alpha in the lesion, lesion edge and normal-appearing white matter when compared to controls. CHOP and p-eIF2 alpha were also significantly raised in regions of grey matter and the central canal (p<0.05). Immunofluorescent dual-label staining confirmed expression of these markers in astrocytes, microglia or neurons. Dual staining of rat and human spinal cord lesions with Oil Red O and CRT antibody showed co-localisation of CRT with the rim of myelin fragments. ELISA testing of sera from control and EAE rats demonstrated significant down-regulation (p<0.05) of CRT in the serum of

  12. Electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiuming; Qin, Xinyue; Zhang, Yuping; Huang, Cheng; Yu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    Polyneuropathy is often an initial manifestation of polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome and therefore this disorder is frequently misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We reviewed electrophysiological data in 20 patients with POEMS syndrome and 36 matched patients with CIDP to compare the electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and CIDP. Compared with CIDP controls, POEMS patients demonstrated (1) less prolonged distal motor latency and less reduced motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction velocities, (2) greater reduction of amplitudes of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) in distal stimulation, and similar reduction of amplitudes of CMAP in proximal stimulation, (3) similar reduction of amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) in median and ulnar nerves, and a greater reduction of amplitudes of SNAP in tibial and peroneal nerves, (4) less temporal dispersion, (5) less frequent conduction block, (6) more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the upper and lower limbs, and more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the lower than upper limbs, (7) similar F wave and H reflex abnormalities, and (8) less frequent skin sympathetic response abnormalities. We concluded that before development of typical clinical manifestations, POEMS neuropathy can be distinguished from CIDP by neural electrophysiological examination. These electrophysiological features can be used for early diagnosis and initiating correct treatment of POEMS syndrome. PMID:24268501

  13. Stance Postural Strategies in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Missori, Paolo; Trompetto, Carlo; Fattapposta, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyneuropathy leads to postural instability and an increased risk of falling. We investigated how impaired motor impairment and proprioceptive input due to neuropathy influences postural strategies. Methods Platformless bisegmental posturography data were recorded in healthy subjects and patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Each subject stood on the floor, wore a head and a hip electromagnetic tracker. Sway amplitude and velocity were recorded and the mean direction difference (MDD) in the velocity vector between trackers was calculated as a flexibility index. Results Head and hip postural sway increased more in patients with CIDP than in healthy controls. MDD values reflecting hip strategies also increased more in patients than in controls. In the eyes closed condition MDD values in healthy subjects decreased but in patients remained unchanged. Discussion Sensori-motor impairment changes the balance between postural strategies that patients adopt to maintain upright quiet stance. Motor impairment leads to hip postural strategy overweight (eyes open), and prevents strategy re-balancing when the sensory context predominantly relies on proprioceptive input (eyes closed). PMID:26977594

  14. Morphogenesis of the demyelinating lesions in Baló's concentric sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Barz, Helmut; Barz, Ulrich; Schreiber, Almut

    2016-06-01

    In tissues with elastic properties, an edema causes a raised tissue pressure and therefore a diminished blood flow. The authors assume that an increased tissue pressure due to local and/or relapsing edema may be the cause for incomplete necrosis (e.g. demyelinated lesions) or seldom complete necrosis in the brain. Newly forming demyelinating lesions seldom show small tissue bands with normal appearing myelin sheaths in the immediate vicinity of precursor lesions (Baló type of MS). The small myelinated bands are the result of a "protected zone" on the edge of previous demyelinated lesions. The authors explain this protected zone with two arguments. Firstly, the resorptive granulation tissue of more or less older lesions is relatively rich in capillaries. These capillaries may act as an energy reservoir that can nourish not only the plaque, but also a narrow adjacent myelinated tissue band by diffusion, even if the capillary blood flow in this tissue band is limited due to the greater tissue pressure of a new developing lesion in the neighborhood. Secondly, another protective mechanism may act simultaneously: older or more sclerosed lesions and small adherent bands of myelinated tissue with them may swell less in cases of an edema than in normal tissue. The hardening of the older lesions is caused by proliferated fiber-forming astrocytes in the sense of scarring. In an area with an increased tissue pressure, the capillaries are less compressed in a sclerosed lesion than in regions of normal grey and white matter. In addition, the adherent myelinated tissue band closest to the edge of a hardened plaque is better protected against swelling and compression than the further away tissue. Theoretically, this protection zone is comparable with protected blood vessels in the Haversian canals or the medullary spaces of bones. Both theses of protecting mechanisms at the edges of demyelinated lesions support the assumption of a hypoxic causation principle of demyelinating

  15. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in a patient receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju Young; Nam, Tai Seung; Kim, Myeong Kyu; Hwang, Jun Eul; Shim, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Sang Hee; Chung, Ik Joo; Bae, Woo Kyun

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP) that developed in a patient with cholangiocarcinoma after receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. A 62-year-old man had multiple hypodense lesions with delayed enhancement in the both lobes of the liver on abdominal computed tomography. He was treated with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin (100 mg/m(2)). After eight cycles of treatment and a cumulative oxaliplatin dose of 780 mg/m(2), he developed an unsteady gait, dysphagia, weakness of both the upper and lower limbs and impairment of all sensory modalities. Nerve conduction studies confirmed the diagnosis of AIDP. Immunoglobulin G i.v. was administered for 5 days but the neurological deficits of both his upper and lower limbs did not improve. This case highlights unusual peripheral nervous system manifestations in a patient who received chemotherapy with oxaliplatin. PMID:22524580

  16. Clinical and Pharmacological Aspects of Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases in Childhood: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Spalice, Alberto; Parisi, Pasquale; Papetti, Laura; Nicita, Francesco; Ursitti, Fabiana; Del Balzo, Francesca; Properzi, Enrico; Verrotti, Alberto; Ruggieri, Martino; Iannetti, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases comprise a spectrum of disorders affecting the myelin of the central and peripheral nervous system. These diseases can usually be differentiated on the basis of clinical, radiological, laboratory and pathological findings. Recent studies have contributed to current awareness that inflammatory demyelinating diseases are not restricted to the adult age group, but are more common in pediatric age than previously believed. Some of pediatric inflammatory demyelinating diseases carry an unfavorable long-term prognosis but appropriate treatments can improve the outcome. The possibility of physical and cognitive disability resulting from these diseases, highlights the urgent need for therapeutic strategies for neurorehabilitation, neuroregeneration, and neurorepair. This review discusses characteristics of primary demyelinating diseases more frequently observed in childhood, focusing on epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatments. PMID:21119885

  17. Clinical and pharmacological aspects of inflammatory demyelinating diseases in childhood: an update.

    PubMed

    Spalice, Alberto; Parisi, Pasquale; Papetti, Laura; Nicita, Francesco; Ursitti, Fabiana; Del Balzo, Francesca; Properzi, Enrico; Verrotti, Alberto; Ruggieri, Martino; Iannetti, Paola

    2010-06-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases comprise a spectrum of disorders affecting the myelin of the central and peripheral nervous system. These diseases can usually be differentiated on the basis of clinical, radiological, laboratory and pathological findings. Recent studies have contributed to current awareness that inflammatory demyelinating diseases are not restricted to the adult age group, but are more common in pediatric age than previously believed. Some of pediatric inflammatory demyelinating diseases carry an unfavorable long-term prognosis but appropriate treatments can improve the outcome. The possibility of physical and cognitive disability resulting from these diseases, highlights the urgent need for therapeutic strategies for neurorehabilitation, neuroregeneration, and neurorepair. This review discusses characteristics of primary demyelinating diseases more frequently observed in childhood, focusing on epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatments. PMID:21119885

  18. Isolated tumefactive demyelinating lesions: diagnosis and long-term evolution of 16 patients in a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Siri, A; Carra-Dalliere, Clarisse; Ayrignac, X; Pelletier, J; Audoin, B; Pittion-Vouyovitch, S; Debouverie, M; Lionnet, C; Viala, F; Sablot, D; Brassat, D; Ouallet, J-C; Ruet, A; Brochet, B; Taillandier, L; Bauchet, L; Derache, N; Defer, G; Cabre, P; de Seze, J; Lebrun Frenay, C; Cohen, M; Labauge, P

    2015-07-01

    Isolated tumefactive demyelinating lesion (TDL) is a rare disease and a challenging entity especially for the differential diagnosis, biopsy indications, and therapeutic decisions. Long-term evolution is not well known. The objective of the study is to describe clinical and MRI characteristics and long-term follow-up of patients with isolated TDL. We performed a retrospective study including patients (1) with one TDL radiologically defined by a ≥20 mm FLAIR hyperintensity involving the white matter associated with T1 hypointensity that enhanced after gadolinium injection and (2) without any other MS lesion on the first MRI. Tumor, abscess, or other inflammatory diseases (ADEM, Baló's concentric sclerosis, systemic disease) were excluded. Sixteen patients (11 females/5 males) were included. The mean age of onset was 35.7 years (range 20-65). MRI disclosed supratentorial lesions with a mean size of 39.4 mm and usually mild edema/mass effect. Peripheral (mainly open-ring pattern) and central (mainly heterogeneous) enhancement were respectively seen in 9/16 and 11/16 patients. CSF study (n = 15) found oligoclonal bands (OCB) in seven. A cerebral biopsy was performed in 11 cases showing acute inflammatory demyelination. Thirteen patients were treated by pulse steroids with marked improvement in ten. At last clinical follow-up (mean 65.8 months, range 6-181), diagnosis was MS in 5 (31 %), isolated TDL in 10 (63 %) and one patient had a second TDL (6 %). Isolated tumefactive demyelinating lesions are a rare diagnostic entity. After a mean follow-up of 5 years, almost one-third became MS whereas most of the patients had no further event. PMID:25929666

  19. Human Endogenous Retrovirus and Neuroinflammation in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Faucard, Raphaël; Madeira, Alexandra; Gehin, Nadège; Authier, François-Jérôme; Panaite, Petrica-Adrian; Lesage, Catherine; Burgelin, Ingrid; Bertel, Mélanie; Bernard, Corinne; Curtin, François; Lang, Aloïs B.; Steck, Andreas J.; Perron, Hervé; Kuntzer, Thierry; Créange, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background Human endogenous retroviruses HERV-W encode a pro-inflammatory protein, named MSRV-Env from its original identification in Multiple Sclerosis. Though not detected in various neurological controls, MSRV-Env was found in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDPs). This study investigated the expression of MSRV in CIDP and evaluated relevant MSRV-Env pathogenic effects. Methods 50 CIDP patients, 19 other neurological controls (ONDs) and 65 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were recruited from two different countries. MSRV-env and -pol transcripts, IL6 and CXCL10 levels were quantified from blood samples. MSRV-Env immunohistology was performed in distal sensory nerves from CIDP and neurological controls biopsies. MSRV-Env pathogenic effects and mode of action were assayed in cultured primary human Schwann cells (HSCs). Findings In both cohorts, MSRV-env and -pol transcripts, IL6 positivity prevalence and CXCL10 levels were significantly elevated in CIDP patients when compared to HBDs and ONDs (statistically significant in all comparisons). MSRV-Env protein was detected in Schwann cells in 5/7 CIDP biopsies. HSC exposed to or transfected with MSRV-env presented a strong increase of IL6 and CXCL10 transcripts and protein secretion. These pathogenic effects on HSC were inhibited by GNbAC1, a highly specific and neutralizing humanized monoclonal antibody targeting MSRV-Env. Interpretation The present study showed that MSRV-Env may trigger the release of critical immune mediators proposed as instrumental factors involved in the pathophysiology of CIDP. Significant MSRV-Env expression was detected in a significant proportion of patients with CIDP, in which it may play a role according to its presently observed effects on Schwann cells along with previously known effects on immune cells. Experimental results also suggest that a biomarker-driven therapeutic strategy targeting this protein with a neutralizing antibody such as GNbAC1

  20. Imaging in Pediatric Demyelinating and Inflammatory Diseases of Brain- Part 2.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Sniya Valsa; Muthusamy, Karthik; Mani, Sunithi; Gibikote, Sridhar; Shroff, Manohar

    2016-09-01

    Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis, management, prognostication and follow up of pediatric demyelinating and inflammatory diseases of brain and forms an integral part of the diagnostic criteria. This article reviews the spectrum of aquaporinopathies with an in-depth discussion on present criteria and differentiation from other demyelinating diseases with clinical vignettes for illustration; the latter part of article deals with the spectrum of CNS vasculitis. PMID:27130513

  1. Contactin 1 IgG4 associates to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with sensory ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Yumako; Devaux, Jérôme J.; Fukami, Yuki; Manso, Constance; Belghazi, Maya; Wong, Anna Hiu Yi

    2015-01-01

    A Spanish group recently reported that four patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy carrying IgG4 autoantibodies against contactin 1 showed aggressive symptom onset and poor response to intravenous immunoglobulin. We aimed to describe the clinical and serological features of Japanese chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients displaying the anti-contactin 1 antibodies. Thirteen of 533 (2.4%) patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy had anti-contactin 1 IgG4 whereas neither patients from disease or normal control subjects did (P = 0.02). Three of 13 (23%) patients showed subacute symptom onset, but all of the patients presented with sensory ataxia. Six of 10 (60%) anti-contactin 1 antibody-positive patients had poor response to intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas 8 of 11 (73%) antibody-positive patients had good response to corticosteroids. Anti-contactin 1 IgG4 antibodies are a possible biomarker to guide treatment option. PMID:25808373

  2. Imaging in Pediatric Demyelinating and Inflammatory Diseases of the Brain- Part 1.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Sniya Valsa; Muthusamy, Karthik; Mani, Sunithi; Gibikote, Sridhar; Shroff, Manohar

    2016-09-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, management, prognostication and follow up of pediatric demyelinating and inflammatory diseases of the brain and forms an integral part of the diagnostic criteria. Conventional and advanced MR imaging is the first and only reliable imaging modality. This article reviews the typical and atypical imaging features of common and some uncommon demyelinating and inflammatory diseases with emphasis on the criteria for categorization. Imaging protocols and the role of advanced imaging techniques are also covered appropriately. PMID:26634264

  3. Olig2-expressing progenitor cells preferentially differentiate into oligodendrocytes in cuprizone-induced demyelinated lesions.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Shyful; Tatsumi, Kouko; Okuda, Hiroaki; Shiosaka, Sadao; Wanaka, Akio

    2009-01-01

    Many oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are found in acute or chronic demyelinated area, but not all of them differentiate efficiently into mature oligodendrocytes in the demyelinated central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies have shown that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Olig2, which stimulates OPCs to differentiate into oligodendrocyte, is strongly up-regulated in many pathological conditions including acute or chronic demyelinating lesions in the adult CNS. Despite their potential role in the treatment of demyelinating diseases, the long-term fate of these up-regulated Olig2 cells has not been identified due to the lack of stable labeling methods. To trace their fate we have used double-transgenic mice, in which we were able to label Olig2-positive cells conditionally with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Demyelination was induced in these mice by feeding cuprizone, a copper chelator. After 6 weeks of cuprizone exposure, GFP-positive (GFP(+)) cells were processed for a second labeling with antibodies to major neural cell markers APC (mature oligodendrocyte marker), GFAP (astrocyte marker), NeuN (neuron marker), Iba1 (microglia marker) and NG2 proteoglycan (oligodendrocyte progenitor marker). More than half of the GFP(+) cells in the external capsule showed co-localization with NG2 proteoglycan. While the percentages of NG2-positive (NG2(+)) and APC-positive (APC(+)) oligodendrocyte lineage cells in cuprizone-treated mice were significantly higher than those in the normal diet group, no significant difference was observed for GFAP-positive (GFAP(+)) astrocytic lineage cells. Our data therefore provide direct evidence that proliferation and differentiation of local and/or recruited Olig2 progenitors contribute to remyelination in demyelinated lesions. PMID:19070638

  4. Occurrence and long-term outcome of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Totaro, Rocco; Di Carmine, C; Splendiani, A; Torlone, S; Patriarca, L; Carrocci, C; Sciamanna, S; Marini, C; Carolei, A

    2016-07-01

    Although tumefactive multiple sclerosis is a well recognized variant of multiple sclerosis, prognostic uncertainty still exists about long term prognosis. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and long term outcome of tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs) in a cohort of multiple sclerosis patients. We reviewed brain MRI of 443 patients referred to our MS clinic. All patients meeting the McDonald criteria for multiple sclerosis and showing at least one TDL were included. Kaplan-Meier estimates of disease-free survival in patient cohort were compared with control group without TDLs using a log-rank test. Seven cases with TDLs were identified (occurrence 1.58 %). Tumefactive demyelinating lesion recurrence was 16.6 %. Cumulative proportion of patients free from clinical relapse and from new T2 lesions was lower in the control group although not reaching statistical significance (30 vs 50 %; P = 0.666 and 21.7 vs 33.3 %; P = 0.761, respectively). Disability progression analysis showed a not significant trend towards lower probability of remaining progression free for TDL patients (50 vs 61 %; P = 0.295). Occurrence of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in our cohort was higher than those reported in other studies. Overall, TDLs were not predictive of poor outcome in terms of disability progression. PMID:27083895

  5. Antibodies to MOG in adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Woodhall, Mark R.; Kim, Ji-Sun; Kim, Seong-Joon; Park, Kyung Seok; Vincent, Angela; Lee, Kwang-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical relevance of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG-Ab) in a cohort of adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease (IDD) of the CNS. Methods: Live cell-based assays for MOG-Ab (IgG1 subset) and antibody to aquaporin-4 (AQP4-Ab) were performed in a cohort of 270 adult patients with IDD and 72 controls. Patients were first grouped by positive antibody result as MOG-Ab or AQP4-Ab, and the remainder were grouped by published diagnostic criteria. Results: Seventeen patients with IDD (6.3%) had MOG-Abs and 49 patients (18.1%) had AQP4-Abs; none had both antibodies. The MOG-Ab patients predominantly manifested with isolated symptoms of optic neuritis (83%). One-third of these patients experienced relapses, which involved only the optic nerve, and all relapsed within 1 year of disease onset. At onset, MRI in the MOG-Ab group uniquely demonstrated perineural enhancement, extending to the soft tissues around the optic nerves (33%). Although about 30% of MOG-Ab patients had brain MRI lesions, they had fewer periventricular lesions than the 26 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS); none of these lesions were ovoid or perpendicular to the ventricle. Moreover, MOG-Ab patients did not meet the diagnostic criteria for definite neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and had less spinal cord involvement than the AQP4-Ab group. Four patients (23.5%) had poor visual outcomes (<0.2) or paraplegia. Conclusions: MOG-Abs may be a disease-specific biomarker in adult patients with IDD who have a disease distinct from NMO or MS. The radiologic as well as clinical manifestations of MOG-Ab patients can be useful in their differential diagnosis. PMID:26516628

  6. Fampridine-PR (prolonged released 4-aminopyridine) is not effective in patients with inflammatory demyelination of the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Leussink, Verena-Isabell; Stettner, Mark; Warnke, Clemens; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Fampridine-PR is a voltage-gated potassium channel inhibitor potentially improving nerve conduction in demyelinated axons. Based on its established clinical efficacy in patients with demyelination in the central nervous system, we assessed if fampridine-PR is also effective in patients with inflammatory demyelination of the peripheral nerve. In this small open-label study, 10 patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) were treated with fampridine-PR 10 mg BID for 28 days and assessed clinically as well as by nerve conduction studies. In this study, Fampridine-PR failed to improve CIDP based on clinical measures and nerve conduction studies. Our findings suggest that Fampridine-PR appears to be ineffective in demyelinating polyneuropathies. These observations may indicate a more complex mode of action beyond improving action potential conduction in demyelinated axons. PMID:26968589

  7. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Following Anti-TNF-α Therapy With Infliximab for Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Amir Y; Concepcion, Orestes; Schlachterman, Alexander; Glover, Sarah; Forsmark, Christopher Y

    2016-04-01

    We present a 29-year-old male with Crohn's disease who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) related to infliximab therapy. He developed lower extremity weakness and dysesthesia 3 weeks after a fourth infliximab dose. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein without pleocytosis. The patient initially responded to plasmapheresis therapy with marked symptomatic improvement, but relapsed and was refractory to subsequent treatments with plasmaphereisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and glucocorticoids. While a causal relationship between infliximab and CIDP cannot be proven, clinicians should monitor Crohn's disease patients who are receiving TNF-α antagonists for neurologic symptoms suggestive of demyelinating disease. PMID:27144200

  8. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Following Anti-TNF-α Therapy With Infliximab for Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Concepcion, Orestes; Schlachterman, Alexander; Glover, Sarah; Forsmark, Christopher Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 29-year-old male with Crohn's disease who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) related to infliximab therapy. He developed lower extremity weakness and dysesthesia 3 weeks after a fourth infliximab dose. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein without pleocytosis. The patient initially responded to plasmapheresis therapy with marked symptomatic improvement, but relapsed and was refractory to subsequent treatments with plasmaphereisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and glucocorticoids. While a causal relationship between infliximab and CIDP cannot be proven, clinicians should monitor Crohn's disease patients who are receiving TNF-α antagonists for neurologic symptoms suggestive of demyelinating disease. PMID:27144200

  9. Serum cytokine and chemokine profiles in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Minako; Sawai, Setsu; Misawa, Sonoko; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Mori, Masahiro; Ishige, Takayuki; Satoh, Mamoru; Nomura, Fumio; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-02-15

    To identify serum cytokine networks specific to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), serum samples of two subgroups (18 patients with typical CIDP and 12 patients with multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy [MADSAM]) were analyzed with multiplex magnetic bead-based cytokine assay. TNF-α, HGF, MIP-1β and IL-1β levels were significantly higher in total CIDP patients than in normal controls. Of these, HGF levels were elevated in typical CIDP patients, but not in MADSAM patients. Patients with high HGF levels showed good responses to steroid treatment. Different cytokine profiles among the CIDP subtypes presumably reflect differences in pathophysiology. PMID:25669993

  10. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Seehusen, Frauke; Al-Azreg, Seham A; Raddatz, Barbara B; Haist, Verena; Puff, Christina; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Ulrich, Reiner; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL), histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease. PMID:27441688

  11. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Seehusen, Frauke; Al-Azreg, Seham A.; Raddatz, Barbara B.; Haist, Verena; Puff, Christina; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Ulrich, Reiner; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL), histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease. PMID:27441688

  12. Challenges in the treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Costa, R; Iancu Ferfoglia, R; Viala, K; Léger, J-M

    2014-10-01

    Chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a rare disease, the most frequent one within the spectrum of the so-called "chronic immune-mediated neuropathies". Challenges in the treatment of CIDP firstly concern its diagnosis, which may be difficult, mainly for the atypical forms. Secondly, challenges encompass the choice of the first-line treatment, such as corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg), and plasma exchanges (PE) that have been proven as efficacious by several randomized controlled trials (RCT). Recent reports have focused on both different regimens of corticosteroids, and the occurrence of relapses following treatment with either corticosteroids or IVIg. These data may be helpful for the choice of the first-line treatment and may result in changing the guidelines for treatment of CIDP in clinical practice. The third and more difficult challenge is to manage long-term treatment for CIDP, since no immunomodulatory treatment has to date been proven as efficacious in this situation. Lastly, challenges in the treatment concern the choice of the best outcome measure for CIDP in RCT and clinical practice. The aim of this article is to overview the results of the more recently reported published trials for CIDP, and to give some insights for the current and future management of CIDP. PMID:25200479

  13. Imaging inflammatory acne: lesion detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cula, Gabriela O.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    It is known that effectiveness of acne treatment increases when the lesions are detected earlier, before they could progress into mature wound-like lesions, which lead to scarring and discoloration. However, little is known about the evolution of acne from early signs until after the lesion heals. In this work we computationally characterize the evolution of inflammatory acne lesions, based on analyzing cross-polarized images that document acne-prone facial skin over time. Taking skin images over time, and being able to follow skin features in these images present serious challenges, due to change in the appearance of skin, difficulty in repositioning the subject, involuntary movement such as breathing. A computational technique for automatic detection of lesions by separating the background normal skin from the acne lesions, based on fitting Gaussian distributions to the intensity histograms, is presented. In order to track and quantify the evolution of lesions, in terms of the degree of progress or regress, we designed a study to capture facial skin images from an acne-prone young individual, followed over the course of 3 different time points. Based on the behavior of the lesions between two consecutive time points, the automatically detected lesions are classified in four categories: new lesions, resolved lesions (i.e. lesions that disappear completely), lesions that are progressing, and lesions that are regressing (i.e. lesions in the process of healing). The classification our methods achieve correlates well with visual inspection of a trained human grader.

  14. Non-infectious inflammatory genital lesions.

    PubMed

    Andreassi, Lucio; Bilenchi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    The genitalia may be the site of non-infectious inflammatory lesions that are generally manifested as balanoposthitis and vulvovaginitis. In men, these forms constitute 50% of all balanoposthitis forms, and in women, vulvovaginitis frequency is even higher. They consist of genital locations of general skin diseases, such as psoriasis, lichen planus, lichen sclerosus, and other clinical entities with their own physiognomy, such as Zoon's balanitis-vulvitis. Diagnosis of genital non-infectious inflammatory lesions is usually made on clinical criteria. A biopsy is only necessary for the identification of clinical conditions that may simulate inflammatory form but are actually premalignant processes. PMID:24559568

  15. Overview of the pathogenesis and treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with intravenous immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi-Rogers, Mohamed; Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired heterogeneous disorder of immune origin affecting the peripheral nerves, causing motor weakness and sensory symptoms and signs. The precise pathophysiology of CIDP remains uncertain although B and T cell mechanisms are believed to be implicated. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) have been shown in a number of trials to be an effective treatment for CIDP. IVIg is thought to exert its immunomodulatory effects by affecting several components of the immune system including B-cells, T-cells, macrophages and complement. This article provides an overview of the pathogenesis of CIDP and of its treatment with IVIg. PMID:20376173

  16. Diagnostic utility of aquaporin-4 in the analysis of active demyelinating lesions

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Bogdan F.G.; Guo, Yong; Jentoft, Mark E.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Lennon, Vanda A.; Pittock, Sean J.; Weinshenker, Brian G.; Wingerchuk, Dean M.; Giannini, Caterina; Metz, Imke; Brück, Wolfgang; Shuster, Elizabeth A.; Carter, Jonathan; Boyd, Clara D.; Clardy, Stacey Lynn; Cohen, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess, in a surgical biopsy cohort of active demyelinating lesions, the diagnostic utility of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) immunohistochemistry in identifying neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD) and describe pathologic features that should prompt AQP4 immunohistochemical analysis and AQP4–immunoglobulin G (IgG) serologic testing. Methods: This was a neuropathologic cohort study of 20 surgical biopsies (19 patients; 11 cord/9 brain), performed because of diagnostic uncertainty, interpreted as active demyelinating disease and containing 2 or more of the following additional features: tissue vacuolation, granulocytic infiltrates, or astrocyte injury. Results: AQP4 immunoreactivity was lost in 18 biopsies and increased in 2. Immunopathologic features of the AQP4 loss cohort were myelin vacuolation (18), dystrophic astrocytes and granulocytes (17), vascular hyalinization (16), macrophages containing glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP)–positive debris (14), and Creutzfeldt-Peters cells (0). All 14 cases with available serum tested positive for AQP4-IgG after biopsy. Diagnosis at last follow-up was NMO/NMOSD (15) and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (1 each relapsing and single). Immunopathologic features of the AQP4 increased cohort were macrophages containing GFAP-positive debris and granulocytes (2), myelin vacuolation (1), dystrophic astrocytes (1), Creutzfeldt-Peters cells (1), and vascular hyalinization (1). Diagnosis at last follow-up was multiple sclerosis (MS) and both tested AQP4-IgG seronegative after biopsy. Conclusions: AQP4 immunohistochemistry with subsequent AQP4-IgG testing has diagnostic utility in identifying cases of NMO/NMOSD. This study highlights the importance of considering NMOSD in the differential diagnosis of tumefactive brain or spinal cord lesions. AQP4-IgG testing may avert biopsy and avoid ineffective therapies if these patients are erroneously treated for MS. PMID:25503621

  17. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus With Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangling; Wang, Yanqiang

    2016-01-01

    We recently encountered a patient with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) that was associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A 34-year-old Chinese female with a 3-year history of SLE presented with acute bilateral leg weakness and paraparesis, and lost the ability to walk 1 day after noticing bilateral leg numbness and pain for 12 days. Physical examination revealed bilateral facial muscle paralysis, muscle strength in the legs with graded 1/5 proximally and 2/5 distally bilaterally and absence of deep tendon reflex in both knees and ankles. Paresthesia was observed in distal limbs with glove and stocking distribution. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis demonstrated albuminocytologic dissociation. Electrophysiologic survey also indicated sensory-motor demyelinating polyneuropathy. The diagnosis of SLE was established based on her initial symptoms including intermittent fevers, hair loss, oral ulcers, malar rash and arthritis affecting the elbow, wrist and hand joints; positive immunologic findings for antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti-DNA antibody, anti-Smith (anti-Sm) antibody, low serum complement levels, and the kidney biopsy specimen showed glomerular mesangial proliferation with focal endothelial cell proliferation (ISN/PPS 2004 classification lupus nephritis, class III). Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide resulted in clinical and electrophysiological improvement. PMID:27298667

  18. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus With Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangling; Wang, Yanqiang

    2016-07-01

    We recently encountered a patient with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) that was associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A 34-year-old Chinese female with a 3-year history of SLE presented with acute bilateral leg weakness and paraparesis, and lost the ability to walk 1 day after noticing bilateral leg numbness and pain for 12 days. Physical examination revealed bilateral facial muscle paralysis, muscle strength in the legs with graded 1/5 proximally and 2/5 distally bilaterally and absence of deep tendon reflex in both knees and ankles. Paresthesia was observed in distal limbs with glove and stocking distribution. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis demonstrated albuminocytologic dissociation. Electrophysiologic survey also indicated sensory-motor demyelinating polyneuropathy. The diagnosis of SLE was established based on her initial symptoms including intermittent fevers, hair loss, oral ulcers, malar rash and arthritis affecting the elbow, wrist and hand joints; positive immunologic findings for antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti-DNA antibody, anti-Smith (anti-Sm) antibody, low serum complement levels, and the kidney biopsy specimen showed glomerular mesangial proliferation with focal endothelial cell proliferation (ISN/PPS 2004 classification lupus nephritis, class III). Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide resulted in clinical and electrophysiological improvement. PMID:27298667

  19. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  20. A case of inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy associated with T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wada, M; Kurita, K; Tajima, K; Kawanami, T; Kato, T

    2003-01-01

    Malignant lymphoma may present prominent peripheral nervous system disorders with variable etiologies. We describe a patient who presented with chronic relapsing polyradiculoneuropathy accompanied by right facial nerve palsy. Gadolinium enhancement of the right facial nerve and cervical spinal roots was noted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sural nerve biopsy specimens showed mononuclear cell infiltration around the vessels in the epineurium. Histopathological and immunohistochemical investigations of sural nerve specimens revealed perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes with T-cell dominancy. No apparent direct invasion of lymphoma cells was seen. The results of nerve conduction studies, sural nerve biopsy and cerebrospinal fluid examination were suggestive of immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy. The chronic and relapsing fashion and unique radiological findings in our patient expand on the previously reported features of peripheral neuropathy associated with peripheral T-cell lymphoma. PMID:12542515

  1. Office immunotherapy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Peter J; Taylor, Bruce V; Davies, Jenny L; Mauermann, Michelle L; Litchy, William J; Klein, Christopher J; Dyck, P James B

    2015-10-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin [IVIg], plasma exchange [PE], and corticosteroids are efficacious treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy [CIDP]. IVIg is effective in multifocal motor neuropathy [MMN]. NIS, NIS-weakness, sum scores of raw amplitudes of motor fiber (CMAPs) amplitudes, and Dyck/Rankin score provided reliable measures to detect and scale abnormality and reflect change; they are therefore ideal for office management of response-based immunotherapy (R-IRx) of CIDP. Using efficacious R-IRx, a large early and late therapeutic response (≥ one-fourth were in remission or had recovered) was demonstrated in CIDP. In MMN only an early improvement with late non-significant worsening was observed. The difference in immunotherapy response supports a fundamental difference between CIDP (immune attack on Schwann cells and myelin) and MMN (attack on nodes of Ranvier and axons). PMID:25976871

  2. Treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: From Molecular Bases to Practical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ripellino, Paolo; Fleetwood, Thomas; Cantello, Roberto; Comi, Cristoforo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, in which both cellular and humoral immune responses are involved. The disease is clinically heterogeneous with some patients displaying pure motor form and others also showing a variable degree of sensory dysfunction; disease evolution may also differ from patient to patient, since monophasic, progressive, and relapsing forms are reported. Underlying such clinical variability there is probably a broad spectrum of molecular dysfunctions that are and will be the target of therapeutic strategies. In this review we first explore the biological bases of current treatments and subsequently we focus on the practical management that must also take into account pharmacoeconomic issues. PMID:24527207

  3. [Inflammatory odontogenic lesions of the jaws].

