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Sample records for inflammatory peptide supergene

  1. The potential of food protein-derived anti-inflammatory peptides against various chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Kaustav; Mine, Yoshinori; Wu, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is considered as one of the major causes for the initiation of various chronic diseases such as asthma, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, osteoporosis and neurological diseases like Parkinson's disease. Increasing scientific evidence has delineated that inflammatory markers such as TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8 and CRP and different transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT are the major key factors that regulate these inflammatory diseases. Food protein-derived bioactive peptides have been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting or reducing the expression of these inflammatory biomarkers and/or by modulating the activity of these transcription factors. This review aims to discuss various molecular targets and underlying mechanisms of food protein-derived anti-inflammatory peptides and to explore their potential against various chronic inflammatory diseases. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26711001

  2. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26985172

  3. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Małgorzata; Majewski, Sławomir

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26985172

  4. A novel anti-inflammatory peptide from human lipocortin 5.

    PubMed Central

    Perretti, M.; Becherucci, C.; Mugridge, K. G.; Solito, E.; Silvestri, S.; Parente, L.

    1991-01-01

    1. A novel anti-inflammatory peptide (residues 204-212) of human recombinant lipocortin 5 (hrLC5) found on the high similarity region with uteroglobin is described. 2. Peptide 204-212 dose-dependently inhibited the contractions of rat isolated stomach strips elicited by porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Contractions caused by arachidonic acid (AA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 5-hydroxytryptamine were not affected. No direct enzyme inhibition was observed in a radiochemical assay. 3. PGE2 release by both human fibroblasts and rat macrophages was reduced by peptide 204-212 in a dose-dependent manner. 4. The development of carrageenin-induced oedema in rats was significantly inhibited by the local administration of peptide 204-212. 5. The pattern and potency of the biological effects of peptide 204-212 are similar to those of antiflammin 2, a lipocortin 1-derived peptide. 6. It is suggested that peptide 204-212 may represent the active site responsible for the anti-inflammatory properties of lipocortin 5. PMID:1832064

  5. The potential impacts of formyl peptide receptor 1 in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. N-formyl peptides, which originate from bacterial peptides or mitochondrial proteins bind with a high binding affinity to formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). N-formyl peptide-FPR1 is involved in the pathogenesis of sterile and infectious inflammatory processes and causes phagocytosis of pathogens or injured cells by neutrophils. Excessive activation of neutrophils by binding of N-formyl peptides is associated with tissue injury requiring drugs that block FPR1-dependent signaling. Here, we review the roles of FPR1 as a critical regulator of inflammatory processes and its involvement in pathological conditions. PMID:27100350

  6. A small peptide with therapeutic potential for inflammatory acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiye; Mu, Lixian; Tang, Jing; Duan, Zilei; Wang, Fengyu; Wei, Lin; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    A designed peptide named LZ1 with 15 amino acid residues containing strong antimicrobial activity against bacteria pathogens of acne vulgaris including Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus. Especially, it exerted strong anti-P. acnes ability. The minimal inhibitory concentration against three strains of P. acnes was only 0.6 µg/ml, which is 4 times lower than that of clindamycin. In experimental mice skin colonization model, LZ1 significantly reduced the number of P. acnes colonized on the ear, P. acnes-induced ear swelling, and inflammatory cell infiltration. It ameliorated inflammation induced by P. acnes by inhibiting the secretion of inflammatory factors including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β. LZ1 showed little cytotoxicity on human keratinocyte and hemolytic activity on human blood red cells. Furthermore, LZ1 was very stable in human plasma. Combined with its potential bactericidal and anti-inflammatory properties, simple structure and high stability, LZ1 might be an ideal candidate for the treatment of acne. PMID:24013774

  7. Supergenes and their role in evolution.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M J; Jiggins, C D

    2014-07-01

    Adaptation is commonly a multidimensional problem, with changes in multiple traits required to match a complex environment. This is epitomized by balanced polymorphisms in which multiple phenotypes co-exist and are maintained in a population by a balance of selective forces. Consideration of such polymorphisms led to the concept of the supergene, where alternative phenotypes in a balanced polymorphism segregate as if controlled by a single genetic locus, resulting from tight genetic linkage between multiple functional loci. Recently, the molecular basis for several supergenes has been resolved. Thus, major chromosomal inversions have been shown to be associated with polymorphisms in butterflies, ants and birds, offering a mechanism for localised reduction in recombination. In several examples of plant self-incompatibility, the functional role of multiple elements within the supergene architecture has been demonstrated, conclusively showing that balanced polymorphism can be maintained at multiple coadapted and tightly linked elements. Despite recent criticism, we argue that the supergene concept remains relevant and is more testable than ever with modern molecular methods. PMID:24642887

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species, Apoptosis, Antimicrobial Peptides and Human Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oyinloye, Babatunji Emmanuel; Adenowo, Abiola Fatimah; Kappo, Abidemi Paul

    2015-01-01

    Excessive free radical generation, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress in the biological system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and pathological conditions associated with diverse human inflammatory diseases (HIDs). Although inflammation which is considered advantageous is a defensive mechanism in response to xenobiotics and foreign pathogen; as a result of cellular damage arising from oxidative stress, if uncontrolled, it may degenerate to chronic inflammation when the ROS levels exceed the antioxidant capacity. Therefore, in the normal resolution of inflammatory reactions, apoptosis is acknowledged to play a crucial role, while on the other hand, dysregulation in the induction of apoptosis by enhanced ROS production could also result in excessive apoptosis identified in the pathogenesis of HIDs. Apparently, a careful balance must be maintained in this complex environment. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed in this review as an excellent candidate capable of playing prominent roles in maintaining this balance. Consequently, in novel drug design for the treatment and management of HIDs, AMPs are promising candidates owing to their size and multidimensional properties as well as their wide spectrum of activities and indications of reduced rate of resistance. PMID:25850012

  9. Supergenes: The Genomic Architecture of a Bird with Four Sexes.

    PubMed

    Campagna, Leonardo

    2016-02-01

    Supergenes are clusters of physically linked, co-evolving genes that often control complex traits. A new study clarifies the origin and possible fate of a fascinating supergene that determines the coloration and mating behavior of a widespread North American bird. PMID:26859263

  10. Immunomodulatory and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Chicken Cathelicidin-2 Derived Peptides.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Albert; van Eldik, Mandy; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Hanne L M; de Zoete, Marcel R; Bikker, Floris J; Haagsman, Henk P

    2016-01-01

    Host Defence Peptides and derived peptides are promising classes of antimicrobial and immunomodulatory lead compounds. For this purpose we examined whether chicken cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2)-derived peptides modulate the function and inflammatory response of avian immune cells. Using a chicken macrophage cell line (HD11) we found that full-length CATH-2 dose-dependently induced transcription of chemokines CXCLi2/IL-8, MCP-3 and CCLi4/RANTES, but not of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. In addition, CATH-2 efficiently inhibited IL-1β and nitric oxide production by HD11 cells induced by different sources of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). N-terminal truncated CATH-2 derived peptides maintained the capacity to selectively induce chemokine transcription, but despite their high LPS affinity several analogs lacked LPS-neutralizing capacity. Substitution of phenylalanine residues by tryptophan introduced endotoxin neutralization capacity in inactive truncated CATH-2 derived peptides. In contrast, amino acid substitution of phenylalanine by tyrosine abrogated endotoxin neutralization activity of CATH-2 analogs. These findings support a pivotal role for aromatic residues in peptide-mediated endotoxin neutralization by CATH-2 analogs and were shown to be independent of LPS affinity. The capacity to modulate chemokine production and dampen endotoxin-induced pro-inflammatory responses in chicken immune cells implicates that small CATH-2 based peptides could serve as leads for the design of CATH-2 based immunomodulatory anti-infectives. PMID:26848845

  11. Immunomodulatory and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Chicken Cathelicidin-2 Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Albert; van Eldik, Mandy; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Hanne L. M.; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Bikker, Floris J.; Haagsman, Henk P.

    2016-01-01

    Host Defence Peptides and derived peptides are promising classes of antimicrobial and immunomodulatory lead compounds. For this purpose we examined whether chicken cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2)-derived peptides modulate the function and inflammatory response of avian immune cells. Using a chicken macrophage cell line (HD11) we found that full-length CATH-2 dose-dependently induced transcription of chemokines CXCLi2/IL-8, MCP-3 and CCLi4/RANTES, but not of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. In addition, CATH-2 efficiently inhibited IL-1β and nitric oxide production by HD11 cells induced by different sources of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). N-terminal truncated CATH-2 derived peptides maintained the capacity to selectively induce chemokine transcription, but despite their high LPS affinity several analogs lacked LPS-neutralizing capacity. Substitution of phenylalanine residues by tryptophan introduced endotoxin neutralization capacity in inactive truncated CATH-2 derived peptides. In contrast, amino acid substitution of phenylalanine by tyrosine abrogated endotoxin neutralization activity of CATH-2 analogs. These findings support a pivotal role for aromatic residues in peptide-mediated endotoxin neutralization by CATH-2 analogs and were shown to be independent of LPS affinity. The capacity to modulate chemokine production and dampen endotoxin-induced pro-inflammatory responses in chicken immune cells implicates that small CATH-2 based peptides could serve as leads for the design of CATH-2 based immunomodulatory anti-infectives. PMID:26848845

  12. Vcsa1 gene peptides for the treatment of inflammatory and allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Morris, Katherine; Kuo, Byron; Wilkinson, Mark D; Davison, Joseph S; Befus, A Dean; Mathison, Ronald D

    2007-06-01

    The recently emerged Vcsa1 gene is one member of the variable coding sequence (VCS) multigene family of Rattus norvegicus. This gene encodes the precursor prohormone SMR1 (submandibular rat-1), which on enzymatic processing gives rise to several 5 to 11 amino acid peptides that modulate a variety of physiological functions. The analgesic pentapeptide sialorphin and anti-inflammatory heptapeptide submandibular gland peptide-T (TDIFEGG) are the most intensively studied. Although the Vcsa1 gene and its protein product are unique to rats, TDIFEGG or a derivative acts on all species examined to date, including human cells, in functions related to allergic reactions and inflammation. In this review, the patent and academic literature on SMR1 and its natural peptides and their derivatives are reviewed for consideration of biological targets and relevance to the development of novel therapeutic agents. The VCS gene family is discussed and we speculate on possible human homologs of these potent anti-inflammatory rat-derived peptides. The biologically active peptide products of SMR1 are considered and the mechanism of action and structure-activity relationships of the anti-inflammatory submandibular gland peptide-T and its derivatives are discussed. PMID:19075974

  13. Evolution of a mimicry supergene from a multilocus architecture

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Robert T.; Salazar, Patricio A.; ffrench-Constant, Richard H.; Jiggins, Chris D.; Joron, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of supergenes have long fascinated evolutionary biologists. In the polymorphic butterfly Heliconius numata, a supergene controls the switch between multiple different forms, and results in near-perfect mimicry of model species. Here, we use a morphometric analysis to quantify the variation in wing pattern observed in two broods of H. numata with different alleles at the supergene locus, ‘P’. Further, we genotype the broods to associate the variation we capture with genetic differences. This allows us to begin mapping the quantitative trait loci that have minor effects on wing pattern. In addition to finding loci on novel chromosomes, our data, to our knowledge, suggest for the first time that ancestral colour-pattern loci, known to have major effects in closely related species, may contribute to the wing patterns displayed by H. numata, despite the large transfer of effects to the supergene. PMID:21676976

  14. Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone: An Emerging Anti-Inflammatory Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Madhuri; Mukhopadhyay, Kasturi

    2014-01-01

    The alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide belonging to the melanocortin family. It is well known for its anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects and shares several characteristics with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). There have been some recent reports about the direct antimicrobial activity of α-MSH against various microbes belonging to both fungal and bacterial pathogens. Similar to α-MSH's anti-inflammatory properties, its C-terminal residues also exhibit antimicrobial activity parallel to that of the entire peptide. This review is focused on the current findings regarding the direct antimicrobial potential and immunomodulatory mechanism of α-MSH and its C-terminal fragments, with particular emphasis on the prospects of α-MSH based peptides as a strong anti-infective agent. PMID:25140322

  15. Poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Rush Lloyd, II

    Inflammatory diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis cause $127.8 billion in US healthcare expenditures each year and are the cause of disability for 27% of disabled persons in the United States. Current treatment options rarely halt disease progression and often result in significant unwanted and debilitating side effects. Our laboratory has previously developed a family of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which inhibit the activity of mitogen activated protein kinase activate protein kinase 2 (MK2). MK2 mediates the inflammatory response by activating Tristetraprline (TTP). Once activated, TTP rapidly stabilizes AU rich regions of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA which allows translation of pro-inflammatory cytokines to occur. Blocking MK2 with our labs CPPs yields a decrease in inflammatory activity but CPPs by are highly non specific and prone to rapid enzymatic degradation in vivo.. In order to increase the potency of MK2 inhibiting CPPs we have developed a novel nanoparticle drug carrier composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid). This drug carrier has been shown to have preliminary efficacy in vitro and ex vivo for suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production when releasing CPPs. This thesis will present progress made on three aims: Specific Aim 1) Create and validate a NIPAm based drug delivery system that mimics the binding and release previously observed between cell penetrating peptides and glycosaminoglycans. Specific Aim 2) Engineer degradability into poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles to enable more drug to be released and qualify that system in vitro. Specific Aim 3) Validate poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in an ex vivo inflammatory model. Overall we have developed a novel anionic nanoparticle system that is biocompatible and efficient at loading and releasing cell penetrating peptides to inflamed tissue. Once loaded with a CPP the nanoparticle drug complex is

  16. Angiotensin peptides attenuate platelet-activating factor-induced inflammatory activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Yokoyama, Izumi; Ebina, Keiichi

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)--a peptide that is part of the renin-angiotensin system-induces vasoconstriction and a subsequent increase in blood pressure; Ang peptides, especially AngII, can also act as potent pro-inflammatory mediators. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid mediator that is implicated in many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of Ang peptides (AngII, AngIII, and AngIV) on PAF-induced inflammatory activity. In experiments using a rat hind-paw oedema model, AngII markedly and dose-dependently attenuated the paw oedema induced by PAF. The inhibitory effects of AngIII and AngIV on PAF-induced paw oedema were lower than that of AngII. Two Ang receptors, the AT1 and AT2 receptors, did not affect the AngII-mediated attenuation of PAF-induced paw oedema. Moreover, intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence studies demonstrated that AngII, AngIII, and AngIV interact with PAF, and that their affinities were closely correlated with their inhibitory effects on PAF-induced rat paw oedema. Also, AngII interacted with metabolite/precursor of PAF (lyso-PAF), and an oxidized phospholipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-(5'-oxo-valeroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC), which bears a marked structural resemblance to PAF. Furthermore, POVPC dose-dependently inhibited AngII-mediated attenuation of PAF-induced paw oedema. These results suggest that Ang peptides can attenuate PAF-induced inflammatory activity through binding to PAF and lyso-PAF in rats. Therefore, Ang peptides may be closely involved in the regulation of many inflammatory diseases caused by PAF. PMID:26348270

  17. Inflammatory mediators release calcitonin gene-related peptide from dorsal root ganglion neurons of the rat.

    PubMed

    Averbeck, B; Izydorczyk, I; Kress, M

    2000-01-01

    The interactions between the inflammatory mediators bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E(2) and acid pH were studied in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture. For this purpose, the cultures were stimulated by inflammatory mediators (bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E(2), 10(-5)M each) or acid solution (pH 6.1) for 5 min and the content of calcitonin gene-related peptide was determined in the supernatant before, during and after stimulation, using an enzyme immunoassay. Acid solution resulted in a threefold increase of the basal calcitonin gene-related peptide release which was entirely dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. The release could not be blocked by the addition of the capsaicin antagonist capsazepine (10(-5)M). Bradykinin (10(-5)M) caused a 50% increase of the basal calcitonin gene-related peptide release which was again dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium, whereas serotonin and prostaglandin E(2) were each ineffective at 10(-5)M concentration. The combination of bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin E(2) led to a fivefold increase of the calcitonin gene-related peptide release which could not be further enhanced by acidification. The competitive capsaicin receptor antagonist capsazepine (10(-5)M) significantly reduced the release induced by the combination of bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin E(2). It is suggested that the inflammatory mediators co-operate and together may act as endogenous agonists at the capsaicin receptor to cause calcium influx and consecutive neuropeptide release. PMID:10858619

  18. Oxpholipin 11D: An Anti-Inflammatory Peptide That Binds Cholesterol and Oxidized Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Ruchala, Piotr; Navab, Mohamad; Jung, Chun-Ling; Hama-Levy, Susan; Micewicz, Ewa D.; Luong, Hai; Reyles, Jonathan E.; Sharma, Shantanu; Waring, Alan J.; Fogelman, Alan M.; Lehrer, Robert I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Many Gram-positive bacteria produce pore-forming exotoxins that contain a highly conserved, 12-residue domain (ECTGLAWEWWRT) that binds cholesterol. This domain is usually flanked N-terminally by arginine and C-terminally by valine. We used this 14-residue sequence as a template to create a small library of peptides that bind cholesterol and other lipids. Methodology/Results Several of these peptides manifested anti-inflammatory properties in a predictive in vitro monocyte chemotactic assay, and some also diminished the pro-inflammatory effects of low-density lipoprotein in apoE-deficient mice. The most potent analog, Oxpholipin-11D (OxP-11D), contained D-amino acids exclusively and was identical to the 14-residue design template except that diphenylalanine replaced cysteine-3. In surface plasmon resonance binding studies, OxP-11D bound oxidized (phospho)lipids and sterols in much the same manner as D-4F, a widely studied cardioprotective apoA-I-mimetic peptide with anti-inflammatory properties. In contrast to D-4F, which adopts a stable α-helical structure in solution, the OxP-11D structure was flexible and contained multiple turn-like features. Conclusion Given the substantial evidence that oxidized phospholipids are pro-inflammatory in vivo, OxP-11D and other Oxpholipins may have therapeutic potential. PMID:20418958

  19. Isolation and characterization of anti-inflammatory peptides derived from whey protein.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ye; Liu, Jie; Shi, Haiming; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2016-09-01

    The present study was conducted to isolate and characterize anti-inflammatory peptides from whey protein hydrolysates using alcalase. Nine subfractions were obtained after sequential purification by ultrafiltration, Sephadex G-25 gel (GE Healthcare, Uppsala, Sweden) filtration chromatography, and preparative HPLC. Among them, subfraction F4e showed the strongest inhibitory activity on interleukin-1β (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA expression in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages. Eight peptides, including 2 new peptides-Asp-Tyr-Lys-Lys-Tyr (DYKKY) and Asp-Gln-Trp-Leu (DQWL)-were identified from subfractions F4c and F4e, respectively, using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Peptide DQWL showed the strongest inhibitory ability on IL-1β, cyclooxygenase-2, and TNF-α mRNA expression and production of IL-1β and TNF-α proteins at concentrations of 10 and 100μg/mL, respectively. Additionally, DQWL treatment significantly inhibited nuclear factor-κB activation by suppressing nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB p65 and blocking inhibitor κB kinase phosphorylation and inhibitor κB degradation together with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Our study suggests that peptide DQWL has anti-inflammatory potential; further confirmation using an in vivo model is needed. PMID:27394940

  20. Novel chimeric peptide with enhanced cell specificity and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Nam-Hong; Lee, Jong-Wan; Jang, Jin-Sun; Park, Yung-Hoon; Park, Seong-Cheol; Jang, Mi-Kyeong

    2015-07-31

    An antimicrobial peptide (AMP), Hn-Mc, was designed by combining the N-terminus of HPA3NT3 and the C-terminus of melittin. This chimeric AMP exhibited potent antibacterial activity with low minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), ranging from 1 to 2 μM against four drug-susceptible bacteria and ten drug-resistant bacteria. Moreover, the hemolysis and cytotoxicity was reduced significantly compared to those of the parent peptides, highlighting its high cell selectivity. The morphological changes in the giant unilamellar vesicles and bacterial cell surfaces caused by the Hn-Mc peptide suggested that it killed the microbial cells by damaging the membrane envelope. An in vivo study also demonstrated the antibacterial activity of the Hn-Mc peptide in a mouse model infected with drug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the chimeric peptide inhibited the expression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines in RAW 264.7 cells by preventing the interaction between LPS and Toll-like receptors. These results suggest that this chimeric peptide is an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory candidate as a pharmaceutic agent. PMID:26028561

  1. Evolution of dominance mechanisms at a butterfly mimicry supergene

    PubMed Central

    Le Poul, Yann; Whibley, Annabel; Chouteau, Mathieu; Prunier, Florence; Llaurens, Violaine; Joron, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic dominance in polymorphic loci may respond to selection; however, the evolution of dominance in complex traits remains a puzzle. We analyse dominance at a wing-patterning supergene controlling local mimicry polymorphism in the butterfly Heliconius numata. Supergene alleles are associated with chromosomal inversion polymorphism, defining ancestral versus derived alleles. Using controlled crosses and the new procedure, Colour Pattern Modelling, allowing whole-wing pattern comparisons, we estimate dominance coefficients between alleles. Here we show strict dominance in sympatry favouring mimicry and inconsistent dominance throughout the wing between alleles from distant populations. Furthermore, dominance among derived alleles is uncoordinated across wing-pattern elements, producing mosaic heterozygous patterns determined by a hierarchy in colour expression. By contrast, heterozygotes with an ancestral allele show complete, coordinated dominance of the derived allele, independently of colours. Therefore, distinct dominance mechanisms have evolved in association with supergene inversions, in response to strong selection on mimicry polymorphism. PMID:25429605

  2. Salivary gland derived peptides as a new class of anti-inflammatory agents: review of preclinical pharmacology of C-terminal peptides of SMR1 protein

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The limitations of steroidal and non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have prompted investigation into other biologically based therapeutics, and identification of immune selective anti-inflammatory agents of salivary origin. The traditional view of salivary glands as accessory digestive structures is changing as their importance as sources of systemically active immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory factors is recognized. Salivary gland involvement in maintenance of whole body homeostasis is regulated by the nervous system and thus constitutes a "neuroendocrine axis". The potent anti-inflammatory activities, both in vivo and in vitro, of the tripeptide Phe-Glu-Gly (FEG) are reviewed. FEG is a carboxyl terminal peptide of the prohormone SMR1 identified in the rat submandibular salivary gland, The D-isomeric form (feG) mimics the activity of its L-isomer FEG. Macropharmacologically, feG attenuates the cardiovascular and inflammatory effects of endotoxemia and anaphylaxis, by inhibition of hypotension, leukocyte migration, vascular leak, and disruption of pulmonary function and intestinal motility. Mechanistically, feG affects activated inflammatory cells, especially neutrophils, by regulating integrins and inhibiting intracellular production of reactive oxygen species. Pharmacodynamically, feG is active at low doses (100 μg/kg) and has a long (9-12 hour) biological half life. As a therapeutic agent, feG shows promise in diseases characterized by over exuberant inflammatory responses such as systemic inflammatory response syndrome and other acute inflammatory diseases. Arthritis, sepsis, acute pancreatitis, asthma, acute respiratory inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease, and equine laminitis are potential targets for this promising therapeutic peptide. The term "Immune Selective Anti-Inflammatory Derivatives" (ImSAIDs) is proposed for salivary-derived peptides to distinguish this class of agents from corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

  3. Annexin A1 mimetic peptide controls the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of silica particles in mice

    PubMed Central

    Trentin, P G; Ferreira, T P T; Arantes, A C S; Ciambarella, B T; Cordeiro, R S B; Flower, R J; Perretti, M; Martins, M A; Silva, P M R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Endogenous glucocorticoids are pro-resolving mediators, an example of which is the endogenous glucocorticoid-regulated protein annexin A1 (ANXA1). Because silicosis is an occupational lung disease characterized by unabated inflammation and fibrosis, in this study we tested the therapeutic properties of the N-terminal ANXA1-derived peptide annexin 1-(2-26) (Ac2-26) on experimental silicosis. Experimental Approach Swiss-Webster mice were administered silica particles intranasally and were subsequently treated with intranasal peptide Ac2-26 (200 μg per mouse) or dexamethasone (25 μg per mouse) for 7 days, starting 6 h post-challenge. Ac2-26 abolished the leukocyte infiltration, collagen deposition, granuloma formation and generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines evoked by silica; these variables were only partially inhibited by dexamethasone. Key Results A clear exacerbation of the silica-induced pathological changes was observed in ANXA1 knockout mice as compared with their wild-type (WT) littermate controls. Incubation of lung fibroblasts from WT mice with Ac2-26 in vitro reduced IL-13 or TGF-β-induced production of CCL2 (MCP-1) and collagen, but this peptide did not affect the production of CCL2 (MCP-1) by stimulated fibroblasts from formyl peptide receptor type 1 (FPR1) knockout mice. Ac2-26 also inhibited the production of CCL2 (MCP-1) from fibroblasts of FPR2 knockout mice. Conclusions and Implications Collectively, our findings reveal novel protective properties of the ANXA1 derived peptide Ac2-26 on the inflammatory and fibrotic responses induced by silica, and suggest that ANXA1 mimetic agents might be a promising strategy as innovative anti-fibrotic approaches for the treatment of silicosis. PMID:25659822

  4. Innate immunity and the role of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin in inflammatory skin disease

    PubMed Central

    Roby, Keith D; Nardo, Anna Di

    2013-01-01

    Cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide is an important mediator of the innate immune response. In addition to its potent antimicrobial activity, cathelicidin has been shown to have chemoattractant and angiogenic properties. Recent research has demonstrated that, in addition to its aforementioned functions, cathelicidin plays an important role in the complex pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory skin diseases. This review will present a concise overview of the role of cathelicidin in infection and in the development of atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and rosacea. This understanding will direct future research efforts to identify therapeutic approaches that use cathelicidin as a novel drug itself, or aim to modify its expression and regulation. PMID:24489580

  5. Anti-infectious and anti-inflammatory effects of peptide fragments sequentially derived from the antimicrobial peptide centrocin 1 isolated from the green sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial resistance against antibiotic treatment has become a major threat to public health. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have emerged as promising alternative agents for treatment of infectious diseases. This study characterizes novel synthetic peptides sequentially derived from the AMP centrocin 1, isolated from the green sea urchin, for their applicability as anti-infective agents. The microbicidal effect of centrocin 1 heavy chain (CEN1 HC-Br), its debrominated analogue (CEN1 HC), the C-terminal truncated variants of both peptides, i.e. CEN1 HC-Br (1–20) and CEN1 HC (1–20), as well as the cysteine to serine substituted equivalent CEN1 HC (Ser) was evaluated using minimal microbicidal concentration assay. The anti-inflammatory properties were assessed by measuring the inhibition of secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. All the peptides tested exhibited marked microbicidal and anti-inflammatory properties. No difference in efficacy was seen comparing CEN1 HC-Br and CEN1 HC, while the brominated variant had higher cytotoxicity. C-terminal truncation of both peptides reduced salt-tolerability of the microbicidal effect as well as anti-inflammatory actions. Also, serine substitution of cysteine residue decreased the microbicidal effect. Thus, from the peptide variants tested, CEN1 HC showed the best efficacy and safety profile. Further, CEN1 HC significantly reduced bacterial counts in two different animal models of infected wounds, while Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) failed to develop resistance against this peptide under continued selection pressure. In summary, CEN1 HC appears a promising new antimicrobial agent, and clinical studies are warranted to evaluate the applicability of this AMP for local treatment of infections in man. PMID:23237525

  6. Human neutrophil peptides: a novel potential mediator of inflammatory cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kieran; Henriques, Melanie; Parker, Tom; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    The traditional view of atherosclerosis has recently been expanded from a predominantly lipid retentive disease to a coupling of inflammatory mechanisms and dyslipidemia. Studies have suggested a novel role for polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-dominant inflammation in the development of atherosclerosis. Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs), also known as α-defensins, are secreted and released from PMN granules upon activation and are conventionally involved in microbial killing. Current evidence suggests an important immunomodulative role for these peptides. HNP levels are markedly increased in inflammatory diseases including sepsis and acute coronary syndromes. They have been found within the intima of human atherosclerotic arteries, and their deposition in the skin correlates with the severity of coronary artery diseases. HNPs form complexes with LDL in solution and increase LDL binding to the endothelial surface. HNPs have also been shown to contribute to endothelial dysfunction, lipid metabolism disorder, and the inhibition of fibrinolysis. Given the emerging relationship between PMN-dominant inflammation and atherosclerosis, HNPs may serve as a link between them and as a biological marker and potential therapeutic target in cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery diseases and acute coronary syndromes. PMID:18805897

  7. Importance of asparagine on the conformational stability and chemical reactivity of selected anti-inflammatory peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano-Correa, Catalina; Barrientos-Salcedo, Carolina; Campos-Fernández, Linda; Alvarado-Salazar, Andres; Esquivel, Rodolfo O.

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory response events are initiated by a complex series of molecular reactions that generate chemical intermediaries. The structure and properties of peptides and proteins are determined by the charge distribution of their side chains, which play an essential role in its electronic structure and physicochemical properties, hence on its biological functionality. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of changing one central amino acid, such as substituting asparagine for aspartic acid, from Cys-Asn-Ser in aqueous solution, by assessing the conformational stability, physicochemical properties, chemical reactivity and their relationship with anti-inflammatory activity; employing quantum-chemical descriptors at the M06-2X/6-311+G(d,p) level. Our results suggest that asparagine plays a more critical role than aspartic acid in the structural stability, physicochemical features, and chemical reactivity of these tripeptides. Substituent groups in the side chain cause significant changes on the conformational stability and chemical reactivity, and consequently on their anti-inflammatory activity.

  8. Cathelicidin LL-37: An Antimicrobial Peptide with a Role in Inflammatory Skin Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reinholz, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis or rosacea are very common. Although their exact pathogenesis is not completely understood all three diseases are characterized by dysregulation of cutaneous innate immunity. Cathelicidin LL-37 is an important effector molecule of innate immunity in the skin and atopic dermatitis, psoriasis or rosacea show defects in cathelicidin expression, function or processing. In atopic dermatitis, cathelicidin induction might be disturbed resulting in defective antimicrobial barrier function. In contrast, psoriasis is characterized by overexpression of cathelicidin. However to date it is unclear whether pro- or anti-inflammatory functions of cathelicidin predominate in lesional skin in psoriasis. In rosacea, cathelicidin processing is disturbed resulting in peptide fragments causing inflammation, erythema and telangiectasias. In this review, the current evidence on the role of cathelicidin LL-37 in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases will be outlined. As cathelicidin LL-37 might also serve as a future treatment target potential novel treatment strategies for those diseases will be discussed. PMID:22577261

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaves a C-terminal peptide from human thrombin that inhibits host inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Mariena J. A.; Bhongir, Ravi K. V.; Kjellström, Sven; Siller, Helena; Kasetty, Gopinath; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen known for its immune evasive abilities amongst others by degradation of a large variety of host proteins. Here we show that digestion of thrombin by P. aeruginosa elastase leads to the release of the C-terminal thrombin-derived peptide FYT21, which inhibits pro-inflammatory responses to several pathogen-associated molecular patterns in vitro and in vivo by preventing toll-like receptor dimerization and subsequent activation of down-stream signalling pathways. Thus, P. aeruginosa ‘hijacks' an endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide-based mechanism, thereby enabling modulation and circumvention of host responses. PMID:27181065

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaves a C-terminal peptide from human thrombin that inhibits host inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Mariena J A; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Kjellström, Sven; Siller, Helena; Kasetty, Gopinath; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen known for its immune evasive abilities amongst others by degradation of a large variety of host proteins. Here we show that digestion of thrombin by P. aeruginosa elastase leads to the release of the C-terminal thrombin-derived peptide FYT21, which inhibits pro-inflammatory responses to several pathogen-associated molecular patterns in vitro and in vivo by preventing toll-like receptor dimerization and subsequent activation of down-stream signalling pathways. Thus, P. aeruginosa 'hijacks' an endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide-based mechanism, thereby enabling modulation and circumvention of host responses. PMID:27181065

  11. A Short Peptide That Mimics the Binding Domain of TGF-β1 Presents Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Emília R.; Fujimura, Patrícia T.; Araujo, Galber R.; da Silva, Carlos A. T.; Silva, Rangel L.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica; Lima, Carla; Ferreira, Márcio J.; Cunha-Junior, Jair P.; Taketomi, Ernesto A.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) is a pleiotropic cytokine with multiple roles in development, wound healing, and immune regulation. TGF-β1-mediated immune dysfunction may lead to pathological conditions, such as inflammation. Chronic inflammatory process is characterized by a continuous release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the inhibition or the blockage of these cytokines signaling pathways are considered a target treatment. In this context, despite the high numbers of TGF-β-targeted pathways, the inducible regulatory T cells (iTreg) to control inflammation seems to be a promising approach. Our aim was to develop novel peptides through phage display (PhD) technology that could mimic TGF-β1 function with higher potency. Specific mimetic peptides were obtained through a PhD subtraction strategy from whole cell binding using TGF-β1 recombinant as a competitor during elution step. We have selected a peptide that seems to play an important role on cellular differentiation and modulation of TNF-α and IL-10 cytokines. The synthetic pm26TGF-β1 peptide tested in PBMC significantly down-modulated TNF-α and up-regulated IL-10 responses, leading to regulatory T cells (Treg) phenotype differentiation. Furthermore, the synthetic peptide was able to decrease leukocytes rolling in BALB/C mice and neutrophils migration during inflammatory process in C57BL/6 mice. These data suggest that this peptide may be useful for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, especially because it displays potent anti-inflammatory properties and do not exhibit neutrophils’ chemoattraction. PMID:26312490

  12. Specific targeting of the IL-23 receptor, using a novel small peptide noncompetitive antagonist, decreases the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Quiniou, Christiane; Domínguez-Punaro, Maria; Cloutier, Frank; Erfani, Atefeh; Ennaciri, Jamila; Sivanesan, Durgajini; Sanchez, Mélanie; Chognard, Gaëlle; Hou, Xin; Rivera, José Carlos; Beauchamp, Claudine; Charron, Guy; Vilquin, Marie; Kuchroo, Vijay; Michnick, Stephen; Rioux, John D; Lesage, Sylvie; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2014-11-15

    IL-23 is part of the IL-12 family of cytokines and is composed of the p19 subunit specific to IL-23 and the p40 subunit shared with IL-12. IL-23 specifically contributes to the inflammatory process of multiple chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorders, including psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. So far, one antibody targeting the shared p40 subunit of IL-12 and IL-23, Ustekinumab, is approved clinically to treat psoriasis. However, there are no treatments inhibiting specifically the IL-23 proinflammatory response. We have developed small IL-23R-specific antagonists by designing all D-peptides arising from flexible regions of IL-23R. Of these peptides, we selected 2305 (teeeqqly), since in addition to its soluble properties, it inhibited IL-23-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in spleen cells. Peptide 2305 specifically binds to IL-23R/IL-12Rβ1-expressing HEK-293 cells and not to cells devoid of the receptor. Peptide 2305 showed functional selectivity by modulating IL-23-induced gene expression in IL-23R/IL-12Rβ1-expressing cells and in Jurkat cells; 2305 does not inhibit IL-12-induced cytokine expression in IL-12Rβ-IL-12Rβ2-HEK-293 cells. Finally, compared with anti-p40 treatment, 2305 effectively and selectively inhibits IL-23-induced inflammation in three in vivo mouse models: IL-23-induced ear inflammation, anti-CD40-induced systemic inflammatory response, and collagen-induced arthritis. We, hereby, describe the discovery and characterization of a potent IL-23R small-peptide modulator, 2305 (teeeqqly), that is effective in vivo. 2305 may be more convenient, less cumbersome, less costly, and most importantly, more specific than current biologics for the treatment of inflammatory conditions, and conceivably complement the actual therapies for these chronic and debilitating inflammatory diseases. PMID:25354400

  13. Antimicrobial peptides and pro-inflammatory cytokines are differentially regulated across epidermal layers following bacterial stimuli.

