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Sample records for inflammatory response syndrome

  1. Defining the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome in Equine Neonates.

    PubMed

    Wong, David M; Wilkins, Pamela A

    2015-12-01

    Defining and describing the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis facilitated recognition and investigation of the complex disease processes involving the host response to infection and trauma. Over the years a variety of definitions of SIRS have been examined and applied to numerous research studies to improve critical care in both human and veterinary clinical practice. This article summarizes the history of the development of the SIRS definition, outlines the pathophysiologic processes that are involved in SIRS, and provides a specific definition for use in foal medicine. PMID:26612743

  2. Fracture initiates systemic inflammatory response syndrome through recruiting polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Haipeng; Liu, Jia; Yao, Jianhua; Zhong, Jianfeng; Guo, Lei; Sun, Tiansheng

    2016-08-01

    Fracture, a common type injury in trauma patients, often results in the development of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Though the mechanism of the fracture-initiated SIRS still remains not well characterized, it is well documented that the polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) play an important role in the inflammatory process. We hypothesize that fractures recruit PMN to the local tissue, which is followed by an increase in the number of peripheral PMN and initiation of SIRS. In the current study, we established a closed femoral fracture rat model. We evaluated the levels of MPO, IL-1β and CINC-1 in fractured tissue homogenate, and we measured the levels of IL-6 and IL-10, the biomarkers for systemic inflammatory response, in the rat sera. In clinical part of the study, we collected blood from patients with isolated closed femoral fractures and evaluated PMN-related chemoattractants (IL-8, IL-1β and G-CSF) and the number of peripheral PMN. We further evaluated the level of mitochondrial DNA in the local haematoma of fracture and the circulating plasma of the patients with fracture. In the animal model of closed femoral fracture, we found a significant recruitment of PMN to the local tissue after fracture, which correlates with the elevated MPO level. We also showed that the concentration of IL-1β and CINC-1 in local tissue is significantly increased and might be responsible for the PMN recruitment. Recruitment of PMN to the local tissue was accompanied with a significant increase in the systemic levels of IL-6 and IL-10 in serum. In the patients with closed femoral fracture, we observed an increase in the number of peripheral PMN and PMN-related chemoattractants, including IL-8, IL-1β and G-CSF. The level of mitochondrial DNA in the local haematoma of fracture and the circulating plasma of patients were significantly higher compared to the healthy volunteers. Our data suggest that fracture released mitochondrial DNA into the local haematoma of

  3. Procalcitonin does discriminate between sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arkader, R; Troster, E J; Lopes, M R; Júnior, R R; Carcillo, J A; Leone, C; Okay, T S

    2006-01-01

    Aims To evaluate whether procalcitonin (PCT) and C reactive protein (CRP) are able to discriminate between sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in critically ill children. Methods Prospective, observational study in a paediatric intensive care unit. Kinetics of PCT and CRP were studied in patients undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) (SIRS model; group I1) and patients with confirmed bacterial sepsis (group II). Results In group I, PCT median concentration was 0.24 ng/ml (reference value <2.0 ng/ml). There was an increment of PCT concentrations which peaked immediately after CPB (median 0.58 ng/ml), then decreased to 0.47 ng/ml at 24 h; 0.33 ng/ml at 48 h, and 0.22 ng/ml at 72 h. CRP median concentrations remained high on POD1 (36.6 mg/l) and POD2 (13.0 mg/l). In group II, PCT concentrations were high at admission (median 9.15 ng/ml) and subsequently decreased in 11/14 patients who progressed favourably (median 0.31 ng/ml). CRP levels were high in only 11/14 patients at admission. CRP remained high in 13/14 patients at 24 h; in 12/14 at 48 h; and in 10/14 patients at 72 h. Median values were 95.0, 50.9, 86.0, and 20.3 mg/l, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was 0.99 for PCT and 0.54 for CRP. Cut off concentrations to differentiate SIRS from sepsis were >2 ng/ml for PCT and >79 mg/l for CRP. Conclusion PCT is able to differentiate between SIRS and sepsis while CRP is not. Moreover, unlike CRP, PCT concentrations varied with the evolution of sepsis. PMID:16326799

  4. Ultrasonographic approach to diagnosis of fetal inflammatory response syndrome: a tool for at-risk fetuses?

    PubMed

    Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Erez, Offer; Loverro, Giuseppe; Di Naro, Edoardo; Weintraub, Adi Yehuda; Tirosh, Dan; Baron, Joel; Hershkovitz, Reli

    2016-07-01

    Preterm parturition is a syndrome that may result from many underlying mechanisms. Infection and inflammation are the prominent ones. Intrauterine infection and inflammation have an effect akin to sepsis, and that is similar to systemic inflammatory response in adults. Indeed, there is evidence to support the association of a fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) to systemic infection and inflammation. The utilization of invasive procedures for the prenatal diagnosis of FIRS is associated with a risk for complications resulting from the invasive method. The progress in the imaging quality of obstetrical ultrasound and the development of novel methods for functional anatomical assessment of the fetal organs may help to identify, noninvasively, fetuses at risk for FIRS in patients presenting with preterm labor. We review the studies describing advanced sonographic modalities and the imaging findings in the heart, thymus, kidney, adrenal glands, and spleen of these fetuses. PMID:26821337

  5. The Biochemical Origin of Pain: The origin of all Pain is Inflammation and the Inflammatory Response. PART 2 of 3 –Inflammatory Profile of Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Every pain syndrome has an inflammatory profile consisting of the inflammatory mediators that are present in the pain syndrome. The inflammatory profile may have variations from one person to another and may have variations in the same person at different times. The key to treatment of Pain Syndromes is an understanding of their inflammatory profile. Pain syndromes may be treated medically or surgically. The goal should be inhibition or suppression of production of the inflammatory mediators and inhibition, suppression or modulation of neuronal afferent and efferent (motor) transmission. A successful outcome is one that results in less inflammation and thus less pain. We hereby describe the inflammatory profile for several pain syndromes including arthritis, back pain, neck pain, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, migraine, neuropathic pain, complex regional pain syndrome / reflex sympathetic dystrophy (CRPS/RSD), bursitis, shoulder pain and vulvodynia. These profiles are derived from basic science and clinical research performed in the past by numerous investigators and will be updated in the future by new technologies such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our unifying theory or law of pain states: The origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. The biochemical mediators of inflammation include cytokines, neuropeptides, growth factors and neurotransmitters. Irrespective of the type of pain whether it is acute or chronic pain, peripheral or central pain, nociceptive or neuropathic pain, the underlying origin is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Activation of pain receptors, transmission and modulation of pain signals, neuro plasticity and central sensitization are all one continuum of inflammation and the inflammatory response. Irrespective of the characteristic of the pain, whether it is sharp, dull, aching, burning, stabbing, numbing or tingling, all pain arise from inflammation and the inflammatory response. We are proposing

  6. Renal systems biology of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tsalik, Ephraim L.; Willig, Laurel K.; Rice, Brandon J.; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C.; Mohney, Robert P.; McDunn, Jonathan; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Miller, Neil A.; Mayer, Eric; Glickman, Seth W.; Jaehne, Anja K.; Glew, Robert H.; Sopori, Mohan L.; Otero, Ronny M.; Harrod, Kevin S.; Cairns, Charles B.; Fowler, Vance G.; Rivers, Emanuel P.; Woods, Christopher W.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Langley, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    A systems biology approach was used to comprehensively examine the impact of renal disease and hemodialysis (HD) on patient response during critical illness. To achieve this we examined the metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome of 150 patients with critical illness, stratified by renal function. Quantification of plasma metabolites indicated greater change as renal function declined, with the greatest derangements in patients receiving chronic HD. Specifically, 6 uremic retention molecules, 17 other protein catabolites, 7 modified nucleosides, and 7 pentose phosphate sugars increased as renal function declined, consistent with decreased excretion or increased catabolism of amino acids and ribonucleotides. Similarly, the proteome showed increased levels of low-molecular weight proteins and acute phase reactants. The transcriptome revealed a broad-based decrease in mRNA levels among patients on HD. Systems integration revealed an unrecognized association between plasma RNASE1 and several RNA catabolites and modified nucleosides. Further, allantoin, N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, and n-acetylaspartate were inversely correlated with the majority of significantly down-regulated genes. Thus, renal function broadly affected the plasma metabolome, proteome, and peripheral blood transcriptome during critical illness; changes not effectively mitigated by hemodialysis. These studies allude to several novel mechanisms whereby renal dysfunction contributes to critical illness. PMID:25993322

  7. Renal systems biology of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsalik, Ephraim L; Willig, Laurel K; Rice, Brandon J; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C; Mohney, Robert P; McDunn, Jonathan E; Dinwiddie, Darrell L; Miller, Neil A; Mayer, Eric S; Glickman, Seth W; Jaehne, Anja K; Glew, Robert H; Sopori, Mohan L; Otero, Ronny M; Harrod, Kevin S; Cairns, Charles B; Fowler, Vance G; Rivers, Emanuel P; Woods, Christopher W; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Langley, Raymond J

    2015-10-01

    A systems biology approach was used to comprehensively examine the impact of renal disease and hemodialysis (HD) on patient response during critical illness. To achieve this, we examined the metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome of 150 patients with critical illness, stratified by renal function. Quantification of plasma metabolites indicated greater change as renal function declined, with the greatest derangements in patients receiving chronic HD. Specifically, 6 uremic retention molecules, 17 other protein catabolites, 7 modified nucleosides, and 7 pentose phosphate sugars increased as renal function declined, consistent with decreased excretion or increased catabolism of amino acids and ribonucleotides. Similarly, the proteome showed increased levels of low-molecular-weight proteins and acute-phase reactants. The transcriptome revealed a broad-based decrease in mRNA levels among patients on HD. Systems integration revealed an unrecognized association between plasma RNASE1 and several RNA catabolites and modified nucleosides. Further, allantoin, N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, and N-acetylaspartate were inversely correlated with the majority of significantly downregulated genes. Thus, renal function broadly affected the plasma metabolome, proteome, and peripheral blood transcriptome during critical illness; changes were not effectively mitigated by hemodialysis. These studies allude to several novel mechanisms whereby renal dysfunction contributes to critical illness. PMID:25993322

  8. A review of the neuro- and systemic inflammatory responses in post concussion symptoms: Introduction of the "post-inflammatory brain syndrome" PIBS.

    PubMed

    Rathbone, Alasdair Timothy Llewelyn; Tharmaradinam, Surejini; Jiang, Shucui; Rathbone, Michel P; Kumbhare, Dinesh A

    2015-05-01

    Post-concussion syndrome is an aggregate of symptoms that commonly present together after head injury. These symptoms, depending on definition, include headaches, dizziness, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and cognitive impairment. However, these symptoms are common, occurring frequently in non-head injured controls, leading some to question the existence of post-concussion syndrome as a unique syndrome. Therefore, some have attempted to explain post-concussion symptoms as post-traumatic stress disorder, as they share many similar symptoms and post-traumatic stress disorder does not require head injury. This explanation falls short as patients with post-concussion syndrome do not necessarily experience many key symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore, other explanations must be sought to explain the prevalence of post-concussion like symptoms in non-head injury patients. Many of the situations in which post-concussion syndrome like symptoms may be experienced such as infection and post-surgery are associated with systemic inflammatory responses, and even neuroinflammation. Post-concussion syndrome itself has a significant neuroinflammatory component. In this review we examine the evidence of neuroinflammation in post-concussion syndrome and the potential role systemic inflammation plays in post-concussion syndrome like symptoms. We conclude that given the overlap between these conditions and the role of inflammation in their etiologies, a new term, post-inflammatory brain syndromes (PIBS), is necessary to describe the common outcomes of many different inflammatory insults. The concept of post-concussion syndrome is in its evolution therefore, the new term post-inflammatory brain syndromes provides a better understanding of etiology of its wide-array of symptoms and the wide array of conditions they can be seen in. PMID:25736063

  9. Intravenous Immunoglobulin with Enhanced Polyspecificity Improves Survival in Experimental Sepsis and Aseptic Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Roumenina, Lubka; Pashov, Anastas; Dimitrov, Jordan; Hadzhieva, Maya; Lindig, Sandro; Voynova, Elisaveta; Dimitrova, Petya; Ivanovska, Nina; Bockmeyer, Clemens; Stefanova, Zvetanka; Fitting, Catherine; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; von Gunten, Stephan; Kaveri, Srini; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Bauer, Michael; Vassilev, Tchavdar

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause for death worldwide. Numerous interventional trials with agents neutralizing single proinflammatory mediators have failed to improve survival in sepsis and aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndromes. This failure could be explained by the widespread gene expression dysregulation known as “genomic storm” in these patients. A multifunctional polyspecific therapeutic agent might be needed to thwart the effects of this storm. Licensed pooled intravenous immunoglobulin preparations seemed to be a promising candidate, but they have also failed in their present form to prevent sepsis-related death. We report here the protective effect of a single dose of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with additionally enhanced polyspecificity in three models of sepsis and aseptic systemic inflammation. The modification of the pooled immunoglobulin G molecules by exposure to ferrous ions resulted in their newly acquired ability to bind some proinflammatory molecules, complement components and endogenous “danger” signals. The improved survival in endotoxemia was associated with serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, diminished complement consumption and normalization of the coagulation time. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with additionally enhanced polyspecificity have a clinical potential in sepsis and related systemic inflammatory syndromes. PMID:26701312

  10. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs attenuate the vascular responses in aging metabolic syndrome rats

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Diaz-Diaz, Eulises; Pavón, Natalia; Guarner-Lans, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging are low-grade systemic inflammatory conditions, and inflammation is a key component of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) upon the vascular reactivity in aging MS rats. Methods: MS was induced in young male rats by adding 30% sucrose in drinking water over 6, 12, and 18 months. When the treatment was finished, the blood samples were collected, and aortas were dissected out. The expression of COX isoenzymes and PLA2 in the aortas was analyzed using Western blot analysis. The contractile responses of aortic rings to norepinephrine (1 μmol/L) were measured in the presence or absence of different NSAIDs (10 μmol/L for each). Results: Serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β) in control rats were remained stable during the aging process, whereas serum IL-6 in MS rats were significantly increased at 12 and 18 months. The levels of COX isoenzyme and PLA2 in aortas from control rats increased with the aging, whereas those in aortas from MS rats were irregularly increased with the highest levels at 6 months. Pretreatment with acetylsalicylic acid (a COX-1 preferential inhibitor), indomethacin (a non-selective COX inhibitor) or meloxicam (a COX-2 preferential inhibitor) decreased NE-induced contractions of aortic rings from MS rats at all the ages, with meloxicam being the most potent. Acetylsalicylic acid also significantly reduced the maximum responses of ACh-induced vasorelaxation of aortic rings from MS rats, but indomethacin and meloxicam had no effect. Conclusion: NSAIDs can directly affect vascular responses in aging MS rats. Understanding the effects of NSAIDs on blood vessels may improve the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and MS in the elders. PMID:25263337

  11. Micronutrients and intrauterine infection, preterm birth and the fetal inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Romero, Roberto; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Espinoza, Jimmy

    2003-05-01

    Prematurity is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Intrauterine infection has emerged as a major cause of premature labor and delivery. It has been estimated that 25% of all preterm deliveries occur to mothers who have microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity, although these infections are mostly subclinical in nature. This article describes the pathways leading to intrauterine infection, microbiology, frequency and clinical consequences of infection. The pathophysiology of the fetal inflammatory response syndrome is reviewed, as is its relationship to long-term handicap, such as cerebral palsy and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. A possible role for two micronutrients, vitamins C and E, in the prevention of the preterm prelabor rupture of membranes and the consequences of fetal inflammation is considered. Research needs are listed. PMID:12730483

  12. Integrated systemic inflammatory response syndrome epidemic model in scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shao-Hong; Zhang, Da-Min; Gong, Guang-Wu; Guo, Chang-Rui

    2011-09-01

    Based on the scale-free network, an integrated systemic inflammatory response syndrome model with artificial immunity, a feedback mechanism, crowd density and the moving activities of an individual can be built. The effects of these factors on the spreading process are investigated through the model. The research results show that the artificial immunity can reduce the stable infection ratio and enhance the spreading threshold of the system. The feedback mechanism can only reduce the stable infection ratio of system, but cannot affect the spreading threshold of the system. The bigger the crowd density is, the higher the infection ratio of the system is and the smaller the spreading threshold is. In addition, the simulations show that the individual movement can enhance the stable infection ratio of the system only under the condition that the spreading rate is high, however, individual movement will reduce the stable infection ratio of the system.

  13. Testicular trauma resulting in shock and systemic inflammatory response syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Okonkwo, Kingsley C; Wong, Kristin G; Cho, Cheng T; Gilmer, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute painful scrotum in children may be associated with torsion of the testis, hematocele, epididymitis and direct testicular injury with hematoma formation. More frequently, however, acute scrotum occurs without a precipitating factor. While most traumatic testicular injuries resolve with conservative management, many require surgical exploration and some are life-threatening. Case presentation A 13-year-old boy with a history of testicular trauma presented with severe scrotal swelling and shock. This case study examines the presentation and possible role of cytokines in the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome in a child with acute traumatic epididymitis. Conclusion Post-traumatic epididymitis presenting as shock in boys is rarely reported. We advocate early recognition of the chain of events leading to clinical presentation of shock and prompt treatment to preserve testicular viability. PMID:18577243

  14. Is circulating endotoxin the trigger for the systemic inflammatory response syndrome seen after injury?

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J L; O'Sullivan, C; O'Riordain, M; O'Riordain, D; Lyons, A; Doherty, J; Mannick, J A; Rodrick, M L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with severe traumatic or burn injury and a mouse model of burn injury were studied early after injury to determine the relation of plasma endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) to the production of proinflammatory cytokines and subsequent resistance to infection. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Elevated levels of plasma LPS have been reported in patients after serious injury. It has been suggested that circulating LPS may be a trigger for increased proinflammatory cytokine production and may play a role in the septic syndromes seen in a substantial portion of such patients. Yet, despite multiple reports of leakage of LPS from the gut and bacterial translocation after injury in animal models, there is little direct evidence linking circulating LPS with production of inflammatory mediators. METHODS: The authors studied serial samples of peripheral blood from 10 patients with 25% to 50% surface area burns and 8 trauma patients (injury Severity Score, 25-57). Patients were compared with 18 healthy volunteers. The study was focused on the first 10 days after injury before the onset of sepsis or the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Plasma samples were assayed for LPS, and adherent cells from the blood were studied for basal and LPS-stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The correlation of increased plasma LPS with TNF-alpha production was studied as was the association of increased plasma LPS and increased TNF-alpha production with subsequent septic complications. We also studied a mouse model of 25% burn injury. Burn mice were compared with sham burn control subjects. Plasma samples were assayed at serial intervals for LPS, and adherent cells from the spleens were studied for basal- and LPS-stimulated production of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6. Expression of the messenger RNAs for IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha also was measured. The relation of increased TNF

  15. Cinnamaldehyde modulates LPS-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome through TRPA1-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Saulo J F; Sousa, Fernanda I A B; Pereira, Domingos M S; Ferro, Thiago A F; Pereira, Ione C P; Silva, Bruna L R; Pinheiro, Aruanã J M C R; Mouchrek, Adriana Q S; Monteiro-Neto, Valério; Costa, Soraia K P; Nascimento, José L M; Grisotto, Marcos A G; da Costa, Robson; Fernandes, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a natural essential oil suggested to possess anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; and to activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels expressed on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of cinnamaldehyde in an in vivo model of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) induced by lipopolysaccharide. Swiss mice received a single oral treatment with cinnamaldehyde 1 h before LPS injection. To investigate whether cinnamaldehyde effects are dependent on TRPA1 activation, animals were treated subcutaneously with the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 5 min prior to cinnamaldehyde administration. Vehicle-treated mice were used as controls. Cinnamaldehyde ameliorated SIRS severity in LPS-injected animals. Diminished numbers of circulating mononuclear cells and increased numbers of peritoneal mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cell numbers were also observed. Cinnamaldehyde augmented the number of peritoneal Ly6C(high) and Ly6C(low) monocyte/macrophage cells in LPS-injected mice. Reduced levels of nitric oxide, plasma TNFα and plasma and peritoneal IL-10 were also detected. Additionally, IL-1β levels were increased in the same animals. TRPA1 antagonism by HC-030031 reversed the changes in the number of circulating and peritoneal leukocytes in cinnamaldehyde-treated animals, whilst increasing the levels of peritoneal IL-10 and reducing peritoneal IL-1β. Overall, cinnamaldehyde modulates SIRS through TRPA1-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:26922677

  16. CD11d integrin blockade reduces the systemic inflammatory response syndrome after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Feng; Brown, Arthur; Dekaban, Gregory A.; Omana, Vanessa; Weaver, Lynne C.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the spinal cord triggers a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), in which inflammatory cells from the circulation invade organs such as the liver, lung and kidney, leading to damage of these organs. Our previous study (Gris, et al, Exp. Neurol, 2008) demonstrated that spinal cord injury (SCI) activates circulating neutrophils that then invade the lung and kidney from 2 to 24 h after injury, increasing myeloperoxidase activity, cyclooxygenase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and lipid peroxidation in these organs. The present study was designed to ascertain whether a treatment that limits the influx of leukocytes into the injured spinal cord would also be effective in reducing the SIRS after SCI. This treatment is intravenous delivery of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the CD11d subunit of the CD11d/CD18 integrin expressed by neutrophils and monocytes. We delivered the anti-CD11d mAb at 2 h post moderate clip compression SCI at the 4th or 12th thoracic segments and assessed inflammation, oxidative activity and cellular damage within the lung, kidney and liver at 12 h post-injury. In some analyses we compared high and low thoracic injuries to evaluate the importance of injury level on the intensity of the SIRS. After T4 injury, treatment with the anti-integrin mAb reduced the presence of neutrophils and macrophages in the lung, with associated decreases in expression of NF-κB and oxidative enzymes and in the concentration of free radicals in this organ. The treatment also reduced lipid peroxidation, protein nitration and cell death in the lung. The anti-CD11d treatment also reduced the inflammatory cells within the kidney after T4 injury, as well as the free radical concentration and amount of lipid peroxidation. In the liver, the mAb treatment reduced the influx of neutrophils but most of the other measures examined were unaffected by SCI. The inflammatory responses within the lung and kidney were often greater after T4

  17. Effect of lornoxicam in lung inflammatory response syndrome after operations for cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Vretzkakis, Giorgos; Mikroulis, Dimitris; Mpakas, Andreas; Kesisis, Georgios; Arikas, Stamatis; Kolettas, Alexandros; Moschos, Giorgios; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Siminelakis, Stavros; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Background The establishment of Extracorporeal Circulation (EC) significantly contributed to improvement of cardiac surgery, but this is accompanied by harmful side-effects. The most important of them is systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Many efforts have been undertaken to minimize this problem but unfortunately without satisfied solution to date. Materials and methods Lornoxicam is a non steroid anti-inflammatory drug which temporally inhibits the cycloxygenase. In this clinical trial we study the effect of lornoxicam in lung inflammatory response after operations for cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. In our study we conclude 14 volunteers patients with ischemic coronary disease undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with EC. In seven of them 16 mg lornoxicam was administered iv before the anesthesia induction and before the connection in heart-lung machine. In control group (7 patients) we administered the same amount of normal saline. Results Both groups are equal regarding pro-operative and intra-operative parameters. The inflammatory markers were calculated by Elisa method. We measured the levels of cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, e-Selectin, p-Selectin) and matrix metaloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) just after anesthesia induction, before and after cardiopulmonary bypass, just after the patients administration in ICU and after 8 and 24 hrs. In all patients we estimated the lung’s inflammatory reaction with lung biopsy taken at the begging and at the end of the operation. We calculated hemodynamics parameters: Cardiac Index (CI), Systemic Vascular Resistance Index (SVRI), Pulmonary Vascular Resistance Index (PVRI), Left Ventricular Stroke Work Index (LVSWI), Right Ventricular Stroke Work Index (RVSWI), and the Pulmonary arterial pressure, and respiratory parameters too: alveolo-arterial oxygen difference D (A-a), intrapulmonary shunt (Qs/Qt) and pulmonary Compliance. IL-6 levels of lornoxicam group were statistical

  18. Reliability of the Identification of the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome in Critically Ill Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Juskewitch, Justin E.; Prasad, Swati; Santillan Salas, Carlos F.; Huskins, W. Charles

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess inter-observer reliability of the identification of episodes of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in critically ill hospitalized infants and children. Design Retrospective cross-sectional study of the application of the 2005 consensus definition of SIRS in infants and children by two independent trained reviewers using information in the electronic medical record. Setting 18-bed pediatric multidisciplinary medical/surgical pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Patients A randomly selected sample of children admitted consecutively to the PICU between May 1 and September 30, 2009. Measurements and Main Results 60 infants and children were selected from a total of 343 admitted patients. Their median age was 3.9 years (interquartile range [IQR], 1.5–12.7), 57% were female, and 68% were Caucasian. 19 (32%) children were identified by both reviewers as having an episode of SIRS (88% agreement, 95% confidence interval [CI] 78–94; κ = 0.75, 95% CI, 0.59–0.92). Amongst those 19 children, agreement between the reviewers for individual SIRS criteria was: temperature (84%, 95% CI 60–97); white blood cell count (89%, 95% CI 67–99); respiratory rate (84%, 95% CI 60–97); heart rate (68%, 95% CI 33–87). Conclusions Episodes of SIRS in critically ill infants and children can be identified reproducibly using the consensus definition. PMID:21926661

  19. Ischemic preconditioning and inflammatory response syndrome after reperfusion injury: an experimental model in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Grigorescu, Bianca Liana; Georgescu, Anca Meda; Cioc, Adrian-Dan; Fodor, Raluca-Ştefania; Cotoi, Ovidiu Simion; Fodor, Pal; Copotoiu, Sanda Maria; Azamfirei, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of local ischemia and inflammatory response syndrome correlated with histological changes associated with ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) after revascularization techniques. We included 12 adult male Wistar rats, aged eight weeks that were randomly divided into two groups. The first group acted as the control and at the second group, we induced diabetes by intraperitoneal streptozotocin administration (60 mg/kg). After eight weeks, the rats were subject to ischemic preconditioning for 10 minutes at three regular intervals. Twenty-four hours post-preconditioning, both groups were subject to ischemia for 20 minutes, followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion. Oxygen extraction was higher in Group 1, the arterio-venous CO2 gradient was higher in the control group, but not significant. The lactate production was higher in Group 1. The second group had a higher Na+ and also a significant difference in K+ values. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End (RAGE) values were higher in the second group but with no significant difference (RAGE1=0.32 ng/mL versus RAGE2=0.40 ng/mL). The muscle samples from the control group displayed significant rhabdomyolysis, damage to the nucleus, while the preconditioned group showed almost normal morphological characteristics. The lungs and kidneys were most damaged in the control group, with damage expressed as thickened alveolar septa, neutrophil infiltrates, eosinophilic precipitates in the proximal convolute tubule. Ischemic preconditioning significantly attenuates the ischemic reperfusion injury. PMID:26743274

  20. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome after Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Goldstein, Jacob S.; Nassif, Michael E.; Zajarias, Alan; Novak, Eric; Tibrewala, Anjan; Wittenberg, Anna M.; Lawler, Cassandra; Damiano, Ralph J.; Moon, Marc R.; Lawton, Jennifer S.; Lasala, John M.; Maniar, Hersh S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective An inflammatory response after cardiac surgery is associated with worse clinical outcomes, but recent trials to attenuate it have been neutral. We evaluated the association between systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and mortality after transcatheter (TAVR) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for aortic stenosis (AS) and evaluated whether diabetes influenced this relationship. Methods Patients (n=747) with severe AS treated with TAVR (n=264) or SAVR (n=483) between 1/2008 and 12/2013 were included and 37% had diabetes mellitus. SIRS was defined by 4 criteria 12 to 48 hours after AVR: 1) white blood cell count <4 or >12; 2) heart rate >90; 3) temperature <36 or >38°C; or 4) respiratory rate >20. Severe SIRS was defined as meeting all 4 criteria. The primary endpoint was 6-month all-cause mortality (60 deaths occurred by 6 months). Inverse propensity weighting (IPW) was performed on 44 baseline and procedural variables to minimize confounding. Results Severe SIRS developed in 6% of TAVR patients and 11% of SAVR patients (p=0.02). Six-month mortality tended to be higher in those with severe SIRS (15.5%) versus those without (7.4%) (p=0.07). After adjustment, severe SIRS was associated with higher 6-month mortality (IPW adjusted HR 2.77, 95% CI 2.04–3.76, p<0.001). Moreover, severe SIRS was more strongly associated with increased mortality in diabetic (IPW adjusted HR 4.12, 95% CI 2.69–6.31, p<0.001) than non-diabetic patients (IPW adjusted HR 1.74, 95% CI 1.10–2.73, p=0.02) (interaction p=0.007). The adverse effect of severe SIRS on mortality was similar after TAVR and SAVR. Conclusion Severe SIRS was associated with a higher mortality after SAVR or TAVR. It occurred more commonly after SAVR and had a greater effect on mortality in diabetic patients. These findings may have implications for treatment decisions in patients with AS, may help explain differences in outcomes between different AVR approaches, and identify diabetic

  1. Circulating Plasma microRNAs can differentiate Human Sepsis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS)

    PubMed Central

    Caserta, Stefano; Kern, Florian; Cohen, Jonathan; Drage, Stephen; Newbury, Sarah F.; Llewelyn, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation in humans may be triggered by infection, termed sepsis, or non-infective processes, termed non-infective systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). MicroRNAs regulate cellular processes including inflammation and may be detected in blood. We aimed to establish definitive proof-of-principle that circulating microRNAs are differentially affected during sepsis and non-infective SIRS. Critically ill patients with severe (n = 21) or non-severe (n = 8) intra-abdominal sepsis; severe (n = 23) or non-severe (n = 21) non-infective SIRS; or no SIRS (n = 16) were studied. Next-generation sequencing and qRT-PCR were used to measure plasma microRNAs. Detectable blood miRNAs (n = 116) were generally up-regulated in SIRS compared to no-SIRS patients. Levels of these ‘circulating inflammation-related microRNAs’ (CIR-miRNAs) were 2.64 (IQR: 2.10–3.29) and 1.52 (IQR: 1.15–1.92) fold higher for non-infective SIRS and sepsis respectively (p < 0.0001), hence CIR-miRNAs appeared less abundant in sepsis than in SIRS. Six CIR-miRNAs (miR-30d-5p, miR-30a-5p, miR-192-5p, miR-26a-5p, miR-23a-5p, miR-191-5p) provided good-to-excellent discrimination of severe sepsis from severe SIRS (0.742–0.917 AUC of ROC curves). CIR-miRNA levels inversely correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and others). Thus, among critically ill patients, sepsis and non-infective SIRS are associated with substantial, differential changes in CIR-miRNAs. CIR-miRNAs may be regulators of inflammation and warrant thorough evaluation as diagnostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:27320175

  2. Circulating Plasma microRNAs can differentiate Human Sepsis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS).

    PubMed

    Caserta, Stefano; Kern, Florian; Cohen, Jonathan; Drage, Stephen; Newbury, Sarah F; Llewelyn, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation in humans may be triggered by infection, termed sepsis, or non-infective processes, termed non-infective systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). MicroRNAs regulate cellular processes including inflammation and may be detected in blood. We aimed to establish definitive proof-of-principle that circulating microRNAs are differentially affected during sepsis and non-infective SIRS. Critically ill patients with severe (n = 21) or non-severe (n = 8) intra-abdominal sepsis; severe (n = 23) or non-severe (n = 21) non-infective SIRS; or no SIRS (n = 16) were studied. Next-generation sequencing and qRT-PCR were used to measure plasma microRNAs. Detectable blood miRNAs (n = 116) were generally up-regulated in SIRS compared to no-SIRS patients. Levels of these 'circulating inflammation-related microRNAs' (CIR-miRNAs) were 2.64 (IQR: 2.10-3.29) and 1.52 (IQR: 1.15-1.92) fold higher for non-infective SIRS and sepsis respectively (p < 0.0001), hence CIR-miRNAs appeared less abundant in sepsis than in SIRS. Six CIR-miRNAs (miR-30d-5p, miR-30a-5p, miR-192-5p, miR-26a-5p, miR-23a-5p, miR-191-5p) provided good-to-excellent discrimination of severe sepsis from severe SIRS (0.742-0.917 AUC of ROC curves). CIR-miRNA levels inversely correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and others). Thus, among critically ill patients, sepsis and non-infective SIRS are associated with substantial, differential changes in CIR-miRNAs. CIR-miRNAs may be regulators of inflammation and warrant thorough evaluation as diagnostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:27320175

  3. Epidemiology of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis in cats hospitalized in a veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Babyak, Jonathan M; Sharp, Claire R

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the epidemiology of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis in cats hospitalized in a veterinary teaching hospital. DESIGN Observational study. ANIMALS 246 client-owned cats. PROCEDURES During a 3-month period, daily treatment records were evaluated for all hospitalized cats. Information extracted included signalment, temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, diagnostic test results, diagnosis, duration of hospitalization, and outcome (survival or death). Cats were classified into 1 of 4 disease categories (sepsis [confirmed infection and SIRS], infection [confirmed infection without SIRS], noninfectious SIRS [SIRS without a confirmed infection], and no SIRS [no SIRS or infection]). RESULTS Of the 246 cats, 26 and 3 were hospitalized 2 and 3 times, respectively; thus, 275 hospitalizations were evaluated. When SIRS was defined as the presence of ≥ 2 of 4 SIRS criteria, 17 cats had sepsis, 16 had infections, 81 had noninfectious SIRS, and 161 were classified in the no SIRS category at hospital admission. The prevalence of sepsis at hospital admission was 6.2 cases/100 admissions. Four cats developed sepsis while hospitalized, resulting in a sepsis incidence rate of 1.5 cases/100 hospital admissions. Four of 17 cats with sepsis at hospital admission and 3 of 4 cats that developed sepsis while hospitalized died or were euthanized, resulting in a mortality rate of 33.3% for septic cats; 239 hospitalizations resulted in survival, 28 resulted in euthanasia, and 8 resulted in death. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that many hospitalized cats have evidence of SIRS and some have sepsis. In cats, sepsis is an important clinical entity with a high mortality rate. PMID:27308883

  4. Fatal sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome after off-label prasugrel: a case report.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L; Kipshidze, Nodar; Pershukov, Igor V; Kuliczkowski, Wiktor; Carnes, Judy; Atar, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive dual antiplatelet therapy is associated not only with more bleeding, impaired wound healing, and potentially more solid cancer rates but it also causes higher infection risks including sepsis, and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). This may be especially true considering the alarming off-label use of prasugrel. A 65-year-old white male patient with a history of myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention and implantation of 2 bare metal stents, was treated with off-label clopidogrel for 4 years, including a double daily dose (150 mg) for the initial 13 months. Still on clopidogrel, the patient was hospitalized with suspected pneumonia. A diagnostic cardiac catheterization revealed a 60%-70% blockage of the mid left anterior descending, but there was no need for coronary intervention. At discharge, clopidogrel 75 mg/d was switched over to off-label prasugrel 10 mg/d on top of aspirin (81 mg/d). On day 3 after prasugrel was given, a football-sized bruise appeared on the patient's lower right abdomen, but computed tomography results were unremarkable. On day 6 after administration of prasugrel, the patient became dizzy, disoriented, confused, experienced difficulty breathing, severe headache, weakness, intensive petechial rash covering the entire body, and breathing difficulty requiring ventilation. Within 24 hours, the patient was unable to correctly identify his age; his eyes were pale in color to almost colorless and when hearing a sound he would turn his entire head toward the sound and he appeared to be blind. His lungs, liver, and kidneys began to show signs of failure over the next 5-9 days. Sixteen days after the administration of the first prasugrel dose, the patient died of sepsis complicated with SIRS. Aggressive off-label use of clopidogrel (double dose for 13 months, and >4 years overall duration), followed by off-label switchover to the highest daily dose (10 mg) prasugrel may trigger sepsis and fatal

  5. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome in nonhuman primates culminating in multiple organ failure, acute lung injury, and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Hukkanen, Renee R; Liggitt, H Denny; Murnane, Robert D; Frevert, Charles W

    2009-10-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a clinicopathological manifestation of overexuberant acute-phase inflammation caused by infectious or noninfectious etiologies. The systemic release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and lipid and vasoactive mediators induces endothelial damage and microvascular thrombosis, potentially culminating in disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) or failure (MOF). We present five cases in the pig-tailed macaque and olive baboon where SIRS resulted in MOF, ARDS, DIC, and the Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome; each with gross and histological elements manifested as edema, deposition of fibrin, hemorrhage, and thrombosis. In the described cases, SIRS was the end-common pathway for multiple risk factors that parallel those documented in humans: major surgery, obstetric complications, and infection. The diagnosis of SIRS should be considered when evaluating nonhuman primate (NHP) cases of MOF manifesting with histological evidence of vascular leakage. Experimental manipulation of NHP models may be complicated by SIRS and accompanying rapid clinical decompensation. Such adverse events may compromise toxicological studies and should be avoided when possible. PMID:19773593

  6. Systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following skin burn wound and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Hu, Xiaolong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yaojun; Wang, Yunchuan; Liu, Jiaqi; Cai, Weixia; Bai, Xiaozhi; Zhu, Xiongxiang; Han, Juntao; Hu, Dahai

    2013-08-01

    Burn wound-related sepsis is associated with the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). This study is aimed at investigating the development and progression of SIS and MODS in a mouse model of skin burn sepsis. C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into the sham, burn, Pseudomonas, and burn/Pseudomonas groups. The back skin of the sham, burn, and burn/Pseudomonas groups was burned about 10% of total area with using 37°C or 98°C water for 8 s, respectively, followed by inoculating with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The Pseudomonas group was infected with P. aeruginosa without burn injury. Their body weights, mortality, organ histology, and function as well as systemic inflammation were measured longitudinally. The burn/Pseudomonas mice lost more body weights than did mice from the other groups and had a significantly higher mortality rate (P < 0.05). The burn/Pseudomonas mice exhibited significantly higher levels of bacterial loads in different organs and serum endotoxin, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor α, and C-reactive protein than those in mice from the other groups (P < 0.05). The burn/Pseudomonas mice also displayed more severe liver, lung, and kidney tissue damage and impaired organ functions, particularly at 72 h after inoculation than did the burn and Pseudomonas groups of mice. Our data indicate that burn and P. aeruginosa infection induced severe sepsis and rapidly progressed into systemic inflammatory response syndrome and MODS in mice. PMID:23707977

  7. [Ocular immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ma, N; Ye, J J

    2016-02-11

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a collection of inflammatory disorders associated with paradoxical worsening of preexisting infectious processes or emerging diseases or even dead after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals in a period of recovery of immune function. Ocular immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is mainly caused by cytomegalovirus which performing a series of ocular inflammation accompanied with the increase of CD4+ T lymphocytes, such as cytomegalovirus retinitis, after HAART. With HAART widely used, the patients of IRIS gradually increased. But the clinical presentations of IRIS were various because of different pathogens. This review summarized the clinical manifestations, risk factors, diagnosis and treatment of ocular IRIS.(Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 51: 150-153). PMID:26906710

  8. Amelioration of Acute Kidney Injury in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome by an Aldose Reductase Inhibitor, Fidarestat

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Mizukami, Hiroki; Kamata, Kosuke; Inaba, Wataru; Kato, Noriaki; Hibi, Chihiro; Yagihashi, Soroku

    2012-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a fatal disease because of multiple organ failure. Acute kidney injury is a serious complication of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and its genesis is still unclear posing a difficulty for an effective treatment. Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor is recently found to suppress lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac failure and its lethality. We studied the effects of AR inhibitor on LPS-induced acute kidney injury and its mechanism. Methods Mice were injected with LPS and the effects of AR inhibitor (Fidarestat 32 mg/kg) before or after LPS injection were examined for the mortality, severity of renal failure and kidney pathology. Serum concentrations of cytokines (interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α) and their mRNA expressions in the lung, liver, spleen and kidney were measured. We also evaluated polyol metabolites in the kidney. Results Mortality rate within 72 hours was significantly less in LPS-injected mice treated with AR inhibitor both before (29%) and after LPS injection (40%) than untreated mice (90%). LPS-injected mice showed marked increases in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and cytokines, and AR inhibitor treatment suppressed the changes. LPS-induced acute kidney injury was associated with vacuolar degeneration and apoptosis of renal tubular cells as well as infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages. With improvement of such pathological findings, AR inhibitor treatment suppressed the elevation of cytokine mRNA levels in multiple organs and renal sorbitol accumulation. Conclusion AR inhibitor treatment ameliorated LPS-induced acute kidney injury, resulting in the lowered mortality. PMID:22253906

  9. Atypical inflammatory demyelinating syndromes of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Todd A; Reddel, Stephen W; Barnett, Michael H; Palace, Jacqueline; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Weinshenker, Brian G

    2016-08-01

    Atypical inflammatory demyelinating syndromes are rare disorders that differ from multiple sclerosis owing to unusual clinical or MRI findings or poor response to treatments used for multiple sclerosis. These syndromes include neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, tumefactive demyelination, Baló's concentric sclerosis, Schilder's disease, and Marburg's multiple sclerosis. The overlapping features of these syndromes with multiple sclerosis and with each other complicate diagnosis and their categorisation as distinct or related conditions. Recognition of these syndromes is crucial because they differ from multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating and non-demyelinating conditions in their prognosis and treatment. Advances in MRI, pathology, and immunobiology are needed to increase understanding of these syndromes, including the extent to which some of them represent distinct entities, and to assist with improvements in their diagnosis and management. PMID:27478954

  10. Plasma bacterial and mitochondrial DNA distinguish bacterial sepsis from sterile systemic inflammatory response syndrome and quantify inflammatory tissue injury in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Sursal, Tolga; Stearns-Kurosawa, Deborah J; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Oh, Sun-Young; Sun, Shiqin; Kurosawa, Shinichiro; Hauser, Carl J

    2013-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a fundamental host response common to bacterial infection and sterile tissue injury. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome can cause organ dysfunction and death, but its mechanisms are incompletely understood. Moreover, SIRS can progress to organ failure or death despite being sterile or after control of the inciting infection. Biomarkers discriminating between sepsis, sterile SIRS, and postinfective SIRS would therefore help direct care. Circulating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a damage-associated molecular pattern reflecting cellular injury. Circulating bacterial 16S DNA (bDNA) is a pathogen-associated pattern (PAMP) reflecting ongoing infection. We developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays to quantify these markers, and predicting their plasma levels might help distinguish sterile injury from infection. To study these events in primates, we assayed banked serum from Papio baboons that had undergone a brief challenge of intravenous Bacillus anthracis delta Sterne (modified to remove toxins) followed by antibiotics (anthrax) that causes organ failure and death. To investigate the progression of sepsis to "severe" sepsis and death, we studied animals where anthrax was pretreated with drotrecogin alfa (activated protein C), which attenuates sepsis in baboons. We also contrasted lethal anthrax bacteremia against nonlethal E. coli bacteremia and against sterile tissue injury from Shiga-like toxin 1. Bacterial DNA and mtDNA levels in timed samples were correlated with blood culture results and assays of organ function. Sterile injury by Shiga-like toxin 1 increased mtDNA, but bDNA was undetectable: consistent with the absence of infection. The bacterial challenges caused parallel early bDNA and mtDNA increases, but bDNA detected pathogens even after bacteria were undetectable by culture. Sublethal E. coli challenge only caused transient rises in mtDNA consistent with a self-limited injury. In lethal

  11. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus-induced immunosuppression exacerbates the inflammatory response to porcine respiratory coronavirus in pigs.