    PubMed

    Gallini, G; Merlini, C; Martelossi, L; Benetti, C

    1991-04-15

    The apical granuloma, the periapical abcess and the radicular cyst are the most frequent between the inflammatory odontogenic lesions of the jaws. These three lesions are caused by the necrosis of the pulp but are very different between each other from an histological point of view and they can correspond to different stages of the same pathological process considering the fact that from a granuloma can arise a periapical abcess or a radicular cyst and from a radicular cyst and abcess can originate. About these three pathological processes we discuss in this article the clinical, radiographical, ethiological, microscopical features, we suggest the treatment and the differential diagnosis. PMID:2070926

  4. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: decreased claudin-5 and relocated ZO-1

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, T; Numata, Y; Mizusawa, H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To clarify the dynamics of molecules composing the blood–nerve barrier (BNB) in inflammatory neuropathies. Methods: The expression of four tight junction (TJ) proteins—claudin-1, claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1—was analysed immunohistochemically in sural nerve biopsy specimens obtained from patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Results: Claudin-1 was detected only in perineurial cells, whereas claudin-5 was present in endothelial cells, irrespective of vessel location or size. Occludin and ZO-1 were found in perineurial cells, in addition to some epineurial and endoneurial endothelial cells. In CIDP, percentages of endoneurial small vessels immunoreactive for claudin-5 were significantly decreased, as were ZO-1 immunoreactive endoneurial small vessels, with staining localised to interfaces between cells. Claudin-1 and occludin immunoreactivity did not differ appreciably between the neuropathies examined. Conclusions: The downregulation of claudin-5 and altered localisation of ZO-1 seen in CIDP specimens may indicate that BNB derangement occurs in inflammatory neuropathies. Further investigation of TJ molecules may suggest new treatments based on properties of the BNB. PMID:15090575

  5. Accelerated repair of demyelinated CNS lesions in the absence of non-muscle myosin IIB.

    PubMed

    Rusielewicz, Tomasz; Nam, Jennifer; Damanakis, Evangelos; John, Gareth R; Raine, Cedric S; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V

    2014-04-01

    The oligodendrocyte (OL), the myelinating cell of the central nervous system, undergoes dramatic changes in the organization of its cytoskeleton as it differentiates from a precursor (oligodendrocyte precursor cells) to a myelin-forming cell. These changes include an increase in its branching cell processes, a phenomenon necessary for OL to myelinate multiple axon segments. We have previously shown that levels and activity of non-muscle myosin II (NMII), a regulator of cytoskeletal contractility, decrease as a function of differentiation and that inhibition of NMII increases branching and myelination of OL in coculture with neurons. We have also found that mixed glial cell cultures derived from NMIIB knockout mice display an increase in mature myelin basic protein-expressing OL compared with wild-type cultures. We have now extended our studies to investigate the role of NMIIB ablation on myelin repair following focal demyelination by lysolecithin. To this end, we generated an oligodendrocyte-specific inducible knockout model using a Plp-driven promoter in combination with a temporally activated CRE-ER fusion protein. Our data indicate that conditional ablation of NMII in adult mouse brain, expedites lesion resolution and remyelination by Plp+ oligodendrocyte-lineage cells when compared with that observed in control brains. Taken together, these data validate the function of NMII as that of a negative regulator of OL myelination in vivo and provide a novel target for promoting myelin repair in conditions such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:24470341

  6. A diagnosis challenge-L4 nerve root compression as the initial presentation of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Alexianu, Marilena; Bastian, Alexandra; Sapira, Violeta; Herţea, Cristina; Cojocaru, M

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 65-year-old woman who was admitted for paraparesis and paresthesias in the inferior limbs. The neurological examination revealed the difficulty in extension of the right foot and of the right toe, accompanied by paresthesias located in the anterolateral area of the right leg, dorsum and plantar area of the foot, the reduction of the right knee jerk, and of the ankle tendon jerk both sides. The vertebro-spinal MRI showed lumbar canal stenosis with L4 intraforaminal compression on the right, and L2-L3 on the left. CSF examination revealed mild increase in protein concentration. The morphological picture of the sural nerve biopsy was compatible with a chronic inflammatory neuropathy and severe muscular lesions of neurogenic origin were observed on right gastrocnemius muscle biopsy. The diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) was established. Solu-medrol (0.5 g/d)-5 days, then medrol (prednisolone) was done, followed by improving of the symptomatology. For the relapse of the disease intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG)-0.4 g/kg/d-5 days was the elective treatment. Six months later she presented a new relapse. IVIG were administered with the remission of the sensitive symptoms. A chronic treatment with medrol was recommended. The diagnosis of L4 disc herniation was obvious in the studied case, but the electroneurographic examination brought extra data for the associated diagnosis of CIDP whose onset was asymmetrical and initially paucisymptomatic. Neither the electroneurographic examination nor the CSF examination were total relevant for CIDP, imposing the sural nerve biopsy. The diagnosis of CIDP involves a team-work composed of neurologist, electroneurophysiologist and neuropathologist. PMID:23610977

  7. [Diagnosis of pediatric multiple sclerosis initially presenting with tumefactive demyelinating lesion using ¹H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Takashi; Gotoh, Yoko; Sano, Fumie; Katoh, Takeo; Nambu, Mituhiko; Okada, Tsutomu; Suenaga, Toshihiko

    2011-09-01

    We report a case of tumefactive demyelinating lesion (TDL) diagnosed using (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H-MRS) and conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 7-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital with complaints of sleepiness and clumsiness of the right limbs. Neurological examination showed somnolence, right-sided apraxia, and hemiparesis with enhanced tendon reflexes and Babinski sign. Conventional brain MRI revealed extensive hyperintensity in the subcortical white matter of the left frontal lobe in both T₂ weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery images. Gadolinium-enhanced T₁ weighted images showed a tumor-like lesion in this area with interrupted rim enhancement, termed open ring sign, and a periventricular lesion along the inferior horn of the right lateral ventricle and a juxtacortical lesion under the right motor cortex. In ¹H-MRS, both single voxel spectroscopy (SVS) and chemical shift imaging showed elevation of choline and reduction of N-acetylaspartate in the left frontal lobe lesion. Furthermore, SVS with a short echo time revealed elevated peaks for glutamate/glutamine complex in this lesion. These results suggested the demyelinating nature of this tumor-like lesion, in accordance with the concept of TDL. Based on this diagnosis, we treated the patient with three sets of methylprednisolone pulse therapy, which resulted in the reduction of TDL and neurological improvement. A follow-up study using MRI also demonstrated two more lesions in the corona radiata and internal capsule of the left hemisphere, supporting a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis based on the revised McDonald's criteria (2010). We concluded that ¹H-MRS may be beneficial in the differential diagnosis of TDL. PMID:21946426

  8. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data.

    PubMed

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p < 0.05) or more severe impairment (p < 0.05), both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p < 0.05), while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p < 0.05) and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p < 0.05). Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p < 0.05 for CIDP; p < 0.05 for MMN). Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP. PMID:27313890

  9. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p < 0.05) or more severe impairment (p < 0.05), both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p < 0.05), while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p < 0.05) and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p < 0.05). Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p < 0.05 for CIDP; p < 0.05 for MMN). Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP. PMID:27313890

  10. Unusual basal ganglia lesions in a diabetic uraemic patient proven to be demyelination: first pathological observation

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Yasutaka; Mito, Yasunori; Yanai, Mituru; Fukazawa, Yu-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    A 64-year-old man suffering from diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure was admitted to our hospital because of consciousness disturbance and parkinsonism. Cranial MRI showed very characteristic features involving the bilateral basal ganglia. Subsequent postmortem examinations demonstrated demyelination in the affected areas. These myelin destruction patterns were quite similar to those of central pontine myelinolysis. However, rapid correction of hyponatraemia was ruled out in this patient. Therefore, a new demyelinating brain disease associated with diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure was suggested. PMID:22948993

  11. Combination therapy of Lovastatin and Rolipram Provides Neuroprotection and Promotes Neurorepair in Inflammatory Demyelination Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Paintlia, Ajaib S; Paintlia, Manjeet K; Singh, Inderjit; Skoff, Robert B; Singh, Avtar K

    2009-01-01

    Drug combination therapies for central nervous system (CNS) demyelination diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) are gaining momentum over monotherapy. Over the past decade, both in vitro and in vivo studies established that statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) and rolipram (phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor; blocks the degradation of intracellular cyclic AMP) can prevent the progression of MS in affected individuals via different mechanisms of action. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of lovastatin and rolipram in combination therapy to promote neurorepair in an inflammatory CNS demyelination model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Combination treatment with suboptimal doses of these drugs in an established case of EAE (clinical disease score ≥2.0) significantly attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells and protected myelin sheath and axonal integrity in the CNS. It was accompanied with elevated level of cyclic AMP and activation of its associated protein kinase A. Interestingly, combination treatment with these drugs impeded neurodegeneration and promoted neurorepair in established EAE animals (clinical disease score ≥3.5) as verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopic analyses. These effects of combination therapy were minimal and/or absent with either drug alone in these settings. Together, these data suggest that combination therapy with lovastatin and rolipram has the potential to provide neuroprotection and promote neurorepair in MS, and may have uses in other related CNS demyelinating diseases. PMID:18720408

  12. Steroids for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: evidence base and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Press, R; Hiew, F L; Rajabally, Y A

    2016-04-01

    Evidence-based therapies for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) consist of corticosteroids, intravenous immunglobulins (IVIg), and plasma exchange. Steroids represent the oldest treatment used historically. In countries where readily available and affordable, IVIg tends to be favored as first-line treatment. The reason for this preference, despite substantially higher costs, is the perception that IVIg is more efficacious and safer than corticosteroids. However, the unselected use of IVIg as a first-line treatment option in all cases of CIDP raises issues of cost-effectiveness in the long-term. Furthermore, serious although rare, particularly thromboembolic side effects may result from their use. Recent data from randomized trials suggest pulsed corticosteroids to have a higher potential in achieving therapy-free remission or longer remission-free periods compared with IVIg, as well as relatively low rates of serious side effects when given as pulsed intravenous infusions during short periods of time. These specific advantages suggest that pulsed steroids could in many cases be used, as the first, rather than second choice of treatment when initiating immunomodulation in CIDP, primarily in hopes of achieving a remission after the short-term use. This article reviews the evidence base for the use of corticosteroids in its various forms in CIDP and factors that may influence clinicians' choice between IVIg and pulsed steroid treatment. The issue of efficacy, relapse rate and time, and side effect profile are analyzed, and some aspects from the authors' experience are discussed in relation to the possibility of using the steroid option as first-line therapy in a large proportion of patients with CIDP. PMID:26437234

  13. Tamoxifen accelerates the repair of demyelinated lesions in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ginez A.; Hofer, Matthias P.; Syed, Yasir A.; Amaral, Ana I.; Rundle, Jon; Rahman, Saifur; Zhao, Chao; Kotter, Mark R. N.

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing central nervous system (CNS) myelin regeneration is recognized as an important strategy to ameliorate the devastating consequences of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Previous findings have indicated that myelin proteins, which accumulate following demyelination, inhibit remyelination by blocking the differentiation of rat oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) via modulation of PKCα. We therefore screened drugs for their potential to overcome this differentiation block. From our screening, tamoxifen emerges as a potent inducer of OPC differentiation in vitro. We show that the effects of tamoxifen rely on modulation of the estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ, and GPR30. Furthermore, we demonstrate that administration of tamoxifen to demyelinated rats in vivo accelerates remyelination. Tamoxifen is a well-established drug and is thus a promising candidate for a drug to regenerate myelin, as it will not require extensive safety testing. In addition, Tamoxifen plays an important role in biomedical research as an activator of inducible genetic models. Our results highlight the importance of appropriate controls when using such models. PMID:27554391

  14. The Subventricular Zone Is Able to Respond to a Demyelinating Lesion After Localized Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Bonsu, Janice M.; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Achanta, Pragathi; Wong, John; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Radiation is a common tool in the treatment of brain tumors that induces neurological deficits as a side effect. Some of these deficits appear to be related to the impact of radiation on the neurogenic niches, producing a drastic decrease in the proliferative capacity of these regions. In the adult mammalian brain, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles is the main neurogenic niche. Neural stem/precursor cells (NSCs) within the SVZ play an important role in brain repair following injuries. However, the irradiated NSCs' ability to respond to damage has not been previously elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the effects of localized radiation on the SVZ ability to respond to a lysolecithin-induced demyelination of the striatum. We demonstrated that the proliferation rate of the irradiated SVZ was increased after brain damage and that residual NSCs were reactivated. The irradiated SVZ had an expansion of doublecortin positive cells that appeared to migrate from the lateral ventricles toward the demyelinated striatum, where newly generated oligodendrocytes were found. In addition, in the absence of demyelinating damage, remaining cells in the irradiated SVZ appeared to repopulate the neurogenic niche a year post-radiation. These findings support the hypothesis that NSCs are radioresistant and can respond to a brain injury, recovering the neurogenic niche. A more complete understanding of the effects that localized radiation has on the SVZ may lead to improvement of the current protocols used in the radiotherapy of cancer. PMID:24038623

  15. Sildenafil (Viagra) Protective Effects on Neuroinflammation: The Role of iNOS/NO System in an Inflammatory Demyelination Model

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Catarina; Nunes, Ana Karolina de Santana; Luna, Rayana Leal de Almeida; Araújo, Shyrlene Meiry da Rocha; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that sildenafil reduces the expression of cytokines, COX-2, and GFAP in a demyelinating model induced in wild-type (WT) mice. Herein, the understandings of the neuroprotective effect of sildenafil and the mediation of iNOS/NO system on inflammatory demyelination induced by cuprizone were investigated. The cerebella of iNOS−/− mice were examined after four weeks of treatment with cuprizone alone or combined with sildenafil. Cuprizone increased GFAP, Iba-1, TNF-α, COX-2, IL-1β, and IFN-γ expression, decreased expression of glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi), and damaged myelin in iNOS−/− mice. Sildenafil reduced Iba-1, IFN-γ, and IL-1β levels but had no effect on the expression of GFAP, TNF-α, and COX-2 compared to the cuprizone group. Sildenafil elevated GSTpi levels and improved the myelin structure/ultrastructure. iNOS−/− mice suffered from severe inflammation following treatment with cuprizone, while WT mice had milder inflammation, as found in the previous study. It is possible that inflammatory regulation through iNOS-feedback is absent in iNOS−/− mice, making them more susceptible to inflammation. Sildenafil has at least a partial anti-inflammatory effect through iNOS inhibition, as its effect on iNOS−/− mice was limited. Further studies are required to explain the underlying mechanism of the sildenafil effects. PMID:23970812

  16. Tumefactive fibro-inflammatory lesions of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Wold, L E; Weiland, L H

    1983-07-01

    Seven patients had tumefactive inflammatory fibrous lesions of the head similar in histologic appearance to Riedel's thyroiditis, sclerosing mediastinitis, and retroperitoneal fibrosis. Five patients were females, and the mean age at presentation was 48 years. Four patients presented clinically with a mass. Histologically, these lesions were characterized by an admixture of mature fibrous tissue and an inflammatory infiltrate of lymphocytes and scattered polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Initially, all patients had been treated surgically. Two patients received radiation therapy when recurrent disease could not be controlled surgically. Five of the six patients on whom follow-up information was available were alive at follow-up that ranged from 14 to 49 months (mean 29). These lesions are distinct histologically from desmoid tumors, fibromatoses, and nodular fasciitis. The spectrum of fibrosclerosing lesions (Riedel's thyroiditis, idiopathic mediastinal fibrosis, retroperitoneal fibrosis, and sclerosing cholangitis) probably includes this group of tumefactive inflammatory fibrous lesions of the head. PMID:6614311

  17. Nuclear export inhibitors avert progression in preclinical models of inflammatory demyelination.

    PubMed

    Haines, Jeffery D; Herbin, Olivier; de la Hera, Belén; Vidaurre, Oscar G; Moy, Gregory A; Sun, Qingxiang; Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Albrecht, Stefanie; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; McCauley, Dilara; Chook, Yuh Min; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Kidd, Grahame J; Shacham, Sharon; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2015-04-01

    Axonal damage has been associated with aberrant protein trafficking. We examined a newly characterized class of compounds that target nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling by binding to the catalytic groove of the nuclear export protein XPO1 (also known as CRM1, chromosome region maintenance protein 1). Oral administration of reversible CRM1 inhibitors in preclinical murine models of demyelination significantly attenuated disease progression, even when started after the onset of paralysis. Clinical efficacy was associated with decreased proliferation of immune cells, characterized by nuclear accumulation of cell cycle inhibitors, and preservation of cytoskeletal integrity even in demyelinated axons. Neuroprotection was not limited to models of demyelination, but was also observed in another mouse model of axonal damage (that is, kainic acid injection) and detected in cultured neurons after knockdown of Xpo1, the gene encoding CRM1. A proteomic screen for target molecules revealed that CRM1 inhibitors in neurons prevented nuclear export of molecules associated with axonal damage while retaining transcription factors modulating neuroprotection. PMID:25706475

  18. Transplanted microvascular endothelial cells promote oligodendrocyte precursor cell survival in ischemic demyelinating lesions.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Keiya; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Puentes, Sandra; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2015-11-01

    We previously showed that transplantation of brain microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) greatly stimulated remyelination in the white matter infarct of the internal capsule (IC) induced by endothelin-1 injection and improved the behavioral outcome. In the present study, we examined the effect of MVEC transplantation on the infarct volume using intermittent magnetic resonance image and on the behavior of oligodendrocyte lineage cells histochemically. Our results in vivo show that MVEC transplantation reduced the infarct volume in IC and apoptotic death of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). These results indicate that MVECs have a survival effect on OPCs, and this effect might contribute to the recovery of the white matter infarct. The conditioned-medium from cultured MVECs reduced apoptosis of cultured OPCs, while the conditioned medium from cultured fibroblasts did not show such effect. These results suggest a possibility that transplanted MVECs increased the number of OPCs through the release of humoral factors that prevent their apoptotic death. Identification of such humoral factors may lead to the new therapeutic strategy against ischemic demyelinating diseases. PMID:26212499

  19. Performance of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values and Conventional MRI Features in Differentiating Tumefactive Demyelinating Lesions From Primary Brain Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Mabray, Marc C.; Cohen, Benjamin A.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier E.; Valles, Francisco E.; Barajas, Ramon F.; Rubenstein, James L.; Cha, Soonmee

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs) remain one of the most common brain lesions to mimic a brain tumor, particularly primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) and high-grade gliomas. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the ability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and conventional MRI features to differentiate TDLs from PCNSLs and high-grade gliomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy-five patients (24 patients with TDLs, 28 with PCNSLs, and 23 with high-grade gliomas) with 168 brain lesions (70 TDLs, 68 PCNSLs, and 30 high-grade gliomas) who underwent DWI before surgery or therapy were included in the study. Minimum ADC (ADCmin) and average ADC (ADCavg) values were calculated for each lesion. ANOVA and ROC analyses were performed. ROC analyses were also performed for the presence of incomplete rim enhancement and for the number of lesions. Multiple-variable logistic regression with ROC analysis was then performed to evaluate performance in multiple-variable models. RESULTS ADCmin was statistically significantly higher (p < 0.01) in TDLs (mean, 0.886; 95% CI, 0.802–0.931) than in PCNSLs (0.547; 95% CI, 0.496–0.598) and high-grade gliomas (0.470; 95% CI, 0.385–0.555). (All ADC values in this article are reported in units of × 10−3 mm2/s.) ADCavg was statistically significantly higher (p < 0.01) in TDLs (mean, 1.362; 95% CI, 1.268–1.456) than in PCNSLs (0.990; 95% CI, 0.919–1.061) but not in high-grade gliomas (1.216; 95% CI, 1.074–1.356). Multiple-variable models showed statistically significant individual effects and superior diagnostic performance on ROC analysis. CONCLUSION TDLs can be diagnosed on preoperative MRI with a high degree of specificity; MRI features of incomplete rim enhancement, high ADC values, and a large number of lesions individually increase the probability and diagnostic confidence that a lesion is a TDL. PMID:26496556

  20. Pericarditis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy during therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2a for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Kazuaki; Konndo, Takeshi; Okada, Shunichi; Enchi, Machiko

    2010-09-27

    We report a case of pericarditis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with biological signs of a lupus-like syndrome due to pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy during treatment for chronic hepatitis C. The patient developed moderate weakness in the lower limbs and dyspnea. He was hospitalized for congestive heart failure. An electrocardiogram showed gradual ST-segment elevation in leads V(1) through V(6) without coronary artery disease. A transthoracic cardiac ultrasonographic study revealed moderate pericardial effusion with normal left ventricular function. Anti-DNA antibody and antids DNA IgM were positive. Neurological examination revealed a symmetrical predominantly sensory polyneuropathy with impairment of light touch and pin prick in globe and stoking-like distribution. Treatment with prednisolone improved the pericarditis and motor nerve disturbance and the treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin improved the sensory nerve disturbance. PMID:21161021

  1. Pericarditis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy during therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2a for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Kazuaki; Konndo, Takeshi; Okada, Shunichi; Enchi, Machiko

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of pericarditis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with biological signs of a lupus-like syndrome due to pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy during treatment for chronic hepatitis C. The patient developed moderate weakness in the lower limbs and dyspnea. He was hospitalized for congestive heart failure. An electrocardiogram showed gradual ST-segment elevation in leads V1 through V6 without coronary artery disease. A transthoracic cardiac ultrasonographic study revealed moderate pericardial effusion with normal left ventricular function. Anti-DNA antibody and antids DNA IgM were positive. Neurological examination revealed a symmetrical predominantly sensory polyneuropathy with impairment of light touch and pin prick in globe and stoking-like distribution. Treatment with prednisolone improved the pericarditis and motor nerve disturbance and the treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin improved the sensory nerve disturbance. PMID:21161021

  2. Variant of multiple sclerosis with dementia and tumefactive demyelinating brain lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Sherifa A

    2015-01-01

    We describe an unusual clinical and diagnostic feature of a patient with multiple sclerosis (MS). A 25-year-old woman was admitted to the Neurology department (December 2009) with one month history of rapid cognitive deterioration. She had poor cognition, dysphasia, reduction in visual acuity and temporal pallor of the optic discs. She had prolonged latencies of P100 component of visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-brain showed multifocal large (≥ 3 cm) white-matter hypointense lesions in T1W and hyperintense in T2W and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images and patchy enhancement. A diagnosis of tumefactive MS was given. She received two consecutive 5-d courses of 1 g daily intravenous methylprednisolone for 2 mo and oral prednisolone in dose of 80 mg twice/daily in between. At the 3rd month, Mini Mental State Examination and VEPs returned to normal but not the MRI. Patient continued oral steroids after hospital discharge (March 2010) for 9 mo with significant MRI improvement after which tapering of steroids started for a year. The patient refused immunomodulation therapy due to her low socioeconomic status. Neither clinical relapse nor new MRI lesions were observed throughout the next 4 years. In spite of the aggressive course of tumefactive MS variant, good prognosis may be seen in some patients. PMID:26090374

  3. Contribution of plexus MRI in the diagnosis of atypical chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lozeron, Pierre; Lacour, Marie-Christine; Vandendries, Christophe; Théaudin, Marie; Cauquil, Cécile; Denier, Christian; Lacroix, Catherine; Adams, David

    2016-01-15

    Nerve enlargement has early been recognized in CIDP and plexus MRI hypertrophy has been reported in typical CIDP cases. Our aim is to determine plexus MRI value in the diagnosis of CIDP with an initial atypical presentation, which, up to now, has not been demonstrated. Retrospective study of 33 consecutive patients suspected of CIDP. Plexus MRI was performed on the most affected territory (brachial or lumbar). Were assessed: plexus trophicity, T2-STIR signal intensity and gadolinium enhancement. Final CIDP diagnosis was made after comprehensive workup. A histo-radiological correlation was performed. Final CIDP diagnosis was made in 25 (76%) including 21 with initial atypical clinical presentation. Eleven CIDP patients (52%) with initial atypical clinical presentation had abnormal plexus MRI including 9 suggestive of CIDP (43%) and none of the patients with an alternative diagnosis. Hypertrophy of the proximal plexus and/or extraforaminal roots was found in 8 cases and Gadolinium enhancement in 2 cases. Abnormalities were more frequent on brachial (86%) than lumbosacral MRIs (29%) and asymmetrical (72%) and most often associated with histological signs of demyelination. The nerve biopsy was suggestive of CIDP in 9/13 patients with normal MRI. Plexus MRI seems useful in the diagnostic strategy of patients with suspicion of CIDP with atypical presentation. Nerve biopsy remains important when other investigations are inconclusive. PMID:26723995

  4. Cortical grey matter demyelination can be induced by elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines in the subarachnoid space of MOG-immunized rats.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Christopher; Magliozzi, Roberta; Durrenberger, Pascal F; Howell, Owain W; Rundle, Jon; Reynolds, Richard

    2013-12-01

    A substantial proportion of cases with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis have extensive inflammation in the leptomeninges that is associated with increased subpial demyelination, neuronal loss and an exacerbated disease course. However, the mechanisms underlying this extensive subpial pathology are poorly understood. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory cytokine production within the meninges may be a key to this process. Post-mortem cerebrospinal fluid and dissected cerebral leptomeningeal tissue from patients with multiple sclerosis were used to study the presence of tumour necrosis factor and interferon gamma protein and messenger RNA levels. A novel model of subpial cortical grey matter demyelination was set up in Dark Agouti rats and analysed using quantitative immunohistochemistry. Increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor and interferon gamma was found in the meninges of cases with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis exhibiting tertiary lymphoid-like structures. Injection of tumour necrosis factor and interferon gamma into the subarachnoid space of female Dark Agouti rats pre-immunized with a subclinical dose of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein mimicked the pathology seen in multiple sclerosis, including infiltration of lymphocytes (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD79+ B cells) into the meninges and extensive subpial demyelination. Extensive microglial/macrophage activation was present in a gradient from the pial surface to deeper cortical layers. Demyelination did not occur in control animals immunized with incomplete Freund's adjuvant and injected with cytokines. These results support the hypothesis that pro-inflammatory molecules produced in the meninges play a major role in cortical demyelination in multiple sclerosis, but also emphasize the involvement of an anti-myelin immune response. PMID:24176976

  5. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Lukas; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:26912645

  6. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain.

    PubMed

    Haider, Lukas; Zrzavy, Tobias; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:26912645

  7. Abnormal sodium channel distribution in optic nerve axons in a model of inflammatory demyelination.

    PubMed

    Craner, Matthew J; Lo, Albert C; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2003-07-01

    Myelinated fibres are characterized by the aggregation of Nav1.6 sodium channels within the axon membrane at nodes of Ranvier, where their presence supports saltatory conduction. In this study, we used immunocytochemical methods to study the organization of sodium channels along axons in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis. We studied axons within the optic nerve, a CNS tract commonly affected in multiple sclerosis, and their cell bodies of origin (retinal ganglion cells), using subtype-specific antibodies generated against sodium channel subtypes Nav1.1, Nav1.2, Nav1.3 and Nav1.6, which previously have been shown to be expressed by retinal ganglion cells. We demonstrate a significant switch from Nav1.6 to Nav1.2 expression in the optic nerve in EAE; there was a reduction in frequency of Nav1.6-positive nodes (84.5% Nav1.6-immunopositive nodes in control versus 32.9% in EAE) and increased frequency of Nav1.2-positive nodes (11.8% Nav1.2 immunopositive nodes in control versus 74.9% in EAE). Moreover, we observed a significant increase in the number of linear (presumably demyelinated) axonal profiles demonstrating extended diffuse immunostaining for Nav1.2 in EAE versus control optic nerves. These changes within the optic nerve are paralleled by decreased levels of Nav1.6 and increased Nav1.2 protein, together with increased levels of Nav1.2 mRNA, within retinal ganglion cells in EAE. Our findings of a loss of Nav1.6 and increased expression of Nav1.2 suggest that electrogenesis in EAE may revert to a stage similar to that observed in immature retinal ganglion cells in which Nav1.2 channels support conduction of action potentials along axons. PMID:12805113

  8. Diagnostic value of aquaporin 4 antibody in assessing idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating central nervous system diseases in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Kishk, Nirmeen A; Abokrysha, Noha T; Rashed, Laila; Ahmed, Nagwa

    2015-04-01

    Neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin G (NMO-IgG) binds selectively to aquaporin 4 (AQP4). We aimed to evaluate the frequency of AQP4 antibody in Egyptian patients. We retrospectively evaluated 39 consecutive Egyptian patients with suspected idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating central nervous system disease (IIDCD) who visited the multiple sclerosis clinic at Kaser Al-Aini Hospital. The patients were diagnosed with NMO, other NMO spectrum disorders, or multiple sclerosis using the respective current diagnostic criteria. For the anti-AQP4 antibody assays, serum samples from all patients and 16 healthy matched controls were evaluated. The coded sera were tested for AQP4 antibody using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. The relations between the clinical diagnosis and the AQP4 antibody serologic status were studied. Among the 39 patients, 21 (53.85%) were AQP4 antibody-positive. NMO spectrum disorders patients had a significantly higher level of AQP4 antibody compared with MS patients and controls (p<0.001). Only eight patients (36.36%) met the Wingerchuk 2006 criteria for NMO diagnosis excluding AQP4 antibody-seropositive status. AQP4 antibody was highly prevalent (almost 54%) in Egyptian IIDCD patients. Our research revealed that we must maintain a high index of suspicion for NMO spectrum disorders. PMID:25677878

  9. Aquaporin-4 Immuneglobulin G Testing in 36 Consecutive Jamaican Patients with Inflammatory Central Nervous System Demyelinating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sandy, Sherri; Seemungal, Terence A.R.; Ali, Amza

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) in Jamaica are lacking. Here we reviewed the clinical records of 700 patients undergoing neurological evaluation at the Kingston Public Hospital, the largest tertiary institution in Jamaica over a 4 month period. We investigated the diagnostic utility of Aquaporin-4 ImmuneglobulinG (AQP4-IgG) testing in 36 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of an inflammatory demyelinating disorder (IDD) of the central nervous system (CNS). Patients were classified into 3 categories: i) NMO, n=10; ii) multiple sclerosis (MS), n=14 and iii) unclassified IDD (n=12). All sera were tested for AQP-IgG status by cell binding assay (Euroimmun). No MS cases were positive. Ninety per cent of NMO cases were positive. Four of 12 patients with unclassified IDD tested positive for AQP4-IgG. AQP4-IgG seropositivity was associated with a lower socioeconomic status, higher EDSS (P=0.04) and lower pulmonary function than the seronegative cases (P=0.007). Aquaporin-4 autoimmunity may account for a significant proportion of Jamaican CNS IDDs. PMID:25309712

  10. Defining and Regulating Acute Inflammatory Lesion Formation during the Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Christopher; Smith, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The primary pathology of the human central nervous system disease multiple sclerosis (MS) and the animal counterpart experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) includes immunological and inflammatory events. Immune system involvement in MS has been widely debated but the role of inflammation has received less attention. Classic acute inflammation features vasculitis, resident tissue macrophage and mast cell participation plus the involvement of circulatory-derived neutrophils and platelets. Pre-lesion development in MS incorporates cerebral vasculitis, activated resident microglia in normal appearing white matter together with infiltrating cell types and factors indicative of an acute inflammatory reaction. Similarly, the formation of perivascular lesions during early EAE includes characteristic neurovasculitis, the participation of central nervous system microglial phenotypes plus haemopoietic cells and mediators, signifying an ongoing acute inflammatory response. EAE has been extensively used as a screen to select drugs for MS treatment but has been criticised as unrepresentative of the human condition due to fundamental differences in disease induction and pathogenesis. The review provides compelling evidence for a distinct acute inflammatory phase in MS lesion formation that is convincingly reproduced in early EAE pathology. Moreover, consideration of drug efficacy studies undertaken during initial EAE validates the occurrence of an acute inflammatory phase in disease pathogenesis. Critical appraisal, recognition and acceptance of the mutual acute inflammatory components inherent in the primary pathology of MS and EAE reveals new targets and encourages confident and reliable employment of the animal model in the assessment of novel compounds for the control of key primary pathological events in human demyelinating disease. PMID:26177741

  11. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, inflammatory fibrosarcoma, and related lesions: an historical review with differential diagnostic considerations.

    PubMed

    Coffin, C M; Dehner, L P; Meis-Kindblom, J M

    1998-05-01

    The concept of the inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) has evolved from an already perplexing pathological process, the inflammatory pseudotumor, which was initially recognized in the lung and regarded as a pseudoneoplasm, although its histological features resembled a spindle cell sarcoma. Despite the pathological findings and their apparent prognostic implications, most affected individuals regardless of the primary site have had favorable clinical outcomes. The designation of inflammatory pseudotumor came to be widely accepted, although these lesions were clearly tumors or masses that may or may not have been pseudoneoplasms. An aberrant or exaggerated response to tissue injury without an established cause has generally been favored as the pathogenesis of the inflammatory pseudotumor or IMT. Once the myofibroblast was identified and its function in tissue repair was established, this cell type was found in a variety of soft tissue lesions from nodular fasciitis to malignant fibrous histiocytoma. The myofibroblast was eventually recognized as the principal cell type in the inflammatory pseudotumor, which provided the opportunity to redesignate this tumor as IMT. Some of the clinical and pathological aspects of the IMT began to suggest the possibility that these lesions are more similar to neoplasms than a postinflammatory process. Another step in the evolution of the inflammatory pseudotumor and IMT occurred with the report of a mesenteric or retroperitoneal tumor with similar pathological features to the latter tumors but with more aggressive behavior to warrant an interpretation of malignancy as an inflammatory fibrosarcoma. The IMT and inflammatory fibrosarcoma appear to have many overlapping clinical and pathological features. These tumors are histogenetically related, and if they are separate entities, they are differentiated more by degrees than absolutes. The therapeutic approach to these tumors should relay primarily on surgical resection. Studies in

  12. Conducting processes in simulated chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy at 20°C-42°C.

    PubMed

    Stephanova, D I; Daskalova, M; Mladenov, M

    2015-03-01

    Decreased conducting processes leading usually to conduction block and increased weakness of limbs during cold (cold paresis) or warmth (heat paresis) have been reported in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). To explore the mechanisms of these symptoms, the effects of temperature (from 20°C to 42°C) on nodal action potentials and their current kinetics in previously simulated case of 70% CIDP are investigated, using our temperature dependent multi-layered model of the myelinated human motor nerve fiber. The results show that potential amplitudes have a bifid form at 20°C. As in the normal case, for the CIDP case, the nodal action potentials are determined mainly by the nodal sodium currents (I Na ) for the temperature range of 20-39°C, as the contribution of nodal fast and slow potassium currents (I Kf and I Ks ) to the total ionic current (Ii) is negligible. Also, the contribution of I Kf and I Ks to the membrane repolarization is enhanced at temperatures higher than 39°C. However, in the temperature range of 20-42°C, all potential parameters in the CIDP case, except for the conduction block during hyperthermia (≥ 40°C) which is again at 45°C, worsen: (i) conduction velocities and potential amplitudes are decreased; (ii) afterpotentials and threshold stimulus currents for the potential generation are increased; (iii) the current kinetics of action potentials is slowed and (iv) the conduction block during hypothermia (≤ 25°C) is at temperatures lower than 20°C. These potential parameters are more altered during hyperthermia and are most altered during hypothermia. The present results suggest that the conducting processes in patients with CIDP are in higher risk during hypothermia than hyperthermia. PMID:25597276

  13. [Aortic inflammatory lesions in Behçet's disease].

    PubMed

    Desbois, A-C; Wechsler, B; Cacoub, P; Saadoun, D

    2016-04-01

    The arterial lesions affect about 10% of patients with Behçet's disease (BD). Aortic inflammatory involvement includes predominantly aortic aneurysmal lesions affecting most often the abdominal aorta. They account for the severity of the disease and are a leading cause of death when they hit the aorta or pulmonary arteries. Within the arterial lesions of BD, aortic involvement is, with femoral lesions, the most common site involved (18-28% of patients with vascular disease). Unlike other large vessels vasculitis (i.e. giant cell arteritis and Takayasu's arteritis) diffuse aortitis is observed in less than 5% of patients with BD. Aortic lesions of BD may be asymptomatic (systematic imaging or occasionally associated with other vascular event) or be revealed by the occurrence of abdominal, thoracic or lumbar pain, or an aortic valve insufficiency. Fever is frequently associated. Increase in acute phase reactants is common in these patients. Histological analysis may show infiltration by lymphocytes, neutrophils and plasma cells in the media and adventitia and a proliferation of the vasa vasorum in the media as well as a fibroblastic proliferation. In the later phase, a fibrous thickening of the media and adventitia is observed as well as a proliferation and thickening of the vasa vasorum. The therapeutic management should always include a medical treatment for the control of inflammation (corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and/or biotherapy) and often an endovascular or surgical treatment if the aneurysm is threatening. The choice between endovascular or surgical treatment is considered case by case, depending on the experience of the team, anatomical conditions and of the clinical presentation. In this review, we provide a detailed and updated review of the literature to describe the aortic inflammatory damage associated with Behçet's disease. PMID:26611428

  14. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of inflammatory abdominal wall lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Rabinowitz, J.G.

    1982-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with inflammatory lesions of the abdominal wall were examined by ultrasonography. Nine of these patients underwent computed tomographic (CT) scanning as well. Both ultrasonography and CT clearly delineated the exact location and extent of abdominal wall abscesses. Abscesses were easily differentiated from cellulitis or phlegmon with ultrasound. The peritoneal line was more clearly delineated on ultrasonograms than on CT scans; abscesses were also more distinct on the ultrasonograms because of their low echogenicity compared with the surrounding structures. Gas bubbles, fat density with specific low attenuation values, and underlying inflamed bowel loops in obese patients with Crohn's disease were better delineated by CT.