    PubMed

    Percoco, Giuseppe; Merle, Chloé; Jaouen, Thomas; Ramdani, Yasmina; Bénard, Magalie; Hillion, Mélanie; Mijouin, Lily; Lati, Elian; Feuilloley, Marc; Lefeuvre, Luc; Driouich, Azeddine; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure

    2013-12-01

    The skin is a natural barrier between the body and the environment and is colonised by a large number of microorganisms. Here, we report a complete analysis of the response of human skin explants to microbial stimuli. Using this ex vivo model, we analysed at both the gene and protein level the response of epidermal cells to Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens), which are present in the cutaneous microbiota. We showed that both bacterial species affect the structure of skin explants without penetrating the living epidermis. We showed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) that S. epidermidis and P. fluorescens increased the levels of transcripts that encode antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), including human β defensin (hBD)2 and hBD3, and the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α and (IL)-1-β, as well as IL-6. In addition, we analysed the effects of bacterial stimuli on the expression profiles of genes related to innate immunity and the inflammatory response across the epidermal layers, using laser capture microdissection (LCM) coupled to qPCR. We showed that AMP transcripts were principally upregulated in suprabasal keratinocytes. Conversely, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was upregulated in the lower epidermis. These findings were confirmed by protein localisation using specific antibodies coupled to optical or electron microscopy. This work underscores the potential value of further studies that use LCM on human skin explants model to study the roles and effects of the epidermal microbiota on human skin physiology. PMID:24118337

  14. Geomorphic surfaces and supergene enrichment in Northern Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenstar, Laura; Mather, Anne; Stuart, Finlay; Cooper, Frances; Sparks, Steve

    2014-05-01

    Supergene enrichment of porphyry copper deposits in the central Andes is thought to be closely correlated with periods of relatively humid climate and the formation of regionally extensive paleosurfaces (e.g. Mortimer, C. 1973) . In northern Chile, two such paleosurfaces have been proposed: the ca. 23 Ma Tarapaca paleosurface within the Coastal Cordillera, and the ca. 10 Ma Pacific paleosurface within the Longitudinal Valley. The Pacific paleosurface is regarded as a single stratigraphic horizon that formed due to either a marked increase in the aridity of the area (Galli-Oliver 1967), regional surface uplift that created a change in the locus of deposition (e.g. Mortimer and Rendic 1975), or a combination of the two. The formation of this surface has been associated with the timing of supergene enrichment throughout the northern Chile and southern Peru (Alpers and Brimhall 1988). Multispectral satellite mapping of the Pacific paleosurface in northern Chile using Landsat, Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) imagery, combined with seismic data (Jordan et al. 2010) indicates that the Pacific paleosurface is not a single chronostratigraphic surface, as previously thought, but an amalgamation of surfaces that have both an erosional and depositional history. New in situ cosmogenic exposure dating of alluvial boulders on the paleosurface is combined with previous data (Dunai et al. 2005, Kober et al. 2007 and Evenstar et al., 2009) giving ages ranging from ca. 23 Ma to <1 Ma, supporting a multiphase and much more continuous history. By combining these apparent exposure ages with regional geomorphology, underlying sedimentology, and seismic sections, the geomorphic evolution of the Longitudinal Valley can be constrained. The results show a complex interplay between uplift within the Coastal Cordillera and Precordillera in the south and a distinct change in depositional pattern towards the north. The

  15. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Human Telomerase-Derived Peptide on P. gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Cytokine Production and Its Mechanism in Human Dental Pulp Cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yoo-Jin; Kwon, Kil-Young; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Lee, Woo-Cheol; Baek, Seung-Ho; Kang, Mo K; Shon, Won-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered with inducing pulpal inflammation and has lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an inflammatory stimulator. GV1001 peptide has anticancer and anti-inflammation activity due to inhibiting activation of signaling molecules after penetration into the various types of cells. Therefore, this study examined inhibitory effect of GV1001 on dental pulp cells (hDPCs) stimulated by P. gingivalis LPS. The intracellular distribution of GV1001 was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to determine the expression levels of TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines. The role of signaling by MAP kinases (ERK and p38) was explored using Western blot analysis. The effect of GV1001 peptide on hDPCs viability was measured by MTT assay. GV1001 was predominantly located in hDPC cytoplasm. The peptide inhibited P. gingivalis LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production in hDPCs without significant cytotoxicity. Furthermore, GV1001 treatment markedly inhibited the phosphorylation of MAP kinases (ERK and p38) in LPS-stimulated hDPCs. GV1001 may prevent P. gingivalis LPS-induced inflammation of apical tissue. Also, these findings provide mechanistic insight into how GV1001 peptide causes anti-inflammatory actions in LPS-stimulated pulpitis without significantly affecting cell viability. PMID:26604431

  16. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Human Telomerase-Derived Peptide on P. gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Cytokine Production and Its Mechanism in Human Dental Pulp Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yoo-Jin; Kwon, Kil-Young; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Lee, Woo-Cheol; Baek, Seung-Ho; Kang, Mo K.; Shon, Won-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered with inducing pulpal inflammation and has lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an inflammatory stimulator. GV1001 peptide has anticancer and anti-inflammation activity due to inhibiting activation of signaling molecules after penetration into the various types of cells. Therefore, this study examined inhibitory effect of GV1001 on dental pulp cells (hDPCs) stimulated by P. gingivalis LPS. The intracellular distribution of GV1001 was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to determine the expression levels of TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines. The role of signaling by MAP kinases (ERK and p38) was explored using Western blot analysis. The effect of GV1001 peptide on hDPCs viability was measured by MTT assay. GV1001 was predominantly located in hDPC cytoplasm. The peptide inhibited P. gingivalis LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production in hDPCs without significant cytotoxicity. Furthermore, GV1001 treatment markedly inhibited the phosphorylation of MAP kinases (ERK and p38) in LPS-stimulated hDPCs. GV1001 may prevent P. gingivalis LPS-induced inflammation of apical tissue. Also, these findings provide mechanistic insight into how GV1001 peptide causes anti-inflammatory actions in LPS-stimulated pulpitis without significantly affecting cell viability. PMID:26604431

  17. Cell-Permeable Peptide Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 Inhibits Chronic Inflammatory Pain Behaviors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Feng; Su, Qingning; Johns, Roger A.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions can lead to persistent debilitating pain, and the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) has been shown to play an important role in the processing of inflammatory pain. Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), a scaffolding protein, has been identified to interact with NMDARs at neuronal synapses of the central nervous system. However, the role of these interactions in the central sensitization of nociceptive processing has not been defined. In the present study, we investigated the effect of disrupting NMDAR/PSD-95 interactions on chronic inflammatory pain behaviors. We constructed a fusion peptide, Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2, comprising the second PDZ domain of PSD-95, to disrupt specificallyNMDARs/PSD-95 protein interactions. Western blot analysis showed that Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 intraperitoneally injected into mice was delivered intracellularly into neurons in the central nervous system. By in vitro and in vivo binding assays, we found that the Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 dose-dependently inhibited the interactions between NMDARs and PSD-95. Furthermore, behavioral testing showed that mice given Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 exhibited significantly reduced complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain behaviors compared to the vehicle-treated group. Our results indicate that by disrupting NMDAR/PSD-95 protein interactions, the cell-permeable fusion peptide Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 provides a new target and approach for chronic inflammatory pain therapy. PMID:18781143

  18. Nanoparticles of noble metals in the supergene zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmodik, S. M.; Kalinin, Yu. A.; Roslyakov, N. A.; Mironov, A. G.; Mikhlin, Yu. L.; Belyanin, D. K.; Nemirovskaya, N. A.; Spiridonov, A. M.; Nesterenko, G. V.; Airiyants, E. V.; Moroz, T. N.; Bul'bak, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    Formation of noble metal nanoparticles is related to various geological processes in the supergene zone. Dispersed mineral phases appear during weathering of rocks with active participation of microorganisms, formation of soil, in aqueous medium and atmosphere. Invisible gold and other noble metals are incorporated into oxides, hydroxides, and sulfides, as well as in dispersed organic and inorganic carbonic matter. Sulfide minerals that occur in bedrocks and ores unaltered by exogenic processes and in cementation zone are among the main concentrators of noble metal nanoparticles. The ability of gold particles to disaggregate is well-known and creates problems in technological and analytical practice. When Au and PGE nanoparticles and clusters occur, these problems are augmented because of their unusual reactions and physicochemical properties. The studied gold, magnetite, titanomagnetite and pyrite microspherules from cementation zone and clay minerals of laterites in Republic of Guinea widen the knowledge of their abundance and inferred formation conditions, in particular, in the contemporary supergene zone. Morphology and composition of micrometer-sized Au mineral spherules were studied with SEM and laser microprobe. The newly formed segregations of secondary gold on the surface of its residual grains were also an object of investigation. The character of such overgrowths is the most indicative for nanoparticles. The newly formed Au particles provide evidence for redistribution of ultradispersed gold during weathering. There are serious prerequisites to state that microorganisms substantially control unusual nano-sized microspherical morphology of gold particles in the supergene zone. This is supported by experiments indicating active absorption of gold by microorganisms and direct evidence for participation of Ralstonia metallidurans bacteria in the formation of peculiar corroded bacteriomorphic surface of gold grains. In addition, the areas enriched in carbon

  19. Suppression of Propionibacterium acnes Infection and the Associated Inflammatory Response by the Antimicrobial Peptide P5 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Sunhyo; Han, Hyo Mi; Song, Peter I.

    2015-01-01

    The cutaneous inflammation associated with acne vulgaris is caused by the anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium acnes through activation of the innate immune system in the skin. Current standard treatments for acne have limitations that include adverse effects and poor efficacy in many patients, making development of a more effective therapy highly desirable. In the present study, we demonstrate the protective effects of a novel customized α-helical cationic peptide, P5, against P. acnes-induced inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Application of P5 significantly reduced expression of two inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-α in P. acnes-treated primary human keratinocytes, where P5 appeared to act in part by binding to bacterial lipoteichoic acid, thereby suppressing TLR2-to-NF-κB signaling. In addition, in a mouse model of acne vulgaris, P5 exerted both anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects against P. acnes, but exerted no cytotoxic effects against skin cells. These results demonstrate that P5, and perhaps other cationic antimicrobial peptides, offer the unique ability to reduce numbers P. acnes cells in the skin and to inhibit the inflammation they trigger. This suggests these peptides could potentially be used to effectively treat acne without adversely affecting the skin. PMID:26197393

  20. Suppression of Propionibacterium acnes Infection and the Associated Inflammatory Response by the Antimicrobial Peptide P5 in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sunhyo; Han, Hyo Mi; Song, Peter I; Armstrong, Cheryl A; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-01-01

    The cutaneous inflammation associated with acne vulgaris is caused by the anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium acnes through activation of the innate immune system in the skin. Current standard treatments for acne have limitations that include adverse effects and poor efficacy in many patients, making development of a more effective therapy highly desirable. In the present study, we demonstrate the protective effects of a novel customized α-helical cationic peptide, P5, against P. acnes-induced inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Application of P5 significantly reduced expression of two inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-α in P. acnes-treated primary human keratinocytes, where P5 appeared to act in part by binding to bacterial lipoteichoic acid, thereby suppressing TLR2-to-NF-κB signaling. In addition, in a mouse model of acne vulgaris, P5 exerted both anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects against P. acnes, but exerted no cytotoxic effects against skin cells. These results demonstrate that P5, and perhaps other cationic antimicrobial peptides, offer the unique ability to reduce numbers P. acnes cells in the skin and to inhibit the inflammation they trigger. This suggests these peptides could potentially be used to effectively treat acne without adversely affecting the skin. PMID:26197393

  1. From topical antidote against skin irritants to a novel counter-irritating and anti-inflammatory peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Berta; Erlanger-Rosengarten, Avigail; Proscura, Elena; Shapira, Elena; Wormser, Uri

    2008-06-15

    The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of the counter-irritating activity of topical iodine against skin lesions induced by chemical and thermal stimuli. The hypothesis that iodine exerts its activity by inducing an endogenous anti-inflammatory factor was confirmed by exposing guinea pig skin to heat stimulus followed by topical iodine treatment and skin extraction. Injection of the extract into naive guinea pigs reduced heat-induced irritation by 69%. The protective factor, identified as a new nonapeptide (histone H2A 36-44, H-Lys-Gly-Asn-Tyr-Ala-Glu-Arg-Ileu-Ala-OH), caused reduction of 40% in irritation score in heat-exposed guinea pigs. The murine analog (H-Lys-Gly-His-Tyr-Ala-Glu-Arg-Val-Gly-OH, termed IIIM1) reduced sulfur mustard (SM)-induced ear swelling at a dose-dependent bell-shape manner reaching peak activity of 1 mg/kg. Cultured keratinocytes transfected with the peptide were more resistant towards SM than the control cells. The peptide suppressed oxidative burst in activated neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the peptide reduced glucose oxidase-induced skin edema in mice at a dose-dependent bell-shape manner. Apart from thermal and chemical-induced skin irritation this novel peptide might be of potential use in chronic dermal disorders such as psoriasis and pemphigus as well as non-dermal inflammatory diseases like multiple sclerosis, arthritis and colitis.

  2. Regulatory vs. inflammatory cytokine T-cell responses to mutated insulin peptides in healthy and type 1 diabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Maki; McDaniel, Kristen; Fitzgerald-Miller, Lisa; Kiekhaefer, Carol; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Davidson, Howard W.; Rewers, Marian; Yu, Liping; Gottlieb, Peter; Kappler, John W.; Michels, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Certain class II MHC (MHCII) alleles in mice and humans confer risk for or protection from type 1 diabetes (T1D). Insulin is a major autoantigen in T1D, but how its peptides are presented to CD4 T cells by MHCII risk alleles has been controversial. In the mouse model of T1D, CD4 T cells respond to insulin B-chain peptide (B:9–23) mimotopes engineered to bind the mouse MHCII molecule, IAg7, in an unfavorable position or register. Because of the similarities between IAg7 and human HLA-DQ T1D risk alleles, we examined control and T1D subjects with these risk alleles for CD4 T-cell responses to the same natural B:9–23 peptide and mimotopes. A high proportion of new-onset T1D subjects mounted an inflammatory IFN-γ response much more frequently to one of the mimotope peptides than to the natural peptide. Surprisingly, the control subjects bearing an HLA-DQ risk allele also did. However, these control subjects, especially those with only one HLA-DQ risk allele, very frequently made an IL-10 response, a cytokine associated with regulatory T cells. T1D subjects with established disease also responded to the mimotope rather than the natural B:9–23 peptide in proliferation assays and the proliferating cells were highly enriched in certain T-cell receptor sequences. Our results suggest that the risk of T1D may be related to how an HLA-DQ genotype determines the balance of T-cell inflammatory vs. regulatory responses to insulin, having important implications for the use and monitoring of insulin-specific therapies to prevent diabetes onset. PMID:25831495

  3. Regulatory vs. inflammatory cytokine T-cell responses to mutated insulin peptides in healthy and type 1 diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Maki; McDaniel, Kristen; Fitzgerald-Miller, Lisa; Kiekhaefer, Carol; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Davidson, Howard W; Rewers, Marian; Yu, Liping; Gottlieb, Peter; Kappler, John W; Michels, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Certain class II MHC (MHCII) alleles in mice and humans confer risk for or protection from type 1 diabetes (T1D). Insulin is a major autoantigen in T1D, but how its peptides are presented to CD4 T cells by MHCII risk alleles has been controversial. In the mouse model of T1D, CD4 T cells respond to insulin B-chain peptide (B:9-23) mimotopes engineered to bind the mouse MHCII molecule, IA(g7), in an unfavorable position or register. Because of the similarities between IA(g7) and human HLA-DQ T1D risk alleles, we examined control and T1D subjects with these risk alleles for CD4 T-cell responses to the same natural B:9-23 peptide and mimotopes. A high proportion of new-onset T1D subjects mounted an inflammatory IFN-γ response much more frequently to one of the mimotope peptides than to the natural peptide. Surprisingly, the control subjects bearing an HLA-DQ risk allele also did. However, these control subjects, especially those with only one HLA-DQ risk allele, very frequently made an IL-10 response, a cytokine associated with regulatory T cells. T1D subjects with established disease also responded to the mimotope rather than the natural B:9-23 peptide in proliferation assays and the proliferating cells were highly enriched in certain T-cell receptor sequences. Our results suggest that the risk of T1D may be related to how an HLA-DQ genotype determines the balance of T-cell inflammatory vs. regulatory responses to insulin, having important implications for the use and monitoring of insulin-specific therapies to prevent diabetes onset. PMID:25831495

  4. Chemical communication of queen supergene status in an ant.

    PubMed

    Trible, W; Ross, K G

    2016-03-01

    Traits of interest to evolutionary biologists often have complex genetic architectures, the nature of which can confound traditional experimental study at single levels of analysis. In the fire ant Solenopsis invicta, the presence of a Mendelian 'supergene' is both necessary and sufficient to induce a shift in a fundamental property of social organization, from single-queen (monogyne) to multiple-queen (polygyne) colonies. This selfish genetic element, termed the Social b (Sb) supergene, contains > 600 genes that collectively promote its fitness by inducing the characteristic polygyne syndrome, in part by causing polygyne workers to accept only queens bearing the Sb element (a behaviour termed 'worker Sb discrimination'). Here, we employ a newly developed behavioural assay to reveal that polygyne workers, many of which bear the Sb element, employ chemical cues on the cuticle of queens to achieve worker Sb discrimination, but we found no evidence for such pheromonally mediated worker Sb discrimination in monogyne workers, which universally lack the Sb element. This polygyne worker Sb discrimination was then verified through a 'green beard' effect previously described in this system. We thus have demonstrated that the Sb element is required both for production of relevant chemical cues of queens and for expression of the behaviours of workers that collectively result in worker Sb discrimination. This information fills a critical gap in the map between genotype and complex phenotype in S. invicta by restricting the search for candidate genes and molecules involved in producing this complex social trait to factors associated with the Sb element itself. PMID:26644320

  5. Anti-inflammatory effect of a human prothrombin fragment-2-derived peptide, NSA9, in EOC2 microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kim, Soung Soo

    2008-04-11

    Pro-inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), and several cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, and IL-6) are responsible for central nervous system (CNS) injuries that include ischemia, Alzheimer's disease, and neural death. Inhibition of these pro-inflammatory mediators would be an effective therapy to reduce the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of a human prothrombin fragment-2-derived peptide, NSA9 (NSAVQLVEN), on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated brain microglia. NSA9 significantly inhibited the release of NO, PGE{sub 2}, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, NSA9 reduced the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 mRNA and protein, which control the production of NO and PGE{sub 2}, respectively. Moreover, NSA9 suppressed the LPS-induced nuclear translocation and activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). These results suggest that NSA9 strongly inhibits the pro-inflammatory responses of microglia through the modulation of NF-{kappa}B activity.

  6. Activity of antimicrobial peptide mimetics in the oral cavity: II. Activity against periopathogenic biofilms and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Scott, R W; Diamond, G

    2010-12-01

    Whereas periodontal disease is ultimately of bacterial etiology, from multispecies biofilms of gram-negative anaerobic microorganisms, much of the deleterious effects are caused by the resultant epithelial inflammatory response. Hence, development of a treatment that combines anti-biofilm antibiotic activity with anti-inflammatory activity would be of great utility. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) such as defensins are naturally occurring peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum activity as well as a variety of immunomodulatory activities. Furthermore, bacteria do not readily develop resistance to these agents. However, clinical studies have suggested that they do not represent optimal candidates for exogenous therapeutic agents. Small-molecule mimetics of these AMPs exhibit similar activities to the parent peptides, in addition to having low toxicity, high stability and low cost. To determine whether AMP mimetics have the potential for treatment of periodontal disease, we examined the activity of one mimetic, mPE, against biofilm cultures of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Metabolic assays as well as culture and biomass measurement assays demonstrated that mPE exhibits potent activity against biofilm cultures of both species. Furthermore, as little as 2 μg ml(-1) mPE was sufficient to inhibit interleukin-1β-induced secretion of interleukin-8 in both gingival epithelial cells and THP-1 cells. This anti-inflammatory activity is associated with a reduction in activation of nuclear factor-κB, suggesting that mPE can act both as an anti-biofilm agent in an anaerobic environment and as an anti-inflammatory agent in infected tissues. PMID:21040516

  7. Interdependencies among Selected Pro-Inflammatory Markers of Endothelial Dysfunction, C-Peptide, Anti-Inflammatory Interleukin-10 and Glucose Metabolism Disturbance in Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Janowska, Joanna; Chudek, Jerzy; Olszanecka-Glinianowicz, Magdalena; Semik-Grabarczyk, Elżbieta; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background: Currently increasing importance is attributed to the inflammatory process as a crucial factor responsible for the progressive damage to vascular walls and progression of atherosclerosis in obese people. We have studied the relationship between clinical and biochemical parameters and C-peptide and anti-inflammatory IL-10, as well as selected markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction such as: CCL2, CRP, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and E-selectin in obese women with various degree of glucose metabolism disturbance. Material and methods: The studied group consisted of 61 obese women, and 20 normal weight, healthy volunteers. Obese patients were spited in subgroups based on the degree of glucose metabolism disorder. Serum samples were analyzed using ELISA kits. Results: Increased concentrations of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, E-selectin, CCL2 and CRP were found in all obese groups compared to the normal weight subjects. In patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) parameters characterizing the degree of obesity significantly positively correlated with levels of CRP and CCL2. Significant relationships were found between levels of glucose and sICAM-1and also E-selectin and HOMA-IR. C-peptide levels are positively associated with CCL2, E-selectin, triglycerides levels, and inversely with IL-10 levels in newly diagnosed T2DM group (p<0.05). Concentrations of IL-10 correlated negatively with E-selectin, CCL2, C-peptide levels, and HOMA-IR in T2DM group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Disturbed lipid and carbohydrate metabolism are manifested by enhanced inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in patients with simply obesity. These disturbances are associates with an increase of adhesion molecules. The results suggest the probable active participation of higher concentrations of C-peptide in the intensification of inflammatory and atherogenic processes in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. In patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes, altered serum concentrations of Il-10 seems

  8. Age of Supergene oxidation and enrichment in the chilean porphyry copper province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sillitoe, R.H.; McKee, E.H.

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-five samples of supergene alunite collected from deeply developed supergene profiles in porphyry copper deposits and prospects between latitudes 20?? and 27?? S in northern Chile yield K/Ar ages ranging from about 34 to 14 Ma. Therefore supergene oxidation and enrichment processes were active from the early Oligocene to the middle Miocene, a minimum of 20 m.y. Supergene activity at individual deposits lasted for at least 0.4 to 6.2 m.y. The early Oligocene supergene activity affected deposits in the Paleocene porphyry copper belt, whereas early and middle Miocene supergene processes are documented in the Early Cretaceous, Paleocene, and late Eocene to early Oligocene porphyry copper belts. Middle Miocene oxidation also affected the oldest epithermal gold-silver deposits in the Maricunga belt farther east. Supergene activity commenced no less than 11 m.y. after generation of each porphyry copper deposit because of the time required to unroof the copper-bearing parts of the system. Supergene activity throughout northern Chile ceased at -14 Ma. The geologic features of deposits and prospects and their morphotectonic positions, present latitudes, and present elevations display no obvious correlations with the supergene chronology. Exploration for major cumulative enrichment blankets should not be carried out either beneath thick sequences of piedmont gravels (?? ignimbrites) of Oligocene through middle Miocene age unless their accumulation is demonstrably late in the documented history of supergene activity, or in porphyry copper provinces, such as those of central Chile and northwestern Argentina, which formed after ??? 14 Ma. The uplift responsible for efficient cumulative copper enrichment is difficult to correlate convincingly with the brief pulses of compressive tectonism postulated for northern Chile and contiguous areas unless their effects were much more prolonged. Intensifying aridity is confirmed as the likely reason for the cessation of supergene

  9. An apoA-I mimetic peptide containing a proline residue has greater in vivo HDL binding and anti-inflammatory ability than the 4F peptide.

    PubMed

    Wool, Geoffrey D; Vaisar, Tomas; Reardon, Catherine A; Getz, Godfrey S

    2009-09-01

    Modifying apolipoprotein (apo) A-I mimetic peptides to include a proline-punctuated alpha-helical repeat increases their anti-inflammatory properties as well as allows better mimicry of full-length apoA-I function. This study compares the following mimetics, either acetylated or biotinylated (b): 4F (18mer) and 4F-proline-4F (37mer, Pro). b4F interacts with both mouse HDL (moHDL) and LDL in vitro. b4F in vivo plasma clearance kinetics are not affected by mouse HDL level. Administration of biotinylated peptides to mice demonstrates that b4F does not associate with lipoproteins smaller than LDL in vivo, though it does associate with fractions containing free hemoglobin (Hb). In contrast, bPro specifically interacts with HDL. b4F and bPro show opposite binding responses to HDL by surface plasmon resonance. Administration of acetylated Pro to apoE(-/-) mice significantly decreases plasma serum amyloid A levels, while acetylated 4F does not have this ability. In contrast to previous reports that inferred that 4F associates with HDL in vivo, we systematically examined this potential interaction and demonstrated that b4F does not interact with HDL in vivo but rather elutes with Hb-containing plasma fractions. bPro, however, specifically binds to moHDL in vivo. In addition, the number of amphipathic alpha-helices and their linker influences the anti-inflammatory effects of apoA-I mimetic peptides in vivo. PMID:19433476

  10. An apoA-I mimetic peptide containing a proline residue has greater in vivo HDL binding and anti-inflammatory ability than the 4F peptide

    PubMed Central

    Wool, Geoffrey D.; Vaisar, Tomas; Reardon, Catherine A.; Getz, Godfrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Modifying apolipoprotein (apo) A-I mimetic peptides to include a proline-punctuated α-helical repeat increases their anti-inflammatory properties as well as allows better mimicry of full-length apoA-I function. This study compares the following mimetics, either acetylated or biotinylated (b): 4F (18mer) and 4F-proline-4F (37mer, Pro). b4F interacts with both mouse HDL (moHDL) and LDL in vitro. b4F in vivo plasma clearance kinetics are not affected by mouse HDL level. Administration of biotinylated peptides to mice demonstrates that b4F does not associate with lipoproteins smaller than LDL in vivo, though it does associate with fractions containing free hemoglobin (Hb). In contrast, bPro specifically interacts with HDL. b4F and bPro show opposite binding responses to HDL by surface plasmon resonance. Administration of acetylated Pro to apoE−/− mice significantly decreases plasma serum amyloid A levels, while acetylated 4F does not have this ability. In contrast to previous reports that inferred that 4F associates with HDL in vivo, we systematically examined this potential interaction and demonstrated that b4F does not interact with HDL in vivo but rather elutes with Hb-containing plasma fractions. bPro, however, specifically binds to moHDL in vivo. In addition, the number of amphipathic α-helices and their linker influences the anti-inflammatory effects of apoA-I mimetic peptides in vivo. PMID:19433476

  11. A cell-permeant peptide corresponding to the cUBP domain of USP5 reverses inflammatory and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Caballero, Agustin; Gadotti, Vinicius M; Chen, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Background Cav3.2 T-type calcium currents in primary afferents are enhanced in various painful pathological conditions, whereas inhibiting Cav3.2 activity or expression offers a strategy for combating the development of pain hypersensitivity. We have shown that Cav3.2 channel surface density is strongly regulated by the ubiquitination machinery and we identified the deubiquitinase USP5 as a Cav3.2 channel interacting protein and regulator of its cell surface expression. We also reported that USP5 is upregulated in chronic pain conditions. Conversely, preventing its binding to the channel in vivo mediates analgesia in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. Results To identify which USP5 domain is responsible for the interaction, we used a series of USP5-derived peptides corresponding to different regions in nUBP, cUBP, UBA1, and UBA2 domains to outcompete full length USP5. We identified a stretch of amino acid residues within the cUBP domain of USP5 as responsible for binding to Cav3.2 calcium channels. Based on this information, we generated a TAT-cUBP1-USP5 peptide that could disrupt the Cav3.2/USP5 interaction in vitro and tested its physiological effect in well-established models of persistent inflammatory pain (CFA test) and chronic mononeuropathy and polyneuropathy in mice (partial sciatic nerve injury and the (ob/ob) diabetic spontaneous neuropathic mice). Our results reveal that the TAT-cUBP1-USP5 peptide attenuated mechanical hyperalgesia induced by both Complete Freund’s Adjuvant and partial sciatic nerve injury, and thermal hyperalgesia in diabetic neuropathic animals. In contrast, Cav3.2 null mice were not affected by the peptide in the partial sciatic nerve injury model. Cav3.2 calcium channel levels in diabetic mice were reduced following the administration of the TAT-cUBP1-USP5 peptide. Conclusions Our findings reveal a crucial region in the cUBP domain of USP5 that is important for substrate recognition and binding to the III-IV linker of Cav3

  12. A TLR4-interacting peptide inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated inflammatory responses, migration and invasion of colon cancer SW480 cells

    PubMed Central

    Rakhesh, Madhusoodhanan; Cate, Moriasi; Vijay, Ramani; Shrikant, Anant; Shanjana, Awasthi

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a major risk factor for carcinogenesis in patients affected by chronic colitis, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression from chronic inflammation to cancer are not completely understood. Activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-NFκB signaling axis is associated with inflammation. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of TLR4-NFκB signaling might help in limiting inflammatory responses and inflammation-induced oncogenesis. In this work, we studied the effects of a TLR4-interacting surfactant protein A-derived (SPA4) peptide on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TLR4-NFκB signaling and cancer progression. We first characterized this peptide for its ability to bind the TLR4 ligand-LPS and for physico-chemical characteristics. Inflammation was induced by challenging the colon cancer SW480 cells with Escherichia coli LPS. Cells were then treated with varying amounts of the SPA4 peptide. Changes in the expression of TLR4, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, in intracellular NFκB-related signal transducers (IKBα, p65, phosphorylated IKBα, phosphorylated p65, RelB, COX-2) as well as in the transcriptional activity of NFκB were studied by immunocytochemistry, immunoblotting and NFκB reporter assay, respectively. Simultaneously, the effects on LPS-induced cell migration and invasion were determined. We found that the SPA4 peptide does not bind to LPS. Rather, its binding to TLR4 inhibits the LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65, production of IL-1β and IL-6, activity of NFκB, migration and invasion of SW480 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that the inhibition of TLR4-NFκB signaling by a TLR4-binding peptide may help for the treatment of chronic inflammation and prevention of inflammation-induced cancer in patients with colitis. PMID:23264896

  13. The conjugation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to small peptides for generating multifunctional supramolecular nanofibers/hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiayang; Kuang, Yi; Shi, Junfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Summary Here we report supramolecular hydrogelators made of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and small peptides. The covalent linkage of Phe–Phe and NSAIDs results in conjugates that self-assemble in water to form molecular nanofibers as the matrices of hydrogels. When the NSAID is naproxen (1), the resultant hydrogelator 1a forms a hydrogel at a critical concentration (cgc) of 0.2 wt % at pH 7.0. Hydrogelator 1a, also acting as a general motif, enables enzymatic hydrogelation in which the precursor turns into a hydrogelator upon hydrolysis catalyzed by a phosphatase at physiological conditions. The conjugates of Phe–Phe with other NSAIDs, such as (R)-flurbiprofen (2), racemic flurbiprofen (3), and racemic ibuprofen (4), are able to form molecular hydrogels, except in the case of aspirin (5). After the conjugation with the small peptides, NSAIDs exhibit improved selectivity to their targets. In addition, the peptides made of D-amino acids help preserve the activities of NSAIDs. Besides demonstrating that common NSAIDs are excellent candidates to promote aromatic–aromatic interaction in water to form hydrogels, this work contributes to the development of functional molecules that have dual or multiple roles and ultimately may lead to new molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents for topical use. PMID:23766806

  14. The conjugation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to small peptides for generating multifunctional supramolecular nanofibers/hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiayang; Kuang, Yi; Shi, Junfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Jie; Xu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Here we report supramolecular hydrogelators made of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and small peptides. The covalent linkage of Phe-Phe and NSAIDs results in conjugates that self-assemble in water to form molecular nanofibers as the matrices of hydrogels. When the NSAID is naproxen (1), the resultant hydrogelator 1a forms a hydrogel at a critical concentration (cgc) of 0.2 wt % at pH 7.0. Hydrogelator 1a, also acting as a general motif, enables enzymatic hydrogelation in which the precursor turns into a hydrogelator upon hydrolysis catalyzed by a phosphatase at physiological conditions. The conjugates of Phe-Phe with other NSAIDs, such as (R)-flurbiprofen (2), racemic flurbiprofen (3), and racemic ibuprofen (4), are able to form molecular hydrogels, except in the case of aspirin (5). After the conjugation with the small peptides, NSAIDs exhibit improved selectivity to their targets. In addition, the peptides made of D-amino acids help preserve the activities of NSAIDs. Besides demonstrating that common NSAIDs are excellent candidates to promote aromatic-aromatic interaction in water to form hydrogels, this work contributes to the development of functional molecules that have dual or multiple roles and ultimately may lead to new molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents for topical use. PMID:23766806

  15. Bovine lactoferricin, an antimicrobial peptide, is anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic in human articular cartilage and synovium

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongyao; Chen, Di; Shen, Jie; Xiao, Guozhi; van Wijnen, Andre J; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a multi-functional peptide derived from proteolytic cleavage of bovine lactoferrin. LfcinB was found to antagonize the biological effects mediated by angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) in endothelial cells. However, the effect of LfcinB on human articular cartilage remained unknown. Here, our findings demonstrate that LfcinB restored the proteoglycan loss promoted by catabolic factors (interleukin-1 β) IL-1β and FGF-2 in vitro and ex vivo. Mechanistically, LfcinB attenuated the effects of IL-1β and FGF-2 on the expression of cartilage-degrading enzymes (MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13), destructive cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6), and inflammatory mediators (iNOS and TLR2). LfcinB induced protective cytokine expression (IL-4 and IL-10), and downregulated aggrecanase basal expression. LfcinB specifically activated ERK MAPK and Akt signaling pathways, which may account for its anti-inflammatory activity. We also revealed that LfcinB exerted similar protective effects on human synovial fibroblasts challenged by IL-1β, with minimal cytotoxicity. Collectively, our results suggest that LfcinB possesses potent anti-catabolic and anti-inflammatory bioactivities in human articular tissues, and may be utilized for the prevention and/or treatment of OA in the future. PMID:22740381

  16. Pharmacological characteristics of endokinin C/D-derived peptides in nociceptive and inflammatory processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Naono-Nakayama, Rumi; Sunakawa, Natsuki; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Matsushima, Osamu; Nishimori, Toshikazu

    2011-12-01

    Endokinins designated from the human TAC4 gene consist of endokinin A, endokinin B, endokinin C (EKC) and endokinin D (EKD). EKC/D is a peptide using the common carboxyl-terminal in EKC and EKD and consists of 12 amino acids, and exerts antagonistic effects on the induction of scratching behavior by substance P (SP). Some of SP-preferring receptor antagonists have several d-tryptophan (d-Trp); however, the pharmacological effect of EKC/D-derived peptides with d-Trp remains to be solved. Therefore, to clarify the pharmacological characteristics of EKC/D-derived peptides, effects of pretreatment with these peptides on SP-induced scratching and thermal hyperalgesia, formalin-induced flinching and carrageenan-induced inflammation were evaluated. Intrathecal administration of [d-Trp(8)]-EKC/D and [d-Trp(10)]-EKC/D showed a markedly long inhibitory effect, at least 14 h, whereas the antagonistic effects of [d-Trp(8,10)]-EKC/D and EKC/D without d-Trp disappeared after 1h. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of [d-Trp(10)]-EKC/D-derived peptides was dependent on the number of amino acids from the amino-terminus, and the more numerous the amino acids, the more marked the antagonistic effect. Thus, these results indicate that the effective duration of EKC/D-derived peptides is dependent on the number of d-Trp in the carboxyl-terminal region and the amino-terminal region regulates the antagonistic effect of EKC/D. PMID:22074956

  17. Controls on supergene enrichment of porphyry copper deposits in the Central Andes: A review and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Adrian J.; Rice, Clive M.