    PubMed

    Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Alekseev, Konstantin; Jung, Kwonil; Fang, Ying; Saif, Linda J

    2010-10-01

    We performed a comprehensive analysis of innate and adaptive immune responses in dual-virus infected pigs to understand whether a pre-existing immunomodulatory respiratory viral infection affects the overall immunity to a subsequent porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV) infection in pigs. Pigs were either mock-infected or infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a virus known to cause immunosuppressive respiratory disease, and then pigs were co-infected with PRCV, which normally causes subclinical respiratory infection. We collected samples for six independent experiments from 178 pigs that were also used for pathological studies. We detected a significant reduction in innate NK-cell-mediated cytotoxic function in PRRSV-infected pigs, which was synergistically further decreased in pigs co-infected with PRCV. Subsequently, in association with clinical signs we observed elevated levels of proinflammatory (IL-6), Th-1 (IL-12), and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines. Increased frequencies of CD4CD8 double-positive T lymphocytes and myeloid cells, in addition to the elevated Th-1 and proinflammatory cytokines in dual-infected pigs, contributed to the severity of lung disease in pigs. The results of our study clarify how each virus modulates the host innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to inflammatory reactions and lung pathology. Thus measurements of cytokines and frequencies of immune cells may serve as indicators of the progression of respiratory viral co-infections, and provide more definitive approaches for treatment. PMID:20883160

  12. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus–Induced Immunosuppression Exacerbates the Inflammatory Response to Porcine Respiratory Coronavirus in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Konstantin; Jung, Kwonil; Fang, Ying; Saif, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We performed a comprehensive analysis of innate and adaptive immune responses in dual-virus infected pigs to understand whether a pre-existing immunomodulatory respiratory viral infection affects the overall immunity to a subsequent porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV) infection in pigs. Pigs were either mock-infected or infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a virus known to cause immunosuppressive respiratory disease, and then pigs were co-infected with PRCV, which normally causes subclinical respiratory infection. We collected samples for six independent experiments from 178 pigs that were also used for pathological studies. We detected a significant reduction in innate NK-cell-mediated cytotoxic function in PRRSV-infected pigs, which was synergistically further decreased in pigs co-infected with PRCV. Subsequently, in association with clinical signs we observed elevated levels of proinflammatory (IL-6), Th-1 (IL-12), and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines. Increased frequencies of CD4CD8 double-positive T lymphocytes and myeloid cells, in addition to the elevated Th-1 and proinflammatory cytokines in dual-infected pigs, contributed to the severity of lung disease in pigs. The results of our study clarify how each virus modulates the host innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to inflammatory reactions and lung pathology. Thus measurements of cytokines and frequencies of immune cells may serve as indicators of the progression of respiratory viral co-infections, and provide more definitive approaches for treatment. PMID:20883160

  13. Inflammatory response and extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph; Van Aken, Hugo; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation (EC) frequently develop a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Surgical trauma, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, endotoxaemia and blood contact to nonendothelial circuit compounds promote the activation of coagulation pathways, complement factors and a cellular immune response. This review discusses the multiple pathways leading to endothelial cell activation, neutrophil recruitment and production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. All these factors may induce cellular damage and subsequent organ injury. Multiple organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery with EC is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. In addition to the pathogenesis of organ dysfunction after EC, this review deals with different therapeutic interventions aiming to alleviate the inflammatory response and consequently multiple organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery. PMID:26060024

  14. Hyperammonemia and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Predicts Presence of Hepatic Encephalopathy in Dogs with Congenital Portosystemic Shunts

    PubMed Central

    Tivers, Mickey S.; Handel, Ian; Gow, Adam G.; Lipscomb, Vicky J.; Jalan, Rajiv; Mellanby, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with liver disease. The pathogenesis of he is incompletely understood although ammonia and inflammatory cytokines have been implicated as key mediators. To facilitate further mechanistic understanding of the pathogenesis of HE, a large number of animal models have been developed which often involve the surgical creation of an anastomosis between the hepatic portal vein and the caudal vena cava. One of the most common congenital abnormalities in dogs is a congenital portosystemic shunt (cpss), which closely mimics these surgical experimental models of HE. Dogs with a cPSS often have clinical signs which mimic clinical signs observed in humans with HE. Our hypothesis is that the pathogenesis of HE in dogs with a cPSS is similar to humans with HE. The aim of the study was to measure a range of clinical, haematological and biochemical parameters, which have been linked to the development of HE in humans, in dogs with a cPSS and a known HE grade. One hundred and twenty dogs with a cPSS were included in the study and multiple regression analysis of clinical, haematological and biochemical variables revealed that plasma ammonia concentrations and systemic inflammatory response syndrome scores predicted the presence of HE. Our findings further support the notion that the pathogenesis of canine and human HE share many similarities and indicate that dogs with cPSS may be an informative spontaneous model of human HE. Further investigations on dogs with cPSS may allow studies on HE to be undertaken without creating surgical models of HE thereby allowing the number of large animals used in animal experimentation to be reduced. PMID:24392080

  15. Exploration of eosinopenia as a diagnostic parameter to differentiate sepsis from systemic inflammatory response syndrome: Results from an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Dimple; Ray, Sumit; Bhargava, Seema; Srivastava, Lalit M.; Garg, Ashish; Gafoor, Imran; Singh, Rahul; Dhar, Debashish

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the Study: Initial differentiation of sepsis from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is of prime importance for early institution of appropriate treatment. This study aimed to compare the differential diagnostic efficacy of absolute eosinophil count (AEC - a routinely available economic marker) with total leukocyte count (TLC) and procalcitonin (PCT - a costly marker available only in specialized settings). Materials and Methods: In this prospective observational study, 170 patients of sepsis (severe sepsis = 125; SIRS = 45) were enrolled. AEC, TLC, and PCT were measured in the blood of all patients at the time of admission and data analyzed statistically. Results: Median AEC was 0 cells/mm3 in both SIRS and sepsis. TLC and PCT levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in culture negative, culture positive, and overall sepsis groups in comparison to SIRS group. At a cutoff of < 50 cells/mm3, AEC demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 23% and 68%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of TLC were 57%, 71%, 85%, 37% and of PCT were 82.4%, 82.2%, 93%, and 63%, respectively with area under curve of 0.455 for AEC, 0.640 for TLC, 0.908 for PCT. Conclusions: This study suggests that eosinopenia is not a reliable diagnostic tool to differentiate sepsis from SIRS. PCT and TLC are better differential diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:27275077

  16. Trauma, Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, Dietary Supplements, Illicit Steroid Use and a Questionable Malignant Hyperthermia Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Capacchione, John F.; Radimer, Matthew C.; Sagel, Jeffrey S.; Kraus, Gregory P.; Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Muldoon, Sheila M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated primarily, but not exclusively, with mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor. Associated environmental factors, however, may also be important for expression of the syndrome. METHODS AND RESULTS A 24-yr-old trauma patient developed a fulminant MH crisis after a 3 minute exposure to sevoflurane. A thorough evaluation of underlying co-morbidities revealed a number of environmental factors that could have altered skeletal muscle calcium regulation, and may have potentially influenced the effects of volatile inhaled anesthetics. Since MH is a syndrome characterized by abnormal skeletal muscle calcium regulation, other factors that alter calcium homeostasis may exacerbate the impact of inhaled MH-triggering drugs. CONCLUSIONS While a thorough history of MH episodes in a proband and family is emphasized as part of a complete preanesthetic evaluation, obtaining a history of other environmental entities that may alter calcium regulation may be equally important to knowing the family history. PMID:19224800

  17. Lung inflammatory response syndrome after cardiac-operations and treatment of lornoxicam

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andreas; Kesisis, George; Arikas, Stamatis; Argyriou, Michael; Siminelakis, Stavros; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Tsiouda, Theodora; Sarika, Eirini; Katamoutou, Ioanna; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    The majority of patients survive after extracorporeal circulation without any clinically apparent deleterious effects. However, disturbances exist in various degrees sometimes, which indicate the harmful effects of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in the body. Several factors during extracorporeal circulation either mechanical dependent (exposure of blood to non-biological area) or mechanical independent (surgical wounds, ischemia and reperfusion, alteration in body temperature, release of endotoxins) have been shown to trigger the inflammatory reaction of the body. The complement activation, the release of cytokines, the leukocyte activation and accumulation as well as the production of several “mediators” such as oxygen free radicals, metabolites of arachidonic acid, platelet activating factors (PAF), nitric acid, and endothelin. The investigation continues today on the three metabolites of lornoxicam (the hydroxylated metabolite and two other metabolites of unknown chemical composition) to search for potential new pharmacological properties and activities. PMID:24672703

  18. Lung inflammatory response syndrome after cardiac-operations and treatment of lornoxicam.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andreas; Kesisis, George; Arikas, Stamatis; Argyriou, Michael; Siminelakis, Stavros; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Tsiouda, Theodora; Sarika, Eirini; Katamoutou, Ioanna; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-03-01

    The majority of patients survive after extracorporeal circulation without any clinically apparent deleterious effects. However, disturbances exist in various degrees sometimes, which indicate the harmful effects of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in the body. Several factors during extracorporeal circulation either mechanical dependent (exposure of blood to non-biological area) or mechanical independent (surgical wounds, ischemia and reperfusion, alteration in body temperature, release of endotoxins) have been shown to trigger the inflammatory reaction of the body. The complement activation, the release of cytokines, the leukocyte activation and accumulation as well as the production of several "mediators" such as oxygen free radicals, metabolites of arachidonic acid, platelet activating factors (PAF), nitric acid, and endothelin. The investigation continues today on the three metabolites of lornoxicam (the hydroxylated metabolite and two other metabolites of unknown chemical composition) to search for potential new pharmacological properties and activities. PMID:24672703

  19. CD11d integrin blockade reduces the systemic inflammatory response syndrome after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Lynne C; Bao, Feng; Dekaban, Gregory A; Hryciw, Todd; Shultz, Sandy R; Cain, Donald P; Brown, Arthur

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic CNS injury triggers a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), in which circulating inflammatory cells invade body organs causing local inflammation and tissue damage. We have shown that the SIRS caused by spinal cord injury is greatly reduced by acute intravenous treatment with an antibody against the CD11d subunit of the CD11d/CD18 integrin expressed by neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages, a treatment that reduces their efflux from the circulation. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a frequently occurring injury after motor vehicle accidents, sporting and military injuries, and falls. Our studies have shown that the anti-CD11d treatment diminishes brain inflammation and oxidative injury after moderate or mild TBI, improving neurological outcomes. Accordingly, we examined the impact of this treatment on the SIRS triggered by TBI. The anti-CD11d treatment was given at 2h after a single moderate (2.5-3.0 atm) or 2 and 24h after each of three consecutive mild (1.0-1.5 atm) fluid percussion TBIs. Sham-injured, saline-treated rats served as controls. At 24h, 72 h, and 4 or 8 weeks after the single TBI and after the third of three TBIs, lungs of rats were examined histochemically, immunocytochemically and biochemically for downstream effects of SIRS including inflammation, tissue damage and expression of oxidative enzymes. Lung sections revealed that both the single moderate and repeated mild TBI caused alveolar disruption, thickening of inter-alveolar tissue, hemorrhage into the parenchyma and increased density of intra-and peri-alveolar macrophages. The anti-CD11d treatment decreased the intrapulmonary influx of neutrophils and the density of activated macrophages and the activity of myeloperoxidase after these TBIs. Moreover, Western blotting studies showed that the treatment decreased lung protein levels of oxidative enzymes gp91(phox), inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, as well as the apoptotic pathway enzyme caspase-3 and levels

  20. CD11d integrin blockade reduces the systemic inflammatory response syndrome after traumatic brain injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Lynne C.; Bao, Feng; Dekaban, Gregory A.; Hryciw, Todd; Shultz, Sandy R.; Cain, Donald P.; Brown, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic CNS injury triggers a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), in which circulating inflammatory cells invade body organs causing local inflammation and tissue damage. We have shown that the SIRS caused by spinal cord injury is greatly reduced by acute intravenous treatment with an antibody against the CD11d subunit of the CD11d/CD18 integrin expressed by neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages, a treatment that reduces their efflux from the circulation. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a frequently occurring injury after motor vehicle accidents, sporting and military injuries, and falls. Our studies have shown that the anti-CD11d treatment diminishes brain inflammation and oxidative injury after moderate or mild TBI, improving neurological outcomes. Accordingly, we examined the impact of this treatment on the SIRS triggered by TBI. The anti-CD11d treatment was given at 2 h after a single moderate (2.5–3.0 atm) or 2 and 24 h after each of three consecutive mild (1.0–1.5 atm) fluid percussion TBIs. Sham-injured, saline-treated rats served as controls. At 24 h, 72 h, and 4 or 8 weeks after the single TBI and after the third of three TBIs, lungs of rats were examined histochemically, immunocytochemically and biochemically for downstream effects of SIRS including inflammation, tissue damage and expression of oxidative enzymes. Lung sections revealed that both the single moderate and repeated mild TBI caused alveolar disruption, thickening of inter-alveolar tissue, hemorrhage into the parenchyma and increased density of intra-and peri-alveolar macrophages. The anti-CD11d treatment decreased the intrapulmonary influx of neutrophils and the density of activated macrophages and the activity of myeloperoxidase after these TBIs. Moreover, Western blotting studies showed that the treatment decreased lung protein levels of oxidative enzymes gp91phox, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, as well as the apoptotic pathway enzyme caspase-3 and

  1. Temperature variability analysis using wavelets and multiscale entropy in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Even though temperature is a continuous quantitative variable, its measurement has been considered a snapshot of a process, indicating whether a patient is febrile or afebrile. Recently, other diagnostic techniques have been proposed for the association between different properties of the temperature curve with severity of illness in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), based on complexity analysis of continuously monitored body temperature. In this study, we tried to assess temperature complexity in patients with systemic inflammation during a suspected ICU-acquired infection, by using wavelets transformation and multiscale entropy of temperature signals, in a cohort of mixed critically ill patients. Methods Twenty-two patients were enrolled in the study. In five, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, group 1) developed, 10 had sepsis (group 2), and seven had septic shock (group 3). All temperature curves were studied during the first 24 hours of an inflammatory state. A wavelet transformation was applied, decomposing the signal in different frequency components (scales) that have been found to reflect neurogenic and metabolic inputs on temperature oscillations. Wavelet energy and entropy per different scales associated with complexity in specific frequency bands and multiscale entropy of the whole signal were calculated. Moreover, a clustering technique and a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were applied for permitting pattern recognition in data sets and assessing diagnostic accuracy of different wavelet features among the three classes of patients. Results Statistically significant differences were found in wavelet entropy between patients with SIRS and groups 2 and 3, and in specific ultradian bands between SIRS and group 3, with decreased entropy in sepsis. Cluster analysis using wavelet features in specific bands revealed concrete clusters closely related with the groups in focus. LDA after wrapper-based feature selection was able to classify

  2. The gut in systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. Enzyme systems fighting multiple organ failure.

    PubMed

    Suliburk, J; Helmer, K; Moore, F; Mercer, D

    2008-01-01

    The prognosis and care of critically ill ICU patients has improved over recent years, but the development of multiple organ failure (MOF) continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality. Shock, with resultant organ ischemia, appears to play a critical role in the development of MOF. It is our global hypothesis that MOF is a gut-derived phenomenon and that novel interventions can improve outcome in shock-induced gut inflammation and dysfunction in critically ill patients. We have found that the anesthetic agent ketamine has a profound impact on the response to endotoxic shock. This review summarizes our findings on the mechanisms of action by which ketamine is able to modulate the nitric oxide, cyclo-oxygenase and heme-oxygenase enzyme systems to attenuate endotoxin-induced organ dysfunction. PMID:17998777

  3. Presence of Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Predicts a Poor Clinical Outcome in Dogs with a Primary Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Scott; Dreistadt, Margaret; Frowde, Polly; Powell, Roger; Milne, Elspeth; Smith, Sionagh; Morrison, Linda; Gow, Adam G; Handel, Ian; Mellanby, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatopathies are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in dogs. The underlying aetiology of most cases of canine hepatitis is unknown. Consequently, treatments are typically palliative and it is difficult to provide accurate prognostic information to owners. In human hepatology there is accumulating data which indicates that the presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a common and debilitating event in patients with liver diseases. For example, the presence of SIRS has been linked to the development of complications such as hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and is associated with a poor clinical outcome in humans with liver diseases. In contrast, the relationship between SIRS and clinical outcome in dogs with a primary hepatitis is unknown. Seventy dogs with histologically confirmed primary hepatitis were enrolled into the study. Additional clinical and clinicopathological information including respiratory rate, heart rate, temperature, white blood cell count, sodium, potassium, sex, presence of ascites, HE score, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bilirubin and red blood cell concentration were available in all cases. The median survival of dogs with a SIRS score of 0 or 1 (SIRS low) was 231 days compared to a median survival of 7 days for dogs with a SIRS score of 2, 3 or 4 (SIRS high) (p<0.001). A Cox proportional hazard model, which included all other co-variables, revealed that a SIRS high score was an independent predictor of a poor clinical outcome. The effect of modulating inflammation on treatment outcomes in dogs with a primary hepatitis is deserving of further study. PMID:26808672

  4. Change of teicoplanin loading dose requirement for incremental increases of systemic inflammatory response syndrome score in the setting of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takafumi; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Takata, Tohru; Irie, Keiichi; Sano, Kazunori; Imakyure, Osamu; Mishima, Kenichi; Futagami, Koujiro

    2016-08-01

    Background Target trough concentrations are recommended for teicoplanin (TEIC) to minimize its adverse effects and to maximize efficacy in sepsis caused by grampositive cocci, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. However, optimal doses to attain proper trough values in patients with sepsis have not yet been well established for TEIC. Objective This study investigated whether the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) score could predict the pharmacokinetics of TEIC in patients with sepsis. Setting This study was conducted at Fukuoka University Hospital in Japan. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients using TEIC between April 2012 and March 2015. SIRS positive was defined as infection with a SIRS score ≥2. Estimates of pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a Bayesian method. Creatinine clearance rates were estimated by the Cockcroft-Gault formula (eCcr). Main outcome measure Change of TEIC loading dose requirement for incremental increases of SIRS score. Results In total, 133 patients were enrolled: 50 non-SIRS patients and 83 patients with SIRS. The TEIC plasma trough concentration was significantly lower in SIRS than non-SIRS patients (15.7 ± 7.1 vs. 20.1 ± 8.6 μg/mL; P < 0.01), although there was no significant difference in the loading dose administered. Moreover, SIRS scores were increasingly predictive of eCcr and TEIC clearance in a stepwise manner. To achieve the target trough concentration (15-30 μg/mL), the optimal doses required in non-SIRS versus SIRS patients were 12-24 versus 18-30 mg/kg/day, respectively, during the first 48 h. Conclusions These findings suggest that the pharmacokinetics of TEIC are altered in SIRS patients, who required higher doses than non-SIRS patients to achieve the target trough concentration. We suggest that the SIRS score can become a new modality to determine the initial TEIC loading dose. PMID:27125378

  5. Chronic Pancreatitis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Prevent Impact of Chemotherapy with Gemcitabine in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, Richard F.; Sparn, Moritz; Waldmann, Jens; Plassmeier, Lars; Bartsch, Detlef K.; Lauth, Matthias; Hudemann, Christoph; Fendrich, Volker

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS BACKGROUND AND AIMSGemcitabine is the standard therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer with metastatic disease. Patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer presenting with increased values of C-reactive protein do not respond to gemcitabine. So far, no studies have evaluated the correlation between chronic pancreatitis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and the loss of chemotherapeutic benefit. METHODS Pdx-1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D/+;LSL-Trp53R172H/+ mice were assigned into four groups: 1) Sixteen animals received a daily intraperitoneal injection of caerulein from their ninth week of life on. 2) Sixteen mice were additionally given gemcitabine. 3) Twelve animals received gemcitabine only. 4) Saline-treated control group. Furthermore, human Paca44 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells were seeded and cultured in 0.5% FBS containing growth medium plus/minus 1 μM gemcitabine plus/minus recombinant human interleukin (IL)-6. RESULTS Induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome and a mild chronic pancreatitis diminished the beneficial effects of gemcitabine upon median overall survival. In median, the monogemcitabine group survived 191 days, whereas the caerulein-mono group survived 114, the control group 121, and the caerulein gemcitabine group 127 days (P < .05). In vitro, the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation by recombinant human IL-6 promoted pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell survival during gemcitabine treatment. CONCLUSION We could demonstrate for the first time that an improvement in median overall survival with gemcitabine is significantly abolished by a persistent mild chronic pancreatitis and a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In particular, the inflammation biomarkers C-reactive protein, IL-6, and IL-1α could indicate the prognostic benefit of gemcitabine chemotherapy and should now be tested in prospective patient-controlled trials. PMID:24953430

  6. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome in tPA Treated Patients Is Associated with Worse Short-term Functional Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Boehme, Amelia K.; Kapoor, Niren; Albright, Karen C.; Lyerly, Michael J.; Rawal, Pawan V.; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Alvi, Muhammad; Houston, J. Thomas; Sisson, April; Beasley, T. Mark; Alexandrov, Anne W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Miller, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Systemic Inflammatory Response (SIRS) is a generalized inflammatory state. The primary goal of the study was to determine if differences exist in outcomes in SIRS and non-SIRS IV tPA treated patients. Methods Consecutive patients were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of SIRS during their admission. SIRS was defined as the presence of two or more: body temperature <36° C or >38° C, HR >90, respiratory rate >20 and WBC <4,000/mm or >12,000mm or >10% bands. Patients diagnosed with infection (via positive culture) were excluded. Results Out of 241 patients, 44 had evidence of SIRS (18%). Adjusting for pre-tPA NIHSS, age, and race, SIRS remained a predictor of poor functional outcome at discharge (OR= 2.58, 95% CI, 1.16 – 5.73, p=0.0197). Conclusion In our sample of tPA treated patients, almost 1 out of 5 patients developed SIRS. Further, we found the presence of SIRS to be associated with poor short-term functional outcomes and prolonged length of stay. PMID:23704110

  7. Central Nervous System Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, David R.; Marais, Suzaan; Scriven, James; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (CNS-IRIS) develops in 9 %–47 % of persons with HIV infection and a CNS opportunistic infection who start antiretroviral therapy and is associated with a mortality rate of 13 %–75 %. These rates vary according to the causative pathogen. Common CNS-IRIS events occur in relation to Cryptococcus, tuberculosis (TB), and JC virus, but several other mycobacteria, fungi, and viruses have been associated with IRIS. IRIS symptoms often mimic the original infection, and diagnosis necessitates consideration of treatment failure, microbial resistance, and an additional neurological infection. These diagnostic challenges often delay IRIS diagnosis and treatment. Corticosteroids have been used to treat CNS-IRIS, with variable responses; the best supportive evidence exists for the treatment of TB-IRIS. Pathogenic mechanisms vary: Cryptococcal IRIS is characterized by a paucity of cerebrospinal inflammation prior to antiretroviral therapy, whereas higher levels of inflammatory markers at baseline predispose to TB meningitis IRIS. This review focuses on advances in the understanding of CNS-IRIS over the past 2 years. PMID:24173584

  8. Hormonal control of inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Farsky, Sandra P.

    1993-01-01

    Almost any stage of inflammatory and immunological responses is affected by hormone actions. This provides the basis for the suggestion that hormones act as modulators of the host reaction against trauma and infection. Specific hormone receptors are detected in the reactive structures in inflamed areas and binding of hormone molecules to such receptors results in the generation of signals that influence cell functions relevant for the development of inflammatory responses. Diversity of hormonal functions accounts for recognized pro- and anti-inflammatory effects exerted by these substances. Most hormone systems are capable of influencing inflammatory events. Insulin and glucocorticoids, however, exert direct regulatory effects at concentrations usually found in plasma. Insulin is endowed with facilitatory actions on vascular reactivity to inflammatory mediators and inflammatory cell functions. Increased concentrations of circulating glucocorticoids at the early stages of inflammation results in downregulation of inflammatory responses. Oestrogens markedly reduce the response to injury in a variety of experimental models. Glucagon and thyroid hormones exert indirect anti-inflammatory effects mediated by the activity of the adrenal cortex. Accordingly, inflammation is not only merely a local response, but a hormone-controlled process. PMID:18475521

  9. Subclinical Inflammatory Status in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cortelazzo, Alessio; De Felice, Claudio; Guerranti, Roberto; Landi, Claudia; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation has been advocated as a possible common central mechanism for developmental cognitive impairment. Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder, mainly caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding MeCP2. Here, we investigated plasma acute phase response (APR) in stage II (i.e., “pseudo-autistic”) RTT patients by routine haematology/clinical chemistry and proteomic 2-DE/MALDI-TOF analyses as a function of four major MECP2 gene mutation types (R306C, T158M, R168X, and large deletions). Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate values (median 33.0 mm/h versus 8.0 mm/h, P < 0.0001) were detectable in RTT, whereas C-reactive protein levels were unchanged (P = 0.63). The 2-DE analysis identified significant changes for a total of 17 proteins, the majority of which were categorized as APR proteins, either positive (n = 6 spots) or negative (n = 9 spots), and to a lesser extent as proteins involved in the immune system (n = 2 spots), with some proteins having overlapping functions on metabolism (n = 7 spots). The number of protein changes was proportional to the severity of the mutation. Our findings reveal for the first time the presence of a subclinical chronic inflammatory status related to the “pseudo-autistic” phase of RTT, which is related to the severity carried by the MECP2 gene mutation. PMID:24511209

  10. The exaggerated inflammatory response in Behçet's syndrome: identification of dysfunctional post-transcriptional regulation of the IFN-γ/CXCL10 IP-10 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, N; Khan, E; Ravindran, R; Lightstone, L; Abraham, S; Botto, M; Johns, M; Haskard, D O

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying the exaggerated inflammatory response in Behçet's syndrome (BS) remain poorly understood. We investigated the response of CD14(+) blood monocytes to interferon (IFN)-γ, focusing on the chemokine CXCL10. Chemokine synthesis and release were analysed at a protein and mRNA level following stimulation with IFN-γ. Findings in BS patients were compared with 25 healthy controls (HC), 15 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 15 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease control patients. BS monocytes produced significantly more CXCL10 protein than HC monocytes from 2 h following IFN-γ stimulation, despite equivalent quantities of mRNA, suggesting more efficient translation. This was significantly more pronounced in BS with high disease activity and in those with ocular and neurological clinical manifestations. The imbalance between CXCL10 protein and mRNA expression was not observed in either RA or SLE patients, and was not seen with other chemokines studied (CXCL9, CXCL11 and CCL2). Furthermore, BS monocytes treated with an alternative stimulant (LPS) did not show abnormal tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α release. Sucrose density gradients to segregate monocyte CXCL10 mRNA into free RNA or polysome-associated RNA showed equal proportions in BS and HC samples, suggesting that the difference between BS and HC may be due to reduced negative control of CXCL10 translation in BS at a post-initiation level. We conclude that BS monocytes have dysfunctional post-transcriptional regulation of CXCL10 mRNA, resulting in over-expression of CXCL10 protein upon IFN-γ stimulation. As CXCL10 is a chemokine that recruits mononuclear cells, this abnormality may contribute to the exaggerated inflammatory responses that characterizes BS. PMID:25982097

  11. Activation of the lectin pathway of complement by cardiopulmonary bypass contributes to the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome after paediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Pągowska-Klimek, I; Świerzko, A S; Michalski, M; Głowacka, E; Szala-Poździej, A; Sokołowska, A; Moll, M; Krajewski, W R; Romak, J; Cedzyński, M

    2016-05-01

    The systemic inflammatory response is a challenge in the management of paediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Although multi-factorial, a contribution by the lectin pathway of complement activation has been postulated. We therefore investigated the changes in serum levels of mannose binding lectin (MBL) and activities of MBL-MBL-associated serine protease (MASP)-1 and MBL-MASP-2 complexes immediately before and during surgery, throughout the first postoperative day and at discharge from the hospital. These changes were analysed in relation to postoperative complications. Blood samples were obtained from 185 children with congenital heart disease undergoing surgical correction with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass: preoperatively (MBL-1), 15 min after initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) (MBL-E), 30 min (MBL-2), 4 h (MBL-3), 12 h (MBL-4) and 24 h (MBL-5) post-CPB and at discharge from hospital (MBL-K). Alterations in serum MBL levels were calculated as a ratio of its serum level at subsequent time-points (MBL-2, -3, -4, -5) to the preoperative (MBL-1) value. Decreases in MBL and MBL-MASP complexes were observed in all samples, correlating with a decrease in C4 and increase in C4a, confirming activation of the lectin pathway. Changes in MBL levels between children with an uncomplicated postoperative course and those suffering from infection or low cardiac output syndrome did not differ significantly, but significant differences were observed between the SIRS and non-SIRS groups. Paediatric cardiac surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass activates the complement system via the lectin pathway and the latter contributes to the development of the post-bypass systemic inflammatory response. PMID:26703090

  12. Treatment and prevention of inflammatory responses and oxidative stress in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome using Chinese herbal medicines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin; Lin, Rong Jing; Hong, Xuchu; Ye, Lin; Lin, Qichang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal medicines for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory responses and oxidative stress in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). A total of 60 patients with OSAHS were randomly divided into two groups (n=30/group): The experimental group, who received the conventional treatment + oral administration of the traditional Chinese herbal formula, Jiawei Di Tan Tang; and the control group, who received the conventional treatment only. OSAHS patients were included in the current study if they presented with snoring and had an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of >30 in a polysomnography study, without comorbidities. The therapeutic course lasted 12 weeks in both groups. Alterations to the mean clinical symptom score, Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) and AHI scores, lowest nocturnal blood oxygen saturation (SaO2) and the serum levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and C-reactive protein (CRP) prior to and following treatment were observed. The mean clinical symptom score was significantly decreased in the experimental group post-treatment compared with the control group (P<0.05). In addition, the clinical symptoms in the experimental group were significantly improved following treatment compared with pre-treatment symptoms (P<0.05). Furthermore, the ESS and AHI scores, lowest nocturnal SaO2 and serum levels of SOD, MDA, IL-6, TNF-α and CRP were significantly improved in the experimental group post-treatment compared with the control group (P<0.05). These parameters in the experimental group were also significantly improved post-treatment compared with those pre-treatment (P<0.05). The results of the present study suggested that oral administration of the traditional Chinese herbal formula Jiawei Di Tan Tang was able to attenuate oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in patients with OSAHS, and thus may

  13. Genomic and Clinical Effects Associated with a Relaxation Response Mind-Body Intervention in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jacquart, Jolene; Scult, Matthew A.; Slipp, Lauren; Riklin, Eric Isaac Kagan; Lepoutre, Veronique; Comosa, Nicole; Norton, Beth-Ann; Dassatti, Allison; Rosenblum, Jessica; Thurler, Andrea H.; Surjanhata, Brian C.; Hasheminejad, Nicole N.; Kagan, Leslee; Slawsby, Ellen; Rao, Sowmya R.; Macklin, Eric A.; Fricchione, Gregory L.; Benson, Herbert; Libermann, Towia A.; Korzenik, Joshua; Denninger, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) can profoundly affect quality of life and are influenced by stress and resiliency. The impact of mind-body interventions (MBIs) on IBS and IBD patients has not previously been examined. Methods Nineteen IBS and 29 IBD patients were enrolled in a 9-week relaxation response based mind-body group intervention (RR-MBI), focusing on elicitation of the RR and cognitive skill building. Symptom questionnaires and inflammatory markers were assessed pre- and post-intervention, and at short-term follow-up. Peripheral blood transcriptome analysis was performed to identify genomic correlates of the RR-MBI. Results Pain Catastrophizing Scale scores improved significantly post-intervention for IBD and at short-term follow-up for IBS and IBD. Trait Anxiety scores, IBS Quality of Life, IBS Symptom Severity Index, and IBD Questionnaire scores improved significantly post-intervention and at short-term follow-up for IBS and IBD, respectively. RR-MBI altered expression of more genes in IBD (1059 genes) than in IBS (119 genes). In IBD, reduced expression of RR-MBI response genes was most significantly linked to inflammatory response, cell growth, proliferation, and oxidative stress-related pathways. In IBS, cell cycle regulation and DNA damage related gene sets were significantly upregulated after RR-MBI. Interactive network analysis of RR-affected pathways identified TNF, AKT and NF-κB as top focus molecules in IBS, while in IBD kinases (e.g. MAPK, P38 MAPK), inflammation (e.g. VEGF-C, NF-κB) and cell cycle and proliferation (e.g. UBC, APP) related genes emerged as top focus molecules. Conclusions In this uncontrolled pilot study, participation in an RR-MBI was associated with improvements in disease-specific measures, trait anxiety, and pain catastrophizing in IBS and IBD patients. Moreover, observed gene expression changes suggest that NF-κB is a target focus molecule in both IBS and IBD—and that

  14. HIV-1 tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lai, Rachel P J; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Patients co-infected with HIV-1 and tuberculosis (TB) are at risk of developing TB-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) following commencement of antiretroviral therapy (ART). TB-IRIS is characterized by transient but severe localized or systemic inflammatory reactions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens. Here, we review the risk factors and clinical management of TB-IRIS, as well as the roles played by different aspects of the immune response in contributing to TB-IRIS pathogenesis. PMID:26423994

  15. Molecular cues guiding inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Olga; Martín, Pilar; González-Amaro, Roberto; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Alarm signals generated at inflammatory foci reach the vascular lumen to attract immune cells towards the affected tissue. Different leucocyte subsets decipher and integrate these complex signals in order to make adequate decisions for their migration towards the inflamed tissue. Soluble cues (cytokines and chemokines) and membrane receptors in both endothelium and leucocytes orchestrate the coordinated recruitment of specific inflammatory cell subsets. All these molecules are spatio-temporally organized in specialized structures at the luminal side of endothelium and the leucocyte membrane or are generated as chemical gradients in the damaged tissue. Thus, the repertoire of chemokines and their receptors as well as adhesion molecules expressed by each leucocyte subset determine their recruitment for participation in specific inflammatory pathologies. Whenever inflammatory signals are altered or misprocessed, inflammation can become chronic, causing extensive tissue damage. To combat chronic inflammation and autoimmune diseases, novel therapeutic strategies attempt to silence the predominant signals in each inflammatory scenario. In this review, we provide a general overview of all these aspects related to the molecular regulation of leucocyte guidance in inflammatory responses. PMID:20053659

  16. Branched DNA-based Alu quantitative assay for cell-free plasma DNA levels in patients with sepsis or systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yan-Qiang; Liang, Dong-Yu; Lou, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhen-huan; Zhang, Lu-rong

    2016-02-01

    Cell-free circulating DNA (cf-DNA) can be detected by various of laboratory techniques. We described a branched DNA-based Alu assay for measuring cf-DNA in septic patients. Compared to healthy controls and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) patients, serum cf-DNA levels were significantly higher in septic patients (1426.54 ± 863.79 vs 692.02 ± 703.06 and 69.66 ± 24.66 ng/mL). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of cf-DNA for normal vs sepsis and SIRS vs sepsis were 0.955 (0.884-1.025), and 0.856 (0.749-0.929), respectively. There was a positive correlation between cf-DNA and interleukin 6 or procalcitonin or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II. The cf-DNA concentration was higher in intensive care unit nonsurviving patients compared to surviving patients (2183.33 ± 615.26 vs 972.46 ± 648.36 ng/mL; P < .05). Branched DNA-based Alu assays are feasible and useful to quantify serum cf-DNA levels. Increased cf-DNA levels in septic patients might complement C-reactive protein and procalcitonin in a multiple marker format. Cell-free circulating DNA might be a new marker in discrimination of sepsis and SIRS. PMID:26589770

  17. The sequential organ failure assessment score as a useful predictor for estimating the prognosis of systemic inflammatory response syndrome patients being treated with extracorporeal blood purification.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Hiroki; Omori, Saori; Kazama, Junichiro J; Gejyo, Fumitake

    2003-08-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Extracorporeal blood purification procedures are becoming important for treating these patients. However, the cost of these procedures is high. Therefore, a prognostic marker would be helpful. To establish the reliability of the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score as a prognostic indicator, we evaluated daily changes in the SOFA score of 40 SIRS patients who needed blood purification procedures such as continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), endotoxin adsorption, bilirubin adsorption, and/or plasma exchange. Twenty patients survived and 20 died. Although the baseline scores of the two groups (survivors and non-survivors) did not differ, both the maximum value of the SOFA score and the DeltaSOFA score (the difference between the maximum SOFA and baseline SOFA scores) were significantly higher in the non-survivor group. The mortality rate among patients with a maximum SOFA score greater than or equal to 18 or a DeltaSOFA score greater than or equal to 3 was higher than for the rest of the patients. The changes in the SOFA score correlated well with the outcomes of the SIRS patients. The maximum SOFA score and the DeltaSOFA score are therefore likely to be useful prognostic markers. PMID:12887731

  18. Obesity-Driven Gut Microbiota Inflammatory Pathways to Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz H. A.; Galvão, José G. F. M.; da Silva, Juliane Santos de França; de Sales-Neto, José M.; Rodrigues-Mascarenhas, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The intimate interplay between immune system, metabolism, and gut microbiota plays an important role in controlling metabolic homeostasis and possible obesity development. Obesity involves impairment of immune response affecting both innate and adaptive immunity. The main factors involved in the relationship of obesity with inflammation have not been completely elucidated. On the other hand, gut microbiota, via innate immune receptors, has emerged as one of the key factors regulating events triggering acute inflammation associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Inflammatory disorders lead to several signaling transduction pathways activation, inflammatory cytokine, chemokine production and cell migration, which in turn cause metabolic dysfunction. Inflamed adipose tissue, with increased macrophages infiltration, is associated with impaired preadipocyte development and differentiation to mature adipose cells, leading to ectopic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. This review focuses on the relationship between obesity and inflammation, which is essential to understand the pathological mechanisms governing metabolic syndrome. PMID:26635627

  19. Antisynthetase syndrome: not just an inflammatory myopathy.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Prayson, Richard; Farver, Carol

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibodies to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, "mechanic's hands," Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Physicians should be familiar with its variety of clinical presentations and should include it in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with unexplained interstitial lung disease. PMID:24085811

  20. Systemic inflammatory response elicited by superantigen destabilizes T regulatory cells, rendering them ineffective during toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; Chowdhary, Vaidehi R; David, Chella S; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2014-09-15

    Life-threatening infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus, particularly the community-acquired methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus, continue to pose serious problems. Greater virulence and increased pathogenicity of certain S. aureus strains are attributed to higher prevalence of exotoxins. Of these exotoxins, the superantigens (SAg) are likely most pathogenic because of their ability to rapidly and robustly activate the T cells even in extremely small quantities. Therefore, countering SAg-mediated T cell activation using T regulatory cells (Tregs) might be beneficial in diseases such as toxic shock syndrome (TSS). As the normal numbers of endogenous Tregs in a typical host are insufficient, we hypothesized that increasing the Treg numbers by administration of IL-2/anti-IL-2 Ab immune complexes (IL2C) or by adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded Tregs might be more effective in countering SAg-mediated immune activation. HLA-DR3 transgenic mice that closely recapitulate human TSS were treated with IL2C to increase endogenous Tregs or received ex vivo expanded Tregs. Subsequently, they were challenged with SAg to induce TSS. Analyses of various parameters reflective of TSS (serum cytokine/chemokine levels, multiple organ pathology, and SAg-induced peripheral T cell expansion) indicated that increasing the Tregs failed to mitigate TSS. On the contrary, serum IFN-γ levels were increased in IL2C-treated mice. Exploration into the reasons behind the lack of protective effect of Tregs revealed IL-17 and IFN-γ-dependent loss of Tregs during TSS. In addition, significant upregulation of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family-related receptor on conventional T cells during TSS could render them resistant to Treg-mediated suppression, contributing to failure of Treg-mediated immune regulation. PMID:25092888

  1. Therapeutics targeting inflammation in the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shahani, Lokesh; Hamill, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is characterized by improvement in a previously incompetent human immune system manifesting as worsening of clinical symptoms secondary to the ability of the immune system to now mount a vigorous inflammatory response. IRIS was first recognized in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus, and this clinical setting continues to be where it is most frequently encountered. Hallmarks of the pathogenesis of IRIS, independent of the clinical presentation and the underlying pathogen, include excessive activation of the immune system, with increased circulating effector memory T cells, and elevated levels of serum cytokines and inflammatory markers. Patients with undiagnosed opportunistic infections remain at risk for unmasking IRIS at the time of active antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Systematic screening for opportunistic infections before starting ART is a key element to prevent this phenomenon. Appropriate management of IRIS requires prompt recognition of the syndrome and exclusion of alternative diagnoses, particularly underlying infections and drug resistance. Controlled studies supporting the use of pharmacologic interventions in IRIS are scare, and recommendations are based on case series and expert opinions. The only controlled trial published to date, showed reduction in morbidity in patients with paradoxical tuberculosis-related IRIS with the use of oral corticosteroids. There are currently limited data to recommend other anti-inflammatory or immunomodulatory therapies that are discussed in this review, and further research is needed. Ongoing research regarding the immune pathogenesis of IRIS will likely direct future rational therapeutic approaches and clinical trials. PMID:26303886

  2. An Elevated Fetal IL-6 Concentration Can Be Observed In Fetuses with Anemia Due To Rh Alloimmunization: Implications for the Understanding of the Fetal Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaisbuch, Edi; Romero, Roberto; Gomez, Ricardo; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) has been described in the context of preterm labor and preterm PROM and is often associated with intra-amniotic infection/inflammation. This syndrome is characterized by systemic fetal inflammation and operationally-defined by an elevated fetal plasma interleukin (IL)-6. The objective of this study was to determine if FIRS can be found in fetuses with activation of their immune system, such as the one observed in Rh alloimmune-mediated fetal anemia. Methods Fetal blood sampling was performed in sensitized Rh-D negative women with suspected fetal anemia (n=16). Fetal anemia was diagnosed according to reference range nomograms established for the assessment of fetal hematologic parameters. An elevated fetal plasma IL-6 concentration was defined using a cutoff of >11 pg/mL. Concentrations of IL-6 were determined by immunoassay. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Results 1) The prevalence of an elevated fetal plasma IL-6 was 25% (4/16); 2) there was an inverse relationship between the fetal hematocrit and IL-6 concentration - the lower the hematocrit, the higher the fetal IL-6 (r= −0.68, p=0.004); 3) fetuses with anemia had a significantly higher plasma IL-6 concentration than those without anemia (3.74 pg/ml, interquartile range (IQR) 1.18–2.63 vs. 1.46 pg/ml, IQR 1.76–14.7; p=0.02); 4) interestingly, all fetuses with an elevated plasma IL-6 concentration had anemia (prevalence 40%, 4/10), while in the group without anemia, none had an elevated fetal plasma IL-6. Conclusions An elevation in fetal plasma IL-6 can be observed in a subset of fetuses with anemia due to Rh alloimmunization. This observation suggests that the hallmark of FIRS can be caused by non-infection-related insults. Further studies are required to determine whether the prognosis of FIRS caused by intra-amniotic infection/inflammation is different from that induced by alloimmunization. PMID:20701435

  3. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome in End-Stage Heart Failure Patients Following Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation: Differences in Plasma Redox Status and Leukocyte Activation.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Nandan K; Sorensen, Erik N; Pham, Si M; Koenig, Steven C; Griffith, Bartley P; Slaughter, Mark S; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2016-05-01

    The role of oxidative stress and leukocyte activation has not been elucidated in developing systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in heart failure (HF) patients after continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) implantation. The objective of this study was to investigate the change of plasma redox status and leukocyte activation in CF-LVAD implanted HF patients with or without SIRS. We recruited 31 CF-LVAD implanted HF patients (16 SIRS and 15 non-SIRS) and 11 healthy volunteers as the control. Pre- and postimplant blood samples were collected from the HF patients. Plasma levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) in erythrocyte, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and polymorphonuclear elastase (PMN-elastase) were measured. The HF patients had a preexisting condition of oxidative stress than healthy controls as evident from the higher oxLDL and MDA levels as well as depleted SOD and TAC. Leukocyte activation in terms of higher plasma MPO and PMN-elastase was also prominent in HF patients than controls. Persistent oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant status were found to be more belligerent in HF patients with SIRS after the implantation of CF-LVAD when compared with non-SIRS patients. Similar to oxidative stress, the activation of blood leukocyte was significantly highlighted in SIRS patients after implantation compared with non-SIRS. We identified that the plasma redox status and leukocyte activation became more prominent in CF-LVAD implanted HF patients who developed SIRS. Our findings suggest that plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress and leukocyte activation may be associated with the development of SIRS after CF-LVAD implant surgery. PMID:26416627