  15. Movement disorders in multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Raja; Jankovic, Joseph

    2013-05-15

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system characterized by dissemination of the lesions in time and space. While tremor is frequently seen in patients with multiple sclerosis, other movement disorders such as parkinsonism, dystonia, chorea, ballism, paroxysmal dystonia, paroxysmal chorea, myoclonus, tourettism, restless leg syndrome and hemifacial spasm are less frequently reported. In this systematic review of the literature, we describe the different movement disorders reported in patients with multiple sclerosis and attempt to characterize their relation with the underlying demyelinating process. We also summarize the reports of movement disorders described in other demyelinating diseases such as neuromyelitis optica, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and central pontine myelinolysis. PMID:23522528

  16. Organ-Specific Protective Role of NKT Cells in Virus-Induced Inflammatory Demyelination and Myocarditis Depends on Mouse Strain

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Eiichiro; Sato, Fumitaka; Omura, Seiichi; Martinez, Nicholas E.; Reddy, Pratap C.; Taniguchi, Masaru; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) can induce demyelination or myocarditis in susceptible mouse strains. A deficiency of NKT cells exacerbated TMEV-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) in SJL/J and BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 background, however, NKT-cell-deficient Jαt 18 KO mice remained as resistant to TMEV-IDD as wild-type mice. Echocardiography and histology showed that Jα18 KO mice developed more severe myocarditis (greater T cell infiltration and fibrosis) than wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role of NKT cells in myocarditis in C57BL/6 mice. Jα18 KO mice had higher cardiac viral RNA and anti-viral antibody titers, but had lower lymphoproliferation and IL-4 and IL-10 production. PMID:25434008

  17. Central Nervous System Idiopathic Inflammatory Demyelinating Disorders in South Americans: A Descriptive, Multicenter, Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Papais-Alvarenga, Regina Maria; Vasconcelos, Claudia Cristina Ferreira; Carra, Adriana; de Castillo, Ibis Soto; Florentin, Sara; Diaz de Bedoya, Fernando Hamuy; Mandler, Raul; de Siervi, Luiza Campanella; Pimentel, Maria Lúcia Vellutini; Alvarenga, Marina Papais; Papais Alvarenga, Marcos; Grzesiuk, Anderson Kuntz; Gama Pereira, Ana Beatriz Calmon; Gomes Neto, Antonio Pereira; Velasquez, Carolina; Soublette, Carlos; Fleitas, Cynthia Veronica; Diniz, Denise Sisteroli; Armas, Elizabeth; Batista, Elizabeth; Hernandez, Freda; Pereira, Fernanda Ferreira Chaves da Costa; Siqueira, Heloise Helena; Cabeça, Hideraldo; Sanchez, Jose; Brooks, Joseph Bruno Bidin; Gonçalves, Marcus Vinicius; Barroso, Maria Cristina Del Negro; Ravelo, Maria Elena; Castillo, Maria Carlota; Ferreira, Maria Lúcia Brito; Rocha, Maria Sheila Guimarães; Parolin, Monica Koncke Fiuza; Molina, Omaira; Marinho, Patricia Beatriz Christino; Christo, Paulo Pereira; Brant de Souza, Renata; Pessanha Neto, Silvio; Camargo, Solange Maria das Graças; Machado, Suzana Costa; Neri, Vanderson Carvalho; Fragoso, Yara Dadalti; Alvarenga, Helcio; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos

    2015-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease (IIDD) spectrum has been investigated among different populations, and the results have indicated a low relative frequency of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) among multiple sclerosis (MS) cases in whites (1.2%-1.5%), increasing in Mestizos (8%) and Africans (15.4%-27.5%) living in areas of low MS prevalence. South America (SA) was colonized by Europeans from the Iberian Peninsula, and their miscegenation with natives and Africans slaves resulted in significant racial mixing. The current study analyzed the IIDD spectrum in SA after accounting for the ethnic heterogeneity of its population. A cross-sectional multicenter study was performed. Only individuals followed in 2011 with a confirmed diagnosis of IIDD using new diagnostic criteria were considered eligible. Patients’ demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. In all, 1,917 individuals from 22 MS centers were included (73.7% female, 63.0% white, 28.0% African, 7.0% Mestizo, and 0.2% Asian). The main disease categories and their associated frequencies were MS (76.9%), NMO (11.8%), other NMO syndromes (6.5%), CIS (3.5%), ADEM (1.0%), and acute encephalopathy (0.4%). Females predominated in all main categories. The white ethnicity also predominated, except in NMO. Except in ADEM, the disease onset occurred between 20 and 39 years old, early onset in 8.2% of all cases, and late onset occurred in 8.9%. The long-term morbidity after a mean disease time of 9.28±7.7 years was characterized by mild disability in all categories except in NMO, which was scored as moderate. Disease time among those with MS was positively correlated with the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score (r=0.374; p=<0.001). This correlation was not observed in people with NMO or those with other NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSDs). Among patients with NMO, 83.2% showed a relapsing-remitting course, and 16.8% showed a monophasic course. The NMO-IgG antibody tested using indirect

  18. Central Nervous System Idiopathic Inflammatory Demyelinating Disorders in South Americans: A Descriptive, Multicenter, Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Papais-Alvarenga, Regina Maria; Vasconcelos, Claudia Cristina Ferreira; Carra, Adriana; de Castillo, Ibis Soto; Florentin, Sara; Diaz de Bedoya, Fernando Hamuy; Mandler, Raul; de Siervi, Luiza Campanella; Pimentel, Maria Lúcia Vellutini; Alvarenga, Marina Papais; Alvarenga, Marcos Papais; Grzesiuk, Anderson Kuntz; Gama Pereira, Ana Beatriz Calmon; Gomes Neto, Antonio Pereira; Velasquez, Carolina; Soublette, Carlos; Fleitas, Cynthia Veronica; Diniz, Denise Sisteroli; Armas, Elizabeth; Batista, Elizabeth; Hernandez, Freda; Pereira, Fernanda Ferreira Chaves da Costa; Siqueira, Heloise Helena; Cabeça, Hideraldo; Sanchez, Jose; Brooks, Joseph Bruno Bidin; Gonçalves, Marcus Vinicius; Barroso, Maria Cristina Del Negro; Ravelo, Maria Elena; Castillo, Maria Carlota; Ferreira, Maria Lúcia Brito; Rocha, Maria Sheila Guimarães; Parolin, Monica Koncke Fiuza; Molina, Omaira; Marinho, Patricia Beatriz Christino; Christo, Paulo Pereira; Brant de Souza, Renata; Pessanha Neto, Silvio; Camargo, Solange Maria das Graças; Machado, Suzana Costa; Neri, Vanderson Carvalho; Fragoso, Yara Dadalti; Alvarenga, Helcio; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos

    2015-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease (IIDD) spectrum has been investigated among different populations, and the results have indicated a low relative frequency of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) among multiple sclerosis (MS) cases in whites (1.2%-1.5%), increasing in Mestizos (8%) and Africans (15.4%-27.5%) living in areas of low MS prevalence. South America (SA) was colonized by Europeans from the Iberian Peninsula, and their miscegenation with natives and Africans slaves resulted in significant racial mixing. The current study analyzed the IIDD spectrum in SA after accounting for the ethnic heterogeneity of its population. A cross-sectional multicenter study was performed. Only individuals followed in 2011 with a confirmed diagnosis of IIDD using new diagnostic criteria were considered eligible. Patients' demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. In all, 1,917 individuals from 22 MS centers were included (73.7% female, 63.0% white, 28.0% African, 7.0% Mestizo, and 0.2% Asian). The main disease categories and their associated frequencies were MS (76.9%), NMO (11.8%), other NMO syndromes (6.5%), CIS (3.5%), ADEM (1.0%), and acute encephalopathy (0.4%). Females predominated in all main categories. The white ethnicity also predominated, except in NMO. Except in ADEM, the disease onset occurred between 20 and 39 years old, early onset in 8.2% of all cases, and late onset occurred in 8.9%. The long-term morbidity after a mean disease time of 9.28±7.7 years was characterized by mild disability in all categories except in NMO, which was scored as moderate. Disease time among those with MS was positively correlated with the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score (r=0.374; p=<0.001). This correlation was not observed in people with NMO or those with other NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSDs). Among patients with NMO, 83.2% showed a relapsing-remitting course, and 16.8% showed a monophasic course. The NMO-IgG antibody tested using indirect

  19. Neuroradiological evaluation of demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disease can affect patients across the life span. Consensus definitions and criteria of all of the different acquired demyelinating diseases that fall on this spectrum have magnetic resonance imaging criteria. The advances of both neuroimaging techniques and important discoveries in immunology have produced an improved understanding of these conditions and classification. Neuroimaging plays a central role in the accurate diagnosis, prognosis, disease monitoring and research efforts that are being undertaken in this disease. This review focuses on the imaging spectrum of acquired demyelinating disease. PMID:23858328

  20. Association Between the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and the Level of Aquaporin-4 Protein Expression in Han and Minority Chinese with Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Chu, Lan; Dai, Qingqing; Xu, Zhu; He, Dian; Wang, Hao; Wang, Qingsong; Zhang, Yifan; Zhu, Yingwu; Li, Yuan; Cai, Gang; Slavica, Krantic; Allan, Kermode

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not aquaporin-4 (AQP4) gene mutations are related to the pathogenesis of inflammatory demyelinating diseases in the central nervous system. Polymorphisms of AQP4 exons 1-5 were determined by sequencing DNA from 67 patients with central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating diseases, including neuromyelitis optica (NMO), multiple sclerosis, recurrent or simultaneous bilateral optic neuritis, and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. A plasmid with the identified new missense mutation was constructed, and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293A) were transfected with either the pEGFP-N1-AQP4-M23 vector (bearing the identified mutated cDNA sequence) or with the plasmid bearing the wild-type AQP4 gene sequence. AQP4 protein expression was analyzed in both experimental groups using Western Blot analysis following protein extraction from transfected cells. A synonymous mutation (rs1839318) was detected on exon 3, and an additional synonymous mutation was detected on the exon 2-2 (rs72557968). Most importantly, a new missense mutation was detected on exon 2-1. According to Western blot analysis, the mutated cDNA sequence yielded increased AQP4 protein expression in comparison with the wild-type cDNA sequence (P < 0.05). AQP4 gene mutations are uncommon, occurring in only 3 out of 67 patients. Although it is possible that the mutations contributed to an increased risk of inflammatory central nervous system disease in these individuals, it is unlikely that mutations are a significant contributor to most patients with NMO spectrum disorders in China. PMID:25895050

  1. Neurotropin attenuates local inflammatory response and inhibits demyelination induced by chronic constriction injury of the mouse sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Shunsuke; Okada, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Michio; Fujisawa, Hiroki; Okada, Tomoyuki; Naiki, Mitsuru; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2016-07-01

    Neuropathic pain caused by nerve damage in the central and/or peripheral nervous systems is a refractory disorder and the management of such chronic pain has become a major issue. Neurotropin is a drug widely used in Japan and China to treat chronic pain. Although Neurotropin has been demonstrated to suppress chronic pain through the descending pain inhibitory system, the mechanism of analgesic action in the peripheral nervous system remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the local effects of Neurotropin on peripheral nerve damage in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Neurotropin reduced mRNA expressions of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the sciatic nerve 1 day after the injury. Activation of Erk was also inhibited locally in the Neurotropin treatment group. Since Erk activation results in demyelination along with dedifferentiation of Schwann cells, we investigated the expression level of myelin basic protein. Five days after the injury, Neurotropin attenuated the downregulation of myelin basic protein in the sciatic nerve in the CCI model. Local effects of Neurotropin around the injury site may result in discovery of new treatments for not only neuropathic pain but also demyelinating diseases and peripheral nervous system injury. PMID:27233579

  2. Theiler's Virus Infection: Pathophysiology of Demyelination and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fumitaka; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hasanovic, Faris; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been suggested to be an autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS), whose primary target is either myelin itself, or myelin-forming cells, the oligodendrocytes. Although axonal damage occurs in MS, it is regarded as a secondary event to the myelin damage. Here, the lesion develops from the myelin (outside) to the axons (inside) “Outside-In model”. The Outside-In model has been supported by an autoimmune model for MS, experimental autoimmune (allergic) encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, recently, 1) EAE-like disease has also been shown to be induced by immune responses against axons, and 2) immune responses against axons and neurons as well as neurodegeneration independent of inflammatory demyelination have been reported in MS, which can not be explained by the Outside-In model. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) is a viral model for MS. In TMEV infection, axonal injury precedes demyelination, where the lesion develops from the axons (inside) to the myelin (outside) “Inside-Out model”. The initial axonal damage could result in the release of neuroantigens, inducing autoimmune responses against myelin antigens, which potentially attack the myelin from outside the nerve fiber. Thus, the Inside-Out and Outside-In models can make a “vicious” immunological cycle or initiate an immune cascade. PMID:20537875

  3. Fulminant Demyelinating Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rahmlow, Megan R.; Kantarci, Orhun

    2013-01-01

    Fulminant demyelinating disease is a heading that covers acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and its variant acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (Hurst disease), severe relapses of multiple sclerosis (MS), variants of MS (tumefactive MS, Marburg variant, Balo concentric sclerosis, myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis), and neuromyelitis optica-spectrum disorders associated with aquaporin autoimmunity. These categories of inflammatory demyelinating disease often prompt hospital admission and many necessitate intensive care monitoring due to the aggressive nature of the illness and associated neurologic morbidity. In this review, we highlight the discriminating clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of these disorders. Acute management is often accomplished with use of high-dose intravenous steroids and plasma exchange. Aggressive disease may respond to immunosuppression. Prognosis for recovery varies among the disorders but most patients improve. Factors influencing outcome are also discussed. PMID:23983890

  4. Pathologic Heterogeneity Persists in Early Active Multiple Sclerosis Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Imke; Weigand, Stephen D; Popescu, Bogdan F G; Frischer, Josa M; Parisi, Joseph E; Guo, Yong; Lassmann, Hans; Brück, Wolfgang; Lucchinetti, Claudia F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions demonstrate immunopathological heterogeneity in patterns of demyelination. Previous cross-sectional studies reported immunopatterns of demyelination were identical among multiple active demyelinating lesions from the same individual, but differed between individuals, leading to the hypothesis of intraindividual pathological homogeneity and interindividual heterogeneity. Other groups suggested a time-dependent heterogeneity of lesions. The objective of our present study was to analyze tissue samples collected longitudinally to determine whether patterns of demyelination persist over time within a given patient. Methods Archival tissue samples derived from patients with pathologically confirmed CNS inflammatory demyelinating disease who had undergone either diagnostic serial biopsy or biopsy followed by autopsy, were analyzed immunohistochemically. Inclusion criteria was the presence of early active demyelinating lesions - required for immunopattern classification - obtained from the same patient at two or more time points. Results Among 1321 surgical biopsies consistent with MS, 22 cases met study inclusion criteria. Twenty-one patients (95%) showed a persistence of immunopathological patterns in tissue sampled from different time points. This persistence was demonstrated for all major patterns of demyelination. A single patient showed features suggestive of both pattern II and pattern III on biopsy, but only pattern II among all active lesions examined at autopsy. Interpretation These findings continue to support the concept of patient-dependent immunopathological heterogeneity in early MS and suggest that the mechanisms and targets of tissue injury may differ among patient subgroups. These observations have potentially significant implications for individualized therapeutic approaches. PMID:24771535

  5. Cost-utility of Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) compared with corticosteroids for the treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has demonstrated improvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) patients in placebo controlled trials. However, IVIG is also much more expensive than alternative treatments such as corticosteroids. The objective of the paper is to evaluate, from a Canadian perspective, the cost-effectiveness of IVIG compared to corticosteroid treatment of CIDP. Methods A markov model was used to evaluate the costs and QALYs for IVIG and corticosteroids over 5 years of treatment for CIDP. Patients initially responding to IVIG could remain a responder or relapse every 12 week model cycle. Non-responding IVIG patients were assumed to be switched to corticosteroids. Patients on corticosteroids were at risk of a number of adverse events (fracture, diabetes, glaucoma, cataract, serious infection) in each cycle. Results Over the 5 year time horizon, the model estimated the incremental costs and QALYs of IVIG treatment compared to corticosteroid treatment to be $124,065 and 0.177 respectively. The incremental cost per QALY gained of IVIG was estimated to be $687,287. The cost per QALY of IVIG was sensitive to the assumptions regarding frequency and dosing of maintenance IVIG. Conclusions Based on common willingness to pay thresholds, IVIG would not be perceived as a cost effective treatment for CIDP. PMID:20565778

  6. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) associated to hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) and revealed after influenza AH1N1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Remiche, Gauthier; Abramowicz, Marc; Mavroudakis, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Neurological complications of AH1N1 vaccination such as Guillain-Barré syndrome were described in the previous years. Several reports suggest that hereditary neuropathies may be a predisposing factor for immune-mediated neuropathies. We report the case of a 54-year-old female who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) 5 weeks after AH1N1 vaccination. She had no previous neurological history, but neurophysiological features led us to suspect an underlying hereditary neuropathy. PMP22 gene analysis showed a typical deletion, confirming the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). We observed a significant clinical and neurophysiological improvement of the neuropathy after intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of CIDP potentially triggered by AH1N1 vaccination. This and previous observations suggest that genetic-determined neuropathies could predispose to the occurrence of immune-mediated neuropathies. One must recall the possibility of a superimposed hereditary neuropathy like HNPP in patients with a clinical presentation of CIDP, especially when positive family history or unexpected neurophysiological features are present. PMID:24146347

  7. Nonsurgical management of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Immature nonvital teeth can often be associated with periapical lesions. Presence of external inflammatory resorption can complicate the treatment plan. A 21-year-old female patient presented with a large periapical lesion in relation to teeth 11 and 12. Tooth 11 was an immature tooth undergoing external inflammatory resorption. Aspiration through the root canal was carried out to evacuate the purulent fluid in the periapical lesion. Triple antibiotic paste was then placed as an intracanal medicament for a period of 2 weeks, followed by calcium hydroxide therapy for a period of 2 months. Mineral trioxide aggregate was then placed as an apical barrier to a thickness of about 4 mm. Obturation of the remainder of the canal space was done after 48 h. Complete periapical healing was evident after 1 year and 6 months. Nonsurgical healing of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption can be successfully achieved. PMID:26180425

  8. Role of glial cells in innate immunity and their role in CNS demyelination.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Subramaniam

    2011-10-28

    The adaptive and innate arms of the immune system are the two pillars of host defense against environmental pathogens. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS which is considered to be autoimmune and is thought to result from breakdown in the usual checks and balances of the adaptive immune response. The major pathological outcome of the disease is "the MS plaque" a unique feature of CNS demyelination characterized by the destruction of oligodendrocytes with loss of myelin and underlying axons. The MS plaque is not seen in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. The prevailing opinion suggests that MS is mediated by the activation of an adaptive immune response which targets neural antigens. Currently, the role of an innate immune in the development of the lesions in MS has remained unclear. We explore the potential cellular elements of the innate immune system and in particular glial cells, which are likely candidates in inducing the specific pathological picture that is evident in MS. Activated microglia and the release of molecules which are detrimental to oligodendrocyte have been suggested as mechanisms by which innate immunity causes demyelination in MS. However a microglia/macrophage centric model does not explain the specificity of lesion development in MS. We propose that activation pathways of receptors of the innate immune system present on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes rather than microglia are central to the pathogenesis of demyelination seen in MS. PMID:21907419

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Peripheral Blood in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy Patients Identifies TNFR1 and TLR Pathways in the IVIg Response

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Alexandra; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Debs, Rabab; Reach, Pauline; Tahiri, Khadija; Carpentier, Wassila; Gueguen, Justine; Guillemot, Vincent; Labeyrie, Céline; Adams, David; Viala, Karine; Cohen Aubart, Fleur

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have studied the response to intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) by a transcriptomic approach in 11 chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) patients (CIDP duration = 6 [0.83–6.5] years). RNA was extracted from cells in whole blood collected before and 3 weeks after IVIg treatment, and hybridized on Illumina chips. After RNA quality controls, gene expression was analyzed using statistical tests fitted for microarrays (R software, limma package), and a pathway analysis was performed using DAVID software. We identified 52 genes with expression that varied significantly after IVIg (fold change [FC] > 1.2, P < 0.001, false discovery rate [FDR] <0.05). Among these 52 genes, 7 were related to immunity, 3 were related to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) pathway (inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD): FC = 1.8, P = 1.7E-7, FDR = 0.004; p21 protein-activated kinase 2 [PAK2]: FC = 1.66, P = 2.6E-5, FDR = 0.03; TNF-α-induced protein 8-like protein 1 [TNFAIP8L1]: P = 1.00E-05, FDR = 0.026), and 2 were related to Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially TLRs 7 and 9, and were implicated in autoimmunity. These genes were UNC93B1 (FC = 1.6, P = 2E-5, FDR = 0.03), which transports TLRs 7 and 9 to the endolysosomes, and RNF216 (FC = 1.5, P = 1E-05, FDR = 0.03), which promotes TLR 9 degradation. Pathway analysis showed that the TNFR1 pathway was significantly lessened by IVIg (enrichment score = 24, Fischer exact test = 0.003). TNF-α gene expression was higher in responder patients than in nonresponders; however, it decreased after IVIg in responders (P = 0.04), but remained stable in nonresponders. Our data suggest the actions of IVIg on the TNFR1 pathway and an original mechanism involving innate immunity through TLRs in CIDP pathophysiology and the response to IVIg. We conclude that responder patients have stronger inflammatory activity

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of Peripheral Blood in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy Patients Identifies TNFR1 and TLR Pathways in the IVIg Response.

    PubMed

    Richard, Alexandra; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Debs, Rabab; Reach, Pauline; Tahiri, Khadija; Carpentier, Wassila; Gueguen, Justine; Guillemot, Vincent; Labeyrie, Céline; Adams, David; Viala, Karine; Cohen Aubart, Fleur

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the response to intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) by a transcriptomic approach in 11 chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) patients (CIDP duration = 6 [0.83-6.5] years). RNA was extracted from cells in whole blood collected before and 3 weeks after IVIg treatment, and hybridized on Illumina chips. After RNA quality controls, gene expression was analyzed using statistical tests fitted for microarrays (R software, limma package), and a pathway analysis was performed using DAVID software. We identified 52 genes with expression that varied significantly after IVIg (fold change [FC] > 1.2, P < 0.001, false discovery rate [FDR] <0.05). Among these 52 genes, 7 were related to immunity, 3 were related to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) pathway (inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD): FC = 1.8, P = 1.7E-7, FDR = 0.004; p21 protein-activated kinase 2 [PAK2]: FC = 1.66, P = 2.6E-5, FDR = 0.03; TNF-α-induced protein 8-like protein 1 [TNFAIP8L1]: P = 1.00E-05, FDR = 0.026), and 2 were related to Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially TLRs 7 and 9, and were implicated in autoimmunity. These genes were UNC93B1 (FC = 1.6, P = 2E-5, FDR = 0.03), which transports TLRs 7 and 9 to the endolysosomes, and RNF216 (FC = 1.5, P = 1E-05, FDR = 0.03), which promotes TLR 9 degradation. Pathway analysis showed that the TNFR1 pathway was significantly lessened by IVIg (enrichment score = 24, Fischer exact test = 0.003). TNF-α gene expression was higher in responder patients than in nonresponders; however, it decreased after IVIg in responders (P = 0.04), but remained stable in nonresponders. Our data suggest the actions of IVIg on the TNFR1 pathway and an original mechanism involving innate immunity through TLRs in CIDP pathophysiology and the response to IVIg. We conclude that responder patients have stronger inflammatory activity that is

  11. T-Cell Apoptosis in Inflammatory Brain Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Jan; Bradl, Monika; Hickey, William F.; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Breitschopf, Helene; Linington, Chris; Wekerle, Hartmut; Lassmann, Hans

    1998-01-01

    Elimination of inflammatory T cells by apoptosis appears to play an important role in the down-regulation of inflammation in the central nervous system. Here we report that apoptosis of T lymphocytes occurs to a similar extent in different models of autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Apoptosis is restricted to cells located in the neuroectodermal parenchyma, thereby leaving T cells present in the brain’s connective tissue compartments unharmed. Death of T cells in the parenchyma does not depend on antigen presentation by resident microglial cells or astrocytes. Adoptive transfer experiments with T lymphocytes carrying a specific genetic marker revealed that in the central nervous system these cells are destroyed regardless of their antigen specificity or state of activation. Although many of both antigen-dependent and -independent mechanisms in the induction of T-cell apoptosis may act simultaneously, our results suggest that the nervous system harbors a specific, currently undefined, mechanism that effectively eliminates infiltrating T lymphocytes. PMID:9736022

  12. Spatially Distinct Neutrophil Responses within the Inflammatory Lesions of Pneumonic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Stasulli, Nikolas M.; Eichelberger, Kara R.; Price, Paul A.; Pechous, Roger D.; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Parker, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During pneumonic plague, the bacterium Yersinia pestis elicits the development of inflammatory lung lesions that continue to expand throughout infection. This lesion development and persistence are poorly understood. Here, we examine spatially distinct regions of lung lesions using laser capture microdissection and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis to identify transcriptional differences between lesion microenvironments. We show that cellular pathways involved in leukocyte migration and apoptosis are downregulated in the center of lung lesions compared to the periphery. Probing for the bacterial factor(s) important for the alteration in neutrophil survival, we show both in vitro and in vivo that Y. pestis increases neutrophil survival in a manner that is dependent on the type III secretion system effector YopM. This research explores the complexity of spatially distinct host-microbe interactions and emphasizes the importance of cell relevance in assays in order to fully understand Y. pestis virulence. PMID:26463167

  13. Cytokine-Neuroantigen Fusion Proteins as a New Class of Tolerogenic, Therapeutic Vaccines for Treatment of Inflammatory Demyelinating Disease in Rodent Models of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mannie, Mark D.; Blanchfield, J. Lori; Islam, S. M. Touhidul; Abbott, Derek J.

    2012-01-01

    Myelin-specific induction of tolerance represents a promising means to modify the course of autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Our laboratory has focused on a novel preclinical strategy for the induction of tolerance to the major encephalitogenic epitopes of myelin that cause experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats and mice. This novel approach is based on the use of cytokine-NAg (neuroantigen) fusion proteins comprised of the native cytokine fused either with or without a linker to a NAg domain. Several single-chain cytokine-NAg fusion proteins were tested including GMCSF-NAg, IFNbeta-NAg, NAgIL16, and IL2-NAg. These cytokine-NAg vaccines were tolerogenic, therapeutic vaccines that had tolerogenic activity when given as pre-treatments before encephalitogenic immunization and also were effective as therapeutic interventions during the effector phase of EAE. The rank order of inhibitory activity was as follows: GMCSF-NAg, IFNbeta-NAg > NAgIL16 > IL2-NAg > MCSF-NAg, IL4-NAg, IL-13-NAg, IL1RA-NAg, and NAg. Several cytokine-NAg fusion proteins exhibited antigen-targeting activity. High affinity binding of the cytokine domain to specific cytokine receptors on particular subsets of APC resulted in the concentrated uptake of the NAg domain by those APC which in turn facilitated the enhanced processing and presentation of the NAg domain on cell surface MHC class II glycoproteins. For most cytokine-NAg vaccines, the covalent linkage of the cytokine domain and NAg domain was required for inhibition of EAE, thereby indicating that antigenic targeting of the NAg domain to APC was also required in vivo for tolerogenic activity. Overall, these studies introduced a new concept of cytokine-NAg fusion proteins as a means to induce tolerance and to inhibit the effector phase of autoimmune disease. The approach has broad application for suppressive vaccination as a therapy for autoimmune diseases such as MS

  14. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and legs, loss of deep tendon reflexes (areflexia), fatigue, and abnormal sensations. CIDP is closely related to Guillain-Barre syndrome and it is considered the chronic counterpart of that acute disease. Is there any ...

  15. Apolipoprotein E Mimetic Promotes Functional and Histological Recovery in Lysolecithin-Induced Spinal Cord Demyelination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhen; Li, Fengqiao; Zhang, Yi Ping; Shields, Lisa B.E.; Hu, Xiaoling; Zheng, Yiyan; Yu, Panpan; Zhang, Yongjie; Cai, Jun; Vitek, Michael P.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering demyelination is the pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS), reducing demyelination and/or promoting remyelination is a practical therapeutic strategy to improve functional recovery for MS. An apolipoprotein E (apoE)-mimetic peptide COG112 has previously demonstrated therapeutic efficacy on functional and histological recovery in a mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of human MS. In the current study, we further investigated whether COG112 promotes remyelination and improves functional recovery in lysolecithin induced focal demyelination in the white matter of spinal cord in mice. Methods A focal demyelination model was created by stereotaxically injecting lysolecithin into the bilateral ventrolateral funiculus (VLF) of T8 and T9 mouse spinal cords. Immediately after lysolecithin injection mice were treated with COG112, prefix peptide control or vehicle control for 21 days. The locomotor function of the mice was measured by the beam walking test and Basso Mouse Scale (BMS) assessment. The nerve transmission of the VLF of mice was assessed in vivo by transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (tcMMEPs). The histological changes were also examined by by eriochrome cyanine staining, immunohistochemistry staining and electron microscopy (EM) method. Results The area of demyelination in the spinal cord was significantly reduced in the COG112 group. EM examination showed that treatment with COG112 increased the thickness of myelin sheaths and the numbers of surviving axons in the lesion epicenter. Locomotor function was improved in COG112 treated animals when measured by the beam walking test and BMS assessment compared to controls. TcMMEPs also demonstrated the COG112-mediated enhancement of amplitude of evoked responses. Conclusion The apoE-mimetic COG112 demonstrates a favorable combination of activities in suppressing inflammatory response, mitigating demyelination and in promoting remyelination and

  16. CCL19 and CCL21 modulate the inflammatory milieu in atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Gleissner, Christian A; Gorbatsch, Stephanie; Doesch, Andreas O; Akhavanpoor, Hamidreza; Wangler, Susanne; Jahn, Frederik; Lasitschka, Felix; Katus, Hugo A; Erbel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the pharmacologic and interventional treatment of coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, and elevated expression of CCL19 and CCL21 has been observed in ruptured lesions of coronary arteries of patients with myocardial infarction and carotid plaques of patients with ischemic symptoms, as well as in plasma of coronary artery disease patients. However, the exact role of CCL19 and CCL21 in atherosclerosis remains unknown. In order to identify CCL19 and CCL21 as a novel therapeutic target, we performed bone marrow transplantation as an immunomodulatory treatment concept. Bone marrow of plt/plt mice (lacking CCL19 and CCL21-Ser) was transplanted into atherogenic Ldlr−/− mice. The study demonstrated a significantly increased inflammatory cellular infiltration into the lesions of plt/plt/Ldlr−/− mice versus controls. Although the level of chemoattraction was increased, messenger ribonucleic acid and protein levels in thoracic aorta and serum of several proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-17) were significantly reduced in plt/plt/Ldlr−/− versus control mice. Increased influx, accompanied by reduced activation of leukocytes in atherosclerotic lesion, was accompanied by increased plaque stability but unchanged lesion development. In conclusion, modulation of the chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 represents a potent immunoregulatory treatment approach, and thus represents a novel therapeutic target to stabilize atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:25473269

  17. CCL19 and CCL21 modulate the inflammatory milieu in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Gleissner, Christian A; Gorbatsch, Stephanie; Doesch, Andreas O; Akhavanpoor, Hamidreza; Wangler, Susanne; Jahn, Frederik; Lasitschka, Felix; Katus, Hugo A; Erbel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the pharmacologic and interventional treatment of coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, and elevated expression of CCL19 and CCL21 has been observed in ruptured lesions of coronary arteries of patients with myocardial infarction and carotid plaques of patients with ischemic symptoms, as well as in plasma of coronary artery disease patients. However, the exact role of CCL19 and CCL21 in atherosclerosis remains unknown. In order to identify CCL19 and CCL21 as a novel therapeutic target, we performed bone marrow transplantation as an immunomodulatory treatment concept. Bone marrow of plt/plt mice (lacking CCL19 and CCL21-Ser) was transplanted into atherogenic Ldlr(-/-) mice. The study demonstrated a significantly increased inflammatory cellular infiltration into the lesions of plt/plt/Ldlr(-/-) mice versus controls. Although the level of chemoattraction was increased, messenger ribonucleic acid and protein levels in thoracic aorta and serum of several proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-17) were significantly reduced in plt/plt/Ldlr(-/-) versus control mice. Increased influx, accompanied by reduced activation of leukocytes in atherosclerotic lesion, was accompanied by increased plaque stability but unchanged lesion development. In conclusion, modulation of the chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 represents a potent immunoregulatory treatment approach, and thus represents a novel therapeutic target to stabilize atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:25473269

  18. Autoantibodies to tetraspanins (CD9, CD81 and CD82) in demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Kazuki; Paul, Friedemann; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Umapathi, Thirugnanam; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-02-15

    Tetraspanin family proteins, CD9, CD81 and CD82 are expressed in the oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells. We investigated autoantibodies to tetraspanin proteins in patients with demyelinating diseases. Sera were collected from 119 multiple sclerosis patients, 19 neuromyelitis optica, 42 acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, 23 chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and 13 acute motor axonal neuropathy as well as 55 healthy controls. Few multiple sclerosis and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients had autoantibodies that were weakly reactive to CD9 or CD81 but the significance is unclear. It is unlikely that these autoantibodies are pathogenic or serve as potential biomarkers in demyelinating diseases. PMID:26857499

  19. Oral Cancer and Oral Precancerous Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Roda, Giulia; Brygo, Alexandre; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Other risk factors include age over 40, male sex, several dietary factors, nutritional deficiencies, viruses, sexually transmitted infections, human papillomavirus, chronic irritation, and possibly genetic predisposition. Precancerous lesions in the oral cavity include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and lichen planus. Histology of oral cancer varies widely but the great majority are squamous cell carcinomas.Epidemiological studies and cancer registries have shown a consistently increased risk of oral malignancies in kidney, bone marrow, heart, or liver transplantation, in graft vs host disease, and in patients with HIV infection. Because of the increasing use of immunosuppressive drugs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, it is useful to more accurately delineate the consequences of chronic immunosuppression to the oral cavity. Oral cancer and precancerous oral lesions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] have been scarcely reported and reviews on the topic are lacking.We conducted a literature search using the terms and variants of all cancerous and precancerous oral manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases. By retrieving the existing literature, it is evident that patients with IBD belong to the high-risk group of developing these lesions, a phenomenon amplified by the increasing HPV prevalence. Education on modifiable risk behaviours in patients with oral cancer is the cornerstone of prevention.Oral screening should be performed for all IBD patients, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or biological drug. PMID:26163301

  20. Systemic inflammatory response reactivates immune-mediated lesions in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Serres, Sébastien; Anthony, Daniel C; Jiang, Yanyan; Broom, Kerry A; Campbell, Sandra J; Tyler, Damian J; van Kasteren, Sander I; Davis, Benjamin G; Sibson, Nicola R

    2009-04-15

    The potential association between microbial infection and reactivation of a multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion is an important issue that remains unresolved, primarily because of the absence of suitable animal models and imaging techniques. Here, we have evaluated this question in an empirical manner using immunohistochemistry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), before and after the induction of a systemic inflammatory response in two distinct models of MS. In a pattern-II-type focal myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model, systemic endotoxin injection caused an increase in regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) around the lesion site after 6 h, together with a reduction in the magnetization transfer ratio of the lesioned corpus callosum. These changes were followed by an increase in the diffusion of tissue water within the lesion 24 h after endotoxin challenge and new leukocyte recruitment as revealed both immunohistochemically and by MRI tracking of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled macrophages. Importantly, we detected in vivo expression of E- and P-selectin in quiescent lesions by MRI-detectable glyconanoparticles conjugated to sialyl Lewis(X). This finding may explain, at least in part, the ability of quiescent MS lesions to rapidly reinitiate the cell recruitment processes. In a pattern-I-type delayed-type hypersensitivity response model, a similar effect of endotoxin challenge on rCBV was observed, together with delayed breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, showing that systemic infection can alter the pathogenesis of MS-like lesions regardless of lesion etiology. These findings will have important implications for the management and monitoring of individuals with MS. PMID:19369550

  1. The road to remyelination in demyelinating diseases: current status and prospects for clinical treatment.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Watzlawik, Jens O; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2013-06-01

    Within CNS disorders, demyelinating diseases are among the most devastating and cost intensive due to long-term disabilities affecting relatively young patients. Multiple sclerosis, a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease in which the persistent inhibitory microenvironment of the resident oligodendrocyte precursor cells abrogates regeneration of myelin sheaths, is the most prominent disease in the spectrum of demyelinating diseases. The essential goal is to stimulate creation of new myelin sheaths on the demyelinated axons, leading to restoration of saltatory conduction and resolving functional deficits. The past few decades witnessed significant efforts to understand the cellular interactions at the lesion site with studies suggesting efficient remyelination as a prerequisite for functional repair. Despite its proven efficacy in experimental models, immunosuppression has not had profound clinical consequences in multiple sclerosis, which argued for a paradigm shift in the design of therapeutics aiming to achieve remyelination. For example, targeting oligodendrocytes themselves may drive remyelination in the CNS. This group and others have demonstrated that natural autoreactive antibodies directed at oligodendrocyte progenitors participate in remyelination. Accordingly, the authors developed a recombinant autoreactive natural human IgM antibody with therapeutic potential for remyelination. PMID:23730884

  2. A brainstem inflammatory lesion causing REM sleep behavior disorder and sleepwalking (parasomnia overlap disorder).

    PubMed

    Limousin, Nadège; Dehais, Caroline; Gout, Olivier; Héran, Françoise; Oudiette, Delphine; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2009-10-01

    A 40-year-old woman with no prior parasomnia developed an acute inflammatory rhombencephalitis with multiple cranial nerve palsies and cerebellar ataxia, followed by myelitis 6 months later, and by an intracranial thrombophlebitis 1 month after. Between and after these episodes, she had a persistent, mild right internuclear ophtalmoplegia, a mild cerebellar ataxia, and a severe REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) lasting for 2 years. She talked, sang and moved nightly while asleep, and injured her son (cosleeping with her) while asleep. In addition, she walked asleep nightly. During video-polysomnography, there were two arousals during slow wave sleep without abnormal behavior, while 44% of REM sleep was without chin muscle atonia with bilateral arm and leg movements. There were small hypointensities in the right pontine tegmentum and in the right dorsal medulla on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, suggesting post-inflammatory lesions that persisted between acute episodes. The RBD and sleepwalking did not improve with clonazepam, but improved with melatonin 9 mg/d. The unilateral small lesion of the pontine tegmentum could be responsible for the parasomnia overlap disorder as in other rare lesional cases. PMID:19345142

  3. Optical biopsy of pre-malignant or degenerative lesions: the role of the inflammatory process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Martinho, Herculano

    2011-03-01

    Recent technological advances in fiber optics, light sources, detectors, and molecular biology have stimulated unprecedented development of optical methods to detect pathological changes in tissues. These methods, collectively termed "optical biopsy," are nondestructive in situ and real-time assays. Optical biopsy techniques as fluorescence spectroscopy, polarized light scattering spectroscopy, optical coherence tomography, confocal reflectance microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy had been extensively used to characterize several pathological tissues. In special, Raman spectroscopy technique had been able to probe several biochemical alterations due to pathology development as change in the DNA, glycogen, phospholipid, non-collagenous proteins. All studies claimed that the optical biopsy methods were able to discriminate normal and malignant tissues. However, few studies had been devoted to the discrimination of very common subtle or early pathological states as inflammatory process, which are always present on, e.g., cancer lesion border. In this work we present a systematic comparison of optical biopsy data on several kinds of lesions were inflammatory infiltrates play the role (breast, cervical, and oral lesion). It will be discussed the essential conditions for the optimization of discrimination among normal and alterated states based on statistical analysis.