    2005-12-01

    The Central Andes host some of the world’s largest porphyry copper deposits. The economic viability of these deposits is dependent on the size and quality of their supergene enrichment blanket. Published models that have strongly influenced exploration policy suggest that supergene enrichment ceased at 14 Ma due to an increase in aridity. Here we discuss these models using published geochronological, geomorphological and geological data. Geochronological data indicate that supergene oxidation and enrichment has been active between 17 and 27°S across the forearc of northern Chile and southern Peru from 44 to 6 Ma, and on the Bolivian Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera of Argentina from 11 Ma to present. There is evidence for cessation at 20, 14 and 6 Ma. However, a major problem is that as more geochronological data become available the age ranges and periods of enrichment increase. This suggests that the full spectrum of enrichment ages may not have been sampled. The relationship between supergene enrichment and the age of regional pediplain surface development is not well constrained. Only in two areas have surfaces related to enrichment been directly dated (southern Peru and south of 26°S in Chile) and suggest formation post 14 Ma. Sedimentological data indicate that a fluctuating arid/semi-arid climate prevailed across the Atacama Desert until between 4 and 3 Ma, climatic conditions that are thought to be favourable for supergene enrichment. The balance between uplift, erosion, burial and sufficient water supply to promote enrichment is complex. This suggests that a simple model for controlling supergene enrichment is unlikely to be widely applicable in northern Chile. General models that involve climatic desiccation at 14 Ma related to rainshadow development and/or the presence of an ancestral cold-upwelling Humboldt Current are not supported by the available geological evidence. The integration of disparate sedimentological, geomorphological and supergene

  18. “Invisible” silver and gold in supergene digenite (Cu1.8S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Martin; Chryssoulis, Stephen L.; Deditius, Artur; Palacios, Carlos; Zúñiga, Alejandro; Weldt, Magdalena; Alvear, Macarena

    2010-11-01

    Despite its potential economic and environmental importance, the study of trace metals in supergene (secondary) Cu-sulfides has been seriously overlooked in the past decades. In this study, the concentration and mineralogical form of "invisible" precious metals (Ag, Au) and metalloids (As, Sb, Se, Te) in supergene digenite (Cu 1.8S) from various Cu deposits in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, the world's premier Cu province, were determined in detail using a combination of microanalytical techniques. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and electron microprobe analyzer (EMPA) measurements reveal that, apart from hosting up to ˜11,000 ppm Ag, supergene digenite can incorporate up to part-per-million contents of Au (˜6 ppm) and associated metalloids such as As (˜300 ppm), Sb (˜60 ppm), Se (˜96 ppm) and Te (˜18 ppm). SIMS analyses of trace metals show that Ag and Au concentrations strongly correlate with As in supergene digenite, defining wedge-shaped zones in Ag-As and Au-As log-log spaces. SIMS depth profiling and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations reveal that samples with anomalously high Ag/As (>˜30) and Au/As (>˜0.03) ratios plot above the wedge zones and contain nanoparticles of metallic Ag and Au, while samples with lower ratios contain Ag and Au that is structurally bound to the Cu-sulfide matrix. The Ag-Au-As relations reported in this study strongly suggest that the incorporation of precious metals in Cu-sulfides formed under supergene, low-temperature conditions respond to the incorporation of a minor component, in this case As. Therefore, As might play a significant role by increasing the solubility of Ag and Au in supergene digenite and controlling the formation and occurrence of Ag and Au nanoparticles. Considering the fact that processes of supergene enrichment in Cu deposits can be active from tens of millions of years (e.g. Atacama Desert), we conclude that supergene digenite may play a previously

  19. The non-peptide GLP-1 receptor agonist WB4-24 blocks inflammatory nociception by stimulating β-endorphin release from spinal microglia

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hui; Gong, Nian; Li, Teng-Fei; Ma, Ai-Niu; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Two peptide agonists of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, exenatide and GLP-1 itself, exert anti-hypersensitive effects in neuropathic, cancer and diabetic pain. In this study, we have assessed the anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of the non-peptide agonist WB4-24 in inflammatory nociception and the possible involvement of microglial β-endorphin and pro-inflammatory cytokines. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used rat models of inflammatory nociception induced by formalin, carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), to test mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Expression of β-endorphin and pro-inflammatory cytokines was measured using real-time quantitative PCR and fluorescent immunoassays. KEY RESULTS WB4-24 displaced the specific binding of exendin (9–39) in microglia. Single intrathecal injection of WB4-24 (0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 μg) exerted dose-dependent, specific, anti-hypersensitive effects in acute and chronic inflammatory nociception induced by formalin, carrageenan and CFA, with a maximal inhibition of 60–80%. Spinal WB4-24 was not effective in altering nociceptive pain. Subcutaneous injection of WB4-24 was also antinociceptive in CFA-treated rats. WB4-24 evoked β-endorphin release but did not inhibit expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in either the spinal cord of CFA-treated rats or cultured microglia stimulated by LPS. WB4-24 anti-allodynia was prevented by a microglial inhibitor, β-endorphin antiserum and a μ-opioid receptor antagonist. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results suggest that WB4-24 inhibits inflammatory nociception by releasing analgesic β-endorphin rather than inhibiting the expression of proalgesic pro-inflammatory cytokines in spinal microglia, and that the spinal GLP-1 receptor is a potential target molecule for the treatment of pain hypersensitivity including inflammatory nociception. PMID:25176008

  20. Antimicrobial Peptide CMA3 Derived from the CA-MA Hybrid Peptide: Antibacterial and Anti-inflammatory Activities with Low Cytotoxicity and Mechanism of Action in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-kook; Seo, Chang Ho; Luchian, Tudor

    2015-01-01

    CA-MA is a hybrid antimicrobial peptide (AMP) derived from two naturally occurring AMPs, cecropin A and magainin 2. CA-MA shows strong antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria but also exhibits cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells. Our objective was to identify CA-MA analogues with reduced cytotoxicity by systematic replacement of amino acids with positively charged R groups (His and Lys), aliphatic R groups (Leu), or polar R groups (Glu). Among the CA-MA analogues studied (CMA1 to -6), CMA3 showed the strongest antimicrobial activity, including against drug-resistant Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from hospital patients. CMA3 appeared to act by inducing pore formation (toroidal model) in the bacterial membrane. In cytotoxicity assays, CMA3 showed little cytotoxicity toward human red blood cells (hRBCs) or HaCaT cells. Additionally, no fluorescence was released from small or giant unilamellar vesicles exposed to 60 μM CMA3 for 80 s, whereas fluorescence was released within 35 s upon exposure to CA-MA. CMA3 also exerted strong lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-neutralizing activity in RAW 264.7 cells, and BALB/c mice exposed to LPS after infection by Escherichia coli showed improved survival after administration of one 0.5-mg/kg of body weight or 1-mg/kg dose of CMA3. Finally, in a mouse model of septic shock, CMA3 reduced the levels of proinflammatory factors, including both nitric oxide and white blood cells, and correspondingly reduced lung tissue damage. This study suggests that CMA3 is an antimicrobial/antiendotoxin peptide that could serve as the basis for the development of anti-inflammatory and/or antimicrobial agents with low cytotoxicity. PMID:26552969

  1. Rational Design of Small Peptides for Optimal Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2: Development of a Highly Effective Anti-Inflammatory Agent.

    PubMed

    Singh, Palwinder; Kaur, Sukhmeet; Kaur, Jagroop; Singh, Gurjit; Bhatti, Rajbir

    2016-04-28

    Among the small peptides 2-31, (H)Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu(OMe) (30) reduced prostaglandin production of COX-2 with an IC50 of 60 nM relative to 6000 nM for COX-1. The 5 mg kg(-1) dose of compound 30 rescued albino mice by 80% from capsaicin-induced paw licking and recovered it by 60% from carrageenan-induced inflammation. The mode of action of compound 30 for targeting COX-2, iNOS, and VGSC was investigated by using substance P, l-arginine, and veratrine, respectively, as biomarkers. The interactions of 30 with COX-2 were supported by isothermal calorimetry experiments showing a Ka of 6.10 ± 1.10 × 10(4) M(-1) and ΔG of -100.3 kJ mol(-1) in comparison to a Ka 0.41 × 10(3) ± 0.09 M(-1) and ΔG of -19.2 ± 0.06 kJ mol(-1) for COX-1. Moreover, compound 30 did not show toxicity up to a 2000 mg kg(-1) dose. Hence, we suggest peptide 30 as a highly potent and promising candidate for further development into an anti-inflammatory drug. PMID:27019010

  2. Anti-inflammatory and anti-endotoxin properties of peptides derived from the carboxy-terminal region of a defensin from the tick Ornithodoros savignyi.

    PubMed

    Malan, Melissa; Serem, June C; Bester, Megan J; Neitz, Albert W H; Gaspar, Anabella R M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small cationic peptides that possess a large spectrum of bioactivities, including antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Several antimicrobial peptides are known to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in vitro and to protect animals from sepsis. In this study, the cellular anti-inflammatory and anti-endotoxin activities of Os and Os-C, peptides derived from the carboxy-terminal of a tick defensin, were investigated. Both Os and Os-C were found to bind LPS in vitro, albeit to a lesser extent than polymyxin B and melittin, known endotoxin-binding peptides. Binding to LPS was found to reduce the bactericidal activity of Os and Os-C against Escherichia coli confirming the affinity of both peptides for LPS. At a concentration of 25 µM, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of Os was higher than glutathione, a known NO scavenger. In contrast, Os-C showed no scavenging activity. Os and Os-C inhibited LPS/IFN-γ induced NO and TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, with no cellular toxicity even at a concentration of 100 µM. Although inhibition of NO and TNF-α secretion was more pronounced for melittin and polymyxin B, significant cytotoxicity was observed at concentrations of 1.56 µM and 25 µM for melittin and polymyxin B, respectively. In addition, Os, Os-C and glutathione protected RAW 264.7 cells from oxidative damage at concentrations as low as 25 µM. This study identified that besides previously reported antibacterial activity of Os and Os-C, both peptides have in addition anti-inflammatory and anti-endotoxin properties. PMID:26662999

  3. Divergence and Functional Degradation of a Sex Chromosome-like Supergene.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, Elaina M; Bergland, Alan O; Korody, Marisa L; Brewer, Michael S; Newhouse, Daniel J; Minx, Patrick; Stager, Maria; Betuel, Adam; Cheviron, Zachary A; Warren, Wesley C; Gonser, Rusty A; Balakrishnan, Christopher N

    2016-02-01

    A major challenge in biology is to understand the genetic basis of adaptation. One compelling idea is that groups of tightly linked genes (i.e., "supergenes" [1, 2]) facilitate adaptation in suites of traits that determine fitness. Despite their likely importance, little is known about how alternate supergene alleles arise and become differentiated, nor their ultimate fate within species. Herein we address these questions by investigating the evolutionary history of a supergene in white-throated sparrows, Zonotrichia albicollis. This species comprises two morphs, tan and white, that differ in pigmentation and components of social behavior [3-5]. Morph is determined by alternative alleles at a balanced >100-Mb inversion-based supergene, providing a unique system for studying gene-behavior relationships. Using over two decades of field data, we document near-perfect disassortative mating among morphs, as well as the fitness consequences of rare assortative mating. We use de novo whole-genome sequencing coupled with population- and phylogenomic data to show that alternate supergene alleles are highly divergent at over 1,000 genes and that these alleles originated prior to the split of Z. albicollis from its sister species and may be polymorphic in Z. albicollis due to a past hybridization event. We provide evidence that the "white" allele may be degrading, similar to neo-Y/W sex chromosomes. We further show that the "tan" allele has surprisingly low levels of genetic diversity yet does not show several canonical signatures of recurrent positive selection. We discuss these results in the context of the origin, molecular evolution, and possible fate of this remarkable polymorphism. PMID:26804558

  4. Anti‐Inflammatory Peptides From Cardiac Progenitors Ameliorate Dysfunction After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei‐Lan; Nagai, Toshio; Tokunaga, Masakuni; Iwanaga, Koji; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Takahashi, Toshinao; Kanda, Masato; Kondo, Naomichi; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Komuro, Issei; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac cell therapy has been proposed as one of the new strategies against myocardial infarction. Although several reports showed improvement of the function of ischemic heart, the effects of cell therapy vary among the studies and the mechanisms of the beneficial effects are still unknown. Previously, we reported that clonal stem cell antigen‐1–positive cardiac progenitor cells exerted a therapeutic effect when transplanted into the ischemic heart. Our aims were to identify the cardiac progenitor‐specific paracrine factor and to elucidate the mechanism of its beneficial effect. Methods and Results By using an antibody array, we found that soluble junctional adhesion molecule‐A (JAM‐A) was abundantly secreted from cardiac progenitor cells. Pretreatment of neutrophils with conditioned medium from cultured cardiac progenitor cells or soluble JAM‐A inhibited transendothelial migration and reduced motility of neutrophils. These inhibitory effects were attenuated by anti–JAM‐A neutralizing antibody. Injection of cardiac progenitor cells into infarct heart attenuated neutrophil infiltration and expression of inflammatory cytokines. Injection of soluble JAM‐A–expressing, but not of JAM‐A siRNA–expressing, cardiac progenitor cells into the infarct heart prevented cardiac remodeling and reduced fibrosis area. Conclusions Soluble JAM‐A secreted from cardiac progenitor cells reduces infiltration of neutrophils after myocardial infarction and ameliorates tissue damage through prevention of excess inflammation. Our finding may lead to a new therapy for cardiovascular disease by using the anti‐inflammatory effect of JAM‐A. PMID:25468657

  5. Sea cucumber peptides exert anti-inflammatory activity through suppressing NF-κB and MAPK and inducing HO-1 in RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiajia; Li, Tiange; Cheng, Xue; Ji, Xiaomin; Gao, Dongxiao; Du, Min; Jiang, Naiyi; Liu, Xueling; Mao, Xueying

    2016-06-15

    The anti-inflammatory effect of sea cucumber peptides (SCP) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 murine macrophages was tested. SCP significantly reduced LPS-induced nitric oxide release by inhibiting the inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression without affecting the cell viability. The mRNA expression of LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines including tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 was suppressed. SCP inhibited LPS-induced degradation of the inhibitor of κBα (IκBα) and nuclear transposition of NF-κB p65, resulting in decreased NF-κB transactivation. Moreover, SCP suppressed the LPS-induced phosphorylation of JNK, ERK and p38. In addition, the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in macrophages was up-regulated by SCP in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition effect of SCP on the mRNA expression of LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines was partially reversed by co-treatment with a HO-1 inhibitor. The SCP with anti-inflammatory activity was made up of low-molecular-weight peptides rich in glycine, glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SCP exerts anti-inflammatory function through inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK activation and inducing HO-1 expression in macrophages. PMID:27220344

  6. Homeostatic regulation of T cell trafficking by a B cell derived peptide is impaired in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Apta, Bonita; Kuravi, Sahithi J.; Yates, Clara M.; Kennedy, Amy; Odedra, Arjun; Alassiri, Mohammed; Harrison, Matthew; Martin, Ashley; Barone, Francesca; Nayar, Saba; Hitchcock, Jessica R.; Cunningham, Adam F.; Raza, Karim; Filer, Andrew; Copland, David A.; Dick, Andrew D.; Robinson, Joseph; Kalia, Neena; Walker, Lucy S. K.; Buckley, Christopher D.; Nash, Gerard B.; Narendran, Parth; Rainger, G. Ed.

    2015-01-01

    During an inflammatory response, lymphocyte recruitment into tissue must be tightly controlled because dysregulated trafficking contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic disease. Here we show that during inflammation and in response to adiponectin, B cells tonically inhibit T cell trafficking by secreting a peptide (PEPITEM) proteolytically derived from 14.3.3.ζδ protein. PEPITEM binds cadherin-15 on endothelial cells, promoting synthesis and release of sphingosine-1 phosphate, which inhibits trafficking of T cells without affecting recruitment of other leukocytes. Expression of adiponectin receptors on B cells and adiponectin induced PEPITEM secretion wanes with age, implying immune senescence of the pathway. Additionally, these changes are evident in individuals with type-1-diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis, and circulating PEPITEM in patient serum is reduced compared to healthy age matched donors. In both diseases, tonic inhibition of T cell trafficking across inflamed endothelium is lost. Importantly, control of patient T cell trafficking is re-established by exogenous PEPITEM. Moreover, in animal models of peritonitis, hepatic I/R injury, Salmonella infection, Uveitis and Sjögren’s Syndrome, PEPITEM could reduce T cell recruitment into inflamed tissues. PMID:25894827

  7. Social dilemmas among supergenes: intragenomic sexual conflict and a selfing solution in Oenothera

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sam P.; Levin, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    Recombination is a powerful policing mechanism to control intragenomic cheats. The ‘parliament of the genes’ can often rapidly block driving genes from cheating during meiosis. But what if the genome parliament is reduced to only two members, or supergenes? Using a series of simple game-theoretic models inspired by the peculiar genetics of Oenothera sp. we illustrate that a 2 supergene genome (α and β) can produce a number of surprising evolutionary dynamics, including increases in lineage longevity following a transition from sexuality (outcrossing) to asexuality (clonal self-fertilization). We end by interpreting the model in the broader context of the evolution of mutualism, which highlights that greater α, β cooperation in the self-fertilizing model can be viewed as an example of partner fidelity driving multi-lineage cooperation. PMID:22133211

  8. Martian supergene enrichment in Shalbatana Valley: Implications for Mars Early atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Ciprian; Carrozzo, Giacomo; DiAchille, Gaetano; Silvestro, Simone; Espostio, Francesca; Mennella, Vito

    2015-04-01

    The present work focuses on the detailed description of the first ever-identified supergene enrichment zone on Mars. The mineral paragenesis present at the site sets constrains on the characteristics of early Martian atmosphere. A chrysocolla/malachite bearing unit in the largest of Shalbatana Valley paleolacustrine sediment accumulation constitutes the proof for this process. The water permanence at the formation time is the main implication of this finding. Furthermore, the potential biogenic involvement at the mineralization stage adds scientific importance to the site. The latter implication could set the site as a high priority choice for future Martian in-situ robotic roving/sample-return missions. The relative age of the area (˜3.7 Ba) adds weight to this finding for purposes of planetary atmosphere evolution comparison. No Earth supergene deposit has survived that long, making this site extremely important to address the problem of the oxidative conditions of the primordial Earth and Mars atmospheres.

  9. Supergene processes and uranium ore formation in the Ronneburg ore field, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonin, A. V.; Gradovsky, I. F.

    2012-04-01

    The Ordovician-Lower Carboniferous sequence of slightly metamorphosed gray carbonate-terrigenous rocks contains the Silurian black cherty shales enriched in carbon (6-9%), pyrite (6-7%), and uranium (˜30 ppm). The uranium ore is localized at the pinch-out of areal and linear zones of the Early Permian supergene (exogenic) oxidation of rocks expressed in reddening (hematitization). U, As, Sb, Cu, Ni, Mo, and Ag have been removed from the oxidized black shales and concentrated in the cementation zone in form of pitchblende and sulfides in wall-rock disseminations and veinlets largely hosted in carbonate-bearing rocks. In the Late Permian, during deposition of the upper Rotliegende and Zechstein, the fractures in the basement were filled with carbonates and sulfates; uranium was partly redeposited along with enrichment in Pb and Zn. Mesozoic and Cenozoic supergene processes altered uranium ore insignificantly.

  10. Cyclic mechanical stretch down-regulates cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide expression and activates a pro-inflammatory response in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Karason, Sigurbergur

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) of patients can cause damage to bronchoalveolar epithelium, leading to a sterile inflammatory response, infection and in severe cases sepsis. Limited knowledge is available on the effects of MV on the innate immune defense system in the human lung. In this study, we demonstrate that cyclic stretch of the human bronchial epithelial cell lines VA10 and BCi NS 1.1 leads to down-regulation of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene expression. We show that treatment of VA10 cells with vitamin D3 and/or 4-phenyl butyric acid counteracted cyclic stretch mediated down-regulation of CAMP mRNA and protein expression (LL-37). Further, we observed an increase in pro-inflammatory responses in the VA10 cell line subjected to cyclic stretch. The mRNA expression of the genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-1β was increased after cyclic stretching, where as a decrease in gene expression of chemokines IP-10 and RANTES was observed. Cyclic stretch enhanced oxidative stress in the VA10 cells. The mRNA expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 3, TLR5 and TLR8 was reduced, while the gene expression of TLR2 was increased in VA10 cells after cyclic stretch. In conclusion, our in vitro results indicate that cyclic stretch may differentially modulate innate immunity by down-regulation of antimicrobial peptide expression and increase in pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:26664810

  11. Structure and lipid interactions of an anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic 10 residue Class G* Apolipoprotein J peptide using solution NMR#

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vinod K.; Palgunachari, Mayakonda N.; Hudson, Jason S.; Shin, Ronald; Keenum, Tamara D.; Rama Krishna, N.; Anantharamaiah, G. M.

    2010-01-01

    The surprising observation that a 10 residue class G* peptide from apolipoprotein J, [113-122]apoJ, possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties prompted us to delineate its structural characteristics in the presence of normal and oxidized lipid. Towards this, we have determined high resolution structure of [113-122]apoJ in solution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and studied its interaction with lipids, including oxidized lipids, using a number of biophysical methods. Circular dichroism and NMR studies established that in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelle this peptide adopts amphipathic α helical structure. The observed Nuclear Overhauser effects indicate that the amphipathic helical structure of the peptide is stabilized by the N-terminal acetyl and C-terminal amide blocking groups. We used isothermal titration calorimetry to measure binding enthalpy of the peptide with DPC micelle, an oxidized lipid, 1-(palmitoyl)-2-(5-keto-6-octene-dioyl) phosphatidylcholine (KOdiA-PC), and the mixture of these two lipids (5mol% KOdiA-PC in DPC micelle). We find that the peptide binding with DPC micelle is associated with an enthalpy change (-16.75±0.16 Kcal/mol) much larger than that resulting from the binding with KodiA-PC (-3.67±0.13 Kcal/mol). Incorporation of a small amount of KOdiA-PC (5mol %) in DPC micelle also results in the lowering of peptide binding enthalpy (-13.43±0.18 Kcal/mol). These results are consistent with overall negative charge and altered conformational properties of oxidized sn-2 chain of KOdiA-PC. Our results have unambiguously established the amphipathic α helical structure of [113-122]apoJ peptide in the presence of DPC micelle as well as its ability to bind oxidized lipid. These in vitro results help explain the previously observed anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic properties of this peptide. PMID:20970404

  12. Therapeutic effect of an altered peptide ligand derived from heat-shock protein 60 by suppressing of inflammatory cytokines secretion in two animal models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, N; Barberá, A; Domínguez, M C; Torres, A M; Hernandez, M V; Hernandez, I; Gil, R; Ancizar, J; Garay, H; Reyes, O; Altruda, F; Silengo, L; Padrón, G

    2012-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease mediated by T cells. Productive engagement of T cell receptors by major histocompatibility complex-peptide leads to proliferation, differentiation and the definition of effector functions. Altered peptide ligands (APL) generated by amino acid substitutions in the antigenic peptide have diverse effects on T cell response. We predicted a novel T cell epitope from human heat-shock protein 60, an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Three APLs were designed from this epitope and it was demonstrated that these peptides induce the activation of T cells through their ability to modify cell cycle phase's distribution of CD4+T cells from RA patients. Also, IL-17, TNF-α and IL-10 levels were determined in PBMC from these patients. Unlike the wild-type peptide and the other two APLs, APL2 increased the IL-10 level and suppressed IL-17 secretion in these assays. Therapeutic effect of this APL in adjuvant arthritis (AA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models was also evaluated. Clinical score, histopathology, inflammatory and regulatory cytokine concentration were monitored in the animals. APL2 efficiently inhibited the progression of AA and CIA with a significant reduction of the clinical and histopathologic score. Therapeutic effect of APL2 on CIA was similar to that obtained with MTX; the standard treatment for RA. This effect was associated with a decrease of TNF-α and IL-17 levels. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of APL2 is mediated in part by down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and support the potential use of APL2 as a therapeutic drug in RA patients. PMID:22686732

  13. Annexin A1 released from apoptotic cells acts through formyl peptide receptors to dampen inflammatory monocyte activation via JAK/STAT/SOCS signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pupjalis, Danute; Goetsch, Julia; Kottas, Diane J; Gerke, Volker; Rescher, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    The immunosuppressive effects of apoptotic cells involve inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine release and establishment of an anti-inflammatory cytokine profile, thus limiting the degree of inflammation and promoting resolution. We report here that this is in part mediated by the release of the anti-inflammatory mediator annexin A1 from apoptotic cells and the functional activation of annexin A1 receptors of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family on target cells. Supernatants from apoptotic neutrophils or the annexin A1 peptidomimetic Ac2-26 significantly reduced IL-6 signalling and the release of TNF-α from endotoxin-challenged monocytes. Ac2-26 activated STAT3 in a JAK-dependent manner, resulting in upregulated SOCS3 levels, and depletion of SOCS3 reversed the Ac2-26-mediated inhibition of IL-6 signalling. This identifies annexin A1 as part of the anti-inflammatory pattern of apoptotic cells and links the activation of FPRs to established signalling pathways triggering anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:21254404

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Action of an Antimicrobial Model Peptide That Suppresses the TRIF-Dependent Signaling Pathway via Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Endocytosis in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Do-Wan; Heo, Kang-Hyuck; Kim, Young-Kyu; Sim, Eun-Jeong; Kang, Tae-Bong; Choi, Jae-Wan; Sim, Dae-Won; Cheong, Sun-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hong; Bang, Jeong-Kyu; Won, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), also called host defense peptides, particularly those with amphipathic helical structures, are emerging as target molecules for therapeutic development due to their immunomodulatory properties. Although the antimicrobial activity of AMPs is known to be exerted primarily by permeation of the bacterial membrane, the mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory activity remains to be elucidated. We report potent anti-inflammatory activity of WALK11.3, an antimicrobial model peptide with an amphipathic helical conformation, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. This peptide inhibited the expression of inflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, INF-β, and TNF-α. Although WALK11.3 did not exert a major effect on all downstream signaling in the MyD88-dependent pathway, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- mediated pro-inflammatory signals were markedly attenuated in the TRIF-dependent pathway due to inhibition of the phosphorylation of STAT1 by attenuation of IRF3 phosphorylation. WALK11.3 specifically inhibited the endocytosis of TLR4, which is essential for triggering TRIF-mediated signaling in macrophage cells. Hence, we suggest that specific interference with TLR4 endocytosis could be one of the major modes of the anti-inflammatory action of AMPs. Our designed WALK11 peptides, which possess both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, may be promising molecules for the development of therapies for infectious inflammation. PMID:26017270

  15. Paleohydrologic evolution and geochemical dynamics of cumulative supergene metal enrichment at La Escondida, Atacama Desert, northern Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpers, C.N.; Brimhall, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative limonite mapping within the leached capping of the porphyry copper deposit at La Escondida, Chile, permits reconstruction of the paleohydrologic and chemical evolution of a well-developed supergene ore-forming system. The mineralogy, textures, and relative abundance of supergene limonite minerals (hematite, goethite, and jarosite) are used to reconstruct the former ratio of pyrite to chalcocite and the preoxidation copper grade based on empirical limonite sulfide correlations. Evidence for cumulative downward enrichment in vertical profiles through leached capping allows quantitative analysis of chemical mass balance in dynamic supergene systems. Slopes of linear regressions for profiles of reconstructed enriched copper grades vs. depth indicate lateral fluxes into or out of a given vertical profile. -from Authors

  16. Screening of an anti-inflammatory peptide from Hydrophis cyanocinctus and analysis of its activities and mechanism in DSS-induced acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zengjie; Jiang, Hailong; Huang, Yan; Wang, Jie; Qiu, Lei; Hu, Zhenlin; Ma, Xingyuan; Lu, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Snake has been used for centuries as a traditional Chinese medicine, especially for therapeutic treatment for inflammatory diseases; however, its mechanisms of action and active constituents remain controversial. In our study, a tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) selective binding peptide, Hydrostatin-SN1 (H-SN1), which was screened from a Hydrophis cyanocinctus venom gland T7 phage display library, was shown to exhibit significant anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo. As a TNFR1 antagonist, it reduced cytotoxicity mediated by TNF-α in L929 fibroblasts and effectively inhibited the combination between TNF-α with TNFR1 in surface plasmon resonance analysis. H-SN1 was also shown to suppress TNFR1–associated signaling pathways as it minimized TNF-α-induced NF-кB and MAPK activation in HEK293 embryonic kidney and HT29 adenocarcinoma cell lines. We next determined the effect of H-SN1 in vivo using a murine model of acute colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate, demonstrating that H-SN1 lowered the clinical parameters of acute colitis including the disease activity index and histologic scores. H-SN1 also inhibited TNF/TNFR1 downstream targets at both mRNA and protein levels. These results indicate that H-SN1 might represent a suitable candidate for use in the treatment of TNF-α-associated inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:27158082

  17. An MD2 Hot-Spot Mimicking Peptide that Suppresses TLR4-Mediated Inflammatory Response In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liping; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Slivka, Peter F.; Fiorini, Zeno; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2012-01-01

    A truncated peptide was shown to retain the structure of the TLR4-binding hot-spot region of MD2, disrupting with the TLR4/MD2 interactions. The peptide not only demonstrated strong binding affinity in the fluorescence polarization assay, but also showed high specificity in macrophage cells. Furthermore, MD2-I was able to suppress neuropathic pain in animal models. PMID:21678541

  18. Naturally occurring mitochondrial-derived peptides are age-dependent regulators of apoptosis, insulin sensitivity, and inflammatory markers

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Laura J.; Lee, Changhan; Xiao, Jialin; Yen, Kelvin; Wong, Richard G.; Nakamura, Hiromi K.; Mehta, Hemal H.; Gao, Qinglei; Ashur, Carmel; Huffman, Derek M.; Wan, Junxiang; Muzumdar, Radhika; Barzilai, Nir; Cohen, Pinchas

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are key players in aging and in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases. Recent mitochondrial transcriptome analyses revealed the existence of multiple small mRNAs transcribed from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Humanin (HN), a peptide encoded in the mtDNA 16S ribosomal RNA region, is a neuroprotective factor. An in silico search revealed six additional peptides in the same region of mtDNA as humanin; we named these peptides small humanin-like peptides (SHLPs). We identified the functional roles for these peptides and the potential mechanisms of action. The SHLPs differed in their ability to regulate cell viability in vitro. We focused on SHLP2 and SHLP3 because they shared similar protective effects with HN. Specifically, they significantly reduced apoptosis and the generation of reactive oxygen species, and improved mitochondrial metabolism in vitro. SHLP2 and SHLP3 also enhanced 3T3-L1 pre-adipocyte differentiation. Systemic hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies showed that intracerebrally infused SHLP2 increased glucose uptake and suppressed hepatic glucose production, suggesting that it functions as an insulin sensitizer both peripherally and centrally. Similar to HN, the levels of circulating SHLP2 were found to decrease with age. These results suggest that mitochondria play critical roles in metabolism and survival through the synthesis of mitochondrial peptides, and provide new insights into mitochondrial biology with relevance to aging and human biology. PMID:27070352

  19. Naturally occurring mitochondrial-derived peptides are age-dependent regulators of apoptosis, insulin sensitivity, and inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Laura J; Lee, Changhan; Xiao, Jialin; Yen, Kelvin; Wong, Richard G; Nakamura, Hiromi K; Mehta, Hemal H; Gao, Qinglei; Ashur, Carmel; Huffman, Derek M; Wan, Junxiang; Muzumdar, Radhika; Barzilai, Nir; Cohen, Pinchas

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are key players in aging and in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases. Recent mitochondrial transcriptome analyses revealed the existence of multiple small mRNAs transcribed from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Humanin (HN), a peptide encoded in the mtDNA 16S ribosomal RNA region, is a neuroprotective factor. An in silico search revealed six additional peptides in the same region of mtDNA as humanin; we named these peptides small humanin-like peptides (SHLPs). We identified the functional roles for these peptides and the potential mechanisms of action. The SHLPs differed in their ability to regulate cell viability in vitro. We focused on SHLP2 and SHLP3 because they shared similar protective effects with HN. Specifically, they significantly reduced apoptosis and the generation of reactive oxygen species, and improved mitochondrial metabolism in vitro. SHLP2 and SHLP3 also enhanced 3T3-L1 pre-adipocyte differentiation. Systemic hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies showed that intracerebrally infused SHLP2 increased glucose uptake and suppressed hepatic glucose production, suggesting that it functions as an insulin sensitizer both peripherally and centrally. Similar to HN, the levels of circulating SHLP2 were found to decrease with age. These results suggest that mitochondria play critical roles in metabolism and survival through the synthesis of mitochondrial peptides, and provide new insights into mitochondrial biology with relevance to aging and human biology. PMID:27070352

  20. Inhibition of lethal inflammatory responses through the targeting of membrane-associated Toll-like receptor 4 signaling complexes with a Smad6-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn Sook; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Su Myung; Kim, Sang-Doo; Kim, Jun Hwan; Lee, Jae Young; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Mamura, Mizuko; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Seong-Jin; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Park, Seok Hee

    2015-05-01

    We have previously reported that Smad6, one of the inhibitory Smads of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, inhibits Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signaling by disrupting the Pellino-1-mediated TLR4 signaling complex. Here, we developed Smaducin-6, a novel membrane-tethered palmitic acid-conjugated Smad6-derived peptide composed of amino acids 422-441 of Smad6. Smaducin-6 interacted with Pellino-1, located in the inner membrane, thereby disrupting the formation of IRAK1-, RIP1-, IKKε-mediated TLR4 signaling complexes. Systemic administration of Smaducin-6 showed a significant therapeutic effect on mouse TLR4-mediated inflammatory disease models, cecal-ligation-puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis, and lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia, by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine production and apoptosis while enhancing neutrophil migration and bacterial clearance. Our findings provide clues to develop new peptide-based drugs to target Pellino-1 protein in TLR4 signaling pathway for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:25766838

  1. Synthetic antimicrobial and LPS-neutralising peptides suppress inflammatory and immune responses in skin cells and promote keratinocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Pfalzgraff, Anja; Heinbockel, Lena; Su, Qi; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Weindl, Günther

    2016-01-01

    The stagnation in the development of new antibiotics and the concomitant high increase of resistant bacteria emphasize the urgent need for new therapeutic options. Antimicrobial peptides are promising agents for the treatment of bacterial infections and recent studies indicate that Pep19-2.5, a synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) peptide (SALP), efficiently neutralises pathogenicity factors of Gram-negative (LPS) and Gram-positive (lipoprotein/-peptide, LP) bacteria and protects against sepsis. Here, we investigated the potential of Pep19-2.5 and the structurally related compound Pep19-4LF for their therapeutic application in bacterial skin infections. SALPs inhibited LP-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and p38 MAPK and reduced cytokine release and gene expression in primary human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts. In LPS-stimulated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and Langerhans-like cells, the peptides blocked IL-6 secretion, downregulated expression of maturation markers and inhibited dendritic cell migration. Both SALPs showed a low cytotoxicity in all investigated cell types. Furthermore, SALPs markedly promoted cell migration via EGFR transactivation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and accelerated artificial wound closure in keratinocytes. Peptide-induced keratinocyte migration was mediated by purinergic receptors and metalloproteases. In contrast, SALPs did not affect proliferation of keratinocytes. Conclusively, our data suggest a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with acute and chronic skin infections. PMID:27509895

  2. Synthetic antimicrobial and LPS-neutralising peptides suppress inflammatory and immune responses in skin cells and promote keratinocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Pfalzgraff, Anja; Heinbockel, Lena; Su, Qi; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Weindl, Günther

    2016-01-01

    The stagnation in the development of new antibiotics and the concomitant high increase of resistant bacteria emphasize the urgent need for new therapeutic options. Antimicrobial peptides are promising agents for the treatment of bacterial infections and recent studies indicate that Pep19-2.5, a synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) peptide (SALP), efficiently neutralises pathogenicity factors of Gram-negative (LPS) and Gram-positive (lipoprotein/-peptide, LP) bacteria and protects against sepsis. Here, we investigated the potential of Pep19-2.5 and the structurally related compound Pep19-4LF for their therapeutic application in bacterial skin infections. SALPs inhibited LP-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and p38 MAPK and reduced cytokine release and gene expression in primary human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts. In LPS-stimulated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and Langerhans-like cells, the peptides blocked IL-6 secretion, downregulated expression of maturation markers and inhibited dendritic cell migration. Both SALPs showed a low cytotoxicity in all investigated cell types. Furthermore, SALPs markedly promoted cell migration via EGFR transactivation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and accelerated artificial wound closure in keratinocytes. Peptide-induced keratinocyte migration was mediated by purinergic receptors and metalloproteases. In contrast, SALPs did not affect proliferation of keratinocytes. Conclusively, our data suggest a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with acute and chronic skin infections. PMID:27509895