  4. Alert cell strategy: mechanisms of inflammatory response and organ protection.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Noboru; Matsuda, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is triggered by various factors such as surgical operation, trauma, burn injury, ischemia, pancreatitis and bacterial translocation. Sepsis is a SIRS associated with bacterial infection. SIRS and sepsis tend to trigger excessive production of inflammatory cytokines and other inflammatory molecules and induce multiple organ failure, such as acute lung injury, acute kidney injury and inflammatory cardiac injury. Epithelial and endothelial cells in some major organs express inflammatory receptors on the plasma membrane and work as alert cells for inflammation, and regulation of these alert cells could have a relieving effect on the inflammatory response. In inflammatory conditions, initial cardiac dysfunction is mediated by decreased preload and adequate infusion therapy is required. Tachyarrhythmia is a complication of inflammatory conditions and early control of the inflammatory reaction would prevent the structural remodeling that is resistant to therapies. Furthermore, there seems to be crosstalk between major organs with a central focus on the kidneys in inflammatory conditions. As an alert cell strategy, volatile anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane, seem to have anti-inflammatory effects, and both experimental and clinical studies have shown the beneficial effects of these drugs in various settings of inflammatory conditions. On the other hand, in terms of intravenous anesthetics, propofol and ketamine, their current status is still controversial as there is a lack of confirmatory evidence on whether they have an organ-protective effect in inflammatory conditions. The local anesthetic lidocaine suppressed inflammatory responses upon both systemic and local administration. For the control of inflammatory conditions, anesthetic agents may be a target of drug development in accordance with other treatments and drugs. PMID:25229471

  5. Utility of Sepsis Biomarkers and the Infection Probability Score to Discriminate Sepsis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome in Standard Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ratzinger, Franz; Schuardt, Michael; Eichbichler, Katherina; Tsirkinidou, Irene; Bauer, Marlene; Haslacher, Helmuth; Mitteregger, Dieter; Binder, Michael; Burgmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Physicians are regularly faced with severely ill patients at risk of developing infections. In literature, standard care wards are often neglected, although their patients frequently suffer from a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) of unknown origin. Fast identification of patients with infections is vital, as they immediately require appropriate therapy. Further, tools with a high negative predictive value (NPV) to exclude infection or bacteremia are important to increase the cost effectiveness of microbiological examinations and to avoid inappropriate antibiotic treatment. In this prospective cohort study, 2,384 patients with suspected infections were screened for suffering from two or more SIRS criteria on standard care wards. The infection probability score (IPS) and sepsis biomarkers with discriminatory power were assessed regarding their capacity to identify infection or bacteremia. In this cohort finally consisting of 298 SIRS-patients, the infection prevalence was 72%. Bacteremia was found in 25% of cases. For the prediction of infection, the IPS yielded 0.51 ROC-AUC (30.1% sensitivity, 64.6% specificity). Among sepsis biomarkers, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) was the best parameter with 0.63 ROC-AUC (57.5% sensitivity, 67.1% specificity). For the prediction of bacteremia, the IPS performed slightly better with a ROC-AUC of 0.58 (21.3% sensitivity, 65% specificity). Procalcitonin was the best discriminator with 0.78 ROC-AUC, 86.3% sensitivity, 59.6% specificity and 92.9% NPV. Furthermore, bilirubin and LBP (ROC-AUC: 0.65, 0.62) might also be considered as useful parameters. In summary, the IPS and widely used infection parameters, including CRP or WBC, yielded a poor diagnostic performance for the detection of infection or bacteremia. Additional sepsis biomarkers do not aid in discriminating inflammation from infection. For the prediction of bacteremia procalcitonin, and bilirubin were the most promising parameters, which might be

  6. Electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiuming; Qin, Xinyue; Zhang, Yuping; Huang, Cheng; Yu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    Polyneuropathy is often an initial manifestation of polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome and therefore this disorder is frequently misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We reviewed electrophysiological data in 20 patients with POEMS syndrome and 36 matched patients with CIDP to compare the electrophysiological features of POEMS syndrome and CIDP. Compared with CIDP controls, POEMS patients demonstrated (1) less prolonged distal motor latency and less reduced motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction velocities, (2) greater reduction of amplitudes of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) in distal stimulation, and similar reduction of amplitudes of CMAP in proximal stimulation, (3) similar reduction of amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) in median and ulnar nerves, and a greater reduction of amplitudes of SNAP in tibial and peroneal nerves, (4) less temporal dispersion, (5) less frequent conduction block, (6) more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the upper and lower limbs, and more frequent neurogenic injury in the muscles of the lower than upper limbs, (7) similar F wave and H reflex abnormalities, and (8) less frequent skin sympathetic response abnormalities. We concluded that before development of typical clinical manifestations, POEMS neuropathy can be distinguished from CIDP by neural electrophysiological examination. These electrophysiological features can be used for early diagnosis and initiating correct treatment of POEMS syndrome. PMID:24268501

  7. Inflammatory Lung Disease in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Claudio; Rossi, Marcello; Chisci, Glauco; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Vannuccini, Laura; Spina, Donatella; Iacona, Ingrid; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA), upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228) and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228) of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with “high” (39.8%) and “low” (34.8%) patterns dominating over “mixed” (19.6%) and “simple mismatch” (5.9%) types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI), and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG) were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease. PMID:24757286

  8. Hansen's disease in association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

    PubMed Central

    George, Anju; Vidyadharan, Suja

    2016-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is characterized by a paradoxical worsening of an existing infection or disease process, soon after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The first case of leprosy presenting as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome was published in 2003. Here we report a case of Hansen's disease borderline tuberculoid presenting with type 1 lepra reaction 5 months after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:26955584

  9. Hansen's disease in association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    George, Anju; Vidyadharan, Suja

    2016-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is characterized by a paradoxical worsening of an existing infection or disease process, soon after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The first case of leprosy presenting as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome was published in 2003. Here we report a case of Hansen's disease borderline tuberculoid presenting with type 1 lepra reaction 5 months after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:26955584

  10. [Sweet's syndrome. Its association with chronic inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Calvo Catalá, J; González Pérez, J A; Febrer Bosch, I; Oliver Mas, V; Herrera Ballester, A

    1990-07-01

    Sweet's syndrome, or febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is a disease first described by Sweet R.D. in 1964 as a dermatologic disease. Subsequently, it has been associated to several disease. One of those rarely describe is the association to chronic intestinal inflammatory disease. We reviewed the cases studied in our hospital since 1980 and found two cases associated to chronic intestinal inflammatory disease. We recommend the carrying out of gastrointestinal studies in patients afflicted by Sweet's syndrome to detect its association. PMID:2103250

  11. Nutrition Intervention: A Strategy Against Systemic Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S.; Chen, Theresa S.; Neuman, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    Background Sepsis and septic shock syndrome are the leading causes of death in critically ill patients. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) released by the colonic microorganisms may translocate across a compromised lumen, leading to upregulated reactive oxidative stress, inflammation, and sepsis. The authors examined an enteral formula high in cysteine (antioxidant precursor), ω-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and prebiotic fructooligosaccharides (FOS) against systemic inflammatory syndrome. Methods Rats were allocated to (1) standard soy-based diet high in cysteine and crude fiber and devoid of EPA-DHA (CHOW); (2) whey-peptide-based liquid diet high in cysteine, EPA-DHA, and FOS (CYSPUFA); or (3) casein-based liquid isonitrogenous diet, low in cysteine and devoid of EPA-DHA-FOS (CASN). Liquid diets provided 25% and CHOW, 23% of calories as protein. After 6 days on diets, rats received an intraperitoneal injection of LPS or saline. Animals gained weight on their respective diets and lost weight after LPS administration. The CYSPUFA group lost considerably less weight (vs CASN or CHOW, P < .05). Inflammatory cytokines significantly increased by 4 hours and subsided 18 hours after assault. The CASN group showed elevated liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase release from damaged hepatocytes and developed severe hepatic pathology with low hematocrit. The CHOW group developed more severe hepatic lesions compared with those on liquid diets. Concentration of liver enzyme and pathology were improved in rats receiving CYSP-UFA. Conclusions Data indicate that CYSPUFA, a diet rich in EPA-DHA-FOS, protects against LPS-induced systemic inflammatory responses and warrants clinical studies in critically ill patients. PMID:19380752

  12. Signalling pathways mediating inflammatory responses in brain ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Planas, A M; Gorina, R; Chamorro, A

    2006-12-01

    Stroke causes neuronal necrosis and generates inflammation. Pro-inflammatory molecules intervene in this process by triggering glial cell activation and leucocyte infiltration to the injured tissue. Cytokines are major mediators of the inflammatory response. Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are released in the ischaemic brain. Anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-10, promote cell survival, whereas pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNFalpha (tumour necrosis factor alpha), can induce cell death. However, deleterious effects of certain cytokines can turn to beneficial actions, depending on particular features such as the concentration, time point and the very intricate network of intracellular signals that become activated and interact. A key player in the intracellular response to cytokines is the JAK (Janus kinase)/STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway that induces alterations in the pattern of gene transcription. These changes are associated either with cell death or survival depending, among other things, on the specific proteins involved. STAT1 activation is related to cell death, whereas STAT3 activation is often associated with survival. Yet, it is clear that STAT activation must be tightly controlled, and for this reason the function of JAK/STAT modulators, such as SOCS (suppressors of cytokine signalling) and PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated STAT), and phosphatases is most relevant. Besides local effects in the ischaemic brain, cytokines are released to the circulation and affect the immune system. Unbalanced pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory plasma cytokine concentrations favouring an 'anti-inflammatory' state can decrease the immune response. Robust evidence now supports that stroke can induce an immunodepression syndrome, increasing the risk of infection. The contribution of individual cytokines and their intracellular signalling pathways to this response needs to be further investigated

  13. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome during treatment of Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Vayssade, Marielle; Tournadre, Anne; D'Incan, Michel; Soubrier, Martin; Dubost, Jean-Jacques

    2015-03-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is a rare complication of the treatment of Whipple's disease. Here, we report the case of a 65-year-old man treated for Whipple's disease affecting the joints, with positive Tropheryma whipplei PCR in CSF, who developed fever and nodular eruption on the trunk, arms and face in association with biological inflammatory syndrome 10 days after initiation of antimicrobial treatment. Skin manifestations and the patient's general condition improved on corticosteroids (0.5mg/kg prednisone), but as steroids were gradually tapered, new nodules appeared below a prednisone dose of 10-15mg. One year after starting treatment, lumbar puncture showed asymptomatic meningitis with negative T. whipplei PCR results which had regressed spontaneously. Two years after the diagnosis, on prednisone 5mg daily and antimicrobial treatment, the patient had only transient, episodic nodular rash without fever or inflammatory syndrome. PMID:25553832

  14. Systemic Inflammatory Syndrome Associated with a Case of Jugular Paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Sokabe, Ayuko; Mizooka, Masafumi; Sakemi, Rinne; Kobayashi, Tomoki; Kishikawa, Nobusuke; Yokobayashi, Kenichi; Kanno, Keishi; Tazuma, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Jugular paraganlioma is a benign, slow-growing tumor originating from the paraganglion cells and it is associated with catecholamine secretion. Paragangliomas can secrete Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and present as a systemic inflammatory syndrome; these characteristics have not been previously associated with jugular paragangliomas. A 63-year-old man with a jugular tumor in the skull base was referred to our hospital for an evaluation of pyrexia, back pain, and acute inflammation. His serum IL-6 level was elevated on admission and it decreased after radiotherapy. This is the first known case of a jugular paraganglioma exhibiting systemic inflammatory syndrome. PMID:27477424

  15. Sjögren's syndrome: another facet of the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Colafrancesco, S; Perricone, C; Priori, R; Valesini, G; Shoenfeld, Y

    2014-06-01

    Recently, a new syndrome, namely the "Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants" (ASIA) has been defined. In this syndrome different conditions characterized by common signs and symptoms and induced by the presence of an adjuvant are included. The adjuvant is a substance capable of boosting the immune response and of acting as a trigger in the development of autoimmune diseases. Post-vaccination autoimmune phenomena represent a major issue of ASIA. Indeed, despite vaccines represent a mainstay in the improvement of human health, several of these have been implicated as a potential trigger for autoimmune diseases. Sjogren's Syndrome (SjS) is a systemic chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of an inflammatory involvement of exocrine glands accompanied by systemic manifestations. Own to the straight association between infectious agents exposure (mainly viruses) and sicca syndrome development, the possible link between vaccine and SjS is not surprising. Indeed, a few cases of SjS following vaccine delivery have been reported. At the same extent, the induction of SjS following silicone exposure has been described too. Thus, the aim of this review was to focus on SjS and its possible development following vaccine or silicone exposure in order to define another possible facet of the ASIA syndrome. PMID:24774584

  16. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jan; Gold, Ralf; Adams, Ortwin; Lassmann, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a viral encephalitis induced by the John Cunningham (JC) virus, an ubiquitous neurotropic papovavirus of the genus polyomavirus that in healthy people in latency resides in kidney and bone marrow cells. Activation and entry into the CNS were first seen in patients with malignancies of the hematopoietic system and an impaired immune system. During the 1980 and the 1990s with the appearance of human immunodeficiency virus infection in humans, PML was found to be the most important opportunistic infection of the central nervous system. As a result of highly efficient immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory treatments, in recent years, the number of PML cases again increased. PML is prevented by an intact cellular immune response and accordingly immune reconstitution can terminate established disease in the CNS. However, forced immune reconstitution can lead to massive destruction of virus-infected cells. This may result in clinical exacerbation associated with high morbidity and mortality and referred to as PML with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (PML-IRIS). In the present review, we discuss virological properties and routes of infection in the CNS, but mostly focus on the pathology of PML and PML-IRIS and on the role of the immune system in these disorders. We show that PML and PML-IRIS result from predominant JC virus infection of oligodendrocytes and, to a lesser extent, of infected neurons. Inflammation in these encephalitides seems to be driven by a dominant cytotoxic T cell response which is massively exaggerated during IRIS. PMID:26323992

  17. Rasmussen Syndrome and Other Inflammatory Epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Varadkar, Sophia; Cross, J Helen

    2015-06-01

    An underlying immune basis is emerging in an increasing number of epileptic and encephalopathic syndromes. The immunopathological mechanisms may be categorized into antibody-mediated, T-cell cytotoxicity, and microglia-induced degeneration. The immune basis in Rasmussen syndrome is thought to be T-cell mediated. Antibodies to extracellular and intracellular epitopes are implicated in limbic and other encephalitides, characterized by seizures, movement disorder, sleep disorder, obtundation, psychosis, mutism, and other psychiatric symptoms. Extracellular antibodies are directed at cell-surface-expressed neuronal or glial proteins: glutamate receptors (N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazol-propionic acid), voltage-gated potassium channel complex (contactin-associated-protein 2 [CASPR2], contactin-2 and leucin-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 [LGI1]), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (GABABR and GABAAR). Antibodies to intracellular antigens are less commonly seen (for example, glutamic acid decarboxylase). Diseases caused by antibodies to cell-surface-expressed antigens are better expected to respond to immune treatments than to those where the presumed mechanism is T-cell driven. Antibodies to the folate receptor FR1 are a cause of primary cerebral folate deficiency. Febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES) may also have an immune basis, although this is yet to be proven. For all these epilepsies, the best treatment and the long-term outcomes are not yet clear. PMID:26060905

  18. The Pathogenesis of ACLF: The Inflammatory Response and Immune Function.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Although systemic inflammation is a hallmark of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), its role in the development of this syndrome is poorly understood. Here the author first summarizes the general principles of the inflammatory response. Inflammation can be triggered by exogenous or endogenous inducers. Important exogenous inducers include bacterial products such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and virulence factors. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns elicit inflammation through structural feature recognition (using innate pattern-recognition receptors [PRRs]), whereas virulence factors generally trigger inflammation via functional feature recognition. Endogenous inducers are called danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and include molecules released by necrotic cells and products of extracellular matrix breakdown. Danger-associated molecular patterns use different PRRs. The purpose of the inflammatory response may differ according to the type of stimulus: The aim of infection-induced inflammation is to decrease pathogen burden, whereas the DAMP-induced inflammation aims to promote tissue repair. An excessive inflammatory response can induce collateral tissue damage (a process called immunopathology). However immunopathology may not be the only mechanism of tissue damage; for example, organ failure can develop because of failed disease tolerance. In this review, the author also discusses how general principles of the inflammatory response can help us to understand the development of ACLF in different contexts: bacterial infection, severe alcoholic hepatitis, and cases in which there is no identifiable trigger. PMID:27172355

  19. Mucosal Inflammatory Response to Salmonella typhimurium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir; McCormick, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium consists of a single layer of epithelial cells that forms a barrier against food antigens and the resident microbiota within the lumen. This delicately balanced organ functions in a highly sophisticated manner to uphold the fidelity of the intestinal epithelium and to eliminate pathogenic microorganisms. On the luminal side, this barrier is fortified by a thick mucus layer, and on the serosal side exists the lamina propria containing a resident population of immune cells. Pathogens that are able to breach this barrier disrupt the healthy epithelial lining by interfering with the regulatory mechanisms that govern the normal balance of intestinal architecture and function. This disruption results in a coordinated innate immune response deployed to eliminate the intruder that includes the release of antimicrobial peptides, activation of pattern-recognition receptors, and recruitment of a variety of immune cells. In the case of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection, induction of an inflammatory response has been linked to its virulence mechanism, the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS secretes protein effectors that exploit the host’s cell biology to facilitate bacterial entry and intracellular survival, and to modulate the host immune response. As the role of the intestinal epithelium in initiating an immune response has been increasingly realized, this review will highlight recent research that details progress made in understanding mechanisms underlying the mucosal inflammatory response to Salmonella infection, and how such inflammatory responses impact pathogenic fitness of this organism. PMID:25071772

  20. Natural Products: Insights into Leishmaniasis Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Igor A.; Mazotto, Ana Maria; Cardoso, Verônica; Alves, Renan L.; Amaral, Ana Claudia F.; Silva, Jefferson Rocha de Andrade; Pinheiro, Anderson S.; Vermelho, Alane B.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that affects several populations worldwide, against which there are no vaccines available and the chemotherapy is highly toxic. Depending on the species causing the infection, the disease is characterized by commitment of tissues, including the skin, mucous membranes, and internal organs. Despite the relevance of host inflammatory mediators on parasite burden control, Leishmania and host immune cells interaction may generate an exacerbated proinflammatory response that plays an important role in the development of leishmaniasis clinical manifestations. Plant-derived natural products have been recognized as bioactive agents with several properties, including anti-protozoal and anti-inflammatory activities. The present review focuses on the antileishmanial activity of plant-derived natural products that are able to modulate the inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. The capability of crude extracts and some isolated substances in promoting an anti-inflammatory response during Leishmania infection may be used as part of an effective strategy to fight the disease. PMID:26538837

  1. [Genes Responsible for Epileptic Syndromes].

    PubMed

    Kato, Mitsuhiro

    2016-02-01

    The first causative gene for epileptic syndrome was revealed 20 years ago. Since then, many genes responsible for epileptic syndrome, particularly sporadic epileptic encephalopathies, such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, and focal cortical dysplasia, have been identified. Although epilepsy was recognized as a channelopathy in the beginning stages of gene discovery, other molecular mechanisms for epileptic syndromes, such as interneuronopathy, synaptic vesicle release, and mTOR signal transduction, are emerging. A new technique for gene analysis using the next-generation sequencer is now available for clinical purpose abroad and precision medicine based on the molecular mechanisms has started. Infrastructural development of the official framework, from molecular diagnosis to personalized therapy, is urgently required in Japan. PMID:26873236

  2. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome unmasking erythema nodosum leprosum: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Arakkal, Geeta Kiran; Damarla, Sudha Vani; Chanda, Geetha Madhuri

    2015-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) occurs as an acute symptomatic expression of a latent infection during the recovery of immune system in response to antiretroviral therapy in HIV patients. IRIS triggers both opportunistic and non-opportunistic infections. We report a case of IRIS in a patient with HIV, presenting as erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL), which led to unmasking of lepromatous leprosy following anti-retroviral therapy (ART). PMID:25657440

  3. Topiramate Responsive Exploding Head Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Palikh, Gaurang M.; Vaughn, Bradley V.

    2010-01-01

    Exploding head syndrome is a rare phenomenon but can be a significant disruption to quality of life. We describe a 39-year-old female with symptoms of a loud bang and buzz at sleep onset for 3 years. EEG monitoring confirmed these events occurred in transition from stage 1 sleep. This patient reported improvement in intensity of events with topiramate medication. Based on these results, topiramate may be an alternative method to reduce the intensity of events in exploding head syndrome. Citation: Palikh GM; Vaughn BV. Topiramate responsive exploding head syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(4):382-383. PMID:20726288

  4. Crusted scabies-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the widely accepted association between crusted scabies and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infection, crusted scabies has not been included in the spectrum of infections associated with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 28-year-old Mexican individual with late HIV-infection, who had no apparent skin lesions but soon after initiation of antiretroviral therapy, he developed an aggressive form of crusted scabies with rapid progression of lesions. Severe infestation by Sarcoptes scabiei was confirmed by microscopic examination of the scale and skin biopsy. Due to the atypical presentation of scabies in a patient responding to antiretroviral therapy, preceded by no apparent skin lesions at initiation of antiretroviral therapy, the episode was interpreted for the first time as “unmasking crusted scabies-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome”. Conclusion This case illustrates that when crusted scabies is observed in HIV-infected patients responding to antiretroviral therapy, it might as well be considered as a possible manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Patient context should be considered for adequate diagnosis and treatment of conditions exacerbated by antiretroviral therapy-induced immune reconstitution. PMID:23181485

  5. Pathology in euthermic bats with white nose syndrome suggests a natural manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, Carol U.; Barber, Daniel; Mandl, Judith N.

    2012-01-01

    White nose syndrome, caused by Geomyces destructans, has killed more than 5 million cave hibernating bats in eastern North America. During hibernation, the lack of inflammatory cell recruitment at the site of fungal infection and erosion is consistent with a temperature-induced inhibition of immune cell trafficking. This immune suppression allows G. destructans to colonize and erode the skin of wings, ears and muzzle of bat hosts unchecked. Yet, paradoxically, within weeks of emergence from hibernation an intense neutrophilic inflammatory response to G. destructans is generated, causing severe pathology that can contribute to death. We hypothesize that the sudden reversal of immune suppression in bats upon the return to euthermia leads to a form of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), which was first described in HIV-infected humans with low helper T lymphocyte counts and bacterial or fungal opportunistic infections. IRIS is a paradoxical and rapid worsening of symptoms in immune compromised humans upon restoration of immunity in the face of an ongoing infectious process. In humans with HIV, the restoration of adaptive immunity following suppression of HIV replication with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can trigger severe immune-mediated tissue damage that can result in death. We propose that the sudden restoration of immune responses in bats infected with G. destructans results in an IRIS-like dysregulated immune response that causes the post-emergent pathology.

  6. Pathology in euthermic bats with white nose syndrome suggests a natural manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meteyer, Carol U; Barber, Daniel; Mandl, Judith N

    2012-11-15

    White nose syndrome, caused by Geomyces destructans, has killed more than 5 million cave hibernating bats in eastern North America. During hibernation, the lack of inflammatory cell recruitment at the site of fungal infection and erosion is consistent with a temperature-induced inhibition of immune cell trafficking. This immune suppression allows G. destructans to colonize and erode the skin of wings, ears and muzzle of bat hosts unchecked. Yet, paradoxically, within weeks of emergence from hibernation an intense neutrophilic inflammatory response to G. destructans is generated, causing severe pathology that can contribute to death. We hypothesize that the sudden reversal of immune suppression in bats upon the return to euthermia leads to a form of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). IRIS was first described in HIV-infected humans with low helper T lymphocyte counts and bacterial or fungal opportunistic infections. IRIS is a paradoxical and rapid worsening of symptoms in immune compromised humans upon restoration of immunity in the face of an ongoing infectious process. In humans with HIV, the restoration of adaptive immunity following suppression of HIV replication with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can trigger severe immune-mediated tissue damage that can result in death. We propose that the sudden restoration of immune responses in bats infected with G. destructans results in an IRIS-like dysregulated immune response that causes the post-emergent pathology. PMID:23154286

  7. [Severe inflammation during recovery from neutropenia: the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome following chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    van Lier, Dirk P T; Janssen, Nico A F; Snoeren, Miranda M; Verweij, Paul E; Blijlevens, Nicole M A; van der Velden, Walter J F M

    2015-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) occurs when a patient is recovering from a transient immunodeficiency and results in an uncontrolled inflammatory response to infectious agents and tissue damage. Symptoms such as fever and radiological signs seem to paradoxically appear or worsen, unmasking a previously unrecognized infection. The patient's clinical condition may then deteriorate as a result of increasing tissue damage and this may even lead to death. IRIS was initially described in patients suffering from a HIV infection who experienced immune recovery following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Increasingly, however, the syndrome is being reported in patients who are recovering from an episode of neutropenia following chemotherapy, hypomethylating agent use or a stem cell transplantation for the treatment of a solid tumour or haematological cancers. We describe two cases of IRIS following an episode of neutropenia in patients with a haematological malignancy and elaborate on the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of IRIS in cancer patients. PMID:26246060

  8. Analyzing inflammatory response as excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yde, Pernille; Høgh Jensen, Mogens; Trusina, Ala

    2011-11-01

    The regulatory system of the transcription factor NF-κB plays a great role in many cell functions, including inflammatory response. Interestingly, the NF-κB system is known to up-regulate production of its own triggering signal—namely, inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-1, and IL-6. In this paper we investigate a previously presented model of the NF-κB, which includes both spatial effects and the positive feedback from cytokines. The model exhibits the properties of an excitable medium and has the ability to propagate waves of high cytokine concentration. These waves represent an optimal way of sending an inflammatory signal through the tissue as they create a chemotactic signal able to recruit neutrophils to the site of infection. The simple model displays three qualitatively different states; low stimuli leads to no or very little response. Intermediate stimuli leads to reoccurring waves of high cytokine concentration. Finally, high stimuli leads to a sustained high cytokine concentration, a scenario which is toxic for the tissue cells and corresponds to chronic inflammation. Due to the few variables of the simple model, we are able to perform a phase-space analysis leading to a detailed understanding of the functional form of the model and its limitations. The spatial effects of the model contribute to the robustness of the cytokine wave formation and propagation.

  9. Collective cell migration during inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Wound scratch healing assays of endothelial cell monolayers is a simple model to study collective cell migration as a function of biological signals. A signal of particular interest is the immune response, which after initial wounding in vivo causes the release of various inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an innate inflammatory cytokine that can induce cell growth, cell necrosis, and change cell morphology. We studied the effects of TNF-α on collective cell migration using the wound healing assays and measured several migration metrics, such as rate of scratch closure, velocities of leading edge and bulk cells, closure index, and velocity correlation functions between migrating cells. We observed that TNF-α alters all migratory metrics as a function of the size of the scratch and TNF-α content. The changes observed in migration correlate with actin reorganization upon TNF-α exposure.

  10. Paradoxical reactions and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Lucy C K; Breen, Ronan; Miller, Robert F; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Lipman, Marc

    2015-03-01

    The coalescence of the HIV-1 and tuberculosis (TB) epidemics in Sub-Saharan Africa has had a significant and negative impact on global health. The availability of effective antimicrobial treatment for both HIV-1 (in the form of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)) and TB (with antimycobacterial agents) has the potential to mitigate the associated morbidity and mortality. However, the use of both HAART and antimycobacterial therapy is associated with the development of inflammatory paradoxical syndromes after commencement of therapy. These include paradoxical reactions (PR) and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndromes (IRIS), conditions that complicate mycobacterial disease in HIV seronegative and seropositive individuals. Here, we discuss case definitions for PR and IRIS, and explore how advances in identifying the risk factors and immunopathogenesis of these conditions informs our understanding of their shared underlying pathogenesis. We propose that both PR and IRIS are characterized by the triggering of exaggerated inflammation in a setting of immunocompromise and antigen loading, via the reversal of immunosuppression by HAART and/or antimycobacterials. Further understanding of the molecular basis of this pathogenesis may pave the way for effective immunotherapies for the treatment of PR and IRIS. PMID:25809754

  11. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong Xiao, Shaobo

    2014-11-15

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. - Highlights: • PRRSV infection triggers HMGB1 release from MARC-145 cells and PAMs. • HMGB1 does not significantly affect PRRSV proliferation. • HMGB1 is involved in PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory responses. • HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced inflammatory responses through TLR2/4 and RAGE.

  12. Inflammatory responses to infection: the Dutch contribution.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Martijn A; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2014-12-01

    At any given moment, our body is under attack by a large variety of pathogens, which aim to enter and use our body to propagate and disseminate. The extensive cellular and molecular complexity of our immune system enables us to efficiently eliminate invading pathogens or at least develop a condition in which propagation of the microorganism is reduced to a minimum. Yet, the evolutionary pressure on pathogens to circumvent our immune defense mechanisms is immense, which continuously leads to the development of novel pathogenic strains that challenge the health of mankind. Understanding this battle between pathogen and the immune system has been a fruitful area of immunological research over the last century and will continue to do so for many years. In this review, which has been written on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Dutch Society for Immunology, we provide an overview of the major contributions that Dutch immunologists and infection biologists have made in the last decades on the inflammatory response to viral, bacterial, fungal or parasitic infections. We focus on those studies that have addressed both the host and the pathogen, as these are most interesting from an immunological point of view. Although it is not possible to completely cover this comprehensive research field, this review does provide an interesting overview of Dutch research on inflammatory responses to infection. PMID:25455597

  13. Scorpion venom and the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Petricevich, Vera L

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion venoms consist of a complex of several toxins that exhibit a wide range of biological properties and actions, as well as chemical compositions, toxicity, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. These venoms are associated with high morbility and mortality, especially among children. Victims of envenoming by a scorpion suffer a variety of pathologies, involving mainly both sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation as well as central manifestations such as irritability, hyperthermia, vomiting, profuse salivation, tremor, and convulsion. The clinical signs and symptoms observed in humans and experimental animals are related with an excessive systemic host inflammatory response to stings and stings, respectively. Although the pathophysiology of envenomation is complex and not yet fully understood, venom and immune responses are known to trigger the release of inflammatory mediators that are largely mediated by cytokines. In models of severe systemic inflammation produced by injection of high doses of venom or venoms products, the increase in production of proinflammatory cytokines significantly contributes to immunological imbalance, multiple organ dysfunction and death. The cytokines initiate a cascade of events that lead to illness behaviors such as fever, anorexia, and also physiological events in the host such as activation of vasodilatation, hypotension, and increased of vessel permeability. PMID:20300540

  14. Scorpion Venom and the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Petricevich, Vera L.

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion venoms consist of a complex of several toxins that exhibit a wide range of biological properties and actions, as well as chemical compositions, toxicity, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. These venoms are associated with high morbility and mortality, especially among children. Victims of envenoming by a scorpion suffer a variety of pathologies, involving mainly both sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation as well as central manifestations such as irritability, hyperthermia, vomiting, profuse salivation, tremor, and convulsion. The clinical signs and symptoms observed in humans and experimental animals are related with an excessive systemic host inflammatory response to stings and stings, respectively. Although the pathophysiology of envenomation is complex and not yet fully understood, venom and immune responses are known to trigger the release of inflammatory mediators that are largely mediated by cytokines. In models of severe systemic inflammation produced by injection of high doses of venom or venoms products, the increase in production of proinflammatory cytokines significantly contributes to immunological imbalance, multiple organ dysfunction and death. The cytokines initiate a cascade of events that lead to illness behaviors such as fever, anorexia, and also physiological events in the host such as activation of vasodilatation, hypotension, and increased of vessel permeability. PMID:20300540

  15. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Naomi F; Scriven, James; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is improving worldwide. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a common complication of ART initiation. In this review, we provide an overview of clinical and epidemiological features of HIV-associated IRIS, current understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms, available therapy, and preventive strategies. The spectrum of HIV-associated IRIS is described, with a particular focus on three important pathogen-associated forms: tuberculosis-associated IRIS, cryptococcal IRIS, and Kaposi’s sarcoma IRIS. While the clinical features and epidemiology are well described, there are major gaps in our understanding of pathophysiology and as a result therapeutic and preventative strategies are suboptimal. Timing of ART initiation is critical to reduce IRIS-associated morbidity. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of IRIS will hopefully enable improved diagnostic modalities and better targeted treatments to be developed. PMID:25709503

  16. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Walker, Naomi F; Scriven, James; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is improving worldwide. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a common complication of ART initiation. In this review, we provide an overview of clinical and epidemiological features of HIV-associated IRIS, current understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms, available therapy, and preventive strategies. The spectrum of HIV-associated IRIS is described, with a particular focus on three important pathogen-associated forms: tuberculosis-associated IRIS, cryptococcal IRIS, and Kaposi's sarcoma IRIS. While the clinical features and epidemiology are well described, there are major gaps in our understanding of pathophysiology and as a result therapeutic and preventative strategies are suboptimal. Timing of ART initiation is critical to reduce IRIS-associated morbidity. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of IRIS will hopefully enable improved diagnostic modalities and better targeted treatments to be developed. PMID:25709503

  17. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Malika; Jafri, Kashif; Sharim, Rebecca; Silverman, Susanna; Sindher, Sayantani B; Shahane, Anupama; Kwan, Mildred

    2015-02-01

    The use of biologics in the treatment of autoimmune disease, cancer, and other immune conditions has revolutionized medical care in these areas. However, there are drawbacks to the use of these medications including increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. One unforeseen risk once opportunistic infection has occurred with biologic use is the onset of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) upon drug withdrawal. Although originally described in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, it has become clear that IRIS may occur when recovery of immune function follows opportunistic infection in the setting of previous immune compromise/suppression. In this review, we draw attention to this potential pitfall on the use of biologic drugs. PMID:25504263

  18. Surgical management of malignant cerebral edema secondary to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome from natalizumab-associated progressive multifocal encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee A; Lopes, Demetrius K

    2015-10-01

    We report a rare multiple sclerosis (MS) patient who developed malignant cerebral edema related to progressive multifocal encephalopathy (PML) immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after natalizumab discontinuation. The patient subsequently required a decompressive hemicraniectomy to reduce intracranial pressure and to avoid uncal herniation. PML is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) which affects oligodendrocytes and is caused by reactivation of latent John Cunningham virus. Natalizumab is a known risk factor (1 in 1000) for MS patients treated with this drug. Discontinuation of natalizumab treatment decreases the risk of PML progression, but a massive inflammatory response can occur after cell-mediated immune surveillance is reestablished in the CNS, causing immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Treatment of IRIS usually consists of steroids and plasma exchange to lessen the immune response, however, mortality has been reported at up to 29.4%, despite aggressive medical treatment. We discuss our management strategy with a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:26115897

  19. Transport induced inflammatory responses in horses.

    PubMed

    Wessely-Szponder, J; Bełkot, Z; Bobowiec, R; Kosior-Korzecka, U; Wójcik, M

    2015-01-01

    Deleterious response to road transport is an important problem in equine practice. It determines different physiological, immunological and metabolic changes which lead to increased susceptibility to several disorders such as pneumonia, diarrhea, colics, laminitis, injuries and rhabdomyolisis. The aim of our study was to look for possible relationships between transportation of female young and older horses over a long and short distance and an inflammatory state reflected by an increase of acute phase protein concentration, oxidative stress and muscle injury. The study was conducted on 24 cold-blooded female horses divided into four groups. Six fillies aged 6-18 months and six mares aged 10-12 years were transported over the distance of about 550 km, six fillies aged 6-18 months and six mares aged 10-12 years were transported over the distance of about 50 km. Plasma and serum were obtained from blood samples taken before transportation (T0), immediately after transportation (T1) and at an abattoir during slaughter (T2). In these samples fibrinogen, MDA, AST and CK were assessed. Fibrinogen increased in all studied groups especially in fillies after long distance transportation, where it reached 205±7.07 mg/dl before transportation, 625±35.35 mg/dl after transportation, and 790±14.14 mg/dl during slaughter. MDA concentrations rose after transportation and reached the maximal level during slaughter. CK activity was more elevated after short transportation in younger horses, whereas initial activity of AST was higher in older horses. We estimated that intensified responses from acute phase, oxidative stress and muscle injury parameters indicated an inflammatory state. PMID:26172192

  20. Deregulation of innate immune and inflammatory signaling in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gañán-Gómez, I; Wei, Y; Starczynowski, DT; Colla, S; Yang, H; Cabrero-Calvo, M; Bohannan, ZS; Verma, A; Steidl, U; Garcia-Manero, G

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are a group of heterogeneous clonal hematologic malignancies that are characterized by defective bone marrow (BM) hematopoiesis and by the occurrence of intramedullary apoptosis. During the past decade, the identification of key genetic and epigenetic alterations in patients has improved our understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease. However, the specific molecular mechanisms leading to the pathogenesis of MDS have largely remained obscure. Recently, essential evidence supporting the direct role of innate immune abnormalities in MDS has been obtained, including the identification of multiple key regulators that are overexpressed or constitutively activated in BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Mounting experimental results indicate that the dysregulation of these molecules leads to abnormal hematopoiesis, unbalanced cell death and proliferation in patients' BM, and has an important role in the pathogenesis of MDS. Furthermore, there is compelling evidence that the deregulation of innate immune and inflammatory signaling also affects other cells from the immune system and the BM microenvironment, which establish aberrant associations with hematopoietic precursors and contribute to the MDS phenotype. Therefore, the deregulation of innate immune and inflammatory signaling should be considered as one of the driving forces in the pathogenesis of MDS. In this article, we review and update the advances in this field, summarizing the results from the most recent studies and discussing their clinical implications. PMID:25761935

  1. Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) 2013: Unveiling the pathogenic, clinical and diagnostic aspects.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Colafrancesco, Serena; Mazor, Roei D; Soriano, Alessandra; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-12-01

    In 2011 a new syndrome termed 'ASIA Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants' was defined pointing to summarize for the first time the spectrum of immune-mediated diseases triggered by an adjuvant stimulus such as chronic exposure to silicone, tetramethylpentadecane, pristane, aluminum and other adjuvants, as well as infectious components, that also may have an adjuvant effect. All these environmental factors have been found to induce autoimmunity by themselves both in animal models and in humans: for instance, silicone was associated with siliconosis, aluminum hydroxide with post-vaccination phenomena and macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome. Several mechanisms have been hypothesized to be involved in the onset of adjuvant-induced autoimmunity; a genetic favorable background plays a key role in the appearance on such vaccine-related diseases and also justifies the rarity of these phenomena. This paper will focus on protean facets which are part of ASIA, focusing on the roles and mechanisms of action of different adjuvants which lead to the autoimmune/inflammatory response. The data herein illustrate the critical role of environmental factors in the induction of autoimmunity. Indeed, it is the interplay of genetic susceptibility and environment that is the major player for the initiation of breach of tolerance. PMID:24238833

  2. Toll-like receptor 4 confers inflammatory response to Suilysin

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Lili; Pian, Yaya; Chen, Shaolong; Ren, Zhiqiang; Liu, Peng; Lv, Qingyu; Zheng, Yuling; Zhang, Shengwei; Hao, Huaijie; Yuan, Yuan; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) is an emerging human pathogen worldwide. A large outbreak occurred in the summer of 2005 in China. Serum samples from this outbreak revealed that levels of the main proinflammatory cytokines were significantly higher in patients with streptococcal toxic-shock-like syndrome (STSLS) than in patients with meningitis only. However, the mechanism underlying the cytokine storm in STSLS caused by SS2 remained unclear. In this study, we found that suilysin (SLY) is the main protein inflammatory stimulus of SS2 and that native SLY (nSLY) stimulated cytokines independently of its haemolytic ability. Interestingly, a small amount of SLY (Å Mol/L) induced strong, long-term TNF-α release from human PBMCs. We also found that nSLY stimulated TNF-α in wild-type macrophages but not in macrophages from mice that carried a spontaneous mutation in TLR4 (P712H). We demonstrated for the first time that SLY stimulates immune cells through TLR4. In addition, the Myd88 adaptor-p38-MAPK pathway was involved in this process. The present study suggested that the TLR4-dependent inflammatory responses induced by SLY in host might contribute to the STSLS caused by SS2 and that p38-MAPK could be used as a target to control the release of excess TNF-α induced by SS2. PMID:26167160

  3. A scarlet pimpernel for the resolution of inflammation? The role of supra-therapeutic doses of cobalamin, in the treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic or traumatic shock.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Cobalamin carrier proteins,the Transcobalamins (TCS), are elevated during trauma, infections and chronic inflammatory conditions. This remains un-explained. It is proposed that such TC elevations signal a need for cobalamin central to the resolution of inflammation. Thus Cobalamin may regulate the transcription factor, NFkappaB, activation or suppression of which determines the inflammatory response and its resolution. Such regulation may involve at least 5 separate mechanisms: (i) hormone-like regulation of TNFalpha, through reduction of excess NO by cobalamin, as well as through the selective inhibition, in tandem with glutathione, of inducible nitric oxide synthase; (ii) quenching of nitric oxide radicals and reactive oxygen species, enhanced by cobalamin's glutathione sparing effect; (iii) the promotion of acetylcholine synthesis, central to the neuro-immune cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway; (iv) the promotion of oxidative phosphorylation; (v) and a bacteriostatic role of the TCS released by neutrophil secondary granules during phagocytosis, which also appears to modulate the inflammatory response. TC elevations are dependent on NFkappaB activation, through crosstalk between NFkappaB and Sp1, another member of the helix-loop-helix protein family, which directly mediates transcription of the TCII gene. Sp1 also has binding sites on the TNFalpha and EGF gene promoters. NFkappaB may thus ensure sufficient cobalamin to determine its own eventual suppression. Cobalamin's established regulation of EGF may additionally preserve normal function of macrophages and the coagulation cascade in wound healing. By regulating NFkappaB, Cobalamin may also be the as yet unidentified mediator needed to potentiate the anti-inflammatory action of eicosanoids derived from omega-3 essential fatty acids. Moreover, animal and human clinical data suggests that high dose cobalamin may prove a promising approach to SIRS/sepsis/septic and traumatic shock. PMID:16545917

  4. Cryptococcus-Related Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome(IRIS): Pathogenesis and Its Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Darin L; Boulware, David R.