  4. Possible Implication of Local Immune Response in Darier's Disease: An Immunohistochemical Characterization of Lesional Inflammatory Infiltrate

    PubMed Central

    Miracco, Clelia; Pietronudo, Francesco; Mourmouras, Vasileios; Pellegrino, Michele; Onorati, Monica; Mastrogiulio, Maria Grazia; Cantarini, Luca; Luzi, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is considered to be normal in Darier's Disease (DD), an inherited skin disorder complicated by skin infections. To date, there are no investigations on the local inflammatory infiltrate in DD skin lesions. In this immunohistochemical study we characterized and quantified it, making comparisons with two other inflammatory skin disorders, that is, pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and lichen ruber planus (LRP), and with the normal skin (NSk). We found a significant (P < .05) decrease of CD1a+ Langerhans cells (LCs) in DD, compared to PV, LRP, and NSk, and of CD123+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), compared to PV and LRP. We hypothesize that the genetic damage of keratinocytes might result in a loss of some subsets of dendritic cells and, consequently, in an impaired local immune response, which might worsen the infections that inevitably occur in this disease. PMID:20671948

  5. Nitric Oxide-Driven Hypoxia Initiates Synovial Angiogenesis, Hyperplasia and Inflammatory Lesions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Fei; Wu, Pei; Xiao, Na; Qiu, Frank; Zeng, Qing-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory articular disease with cartilage and bone damage due to hyperplasic synoviocyte invasion and subsequent matrix protease digestion. Although monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) have been approved for clinical use in patients with RA, desired therapeutic regimens suitable for non-responders are still unavailable because etiological initiators leading to RA remain enigmatic and unidentified. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacteria-induced arthritis (BIA) that simulates collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is developed in mice upon daily live bacterial feeding. The morphological lesions of paw erythema and edema together with the histological alterations of synovial hyperplasia and lymphocytic infiltration emerge as the early-phase manifestations of BIA and CIA. Bacteria- or collagen-mediated global upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines is accompanied by the burst of nitric oxide (NO). Elevation of the serum NO level is correlated with decline of the blood oxygen saturation percentage (SpO2), reflecting a hypoxic consequence during development towards arthritis. NO-driven hypoxia is further evident from a positive relationship between NO and lactic acid (LA), an end product from glycolysis. Upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) validates hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in the inflamed synovium of modeling mice. Administration of the NO donor compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP) causes articular inflammation by inducing synovial hypoxia. Anti-bacteria by the antibiotic cefotaxime and/or the immunosuppressant rapamycin or artesunate that also inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) can abrogate NO production, mitigate hypoxia, and considerably ameliorate or even completely abort synovitis, hence highlighting that NO may serve as an initiator of inflammatory arthritis. Conclusions/Significance Like collagen, bacteria also

  6. Functional consequences of ethidium bromide demyelination of the mouse ventral spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Kuypers, Nicholas J.; James, Kurtis T.; Enzmann, Gaby U.; Magnuson, David S.K.; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Ethidium bromide (EB) has been extensively used in the rat as a model of spinal cord demyelination. However, this lesion has not been addressed in the adult mouse, a model with unlimited genetic potential. Here we characterize behavioral function, inflammation, myelin status and axonal viability following bilateral injection of 0.20 mg/mL ethidium bromide or saline into the ventral white matter (VWM) of female C57Bl/6 mice. EB-induced VWM demyelination significantly reduced spared VWM and Basso Mouse Scale (BMS) scores persisting out to 2 months. Chronic hindlimb dysfunction was accompanied by a persistent inflammatory response (demonstrated by CD45+ immunofluorescence) and axonal loss (demonstrated by NF-M immunofluorescence and electron microscopy; EM). These cellular responses differ from the rat where inflammation resolves by 3–4 weeks and axon loss is minimal following EB demyelination. As these data suggest that EB-injection in the mouse spinal cord is a non-remyelinating lesion, we sought to ask whether wheel running could promote recovery by enhancing plasticity of local lumbar circuitry independent of remyelination. This did not occur as BMS and Treadscan® assessment revealed no significant effect of wheel running on recovery. However, this study defines the importance of descending ventral motor pathways to locomotor function in the mouse as VWM loss results in a chronic hindlimb deficit. PMID:23466931

  7. Cuprizone-induced demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation result in different proton magnetic resonance metabolite spectra

    PubMed Central

    Praet, Jelle; Orije, Jasmien; Kara, Firat; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Santermans, Eva; Daans, Jasmijn; Hens, Niel; Verhoye, Marleen; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    Conventional MRI is frequently used during the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis but provides only little additional pathological information. Proton MRS (1H-MRS), however, provides biochemical information on the lesion pathology by visualization of a spectrum of metabolites. In this study we aimed to better understand the changes in metabolite concentrations following demyelination of the white matter. Therefore, we used the cuprizone model, a well-established mouse model to mimic type III human multiple sclerosis demyelinating lesions. First, we identified CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling as a major regulator of microglial activity in the cuprizone mouse model. Compared with control groups (heterozygous CX3CR1+/− C57BL/6 mice and wild type CX3CR1+/+ C57BL/6 mice), microgliosis, astrogliosis, oligodendrocyte cell death and demyelination were shown to be highly reduced or absent in CX3CR1−/− C57BL/6 mice. Second, we show that 1H-MRS metabolite spectra are different when comparing cuprizone-treated CX3CR1−/− mice showing mild demyelination with cuprizone-treated CX3CR1+/+ mice showing severe demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation. Following cuprizone treatment, CX3CR1+/+ mice show a decrease in the Glu, tCho and tNAA concentrations as well as an increased Tau concentration. In contrast, following cuprizone treatment CX3CR1−/− mice only showed a decrease in tCho and tNAA concentrations. Therefore, 1H-MRS might possibly allow us to discriminate demyelination from demyelination-associated inflammation via changes in Tau and Glu concentration. In addition, the observed decrease in tCho concentration in cuprizone-induced demyelinating lesions should be further explored as a possible diagnostic tool for the early identification of human MS type III lesions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25802215

  8. Astrocytic TYMP and VEGFA drive blood-brain barrier opening in inflammatory central nervous system lesions.

    PubMed

    Chapouly, Candice; Tadesse Argaw, Azeb; Horng, Sam; Castro, Kamilah; Zhang, Jingya; Asp, Linnea; Loo, Hannah; Laitman, Benjamin M; Mariani, John N; Straus Farber, Rebecca; Zaslavsky, Elena; Nudelman, German; Raine, Cedric S; John, Gareth R

    2015-06-01

    In inflammatory central nervous system conditions such as multiple sclerosis, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier is a key event in lesion pathogenesis, predisposing to oedema, excitotoxicity, and ingress of plasma proteins and inflammatory cells. Recently, we showed that reactive astrocytes drive blood-brain barrier opening, via production of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). Here, we now identify thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP; previously known as endothelial cell growth factor 1, ECGF1) as a second key astrocyte-derived permeability factor, which interacts with VEGFA to induce blood-brain barrier disruption. The two are co-induced NFκB1-dependently in human astrocytes by the cytokine interleukin 1 beta (IL1B), and inactivation of Vegfa in vivo potentiates TYMP induction. In human central nervous system microvascular endothelial cells, VEGFA and the TYMP product 2-deoxy-d-ribose cooperatively repress tight junction proteins, driving permeability. Notably, this response represents part of a wider pattern of endothelial plasticity: 2-deoxy-d-ribose and VEGFA produce transcriptional programs encompassing angiogenic and permeability genes, and together regulate a third unique cohort. Functionally, each promotes proliferation and viability, and they cooperatively drive motility and angiogenesis. Importantly, introduction of either into mouse cortex promotes blood-brain barrier breakdown, and together they induce severe barrier disruption. In the multiple sclerosis model experimental autoimmune encephalitis, TYMP and VEGFA co-localize to reactive astrocytes, and correlate with blood-brain barrier permeability. Critically, blockade of either reduces neurologic deficit, blood-brain barrier disruption and pathology, and inhibiting both in combination enhances tissue preservation. Suggesting importance in human disease, TYMP and VEGFA both localize to reactive astrocytes in multiple sclerosis lesion samples. Collectively, these data identify TYMP as an

  9. Astrocytic TYMP and VEGFA drive blood–brain barrier opening in inflammatory central nervous system lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chapouly, Candice; Tadesse Argaw, Azeb; Horng, Sam; Castro, Kamilah; Zhang, Jingya; Asp, Linnea; Loo, Hannah; Laitman, Benjamin M.; Mariani, John N.; Straus Farber, Rebecca; Zaslavsky, Elena; Nudelman, German; Raine, Cedric S.

    2015-01-01

    In inflammatory central nervous system conditions such as multiple sclerosis, breakdown of the blood–brain barrier is a key event in lesion pathogenesis, predisposing to oedema, excitotoxicity, and ingress of plasma proteins and inflammatory cells. Recently, we showed that reactive astrocytes drive blood–brain barrier opening, via production of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). Here, we now identify thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP; previously known as endothelial cell growth factor 1, ECGF1) as a second key astrocyte-derived permeability factor, which interacts with VEGFA to induce blood–brain barrier disruption. The two are co-induced NFκB1-dependently in human astrocytes by the cytokine interleukin 1 beta (IL1B), and inactivation of Vegfa in vivo potentiates TYMP induction. In human central nervous system microvascular endothelial cells, VEGFA and the TYMP product 2-deoxy-d-ribose cooperatively repress tight junction proteins, driving permeability. Notably, this response represents part of a wider pattern of endothelial plasticity: 2-deoxy-d-ribose and VEGFA produce transcriptional programs encompassing angiogenic and permeability genes, and together regulate a third unique cohort. Functionally, each promotes proliferation and viability, and they cooperatively drive motility and angiogenesis. Importantly, introduction of either into mouse cortex promotes blood–brain barrier breakdown, and together they induce severe barrier disruption. In the multiple sclerosis model experimental autoimmune encephalitis, TYMP and VEGFA co-localize to reactive astrocytes, and correlate with blood–brain barrier permeability. Critically, blockade of either reduces neurologic deficit, blood–brain barrier disruption and pathology, and inhibiting both in combination enhances tissue preservation. Suggesting importance in human disease, TYMP and VEGFA both localize to reactive astrocytes in multiple sclerosis lesion samples. Collectively, these data identify TYMP

  10. Paediatric UK demyelinating disease longitudinal study (PUDDLS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is evidence that at least 5% of Multiple sclerosis (MS) cases manifest in childhood. Children with MS present with a demyelinating episode involving single or multiple symptoms prior to developing a second event (usually within two years) to then meet criteria for diagnosis. There is evidence from adult cohorts that the incidence and sex ratios of MS are changing and that children of immigrants have a higher risk for developing MS. A paediatric population should reflect the vanguard of such changes and may reflect trends yet to be observed in adult cohorts. Studying a paediatric population from the first demyelinating event will allow us to test these hypotheses, and may offer further valuable insights into the genetic and environmental interactions in the pathogenesis of MS. Methods/Design The Paediatric UK Demyelinating Disease Longitudinal Study (PUDDLS) is a prospective longitudinal observational study which aims to determine the natural history, predictors and outcomes of childhood CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases. PUDDLS will involve centres in the UK, and will establish a cohort of children affected with a first CNS inflammatory demyelinating event for long-term follow up by recruiting for approximately 5 years. PUDDLS will also establish a biological sample archive (CSF, serum, and DNA), allowing future hypothesis driven research. For example, the future discovery of a biomarker will allow validation within this dataset for the evaluation of novel biomarkers. Patients will also be requested to consent to be contacted in the future. A secondary aim is to collaborate internationally with the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group when future collaborative studies are proposed, whilst sharing a minimal anonymised dataset. PUDDLS is the second of two jointly funded studies. The first (UCID-SS) is an epidemiological surveillance study that already received ethical approvals, and started on the 1st September 2009. There is

  11. Ultrasound of Inherited vs. Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Zaidman, Craig M.; Harms, Matthew B.; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We compared features of nerve enlargement in inherited and acquired demyelinating neuropathies using ultrasound. Methods We measured median and ulnar nerve cross-sectional areas in proximal and distal regions in 128 children and adults with inherited (Charcot-Marie Tooth-1 (CMT-1) (n=35)) and acquired (Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) (n=55), Guillaine-Barre Syndrome (GBS) (n=21) and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN) (n=17)) demyelinating neuropathies. We classified nerve enlargement by degree and number of regions affected. We defined patterns of nerve enlargement as: none- no enlargement; mild-nerves enlarged but never more than twice normal; regional- nerves normal at at least one region and enlarged more than twice normal at atleast one region; diffuse- nerves enlarged at all four regions with atleast one region more than twice normal size. Results Nerve enlargement was commonly diffuse (89%) and generally more than twice normal size in CMT-1, but not (p<0.001) in acquired disorders which mostly had either no, mild or regional nerve enlargement (CIDP (64%), GBS (95%), and MMN (100%)). In CIDP, subjects treated within three months of disease onset had less nerve enlargement than those treated later. Discussion Ultrasound identified patterns of diffuse nerve enlargement can be used to screen patients suspected of having CMT-1. Normal, mildly, or regionally enlarged nerves in demyelinating polyneuropathy suggests an acquired etiology. Early treatment in CIDP may impede nerve enlargement. PMID:24101129

  12. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression in the Epithelium of Inflammatory Periapical Lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, R.; Perrotta, R.E.; Musumeci, G.; Crimi, S.; dos Santos, J.N.; Rusu, M.C.; Bufo, P.; Barbato, E.; Pannone, G.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are essential for the innate immune response against invading pathogens and have been described in immunocompetent cells of areas affected by periapical disease. Besides initiating the inflammatory response, they also directly regulate epithelial cell proliferation and survival in a variety of settings. This study evaluates the in situ expression of TLR4 in periapical granulomas (PG) and radicular cysts, focusing on the epithelial compartment. Twenty-one periapical cysts (PC) and 10 PG were analyzed; 7 dentigerous non-inflamed follicular cyst (DC) served as control. TLR4 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. TLR4 immunoreaction products were detected in the epithelium of all specimens, with a higher percentage of immunostained cells in PG. Although TLR4 overexpression was detected in both PG and PC, there were differences that seemed to be related to the nature of the lesion, since in PG all epithelial cells of strands, islands and trabeculae were strongly immunoreactive for TLR4, whereas in PC only some areas of the basal and suprabasal epithelial layers were immunostained. This staining pattern is consistent with the action of TLR4: in PG it could promote formation of epithelial cell rests of Malassez and in epithelial strands and islands the enhancement of cell survival, proliferation and migration, whereas in PC TLR4 could protect the lining epithelium from extensive apoptosis. These findings go some way towards answering the intriguing question of why many epithelial strands or islands in PG and the lining epithelium of apical cysts regress after non-surgical endodontic therapy, and suggest that TLR4 plays a key role in the pathobiology of the inflammatory process related to periapical disease. PMID:26708181

  13. Demyelination and axonal preservation in a transgenic mouse model of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Julia M; McCulloch, Mailis C; Montague, Paul; Brown, Angus M; Thilemann, Sebastian; Pratola, Laura; Gruenenfelder, Fredrik I; Griffiths, Ian R; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2010-01-01

    It is widely thought that demyelination contributes to the degeneration of axons and, in combination with acute inflammatory injury, is responsible for progressive axonal loss and persistent clinical disability in inflammatory demyelinating disease. In this study we sought to characterize the relationship between demyelination, inflammation and axonal transport changes using a Plp1-transgenic mouse model of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. In the optic pathway of this non-immune mediated model of demyelination, myelin loss progresses from the optic nerve head towards the brain, over a period of months. Axonal transport is functionally perturbed at sites associated with local inflammation and ‘damaged’ myelin. Surprisingly, where demyelination is complete, naked axons appear well preserved despite a significant reduction of axonal transport. Our results suggest that neuroinflammation and/or oligodendrocyte dysfunction are more deleterious for axonal health than demyelination per se, at least in the short term. PMID:20091761

  14. Is disturbed clearance of apoptotic keratinocytes responsible for UVB-induced inflammatory skin lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus?

    PubMed Central

    Reefman, Esther; de Jong, Marcelus CJM; Kuiper, Hilde; Jonkman, Marcel F; Limburg, Pieter C; Kallenberg, Cees GM; Bijl, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Apoptotic cells are thought to play an essential role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We hypothesise that delayed or altered clearance of apoptotic cells after UV irradiation will lead to inflammation in the skin of SLE patients. Fifteen SLE patients and 13 controls were irradiated with two minimal erythemal doses (MEDs) of ultraviolet B light (UVB). Subsequently, skin biopsies were analysed (immuno)histologically, over 10 days, for numbers of apoptotic cells, T cells, macrophages, and deposition of immunoglobulin and complement. Additionally, to compare results with cutaneous lesions of SLE patients, 20 biopsies of lupus erythematosus (LE) skin lesions were analysed morphologically for apoptotic cells and infiltrate. Clearance rate of apoptotic cells after irradiation did not differ between patients and controls. Influx of macrophages in dermal and epidermal layers was significantly increased in patients compared with controls. Five out of 15 patients developed a dermal infiltrate that was associated with increased epidermal influx of T cells and macrophages but not with numbers of apoptotic cells or epidermal deposition of immunoglobulins. Macrophages were ingesting multiple apoptotic bodies. Inflammatory lesions in these patients were localised near accumulations of apoptotic keratinocytes similar as was seen in the majority of LE skin lesions. In vivo clearance rate of apoptotic cells is comparable between SLE patients and controls. However, the presence of inflammatory lesions in the vicinity of apoptotic cells, as observed both in UVB-induced and in LE skin lesions in SLE patients, suggests that these lesions result from an inflammatory clearance of apoptotic cells. PMID:17014704

  15. Cavitating lung lesion as a manifestation of inflammatory tumor (pseudotumor) of the lung: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Michaelides, Stylianos A.; Passalidou, Elisabeth; Bablekos, George D.; Aza, Evlambia; Goulas, George; Chorti, Maria; Nicolaou, Irene N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung Symptoms: Cough dry • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Rare disease Background: Inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung involves a benign, non-neoplastic lung lesion of unknown etiology. Case Report: We present a case of a 60-year-old female smoker who had been under intermittent immunosuppressive medication for discoid lupus, who was admitted to hospital with fever of 39.5°C of 10-day duration, not responding to an oral cephalosporin. Chest CT examination showed a cavitating opacity in the upper zone of the left lung. It was not feasible to establish a diagnosis based on clinical and laboratory testing nor based on CT scanning and bronchoscopy. Thus, the patient underwent left thoracotomy and sphenoid resection of the lesion, which was sent for biopsy. The histopathologic features aided by immunohistochemical staining proved the lesion to be an inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung. Conclusions: The case is reported because of the extremely rare radiologic presentation of the development of a lung pseudotumor emerging as a cavitated lesion, which relapsed during the follow-up period while the patient was still under immunosuppressive medication. PMID:24971159

  16. Local Injection of Lenti-BDNF at the Lesion Site Promotes M2 Macrophage Polarization and Inhibits Inflammatory Response After Spinal Cord Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xin-Chao; Dang, Yuan-Yuan; Gao, Hong-Yan; Wang, Zhao-Tao; Gao, Mou; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Hong-Tian; Xu, Ru-Xiang

    2015-08-01

    There is much evidence to suggest that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a prominent candidate in promoting neuroprotection, axonal regeneration, and synaptic plasticity following spinal cord injury (SCI). Although some evidence indicates that BDNF has potent anti-oxidative effects and may be involved in the regulation of the immune response, the effects of BDNF in the inflammatory response during the course of secondary damage after SCI is still unclear. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of BDNF with a special focus on their effect on macrophage polarization after SCI. Adult C57 mice underwent T10 spinal cord clip compression injury and received lenti-BDNF vector injections at the epicenter of the lesion site. Four days later, total BDNF levels were greatly increased in animals that received lenti-BDNF injections. Confocal imaging showed that more than 80 % of the lenti-virus infected cells were CD11b-positive macrophages. In addition, the expression of arginase-1 and CD206 (associated with M2 macrophage phenotype) significantly increased in the animals that received lenti-BDNF injections compared with those that received lenti-EGFP injections. On the contrary, the expression of CD16/32 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (M1 phenotype marker) was down-regulated as demonstrated using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the production of interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor alpha was significantly reduced whereas the levels of interleukin 10 and interleukin 13 were elevated in subjects that received lenti-BDNF vector injections. The time course of functional recovery revealed that gradual recovery was observed in the subacute phase in lenti-BDNF group, little improvement was observed in lenti-EGFP group. At the axonal level, significant retraction of the CST axons were observed in lenti-EGFP injected animals relative to lenti-BDNF group by biotinylated dextran amine tracing. In addition, compared to lenti

  17. Alteration of synaptic connectivity of oligodendrocyte precursor cells following demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Sahel, Aurélia; Ortiz, Fernando C.; Kerninon, Christophe; Maldonado, Paloma P.; Angulo, María Cecilia; Nait-Oumesmar, Brahim

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are a major source of remyelinating oligodendrocytes in demyelinating diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). While OPCs are innervated by unmyelinated axons in the normal brain, the fate of such synaptic contacts after demyelination is still unclear. By combining electrophysiology and immunostainings in different transgenic mice expressing fluorescent reporters, we studied the synaptic innervation of OPCs in the model of lysolecithin (LPC)-induced demyelination of corpus callosum. Synaptic innervation of reactivated OPCs in the lesion was revealed by the presence of AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic currents, VGluT1+ axon-OPC contacts in 3D confocal reconstructions and synaptic junctions observed by electron microscopy. Moreover, 3D confocal reconstructions of VGluT1 and NG2 immunolabeling showed the existence of glutamatergic axon-OPC contacts in post-mortem MS lesions. Interestingly, patch-clamp recordings in LPC-induced lesions demonstrated a drastic decrease in spontaneous synaptic activity of OPCs early after demyelination that was not caused by an impaired conduction of compound action potentials. A reduction in synaptic connectivity was confirmed by the lack of VGluT1+ axon-OPC contacts in virtually all rapidly proliferating OPCs stained with EdU (50-ethynyl-20-deoxyuridine). At the end of the massive proliferation phase in lesions, the proportion of innervated OPCs rapidly recovers, although the frequency of spontaneous synaptic currents did not reach control levels. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that newly-generated OPCs do not receive synaptic inputs during their active proliferation after demyelination, but gain synapses during the remyelination process. Hence, glutamatergic synaptic inputs may contribute to inhibit OPC proliferation and might have a physiopathological relevance in demyelinating disorders. PMID:25852473

  18. [Ultrasonographic diagnosis of inflammatory neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takamichi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Hosomi, Naohisa; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonographic nerve enlargement has primarily been reported in patients with inflammatory neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, vasculitic neuropathy and leprosy. Nerve ultrasonography is a promising diagnostic supportive tool for inflammatory neuropathies. The ultrasonographic findings that are currently useful are 1) nerve enlargement primarily suggests the existence of inflammatory or demyelinating neuropathies and 2) for patients with CIDP or demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the pattern of nerve enlargement is noted, and this pattern is useful for discriminating between these diseases. More precise evidence of ultrasonographic findings for inflammatory neuropathies should be established in the future. PMID:24607946

  19. P2Y6 Receptor Potentiates Pro-Inflammatory Responses in Macrophages and Exhibits Differential Roles in Atherosclerotic Lesion Development

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Ricardo A.; Yan, Mujing; Search, Debra; Zhang, Rongan; Carson, Nancy L.; Ryan, Carol S.; Smith-Monroy, Constance; Zheng, Joanna; Chen, Jian; Kong, Yan; Tang, Huaping; Hellings, Samuel E.; Wardwell-Swanson, Judith; Dinchuk, Joseph E.; Psaltis, George C.; Gordon, David A.; Glunz, Peter W.; Gargalovic, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Background P2Y6, a purinergic receptor for UDP, is enriched in atherosclerotic lesions and is implicated in pro-inflammatory responses of key vascular cell types and macrophages. Evidence for its involvement in atherogenesis, however, has been lacking. Here we use cell-based studies and three murine models of atherogenesis to evaluate the impact of P2Y6 deficiency on atherosclerosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Cell-based studies in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, which lack functional P2Y6 receptors, showed that exogenous expression of P2Y6 induces a robust, receptor- and agonist-dependent secretion of inflammatory mediators IL-8, IL-6, MCP-1 and GRO1. P2Y6-mediated inflammatory responses were also observed, albeit to a lesser extent, in macrophages endogenously expressing P2Y6 and in acute peritonitis models of inflammation. To evaluate the role of P2Y6 in atherosclerotic lesion development, we used P2Y6-deficient mice in three mouse models of atherosclerosis. A 43% reduction in aortic arch plaque was observed in high fat-fed LDLR knockout mice lacking P2Y6 receptors in bone marrow-derived cells. In contrast, no effect on lesion development was observed in fat-fed whole body P2Y6xLDLR double knockout mice. Interestingly, in a model of enhanced vascular inflammation using angiotensin II, P2Y6 deficiency enhanced formation of aneurysms and exhibited a trend towards increased atherosclerosis in the aorta of LDLR knockout mice. Conclusions P2Y6 receptor augments pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages and exhibits a pro-atherogenic role in hematopoietic cells. However, the overall impact of whole body P2Y6 deficiency on atherosclerosis appears to be modest and could reflect additional roles of P2Y6 in vascular disease pathophysiologies, such as aneurysm formation. PMID:25360548

  20. Polycyclic Annular Lesion Masquerading as Lupus Erythematosus and Emerging as Tinea Faciei Incognito

    PubMed Central

    Kye, Heesang; Kim, Dai Hyun; Seo, Soo Hong; Ahn, Hyo Hyun; Kye, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    Tinea incognito is a dermatophytic infection induced by immunosuppressive agents that lacks the classic features of a typical fungal infection. Although the treatment of tinea incognito is simple and relatively easy, its clinical manifestation varies and can masquerade as various skin disorders, causing misdiagnosis and thus preventing prompt and appropriate treatment. Here, we report an interesting case of tinea incognito occurring after topical steroid administration in an immunosuppressed patient with dermatitis artefacta. A 40-year-old female patient who had been taking systemic glucocorticoid for 4 years for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy presented with itching multiple erythematous erosive lesions on the face and upper chest for 2 months. Initial biopsy produced nonspecific findings. The skin lesion was aggravated and became polycyclic and erythematous; after azathioprine was added, her chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy became aggravated. A second biopsy confirmed hyphae in the cornified layer. Complete remission was achieved after admonishing oral terbinafine and topical amorolfine. PMID:26082592

  1. Polycyclic Annular Lesion Masquerading as Lupus Erythematosus and Emerging as Tinea Faciei Incognito.

    PubMed

    Kye, Heesang; Kim, Dai Hyun; Seo, Soo Hong; Ahn, Hyo Hyun; Kye, Young Chul; Choi, Jae Eun

    2015-06-01

    Tinea incognito is a dermatophytic infection induced by immunosuppressive agents that lacks the classic features of a typical fungal infection. Although the treatment of tinea incognito is simple and relatively easy, its clinical manifestation varies and can masquerade as various skin disorders, causing misdiagnosis and thus preventing prompt and appropriate treatment. Here, we report an interesting case of tinea incognito occurring after topical steroid administration in an immunosuppressed patient with dermatitis artefacta. A 40-year-old female patient who had been taking systemic glucocorticoid for 4 years for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy presented with itching multiple erythematous erosive lesions on the face and upper chest for 2 months. Initial biopsy produced nonspecific findings. The skin lesion was aggravated and became polycyclic and erythematous; after azathioprine was added, her chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy became aggravated. A second biopsy confirmed hyphae in the cornified layer. Complete remission was achieved after admonishing oral terbinafine and topical amorolfine. PMID:26082592

  2. Selection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and treatment regimen for sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Plahovinsak, Jennifer L; Buccellato, Matthew A; Reid, Frances M; Graham, John S

    2016-09-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in sulfur mustard (HD) injury and HD pathogenesis, suggesting that anti-inflammatory treatments applied as soon as possible following HD injury may reduce tissue damage and accelerate healing. This study used the HD dermal weanling swine model to investigate the efficacy of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, capsaicin and diclofenac, when applied in combination with the steroid, clobetasol. The therapeutic regimen was also investigated with respect to initiation of treatment post-exposure, frequency and duration. Yorkshire-cross pigs were randomly assigned to experimental groups, corresponding to all combinations of treatment (capsaicin with clobetasol or diclofenac with clobetasol), onset time (1, 2 or 4 h post-exposure), treatment duration (1, 3 or 5 days) and frequency of applications (2, 3 or 4 per day). For each animal, two sites on the ventral abdomen were exposed to 400 μL of neat HD for 8 min to achieve superficial dermal (SD) lesions and two sites were exposed to 400 μL neat HD for 30 min to achieve deep dermal (DD) lesions. Each treatment regimen was tested against a SD and a DD injury. Untreated SD and DD lesion sites served as within-animal controls. Assessments, up to one week post-challenge, included digital photographs, clinical assessments (lesion size measurements and modified Draize scoring), transepidermal water loss (TEWL), reflectance colorimetry and histopathologic evaluations that included an estimate for depth of injury and wound healing parameters. Diclofenac plus clobetasol treatment resulted in significant reductions in lesion contracture and modified Draize scores, increased barrier function (decreased TEWL), and increased healing as determined by histopathology for both SD and DD injury when compared with untreated sites and sites treated with capsaicin plus clobetasol. An increased duration of treatment from 1 to 5 days was most commonly associated with decreased

  3. [Diagnostic algorithm of a lesion of jaws bone tissues in purulent inflammatory diseases of maxillofacial region].