  3. The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor an anti-inflammatory peptide; therapeutics originating from amebic abscess of the liver.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Juan R

    2011-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica in culture produces a pentapeptide (MQCNS). This oligopeptide inhibits the in vitro and in vivo locomotion of human monocytes, hence its denomination Monocyte Locomotion Inhibitory Factor (MLIF). The original isolated peptide and its synthetic construct display similar effects, among others, being inhibition of the respiratory burst in monocytes and neutrophils, decrease of Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) skin hypersensitivity in guinea pigs and gerbils, and delay of mononuclear leukocytes in human Rebuck skin windows with inhibition of vascular cell Very late antigen (VLA)-4 and Vascular adhesion molecules (VCAM) in endothelia and monocytes. The MLIF molecular mechanism of action is unknown, but data reveal its implication in Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and Mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. This could explain MLIF multiplicity of biological effects. On the other hand, the amebic peptide has been useful in treating experimental amebiasis of the liver. The amebic peptide is effective in reducing inflammation induced by carragenin and arthritis in a Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Microarray data from experimental arthritis revealed an MLIF gene expression profile that includes genes that are involved in apoptosis, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, and inflammation / chemotaxis. MLIF could be involved in unsuspected biological factions because there is increasing data on the peptide effect on several cell activities. This review also presents uses of MLIF as described in patents. PMID:22074573

  4. A supergene determines highly divergent male reproductive morphs in the ruff.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Clemens; Stocks, Michael; Risse, Judith E; Dos Remedios, Natalie; Farrell, Lindsay L; McRae, Susan B; Morgan, Tawna C; Karlionova, Natalia; Pinchuk, Pavel; Verkuil, Yvonne I; Kitaysky, Alexander S; Wingfield, John C; Piersma, Theunis; Zeng, Kai; Slate, Jon; Blaxter, Mark; Lank, David B; Burke, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Three strikingly different alternative male mating morphs (aggressive 'independents', semicooperative 'satellites' and female-mimic 'faeders') coexist as a balanced polymorphism in the ruff, Philomachus pugnax, a lek-breeding wading bird. Major differences in body size, ornamentation, and aggressive and mating behaviors are inherited as an autosomal polymorphism. We show that development into satellites and faeders is determined by a supergene consisting of divergent alternative, dominant and non-recombining haplotypes of an inversion on chromosome 11, which contains 125 predicted genes. Independents are homozygous for the ancestral sequence. One breakpoint of the inversion disrupts the essential CENP-N gene (encoding centromere protein N), and pedigree analysis confirms the lethality of homozygosity for the inversion. We describe new differences in behavior, testis size and steroid metabolism among morphs and identify polymorphic genes within the inversion that are likely to contribute to the differences among morphs in reproductive traits. PMID:26569125

  5. Identification of a cell-penetrating peptide domain from human beta-defensin 3 and characterization of its anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jue Yeon; Suh, Jin Sook; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Park, Hyun Jung; Park, Yoon Jeong; Chung, Chong Pyoung

    2015-01-01

    Human beta-defensins (hBDs) are crucial factors of intrinsic immunity that function in the immunologic response to a variety of invading enveloped viruses, bacteria, and fungi. hBDs can cause membrane depolarization and cell lysis due to their highly cationic nature. These molecules participate in antimicrobial defenses and the control of adaptive and innate immunity in every mammalian species and are produced by various cell types. The C-terminal 15-mer peptide within hBD3, designated as hBD3-3, was selected for study due to its cell- and skin-penetrating activity, which can induce anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. hBD3-3 penetrated both the outer membrane of the cells and mouse skin within a short treatment period. Two other peptide fragments showed poorer penetration activity compared to hBD3-3. hBD3-3 inhibited the lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide, and secretory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, hBD3-3 reduced the interstitial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a lung inflammation model. Further investigation also revealed that hBD3-3 downregulated nuclear factor kappa B-dependent inflammation by directly suppressing the degradation of phosphorylated-IκBα and by downregulating active nuclear factor kappa B p65. Our findings indicate that hBD3-3 may be conjugated with drugs of interest to ensure their proper translocation to sites, such as the cytoplasm or nucleus, as hBD3-3 has the ability to be used as a carrier, and suggest a potential approach to effectively treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:26347021

  6. The anti-inflammatory peptide Ac-SDKP is released from thymosin-β4 by renal meprin-α and prolyl oligopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Nakagawa, Pablo; Janic, Branislava; Romero, Cesar A; Worou, Morel E; Monu, Sumit R; Peterson, Edward L; Shaw, Jiajiu; Valeriote, Frederick; Ongeri, Elimelda M; Niyitegeka, Jean-Marie V; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; Carretero, Oscar A

    2016-05-15

    N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) is a natural tetrapeptide with anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic properties. Previously, we have shown that prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is involved in the Ac-SDKP release from thymosin-β4 (Tβ4). However, POP can only hydrolyze peptides shorter than 30 amino acids, and Tβ4 is 43 amino acids long. This indicates that before POP hydrolysis takes place, Tβ4 is hydrolyzed by another peptidase that releases NH2-terminal intermediate peptide(s) with fewer than 30 amino acids. Our peptidase database search pointed out meprin-α metalloprotease as a potential candidate. Therefore, we hypothesized that, prior to POP hydrolysis, Tβ4 is hydrolyzed by meprin-α. In vitro, we found that the incubation of Tβ4 with both meprin-α and POP released Ac-SDKP, whereas no Ac-SDKP was released when Tβ4 was incubated with either meprin-α or POP alone. Incubation of Tβ4 with rat kidney homogenates significantly released Ac-SDKP, which was blocked by the meprin-α inhibitor actinonin. In addition, kidneys from meprin-α knockout (KO) mice showed significantly lower basal Ac-SDKP amount, compared with wild-type mice. Kidney homogenates from meprin-α KO mice failed to release Ac-SDKP from Tβ4. In vivo, we observed that rats treated with the ACE inhibitor captopril increased plasma concentrations of Ac-SDKP, which was inhibited by the coadministration of actinonin (vehicle, 3.1 ± 0.2 nmol/l; captopril, 15.1 ± 0.7 nmol/l; captopril + actinonin, 6.1 ± 0.3 nmol/l; P < 0.005). Similar results were obtained with urinary Ac-SDKP after actinonin treatment. We conclude that release of Ac-SDKP from Tβ4 is mediated by successive hydrolysis involving meprin-α and POP. PMID:26962108

  7. Generation of the First TCR Transgenic Mouse with CD4(+) T Cells Recognizing an Anti-inflammatory Regulatory T Cell-Inducing Hsp70 Peptide.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Manon A A; van Herwijnen, Martijn J C; van Kooten, Peter J S; Hoek, Aad; van der Zee, Ruurd; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke

    2016-01-01

    Antigen-specific regulatory T cells (Tregs) directed at self-antigens are difficult to study since suitable specific tools to isolate and characterize these cells are lacking. A T cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic mouse would generate possibilities to study such -antigen-specific T cells. As was shown previously, immunization with the mycobacterial heat shock protein (Hsp) 70-derived peptide B29 and its mouse homologs mB29a and mB29b induced anti-inflammatory responses. Furthermore, B29 induced antigen--specific Tregs in vivo. To study mB29b-specific Tregs, we isolated the TCR from T cell hybridomas generated against mB29b and produced a TCR transgenic mouse that expresses a MHC-class II restricted mB29b-specific TCR. These TCR transgenic CD4(+) T cells were found to cross-react with the B29 epitope as identified with peptide-induced proliferation and IL-2 production. Thus, we have successfully generated a novel mouse model with antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that recognize self and bacterial Hsp 70-derived peptides. With this novel mouse model, it will be possible to study primary antigen-specific T cells with specificity for a regulatory Hsp70 T cell epitope. This will enable the isolation and characterization CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs with a proven specificity. This will provide useful knowledge of the induction, activation, and mode of action of Hsp70-specific Tregs, for instance, during experimental arthritis. PMID:27014269

  8. Inhibition of CD4+ T lymphocyte binding to fibronectin and immune-cell accumulation in inflammatory sites by non-peptidic mimetics of Arg-Gly-Asp.

    PubMed

    Hershkoviz, R; Greenspoon, N; Mekori, Y A; Hadari, R; Alon, R; Kapustina, G; Lider, O

    1994-02-01

    The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion motif has been demonstrated in various studies to play a pivotal role in leucocyte and platelet interactions with plasma and extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. The recognition of the RGD sequence is mediated by heterodimeric receptors designated integrins of the beta 1 subfamily, expressed on distinct cell types, including T lymphocytes. We have recently shown that flexible non-peptidic mimetics of RGD, in which the two ionic side groups were separated by a linear spacer of 11 atoms, bound specifically to the platelet integrin alpha 11b beta 3, and inhibited T cell-mediated immune responses. The present study was designed to (i) further characterize the structural requirements for RGD interactions with CD4+ T cells, and (ii) examine the mechanisms by which the RGD mimetics interfere with immune cell reactivity in vivo. We now report that freezing the conformational degrees of freedom in the spacer chain, which fixes the relative orientation of the guanidinium and carboxylate side groups in a favourable manner, results in a higher level of inhibition of T cell binding to immobilized fibronectin, an RGD-containing ECM glycoprotein. In vivo, treatment of mice with relatively low doses of the RGD mimetics, but not the RGD peptide, inhibited the elicitation of an adoptively transferred DTH reaction. This inhibition was achieved by direct impairment of the ability of antigen-primed lymph node cells to migrate and accumulate in inflammatory sites. Hence, we suggest that the design and production of non-peptidic mimetics of RGD offers a novel approach to study defined parameters related to the structure-function requirements of small adhesion epitopes. Furthermore, this approach could be used therapeutically to inhibit pathological processes which depend on RGD recognition. PMID:7905794

  9. Generation of the First TCR Transgenic Mouse with CD4+ T Cells Recognizing an Anti-inflammatory Regulatory T Cell-Inducing Hsp70 Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Manon A. A.; van Herwijnen, Martijn J. C.; van Kooten, Peter J. S.; Hoek, Aad; van der Zee, Ruurd; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke

    2016-01-01

    Antigen-specific regulatory T cells (Tregs) directed at self-antigens are difficult to study since suitable specific tools to isolate and characterize these cells are lacking. A T cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic mouse would generate possibilities to study such ­antigen-specific T cells. As was shown previously, immunization with the mycobacterial heat shock protein (Hsp) 70-derived peptide B29 and its mouse homologs mB29a and mB29b induced anti-inflammatory responses. Furthermore, B29 induced antigen-­specific Tregs in vivo. To study mB29b-specific Tregs, we isolated the TCR from T cell hybridomas generated against mB29b and produced a TCR transgenic mouse that expresses a MHC-class II restricted mB29b-specific TCR. These TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells were found to cross-react with the B29 epitope as identified with peptide-induced proliferation and IL-2 production. Thus, we have successfully generated a novel mouse model with antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that recognize self and bacterial Hsp 70-derived peptides. With this novel mouse model, it will be possible to study primary antigen-specific T cells with specificity for a regulatory Hsp70 T cell epitope. This will enable the isolation and characterization CD4+CD25+ Tregs with a proven specificity. This will provide useful knowledge of the induction, activation, and mode of action of Hsp70-specific Tregs, for instance, during experimental arthritis. PMID:27014269

  10. Andean uplift and climate evolution in the southern Atacama Desert deduced from geomorphology and supergene alunite-group minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissig, Thomas; Riquelme, Rodrigo

    2010-11-01

    Supergene alunite group minerals from the Late Eocene El Salvador porphyry Cu district, the El Hueso epithermal gold deposit and the Coya porphyry Au prospect located in the Precordillera of Northern Chile (~ 26 to 26° 30´ Lat. S) have been dated by the 40Ar/ 39Ar method and analyzed for stable isotopes. These data support published geomorphologic and sedimentologic evidence suggesting that the Precordillera in the Southern Atacama Desert had been uplifted as early as the late Eocene and, thus, significantly prior to the Altiplano which attained its high elevation only in the late Miocene. The oldest supergene alunite from the Damiana exotic deposit at El Salvador was dated at 35.8 ± 1 Ma and yielded a δD (VSMOW) value of -74‰ which indicates elevations of the Precordillera near El Salvador of at least 3000 m in the Late Eocene. In contrast, Miocene supergene alunite from El Salvador, El Hueso, and Coya have less negative δD signatures reaching values as high as -23 to -25‰ at El Hueso and El Salvador between about 8.2 and 14 Ma. Late Miocene to Holocene supergene alunite, jarosite and natroalunite ages are restricted to El Hueso and Coya located near 4000 m above sea level in the Precordillera, roughly 1000 m higher than the present elevation of El Salvador. The δD values of samples younger than ~ 5 Ma vary between -57 and -97‰. The complex evolution of the δD signatures suggests that meteoric waters recorded in supergene alunite group minerals were variably affected by evaporation and provides evidence for climate desiccation and onset of hyper arid conditions in the Central Depression of the southern Atacama Desert after 15 Ma, which agrees well with published constraints from the Atacama Desert at 23-24° Lat. S. Our data also suggest that wetter climatic conditions than at present prevailed in the latest Miocene and early Pliocene in the Precordillera. The new and previously published age constraints for El Salvador indicate that supergene

  11. The pro-inflammatory peptide LL-37 promotes ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Marini, Frank C; Watson, Keri; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Dembinski, Jennifer L; LaMarca, Heather L; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Honer zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Danka, Elizabeth S; Henkle, Sarah L; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-03-10

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to engraft into the stroma of several tumor types, where they contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the chemotactic signals mediating MSC migration to tumors remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that LL-37 (leucine, leucine-37), the C-terminal peptide of human cationic antimicrobial protein 18, stimulates the migration of various cell types and is overexpressed in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Although there is evidence to support a pro-tumorigenic role for LL-37, the function of the peptide in tumors remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of LL-37 in vivo significantly reduces the engraftment of MSCs into ovarian tumor xenografts, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth as well as disruption of the fibrovascular network. Migration and invasion experiments conducted in vitro indicated that the LL-37-mediated migration of MSCs to tumors likely occurs through formyl peptide receptor like-1. To assess the response of MSCs to the LL-37-rich tumor microenvironment, conditioned medium from LL-37-treated MSCs was assessed and found to contain increased levels of several cytokines and pro-angiogenic factors compared with controls, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-10, CCL5, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Similarly, Matrigel mixed with LL-37, MSCs, or the combination of the two resulted in a significant number of vascular channels in nude mice. These data indicate that LL-37 facilitates ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of progenitor cell populations to serve as pro-angiogenic factor-expressing tumor stromal cells. PMID:19234121

  12. The pro-inflammatory peptide LL-37 promotes ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Marini, Frank C.; Watson, Keri; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; LaMarca, Heather L.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; zu Bentrup, Kerstin Honer; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Henkle, Sarah L.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to engraft into the stroma of several tumor types, where they contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the chemotactic signals mediating MSC migration to tumors remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that LL-37 (leucine, leucine-37), the C-terminal peptide of human cationic antimicrobial protein 18, stimulates the migration of various cell types and is overexpressed in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Although there is evidence to support a pro-tumorigenic role for LL-37, the function of the peptide in tumors remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of LL-37 in vivo significantly reduces the engraftment of MSCs into ovarian tumor xenografts, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth as well as disruption of the fibrovascular network. Migration and invasion experiments conducted in vitro indicated that the LL-37-mediated migration of MSCs to tumors likely occurs through formyl peptide receptor like-1. To assess the response of MSCs to the LL-37-rich tumor microenvironment, conditioned medium from LL-37-treated MSCs was assessed and found to contain increased levels of several cytokines and pro-angiogenic factors compared with controls, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-10, CCL5, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Similarly, Matrigel mixed with LL-37, MSCs, or the combination of the two resulted in a significant number of vascular channels in nude mice. These data indicate that LL-37 facilitates ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of progenitor cell populations to serve as pro-angiogenic factor-expressing tumor stromal cells. PMID:19234121

  13. Single administration of p2TA (AB103), a CD28 antagonist peptide, prevents inflammatory and thrombotic reactions and protects against gastrointestinal injury in total-body irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Mirzoeva, Salida; Paunesku, Tatjana; Wanzer, M Beau; Shirvan, Anat; Kaempfer, Raymond; Woloschak, Gayle E; Small, William

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to elucidate the action of the CD28 mimetic peptide p2TA (AB103) that attenuates an excessive inflammatory response in mitigating radiation-induced inflammatory injuries. BALB/c and A/J mice were divided into four groups: Control (C), Peptide (P; 5 mg/kg of p2TA peptide), Radiation (R; total body irradiation with 8 Gy γ-rays), and Radiation + Peptide (RP; irradiation followed by p2TA peptide 24 h later). Gastrointestinal tissue damage was evaluated by analysis of jejunum histopathology and immunohistochemistry for cell proliferation (Cyclin D1) and inflammation (COX-2) markers, as well as the presence of macrophages (F4/80). Pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and KC as well as fibrinogen were quantified in plasma samples obtained from the same mice. Our results demonstrated that administration of p2TA peptide significantly reduced the irradiation-induced increase of IL-6 and fibrinogen in plasma 7 days after exposure. Seven days after total body irradiation with 8 Gy of gamma rays numbers of intestinal crypt cells were reduced and villi were shorter in irradiated animals compared to the controls. The p2TA peptide delivery 24 h after irradiation led to improved morphology of villi and crypts, increased Cyclin D1 expression, decreased COX-2 staining and decreased numbers of macrophages in small intestine of irradiated mice. Our study suggests that attenuation of CD28 signaling is a promising therapeutic approach for mitigation of radiation-induced tissue injury. PMID:25054224

  14. The Overlapping Roles of Antimicrobial Peptides and Complement in Recruitment and Activation of Tumor-Associated Inflammatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rayahi, Izzat A. M.; Sanyi, Raghad H. H.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent a group of small (6–100 amino acids), biologically active molecules, which are produced by plants, mammals, and microorganisms (1). An important element of the innate immune response, AMP, possesses potent antibiotic, antifungal, and antiviral activities. Furthermore, AMP may be involved in a number of other processes such as angiogenesis and modulation of the immune response such as stimulation of chemokines and chemotaxis of leukocytes. AMPs have been proposed as alternative therapies for infectious diseases. AMP may also exert cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. Further understanding of the biological function of these peptides during tumor development and progression may aid in the development of novel anti-tumor therapies with refined application of innate molecules. AMP and complement have distinct roles to play in shaping the microenvironment (Table 1). Components of the complement system are integral contributors in responding to infection and sterile inflammation. Moreover, complement plays a role in the trafficking of cells in the tumor microenvironment, and thereby possibly in the immune response to cancer. This article will try to outline characteristics of AMP and complement in mobilization and recruitment of cells in tumor microenvironment. PMID:25657649

  15. U/Pb age and origin of supergene uranophane-beta from the Borborema Pegmatite Mineral Province, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, H. G.; Hansen, B. T.; Weber, B.

    2013-08-01

    Uranophane-beta of supergene origin formed in the Borborema Pegmatite Mineral. Province, which is situated in the north-easternmost part of Brazil. The sampling site lies in the topmost parts of the Quintos Pegmatite, about ten kilometers north of the town of Equador. The uranyl silicate was investigated for its age and physical chemical regime of formation. Age dating yielded a U/Pb age of 6.77 ± 0.61 Ma. Uranophane has been derived together with autunite from weathering of brannerite in a tropical climate under alternating wet and dry seasons, when the pH was below 8. This canary-yellow well-crystallized uranyl silicate can be used as a physical chemical marker as well as a clock for supergene alteration.

  16. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms of apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide in acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sharifov, Oleg F; Xu, Xin; Gaggar, Amit; Grizzle, William E; Mishra, Vinod K; Honavar, Jaideep; Litovsky, Silvio H; Palgunachari, Mayakonda N; White, C Roger; Anantharamaiah, G M; Gupta, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to sepsis has a high mortality rate with limited treatment options. High density lipoprotein (HDL) exerts innate protective effects in systemic inflammation. However, its role in ARDS has not been well studied. Peptides such as L-4F mimic the secondary structural features and functions of apolipoprotein (apo)A-I, the major protein component of HDL. We set out to measure changes in HDL in sepsis-mediated ARDS patients, and to study the potential of L-4F to prevent sepsis-mediated ARDS in a rodent model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated acute lung injury, and a combination of primary human leukocytes and human ARDS serum. We also analyzed serum from non-lung disease intubated patients (controls) and sepsis-mediated ARDS patients. Compared to controls, ARDS demonstrates increased serum endotoxin and IL-6 levels, and decreased HDL, apoA-I and activity of anti-oxidant HDL-associated paraoxanase-1. L-4F inhibits the activation of isolated human leukocytes and neutrophils by ARDS serum and LPS in vitro. Further, L-4F decreased endotoxin activity and preserved anti-oxidant properties of HDL both in vitro and in vivo. In a rat model of severe endotoxemia, L-4F significantly decreased mortality and reduces lung and liver injury, even when administered 1 hour post LPS. Our study suggests the protective role of the apoA-I mimetic peptide L-4F in ARDS and gram-negative endotoxemia and warrant further clinical evaluation. The main protective mechanisms of L-4F are due to direct inhibition of endotoxin activity and preservation of HDL anti-oxidant activity. PMID:23691230

  17. Amelioration of cardiac function and activation of anti-inflammatory vasoactive peptides expression in the rat myocardium by low level laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Manchini, Martha Trindade; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Feliciano, Regiane dos Santos; Santana, Eduardo Tadeu; Antônio, Ednei Luis; de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho, Paulo; Montemor, Jairo; Crajoinas, Renato Oliveira; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Silva, José Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used as an anti-inflammatory treatment in several disease conditions, even when inflammation is a secondary consequence, such as in myocardial infarction (MI). However, the mechanism by which LLLT is able to protect the remaining myocardium remains unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that LLLT reduces inflammation after acute MI in female rats and ameliorates cardiac function. The potential participation of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) and Kallikrein-Kinin System (KKS) vasoactive peptides was also evaluated. LLLT treatment effectively reduced MI size, attenuated the systolic dysfunction after MI, and decreased the myocardial mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-6 in comparison to the non-irradiated rat tissue. In addition, LLLT treatment increased protein and mRNA levels of the Mas receptor, the mRNA expression of kinin B2 receptors and the circulating levels of plasma kallikrein compared to non-treated post-MI rats. On the other hand, the kinin B1 receptor mRNA expression decreased after LLLT. No significant changes were found in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the myocardial remote area between laser-irradiated and non-irradiated post-MI rats. Capillaries density also remained similar between these two experimental groups. The mRNA expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was increased three days after MI, however, this effect was blunted by LLLT. Moreover, endothelial NOS mRNA content increased after LLLT. Plasma nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) concentration was increased three days after MI in non-treated rats and increased even further by LLLT treatment. Our data suggest that LLLT diminishes the acute inflammation in the myocardium, reduces infarct size and attenuates left ventricle dysfunction post-MI and increases vasoactive peptides expression and nitric oxide (NO) generation. PMID:24991808

  18. Mapping the Interaction of B Cell Leukemia 3 (BCL-3) and Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) p50 Identifies a BCL-3-mimetic Anti-inflammatory Peptide*

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Patricia E.; Grassia, Gianluca; Colleran, Amy; Kiely, Patrick A.; Ialenti, Armando; Maffia, Pasquale; Carmody, Ruaidhrí J.

    2015-01-01

    The NF-κB transcriptional response is tightly regulated by a number of processes including the phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and subsequent proteasomal degradation of NF-κB subunits. The IκB family protein BCL-3 stabilizes a NF-κB p50 homodimer·DNA complex through inhibition of p50 ubiquitination. This complex inhibits the binding of the transcriptionally active NF-κB subunits p65 and c-Rel on the promoters of NF-κB target genes and functions to suppress inflammatory gene expression. We have previously shown that the direct interaction between p50 and BCL-3 is required for BCL-3-mediated inhibition of pro-inflammatory gene expression. In this study we have used immobilized peptide array technology to define regions of BCl-3 that mediate interaction with p50 homodimers. Our data show that BCL-3 makes extensive contacts with p50 homodimers and in particular with ankyrin repeats (ANK) 1, 6, and 7, and the N-terminal region of Bcl-3. Using these data we have designed a BCL-3 mimetic peptide based on a region of the ANK1 of BCL-3 that interacts with p50 and shares low sequence similarity with other IκB proteins. When fused to a cargo carrying peptide sequence this BCL-3-derived peptide, but not a mutated peptide, inhibited Toll-like receptor-induced cytokine expression in vitro. The BCL-3 mimetic peptide was also effective in preventing inflammation in vivo in the carrageenan-induced paw edema mouse model. This study demonstrates that therapeutic strategies aimed at mimicking the functional activity of BCL-3 may be effective in the treatment of inflammatory disease. PMID:25922067

  19. Genomic Analysis of Detoxification Supergene Families in the Mosquito Anopheles sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dan; Liu, Xianmiao; Sun, Yan; Ma, Lei; Shen, Bo; Zhu, Changliang

    2015-01-01

    Anopheles sinensis is an important malaria vector in China and other Southeast Asian countries, and the emergence of insecticide resistance in this mosquito poses a serious threat to the efficacy of malaria control programs. The recently published An. sinensis genome and transcriptome provide an opportunity to understand the molecular mechanisms of insecticide resistance. Analysis of the An. sinensis genome revealed 174 detoxification genes, including 93 cytochrome P450s (P450s), 31 glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs), and 50 choline/carboxylesterases (CCEs). The gene number was similar to that in An. gambiae, but represented a decrease of 29% and 42% compared with Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus, respectively. The considerable contraction in gene number in Anopheles mosquitoes mainly occurred in two detoxification supergene families, P450s and CCEs. The available An. sinensis transcriptome was also re-analyzed to further identify key resistance-associated detoxification genes. Among 174 detoxification genes, 124 (71%) were detected. Several candidate genes overexpressed in a deltamethrin-resistant strain (DR-strain) were identified as belonging to the CYP4 or CYP6 family of P450s and the Delta GST class. These generated data provide a basis for identifying the resistance-associated genes of An. sinensis at the molecular level. PMID:26588704

  20. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) differentially affects inflammatory immune responses in human monocytes infected with viable Salmonella or stimulated with LPS.

    PubMed

    Askar, Basim; Ibrahim, Hiba; Barrow, Paul; Foster, Neil

    2015-09-01

    We compared the effect of VIP on human blood monocytes infected with Salmonella typhimurium 4/74 or stimulated with LPS. VIP (10(-7)M) increased monocyte viability by 24% and 9% when cultured for 24h with 4/74 or Salmonella LPS (100ng/ml), respectively. Significantly increased (P<0.05) numbers of 4/74 were also recovered from monocytes co-cultured with VIP after 6h post-infection (pi) and this remained high after 24h pi. Both 4/74 and LPS increased (P<0.05) the concentration of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 measured in monocyte supernatants. However, LPS induced this effect more rapidly while, with the exception of IL-6, 4/74 induced higher concentrations (P<0.05). VIP significantly decreased (P<0.05) TNF-α and IL-1β production by 4/74-infected monocytes after 6 pi, but only after 24h in LPS-cultured monocytes. This trend was reversed for IL-6 production. However, TNF-α and IL-1β production by 4/74-infected monocytes, cultured with VIP, still remained higher (P<0.05) than concentrations measured in supernatants cultured only with LPS. VIP also increased (P<0.05) production of anti-inflammatory IL-10 in both 4/74 and LPS cultures after 24h. We also show a differential effect of VIP on the expression of TNFα and IL-6 receptors, since VIP was only able to decreased expression in LPS-stimulated monocytes but not in 4/74-infected monocytes. In conclusion, we show a differential effect of VIP on human monocytes infected with virulent Salmonella or stimulated with LPS. Our study suggests that the use of VIP in bacteraemia and/or sepsis may be limited to an adjunctive therapy to antibiotic treatment. PMID:26206287

  1. Sulphide and supergene nonsulphide Zn-Pb deposits of the southern Kootenay Arc, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, S.; Simandl, G. J.

    2009-05-01

    The Kootenay Arc (KA) hosts a large number of carbonate-hosted base metal (Zn-Pb) deposits. These deposits occur mainly within the dolomitized limestone of the Lower Cambrian Badshot Formation (or its equivalent the Reeves Member of the Laib Formation), and the Upper Cambrian to Lower Ordovician Nelway Formation. They range in size from 6-10 million tonnes with average grades of 3-4% Zn, 1-2% Pb, 0.4% Cd and traces of Ag. The deposits, their dolomitic envelopes, and the limestone hostrock lie within secondary isoclinal folds along the limbs of regional anticlinal structures. Most of the deposits are stratabound lenticular concentrations of sphalerite, galena, pyrite, local pyrrhotite and rare arsenopyrite in isoclinally folded dolomitized or silicified carbonate layers. Brecciated zones are common within the more massive sulphide mineralization. Several deposits are past producers (e.g., Reeves MacDonald, Jersey, and HB) and others are advanced prospects. They are interpreted as metamorphosed MVT- or Irish-type Pb-Zn deposits. The main concentrations of these deposits define the Salmo and Duncan camps. The near-surface portions of these carbonate-hosted sulphide deposits are weathered and strongly oxidized (supergene environment). They consist of extensive Zn- and Pb-bearing iron oxide gossans and base metal-bearing nonsulphide mineralization. The most common nonsulphide minerals are goethite, hematite, hemimorphite, smithsonite, cerussite, anglesite, and hydrozincite. The Reeves MacDonald, Jersey-Emerald, Lomond, and Oxide group of deposits are the best examples of carbonate-hosted nonsulphide base metal (CHNSBM) deposits in the KA. The shape, mineralogy and paragenesis of the known CHNSBM deposits are indicative of direct-replacement of sulphides by nonsulphide base metal-bearing minerals. Zn-rich (low Pb) CHNSBM deposits commonly form by interaction of Zn-rich fluids with carbonate wallrock (replacement process). Such deposits (consisting of "white ore") may

  2. Bradyzide, a potent non-peptide B2 bradykinin receptor antagonist with long-lasting oral activity in animal models of inflammatory hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Gillian M; Perkins, Martin N; Rang, Humphrey P; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Brown, Michael C; McIntyre, Peter; Urban, Laszlo; Dziadulewicz, Edward K; Ritchie, Timothy J; Hallett, Allan; Snell, Christopher R; Wrigglesworth, Roger; Lee, Wai; Davis, Clare; Phagoo, Steve B; Davis, Andrew J; Phillips, Elsa; Drake, Gillian S; Hughes, Glyn A; Dunstan, Andrew; Bloomfield, Graham C

    2000-01-01

    Bradyzide is from a novel class of rodent-selective non-peptide B2 bradykinin antagonists (1-(2-Nitrophenyl)thiosemicarbazides). Bradyzide has high affinity for the rodent B2 receptor, displacing [3H]-bradykinin binding in NG108-15 cells and in Cos-7 cells expressing the rat receptor with KI values of 0.51±0.18 nM (n=3) and 0.89±0.27 nM (n=3), respectively. Bradyzide is a competitive antagonist, inhibiting B2 receptor-induced 45Ca efflux from NG108-15 cells with a pKB of 8.0±0.16 (n=5) and a Schild slope of 1.05. In the rat spinal cord and tail preparation, bradyzide inhibits bradykinin-induced ventral root depolarizations (IC50 value; 1.6±0.05 nM (n=3)). Bradyzide is much less potent at the human than at the rodent B2 receptor, displacing [3H]-bradykinin binding in human fibroblasts and in Cos-7 cells expressing the human B2 receptor with KI values of 393±90 nM (n=3) and 772±144 nM (n=3), respectively. Bradyzide inhibits bradykinin-induced [3H]-inositol trisphosphate (IP3) formation with IC50 values of 11.6±1.4 nM (n=3) at the rat and 2.4±0.3 μM (n=3) at the human receptor. Bradyzide does not interact with a range of other receptors, including human and rat B1 bradykinin receptors. Bradyzide is orally available and blocks bradykinin-induced hypotension and plasma extravasation. Bradyzide shows long-lasting oral activity in rodent models of inflammatory hyperalgesia, reversing Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in the rat knee joint (ED50, 0.84 μmol kg−1; duration of action >4 h). It is equipotent with morphine and diclofenac, and 1000 times more potent than paracetamol, its maximal effect exceeding that of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Bradyzide does not exhibit tolerance when administered over 6 days. In summary, bradyzide is a potent, orally active, antagonist of the B2 bradykinin receptor, with selectivity for the rodent over the human receptor. PMID:10694205

  3. Effects of Spinally Administered Bifunctional Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Peptide Receptor/μ-Opioid Receptor Ligands in Mouse Models of Neuropathic and Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sukhtankar, Devki D.; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Husbands, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide receptor (NOP) agonists produce antinociceptive effects in animal models after spinal administration and potentiate μ-opioid receptor (MOP)-mediated antinociception. This study determined the antinociceptive effects of spinally administered bifunctional NOP/MOP ligands and the antinociceptive functions of spinal NOP and MOP receptors in mice. Antinociceptive effects of bifunctional NOP/MOP ligands BU08028 [(2S)-2-[(5R,6R,7R,14S)-N-cyclopropylmethyl-4,5-epoxy-6,14-ethano-3-hydroxy-6-methoxymorphinan-7-yl]-3,3-dimethylpentan-2-ol] and SR16435 [1-(1-(2,3,3α,4,5,6-hexahydro-1H-phenalen-1-yl)piperidin-4-yl)-indolin-2-one] were pharmacologically compared with the putative bifunctional ligand buprenorphine, selective NOP agonist SCH221510 [3-endo-8-[bis(2-methylphenyl)methyl]-3-phenyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octan-3-ol] and selective MOP agonist morphine in neuropathic and inflammatory pain models. Additionally, the degree of tolerance development to the antiallodynic effects of SR16435 and buprenorphine were determined after repeated intrathecal administration. Our data indicated that BU08028 and SR16435 were more potent than morphine and SCH221510 in attenuating nerve injury-induced tactile allodynia and inflammation-induced thermal hyperalgesia. Coadministration of receptor-selective antagonists further revealed that both NOP and MOP in the spinal cord mediated the antiallodynic effects of BU08028 and SR16435, but intrathecal buprenorphine-induced antiallodynic effects were primarily mediated by MOP. Repeated intrathecal administration of SR16435 resulted in reduced and slower development of tolerance to its antiallodynic effects compared with buprenorphine. In conclusion, both NOP and MOP receptors in the spinal cord independently drive antinociception in mice. Spinally administered bifunctional NOP/MOP ligands not only can effectively attenuate neuropathic and inflammatory pain, but also have higher antinociceptive potency with reduced

  4. Oxidative weathering chemical migration under variably saturated conditions and supergene copper enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, K.; Brimhall, G.