    2011-01-01

    This review provides an overview of Cryptococcus neoformans immunology and focuses on the pathogenesis of Cryptococcus-related paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Cryptococcal IRIS has three phases: (1) before antiretroviral therapy (ART), with a paucity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation and defects in antigen clearance; (2) during initial ART immune recovery, with pro-inflammatory signaling by antigen-presenting cells without an effector response; and (3) at IRIS, a cytokine storm with a predominant type-1 helper T-cell (Th1) interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) response. Understanding IRIS pathogenesis allows for risk stratification and customization of HIV/AIDS care. In brief, persons at high IRIS risk may benefit from enhancing microbiologic clearance by use of adjunctive agents in combination with amphotericin, prolonging initial induction therapy, and/or increasing the initial consolidation antifungal therapy dose to at least 800 mg of fluconazole daily until the 2-week CSF culture is known to be sterile. Prophylactic anti-inflammatory therapies or undue delay of ART initiation in an attempt to prevent IRIS is unwarranted and may be dangerous. PMID:22389746

  5. Acute hypoxemia in humans enhances the neutrophil inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Douglas Y; Moore, Ernest E; Partrick, David A; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Offner, Patrick J; Silliman, Christopher C

    2002-04-01

    The neutrophil (PMN) is regarded as a key component in the hyperinflammatory response known as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and subsequent multiple organ failure (MOF) are related to the severity of this hyperinflammation. ICU patients who are at highest risk of developing MOF may have acute hypoxic events that complicate their hospital course. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of acute hypoxia and subsequent hypoxemia on circulating PMNs in human volunteers. Healthy subjects were exposed to a changing O2/N2 mixture until their O2 saturation (SaO2) reached a level of 68% saturation. These subjects were then exposed to room air and then returned to their baseline SaO2. PMNs were isolated from pre- and post-hypoxemic arterial blood samples and were then either stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or PMA alone, or they were primed with L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine, beta-acetyl-gamma-O-alkyl (PAF) followed by fMLP activation. Reactive oxygen species generation as measured by superoxide anion production was enhanced in primed PMNs after hypoxemia. Protease degranulation as measured by elastase release was enhanced in both quiescent PMNs and primed PMNs after fMLP activation following the hypoxemic event. Adhesion molecule upregulation as measured by CD11b/CD18, however, was not significantly changed after hypoxemia. Apoptosis of quiescent PMNs was delayed after the hypoxemic event. TNFalpha, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-8 cytokine levels were unchanged following hypoxemia. These results indicate that relevant acute hypoxemic events observed in the clinical setting enhance several PMN cytotoxic functions and suggest that a transient hypoxemic insult may promote hyperinflammation. PMID:11954825

  6. Functional Roles of Syk in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Young-Su; Son, Young-Jin; Ryou, Chongsuk; Sung, Gi-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a series of complex biological responses to protect the host from pathogen invasion. Chronic inflammation is considered a major cause of diseases, such as various types of inflammatory/autoimmune diseases and cancers. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) was initially found to be highly expressed in hematopoietic cells and has been known to play crucial roles in adaptive immune responses. However, recent studies have reported that Syk is also involved in other biological functions, especially in innate immune responses. Although Syk has been extensively studied in adaptive immune responses, numerous studies have recently presented evidence that Syk has critical functions in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and is closely related to innate immune response. This review describes the characteristics of Syk-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes the recent findings supporting the crucial roles of Syk in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and diseases, and discusses Syk-targeted drug development for the therapy of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25045209

  7. An Update on the Inflammatory Response after Endovascular Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Arnaoutoglou, Eleni; Kouvelos, George; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Patelis, Nikolaos; Lazaris, Andreas; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2015-01-01

    Postimplantation syndrome (PIS) is the clinical and biochemical expression of an inflammatory response following endovascular repair of an aortic aneurysm (EVAR). The goal of this review is to provide an update on the inflammatory response after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm, discussing its causes and effects on the clinical outcome of the patient. PIS concerns nearly one-third of patients after EVAR. It is generally a benign condition, although in some patients it may negatively affect outcome. The different definitions and conclusions drawn from several studies reveal that PIS needs to be redefined with standardized diagnostic criteria. The type of the endograft's material seems to play a role in the inflammatory response. Future studies should focus on a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, predictors, and risk factors as well as determining whether effective preventive strategies are necessary. PMID:26166953

  8. Common links between metabolic syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: Current overview and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Arkadiusz; Mosińska, Paula; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) features a constellation of central obesity, dyslipidemia, impaired glucose metabolism and often hypertension joined by insulin resistance and chronic inflammation. All these elements greatly raise patient's risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, resulting in an increased mortality. Metabolic syndrome affects approximately 20-25% of the world's adult population and thus it is essential to study its pathophysiology and seek new pharmacological targets. There is a thoroughly studied link between MS and inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) system, i.e. steatohepatitis. However, recent findings also indicate similarities in pathophysiological features between MS and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including adipose tissue dysregulation, inadequate immune response, and inflammation. In this review we aim to outline the pathophysiology of MS and emphasize the aspects revealed recently, such as mineralocorticoid activity, involvement of sex hormones and an accompanying increase in prolactin secretion. More importantly, we focus on the common links between MS and IBD. Finally, we describe new strategies and drug targets that may be utilized in MS therapy, namely adiponectin mimetics, GLP-1-based multi agonists, ABCA1 agonists and possible role of miRNA. We also discuss the possible utility of selected agents as adjuvants in IBD therapy. PMID:27238750

  9. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in association with HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis: Views over hidden possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Esaki Muthu; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Murugavel, Kailapuri G; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Sekar, Ramalingam; Lloyd, Charmaine AC; Solomon, Suniti; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran

    2007-01-01

    Gut immune components are severely compromised among persons with AIDS, which allows increased translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) into the systemic circulation. These microbial LPS are reportedly increased in chronically HIV-infected individuals and findings have correlated convincingly with measures of immune activation. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is an adverse consequence of the restoration of pathogen-specific immune responses in a subset of HIV-infected subjects with underlying latent infections during the initial months of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Whether IRIS is the result of a response to a high antigen burden, an excessive response by the recovering immune system, exacerbated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines or a lack of immune regulation due to inability to produce regulatory cytokines remains to be determined. We theorize that those who develop IRIS have a high burden of proinflammatory cytokines produced also in response to systemic bacterial LPS that nonspecifically act on latent mycobacterial antigens. We also hypothesize that subjects that do not develop IRIS could have developed either tolerance (anergy) to persistent LPS/tubercle antigens or could have normal FOXP3+ gene and that those with defective FOXP3+ gene or those with enormous plasma LPS could be vulnerable to IRIS. The measure of microbial LPS, anti-LPS antibodies and nonspecific plasma cytokines in subjects on HAART shall predict the role of these components in IRIS. PMID:18053126

  10. Managing Sjögren’s Syndrome and non-Sjögren Syndrome dry eye with anti-inflammatory therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coursey, Terry G; de Paiva, Cintia S

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye from Sjögren’s syndrome is a multifactorial disease that results in dysfunction of the lacrimal functional unit. Studies have shown changes in tear composition, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and metalloproteinase. T-lymphocytes have been shown to increase in the conjunctiva and lacrimal glands in patient and animal models. This inflammation is in part responsible for the pathogenesis of the disease, which results in symptoms of eye irritation, ocular surface epithelial disease, and loss of corneal barrier function. There are a number of anti-inflammatory approaches for treating this disease. The current study reviews details of immune response and anti–inflammatory therapies used to control this disease. PMID:25120351

  11. Platelet activation and apoptosis modulate monocyte inflammatory responses in dengue

    PubMed Central

    Hottz, Eugenio D.; Medeiros-de-Moraes, Isabel M.; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; de Assis, Edson F.; Vals-de-Souza, Rogério; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Bozza, Patrícia T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease in the world. Dengue infection has a large spectrum of clinical manifestations from self-limited febrile illness to severe syndromes accompanied by bleeding and shock. Thrombocytopenia and vascular leak with altered cytokine profiles in plasma are features of severe dengue. Although monocytes have been recognized as important sources of cytokines in dengue, the contributions of platelet-monocyte interactions to inflammatory responses in dengue have not been addressed. Patients/Methods Patients with dengue were investigated for platelet-monocyte aggregate formation and markers of monocyte activation. Platelet-induced cytokine responses by monocytes and underlying mechanisms were also investigated in vitro. Results We observed increased levels of platelet-monocyte aggregates in blood samples from patients with dengue, especially patients with thrombocytopenia and increased vascular permeability. Moreover, the exposure of monocytes from healthy volunteers to platelets from patients with dengue induced the secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10 and MCP-1, while the exposure to platelets from healthy volunteers only induced the secretion of MCP-1. In addition to the well-established modulation of monocyte cytokine responses by activated platelets through P-selectin binding, we found that interaction of monocytes with apoptotic platelets mediate IL-10 secretion through phosphatidylserine recognition in platelet-monocyte aggregates. Moreover, IL-10 secretion required platelet-monocyte contact but not phagocytosis. Conclusions Together, our results demonstrate that activated and apoptotic platelets aggregate with monocytes during dengue infection and signal specific cytokine responses that may contribute to the pathogenesis of dengue. PMID:25015827

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Dietary Combo in Overweight and Obese Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Amany Alsayed; Amine, Ezzat Khamis; Salem, Hesham Abd Elfattah; Abd El Fattah, Nesrin Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is of clinical and public health importance, affecting up to one in five women of reproductive age. It has significant and diverse clinical implications including reproductive, metabolic, and psychological features. Aim: The study was to investigate the effect of anti-inflammatory dietary combo on metabolic, endocrine, inflammatory, and reproductive profiles in overweight and obese women with PCOS. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 nonpregnant, overweight, and obese adult females with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria, were screened during the year 2012, and 75 completed the trial. At baseline and study end, fasting blood samples were drawn to measure biological markers, body fat percent (BFP), and visceral fat area (VFA) were assessed by the InBody720 device and anthropometric measurements were done for all participants who were subjected to an anti-inflammatory hypocaloric diet and physical activity for 12 weeks. Results: At study completion, we achieved moderate weight loss of (± 7%) and significant improvements in body composition, hormones and menstrual cyclicity, blood pressure, glucose homeostasis, dyslipidemia, C-reactive protein (CRP), and serum amyloid A (SAA) (surrogate measures of cardiovascular risk (CVR)). This was a clinically relevant weight loss that is associated with a reduced prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and metabolic syndrome (MS) in the general population and improved fertility outcomes in PCOS. We achieved 63% regain of menstrual cyclicity and 12% spontaneous pregnancy rate within 12 week. Conclusions: We have explored an additional dietary treatment option with good prognostic metabolic and reproductive responses to weight loss that occur in overweight and obese PCOS. PMID:26258078

  13. ARC Syndrome-Linked Vps33B Protein Is Required for Inflammatory Endosomal Maturation and Signal Termination.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Mohammed Ali; Mandraju, Rajakumar; Tracy, Charles; Hu, Wei; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Krämer, Helmut

    2016-08-16

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and other pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) sense microbial ligands and initiate signaling to induce inflammatory responses. Although the quality of inflammatory responses is influenced by internalization of TLRs, the role of endosomal maturation in clearing receptors and terminating inflammatory responses is not well understood. Here, we report that Drosophila and mammalian Vps33B proteins play critical roles in the maturation of phagosomes and endosomes following microbial recognition. Vps33B was necessary for clearance of endosomes containing internalized PRRs, failure of which resulted in enhanced signaling and expression of inflammatory mediators. Lack of Vps33B had no effect on trafficking of endosomes containing non-microbial cargo. These findings indicate that Vps33B function is critical for determining the fate of signaling endosomes formed following PRR activation. Exaggerated inflammatory responses dictated by persistence of receptors in aberrant endosomal compartments could therefore contribute to symptoms of ARC syndrome, a disease linked to loss of Vps33B. PMID:27496733

  14. Macrophage Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Response to EMCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Zachary R.; Corbett, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The expression and production of type 1 interferon is the classic cellular response to virus infection. In addition to this antiviral response, virus infection also stimulates the production of proinflammatory mediators. In this review, the pathways controlling the induction of inflammatory genes and the roles that these inflammatory mediators contribute to host defense against viral pathogens will be discussed. Specific focus will be on the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5, as a signaling receptor controlling the activation of pathways leading to virus-induced inflammatory gene expression. PMID:26295266

  15. The systemic inflammatory response in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Anderson

    2000-09-01

    The physiologic diagnosis of heart failure has changed very little over the past several decades: heart failure is the inability of the cardiac output to meet the metabolic demands of the organism. The clinical definition of heart failure (also relatively unchanged) describes it as ventricular dysfunction that is accompanied by reduced exercise tolerance. Our understanding of the true pathophysiologic processes involved in heart failure have, however, changed. We have moved from thinking of heart failure as primarily a circulatory phenomenon to seeing it as a pathophysiologic state under the control of multiple complex systems. Over the past several years the dramatic explosion of research in the fields of immunology and immunopathology have added an additional piece to the puzzle that defines heart failure and have lead to an understanding of heart failure, at least in some part, as an 'inflammatory disease'. In this review we will examine several of the key inflammatory mediators as they relate to heart failure while at the same time attempting to define the source(s) of these mediators. We will examine key elements of the inflammatory cascade as they relate to heart failure such as: cytokines, 'proximal mediators' (e.g. NF-kappaB), and distal mediators (e.g. nitric oxide). We will end with a discussion of the potential therapeutic role of anti-inflammatory strategies in the future treatment of heart failure. Also, throughout the review we will examine the potential pitfalls encountered in applying bench discoveries to the bedside as have been learned in the field of septic shock research. PMID:10978715

  16. Erythema elevatum diutinum in acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Can it be an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Sheethal K; Marfatia, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old male with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) presented with multiple hyperpigmented papules and nodules on both ankles, dorsum of bilateral feet and soles. It was associated with mild itching and pain. The patient was diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 2007. First-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) was started in 2009 to which he responded initially. He was shifted to second-line ART 11 months ago in March 2015 due to treatment failure as suggested by CD4 count of 50 cells/mm3. The present skin lesions started 2 months after the initiation of second-line ART. Differential diagnoses considered were Kaposi's sarcoma and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) related infections, but biopsy was suggestive of erythema elevatum diutinum (EED). Patient was started on oral dapsone 100 mg/day and increased to 200 mg/day to which he is responding gradually. In the present case, appearance of the lesions after initiation of second-line ART coupled with increase in CD4 count and decrease of viral load below undetectable level suggest that EED could be an IRIS. PMID:27190420

  17. Erythema elevatum diutinum in acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Can it be an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    PubMed

    Jose, Sheethal K; Marfatia, Yogesh S

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old male with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) presented with multiple hyperpigmented papules and nodules on both ankles, dorsum of bilateral feet and soles. It was associated with mild itching and pain. The patient was diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 2007. First-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) was started in 2009 to which he responded initially. He was shifted to second-line ART 11 months ago in March 2015 due to treatment failure as suggested by CD4 count of 50 cells/mm(3). The present skin lesions started 2 months after the initiation of second-line ART. Differential diagnoses considered were Kaposi's sarcoma and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) related infections, but biopsy was suggestive of erythema elevatum diutinum (EED). Patient was started on oral dapsone 100 mg/day and increased to 200 mg/day to which he is responding gradually. In the present case, appearance of the lesions after initiation of second-line ART coupled with increase in CD4 count and decrease of viral load below undetectable level suggest that EED could be an IRIS. PMID:27190420

  18. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: the trouble with immunity when you had none

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Daniel L.; Andrade, Bruno B.; Sereti, Irini; Sher, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Some individuals who are infected with HIV rapidly deteriorate shortly after starting antiretroviral therapy, despite effective viral suppression. This reaction, referred to as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), is characterized by tissue-destructive inflammation and arises as CD4+ T cells re-emerge. It has been proposed that IRIS is caused by a dysregulation of the expanding population of CD4+ T cells specific for a co-infecting opportunistic pathogen. Here, we argue that IRIS instead results from hyper-responsiveness of the innate immune system to T cell help, a mechanism that may be shared by the many manifestations of IRIS that occur following the reversal of other types of immunosuppression in pathogen-infected hosts. PMID:22230950

  19. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: incidence and implications for mortality

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Richard M.; Richardson, James T.; Buchacz, Kate; Chmiel, Joan S.; Durham, Marcus D.; Palella, Frank J.; Wendrow, Andrea; Wood, Kathy; Young, Benjamin; Brooks, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe incidence of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) and its association with mortality in a large multisite US HIV-infected cohort applying an objective, comprehensive definition. Design We studied 2 610 patients seen during 1996–2007 who initiated or resumed highly active combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and, during the next 6 months, demonstrated a decline in plasma HIV-RNA viral load of at least 0.5 log10 copies/ml or an increase of at least 50% in CD4 cell count per microliter. We defined IRIS as the diagnosis of a type B or C condition [as per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 1993 AIDS case definition] or any new mucocutaneous disorder during this same 6-month period. Methods We assessed the incidence of IRIS and evaluated risk factors for IRIS using conditional logistic regression and for all-cause mortality using proportional hazards models. Results We identified 370 cases of IRIS (in 276 patients). Median and nadir CD4 cell counts at cART initiation were 90 and 43 cells/μl, respectively; median viral load was 2.7 log10 copies/ml. The most common IRIS-defining diagnoses were candidiasis (all forms), cytomegalovirus infection, disseminated Mycobacterium avium intracellulare, Pneumocystis pneumonia, varicella zoster, Kaposi’s sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Only one case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was observed. IRIS was independently associated with CD4 cell count less than 50 cells/μl vs. at least 200 cells/μl [odds ratio (OR) 5.0] and a viral load of at least 5.0 log10 copies vs. less than 4.0 log10 copies (OR 2.3). IRIS with a type B-defining or type C-defining diagnosis approximately doubled the risk for all-cause mortality. Conclusion In this large US-based HIV-infected cohort, IRIS occurred in 10.6% of patients who responded to effective ART and contributed to increased mortality. PMID:22233655

  20. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Orofacial Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eun Sun; Bae, Jin Young; Kim, Tae Heon; Kim, Yun Sook; Suk, Kyoungho

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in many neurological diseases and inflammatory responses. Inflammatory mediators induce neuronal damage and trigger the neuropathic or inflammatory pain. But there is very little data on the role of the ER stress response in pain mechanisms. In this study, we explored whether the ER stress response is involved in orofacial inflammatory pain by using a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-injected rat model. The thermal pain hypersensitivity increased significantly after CFA injection. We found that the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress response genes, GRP78/Bip and p-eIF2α, increased significantly in trigeminal ganglion (TG) of CFA-injected rats compared to control animals. In immunofluorescence analysis, a significant increase of GRP78 and p-eIF2α immunopositive neurons was observed in CFA-injected TG compared to control TG. When we administered an ER stress modulator, salubrinal, CFA-induced thermal pain hypersensitivity was temporally reduced. Thus, our study suggests that ER stress responses in TG neurons contribute to CFA-induced inflammatory pain, and may comprise an important molecular mechanism underlying the orofacial inflammatory pain pathway. PMID:25548537

  1. Thoracic manifestations of paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome during or after antituberculous therapy in HIV-negative patients.

    PubMed

    Pornsuriyasak, Prapaporn; Suwatanapongched, Thitiporn

    2015-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a consequence of exaggerated and dysregulated host's inflammatory response to invading microorganism, leading to uncontrolled inflammatory reactions. IRIS associated with tuberculosis (TB) is well recognized among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, but it is less common among HIV-negative patients. IRIS can manifest as a paradoxical worsening or recurring of preexisting tuberculous lesions or development of new lesions despite successful antituberculous treatment. Hence, the condition might be misdiagnosed as superimposed infections, treatment failure, or relapse of TB. This pictorial essay reviewed diagnostic criteria and various thoracic manifestations of the paradoxical form of TB-associated IRIS (TB-IRIS) that might aid in early recognition of this clinical entity among HIV-negative patients. The treatment and outcomes of TB-IRIS were also discussed. PMID:25698091

  2. Local inflammatory response in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Łaskowski, P; Klim, B; Ostrowski, K; Szkudlarek, M; Litwiejko-Pietryńczak, E; Kitlas, K; Nienartowicz, S; Dzięcioł, J

    2016-06-01

    Type and intensity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in close proximity to the primary tumor are prognostically significant in postoperative patients. High intensity of TILs is considered to be a prognostically beneficial factor. The research included 66 postoperative colorectal cancer patients. The control group comprised 20 colon segments. Monoclonal antibodies LCA, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20, CD23 and CD138 were used to differentiate between T and B lymphocytes. Types of cells in the infiltrate were defined. We found greater numbers of T and B lymphocytes located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue when compared to the control group. T lymphocyte intensity in the inflammatory infiltrations was directly correlated with the size of resected tumors, presence of regional lymphatic node metastases and histological grade of malignancy. Lymphocytic infiltrations of greater intensity located in close proximity to the primary tumor were found in subjects with less advanced colorectal cancer. The research presented here proves direct dependence between the immune system and colorectal cancer. The presence of lymphocytes in the inflammatory infiltrations located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue has been proved to be prognostically beneficial. The obtained results support the application of immunotherapy in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27543872

  3. Erythrocyte deformability - A partner of the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Silva-Herdade, Ana Santos; Andolina, Giulia; Faggio, Caterina; Calado, Ângelo; Saldanha, Carlota

    2016-09-01

    We aim to establish an in vivo animal model of acute inflammation using PAF (platelet activating factor) as inflammatory agent and to study the erythrocyte deformability changes induced by the inflammatory response. Counting the number of rolling and adherent neutrophils to endothelium after 2, 4 and 6h of intrascrotal injection of PAF we showed the induction of an inflammatory state. Blood samples are collected in order to measure the erythrocyte deformability and to quantify NO efflux from the red blood cells (RBCs). The results show an increased number of rolling and adherent neutrophils after 2h and 4h of inflammation as well as decreased values of erythrocyte deformability in the same time-points. This result is in line with the need of a low blood viscosity to the recruitment process that will improve leukocyte migration towards the endothelial wall. NO efflux from RBCs is also affected by the inflammatory response at the first hours of inflammation. This animal model demonstrates in vivo the association between an acute inflammatory response and the rheological properties of the blood, namely the RBCs deformability. For those reasons we consider this as an adequate model to study acute inflammatory responses as well as hemorheological parameters. PMID:27142964

  4. Hyperperfusion in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is associated with disease progression and absence of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Michael N.; Gheuens, Sarah; Ngo, Long; Wang, Xiaoen; Alsop, David C.

    2013-01-01

    We sought to characterize perfusion patterns of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy lesions by arterial spin labelling perfusion magnetic resonance imaging and to analyse their association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, and survival. A total of 22 patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy underwent a clinical evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain within 190 days of symptom onset. The presence of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome was determined based on clinical and laboratory criteria. Perfusion within progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy lesions was determined by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging. We observed intense hyperperfusion within and at the edge of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy lesions in a subset of subjects. This hyperperfusion was quantified by measuring the fraction of lesion volume showing perfusion in excess of twice normal appearing grey matter. Hyperperfused lesion fraction was significantly greater in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy progressors than in survivors (12.8% versus 3.4% P = 0.02) corresponding to a relative risk of progression for individuals with a hyperperfused lesion fraction ≥ 4.0% of 9.1 (95% confidence interval of 1.4–59.5). The presence of hyperperfusion was inversely related to the occurrence of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome at the time of scan (P = 0.03). Indeed, within 3 months after symptom onset, hyperperfusion had a positive predictive value of 88% for absence of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging recognized regions of elevated perfusion within lesions of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. These regions might represent virologically active areas operating in the absence of an effective adaptive immune response and correspond with a worse prognosis. PMID:24088807

  5. Vagus nerve stimulation attenuates the systemic inflammatory response to endotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikova, Lyudmila V.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Zhang, Minghuang; Yang, Huan; Botchkina, Galina I.; Watkins, Linda R.; Wang, Haichao; Abumrad, Naji; Eaton, John W.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2000-05-01

    Vertebrates achieve internal homeostasis during infection or injury by balancing the activities of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), produced by all gram-negative bacteria, activates macrophages to release cytokines that are potentially lethal. The central nervous system regulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin through humoral mechanisms. Activation of afferent vagus nerve fibres by endotoxin or cytokines stimulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal anti-inflammatory responses. However, comparatively little is known about the role of efferent vagus nerve signalling in modulating inflammation. Here, we describe a previously unrecognized, parasympathetic anti-inflammatory pathway by which the brain modulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin. Acetylcholine, the principle vagal neurotransmitter, significantly attenuated the release of cytokines (tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-18), but not the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human macrophage cultures. Direct electrical stimulation of the peripheral vagus nerve in vivo during lethal endotoxaemia in rats inhibited TNF synthesis in liver, attenuated peak serum TNF amounts, and prevented the development of shock.

  6. [Phenotypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Syndrome and Differential Diagnosis Focused in Inflammatory Neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most frequent form of inherited neuropathy, is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome of the peripheral nervous system with a rather homologous clinical phenotype (slowly progressive distal weakness and muscle atrophy, skeletal deformities, and areflexia in each limb). CMT1 is the autosomal-dominant demyelinating form, and CMT1A (mostly PMP22 duplication) is the most frequent subtype, followed by CMTX1, HNPP (hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies), CMT1B, or CMT2. As CMT is characterized by slowly progressive motor and sensory disturbances in each limb, it could be misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) occasionally. Some points can distinguish demyelinating CMT from CIDP. CMT1 patients do not show the conduction block that is frequent in CIDP. In addition, ultrasonographic findings are useful because CMT1 suggests diffuse enlargement of peripheral nerves, whereas CIDP is characterized by asymmetrical or focal enlargement of peripheral nerves. Some CMT1 cases show favorable responses to immunomodulating therapeutics such as corticosteroids, IVIg, and plasma exchange. Such CIDP-like CMT1 (especially CMT1B or CMT2A) shows moderate to high levels of cerebrospinal fluid protein and infiltrated inflammatory macrophages. PMID:26764297

  7. Acute microbiologically negative hypoxic interstitial pneumonia on HAART: Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome unmasking Pneumocystis Jiroveci infection with an atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sovaila, S; de Raigniac, A; Picard, C; Taulera, O; Lascoux-Combe, C; Sereni, D; Bourgarit, A

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy for AIDS sometimes engenders inflammatory manifestations resulting from an inappropriate and unbalanced immune-system restoration, called Immune Reconstitution inflammatory Syndrome, which, in turn, can unmask a subclinical infection/pathology. Despite our patient’s evident syndrome, the atypical clinical, microbiologic and radiologic feature of Pneumocystis pneumonia made its diagnosis difficult. PMID:22802889

  8. Reduced Acute Inflammatory Responses to Microgel Conformal Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Amanda W.; Singh, Neetu; Burns, Kellie L.; Babensee, Julia E.; Lyon, L. Andrew; García, Andrés J.

    2008-01-01

    Implantation of synthetic materials into the body elicits inflammatory host responses that limit medical device integration and biological performance. This inflammatory cascade involves protein adsorption, leukocyte recruitment and activation, cytokine release, and fibrous encapsulation of the implant. We present a coating strategy based on thin films of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel microparticles (i.e. microgels) cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate. These particles were grafted onto a clinically relevant polymeric material to generate conformal coatings that significantly reduced in vitro fibrinogen adsorption and primary human monocytes/macrophage adhesion and spreading. These microgel coatings also reduced leukocyte adhesion and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1) in response to materials implanted acutely in the murine intraperitoneal space. These microgel coatings can be applied to biomedical implants as a protective coating to attenuate biofouling, leukocyte adhesion and activation, and adverse host responses for biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:18804859

  9. Supression of inflammatory responses by labdane-type diterpenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Giron, Natalia; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Lopez-Fontal, Raquel; Bosca, Lisardo; Hortelano, Sonsoles Heras, Beatriz de las

    2008-04-15

    A series of 11 labdane-type diterpenoids (1-11) with various patterns of substitution were tested for potential anti-inflammatory activity. Of these compounds, 4 and 11 were selected to evaluate their influence on targets relevant to the regulation of the inflammatory response. These diterpenoids reduced the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages, with IC50 in the range 1-10 {mu}M. Inhibition of these inflammatory mediators was related to inhibition of the expression of nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) at the transcriptional level, as determined by western-blot and RT-PCR. Examination of the effects of these diterpenoids on nuclear factor {kappa}B signaling showed that both compounds inhibit the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and I{kappa}B{beta}, preventing their degradation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. Inhibition of IKK activity was also observed. These derivatives displayed significant anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, suppressing mouse ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and inhibiting myeloperoxidase activity, an index of neutrophil infiltration. The anti-inflammatory effects of these labdane diterpenoids, together with their low cell toxicity, suggest potential therapeutic applications in the regulation of the inflammatory response.

  10. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases. PMID:26687466

  11. Colchicine Acutely Suppresses Local Cardiac Production of Inflammatory Cytokines in Patients With an Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Gonzalo J; Robertson, Stacy; Barraclough, Jennifer; Xia, Qiong; Mallat, Ziad; Bursill, Christina; Celermajer, David S; Patel, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, and downstream IL-6 are key inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. Colchicine is believed to block the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic complex responsible for the production of IL-1β and IL-18. In vivo effects of colchicine on cardiac cytokine release have not been previously studied. This study aimed to (1) assess the local cardiac production of inflammatory cytokines in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), stable coronary artery disease and in controls; and (2) determine whether acute administration of colchicine inhibits their production. Methods and Results Forty ACS patients, 33 with stable coronary artery disease, and 10 controls, were included. ACS and stable coronary artery disease patients were randomized to oral colchicine treatment (1 mg followed by 0.5 mg 1 hour later) or no colchicine, 6 to 24 hours prior to cardiac catheterization. Blood samples from the coronary sinus, aortic root (arterial), and lower right atrium (venous) were collected and tested for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 using ELISA. In ACS patients, coronary sinus levels of IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were significantly higher than arterial and venous levels (P=0.017, <0.001 and <0.001, respectively). Transcoronary (coronary sinus-arterial) gradients for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were highest in ACS patients and lowest in controls (P=0.077, 0.033, and 0.014, respectively). Colchicine administration significantly reduced transcoronary gradients of all 3 cytokines in ACS patients by 40% to 88% (P=0.028, 0.032, and 0.032, for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6, respectively). Conclusions ACS patients exhibit increased local cardiac production of inflammatory cytokines. Short-term colchicine administration rapidly and significantly reduces levels of these cytokines. PMID:26304941

  12. Sphingosine Kinases Are Not Required for Inflammatory Responses in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yuquan; Lee, Hyeuk Jong; Mariko, Boubacar; Lu, Yi-Chien; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Haka, Abigail S.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Camerer, Eric; Proia, Richard L.; Hla, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine kinases (Sphks), which catalyze the formation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) from sphingosine, have been implicated as essential intracellular messengers in inflammatory responses. Specifically, intracellular Sphk1-derived S1P was reported to be required for NFκB induction during inflammatory cytokine action. To examine the role of intracellular S1P in the inflammatory response of innate immune cells, we derived murine macrophages that lack both Sphk1 and Sphk2 (MΦ Sphk dKO). Compared with WT counterparts, MΦ Sphk dKO cells showed marked suppression of intracellular S1P levels whereas sphingosine and ceramide levels were strongly up-regulated. Cellular proliferation and apoptosis were similar in MΦ Sphk dKO cells compared with WT counterparts. Treatment of WT and MΦ Sphk dKO with inflammatory mediators TNFα or Escherichia coli LPS resulted in similar NFκB activation and cytokine expression. Furthermore, LPS-induced inflammatory responses, mortality, and thioglycolate-induced macrophage recruitment to the peritoneum were indistinguishable between MΦ Sphk dKO and littermate control mice. Interestingly, autophagic markers were constitutively induced in bone marrow-derived macrophages from Sphk dKO mice. Treatment with exogenous sphingosine further enhanced intracellular sphingolipid levels and autophagosomes. Inhibition of autophagy resulted in caspase-dependent cell death. Together, these data suggest that attenuation of Sphk activity, particularly Sphk2, leads to increased intracellular sphingolipids and autophagy in macrophages. PMID:24081141

  13. Mast cells mediate acute inflammatory responses to implanted biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liping; Jennings, Timothy A.; Eaton, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Implanted biomaterials trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. The mechanisms involved in such acute inflammatory responses can be arbitrarily divided into phagocyte transmigration, chemotaxis, and adhesion to implant surfaces. We earlier observed that two chemokines—macrophage inflammatory protein 1α/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1—and the phagocyte integrin Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)/surface fibrinogen interaction are, respectively, required for phagocyte chemotaxis and adherence to biomaterial surfaces. However, it is still not clear how the initial transmigration of phagocytes through the endothelial barrier into the area of the implant is triggered. Because implanted biomaterials elicit histaminic responses in the surrounding tissue, and histamine release is known to promote rapid diapedesis of inflammatory cells, we evaluated the possible role of histamine and mast cells in the recruitment of phagocytes to biomaterial implants. Using i.p. and s.c. implantation of polyethylene terephthalate disks in mice we find: (i) Extensive degranulation of mast cells, accompanied by histamine release, occurs adjacent to short-term i.p. implants. (ii) Simultaneous administration of H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists (pyrilamine and famotidine, respectively) greatly diminishes recruitment and adhesion of both neutrophils (<20% of control) and monocytes/macrophages (<30% of control) to implants. (iii) Congenitally mast cell-deficient mice also exhibit markedly reduced accumulation of phagocytes on both i.p. and s.c implants. (iv) Finally, mast cell reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice restores “normal” inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants. We conclude that mast cells and their granular products, especially histamine, are important in recruitment of inflammatory cells to biomaterial implants. Improved knowledge of such responses may permit purposeful modulation of both acute and chronic inflammation affecting implanted biomaterials. PMID

  14. Guanosine Protects Against Cortical Focal Ischemia. Involvement of Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Gisele; Tonon, André Comiran; Guella, Felipe Lhywinskh; Pettenuzzo, Letícia Ferreira; Duarte, Thiago; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Oses, Jean Pierre; Achaval, Matilde; Souza, Diogo Onofre

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is the major cause of death and the most frequent cause of disability in the adult population worldwide. Guanosine plays an important neuroprotective role in several cerebral ischemic models and is involved in the modulation of oxidative responses and glutamatergic parameters. Because the excessive reactive oxygen species produced during an ischemic event can trigger an inflammatory response, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that guanosine is neuroprotective against focal cerebral ischemia, inhibits microglia/macrophages activation, and mediates an inflammatory response ameliorating the neural damage. Permanent focal cerebral ischemia was induced in adult rats, and guanosine was administered immediately, 1, 3, and 6 h after surgery. Twenty-four hours after ischemia, the asymmetry scores were evaluated by the cylinder test; neuronal damage was evaluated by Fluoro-Jade C (FJC) staining and propidium iodide (PI) incorporation; microglia and immune cells were evaluated by anti-Iba-1 antibody; and inflammatory parameters such as interleukins (IL): IL-1, IL-6, IL-10; tumor necrosis factors alpha (TNF-α); and interferon-gamma (INF-γ) were evaluated in the brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. The ischemic event increased the levels of Iba-1-positive cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased IL-10 levels (an anti-inflammatory cytokine) in the lesion periphery. The guanosine treatment attenuated the changes in these inflammatory parameters and also reduced the infarct volume, PI incorporation, and number of FJC-positive cells, improving the functional recovery. Thus, guanosine may have been a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of ischemic brain injury by reduction of inflammatory process triggered in an ischemic event. PMID:25394382

  15. 20 Years On: Is It Time to Redefine the Systemic Inflammatory Response to Cardiothoracic Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Landis, R. Clive

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The “systemic inflammatory response” has never been defined from a cardiothoracic surgery perspective, but borrowed its definition from the critical care field at a landmark 1992 definition conference on sepsis. It is unclear why the diagnostic criteria for the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) were adopted in isolation, ignoring other potentially more useful definitions for Severe Septic Shock or Secondary Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome. The 1992 SIRS definition for sepsis has since been updated at a conference in 2001 advocating PIRO (Predisposition, Infection, host Response, Organ dysfunction) as a hypothetical model to better link sepsis with clinical outcome. PIRO is readily adaptable to cardiothoracic surgery and provides the precedent and road map for how to update a definition. The need is obvious since the current definition of SIRS is widely disregarded in heart surgery: a dwindling proportion (14%) of articles on the systemic inflammatory response even mention SIRS and 0% monitored SIRS criteria in the past decade in an evidence-based review of anti-inflammatory interventions. The name “inflammatory response” is also problematic; it is too narrow and might be replaced with host response (the R in PIRO) to better convey the wide spectrum of host defensive pathways activated during heart surgery (i.e., complement, coagulation, fibrinolysis, kinins, cytokines, proteases, hemolysis, oxidative stress). A variant on PIRO could allow these elements of the host Response (R) to be anchored within the context of Premorbid conditions (P) and the inevitable Insult (I) from surgery, to better link risk exposures to Organ dysfunction (O) in heart surgery. The precedent of PIRO suggests the following steps will be required to redefine the systemic inflammatory response: 1) buy-in from the leading societies for cardiothoracic surgery, anesthesia, and perfusion on the need for a re-definition conference, 2) assigning relative risk

  16. Acute Cryptococcal Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in a Patient on Natalizumab

    PubMed Central

    Gundacker, Nathan D.; Jordan, Stephen J.; Jones, Benjamin A.; Drwiega, Joseph C.; Pappas, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Presented is the first case of acute immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS)-associated cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in a patient on natalizumab for multiple sclerosis. The patient developed acute cerebral edema after initiation of amphotericin B. We propose several mechanisms that explain the acuity of IRIS in this specific patient population and suggest possible therapies. PMID:27006962

  17. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  18. Effects of nanoporous alumina on inflammatory cell response.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Shiuli; Hoess, Andreas; Shen, Jinhui; Thormann, Annika; Heilmann, Andreas; Tang, Liping; Karlsson-Ott, Marjam

    2014-11-01

    The present study focuses on the effects of nanoscale porosity on inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. Nanoporous alumina membranes with different pore sizes, 20 and 200 nm in diameter, were used. We first evaluated cell/alumina interactions in vitro by observing adhesion, proliferation, and activation of a murine fibroblast and a macrophage cell line. To investigate the chronic inflammatory response, the membranes were implanted subcutaneously in mice for 2 weeks. Cell recruitment to the site of implantation was determined by histology and the production of cytokines was measured by protein array analysis. Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that 200 nm pores induced a stronger inflammatory response as compared to the alumina with 20 nm pores. This was observed by an increase in macrophage activation in vitro as well as higher cell recruitment and generation of proinflammatory cytokines around the alumina with 200 nm pores, in vivo. Our results suggest that nanofeatures can be modulated in order to control the inflammatory response to implants. PMID:24288233

  19. Extracellular Cyclophilins Contribute to the Regulation of Inflammatory Responses1

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Kamalpreet; Gwinn, William M.; Bower, Molly A.; Watson, Alan; Okwumabua, Ifeanyi; MacDonald, H. Robson; Bukrinsky, Michael I.; Constant, Stephanie L.

    2010-01-01

    The main regulators of leukocyte trafficking during inflammatory responses are chemokines. However, another class of recently identified chemotactic agents is extracellular cyclophilins, the proteins mostly known as receptors for the immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine A. Cyclophilins can induce leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro and have been detected at elevated levels in inflamed tissues, suggesting that they might contribute to inflammatory responses. We recently identified CD147 as the main signaling receptor for cyclophilin A. In the current study we examined the contribution of cyclophilin-CD147 interactions to inflammatory responses in vivo using a mouse model of acute lung injury. Blocking cyclophilin-CD147 interactions by targeting CD147 (using anti-CD147 Ab) or cyclophilin (using nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporine A analog) reduced tissue neutrophilia by up to 50%, with a concurrent decrease in tissue pathology. These findings are the first to demonstrate the significant contribution of cyclophilins to inflammatory responses and provide a potentially novel approach for reducing inflammation-mediated diseases. PMID:15972687

  20. COMPARTMENTALIZATION OF THE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO INHALED GRAIN DUST

    EPA Science Inventory


    Interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and the secreted form of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1RA) are involved in the inflammatory response to inhaled grain dust. Previously, we found considerable production of these cytokines in the lower...

  1. Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress and Immune-Inflammatory Pathways in Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME)/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Gerwyn; Maes, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) has been classified as a disease of the central nervous system by the WHO since 1969. Many patients carrying this diagnosis do demonstrate an almost bewildering array of biological abnormalities particularly the presence of oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) and a chronically activated innate immune system. The proposal made herein is that once generated chronically activated O&NS and immune-inflammatory pathways conspire to generate a multitude of self-sustaining and self-amplifying pathological processes which are associated with the onset of ME/CFS. Sources of continuous activation of O&NS and immune-inflammatory pathways in ME/CFS are chronic, intermittent and opportunistic infections, bacterial translocation, autoimmune responses, mitochondrial dysfunctions, activation of the Toll-Like Receptor Radical Cycle, and decreased antioxidant levels. Consequences of chronically activated O&NS and immune-inflammatory pathways in ME/CFS are brain disorders, including neuroinflammation and brain hypometabolism / hypoperfusion, toxic effects of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite, lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA, secondary autoimmune responses directed against disrupted lipid membrane components and proteins, mitochondrial dysfunctions with a disruption of energy metabolism (e.g. compromised ATP production) and dysfunctional intracellular signaling pathways. The interplay between all of these factors leads to self-amplifying feed forward loops causing a chronic state of activated O&NS, immune-inflammatory and autoimmune pathways which may sustain the disease. PMID:24669210

  2. The choroid plexus response to a repeated peripheral inflammatory stimulus

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic systemic inflammation triggers alterations in the central nervous system that may relate to the underlying inflammatory component reported in neurodegenerative disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. However, it is far from being understood whether and how peripheral inflammation contributes to induce brain inflammatory response in such illnesses. As part of the barriers that separate the blood from the brain, the choroid plexus conveys inflammatory immune signals into the brain, largely through alterations in the composition of the cerebrospinal fluid. Results In the present study we investigated the mouse choroid plexus gene expression profile, using microarray analyses, in response to a repeated inflammatory stimulus induced by the intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide every two weeks for a period of three months; mice were sacrificed 3 and 15 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection. The data show that the choroid plexus displays a sustained response to the repeated inflammatory stimuli by altering the expression profile of several genes. From a total of 24,000 probes, 369 are up-regulated and 167 are down-regulated 3 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection, while at 15 days the number decreases to 98 and 128, respectively. The pathways displaying the most significant changes include those facilitating entry of cells into the cerebrospinal fluid, and those participating in the innate immune response to infection. Conclusion These observations contribute to a better understanding of the brain response to peripheral inflammation and pave the way to study their impact on the progression of several disorders of the central nervous system in which inflammation is known to be implicated. PMID:19922669

  3. Titanium surface hydrophilicity modulates the human macrophage inflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Alfarsi, Mohammed A; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Increased titanium surface hydrophilicity has been shown to accelerate dental implant osseointegration. Macrophages are important in the early inflammatory response to surgical implant placement and influence the subsequent healing response. This study investigated the modulatory effect of a hydrophilic titanium surface on the inflammatory cytokine expression profile in a human macrophage cell line (THP-1). Genes for 84 cytokines, chemokines, and their receptors were analyzed following exposure to (1) polished (SMO), (2) micro-rough sand blasted, acid etched (SLA), and (3) hydrophilic-modified SLA (modSLA) titanium surfaces for 1 and 3 days. By day 3, the SLA surface elicited a pro-inflammatory response compared to the SMO surface with statistically significant up-regulation of 16 genes [Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) Interleukin (IL)-1β, Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)-1, 2, 3, 4, 18, 19, and 20, Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)-1, 5, 8 and 12, Chemokine (C-C motif) receptor (CCR)-7, Lymphotoxin-beta (LTB), and Leukotriene B4 receptor (LTB4R)]. This effect was countered by the modSLA surface, which down-regulated the expression of 10 genes (TNF, IL-1α and β, CCL-1, 3, 19 and 20, CXCL-1 and 8, and IL-1 receptor type 1), while two were up-regulated (osteopontin and CCR5) compared to the SLA surface. These cytokine gene expression changes were confirmed by decreased levels of corresponding protein secretion in response to modSLA compared to SLA. These results show that a hydrophilic titanium surface can modulate human macrophage pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and protein secretion. An attenuated pro-inflammatory response may be an important molecular mechanism for faster and/or improved wound healing. PMID:23595995

  4. Cellular Immune Activation in Cerebrospinal Fluid From Ugandans With Cryptococcal Meningitis and Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meya, David B.; Okurut, Samuel; Zziwa, Godfrey; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Kelsey, Melander; Cose, Steve; Joloba, Moses; Naluyima, Prossy; Palmer, Brent E.; Kambugu, Andrew; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Eller, Michael A.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Boulware, David R.; Manabe, Yuka C.; Janoff, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is characterized by high fungal burden and limited leukocyte trafficking to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The immunopathogenesis of CM immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after initiation of antiretroviral therapy at the site of infection is poorly understood. Methods. We characterized the lineage and activation status of mononuclear cells in blood and CSF of HIV-infected patients with noncryptococcal meningitis (NCM) (n = 10), those with CM at day 0 (n = 40) or day 14 (n = 21) of antifungal therapy, and those with CM-IRIS (n = 10). Results. At diagnosis, highly activated CD8+ T cells predominated in CSF in both CM and NCM. CM-IRIS was associated with an increasing frequency of CSF CD4+ T cells (increased from 2.2% to 23%; P = .06), a shift in monocyte phenotype from classic to an intermediate/proinflammatory, and increased programmed death ligand 1 expression on natural killer cells (increased from 11.9% to 61.6%, P = .03). CSF cellular responses were distinct from responses in peripheral blood. Conclusions. After CM, T cells in CSF tend to evolve with the development of IRIS, with increasing proportions of activated CD4+ T cells, migration of intermediate monocytes to the CSF, and declining fungal burden. These changes provide insight into IRIS pathogenesis and could be exploited to more effectively treat CM and prevent CM-IRIS. PMID:25492918

  5. Leptospira interrogans induces uterine inflammatory responses and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Guo, Mengyao; Zhang, Wenlong; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Zecai; Jiang, Haichao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans), a worldwide zoonosis, infect humans and animals. In dogs, four syndromes caused by leptospirosis have been identified: icteric, hemorrhagic, uremic (Stuttgart disease) and reproductive (abortion and premature or weak pups), and also it caused inflammation. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex mixture of matrix molecules that is crucial to the reproduction. Both inflammatory response and ECM are closed relative to reproductive. The aim of this study was to clarify how L. interrogans affected the uterus of dogs, by focusing on the inflammatory responses, and ECM expression in dogs uterine tissue infected by L. interrogans. In the present study, 27 dogs were divided into 3 groups, intrauterine infusion with L. interrogans, to make uterine infection, sterile EMJH, and normal saline as a control, respectively. The uteruses were removed by surgical operation in 10, 20, and 30 days, respectively. The methods of histopathological analysis, ELISA, Western blot and qPCR were used. The results showed that L. interrogans induced significantly inflammatory responses, which were characterized by inflammatory cellular infiltration and high expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in uterine tissue of these dogs. Furthermore, L. interrogans strongly down-regulated the expression of ECM (collagens (CL) IV, fibronectins (FN) and laminins (LN)) in mRNA and protein levels. These data indicated that strongly inflammatory responses, and abnormal regulation of ECM might contribute to the proliferation of dogs infected by L. interrogans. PMID:25153777