    PubMed

    Mubarakova, L N

    2008-01-01

    The writer detects changes of density of strontium, calcium, zinc and ratio Ca/Sr, Zn/Sr in oral liquid at examination 162 patients with acute odontogenic inflammatory diseases and 85 ill with a fracture of a mandible and at it inflammatory complication. By her is established the increase density of calcium in a stomatic liquid at all purulent-inflammatory diseases of maxillofacial area. The strontium is reduced only at an acute odontogenic osteomyelitis and odontogenic lymphadenitis complicated by a phlegmon. The ratio Ca/Sr, Zn/Sr is-augmented also only at the data diseases. PMID:18577924

  4. A validated model of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine balancing act in articular cartilage lesion formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiayi; Brouillette, Marc J; Ayati, Bruce P; Martin, James A

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of articular cartilage result in the formation of a cartilage lesion and contribute to cartilage degeneration and the risk of osteoarthritis (OA). A better understanding of the framework for the formation of a cartilage lesion formation would be helpful in therapy development. Toward this end, we present an age and space-structured model of articular cartilage lesion formation after a single blunt impact. This model modifies the reaction-diffusion-delay models in Graham et al. (2012) (single impact) and Wang et al. (2014) (cyclic loading), focusing on the "balancing act" between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Age structure is introduced to replace the delay terms for cell transitions used in these earlier models; we find age structured models to be more flexible in representing the underlying biological system and more tractable computationally. Numerical results show a successful capture of chondrocyte behavior and chemical activities associated with the cartilage lesion after the initial injury; experimental validation of our computational results is presented. We anticipate that our in silico model of cartilage damage from a single blunt impact can be used to provide information that may not be easily obtained through in in vivo or in vitro studies. PMID:25806365

  5. A Validated Model of the Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokine Balancing Act in Articular Cartilage Lesion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiayi; Brouillette, Marc J.; Ayati, Bruce P.; Martin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of articular cartilage result in the formation of a cartilage lesion and contribute to cartilage degeneration and the risk of osteoarthritis (OA). A better understanding of the framework for the formation of a cartilage lesion formation would be helpful in therapy development. Toward this end, we present an age and space-structured model of articular cartilage lesion formation after a single blunt impact. This model modifies the reaction-diffusion-delay models in Graham et al. (2012) (single impact) and Wang et al. (2014) (cyclic loading), focusing on the “balancing act” between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Age structure is introduced to replace the delay terms for cell transitions used in these earlier models; we find age structured models to be more flexible in representing the underlying biological system and more tractable computationally. Numerical results show a successful capture of chondrocyte behavior and chemical activities associated with the cartilage lesion after the initial injury; experimental validation of our computational results is presented. We anticipate that our in silico model of cartilage damage from a single blunt impact can be used to provide information that may not be easily obtained through in in vivo or in vitro studies. PMID:25806365

  6. Immunohistochemical characteristics of surfactant proteins a, B, C and d in inflammatory and tumorigenic lung lesions of f344 rats.

    PubMed

    Yokohira, Masanao; Yamakawa, Keiko; Nakano, Yuko; Numano, Takamasa; Furukawa, Fumio; Kishi, Sosuke; Ninomiya, Fumiko; Kanie, Shohei; Hitotsumachi, Hiroko; Saoo, Kousuke; Imaida, Katsumi

    2014-10-01

    Surfactant proteins (SPs), originally known as human lung surfactants, are essential to respiratory structure and function. There are 4 subtypes, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D, with SP-A and SP-D having immunological functions, and SP-B and SP-C having physicochemical properties that reduce the surface tension at biological interfaces. In this experiment, the expressions of SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D in lung neoplastic lesions induced by N-bis (2-hydroxypropyl) nitrosamine (DHPN) and inflammatory lesions due to quartz instillation were examined and compared immunohistochemically. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) lung samples featuring inflammation were obtained with a rat quartz instillation model, and neoplastic lesions, hyperplasias and adenomas, were obtained with the rat DHPN-induced lung carcinogenesis model. In the rat quartz instillation model, male 10-week old F344 rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation (IT) to quartz at a dose of 2 mg/rat suspended in saline (0.2 ml) on day 0, and sacrificed on day 28. Lung tumorigenesis in F344 male rats was initiated by DHPN in drinking water for 2 weeks, and the animals were then sacrificed in week 30. Lung proliferative lesions, hyperplasias and adenomas, were observed with DHPN, and inflammation was observed with quartz. The expressions of SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D were examined immunohistochemically. SP-B and SP-C showed strong expression in lung hyperplasias and adenomas, while SP-A and SP-D were observed in mucus or exudates in inflammatory alveoli. These results suggest the possibility that SP-B and SP-C are related to lung tumorigenesis. PMID:25378802

  7. Nandrolone decanoate and resistance exercise training favor the occurrence of lesions and activate the inflammatory response in the ventral prostate.

    PubMed

    Gomes, F C; Chuffa, L G A; Scarano, W R; Pinheiro, P F F; Fávaro, W J; Domeniconi, R F

    2016-05-01

    Age is a key factor in the development of prostatic lesions. An increase in reactive oxygen species levels occurs during aging. Furthermore, the indiscriminate use of anabolic androgenic steroids and physical exercise alter the availability of hormones and may promote the appearance of lesions. This study examined whether the use of nandrolone decanoate (ND), associated or not with resistance exercise training, affects the pathways related to the inflammatory response in the ventral prostate of adult and aged rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were distributed into eight experimental groups: sedentary with ND, sedentary without ND, exercise with ND, and exercise without ND. The animals performed resistance exercise training and received ND two times/week (5 mg/kg, i.m.) for 8 weeks. Adult rats were killed immediately following treatment completion, and aged rats remained untreated until reaching 300 days of age. The adult animals that received ND and performed resistance exercise training showed a higher occurrence of lesions with TLR4 activation. Marked IL-6 expression occurred in the group that performed resistance exercise training. The group exposed to ND showed overexpression of TLR2, TLR4, NOX1, Nrf2, TNF-α, and P38MAPK. The animals that received ND and performed training showed increase levels of NFκB, IRF3, IL-6, TNF-α, and NOX1. TLR2 and TLR4 showed no upregulation in the aged animals. The groups exercise + ND showed lesions in the adult stage and after aging, followed by molecular alterations. We concluded that nandrolone decanoate and resistance exercise training can promote the onset of prostatic tumors in the adult stage, and during aging, activating pathways involved in the inflammatory response. PMID:27011054

  8. Fulminant Demyelinating Diseases of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Carolyn J; Cree, Bruce A

    2015-12-01

    Fulminant demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system include acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, the related acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis, multiple sclerosis variants, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, and idiopathic transverse myelitis. These syndromes are often managed with similar acute treatments including high-dose corticosteroids and plasmapheresis; however, long-term management varies. Although the prognosis of fulminant demyelinating disease was historically poor, outcomes today may be improved due to earlier diagnosis, rapid implementation of anti-inflammatory therapies such as high-dose corticosteroids and plasmapheresis, and improved supportive care. PMID:26595866

  9. Early and widespread injury of astrocytes in the absence of demyelination in acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Christopher A; Adiele, Reginald C; Tham, Mylyne; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Popescu, Bogdan F G H

    2014-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHL) is a fulminant demyelinating disease of unknown etiology. Most cases are fatal within one week from onset. AHL pathology varies with the acuteness of disease. Hemorrhages, vessel fibrinoid necrosis, perivascular fibrin exudation, edema and neutrophilic inflammation are early features, while perivascular demyelination, microglial foci and myelin-laden macrophages appear later. Reactive astrocytosis is not present in early hemorrhagic non-demyelinated lesions, but is seen in older lesions. This case report presents the pathology of an AHL case with fulminant course and fatal outcome within 48 hours from presentation. Severe hemorrhages, edema and neutrophilic inflammation in the absence of circumscribed perivascular demyelination affected the temporal neocortex and white matter, hippocampus, cerebellar cortex and white matter, optic chiasm, mammillary bodies, brainstem, cranial nerve roots and leptomeninges. Perivascular end-feet and parenchymal processes of astrocytes exhibited impressive swelling in haemorrhagic but non-demyelinated white matter regions. Astrocytes were dystrophic and displayed degenerating processes. Astrocytic swellings and remnants were immunoreactive for aquaporin-4, aquaporin-1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. These morphological changes of astrocytes consistent with injury were also observed in haemorrhagic and normal appearing cortex. Our findings reinforce that perivascular demyelination is not present early in AHL. This is the first study that highlights the early and widespread astrocytic injury in the absence of demyelination in AHL, suggesting that, similarly to neuromyelitis optica and central pontine myelinolysis, demyelination in AHL is secondary to astrocyte injury. PMID:24887055

  10. Immune-mediated demyelination--immunopathological basis for electrophysiological changes.

    PubMed

    Saida, T; Saida, K

    1982-01-01

    A focal immune-mediated demyelinating lesion of peripheral nerve was produced by intraneural injection of antiserum to galactocerebroside, a major glycosphingolipid hapten common in CNS and PNS myelin. This model provides an excellent system for correlative studies of physiological and pathological alterations in the processes of demyelination, because the time course of such changes is predictable from animal to animal. Twenty minutes after antiserum injection, Schwann cells showed focal cytoplasmic outpouching and their external mesaxons opened. Between 1 and 8 h after injection "melting," splitting, vesiculation and vacuolation of myelin became increasingly prominent at paranodal regions and Schmidt-Lantermann clefts, with concomitant degenerative changes in Schwann cell cytoplasm. Disruption of myelin in the paranodal region with detachment of the outermost paranodal myelin loops from paranodal axon resulted in an increase in nodal surface area. This seems to be the most critical anatomical alteration responsible for the early changes in propagation of nerve impulses in this antibody-mediated demyelinating lesion. Between 8 h and 3 days axons became demyelinated progressively over several internodes by macrophage phagocytosis. The onset of clinical and saltatory conduction recovery from the lesion corresponded to the appearance of 2-8 myelin lamellae around each remyelinating axon. PMID:6962042

  11. Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is a homeostatic factor in the central nervous system limiting neuroinflammation and demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Neuwirth, Ales; Economopoulou, Matina; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Chung, Kyoung-Jin; Bittner, Stefan; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Langer, Harald; Samus, Maryna; Kim, Hyesoon; Cho, Geum-Sil; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Bdeir, Khalil; Chavakis, Emmanouil; Koh, Jae-Young; Boon, Louis; Hosur, Kavita; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Meuth, Sven G.; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) and disruption of its immune privilege are major contributors to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and of its rodent counterpart, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have previously identified developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) as an endogenous anti-inflammatory factor, which inhibits integrin-dependent leukocyte adhesion. Here we show that Del-1 contributes to the immune privilege status of the CNS. Intriguingly, Del-1 expression decreased in chronic active MS lesions and in the inflamed CNS in the course of EAE. Del-1-deficiency was associated with increased EAE severity, accompanied by increased demyelination and axonal loss. As compared to control mice, Del-1−/− mice displayed enhanced disruption of the blood brain barrier and increased infiltration of neutrophil granulocytes in the spinal cord in the course of EAE, accompanied by elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines, including IL-17. The augmented levels of IL-17 in Del-1-deficiency derived predominantly from infiltrated CD8+ T cells. Increased EAE severity and neutrophil infiltration due to Del-1-deficiency was reversed in mice lacking both Del-1 and IL-17-receptor, indicating a crucial role for the IL-17/neutrophil inflammatory axis in EAE pathogenesis in Del-1−/− mice. Strikingly, systemic administration of Del-1-Fc ameliorated clinical relapse in relapsing-remitting EAE. Therefore, Del-1 is an endogenous homeostatic factor in the CNS protecting from neuroinflammation and demyelination. Our findings provide mechanistic underpinnings for the previous implication of Del-1 as a candidate MS susceptibility gene and suggest that Del-1-centered therapeutic approaches may be beneficial in neuroinflammatory and demyelinating disorders. PMID:25385367

  12. Developmental endothelial locus-1 is a homeostatic factor in the central nervous system limiting neuroinflammation and demyelination.

    PubMed

    Choi, E Y; Lim, J-H; Neuwirth, A; Economopoulou, M; Chatzigeorgiou, A; Chung, K-J; Bittner, S; Lee, S-H; Langer, H; Samus, M; Kim, H; Cho, G-S; Ziemssen, T; Bdeir, K; Chavakis, E; Koh, J-Y; Boon, L; Hosur, K; Bornstein, S R; Meuth, S G; Hajishengallis, G; Chavakis, T

    2015-07-01

    Inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) and disruption of its immune privilege are major contributors to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and of its rodent counterpart, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have previously identified developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) as an endogenous anti-inflammatory factor, which inhibits integrin-dependent leukocyte adhesion. Here we show that Del-1 contributes to the immune privilege status of the CNS. Intriguingly, Del-1 expression decreased in chronic-active MS lesions and in the inflamed CNS in the course of EAE. Del-1-deficiency was associated with increased EAE severity, accompanied by increased demyelination and axonal loss. As compared with control mice, Del-1(-/-) mice displayed enhanced disruption of the blood-brain barrier and increased infiltration of neutrophil granulocytes in the spinal cord in the course of EAE, accompanied by elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-17 (IL-17). The augmented levels of IL-17 in Del-1-deficiency derived predominantly from infiltrated CD8(+) T cells. Increased EAE severity and neutrophil infiltration because of Del-1-deficiency was reversed in mice lacking both Del-1 and IL-17 receptor, indicating a crucial role for the IL-17/neutrophil inflammatory axis in EAE pathogenesis in Del-1(-/-) mice. Strikingly, systemic administration of Del-1-Fc ameliorated clinical relapse in relapsing-remitting EAE. Therefore, Del-1 is an endogenous homeostatic factor in the CNS protecting from neuroinflammation and demyelination. Our findings provide mechanistic underpinnings for the previous implication of Del-1 as a candidate MS susceptibility gene and suggest that Del-1-centered therapeutic approaches may be beneficial in neuroinflammatory and demyelinating disorders. PMID:25385367

  13. Scanning acoustic microscopy for characterization of neoplastic and inflammatory lesions of lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Miura, Katsutoshi; Nasu, Hatsuko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    A scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) imaging system calculates and color codes speed of sound (SOS). We evaluated the SAM results for lymph node imaging and compared these results with those of light microscopy (LM). SAM showed normal structures and localized/diffuse lesions of the lymph node. Our results revealed that as a rule, soft areas such as cystic necrosis presented less SOS while harder areas such as coagulative necrosis, granulomas, and fibrosis exhibited greater SOS. SOS increased according to stromal desmoplastic reactions and cellular concentration. In neoplastic lesions, statistically significant differences in SOS were observed among scirrhous carcinomas, lymphomas, and medullary carcinomas. SAM provided the following benefits over LM: (1) images reflected the tissue elasticity of each lesion, (2) digitized SOS data could be statistically comparable, (3) images were acquired in a few minutes without special staining, (4) SAM images and echographic images were comparable for clinical ultrasound imaging study. PMID:23409246

  14. Dermoscopy for the pediatric dermatologist part I: dermoscopy of pediatric infectious and inflammatory skin lesions and hair disorders.

    PubMed

    Haliasos, Elena C; Kerner, Miryam; Jaimes-Lopez, Natalia; Rudnicka, Lidia; Zalaudek, Iris; Malvehy, Josep; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Braun, Ralph P; Marghoob, Ashfaq A

    2013-01-01

    The dermoscope allows physicians to examine the macroscopic and microscopic primary morphology of skin lesions, identify subtle clinical clues, confirm naked-eye clinical diagnoses, and monitor treatment progress while posing little threat to the young patient. This review summarizes important dermoscopic structures seen in infectious and inflammatory skin conditions and hair disorders in children. Scabies, pediculosis, phthiriasis, molluscum contagiosum, tinea nigra, and verrucae are well characterized dermoscopically by delta-shaped structures, ovoid-shaped nits, the crab louse, red corona, brown strands or spicules, and multiple densely packed papilla with a central black dot surrounded by a whitish halo, respectively. These dermoscopic structures will be discussed, focusing on the dermoscopic morphologies and dermoscopic sensitivity for diagnosis and its utility in monitoring treatment progress. Dermoscopy has also been shown to significantly improve the clinician's diagnostic and monitoring accuracy of inflammatory skin lesions such as psoriasis, which is characterized dermoscopically by uniformly distributed dotted blood vessels, and lichen planus, which is characterized by whitish lines on a purple to reddish background. Dermoscopy of the hair and scalp (trichoscopy) facilitates the differential diagnosis of hair diseases in children, including alopecia areata, trichotillomania, and tinea capitis. It can also assist in the diagnosis of multiple genetic hair shaft disorders, such as monilethrix, trichorrhexis invaginata, trichorrhexis nodosa, pili torti, and pili annulati. PMID:23405886

  15. Integrated imaging of hepatic tumors in childhood. Part II. Benign lesions (congenital, reparative, and inflammatory)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Greenspan, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have encountered benign liver masses as frequently as malignant lesions in children with hepatomegaly. Lesions studied included abscesses, cavernous hemangioma/hemangioendothelioma, adenoma of glycogen storage disease, choledochal cysts, focal nodular hyperplasia, cystic hepatoblastoma, and hamartoma. An intergrated imaging protocol involving ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy proved to be more helpful than any one modality in establishing the benign or malignant nature of a hepatic neoplasm and the type of tumor, which is of particular importance when surgical exploration and/or biopsy is contraindicated.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Latov, Norman

    2014-08-01

    Chronic neuropathies are operationally classified as primarily demyelinating or axonal, on the basis of electrodiagnostic or pathological criteria. Demyelinating neuropathies are further classified as hereditary or acquired-this distinction is important, because the acquired neuropathies are immune-mediated and, thus, amenable to treatment. The acquired chronic demyelinating neuropathies include chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), neuropathy associated with monoclonal IgM antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG; anti-MAG neuropathy), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and POEMS syndrome. They have characteristic--though overlapping--clinical presentations, are mediated by distinct immune mechanisms, and respond to different therapies. CIDP is the default diagnosis if the neuropathy is demyelinating and no other cause is found. Anti-MAG neuropathy is diagnosed on the basis of the presence of anti-MAG antibodies, MMN is characterized by multifocal weakness and motor conduction blocks, and POEMS syndrome is associated with IgG or IgA λ-type monoclonal gammopathy and osteosclerotic myeloma. The correct diagnosis, however, can be difficult to make in patients with atypical or overlapping presentations, or nondefinitive laboratory studies. First-line treatments include intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), corticosteroids or plasmapheresis for CIDP; IVIg for MMN; rituximab for anti-MAG neuropathy; and irradiation or chemotherapy for POEMS syndrome. A correct diagnosis is required for choosing the appropriate treatment, with the aim of preventing progressive neuropathy. PMID:24980070

  17. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy, Multifocal Acquired Demyelinating Sensory and Motor Neuropathy and Other Chronic Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Variants

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Katz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathies (CADP) are an important group of immune neuromuscular disorders affecting myelin. These are distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Classically, CIDP is characterized by proximal and distal weakness, large fiber sensory loss, elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein content, demyelinating changes nerve conduction studies or nerve biopsy, and response to immunomodulating treatment. In this chapter we discuss CADP with emphasis on multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM), distal acquired demyelinating symmetric (DADS) neuropathy and conclude with less common variants. While each of these entities has distinctive laboratory and electrodiagnostic features that aid in their diagnosis, clinical characteristics are of paramount importance in diagnosing specific conditions and determining the most appropriate therapies. Unlike CIDP, MMN is typically asymmetric and affects only the motor nerve fibers. MMN is a rare disease that presents chronically, over several years of progression affecting the arms are more commonly than the legs. Men are more likely than women to develop MMN. MADSAM should be suspected in patients who have weakness and loss of sensation in primarily one arm or leg which progresses slowly over several months to years. It is important in patient with multifocal demyelinating clinical presentation to distinguish MMN from MADSAM since corticosteroids are not effective in MMN where the mainstay of therapy is intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIg). DADS can be subdivided into DADS-M (associated woth M-protein) and DADS-I which is idioapthic. While DADS-I patients respond somewhat to immunotherapy, DADS-M patients present with distal predominant sensorimotor demyelinating neuropathy phenotype and are notoriously refractory to immunotherapies regardless of antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Our knowledge

  18. Time course of lewisite-induced skin lesions and inflammatory response in the SKH-1 hairless mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nguon, Nina; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Vallet, Virginie; Elbakdouri, Nacéra; Wartelle, Julien; Mouret, Stéphane; Bertoni, Marine; Dorandeu, Frédéric; Boudry, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Data on the toxicity of lewisite (L), a vesicant chemical warfare agent, are scarce and conflicting, and the use of the specific antidote is not without drawbacks. This study was designed to evaluate if the SKH-1 hairless mouse model was suitable to study the L-induced skin injuries. We studied the progression of lesions following exposure to L vapors for 21 days using paraclinical parameters (color, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and biomechanical measurements), histological assessments, and biochemical indexes of inflammation. Some data were also obtained over 27 weeks. The development of lesions was similar to that reported in other models. The TEWL parameter appeared to be the most appropriate index to follow their progression. Histological analysis showed inflammatory cell infiltration and microvesications at day 1 and a complete wound closure by day 21. Biochemical studies indicated a deregulation of the levels of several cytokines and receptors involved in inflammation. An increase in the quantity of pro-matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 was shown as observed in other models. This suggests that the SKH-1 mouse model is relevant for the investigation of the physiopathological process of skin lesions induced by L and to screen new treatment candidates. PMID:24635178

  19. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H. K.; Das, D.; Doley, R.; Sahu, P. P.

    2016-03-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination.

  20. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model.

    PubMed

    Das, H K; Das, D; Doley, R; Sahu, P P

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination. PMID:26932543

  1. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model

    PubMed Central

    Das, H. K.; Das, D.; Doley, R.; Sahu, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination. PMID:26932543

  2. Early loss of oligodendrocytes in human and experimental neuromyelitis optica lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wrzos, Claudia; Winkler, Anne; Metz, Imke; Kayser, Dieter M.; Thal, Dietmar R.; Wegner, Christiane; Brück, Wolfgang; Nessler, Stefan; Bennett, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a chronic, mostly relapsing inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS characterized by serum anti-aquaporin 4 (AQP4) antibodies in the majority of patients. Anti-AQP4 antibodies derived from NMO patients target and deplete astrocytes in experimental models when co-injected with complement. However, the time course and mechanisms of oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination and the fate of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) have not been examined in detail. Also, no studies regarding astrocyte repopulation of experimental NMO lesions have been reported. We utilized two rat models using either systemic transfer or focal intracerebral injection of recombinant human anti-AQP4 antibodies to generate NMO-like lesions. Time-course experiments were performed to examine oligodendroglial and astroglial damage and repair. In addition, oligodendrocyte pathology was studied in early human NMO lesions. Apart from early complement-mediated astrocyte destruction, we observed a prominent, very early loss of oligodendrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) as well as a delayed loss of myelin. Astrocyte repopulation of focal NMO lesions was already substantial after 1 week. Olig2-positive OPCs reappeared before NogoA-positive, mature oligodendrocytes. Thus, using two experimental models that closely mimic the human disease, our study demonstrates that oligodendrocyte and OPC loss is an extremely early feature in the formation of human and experimental NMO lesions and leads to subsequent, delayed demyelination, highlighting an important difference in the pathogenesis of MS and NMO. PMID:24292009

  3. Histopathology of duodenal mucosal lesions in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease: statistical analysis to identify distinctive features.

    PubMed

    Hardee, Steven; Alper, Arik; Pashankar, Dinesh S; Morotti, Raffaella A

    2014-01-01

    Histopathologic lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract (UGT) are common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Pediatric patients have a higher incidence of IBD-associated gastritis and duodenitis than do adults. This study aimed to identify histopathologic features of duodenal lesions in the pediatric population that are characteristic of IBD, compared to duodenal pathology of different etiopathogenesis. We performed a retrospective analysis of UGT biopsies from pediatric patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of duodenitis (0-18 years of age) over a 7-year period. We identified 40 cases of duodenitis associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and 10 cases associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) and compared the histopathologic characteristics of the duodenitis with age-matched controls consisting of 40 cases duodenitis associated with celiac disease and 40 non-Helicobacter pylori-associated (NOS) etiology duodenitis cases. The histologic features that were evaluated included presence of granulomas, duodenal cryptitis, erosion, lamina propria eosinophils, villous blunting, increased intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), and crypt hyperplasia, among others. Additionally, we evaluated the presence of associated gastritis in all of these groups. Statistical analysis to identify significant differences was performed using Kruskal-Wallis testing. Cryptitis was the most distinctive feature of IBD-associated duodenitis. Granulomas were exceptionally rare. The severity of villous blunting and presence of IELs was significantly different in the IBD versus the celiac group. There is a significant overlap with duodenal lesions of different etiopathogenesis, including villous blunting and eosinophilia. With the exclusion of granulomas, cryptitis seems the most distinctive feature of the duodenal lesions associated with IBD. PMID:25207874

  4. FLT PET/CT in a Case of Demyelinating Disease.

    PubMed

    Nikaki, Alexandra; Prassopoulos, Vasilios; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Tsougos, Ioannis; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    A 32-year-old woman, with spare previous medical history, presented with neurological symptoms of numbness and diplopia. The patient underwent brain MRI, which revealed a lesion of abnormal signal in the midbrain that could be attributed to subacute stroke; however, consecutive MRIs revealed multiple lesions of abnormal signal pointing to demyelinating disease. During symptoms investigation and MRI findings assessment, the patient underwent a FLT PET/CT examination, which revealed lesions of increased FLT uptake, probably indicating active disease and blood-brain barrier disruption. PMID:27088385

  5. Tumours and inflammatory lesions of the anal canal and perianal skin revisited: an update and practical approach.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Heather; Serra, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Tumours of the anal and perianal region are relatively rare, and clinically often interpreted as innocuous lesions, leading to frequent delays in diagnosis and adequate treatment. Although squamous cell neoplasia represents the most common entity encountered in this anatomically complex area, many conditions, both neoplastic and inflammatory, may occur. Adding to the challenge of correct diagnosis and patient management, recent years have seen major updates in the terminology of squamous cell neoplasia, created to reflect advances in our understanding of the role of human papilloma virus and unify previous terminologies used for different sites in the anogenital tract. However, squamous cell neoplasia in the anal canal and perianal region may differ in terms of histology, biological behaviour, staging and treatment. The aim of this review is to present an overview of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions that may be seen in this area, an update on important developments and terminology, potential pitfalls that may be encountered in routine pathology practice and a practical approach on how to resolve these issues. PMID:26602415

  6. Nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal axonal proteins during demyelination and remyelination in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Coman, I; Aigrot, M S; Seilhean, D; Reynolds, R; Girault, J A; Zalc, B; Lubetzki, C

    2006-12-01

    Saltatory conduction in myelinated fibres depends on the specific molecular organization of highly specialized axonal domains at the node of Ranvier, the paranodal and the juxtaparanodal regions. Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) have been shown to be deployed along the naked demyelinated axon in experimental models of CNS demyelination and in multiple sclerosis lesions. Little is known about aggregation of nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal constituents during the repair process. We analysed by immunohistochemistry on free-floating sections from multiple sclerosis brains the expression and distribution of nodal (Na(v) channels), paranodal (paranodin/Caspr) and juxtaparanodal (K(v) channels and Caspr2) molecules in demyelinated and remyelinated lesions. Whereas in demyelinated lesions, paranodal and juxtaparanodal proteins are diffusely distributed on denuded axons, the distribution of Na(v) channels is heterogeneous, with a diffuse immunoreactivity but also few broad Na(v) channel aggregates in all demyelinated lesions. In contrast to the demyelinated plaques, all remyelinated lesions are characterized by the detection of aggregates of Na(v) channels, paranodin/Caspr, K(v) channels and Caspr2. Our data suggest that these aggregates precede remyelination, and that Na(v) channel aggregation is the initial event, followed by aggregation of paranodal and then juxtaparanodal axonal proteins. Remyelination takes place in multiple sclerosis tissue but myelin repair is often incomplete, and the reasons for this remyelination deficit are many. We suggest that a defect of Na(v) channel aggregation might be involved in the remyelination failure in demyelinated lesions with spared axons and oligodendroglial cells. PMID:16766541

  7. Nogo Receptor Inhibition Enhances Functional Recovery following Lysolecithin-Induced Demyelination in Mouse Optic Chiasm

    PubMed Central

    Pourabdolhossein, Fereshteh; Mozafari, Sabah; Morvan-Dubois, Ghislaine; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Lopez-Juarez, Alejandra; Pierre-Simons, Jacqueline; Demeneix, Barbara A.; Javan, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibitory factors have been implicated in the failure of remyelination in demyelinating diseases. Myelin associated inhibitors act through a common receptor called Nogo receptor (NgR) that plays critical inhibitory roles in CNS plasticity. Here we investigated the effects of abrogating NgR inhibition in a non-immune model of focal demyelination in adult mouse optic chiasm. Methodology/Principal Findings A focal area of demyelination was induced in adult mouse optic chiasm by microinjection of lysolecithin. To knock down NgR levels, siRNAs against NgR were intracerebroventricularly administered via a permanent cannula over 14 days, Functional changes were monitored by electrophysiological recording of latency of visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Histological analysis was carried out 3, 7 and 14 days post demyelination lesion. To assess the effect of NgR inhibition on precursor cell repopulation, BrdU was administered to the animals prior to the demyelination induction. Inhibition of NgR significantly restored VEPs responses following optic chiasm demyelination. These findings were confirmed histologically by myelin specific staining. siNgR application resulted in a smaller lesion size compared to control. NgR inhibition significantly increased the numbers of BrdU+/Olig2+ progenitor cells in the lesioned area and in the neurogenic zone of the third ventricle. These progenitor cells (Olig2+ or GFAP+) migrated away from this area as a function of time. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that inhibition of NgR facilitate myelin repair in the demyelinated chiasm, with enhanced recruitment of proliferating cells to the lesion site. Thus, antagonizing NgR function could have therapeutic potential for demyelinating disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis. PMID:25184636

  8. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor: A Rarely Seen Submucosal Lesion of the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Deniz; Gündüz, Şeyda; Tural, Deniz; Uysal, Mükremin; Tatlı, Ali Murat; Başsorgun, Cumhur İbrahim; Elpek, Gülsüm Özlem; Coşkun, Hasan Şenol; Bozcuk, Hakan Şat; Savaş, Burhan

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare mesenchymal benign tumor which is generally seen in children and in young adults. It is especially located in the lungs. In histopathological examination, neoplastic fusiform cells originating from a subtype of accessory immune system cells which are called fibroblastic reticulum cells are seen (Kouichi and Youichirou, 2008). Although IMT is histopathologically benign, imaging methods show its tendency for local recurrence and invasion. In most of the cases, it may not be possible to make a distinction whether it is malign or benign. Complete surgical resection is the most important treatment method. In this study, we have discussed the findings of our case having a gastric submucosal located IMT in light of the current literatures. PMID:23573435

  9. The neural androgen receptor: a therapeutic target for myelin repair in chronic demyelination.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rashad; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Bielecki, Bartosz; Steibel, Jérôme; Boehm, Nelly; Liere, Philippe; Macklin, Wendy B; Kumar, Narender; Habert, René; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina; Tronche, François; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Schumacher, Michael; Ghandour, M Said

    2013-01-01

    Myelin regeneration is a major therapeutic goal in demyelinating diseases, and the failure to remyelinate rapidly has profound consequences for the health of axons and for brain function. However, there is no efficient treatment for stimulating myelin repair, and current therapies are limited to anti-inflammatory agents. Males are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than females, but often have a more severe disease course and reach disability milestones at an earlier age than females, and these observations have spurred interest in the potential protective effects of androgens. Here, we demonstrate that testosterone treatment efficiently stimulates the formation of new myelin and reverses myelin damage in chronic demyelinated brain lesions, resulting from the long-term administration of cuprizone, which is toxic for oligodendrocytes. In addition to the strong effect of testosterone on myelin repair, the number of activated astrocytes and microglial cells returned to low control levels, indicating a reduction of neuroinflammatory responses. We also identify the neural androgen receptor as a novel therapeutic target for myelin recovery. After the acute demyelination of cerebellar slices in organotypic culture, the remyelinating actions of testosterone could be mimicked by 5α-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite that is not converted to oestrogens, and blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide. Testosterone treatment also failed to promote remyelination after chronic cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice with a non-functional androgen receptor. Importantly, testosterone did not stimulate the formation of new myelin sheaths after specific knockout of the androgen receptor in neurons and macroglial cells. Thus, the neural brain androgen receptor is required for the remyelination effect of testosterone, whereas the presence of the receptor in microglia and in peripheral tissues is not sufficient to enhance remyelination. The potent synthetic

  10. Current Concepts of the Pathogenesis and Pathology of Inflammatory Lesions of the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Shnitka, Theodor K.

    1964-01-01

    The histopathologic lesions of regional enteritis and ulcerative colitis, particularly in their early stages, are distinct and distinguishable, irrespective of the sites that are involved. Regional enteritis is characterized by lymphangiectasis, lymphedema, lymphoid hyperplasia, and granulomatous inflammation of the submucosal and subserosal layers of intestine, whereas chronic ulcerative colitis is an exudative, ulcerative disorder of the mucosal layer that commences with “crypt abscesses” and only in its later stages progresses to deeper coats of the wall. Electron microscopy of a rectal biopsy from a juvenile patient with chronic ulcerative colitis for five years disclosed a labyrinthine system of clefts and compartments between columnar, mucosal epithelial cells. Regenerated colonic epithelial cells were of primitive, germinal type and featured a “vesicular” rather than a “goblet” pattern of mucus secretion. Clusters of small “clavate fimbriae” projected from the tips of microvilli. Each of these newly recognized substructures measured 30 to 60 mμ. in diameter, and was enclosed by a tri-laminar “unit membrane”, derived from the surface plasma membrane of the cell. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19 PMID:14182565

  11. Inflammatory pseudotumor containing necrotizing granulomatous lesions of kidney: a hitherto undescribed entity.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Herein reported is a case of inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of kidney. It is not described in WHO, AFIP, and other books. A review of the literature revealed about 35 cases. A 76-year-old man underwent nephrectomy under clinical diagnosis of renal pelvic carcinoma. Grossly, a solid tumor was seen in renal parenchyma. Microscopically, it was composed of spindle cell tissue with inflammation and many necrotizing granulomas. Epithelioid histiocytes were abundant but giant cells were few. Lymphocytes and plasma cells were also seen. The features suggested tuberculosis (TB), but Ziehl-Neelsen stains and PCR revealed no TB bacillus. Immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor spindle cells were positive for vimentin, CD68, CD45, and Ki-67 (labeling = 18%), α-smooth muscle antigen, and NSE. Focal staining of KIT (mast cells), S100 protein (Langerhans cells), and CD10 (spindle cells) was present. IgG4 was negative. The tumor spindle cells were negative for other antigens examined. PMID:25379319

  12. Disease-specific molecular events in cortical multiple sclerosis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Isabella; Höftberger, Romana; Gerlach, Susanna; Haider, Lukas; Zrzavy, Tobias; Hametner, Simon; Mahad, Don; Binder, Christoph J.; Krumbholz, Markus; Bauer, Jan; Bradl, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Cortical lesions constitute an important part of multiple sclerosis pathology. Although inflammation appears to play a role in their formation, the mechanisms leading to demyelination and neurodegeneration are poorly understood. We aimed to identify some of these mechanisms by combining gene expression studies with neuropathological analysis. In our study, we showed that the combination of inflammation, plaque-like primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the cortex is specific for multiple sclerosis and is not seen in other chronic inflammatory diseases mediated by CD8-positive T cells (Rasmussen’s encephalitis), B cells (B cell lymphoma) or complex chronic inflammation (tuberculous meningitis, luetic meningitis or chronic purulent meningitis). In addition, we performed genome-wide microarray analysis comparing micro-dissected active cortical multiple sclerosis lesions with those of tuberculous meningitis (inflammatory control), Alzheimer’s disease (neurodegenerative control) and with cortices of age-matched controls. More than 80% of the identified multiple sclerosis-specific genes were related to T cell-mediated inflammation, microglia activation, oxidative injury, DNA damage and repair, remyelination and regenerative processes. Finally, we confirmed by immunohistochemistry that oxidative damage in cortical multiple sclerosis lesions is associated with oligodendrocyte and neuronal injury, the latter also affecting axons and dendrites. Our study provides new insights into the complex mechanisms of neurodegeneration and regeneration in the cortex of patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23687122

  13. Dendritic Cells Are the Major Antigen Presenting Cells in Inflammatory Lesions of Murine Mycoplasma Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiangle; Jones, Harlan P.; Dobbs, Nicole; Bodhankar, Sheetal; Simecka, Jerry W.