    1999-04-01

    Transport of oxygen gas from the land surface through an unsaturated zone has a strong influence on oxidative weathering processes. Oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), one of the most common naturally occurring minerals, is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste rock piles. Here we present a detailed numerical model of supergene copper enrichment that involves the oxidative weathering of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) and chalcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}), and acidification that causes mobilization of metals in the unsaturated zone, with subsequent formation of enriched ore deposits of chalcocite (CuS) and covellite (Cu{sub 2}S) in the reducing conditions below the water table. We examine and identify some significant conceptual and computational issues regarding the oxidative weathering processes through the modeling tool. The dissolution of gaseous oxygen induced by the oxidation reduces oxygen partial pressure, as well as the total pressure of the gas phase. As a result, the gas flow is modified, then the liquid phase flow. Results indicate that this reaction effect on the fluid flow may not be important under ambient conditions, and gas diffusion can be a more important mechanism for oxygen supply than gas or liquid advection. Acidification, mobilization of metals, and alteration of primary minerals mostly take place in unsaturated zone (oxidizing), while precipitation of secondary minerals mainly occurs in saturated zone (reducing). The water table may be considered as an interface between oxidizing and reducing zones. Moving water table due to change of infiltration results in moving oxidizing zone and redistributing aqueous chemical constitutes and secondary mineral deposits. The oxidative weathering processes are difficult to model numerically, because concentrations of redox sensitive chemical species such as O{sub 2}(aq), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and HS{sup -} may change over tens of orders of magnitude between oxidizing and reducing

  5. Genesis of superimposed hypogene and supergene Fe orebodies in BIF at the Madoonga deposit, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duuring, Paul; Hagemann, Steffen

    2013-03-01

    The Madoonga iron ore body hosted by banded iron formation (BIF) in the Weld Range greenstone belt of Western Australia is a blend of four genetically and compositionally distinct types of high-grade (>55 wt% Fe) iron ore that includes: (1) hypogene magnetite-talc veins, (2) hypogene specular hematite-quartz veins, (3) supergene goethite-hematite, and (4) supergene-modified, goethite-hematite-rich detrital ores. The spatial coincidence of these different ore types is a major factor controlling the overall size of the Madoonga ore body, but results in a compositionally heterogeneous ore deposit. Hypogene magnetite-talc veins that are up to 3 m thick and 50 m long formed within mylonite and shear zones located along the limbs of isoclinal, recumbent F1 folds. Relative to least-altered BIF, the magnetite-talc veins are enriched in Fe2O3(total), P2O5, MgO, Sc, Ga, Al2O3, Cl, and Zr; and depleted in SiO2 and MnO2. Mafic igneous countryrocks located within 10 m of the northern contact of the mineralised BIF display the replacement of primary igneous amphibole and plagioclase, and metamorphic chlorite by hypogene ferroan chlorite, talc, and magnetite. Later-forming, hypogene specular hematite-quartz veins and their associated alteration halos partly replace magnetite-talc veins in BIF and formed during, to shortly after, the F2-folding and tilting of the Weld Range tectono-stratigraphy. Supergene goethite-hematite ore zones that are up to 150 m wide, 400 m long, and extend to depths of 300 m replace least-altered BIF and existing hypogene alteration zones. The supergene ore zones formed as a result of the circulation of surface oxidised fluids through late NNW- to NNE-trending, subvertical brittle faults. Flat-lying, supergene goethite-hematite-altered, detrital sediments are concentrated in a paleo-topographic depression along the southern side of the main ENE-trending ridge at Madoonga. Iron ore deposits of the Weld Range greenstone belt record remarkably similar

  6. Hemoglobin and B-type natriuretic peptide preoperative values but not inflammatory markers, are associated with postoperative morbidity in cardiac surgery: a prospective cohort analytic study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Risk stratification in cardiac surgery significantly impacts outcome. This study seeks to define whether there is an independent association between the preoperative serum level of hemoglobin (Hb), leukocyte count (LEUCO), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), or B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and postoperative morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery. Methods Prospective, analytic cohort study, with 554 adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in a tertiary cardiovascular hospital and followed up for 12 months. The cohort was distributed according to preoperative values of Hb, LEUCO, hsCRP, and BNP in independent quintiles for each of these variables. Results After adjustment for all covariates, a significant association was found between elevated preoperative BNP and the occurrence of low postoperative cardiac output (OR 3.46, 95% CI 1.53–7.80, p = 0.003) or postoperative atrial fibrillation (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.45–10.38). For the combined outcome (death/acute coronary syndrome/rehospitalization within 12 months), we observed an OR of 1.93 (95% CI 1.00–3.74). An interaction was found between BNP level and the presence or absence of diabetes mellitus. The OR for non-diabetics was 1.26 (95% CI 0.61–2.60) and for diabetics was 18.82 (95% CI 16.2–20.5). Preoperative Hb was also significantly and independently associated with the occurrence of postoperative low cardiac output (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.13–0.81, p = 0.016). Both Hb and BNP were significantly associated with the lengths of intensive care unit and hospital stays and the number of transfused red blood cells (p < 0.002). Inflammatory markers, although associated with adverse outcomes, lost statistical significance when adjusted for covariates. Conclusions High preoperative BNP or low Hb shows an association of independent risk with postoperative outcomes, and their measurement could help to stratify surgical risk. The ability to predict the onset of atrial fibrillation or

  7. A CCL chemokine-derived peptide (CDIP-2) exerts anti-inflammatory activity via CCR1, CCR2 and CCR3 chemokine receptors: Implications as a potential therapeutic treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Enríquez, E; Medina-Tamayo, J; Soldevila, G; Fortoul, T I; Anton, B; Flores-Romo, L; García-Zepeda, E A

    2014-05-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of eosinophils, Th2 cells and mononuclear cells in the airways, leading to changes in lung architecture and subsequently reduced respiratory function. We have previously demonstrated that CDIP-2, a chemokine derived peptide, reduced in vitro chemotaxis and decreased cellular infiltration in a murine model of allergic airway inflammation. However, the mechanisms involved in this process have not been identified yet. Now, we found that CDIP-2 reduces chemokine-mediated functions via interactions with CCR1, CCR2 and CCR3. Moreover, using bone marrow-derived eosinophils, we demonstrated that CDIP-2 modifies the calcium fluxes induced by CCL11 and down-modulated CCR3 expression. Finally, CDIP-2 treatment in a murine model of OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation reduced leukocyte recruitment and decreases production of cytokines. These data suggest that chemokine-derived peptides represent new therapeutic tools to generate more effective antiinflammatory drugs. PMID:24560857

  8. Persistency-field Eh-pH diagrams for sulfides and their application to supergene oxidation and enrichment of sulfide ore bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sato, M.

    1992-01-01

    At temperatures prevailing near the Earth's surface, metastable co-existence of chemical substances is common because chemical reactions that would directly lead to the attainment of thermody-namically most stable equilibria are often blocked by high activation energy barriers. The persistency of a metastable assemblage is then governed by alternative reaction paths that provide lower activation energy barriers. Comparison of observed mineral assemblages in the supergene oxidized and enriched sulfide ores with corresponding stability Eh-pH diagrams reveals that the supergene assemblages are mostly metastable due primarily to the persistency of sulfide minerals beyond stability boundaries. A new set of diagrams called persistency-field Eh-pH diagrams has been constructed for binary metal sulfides on the basis of electrochemical and other experimental data. Each diagram delineates the persistency field, which is a combined field of thermodynamic stability and reaction path-controlled metastability, for a specific sulfide mineral. When applied to the supergene assemblages, these new diagrams show much better correspondence to the field observations. Although there may still be room for further refinement, the new diagrams appear to provide a strong visual aid to the understanding of the behavior of sulfide minerals in the supergene conditions. ?? 1992.

  9. The Bi'r Tawilah deposit, central western Saudi Arabia: Supergene enrichment of a Pan-African epithermal gold mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surour, Adel A.; Harbi, Hesham M.; Ahmed, Ahmed H.

    2014-01-01

    The Bi'r Tawilah gold deposit in central western Saudi Arabia represents a Pan-African example of gold mineralization in which both hypogene and supergene ores are recorded. The sulphidic gold ore is hosted in intermediate to felsic intrusions that occur along the N-S trending thrust-fault zone within the so-called “Nabitah orogenic zone”. There are four rock units present (from oldest to youngest): serpentinites and related listwaenites, diorites, granitic rocks and porphyries. Hydrothermal alteration consists of chloritization, sericitization, carbonatization and silicification and affects all rock types. Chloritization of biotite results in abundant rutile, whereas sulphidization coincides with carbonatization. The Bi'r Tawilah ore is confined to NW-trending shears (Riedel fractures) related to N-S slip of the pre-existing Tawilah thrust due to activation within the Najd fault system. Samples from the boreholes show macro- and microscopic evidence of shearing such as micro-shear planes and strain shadows of pyrite. Sulphides and gold are present in most rock types. Paragenetically, the sulphides consist of abundant pyrite and relatively lesser amounts of arsenopyrite, in addition to very minor chalcopyrite, sphalerite and galena. In all boreholes, it was noticed that the abundance of arsenopyrite increases with depth. The elevated silver content of electrum (∼13-22 wt%) at Bi'r Tawilah is typical of gold deposits and low-sulphidation epithermal deposits. The early mineralization stage took place in proximity to hydrothermally altered intermediate to felsic intrusions. The aerially restricted hydrothermal alteration by carbon-aqueous fluids led to ore remobilization in which gold amounts up to 4.3 g/t. Finally, gold enrichment (up to 5.4 g/t) resulted from supergene alteration that took place during weathering above the water table at a depth of ∼20-25 m.

  10. Single Chain Recombinant HLA-DQ2.5/peptide Molecules Block α2-gliadin-Specific Pathogenic CD4+ T Cell Proliferation and Attenuate Production of Inflammatory Cytokines: A Potential Therapy for Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huan, J; Meza-Romero, R; Mooney, J L; Vandenbark, A A; Offner, H; Burrows, G G

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related proteins in barley and rye. CD4+ T cells play a central role in CD, recognizing and binding complexes of HLA-DQ2.5 bearing gluten peptides that have survived digestion and that are deamidated by tissue transglutaminase (TG2), propagating a cascade of inflammatory processes that damage and eventually destroy the villous tissue structures of the small intestine. Here we present data showing that recombinant DQ2.5-derived molecules bearing covalently tethered α2-gliadin-61-71 peptide have a remarkable ability to block antigen-specific T cell proliferation and inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in human DQ2.5-restricted α2-gliadin specific T cell clones obtained from patients with celiac disease. The results from our in vitro studies suggest that HLA-DQ2.5 derived molecules could significantly inhibit and perhaps reverse the intestinal pathology caused by T cell mediated inflammation and the associated production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:20736999

  11. Liquid Crystalline Nanodispersions Functionalized with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Topical Delivery of Short-Interfering RNAs: A Proposal for Silencing a Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine in Cutaneous Diseases.

    PubMed

    Petrilli, R; Eloy, J O; Praça, F S G; Del Ciampo, J O; Fantini, M A C; Fonseca, M J V; Bentley, M V L B

    2016-05-01

    Short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are a potential strategy for the treatment of cutaneous diseases. In this context, liquid crystalline nanoparticles functionalized with specific proteins and peptide-transduction domains (PTDs), which act as penetration enhancers, are a promising carrier for siRNA delivery through the skin. Herein, hexagonal phase liquid crystal nanoparticles based on monoolein (MO) and/or oleic acid (OA) containing (or lacking) the cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) and the cationic lipid oleylamine (OAM) were functionalized with the membrane transduction peptides transcriptional activator (TAT) or penetratin (PNT). These nanoparticles were complexed with siRNA and characterized by particle size, polydispersity, zeta potential, complexation efficiency and siRNA release. The formulations containing cationic agents presented positive zeta potentials, sizes on the nanometer scale, and complexed siRNAs at concentrations of 10 μM; these agents were successfully released in a heparin competition assay. Cell culture studies demonstrated that nanoparticles composed of MO:OA:PEI functionalized with TAT were the most efficient at transfecting L929 cells, and the uptake efficiency was enhanced by TAT peptide functionalization. Thereafter, the selected formulations were evaluated for in vivo skin irritation, penetration and in vivo efficacy using a chemically induced inflammatory animal model. These nanoparticles did not irritate the skin and provided higher siRNA penetration and delivery into the skin than control formulations. Additionally, efficacy studies in the animal model showed that the association of TAT with the nanodispersion provided higher suppression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Thus, the development of liquid crystalline nanodispersions containing TAT may lead to improved topical siRNA delivery for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:27305826

  12. Antinociceptive effects of analgesic-antitumor peptide (AGAP), a neurotoxin from the scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch, on formalin-induced inflammatory pain through a mitogen-activated protein kinases-dependent mechanism in mice.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qinghong; Ruan, Jiaping; Cai, Xueting; Lu, Wuguang; Ye, Juan; Yang, Jie; Yang, Yang; Sun, Xiaoyan; Cao, Junli; Cao, Peng

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-nociceptive effect and the underlying mechanism of the analgesic-antitumor peptide (AGAP), a neurotoxin from the scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch. AGAP in doses of 0.2, 1 and 5 µg was injected intraplantarly (i.pl.) before formalin injection 10 min at the same site. The suppression by intraplantar injection of AGAP on formalin-induced spontaneous nociceptive behaviors was investigated. The results show that AGAP could dose-dependently inhibit formalin-induced two-phase spontaneous flinching response. To investigate the mechanism of action of treatment with AGAP in inflammatory pain, the expressions of peripheral and spinal phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (phospho-MAPKs) including p-p38, p-ERK and p-JNK were examined. We found that formalin increased the expressions of peripheral and spinal MAPKs, which were prevented by pre-intraplantar injection of AGAP in inflammation pain model in mice. AGAP could also decrease the expression of spinal Fos induced by formalin. Furthermore, combinations the lower doses of the inhibitors of MAPKs (U0126, SP600125, or SB203580 0.1 µg) with the lower dose of AGAP (0.2 µg), the results suggested that AGAP could potentiate the effects of the inhibitors of MAPKs on the inflammatory pain. The present results indicate that pre-intraplantar injection of AGAP prevents the inflammatory pain induced by formalin through a MAPKs-mediated mechanism in mice. PMID:24244296

  13. Extreme 34S depletions in ZnS at the Mike gold deposit, Carlin Trend, Nevada: Evidence for bacteriogenic supergene sphalerite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bawden, T.M.; Einaudi, M.T.; Bostick, B.C.; Meibom, A.; Wooden, J.; Norby, J.W.; Orobona, M.J.T.; Chamberlain, C.P.

    2003-01-01

    We identified submicrometer-sized framboidal sphalerite (ZnS) below the base of supergene oxidation in a Carlin-type gold deposit of Eocene age in Nevada, United States, where the framboidal sphalerite forms a blanket-like body containing >400,000 metric tons of zinc. Framboidal sphalerite <0.1 ??m in diameter, formed in the early Miocene, ranges from <0.1 to 0.35 mol% FeS; the ??34S values range from -25??? to -70???, the lowest values measured in a marine or terrestrial environment. These S isotope data demonstrate the involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria and provide the first documentation that sphalerite can form significant supergene sulfide-enrichment blankets.

  14. Extreme 34S depletions in ZnS at the Mike gold deposit, Carlin Trend, Nevada: Evidence for bacteriogenic supergene sphalerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawden, Thomas M.; Einaudi, Marco T.; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Meibom, Anders; Wooden, Joseph; Norby, John W.; Orobona, Michael J. T.; Page Chamberlain, C.

    2003-10-01

    We identified submicrometer-sized framboidal sphalerite (ZnS) below the base of supergene oxidation in a Carlin-type gold deposit of Eocene age in Nevada, United States, where the framboidal sphalerite forms a blanket-like body containing >400,000 metric tons of zinc. Framboidal sphalerite <0.1 μm in diameter, formed in the early Miocene, ranges from <0.1 to 0.35 mol% FeS; the δ34S values range from -25‰ to -70‰, the lowest values measured in a marine or terrestrial environment. These S isotope data demonstrate the involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria and provide the first documentation that sphalerite can form significant supergene sulfide-enrichment blankets.

  15. Authigenic heavy minerals a clue to unravel supergene and hypogene alteration of marine and continental sediments of Triassic to Cretaceous age (SE Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Harald G.

    2010-05-01

    Siliciclastic continental-marine sediments of Triassic through Jurassic age, resting unconformably on the crystalline rocks of the Central European Variscides, and marine-(deltaic) sediments of Cretaceous age deposited in a narrow embankment are well exposed in the Wackersdorf area, SE Germany. These sediments were investigated for their variegated spectrum of authigenic heavy minerals (HM) and heavy mineral (HM) aggregates, the majority of which belongs to the (semi)opaque group of minerals, using petrographic and ore microscopy, supplemented by SEM-EDX and by EMPA. These HMs originated from supergene (weathering + diagenesis) and hypogene alteration (hydrothermal processes related to faults and unconformities). The physical and chemical conditions during which these authigenic minerals developed are discussed by means of Eh-pH diagrams under different temperature conditions (< 200 °C). Minerals indicative of supergene alteration in these sediments are apatite, Fe-Mn "limonite", barite, ankerite, Fe-(Ni) sulfides and Pb-Cu-Zn sulfides. The ilmenite-pseudorutile-anatase series may be used as a measure for the intensity of supergene alteration under rising oxygen fugacity. Pseudorutile and anatase also formed during hypogene alteration, and developed different crystal morphologies compared with their supergene counterparts found in the above series. The authigenic HM fluorite, barite, niccolite, acanthite, silver, bravoite, Ni marcasite, pyrite, sphalerite, galena, chalcopyrite, chalcocite and rhabdophane-(Ce) were produced by hypogene/ hydrothermal processes. The hypogene mineralization in the Mesozoic foreland sediments belongs to two types: (1) epi-mesothermal REE-F mineralization controlled by the structural reactivation along a deep-seated lineamentary fault zone, and (2) epithermal Ni-Cu-Zn-As-S mineralization related to the geohydraulic plane of the late Variscan unconformity/Permo-Triassic peneplain.

  16. The cell-penetrating peptide domain from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) has anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jue-Yeon; Seo, Yoo-Na; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yoon-Jeong; Chung, Chong-Pyoung

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP sequence identified from HB-EGF has cell penetration activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits the NF-{kappa}B dependent inflammatory responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP directly blocks phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. -- Abstract: A heparin-binding peptide (HBP) sequence from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) was identified and was shown to exhibit cell penetration activity. This cell penetration induced an anti-inflammatory reaction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. HBP penetrated the cell membrane during the 10 min treatment and reduced the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cytokines (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, HBP inhibited the LPS-induced upregulation of cytokines, including TNF-{alpha} and IL-6, and decreased the interstitial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a lung inflammation model. HBP inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent inflammatory responses by directly blocking the phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and by subsequently inhibiting the nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, this novel HBP may be potentially useful candidate for anti-inflammatory treatments and can be combined with other drugs of interest to transport attached molecules into cells.

  17. Ac2-26 Mimetic Peptide of Annexin A1 Inhibits Local and Systemic Inflammatory Processes Induced by Bothrops moojeni Venom and the Lys-49 Phospholipase A2 in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Carla Patrícia; Ullah, Anwar; Arni, Raghuvir Krishnaswamy; Gil, Cristiane Damas; Oliani, Sonia Maria

    2015-01-01

    Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is an endogenous glucocorticoid regulated protein that modulates anti-inflammatory process and its therapeutic potential has recently been recognized in a range of systemic inflammatory disorders. The effect of the N-terminal peptide Ac2-26 of AnxA1 on the toxic activities of Bothrops moojeni crude venom (CV) and its myotoxin II (MjTX-II) were evaluated using a peritonitis rat model. Peritonitis was induced by the intraperitoneal injection of either CV or MjTX-II, a Lys-49 phospholipase A2. Fifteen minutes after the injection, the rats were treated with either Ac2-26 or PBS. Four hours later, the CV and MjTX-II-induced peritonitis were characterized by neutrophilia (in the peritoneal exudate, blood and mesentery) and increased number of mesenteric degranulated mast cells and macrophages. At 24 hours post-injection, the local inflammatory response was attenuated in the CV-induced peritonitis while the MjTX-II group exhibited neutrophilia (peritoneal exudates and blood). Ac2-26 treatment prevented the influx of neutrophils in MjTX-II–induced peritonitis and diminished the proportion of mesenteric degranulated mast cells and macrophages in CV-induced peritonitis. Additionally, CV and MjTX-II promoted increased levels of IL-1β and IL-6 in the peritoneal exudates which were significantly reduced after Ac2-26 treatment. At 4 and 24 hours, the endogenous expression of AnxA1 was upregulated in the mesenteric neutrophils (CV and MjTX-II groups) and mast cells (CV group). In the kidneys, CV and MjTX-II administrations were associated with an increased number of macrophages and morphological alterations in the juxtamedullary nephrons in proximal and distal tubules. Ac2-26 promoted significant recovery of the juxtamedullary structures, decreased the number of macrophages and diminished the AnxA1 in epithelial cells from distal tubules and renal capsules. Our results show that Ac2-26 treatment significantly attenuates local and systemic inflammatory

  18. Effects of exendin-4, a glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonist, on neutrophil count and inflammatory cytokines in a rat model of endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Yanay, Ofer; Bailey, Adam L; Kernan, Kelly; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Osborne, William R

    2015-01-01

    Background Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. A variety of strategies targeting modulation of the pro-inflammatory response associated with early sepsis have been reported without clinical success. GLP-1 enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In addition, it was shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. We hypothesized that treatment with exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, would attenuate inflammation and improve glucose control in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) rat model of inflammation. Methods Two-month-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of the following four groups: 1) treatment: intraperitoneal (IP) injection of LPS 10 mg/kg followed by exendin-4, 30 μg/kg, 10 minutes later; 2) control-1: IP injection of LPS 10 mg/kg, followed by normal saline (NS); 3) control-2: IP NS injection followed by exendin-4; 4) sham: IP injection of NS followed by another NS injection. Glucose concentration, total white blood count with absolute neutrophil count, and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine concentrations were measured at 0, 3, 6, and 10 hours following LPS injection. Results At 3 hours, rats injected with LPS developed neutropenia, elevated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and mild hypoglycemia. Treatment with exendin-4 significantly modulated neutropenia, and decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IFNγ). However, exendin-4 had no effect on IL-10 concentrations. LPS injection led to mild hypoglycemia, that was not observed in rats treated with exendin-4. Sham animals exhibited no significant change from baseline in all parameters. Conclusion In this LPS model of acute early phase inflammation, treatment with exendin-4 decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations without changing IL-10 blood levels and improved neutropenia. Following LPS injection, rats developed a tendency toward hypoglycemia that improved with exendin-4. Overall our data suggest that exogenous exendin-4

  19. Distribution and assessment of Pb in the supergene environment of the Huainan Coal Mining Area, Anhui, China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ting; Liu, Guijian; Zhou, Chuncai; Yuan, Zijiao; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing

    2014-08-01

    Coal mining area is highly subject to lead (Pb) pollution from coal mining activities. Several decades of coal mining and processing practices in dozens of coal mines in the Huainan Coal Mining Area (HCMA) have led to the accumulation of massive amounts of coal gangue, which piled in dumps. In order to investigate the impacts of coal gangue dumps on Pb level in the supergene media of the HCMA, a systematic sampling campaign comprising coal gangue, soil, wheat, and earthworm samples was conducted. The average Pb content in the coal mining area soil is 24 mg/kg, which is slightly higher than the associated coal gangues (23 mg/kg) and markedly higher than reference region soil (12.6 mg/kg). Soil in the HCMA present a slight to moderate Pb contamination, which might be related to the weathering and leaching of coal gangue dumps. Lateral distribution of Pb in HCMA soil differed among individual coal mines. The soil profile distribution of Pb depends on both natural and anthropogenic contributions. Average Pb content is higher in roots than in stems, leaves, and wheat husks, while the Pb level in seeds exceeded the maximum Pb allowance for foods (Maximum Levels of Contaminants in Foods of China, GB 2762-2012). Earthworms in the selected area are significantly enriched in Pb, suggesting higher bio-available Pb level in soil in the HCMA. PMID:24756412

  20. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects of Cecropin A(1-8)-Magainin2(1-12) hybrid peptide analog p5 against Malassezia furfur infection in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sunhyo; Choi, Soon-Yong; Acharya, Samudra; Chun, Young-Jin; Gurley, Catherine; Park, Yoonkyung; Armstrong, Cheryl A; Song, Peter I; Kim, Beom-Joon

    2011-08-01

    The lipophilic fungus Malassezia furfur (M. furfur) is a commensal microbe associated with several chronic diseases such as pityriasis versicolor, folliculitis, and seborrheic dermatitis. Because M. furfur-related diseases are difficult to treat and require prolonged use of medications, the treatment for M. furfur-related skin diseases is supposed to gain control over M. furfur growth and the inflammation associated with it, as well as to prevent secondary infections. In this study, we investigated the antifungal and anti-inflammatory effects of cecropin A(1-8)-magainin 2(1-12) hybrid peptide analog P5 on M. furfur. The minimal inhibitory concentration of P5 against M. furfur was 0.39 μM, making it 3-4 times more potent than commonly used antifungal agents such as ketoconazole (1.5 μM) or itraconazole (1.14 μM). P5 efficiently inhibited the expression of IL-8 and Toll-like receptor 2 in M. furfur-infected human keratinocytes without eukaryotic cytotoxicity at its fungicidal concentration. Moreover, P5 significantly downregulated NF-κB activation and intracellular calcium fluctuation, which are closely related with enhanced responses of keratinocyte inflammation induced by M. furfur infection. Taken together, these observations suggest P5 may be a potential therapeutic agent for M. furfur-associated human skin diseases because of its distinct antifungal and anti-inflammatory action. PMID:21593770

  1. Supergene destruction of a hydrothermal replacement alunite deposit at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah: Mineralogy, spectroscopic remote sensing, stable-isotope, and argon-age evidences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, C.G.; Rye, R.O.; Rockwell, B.W.; Kunk, M.J.; Councell, T.B.

    2005-01-01

    Big Rock Candy Mountain is a prominent center of variegated altered volcanic rocks in west-central Utah. It consists of the eroded remnants of a hypogene alunite deposit that, at ???21 Ma, replaced intermediate-composition lava flows. The alunite formed in steam-heated conditions above the upwelling limb of a convection cell that was one of at least six spaced at 3- to 4-km intervals around the margin of a monzonite stock. Big Rock Candy Mountain is horizontally zoned outward from an alunite core to respective kaolinite, dickite, and propylite envelopes. The altered rocks are also vertically zoned from a lower pyrite-propylite assemblage upward through assemblages successively dominated by hypogene alunite, jarosite, and hematite, to a flooded silica cap. This hydrothermal assemblage is undergoing natural destruction in a steep canyon downcut by the Sevier River in Marysvale Canyon. Integrated geological, mineralogical, spectroscopic remote sensing using AVIRIS data, Ar radiometric, and stable isotopic studies trace the hypogene origin and supergene destruction of the deposit and permit distinction of primary (hydrothermal) and secondary (weathering) processes. This destruction has led to the formation of widespread supergene gypsum in cross-cutting fractures and as surficial crusts, and to natrojarosite, that gives the mountain its buff coloration along ridges facing the canyon. A small spring, Lemonade Spring, with a pH of 2.6 and containing Ca, Mg, Si, Al, Fe, Mn, Cl, and SO4, also occurs near the bottom of the canyon. The 40Ar/39 Ar age (21.32??0.07 Ma) of the alunite is similar to that for other replacement alunites at Marysvale. However, the age spectrum contains evidence of a 6.6-Ma thermal event that can be related to the tectonic activity responsible for the uplift that led to the downcutting of Big Rock Candy Mountain by the Sevier River. This ???6.6 Ma event also is present in the age spectrum of supergene natrojarosite forming today, and probably dates

  2. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar analysis of supergene jarosite and alunite: Implications to the paleoweathering history of the western USA and West Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcelos, P.M.; Brimhall, G.H. ); Becker, T.A.; Renne, P.R. )

    1994-01-01

    Supergene alunite (KAl[sub 3](SO[sub 4])[sub 2](OH)[sub 6]) and jarosite (KFe[sub 3](SO[sub 4])[sub 2](OH)[sub 6]) are often precipitated during the oxidation of sulfide-bearing rocks by meteoric solutions. Dating of these phases by the [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar method allows timing of the progression of the oxidation front during chemical weathering. Fine-scale laser-heating [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of hypogene alunite and supergene jarosites allows to precisely and accurately time hydrothermal alteration and subsequent supergene oxidation in Goldfield, Nevada. The results indicate that pervasive weathering occurred in the western USA during the Late Miocene ([approximately] 10 Ma ago). Similar application of this technique to the study of weathering and laterite formation in West Africa indicates that the last pervasive oxidation event recorded in the weathering profile in this area also occurred in the Miocene ([approximately] 13 Ma ago). The occurrence of a pervasive Mid to Late Miocene oxidation event recorded in these weathering profiles in the western USA and Africa, and also previously measured in Brazil and Chile, indicates that climatic conditions at that time were conducive to worldwide development of deep weathering sequences. Subsequent weathering processes have not been as pervasive as the late Miocene event, indicating a general climatic transition to cooler, drier climates in most of the areas studied. The results indicate that deep weathering profiles reflect past climatic conditions and may not be directly linked to the present climates.

  3. Comparison of Two Assays to Determine Anti-Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies in Rheumatoid Arthritis in relation to Other Chronic Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases: Assaying Anti-Modified Citrullinated Vimentin Antibodies Adds Value to Second-Generation Anti-Citrullinated Cyclic Peptides Testing

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Toscano, Miriam Lizette; Olivas-Flores, Eva Maria; Zavaleta-Muñiz, Soraya Amali; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Ponce-Guarneros, Manuel; Castro-Contreras, Uriel; Nava, Arnulfo; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Celis, Alfredo; Fajardo-Robledo, Nicte Selene; Corona-Sanchez, Esther Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Determination of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) plays a relevant role in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To date, it is still unclear if the use of several tests for these autoantibodies in the same patient offers additional value as compared to performing only one test. Therefore, we evaluated the performance of using two assays for ACPA: second-generation anti-citrullinated cyclic peptides antibodies (anti-CCP2) and anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV) antibodies for the diagnosis of RA. We compared three groups: RA (n = 142), chronic inflammatory disease (CIRD, n = 86), and clinically healthy subjects (CHS, n = 56) to evaluate sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios (LR) of these two assays for the presence of RA. A lower frequency of positivity for anti-CCP2 was found in RA (66.2%) as compared with anti-MCV (81.0%). When comparing RA versus other CIRD, sensitivity increased when both assays were performed. This strategy of testing both assays had high specificity and LR+. We conclude that adding the assay of anti-MCV antibodies to the determination of anti-CCP2 increases the sensitivity for detecting seropositive RA. Therefore, we propose the use of both assays in the initial screening of RA in longitudinal studies, including early onset of undifferentiated arthritis. PMID:25025037

  4. Comparison of two assays to determine anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis in relation to other chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases: assaying anti-modified citrullinated vimentin antibodies adds value to second-generation anti-citrullinated cyclic peptides testing.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Toscano, Miriam Lizette; Olivas-Flores, Eva Maria; Zavaleta-Muñiz, Soraya Amali; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Ponce-Guarneros, Manuel; Castro-Contreras, Uriel; Nava, Arnulfo; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Celis, Alfredo; Fajardo-Robledo, Nicte Selene; Corona-Sanchez, Esther Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Determination of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) plays a relevant role in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To date, it is still unclear if the use of several tests for these autoantibodies in the same patient offers additional value as compared to performing only one test. Therefore, we evaluated the performance of using two assays for ACPA: second-generation anti-citrullinated cyclic peptides antibodies (anti-CCP2) and anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV) antibodies for the diagnosis of RA. We compared three groups: RA (n = 142), chronic inflammatory disease (CIRD, n = 86), and clinically healthy subjects (CHS, n = 56) to evaluate sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios (LR) of these two assays for the presence of RA. A lower frequency of positivity for anti-CCP2 was found in RA (66.2%) as compared with anti-MCV (81.0%). When comparing RA versus other CIRD, sensitivity increased when both assays were performed. This strategy of testing both assays had high specificity and LR+. We conclude that adding the assay of anti-MCV antibodies to the determination of anti-CCP2 increases the sensitivity for detecting seropositive RA. Therefore, we propose the use of both assays in the initial screening of RA in longitudinal studies, including early onset of undifferentiated arthritis. PMID:25025037

  5. Vitamin D3 Suppresses Class II Invariant Chain Peptide Expression on Activated B-Lymphocytes: A Plausible Mechanism for Downregulation of Acute Inflammatory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Danner, Omar K.; Matthews, Leslie R.; Francis, Sharon; Rao, Veena N.; Harvey, Cassie P.; Tobin, Richard P.; Wilson, Ken L.; Alema-Mensah, Ernest; Newell Rogers, M. Karen; Childs, Ed W.