  6. Neither classical nor alternative macrophage activation is required for Pneumocystis clearance during immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo-Qian; Wang, Jing; Hoy, Zachary; Keegan, Achsah; Bhagwat, Samir; Gigliotti, Francis; Wright, Terry W

    2015-12-01

    Pneumocystis is a respiratory fungal pathogen that causes pneumonia (Pneumocystis pneumonia [PcP]) in immunocompromised patients. Alveolar macrophages are critical effectors for CD4(+) T cell-dependent clearance of Pneumocystis, and previous studies found that alternative macrophage activation accelerates fungal clearance during PcP-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, the requirement for either classically or alternatively activated macrophages for Pneumocystis clearance has not been determined. Therefore, RAG2(-/-) mice lacking either the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) receptor (IFN-γR) or interleukin 4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα) were infected with Pneumocystis. These mice were then immune reconstituted with wild-type lymphocytes to preserve the normal T helper response while preventing downstream effects of Th1 or Th2 effector cytokines on macrophage polarization. As expected, RAG2(-/-) mice developed severe disease but effectively cleared Pneumocystis and resolved IRIS. Neither RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) nor RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice displayed impaired Pneumocystis clearance. However, RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice developed a dysregulated immune response, with exacerbated IRIS and greater pulmonary function deficits than those in RAG2 and RAG/IL-4Rα(-/-) mice. RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice had elevated numbers of lung CD4(+) T cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and NK cells but severely depressed numbers of lung CD8(+) T suppressor cells. Impaired lung CD8(+) T cell responses in RAG/IFN-γR(-/-) mice were associated with elevated lung IFN-γ levels, and neutralization of IFN-γ restored the CD8 response. These data demonstrate that restricting the ability of macrophages to polarize in response to Th1 or Th2 cytokines does not impair Pneumocystis clearance. However, a cell type-specific IFN-γ/IFN-γR-dependent mechanism regulates CD8(+) T suppressor cell recruitment, limits immunopathogenesis, preserves lung function, and enhances the resolution of PcP-related IRIS

  7. A20-Deficient Mast Cells Exacerbate Inflammatory Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vahl, J. Christoph; Aszodi, Attila; Peschke, Katrin; Schenten, Dominik; Hammad, Hamida; Beyaert, Rudi; Saur, Dieter; van Loo, Geert; Roers, Axel; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Kool, Mirjam; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, this notion based on studies in mast cell-deficient mice is controversial. We therefore established an in vivo model for hyperactive mast cells by specifically ablating the NF-κB negative feedback regulator A20. While A20 deficiency did not affect mast cell degranulation, it resulted in amplified pro-inflammatory responses downstream of IgE/FcεRI, TLRs, IL-1R, and IL-33R. As a consequence house dust mite- and IL-33-driven lung inflammation, late phase cutaneous anaphylaxis, and collagen-induced arthritis were aggravated, in contrast to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and immediate anaphylaxis. Our results provide in vivo evidence that hyperactive mast cells can exacerbate inflammatory disorders and define diseases that might benefit from therapeutic intervention with mast cell function. PMID:24453940

  8. Lung epithelial cells modulate the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rubovitch, Vardit; Gershnabel, Shoham; Kalina, Moshe

    2007-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effect of alveolar epithelial cells on inflammatory responses in macrophages. Lung epithelial cells (either rat RLE-6TN or human A549 cells) reduced LPS-induced NO production in alveolar macrophages (AM) in a contact-independent mechanism. The inhibitory effect of the epithelial cells was present already at the transcriptional level: LPS-induced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression was significantly smaller. Surfactant protein A (SP-A)-induced NO production by alveolar macrophages was also reduced in the presence of A549 cells, though, by a different kinetics. LPS-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) production (another inflammatory pathway) by alveolar macrophages was also reduced in the presence of RLE-6TN cells. These data suggest a role for lung epithelial cells in the complicated modulation of inflammatory processes, and provide an insight into the mechanism underlying. PMID:17851743

  9. Janus Kinase-3 Dependent Inflammatory Responses in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Debra L.; Malaviya, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Summary Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory condition of the lung characterized by reversible airway obstruction, high serum immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels, and chronic airway inflammation. A number of cells including mast cells, T-cells, macrophages and dendritic cells play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Janus Kinase (JAK) −3, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase, traditionally known to mediate cytokine signaling, also regulates functional responses of these cells. In this review the role of JAK-3 in regulating various pathogenic processes in allergic asthma is discussed. We propose that targeting JAK-3 is a rationale approach to control the inflammatory responses of multiple cell types responsible for the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. PMID:20430118

  10. Modulation of Hemostatic and Inflammatory Responses by Leptospira Spp.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Mônica L.; Naudin, Clément; Mörgelin, Matthias; Romero, Eliete C.; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T. O.; Herwald, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide spread zoonotic and neglected infectious disease of human and veterinary concern that is caused by pathogenic Leptospira species. In severe infections, hemostatic impairments such as coagulation/fibrinolysis dysfunction are frequently observed. These complications often occur when the host response is controlled and/or modulated by the bacterial pathogen. In the present investigation, we aimed to analyze the modulation of the hemostatic and inflammatory host responses by the bacterial pathogen Leptospira. The effects of leptospires and their secreted products on stimulation of human intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation were investigated by means of altered clotting times, assembly and activation of contact system and induction of tissue factor. We show that both extrinsic and intrinsic coagulation cascades are modulated in response to Leptospira or leptospiral secreted proteins. We further find that the pro-inflammatory mediator bradykinin is released following contact activation at the bacterial surface and that pro-coagulant microvesicles are shed from monocytes in response to infection. Also, we show that human leptospirosis patients present higher levels of circulating pro-coagulant microvesicles than healthy individuals. Here we show that both pathways of the coagulation system are modulated by leptospires, possibly leading to altered hemostatic and inflammatory responses during the disease. Our results contribute to the understanding of the leptospirosis pathophysiological mechanisms and may open new routes for the discovery of novel treatments for the severe manifestations of the disease. PMID:27167223

  11. Modulation of Hemostatic and Inflammatory Responses by Leptospira Spp.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Mônica L; Naudin, Clément; Mörgelin, Matthias; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T O; Herwald, Heiko

    2016-05-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide spread zoonotic and neglected infectious disease of human and veterinary concern that is caused by pathogenic Leptospira species. In severe infections, hemostatic impairments such as coagulation/fibrinolysis dysfunction are frequently observed. These complications often occur when the host response is controlled and/or modulated by the bacterial pathogen. In the present investigation, we aimed to analyze the modulation of the hemostatic and inflammatory host responses by the bacterial pathogen Leptospira. The effects of leptospires and their secreted products on stimulation of human intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation were investigated by means of altered clotting times, assembly and activation of contact system and induction of tissue factor. We show that both extrinsic and intrinsic coagulation cascades are modulated in response to Leptospira or leptospiral secreted proteins. We further find that the pro-inflammatory mediator bradykinin is released following contact activation at the bacterial surface and that pro-coagulant microvesicles are shed from monocytes in response to infection. Also, we show that human leptospirosis patients present higher levels of circulating pro-coagulant microvesicles than healthy individuals. Here we show that both pathways of the coagulation system are modulated by leptospires, possibly leading to altered hemostatic and inflammatory responses during the disease. Our results contribute to the understanding of the leptospirosis pathophysiological mechanisms and may open new routes for the discovery of novel treatments for the severe manifestations of the disease. PMID:27167223

  12. Inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus syndrome with its polymorphic presentation - A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, C. Anand; Yeluri, Garima; Raghav, Namita

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal nevi are hamartomatous lesions that are typically present at birth, but can occur anytime during childhood and may rarely appear in adulthood. An estimated one-third of individuals with epidermal nevi have involvement of other organ systems; hence, this condition is considered to be an epidermal nevus syndrome. There are four distinct epidermal nevus syndromes recognizable by the different types of associated epithelial nevi: linear sebaceous nevi, linear nevus comedonicus, linear epidermal nevus, and inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus (ILVEN). Each type may be regarded as a part of a syndrome with other systemic manifestations. We report a rare case of ILVEN syndrome in a 23-year-old female patient with a wide spectrum of mucosal, cutaneous, and skeletal abnormalities, demonstrating the polymorphic presentation of this condition. PMID:22557913

  13. Aberrant Inflammasome Activation Characterizes Tuberculosis-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hong Yien; Yong, Yean Kong; Shankar, Esaki M; Paukovics, Geza; Ellegård, Rada; Larsson, Marie; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; French, Martyn A; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2016-05-15

    Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) complicates combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in up to 25% of patients with HIV/TB coinfection. Monocytes and IL-18, a signature cytokine of inflammasome activation, are implicated in TB-IRIS pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated inflammasome activation both pre- and post-cART in TB-IRIS patients. HIV/TB patients exhibited higher proportions of monocytes expressing activated caspase-1 (casp1) pre-cART, compared with HIV patients without TB, and patients who developed TB-IRIS exhibited the greatest increase in casp1 expression. CD64(+) monocytes were a marker of increased casp1 expression. Furthermore, IL-1β, another marker of inflammasome activation, was also elevated during TB-IRIS. TB-IRIS patients also exhibited greater upregulation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome mRNA, compared with controls. Analysis of plasma mitochondrial DNA levels showed that TB-IRIS patients experienced greater cell death, especially pre-cART. Plasma NO levels were lower both pre- and post-cART in TB-IRIS patients, providing evidence of inadequate inflammasome regulation. Plasma IL-18 levels pre-cART correlated inversely with NO levels but positively with monocyte casp1 expression and mitochondrial DNA levels, and expression of IL-18Rα on CD4(+) T cells and NK cells was higher in TB-IRIS patients, providing evidence that IL-18 is a marker of inflammasome activation. We propose that inflammasome activation in monocytes/macrophages of HIV/TB patients increases with ineffective T cell-dependent activation of monocytes/macrophages, priming them for an excessive inflammatory response after cART is commenced, which is greatest in patients with TB-IRIS. PMID:27076678

  14. The Systemic Inflammatory Response to Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna; Erb-Downward, John R.; Walk, Seth T.; Micic, Dejan; Falkowski, Nicole; Santhosh, Kavitha; Mogle, Jill A.; Ring, Cathrin; Young, Vincent B.; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Aronoff, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The systemic inflammatory response to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is incompletely defined, particularly for patients with severe disease. Methods Analysis of 315 blood samples from 78 inpatients with CDI (cases), 100 inpatients with diarrhea without CDI (inpatient controls), and 137 asymptomatic outpatient controls without CDI was performed. Serum or plasma was obtained from subjects at the time of CDI testing or shortly thereafter. Severe cases had intensive care unit admission, colectomy, or death due to CDI within 30 days after diagnosis. Thirty different circulating inflammatory mediators were quantified using an antibody-linked bead array. Principal component analysis (PCA), multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and logistic regression were used for analysis. Results Based on MANOVA, cases had a significantly different inflammatory profile from outpatient controls but not from inpatient controls. In logistic regression, only chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5) levels were associated with cases vs. inpatient controls. Several mediators were associated with cases vs. outpatient controls, especially hepatocyte growth factor, CCL5, and epithelial growth factor (inversely associated). Eight cases were severe and associated with elevations in IL-8, IL-6, and eotaxin. Conclusions A broad systemic inflammatory response occurs during CDI and severe cases appear to differ from non-severe infections. PMID:24643077

  15. Filoviruses and the balance of innate, adaptive, and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Chen, Lieping; Olinger, Gene G; Pratt, William D; Schmaljohn, Alan L

    2006-01-01

    The Filoviruses Marburg virus and Ebola virus are among the deadliest of human pathogens, causing fulminant hemorrhagic fevers typified by overmatched specific immune responses and profuse inflammatory responses. Keys to both vaccination and treatment may reside, first, in the understanding of immune dysfunctions that parallel Filoviral disease and, second, in devising ways to redirect and restore normal immune function as well as to mitigate inflammation. Here, we describe how Filoviral infections may subvert innate immune responses through perturbances of dendritic cells and neutrophils, with particular emphasis on the downstream effects on adaptive immunity and inflammation. We suggest that pivotal events may be subject to therapeutic intervention as Filoviruses encounter immune processes. PMID:17201655

  16. Benfotiamine Attenuates Inflammatory Response in LPS Stimulated BV-2 Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Iva; Savic, Danijela; Laketa, Danijela; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Milenkovic, Ivan; Pekovic, Sanja; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Lavrnja, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells are resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), recognized as key elements in the regulation of neural homeostasis and the response to injury and repair. As excessive activation of microglia may lead to neurodegeneration, therapeutic strategies targeting its inhibition were shown to improve treatment of most neurodegenerative diseases. Benfotiamine is a synthetic vitamin B1 (thiamine) derivate exerting potentially anti-inflammatory effects. Despite the encouraging results regarding benfotiamine potential to alleviate diabetic microangiopathy, neuropathy and other oxidative stress-induced pathological conditions, its activities and cellular mechanisms during microglial activation have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of benfotiamine were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine BV-2 microglia. We determined that benfotiamine remodels activated microglia to acquire the shape that is characteristic of non-stimulated BV-2 cells. In addition, benfotiamine significantly decreased production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO; cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), tumor necrosis factor alpha α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), whereas it increased anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10) production in LPS stimulated BV-2 microglia. Moreover, benfotiamine suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and protein kinase B Akt/PKB. Treatment with specific inhibitors revealed that benfotiamine-mediated suppression of NO production was via JNK1/2 and Akt pathway, while the cytokine suppression includes ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and Akt pathways. Finally, the potentially protective effect is mediated by the suppression of translocation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in the nucleus. Therefore, benfotiamine may

  17. Treatment guidelines and prognosis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Anup R; Marulappa, Rekha; Hegde, Usha; Kappadi, Damodhar; Ambikathanaya, U K; Nair, Priyanka

    2015-04-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is an "unmasking" or paradoxical worsening of a pre-existing infection after commencement of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) - infected patients. The use of HAART in the management of HIV patients restores immune responses against pathogens however in few patients, the reconstituted immune system leads to IRIS. As the treatment protocols are not standardized for IRIS, this leads to short-term morbidity or in some cases also mortality. Therefore, treatment in these patients is a huge challenge and further more research regarding the immunopathogenesis, diagnosis and management of IRIS should be well thought-out. To understand the immunopathogenesis of IRIS it will be difficult to elucidate the intrinsic dynamics of immune cells after initiation of HAART but, there are few biomarkers which help to predict or diagnose IRIS and develop specific treatment, following initiation of HIV therapy. This review is an attempt to put light on those patients with IRIS with treatment guidelines for the management of the progression of it. PMID:25954081

  18. Inflammatory Responses to Salmonella Infections Are Serotype-Specific

    PubMed Central

    Ktsoyan, Zhanna; Ghazaryan, Karine; Manukyan, Gayane; Martirosyan, Anush; Mnatsakanyan, Armine; Arakelova, Karine; Gevorgyan, Zaruhi; Sedrakyan, Anahit; Asoyan, Ara; Boyajyan, Anna; Aminov, Rustam

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the profile of inflammatory response in patients with acute salmonellosis caused by two serotypes of Salmonella enterica, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, as well as in convalescent patients with previous acute disease caused by S. Enteritidis. Patients with acute disease showed significantly elevated levels of IL-1β, IL-17, IL-10, and calprotectin compared to healthy control subjects. In convalescent patients, these markers were also significantly elevated, with the exception of IL-1β. Multivariate statistical analyses with the use of these variables produced models with a good predictive accuracy resulting in excellent separation of the diseased and healthy cohorts studied. Overall, the results suggest that the profile of inflammatory response in this disease is determined, to a significant degree, by the serotype of Salmonella, and the profile of certain cytokines and calprotectin remains abnormal for a number of months following the acute disease stage. PMID:26904722

  19. Inflammatory Responses to Salmonella Infections Are Serotype-Specific.

    PubMed

    Ktsoyan, Zhanna; Ghazaryan, Karine; Manukyan, Gayane; Martirosyan, Anush; Mnatsakanyan, Armine; Arakelova, Karine; Gevorgyan, Zaruhi; Sedrakyan, Anahit; Asoyan, Ara; Boyajyan, Anna; Aminov, Rustam

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the profile of inflammatory response in patients with acute salmonellosis caused by two serotypes of Salmonella enterica, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, as well as in convalescent patients with previous acute disease caused by S. Enteritidis. Patients with acute disease showed significantly elevated levels of IL-1β, IL-17, IL-10, and calprotectin compared to healthy control subjects. In convalescent patients, these markers were also significantly elevated, with the exception of IL-1β. Multivariate statistical analyses with the use of these variables produced models with a good predictive accuracy resulting in excellent separation of the diseased and healthy cohorts studied. Overall, the results suggest that the profile of inflammatory response in this disease is determined, to a significant degree, by the serotype of Salmonella, and the profile of certain cytokines and calprotectin remains abnormal for a number of months following the acute disease stage. PMID:26904722

  20. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2–eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2–eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  1. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2-eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2-eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  2. The role of peroxiredoxin 4 in inflammatory response and aging.

    PubMed

    Klichko, Vladimir I; Orr, William C; Radyuk, Svetlana N

    2016-02-01

    In prior studies, we determined that the moderate overexpression of the Drosophila endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized peroxiredoxin (Prx), dPrx4, reduced oxidative damage and conferred beneficial effects on life span, while a high-level expression increased the incidence of tissue-specific apoptosis and dramatically shortened longevity. The detrimental pro-apoptotic and life-shortening effects were attributed to aberrant localization of dPrx4 and the apparent ER stress elicited by dPrx4 overexpression. In addition, the activation of both the NF-κB- and the JAK/STAT-mediated stress responses was detected, although it was not clear whether these served as functional alarm signals. Here we extend these findings to show that the activation of the NF-κB-dependent immunity-related/inflammatory genes, associated with life span shortening effects, is dependent on the activity of a Drosophila NF-κB ortholog, Relish. In the absence of Relish, the pro-inflammatory effects typically elicited by dPrx4 overexpression were not detected. The absence of Relish not only prevented the hyperactivation of the immunity-related genes but also significantly rescued the severe shortening of life span normally observed in dPrx4 overexpressors. The overactivation of the immune/inflammatory responses was also lessened by JAK/STAT signaling. In addition, we found that cellular immune/pro-inflammatory responses provoked by the oxidant paraquat but not bacteria are mediated via dPrx4 activity in the ER, as the upregulation of the immune-related genes was eliminated in flies underexpressing dPrx4, whereas immune responses triggered by bacteria were unaffected. Finally, efforts to reveal critical tissues where dPrx4 modulates longevity showed that broad targeting of dPrx4 to neuronal tissue had strong beneficial effects, while targeting expression to the fat body had deleterious effects. PMID:26689888

  3. Engineering macrophages to control the inflammatory response and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K V; Yang, H L; Giachelli, C M; Scatena, M

    2015-12-10

    Macrophage (MΦ) dysregulation is increasingly becoming recognized as a risk factor for a number of inflammatory complications including atherosclerosis, cancer, and the host response elicited by biomedical devices. It is still unclear what roles the pro-inflammatory (M1) MΦ and pro-healing (M2) MΦ phenotypes play during the healing process. However, it has been shown that a local overabundance of M1 MΦs can potentially lead to a chronically inflamed state of the tissue; while a local over-exuberant M2 MΦ response can lead to tissue fibrosis and even promote tumorigenesis. These notions strengthen the argument that the tight temporal regulation of this phenotype balance is necessary to promote inflammatory resolution that leads to tissue homeostasis. In this study, we have engineered pro-inflammatory MΦs, MΦ-cTLR4 cells, which can be activated to a M1-like MΦ phenotype with a small molecule, the chemical inducer of dimerization (CID) drug. The MΦ-cTLR4 cells when activated with the CID drug, express increased levels of TNFα, IL-6, and iNOS. Activated MΦ-cTLR4 cells stay stimulated for at least 48h; once the CID drug is withdrawn, the MΦ-cTLR4 cells return to baseline state within 18h. Further, in vitro CID-activated MΦ-cTLR4 cells induce upregulation of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 on endothelial cells (EC) in a TNFα-dependent manner. With the ability to specifically modulate the MФ-cTLR4 cells with the presence or absence of a small molecule, we now have the tool necessary to observe a primarily M1 MФ response during inflammation. By isolating this phase of the wound healing response, it may be possible to determine conditions for ideal healing. PMID:26610863

  4. Post-mating inflammatory responses of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Katila, T

    2012-08-01

    This review attempts to summarize the current knowledge on uterine inflammatory response after mating in horses, pigs and cattle. Post-mating endometritis has been extensively studied in horses as it has been considered to cause infertility. The inflammation is known to occur also in cattle, but it has not been investigated to a similar extent. There are a number of publications about mechanisms of post-mating uterine inflammation in pigs, which seem to resemble those in horses. The major focus of this review is the horse, but relevant literature is presented also on swine and cattle. Spermatozoa, seminal plasma and semen extenders play roles in the induction of inflammation. In addition, sperm numbers, concentration and viability, as well as the site of semen deposition may modulate the inflammatory response. Cytokines, polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) and mononuclear cells represent the uterine inflammatory response to mating. Inflammation is the first line of defence against invasion and eliminates excess spermatozoa and bacteria. Semen deposition elicits a massive PMN invasion, followed by phagocytosis of sperm aided by the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. Exposure of the female genital tract to semen is important also for endometrial receptivity and pre-implantation embryo development. Seminal plasma (SP) and inflammation elicit transient immune tolerance to antigens present in semen. SP contains immune-regulatory molecules that activate and control immune responses to antigens by stimulating expression of cytokines and growth factors and by initiating tissue remodelling. SP also regulates ovarian function. Effective elimination of excess sperm and inflammatory by-products and subsequent rapid return of the endometrium to the normal state is a prerequisite for pregnancy. Uterine backflow, driven by myometrial contractions and requiring a patent cervix, is an important physical tool in uterine drainage. PMID:22913558

  5. Effect of the PA-MSHA vaccine on septic serum-induced inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Feng; Wang, Li; Qu, Yi; Zhong, De-Wu; Miao, Xiong-Ying; Yao, Hong-Liang

    2013-04-01

    Sepsis is defined as a complex clinical syndrome caused by a serious infection followed by an amplified and deregulated inflammatory response. The complex syndrome is associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality, despite substantial clinical advances. A vaccine derived from the outer membrane proteins of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-MSHA) has been demonstrated to exhibit immune modulatory properties. In the present study, the effect of the PA-MSHA vaccine on the inflammatory response induced by serum from septic patients in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was determined. It was observed that PA-MSHA pretreatment inhibits the production of septic serum-induced tumor necrosis factor-α. In addition, PA-MSHA treatment increases interleukin-10 levels and promotes the generation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. Thus, the results of the current study provide mechanistic insight relevant to the potential application of PA-MSHA in the treatment of sepsis. PMID:23440442

  6. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing. PMID:25102201

  7. Effects of trace element supplementation on the inflammatory response in a rabbit model of major trauma.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wan-an; Yu, Xiao-jun; Liu, Fu-Qi; Wang, Hai-peng; Wang, Dian; Lai, Xiao-ping

    2010-01-01

    Patients with a severe trauma exhibit a strong oxidative stress, an intense inflammatory response, and long-lasting hypermetabolism, all of which are proportional to the severity of injury. In this study, we investigated the impact of trace element (TE) supplementation on the inflammatory response in an animal model of major trauma. New Zealand White rabbits were randomly assigned as a control group (n=5) and an experimental group (n=70) that, after receiving a major trauma, was subdivided into Trauma-Control (n=35) and Trauma-TE (n=35) groups. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) was observed in 40 out of 70 rabbits with a trauma, with a higher incidence in the Trauma-Control group (88.6%; 31/35) than the Trauma-TE group (28.6%; 10/35) (p<0.01). The mortality rate was significantly different between the Trauma-Control and the Trauma-TE groups; (34% vs. 8%; p<0.01). There were significant post-trauma alterations in the levels of (1) serum and spleen zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and manganese (Mn), (2) serum AST and ALT, (3) serum interleukin-6/10, and (4) nuclear factor kappa binding (NF-kappaB) activity and the expression. TE supplementation: (1) improved blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine (Cr) levels, (2) stabilized IL-6/10 production, (3) decreased NF-kappaB p(65) production. Appropriate TE supplementation can improve the TE status, mitigate SIRS, and reduce the mortality due to multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS)/multiple organ failure (MOF) after major trauma. PMID:20122578

  8. Quantitative Risk-Benefit Analysis of Probiotic Use for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William E

    2016-04-01

    Probiotics have seen widespread use for a variety of gastrointestinal problems, especially in two common disorders: irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Since a wide variety of probiotic preparations has been used, and despite a large number of studies performed, a great deal of heterogeneity exists among them. Straightforward evidence-based recommendations for the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease have thus been difficult to formulate. In an effort to improve understanding of the risk-benefit balance of probiotics in these conditions, this study (1) queried the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database for all reported adverse drug events related to probiotics in 2013, and (2) constructed risk-benefit planes for both irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease using a geometric approximation of the confidence region between risk and benefit. The results show that adverse events from probiotics vary widely by disease, and when they occur, they are mild and may be difficult to distinguish from the natural history of the underlying disorders they are used to treat. The risk-benefit plane for irritable bowel syndrome straddles the risk-benefit threshold, so patients can expect a balance between a low chance of risk and also a low chance of benefit. The risk-benefit plane for inflammatory bowel disease largely lies above the risk-benefit threshold, so patients may expect more benefit than risk in most cases. More standardized and high-quality research is needed to improve our understanding of risk and benefit for these complex biopharmaceuticals. PMID:26467550

  9. Inflammatory markers and cardiovascular risk in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Espinola-Klein, Christine; Gori, Tommaso; Blankenberg, Stefan; Munzel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Elevated blood glucose, obesity, high blood pressure, elevated triglycerides and low high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are well accepted risk factors in the development of coronary artery disease. Clustering of at least three of these factors in an individual is defined as metabolic syndrome (MetS). Obesity is a central pathological mechanism in the disease and it is expected that the incidence of this condition will increase dramatically within the next years. The visceral adipose tissue is not only an energy depot but also an endocrine organ which produces a large number of bioactive molecules, the so called adipokines. In the setting of obesity, the over-production of proinflammatory and pro-thrombotic adipokines is associated with insulin resistance. This mechanism represents the pathophysiological basis for the development of MetS. Inflammation has a central role in the pathogenesis of MetS and in mediating its impact on the development of cardiovascular disease. Knowledge of these mechanisms has relevance in the context of preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:21196255

  10. Inflammatory responses in Ebola virus-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    BAIZE, S; LEROY, E M; GEORGES, A J; GEORGES-COURBOT, M-C; CAPRON, M; BEDJABAGA, I; LANSOUD-SOUKATE, J; MAVOUNGOU, E

    2002-01-01

    Ebola virus subtype Zaire (Ebo-Z) induces acute haemorrhagic fever and a 60–80% mortality rate in humans. Inflammatory responses were monitored in victims and survivors of Ebo-Z haemorrhagic fever during two recent outbreaks in Gabon. Survivors were characterized by a transient release in plasma of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) and MIP-1β early in the disease, followed by circulation of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) and soluble receptors for TNFα (sTNF-R) and IL-6 (sIL-6R) towards the end of the symptomatic phase and after recovery. Fatal infection was associated with moderate levels of TNFα and IL-6, and high levels of IL-10, IL-1RA and sTNF-R, in the days before death, while IL-1β was not detected and MIP-1α and MIP-1β concentrations were similar to those of endemic controls. Simultaneous massive activation of monocytes/macrophages, the main target of Ebo-Z, was suggested in fatal infection by elevated neopterin levels. Thus, presence of IL-1β and of elevated concentrations of IL-6 in plasma during the symptomatic phase can be used as markers of non-fatal infection, while release of IL-10 and of high levels of neopterin and IL-1RA in plasma as soon as a few days after the disease onset is indicative of a fatal outcome. In conclusion, recovery from Ebo-Z infection is associated with early and well-regulated inflammatory responses, which may be crucial in controlling viral replication and inducing specific immunity. In contrast, defective inflammatory responses and massive monocyte/macrophage activation were associated with fatal outcome. PMID:11982604

  11. On the inflammatory response in metal-on-metal implants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal implants are a special form of hip endoprostheses that despite many advantages can entail serious complications due to release of wear particles from the implanted material. Metal wear particles presumably activate local host defence mechanisms, which causes a persistent inflammatory response with destruction of bone followed by a loosening of the implant. To better characterize this inflammatory response and to link inflammation to bone degradation, the local generation of proinflammatory and osteoclast-inducing cytokines was analysed, as was systemic T cell activation. Methods By quantitative RT-PCR, gene expression of cytokines and markers for T lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and osteoclasts, respectively, was analysed in tissue samples obtained intraoperatively during exchange surgery of the loosened implant. Peripheral T cells were characterized by cytofluorometry before surgery and 7 to 10 days thereafter. Results At sites of osteolysis, gene expression of cathepsin K, CD14 and CD3 was seen, indicating the generation of osteoclasts, and the presence of monocytes and of T cells, respectively. Also cytokines were highly expressed, including CXCL8, IL-1ß, CXCL2, MRP-14 and CXCL-10. The latter suggest T cell activation, a notion that could be confirmed by detecting a small, though conspicuous population of activated CD4+ cells in the peripheral blood T cells prior to surgery. Conclusion Our data support the concept that metallosis is the result of a local inflammatory response, which according to histomorphology and the composition of the cellular infiltrate classifies as an acute phase of a chronic inflammatory disease. The proinflammatory environment, particularly the generation of the osteoclast-inducing cytokines CXCL8 and IL1-ß, promotes bone resorption. Loss of bone results in implant loosening, which then causes the major symptoms of metallosis, pain and reduced range of motion. PMID:24650243

  12. Inflammatory biomarkers as differential predictors of antidepressant response.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Although antidepressants are generally effective in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), it can still take weeks before patients feel the full antidepressant effects. Despite the efficacy of standard treatments, approximately two-thirds of patients with MDD fail to respond to pharmacotherapy. Therefore, the identification of blood biomarkers that can predict the treatment response to antidepressants would be highly useful in order to improve this situation. This article discusses inflammatory molecules as predictive biomarkers for antidepressant responses to several classes of antidepressants, including the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine. PMID:25856677

  13. Short communication: Camel milk ameliorates inflammatory responses and oxidative stress and downregulates mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-Wei; Kong, Gui-Qing; Ma, Ming-Ming; Li, Yan; Huang, Xiao; Wang, Li-Peng; Peng, Zhen-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Liu, Xiang-Yong; Wang, Xiao-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complex syndrome disorder with high mortality rate. Camel milk (CM) contains antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties and protects against numerous diseases. This study aimed to demonstrate the function of CM in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS in rats. Camel milk reduced the lung wet:dry weight ratio and significantly reduced LPS-induced increases in neutrophil infiltration, interstitial and intra-alveolar edema, thickness of the alveolar wall, and lung injury scores of lung tissues. It also had antiinflammatory and antioxidant effects on LPS-induced ARDS. After LPS stimulation, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-10, and IL-1β) in serum and oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, and total antioxidant capacity) in lung tissue were notably attenuated by CM. Camel milk also downregulated mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Given these results, CM is a potential complementary food for ARDS treatment. PMID:26601576

  14. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut . E-mail: jaeschke@email.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose.

  15. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu, Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose. PMID:16781746

  16. The Inflammatory Response in Psoriasis: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaxiong; Chang, Christopher; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by an excessively aberrant hyperproliferation of keratinocytes. The pathogenesis of psoriasis is complex and the exact mechanism remains elusive. However, psoriasis is thought to result from a combination of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental influences. Recent studies have identified that epigenetic factors including dysregulated DNA methylation levels, abnormal histone modification and microRNAs expressions are involved in the development of psoriasis. The interplay of immune cells and cytokines is another critical factor in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. These factors or pathways include Th1/Th2 homeostasis, the Th17/Treg balance and the IL-23/Th17 axis. Th17 is believed particularly important in psoriasis due to its pro-inflammatory effects and its involvement in an integrated inflammatory loop with dendritic cells and keratinocytes, contributing to an overproduction of antimicrobial peptides, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines that leads to amplification of the immune response. In addition, other pathways and signaling molecules have been found to be involved, including Th9, Th22, regulatory T cells, γδ T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and their related cytokines. Understanding the pathogenesis of psoriasis will allow us to develop increasingly efficient targeted treatment by blocking relevant inflammatory signaling pathways and molecules. There is no cure for psoriasis at the present time, and much of the treatment involves managing the symptoms. The biologics, while lacking the adverse effects associated with some of the traditional medications such as corticosteroids and methotrexate, have their own set of side effects, which may include reactivation of latent infections. Significant challenges remain in developing safe and efficacious novel targeted therapies that depend on a better understanding of the immunological dysfunction in psoriasis. PMID:27025861

  17. Role of moesin in HMGB1-stimulated severe inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Kwon, O K; Han, M-S; Lee, Y-M; Kim, S-W; Kim, K-M; Lee, T; Lee, S; Bae, J-S

    2015-08-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that arises when the body's response to infection causes systemic inflammation. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), as a late mediator of sepsis, enhances hyperpermeability, and it is therefore a therapeutic target. Despite extensive research into the underlying mechanisms of sepsis, the target molecules controlling vascular leakage remain largely unknown. Moesin is a cytoskeletal protein involved in cytoskeletal changes and paracellular gap formation. The objectives of this study were to determine the roles of moesin in HMGB1-mediated vascular hyperpermeability and inflammatory responses and to investigate the mechanisms of action underlying these responses. Using siRNA knockdown of moesin expression in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), moesin was found to be required in HMGB1-induced F-actin rearrangement, hyperpermeability, and inflammatory responses. The mechanisms involved in moesin phosphorylation were analysed by blocking the binding of the HMGB1 receptor (RAGE) and inhibiting the Rho and MAPK pathways. HMGB1-treated HUVECs exhibited an increase in Thr558 phosphorylation of moesin. Circulating levels of moesin were measured in patients admitted to the intensive care unit with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock; these patients showed significantly higher levels of moesin than healthy controls, which was strongly correlated with disease severity. High blood moesin levels were also observed in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice. Administration of blocking moesin antibodies attenuated CLP-induced septic death. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that the HMGB1-RAGE-moesin axis can elicit severe inflammatory responses, suggesting it to be a potential target for the development of diagnostics and therapeutics for sepsis. PMID:25947626

  18. Plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines in adult Nigerians with the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Christiana, Udenze Ifeoma; Casimir, Amadi E.; Nicholas, Awolola Awodele; Christian, Makwe C.; Obiefuna, Ajie I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to determine the plasma levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrotic factor alpha (TNF-α, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in adult Nigerians with the metabolic syndrome and to determine the relationship between components of the metabolic syndrome and CRP in adult Nigerians. Subjects and Methods: This was a case–control study of fifty adult men and women with the metabolic syndrome, and fifty age- and sex-matched males and females without the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Programme-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Written informed consent was obtained from the participants. Blood pressure and anthropometry measurements were taken and venous blood was collected after an overnight fast. The Ethics Committee of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria, approved the study protocol. Comparisons of continuous variables and categorical variables were done using the Student's t-test and Chi-square test, respectively. Regression analysis was used to determine the associations between variables. Statistical significance was set at P< 0.05. Results: The age- and sex-matched males and females with and without the metabolic syndrome did not differ in their sociodemographic characteristics. They however differed in some clinical and laboratory parameters such as diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.048), waist circumference (P = 0.002), body mass index (P = 0.012), waist/hip ratio (P = 0.023), high density lipoprotein (HDL) (P = 0.012), and insulin resistance (IR) (P = 0.042). There was a statistically significant increase in the inflammatory marker, CRP (P = 0.019), the cytokines, IL6 (P = 0.040), and TNF-α (P = 0.031) between the subjects with and without metabolic syndrome. There was also a significant association between CRP, waist circumference, IR, and HDL in the metabolic syndrome (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines are raised in

  19. Opportunistic infections and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV-1-infected adults in the combined antiretroviral therapy era: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Manzardo, Christian; Guardo, Alberto C; Letang, Emilio; Plana, Montserrat; Gatell, Jose M; Miro, Jose M

    2015-06-01

    Despite the availability of effective combined antiretroviral treatment, many patients still present with advanced HIV infection, often accompanied by an AIDS-defining disease. A subgroup of patients starting antiretroviral treatment under these clinical conditions may experience paradoxical worsening of their disease as a result of an exaggerated immune response towards an active (but also subclinical) infectious agent, despite an appropriate virological and immunological response to the treatment. This clinical condition, known as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, may cause significant morbidity and even mortality if it is not promptly recognized and treated. This review updates current knowledge about the incidence, diagnostic criteria, risk factors, clinical manifestations, and management of opportunistic infections and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in the combined antiretroviral treatment era. PMID:25860288

  20. Immunological and Inflammatory Responses to Organic Dust in Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Jill A.; Romberger, Debra J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Agriculture represents a major industry worldwide, and despite protection against the development of IgE-mediated diseases, chronic exposure to agriculture-related organic dusts is associated with an increased risk of developing respiratory disease. This article will review the literature regarding new knowledge of important etiologic agents in the dusts and focus on the immunologic responses following acute and repetitive organic dust exposures. Recent findings Although endotoxin remains important, there is an emerging role for non-endotoxin components such as peptidoglycans from Gram-positive bacteria. Pattern recognition receptors including Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR2 and intracellular nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors are partially responsible for mediating the inflammatory consequences. Repeated organic dust exposures modulate innate and adaptive immune function with a resultant adaptation-like response. However, repetitive exposures cause lung parenchymal inflammation, chronic disease, and lung function decline over time. Summary The immunological consequences of organic dust exposure in the farming industry are likely explained by the diversity of microbial motifs in dust that can elicit differing innate immune receptor signaling pathways. Whereas initial activation results in a robust inflammatory response, repetitive dust exposures modulate immunity. This can result in low-grade, chronic inflammation and/or protection against allergic disease. PMID:22306554

  1. Systemic inflammatory mediators in post-traumatic Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS I) - longitudinal investigations and differences to control groups

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I (CRPS I) is a disease that might affect an extremity after trauma or operation. The pathogenesis remains yet unclear. It has clinical signs of severe local inflammation as a result of an exaggerated inflammatory response but neurogenic dysregulation also contributes to it. Some studies investigated the role inflammatory mediators and cytokines; however, few longitudinal studies exist and control groups except healthy controls were not investigated yet. Methods To get further insights into the role of systemic inflammatory mediators in CRPS I, we investigated a variety of pro-, anti-, or neuro-inflammatory mediators such as C-Reactive Protein (CRP), White Blood Cell Count (WBC), Interleukins 4, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12 (p70), Interferon gamma, Tumor-Necrosis-Factor alpha (TNF-α) and its soluble Receptors I/II, soluble Selectins (E, L, P), Substance-P (SP), and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) at different time points in venous blood from patients with acute (AC) and chronic (CC) CRPS I, patients with forearm fractures (FR), with neuralgia (NE), and from healthy volunteers (C). Results No significant changes for serum parameters investigated in CRPS compared to control groups were found except for CC/C (CGRP p = 0.007), FR/C (CGRP p = 0.048) and AC/CC (IL-12 p = 0.02; TNFRI/II p = 0.01; SP p = 0.049). High interindividual variations were observed. No intra-or interindividual correlation of parameters with clinical course (e.g. chronification) or outcome was detectable. Conclusion Although clinically appearing as inflammation in acute stages, local rather than systemic inflammatory responses seem to be relevant in CRPS. Variable results from different studies might be explained by unpredictable intermittent release of mediators from local inflammatory processes into the blood combined with high interindividual variabilities. A clinically relevant difference to various control groups was not notable in this pilot study

  2. Criminal and legal responsibilities in Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gullucayir, Sibel; Asirdizer, Mahmut; Yavuz, M Sunay; Zeyfeoglu, Yildiray; Ulucay, Tarik

    2009-01-01

    Tourette's Syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychological disorder characterized by the presence of multiple involuntary motor tics accompanied by one or more vocal tics. Articles about TS and criminal responsibility and the restriction of civil rights are limited. A person with TS was evaluated to consider his criminal responsibility after swearing at a referee during a football game. He was also evaluated as to whether or not he was capable of professionally driving a service bus. Additionally, medico-legal situations regarding military service, obtaining a shotgun license and marriages of patients with TS were considered. PMID:20039524

  3. Inflammatory Signals Regulate IL-15 in Response to Lymphodepletion.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Scott M; Rivas, Sarai C; Colpitts, Sara L; Howard, Megan E; Stonier, Spencer W; Schluns, Kimberly S

    2016-06-01

    Induction of lymphopenia has been exploited therapeutically to improve immune responses to cancer therapies and vaccinations. Whereas IL-15 has well-established roles in stimulating lymphocyte responses after lymphodepletion, the mechanisms regulating these IL-15 responses are unclear. We report that cell surface IL-15 expression is upregulated during lymphopenia induced by total body irradiation (TBI), cyclophosphamide, or Thy1 Ab-mediated T cell depletion, as well as in RAG(-/-) mice; interestingly, the cellular profile of surface IL-15 expression is distinct in each model. In contrast, soluble IL-15 (sIL-15) complexes are upregulated only after TBI or αThy1 Ab. Analysis of cell-specific IL-15Rα conditional knockout mice revealed that macrophages and dendritic cells are important sources of sIL-15 complexes after TBI but provide minimal contribution in response to Thy1 Ab treatment. Unlike with TBI, induction of sIL-15 complexes by αThy1 Ab is sustained and only partially dependent on type I IFNs. The stimulator of IFN genes pathway was discovered to be a potent inducer of sIL-15 complexes and was required for optimal production of sIL-15 complexes in response to Ab-mediated T cell depletion and TBI, suggesting products of cell death drive production of sIL-15 complexes after lymphodepletion. Lastly, we provide evidence that IL-15 induced by inflammatory signals in response to lymphodepletion drives lymphocyte responses, as memory CD8 T cells proliferated in an IL-15-dependent manner. Overall, these studies demonstrate that the form in which IL-15 is expressed, its kinetics and cellular sources, and the inflammatory signals involved are differentially dictated by the manner in which lymphopenia is induced. PMID:27183627

  4. Systemic inflammatory responses in African tick-bite fever.

    PubMed

    Jensenius, Mogens; Ueland, Thor; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Brosstad, Frank; Stylianou, Eva; Vene, Sirkka; Myrvang, Bjørn; Raoult, Didier; Aukrust, Pål

    2003-04-15

    Information regarding the inflammatory response in African tick-bite fever (ATBF), an emerging spotted-fever-group rickettsiosis, in international travelers to sub-Saharan Africa, is scarce. Plasma/serum levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF), soluble (s) E-selectin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, interferon-gamma, IL-10, IL-13, IL-8, RANTES, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, and C-reactive protein were studied, at both first presentation and follow-up, in 15 patients with travel-associated ATBF and in 14 healthy travelers who served as control subjects. Our main and novel findings are the following: (1) patients with ATBF had increased levels of vWF and sE-selectin, with a subsequent decrease at follow-up; (2) with the exception of IFN-gamma, levels of cytokines and chemokines were also increased in these patients at the first presentation; and (3) IL-10 and IL-13 tended to increase during follow-up, whereas most of the inflammatory cytokines decreased. The induction of these mediators and the balance between them may be critical both for the regulation of inflammation and for protective immunity in ATBF. PMID:12696016

  5. Platelets in Pulmonary Immune Responses and Inflammatory Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Elizabeth A; Weyrich, Andrew S; Zimmerman, Guy A

    2016-10-01

    Platelets are essential for physiological hemostasis and are central in pathological thrombosis. These are their traditional and best known activities in health and disease. In addition, however, platelets have specializations that broaden their functional repertoire considerably. These functional capabilities, some of which are recently discovered, include the ability to sense and respond to infectious and immune signals and to act as inflammatory effector cells. Human platelets and platelets from mice and other experimental animals can link the innate and adaptive limbs of the immune system and act across the immune continuum, often also linking immune and hemostatic functions. Traditional and newly recognized facets of the biology of platelets are relevant to defensive, physiological immune responses of the lungs and to inflammatory lung diseases. The emerging view of platelets as blood cells that are much more diverse and versatile than previously thought further predicts that additional features of the biology of platelets and of megakaryocytes, the precursors of platelets, will be discovered and that some of these will also influence pulmonary immune defenses and inflammatory injury. PMID:27489307

  6. The hepatic inflammatory response after acetaminophen overdose: role of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lawson, J A; Farhood, A; Hopper, R D; Bajt, M L; Jaeschke, H