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasmas cause chronic respiratory diseases in animals and humans, and to date, development of vaccines have been problematic. Using a murine model of mycoplasma pneumonia, lymphocyte responses, specifically T cells, were shown to confer protection as well as promote immunopathology in mycoplasma disease. Because T cells play such a critical role, it is important to define the role of antigen presenting cells (APC) as these cells may influence either exacerbation of mycoplasma disease pathogenesis or enhancement of protective immunity. The roles of APC, such as dendritic cells and/or macrophages, and their ability to modulate adaptive immunity in mycoplasma disease are currently unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify individual pulmonary APC populations that may contribute to the activation of T cell responses during mycoplasma disease pathogenesis. The present study indeed demonstrates increasing numbers of CD11c− F4/80+ cells, which contain macrophages, and more mature/activated CD11c+ F4/80− cells, containing DC, in the lungs after infection. CD11c− F4/80+ macrophage-enriched cells and CD11c+ F4/80− dendritic cell-enriched populations showed different patterns of cytokine mRNA expression, supporting the idea that these cells have different impacts on immunity in response to infection. In fact, DC containing CD11c+ F4/80− cell populations from the lungs of infected mice were most capable of stimulating mycoplasma-specific CD4+ Th cell responses in vitro. In vivo, these CD11c+F4/80− cells were co-localized with CD4+ Th cells in inflammatory infiltrates in the lungs of mycoplasma-infected mice. Thus, CD11c+F4/80− dendritic cells appear to be the major APC population responsible for pulmonary T cell stimulation in mycoplasma-infected mice, and these dendritic cells likely contribute to responses impacting disease pathogenesis. PMID:23390557

  14. Saltatory conduction precedes remyelination in axons demyelinated with lysophosphatidyl choline.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Bostock, H; Hall, S M

    1982-04-01

    The changing electrical and morphological properties of demyelinating and remyelinating nerve fibres have been studied in rat ventral roots after intrathecal injection of lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC). The spatial distribution of electrical excitability within the lesion has been studied in undissected single fibres using high-resolution longitudinal current analysis. The distribution of excitability has been correlated with the ultrastructure of the fibres and with the distribution of the surrounding Schwann cells. Demyelinated axolemma was initially not excited, but conduction across demyelinated internodes appeared progressively from the 4th day after LPC injection. Conduction was never continuous, but proceeded via new foci of inward membrane current as early as 4 days after LPC injection, i.e. 3 days before the onset of remyelination. It is suggested that these foci (termed phi-nodes to distinguish them from the nodes of Ranvier distributed along myelinated nerve fibres) are precursors of nodes of Ranvier, and may indicate aggregates of sodium channels which form along the demyelinated axolemma prior to remyelination. PMID:6804606

  15. Intrathecal gene therapy rescues a model of demyelinating peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kagiava, Alexia; Sargiannidou, Irene; Theophilidis, George; Karaiskos, Christos; Richter, Jan; Bashiardes, Stavros; Schiza, Natasa; Nearchou, Marianna; Christodoulou, Christina; Scherer, Steven S; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2016-04-26

    Inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies are progressive incurable diseases without effective treatment. To develop a gene therapy approach targeting myelinating Schwann cells that can be translatable, we delivered a lentiviral vector using a single lumbar intrathecal injection and a myelin-specific promoter. The human gene of interest, GJB1, which is mutated in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT1X), was delivered intrathecally into adult Gjb1-null mice, a genetically authentic model of CMT1X that develops a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. We obtained widespread, stable, and cell-specific expression of connexin32 in up to 50% of Schwann cells in multiple lumbar spinal roots and peripheral nerves. Behavioral and electrophysiological analysis revealed significantly improved motor performance, quadriceps muscle contractility, and sciatic nerve conduction velocities. Furthermore, treated mice exhibited reduced numbers of demyelinated and remyelinated fibers and fewer inflammatory cells in lumbar motor roots, as well as in the femoral motor and sciatic nerves. This study demonstrates that a single intrathecal lentiviral gene delivery can lead to Schwann cell-specific expression in spinal roots extending to multiple peripheral nerves. This clinically relevant approach improves the phenotype of an inherited neuropathy mouse model and provides proof of principle for treating inherited demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:27035961

  16. Remyelination of demyelinated rat axons by transplanted mouse oligodendrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Crang, A.J.; Blakemore, W.F. )

    1991-01-01

    The injection of the gliotoxic agent ethidium bromide (EB) into spinal white matter produces a CNS lesion in which it is possible to investigate the ability of transplanted glial cells to reconstruct a glial environment around demyelinated axons. This study demonstrates that transplanted mouse glial cells can repopulate EB lesions in rats provided tissue rejection is controlled. In X-irradiated EB lesions in cyclosporin-A-treated rats, mouse oligodendrocytes remyelinated rat axons and, together with mouse astrocytes, re-established a CNS environment. When transplanted into nonirradiated EB lesions in nude rats, mouse glial cells modulated the normal host repair by Schwann cells to remyelination by oligodendrocytes. In both X-irradiated and non-irradiated EB lesions, transplanted mouse glial cells behaved similarly to isogenic rat glial cell transplants. These findings indicate that the cell-cell interactions involved in reconstruction of a glial environment are common to both mouse and rat.

  17. Autoimmune demyelination in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tabira, T

    1988-01-01

    Autoimmune demyelination was studied in EAE induced by active challenge or by transfer of effector T-cell lines or clones specific for myelin basic protein or proteolipid apoprotein. The following points became clear: (1) Proteolipid apoprotein is responsible for widespread demyelination; (2) demyelination is more significant in EAE with a more chronic disease process; (3) a single T-cell clone can mediate significant demyelination without the aid of recipient-derived T-cell populations; (4) the difference in vulnerability between axons and myelin may account for the T-cell-mediated demyelination; and (5) effector T-cell clones can be activated by allogeneic antigens. PMID:2462801

  18. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 positively affects both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent-induced gastrointestinal lesions and adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevic, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagic, V; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Zoricic, I; Konjevoda, P; Perovic, D; Simicevic, V; Separovic, J; Hanzevacki, M; Ljubanovic, D; Artukovic, B; Bratulic, M; Tisljar, M; Rekic, B; Gjurasin, M; Miklic, P; Buljat, G

    1997-01-01

    Besides a superior protection of the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (an essential fragment of an organoprotective gastric juice peptide BPC) against different gastrointestinal and liver lesions, an acute anti-inflammatory and analgetic activity was also noted. Consequently, its effect on chronic inflammation lesions, such as adjuvant arthritis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIAs)-induced gastrointestinal lesions was simultaneously studied in rats. In gastrointestinal lesions (indomethacin (30 mg/kg s.c.), aspirin (400 mg/kg i.g.) and diclofenac (125 mg/kg i.p.) studies, BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.) was regularly given simultaneously and/or 1 h prior to drug application (indomethacin). In the adjuvant arthritis (tail-application of 0.2 mL of Freund's adjuvant) studies (14 days, 30 days, 1 year) BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.), it was given as a single application (at 1 h either before or following the application of Freund's adjuvant) or in a once daily regimen (0-14th day, 14-30th day, 14th day-1 year). Given with the investigated NSAIAs, BPC 157 consistently reduced the otherwise prominent lesions in the stomach of the control rats, as well as the lesions in the small intestine in the indomethacin groups. In the adjuvant arthritis studies, the lesion's development seems to be considerably reduced after single pentadecapeptide medication, and even more attenuated in rats daily treated with BPC 157. As a therapy of already established adjuvant arthritis, its salutary effect consistently appeared already after 2 weeks of medication and it could be clearly seen also after 1 year of application. Taking together all these results, the data likely point to a special anti-inflammatory and mucosal integrity protective effect. PMID:9403784

  19. Effect of particle size on their accumulation in an inflammatory lesion in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ayaka; Tanaka, Hiroki; Sakurai, Yu; Tange, Kota; Nakai, Yuta; Ohkawara, Tatsuya; Takeda, Hiroshi; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Akita, Hidetaka

    2016-07-25

    Taking advantage of the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect is a promising approach for delivering macromolecules or nanoparticles to tumors. Recent studies revealed that this strategy is also applicable for targeting other pathological lesions (i.e. inflammatory disease). In the present study, we report the optimal size of a nanoparticle for allowing the higher accumulation of a particle in an inflammatory lesion using a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model. As a nanoparticle platform, we utilized a SS-cleavable and pH-activated lipid-like material (ssPalm), that can be used to produce particles in a variety of sizes ranging from 50nm to 180nm while using the same lipid composition. In healthy mice, particle accumulation remained low regardless of size. In contrast, the accumulation in inflammatory colon tissue was enhanced depending on the progress of the inflammation. In this situation, the apparent uptake clearance accumulation of a mid-sized particle (113nm on average) was higher than that for smaller and larger (54nm and 183nm in average, respectively) ones. Therefore, controlling particle size is an important parameter for the extensive targeting of inflammatory lesion. PMID:27231121

  20. Molecular Biology, Epidemiology, and Pathogenesis of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy, the JC Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease of the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ferenczy, Michael W.; Marshall, Leslie J.; Nelson, Christian D. S.; Atwood, Walter J.; Nath, Avindra; Khalili, Kamel

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a debilitating and frequently fatal central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease caused by JC virus (JCV), for which there is currently no effective treatment. Lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain leads to their eventual destruction and progressive demyelination, resulting in multiple foci of lesions in the white matter of the brain. Before the mid-1980s, PML was a relatively rare disease, reported to occur primarily in those with underlying neoplastic conditions affecting immune function and, more rarely, in allograft recipients receiving immunosuppressive drugs. However, with the onset of the AIDS pandemic, the incidence of PML has increased dramatically. Approximately 3 to 5% of HIV-infected individuals will develop PML, which is classified as an AIDS-defining illness. In addition, the recent advent of humanized monoclonal antibody therapy for the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and Crohn's disease has also led to an increased risk of PML as a side effect of immunotherapy. Thus, the study of JCV and the elucidation of the underlying causes of PML are important and active areas of research that may lead to new insights into immune function and host antiviral defense, as well as to potential new therapies. PMID:22763635

  1. Classification of choroiditis based on inflammatory lesion process rather than fundus appearance: enhanced comprehension through the ICGA concepts of the iceberg and jellyfish effects.

    PubMed

    Herbort, C P; Papadia, M; Mantovani, A

    2012-04-01

    Choroidal inflammatory diseases have been classically grouped under the term of white dot syndromes (WDS), a term only based on the appearance (white-yellow dots) of inflammatory fundus lesions. This purely descriptive and vague terminology, regrouping a pot-pourri of posterior inflammatory conditions, probably came into use because the precise exploration of the choroid was not possible, and also because many of the diseases were rare and not well understood. Since the availability of indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) that allows one to explore the choroidal compartment, it became possible to understand the lesion mechanism of choroiditides and to classify this group of diseases according to their pathophysiological behaviour. It was our aim to show here that the term WDS is applied to and encompasses inflammatory conditions that are characterized by completely different lesion mechanisms and should therefore be classified separately from each other. ICGA made it possible to differentiate two types of choroiditides, including on the one hand inflammatory diseases of the choroidal stroma and on the other hand inflammatory diseases of the choriocapillaris. Unfortunately, twenty years after its advent, ICGA is still not used routinely in uveitis centres and the traditional inappropriate but overall useless term of WDS is still used, maintaining the confusion about these diseases. The aim of this work was (i) to illustrate that meaningful exploration of choroidal inflammation, mostly occult and inaccessible to usual investigations, has to be performed using ICGA, (ii) to insist on the crucial importance of ICGA in the management of choroiditis and (iii) to enhance the comprehension of the ICGA-based classification of choroiditis, by using the demonstrative and striking analogue concepts of iceberg and jellyfish effects. PMID:22495994

  2. Hepatocellular expression of a novel glycoprotein with sialylated difucosyl Lex activity in the active inflammatory lesions of chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Y.; Shimoe, T.; Muguruma, M.; Usumoto, R.; Tsuji, T.; Jinno, K.; Moriwaki, S.; Shin, S.; Hakomori, S.

    1988-01-01

    Hepatic expression of sialylated difucosyl Lex antigen (SDLex, NeuAc alpha 2-3Gal beta 1-4(Fuc alpha 1-3)GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4(Fuc alpha 1-3)GlcNAc beta 1-) was studied with monoclonal antibody FH6, which defines this structure. Hepatocytes in the severe form of chronic active hepatitis and liver cirrhosis strongly expressed SDLex. The antigen was only weakly and focally detected in chronic persistent hepatitis. The mild form of chronic active hepatitis showed intermediate expression. SDLex expressed along the liver cell membranes displayed a honeycomb pattern when extensively expressed in the severe form of chronic active hepatitis or in liver cirrhosis. Cytoplasmic expression was faint and focal. Preferential tissue distribution was at the periphery of the hepatic lobules where the distruction of the limiting plate was present. The antigen was also expressed in sinusoidal lining cells and polymorphonuclear cells but not in the biliary epithelia. Hepatocytes expressing SDLex did not express related carbohydrate antigens, ie, Type 2 chain N-acetyllactosamine, Lex, and sialylated Lea. On subcellular fractionation, the microsome fraction contained the majority of the antigen activity. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis revealed one major SDLex-active glycoprotein with an apparent molecular weight of 110 kilodaltons. This glycoprotein was different from SDLex-active glycoproteins found in the sera of cancer patients. No ganglioside showed FH6 reactivity. These results indicate that liver cells in active inflammatory lesion expressed a novel glycoprotein carrying SDLex antigen in honeycomblike membrane-associated pattern. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3341453

  3. Effects of etanercept versus sulfasalazine in early axial spondyloarthritis on active inflammatory lesions as detected by whole-body MRI (ESTHER): a 48-week randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Song, I-H; Hermann, KG; Haibel, H; Althoff, CE; Listing, J; Burmester, GR; Krause, A; Bohl-Bühler, M; Freundlich, B; Rudwaleit, M; Sieper, J

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the potential of etanercept versus sulfasalazine to reduce active inflammatory lesions on whole-body MRI in active axial spondyloarthritis with a symptom duration of less than 5 years. Methods Patients were randomly assigned to etanercept (n=40) or sulfasalazine (n=36) treatment over 48 weeks. All patients showed active inflammatory lesions (bone marrow oedema) on MRI in either the sacroiliac joints or the spine. MRI was performed at weeks 0, 24 and 48 and was scored for active inflammatory lesions in sacroiliac joints and the spine including posterior segments and peripheral enthesitis by two radiologists, blinded for treatment arm and MRI time point. Results In the etanercept group, the reduction of the sacroiliac joint score from 7.7 at baseline to 2.0 at week 48 was significantly (p=0.02) larger compared with the sulfasalazine group from 5.4 at baseline to 3.5 at week 48. A similar difference in the reduction of inflammation was found in the spine from 2.2 to 1.0 in the etanercept group versus from 1.4 to 1.3 in the sulfasalazine group between baseline and week 48, respectively (p=0.01). The number of enthesitic sites also improved significantly from 26 to 11 in the etanercept group versus 24 to 26 in the sulfasalazine group (p=0.04 for difference). 50% of patients reached clinical remission in the etanercept group versus 19% in the sulfasalazine group at week 48. Conclusion In patients with early axial spondyloarthritis active inflammatory lesions detected by whole-body MRI improved significantly more in etanercept versus sulfasalazine-treated patients. This effect correlated with a good clinical response in the etanercept group. PMID:21372193

  4. Enzyme-labeled Antigen Method: Development and Application of the Novel Approach for Identifying Plasma Cells Locally Producing Disease-specific Antibodies in Inflammatory Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Sakurai, Kouhei; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory lesions of autoimmune and infectious diseases, plasma cells are frequently observed. Antigens recognized by antibodies produced by the plasma cells mostly remain unclear. A new technique identifying these corresponding antigens may give us a breakthrough for understanding the disease from a pathophysiological viewpoint, simply because the immunocytes are seen within the lesion. We have developed an enzyme-labeled antigen method for microscopic identification of the antigen recognized by specific antibodies locally produced in plasma cells in inflammatory lesions. Firstly, target biotinylated antigens were constructed by the wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system or through chemical biotinylation. Next, proteins reactive to antibodies in tissue extracts were screened and antibody titers were evaluated by the AlphaScreen method. Finally, with the enzyme-labeled antigen method using the biotinylated antigens as probes, plasma cells producing specific antibodies were microscopically localized in fixed frozen sections. Our novel approach visualized tissue plasma cells that produced 1) autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis, 2) antibodies against major antigens of Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontitis or radicular cyst, and 3) antibodies against a carbohydrate antigen, Strep A, of Streptococcus pyogenes in recurrent tonsillitis. Evaluation of local specific antibody responses expectedly contributes to clarifying previously unknown processes in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27006517

  5. Other noninfectious inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Álex; Auger, Cristina; Rovira, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory-demyelinating diseases (IIDDs) represent a broad spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including monophasic, multiphasic, and progressive disorders that range from highly localized forms to multifocal or diffuse variants. In addition to the classic multiple sclerosis (MS) phenotypes, several MS variants have been described, which can be differentiated on the basis of severity, clinical course, and lesion distribution. Other forms of IIDD are now recognized as distinct entities and not MS variants, such as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders. The CNS can also be affected by a variety of inflammatory diseases. These include primary angiitis of the CNS (PACNS), a rare disorder specifically targeting the CNS vasculature, and various systemic conditions which, among other organs and systems, can also affect the CNS, such as systemic vasculitis and sarcoidosis. The diagnosis of PACNS is difficult, as this condition may be confused with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), a term comprising a group of conditions characterized by prolonged but reversible vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spine is the radiologic technique of choice for diagnosing these disorders, and, together with the clinical and laboratory findings, enables a prompt and accurate diagnosis. PMID:27432677

  6. Eosinophil Granule Proteins ECP and EPX as Markers for a Potential Early-Stage Inflammatory Lesion in Female Genital Schistosomiasis (FGS)

    PubMed Central

    Randrianasolo, Bodo Sahondra; Ravoniarimbinina, Pascaline; Ravaoalimalala, Vololomboahangy Elisabeth; Leutscher, Peter; Kjetland, Eyrun Floerecke; Vennervald, Birgitte Jyding

    2014-01-01

    Background Genital granulomas induced by Schistosoma haematobium eggs can manifest as different lesion types visible by colposcopy; rubbery papules (RP), homogenous sandy patches (HSP) and grainy sandy patches (GSP). Pronounced tissue eosinophilia is a candidate marker for active S. haematobium pathology, as viable schistosome egg granulomas often are eosinophil rich. Here it was investigated whether eosinophil granule proteins ECP (eosinophil cationic protein) and EPX (eosinophil protein-X) in urine and genital lavage can be used as markers for active FGS lesions. Methods Uro-genital samples from 118 Malagasy women were analysed for ECP and EPX by standard sandwich avidin/biotin amplified ELISA. Principal findings The women with RP lesions had significantly higher levels of ECP and EPX in both lavage and urine. Furthermore, women with RP lesions were significantly younger than those with GSP. This could indicate that RP lesions might be more recently established and thus represent an earlier inflammatory lesion stage. Conclusion ECP in genital lavage might be a future tool aiding the identification of FGS pathology at a stage where reversibility remains a possibility following praziquantel treatment. PMID:25033206

  7. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indometacin enhances endogenous remyelination.

    PubMed

    Preisner, Anna; Albrecht, Stefanie; Cui, Qiao-Ling; Hucke, Stephanie; Ghelman, Julia; Hartmann, Christine; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Antel, Jack; Klotz, Luisa; Kuhlmann, Tanja

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most frequent demyelinating disease in the CNS that is characterized by inflammatory demyelinating lesions and axonal loss, the morphological correlate of permanent clinical disability. Remyelination does occur, but is limited especially in chronic disease stages. Despite effective immunomodulatory therapies that reduce the number of relapses the progressive disease phase cannot be prevented. Therefore, promotion of neuroprotective and repair mechanisms, such as remyelination, represents an attractive additional treatment strategy. A number of pathways have been identified that may contribute to impaired remyelination in MS lesions, among them the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here, we demonstrate that indometacin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that has been also shown to modulate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer cells promotes differentiation of primary human and murine oligodendrocytes, myelination of cerebellar slice cultures and remyelination in cuprizone-induced demyelination. Our in vitro experiments using GSK3β inhibitors, luciferase reporter assays and oligodendrocytes expressing a mutant, dominant stable β-catenin indicate that the mechanism of action of indometacin depends on GSK3β activity and β-catenin phosphorylation. Indometacin might represent a promising treatment option to enhance endogenous remyelination in MS patients. PMID:25943886

  8. Local overexpression of interleukin-11 in the central nervous system limits demyelination and enhances remyelination.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Anurag; Janssens, Kris; Bogie, Jeroen; Van Den Haute, Chris; Struys, Tom; Lambrichts, Ivo; Baekelandt, Veerle; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, Jerome J A; Slaets, Helena; Hellings, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Demyelination is one of the pathological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, no therapy is available which directly potentiates endogenous remyelination. Interleukin-11 (IL-11), a member of the gp130 family of cytokines, is upregulated in MS lesions. Systemic IL-11 treatment was shown to ameliorate clinical symptoms in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. IL-11 modulates immune cells and protects oligodendrocytes in vitro. In this study, the cuprizone-induced demyelination mouse model was used to elucidate effects of IL-11 on de- and remyelination, independent of the immune response. Prophylactic-lentiviral- (LV-) mediated overexpression of IL-11 in mouse brain significantly limited acute demyelination, which was accompanied with the preservation of CC1(+) mature oligodendrocytes (OLs) and a decrease in microglial activation (Mac-2(+)). We further demonstrated that IL-11 directly reduces myelin phagocytosis in vitro. When IL-11 expressing LV was therapeutically applied in animals with extensive demyelination, a significant enhancement of remyelination was observed as demonstrated by Luxol Fast Blue staining and electron microscopy imaging. Our results indicate that IL-11 promotes maturation of NG2(+) OPCs into myelinating CC1(+) OLs and may thus explain the enhanced remyelination. Overall, we demonstrate that IL-11 is of therapeutic interest for MS and other demyelinating diseases by limiting demyelination and promoting remyelination. PMID:23818742

  9. Local Overexpression of Interleukin-11 in the Central Nervous System Limits Demyelination and Enhances Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Anurag; Janssens, Kris; Bogie, Jeroen; Van Den Haute, Chris; Struys, Tom; Lambrichts, Ivo; Baekelandt, Veerle; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, Jerome J. A.; Hellings, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Demyelination is one of the pathological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, no therapy is available which directly potentiates endogenous remyelination. Interleukin-11 (IL-11), a member of the gp130 family of cytokines, is upregulated in MS lesions. Systemic IL-11 treatment was shown to ameliorate clinical symptoms in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. IL-11 modulates immune cells and protects oligodendrocytes in vitro. In this study, the cuprizone-induced demyelination mouse model was used to elucidate effects of IL-11 on de- and remyelination, independent of the immune response. Prophylactic-lentiviral- (LV-) mediated overexpression of IL-11 in mouse brain significantly limited acute demyelination, which was accompanied with the preservation of CC1+ mature oligodendrocytes (OLs) and a decrease in microglial activation (Mac-2+). We further demonstrated that IL-11 directly reduces myelin phagocytosis in vitro. When IL-11 expressing LV was therapeutically applied in animals with extensive demyelination, a significant enhancement of remyelination was observed as demonstrated by Luxol Fast Blue staining and electron microscopy imaging. Our results indicate that IL-11 promotes maturation of NG2+ OPCs into myelinating CC1+ OLs and may thus explain the enhanced remyelination. Overall, we demonstrate that IL-11 is of therapeutic interest for MS and other demyelinating diseases by limiting demyelination and promoting remyelination. PMID:23818742

  10. IL-17-induced Act1-mediated signaling is critical for cuprizone-induced demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Zizhen; Liu, Liping; Spangler, Roo; Spear, Charles; Wang, Chenhui; Gulen, Muhammet Fatih; Veenstra, Mike; Ouyang, Wenjun; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Li, Xiaoxia

    2012-01-01

    Cuprizone inhibits mitochondrial function and induces demyelination in the corpus callosum which resembles pattern III lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. However, the molecular and cellular mechanism by which cuprizone induces demyelination remains unclear. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) secreted by T helper 17 (Th17) cells and γδT cells are essential in the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In this study, we examined the importance of IL-17 signaling in cuprizone-induced demyelination. We found that mice deficient in IL-17A, IL-17RC and adaptor protein Act1 (of IL-17R) all had reduced demyelination accompanied by lessened microglial and polydendrocyte cellular reactivity compared to that in wild-type mice in response to cuprizone feeding, demonstrating the essential role of IL-17-induced Act1-mediated signaling in cuprizone-induced demyelination. Importantly, specific deletion of Act1 in astrocytes reduced the severity of tissue injury in this model, indicating the critical role of CNS resident cells in the pathogenesis of cuprizone-induced demyelination. In cuprizone-fed mice IL-17 was produced by CNS CD3+ T cells suggesting a source of IL-17 in CNS upon cuprizone treatment. PMID:22699909

  11. IL-17-induced Act1-mediated signaling is critical for cuprizone-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zizhen; Liu, Liping; Spangler, Roo; Spear, Charles; Wang, Chenhui; Gulen, Muhammet Fatih; Veenstra, Mike; Ouyang, Wenjun; Ransohoff, Richard M; Li, Xiaoxia

    2012-06-13

    Cuprizone inhibits mitochondrial function and induces demyelination in the corpus callosum, which resembles pattern III lesions in multiple sclerosis patients. However, the molecular and cellular mechanism by which cuprizone induces demyelination remains unclear. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) secreted by T helper 17 cells and γδT cells are essential in the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In this study, we examined the importance of IL-17 signaling in cuprizone-induced demyelination. We found that mice deficient in IL-17A, IL-17 receptor C (IL-17RC), and adaptor protein Act1 (of IL-17R) all had reduced demyelination accompanied by lessened microglial and polydendrocyte cellular reactivity compared with that in wild-type mice in response to cuprizone feeding, demonstrating the essential role of IL-17-induced Act1-mediated signaling in cuprizone-induced demyelination. Importantly, specific deletion of Act1 in astrocytes reduced the severity of tissue injury in this model, indicating the critical role of CNS resident cells in the pathogenesis of cuprizone-induced demyelination. In cuprizone-fed mice, IL-17 was produced by CNS CD3(+) T cells, suggesting a source of IL-17 in CNS upon cuprizone treatment. PMID:22699909

  12. Influenza Vaccine-Induced CNS Demyelination in a 50-Year-Old Male

    PubMed Central

    Sacheli, Aaron; Bauer, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 50 Final Diagnosis: Acute post-vaccination CNS demyelinating disorder Symptoms: Blurred vision • hemiparesis • hemiplegia • hypertonia • itching • paresthesia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: MRI Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: There are several categories of primary inflammatory demyelinating disorders, which comprise clinically similar neurologic sequelae. Of interest, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) are 2 demyelinating conditions of the central nervous system (CNS), whose clinical similarity pose a significant challenge to definitive diagnosis. Yet, both remain important clinical considerations in patients with neurologic signs and symptoms in the context of recent vaccination. Case Report: We report a case of a 50-year-old Caucasian male with a course of progressive, focal, neurologic deficits within 24 h after receiving the influenza vaccine. Subsequent work-up revealed the possibility of an acute central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating episode secondary to the influenza vaccine, best described as either CIS or ADEM. Conclusions: Case reports of CNS demyelination following vaccinations have been previously noted, most often occurring in the context of recent influenza vaccination. This report serves to document a case of CNS demyelination occurring 24 h after influenza vaccination in a middle-aged patient, and will describe some salient features regarding the differential diagnosis of CIS and ADEM, as well as their potential management. PMID:25175754

  13. Are electrophysiological criteria useful in distinguishing childhood demyelinating neuropathies?

    PubMed

    Potulska-Chromik, Anna; Ryniewicz, Barbara; Aragon-Gawinska, Karolina; Kabzinska, Dagmara; Seroka, Andrzej; Lipowska, Marta; Kaminska, Anna M; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) needs to be differentiated from hereditary neuropathy. We aimed to validate existing CIDP nerve conduction study (NCS) criteria in a group of children with demyelinating neuropathies of chronic or subacute onset. Retrospective analysis of clinical and NCS results in 18 children with CIDP, 7 with hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsy (HNPP), and 24 with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1a (CMT1a). AAN and EFNS electrodiagnostic CIDP criteria were fulfilled in 17 of 18 CIDP, 3 of 7 HNPP, and 23 of 24 CMT1a patients. A distal compound muscle action potential (dCMAP) of >9 ms was observed in 14 of 18 CIDP patients but not in any patients with HNPP. Abnormal median/normal sural SNAP (AMNS) and a 10 m/s difference between conduction velocities (CV) of two corresponding nerves were not observed in any CMT1a patients. NCS in CMT1a, HNPP, and CIDP reflect demyelination. dCMAP duration, sensory AMNS, and a 10 m/s CV difference parameter are most useful in the differential diagnosis of pediatric CIDP. PMID:26663344

  14. Radial Diffusivity Predicts Demyelination in ex-vivo Multiple Sclerosis Spinal Cords

    PubMed Central

    Klawiter, Eric C.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Liang, Hsiao-Fang; Budde, Matthew D.; Naismith, Robert T.; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Cross, Anne H.; Benzinger, Tammie L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Correlation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with histochemical staining for demyelination and axonal damage in multiple sclerosis (MS) ex vivo human cervical spinal cords. Background In MS, demyelination, axonal degeneration, and inflammation contribute to disease pathogenesis to variable degrees. Based upon in vivo animal studies with acute injury and histopathologic correlation, we hypothesized that DTI can differentiate between axonal and myelin pathologies within humans. Methods DTI was performed at 4.7 Tesla on 9 MS and 5 normal control fixed cervical spinal cord blocks following autopsy. Sections were then stained for Luxol fast blue (LFB), Bielschowsky silver, and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Regions of interest (ROIs) were graded semi-quantitatively as normal myelination, mild (<50%) demyelination, or moderate-severe (>50%) demyelination. Corresponding axonal counts were manually determined on Bielschowsky silver. ROIs were mapped to co-registered DTI parameter slices. DTI parameters evaluated included standard quantitative assessments of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), relative anisotropy (RA), axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity. Statistical correlations were made between histochemical gradings and DTI parameters using linear mixed models. Results: Within ROIs in MS subjects, increased radial diffusivity distinguished worsening severities of demyelination. Relative anisotropy was decreased in the setting of moderate-severe demyelination compared to normal areas and areas of mild demyelination. Radial diffusivity, ADC, and RA became increasingly altered within quartiles of worsening axonal counts. Axial diffusivity did not correlate with axonal density (p=0.091). Conclusions Increased radial diffusivity can serve as a surrogate for demyelination. However, radial diffusivity was also altered with axon injury, suggesting that this measure is not pathologically specific within chronic human MS tissue. We propose that radial diffusivity

  15. Tumefactive demyelinating disease with isolated spinal cord involvement

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Claudia F

    2014-01-01

    Tumefactive multiple sclerosis (TMS) is an unusual variant of demyelinating disease. TMS has a variable and unknown progression and presents with features similar to a neoplasm making the determination a diagnostic challenge to clinicians. This report presents one of the very few reported cases of isolated spinal cord TMS, and the second case to describe TMS of the lower spinal cord, given that the lesions are typically cervical. This case study presents a diagnostic approach based on clinical, laboratory, and imaging characteristics, as well as sheds some light on the response to therapy and disease evolution. PMID:25298871

  16. Fingolimod Attenuates Splenocyte-Induced Demyelination in Cerebellar Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Adam J.; Mir, Anis K.; Dev, Kumlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    The family of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) is G-protein-coupled, comprised of subtypes S1PR1-S1PR5 and activated by the endogenous ligand S1P. The phosphorylated version of Fingolimod (pFTY720), an oral therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS), induces S1PR1 internalisation in T cells, subsequent insensitivity to S1P gradients and sequestering of these cells within lymphoid organs, thus limiting immune response. S1PRs are also expressed in neuronal and glial cells where pFTY720 is suggested to directly protect against lysolecithin-induced deficits in myelination state in organotypic cerebellar slices. Of note, the effect of pFTY720 on immune cells already migrated into the CNS, prior to treatment, has not been well established. We have previously found that organotypic slice cultures do contain immune cells, which, in principle, could also be regulated by pFTY720 to maintain levels of myelin. Here, a mouse organotypic cerebellar slice and splenocyte co-culture model was thus used to investigate the effects of pFTY720 on splenocyte-induced demyelination. Spleen cells isolated from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein immunised mice (MOG-splenocytes) or from 2D2 transgenic mice (2D2-splenocytes) both induced demyelination when co-cultured with mouse organotypic cerebellar slices, to a similar extent as lysolecithin. As expected, in vivo treatment of MOG-immunised mice with FTY720 inhibited demyelination induced by MOG-splenocytes. Importantly, in vitro treatment of MOG- and 2D2-splenocytes with pFTY720 also attenuated demyelination caused by these cells. In addition, while in vitro treatment of 2D2-splenocytes with pFTY720 did not alter cell phenotype, pFTY720 inhibited the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFNγ) and interleukin 6 (IL6) from these cells. This work suggests that treatment of splenocytes by pFTY720 attenuates demyelination and reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine release, which likely contributes to enhanced

  17. MMP1-1607 polymorphism increases the risk for periapical lesion development through the upregulation MMP-1 expression in association with pro-inflammatory milieu elements

    PubMed Central

    TROMBONE, Ana Paula Favaro; CAVALLA, Franco; SILVEIRA, Elcia Maria Varize; ANDREO, Camile Bermejo; FRANCISCONI, Carolina Favaro; FONSECA, Angélica Cristina; LETRA, Ariadne; SILVA, Renato Menezes; GARLET, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Increased matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity is a hallmark of periapical granulomas. However, the factors underlying the MMPs expression modulation in healthy and diseased periapical tissues remains to be determined. Objective In this study, we evaluated the association between the MMP1-1607 polymorphism (rs1799750) and pro-inflammatory milieu elements with MMP-1 mRNA levels in vivo. Material and Methods MMP1-1607 SNP and the mRNA levels of MMP-1, TNF-a, IFN-g, IL-17A, IL-21, IL-10, IL-4, IL-9, and FOXp3 were determined via RealTimePCR in DNA/RNA samples from patients presenting periapical granulomas (N=111, for both genotyping and expression analysis) and control subjects (N=214 for genotyping and N=26 for expression analysis). The Shapiro-Wilk, Fisher, Pearson, Chi-square ordinal least squares regression tests were used for data analysis (p<0.05 was considered statistically significant). Results The MMP1-1607 1G/2G and 1G/2G+2G/2G genotypes were significantly more prevalent in the patients than in controls, comprising a risk factor for periapical lesions development. MMP-1 mRNA levels were higher in periapical lesions than in healthy periodontal ligament samples, as well as higher in active than in inactive lesions. The polymorphic allele 2G carriers presented a significantly higher MMP-1 mRNA expression when compared with the 1G/1G genotype group. The ordered logistic regression demonstrated a significant correlation between the genetic polymorphism and the expression levels of MMP-1. Additionally, the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-17A, IFN-g, TNF-a, IL-21, IL-10, IL-9, and IL-4 were significant as complementary explanatory variables of MMP-1 expression. Conclusion The MMP1-1607 SNP was identified as a risk factor for periapical lesions development, possibly due to its association with increased MMP-1 mRNA levels in periapical lesions. The MMP-1 expression is also under the control of the inflammatory milieu elements, being the