    2016-01-01

    Class II invariant chain peptide (CLIP) expression has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in the regulation of B cell function after nonspecific polyclonal expansion. Several studies have shown vitamin D3 helps regulate the immune response. We hypothesized that activated vitamin D3 suppresses CLIP expression on activated B-cells after nonspecific activation or priming of C57BL/6 mice with CpG. This study showed activated vitamin D3 actively reduced CLIP expression and decreased the number of CLIP+ B-lymphocytes in a dose and formulation dependent fashion. Flow cytometry was used to analyze changes in mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) based on changes in concentration of CLIP on activated B-lymphocytes after treatment with the various formulations of vitamin D3. The human formulation of activated vitamin D (calcitriol) had the most dramatic reduction in CLIP density at an MFI of 257.3 [baseline of 701.1 (P value = 0.01)]. Cholecalciferol and alfacalcidiol had no significant reduction in MFI at 667.7 and 743.0, respectively. Calcitriol seemed to best reduce CLIP overexpression in this ex vivo model. Bioactive vitamin D3 may be an effective compliment to other B cell suppression therapeutics to augment downregulation of nonspecific inflammation associated with many autoimmune disorders. Further study is necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:27313879

  6. Activation of IKK/NF-κB provokes renal inflammatory responses in guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhankar; Periyasamy, Ramu

    2012-01-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the consequences of the disruption of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene (Npr1) on proinflammatory responses of nuclear factor kappa B, inhibitory kappa B kinase, and inhibitory kappa B alpha (NF-κB, IKK, IκBα) in the kidneys of mutant mice. The results showed that the disruption of Npr1 enhanced the renal NF-κB binding activity by 3.8-fold in 0-copy (−/−) mice compared with 2-copy (+/+) mice. In parallel, IKK activity and IκBα protein phosphorylation were increased by 8- and 11-fold, respectively, in the kidneys of 0-copy mice compared with wild-type mice. Interestingly, IκBα was reduced by 80% and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis were significantly enhanced in 0-copy mice than 2-copy mice. Treatment of 0-copy mice with NF-κB inhibitors andrographolide, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and etanercept showed a substantial reduction in renal fibrosis, attenuation of proinflammatory cytokines gene expression, and significantly reduced IKK activity and IkBα phosphorylation. These findings indicate that the systemic disruption of Npr1 activates the renal NF-κB pathways in 0-copy mice, which transactivates the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines to initiate renal remodeling; however, inhibition of NF-κB pathway repairs the abnormal renal pathology in mutant mice. PMID:22318993

  7. Vitamin D3 Suppresses Class II Invariant Chain Peptide Expression on Activated B-Lymphocytes: A Plausible Mechanism for Downregulation of Acute Inflammatory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Danner, Omar K; Matthews, Leslie R; Francis, Sharon; Rao, Veena N; Harvey, Cassie P; Tobin, Richard P; Wilson, Ken L; Alema-Mensah, Ernest; Newell Rogers, M Karen; Childs, Ed W

    2016-01-01

    Class II invariant chain peptide (CLIP) expression has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in the regulation of B cell function after nonspecific polyclonal expansion. Several studies have shown vitamin D3 helps regulate the immune response. We hypothesized that activated vitamin D3 suppresses CLIP expression on activated B-cells after nonspecific activation or priming of C57BL/6 mice with CpG. This study showed activated vitamin D3 actively reduced CLIP expression and decreased the number of CLIP(+) B-lymphocytes in a dose and formulation dependent fashion. Flow cytometry was used to analyze changes in mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) based on changes in concentration of CLIP on activated B-lymphocytes after treatment with the various formulations of vitamin D3. The human formulation of activated vitamin D (calcitriol) had the most dramatic reduction in CLIP density at an MFI of 257.3 [baseline of 701.1 (P value = 0.01)]. Cholecalciferol and alfacalcidiol had no significant reduction in MFI at 667.7 and 743.0, respectively. Calcitriol seemed to best reduce CLIP overexpression in this ex vivo model. Bioactive vitamin D3 may be an effective compliment to other B cell suppression therapeutics to augment downregulation of nonspecific inflammation associated with many autoimmune disorders. Further study is necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:27313879

  8. Adiponectin-derived active peptide ADP355 exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic activities in thioacetamide-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huafeng; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Zimu; Huang, Biao; Cheng, Xixi; Wang, Dan; la Gahu, Zha; Xue, Zhenyi; Da, Yurong; Li, Daiqing; Yao, Zhi; Gao, Fei; Xu, Aimin; Zhang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived circulating protein with beneficial effects on injured livers. Adiponectin-deficient (adipo(−/−)) mice develop enhanced liver fibrosis, suggesting that adiponectin could be a therapeutic target for liver injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective role of ADP355, an adiponectin-based active short peptide, in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced acute injury and chronic liver fibrosis in mice. ADP355 remarkably reduced TAA-induced necroinflammation and liver fibrosis. ADP355 treatment increased liver glycogen, decreased serum alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase activity, and promoted body weight gain, hyper-proliferation and hypo-apoptosis. In addition, ADP355 administration suppressed the TAA-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells and macrophages in the liver. These were associated with the inactivation of TGF-β1/SMAD2 signaling and the promotion of AMPK and STAT3 signaling. Sensitivity of adipo(−/−) mice to chronic liver injury was decreased with ADP355. In conclusion, ADP355 could mimic adiponectin’s action and may be suitable for the preclinical or clinical therapy of chronic liver injury. PMID:26777428

  9. Adiponectin-derived active peptide ADP355 exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic activities in thioacetamide-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huafeng; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Zimu; Huang, Biao; Cheng, Xixi; Wang, Dan; la Gahu, Zha; Xue, Zhenyi; Da, Yurong; Li, Daiqing; Yao, Zhi; Gao, Fei; Xu, Aimin; Zhang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived circulating protein with beneficial effects on injured livers. Adiponectin-deficient (adipo(-/-)) mice develop enhanced liver fibrosis, suggesting that adiponectin could be a therapeutic target for liver injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective role of ADP355, an adiponectin-based active short peptide, in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced acute injury and chronic liver fibrosis in mice. ADP355 remarkably reduced TAA-induced necroinflammation and liver fibrosis. ADP355 treatment increased liver glycogen, decreased serum alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase activity, and promoted body weight gain, hyper-proliferation and hypo-apoptosis. In addition, ADP355 administration suppressed the TAA-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells and macrophages in the liver. These were associated with the inactivation of TGF-β1/SMAD2 signaling and the promotion of AMPK and STAT3 signaling. Sensitivity of adipo(-/-) mice to chronic liver injury was decreased with ADP355. In conclusion, ADP355 could mimic adiponectin's action and may be suitable for the preclinical or clinical therapy of chronic liver injury. PMID:26777428

  10. The status of supergenes in the 21st century: recombination suppression in Batesian mimicry and sex chromosomes and other complex adaptations.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    I review theoretical models for the evolution of supergenes in the cases of Batesian mimicry in butterflies, distylous plants and sex chromosomes. For each of these systems, I outline the genetic evidence that led to the proposal that they involve multiple genes that interact during 'complex adaptations', and at which the mutations involved are not unconditionally advantageous, but show advantages that trade-off against some disadvantages. I describe recent molecular genetic studies of these systems and questions they raise about the evolution of suppressed recombination. Nonrecombining regions of sex chromosomes have long been known, but it is not yet fully understood why recombination suppression repeatedly evolved in systems in distantly related taxa, but does not always evolve. Recent studies of distylous plants are tending to support the existence of recombination-suppressed genome regions, which may include modest numbers of genes and resemble recently evolved sex-linked regions. For Batesian mimicry, however, molecular genetic work in two butterfly species suggests a new supergene scenario, with a single gene mutating to produce initial adaptive phenotypes, perhaps followed by modifiers specifically refining and perfecting the new phenotype. PMID:27087840

  11. [Biomarkers for chronic inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Holzinger, D; Föll, D

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory disorders of childhood, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are a challenge for laboratory diagnostics. Firstly, the classical inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) often inadequately reflect disease activity but on the other hand there are few specific biomarkers that can be helpful in managing these diseases. Acute phase proteins reflect the systemic inflammatory response insufficiently as their increase is only the indirect result of local inflammatory processes. Modern inflammation diagnostics aim to reflect these local processes and to allow precise monitoring of disease activity. Experimental biomarkers, such as S100 proteins can detect subclinical inflammatory activity. In addition, established laboratory parameters exist for JIA [antinuclear antibodies (ANA), rheumatoid factor (RF), antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP)] and for chronic IBD (fecal calprotectin) that are useful in the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26608264

  12. Timing and duration of supergene mineralization at the Xinrong manganese deposit, western Guangdong Province, South China: cryptomelane 40Ar/39Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Wei; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Xiao-Dong; Duzgoren-Aydin, Nurdan; Yan, Dai-Rong; Zhang, Jian-Qiang; Hu, Ming-An

    2007-04-01

    Supergene Mn-oxide deposits are widely distributed in Guangxi, Guangdong, Yunnan, and Hunan Provinces, South China, accounting for 18% of the total Mn reserves in the country. Direct dating of supergene Mn enrichment, however, is lacking. In this paper, we present high-resolution 40Ar/39Ar ages of Mn oxides from the Xinrong Mn deposit, western Guangdong, to place numerical constraints on the timing and duration of supergene Mn enrichment. A total of ten cryptomelane samples, spanning a vertical extent of 67 m, were dated using the 40Ar/39Ar laser incremental heating technique, with seven samples yielding well-defined plateau or pseudo-plateau ages ranging from 23.48 ± 0.91 to 2.06 ± 0.05 Ma (2 σ). One sample yields a staircase spectrum that does not reach a plateau; the spectrum, however, indicates the presence of two or more generations of Mn oxides in the sample, whose ages are best estimated at 22.34 ± 0.31 and 10.2 ± 0.86 Ma, respectively. The remaining two samples gave meaningless or uninterpretable results due to significant 39Ar recoil and contamination by old phases. The 40Ar/39Ar data thus reveal a protracted history of weathering and supergene Mn enrichment that started at least in the end of the Oligocene or beginning of Miocene and extending into the latest Pliocene. Staircase-apparent age spectra, resulting from banded or botryoidal samples, yield an average growth rate of Mn oxides at 0.6-0.7 × 10-3 mm kyr-1. The values indicate that a 1-mm grain of Mn oxides may host minerals precipitated during a time span of ca. 1.5 m.y., and accumulation of Mn oxides to form economic deposits under weathering environments may take millions of years. The distribution of weathering ages shows that the oldest Mn oxides occur on the top of the profile, whereas the youngest minerals are found at the bottom, suggesting downward propagation of weathering fronts. However, two samples located at the intermediate depths of the profile yield ages comparable with those

  13. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  14. Direct dating of weathering phenomena by [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar and K-Ar analysis of supergene K-Mn oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcelos, P.M.; Brimhall, G.H. ); Renne, P.R.; Becker, T.A. )

    1994-03-01

    Potassium-bearing manganese oxides, cryptomelane, K[sub 1-2](Mn[sup 3+]Mn[sup 4+])[sub 8] O[sub 16] [center dot] xH[sub 2]O, and hollandite, (K,Ba)[sub 1-2](Mn[sup 3+],Mn[sup 4+])[sub 8] O[sub 16] [center dot] xH[sub 2]O, are often authigenically precipitated in weathering profiles. Dating of these phases allows timing of the progression of oxidation fronts during weathering and pedogenic processes. Potential problems in manganese oxide dating, such as Ar and/or K losses, excess argon, [sup 39]Ar loss by recoil during neutron irradiation, etc. are addressed. The K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar analytical results indicate that Ar and/or K losses, excess [sup 40]Ar, and [sup 39]Ar recoil seem not to pose problems in manganese oxide dating. This investigation suggests that the fine scale, laser-probe [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar technique is most appropriate for dating of weathering phenomena because this technique permits identification of contaminating phases and the presence of multiple generations of weathering minerals in the inherently complex mineral assemblage characteristic of weathering profiles. K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of supergene K-bearing manganese oxides formed during lateritization of Archean and Proterozoic bedrocks in the Carajas Region, Amazonia, Brazil, indicates that weathering started before 72 [+-] 6 Ma. Petrographic, electron microscope, and electron microprobe investigation reveal multiple generations of manganese oxide precipitation. Age clusters at 65-69, 51-56, 40-43, 33-35, 20, 24, 12-17 Ma, and zero-age (0.2 [+-] 0.2 Ma) suggest episodic precipitation of K-Mn oxides resulting form changing weathering conditions in the Amazon throughout the Cenozoic. K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of supergene cryptomelane from weathering profiles in eastern Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, suggests continuous weathering from 10 to 5.6 Ma ago, possibly reflecting local climatic conditions due to the proximity with the Atlantic Ocean.

  15. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  16. Age and mineralogy of supergene uranium minerals — Tools to unravel geomorphological and palaeohydrological processes in granitic terrains (Bohemian Massif, SE Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, H. G.; Gerdes, A.; Weber, B.

    2010-04-01

    Uranyl phosphates (torbernite, autunite, uranocircite, saleeite) and hydrated uranyl silicates (normal and beta-uranophane) found in various erosion levels and structures in the Late Variscan granites at the western edge of the Bohemian Massif, Germany, were the target of mineralogical investigations and age dating, using conventional and more advanced techniques such as Laser-Ablation-Inductive-Coupled-Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Supergene U minerals have an edge over other rock-forming minerals for such studies, because of their inherent ‘clock’ and their swift response to chemical and physical environmental changes on different scales. Uraniferous phoscretes and silcretes, can be used to characterize the alkalinity/acidity of meteoric/per descensum fluids and to constrain the redox conditions during geomorphic processes. This study aims to decipher the geomorphological and palaeohydrological regime that granitic rocks of the Central European Variscides (Moldanubian and Saxothuringian zones) went through during the Neogene and Quaternary in the foreland of the rising Alpine mobile fold belt. The study provides an amendment to the current sub-division of the regolith by introducing the term “hydraulith”, made up of percolation and infiltration zones, for the supergene alteration zone in granitic terrains. It undercuts the regolith at the brink of the phreatic to vadose hydrological zones. Based upon the present geomorphological and mineralogical studies a four-stage model is proposed for the evolution of the landscape in a granitic terrain which might also be applicable to other regions of the European Variscides, considering the hydrological facies changes along with paleocurrent and paleoslope in the basement and the development of the fluvial drainage system in the foreland. Stage I (U mineralization in the infiltration zone) is a mirror image of the relic granitic landscape with high-altitude divides and alluvial-fluvial terraces. Its

  17. Fast formation of supergene Mn oxides/hydroxides under acidic conditions in the oxic/anoxic transition zone of a shallow aquifer.

    PubMed

    Schäffner, F; Merten, D; Pollok, K; Wagner, S; Knoblauch, S; Langenhorst, F; Büchel, G

    2015-12-01

    Extensive uranium mining in the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) in eastern Thuringia and Saxony took place during the period of 1946-1990. During mining activities, pelitic sediments rich in organic carbon and uranium were processed and exposed to oxygen. Subsequent pyrite oxidation and acidic leaching lead to partial contamination of the area with heavy metals and acid mine drainage (AMD) even few years after completion of remediation. One of those areas is the former heap Gessen (Ronneburg, Germany) were the residual contamination can be found 10 m under the base of the former heap containing partly permeable drainage channels. Actually, in such a system, a rapid but locally restricted mineralization of Mn oxides takes place under acidic conditions. This formation can be classified as a natural attenuation process as certain heavy metals, e.g., Cd (up to 6 μg/g), Ni (up to 311 μg/g), Co (up to 133 μg/g), and Zn (up to 104 μg/g) are bound to this phases. The secondary minerals occur as colored layers close to the shallow aquifer in glacial sediments and could be identified as birnessite and todorokite as Mn phase. The thermodynamic model shows that even small changes in the system are sufficient to shift either the pH or the Eh in the direction of stable Mn oxide phases in this acidic system. As a consequence of 9-15-year-long formation process (or even less), the supergene mineralization provides a cost-efficient contribution for remediation (natural attenuation) strategies of residual with heavy metals (e.g., Cd, Co, Ni, Zn) contaminated substrates. PMID:25822842

  18. Chemical and physical erosion rhythms of the West African Cenozoic morphogenesis: The 39Ar-40Ar dating of supergene K-Mn oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, Anicet; Ruffet, Gilles; HéNocque, Olivier; Colin, Fabrice

    2008-12-01

    Chemical weathering and mechanical erosion are first-order processes of long-term tropical morphogenesis, which is still poorly deciphered for lack of time constraints. We address this issue by laser probe 39Ar-40Ar dating of generations of cryptomelane [K1-2Mn8O16, nH2O] from the manganese ore deposit of Tambao in northern Burkina Faso. This Mn deposit results from the supergene weathering of carbonate and silicate Mn protores underneath lateritic palaeolandsurfaces. It consists of an upper cryptomelane-rich domain and a lower domain where pyrolusite (β-MnO2) is the dominant Mn oxide. The oldest 39Ar-40Ar ages (59-45 Ma) are obtained on surface outcrops while the youngest ones characterize deep oxidation fronts (3.4-2.9 Ma). Apparent correlations of 39Ar-40Ar age groups with δ18O and eustatic curves allow definition of the different stages of morphogenesis. Paleocene-Eocene ages (59-45 Ma) bracket a greenhouse period propitious to bauxitic weathering. The lack of significant ages between ˜45 and 29 Ma characterizes a period dominated by mechanical erosion, during which detrital sediments, including lateritic materials, were accumulated in intracratonic basins allowing the exhumation of a new lateritic landsurface. Two major weathering periods separated by a second erosion episode (24-18 Ma) are also depicted at the end of Oligocene (29-24 Ma) and lower to mid-Miocene (18-11.5 Ma) in the upper domain, during which newly shaped land surfaces conspicuously weathered. The shorter-weathering and erosion episodes recorded in the lower domain from ˜18 to ˜2.9 Ma led to the final geomorphic changes that were conducive to the formation of glacis. The preservation of old cryptomelane (59-45 Ma) in the upper part of the ore deposit indicates a Cenozoic denudation limited to the erosion of previous bauxites, and partly, of ferricretes.

  19. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.

    2009-10-13

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  20. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  1. Criteria for the recognition of pedogenic/supergene and nonpedogenic/hypogene deposits and their relationship to the origin of calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain. Special report No. 14

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.; Monger, H.C.

    1993-10-01

    This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. The purpose of this report is to try and establish criteria for the recognition of pedogenic/supergene deposits of calcite/opal versus non-pedogenic/hypogene deposits of calcite/opal. Far from being of esoteric concern, this subject is of paramount importance to the pedogenic-hypogene debate which rages around the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a high-level radioactive waste repository site.

  2. Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of a serpentinite-derived laterite profile from East Sulawesi, Indonesia: Implications for the lateritization process and Ni supergene enrichment in the tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei; Yang, Jianwen; Yang, Mengli; Pang, Baocheng; Liu, Xijun; Niu, Hujie; Huang, Xiaorong

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the lateritization process and supergene Ni enrichment in the tropical rainforest, a well developed laterite profile over the serpentinite in the Kolonodale area of East Sulawesi, Indonesia, has been investigated using field geology methods, mineralogical and geochemical techniques. Three lithostratigraphic horizons over the bedrock are distinguished from bottom to top: the saprolite horizon, the limonite horizon, and the ferruginous cap. In general, the profile is characterized by (1) a depth-related pH ranging from 5.56 to 8.56, with a higher value in the saprolite horizon and a lower value in the ferruginous cap, (2) a highly variable organic matter concentration from 1.11% to 4.82%, showing a increasing trend from bottom to top, (3) a progressive mineral assemblage transition from the silicate mineral dominant (mainly serpentine) to the Fe-oxyhydroxide dominant (mainly goethite), and (4) a typical laterite geochemical pattern with an increase of Fe, Al, Mn, Cr and Ti but a decrease of Mg, Ca, Na and K upward from the bedrock. The highest concentration of Ni (up to 11.53%NiO) occurs in the saprolite horizon, showing nearly 40 times richer compared to the bedrock. The mineral evolution during the lateritization process shows various paths from the primary minerals to altered minerals, which is integrally affected by the nature of the primary minerals and environmental conditions. Garnierite, as a significant ore mineral formed by the secondary precipitation processes in the study profile, is identified as a mixture of talc- and serpentine-like phases. The mass-balance calculation reveals that there are diversified elemental behaviors during the serpentinite lateritization under the rainforest conditions. In particular, Ni, as the ore-forming element in the laterite profile, is associated closely with the pH environment, organic matter concentration and mineral evolution during the lateritization process. The findings of the present study support a

  3. Mineralogical, chemical, and crystallographic properties of supergene jarosite-group minerals from the Xitieshan Pb-Zn sulfide deposit, northern Tibetan Plateau, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Lei; Li, Jian-Wei; Rye, Robert O.; Benzel, William H.; Lowers, H.A.; He, Ming-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Supergene jarosite-group minerals are widespread in weathering profiles overlying Pb-Zn sulfide ores at Xitieshan, northern Tibetan Plateau, China. They consist predominantly of K-deficient natrojarosite, with lesser amounts of K-rich natrojarosite and plumbojarosite. Electron microprobe (EMP) analyses, scanning electron microcopy (SEM) investigation, and X-ray mapping reveal that the jarosite-group minerals are characterized by spectacular oscillatory zoning composed of alternating growth bands of K-deficient and K-bearing natrojarosite (K2O >1 wt.%). Plumbojarosite, whenever present, occurs as an overgrowth in the outermost bands, and its composition can be best represented by K0.29Na0.19Pb0.31Fe2.66Al0.22(SO4)1.65(PO4)0.31(AsO4)0.04(OH)7.37. The substitution of monovalent for divalent cations at the A site of plumbojarosite is charge balanced by the substitution of five-valent for six-valent anions in XO,4/sub> at the X site. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of representative samples reveal mass losses of 11.46 wt.% at 446.6 °C and 21.42 wt.% at 683.4 °C due to dehydroxylation and desulfidation, respectively. TGA data also indicate that the natrojarosite structure collapses at 446.6 °C, resulting in the formation of NaFe(SO4)2 and minor hematite. The decomposition products of NaFe(SO4) are hematite and Na,2SO4. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses show that the jarosite-group minerals have mean unit-cell parameters of a=7.315 ä and c=016.598 ä. XRD and EMP data support the view that substitutions of Na for K in the A site and full Fe occupancy in the B site can considerably decrease the unit-cell parameter c, but only slightly increase a. The results from this study suggest that the observed oscillatory zoning of jarosite-group minerals at Xitieshan resulted mainly from substitutions of K for Na at the A site and P for S at the X site.

  4. Time constraints on post-rift evolution of the Southwest Indian passive margin from ^{40}Ar-^{39Ar dating of supergene K-Mn oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Arnaud, Nicolas; Beauvais, Anicet; Chardon, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    The high-elevation passive margin of Southwest India is marked by the Western Ghats escarpment, which separates the coastal domain from the low-relief East-dipping Mysore plateau. The escarpment has evolved from the Seychelles rifting at ~ 63 Ma following the Deccan traps volcanic event at ~ 65-63 Ma. This escarpment results from differential erosion processes across the passive margin, the rate and timing of which depend upon whether the margin has evolved according to a model of downwarped or rising flank topography. We explore the post-rift evolution of the South Indian passive margin through the characterisation of stepped relicts of lateritic paleosurfaces across that margin, and notably by 40Ar-39Ar dating of in-situ formed K-Mn oxides in supergene Mn-ore deposits carried by these paleosurfaces. The genesis and maturation of Mn-ore deposits are generally linked to progressive weathering processes of the paleosurfaces, which expose them. Dating of K-Mn oxides thus document the timing of these processes [1], and potentially the ages of the altered paleosurface. Moreover, the elevation differences between successive lateritic paleosurfaces of different ages may provide denudation rates for the considered time spans. Previous work (e.g., [2]) and our own field investigations, allow identifying three main lateritic paleosurfaces on the plateau at altitude ranges of 1000-900 m (S2), 900-800 m (S3) and 800-700 m (S3d), and a lower paleosurface in the coastal domain at 150-50 m (S4). K-Mn oxides (cryptomelane) were sampled in Mn ore deposits from different paleosurfaces, particularly in the coastal area around Goa on S4 and in Sandur and Shimoga Mn-ore deposits exposed on S2 and S3. The 40Ar-39Ar ages obtained from carefully characterised mineralogical assemblages range from ~ 26 to ~ 36 Ma in the Sandur Mn-ore deposit indicating intense lateritic weathering processes at the Eocene-Oligocene transition underneath paleosurface S2. Similar ages of ~ 24 and ~ 32 Ma are

  5. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Juan; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-01-11

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are a diverse class of naturally occurring molecules that are produced as a first line of defense by all multicellular organisms. These proteins can have broad activity to directly kill bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and even cancer cells. Insects and plants primarily deploy AMPs as an antibiotic to protect against potential pathogenic microbes, but microbes also produce AMPs to defend their environmental niche. In higher eukaryotic organisms, AMPs can also be referred to as 'host defense peptides', emphasizing their additional immunomodulatory activities. These activities are diverse, specific to the type of AMP, and include a variety of cytokine and growth factor-like effects that are relevant to normal immune homeostasis. In some instances, the inappropriate expression of AMPs can also induce autoimmune diseases, thus further highlighting the importance of understanding these molecules and their complex activities. This Primer will provide an update of our current understanding of AMPs. PMID:26766224

  6. Peptide arrays for screening cancer specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sahar; Mathews, Anu Stella; Byeon, Nara; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we describe a novel method to screen peptides for specific recognition by cancer cells. Seventy peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane in an array format, and a direct method to study the peptide-whole cell interaction was developed. The relative binding affinity of the cells for different peptides with respect to a lead 12-mer p160 peptide, identified by phage display, was evaluated using the CyQUANT fluorescence of the bound cells. Screening allowed identification of at least five new peptides that displayed higher affinity (up to 3-fold) for MDA-MB-435 and MCF-7 human cancer cells compared to the p160 peptide. These peptides showed very little binding to the control (noncancerous) human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Three of these peptides were synthesized separately and labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to study their uptake and interaction with the cancer and control cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. The results confirmed the high and specific affinity of an 11-mer peptide 11 (RGDPAYQGRFL) and a 10-mer peptide 18 (WXEAAYQRFL) for the cancer cells versus HUVECs. Peptide 11 binds different receptors on target cancer cells as its sequence contains multiple recognition motifs, whereas peptide 18 binds mainly to the putative p160 receptor. The peptide array-whole cell binding assay reported here is a complementary method to phage display for further screening and optimization of cancer targeting peptides for cancer therapy and diagnosis. PMID:20799711

  7. Inflammatory glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Bodh, Sonam A.; Kumar, Vasu; Raina, Usha K.; Ghosh, B.; Thakar, Meenakshi

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is seen in about 20% of the patients with uveitis. Anterior uveitis may be acute, subacute, or chronic. The mechanisms by which iridocyclitis leads to obstruction of aqueous outflow include acute, usually reversible forms (e.g., accumulation of inflammatory elements in the intertrabecular spaces, edema of the trabecular lamellae, or angle closure due to ciliary body swelling) and chronic forms (e.g., scar formation or membrane overgrowth in the anterior chamber angle). Careful history and follow-up helps distinguish steroid-induced glaucoma from uveitic glaucoma. Treatment of combined iridocyclitis and glaucoma involves steroidal and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents and antiglaucoma drugs. However, glaucoma drugs can often have an unpredictable effect on intraocular pressure (IOP) in the setting of uveitis. Surgical intervention is required in case of medical failure. Method of Literature Search: Literature on the Medline database was searched using the PubMed interface. PMID:21713239

  8. APL-2, an altered peptide ligand derived from heat-shock protein 60, induces interleukin-10 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell derived from juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients and downregulates the inflammatory response in collagen-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Norailys; Cantera, Dolores; Barberá, Ariana; Alonso, Amaris; Chall, Elsy; Franco, Lourdes; Ancizar, Julio; Nuñez, Yanetsy; Altruda, Fiorella; Silengo, Lorenzo; Padrón, Gabriel; Del Carmen Dominguez, Maria

    2015-02-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by autoimmune arthritis of unknown cause with onset before age of 16 years. Methotrexate provides clinical benefits in JIA. For children who do not respond to methotrexate, treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is an option. However, some patients do not respond or are intolerant to anti-TNF therapy. Induction of peripheral tolerance has long been considered a promising approach to the treatment of chronic autoimmune diseases. We aimed to evaluate the potentialities of two altered peptide ligands (APLs) derived from human heat-shock protein 60, an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis, in JIA patients. Interferon (IFN)-γ, TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-10 levels were determined in ex vivo assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from these patients. Wild-type peptide and one of these APLs increased IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. Unlike, the other APLs (called APL2) increased the IL-10 level without affecting IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. On the other hand, APL2 induces a marked activation of T cells since it transforms cell cycle phase's distribution of CD4+ T cells from these patients. In addition, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of APL2 in collagen-induced arthritis model. Therapy with APL2 reduced arthritis scores and histological lesions in mice. This effect was associated to a decrease in TNF-α and IL-17 levels. These results indicate a therapeutic potentiality of APL2 for JIA. PMID:24474501

  9. Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide attenuates trauma-/haemorrhagic shock-induced acute lung injury through inhibiting oxidative stress and the NF-κB-dependent inflammatory/MMP-9 pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhi; Zhao, Xiu; Liu, Martin; Jin, Hongxu; Wang, Ling; Hou, Mingxiao; Gao, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is one of the most serious complications in traumatic patients and is an important part of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) is a peptide with a wide range of biological activity. In this study, we investigated local changes in oxidative stress and the NF-κB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) pathway in rats with trauma/haemorrhagic shock (TH/S)-induced ALI and evaluated the effects of pretreatment with rhBNP. Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operation group, model group, low-dosage rhBNP group and high-dosage rhBNP group (n = 12 for each group). Oxidative stress and MPO activity were measured by ELISA kits. MMP-9 activity was detected by zymography analysis. NF-κB activity was determined using Western blot assay. With rhBNP pretreatment, TH/S-induced protein leakage, increased MPO activity, lipid peroxidation and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity were inhibited. Activation of antioxidative enzymes was reversed. The phosphorylation of NF-κB and the degradation of its inhibitor IκB were suppressed. The results suggested that the protection mechanism of rhBNP is possibly mediated through upregulation of anti-oxidative enzymes and inhibition of NF-κB activation. More studies are needed to further evaluate whether rhBNP is a suitable candidate as an effective inhaling drug to reduce the incidence of TH/S-induced ALI. PMID:26852688

  10. Anti-chlamydial effect of plant peptides.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Emese Petra; Mosolygó, Tímea; Tiricz, Hilda; Szabó, Agnes Míra; Karai, Adrienn; Kerekes, Fanni; Virók, Dezső P; Kondorosi, Eva; Burián, Katalin

    2014-06-01

    Even in asymptomatic cases of Chlamydia trachomatis infection, the aim of the antibiotic strategy is eradication of the pathogen so as to avoid the severe late sequelae, such as pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and tubal infertility. Although first-line antimicrobial agents have been demonstrated to be predominantly successful in the treatment of C. trachomatis infection, treatment failures have been observed in some cases. Rich source of antimicrobial peptides was recently discovered in Medicago species, which act in plants as differentiation factors of the endosymbiotic bacterium partner. Several of these symbiotic plant peptides have proved to be potent killers of various bacteria in vitro. We show here that 7 of 11 peptides tested exhibited antimicrobial activity against C. trachomatis D, and that the killing activity of these peptides is most likely due to their interaction with specific bacterial targets. PMID:24939689

  11. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... C-peptide is a useful marker of insulin production. The following are some purposes of C-peptide ... it nearly impossible to directly evaluate endogenous insulin production. In these cases, C-peptide measurement is a ...

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1-3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1-3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1-3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1-3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1-11 (hLF 1-11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections. PMID

  14. Neogene geomorphic and climatic evolution of the central San Juan Mountains, Colorado: K/Ar age and stable isotope data on supergene alunite and jarosite from the Creede mining district

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, Robert O.; Bethke, Philip M.; Lanphere, Marvin A.; Steven, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    K/Ar age determinations or supergene alunite and jarosite, formed during Neogene weathering of the epithermal silver and base-metal ores of the Creede mining district, have been combined with geologic evidence to estimate the timing of regional uplift of the southern Rocky Mountains and related canyon cutting. In addition, oxygen and hydrogen isotopic studies suggest climate changes in the central San Juan Mountains during the past 5 m.y. Alunite [ideally (K,Na)Al3(SO4)2(OH)6] and jarosite [ideally KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6] can be dated by K/Ar or 40Ar/39Ar techniques and both contain OH and SO4 sites that enable four stable isotope analyses (δD, δ18OOH, and δ34S) to be made. This supergene alunite and jarosite formed by weathering of sulfide-rich ore bodies may record the evolution of the chemical and hydrologic processes affecting ancient oxidized acid ground water, as well as details of climate history and geomorphic evolution. Fine-grained (1-10 μm) supergene alunite and jarosite occur in minor fractures in the upper, oxidized parts of the 25 Ma sulfide-bearing veins of the Creede mining district, and jarosite also occurs in adjacent oxidized Ag-bearing clastic sediments. K/Ar ages for alunite range from 4.8 to 3.1 Ma, and for jarosite range from 2.6 to 0.9 Ma. The δD values for alunite and jarosite show opposite correlations with elevation, and values for jarosite correlate with age. Calculated δDH2O values of alunite fluids approach but are larger than those of present-day meteoric water. Calculated δDH2O values for jarosite fluids are more variable; the values of the youngest jarosites are lowest and are similar to those of present-day meteoric water in the district. The narrow δD-δ18OSO4 values of alunites reflects oxidation of sulfide below the water table. The greater range in these values for jarosites reflects oxidation of sulfide under vadose conditions. The ages of alunite mark the position of the paleo-water table at the end of a period of moderate

  15. The effect of 17β-estradiol on gene expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide and some pro-inflammatory mediators in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with pure menstrual migraine

    PubMed Central

    Karkhaneh, Azam; Ansari, Mohammad; Emamgholipour, Solaleh; Rafiee, Mohammad Hessam

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has long been postulated to play an integral role in the pathophysiology of migraine. Earlier studies showed that CGRP can stimulate the synthesis and release of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines from trigeminal ganglion glial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 17β-estradiol in regulation of CGRP expression, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, and NO and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) release in cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with pure menstrual migraine and healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on twelve patients with pure menstrual migraine and twelve age-and sex-matched healthy individuals. PBMCs treated with 17β-estradiol for 24 hr at physiological and pharmacological doses. Gene expression was evaluated by real time-PCR. CGRP and IL-1β proteins in culture supernatant were determined by ELISA method. Activity of iNOS in PBMCs and total nitrite in the culture supernatant were measured by colorimetric assays. Results: Treatment with 17β-estradiol had a biphasic effect on expression of CGRP. We found that 17β-estradiol treatment at pharmacological dose significantly increases mRNA expression of CGRP in both groups (P<0.001), whereas at physiological dose it could significantly decrease CGRP mRNA expression (P<0.001), CGRP protein levels, IL-1β release, NO production and iNOS activity only in patient groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: Collectively, it appears that 17β-estradiol can exert protective effect on decrease of inflammation in migraine via decrease in levels of CGRP, IL-1β and iNOS activity; however, more studies are necessary in this regard. PMID:26526225

  16. New insights into the bioactivity of peptides from probiotics.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Pati, Bikas R; Chakraborty, Ranadhir; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are unique bacteria that offer several therapeutic benefits to human beings when administered in optimum amounts. Probiotics are able to produce antimicrobial substances, which stimulate the body's immune responses. Here, we review in detail the anti-infective peptides derived from probiotics and their potential immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities, including a major role in cross-talk between probiotics and gut microbiota under adverse conditions. Insights from the engineered cell surface of probiotics may provide novel anti-infective therapy by heterologous expression of receptor peptides of bacterial toxins. It may be possible to use antigenic peptides from viral pathogens as live vaccines. Another possibility is to generate antiviral peptides that bind directly to virus particles, while some peptides exert anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects. Some extracellular polymeric substances might serve as anti-infective peptides. These avenues of treatment have remained largely unexplored to date, despite their potential in generating powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-infective products. PMID:27100351

  17. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  18. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  19. Immune modulation by multifaceted cationic host defense (antimicrobial) peptides.

    PubMed

    Hilchie, Ashley L; Wuerth, Kelli; Hancock, Robert E W

    2013-12-01

    Cationic host defense (antimicrobial) peptides were originally studied for their direct antimicrobial activities. They have since been found to exhibit multifaceted immunomodulatory activities, including profound anti-infective and selective anti-inflammatory properties, as well as adjuvant and wound-healing activities in animal models. These biological properties suggest that host defense peptides, and synthetic derivatives thereof, possess clinical potential beyond the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. In this Review, we provide an overview of the biological activities of host defense and synthetic peptides, their mechanism(s) of action and new therapeutic applications and challenges that are associated with their clinical use. PMID:24231617

  20. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested. PMID:27145593

  1. Epithelial antimicrobial peptides in host defense against infection

    PubMed Central

    Bals, Robert

    2000-01-01

    One component of host defense at mucosal surfaces seems to be epithelium-derived antimicrobial peptides. Antimicrobial peptides are classified on the basis of their structure and amino acid motifs. Peptides of the defensin, cathelicidin, and histatin classes are found in humans. In the airways, α-defensins and the cathelicidin LL-37/hCAP-18 originate from neutrophils. β-Defensins and LL-37/hCAP-18 are produced by the respiratory epithelium and the alveolar macrophage and secreted into the airway surface fluid. Beside their direct antimicrobial function, antimicrobial peptides have multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with effects on epithelial and inflammatory cells, influencing such diverse processes as proliferation, immune induction, wound healing, cytokine release, chemotaxis, protease-antiprotease balance, and redox homeostasis. Further, antimicrobial peptides qualify as prototypes of innovative drugs that might be used as antibiotics, anti-lipopolysaccharide drugs, or modifiers of inflammation. PMID:11667978

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  3. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  4. Antimicrobial peptides in 2014.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  5. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterizations on new Fe sulphoarsenate hilarionite (Fe2((III))(SO4)(AsO4)(OH)·6H2O): Implications for arsenic mineralogy in supergene environment of mine area.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; He, LiLe; Dong, Faqin; Frost, Ray L

    2017-01-01

    Hilarionite (Fe2 (SO4)(AsO4)(OH)·6H2O) is a new Fe sulphoarsenates mineral, which recently is found in the famous Lavrion ore district, Atliki Prefecture, Greece. The spectroscopic study of hilarionite enriches the data of arsenic mineralogy in supergene environment of a mine area. The infrared and Raman means are used to characterize the molecular structure of this mineral. The IR bands at 875 and 905cm(-1) are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching vibrations of AsO4(3-). The IR bands at 1021, 1086 and 1136cm(-1) correspond to the possible antisymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations of SO4(2-). The Raman bands at 807, 843 and 875cm(-1) clearly show that arsenate components in the mineral structure, which are assigned to the symmetric stretching vibrations (ν1) of AsO4(3-) (807 and 843cm(-1)) and the antisymmetric vibration (ν3) (875cm(-1)). IR bands provide more sulfate information than Raman, which can be used as the basis to distinguish hilarionite from kaňkite. The powder XRD data shows that hilarionite has obvious differences with the mineral structure of kaňkite. The thermoanalysis and SEM-EDX results show that hilarionite has more sulfate than arsenate. PMID:27391313

  6. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation. PMID:26281357

  7. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  8. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  9. Anti-mycobacterial peptides: from human to phage.