    2000-04-01

    Acetaminophen overdose induces severe liver injury and hepatic failure. There is evidence that inflammatory cells may be involved in the pathophysiology. Thus, the aim of this investigation was to characterize the neutrophilic inflammatory response after treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen. A time course study showed that neutrophils accumulate in the liver parallel to or slightly after the development of liver injury. The number of neutrophils in the liver was substantial (209 +/- 64 PMN/50 high-power fields at 12 h) compared to baseline levels (7 +/- 1). Serum levels of TNF-alpha and the C-X-C chemokines KC and MIP-2 increased by 28-, 14-, and 295-fold, respectively, over levels found in controls during the injury process. In addition, mRNA expression of MIP-2 and KC were upregulated in livers of acetaminophen-treated animals as determined by ribonuclease protection assay. However, none of these mediators were generated in large enough quantities to account for neutrophil sequestration in the liver. There was no upregulation of Mac-1 (CD11b/ CD18) or shedding of L-selectin on circulating neutrophils. Moreover, an anti-CD18 antibody had no protective effect against acetaminophen overdose during the first 24 h. These results indicate that there is a local inflammatory response after acetaminophen overdose, including a substantial accumulation of neutrophils in the liver. Because of the critical importance of beta2 integrins for neutrophil cytotoxicity, these results suggest that neutrophils do not contribute to the initiation or progression of AAP-induced liver. The inflammation observed after acetaminophen overdose may be characteristic for a response sufficient to recruit neutrophils for the purpose of removing necrotic cells but is not severe enough to cause additional damage. PMID:10774834

  7. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  8. Systemic inflammatory response and neuromuscular involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ching-Hua; Allen, Kezia; Oei, Felicia; Leoni, Emanuela; Kuhle, Jens; Tree, Timothy; Fratta, Pietro; Sharma, Nikhil; Sidle, Katie; Howard, Robin; Orrell, Richard; Fish, Mark; Greensmith, Linda; Pearce, Neil; Gallo, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the combined blood expression of neuromuscular and inflammatory biomarkers as predictors of disease progression and prognosis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: Logistic regression adjusted for markers of the systemic inflammatory state and principal component analysis were carried out on plasma levels of creatine kinase (CK), ferritin, and 11 cytokines measured in 95 patients with ALS and 88 healthy controls. Levels of circulating biomarkers were used to study survival by Cox regression analysis and correlated with disease progression and neurofilament light chain (NfL) levels available from a previous study. Cytokines expression was also tested in blood samples longitudinally collected for up to 4 years from 59 patients with ALS. Results: Significantly higher levels of CK, ferritin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)–α, and interleukin (IL)–1β, IL-2, IL-8, IL-12p70, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13 and lower levels of interferon (IFN)–γ were found in plasma samples from patients with ALS compared to controls. IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were the most highly regulated markers when all explanatory variables were jointly analyzed. High ferritin and IL-2 levels were predictors of poor survival. IL-5 levels were positively correlated with CK, as was TNF-α with NfL. IL-6 was strongly associated with CRP levels and was the only marker showing increasing expression towards end-stage disease in the longitudinal analysis. Conclusions: Neuromuscular pathology in ALS involves the systemic regulation of inflammatory markers mostly active on T-cell immune responses. Disease stratification based on the prognostic value of circulating inflammatory markers could improve clinical trials design in ALS. PMID:27308305

  9. Attachment avoidance predicts inflammatory responses to marital conflict.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Jean-Philippe; Glaser, Ronald; Loving, Timothy J; Malarkey, William B; Stowell, Jeffrey; Houts, Carrie; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2009-10-01

    Marital stress has been associated with immune dysregulation, including increased production of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Attachment style, one's expectations about the availability and responsiveness of others in intimate relationships, appears to influence physiological stress reactivity and thus could influence inflammatory responses to marital conflict. Thirty-five couples were invited for two 24-h admissions to a hospital research unit. The first visit included a structured social support interaction, while the second visit comprised the discussion of a marital disagreement. A mixed effect within-subject repeated measure model indicated that attachment avoidance significantly influenced IL-6 production during the conflict visit but not during the social support visit. Individuals with higher attachment avoidance had on average an 11% increase in total IL-6 production during the conflict visit as compared to the social support visit, while individuals with lower attachment avoidance had, on average, a 6% decrease in IL-6 production during the conflict visit as compared to the social support visit. Furthermore, greater attachment avoidance was associated with a higher frequency of negative behaviors and a lower frequency of positive behaviors during the marital interaction, providing a mechanism by which attachment avoidance may influence inflammatory responses to marital conflict. In sum, these results suggest that attachment avoidance modulates marital behavior and stress-induced immune dysregulation. PMID:18952163

  10. Inflammatory cause of metabolic syndrome via brain stress and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Cai, Dongsheng; Liu, Tiewen

    2012-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome, a network of medical disorders that greatly increase the risk for developing metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, has reached epidemic levels in many areas of today's world. Despite this alarming medicare situation, scientific understandings on the root mechanisms of metabolic syndrome are still limited, and such insufficient knowledge contributes to the relative lack of effective treatments or preventions for related diseases. Recent interdisciplinary studies from neuroendocrinology and neuroimmunology fields have revealed that overnutrition can trigger intracellular stresses to cause inflammatory changes mediated by molecules that control innate immunity. This type of nutrition-related molecular inflammation in the central nervous system, particularly in the hypothalamus, can form a common pathogenic basis for the induction of various metabolic syndrome components such as obesity, insulin resistance, and hypertension. Proinflammatory NF-κB pathway has been revealed as a key molecular system for pathologic induction of brain inflammation, which translates overnutrition and resulting intracellular stresses into central neuroendocrine and neural dysregulations of energy, glucose, and cardiovascular homeostasis, collectively leading to metabolic syndrome. This article reviews recent research advances in the neural mechanisms of metabolic syndrome and related diseases from the perspective of pathogenic induction by intracellular stresses and NF-κB pathway of the brain. PMID:22328600

  11. Pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses to intra-amniotic IL-1α in fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Boris W.; Nitsos, Ilias; Pillow, J. Jane; Collins, Jennifer J. P.; Polglase, Graeme R.; Newnham, John P.; Jobe, Alan H.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies implicate IL-1 as an important mediator of perinatal inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that intra-amniotic IL-1α would induce pulmonary and systemic fetal inflammatory responses. Sheep with singleton fetuses were given an intra-amniotic injection of recombinant sheep IL-1α (100 μg) and were delivered 1, 3, or 7 days later, at 124 ± 1 days gestation (n=5–8/group). A separate group of sheep were given two intra-amniotic IL-1α injections (100 μg dose each): 7 days and again 1 day prior to delivery. IL-1α induced a robust increase in monocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and IL-8 protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. H2O2 secretion was increased in inflammatory cells isolated from lungs of IL-1α-exposed lambs upon LPS challenge in vitro compared with control monocytes. T lymphocytes were recruited to the lung. IL-1β, cyclooxygenase-1, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression increased in the lung 1 day after intra-amniotic IL-1α exposure. Lung volumes increased 7 days after intra-amniotic IL-1α exposure, with minimal anatomic changes in air space morphology. The weight of the posterior mediastinal lymph node draining the lung and the gastrointestinal tract doubled, inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOSII)-positive cells increased, and Foxp3-positive T-regulatory lymphocytes decreased in the lymph node after IL-1α exposure. In the blood, neutrophil counts and plasma haptoglobin increased after IL-1α exposure. Compared with a single exposure, exposure to intra-amniotic IL-1α 7 days and again 1 day before delivery had a variable effect (increases in some inflammatory markers, but not pulmonary cytokines). IL-1α is a potent mediator of the fetal inflammatory response syndrome. PMID:21665964

  12. Cytotoxic mediators in paradoxical HIV-tuberculosis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Katalin A; Walker, Naomi F; Meintjes, Graeme; Deffur, Armin; Nicol, Mark P; Skolimowska, Keira H; Matthews, Kerryn; Tadokera, Rebecca; Seldon, Ronnett; Maartens, Gary; Rangaka, Molebogeng X; Besra, Gurdyal S; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2015-02-15

    Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) frequently complicates combined antiretroviral therapy and antituberculosis therapy in HIV-1-coinfected tuberculosis patients. The immunopathological mechanisms underlying TB-IRIS are incompletely defined, and improved understanding is required to derive new treatments and to reduce associated morbidity and mortality. We performed longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses of human PBMCs from paradoxical TB-IRIS patients and non-IRIS controls (HIV-TB-coinfected patients commencing antiretroviral therapy who did not develop TB-IRIS). Freshly isolated PBMC stimulated with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (hkH37Rv) were used for IFN-γ ELISPOT and RNA extraction. Stored RNA was used for microarray and RT-PCR, whereas corresponding stored culture supernatants were used for ELISA. Stored PBMC were used for perforin and granzyme B ELISPOT and flow cytometry. There were significantly increased IFN-γ responses to hkH37Rv in TB-IRIS, compared with non-IRIS PBMC (p = 0.035). Microarray analysis of hkH37Rv-stimulated PBMC indicated that perforin 1 was the most significantly upregulated gene, with granzyme B among the top five (log2 fold difference 3.587 and 2.828, respectively), in TB-IRIS. Downstream experiments using RT-PCR, ELISA, and ELISPOT confirmed the increased expression and secretion of perforin and granzyme B. Moreover, granzyme B secretion reduced in PBMC from TB-IRIS patients during corticosteroid treatment. Invariant NKT cell (CD3(+)Vα24(+)) proportions were higher in TB-IRIS patients (p = 0.004) and were a source of perforin. Our data implicate the granule exocytosis pathway in TB-IRIS pathophysiology. Further understanding of the immunopathogenesis of this condition will facilitate development of specific diagnostic and improved therapeutic options. PMID:25589068

  13. Effects of tityustoxin on cerebral inflammatory response in young rats.

    PubMed

    Van Fraga, Iva Tereza; Limborço-Filho, Marcelo; Lima, Onésia Cristina Oliveira; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Guidine, Patrícia Alves Maia; Moraes, Márcio Flávio Dutra; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Moraes-Santos, Tasso; Massensini, André Ricardo; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana

    2015-02-19

    Accidents caused by scorpion stings, mainly affecting children, are considered an important cause of morbidity and mortality in tropical countries. Clinical studies demonstrate the relevant role of systemic inflammatory events in scorpion envenoming. However, remains poorly understood whether the major lethal component in Tityus serrulatus venom, tityustoxin (TsTX), is able to induce inflammatory responses in the cerebral microcirculation. In this study, we systematically examined leukocyte recruitment into the CNS in response to TsTX injection. Accordingly, developing rats were subjected to a subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of TsTX (0.75mg/kg), and leukocyte recruitment (i.e., 4, 8 and 12h after injection) and TNF-α levels were evaluated. Rats injected with TsTX presented a significant increase in leukocyte rolling and adhesion and higher levels of TNF-α at all time points studied, compared to the control group. Altogether, this work demonstrates the triggering of neuroimmunological mechanisms induced by TsTX injection in young rats. PMID:25545555

  14. Inflammatory Response in Preterm and Very Preterm Newborns with Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Segura-Cervantes, Enrique; Mancilla-Ramírez, Javier; González-Canudas, Jorge; Alba, Erika; Santillán-Ballesteros, René; Morales-Barquet, Deneb; Sandoval-Plata, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The response of the adaptive immune system is usually less intense in premature neonates than term neonates. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether immunological parameters vary between preterm (PT) neonates (≥32 weeks of gestational age) and very preterm (VPT) neonates (<32 weeks of gestational age). A cross-sectional study was designed to prospectively follow PT and VPT neonates at risk of developing sepsis. Plasma concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, and IL-10 were detected using flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (C-RP) and the complex SC5b-9 were detected in the plasma using commercial kits. A total of 83 patients were included. The laboratory results and clinical histories showed that 26 patients had sepsis; 14 were VPT, and 12 were PT. The levels of C-RP, SC5b-9 (innate immune response mediators), and IL-10 or IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines) were elevated during sepsis in both groups. IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 (proinflammatory cytokines) were differentially elevated only in PT neonates. The VPT neonates with sepsis presented increases in C-RP, SC5b-9, and anti-inflammatory cytokines but not in proinflammatory cytokines, whereas PT neonates showed increases in all studied mediators of inflammation. PMID:27293317

  15. Inflammatory Response in Preterm and Very Preterm Newborns with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Segura-Cervantes, Enrique; Mancilla-Ramírez, Javier; González-Canudas, Jorge; Alba, Erika; Santillán-Ballesteros, René; Morales-Barquet, Deneb; Sandoval-Plata, Gabriela; Galindo-Sevilla, Norma

    2016-01-01

    The response of the adaptive immune system is usually less intense in premature neonates than term neonates. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether immunological parameters vary between preterm (PT) neonates (≥32 weeks of gestational age) and very preterm (VPT) neonates (<32 weeks of gestational age). A cross-sectional study was designed to prospectively follow PT and VPT neonates at risk of developing sepsis. Plasma concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, and IL-10 were detected using flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (C-RP) and the complex SC5b-9 were detected in the plasma using commercial kits. A total of 83 patients were included. The laboratory results and clinical histories showed that 26 patients had sepsis; 14 were VPT, and 12 were PT. The levels of C-RP, SC5b-9 (innate immune response mediators), and IL-10 or IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines) were elevated during sepsis in both groups. IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 (proinflammatory cytokines) were differentially elevated only in PT neonates. The VPT neonates with sepsis presented increases in C-RP, SC5b-9, and anti-inflammatory cytokines but not in proinflammatory cytokines, whereas PT neonates showed increases in all studied mediators of inflammation. PMID:27293317

  16. Guillain Barre syndrome in an HIV-1-infected patient after the beginning of combined antiretroviral therapy: an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    PubMed

    Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Digiulio, Maria Anna; Cavallari, Eugenio Nelson; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mezzaroma, Ivano

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1-associated Guillan-Barre syndrome (hGBS) is an ascendant progressive polyradiculoneuropathy described throughout the course of the viral disease, mainly associated with the acute retroviral syndrome. HGBS is occasionally described in severely immunocompromised subjects in the context of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. The case described occurred soon after the start of a combined antiretroviral treatment in an HIV-1 infected patient with ulcerative colitis in the absence of severe immunosuppression. This manifestation may be interpreted as an uncommon appearance of an immune reconstitution syndrome in the presence of a predisposing autoimmune pathology. PMID:24531178

  17. Criminal Responsibility of the Frontal Lobe Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sener, Mustafa Talip; Ozcan, Halil; Sahingoz, Sadik; Ogul4, Hayri

    2015-01-01

    Neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms might be detected due to damage of frontal lobes as detected in damages of many brain regions. Frontal lobe syndrome (FLS) occurs as a result of damage in prefrontal region due to various causes. Symptoms due to prefrontal region damage, varies according to the size and location of the lesion. In most of the cases; executive dysfunctions, attention deficits, inconsistencies in social life, impulse control problems, obsessive behaviors and violence behaviors are common clinical signs. Behavioral symptoms seen in FLS can be confused with personality disorders and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. FLS is a neuropsychiatric disorder rarely assessed in forensic psychiatry and in terms of detection of criminal responsibility. In this case report, criminal responsibility in FLS was assessed through a FLS case in which an offense of “threat” was committed and investigated in terms of criminal responsibility. PMID:26644774

  18. Criminal Responsibility of the Frontal Lobe Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sener, Mustafa Talip; Ozcan, Halil; Sahingoz, Sadik; Ogul, Hayri

    2015-10-01

    Neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms might be detected due to damage of frontal lobes as detected in damages of many brain regions. Frontal lobe syndrome (FLS) occurs as a result of damage in prefrontal region due to various causes. Symptoms due to prefrontal region damage, varies according to the size and location of the lesion. In most of the cases; executive dysfunctions, attention deficits, inconsistencies in social life, impulse control problems, obsessive behaviors and violence behaviors are common clinical signs. Behavioral symptoms seen in FLS can be confused with personality disorders and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. FLS is a neuropsychiatric disorder rarely assessed in forensic psychiatry and in terms of detection of criminal responsibility. In this case report, criminal responsibility in FLS was assessed through a FLS case in which an offense of "threat" was committed and investigated in terms of criminal responsibility. PMID:26644774

  19. Cryptococcal Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in HIV-1–infected individuals: Literature Review and Proposed Clinical Case Definitions

    PubMed Central

    Haddow, Lewis J; Colebunders, Robert; Meintjes, Graeme; Lawn, Stephen D; Elliott, Julian H; Manabe, Yukari C; Bohjanen, Paul R; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Easterbrook, Philippa J; French, Martyn A; Boulware, David R

    2011-01-01

    Cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (C-IRIS) may present as a clinical deterioration or new presentation of cryptococcal disease following initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and is believed to be caused by recovery of cryptococcus-specific immune responses. We have reviewed the existing literature on C-IRIS to inform the development of a consensus case definition specific for paradoxical cryptococcal IRIS in patients with known cryptococcal disease prior to ART, and a second definition for incident cases of cryptococcosis developing during ART (here termed ART-associated cryptococcosis), a proportion of which are likely to be “unmasking” C-IRIS. These structured case definitions are intended for use in future clinical, epidemiologic and immunopathologic studies of C-IRIS, harmonizing diagnostic criteria, and facilitating comparisons between studies. As with tuberculosis-associated IRIS, these proposed definitions should be regarded as preliminary until further insights into the immunopathology of IRIS permit their refinement. PMID:21029993

  20. Cardiovascular and inflammatory response to cholecystokinin during endotoxemic shock.

    PubMed

    Saia, Rafael Simone; Bertozi, Giuliana; Mestriner, Fabíola Leslie; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiróz Cunha, Fernando; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari

    2013-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) was first described as a gastrointestinal hormone, but its receptors have been located in cardiac and vascular tissues, as well as in immune cells. Our aims were to investigate the role of CCK on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hypotension and its ability to modulate previously reported inflammatory mediators, therefore affecting cardiovascular function. To conduct these experiments, rats had their jugular vein cannulated for drug administration, and also, the femoral artery cannulated for mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate records. Endotoxemia induced by LPS from Escherichia coli (1.5 mg/kg; i.v.) stimulated the release of CCK, a progressive drop in MAP, and increase in heart rate. Plasma tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10), nitrate, vasopressin, and lactate levels were elevated in the endotoxemic rats. The pretreatment with proglumide (nonselective CCK antagonist; 30 mg/kg; i.p.) aggravated the hypotension and also increased plasma TNF-α and lactate levels. On the other hand, CCK (0.4 μg/kg; i.v.) administered before LPS significantly restored MAP, reduced aortic and hepatic inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production, and elevated plasma vasopressin and IL-10 concentrations; it did not affect TNF-α. Physiological CCK concentration reduced nitrite and iNOS synthesis by peritoneal macrophages, possibly through a self-regulatory IL-10-dependent mechanism. Together, these data suggest a new role for the peptide CCK in modulating MAP, possibly controlling the inflammatory response, stimulating the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, and reducing vascular and macrophage iNOS-derived nitric oxide production. Based on these findings, CCK could be used as an adjuvant therapeutic agent to improve cardiovascular function. PMID:23247127

  1. Inflammatory and innate immune responses in dengue infection: protection versus disease induction.

    PubMed

    Costa, Vivian Vasconcelos; Fagundes, Caio Tavares; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2013-06-01

    Dengue disease is a mosquito-borne viral disease of expanding geographical range and incidence. Infection by one of the four serotypes of dengue virus induces a spectrum of disease manifestations, ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening Dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Many efforts have been made to elucidate several aspects of dengue virus-induced disease, but the pathogenesis of disease is complex and remains unclear. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the early stages of infection is crucial to determine and develop safe therapeutics to prevent the severe outcomes of disease without interfering with control of infection. In this review, we discuss the dual role of the innate and inflammatory pathways activated during dengue disease in mediating both protection and exacerbation of disease. We show that some mediators involved in each of these responses differ substantially, suggesting that interfering in disease-associated immune pathways may represent a potential therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of severe dengue. PMID:23567637

  2. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Agrawal, Anshu; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency. PMID:27413170

  3. Hyaluronidase Modulates Inflammatory Response and Accelerates the Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Fronza, Marcio; Caetano, Guilherme F.; Leite, Marcel N.; Bitencourt, Claudia S.; Paula-Silva, Francisco W. G.; Andrade, Thiago A. M.; Frade, Marco A. C.; Merfort, Irmgard; Faccioli, Lúcia H.

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronidases are enzymes that degrade hyaluronan an important constituent of the extracellular matrix. They have been used as a spreading agent, improving the absorption of drugs and facilitating the subcutaneous infusion of fluids. Here, we investigated the influence of bovine testes hyaluronidase (HYAL) during cutaneous wound healing in in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated in the wound scratch assay that HYAL increased the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro at low concentration, e.g. 0.1 U HYAL enhanced the cell number by 20%. HYAL presented faster and higher reepithelialization in in vivo full-thickness excisional wounds generated on adult Wistar rats back skin already in the early phase at 2nd day post operatory compared to vehicle-control group. Wound closured area observed in the 16 U and 32 U HYAL treated rats reached 38% and 46% compared to 19% in the controls, respectively. Histological and biochemical analyses supported the clinical observations and showed that HYAL treated wounds exhibited increased granulation tissue, diminished edema formation and regulated the inflammatory response by modulating the release of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factor and eicosanoids mediators. Moreover, HYAL increased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) γ and PPAR β/δ, the collagen content in the early stages of healing processes as well as angiogenesis. Altogether these data revealed that HYAL accelerates wound healing processes and might be beneficial for treating wound disorders. PMID:25393024

  4. Innate inflammatory responses in stroke: mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Kawabori, Masahito; Yenari, Midori A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Ischemic stroke is more commonly encountered compared to hemorrhagic stroke, and leads to tissue death by ischemia due to occlusion of a cerebral artery. Inflammation is known to result as a result of ischemic injury, long thought to be involved in initiating the recovery and repair process. However, work over the past few decades indicates that aspects of this inflammatory response may in fact be detrimental to stroke outcome. Acutely, inflammation appears to have a detrimental effect, and anti-inflammatory treatments have been been studied as a potential therapeutic target. Chronically, reports suggest that post-ischemic inflammation is also essential for the tissue repairing and remodeling. The majority of the work in this area has centered around innate immune mechanisms, which will be the focus of this review. This review describes the different key players in neuroinflammation and their possible detrimental and protective effects in stroke. A better understanding of the roles of the different immune cells and their temporal profile of damage versus repair will help to clarify more effective modulation of inflammation post stroke. Introduction Stroke refers to conditions caused by occlusion and/or rupture of blood vessels in the brain, and is a leading cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. PMID:24372209

  5. Hyaluronidase modulates inflammatory response and accelerates the cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Fronza, Marcio; Caetano, Guilherme F; Leite, Marcel N; Bitencourt, Claudia S; Paula-Silva, Francisco W G; Andrade, Thiago A M; Frade, Marco A C; Merfort, Irmgard; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronidases are enzymes that degrade hyaluronan an important constituent of the extracellular matrix. They have been used as a spreading agent, improving the absorption of drugs and facilitating the subcutaneous infusion of fluids. Here, we investigated the influence of bovine testes hyaluronidase (HYAL) during cutaneous wound healing in in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated in the wound scratch assay that HYAL increased the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro at low concentration, e.g. 0.1 U HYAL enhanced the cell number by 20%. HYAL presented faster and higher reepithelialization in in vivo full-thickness excisional wounds generated on adult Wistar rats back skin already in the early phase at 2nd day post operatory compared to vehicle-control group. Wound closured area observed in the 16 U and 32 U HYAL treated rats reached 38% and 46% compared to 19% in the controls, respectively. Histological and biochemical analyses supported the clinical observations and showed that HYAL treated wounds exhibited increased granulation tissue, diminished edema formation and regulated the inflammatory response by modulating the release of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factor and eicosanoids mediators. Moreover, HYAL increased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) γ and PPAR β/δ, the collagen content in the early stages of healing processes as well as angiogenesis. Altogether these data revealed that HYAL accelerates wound healing processes and might be beneficial for treating wound disorders. PMID:25393024

  6. Biomechanical changes in endothelial cells result from an inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkus, Janina; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    During periods of infection and disease, the immune system induces the release of TNF-α, an inflammatory cytokine, from a variety of cell types, such as macrophages. TNF-α, while circulating in the vasculature, binds to the apical surface of endothelial cells and causes a wide range of biological and mechanical changes to the endothelium. While the biological changes have been widely studied, the biomechanical aspects have been largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the biomechanical changes of the endothelium as a function of TNF-α treatment. First, we studied the traction forces applied by the endothelium, an effect that is much less studied than others. Through the use of traction force microscopy, we found that TNF-α causes an increase in traction forces applied by the endothelial cells as compared to non-treated cells. Then, we investigated cell morphology, cell mechanics, migration, and cytoskeletal dynamics. We found that in addition to increasing applied traction forces, TNF-α causes an increase in cell area and aspect ratio on average, as well as a shift in the organization of F-actin filaments within the cell. Combining these findings together, our results show that an inflammatory response heavily impacts the morphology, cell mechanics, migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, and applied traction forces of endothelial cells.

  7. The Role of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases in Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, Byong Chul; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Hong, Sungyoul

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) mediate the methylation of a number of protein substrates of arginine residues and serve critical functions in many cellular responses, including cancer development, progression, and aggressiveness, T-lymphocyte activation, and hepatic gluconeogenesis. There are nine members of the PRMT family, which are divided into 4 types (types I–IV). Although most PRMTs do not require posttranslational modification (PTM) to be activated, fine-tuning modifications, such as interactions between cofactor proteins, subcellular compartmentalization, and regulation of RNA, via micro-RNAs, seem to be required. Inflammation is an essential defense reaction of the body to eliminate harmful stimuli, including damaged cells, irritants, or pathogens. However, chronic inflammation can eventually cause several types of diseases, including some cancers, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. Therefore, inflammation responses should be well modulated. In this review, we briefly discuss the role of PRMTs in the control of inflammation. More specifically, we review the roles of four PRMTs (CARM1, PRMT1, PRMT5, and PRMT6) in modulating inflammation responses, particularly in terms of modulating the transcriptional factors or cofactors related to inflammation. Based on the regulatory roles known so far, we propose that PRMTs should be considered one of the target molecule groups that modulate inflammatory responses. PMID:27041824

  8. The Role of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases in Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, Byong Chul; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Hong, Sungyoul; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) mediate the methylation of a number of protein substrates of arginine residues and serve critical functions in many cellular responses, including cancer development, progression, and aggressiveness, T-lymphocyte activation, and hepatic gluconeogenesis. There are nine members of the PRMT family, which are divided into 4 types (types I-IV). Although most PRMTs do not require posttranslational modification (PTM) to be activated, fine-tuning modifications, such as interactions between cofactor proteins, subcellular compartmentalization, and regulation of RNA, via micro-RNAs, seem to be required. Inflammation is an essential defense reaction of the body to eliminate harmful stimuli, including damaged cells, irritants, or pathogens. However, chronic inflammation can eventually cause several types of diseases, including some cancers, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. Therefore, inflammation responses should be well modulated. In this review, we briefly discuss the role of PRMTs in the control of inflammation. More specifically, we review the roles of four PRMTs (CARM1, PRMT1, PRMT5, and PRMT6) in modulating inflammation responses, particularly in terms of modulating the transcriptional factors or cofactors related to inflammation. Based on the regulatory roles known so far, we propose that PRMTs should be considered one of the target molecule groups that modulate inflammatory responses. PMID:27041824

  9. Regulation of inflammatory responses by IL-17F

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuexian O.; Chang, Seon Hee; Park, Heon; Nurieva, Roza; Shah, Bhavin; Acero, Luis; Wang, Yi-Hong; Schluns, Kimberly S.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Zhu, Zhou; Dong, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Although interleukin (IL) 17 has been extensively characterized, the function of IL-17F, which has an expression pattern regulated similarly to IL-17, is poorly understood. We show that like IL-17, IL-17F regulates proinflammatory gene expression in vitro, and this requires IL-17 receptor A, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6, and Act1. In vivo, overexpression of IL-17F in lung epithelium led to infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages and mucus hyperplasia, similar to observations made in IL-17 transgenic mice. To further understand the function of IL-17F, we generated and analyzed mice deficient in IL-17F or IL-17. IL-17, but not IL-17F, was required for the initiation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Mice deficient in IL-17F, but not IL-17, had defective airway neutrophilia in response to allergen challenge. Moreover, in an asthma model, although IL-17 deficiency reduced T helper type 2 responses, IL-17F–deficient mice displayed enhanced type 2 cytokine production and eosinophil function. In addition, IL-17F deficiency resulted in reduced colitis caused by dextran sulfate sodium, whereas IL-17 knockout mice developed more severe disease. Our results thus demonstrate that IL-17F is an important regulator of inflammatory responses that seems to function differently than IL-17 in immune responses and diseases. PMID:18411338

  10. Regulation of inflammatory responses by IL-17F.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuexian O; Chang, Seon Hee; Park, Heon; Nurieva, Roza; Shah, Bhavin; Acero, Luis; Wang, Yi-Hong; Schluns, Kimberly S; Broaddus, Russell R; Zhu, Zhou; Dong, Chen

    2008-05-12

    Although interleukin (IL) 17 has been extensively characterized, the function of IL-17F, which has an expression pattern regulated similarly to IL-17, is poorly understood. We show that like IL-17, IL-17F regulates proinflammatory gene expression in vitro, and this requires IL-17 receptor A, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6, and Act1. In vivo, overexpression of IL-17F in lung epithelium led to infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages and mucus hyperplasia, similar to observations made in IL-17 transgenic mice. To further understand the function of IL-17F, we generated and analyzed mice deficient in IL-17F or IL-17. IL-17, but not IL-17F, was required for the initiation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Mice deficient in IL-17F, but not IL-17, had defective airway neutrophilia in response to allergen challenge. Moreover, in an asthma model, although IL-17 deficiency reduced T helper type 2 responses, IL-17F-deficient mice displayed enhanced type 2 cytokine production and eosinophil function. In addition, IL-17F deficiency resulted in reduced colitis caused by dextran sulfate sodium, whereas IL-17 knockout mice developed more severe disease. Our results thus demonstrate that IL-17F is an important regulator of inflammatory responses that seems to function differently than IL-17 in immune responses and diseases. PMID:18411338

  11. Morphological features of the inflammatory response in molluscs.

    PubMed

    De Vico, G; Carella, F

    2012-12-01

    Over the last few years, there has been a large increase in studying the biology and pathology of molluscs, predominantly in addressing the molecular patterns involved in their immune-mediated and inflammatory responses. Conversely, the literature-based diagnostic criteria concerning the morphology of the above phenomena still involves pathogenetic confusion and conflicting terminology. A comparison of bibliographic resources, such as the Abridged Glossary of Terms Used in Invertebrate Pathology and the National Status manual for molluscan histopathological examination and analysis from the NOAA, have revealed variability in the definitions of superimposable lesions, emphasising the need for further efforts in establishing standard terminology and methodologies in this field of study. This review suggests some possible solutions for overcoming the use of parallel terminologies in diagnosing inflammation in molluscs and also highlights conflicting features requiring further discussion. PMID:22513124

  12. Engineering Immunomodulatory Biomaterials To Tune the Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Ajaykumar; Bhise, Nupura S; Evangelista, Marta B; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Vrana, Nihal Engin; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Current state-of-the-art biomedical implants and tissue engineering methods promise technologies to improve or even restore the function of diseased organs. However, one of the biggest challenges to clinical success is the lack of functional integration. A series of cellular and molecular events following biomaterial implantation poses an important bottleneck for developing breakthrough solutions. With inflammation increasingly recognized as a crucial component influencing regeneration, immunomodulation or immuno-engineering has emerged as a potential solution to overcome this key challenge in regenerative medicine. We postulate possibilities to utilize biomaterial physicochemical modifications to modulate the host inflammatory response and develop strategies for effective biomaterial integration. Biomaterial-based immunomodulation strategies can significantly ameliorate the outcomes of medical implants and tissue engineering therapies. PMID:27138899

  13. Particulate oil shale inhalation and pulmonary inflammatory response in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.S.; Holland, L.M.; Halleck, M.S.; Martinez, E.; Saunders, G.

    1983-01-01

    This experiment detrimetal that long-term inhalation of shale dusts by rats elicits a limited inflammatory response in the lung less profound than that observed in animals exposed to equivalent levels of quartz alone. This observation suggests that organic and inorganic constituents of shale may provide a protective effect. The implications for fibrogenic disease are two-fold: (1) inhalation of oil shale dusts appeared to be less detriemtal than the inhalation of quartz along, and (2) there was no apparent synergistic action of quartz and the complex of organic materials present in shale. Animals exposed to shale dusts failed to develop any significant lung lesions, while all of the animals exposed to quartz developed granulomas and some frank fibrosis.

  14. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase inflammatory responses in vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sung Gu; Newsome, Bradley; Hennig, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Numerous risk factors for endothelial cell inflammation and the development of atherosclerosis have been identified, including inhalation of ultrafine particles. Recently, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) such as titanium (TiO2) NPs have attracted much attention due to their wide range of applications. However, there are also great concerns surrounding potential adverse health effects in vascular systems. Although TiO2 NPs are known to induce oxidative stress and inflammation, the associated signaling pathways have not been well studied. The focus of this work, therefore, deals with examination of the cellular signaling pathways responsible for TiO2 NP-induced endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation. In this study, primary vascular endothelial cells were treated with TiO2 NPs for 2–16 h at concentrations of 0–50 µg/mL. TiO2 NP exposure increased cellular oxidative stress and DNA binding of NF-κB. Further, phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, JNK and p38 was increased in cells exposed to TiO2 NPs. TiO2 NPs also significantly increased induction of mRNA and protein levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Pretreatment with inhibitors for NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate), oxidative stress (epigallocatechin gallate and apocynin), Akt (LY294002), ERK (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) and p38 (SB203580) significantly attenuated TiO2 NP-induced MCP-1 and VCAM-1 gene expression, as well as activation of NF-κB. These data indicate that TiO2 NPs can induce endothelial inflammatory responses via redox-sensitive cellular signaling pathways. PMID:23380242

  15. Inflammatory Response to Burn Trauma: Nicotine Attenuates Proinflammatory Cytokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Papst, S.; Reimers, K.; Stukenborg-Colsman, C.; Steinstraesser, L.; Vogt, P. M.; Kraft, T.; Niederbichler, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The immune response to an inflammatory stimulus is balanced and orchestrated by stimulatory and inhibitory factors. After a thermal trauma, this balance is disturbed and an excessive immune reaction with increased production and release of proinflammatory cytokines results. The nicotine-stimulated anti-inflammatory reflex offsets this. The goal of this study was to verify that transdermal administration of nicotine downregulates proinflammatory cytokine release after burn trauma. Methods: A 30% total body surface area full-thickness rat burn model was used in Sprague Dawley rats (n = 35, male). The experimental animals were divided into a control group, a burn trauma group, a burn trauma group with additional nicotine treatment, and a sham + nicotine group with 5 experimental animals per group. The last 2 groups received a transdermal nicotine administration of 1.75 mg. The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 were determined in homogenates of hearts, livers, and spleens 12 or 24 hours after burn trauma. Results: Experimental burn trauma resulted in a significant increase in cytokine levels in hearts, livers, and spleens. Nicotine treatment led to a decrease of the effect of the burn trauma with significantly lower concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 compared to the trauma group. Conclusions: This study confirms in a standardized burn model that stimulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is involved in the regulation of effectory molecules of the immune response. Looking at the results of our study, further experiments designed to explore and evaluate the potency and mechanisms of the immunomodulating effects of this receptor system are warranted. PMID:25671045

  16. Systemic inflammatory response due to chloroform intoxication--an uncommon complication.

    PubMed

    Dettling, A; Stadler, K; Eisenbach, C; Skopp, G; Haffner, H T

    2016-03-01

    Well-known adverse effects of chloroform are drowsiness, nausea, and liver damage. Two cases with an uncommon complication due to chloroform intoxication are presented. In the first case, a general physician, because of nausea and dyspnea, admitted a 34-year-old woman to hospital. She developed a toxic pulmonary edema requiring mechanical ventilation for a few days, and a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) with elevated white blood cell counts, a moderate increase of C-reactive protein, and slightly elevated procalcitonin levels. There were inflammatory altered skin areas progressing to necrosis later on. However, bacteria could be detected neither in blood culture nor in urine. Traces of chloroform were determined from a blood sample, which was taken 8 h after admission. Later, the husband confessed to the police having injected her chloroform and put a kerchief soaked with chloroform over her nose and mouth. In the second case, a 50-year-old man ingested chloroform in a suicidal attempt. He was found unconscious in his house and referred to a hospital. In the following days, he developed SIRS without growth of bacteria in multiple blood cultures. He died several days after admission due to multi-organ failure. SIRS in response to chloroform is a rare but severe complication clinically mimicking bacterial-induced sepsis. The mechanisms leading to systemic inflammation after chloroform intoxication are currently unclear. Possibly, chloroform and/or its derivates may interact with pattern recognition receptors and activate the same pro-inflammatory mediators (cytokines, interleukins, prostaglandins, leukotrienes) that cause SIRS in bacterial sepsis. PMID:25676899

  17. Puerarin partly counteracts the inflammatory response after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion via activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojie; Mei, Zhigang; Qian, Jingping; Zeng, Yongbao; Wang, Mingzhi

    2013-12-01

    Puerarin, a major isoflavonoid derived from the Chinese medical herb radix puerariae (Gegen), has been reported to inhibit neuronal apoptosis and play an anti-inflammatory role in focal cerebral ischemia model rats. Recent findings regarding stroke pathophysiology have recognized that anti-inflammation is an important target for the treatment of ischemic stroke. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is a highly robust neural-immune mechanism for inflammation control. This study was to investigate whether activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can be involved in the mechanism of inhibiting the inflammatory response during puerarin-induced cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. Results showed that puerarin pretreatment (intravenous injection) reduced the ischemic infarct volume, improved neurological deficit after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion and decreased the levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in brain tissue. Pretreatment with puerarin (intravenous injection) attenuated the inflammatory response in rats, which was accompanied by janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inhibition. These observations were inhibited by the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR) antagonist α-bungarotoxin (α-BGT). In addition, puerarin pretreatment increased the expression of α7nAchR mRNA in ischemic cerebral tissue. These data demonstrate that puerarin pretreatment strongly protects the brain against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and inhibits the inflammatory response. Our results also indicated that the anti-inflammatory effect of puerarin may partly be mediated through the activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. PMID:25206641

  18. Development of post-pericardiotomy syndrome is preceded by an increase in pro-inflammatory and a decrease in anti-inflammatory serological markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome (PPS) is a common complication after cardiac surgery, occuring in 10-40% of patients. PPS may prolong hospitalization, and even serious complications like tamponade and constrictive pericarditis may occur. Early diagnosis and treatment may reduce morbidity. In 50 patients transferred to our hospital after cardiac surgery we found an increase in pro-inflammatory and a decrease in anti-inflammatory cytokines at admission in the patients later developing PPS compared to the patients who did not develop PPS. If confirmed in larger studies, these findings may prove useful in early identification of and targeted treatment in patients developing PPS. PMID:22824227

  19. Development of post-pericardiotomy syndrome is preceded by an increase in pro-inflammatory and a decrease in anti-inflammatory serological markers.

    PubMed

    Snefjellå, Nora; Lappegård, Knut Tore

    2012-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome (PPS) is a common complication after cardiac surgery, occuring in 10-40% of patients. PPS may prolong hospitalization, and even serious complications like tamponade and constrictive pericarditis may occur. Early diagnosis and treatment may reduce morbidity. In 50 patients transferred to our hospital after cardiac surgery we found an increase in pro-inflammatory and a decrease in anti-inflammatory cytokines at admission in the patients later developing PPS compared to the patients who did not develop PPS. If confirmed in larger studies, these findings may prove useful in early identification of and targeted treatment in patients developing PPS. PMID:22824227

  20. Arterial Stiffness Alterations and Inflammatory Response Following Endovascular Aortic Repair: Based on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19-23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA).

    PubMed

    Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Mylonas, Spyridon N; Kakisis, John; Kadoglou, Nikolaos P E; Papadakis, Ioannis; Sfyroeras, George S; Antonopoulos, Constantine C N; Mantas, George; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Liapis, Christos D

    2015-04-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and thoracic aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) have been widely incorporated into clinical practice. However, changes in arterial stiffness and post-implantation syndrome after aortic endografting remain important issues under investigation. The aneurysm sac wall motion after successful EVAR and TEVAR reflects complex interactions between all the components of the excluded aneurysm, including true compliance of the aneurysm wall itself, intra-aneurysm sac pressure, remodeling of the thrombus, and mechanical characteristics of the endograft. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that aortic endografting results in increased arterial stiffness in animal models. It can be assumed that the alterations of aortic mechanical properties can have a direct impact on heart output. The long-term impact of these mechanical changes on cardiovascular outcomes and the potential effects of different endografts on hemodynamics are important issues under investigation. Post-implantation syndrome (PIS) is a systemic inflammatory response frequently observed after endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies. The main features of PIS include fever, leukocytosis, elevated C-reactive protein levels, and coagulation disturbances. Endograft design appears to influence this inflammatory response following aortic endografting; woven polyester endografts have been shown to be associated with greater inflammatory response compared to PTFE stent grafts. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature to elucidate arterial stiffness alterations and inflammatory response after EVAR and TEVAR and the impact of endograft design on aortic stiffness and the post-inflammatory response. PMID:26798761

  1. Imbalanced secondary mucosal antioxidant response in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kruidenier, Laurens; Kuiper, Ineke; Van Duijn, Wim; Mieremet-Ooms, Marij A C; van Hogezand, Ruud A; Lamers, Cornelis B H W; Verspaget, Hein W

    2003-09-01

    cells that expressed CAT remained unchanged during inflammation and GPO was found in only a very low and constant number of epithelial cells. In addition, the inflamed epithelium displayed decreased expression of the hydroxyl radical (OH(*)) scavenger MT. In view of the high epithelial SOD levels in inflamed IBD epithelium, it is speculated that the efficient removal of excess H(2)O(2) is hampered in these cells, thereby increasing not only the risk of detrimental effects of H(2)O(2) directly, but also those of its extremely reactive derivatives such as OH(*). Taken together, the results suggest an imbalanced and inefficient endogenous antioxidant response in the intestinal mucosa of IBD patients, which may contribute to both the pathogenesis and the perpetuation of the inflammatory processes. PMID:12950013

  2. Radiation promotes colorectal cancer initiation and progression by inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Bozeman, R G; Kaisani, A; Kim, W; Zhang, L; Richardson, J A; Wright, W E; Shay, J W

    2016-06-30

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common as protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared with conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole-body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIRs), which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence-associated gene (P19Arf), are markedly increased. Following these changes, loss of Casein kinase Iα and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared with X-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid-ethyl amide (CDDO-EA), reduces proton irradiation-associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA. PMID:26477319

  3. Radiation Promotes Colorectal Cancer Initiation and Progression by Inducing Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Bozeman, Ronald; Kaisani, Aadil; Kim, Wanil; Zhang, Lu; Richardson, James A.; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common since protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared to conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIR) which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence associated gene (P19Arf) are markedly increased. Following these changes loss of Casein kinase Iα (CKIα) and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared to x-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, CDDO-EA, reduces proton irradiation associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus, exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA. PMID:26477319

  4. Modulation of inflammatory response of wounds by antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mrinalini; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Management of infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is becoming difficult due to the rapid emergence of multi-antibiotic resistant strains. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) has a lot of potential as an alternative approach for inactivation of antibiotic resistant bacteria. In this study we report results of our investigations on the effect of poly-L-lysine conjugate of chlorine p6 (pl-cp6) mediated APDT on the healing of P.aeruginosa infected wounds and the role of Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) induced inflammatory response in this process. Materials and method: Excisional wounds created in Swiss albino mice were infected with ∼107 colony forming units of P.aeruginosa. Mice with wounds were divided into three groups: 1) Uninfected, 2) Infected, untreated control (no light, no pl-cp6), 3) Infected, APDT. After 24 h of infection (day 1 post wounding), the wounds were subjected to APDT [pl-cp6 applied topically and exposed to red light (660 ± 25 nm) fluence of ∼ 60 J/cm2]. Subsequent to APDT, on day 2 and 5 post wounding (p.w), measurements were made on biochemical parameters of inflammation [toll like receptor-4 (TLR-4), NF-kB, Inteleukin (IL)-[1α, IL-β, and IL-2)] and cell proliferation [(fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP)]. Results: In comparison with untreated control, while expression of TLR-4, NF-kB (p105 and p50), and proinflammatory interleukins (IL-1α, IL-1β,IL-2) were reduced in the infected wounds subjected to APDT, the levels of FGF-2 and ALP increased, on day 5 p.w. Conclusion: The measurements made on the inflammatory markers and cell proliferation markers suggest that APDT reduces inflammation caused by P.aeruginosa and promotes cell proliferation in wounds. PMID:26557735

  5. Eosinophil-mediated signalling attenuates inflammatory responses in experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Masterson, Joanne C; McNamee, Eóin N; Fillon, Sophie A; Hosford, Lindsay; Harris, Rachel; Fernando, Shahan D; Jedlicka, Paul; Iwamoto, Ryo; Jacobsen, Elizabeth; Protheroe, Cheryl; Eltzschig, Holger K; Colgan, Sean P; Arita, Makoto; Lee, James J; Furuta, Glenn T

    2015-01-01

    Objective Eosinophils reside in the colonic mucosa and increase significantly during disease. Although a number of studies have suggested that eosinophils contribute to the pathogenesis of GI inflammation, the expanding scope of eosinophil-mediated activities indicate that they also regulate local immune responses and modulate tissue inflammation. We sought to define the impact of eosinophils that respond to acute phases of colitis in mice. Design Acute colitis was induced in mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium, 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid or oxazolone to C57BL/6J (control) or eosinophil deficient (PHIL) mice. Eosinophils were also depleted from mice using antibodies against interleukin (IL)-5 or by grafting bone marrow from PHIL mice into control mice. Colon tissues were collected and analysed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and reverse transcription PCR; lipids were analysed by mass spectroscopy. Results Eosinophil-deficient mice developed significantly more severe colitis, and their colon tissues contained a greater number of neutrophils, than controls. This compensatory increase in neutrophils was accompanied by increased levels of the chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, which attract neutrophils. Lipidomic analyses of colonic tissue from eosinophil-deficient mice identified a deficiency in the docosahexaenoic acid-derived anti-inflammatory mediator 10, 17- dihydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (diHDoHE), namely protectin D1 (PD1). Administration of an exogenous PD1-isomer (10S, 17S-DiHDoHE) reduced the severity of colitis in eosinophil-deficient mice. The PD1-isomer also attenuated neutrophil infiltration and reduced levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and inducible NO-synthase in colons of mice. Finally, in vitro assays identified a direct inhibitory effect of PD1-isomer on neutrophil transepithelial migration. Conclusions Eosinophils exert a protective effect in acute mouse colitis, via production of anti-inflammatory lipid

  6. Chemokines and the inflammatory response following cardiopulmonary bypass--a new target for therapeutic intervention?--A review.