  18. Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells in Chronic Demyelination of Multiple Sclerosis Optic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Alison Ruth; Carroll, William M

    2015-09-01

    Reports that chronically demyelinated multiple sclerosis brain and spinal cord lesions contained immature oligodendrocyte lineage cells have generated major interest aimed at the potential for promotion of endogenous repair. Despite the prominence of the optic nerve as a lesion site and its importance in clinical disease assessment, no detailed studies of multiple sclerosis-affected optic nerve exist. This study aims to provide insight into the cellular pathology of chronic demyelination in multiple sclerosis through direct morphological and immunohistochemical analysis of optic nerve in conjunction with observations from an experimental cat optic nerve model of successful remyelination. Myelin staining was followed by immunohistochemistry to differentially label neuroglia. Digitally immortalized sections were then analyzed to generate quantification data and antigenic phenotypes including maturational stages within the oligodendrocyte lineage. It was found that some chronically demyelinated multiple sclerosis optic nerve lesions contained oligodendroglial cells and that heterogeneity existed in the presence of myelin sheaths, oligodendrocyte maturational stages and extent of axonal investment. The findings advance our understanding of oligodendrocyte activity in chronically demyelinated human optic nerve and may have implications for studies aimed at enhancement of endogenous repair in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25175564

  19. Promotion of Remyelination by Sulfasalazine in a Transgenic Zebrafish Model of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suhyun; Lee, Yun-Il; Chang, Ki-Young; Lee, Dong-Won; Cho, Sung Chun; Ha, Young Wan; Na, Ji Eun; Rhyu, Im Joo; Park, Sang Chul; Park, Hae-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Most of the axons in the vertebrate nervous system are surrounded by a lipid-rich membrane called myelin, which promotes rapid conduction of nerve impulses and protects the axon from being damaged. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the CNS characterized by infiltration of immune cells and progressive damage to myelin and axons. One potential way to treat MS is to enhance the endogenous remyelination process, but at present there are no available treatments to promote remyelination in patients with demyelinating diseases. Sulfasalazine is an anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating drug that is used in rheumatology and inflammatory bowel disease. Its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties prompted us to test the ability of sulfasalazine to promote remyelination. In this study, we found that sulfasalazine promotes remyelination in the CNS of a transgenic zebrafish model of NTR/MTZ-induced demyelination. We also found that sulfasalazine treatment reduced the number of macrophages/microglia in the CNS of demyelinated zebrafish larvae, suggesting that the acceleration of remyelination is mediated by the immunomodulatory function of sulfasalazine. Our data suggest that temporal modulation of the immune response by sulfasalazine can be used to overcome MS by enhancing myelin repair and remyelination in the CNS. PMID:26549504

  20. Progressive Injury in Chronic Multiple Sclerosis Lesions Is Gender-Specific: A DTI Study

    PubMed Central

    Klistorner, Alexander; Wang, Chenyu; Yiannikas, Con; Graham, Stuart L.; Parratt, John; Barnett, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the longitudinal integrity of white matter tracts in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) as determined by changes in diffusivity indices of lesional and non-lesional white matter in the optic radiation over 12 months. Methods The optic radiation (OR) was identified in sixty RRMS patients using probabilistic tractography. MS lesions were segmented on FLAIR T2 images and a lesion mask was intersected with the co-registered OR. Lesions within the OR were identified in 39 patients. Voxel-based analysis of axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) within OR lesions and non-lesional normal appearing white matter (NAWM) was performed at baseline and 12 months in 34 patients (five patients excluded due to new OR lesions). Results Both RD and AD demonstrated much higher values within the lesions compared with non-lesional NAWM. There was a significant (p<0.001) increase of lesional AD and RD during the follow-up period. This increase, however, was driven almost entirely by the male cohort, in which a significantly greater change in both AD (M-2.7%, F-0.9%) and RD (M-4.6%, F-0.7%) was observed during the follow-up period. Non-lesional NAWM also demonstrated an increase in both AD and RD, albeit on a much lesser scale (1.0% and 0.6% respectively). In contradistinction to lesions, the diffusivity change in non-lesional NAWM was similar between sexes. Conclusions The evolution of AD and RD in chronic MS lesions over 12 months suggests ongoing inflammatory demyelinating activity accompanied by axonal loss. In addition, our findings are consistent with the recently observed trend of more rapid clinical progression in males and establish a potential in vivo biomarker of gender dichotomy by demonstrating a significantly faster rate of microstructural change in the chronic lesions of male patients with MS. PMID:26901540

  1. Chronic demyelinating peripheral neuropathy in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

    PubMed

    Argov, Z; Soffer, D; Eisenberg, S; Zimmerman, Y

    1986-07-01

    Three siblings with chemically proved cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis presented with typical neurological manifestations of dementia and spinocerebellar disorder. Electrodiagnostic tests revealed demyelinating neuropathy in all three. Sural nerve biopsies showed loss of myelinated large fibers, marked Schwann cell proliferation, and onion bulb formation. Teased-fiber preparations confirmed the occurrence of segmental demyelination and remyelination. We suggest that demyelinating neuropathy is part of the neurological spectrum of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a recessively inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. PMID:3017187

  2. Early burn wound excision and skin grafting postburn trauma restores in vivo neutrophil delivery to inflammatory lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Tchervenkov, J.I.; Epstein, M.D.; Silberstein, E.B.; Alexander, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    This study assessed the effect of early vs delayed postburn wound excision and skin grafting on the in vivo neutrophil delivery to a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction and a bacterial skin lesion (BSL). Male Lewis rats were presensitized to keyhole-limpet hemocyanin. Group 1 comprised sham controls. Groups 2 through 4 were given a 30% 3 degrees scald burn, but the burn wounds were excised, and skin was grafted on days 1, 3, and 7, respectively, after the burn. Group 5 comprised burn controls. Twelve days after burn trauma, all rats were injected at different intervals (during a 24-hour period) with a trio of intradermal injections of keyhole-limpet hemocyanin, Staphylococcus aureus 502A, and saline at different sites. In vivo neutrophil delivery to these dermal lesions was determined by injecting indium in 111 oxyquinoline-labeled neutrophils isolated from similarly treated groups of rats. Neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL lesions was restored to normal by excision and skin grafting of the burn wound one day after burn trauma. Waiting three days after burn trauma to excise and skin graft the wound partially, but not completely, restored the in vivo neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL lesions. Waiting one week to excise and skin graft a burn wound resulted in no improvement in neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL dermal lesions. It was concluded that burn wound excision and skin grafting immediately after burn trauma restored in vivo neutrophil delivery to a BSL and DTH dermal lesion. This may, in part, explain the beneficial effect of early aggressive burn wound debridement in patients with burn injuries.

  3. Primary intraosseous atypical inflammatory meningioma presenting as a lytic skull lesion: Case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bohara, Sangita; Agarwal, Swapnil; Khurana, Nita; Pandey, P N

    2016-01-01

    Primary extradural meningiomas of the skull comprise 1% of all meningiomas, and lytic skull meningiomas are still rarer and are said to be more aggressive. We present a case of 38-year-old male with an extradural tumor which on histopathological examination showed features of inflammatory atypical meningioma (WHO Grade II). The intense inflammatory nature of osteolytic primary intraosseous meningioma has not been reported before. This entity deserves special mention because of the need for adjuvant therapy and proper follow-up. PMID:27510685

  4. Antibodies to gliomedin cause peripheral demyelinating neuropathy and the dismantling of the nodes of Ranvier.

    PubMed

    Devaux, Jérôme J

    2012-10-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are conditions that affect peripheral nerves. The mechanisms that underlie demyelination in these neuropathies are unknown. Recently, we demonstrated that the node of Ranvier is the primary site of the immune attack in patients with GBS and CIDP. In particular, GBS patients have antibodies against gliomedin and neurofascin, two adhesion molecules that play a crucial role in the formation of nodes of Ranvier. We demonstrate that immunity toward gliomedin, but not neurofascin, induced a progressive neuropathy in Lewis rats characterized by conduction defects and demyelination in spinal nerves. The clinical symptoms closely followed the titers of anti-gliomedin IgG and were associated with an important deposition of IgG at nodes. Furthermore, passive transfer of antigliomedin IgG induced a severe demyelinating condition and conduction loss. In both active and passive models, the immune attack at nodes occasioned the loss of the nodal clusters for gliomedin, neurofascin-186, and voltage-gated sodium channels. These results indicate that primary immune reaction against gliomedin, a peripheral nervous system adhesion molecule, can be responsible for the initiation or progression of the demyelinating form of GBS. Furthermore, these autoantibodies affect saltatory propagation by dismantling nodal organization and sodium channel clusters. Antibodies reactive against nodal adhesion molecules thus likely participate in the pathologic process of GBS and CIDP. PMID:22885108

  5. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  6. Fibroblast growth factor signalling in multiple sclerosis: inhibition of myelination and induction of pro-inflammatory environment by FGF9.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Maren; Thümmler, Katja; Arthur, Ariel; Brunner, Sarah; Elliott, Christina; McElroy, Daniel; Mohan, Hema; Williams, Anna; Edgar, Julia M; Schuh, Cornelia; Stadelmann, Christine; Barnett, Susan C; Lassmann, Hans; Mücklisch, Steve; Mudaliar, Manikhandan; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Meinl, Edgar; Linington, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    Remyelination failure plays an important role in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis, but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We now report actively demyelinating lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis are associated with increased glial expression of fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9), which we demonstrate inhibits myelination and remyelination in vitro. This inhibitory activity is associated with the appearance of multi-branched 'pre-myelinating' MBP+ / PLP+ oligodendrocytes that interact with axons but fail to assemble myelin sheaths; an oligodendrocyte phenotype described previously in chronically demyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions. This inhibitory activity is not due to a direct effect of FGF9 on cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage but is mediated by factors secreted by astrocytes. Transcriptional profiling and functional validation studies demonstrate that these include effects dependent on increased expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-sensitive proteases, enzymes more commonly associated with extracellular matrix remodelling. Further, we found that FGF9 induces expression of Ccl2 and Ccl7, two pro-inflammatory chemokines that contribute to recruitment of microglia and macrophages into multiple sclerosis lesions. These data indicate glial expression of FGF9 can initiate a complex astrocyte-dependent response that contributes to two distinct pathogenic pathways involved in the development of multiple sclerosis lesions. Namely, induction of a pro-inflammatory environment and failure of remyelination; a combination of effects predicted to exacerbate axonal injury and loss in patients. PMID:25907862

  7. Protective Effect of a cAMP Analogue on Behavioral Deficits and Neuropathological Changes in Cuprizone Model of Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Vakilzadeh, Gelareh; Khodagholi, Fariba; Ghadiri, Tahereh; Darvishi, Marzieh; Ghaemi, Amir; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Gorji, Ali; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease that leads to neuronal cell loss. Cyclic AMP and its analogs are well known to decrease inflammation and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the effects of bucladesine, a cell-permeable analogue of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), on myelin proteins (PLP, PMP-22), inflammation, and apoptotic, as well as anti-apoptotic factors in cuprizone model of demyelination. C57BL/6J mice were fed with chow containing 0.2% copper chelator cuprizone or vehicle by daily oral gavage for 5 weeks to induce reversible demyelination predominantly of the corpus callosum. Bucladesine was administered intraperitoneally at different doses (0.24, 0.48, or 0.7 μg/kg body weight) during the last 7 days of 5-week cuprizone treatment. Bucladesine exhibited a protective effect on myelination. Furthermore, bucladesine significantly decreased the production of interleukin-6 pro-inflammatory mediator as well as nuclear factor-κB activation and reduced the mean number of apoptotic cells compared to cuprizone-treated mice. Bucladesine also decreased production of caspase-3 as well as Bax and increased Bcl-2 levels. Our data revealed that enhancement of intracellular cAMP prevents demyelination and plays anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties in mice cuprizone model of demyelination. This suggests the modulation of intracellular cAMP as a potential target for treatment of MS. PMID:25128030

  8. Multiple Colon Ulcers with Typical Small Intestinal Lesions Induced by Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Momoko; Ando, Takayuki; Hamashima, Takeru; Yoshita, Hiroki; Nanjo, Sohachi; Mihara, Hiroshi; Fujinami, Haruka; Kajiura, Shinya; Nishikawa, Jun; Miura, Yoshiaki; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of NSAID-induced colon ulcers is difficult when the distribution or endoscopic findings are not typical. An 83-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital for hemorrhagic diarrhea. Colonoscopy showed multiple ulcers in the entire colon, particularly longitudinal ulcers in the transverse colon. These were unusual for NSAID-induced colopathy, although she had been on meloxicam. However, capsule endoscopy revealed multiple scars and erosions, characteristic of NSAIDs users. The final diagnosis was NSAID-induced enteropathy, and all lesions were in remission after meloxicam discontinuation. We herein emphasize the value of an endoscopic assessment of the entire digestive tract in the diagnosis of NSAID-induced mucosal lesions. PMID:26278290

  9. Supramaximal Stimulus Intensity as a Diagnostic Tool in Chronic Demyelinating Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Vivien; Warman Chardon, Jodi; Mills, Julie; Goldsmith, Claire; Bourque, Pierre R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The ability to correctly identify chronic demyelinating neuropathy can have important therapeutic and prognostic significance. The stimulus intensity value required to obtain a supramaximal compound muscle action potential amplitude is a commonly acquired data point that has not been formally assessed as a diagnostic tool in routine nerve conduction studies to identify chronic neuropathies. We postulated that this value was significantly elevated in chronic demyelinating neuropathy. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed electrophysiology laboratory records to compare the stimulus intensity values recorded during median and ulnar motor nerve conduction studies. The groups studied included normal controls (n = 42) and the following diagnostic categories: chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) (n = 20), acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (AIDP) (n = 13), Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) type 1 or 4C (n = 15), carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (n = 11), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (n = 18). Results. Supramaximal intensities were significantly higher in patients with CMT (median nerve: 43.4 mA) and CIDP (median nerve: 38.9 mA), whereas values similar to normal controls (median nerve: 25.3 mA) were obtained in ALS, CTS, and AIDP. Conclusions. Supramaximal stimulus intensity may be used as an additional criterion to identify the pathophysiology of neuropathy. We postulate that endoneurial hypertrophic changes may increase electrical impedance and thus the threshold of excitation at nodes of Ranvier. PMID:27413732

  10. Autoimmune antigenic targets at the node of Ranvier in demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Panos; Alexopoulos, Harry; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-03-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that autoantibodies contribute to the pathogenesis of demyelination in the PNS and CNS. Rapid reversal of electrophysiological blockade after plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is more likely to result from removal or neutralization of an antibody that impairs saltatory conduction than from remyelination. Although up to 30% of patients with acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy harbour autoantibodies, specific antigens have been identified in no more than 13% of cases. To date, autoantigens identified at the node of Ranvier include neurofascin 186, gliomedin and possibly moesin in the nodal domain, and contactin-1, Caspr1 and neurofascin 155 in the paranodal domain. In some patients with multiple sclerosis, paranodal CNPase and juxtaparanodal contactin-2 trigger a humoral response. This Review explores the molecular anatomy of the node of Ranvier, focusing on proteins with extracellular domains that could serve as antigens. The clinical implications of node-specific antibody responses are addressed, and the best approaches to identify antibodies that target nodal proteins are highlighted. Also discussed are the roles of these antibodies as either secondary, disease-exacerbating responses, or as a primary effector mechanism that defines demyelination or axonal degeneration at the node, identifies disease subtypes or determines response to treatments. PMID:25623793

  11. Supramaximal Stimulus Intensity as a Diagnostic Tool in Chronic Demyelinating Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Parker, Vivien; Warman Chardon, Jodi; Mills, Julie; Goldsmith, Claire; Bourque, Pierre R

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The ability to correctly identify chronic demyelinating neuropathy can have important therapeutic and prognostic significance. The stimulus intensity value required to obtain a supramaximal compound muscle action potential amplitude is a commonly acquired data point that has not been formally assessed as a diagnostic tool in routine nerve conduction studies to identify chronic neuropathies. We postulated that this value was significantly elevated in chronic demyelinating neuropathy. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed electrophysiology laboratory records to compare the stimulus intensity values recorded during median and ulnar motor nerve conduction studies. The groups studied included normal controls (n = 42) and the following diagnostic categories: chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) (n = 20), acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (AIDP) (n = 13), Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) type 1 or 4C (n = 15), carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (n = 11), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (n = 18). Results. Supramaximal intensities were significantly higher in patients with CMT (median nerve: 43.4 mA) and CIDP (median nerve: 38.9 mA), whereas values similar to normal controls (median nerve: 25.3 mA) were obtained in ALS, CTS, and AIDP. Conclusions. Supramaximal stimulus intensity may be used as an additional criterion to identify the pathophysiology of neuropathy. We postulate that endoneurial hypertrophic changes may increase electrical impedance and thus the threshold of excitation at nodes of Ranvier. PMID:27413732

  12. Promoting remyelination: utilizing a viral model of demyelination to assess cell-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Marro, Brett S; Blanc, Caroline A; Loring, Jeanne F; Cahalan, Michael D; Lane, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS. While a broad range of therapeutics effectively reduce the incidence of focal white matter inflammation and plaque formation for patients with relapse-remitting forms of MS, a challenge within the field is to develop therapies that allow for axonal protection and remyelination. In the last decade, growing interest has focused on utilizing neural precursor cells (NPCs) to promote remyelination. To understand how NPCs function in chronic demyelinating environments, several excellent pre-clinical mouse models have been developed. One well accepted model is infection of susceptible mice with neurotropic variants of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) that undergo chronic demyelination exhibiting clinical and histopathologic similarities to MS patients. Combined with the possibility that an environmental agent such as a virus could trigger MS, the MHV model of demyelination presents a relevant mouse model to assess the therapeutic potential of NPCs transplanted into an environment in which inflammatory-mediated demyelination is established. PMID:25245576

  13. Gliopathy of Demyelinating and Non-Demyelinating Strains of Mouse Hepatitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Lawrence C.; Biswas, Kaushiki; Shindler, Kenneth S.; Nabar, Manasi; Stout, Marjorie; Hingley, Susan T.; Grinspan, Judith B.; Das Sarma, Jayasri

    2015-01-01

    Demyelination in the central nervous system induced by neurovirulent strains of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) is mediated by the viral spike glycoprotein, but it is not clear whether the mechanism of this disease pathology involves direct viral infection of oligodendrocytes. Detailed studies of glial cell tropism of MHV are presented, demonstrating that direct MHV infection of oligodendrocytes differs between demyelinating (RSA59) and non-demyelinating (RSMHV2) viral strains both in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that direct injury of mature oligodendrocytes is an important mechanism of virus-induced demyelination. In vivo, RSA59 infection was identified in spinal cord gray and white matter, but infected oligodendrocytes were restricted to white matter. In contrast, RSMHV2 infection was restricted to gray matter neurons and was not localized to oligodendrocytes. In vitro, RSA59 can infect both oligodendrocyte precursors and differentiated oligodendrocytes, whereas RSMHV2 can infect oligodendrocyte precursors but not differentiated oligodendrocytes. Viral spreading through axonal means to white matter and release of the demyelinating strain MHV at the nerve end is critical for oligodendrocytes infection and subsequent demyelination. Understanding the mechanisms by which known viruses effect demyelination in this animal model has important therapeutic implications in the treatment of human demyelinating disease. PMID:26733813

  14. High-Fat Diet Promotion of Endometriosis in an Immunocompetent Mouse Model is Associated With Altered Peripheral and Ectopic Lesion Redox and Inflammatory Status.

    PubMed

    Heard, Melissa E; Melnyk, Stepan B; Simmen, Frank A; Yang, Yanqing; Pabona, John Mark P; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2016-07-01

    Endometriosis is a benign gynecological condition that causes considerable morbidity due to associated infertility, debilitating pelvic pain and inflammatory dysfunctions. Diet is a highly modifiable risk factor for many chronic diseases, but its contribution to endometriosis has not been extensively investigated, due partly to the paradoxical inverse association between obesity and disease incidence. Nevertheless, chronic exposure to dietary high-fat intake has been linked to greater systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, both features of women with endometriosis. Here, we evaluated the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) (45% fat kcal) on endometriosis progression using an immunocompetent mouse model where ectopic lesion incidence was induced in wild-type recipients by ip administration of endometrial fragments from transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 9-null donor mice. We show that HFD significantly increased ectopic lesion numbers in recipient mice with no significant weight gain and modifications in systemic ovarian steroid hormone and insulin levels, relative to control diet-fed (17% fat kcal) mice. HFD promotion of lesion establishment was associated with reductions in stromal estrogen receptor 1 isoform and progesterone receptor expression, increased F4/80-positive macrophage infiltration, higher stromal but not glandular epithelial proliferation, and enhanced expression of proinflammatory and prooxidative stress pathway genes. Lesion-bearing HFD-fed mice also displayed higher peritoneal fluid TNFα and elevated local and systemic redox status than control diet-fed counterparts. Our results suggest that HFD intake exacerbates endometriosis outcome in the absence of ovarian dysfunction and insulin resistance in mice and warrants further consideration with respect to clinical management of endometriosis progression and recurrence in nonobese patients. PMID:27175969

  15. Remote acute demyelination after focal proton radiation therapy for optic nerve meningioma.

    PubMed

    Redjal, Navid; Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Dietrich, Jorg; Dinevski, Nikolaj; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Nahed, Brian V; Loeffler, Jay S

    2015-08-01

    We present a unique patient with delayed onset, acute demyelination that occurred distant to the effective field of radiation after proton beam radiotherapy for an optic nerve sheath meningioma. The use of stereotactic radiotherapy as an effective treatment modality for some brain tumors is increasing, given technological advances which allow for improved targeting precision. Proton beam radiotherapy improves the precision further by reducing unnecessary radiation to surrounding tissues. A 42-year-old woman was diagnosed with an optic nerve sheath meningioma after initially presenting with vision loss. After biopsy of the lesion to establish diagnosis, the patient underwent stereotactic proton beam radiotherapy to a small area localized to the tumor. Subsequently, the patient developed a large enhancing mass-like lesion with edema in a region outside of the effective radiation field in the ipsilateral frontal lobe. Given imaging features suggestive of possible primary malignant brain tumor, biopsy of this new lesion was performed and revealed an acute demyelinating process. This patient illustrates the importance of considering delayed onset acute demyelination in the differential diagnosis of enhancing lesions in patients previously treated with radiation. PMID:25937571

  16. One calcitriol dose transiently increases Helios+ FoxP3+ T cells and ameliorates autoimmune demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Nashold, Faye E; Nelson, Corwin D; Brown, Lauren M; Hayes, Colleen E

    2013-10-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an incurable inflammatory demyelinating disease. We investigated one calcitriol dose plus vitamin D3 (calcitriol/+D) as a demyelinating disease treatment in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Evidence that calcitriol-vitamin D receptor pathway deficits may promote MS, and data showing calcitriol enhancement of autoimmune T cell apoptosis provided the rationale. Whereas vitamin D3 alone was ineffective, calcitriol/+D transiently increased central nervous system (CNS) Helios(+)FoxP3(+) T cells and sustainably decreased CNS T cells, pathology, and neurological deficits in mice with EAE. Calcitriol/+D, which was more effective than methylprednisolone, has potential for reversing inflammatory demyelinating disease safely and cost-effectively. PMID:23968560

  17. Preventive Effects of Tocotrienol on Stress-Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions and Its Relation to Oxidative and Inflammatory Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Nur Azlina, Mohd Fahami; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Abdel Aziz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible gastroprotective effect of tocotrienol against water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS) induced gastric ulcers in rats by measuring its effect on gastric mucosal nitric oxide (NO), oxidative stress, and inflammatory biomarkers. Twenty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups of seven rats. The two control groups were administered vitamin-free palm oil (vehicle) and the two treatment groups were given omeprazole (20 mg/kg) or tocotrienol (60 mg/kg) orally. After 28 days, rats from one control group and both treated groups were subjected to WIRS for 3.5 hours once. Malondialdehyde (MDA), NO content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were assayed in gastric tissue homogenates. Gastric tissue SOD, iNOS, TNF-α and IL1-β expression were measured. WIRS increased the gastric MDA, NO, and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels significantly when compared to the non-stressed control group. Administration of tocotrienol and omeprazole displayed significant protection against gastric ulcers induced by exposure to WIRS by correction of both ulcer score and MDA content. Tissue content of TNF-α and SOD activity were markedly reduced by the treatment with tocotrienol but not omeprazole. Tocotrienol significantly corrected nitrite to near normal levels and attenuated iNOS gene expression, which was upregulated in this ulcer model. In conclusion, oral supplementation with tocotrienol provides a gastroprotective effect in WIRS-induced ulcers. Gastroprotection is mediated through 1) free radical scavenging activity, 2) the increase in gastric mucosal antioxidant enzyme activity, 3) normalisation of gastric mucosal NO through reduction of iNOS expression, and 4) attenuation of inflammatory cytokines. In comparison to omeprazole, it exerts similar effectiveness but has a more diverse mechanism of protection, particularly through its effect on NO, SOD activity, and TNF-α. PMID:26465592

  18. Intravenous Administration of Human ES-derived Neural Precursor Cells Attenuates Cuprizone-induced CNS Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Stephen J.; Bajpai, Ruchi; Moore, Craig S.; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Brown, Graham D.; Pagarigan, Roberto R.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Terskikh, Alexey V.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Previous studies have demonstrated the therapeutic potential for human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells (hES-NPCs) in autoimmune and genetic animal models of demyelinating diseases. Herein, we tested whether intravenous (i.v) administration of hES-NPCs would impact central nervous system (CNS) demyelination in a cuprizone model of demyelination. Methods C57Bl/6 mice were fed cuprizone (0.2%) for two weeks and then separated into two groups that either received an i.v. injection of hES-NPCs or i.v. administration of media without these cells. After an additional two weeks of dietary cuprizone treatment, CNS tissues were analyzed for detection of transplanted cells and differences in myelination in the region of the corpus callosum (CC). Results Cuprizone-induced demyelination in the CC was significantly reduced in mice treated with hES-NPCs compared with cuprizone-treated controls that did not receive stem cells. hES-NPCs were identified within the brain tissues of treated mice and revealed migration of transplanted cells into the CNS. A limited number of human cells were found to express the mature oligodendrocyte marker, O1, or the astrocyte marker, GFAP. Reduced apoptosis and attenuated microglial and astrocytic responses were also observed in the CC of hES-NPC-treated mice. Conclusions These findings indicated that systemically-administered hES-NPCs migrated from circulation into a demyelinated lesion within the CNS and effectively reduced demyelination. Observed reductions in astrocyte and microglial responses, and (c) the benefit of hES-NPC treatment in this model of myelin injury was not obviously accountable to tissue replacement by exogenously administered cells. PMID:21276029

  19. Reduction in Serum Aquaporin-4 Antibody Titers During Development of a Tumor-Like Brain Lesion in a Patient With Neuromyelitis Optica: A Serum Antibody–Consuming Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Höftberger, Romana; Waters, Patrick; Krampla, Wolfgang; Lassmann, Hans; Budka, Herbert; Vincent, Angela; Kristoferitsch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS with severe involvement of the optic nerve and spinal cord. Highly specific serum IgG autoantibodies (NMO-IgG) that react with aquaporin-4 (AQP4), the most abundant CNS water channel protein, are found in patients with NMO. However, in vivo evidence combining the results of AQP4 antibody serum levels and brain pathology is lacking. We report a patient with NMO whose AQP4 antibody levels decreased simultaneously with clinical deterioration caused by the development of a tumor-like brain lesion. In the seminecrotic biopsied brain lesion, there was activated complement complex, whereas only very scattered immunoreactivity to AQP4 protein was detectable. The decrease in serum AQP4 antibody levels and the loss of AQP4 in the tumor-like lesion could represent a “serum antibody–consuming effect” during lesion formation. PMID:25668569

  20. Nociception and inflammatory hyperalgesia evaluated in rodents using infrared laser stimulation after Trpv1 gene knockout or resiniferatoxin lesion.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kendall; Lebovitz, Evan E; Keller, Jason M; Mannes, Andrew J; Nemenov, Michael I; Iadarola, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    TRPV1 is expressed in a subpopulation of myelinated Aδ and unmyelinated C-fibers. TRPV1+ fibers are essential for the transmission of nociceptive thermal stimuli and for the establishment and maintenance of inflammatory hyperalgesia. We have previously shown that high-power, short-duration pulses from an infrared diode laser are capable of predominantly activating cutaneous TRPV1+ Aδ-fibers. Here we show that stimulating either subtype of TRPV1+ fiber in the paw during carrageenan-induced inflammation or following hind-paw incision elicits pronounced hyperalgesic responses, including prolonged paw guarding. The ultrapotent TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX) dose-dependently deactivates TRPV1+ fibers and blocks thermal nociceptive responses in baseline or inflamed conditions. Injecting sufficient doses of RTX peripherally renders animals unresponsive to laser stimulation even at the point of acute thermal skin damage. In contrast, Trpv1-/- mice, which are generally unresponsive to noxious thermal stimuli at lower power settings, exhibit withdrawal responses and inflammation-induced sensitization using high-power, short duration Aδ stimuli. In rats, systemic morphine suppresses paw withdrawal, inflammatory guarding, and hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent fashion using the same Aδ stimuli. The qualitative intensity of Aδ responses, the leftward shift of the stimulus-response curve, the increased guarding behaviors during carrageenan inflammation or after incision, and the reduction of Aδ responses with morphine suggest multiple roles for TRPV1+ Aδ fibers in nociceptive processes and their modulation of pathological pain conditions. PMID:24434730

  1. Increased levels of myelin basic protein transcripts in virus-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Kristensson, K; Holmes, K V; Duchala, C S; Zeller, N K; Lazzarini, R A; Dubois-Dalcq, M

    In multiple sclerosis, a demyelinating disease of young adults, there is a paucity of myelin repair in the central nervous system (CNS) which is necessary for the restoration of fast saltatory conduction in axons. Consequently, this relapsing disease often causes marked disability. In similar diseases of small rodents, however, remyelination can be quite extensive, as in the demyelinating disease caused by the A59 strain of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV-A59), a coronavirus of mice. To investigate when and where oligodendrocytes are first triggered to repair CNS myelin in such disease, we have used a complementary DNA probe specific for one major myelin protein gene, myelin basic protein (MBP), which hybridizes with the four forms of MBP messenger RNA in rodents. Using Northern blot and in situ hybridization techniques, we previously found that MBP mRNA is first detected at about 5 days after birth, peaks at 18 days and progressively decreases to 25% of the peak levels in the adult. We now report that in spinal cord sections of adult animals with active demyelination and inflammatory cells, in situ hybridization reveals a dramatic increase in probe binding to MBP-specific mRNA at 2-3 weeks after virus inoculation and before remyelination can be detected by morphological methods. This increase of MBP-specific mRNA is found at the edge of the demyelinating area and extends into surrounding areas of normal-appearing white matter. Thus, in situ hybridization with myelin-specific probes appears to be a useful method for detecting the timing, intensity and location of myelin protein gene reactivation preceding remyelination. This method could be used to elucidate whether such a reactivation occurs in multiple sclerosis brain tissue. Our results suggest that in mice, glial cells react to a demyelinating process with widespread MBP mRNA synthesis which may be triggered by a diffusible factor released in the demyelinated areas. PMID:2426599

  2. The EIIIA domain from astrocyte‐derived fibronectin mediates proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells following CNS demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Stoffels, Josephine M. J.; Hoekstra, Dick; Franklin, Robin J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system remyelination by oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) ultimately fails in the majority of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. Remyelination benefits from transient expression of factors that promote migration and proliferation of OPCs, which may include fibronectin (Fn). Fn is present in demyelinated lesions in two major forms; plasma Fn (pFn), deposited following blood‐brain barrier disruption, and cellular Fn, synthesized by resident glial cells and containing alternatively spliced domains EIIIA and EIIIB. Here, we investigated the distinctive roles that astrocyte‐derived Fn (aFn) and pFn play in remyelination. We used an inducible Cre‐lox recombination strategy to selectively remove pFn, aFn or both from mice, and examined the impact on remyelination of toxin‐induced demyelinated lesions of spinal cord white matter. This approach revealed that astrocytes are a major source of Fn in demyelinated lesions. Furthermore, following aFn conditional knockout, the number of OPCs recruited to the demyelinated lesion decreased significantly, whereas OPC numbers were unaltered following pFn conditional knockout. However, remyelination completed normally following conditional knockout of aFn and pFn. Both the EIIIA and EIIIB domains of aFn were expressed following demyelination, and in vitro assays demonstrated that the EIIIA domain of aFn mediates proliferation of OPCs, but not migration. Therefore, although the EIIIA domain from aFn mediates OPC proliferation, aFn is not essential for successful remyelination. Since previous findings indicated that astrocyte‐derived Fn aggregates in chronic MS lesions inhibit remyelination, aFn removal may benefit therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in MS. GLIA 2015;63:242–256 PMID:25156142

  3. Investigation of Functional Activity of Cells in Granulomatous Inflammatory Lesions from Mice with Latent Tuberculous Infection in the New Ex Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The new ex vivo model system measuring functional input of individual granuloma cells to formation of granulomatous inflammatory lesions in mice with latent tuberculous infection has been developed and described in the current study. Monolayer cultures of cells that migrated from individual granulomas were established in the proposed culture settings for mouse spleen and lung granulomas induced by in vivo exposure to BCG vaccine. The cellular composition of individual granulomas was analyzed. The expression of the leukocyte surface markers such as phagocytic receptors CD11b, CD11c, CD14, and CD16/CD32 and the expression of the costimulatory molecules CD80, CD83, and CD86 were tested as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines (IFNγ and IL-1α) and growth factors (GM-CSF and FGFb) for cells of individual granulomas. The colocalization of the phagocytic receptors and costimulatory molecules in the surface microdomains of granuloma cells (with and without acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria) has also been detected. It was found that some part of cytokine macrophage producers have carried acid-fast mycobacteria. Detected modulation in dynamics of production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and leukocyte surface markers by granuloma cells has indicated continued processes of activation and deactivation of granuloma inflammation cells during the latent tuberculous infection progress in mice. PMID:24198843

  4. Technetium-99m HM-PAO-labeled leukocytes in detection of inflammatory lesions: Comparison with gallium-67 citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Vorne, M.; Soini, I.; Lantto, T.; Paakkinen, S. )

    1989-08-01

    Forty-three patients with suspected benign, inflammatory, or infectious diseases were imaged with ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO-labeled leukocytes and ({sup 67}Ga)citrate. Technetium-99m leukocytes showed 22 true-positive, no false-positive, 19 true-negative, and two false-negative findings and ({sup 67}Ga)citrate 23, 7, 12 and 1, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values with {sup 99m}Tc leukocytes were 92%, 100%, and 95%, and with ({sup 67}Ga)citrate 96%, 63%, and 81%. Technetium-99m leukocyte scintigraphy has a promising future in comparison with ({sup 67}Ga)citrate because of the ready availability of ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO, the good image quality, more rapid results (within few hours), and the lower radiation exposure to the patient with {sup 99m}Tc leukocytes. The usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc leukocytes in chronic osteomyelitis needs further evaluation.