    PubMed

    Teng, Tieshan; Liu, Jiafa; Wei, Hongping

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major pathogen of tuberculosis (TB). With the growing problem of M. tuberculosis resistant to conventional antibiotics, especially multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively-drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), the need for new TB drugs is now more prominent than ever. Among the promising candidates for anti-TB drugs, anti-mycobacterial peptides have a few advantages, such as low immunogenicity, selective affinity to prokaryotic negatively charged cell envelopes, and diverse modes of action. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the anti-mycobacterial peptides, highlighting the sources, effectiveness and bactericidal mechanisms of these antimicrobial peptides. Most of the current anti-mycobacterial peptides are derived either from host immune cells, bacterial extraction, or mycobacteriophages. Besides trans-membrane pore formation, which is considered to be the common bactericidal mechanism, many of the anti-mycobacterial peptides have the second non-membrane targets within mycobacteria. Additionally, some antimicrobial peptides play critical roles in innate immunity. However, a few obstacles, such as short half-life in vivo and resistance to antimicrobial peptides, need overcoming before clinical applications. Nevertheless, the multiple functions of anti-mycobacterial peptides, especially direct killing of pathogens and immune-modulators in infectious and inflammatory conditions, indicate that they are promising candidates for future drug development. PMID:25613372

  10. Identification of a NFκB inhibitory peptide from tryptic β-casein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, J; Klempt, M; Clawin-Rädecker, I; Lorenzen, P Chr; Meisel, H

    2014-12-15

    Several bioactive peptides are encrypted within the sequence of major milk proteins, requiring enzymatic proteolysis for release and activation. The present study aimed at the identification of potential anti-inflammatory activities in tryptic hydrolysates of bovine β-casein. Inflammatory processes involve in most cases an activation of Nuclear factor Kappa-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), which is a pro-inflammatory transcription factor of several genes. Hence, a NFκB reporter cell line was established, and TNF-α mediated activation of NFκB was used as a measurement. Bovine β-casein (β-CN) was hydrolysed by trypsin and fractionated by ultrafiltration. Total proteolysate as well as the fraction containing peptides between 1 and 5 kDa showed an inhibitory effect in the cell-based assay, while the fraction containing molecules smaller than 1 kDa did not. This anti-inflammatory effect was ascribed to a group of large, hydrophobic peptides, which were identified using LC-MS. The main peptide was synthesised and showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect in HEK(nfkb-RE)-cells. Thus, for the first time, a casein-derived peptide having an anti-inflammatory effect in vitro has been identified. PMID:25038658

  11. Antihypertensive peptides from curd

    PubMed Central

    Dabarera, Melani Chathurika; Athiththan, Lohini V.; Perera, Rasika P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Curd (Dadhi) peptides reduce hypertension by inhibiting angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and serum cholesterol. Peptides vary with bacterial species and milk type used during fermentation. Aim: To isolate and assay the antihypertensive peptides, before and after digestion, in two commercially available curd brands in Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: Whey (Dadhi Mastu) separated by high-speed centrifugation was isolated using reverse-phase-high- performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Eluted fractions were analyzed for ACE inhibitory activity using modified Cushman and Cheung method. Curd samples were subjected to enzymatic digestion with pepsin, trypsin, and carboxypeptidase-A at their optimum pH and temperature. Peptides isolated using reverse-phase-HPLC was assayed for ACE inhibitory activity. Results: Whey peptides of both brands gave similar patterns (seven major and five minor peaks) in HPLC elution profile. Smaller peptides concentration was higher in brand 1 and penta-octapeptides in brand 2. Pentapeptide had the highest ACE inhibitory activity (brand 2–90% and brand 1–73%). After digestion, di and tri peptides with similar inhibitory patterns were obtained in both which were higher than before digestion. Thirteen fractions were obtained, where nine fractions showed more than 70% inhibition in both brands with 96% ACE inhibition for a di-peptide. Conclusion: Curd has ACE inhibitory peptides and activity increases after digestion. PMID:27011726

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  13. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  14. Peptide folding simulations.

    PubMed

    Gnanakaran, S; Nymeyer, Hugh; Portman, John; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; García, Angel E

    2003-04-01

    Developments in the design of small peptides that mimic proteins in complexity, recent advances in nanosecond time-resolved spectroscopy methods to study peptides and the development of modern, highly parallel simulation algorithms have come together to give us a detailed picture of peptide folding dynamics. Two newly implemented simulation techniques, parallel replica dynamics and replica exchange molecular dynamics, can now describe directly from simulations the kinetics and thermodynamics of peptide formation, respectively. Given these developments, the simulation community now has the tools to verify and validate simulation protocols and models (forcefields). PMID:12727509

  15. The Anti-inflammatory Effect of GV1001 Mediated by the Downregulation of ENO1-induced Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jiyea; Kim, Hyemin; Kim, Yejin; Jang, Mirim; Jeon, Jane; Hwang, Young-il; Shon, Won Jun; Song, Yeong Wook; Lee, Wang Jae

    2015-01-01

    GV1001 is a peptide derived from the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) sequence that is reported to have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects. Enolase1 (ENO1) is a glycolytic enzyme, and stimulation of this enzyme induces high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines from concanavalin A (Con A)-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and ENO1-expressing monocytes in healthy subjects, as well as from macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Therefore, this study investigated whether GV1001 downregulates ENO1-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines as an anti-inflammatory peptide. The results showed that GV1001 does not affect the expression of ENO1 in either Con A-activated PBMCs or RA PBMCs. However, ENO1 stimulation increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6, and these cytokines were downregulated by pretreatment with GV1001. Moreover, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB were activated when ENO1, on the surface of Con A-activated PBMCs and RA PBMCs, was stimulated, and they were successfully suppressed by pre-treatment with GV1001. These results suggest that GV1001 may be an effective anti-inflammatory peptide that downregulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through the suppression of p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation following ENO1 stimulation. PMID:26770183

  16. The Anti-inflammatory Effect of GV1001 Mediated by the Downregulation of ENO1-induced Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyea; Kim, Hyemin; Kim, Yejin; Jang, Mirim; Jeon, Jane; Hwang, Young-Il; Shon, Won Jun; Song, Yeong Wook; Kang, Jae Seung; Lee, Wang Jae

    2015-12-01

    GV1001 is a peptide derived from the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) sequence that is reported to have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects. Enolase1 (ENO1) is a glycolytic enzyme, and stimulation of this enzyme induces high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines from concanavalin A (Con A)-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and ENO1-expressing monocytes in healthy subjects, as well as from macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Therefore, this study investigated whether GV1001 downregulates ENO1-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines as an anti-inflammatory peptide. The results showed that GV1001 does not affect the expression of ENO1 in either Con A-activated PBMCs or RA PBMCs. However, ENO1 stimulation increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6, and these cytokines were downregulated by pretreatment with GV1001. Moreover, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB were activated when ENO1, on the surface of Con A-activated PBMCs and RA PBMCs, was stimulated, and they were successfully suppressed by pre-treatment with GV1001. These results suggest that GV1001 may be an effective anti-inflammatory peptide that downregulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through the suppression of p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation following ENO1 stimulation. PMID:26770183

  17. Curcumin in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Shehzad, Adeeb; Rehman, Gauhar; Lee, Young Sup

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric is also used as a remedy for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases. Acute and chronic inflammation is a major factor in the progression of obesity, type II diabetes, arthritis, pancreatitis, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases, as well as certain types of cancer. Turmeric has a long history of use in Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Recent studies on the efficacy and therapeutic applicability of turmeric have suggested that the active ingredient of tumeric is curcumin. Further, compelling evidence has shown that curcumin has the ability to inhibit inflammatory cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis through multiple molecular targets and mechanisms of action. Curcumin is safe, non-toxic, and mediates its anti-inflammatory effects through the down-regulation of inflammatory transcription factors, cytokines, redox status, protein kinases, and enzymes that all promote inflammation. In addition, curcumin induces apoptosis through mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, as well as activation of caspase cascades. In the current study, the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin were evaluated relative to various chronic inflammatory diseases. Based on the available pharmacological data obtained from in vitro and in vivo research, as well as clinical trials, an opportunity exists to translate curcumin into clinics for the prevention of inflammatory diseases in the near future. PMID:23281076

  18. Epithelial restitution and wound healing in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Andreas; Dignass, Axel U

    2008-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by a chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. The mucosal epithelium of the alimentary tract constitutes a key element of the mucosal barrier to a broad spectrum of deleterious substances present within the intestinal lumen including bacterial microorganisms, various dietary factors, gastrointestinal secretory products and drugs. In addition, this mucosal barrier can be disturbed in the course of various intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. Fortunately, the integrity of the gastrointestinal surface epithelium is rapidly reestablished even after extensive destruction. Rapid resealing of the epithelial barrier following injuries is accomplished by a process termed epithelial restitution, followed by more delayed mechanisms of epithelial wound healing including increased epithelial cell proliferation and epithelial cell differentiation. Restitution of the intestinal surface epithelium is modulated by a range of highly divergent factors among them a broad spectrum of structurally distinct regulatory peptides, variously described as growth factors or cytokines. Several regulatory peptide factors act from the basolateral site of the epithelial surface and enhance epithelial cell restitution through TGF-beta-dependent pathways. In contrast, members of the trefoil factor family (TFF peptides) appear to stimulate epithelial restitution in conjunction with mucin glycoproteins through a TGF-beta-independent mechanism from the apical site of the intestinal epithelium. In addition, a number of other peptide molecules like extracellular matrix factors and blood clotting factors and also non-peptide molecules including phospholipids, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), adenine nucleotides, trace elements and pharmacological agents modulate intestinal epithelial repair mechanisms. Repeated damage and injury of the intestinal surface are key features of various intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel

  19. Epithelial restitution and wound healing in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Andreas; Dignass, Axel U

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by a chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. The mucosal epithelium of the alimentary tract constitutes a key element of the mucosal barrier to a broad spectrum of deleterious substances present within the intestinal lumen including bacterial microorganisms, various dietary factors, gastrointestinal secretory products and drugs. In addition, this mucosal barrier can be disturbed in the course of various intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. Fortunately, the integrity of the gastrointestinal surface epithelium is rapidly reestablished even after extensive destruction. Rapid resealing of the epithelial barrier following injuries is accomplished by a process termed epithelial restitution, followed by more delayed mechanisms of epithelial wound healing including increased epithelial cell proliferation and epithelial cell differentiation. Restitution of the intestinal surface epithelium is modulated by a range of highly divergent factors among them a broad spectrum of structurally distinct regulatory peptides, variously described as growth factors or cytokines. Several regulatory peptide factors act from the basolateral site of the epithelial surface and enhance epithelial cell restitution through TGF-β-dependent pathways. In contrast, members of the trefoil factor family (TFF peptides) appear to stimulate epithelial restitution in conjunction with mucin glycoproteins through a TGF-β-independent mechanism from the apical site of the intestinal epithelium. In addition, a number of other peptide molecules like extracellular matrix factors and blood clotting factors and also non-peptide molecules including phospholipids, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), adenine nucleotides, trace elements and pharmacological agents modulate intestinal epithelial repair mechanisms. Repeated damage and injury of the intestinal surface are key features of various intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel

  20. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin produced by the body and insulin injected ...

  1. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  3. Peptide 19-2.5 inhibits heparan sulfate-triggered inflammation in murine cardiomyocytes stimulated with human sepsis serum.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lukas; Schmitz, Susanne; De Santis, Rebecca; Doemming, Sabine; Haase, Hajo; Hoeger, Janine; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus; Marx, Gernot; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction in sepsis has been linked to inflammation caused by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as well as by host danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). These include soluble heparan sulfate (HS), which triggers the devastating consequences of the pro-inflammatory cascades in severe sepsis and septic shock. Thus, there is increasing interest in the development of anti-infective agents, with effectiveness against both PAMPs and DAMPs. We hypothesized that a synthetic antimicrobial peptide (peptide 19-2.5) inhibits inflammatory response in murine cardiomyocytes (HL-1 cells) stimulated with PAMPs, DAMPs or serum from patients with septic shock by reduction and/or neutralization of soluble HS. In the current study, our data indicate that the treatment with peptide 19-2.5 decreases the inflammatory response in HL-1 cells stimulated with either PAMPs or DAMPs. Furthermore, our work shows that soluble HS in serum from patients with Gram-negative or Gram-positive septic shock induces a strong pro-inflammatory response in HL-1 cells, which can be effectively blocked by peptide 19-2.5. Based on these findings, peptide 19-2.5 is a novel anti-inflammatory agent interacting with both PAMPs and DAMPs, suggesting peptide 19-2.5 may have the potential for further development as a broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory agent in sepsis-induced myocardial inflammation and dysfunction. PMID:26024383

  4. An Immunosuppressant Peptide from the Hard Tick Amblyomma variegatum

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yufeng; Chen, Wenlin; Mo, Guoxiang; Chen, Ran; Fang, Mingqian; Yedid, Gabriel; Yan, Xiuwen

    2016-01-01

    Ixodid ticks are well known for spreading transmitted tick-borne pathogens while being attached to their hosts for almost 1–2 weeks to obtain blood meals. Thus, they must secrete many immunosuppressant factors to combat the hosts’ immune system. In the present work, we investigated an immunosuppressant peptide of the hard tick Amblyomma variegatum. This peptide, named amregulin, is composed of 40 residues with an amino acid sequence of HLHMHGNGATQVFKPRLVLKCPNAAQLIQPGKLQRQLLLQ. A cDNA of the precursor peptide was obtained from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, Bethesda, MD, USA). In rat splenocytes, amregulin exerts significant anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the secretion of inflammatory factors in vitro, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). In rat splenocytes, treated with amregulin, compared to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone, the inhibition of the above inflammatory factors was significant at all tested concentrations (2, 4 and 8 µg/mL). Amregulin shows strong free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities (5, 10 and 20 µg/mL) in vitro. Amregulin also significantly inhibits adjuvant-induced paw inflammation in mouse models in vivo. This peptide may facilitate the ticks’ successful blood feeding and may lead to host immunotolerance of the tick. These findings have important implications for the understanding of tick-host interactions and the co-evolution between ticks and the viruses that they bear. PMID:27153086

  5. An Immunosuppressant Peptide from the Hard Tick Amblyomma variegatum.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yufeng; Chen, Wenlin; Mo, Guoxiang; Chen, Ran; Fang, Mingqian; Yedid, Gabriel; Yan, Xiuwen

    2016-01-01

    Ixodid ticks are well known for spreading transmitted tick-borne pathogens while being attached to their hosts for almost 1-2 weeks to obtain blood meals. Thus, they must secrete many immunosuppressant factors to combat the hosts' immune system. In the present work, we investigated an immunosuppressant peptide of the hard tick Amblyomma variegatum. This peptide, named amregulin, is composed of 40 residues with an amino acid sequence of HLHMHGNGATQVFKPRLVLKCPNAAQLIQPGKLQRQLLLQ. A cDNA of the precursor peptide was obtained from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, Bethesda, MD, USA). In rat splenocytes, amregulin exerts significant anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the secretion of inflammatory factors in vitro, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). In rat splenocytes, treated with amregulin, compared to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone, the inhibition of the above inflammatory factors was significant at all tested concentrations (2, 4 and 8 µg/mL). Amregulin shows strong free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities (5, 10 and 20 µg/mL) in vitro. Amregulin also significantly inhibits adjuvant-induced paw inflammation in mouse models in vivo. This peptide may facilitate the ticks' successful blood feeding and may lead to host immunotolerance of the tick. These findings have important implications for the understanding of tick-host interactions and the co-evolution between ticks and the viruses that they bear. PMID:27153086

  6. A Cell-penetrating Peptide Suppresses Inflammation by Inhibiting NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu Fu; Xu, Xiang; Fan, Xia; Zhang, Chun; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Xi; Guo, Wei; Xing, Wei; Yu, Jian; Yan, Jing-Long; Liang, Hua-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a central regulator of immune response and a potential target for developing anti-inflammatory agents. Mechanistic studies suggest that compounds that directly inhibit NF-κB DNA binding may block inflammation and the associated tissue damage. Thus, we attempted to discover peptides that could interfere with NF-κB signaling based on a highly conserved DNA-binding domain found in all NF-κB members. One such small peptide, designated as anti-inflammatory peptide-6 (AIP6), was characterized in the current study. AIP6 directly interacted with p65 and displayed an intrinsic cell-penetrating property. This peptide demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, AIP6 inhibited the DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of the p65 NF-κB subunit as well as the production of inflammatory mediators in macrophages upon stimulation. Local administration of AIP6 significantly inhibited inflammation induced by zymosan in mice. Collectively, our results suggest that AIP6 is a promising lead peptide for the development of specific NF-κB inhibitors as potential anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:21556052

  7. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection and inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and other female reproductive organs. It causes scarring ... United States. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, two sexually transmitted diseases, are the most common causes of PID. Other ...

  8. Interactions between APP secretases and inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Magdalena; Walter, Jochen; Gentleman, Steve M

    2008-01-01

    There is now a large body of evidence linking inflammation to Alzheimer's disease (AD). This association manifests itself neuropathologically in the presence of activated microglia and astrocytes around neuritic plaques and increased levels of inflammatory mediators in the brains of AD patients. It is considered that amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which is derived from the processing of the longer amyloid precursor protein (APP), could be the most important stimulator of this response, and therefore determining the role of the different secretases involved in its generation is essential for a better understanding of the regulation of inflammation in AD. The finding that certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can affect the processing of APP by inhibiting β- and γ-secretases, together with recent revelations that these enzymes may be regulated by inflammation, suggest that they could be an interesting target for anti-inflammatory drugs. In this review we will discuss some of these issues and the role of the secretases in inflammation, independent of their effect on Aβ formation. PMID:18564425

  9. Mucosal Inflammatory Response to Salmonella typhimurium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir; McCormick, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium consists of a single layer of epithelial cells that forms a barrier against food antigens and the resident microbiota within the lumen. This delicately balanced organ functions in a highly sophisticated manner to uphold the fidelity of the intestinal epithelium and to eliminate pathogenic microorganisms. On the luminal side, this barrier is fortified by a thick mucus layer, and on the serosal side exists the lamina propria containing a resident population of immune cells. Pathogens that are able to breach this barrier disrupt the healthy epithelial lining by interfering with the regulatory mechanisms that govern the normal balance of intestinal architecture and function. This disruption results in a coordinated innate immune response deployed to eliminate the intruder that includes the release of antimicrobial peptides, activation of pattern-recognition receptors, and recruitment of a variety of immune cells. In the case of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection, induction of an inflammatory response has been linked to its virulence mechanism, the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS secretes protein effectors that exploit the host’s cell biology to facilitate bacterial entry and intracellular survival, and to modulate the host immune response. As the role of the intestinal epithelium in initiating an immune response has been increasingly realized, this review will highlight recent research that details progress made in understanding mechanisms underlying the mucosal inflammatory response to Salmonella infection, and how such inflammatory responses impact pathogenic fitness of this organism. PMID:25071772

  10. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  11. Inhibitory Effects of Antimicrobial Peptides on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Shang, Dejing

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are usually small molecule peptides, which display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, high efficiency, and stability. For the multiple-antibiotic-resistant strains, AMPs play a significant role in the development of novel antibiotics because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and specific antimicrobial mechanism. Besides broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, AMPs also have anti-inflammatory activity. The neutralization of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) plays a key role in anti-inflammatory action of AMPs. On the one hand, AMPs can readily penetrate the cell wall barrier by neutralizing LPS to remove Gram-negative bacteria that can lead to infection. On the contrary, AMPs can also inhibit the production of biological inflammatory cytokines to reduce the inflammatory response through neutralizing circulating LPS. In addition, AMPs also modulate the host immune system by chemotaxis of leukocytes, to promote immune cell proliferation, epithelialization, and angiogenesis and thus play a protective role. This review summarizes some recent researches about anti-inflammatory AMPs, with a focus on the interaction of AMPs and LPS on the past decade. PMID:26612970

  12. Synthetic antimicrobial peptide design.

    PubMed

    Powell, W A; Catranis, C M; Maynard, C A

    1995-01-01

    To guide the design of potential plant pathogen-resistance genes, synthetic variants of naturally occurring antimicrobial gene products were evaluated. Five 20-amino acid (ESF1, ESF4, ESF5, ESF6, ESF13), one 18-amino acid (ESF12), and one 17-amino acid (ESF17) amphipathic peptide sequences were designed, synthesized, and tested with in vitro bioassays. Positive charges on the hydrophilic side of the peptide were shown to be essential for antifungal activity, yet the number of positive charges could be varied with little or no change in activity. The size could be reduced to 18 amino acids, but at 17 amino acids a significant reduction in activity was observed. ESF1, 5, 6, and 12 peptides were inhibitory to the germination of conidia from Cryphonectria parasitica, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, and Septoria musiva but did not inhibit the germination of pollen from Castanea mollissima and Salix lucida. ESF12 also had no effect on the germination of Malus sylvestris and Lycopersicon esculentum pollen, but inhibited the growth of the bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Erwinia amylovora, and Pseudomonas syringae. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of the active ESF peptides were similar to those of the naturally occurring control peptides, magainin II and cecropin B. The significant differential in sensitivity between the microbes and plant cells indicated that the active ESF peptides are potentially useful models for designing plant pathogen-resistance genes. PMID:7579625

  13. Antimitotic peptides and depsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Ernest; Covell, David G

    2002-01-01

    Tubulin is the target for an ever increasing number of unusual peptides and depsipeptides that were originally isolated from a wide variety of organisms. Since tubulin is the major component of cellular microtubules, which maintain cell shape in interphase and form the mitotic spindle, most of these compounds are highly toxic to mammalian cells. These peptides and depsipeptides disrupt cellular microtubules and prevent formation of a functional spindle, resulting in the accumulation of cultured cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle through specific inhibition of mitosis. At the biochemical level, the compounds all inhibit the assembly of tubulin into polymer and, in the cases where it has been studied, strongly suppress microtubule dynamics at low concentrations. In most cases the peptides and depsipeptides inhibit the binding of vinblastine and vincristine to tubulin in a noncompetitive manner, inhibit tubulin-dependent GTP hydrolysis, and interfere with nucleotide turnover at the exchangeable GTP site on beta-tubulin. Most of the peptides and depsipeptides induce tubulin to form oligomers of aberrant morphology, including tubulin rings that vary in diameter depending on the (depsi) peptide under study. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the cellular, biochemical, in vivo, and SAR aspects of this group of compounds. We also summarize initial efforts by computer modeling to decipher a pharmacophore among the diverse structures of these peptides and depsipeptides. PMID:12678750

  14. Non-peptide ligand binding to the formyl peptide receptor FPR2--A comparison to peptide ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Stepniewski, Tomasz M; Filipek, Slawomir

    2015-07-15

    Ligands of the FPR2 receptor initiate many signaling pathways including activation of phospholipase C, protein kinase C, the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway. The possible actions include also calcium flux, superoxide generation, as well as migration and proliferation of monocytes. FPR2 activation may induce a pro- and anti-inflammatory effect depending on the ligand type. It is also found that this receptor is involved in tumor growth. Most of currently known FPR2 ligands are agonists since they were designed based on N-formyl peptides, which are natural agonists of formyl receptors. Since the non-peptide drugs are indispensable for effective treatment strategies, we performed a docking study of such ligands employing a generated dual template homology model of the FPR2 receptor. The study revealed different binding modes of particular classes of these drugs. Based on the obtained docking poses we proposed a detailed location of three hydrophobic pockets in orthosteric binding site of FPR2. Our model emphasizes the importance of aromatic stacking, especially with regard to residues His102(3.29) and Phe257(6.51), for binding of FPR2 ligands. We also identified other residues important for non-peptide ligand binding in the binding site of FPR2. PMID:25882522

  15. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a group of rare disorders including polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and autoimmune necrotizing myopathies (NMs). The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies share many similarities. They present acutely, subacutely, or chronically with marked proximal and symmetric muscle weakness, except for associated distal and asymmetric weakness in inclusion body myositis. The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies also share a variable degree of creatine kinase (CK) elevation and a nonspecifically abnormal electromyogram demonstrating an irritative myopathy. The muscle pathology demonstrates inflammatory exudates of variable distribution within the muscle fascicle. Despite these similarities, the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group. The overlap syndrome (OS) refers to the association of PM, DM, or NM with connective tissue disease, such as scleroderma or systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition to elevated antinuclear antibodies (ANA), patients with OS may be weaker in the proximal arms than the legs mimicking the pattern seen in some muscular dystrophies. In this review, we focus on DM, PM, and NM and examine current and promising therapies. PMID:23117947

  16. Identification of novel antiacetylated vimentin antibodies in patients with early inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Juarez, Maria; Bang, Holger; Hammar, Friederike; Reimer, Ulf; Dyke, Bernard; Sahbudin, Ilfita; Buckley, Christopher D; Fisher, Benjamin; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate serum antibody reactivity against a panel of post-translationally modified vimentin peptides (PTMPs) in patients with early inflammatory arthritis. Methods A panel of PTMPs was developed. Microtitre plates were coated with peptides derived from vimentin that were identical in length and composition except at one amino acid that was changed to introduce one of three post-translational modifications (PTMs)—either a citrullinated, carbamylated or acetylated residue. Sera of 268 treatment-naive patients with early inflammatory arthritis and symptoms ≤3 months' duration were tested. Patients were assigned to one of three outcome categories at 18-month follow-up (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), persistent non-RA arthritis and resolving arthritis). Results Antibodies against citrullinated, carbamylated and acetylated vimentin peptides were detected in the sera of patients with early inflammatory arthritis. The proportion of patients seropositive for all antibody types was significantly higher in the RA group than in the other groups. Anti cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP)-positive patients with RA had higher numbers of peptides recognised and higher levels of antibodies against those peptides, representing a distinct profile compared with the other groups. Conclusions We show for the first time that antibodies against acetylated vimentin are present in the sera of patients with early RA and confirm and extend previous observations regarding anticitrullinated and anticarbamylated antibodies. PMID:26160441

  17. Anti-inflammatory treatment.

    PubMed

    Fistarol, Susanna K; Itin, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory mucosal disorders are treated conventionally with potent or superpotent topical corticosteroids. For more than 20 years, topical cyclosporine has been used in the management of oral mucous membrane affections. Recently other topically applied calcineurin inhibitors, namely tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, expanded the armamentarium for the treatment of inflammatory mucosal diseases. This chapter places its main emphasis on the efficacy and safety of topical calcineurin inhibitors in the management of different oral and genital conditions, including anogenital lichen sclerosus (LS), oral and genital lichen planus, plasma cell balanitis and vulvitis, mucous membrane pemphigoid and pemphigus vulgaris, all conditions having usually a protracted course, requiring long-lasting treatment. There is current evidence for the effectiveness of both pimecrolimus and tacrolimus in the topical treatment of inflammatory oral mucosal diseases and genital dermatoses, especially oral lichen planus and genital LS. PMID:21325840

  18. Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation response plays an important role in host survival, and it also leads to acute and chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, bowel diseases, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and various neurodegenerative diseases. During the course of inflammation, the ROS level increases. In addition to ROS, several inflammatory mediators produced at the site lead to numerous cell-mediated damages. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is a chronic intestinal disorder resulting from a dysfunctional epithelial, innate and adaptive immune response to intestinal microorganisms. The methods involving indomethacin-induced enterocolitis in rats with macroscopic changes of IBD, myeloperoxidase assay, microscopic (histologic) characters and biochemical parameters are discussed. PMID:26939275

  19. Evolution of Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okin, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The association of inflammation with modern human diseases (e.g. obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer) remains an unsolved mystery of current biology and medicine. Inflammation is a protective response to noxious stimuli that unavoidably occurs at a cost to normal tissue function. This fundamental tradeoff between the cost and benefit of the inflammatory response has been optimized over evolutionary time for specific environmental conditions. Rapid change of the human environment due to niche construction outpaces genetic adaptation through natural selection, leading increasingly to a mismatch between the modern environment and selected traits. Consequently, multiple tradeoffs that affect human physiology are not optimized to the modern environment, leading to increased disease susceptibility. Here we examine the inflammatory response from an evolutionary perspective. We discuss unique aspects of the inflammatory response and its evolutionary history that can help explain the association between inflammation and modern human diseases. PMID:22975004

  20. Macrophage Inflammatory Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ylostalo, Joni H.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent a widely distributed and functionally diverse population of innate myeloid cells involved in inflammatory response to pathogens, tissue homeostasis and tissue repair (Murray and Wynn, 2011). Macrophages can be broadly grouped into two subpopulations with opposing activites: M1 or pro-inflammatory macrophages that promote T-helper type 1 (Th1) cell immunity and tissue damage, and M2 or anti-inflammatory/alternatively activated macrophages implicated in Th2 response and resolution of inflammation. Here we describe a rapid assay we used previously to monitor changes in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages in response to therapeutic paracrine factors produced by adult stem cells (Bartosh et al., 2010; Ylostalo et al., 2012; Bartosh et al., 2013). The assay can be adapted appropriately to test macrophage response to other agents as well that will be referred to herein as ‘test reagents’ or ‘test compounds’. In this protocol, the mouse macrophage cell line J774A.1 is expanded as an adherent monolayer on petri dishes allowing for the cells to be harvested easily without enzymes or cell scrapers that can damage the cells. The macropahges are then stimulated in suspension with LPS and seeded into 12-well cell culture plates containing the test reagents. After 16–18 h, the medium conditioned by the macrophages is harvested and the cytokine profile in the medium determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). We routinely measure levels of the pro-inflammtory cytokine TNF-alpha and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10).

  1. Serum peptide reactivities may distinguish neuromyelitis optica subgroups and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Imke; Beißbarth, Tim; Ellenberger, David; Pache, Florence; Stork, Lidia; Ringelstein, Marius; Aktas, Orhan; Jarius, Sven; Wildemann, Brigitte; Dihazi, Hassan; Friede, Tim; Ruprecht, Klemens; Paul, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess in an observational study whether serum peptide antibody reactivities may distinguish aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody (Ab)–positive and -negative neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods: We screened 8,700 peptides that included human and viral antigens of potential relevance for inflammatory demyelinating diseases and random peptides with pooled sera from different patient groups and healthy controls to set up a customized microarray with 700 peptides. With this microarray, we tested sera from 66 patients with AQP4-Ab-positive (n = 16) and AQP4-Ab-negative (n = 19) NMOSD, RRMS (n = 11), and healthy controls (n = 20). Results: Differential peptide reactivities distinguished NMOSD subgroups from RRMS in 80% of patients. However, the 2 NMOSD subgroups were not well-discriminated, although those patients are clearly separated by their antibody reactivities against AQP4 in cell-based assays. Elevated reactivities to myelin and Epstein-Barr virus peptides were present in RRMS and to AQP4 and AQP1 peptides in AQP4-Ab-positive NMOSD. Conclusions: While AQP4-Ab-positive and -negative NMOSD subgroups are not well-discriminated by peptide antibody reactivities, our findings suggest that peptide antibody reactivities may have the potential to distinguish between both NMOSD subgroups and MS. Future studies should thus concentrate on evaluating peptide antibody reactivities for the differentiation of AQP4-Ab-negative NMOSD and MS. PMID:26894206

  2. Hypoglycemic agents and potential anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Vishal; Galdo, John A; Mathews, Suresh T

    2016-01-01

    Current literature shows an association of diabetes and secondary complications with chronic inflammation. Evidence of these immunological changes include altered levels of cytokines and chemokines, changes in the numbers and activation states of various leukocyte populations, apoptosis, and fibrosis during diabetes. Therefore, treatment of diabetes and its complications may include pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation. Apart from anti-inflammatory drugs, various hypoglycemic agents have also been found to reduce inflammation that could contribute to improved outcomes. Extensive studies have been carried out with thiazolidinediones (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and metformin (AMP-activated protein kinase activator) with each of these classes of compounds showing moderate-to-strong anti-inflammatory action. Sulfonylureas and alpha glucosidase inhibitors appeared to exert modest effects, while the injectable agents, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, may improve secondary complications due to their anti-inflammatory potential. Currently, there is a lack of clinical data on anti-inflammatory effects of sodium–glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors. Nevertheless, for all these glucose-lowering agents, it is essential to distinguish between anti-inflammatory effects resulting from better glucose control and effects related to intrinsic anti-inflammatory actions of the pharmacological class of compounds. PMID:27114714

  3. Effects of PEGylation on membrane and lipopolysaccharide interactions of host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Papareddy, Praveen; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

    2014-04-14

    Effects of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugation on peptide interactions with lipid membranes and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were investigated for KYE28 (KYEITTIHNLFRKLTHRLFRRNFGYTLR), an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptide derived from human heparin cofactor II. In particular, effects of PEG length and localization was investigated by ellipsometry, circular dichroism, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and fluorescence/electron microscopy. PEGylation of KYE28 reduces peptide binding to lipid membranes, an effect accentuated at increasing PEG length, but less sensitive to conjugation site. The reduced binding causes suppressed liposome leakage induction, as well as bacterial lysis. As a result of this, the antimicrobial effects of KYE28 is partially lost with increasing PEG length, but hemolysis also strongly suppressed and selecticity improved. Through this, conditions can be found, at which the PEGylated peptide displays simultaneously efficient antimicrobial affects and low hemolysis in blood. Importantly, PEGylation does not markedly affect the anti-inflammatory effects of KYE28. The combination of reduced toxicity, increased selectivity, and retained anti-inflammatory effect after PEGylation, as well as reduced scavenging by serum proteins, thus shows that PEG conjugation may offer opportunities in the development of effective and selective anti-inflammatory peptides. PMID:24588750

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants.

    PubMed

    Tam, James P; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  5. Electromembrane extraction of peptides.