    PubMed

    Ben-Abraham, Ron; Weinbroum, Avi A; Dekel, Benjamin; Paret, Gideon

    2003-10-01

    This 10-year Medline search of English-language articles describing experimental and clinical studies on chemokines, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and systemic or multiorgan failure revealed that chemokines are significantly involved in the pathogenesis of post-CPB syndrome. The post-CPB inflammatory response depends upon recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells. Leucocyte recruitment is a well-orchestrated process that involves several protein families, including pro-inflammatory cytokines, adhesion molecules and chemokines. Current anti-inflammatory therapies mostly act on the cells that have already been recruited. A more efficient therapy might be the prevention of excessive recruitment of particular leucocyte populations by antagonizing chemokine receptors which might act upstream of the current anti-inflammatory agents. The chemokines, which are a cytokine subfamily of chemotactic cytokines, participate in recognizing, recruiting, removing and repairing inflammation. As chemokines target specific leucocyte subsets, antagonism of a single chemokine ligand or receptor would be expected to have a circumscribed effect, thereby endowing the antagonist with a limited side-effect profile. Chemokines should be considered as possible targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:14535901

  7. Cerebral analgesic response to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Hodkinson, Duncan J; Khawaja, Nadine; OʼDaly, Owen; Thacker, Michael A; Zelaya, Fernando O; Wooldridge, Caroline L; Renton, Tara F; Williams, Steven C R; Howard, Matthew A

    2015-07-01

    Nonopioid agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are the most commonly used class of analgesics. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition at both peripheral and central sites can contribute to the antihyperalgesic effects of NSAIDs, with the predominant clinical effect being mediated centrally. In this study, we examined the cerebral response to ibuprofen in presurgical and postsurgical states and looked at the analgesic interaction between surgical state and treatment. We used an established clinical pain model involving third molar extraction, and quantitative arterial spin labelling (ASL) imaging to measure changes in tonic/ongoing neural activity. Concurrent to the ASL scans, we presented visual analogue scales inside the scanner to evaluate the subjective experience of pain. This novel methodology was incorporated into a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, with an open method of drug administration. We found that independent of its antinociceptive action, ibuprofen has no effect on regional cerebral blood flow under pain-free conditions (presurgery). However, in the postsurgical state, we observed increased activation of top-down modulatory circuits, which was accompanied by decreases in the areas engaged because of ongoing pain. Our findings demonstrate that ibuprofen has a measurable analgesic response in the human brain, with the subjective effects of pain relief reflected in two distinct brain networks. The observed activation of descending modulatory circuits warrants further investigation, as this may provide new insights into the inhibitory mechanisms of analgesia that might be exploited to improve safety and efficacy in pain management. PMID:25851460

  8. A pneumococcal pilus influences virulence and host inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Barocchi, M A; Ries, J; Zogaj, X; Hemsley, C; Albiger, B; Kanth, A; Dahlberg, S; Fernebro, J; Moschioni, M; Masignani, V; Hultenby, K; Taddei, A R; Beiter, K; Wartha, F; von Euler, A; Covacci, A; Holden, D W; Normark, S; Rappuoli, R; Henriques-Normark, B

    2006-02-21

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. The initial event in invasive pneumococcal disease is the attachment of encapsulated pneumococci to epithelial cells in the upper respiratory tract. This work provides evidence that initial bacterial adhesion and subsequent ability to cause invasive disease is enhanced by pili, long organelles able to extend beyond the polysaccharide capsule, previously unknown to exist in pneumococci. These adhesive pili-like appendages are encoded by the pneumococcal rlrA islet, present in some, but not all, clinical isolates. Introduction of the rlrA islet into an encapsulated rlrA-negative isolate allowed pilus expression, enhanced adherence to lung epithelial cells, and provided a competitive advantage upon mixed intranasal challenge of mice. Furthermore, a pilus-expressing rlrA islet-positive clinical isolate was more virulent than a nonpiliated deletion mutant, and it out-competed the mutant in murine models of colonization, pneumonia, and bacteremia. Additionally, piliated pneumococci evoked a higher TNF response during systemic infection, compared with nonpiliated derivatives, suggesting that pneumococcal pili not only contribute to adherence and virulence but also stimulate the host inflammatory response. PMID:16481624

  9. Acute Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Clinical Response to Parenteral Doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Anthony W.; Malkasian, Kay L.; Marshall, John R.; Guze, Lucien B.

    1975-01-01

    The bacteriology of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and clinical response to parenteral doxycycline were evaluated in 30 patients. Only 3 of 21 cul-de-sac cultures from PID patients were sterile, whereas all 8 normal control subjects yielded negative results (P< 0.005). Poor correlation was observed between cervical and cul-de-sac cultures. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, isolated from the cervix in 17 patients (57%), was recovered from the cul-de-sac only once. Streptococcus, Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus, coliforms, and other organisms normally present in the vagina were the predominant isolates recovered from the cul-de-sac. Parenteral doxycycline resulted in rapid resolution of signs and symptoms (within 48 h) in 20 of 27 evaluable patients (74%). In five others, signs and symptoms of infection abated within 4 days. The remaining two patients failed to respond; in both cases, adnexal masses developed during doxycycline therapy. Gonococci were eradicated from the cervix in all but one patient who, nevertheless, had a rapid defervescence of symptoms. There was no clear-cut correlation between the clinical response and in vitro susceptibility of cul-de-sac isolates to doxycycline. These data confirm the usefulness of broad-spectrum antibiotics in acute PID. Culdocentesis is a reliable means of obtaining material for the bacteriological diagnosis of acute PID; however, the pathogenetic role and relative importance of gonococci and various other bacteria in acute PID need to be clarified further. PMID:1169908

  10. Histone deacetylase 5 regulates the inflammatory response of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Poralla, Lukas; Stroh, Thorsten; Erben, Ulrike; Sittig, Marie; Liebig, Sven; Siegmund, Britta; Glauben, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Modifying the chromatin structure and interacting with non-histone proteins, histone deacetylases (HDAC) are involved in vital cellular processes at different levels. We here specifically investigated the direct effects of HDAC5 in macrophage activation in response to bacterial or cytokine stimuli. Using murine and human macrophage cell lines, we studied the expression profile and the immunological function of HDAC5 at transcription and protein level in over-expression as well as RNA interference experiments. Toll-like receptor-mediated stimulation of murine RAW264.7 cells significantly reduced HDAC5 mRNA within 7 hrs but presented baseline levels after 24 hrs, a mechanism that was also found for Interferon-γ treatment. If treated with lipopolysaccharide, RAW264.7 cells transfected for over-expression only of full-length but not of mutant HDAC5, significantly elevated secretion of tumour necrosis factor α and of the monocyte chemotactic protein-1. These effects were accompanied by increased nuclear factor-κB activity. Accordingly, knock down of HDAC5-mRNA expression using specific siRNA significantly reduced the production of these cytokines in RAW264.7 or human U937 cells. Taken together, our results suggest a strong regulatory function of HDAC5 in the pro-inflammatory response of macrophages. PMID:26059794

  11. A pneumococcal pilus influences virulence and host inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Barocchi, M. A.; Ries, J.; Zogaj, X.; Hemsley, C.; Albiger, B.; Kanth, A.; Dahlberg, S.; Fernebro, J.; Moschioni, M.; Masignani, V.; Hultenby, K.; Taddei, A. R.; Beiter, K.; Wartha, F.; von Euler, A.; Covacci, A.; Holden, D. W.; Normark, S.; Rappuoli, R.; Henriques-Normark, B.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. The initial event in invasive pneumococcal disease is the attachment of encapsulated pneumococci to epithelial cells in the upper respiratory tract. This work provides evidence that initial bacterial adhesion and subsequent ability to cause invasive disease is enhanced by pili, long organelles able to extend beyond the polysaccharide capsule, previously unknown to exist in pneumococci. These adhesive pili-like appendages are encoded by the pneumococcal rlrA islet, present in some, but not all, clinical isolates. Introduction of the rlrA islet into an encapsulated rlrA-negative isolate allowed pilus expression, enhanced adherence to lung epithelial cells, and provided a competitive advantage upon mixed intranasal challenge of mice. Furthermore, a pilus-expressing rlrA islet-positive clinical isolate was more virulent than a nonpiliated deletion mutant, and it out-competed the mutant in murine models of colonization, pneumonia, and bacteremia. Additionally, piliated pneumococci evoked a higher TNF response during systemic infection, compared with nonpiliated derivatives, suggesting that pneumococcal pili not only contribute to adherence and virulence but also stimulate the host inflammatory response. PMID:16481624

  12. Kefir reduces insulin resistance and inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Damiana D; Grześkowiak, Łukasz M; Ferreira, Célia L L F; Fonseca, Ana Carolina M; Reis, Sandra A; Dias, Mariana M; Siqueira, Nathane P; Silva, Leticia L; Neves, Clóvis A; Oliveira, Leandro L; Machado, Alessandra B F; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo G

    2016-08-10

    There is growing evidence that kefir can be a promising tool in decreasing the risk of many diseases, including metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of kefir supplementation in the diet of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) in which MetS was induced with monosodium glutamate (MSG), and to determine its effect on metabolic parameters, inflammatory and oxidation marker expression and glycemic index control. Thirty animals were used in this experiment. For the induction of MetS, twenty two-day-old male SHR received five consecutive intradermal injections of MSG. For the Negative Control, ten newborn male SHR received intradermal injections of saline solution (0.9% saline solution). After weaning, animals received standard diet and water ad libitum until reaching 3 months old, for the development of MetS. They were then divided into three groups (n = 10): negative control (NC, 1 mL saline solution per day), positive control (PC, 1 mL saline solution per day) and the Kefir group (1 mL kefir per day). Feeding was carried out by gavage for 10 weeks and the animals received standard food and water ad libitum. Obesity, insulin resistance, pro- and anti-inflammatory markers, and the histology of pancreatic and adipose tissues were among the main variables evaluated. Compared to the PC group, kefir supplementation reduced plasma triglycerides, liver lipids, liver triglycerides, insulin resistance, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, thoracic circumference, abdominal circumference, products of lipid oxidation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression (IL-1β) and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine expression (IL-10). The present findings indicate that kefir has the potential to benefit the management of MetS. PMID:27384318

  13. Apoptosis of resident and inflammatory macrophages before and during the inflammatory response of the virgin bovine mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Macrophages may play a prominent role in defense of the bovine mammary gland, and their functionality is necessary for successful eradication of bacterial pathogens. In contrast to necrosis, however, apoptosis has not yet been studied in macrophages from bovine mammary glands. Therefore, the aim of this study was to confirm the occurrence of apoptosis in macrophages from resting heifer mammary glands and during the inflammatory response. Methods Inflammatory response was induced by phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Resident macrophages (RESMAC) were obtained before and inflammatory macrophages (INFMAC) 24, 48, 72 and 168 hours after inducing inflammatory response in mammary glands of unbred heifers. Cell samples were analyzed for differential counts, apoptosis and necrosis using flow cytometry. Results Populations of RESMAC and INFMAC contained monocyte-like cells and vacuolized cells. Apoptosis was detected differentially in both morphologically different types of RESMAC and INFMAC and also during initiation and resolution of the inflammatory response. In the RESMAC population, approximately one-tenth of monocyte-like cells and one-third of vacuolized cells were apoptotic. In the INFMAC population obtained 24 h after PBS treatment, approximately one-tenth of monocyte-like cells and almost one-quarter of vacuolized cells were apoptotic. At the same time following LPS, however, we observed a significantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells in the population of monocyte-like INFMAC and vacuolized INFMAC. Moreover, a higher percentage of apoptotic cells in INFMAC was detected during all time points after PBS in contrast to LPS. Comparing RESMAC and INFMAC, we observed that vacuolized cells from populations of RESMAC and INFMAC underwent apoptosis more intensively than did monocyte-like cells. Conclusions We conclude that apoptosis of virgin mammary gland macrophages is involved in regulating their lifespan, and it is involved

  14. DISREGULATION OF INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES BY CHRONIC CIRCADIAN DISRUPTION

    PubMed Central

    Castanon-Cervantes, Oscar; Wu, Mingwei; Ehlen, J. Christopher; Paul, Ketema; Gamble, Karen L.; Johnson, Russell L.; Besing, Rachel C.; Menaker, Michael; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Davidson, Alec J.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms modulate nearly every mammalian physiological process. Chronic disruption of circadian timing in shift work or during chronic jet lag in animal models leads to a higher risk of several pathologies. Many of these conditions in both shift workers and experimental models share the common risk factor of inflammation. Here we show that experimentally-induced circadian disruption altered innate immune responses. Endotoxemic shock induced by LPS was magnified leading to hypothermia and death after 4 consecutive weekly 6h phase-advances of the light-dark schedule, with 89% mortality compared with 21% in unshifted control mice. This may be due to a heightened release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to LPS treatment in shifted animals. Isolated peritoneal macrophages harvested from shifted mice exhibited a similarly heightened response to LPS in vitro, indicating that these cells are a target for jet lag. Sleep deprivation and stress are known to alter immune function and are potential mediators of the effects we describe. However polysomnographic recording in mice exposed to the shifting schedule revealed no sleep loss, and stress measures were not altered in shifted mice. In contrast, we observed altered or abolished rhythms in the expression of clock genes in the central clock, liver, thymus and peritoneal macrophages in mice after chronic jet lag. We conclude that circadian disruption, but not sleep loss or stress, are associated with jet lag-related disregulation of the innate immune system. Such immune changes might be a common mechanism for the myriad negative health effects of shift work. PMID:20944004

  15. Pulpal inflammatory responses following non-carious class V restorations.

    PubMed

    About, I; Murray, P E; Franquin, J C; Remusat, M; Smith, A J

    2001-01-01

    The effects of inflammatory activity following surgical intervention can injure pulp tissues; in severe cases it can lead to pulpal complications. With this article, the authors report on the effects of cavity preparation and restoration events and how they can interact together to reduce or increase the severity of pulpal inflammatory activity in 202 restored Class V cavities. Although some inflammatory activity was observed in the absence of bacteria, the severity of pulpal inflammatory activity was increased when cavity restorations became infected. Zinc oxide eugenol and resin-modified glass ionomer cement prevented bacterial microleakage in cavity restorations, with no severe inflammatory activity observed with these materials. Bacteria were observed in cavities restored with enamel bonding resin and adhesive bonded composites and were associated with severe grades of inflammatory activity. The cavity remaining dentin thickness influenced the grade of inflammatory activity. In the absence of infection, the grade of inflammatory activity decreased after 20 weeks post-operatively. In the presence of infection, the grade of pulpal inflammation remained stable until a minimum of 30 weeks had elapsed. PMID:11504432

  16. CNS–Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in the Setting of HIV Infection, Part 2: Discussion of Neuro–Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome with and without Other Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Post, M.J.D.; Thurnher, M.M.; Clifford, D.B.; Nath, A.; Gonzalez, R.G.; Gupta, R.K.; Post, K.K.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY While the previous review of CNS-IRIS in the HIV-infected patient on highly active antiretroviral therapy (Part 1) dealt with an overview of the biology, pathology, and neurologic presentation of this condition and a discussion of the atypical imaging findings in PML-IRIS and cryptococcal meningitis–IRIS due to the robust inflammatory response, the current review (Part 2) discusses the imaging findings in other commonly encountered organisms seen in association with CNS-IRIS, namely, VZV, CMV, HIV, Candida organisms, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Toxoplasma gondii. Also described is the imaging appearance of CNS-IRIS when not associated with a particular organism. Recognition of these imaging findings will give credence to the diagnosis of CNS-IRIS and will allow the clinician to institute changes in medical management, if necessary, so that immune reconstitution and improved patient outcome can occur with time. PMID:22790252

  17. Persistent inflammatory, immunosuppressed, catabolic syndrome (PICS): A new phenotype of multiple organ failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Martin D.; Moore, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    A new phenotype of multiple organ failure has appeared: Persistent Inflammatory, Immunosuppressed, Catabolic Syndrome (PICS). Comorbidities and age >65 years have been established as the leading risk factors for PICS. As the percentage of elderly people continues to increase the prevalence of PICS in our ICUs will surely grow. Malnutrition (despite appropriate supplementation), recurrent nosocomial infections, frailty, ventilator dependence, and an indolent death depicts the central theme that plagues PICS patients. Aligned with the recently awarded P50 grant by NIGMS entitled, “PICS: A New Horizon for Surgical Critical Care”, and the University Of Florida’s Sepsis and Critical Illness Research Center will investigate the genetic make-up of PICS patients, better understand frailty and the implication in trauma patients, and hopefully elucidate new therapies. Currently, there are no therapies to combat PICS aside from nutritional inference elaborated after reviewing the literature on Burns, Cachexia, and Sarcopenia. PMID:26086042

  18. Penicillium marneffei presenting as an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in a patient with advanced HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Charlotte; Hajjawi, Rachel; Barlow, Gavin; Thaker, Hiten; Adams, Kate; Moss, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A 62-year-old British man with advanced HIV was established on antiretroviral therapy and treatment for disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex and Cytomegalovirus infections. One month later he re-presented with epigastric pain, an epigastric mass and skin lesions. Abdominal imaging revealed large volume lymphadenopathy, which was not present on previous imaging. Blood cultures yielded Penicillium marneffei, a dimorphic fungus endemic to South-east Asia. The patient had spent several years travelling in Thailand prior to the diagnosis of HIV. Penicilliosis is a common AIDS-defining illness in endemic areas, but remains rare in Europe. In this case, it presented in the context of a rapidly decreasing viral load as an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. The challenges of management in the context of multiple comorbidities and polypharmacy are discussed. PMID:23362074

  19. Turner syndrome associated with acquired von Willebrand disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Lubomir; Stueben, Eugen T; Jaikishen, Jay P; Lamarche, Maximo B

    2002-07-01

    We report a unique case of Turner syndrome associated with acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). During 7 years of close follow-up, the patient presented with multiple major episodes of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding caused by different pathogenic mechanisms, such as IBD, AvWD, gastric varices, and thrombocytopenia. AvWD mimicking familial vWD type III on laboratory testing was most probably triggered by autoimmune mechanism associated with PBC. Therapy of PBC with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) resulted in significant decrease of liver enzymes followed by normalization of vWF and FVIII levels. Portosystemic shunt placement with ligation of gastric varices improved hypersplenism and severe thrombocytopenia and led to clinical stability for more than 24 months. The clinicopathological features of these disorders and of the recurrent bleeding episodes are discussed in the text along with a review of the literature. PMID:12116986

  20. Triggering of inflammatory response by myeloperoxidase-oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Legssyer, Ilham; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Kisoka, Roger Lema; Babar, Sajida; Moguilevsky, Nicole; Delree, Paul; Ducobu, Jean; Remacle, Claude; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Brohee, Dany

    2006-10-01

    The oxidation theory proposes that LDL oxidation is an early event in atherosclerosis and that oxidized LDL contributes to atherogenesis in triggering inflammation. In contrast to the copper-modified LDL, there are few studies using myeloperoxidase-modified LDL (Mox-LDL) as an inflammation inducer. Our aim is to test whether Mox-LDL could constitute a specific inducer of the inflammatory response. Albumin, which is the most abundant protein in plasma and which is present to an identical concentration of LDL in the intima, was used for comparison. The secretion of IL-8 by endothelial cells (Ea.hy926) and TNF-alpha by monocytes (THP-1) was measured in the cell medium after exposure of these cells to native LDL, native albumin, Mox-LDL, or Mox-albumin. We observed that Mox-LDL induced a 1.5- and 2-fold increase (ANOVA; P < 0.001) in IL-8 production at 100 microg/mL and 200 microg/mL, respectively. The incubation of THP-1 cells with Mox-LDL (100 microg/mL) increased the production of TNF-alpha 2-fold over the control. Native LDL, albumin, and Mox-albumin showed no effect in either cellular types. The myeloperoxidase-modified LDL increase in cytokine release by endothelial and monocyte cells and by firing both local and systemic inflammation could induce atherogenesis and its development. PMID:17167545

  1. Acute inflammatory response in spinal cord following impact injury.

    PubMed

    Carlson, S L; Parrish, M E; Springer, J E; Doty, K; Dossett, L

    1998-05-01

    Numerous factors are involved in the spread of secondary damage in spinal cord after traumatic injury, including ischemia, edema, increased excitatory amino acids, and oxidative damage to the tissue from reactive oxygen species. Neutrophils and macrophages can produce reactive oxygen species when activated and thus may contribute to the lipid peroxidation that is known to occur after spinal cord injury. This study examined the rostral-caudal distribution of neutrophils and macrophages/microglia at 4, 6, 24, and 48 h after contusion injury to the T10 spinal cord of rat (10 g weight, 50 mm drop). Neutrophils were located predominantly in necrotic regions, with a time course that peaked at 24 h as measured with assays of myeloperoxidase activity (MPO). The sharpest peak of MPO activity was localized between 4 mm rostral and caudal to the injury. Macrophages/microglia were visualized with antibodies against ED1 and OX-42. Numerous cells with a phagocytic morphology were present by 24 h, with a higher number by 48 h. These cells were predominantly located within the gray matter and dorsal funiculus white matter. The number of cells gradually declined through 6 mm rostral and caudal to the lesion. OX-42 staining also revealed reactive microglia with blunt processes, particularly at levels distant to the lesion. The number of macrophages/microglia was significantly correlated with the amount of tissue damage at each level. Treatments to decrease the inflammatory response are likely to be beneficial to recovery of function after traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:9582256

  2. Role of Fiber Length on Phagocytosis & Inflammatory Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkevich, Leonid; Stark, Carahline; Champion, Julie

    2014-03-01

    Asbestos fibers have long been associated with lung cancer death. The inability of immune cells (e.g. macrophages) to effectively remove asbestos leads to chronic inflammation and disease. This study examines the role of fiber length on toxicity at the cellular level using model glass fibers. A major challenge is obtaining single diameter fibers but differing in length. Samples of 1 micron diameter fibers with different length distributions were prepared: short fibers (less than 15 microns) by aggressive crushing, and long fibers (longer than 15 microns) by successive sedimentation. Time-lapse video microscopy monitored the interaction of MH-S murine alveolar macrophages with the fibers: short fibers were easily internalized by the macrophages, but long fibers resisted internalization over many hours. Production of TNF- α (tumor necrosis factor alpha), a general inflammatory secreted cytokine, and Cox-2 (cyclo-oxygenase-2), an enzyme that produces radicals, each exhibited a dose-dependence that was greater for long than for short fibers. These results corroborate the importance of fiber length in both physical and biochemical cell response and support epidemiological observations of higher toxicity for longer fibers.

  3. Helicobacter hepaticus Induces an Inflammatory Response in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kleine, Moritz; Worbs, Tim; Schrem, Harald; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Förster, Reinhold; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Bektas, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter spp. on human liver cells, resulting in an inflammatory response with increased synthesis of inflammatory mediators and consecutive monocyte activation. PMID:24932686

  4. Burn size determines the inflammatory and hypermetabolic response

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Norbury, William B; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Kulp, Gabriela A; Herndon, David N

    2007-01-01

    Background Increased burn size leads to increased mortality of burned patients. Whether mortality is due to inflammation, hypermetabolism or other pathophysiologic contributing factors is not entirely determined. The purpose of the present study was to determine in a large prospective clinical trial whether different burn sizes are associated with differences in inflammation, body composition, protein synthesis, or organ function. Methods Pediatric burned patients were divided into four burn size groups: <40% total body surface area (TBSA) burn, 40–59% TBSA burn, 60–79% TBSA burn, and >80% TBSA burn. Demographic and clinical data, hypermetabolism, the inflammatory response, body composition, the muscle protein net balance, serum and urine hormones and proteins, and cardiac function and changes in liver size were determined. Results One hundred and eighty-nine pediatric patients of similar age and gender distribution were included in the study (<40% TBSA burn, n = 43; 40–59% TBSA burn, n = 79; 60–79% TBSA burn, n = 46; >80% TBSA burn, n = 21). Patients with larger burns had more operations, a greater incidence of infections and sepsis, and higher mortality rates compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). The percentage predicted resting energy expenditure was highest in the >80% TBSA group, followed by the 60–79% TBSA burn group (P < 0.05). Children with >80% burns lost the most body weight, lean body mass, muscle protein and bone mineral content (P < 0.05). The urine cortisol concentration was highest in the 80–99% and 60–79% TBSA burn groups, associated with significant myocardial depression and increased change in liver size (P < 0.05). The cytokine profile showed distinct differences in expression of IL-8, TNF, IL-6, IL-12p70, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (P < 0.05). Conclusion Morbidity and mortality in burned patients is burn size dependent, starts at a 60% TBSA burn and is due to an

  5. [Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: Is there a connection?].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Perelló, Antonia; Balboa, Agustín

    2009-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders and is that with the greatest socioeconomic impact worldwide. Diagnosis of IBS is based on clinical criteria that have been modified over time, the Rome II criteria being those that are currently followed. Some of the symptoms of IBS are similar to those in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which can hamper or delay diagnosis. The use of inflammatory markers in stools (such as calprotectin) may help to distinguish between these two entities. A possible connection between IBS and IBD could be based on five points: (i) both disorders have similar symptoms; (ii) symptoms often overlap in the same patients; (iii) IBS and IBD have a common familial aggregation; (iv) some predisposing factors, such as a history of acute gastroenteritis, play a role in both disorders, and (v) importantly, signs of microinflammation are found in the bowels of patients with IBS. With regard to this latter point, an increase in inflammatory cells has been found in the intestinal mucosa of patients with IBS and, more specifically, mastocytes have been found to be increased in the jejunum and colon while CD3 and CD25 intraepithelial lymphocytes have be observed to be increased in the colon. Moreover, activated mastocytes are increased near to nerve endings in patients with IBS and this finding has been correlated with the intensity of both intestinal symptoms (abdominal pain) and psychological symptoms (depression and fatigue). A good model of microinflammation is post-infectious IBS, since the timing of the onset of the infectious process is known. In patients with post-infectious IBS, an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes and enterochromaffin cells is initially found, which is reduced over time; consequently, although the symptoms of IBS persist, after 3 years no differences are detected in the number of inflammatory cells between IBS patients and controls. Among the various

  6. Aging, microglial cell priming, and the discordant central inflammatory response to signals from the peripheral immune system

    PubMed Central

    Dilger, Ryan N.; Johnson, Rodney W.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that activation of the peripheral immune system elicits a discordant central (i.e., in the brain) inflammatory response in aged but otherwise healthy subjects compared with younger cohorts. A fundamental difference in the reactive state of microglial cells in the aged brain has been suggested as the basis for this discordant inflammatory response. Thus, the aging process appears to serve as a “priming” stimulus for microglia, and upon secondary stimulation with a triggering stimulus (i.e., peripheral signals communicating infection), these primed microglia release excessive quantities of proinflammatory cytokines. Subsequently, this exaggerated cytokine release elicits exaggerated behavioral changes including anorexia, hypersomnia, lethargy, decreased social interaction, and deficits in cognitive and motor function (collectively known as the sickness behavior syndrome). Whereas this reorganization of host priorities is normally adaptive in young subjects, there is a propensity for this response to be maladaptive in aged subjects, resulting in greater severity and duration of the sickness behavior syndrome. Consequently, acute bouts of cognitive impairment in elderly subjects increase the likelihood of poor self-care behaviors (i.e., anorexia, weight loss, noncompliance), which ultimately leads to higher rates of hospitalization and mortality. PMID:18495785

  7. Schnitzler Syndrome: A Dramatic Response to Anakinra.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Ana Isabel; Micaelo, Manuela; Pierdomenico, Francesca; Freitas, João Pedro

    2016-06-01

    Schnitzler syndrome is a rare acquired systemic disease with a chronic evolution and difficult treatment. We report a 50-year-old woman with Schnitzler syndrome for 10 years, with major impact on her quality of life and refractory to conventional therapies. The patient was started on anakinra, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, with a rapid and sustained remission of the syndrome manifestations. PMID:27017618

  8. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 5: In Vitro Cytotoxicity Effects on Renal Tubular Cells and Inflammatory Profile

    PubMed Central

    Brocca, Alessandra; Virzì, Grazia Maria; Pasqualin, Chiara; Pastori, Silvia; Marcante, Stefano; de Cal, Massimo; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 5 (CRS Type 5) reflects concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunctions in the setting of a wide spectrum of systemic disorders. Our aim was to study in vitro effects of CRS Type 5 plasma on renal tubular cells (RTCs), in terms of cellular death and the characterization of inflammatory plasma profile in these patients. Material and Methods. We enrolled 11 CRS Type 5 patients from ICU and 16 healthy controls. Plasma from patients and controls was incubated with renal tubular cells (RTCs) and cell death was evaluated. Plasma cytokines were detected. Results. RTCs incubated with CRS Type 5 plasma showed significantly higher apoptosis and necrosis with respect to controls. Plasma cytokine profile of CRS Type 5 patients was significantly different from controls: we observed the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in these patients. Caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 were activated in cells treated with CRS Type 5 plasma compared to controls. Conclusions. Our results underline the cytotoxic effect of CRS Type 5 mediators on RTC viability, probably due to the activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis and to the deregulation of cytokine release. The consequence may be the damage of distant organs which lead to the worsening of condition of patients. PMID:26266085

  9. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in a patient with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Shahani, Lokesh; Shah, Minal; Tavakoli-Tabasi, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a severe opportunistic infection of the central nervous system. A 52-year-old man with HIV infection, recently started on antiretroviral therapy, presented with symptoms of mental cloudiness, blurry vision and ataxia. MRI of the brain showed nodular perivascular space enhancement with surrounding vasogenic oedema and midline shift. A lumbar puncture revealed non-inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid and was positive for JC virus. As the patient developed worsening symptoms in the setting of initiation of antiretroviral therapy with immune recovery, a diagnosis of JC virus-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) was made. With recent literature on the use of CCR5 antagonist maraviroc in PML, our patient was started on maraviroc and noted to have improvement in PML IRIS. This is the first case of an HIV-positive patient successfully treated for PML IRIS with maraviroc, as verified by our literature review; also, our case has clinical implications in improving outcome in PML IRIS. PMID:26063110

  10. Is Xanthine oxidase activity in polycystic ovary syndrome associated with inflammatory and cardiovascular risk factors?

    PubMed

    Isık, Hatice; Aynıoglu, Oner; Tımur, Hakan; Sahbaz, Ahmet; Harma, Muge; Can, Murat; Guven, Berrak; Alptekin, Husnu; Kokturk, Furuzan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to examine women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) to determine the relationship between xanthine oxidase (XO) and oxidative stress, inflammatory status, and various clinical and biochemical parameters. In this cross-sectional study a total of 83 women including 45 PCOS patients and 38 healthy women were enrolled. We collected blood samples for XO and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, hormone levels, cholesterol values, and inflammatory markers. Body mass index (BMI) , waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and blood pressure were assessed. Blood samples were taken for hormonal levels, cholesterol levels, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell and neutrophil counts, XO and SOD activities. The basal hormone levels, triglyceride (TG) levels, TG/HDL-C (high density lipoprotein-cholesterol) ratios FPG, FPI and HOMA-IR levels were higher in PCOS patients compared to controls (p<0.05). Platelet and plateletcrit (PCT) values, CRP, and XO activity were significantly increased, however SOD activity was decreased in PCOS patients (p<0.001). XO activity was positively correlated with LH/FSH and TG/HDL ratios, CRP, PCT, FPG, FPI, and HOMA-IR, and negatively correlated with QUICKI levels. In conclusion, XO is a useful marker to assess oxidative stress in PCOS patients. Positive correlations between XO and inflammatory markers and cardiovascular disease risk factors suggest that XO plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PCOS and its metabolic complications. PMID:27295433

  11. Nicolau syndrome after intramuscular injection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID).

    PubMed

    Dadaci, Mehmet; Altuntas, Zeynep; Ince, Bilsev; Bilgen, Fatma; Tufekci, Osman; Poyraz, Necdet

    2015-01-01

    Nicolau syndrome is a rare complication of intramuscular injection that leads to local ischemic necrosis of the skin and adipose tissue. In this paper, we discuss etiologies, risk factors, and treatment options for gluteal Nicolau syndrome referring to patients treated in our hospital. Our study includes 17 women who visited our clinic with symptoms of gluteal necrosis secondary to intramuscular injection. The following variables were taken into account: injection site, drug administered, frequency of injections, the person who administered the injections, needle size, and needle tip color. Magnetic resonance images obtained in the aftermath of intramuscular injection application were carefully analyzed for presence of necrosis, cyst formation and the thickness of the gluteal fat tissue layer. Drugs that had been received in intramuscular injection were exclusively non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Mean patient BMI was 41.8 (all patients were considered as obese), and mean gluteal fat thickness was 54 mm. Standard length of needles (3.8 cm) had been used in procedures. The wounds were treated with primary closure in 11 patients and with local flap therapy in 6 patients. The observed necrosis was a consequence of misplaced gluteal injection, where drugs were injected into the adipose tissue instead of the muscle due to the extreme thickness of the fat layer, on one hand, and the inappropriate length of standard needles, on the other hand. Intramuscular injection should be avoided in obese patients whenever possible: if it is necessary, proper injection technique should be used. PMID:25725145

  12. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika PMID:27212842

  13. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika. PMID:27212842

  14. Emotional Responsivity in Young Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Debbie J.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Most, David E.; Philofsky, Amy; Rogers, Sally J.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that young children with Williams syndrome show higher rates of emotional responsivity relative to other children with developmental disabilities was explored. Performance of 23 young children with Williams syndrome and 30 MA-matched children with developmental disabilities of nonspecific etiologies was compared on an adaptation of…

  15. Teaching Spontaneous Responses to a Young Child with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Kathleen; Jones, Emily

    2008-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome experience significant communication impairments, particularly in expressive language. Although receiving little attention in the literature, deficiencies in expressive language are likely to affect spontaneous communicative responses in children with Down syndrome. In this study, using a multiple baseline design across…

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid cytokine profiles predict risk of early mortality and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Joseph N; Meintjes, Graeme; Bicanic, Tihana; Buffa, Viviana; Hogan, Louise; Mo, Stephanie; Tomlinson, Gillian; Kropf, Pascale; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Harrison, Thomas S

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the host immune response during cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is of critical importance for the development of immunomodulatory therapies. We profiled the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immune-response in ninety patients with HIV-associated CM, and examined associations between immune phenotype and clinical outcome. CSF cytokine, chemokine, and macrophage activation marker concentrations were assayed at disease presentation, and associations between these parameters and microbiological and clinical outcomes were examined using principal component analysis (PCA). PCA demonstrated a co-correlated CSF cytokine and chemokine response consisting primarily of Th1, Th2, and Th17-type cytokines. The presence of this CSF cytokine response was associated with evidence of increased macrophage activation, more rapid clearance of Cryptococci from CSF, and survival at 2 weeks. The key components of this protective immune-response were interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17 levels also made a modest positive contribution to the PC1 score. A second component of co-correlated chemokines was identified by PCA, consisting primarily of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α). High CSF chemokine concentrations were associated with low peripheral CD4 cell counts and CSF lymphocyte counts and were predictive of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). In conclusion CSF cytokine and chemokine profiles predict risk of early mortality and IRIS in HIV-associated CM. We speculate that the presence of even minimal Cryptococcus-specific Th1-type CD4+ T-cell responses lead to increased recruitment of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes into the central nervous system (CNS), more effective activation of CNS macrophages and microglial cells, and faster organism clearance; while high CNS chemokine levels may predispose to over recruitment or inappropriate recruitment of immune cells to the CNS and IRIS

  17. Activation of P2X7 Receptor by ATP Plays an Important Role in Regulating Inflammatory Responses during Acute Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Benjamin H.; Hwang, David M.; Palaniyar, Nades; Grinstein, Sergio; Philpott, Dana J.; Hu, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Acute viral infection causes damages to the host due to uncontrolled viral replication but even replication deficient viral vectors can induce systemic inflammatory responses. Indeed, overactive host innate immune responses to viral vectors have led to devastating consequences. Macrophages are important innate immune cells that recognize viruses and induce inflammatory responses at the early stage of infection. However, tissue resident macrophages are not easily activated by the mere presence of virus suggesting that their activation requires additional signals from other cells in the tissue in order to trigger inflammatory responses. Previously, we have shown that the cross-talk between epithelial cells and macrophages generates synergistic inflammatory responses during adenoviral vector infection. Here, we investigated whether ATP is involved in the activation of macrophages to induce inflammatory responses during an acute adenoviral infection. Using a macrophage-epithelial cell co-culture system we demonstrated that ATP signaling through P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is required for induction of inflammatory mediators. We also showed that ATP-P2X7R signaling regulates inflammasome activation as inhibition or deficiency of P2X7R as well as caspase-1 significantly reduced IL-1β secretion. Furthermore, we found that intranasal administration of replication deficient adenoviral vectors in mice caused a high mortality in wild-type mice with symptoms of acute respiratory distress syndrome but the mice deficient in P2X7R or caspase-1 showed increased survival. In addition, wild-type mice treated with apyrase or inhibitors of P2X7R or caspase-1 showed higher rates of survival. The improved survival in the P2X7R deficient mice correlated with diminished levels of IL-1β and IL-6 and reduced neutrophil infiltration in the early phase of infection. These results indicate that ATP, released during viral infection, is an important inflammatory regulator that activates the

  18. Prokineticin 1 Induces Inflammatory Response in Human Myometrium

    PubMed Central

    Gorowiec, Marta R.; Catalano, Rob D.; Norman, Jane E.; Denison, Fiona C.; Jabbour, Henry N.