  5. Restless Leg Syndrome in Different Types of Demyelinating Neuropathies: A Single-Center Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Luigetti, Marco; Del Grande, Alessandra; Testani, Elisa; Bisogni, Giulia; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazza, Salvatore; Sabatelli, Mario; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to determine the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a cohort of patients with demyelinating neuropathies. Methods: Patients were retrospectively recruited from our cohort of different forms of demyelinating neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP), Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) referred to our Department of Neurology in a 10-year period. The validated 4-item RLS questionnaire was used for diagnosis of RLS. All patients with RLS who fulfilled criteria underwent a suggested immobilization test to confirm the diagnosis. A group of outpatients referred to the sleep disorders unit and data from published literature were used as controls. Results: Prevalence of RLS in demyelinating neuropathy group was higher than prevalence observed in control population (p = 0.0142) or in the literature data (p = 0.0007). In particular, in comparison with both control population and literature data, prevalence of RLS was higher in CIDP group (p = 0.0266 and p = 0.0063, respectively) and in CMT1A group (p = 0.0312 and p = 0.0105, respectively), but not in HNPP (p = 1.000 and p = 0.9320, respectively). Conclusions: our study confirms a high prevalence of RLS in inflammatory neuropathies as CIDP and, among inherited neuropathies, in CMT1A but not in HNPP. Considering that this is only a small cohort from a single-center retrospective experience, the link between RLS and neuropathy remains uncertain, and larger multicenter studies are probably needed to clarify the real meaning of the association between RLS and neuropathy. Citation: Luigetti M; Del Grande A; Testani E; Bisogni G; Losurdo A; Giannantoni NM; Mazza S; Sabatelli M; Della Marca G. Restless leg syndrome in different types of demyelinating neuropathies: a single-center pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(9):945-949. PMID:23997707

  6. [Demyelinating diseases in children with acute neurological symptoms].

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Isa Amalie; Skov, Liselotte; Miranda, Maria Jose

    2015-12-01

    Demyelinating diseases in children is a broad group of illnesses, which affect the central nervous system. Demyelinating diseases can be monophasic or chronic and comprise acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Demyelinating diseases are rare, but it is important for the physician to recognize these diseases, as well as to understand the differential diagnoses. This review summarizes the current knowledge of demyelinating disorders in children, focusing on an approach to diagnosis and management. PMID:26651911

  7. Impact of different ratios of Omega-6 polyundaturated fatty acids to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on atherosclerotic lesion formation and inflammatory factors in the LDL receptor knockout mouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to assess the effect of different ratios of omega-6 to EPA plus DHA on atherosclerotic lesion formation and plasma inflammatory markers in LDLr-/- mice. Mice (n=10/group) were fed the following diets for 32 weeks: high fat (20% w/w) without EPA and DHA (HF omega-6), and high fat wi...

  8. No evidence for chronic demyelination in spared axons following spinal cord injury in a mouse

    PubMed Central

    Lasiene, Jurate; Shupe, Larry; Perlmutter, Steve; Horner, Philip

    2008-01-01

    The pattern of remyelination after traumatic spinal cord injury remains elusive, with animal and human studies reporting partial to complete demyelination followed by incomplete remyelination. In the present study, we found that spared rubrospinal tract (RST) axons of passage traced with actively transported dextrans and examined caudally to the lesion twelve weeks after mouse spinal cord contusion injury were fully remyelinated. Spared axons exhibited a marginally reduced myelin thickness and significantly shorter internodes. Contactin-associated protein (CASPR) and Kv1.2 channels were used to identify internodes and paranodal protein distribution properties were used as an index of myelin integrity. This is the first time the CNS myelin internode length was measured in a mouse. To better understand the significance of shortened internodes and thinner myelin in spared axons, we modeled conduction properties using McIntyre’s et al. model of myelinated axons. Mathematical modeling predicted a 21% decrease in the conduction velocity of remyelinated RST axons due to shortened internodes. To determine whether demyelination could be present on axons exhibiting a pathological transport system we utilized the retroviral reporter system. Virally delivered GFP unveiled a small population of dystrophic RST axons that persist chronically with evident demyelination or abnormal remyelination. Collectively these data show that lasting demyelination in spared axons is rare and that remyelination of axons of passage occurs in the chronically injured mouse spinal cord. PMID:18400887

  9. Treatment Responsiveness in CIDP Patients with Diabetes Is Associated with Higher Degrees of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alon; Alabdali, Majed; Qrimli, Mohammad; Albulaihe, Hana; Breiner, Ari; Barnett, Carolina; Katzberg, Hans D.; Lovblom, Leif E.; Perkins, Bruce A.; Bril, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is one of several chronic treatable acquired demyelinating neuropathies. Objectives To explore the association between the degree of demyelination in CIDP, and treatment responsiveness. Methods A retrospective chart review of CIDP subjects assessed between 1997 and 2013 was performed to compare treatment responsiveness using different sets of criteria. Results 99 CIDP patients were included, 34 with diabetes mellitus (DM). Treatment responsiveness was higher in CIDP-DM fulfilling 1 or more EFNS/PNS criteria, (63% vs. 31%, p = 0.03), and in CIDP+DM fulfilling 2 or more criteria (89% vs. 36%, p = 0.01). Nonetheless, treatment responsiveness in CIDP+DM had the highest odds ratio (3.73, p = 0.01). Similar results were also shown in simplified uniform study criteria, with 10% cut off values for CIDP-DM, compared to 30% for CIDP+DM. Conclusion In CIDP+DM, higher degrees of demyelination are associated with treatment responsiveness, implying the need to adjust current criteria in these patients. PMID:26461125

  10. The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor agonist FTY720 is neuroprotective after cuprizone-induced CNS demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Slowik, A; Schmidt, T; Beyer, C; Amor, S; Clarner, T; Kipp, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Modulation of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor is an approved treatment for relapsing multiple sclerosis because of its anti-inflammatory effect of retaining lymphocytes within the lymph nodes. Here, we evaluated the potential of an agonist at this receptor, FTY720 (fingolimod), to activate the promyelinating pathways within the brain to encourage remyelination and neuroprotection. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH In this study, we used the cuprizone model in male C57BL/6 mice and tested the promyelinating and neuroprotective effects of FTY720 after acute and chronic toxin-induced experimental demyelination. We used histological, immunohistochemical and gene expression methods. KEY RESULTS The midline of the corpus callosum was severely demyelinated after acute and chronic cuprizone-induced demyelination. Robust endogenous remyelination was evident after acute, but impaired after chronic, demyelination. FTY720 treatment modestly accelerated myelin recovery after acute but not chronic cuprizone exposure. Markers of gliosis (astrocyte and microglia activation) were not affected by FTY720 treatment. Remarkably, the accumulation of amyloid precursor protein-positive spheroids in axons was less distinct in FTY720-treated animals, indicating that this compound alleviated ongoing axonal damage. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We show that even during endogenous remyelination, axonal degeneration continued at a low level, accumulating over time. This continuous neurodegenerative process was ameliorated by FTY720 treatment. FTY720 preserved CNS integrity by direct interaction with brain resident cells, the actions of which are still to be defined. PMID:25220526

  11. Dysautonomic polyneuropathy as a variant of chronic inflammatory "demyelinating" polyneuropathy?

    PubMed

    Wolf, Hans-Heinrich; Kornhuber, Malte Erich; Weis, Joachim; Posa, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the clinical course over almost one decade of a male patient presenting with immune-mediated pure autonomic neuropathy resembling a distinct variant of chronic dysimmune polyneuropathies. We suppose autoantibodies directed against epitopes on autonomic axons or neurons causative for the symptoms. PMID:27379500

  12. Environmental and genetic factors in pediatric inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Waubant, Emmanuelle; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Pugliatti, Maura; Hanwell, Heather; Mowry, Ellen M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2016-08-30

    The onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) occurs in childhood in about 5% of all patients with MS. The disease in adults has a complex genetic and environmental inheritability. One of the main risk factors, also confirmed in pediatric MS, is HLA DRB1*1501 In addition to genetic factors, a large part of disease susceptibility in adults is conferred by environmental risk factors such as low vitamin D status, exposure to cigarette smoking, and remote Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In children, both exposure to cigarette smoking and prior EBV infection have been reported consistently as risk factors for MS. The role of vitamin D remains to be confirmed in this age category. Finally, although very likely critical in disease processes, few gene-environment interactions and epigenetic changes have been reported for adult and pediatric MS susceptibility. Of interest, some of the risk factors for MS have also been associated with disease course modification, such as low 25(OH) vitamin D serum levels in pediatric and adult MS. Age is also a clear disease modifier of clinical, CSF, and MRI phenotype in children with the disease. Finally, although much has yet to be unraveled regarding molecular processes at play in MS, there is a larger gap in our knowledge of genetic and environmental risk factors for pediatric neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and only collaborative studies will answer those questions. PMID:27572857

  13. Aggregation of MBP in chronic demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Frid, Kati; Einstein, Ofira; Friedman-Levi, Yael; Binyamin, Orli; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Gabizon, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Misfolding of key disease proteins to an insoluble state is associated with most neurodegenerative conditions, such as prion, Parkinson, and Alzheimer’s diseases. In this work, and by studying animal models of multiple sclerosis, we asked whether this is also the case for myelin basic protein (MBP) in the late and neurodegenerative phases of demyelinating diseases. Methods To this effect, we tested whether MBP, an essential myelin component, present prion-like properties in animal models of MS, as is the case for Cuprizone-induced chronic demyelination or chronic phases of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). Results We show here that while total levels of MBP were not reduced following extensive demyelination, part of these molecules accumulated thereafter as aggregates inside oligodendrocytes or around neuronal cells. In chronic EAE, MBP precipitated concomitantly with Tau, a marker of diverse neurodegenerative conditions, including MS. Most important, analysis of fractions from Triton X-100 floatation gradients suggest that the lipid composition of brain membranes in chronic EAE differs significantly from that of naïve mice, an effect which may relate to oxidative insults and subsequently prevent the appropriate insertion and compaction of new MBP in the myelin sheath, thereby causing its misfolding and aggregation. Interpretation Prion-like aggregation of MBP following chronic demyelination may result from an aberrant lipid composition accompanying this pathological status. Such aggregation of MBP may contribute to neuronal damage that occurs in the progressive phase of MS. PMID:26273684

  14. Bone marrow transplantation in the rat. III. Structure of the liver inflammatory lesion in acute graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczynski, D.; Renkonen, R.; Haeyry, P.

    1985-08-01

    The liver is a major parenchymal target organ of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after bone marrow transplantation in the rat. The authors have analyzed the nature of cellular infiltrates in the liver using monoclonal antibodies against white cell subsets and investigated the anatomic distribution of the inflammatory cell subsets inside the liver parenchyma. Several types of white cells are present in a normal control liver: In the portal area the T-helper (Th) cells predominate, (surface) immunoglobulin-expressing B cells are present in ample numbers, and most of the phagocytes are Ia-positive. In the central vein area the T-suppressor/killer cells (Tsk) dominate, no B cells are present, and most of the phagocytes are Ia-negative. During aGVHD the number of T cells increases rapidly in the portal area; and after an initial strong increase, the Th/Tsk ratio decreases but remains still above 1. In the central vein area there is also an increase in the number of T cells, compared with that in the syngeneic recipient, but the Th/Tsk ratio rapidly decreases and remains uniformly below 1. During aGVHD the B cells entirely disappear from the portal area, whereas a small but distinct number of mature plasma cells with intracellular immunoglobulin appear in the central vein area. Following irradiation the Ia-positive phagocytic cells entirely disappear from the portal area and decrease distinctly in number in the central vein area. During aGVHD the number of Ia-positive phagocytes increases again in both locations. In the central vein area the positive phagocytes are seen over the background level, and, concomitantly, the Ia-negative phagocytes disappear.

  15. Vesicular demyelination induced by raised intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Hall, S M; Schauf, C L

    1985-11-01

    Incubation of nerve with high concentrations of the divalent cation ionophore A23187 produces myelin vesiculation (Schlaepfer 1977). This observation has now been extended using segments of rat ventral or dorsal root incubated with high (19 microM, 10 micrograms/ml) or low (1-1.5 microM) concentrations of A23187, or another divalent ionophore, ionomycin. Low concentrations of A23187 induced no vesiculation within a 2-h period. However, subsequent incubation of these roots in fresh, ionophore-free medium for 20 h, resulted in a prominent vesicular demyelination at the Schmidt-Lanterman incisures and paranodes of many fibres. At this time (22 h) the Schwann cells associated with some demyelinating internodes appeared vital upon ultrastructural examination: the cells also excluded the nuclear dye nigrosin. High concentrations of A23187 induced a similar vesicular demyelination in affected fibres within only 15-20 min. While the Schwann cells continued to exclude nigrosin for a further 4 h, their ultrastructural appearance indicated that they were probably in the early stages of necrosis. Incubation of moribund root with the ionophore produced no myelin vesiculation. At all ionophore concentrations, the myelin vesiculation was dependent upon the presence of extracellular Ca2+, and could be modulated in severity by varying this concentration. Other divalent cations (Ba2+, Co2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Ni2+, Sr2+) could not substitute for Ca2+. The vesiculation induced by A23187 could be entirely prevented by the addition of Zn2+ (greater than or equal to 1 microM), Ni2+ (greater than or equal to 1-10 microM), Co2+ (greater than or equal to 100 microM) or Mn2+ (greater than or equal to 100 microM) to the bathing medium. A23187 applied to only part of an isolated internode resulted in a localization of the myelin disruption to that region. Ionomycin (greater than or equal to 1 microM), an ionophore with a greater selectivity for Ca2+ than A23187, also induced a prompt Ca2+-dependent

  16. Mitochondria as crucial players in demyelinated axons: lessons from neuropathology and experimental demyelination.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Graham R; Mahad, Don J

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are the most efficient producers of energy in the form of ATP. Energy demands of axons, placed at relatively great distances from the neuronal cell body, are met by mitochondria, which when functionally compromised, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess. Axons are made metabolically efficient by myelination, which enables saltatory conduction. The importance of mitochondria for maintaining the structural integrity of myelinated axons is illustrated by neuroaxonal degeneration in primary mitochondrial disorders. When demyelinated, the compartmentalisation of ion channels along axons is disrupted. The redistribution of electrogenic machinery is thought to increase the energy demand of demyelinated axons. We review related studies that focus on mitochondria within unmyelinated, demyelinated and dysmyelinated axons in the central nervous system. Based on neuropathological observations we propose the increase in mitochondrial presence within demyelinated axons as an adaptive process to the increased energy need. An increased presence of mitochondria would also increase the capacity to produce deleterious agents such as ROS when functionally compromised. Given the lack of direct evidence of a beneficial or harmful effect of mitochondrial changes, the precise role of increased mitochondrial presence within axons due to demyelination needs to be further explored in experimental demyelination in-vivo and in-vitro. PMID:21331147

  17. Differences in Membrane Properties in Simulated Cases of Demyelinating Neuropathies: Internodal Focal Demyelinations without Conduction Block

    PubMed Central

    Daskalova, M. S.; Alexandrov, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The membrane properties (intracellular, extracellular, electrotonic potentials, strength-duration time constants, rheobasic currents and recovery cycles), which can now be measured in healthy subjects and patients with demyelinating neuropathies, are investigated in simulated cases of focal reduction (70%) of the myelin sheath in one, two and three successive internodal segments along the length of human motor fibres. The internodally focally demyelinated cases (termed as IFD1, IFD2 and IFD3, respectively) are simulated using our previous double cable model of the fibres. The results show that the intracellular potentials are with reduced amplitude and slowed conduction velocity in the vicinity of demyelinated segments, however the segmental conduction block is not achieved. The radial decline of the extracellular potential amplitudes slightly increases with the increase of the radial distance and demyelination. In contrast, the electrotonic potentials, strength-duration time constants and rheobases are normal. In the recovery cycles, the refractoriness, supernormality and less late subnormality are close to the normal, showing that the pathology is relatively minor. The obtained abnormalities in the potentials and excitability properties provide new information about the pathophysiology of the demyelinated human motor axons and can be observed in vivo in patients with acquired demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:19669452

  18. Differences in Membrane Properties in Simulated Cases of Demyelinating Neuropathies: Internodal Focal Demyelinations with Conduction Block

    PubMed Central

    Daskalova, M. S.; Alexandrov, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the membrane properties (potentials and axonal excitability indices) in the case of myelin wrap reduction (96%) in one, two and three consecutive internodes along the length of human motor nerve fibre. The internodally focally demyelinated cases (termed as IFD1, IFD2 and IFD3, respectively, with one, two and three demyelinated internodes are simulated using our previous double cable model of the fibre. The progressively greater increase of focal loss of myelin lamellae blocks the invasion of the intracellular potentials into the demyelinated zones. For all investigated cases, the radial decline of the extracellular potential amplitudes increases with the increase of the radial distance and demyelination, whereas the electrotonic potentials show a decrease in the slow part of the depolarizing and hyperpolarizing responses. The time constants are shorter and the rheobases higher for the IFD2 and IFD3 cases than for the normal case. In the recovery cycles, the same cases have less refractoriness, greater supernormality and less late subnormality than the normal case. The simulated membrane abnormalities can be observed in vivo in patients with demyelinating forms of Guillain-Barré syndrome. The study provides new information about the pathophysiology of acquired demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:19669456

  19. Inflammatory response in serrated precursor lesions of the colon classified according to WHO entities, clinical parameters and phenotype–genotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Atreya, Raja; Aust, Daniela; Baretton, Gustavo; Eck, Matthias; Erlenbach‐Wünsch, Katharina; Hartmann, Arndt; Lugli, Alessandro; Stöhr, Robert; Vieth, Michael; Wirsing, Anna M; Zlobec, Inti; Katzenberger, Tiemo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Studies on traditional serrated adenoma (TSA) and sessile serrated adenoma with dysplasia (SSA‐D) are rare due to the low frequency of these lesions, which are well defined by the latest WHO classification. However, introducing new morphological criteria such as intra‐epithelial lymphocytes (IELs) might facilitate colorectal polyp diagnoses. Additionally, the phenotype–genotype correlation needs to be updated as the terminology has repeatedly changed. This study analysed 516 polyps, consisting of 118 classical adenomas (CAD), 116 hyperplastic polyps (HPP), 179 SSAs, 41 SSA‐Ds, and 62 TSAs. The lesions were analysed in relation to the patients’ clinical parameters including gender, age, localisation, and size. The inflammatory background of the polyps was quantified and BRAF and KRAS mutations as well as MLH1 and CDKN2A promoter methylation were assessed. In multivariate analyses, an increase in IELs was an independent and robust new criterion for the diagnosis of SSA‐D (p < 0.001). Superficial erosions and acute neutrophil granulocytes led to reactive changes potentially resembling dysplasia. KRAS and BRAF mutations were associated with CAD/TSA and HPP/SSA, respectively. However, almost half of TSAs had a BRAF mutation and were KRAS wild type. CDKN2A seems to precede MLH1 hyper‐methylation within the serrated carcinogenesis model. The genotyping of WHO‐based entities – and especially SSA – has sharpened in comparison to previously published data. TSAs can be sub‐grouped according to their mutation status. Of note, the higher number of IELs in SSA‐D reflects their close relationship to colorectal cancers with micro‐satellite instability. Therefore, IELs might represent a new diagnostic tool for SSA‐D.

  20. Recurrent asymptomatic demyelinating disease following 13-cis-retinoic acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Darin T; Prados, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of multifocal demyelination within the central nervous system in a patient being treated for a left hemispheric gemnistocytic astrocytoma with radiation therapy and chemotherapy, comprising temozolomide (360 mg/day—days 1–5 every 28 days) and 13-cis-retinoic acid (100 mg/m2/day—separated into two doses administered every 12 h on days 1 through 21 every 28 days). Five months into her first round of chemotherapy, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated multifocal regions of T2 prolongation with associated gadolinium enhancement within the right cerebral hemisphere. Spectroscopic data were consistent with demyelination rather than neoplasia. Despite the incidentally identified radiological progression, new neurological symptoms were not described. Interval resolution of the demyelinating lesions was observed in the years following the discontinuance of her chemotherapy regimen with reactivation of the previously observed lesions and the development of new T2 foci 6 months into her second round of re-treatment for tumour progression 5 years later. PMID:21901115

  1. Directional diffusivity as a magnetic resonance (MR) biomarker in demyelinating disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzinger, Tammie L. S.; Cross, Anne H.; Xu, Junqian; Naismith, Robert; Sun, Shu-Wei; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2007-09-01

    Directional diffusivities derived from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) measurements describe water movement parallel to (λ ||, axial diffusivity) and perpendicular to (λ⊥radial diffusivity) axonal tracts. λ || and λ⊥ have been shown to differentially detect axon and myelin abnormalities in several mouse models of central nervous system white matter pathology in our laboratory. These models include experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), (1) myelin basic protein mutant mice with dysmyelination and intact axons, (2) cuprizone-induced demyelination, and remyelination, with reversible axon injury (2, 3) and a model of retinal ischemia in which retinal ganglion cell death is followed by Wallerian degeneration of optic nerve, with axonal injury preceding demyelination. (4) Decreased λ|| correlates with acute axonal injury and increased λ⊥ indicates myelin damage. (4) More recently, we have translated this approach to human MR, investigating acute and chronic optic neuritis in adults with multiple sclerosis, brain lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in children. We are also investigating the use of this technique to probe the underlying structural change of the cervical spinal cord in acute and chronic T2- hyperintense lesions in spinal stenosis, trauma, and transverse myelitis. In each of these demyelinating diseases, the discrimination between axonal and myelin injury which we can achieve has important prognostic and therapeutic implications. For those patients with myelin injury but intact axons, early, directed drug therapy has the potential to prevent progression to axonal loss and permanent disability.

  2. Species-specific inflammatory responses as a primary component for the development of glomerular lesions in mice and monkeys following chronic administration of a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Kendall S; Sobry, Cécile; Derr, Victoria; Adams, Mike J; Besten, Cathaline Den; De Kimpe, Sjef; Francis, Ian; Gales, Tracy L; Haworth, Richard; Maguire, Shaun R; Mirabile, Rosanna C; Mullins, David; Palate, Bernard; Doorten, Yolanda Ponstein-Simarro; Ridings, James E; Scicchitano, Marshall S; Silvano, Jérémy; Woodfine, Jennie

    2014-07-01

    Chronic administration of drisapersen, a 2'-OMe phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide (AON) to mice and monkeys resulted in renal tubular accumulation, with secondary tubular degeneration. Glomerulopathy occurred in both species with species-specific characteristics. Glomerular lesions in mice were characterized by progressive hyaline matrix accumulation, accompanied by the presence of renal amyloid and with subsequent papillary necrosis. Early changes involved glomerular endothelial hypertrophy and degeneration, but the chronic glomerular amyloid and hyaline alterations in mice appeared to be species specific. An immune-mediated mechanism for the glomerular lesions in mice was supported by early inflammatory changes including increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and other immunomodulatory genes within the renal cortex, increased stimulation of CD68 protein, and systemic elevation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1. In contrast, kidneys from monkeys given drisapersen chronically showed less severe glomerular changes characterized by increased mesangial and inflammatory cells, endothelial cell hypertrophy, and subepithelial and membranous electron-dense deposits, with ultrastructural and immunohistochemical characteristics of complement and complement-related fragments. Lesions in monkeys resembled typical features of C3 glomerulopathy, a condition described in man and experimental animals to be linked to dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. Thus, inflammatory/immune mechanisms appear critical to glomerular injury with species-specific sensitivities for mouse and monkey. The lower observed proinflammatory activity in humans as compared to mice and monkeys may reflect a lower risk of glomerular injury in patients receiving AON therapy. PMID:24292388

  3. SURF1 deficiency causes demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Daniele; Chassagne, Maïté; Mayençon, Martine; Padet, Sylvie; Melchionda, Laura; Rouvet, Isabelle; Lannes, Béatrice; Bozon, Dominique; Latour, Philippe; Zeviani, Massimo; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédicte

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether mutations in the SURF1 gene are a cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Methods: We describe 2 patients from a consanguineous family with demyelinating autosomal recessive CMT disease (CMT4) associated with the homozygous splice site mutation c.107-2A>G in the SURF1 gene, encoding an assembly factor of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV. This observation led us to hypothesize that mutations in SURF1 might be an unrecognized cause of CMT4, and we investigated SURF1 in a total of 40 unrelated patients with CMT4 after exclusion of mutations in known CMT4 genes. The functional impact of c.107-2A>G on splicing, amount of SURF1 protein, and on complex IV activity and assembly was analyzed. Results: Another patient with CMT4 was found to harbor 2 additional SURF1 mutations. All 3 patients with SURF1-associated CMT4 presented with severe childhood-onset neuropathy, motor nerve conduction velocities <25 m/s, and lactic acidosis. Two patients had brain MRI abnormalities, including putaminal and periaqueductal lesions, and developed cerebellar ataxia years after polyneuropathy. The c.107-2A>G mutation produced no normally spliced transcript, leading to SURF1 absence. However, complex IV remained partially functional in muscle and fibroblasts. Conclusions: We found SURF1 mutations in 5% of families (2/41) presenting with CMT4. SURF1 should be systematically screened in patients with childhood-onset severe demyelinating neuropathy and additional features such as lactic acidosis, brain MRI abnormalities, and cerebellar ataxia developing years after polyneuropathy. PMID:24027061

  4. Ligation of the Jugular Veins Does Not Result in Brain Inflammation or Demyelination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Pulli, Benjamin; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Ueno, Takuya; Waterman, Peter; Truelove, Jessica; Oklu, Rahmi; Chen, John W.

    2012-01-01

    An alternative hypothesis has been proposed implicating chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) as a potential cause of multiple sclerosis (MS). We aimed to evaluate the validity of this hypothesis in a controlled animal model. Animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care committee. The jugular veins in SJL mice were ligated bilaterally (n = 20), and the mice were observed for up to six months after ligation. Sham-operated mice (n = 15) and mice induced with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (n = 8) were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. The animals were evaluated using CT venography and 99mTc-exametazime to assess for structural and hemodynamic changes. Imaging was performed to evaluate for signs of blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and neuroinflammation. Flow cytometry and histopathology were performed to assess inflammatory cell populations and demyelination. There were both structural changes (stenosis, collaterals) in the jugular venous drainage and hemodynamic disturbances in the brain on Tc99m-exametazime scintigraphy (p = 0.024). In the JVL mice, gadolinium MRI and immunofluorescence imaging for barrier molecules did not reveal evidence of BBB breakdown (p = 0.58). Myeloperoxidase, matrix metalloproteinase, and protease molecular imaging did not reveal signs of increased neuroinflammation (all p>0.05). Flow cytometry and histopathology also did not reveal increase in inflammatory cell infiltration or population shifts. No evidence of demyelination was found, and the mice remained without clinical signs. Despite the structural and hemodynamic changes, we did not identify changes in the BBB permeability, neuroinflammation, demyelination, or clinical signs in the JVL group compared to the sham group. Therefore, our murine model does not support CCSVI as a cause of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:22457780

  5. Analysis of inflammatory periimplant lesions during a 12-week period of undisturbed plaque accumulation--a comparison between flapless and flap surgery in the mini-pig.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Cornelia K; Thorwarth, Michael; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    This study's aim was to clarify the influence of soft tissue management on the development of periimplant infection. Four weeks after removal of all maxillary premolars in 12 mini-pigs, four BEGO Semados RI implants were inserted in each maxillary quadrant. Employing a split-mouth design, one quadrant was randomized to flapless insertion while the contralateral side was chosen for flap surgery. Following 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks of transmucosal implant, healing biopsies were retrieved from the periimplant soft tissue and subjected to further analysis. Histomorphometrically, a significant reduction of transmigration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (week 1, p = 0.007; week 2, p = 0.021; week 4, p = 0.023; week 12, p = 0.013) as well as the density of the subepithelial inflammatory infiltrates (week 1, p = 0.007; week 2, p = 0.046; week 4, p = 0.003; week 12, p = 0.032) was verified following flapless surgery. Quantification of inducible nitric oxide synthase showed significantly reduced expression in the flapless group 2 (p = 0.027), 4 (p = 0.005) and 12 (p = 0.004) weeks post-insertion. Analysis of CD31 and collagen I immunostained sections revealed more regular capillary distribution as well as higher vessel and collagen density in the flapless group. The data of the present study indicate that flapless placement reduces the incidence of inflammatory periimplant soft tissue lesions during a 12-week period. Considering the beneficial effects of flapless placement on early soft tissue healing and stability, the technique might be preferred in case of an uncomplicated locoregional anatomy with sufficient hard and soft tissue. However, this positive effect might disappear after manipulation of the implant and soft tissue during impression taking or try in of the prosthodontic supraconstruction. PMID:22186942

  6. Anthocyanins suppress the secretion of proinflammatory mediators and oxidative stress, and restore ion pump activities in demyelination.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fabiano B; Gutierres, Jessié M; Bohnert, Crystiani; Zago, Adriana M; Abdalla, Fátima H; Vieira, Juliano M; Palma, Heloisa E; Oliveira, Sara M; Spanevello, Roselia M; Duarte, Marta M; Lopes, Sonia T A; Aiello, Graciane; Amaral, Marta G; Pippi, Ney Luis; Andrade, Cinthia M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of anthocyanins (ANT) on oxidative and inflammatory parameters, as well as ion pump activities, in the pons of rats experimentally demyelinated with ethidium bromide (EB). Rats were divided in six groups: control, ANT 30 mg/kg, ANT 100 mg/kg, EB (0.1%), EB plus ANT 30 mg/kg and EB plus ANT 100 mg/kg. The EB cistern pons injection occurred on the first day. On day 7, there was a peak in the demyelination. During the 7 days, the animals were treated once per day with vehicle or ANT. It was observed that demyelination reduced Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities and increased 4-hydroxynonenal, malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl and NO2plus NO3 levels. In addition, a depletion of glutathione reduced level/nonprotein thiol content and a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity were also seen. The dose of 100 mg/kg showed a better dose-response to the protective effects. The demyelination did not affect the neuronal viability but did increase the inflammatory infiltrate (myeloperoxidase activity) followed by an elevation in interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ levels. ANT promoted a reduction in cellular infiltration and proinflammatory mediators. Furthermore, ANT restored the levels of IL-10. Luxol fast blue staining confirmed the loss of myelin in the EB group and the protective effect of ANT 100 mg/kg. In conclusion, this study was the first to show that ANT are able to restore ion pump activities and protect cellular components against the inflammatory and oxidative damages induced by demyelination. PMID:25632845

  7. B Cell, Th17, and Neutrophil Related Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokine/Chemokines Are Elevated in MOG Antibody Associated Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kothur, Kavitha; Wienholt, Louise; Tantsis, Esther M; Earl, John; Bandodkar, Sushil; Prelog, Kristina; Tea, Fiona; Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Brilot, Fabienne; Dale, Russell C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG Ab) associated demyelination represents a subgroup of autoimmune demyelination that is separate from multiple sclerosis and aquaporin 4 IgG-positive NMO, and can have a relapsing course. Unlike NMO and MS, there is a paucity of literature on immunopathology and CSF cytokine/chemokines in MOG Ab associated demyelination. Aim To study the differences in immunopathogenesis based on cytokine/chemokine profile in MOG Ab-positive (POS) and -negative (NEG) groups. Methods We measured 34 cytokines/chemokines using multiplex immunoassay in CSF collected from paediatric patients with serum MOG Ab POS [acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM = 8), transverse myelitis (TM = 2) n = 10] and serum MOG Ab NEG (ADEM = 5, TM = 4, n = 9) demyelination. We generated normative data using CSF from 20 non-inflammatory neurological controls. Results The CSF cytokine and chemokine levels were higher in both MOG Ab POS and MOG Ab NEG demyelination groups compared to controls. The CSF in MOG Ab POS patients showed predominant elevation of B cell related cytokines/chemokines (CXCL13, APRIL, BAFF and CCL19) as well as some of Th17 related cytokines (IL-6 AND G-CSF) compared to MOG Ab NEG group (all p<0.01). In addition, patients with elevated CSF MOG antibodies had higher CSF CXCL13, CXCL12, CCL19, IL-17A and G-CSF than patients without CSF MOG antibodies. Conclusion Our findings suggest that MOG Ab POS patients have a more pronounced CNS inflammatory response with elevation of predominant humoral associated cytokines/chemokines, as well as some Th 17 and neutrophil related cytokines/chemokines suggesting a differential inflammatory pathogenesis associated with MOG antibody seropositivity. This cytokine/chemokine profiling provides new insight into disease pathogenesis, and improves our ability to monitor inflammation and response to treatment. In addition, some of these molecules may represent potential immunomodulatory targets

  8. Changed distribution of sodium channels along demyelinated axons.

    PubMed

    England, J D; Gamboni, F; Levinson, S R; Finger, T E

    1990-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are largely localized to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons, providing a physiological basis for saltatory conduction. What happens to these channels in demyelinated axons is not known with certainty. Experimentally demyelinated axons were examined by using a well-characterized, polyclonal antibody directed against sodium channels. Immunocytochemical and radioimmunoassay data were consistent with the distribution of an increased number of sodium channels along segments of previously internodal axon. These findings affirm the plasticity of sodium channels in demyelinated axolemma and may be relevant to understanding how axons recover conduction after demyelination. PMID:2168559

  9. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26878172

  10. Abnormal endothelial tight junctions in active lesions and normal-appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Plumb, Jonnie; McQuaid, Stephen; Mirakhur, Meenakshi; Kirk, John

    2002-04-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, demonstrable in vivo by enhanced MRI is characteristic of new and expanding inflammatory lesions in relapsing-remitting and chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Subtle leakage may also occur in primary progressive MS. However, the anatomical route(s) of BBB leakage have not been demonstrated. We investigated the possible involvement of interendothelial tight junctions (TJ) by examining the expression of TJ proteins (occludin and ZO-1 ) in blood vessels in active MS lesions from 8 cases of MS and in normal-appearing white (NAWM) matter from 6 cases. Blood vessels (10-50 per frozen section) were scanned using confocal laser scanning microscopy to acquire datasets for analysis. TJ abnormalities manifested as beading, interruption, absence or diffuse cytoplasmic localization of fluorescence, or separation of junctions (putative opening) were frequent (affecting 40% of vessels) in oil-red-O-positive active plaques but less frequent in NAWM (15%), and in normal (< 2%) and neurological controls (6%). Putatively "open" junctions were seen in vessels in active lesions and in microscopically inflamed vessels in NAWM. Dual fluorescence revealed abnormal TJs in vessels with pre-mortem serum protein leakage. Abnormal or open TJs, associated with inflammation may contribute to BBB leakage in enhancing MRI lesions and may also be involved in subtle leakage in non-enhancing focal and diffuse lesions in NAWM. BBB disruption due to tight junctional pathology should be regarded as a significant form of tissue injury in MS, alongside demyelination and axonopathy. PMID:11958369