    PubMed

    Balchen, Marte; Reubsaet, Léon; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2008-06-20

    Rapid extraction of eight different peptides using electromembrane extraction (EME) was demonstrated for the first time. During an extraction time of 5 min, the model peptides migrated from a 500 microL aqueous acidic sample solution, through a thin supported liquid membrane (SLM) of an organic liquid sustained in the pores in the wall of a porous hollow fiber, and into a 25 microL aqueous acidic acceptor solution present inside the lumen of the hollow fiber. The driving force of the extraction was a 50 V potential sustained across the SLM, with the positive electrode in the sample and the negative electrode in the acceptor solution. The nature and the composition of the SLM were highly important for the EME process, and a mixture of 1-octanol and 15% di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate was found to work properly. Using 1mM HCl as background electrolyte in the sample and 100 mM HCl in the acceptor solution, and agitation at 1050 rpm, enrichment up to 11 times was achieved. Recoveries were found to be dependent on the structure of the peptide, indicating that the polarity and the number of ionized groups were important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency. The experimental findings suggested that electromembrane extraction of peptides is possible and may be a valuable tool for future extraction of peptides. PMID:18479691

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  7. Prostacyclin: An Inflammatory Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Stitham, Jeremiah; Midgett, Charles; Martin, Kathleen A.; Hwa, John

    2011-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a member of the prostaglandin family of bioactive lipids. Its best-characterized role is in the cardiovascular system, where it is released by vascular endothelial cells, serving as a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet aggregation. In recent years, prostacyclin (PGI2) has also been shown to promote differentiation and inhibit proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition to these well-described homeostatic roles within the cardiovascular system, prostacyclin (PGI2) also plays an important role as an inflammatory mediator. In this review, we focus on the contribution of prostacyclin (PGI2) as both a pathophysiological mediator and therapeutic agent in three major inflammatory-mediated disease processes, namely rheumatoid arthritis, where it promotes disease progression (“pro-inflammatory”), along with pulmonary vascular disease and atherosclerosis, where it inhibits disease progression (“anti-inflammatory”). The emerging role of prostacyclin (PGI2) in this context provides new opportunities for understanding the complex molecular basis for inflammatory-related diseases, and insights into the development of current and future anti-inflammatory treatments. PMID:21687516

  8. Mesenteric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Poras

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs), also known as inflammatory pseudotumors and inflammatory fibrosarcomas, are uncommon mesenchymal tumors composed of myofibroblastic spindle cells admixed with lymphocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils. Once thought to be reactive, these lesions are now considered to be neoplastic. These tumors can occur throughout the body, most commonly in the lung, mesentery and omentum. Patients commonly present with painless abdominal mass or with intestinal obstruction. IMTs may be multicentric, have a high local recurrence rate and may metastasize in rare cases. The lesions show wide variability in their histologic features and cellularity, and marked inflammatory infiltration, predominantly of plasmatocytes and lymphocytes, and occasionally neutrophils and eosinophils. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements and/or ALK1 and p80 immunoreactivity are reported in 33-67% of the tumors. Owing to the rarity of these lesions, there are no specific imaging findings that distinguish IMTs from other mesenteric masses. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice. Local recurrence rates are high, and re-excision is the preferred therapy for local recurrences. ALK-positive tumors show good response to ALK inhibitors. Current knowledge and comprehensive review of the available literature on IMTs is herein presented. PMID:25608706

  9. Mammalian antimicrobial peptide influences control of cutaneous Leishmania infection

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Manjusha M.; Barbi, Joseph; McMaster, W. Robert; Gallo, Richard L.; Satoskar, Abhay R.; McGwire, Bradford S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cathelicidin-type antimicrobial peptides (CAMP) are important mediators of innate immunity against microbial pathogens acting through direct interaction with and disruption of microbial membranes and indirectly through modulation of host cell migration and activation. Using a mouse knock-out model in CAMP we studied the role of this host peptide in control of dissemination of cutaneous infection by the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. The presence of pronounced host inflammatory infiltration in lesions and lymph nodes of infected animals was CAMP-dependent. Lack of CAMP expression was associated with higher levels of IL-10 receptor expression in bone marrow, splenic and lymph node macrophages as well as higher anti-inflammatory IL-10 production by bone marrow macrophages and spleen cells but reduced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ by lymph nodes. Unlike wild-type mice, local lesions were exacerbated and parasites were found largely disseminated in CAMP knockouts. Infection of CAMP knockouts with parasite mutants lacking the surface metalloprotease virulence determinant resulted in more robust disseminated infection than in control animals suggesting that CAMP activity is negatively regulated by parasite surface proteolytic activity. This correlated with the ability of the pro-tease to degrade CAMP in vitro and co-localization of CAMP with parasites within macrophages. Our results highlight the interplay of antimicrobial peptides and Leishmania that influence the host immune response and the outcome of infection. PMID:21501359

  10. Curbing Inflammation through Endogenous Pathways: Focus on Melanocortin Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tazeen J.; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Perretti, Mauro; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    The resolution of inflammation is now known to be an active process, armed with a multitude of mediators both lipid and protein in nature. Melanocortins are peptides endowed with considerable promise with their proresolution and anti-inflammatory effects in preclinical models of inflammatory disease, with tissue protective effects. These peptides and their targets are appealing because they can be seen as a natural way of inducing these effects as they harness endogenous pathways of control. Whereas most of the information generated about these mediators derives from several acute models of inflammation (such as zymosan induced peritonitis), there is some indication that these mediators may inhibit chronic inflammation by modulating cytokines, chemokines, and leukocyte apoptosis. In addition, proresolving mediators and their mimics have often been tested alongside therapeutic protocols, hence have been tested in settings more relevant to real life clinical scenarios. We provide here an overview on some of these mediators with a focus on melanocortin peptides and receptors, proposing that they may unveil new opportunities for innovative treatments of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:23738228

  11. Synthetic cationic peptide IDR-1018 modulates human macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pena, Olga M; Afacan, Nicole; Pistolic, Jelena; Chen, Carol; Madera, Laurence; Falsafi, Reza; Fjell, Christopher D; Hancock, Robert E W

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in the innate immune response. To respond in a rapid and efficient manner to challenges in the micro-environment, macrophages are able to differentiate towards classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated phenotypes. Synthetic, innate defense regulators (IDR) peptides, designed based on natural host defence peptides, have enhanced immunomodulatory activities and reduced toxicity leading to protection in infection and inflammation models that is dependent on innate immune cells like monocytes/macrophages. Here we tested the effect of IDR-1018 on macrophage differentiation, a process essential to macrophage function and the immune response. Using transcriptional, protein and systems biology analysis, we observed that differentiation in the presence of IDR-1018 induced a unique signature of immune responses including the production of specific pro and anti-inflammatory mediators, expression of wound healing associated genes, and increased phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Transcription factor IRF4 appeared to play an important role in promoting this IDR-1018-induced phenotype. The data suggests that IDR-1018 drives macrophage differentiation towards an intermediate M1-M2 state, enhancing anti-inflammatory functions while maintaining certain pro-inflammatory activities important to the resolution of infection. Synthetic peptides like IDR-1018, which act by modulating the immune system, could represent a powerful new class of therapeutics capable of treating the rising number of multidrug resistant infections as well as disorders associated with dysregulated immune responses. PMID:23308112

  12. Role of vasoactive intestinal peptide in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Hua; Li, Yu-Sheng; Luo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) plays important roles in many biological functions, such as, stimulation of contractility in the heart, vasodilation, promoting neuroendocrine-immune communication, lowering arterial blood pressure, and anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory activity. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic and degenerative bone disease, which is one of the most common causes of disability and most common in both sexes as people become older. Interestingly VIP can prevent chronic cartilage damage and joint remodeling. This review article provides update information on the association of VIP and OA and its treatment. Evidences suggest that VIP is down-regulated in synovial fluid of OA, and VIP down-regulation leads to increase in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines that might contribute to the pathogenesis of OA; however contradictory reports also exist suggesting that accumulation of VIP in joints can also contribute OA. A number of studies indicated that up-regulation of VIP can counteract the action of pro-inflammatory stimuli and alleviate the pain in OA. More clinical investigations are necessary to determine the biology of VIP and its therapeutic potential in OA that might represent the future standards of care for OA. PMID:27553659

  13. Purification of a novel nitric oxide inhibitory peptide derived from enzymatic hydrolysates of Mytilus coruscus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Yon-Suk; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Kang, Seo Hee; Choi, Dong-Kug; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Jung Suck; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2013-06-01

    Shellfish contain significant levels of high quality protein and are therefore a potential source for biofunctional high-value peptides. To purify a novel anti-inflammatory peptide from Mytilus coruscus (M. coruscus), we applied enzymatic hydrolysis and tangential flow filtration (TFF) and investigated its nitric oxide inhibitory property. To prepare the peptide, eight proteases were employed for enzymatic hydrolysis. Flavouzyme hydrolysates, which showed clearly superior nitric oxide inhibitory activity on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7, were further purified using a TFF system and consecutive chromatographic methods. Finally, a novel anti-inflammatory peptide composed of 10 amino acid residues was obtained, and the sequence was identified as Gly-Val-Ser-Leu-Leu-Gln-Gln-Phe-Phe-Leu at N-terminal position. The peptide from M. coruscus effectively inhibited nitric oxide production on macrophage cells. This is the first report of an anti-inflammatory peptide derived from the hydrolysates of M. coruscus. PMID:23500953

  14. Taurine and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Kontny, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is the most abundant free amino acid in humans and plays an important role in several essential biological processes such as bile acid conjugation, maintenance of calcium homeostasis, osmoregulation and membrane stabilization. Moreover, attenuation of apoptosis and its antioxidant activity seem to be crucial for the cytoprotective effects of taurine. Although these properties are not tissue specific, taurine reaches particularly high concentrations in tissues exposed to elevated levels of oxidants (e.g., inflammatory cells). It suggests that taurine may play an important role in inflammation associated with oxidative stress. Indeed, at the site of inflammation, taurine is known to react with and detoxify hypochlorous acid generated by the neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO)-halide system. This reaction results in the formation of less toxic taurine chloramine (TauCl). Both haloamines, TauCl and taurine bromamine (TauBr), the product of taurine reaction with hypobromous acid (HOBr), exert antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. In contrast to a well-documented regulatory role of taurine and taurine haloamines (TauCl, TauBr) in acute inflammation, their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases is not clear. This review summarizes our current knowledge concerning the role of taurine, TauCl and TauBr in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases initiated or propagated by MPO-derived oxidants. The aim of this paper is to show links between inflammation, neutrophils, MPO, oxidative stress and taurine. We will discuss the possible contribution of taurine and taurine haloamines to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, especially in the best studied example of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22810731

  15. Signal peptide of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2014-06-01

    Cellulase is an enzyme playing a crucial role in biotechnology industries ranging from textile to biofuel because of tremendous amount of cellulose produced in plant. In order to improve cellulase productivity, huge resource has been spent in search for good cellulases from microorganism in remote areas and in creation of ideal cellulase by engineering. However, not much attention is given to the secretion of cellulases from cell into extracellular space, where a cellulase plays its enzymatic role. In this minireview, the signal peptides, which lead secreted proteins to specific secretion systems and scatter in literature, are reviewed. The patterns of signal peptides are checked against 4,101 cellulases documented in UniProtKB, the largest protein database in the world, to determine how these cellulases are secreted. Simultaneous review on both literature and cellulases from the database not only provides updated knowledge on signal peptides but also indicates the gap in our research. PMID:24743986

  16. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26724202

  17. Structural and Functional Analysis of Horse Cathelicidin Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Skerlavaj, Barbara; Scocchi, Marco; Gennaro, Renato; Risso, Angela; Zanetti, Margherita

    2001-01-01

    Cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptides are a component of the peptide-based host defense of neutrophils and epithelia, with a widespread distribution in mammals. We recently reported the cDNA sequences of three putative horse myeloid cathelicidins, named eCATH-1, -2, and -3. A Western analysis was performed to investigate their presence in neutrophils and processing to mature peptides. eCATH-2 and eCATH-3, but not eCATH-1, were found to be present in uncleaved forms in horse neutrophils. The corresponding mature peptides were detected in inflammatory sites, suggesting that processing of the propeptides takes place upon neutrophil activation. A functional characterization was then performed with synthetic eCATH peptides. Circular dichroism measurements indicated an amphipathic α-helical conformation of these peptides in an anisotropic environment, and in vitro assays revealed a potent activity and a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity for eCATH-1 and a somewhat more restricted spectrum of activity for eCATH-2. Conversely, a strong dependence on salt concentration was observed when the activity of eCATH-3 was tested. This peptide efficiently killed bacteria and some fungal species, i.e., Cryptococcus neoformans and Rhodotorula rubra, in low-ionic-strength media, but the activity was inhibited in the presence of physiological salt medium. This behavior could be modified by modulating the amphipathicity of the molecule. In fact, the synthetic analogue LLK-eCATH-3, with a slightly modified sequence that increases the hydrophobic moment of the peptide, displayed a potent activity in physiological salt medium against the strains resistant to eCATH-3 under these conditions. PMID:11181349

  18. Intestinal barrier in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Antoni, Lena; Nuding, Sabine; Wehkamp, Jan; Stange, Eduard F

    2014-01-01

    A complex mucosal barrier protects as the first line of defense the surface of the healthy intestinal tract from adhesion and invasion by luminal microorganisms. In this review, we provide an overview about the major components of this protective system as for example an intact epithelium, the synthesis of various antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and the formation of the mucus layer. We highlight the crucial importance of their correct functioning for the maintenance of a proper intestinal function and the prevention of dysbiosis and disease. Barrier disturbances including a defective production of AMPs, alterations in thickness or composition of the intestinal mucus layer, alterations of pattern-recognition receptors, defects in the process of autophagy as well as unresolved endoplasmic reticulum stress result in an inadequate host protection and are thought to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory bowel diseases Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:24574793

  19. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  20. Multidimensional signatures in antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Nannette Y.; Yeaman, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional analyses distinguish between antimicrobial peptides by differences in amino acid sequence. Yet structural paradigms common to broader classes of these molecules have not been established. The current analyses examined the potential conservation of structural themes in antimicrobial peptides from evolutionarily diverse organisms. Using proteomics, an antimicrobial peptide signature was discovered to integrate stereospecific sequence patterns and a hallmark three-dimensional motif. This striking multidimensional signature is conserved among disulfide-containing antimicrobial peptides spanning biological kingdoms, and it transcends motifs previously limited to defined peptide subclasses. Experimental data validating this model enabled the identification of previously unrecognized antimicrobial activity in peptides of known identity. The multidimensional signature model provides a unifying structural theme in broad classes of antimicrobial peptides, will facilitate discovery of antimicrobial peptides as yet unknown, and offers insights into the evolution of molecular determinants in these and related host defense effector molecules. PMID:15118082

  1. Progressive inflammatory pathology in the retina of aluminum-fed 5xFAD transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Pogue, A I; Dua, P; Hill, J M; Lukiw, W J

    2015-11-01

    At least 57 murine transgenic models for Alzheimer's disease (Tg-AD) have been developed to overexpress the 42 amino acid amyloid-beta (Aβ42) peptide in the central nervous system (CNS). These 'humanized murine Tg-AD models' have greatly expanded our understanding of the contribution of Aβ42 peptide-mediated pro-inflammatory neuropathology to the AD process. A number of independent laboratories using different amyloid-overexpressing Tg-AD models have shown that supplementation of murine Tg-AD diets and/or drinking water with aluminum significantly enhances Aβ42 peptide-mediated inflammatory pathology and AD-type cognitive change compared to animals receiving control diets. In humans AD-type pathology appears to originate in the limbic system and progressively spreads into primary processing and sensory regions such as the retina. In these studies, for the first time, we assess the propagation of Aβ42 and inflammatory signals into the retina of 5xFAD Tg-AD amyloid-overexpressing mice whose diets were supplemented with aluminum. The two most interesting findings were (1) that similar to other Tg-AD models, there was a significantly accelerated development of Aβ42 and inflammatory pathology in 5xFAD Tg-AD mice fed aluminum; and (2) in aluminum-supplemented animals, markers for inflammatory pathology appeared in both the brain and the retina as evidenced by an evolving presence of Aβ42 peptides, and accompanied by inflammatory markers - cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The results indicate that in the 5xFAD Tg-AD model aluminum not only enhances an Aβ42-mediated inflammatory degeneration of the brain but also appears to induce AD-type pathology in an anatomically-linked primary sensory area that involves vision. PMID:26213226

  2. Obstructive inflammatory tracheal pseudomembrane.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Lessmann, Astrid; Torrego-Fernández, Alfons

    2013-09-01

    Pathologies acquired after the establishment of an artificial airway include stenosis, granulomas and the formation of pseudomembranes, to name a few. The most common form of presentation in adults is circumferential stenosis, which often requires therapeutic endoscopic measures to achieve resolution. This Case Report describes the case of an obstructive inflammatory tracheal pseudomembrane in the shape of a tracheal septum secondary to repeated intubations that was resolved with conservative treatment. The clinical presentation of this entity generally includes the appearance of respiratory infection and/or atelectasis after the withdrawal of the orotracheal tube as a consequence of the accumulation of secretions between the tracheal wall and the pseudomembrane. Inflammatory pseudomembranes can resolve spontaneously with the help of glucocorticoids, although on occasion they require an invasive endotracheal procedure depending on the evolution. PMID:23419993

  3. Inflammatory pseudotumor of spleen

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Parvin; Noorollahi, Hasan; Hani, Mohsen; Bagheri, Marzie

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is an uncommon tumor and its occurrence in spleen is rare. This tumor is composed of proliferation of spindle cells of unknown origin and etiology that mimic other tumors at clinical and histological evaluation. The most surmising etiology is Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and the most suspected origin is myofibroblasts, hence its synonym is “inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor.” The clinical appearance of tumor is related to its location but the most ones are abdominal pain, fever and weight loss. Surgical removal for this lesion is treatment of choice and there is few reported case with recurrence and metastasis. Herein we report a 63-year-old female patient with and abdominal discomfort that primary paraclinical investigations had been showed splenic mass and therefore surgical treatment was performed for her. Microscopic examination suggest some different diagnosis such as IPT, thus immunohistochemical staining was perform to confirm the diagnosis and rule out the others. PMID:24592376

  4. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Chronic Inflammatory polyneuropathies are an important group of neuromuscular disorders that present chronically and progress over more than 8 weeks, being referred to as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Despite tremendous progress in elucidating disease pathogenesis, the exact triggering event remains unknown. Our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of CIDP and its variants continues to expand, resulting in improved opportunities for identification and treatment. Most clinical neurologists will be involved in the management of patients with these disorders, and should be familiar with available therapies for CIDP. We review the distinctive clinical, laboratory, and electro-diagnostic features that aid in diagnosis. We emphasize the importance of clinical patterns that define treatment responsiveness and the most appropriate therapies in order to improve prognosis. PMID:23564314

  5. Inflammatory mechanisms of endometritis.

    PubMed

    Woodward, E M; Troedsson, M H T

    2015-07-01

    Transient post breeding endometritis is a normal physiological reaction in the mare, as it is believed that an inflammatory response is necessary for the effective removal of contaminating bacteria and excess spermatozoa introduced into the uterus. While most mares can clear endometritis within a reasonable amount of time, persistent endometritis caused by either bacteria or spermatozoa can threaten the success of a pregnancy. A subpopulation of mares is susceptible to persistent endometritis, and these mares are a concern in equine reproductive medicine. Research has identified several factors that contribute to susceptibility; however, the exact mechanisms of the progression of the disease are still being elucidated. Current research focuses on endometrial gene expression during endometritis in an attempt to understand the timing of specific inflammatory processes involved with the development of susceptibility to persistent endometritis. With an increased understanding of the mechanisms involved with the disease, current treatments can be improved upon, and new treatments can be developed to target affected pathways. PMID:25537084

  6. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  7. Keratoconus: an inflammatory disorder?

    PubMed

    Galvis, V; Sherwin, T; Tello, A; Merayo, J; Barrera, R; Acera, A

    2015-07-01

    Keratoconus has been classically defined as a progressive, non-inflammatory condition, which produces a thinning and steepening of the cornea. Its pathophysiological mechanisms have been investigated for a long time. Both genetic and environmental factors have been associated with the disease. Recent studies have shown a significant role of proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, and free radicals; therefore, although keratoconus does not meet all the classic criteria for an inflammatory disease, the lack of inflammation has been questioned. The majority of studies in the tears of patients with keratoconus have found increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Eye rubbing, a proven risk factor for keratoconus, has been also shown recently to increase the tear levels of MMP-13, IL-6, and TNF-α. In the tear fluid of patients with ocular rosacea, IL-1α and MMP-9 have been reported to be significantly elevated, and cases of inferior corneal thinning, resembling keratoconus, have been reported. We performed a literature review of published biochemical changes in keratoconus that would support that this could be, at least in part, an inflammatory condition. PMID:25931166

  8. Keratoconus: an inflammatory disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, V; Sherwin, T; Tello, A; Merayo, J; Barrera, R; Acera, A

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus has been classically defined as a progressive, non-inflammatory condition, which produces a thinning and steepening of the cornea. Its pathophysiological mechanisms have been investigated for a long time. Both genetic and environmental factors have been associated with the disease. Recent studies have shown a significant role of proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, and free radicals; therefore, although keratoconus does not meet all the classic criteria for an inflammatory disease, the lack of inflammation has been questioned. The majority of studies in the tears of patients with keratoconus have found increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Eye rubbing, a proven risk factor for keratoconus, has been also shown recently to increase the tear levels of MMP-13, IL-6, and TNF-α. In the tear fluid of patients with ocular rosacea, IL-1α and MMP-9 have been reported to be significantly elevated, and cases of inferior corneal thinning, resembling keratoconus, have been reported. We performed a literature review of published biochemical changes in keratoconus that would support that this could be, at least in part, an inflammatory condition. PMID:25931166

  9. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited

    PubMed Central

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B.; Butenko, Melinka A.; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S.; De Smet, Ive

    2015-01-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants. PMID:26136270

  10. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    PubMed

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants. PMID:26136270

  11. The Role of Formylated Peptides and Formyl Peptide Receptor 1 in Governing Neutrophil Function during Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dorward, David A.; Lucas, Christopher D.; Chapman, Gavin B.; Haslett, Christopher; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil migration to sites of inflammation and the subsequent execution of multiple functions are designed to contain and kill invading pathogens. These highly regulated and orchestrated processes are controlled by interactions between numerous receptors and their cognate ligands. Unraveling and identifying those that are central to inflammatory processes may represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of neutrophil-dominant inflammatory disorders in which dysregulated neutrophil recruitment, function, and elimination serve to potentiate rather than resolve an initial inflammatory insult. The first G protein–coupled receptor to be described on human neutrophils, formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1), is one such receptor that plays a significant role in the execution of these functions through multiple intracellular signaling pathways. Recent work has highlighted important observations with regard to both receptor function and the importance and functional relevance of FPR1 in the pathogenesis of a range of both sterile and infective inflammatory conditions. In this review, we explore the multiple components of neutrophil migration and function in both health and disease, with a focus on the role of FPR1 in these processes. The current understanding of FPR1 structure, function, and signaling is examined, alongside discussion of the potential importance of FPR1 in inflammatory diseases suggesting that FPR1 is a key regulator of the inflammatory environment. PMID:25791526

  12. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  13. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  14. The emerging role of peptides and lipids as antimicrobial epidermal barriers and modulators of local inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Brogden, N.K.; Mehalick, L.; Fischer, C.L.; Wertz, P.W.; Brogden, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Skin is complex and comprised of distinct layers, each layer with unique architecture and immunologic functions. Cells within these layers produce differing amounts of antimicrobial peptides and lipids (sphingoid bases and sebaceous fatty acids) that limit colonization of commensal and opportunistic microorganisms. Furthermore, antimicrobial peptides and lipids have distinct, concentration-dependent ancillary innate and adaptive immune functions. At 0.1-2.0 μM, antimicrobial peptides induce cell migration and adaptive immune responses to co-administered antigens. At 2.0-6.0 μM, they induce cell proliferation and enhance wound healing. At 6.0-12.0 μM, antimicrobial peptides can regulate chemokine and cytokine production and at their highest concentrations of 15.0-30.0 μM, antimicrobial peptides can be cytotoxic. At 1-100 nM, lipids enhance cell migration induced by chemokines, suppress apoptosis, and optimize T cell cytotoxicity and at 0.3-1.0 μM, they inhibit cell migration and attenuate chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. Recently many antimicrobial peptides and lipids at 0.1-2.0 μM have been found to attenuate the production of chemokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines to microbial antigens. Together, both the antimicrobial and the anti-inflammatory activities of these peptides and lipids may serve to create a strong, overlapping immunologic barrier that not only controls the concentrations of cutaneous commensal flora but also the extent to which they induce a localized inflammatory response. PMID:22538862

  15. Antimicrobial peptides: premises and promises.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K V R; Yedery, R D; Aranha, C

    2004-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the natural defences of most living organisms against invading pathogens. These are relatively small (< 10kDa), cationic and amphipathic peptides of variable length, sequence and structure. During the past two decades several AMPs have been isolated from a wide variety of animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants as well as from bacteria and fungi. Most of these peptides are obtained from different sources like macrophages, neutrophils, epithelial cells, haemocytes, fat body, reproductive tract, etc. These peptides exhibit broad-spectrum activity against a wide range of microorganisms including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, protozoa, yeast, fungi and viruses. A few peptides have also been found to be cytotoxic to sperm and tumour cells. AMPs are classified based on the three dimensional structural studies carried out with the help of NMR. The peptides are broadly classified into five major groups namely (a) peptides that form alpha-helical structures, (b) peptides rich in cysteine residues, (c) peptides that form beta-sheet, (d) peptides rich in regular amino acids namely histatin, arginine and proline and (e) peptides composed of rare and modified amino acids. Most of these peptides are believed to act by disrupting the plasma membrane leading to the lysis of the cell. AMPs have been found to be excellent candidates for developing novel antimicrobial agents and a few of these peptides show antimicrobial activity against pathogens causing sexually transmitted infection (STI), including HIV/HSV. Peptides, namely magainin and nisin have been shown to demonstrate contraceptive properties in vitro and in vivo. A few peptides have already entered clinical trials for the treatment of impetigo, diabetic foot ulcers and gastric helicobacter infections. In this review, we discuss the source, structures and mode of action with special reference to therapeutic considerations of various AMPs

  16. [Ultrasonographic diagnosis of inflammatory neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takamichi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Hosomi, Naohisa; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonographic nerve enlargement has primarily been reported in patients with inflammatory neuropathies such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, vasculitic neuropathy and leprosy. Nerve ultrasonography is a promising diagnostic supportive tool for inflammatory neuropathies. The ultrasonographic findings that are currently useful are 1) nerve enlargement primarily suggests the existence of inflammatory or demyelinating neuropathies and 2) for patients with CIDP or demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the pattern of nerve enlargement is noted, and this pattern is useful for discriminating between these diseases. More precise evidence of ultrasonographic findings for inflammatory neuropathies should be established in the future. PMID:24607946

  17. Biophysical mechanisms of endotoxin neutralization by cationic amphiphilic peptides.

    PubMed

    Kaconis, Yani; Kowalski, Ina; Howe, Jörg; Brauser, Annemarie; Richter, Walter; Razquin-Olazarán, Iosu; Iñigo-Pestaña, Melania; Garidel, Patrick; Rössle, Manfred; Martinez de Tejada, Guillermo; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides (LPS)) are strong elicitors of the human immune system by interacting with serum and membrane proteins such as lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) and CD14 with high specificity. At LPS concentrations as low as 0.3 ng/ml, such interactions may lead to severe pathophysiological effects, including sepsis and septic shock. One approach to inhibit an uncontrolled inflammatory reaction is the use of appropriate polycationic and amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides, here called synthetic anti-LPS peptides (SALPs). We designed various SALP structures and investigated their ability to inhibit LPS-induced cytokine secretion in vitro, their protective effect in a mouse model of sepsis, and their cytotoxicity in physiological human cells. Using a variety of biophysical techniques, we investigated selected SALPs with considerable differences in their biological responses to characterize and understand the mechanism of LPS inactivation by SALPs. Our investigations show that neutralization of LPS by peptides is associated with a fluidization of the LPS acyl chains, a strong exothermic Coulomb interaction between the two compounds, and a drastic change of the LPS aggregate type from cubic into multilamellar, with an increase in the aggregate sizes, inhibiting the binding of LBP and other mammalian proteins to the endotoxin. At the same time, peptide binding to phospholipids of human origin (e.g., phosphatidylcholine) does not cause essential structural changes, such as changes in membrane fluidity and bilayer structure. The absence of cytotoxicity is explained by the high specificity of the interaction of the peptides with LPS. PMID:21641310

  18. Phage-displayed peptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Zwick, Michael B; Shen, Juqun; Scott, Jamie K

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year, significant advances have been achieved through the use of phage-displayed peptide libraries. A wide variety of bioactive molecules, including antibodies, receptors and enzymes, have selected high-affinity and/or highly-specific peptide ligands from a number of different types of peptide library. The demonstrated therapeutic potential of some of these peptides, as well as new insights into protein structure and function that peptide ligands have provided, highlight the progress made within this rapidly-expanding field. PMID:9720267

  19. Vitamin D and inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kai; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    Beyond its critical function in calcium homeostasis, vitamin D has recently been found to play an important role in the modulation of the immune/inflammation system via regulating the production of inflammatory cytokines and inhibiting the proliferation of proinflammatory cells, both of which are crucial for the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Several studies have associated lower vitamin D status with increased risk and unfavorable outcome of acute infections. Vitamin D supplementation bolsters clinical responses to acute infection. Moreover, chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic kidney disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and others, tend to have lower vitamin D status, which may play a pleiotropic role in the pathogenesis of the diseases. In this article, we review recent epidemiological and interventional studies of vitamin D in various inflammatory diseases. The potential mechanisms of vitamin D in regulating immune/inflammatory responses in inflammatory diseases are also discussed. PMID:24971027

  20. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  1. Immobilized thrombin receptor agonist peptide accelerates wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Strukova, S M; Dugina, T N; Chistov, I V; Lange, M; Markvicheva, E A; Kuptsova, S; Zubov, V P; Glusa, E

    2001-10-01

    To accelerate the healing processes in wound repair, attempts have been repeatedly made to use growth factors including thrombin and its peptide fragments. Unfortunately, the employment of thrombin is limited because of its high liability and pro-inflammatory actions at high concentrations. Some cellular effects of thrombin in wound healing are mediated by the activation of protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1). The thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP:SFLLRN) activates this receptor and mimics the effects of thrombin, but TRAP is a relatively weak agonist. We speculated that the encapsulated peptide may be more effective for PAR-1 activation than nonimmobilized peptide and developed a novel method for TRAP encapsulation in hydrogel films based on natural and synthetic polymers. The effects of an encapsulated TRAP in composite poly(N-vinyl caprolactam)-calcium alginate (PVCL) hydrogel films were investigated in a mouse model of wound healing. On day 7 the wound sizes decreased by about 60% under TRAP-chitosan-containing PVCL films, as compared with control films without TRAP. In the case of TRAP-polylysine-containing films no significant decrease in wound sizes was found. The fibroblast/macrophage ratio increased under TRAP-containing films on day 3 and on day 7. The number of proliferating fibroblasts increased to 150% under TRAP-chitosan films on day 7 as compared with control films. The number of [3H]-thymidine labeled endothelial and epithelial cells in granulation tissues was also enhanced. Thus, the immobilized TRAP to PVCL-chitosan hydrogel films were found to promote wound healing following the stimulation of fibroblast and epithelial cell proliferation and neovascularization. Furthermore, TRAP was shown to inhibit the secretion of the inflammatory mediator PAF from stimulated rat peritoneal mast cells due to augmentation of NO release from the mast cells. The encapsulated TRAP is suggested to accelerate wound healing due to the anti-inflammatory effects

  2. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  3. Natriuretic peptides in fish physiology.

    PubMed

    Loretz, C A; Pollina, C

    2000-02-01

    Natriuretic peptides exist in the fishes as a family of structurally-related isohormones including atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and ventricular natriuretic peptide (VNP); to date, brain natriuretic peptide (or B-type natriuretic peptide, BNP) has not been definitively identified in the fishes. Based on nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarity, the natriuretic peptide family of isohormones may have evolved from a neuromodulatory, CNP-like brain peptide. The primary sites of synthesis for the circulating hormones are the heart and brain; additional extracardiac and extracranial sites, including the intestine, synthesize and release natriuretic peptides locally for paracrine regulation of various physiological functions. Membrane-bound, guanylyl cyclase-coupled natriuretic peptide receptors (A- and B-types) are generally implicated in mediating natriuretic peptide effects via the production of cyclic GMP as the intracellular messenger. C- and D-type natriuretic peptide receptors lacking the guanylyl cyclase domain may influence target cell function through G(i) protein-coupled inhibition of membrane adenylyl cyclase activity, and they likely also act as clearance receptors for circulating hormone. In the few systems examined using homologous or piscine reagents, differential receptor binding and tissue responsiveness to specific natriuretic peptide isohormones is demonstrated. Similar to their acute physiological effects in mammals, natriuretic peptides are vasorelaxant in all fishes examined. In contrast to mammals, where natriuretic peptides act through natriuresis and diuresis to bring about long-term reductions in blood volume and blood pressure, in fishes the primary action appears to be the extrusion of excess salt at the gills and rectal gland, and the limiting of drinking-coupled salt uptake by the alimentary system. In teleosts, both hypernatremia and hypervolemia are effective stimuli for cardiac secretion of

  4. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3–8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting—cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  5. Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is the body's first response to infection or injury and is critical for both innate and adaptive immunity. It can be considered as part of the complex biological response of vascular tissues to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. The search for natural compounds and phytoconstituents that are able to interfere with these mechanisms by preventing a prolonged inflammation could be useful for human health. Here, the anti-inflammatory properties of plant-based drugs are put together with both in vitro and acute (carrageenan, egg albumin and croton oil) and chronic (cotton pellet) in vivo models. PMID:26939273

  6. [Inflammatory myopathies. New concepts].

    PubMed

    López Longo, Francisco Javier

    2008-03-01

    Myopathies are diseases characterized by the primary affection of skeletal muscle. In general they present with muscle weakness, pain, contracture, paresthesias, rigidity, or fatigue. They can be hereditary, such as muscle dystrophies, congenital, myotonic, metabolic, and myasthenic, or acquired. Among the latter ones we include idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), toxic, endocrine, or infectious myopathies and myasthenia gravis. There is a current acceptance of considerable clinical and histopathological overlap among some muscle dystrophies and some IIM. However, the molecular profile is different and characteristic in each myopathy and the study into the patterns of expression of genes in the muscle can be useful in their differential diagnosis, including that of IIM. PMID:21794553

  7. Uncoupling Angiogenesis and Inflammation in Peripheral Artery Disease with Therapeutic Peptide-loaded Microgels

    PubMed Central

    Zachman, Angela L.; Wang, Xintong; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Fitzpatrick, Sean T.; Lee, Sue H.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Skala, Melissa C.; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized by vessel occlusion and ischemia in the limbs. Treatment for PAD with surgical interventions has been showing limited success. Moreover, recent clinical trials with treatment of angiogenic growth factors proved ineffective as increased angiogenesis triggered severe inflammation in a proportionally coupled fashion. Hence, the overarching goal of this research was to address this issue by developing a biomaterial system that enables controlled, dual delivery of pro-angiogenic C16 and anti-inflammatory Ac-SDKP peptides in a minimally-invasive way. To achieve the goal, a peptide-loaded injectable microgel system was developed and tested in a mouse model of PAD. When delivered through multiple, low volume injections, the combination of C16 and Ac-SDKP peptides promoted angiogenesis, muscle regeneration, and perfusion recovery, while minimizing detrimental inflammation. Additionally, this peptide combination regulated inflammatory TNF-α pathways independently of MMP-9 mediated pathways of angiogenesis in vitro, suggesting a potential mechanism by which angiogenic and inflammatory responses can be uncoupled in the context of PAD. This study demonstrates a translatable potential of the dual peptide-loaded injectable microgel system for PAD treatment. PMID:25154665

  8. Regulation of Airway Inflammation by G-protein Regulatory Motif Peptides of AGS3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, IL-Whan; Ahn, Do Whan; Choi, Jang-Kyu; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ock, Mee Sun; You, EunAe; Rhee, SangMyung; Kim, Kwang Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung infections have critical consequences on mortality and morbidity in humans. The aims of the present study were to examine the mechanisms by which CXCL12 affects MUC1 transcription and airway inflammation, which depend on activator of G-protein signaling (AGS) 3 and to identify specific molecules that suppress CXCL12-induced airway inflammation by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors. Herein, AGS3 suppresses CXCL12-mediated upregulation of MUC1 and TNFα by regulating Gαi. We found that the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif peptide in AGS3 binds to Gαi and downregulates MUC1 expression; in contrast, this motif upregulates TNFα expression. Mutated GPR Q34A peptide increased the expression of MUC1 and TGFβ but decreased the expression of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, CXCR4-induced dendritic extensions in 2D and 3D matrix cultures were inhibited by the GPR Q34A peptide compared with a wild-type GPR peptide. The GPR Q34A peptide also inhibited CXCL12-induced morphological changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the mouse lung, and production of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the lungs. Our data indicate that the GPR motif of AGS3 is critical for regulating MUC1/Muc1 expression and cytokine production in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27270970

  9. [Brain natriuretic peptide].

    PubMed

    La Villa, G; Lazzeri, C; Fronzaroli, C; Franchi, F; Gentilini, P

    1995-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone with a spectrum of activities quite similar to those of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), including diuretic, natriuretic, hypotensive and smooth muscle relaxant activities. These effects are due to the stimulation of guanylate cyclase-linked natriuretic peptide receptors, leading to an increase in cyclic GMP concentration in target cells. BNP has a lower affinity than ANP for C (clearance) receptors, and is less susceptible to degradation by neutral endopeptidase-24.11, resulting in a longer half-life. In the kidney, BNP increases the glomerular filtration rate and inhibits sodium reabsorption in the distal tubule. It also inhibits the release of renin and aldosterone. Unlike ANP, produced by the atria, BNP is mainly synthesized and released into circulation by the left ventricle and is therefore influenced by stimuli involving this cardiac chamber, such as an increase in arterial pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and dilation. Plasma BNP levels are very low in healthy subjects, and respond modestly, although significantly to physiological stimuli such as changes in posture or sodium intake. In contrast, plasma BNP concentrations increase in disease states such as cirrhosis with ascites, hypertension, chronic renal failure, acute myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure. In the latter condition, plasma BNP concentration is a reliable prognostic index. Evidence obtained by administering BNP to healthy subjects and hypertensive patients suggests that BNP, at physiological and pathophysiological plasma concentrations, markedly influences cardiovascular homeostasis, mainly due to its effects on sodium excretion and the renin-aldosterone axis. PMID:8718658

  10. The Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptide 19-2.5 Interacts with Heparanase and Heparan Sulfate in Murine and Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; De Santis, Rebecca; Koczera, Patrick; Simons, Nadine; Haase, Hajo; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus; Marx, Gernot; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains from their proteoglycans. Thereby, heparanase liberates highly potent circulating heparan sulfate-fragments (HS-fragments) and triggers the fatal and excessive inflammatory response in sepsis. As a potential anti-inflammatory agent for sepsis therapy, peptide 19–2.5 belongs to the class of synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide peptides; however, its activity is not restricted to Gram-negative bacterial infection. We hypothesized that peptide 19–2.5 interacts with heparanase and/or HS, thereby reducing the levels of circulating HS-fragments in murine and human sepsis. Our data indicate that the treatment of septic mice with peptide 19–2.5 compared to untreated control animals lowers levels of plasma heparanase and circulating HS-fragments and reduces heparanase activity. Additionally, mRNA levels of heparanase in heart, liver, lung, kidney and spleen are downregulated in septic mice treated with peptide 19–2.5 compared to untreated control animals. In humans, plasma heparanase level and activity are elevated in septic shock. The ex vivo addition of peptide 19–2.5 to plasma of septic shock patients decreases heparanase activity but not heparanase level. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed a strong exothermic reaction between peptide 19–2.5 and heparanase and HS-fragments. However, a saturation character has been identified only in the peptide 19–2.5 and HS interaction. In conclusion, the findings of our current study indicate that peptide 19–2.5 interacts with heparanase, which is elevated in murine and human sepsis and consecutively attenuates the generation of circulating HS-fragments in systemic inflammation. Thus, peptide 19–2.5 seems to be a potential anti-inflammatory agent in sepsis. PMID:26600070