    2011-01-01

    The infiltration of human myometrium and cervix with leukocytes and the formation of a pro-inflammatory environment within the uterus have been associated with the initiation of both term and preterm parturition. The mechanism regulating the onset of this pro-inflammatory cascade is not fully elucidated. We demonstrate that prokineticin 1 (PROK1) is up-regulated in human myometrium and placenta during labor. The expression of PROK1 receptor remains unchanged during labor and is abundantly expressed in the myometrium. Gene array analysis identified 65 genes up-regulated by PROK1 in human myometrium, mainly cytokines and chemokines, including IL-1β, chemokine C-C motif ligand 3, and colony-stimulating factor 3. In addition, we demonstrate that PROK1 increases the expression of chemokine C-C motif ligand 20, IL-6, IL-8, prostaglandin synthase 2, and prostaglandin E2 and F2α secretion. The treatment of myometrial explants with 100 ng/mL of lipopolysaccharide up-regulates the expression of PROK1, PROK1 receptor, and inflammatory mediators. The infection of myometrial explants with lentiviral microRNA targeting PROK1, preceding treatment with lipopolysaccharide, reduces the expression of inflammatory genes. We propose that PROK1 is a novel inflammatory mediator that can contribute to the onset of human parturition at term and partially mediate premature onset of inflammatory pathways during bacterial infection. PMID:21983634

  19. Early inflammatory response in epithelial ovarian tumor cyst fluids.

    PubMed

    Kristjánsdóttir, Björg; Partheen, Karolina; Fung, Eric T; Yip, Christine; Levan, Kristina; Sundfeldt, Karin

    2014-10-01

    Mortality rates for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) are high, mainly due to late-stage diagnosis. The identification of biomarkers for this cancer could contribute to earlier diagnosis and increased survival rates. Given that chronic inflammation plays a central role in cancer initiation and progression, we selected and tested 15 cancer-related cytokines and growth factors in 38 ovarian cyst fluid samples. We used ovarian cyst fluid since it is found in proximity to the pathology and mined it for inflammatory biomarkers suitable for early detection of EOC. Immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sample fractionation were obtained by using tandem antibody libraries bead and mass spectrometry. Two proteins, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and interleucin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8), were significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the malignant (n = 16) versus benign (n = 22) tumor cysts. Validation of MCP-1, IL-8, and growth-regulated protein-α (GROα/CXCL1) was performed with ELISA in benign, borderline, and malignant cyst fluids (n = 256) and corresponding serum (n = 256). CA125 was measured in serum from all patients and used in the algorithms performed. MCP-1, IL-8, and GROα are proinflammatory cytokines and promoters of tumor growth. From 5- to 100-fold higher concentrations of MCP-1, IL-8 and GROα were detected in the cyst fluids compared to the serum. Significant (P < 0.001) cytokine response was already established in borderline cyst fluids and stage I EOC. In serum a significant (P < 0.01) increase of IL-8 and GROα was found, but not until stage I and stage III EOC, respectively. These findings confirm that early events in tumorigenesis can be analyzed and detected in the tumor environment and we conclude that ovarian cyst fluid is a promising source in the search for new biomarkers for early ovarian tumors. PMID:24947406

  20. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  1. Immunological profiling of tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and non-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome death in HIV-infected adults with pulmonary tuberculosis starting antiretroviral therapy: a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ravimohan, Shruthi; Tamuhla, Neo; Steenhoff, Andrew P.; Letlhogile, Rona; Nfanyana, Kebatshabile; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; MacGregor, Rob Roy; Gross, Robert; Weissman, Drew; Bisson, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patients co-infected with advanced HIV and tuberculosis are at risk of tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) and death soon after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Tuberculosis-associated IRIS has been associated with quicker recovery of cellular immune responses after ART initiation and early mortality with slower recovery of these responses. We aimed to assess whether patients who have these outcomes have distinct immunological profiles before and after ART initiation. Methods We undertook this prospective cohort study at 22 public clinics and the main public hospital in Gaborone, Botswana, in ART-naive adults (aged ≥21 years) with advanced HIV (CD4 cell counts ≤125 cells per μL) and pulmonary tuberculosis. We obtained data for clinical variables and for levels of 29 plasma biomarkers, quantified by Luminex assay. We classified patients as having tuberculosis-associated IRIS, early mortality, or survival without a diagnosis of tuberculosis-associated IRIS (controls), on the basis of outcomes recorded in the 6 months after ART initiation. We used rank-sum or χ² tests, and logistic regression with odds ratios (OR) and 95% CIs, to assess the association between variables measured before and 4 weeks after ART initiation with death and tuberculosis-associated IRIS, compared with controls. Findings Between Nov 12, 2009, and July 3, 2013, we enrolled 201 participants. 31 (15%) patients left the study before ART initiation, leaving 170 (85%) patients for analysis. Patients with tuberculosis-associated IRIS had reduced pre-ART concentrations of several pro-inflammatory biomarkers, including interleukin (IL)-6 (adjusted OR per 1 log10 increase 0·40 [95% CI 0·18–0·89]). However, patients with early death had increased pre-ART concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (adjusted OR 9·0 [95% CI 1·0–80·0]) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α (7·8 [1

  2. Alien Limb Syndrome Responsive to Amantadine in a Patient with Corticobasal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gondim, Francisco de Assis Aquino; Tavares Júnior, José Wagner Leonel; Morais, Arlindo A.; Sales, Paulo Marcelo Gondim; Wagner, Horta Goes

    2015-01-01

    Background Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder associated with parkinsonism and alien limb syndrome. Dressing and ideomotor apraxia were reportedly responsive to amantadine. Case Report A 79-year-old female was referred for evaluation of right hemiparesis. Neurological examination showed dementia, normal ocular movements, mild facial hypomimia, and bradykinesia with right hemiparesis. Nine years later, she developed alien limb syndrome and was diagnosed with CBS. After failure to respond to several medications, alien limb syndrome markedly improved with amantadine. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a consistent response of severe, forced dystonic alien limb syndrome to amantadine in a patient with CBS. PMID:26217545

  3. The "bioregulatory effect of exercise" on the innate/inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    The effects of exercise on the innate response are primarily mediated by the SNS (sympathetic nervous system) and/or the HPA (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal) axis and by stress proteins such as Hsp72. Regular exercise can induce immuno-neuroendocrine stabilization in persons with deregulated inflammatory and stress feedback by reducing the presence of stress hormones and inflammatory cytokines. Anti-inflammatory and "anti-stress" responses seem also to be induced (paradoxically, opposite to the effects in healthy persons) after sessions of exercise, being a promising strategy for treating certain inflammatory pathologies. Nevertheless, the biomedical side effects of exercise are also needed to be considered. This article defines the "Bioregulatory Effect of Exercise" to be one that reduces or prevents any excessive effect of inflammatory mediators and stimulates (or at least does not impair) the innate defences (i.e. chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and microbicidal activities) against pathogens. It also generates immunophysiological adaptations through an optimal balance between the pro- and the anti-inflammatory responses. These effects are mediated via immuno-neuroendocrine interactions. This review analyses concepts and conclusions related to how exercise affects the innate and/or inflammatory responses and discusses some paradoxical interpretations relevant for the practical use of exercise in treating infectious and inflammatory diseases. A potential role of exercise as hormesis strategy and the concept of exercise immunization are also discussed. PMID:26979741

  4. A novel pathway by which the environmental toxin 4-Nonylphenol may promote an inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Albert; Jung, Byeong Ho; Cadet, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background 4-Nonylphenol is a ubiquitous environmental toxin that is formed as a byproduct in the manufacturing and/or sewage treatment of regular household items. Previous work in our lab has implicated 4-NP in the progression of autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease in which macrophages mistakenly attack the intestinal linings, causing chronic inflammation. Several key pro-and anti-inflammatory molecules have been shown to be involved in the manifestation of this disease, including IL-23A, COX-2, IL-8, TLR-4, and IL-10. Material/Methods 4-NP’s effects on these known mediators of IBD were effectively analyzed using a novel model for IBD, by which 4-NP may promote an inflammatory response. Data were collected using DNA Microarray, RT-PCR, and ELISA, after 48 hour treatment of U937 histiocytic lymphocyte cells and COLO320DM human intestinal epithelial cells with 1 nM and 5 nM concentrations of 4-NP. Results Significant dysregulation of the expression of both pro- and anti-inflammatory genes was observed in U937 cells that would promote and prolong inflammation. However, TLR-4, IL-8, and COX-2 gene expressions showed unprecedented effects in COLO320DM cells suggesting that these genes mediate apoptotic processes within the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that 4-NP administration engenders immune responses linked to apoptotic processes via dysregulation of macrophage signaling. In sum, 4-NP appears to increases the risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease by promoting or prolonging adverse progression of inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24717721

  5. TLR9 and IRF3 Cooperate to Induce a Systemic Inflammatory Response in Mice Injected With Liposome:DNA

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Wendy E; Booth, Carmen J; Goldstein, Daniel R

    2010-01-01

    Liposome:DNA is a promising gene therapy vector. However, this vector can elicit a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Prior reports indicate that liposome:DNA vectors activate Toll-like receptor (TLR)9. We hypothesized that liposome:DNA vectors also activate the cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway, which signals via interferon (IFN) regulatory factor (IRF)3. To test this, we treated dendritic cells (DCs) with liposome:DNA in vitro and found that IRF3 was phosphorylated independent of TLR9. To test the contribution of this pathway in vivo, we injected a liposome:DNA vector into wild-type (WT), TLR9-knockout (KO), IRF3-KO, and TLR9-IRF3-double-KO (DKO) mice. WT mice exhibited a systemic inflammatory response, evidenced by elevations in serum cytokines, serum enzyme changes indicating organ damage, hypothermia, and mortality. The cytokine response was reduced in TLR9-KO, IRF3-KO, and TLR9-IRF3-DKO mice and all three groups survived. We found that IFN-γ-KO mice that receive liposome:DNA had a reduced cytokine response and 100% survival. CD11c+ and NK1.1+ cells produced IFN-γ and depleting CD11c+ cells reduced the cytokine response in mice injected with liposome:DNA. These findings may facilitate the development of immunologically inert gene therapy vectors and may provide general insight into the mechanisms of SIRS. PMID:20145605

  6. CIRCULATING INFLAMMATORY MARKERS IN POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F.; Luque-Ramírez, Manuel; González, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review and meta-analyse the studies evaluating the status of serum inflammatory markers in women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of articles published in English before January 2010 and identified using the Entrez-PubMed engine. Setting Academic hospital Interventions Measurement of serum concentrations of inflammatory markers by high-sensitivity techniques. Main Outcome Measures Meta-analyses of the mean difference in serum C-reactive protein (CRP), interlekin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentrations among patients with PCOS and appropriate controls, applying random-effects models to limit interstudy variability, and using appropriate estimates of evidence dissemination bias. Results Meta-analysis of the 31 articles meeting inclusion criteria showed that circulating CRP was 96% higher in women with PCOS compared to controls (95% confidence interval 71% – 122%, z = 7.32, p < 0.0001) without evidence dissemination bias (Egger’s regression intercept 0.45, 95% confidence interval −2.30 – 3.21, P = 0.739). These findings persisted after excluding five studies with mismatches in body mass and/or frequency of obesity between women with PCOS and controls. Meta-analyses involving 10 studies of IL-6, and 9 studies of TNF-α revealed no statistically significant differences between PCOS and controls. Conclusion Women with PCOS exhibit elevation in circulating CRP that is independent of obesity. This finding corroborates existing molecular evidence of the chronic low-grade inflammation that may underpin the pathogenesis of this disorder. PMID:21168133

  7. Emotional responsivity in young children with Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Debbie J; Hepburn, Susan L; Most, David E; Philofsky, Amy; Rogers, Sally J

    2007-05-01

    The hypothesis that young children with Williams syndrome show higher rates of emotional responsivity relative to other children with developmental disabilities was explored. Performance of 23 young children with Williams syndrome and 30 MA-matched children with developmental disabilities of nonspecific etiologies was compared on an adaptation of Repacholi and Gopnik's (1997) "Yummy-Yucky" task. Results show that children with Williams syndrome were more likely to mimic and/or imitate facial affect and vocalizations than children in the mixed comparison group. Yet, this increased emotional responsivity did not substantially improve decision-making based on the affective display; children with Williams syndrome were more likely to attempt to convince the experimenter that the disliked food was likable. Implications of a social profile that includes enhanced emotional responsivity paired with impaired perspective taking are discussed. PMID:17542656

  8. Silencing of miR155 promotes the production of inflammatory mediators in Guillain-Barré syndrome in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Zhong; Feng, Xun-Gang; Shi, Qi-Guang; Hao, Yan-Lei; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Ai-Mei; Kong, Qing-Xia

    2013-04-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR155) has been demonstrated as a central regulator of immune responses induced by inflammatory mediators. Previous studies suggest that miR155 may play adverse effects in various diseases. We hereby explored the roles of miR155 in the pathogenesis of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were separated from GBS patients and healthy controls. Expression of miR155 in PBMCs was detected by quantitative PCR. An inhibitor of miR155 was transfected into the cultured PBMCs and the GBS-related cytokines were detected. Significantly, our study demonstrated that miR155 was downregulated in PBMCs from GBS patients and silencing of miR155 profoundly promoted the production of Th1-type cytokines in vitro. Our data effectively demonstrate a protective role of miR155 in GBS, which suggests that miR155 may be a promising target for the therapy of the disease. PMID:23065188

  9. IMMUNE RECONSTITUTION INFLAMMATORY SYNDROME (IRIS)-ASSOCIATED BURKITT LYMPHOMA FOLLOWING COMBINATION ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Vishnu, Prakash; Dorer, Russell P.; Aboulafia, David M.

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is defined as a paradoxical worsening or unmasking of infections and autoimmune diseases, following initiation of combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). More recently, the case definition of IRIS has been broadened to include certain malignancies including Kaposi’s sarcoma, and less frequently Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Here in we describe 3 patients infected with HIV who began cART and within a median of 15 weeks each achieved non-detectable HIV viral loads, and yet within 6 months presented for medical attention with fevers, night sweats, weight loss and bulky lymphadenopathy. Laboratory studies included elevated lactate dehydrogenase and β-2 microglobulin levels and well preserved CD4+ lymphocyte counts in excess of 350 cells/µL. In each patient lymph node biopsies were diagnostic of Burkitt lymphoma (BL). Patients were managed with multi-agent chemotherapy in conjunction with cART. We also survey the medical literature of other cases of IRIS-associated BL. Although the pathogenesis of IRIS-associated BL is not well elucidated, chronic antigenic stimulation coupled with immune deterioration, followed by subsequent restoration of the immune response and aberrant cytokine expression may be a pathway to lymphomagenesis. IRIS-associated BL should be suspected in patients with normal or near normal CD4+ lymphocyte counts who develop progressive lymphadenopathy post-initiation of cART. PMID:25458079

  10. Leishmaniasis as a Manifestation of Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS) in HIV-Infected Patients: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Badaró, Roberto; Gonçalves, Larissa O.; Gois, Luana L.; Maia, Zuinara Pereira Gusmão; Benson, Constance; Grassi, Maria Fernanda Rios

    2016-01-01

    Introduction After the onset of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), some HIV-infected patients present a severe inflammation in response to a latent or a previously treated opportunistic pathogen termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Few reports of tegumentary and visceral leishmaniasis have been described in association with IRIS. Methods A systematic literature review of IRIS in association with leishmaniasis identified 34 reported cases. Results and Discussion The majority of these occurred in males 4 months following the onset of HAART. The mean CD4 count before HAART was 94 ± 77 cells/mm3, increasing to 5 times the initial value between the onset of HAART and IRIS presentation. Visceral leishmaniasis and post–kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis were the most commonly reported clinical manifestations, followed by tegumentary leishmaniasis and uveitis. Conclusions Commonly found characteristics included cutaneous involvement, regardless of Leishmania species; appearance of lesions unrelated to time of probable Leishmania infection; rapid recovery of CD4 count following HAART; and rapid progression. PMID:25331225

  11. The immune pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuhuang; Zhou, Huaying; He, Yan; Chen, Zi; He, Bo; He, Mei

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigated the immunological pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A total of 238 patients with AIDS who received initial HAART were included in this prospective cohort study. Blood samples were collected immediately, at baseline, at week 12, and at week 24 after initial HAART and at the onset of IRIS. Lymphocyte subsets, Th1 and Th2 cytokines, and interleukin (IL)-7 levels were measured by flow cytometry or ELISA. Among the 238 patients with AIDS who received HAART, 47 patients developed IRIS. The percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) naive, memory, and activated cells exhibited no significant differences between AIDS patients with and without IRIS 24 weeks after initial HAART. The percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells was lower in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients before HAART, 12 weeks after HAART, 24 weeks after HAART, and at the onset of IRIS. IL-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ levels were significantly higher at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. In contrast, IL-4 and IL-10 levels were significantly lower at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. Plasma IL-7 decreased gradually with the progression of HAART. The level of IL-7 was higher in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients at all follow-up time points. An imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokines, a consistently low CD(+)CD25(+)Fox3(+) percentage, and a high IL-7 level may be crucial in the pathogenesis of IRIS in AIDS patients who had received HAART. PMID:25131160

  12. Effect of Kramecyne on the Inflammatory Response in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Miranda, E.; Lemus-Bautista, J.; Pérez, S.; Pérez-Ramos, J.

    2013-01-01

    Kramecyne is a new peroxide, it was isolated from Krameria cytisoides, methanol extract, and this plant was mostly found in North and South America. This compound showed potent anti-inflammatory activity; however, the mechanisms by which this compound exerts its anti-inflammatory effect are not well understood. In this study, we examined the effects of kramecyne on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that kramecyne inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin- (IL-) 6. During the inflammatory process, levels of cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, kramecyne suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23573152

  13. Foxo1-mediated inflammatory response after cerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; He, Qi; Zhai, Xuan; You, Yan; Li, Lingyu; Hou, Yanghao; He, Faming; Zhao, Yong; Zhao, Jing

    2016-08-26

    The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of transcription factors plays a crucial role in cell apoptosis, immune regulation, and tissue development. Foxo1, as the foremost member of the Foxo family, regulates a wide range of molecular signals in many tissues, including tumor, liver, and brain. This study investigated Foxo1 expression at different time points and in different brain areas, and the role of Foxo1 in vivo in regulating inflammatory injury in a rat model of autologous blood-injected cerebral hemorrhage injury. We found that Foxo1 expression peaked at 12h post-intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and in the ipsilateral corpus striatum. Foxo1 knockdown by Foxo1 siRNA decreased ICH injury, improved neurological function, and decreased the expression of inflammatory factors downstream of the Foxo1 pathway, including TLR4, NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-18. Foxo1 knockdown also decreased the expression and activity of myeloperoxidase, IL-1β, and IL-18. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that Foxo1 is a key regulator of inflammatory injury in rats after ICH. By identifying the molecular mechanisms of Foxo1/TLR4/NF-κB signaling, we provide a novel rationale for therapeutic approaches to managing inflammatory injury after ICH. PMID:27288017

  14. Exposure of humans to a volatile organic mixture. 3. Inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Koren, H.S.; Graham, D.E.; Devlin, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    A set of symptoms has been described during the past two decades that has been called the sick building syndrome. These symptoms include eye, nose, and throat irritation; headache; mental fatigue; and respiratory distress. It is likely that the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in synthetic materials used in homes and office buildings contribute to these symptoms. However, there have been very few studies in which humans have been exposed to known amounts of VOCs under carefully controlled conditions. In the study, 14 subjects were exposed to a mixture of VOCs (25 mg/sq meter total hydrocarbon) that is representative of what is found in new homes and office buildings. Because irritations of the nose and throat are symptoms often associated with the upper respiratory tract and may result from an inflammatory response in the upper airways, the authors used nasal lavage to monitor neutrophil (PMN) influx into the nasal passages following exposure to VOCs. There were statistically significant increases in PMNs, both immediately after a 4-h exposure to VOCs and 18 h later.

  15. EXPOSURE OF HUMANS TO VOLATILE ORGANIC MIXTURE. III. INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A set of symptoms has been described during the past two decades which has been called the "sick building syndrome." hese symptoms include eye, nose, and throat irritation; headache; mental fatigue; and respiratory distress. t is likely that volatile organic compounds (VOC) prese...

  16. Docosahexaenoic Acid, Inflammation, and Bacterial Dysbiosis in Relation to Periodontal Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tabbaa, Maria; Golubic, Mladen; Roizen, Michael F.; Bernstein, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, has been used to treat a range of different conditions, including periodontal disease (PD) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). That DHA helps with these oral and gastrointestinal diseases in which inflammation and bacterial dysbiosis play key roles, raises the question of whether DHA may assist in the prevention or treatment of other inflammatory conditions, such as the metabolic syndrome, which have also been linked with inflammation and alterations in normal host microbial populations. Here we review established and investigated associations between DHA, PD, and IBD. We conclude that by beneficially altering cytokine production and macrophage recruitment, the composition of intestinal microbiota and intestinal integrity, lipopolysaccharide- and adipose-induced inflammation, and insulin signaling, DHA may be a key tool in the prevention of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23966110

  17. The anti-inflammatory effects of methylsulfonylmethane on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Hee; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lim, Hwan; Baek, Doo-Yeon; Shin, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyung

    2009-04-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), also known as dimethyl sulfone and methyl sulfone, is an organic sulfur-containing compound that occurs naturally in a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, and animals, including humans. In the present study, we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of MSM in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages, RAW264.7 cells. MSM significantly inhibited the release of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E(2) by alleviating the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, the levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were decreased by MSM treatment in cell culture supernatants. Further study indicated that the translocation of the p65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB to the nucleus was inhibited by MSM treatment in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, in which it helped block degradation of inhibitor of NF-kappaB. In addition, in vivo studies demonstrated that topical administration of MSM at 500-1250 microg/ear resulted in similar inhibitory activities in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-induced mouse ear edema. Collectively, theses results indicate that MSM inhibits LPS-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators in murine macrophages through downregulation of NF-kappaB signaling. PMID:19336900

  18. Correlation Between Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis and Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Hung, Peir-Haur; Chung, Chi-Jung; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Chao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) has been investigated in Western countries and identified to be associated with chronic pelvic pain and inflammation. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a complex syndrome that is significantly more prevalent in women than in men. Chronic pelvic pain is a main symptom of BPS/IC, and chronic inflammation is a major etiology of BPS/IC. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between BPS/IC and PID using a population-based dataset. We constructed a case–control study from the Taiwan National Health Insurance program. The case cohort comprised 449 patients with BPS/IC, and 1796 randomly selected subjects (about 1:4 matching) were used as controls. A Multivariate logistic regression model was constructed to estimate the association between BPS/IC and PID. Of the 2245 sampled subjects, a significant difference was observed in the prevalence of PID between BPS/IC cases and controls (41.7% vs 15.4%, P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) for PID among cases was 3.69 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.89–4.71). Furthermore, the ORs for PID among BPS/IC cases were 4.52 (95% CI: 2.55–8.01), 4.31 (95% CI: 2.91–6.38), 3.00 (95% CI: 1.82–4.94), and 5.35 (95% CI: 1.88–15.20) in the <35, 35–49, 50–64, and >65 years age groups, respectively, after adjusting for geographic region, irritable bowel syndrome, and hypertension. Joint effect was also noted, specifically when patients had both PID and irritable bowel disease with OR of 10.5 (95% CI: 4.88–22.50). This study demonstrated a correlation between PID and BPS/IC. Clinicians treating women with PID should be alert to BPS/IC-related symptoms in the population. PMID:26579800

  19. Individuals with increased inflammatory response to ozone demonstrate muted signaling of immune cell trafficking pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background Exposure to ozone activates innate immune function and causes neutrophilic (PMN) airway inflammation that in some individuals is robustly elevated. The interplay between immunoinflammatory function and genomic signaling in those with heightened inflammatory responsive...

  20. Endothelial Inflammatory Transcriptional Responses to an Altered Plasma Exposome Following Inhalation of Diesel Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND:Air pollution, especially emissions derived from traffic sources, is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, it remains unclear how inhaled factors drive extrapulmonary pathology.OBJECTIVES:Previously, we found that canonical inflammatory response tra...

  1. ANTIOXIDANT SUPPLEMENTATION AND NASAL INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES AMONG YOUNG ASTHMATICS EXPOSED TO HIGH LEVELS OF OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Recent studies examining the inflammatory response in atopic asthma to ozone suggest a release of soluble mediators of inflammation factors that might be related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Antioxidant could prove useful in subjects exposed to additional oxidati...

  2. Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: case definitions for use in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Meintjes, Graeme; Lawn, Stephen D; Scano, Fabio; Maartens, Gary; French, Martyn A; Worodria, William; Elliott, Julian H; Murdoch, David; Wilkinson, Robert J; Seyler, Catherine; John, Laurence; van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Reiss, Peter; Lynen, Lut; Janoff, Edward N; Gilks, Charles; Colebunders, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) has emerged as an important early complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings, especially in patients with tuberculosis. However, there are no consensus case definitions for IRIS or tuberculosis-associated IRIS. Moreover, previously proposed case definitions are not readily applicable in settings where laboratory resources are limited. As a result, existing studies on tuberculosis-associated IRIS have used a variety of non-standardised general case definitions. To rectify this problem, around 100 researchers, including microbiologists, immunologists, clinicians, epidemiologists, clinical trialists, and public-health specialists from 16 countries met in Kampala, Uganda, in November, 2006. At this meeting, consensus case definitions for paradoxical tuberculosis-associated IRIS, ART-associated tuberculosis, and unmasking tuberculosis-associated IRIS were derived, which can be used in high-income and resource-limited settings. It is envisaged that these definitions could be used by clinicians and researchers in a variety of settings to promote standardisation and comparability of data. PMID:18652998

  3. Late onset of cryptococcal cervical lymphadenitis following immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Sethupathi, Meenakshi; Yoganathan, Kathir

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman was diagnosed HIV positive with disseminated cryptococcal infection in May 2006. Her initial CD4 was 7 cells/µL and she had a right supraclavicular nodal mass, which was biopsied and shown to be consistent with cryptococcal lymphadenitis. She was treated for disseminated cryptococcal infection and was started on antiretroviral medications subsequently. Two years later, she developed a left supraclavicular mass. Her CD4 count was 320 cells/µL and HIV RNA level was undetectable. Investigations and biopsy results were consistent with a late presentation of cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). She was treated with oral corticosteroids and her symptoms resolved completely. IRIS is a recognised complication of HIV treatment and occurs in a significant percentage of patients within the first 3 months of starting antiretroviral therapy. This case report illustrates the importance of recognising late presentations of IRIS. It is vital to differentiate true cryptococcal lymphadenitis from IRIS-induced cryptococcal lymphadenitis. PMID:25564633

  4. Predictors of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with Kaposi's sarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cattelan, Anna Maria; Mattiolo, Adriana; Grassi, Angela; Piano, Maria Assunta; Sasset, Lolita; Trevenzoli, Marco; Zanovello, Paola; Calabrò, Maria Luisa

    2016-01-01

    We present here a case of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS-IRIS) developed in an AIDS patient two months after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Baseline characteristics of this IRIS-KS case, within a cohort of 12 naïve AIDS-KS patients, were analyzed. No statistically significant differences in CD4 cell counts, plasma HIV RNA load, KS clinical staging, human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) antibody titers and HHV8 load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and saliva were evidenced. HHV8 load in plasma was found to be significantly higher in the KS-IRIS patient (> 6 log10 genome equivalents/ml, p = 0.01, t-test) compared to the 11 patients with KS regression. This case highlights that measurement of HHV8 load in plasma may be useful to identify patients at risk for KS-IRIS, and that this parameter should be included in the design of larger studies to define KS-IRIS risk predictors. PMID:26848307

  5. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Serum Lipopolysaccharide Levels Predict Multiple Organ Failure and Death in Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Michelena, Javier; Altamirano, José; Abraldes, Juan G.; Affò, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Dominguez, Marlene; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Javier; Arroyo, Vicente; Ginès, Pere; Louvet, Alexandre; Mathurin, Philippe; Mehal, Wajahat Z.; Caballería, Juan; Bataller, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) frequently progresses to multiple organ failure (MOF) and death. However, the driving factors are largely unknown. At admission, patients with AH often show criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) even in the absence of an infection. We hypothesize that the presence of SIRS may predispose to MOF and death. To test this hypothesis, we studied a cohort including 162 patients with biopsy-proven AH. The presence of SIRS and infections was assessed in all patients, and multivariate analyses identified variables independently associated with MOF and 90-day mortality. At admission, 32 (19.8%) patients were diagnosed with a bacterial infection, while 75 (46.3%) fulfilled SIRS criteria; 58 patients (35.8%) developed MOF during hospitalization. Short-term mortality was significantly higher among patients who developed MOF (62.1% versus 3.8%, P <0.001). The presence of SIRS was a major predictor of MOF (odds ratio = 2.69, P=0.025) and strongly correlated with mortality. Importantly, the course of patients with SIRS with and without infection was similar in terms of MOF development and short-term mortality. Finally, we sought to identify serum markers that differentiate SIRS with and without infection. We studied serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and lipopolysaccharide at admission. All of them predicted mortality. Procalcitonin, but not high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, serum levels identified those patients with SIRS and infection. Lipopolysaccharide serum levels predicted MOF and the response to prednisolone. Conclusion In the presence or absence of infections, SIRS is a major determinant of MOF and mortality in AH, and the mechanisms involved in the development of SIRS should be investigated; procalcitonin serum levels can help to identify patients with infection, and lipopolysaccharide levels may help to predict mortality and the response to steroids. PMID:25761863

  6. Cells from Degenerative Intervertebral Discs Demonstrate Unfavorable Responses to Mechanical and Inflammatory Stimuli: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Coelho, J. Paulo; Vo, Nam V.; Pacek, Corey; Westrick, Edward; Kang, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mechanical forces and inflammatory signaling influence intervertebral disc matrix homeostasis. We hypothesized that annulus fibrosus cells from degenerative discs would have altered responses to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli compared with cells isolated from normal discs. Design Annulus fibrosus cells were isolated from New Zealand White rabbits with normal and magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed degenerative discs created by annular stab. Cells were cultured with and without inflammatory and mechanical stimuli (tensile strain). After 4 or 24 hrs, the mRNA expression of inflammatory, catabolic, and anabolic genes was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Baseline gene expression differences were noted between cells from normal and degenerative discs. Degenerative cells demonstrated a more proinflammatory response profile to inflammatory and mechanical stimuli and loss of the beneficial effects of mechanical signaling. Decreased expression of catabolic and anabolic genes was observed in degenerative cells under conditions of inflammatory and mechanical stimuli. Conclusions These data demonstrate that degenerative cells have a decreased capacity to respond positively to beneficial levels of mechanical strain and demonstrate an exaggerated response to an inflammatory stimulus. This may, in part, help to explain differential responses to motion-based therapies in patients with intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:22760106

  7. [Difficulties in interpreting the monoclonal gammopathy of chance discovery: transitional gammopathy case in a significant inflammatory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Karfo, Raoul; Benchekroun, Laila; Zohoun, Alban; Chabraoui, Layachi

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a monoclonal immunoglobulin is usually witnessed a malignant lymphoproliferative disease, but sometimes it is a transient event during viral, bacterial or fungal infections and during an inflammatory syndrome. Achieving electrophoresis performed in an elderly patient aged 55 with anemia to 63 g/L hemoglobin showed a consistent profile with intense inflammatory syndrome and chronic atypical with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) greater than 300 mg/L (normal values: 0-8 mg/L) associated with the presence of two thin appearance monoclonal migrating bands in gamma position. Achieving immunofixation showed IgM kappa monoclonal confirmed by using betamercaptoethanol (BME). Radiological findings, hematological, revealed nothing. The recovery of blood away from the inflammation on another sample report presented a CRP at 5 mg/L and a subnormal profile electrophoresis and immunofixation revealed nothing. The comparison of the results of biochemical investigations, haematological and clinical and radiological control of the electrophoretic profile of a remote inflammatory syndrome to exclude cases of transient gammopathies. PMID:26411917

  8. Red wine extract decreases pro-inflammatory markers, nuclear factor-κB and inducible NOS, in experimental metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Janega, Pavol; Klimentová, Jana; Barta, Andrej; Kovácsová, Mária; Vranková, Stanislava; Cebová, Martina; Čierna, Zuzana; Matúsková, Zuzana; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Pechánová, Olga

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to analyse the effects of alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE) on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and pro-inflammatory markers such as nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) and inducible NOS (iNOS) protein expression in experimental metabolic syndrome. Young 6 week-old male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and obese, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR/N-cp) were divided into control groups and groups treated with AWE (24.2 mg per kg per day) for 3 weeks (n = 6 in each group). Total NOS activity and endothelial NOS (eNOS), iNOS and NFκB (p65) protein expressions were determined in the heart left ventricle and aorta by Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. All parameters investigated significantly increased in the aorta of SHR/N-cp rats. Pro-inflammatory markers such as NFκB and iNOS were increased in the left ventricle as well. AWE treatment did not affect total NOS activity and eNOS expression in the aorta; however, it was able to decrease NFκB and iNOS protein expression in both the left ventricle and aorta. In conclusion, in the cardiovascular system, Alibernet red wine extract decreased NFκB and iNOS protein expressions elevated as a consequence of developed metabolic syndrome. This effect may represent one of the protective, anti-inflammatory properties of Alibernet red wine polyphenols on cardiovascular risk factors related to metabolic syndrome. PMID:25051230

  9. The Biochemical Origin of Pain – Proposing a new law of Pain: The origin of all Pain is Inflammation and the Inflammatory Response PART 1 of 3 – A unifying law of pain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We are proposing a unifying theory or law of pain, which states: The origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. The biochemical mediators of inflammation include cytokines, neuropeptides, growth factors and neurotransmitters. Irrespective of the type of pain whether it is acute or chronic pain, peripheral or central pain, nociceptive or neuropathic pain, the underlying origin is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Activation of pain receptors, transmission and modulation of pain signals, neuro plasticity and central sensitization are all one continuum of inflammation and the inflammatory response. Irrespective of the characteristic of the pain, whether it is sharp, dull, aching, burning, stabbing, numbing or tingling, all pain arise from inflammation and the inflammatory response. We are proposing a re-classification and treatment of pain syndromes based upon their inflammatory profile. Treatment of pain syndromes should be based on these principles: Determination of the inflammatory profile of the pain syndromeInhibition or suppression of production of the appropriate inflammatory mediators e.g. with inflammatory mediator blockers or surgical intervention where appropriateInhibition or suppression of neuronal afferent and efferent (motor) transmission e.g. with anti-seizure drugs or local anesthetic blocksModulation of neuronal transmission e.g. with opioid medication At the L.A. Pain Clinic, we have successfully treated a variety of pain syndromes by utilizing these principles. This theory of the biochemical origin of pain is compatible with, inclusive of, and unifies existing theories and knowledge of the mechanism of pain including the gate control theory, and theories of pre-emptive analgesia, windup and central sensitization. PMID:17240081

  10. Sleep deprivation attenuates inflammatory responses and ischemic cell death.

    PubMed

    Weil, Zachary M; Norman, Greg J; Karelina, Kate; Morris, John S; Barker, Jacqueline M; Su, Alan J; Walton, James C; Bohinc, Steven; Nelson, Randy J; DeVries, A Courtney

    2009-07-01

    Although the biological function of sleep remains uncertain, the consequences of sleep deprivation are well-described and are reported to be detrimental to cognitive function and affective well-being. Sleep deprivation also is strongly associated with elevated risk factors for cardiovascular disease. We used a mouse model of cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation to test the hypothesis that acute sleep deprivation would exacerbate neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration after global ischemia. The resulting data led to a rejection of our hypothesis that sleep deprivation is necessarily detrimental. Indeed, acute sleep deprivation (ASD) was associated with a reduction in ischemia-induced interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) gene expression and attenuation of neuronal damage in the hippocampus. Further, sleep deprivation increased gene expression of two anti-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and IL-10 that are associated with improved ischemic outcome. To determine whether the anti-inflammatory properties of ASD were specific to ischemia, mice were treated systemically with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent inflammogen. Acute sleep deprivation attenuated the central and peripheral increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and increased IL-10 expression. Together, the ischemia and LPS data suggest that, ASD produces an anti-inflammatory bias that could be exploited to improve medical procedures that are compromised by inflammation. PMID:19409382

  11. 5-Aminolevulinic acid regulates the inflammatory response and alloimmune reaction.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Masayuki; Nishio, Yoshiaki; Ito, Hidenori; Tanaka, Tohru; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-08-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is a naturally occurring amino acid and precursor of heme and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Exogenously administrated 5-ALA increases the accumulation of PpIX in tumor cells specifically due to the compromised metabolism of 5-ALA to heme in mitochondria. PpIX emits red fluorescence by the irradiation of blue light and the formation of reactive oxygen species and singlet oxygen. Thus, performing a photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) using 5-ALA have given rise to a new strategy for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In addition to the field of tumor therapy, 5-ALA has been implicated in the treatment of inflammatory disease, autoimmune disease and transplantation due to the anti-inflammation and immunoregulation properties that are elicited with the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, an inducible enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the oxidative degradation of heme to free iron, biliverdin and carbon monoxide (CO), in combination with sodium ferrous citrate (SFC), because an inhibitor of HO-1 abolishes the effects of 5-ALA. Furthermore, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and heme are involved in the HO-1 expression. Biliverdin and CO are also known to have anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory functions. We herein review the current use of 5-ALA in inflammatory diseases, transplantation medicine, and tumor therapy. PMID:26643355

  12. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  13. Adult-onset Satoyoshi syndrome and response to plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Aghoram, Rajeshwari; Srijithesh, P. R.; Kannoth, Sudheeran

    2016-01-01

    Satoyoshi syndrome is a rare disease characterized by alopecia, recurrent muscle spasms, diarrhea, and skeletal abnormalities Adult-onset disease is reported only in five patients. Most of the reports have not characterized the nature of muscle spasm in the disease. In this paper, we report the first case of adult-onset Satoyoshi syndrome from India and the clinical and electrophysiological response to plasmapheresis. PMID:27011647

  14. Attenuating the Systemic Inflammatory Response to Adult Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Critical Review of the Evidence Base

    PubMed Central

    Landis, R. Clive; Brown, Jeremiah R.; Fitzgerald, David; Likosky, Donald S.; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Baker, Robert A.; Hammon, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: A wide range of pharmacological, surgical, and mechanical pump approaches have been studied to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass, yet no systematically based review exists to cover the scope of anti-inflammatory interventions deployed. We therefore conducted an evidence-based review to capture “self-identified” anti-inflammatory interventions among adult cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. To be included, trials had to measure at least one inflammatory mediator and one clinical outcome, specified in the “Outcomes 2010” consensus statement. Ninety-eight papers satisfied inclusion criteria and formed the basis of the review. The review identified 33 different interventions and approaches to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response. However, only a minority of papers (35 of 98 [35.7%]) demonstrated any clinical improvement to one or more of the predefined outcome measures (most frequently myocardial protection or length of intensive care unit stay). No single intervention was supported by strong level A evidence (multiple randomized controlled trials [RCTs] or meta-analysis) for clinical benefit. Interventions at level A evidence included off-pump surgery, minimized circuits, biocompatible circuit coatings, leukocyte filtration, complement C5 inhibition, preoperative aspirin, and corticosteroid prophylaxis. Interventions at level B evidence (single RCT) for minimizing inflammation included nitric oxide donors, C1 esterase inhibition, neutrophil elastase inhibition, propofol, propionyl-L-carnitine, and intensive insulin therapy. A secondary analysis revealed that suppression of at least one inflammatory marker was necessary but not sufficient to confer clinical benefit. The most effective interventions were those that targeted multiple inflammatory pathways. These observations are consistent with a “multiple hit” hypothesis, whereby clinically effective suppression of the systemic inflammatory response

  15. Attenuating the Systemic Inflammatory Response to Adult Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Critical Review of the Evidence Base.

    PubMed

    Landis, R Clive; Brown, Jeremiah R; Fitzgerald, David; Likosky, Donald S; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Baker, Robert A; Hammon, John W

    2014-09-01

    A wide range of pharmacological, surgical, and mechanical pump approaches have been studied to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass, yet no systematically based review exists to cover the scope of anti-inflammatory interventions deployed. We therefore conducted an evidence-based review to capture "self-identified" anti-inflammatory interventions among adult cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. To be included, trials had to measure at least one inflammatory mediator and one clinical outcome, specified in the "Outcomes 2010" consensus statement. Ninety-eight papers satisfied inclusion criteria and formed the basis of the review. The review identified 33 different interventions and approaches to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response. However, only a minority of papers (35 of 98 [35.7%]) demonstrated any clinical improvement to one or more of the predefined outcome measures (most frequently myocardial protection or length of intensive care unit stay). No single intervention was supported by strong level A evidence (multiple randomized controlled trials [RCTs] or meta-analysis) for clinical benefit. Interventions at level A evidence included off-pump surgery, minimized circuits, biocompatible circuit coatings, leukocyte filtration, complement C5 inhibition, preoperative aspirin, and corticosteroid prophylaxis. Interventions at level B evidence (single RCT) for minimizing inflammation included nitric oxide donors, C1 esterase inhibition, neutrophil elastase inhibition, propofol, propionyl-L-carnitine, and intensive insulin therapy. A secondary analysis revealed that suppression of at least one inflammatory marker was necessary but not sufficient to confer clinical benefit. The most effective interventions were those that targeted multiple inflammatory pathways. These observations are consistent with a "multiple hit" hypothesis, whereby clinically effective suppression of the systemic inflammatory response requires hitting multiple

  16. Role of virulence factors on host inflammatory response induced by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Villamil, Javier; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens are able to breach the intestinal barrier, and different bacterial species can display different abilities to colonize hosts and induce inflammation. Inflammatory response studies induced by enteropathogens as Escherichia coli are interesting since it has acquired diverse genetic mobile elements, leading to different E. coli pathotypes. Diarrheagenic E. coli secrete toxins, effectors and virulence factors that exploit the host cell functions to facilitate the bacterial colonization. Many bacterial proteins are delivered to the host cell for subverting the inflammatory response. Hereby, we have highlighted the specific processes used by E. coli pathotypes, by that subvert the inflammatory pathways. These mechanisms include an arrangement of pro- and anti-inflammatory responses to favor the appropriate environmental niche for the bacterial survival and growth. PMID:26059623

  17. Auditory Brainstem Responses in Young Adults with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widen, Judith E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    In a study of 15 individuals (ages 15-21) with Down Syndrome, auditory brainstem response (ABR) detection levels were elevated, response amplitude reduced, and latency-intensity functions were significantly steeper than for a matched control group. Findings were associated with an impairment in hearing sensitivity at 8000 Hz for the experimental…

  18. Abnormal immune responses of Bloom's syndrome lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hütteroth, T H; Litwin, S D; German, J

    1975-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome is a rare autosmal recessive disorder, first characterized by growth retardation and asum-sensitive facial telangiectasia and more recently demonstarted to have increased chromosome instability, a predisposition to malignancy, and increased susecptibitily to infection. The present report ocncern the immune function of Bloom's syndrom lymphoctes in vitro. Four affected homozgotes and five heterozygotes were studied. An abnormal serum concentartion of at least one class of immunoglobin was present in three out of four homozgotes. Affected homozgotes were shown capable of both a humoral and cellular response after antigenic challenge, the responses in general being weak but detectable. Blood lymphocytes from Bloom's syndrome individuals were cultured in impaired proliferavite response and synthesized less immunoglobulin at the end of 5 days than did normal controls. In contrast, they had a normal proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin except at highest concentrations of the mitogen. In the mixed lymphocte culture, Bloom's syndrome lymphocytes proved to be poor responder cells but normal stimulator cells. Lmyphoctes from the heterozgotes produced normal responses in these three systems. Distrubed immunity appears to be on of several major consequences of homozygosity for the Bloom's syndrome gene. Although the explanation for this pleiotropism is at present obscure, the idea was advanced that the aberrant immune function is, along with the major clincial feature-small body size, amanifestation of defect in cellular proliferation. PMID:124745

  19. Nutrition before and during Surgery and the Inflammatory Response of the Heart: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Marlieke; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Kok, Wouter E. M.; Cocchieri, Riccardo; Wisselink, Willem; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Major surgery induces a long fasting time and provokes an inflammatory response which increases the risk of infections. Nutrition given before and during surgery can avoid fasting and has been shown to increase the arginine/asymmetric dimetlhylarginine ratio, a marker of nitric oxide availability, in cardiac tissue and increased concentrations of branched chain amino acids in blood plasma. However, the effect of this new nutritional strategy on organ inflammatory response is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effect of nutrition before and during cardiac surgery on myocardial inflammatory response. In this trial, 32 patients were randomised between enteral, parenteral, and no nutrition supplementation (control) from 2 days before, during, up to 2 days after coronary artery bypass grafting. Both solutions included proteins or amino acids, glucose, vitamins, and minerals. Myocardial atrial tissue was sampled before and after revascularization and was analysed immunohistochemically, subdivided into cardiomyocytic, fatty, and fibrotic areas. Inflammatory cells, especially leukocytes, were present in cardiac tissue in all study groups. No significant differences were found in the myocardial inflammatory response between the enteral, parenteral, and control groups. In conclusion, nutrition given before and during surgery neither stimulates nor diminishes the myocardial inflammatory response in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The trial was registered in Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2183. PMID:26294967

  20. JAK2/STAT3 pathway mediating inflammatory responses in heatstroke-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhen; Cheng, Ming; Wang, Shu-Cai; Lv, Wei; Hu, Huai-Qiang; Li, Chuan-Fen; Cao, Bing-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Heatstroke not only directly induces cell injury, but also causes large amounts of inflammatory mediators release and cells with extensive biological activities to induce a systemic inflammatory response and immune dysfunction. This study aimed to observe the effects of JAK2 inhibitor AG490 on the brain injury and inflammatory responses of rats with systemic heatstroke. Under the light microscope, the hippocampus tissues of rat with heatstroke were edema and apoptotic rate was increased. Up-regulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and down-regulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were also found after heatstroke in rats, which compared with that of the control group. Heatstroke induced inflammation factors secretions and up-regulated levels of matrix metallopeptidase 2 and 9 (MMP2 and MMP-9) and systemic inflammatory response molecules including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor-beta 1 (TNF-β1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, the JAK2 inhibitor AG490 was significantly attenuated the brain injury and inflammatory responses induced by heatstroke in rats. The survival time of heatstroke rats showed that AG490 notably lived longer than heatstroke rats without AG490 treatment. These findings suggest that AG490 may prevent the occurrence of heatstroke via inhibiting the JAK2/STAT3 pathway and the systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:26261556

  1. JAK2/STAT3 pathway mediating inflammatory responses in heatstroke-induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zhen; Cheng, Ming; Wang, Shu-Cai; Lv, Wei; Hu, Huai-Qiang; Li, Chuan-Fen; Cao, Bing-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Heatstroke not only directly induces cell injury, but also causes large amounts of inflammatory mediators release and cells with extensive biological activities to induce a systemic inflammatory response and immune dysfunction. This study aimed to observe the effects of JAK2 inhibitor AG490 on the brain injury and inflammatory responses of rats with systemic heatstroke. Under the light microscope, the hippocampus tissues of rat with heatstroke were edema and apoptotic rate was increased. Up-regulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and down-regulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were also found after heatstroke in rats, which compared with that of the control group. Heatstroke induced inflammation factors secretions and up-regulated levels of matrix metallopeptidase 2 and 9 (MMP2 and MMP-9) and systemic inflammatory response molecules including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor-beta 1 (TNF-β1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, the JAK2 inhibitor AG490 was significantly attenuated the brain injury and inflammatory responses induced by heatstroke in rats. The survival time of heatstroke rats showed that AG490 notably lived longer than heatstroke rats without AG490 treatment. These findings suggest that AG490 may prevent the occurrence of heatstroke via inhibiting the JAK2/STAT3 pathway and the systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:26261556

  2. Functional Food Targeting the Regulation of Obesity-Induced Inflammatory Responses and Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Shizuka; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Lin, Shan; Uemura, Taku; Yu, Rina; Kawada, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a low-grade systemic chronic inflammatory state, characterized by the abnormal production of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipocytokines. It has been found that immune cells such as macrophages can infiltrate adipose tissue and are responsible for the majority of inflammatory cytokine production. Obesity-induced inflammation is considered a potential mechanism linking obesity to its related pathologies, such as insulin resistance, cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes, and some immune disorders. Therefore, targeting obesity-related inflammatory components may be a useful strategy to prevent or ameliorate the development of such obesity-related diseases. It has been shown that several food components can modulate inflammatory responses in adipose tissue via various mechanisms, some of which are dependent on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), whereas others are independent on PPARγ, by attenuating signals of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and/or c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK). In this review, we introduce the beneficial effects of anti-inflammatory phytochemicals that can help prevent obesity-induced inflammatory responses and pathologies. PMID:20508825

  3. Characterization of Inflammatory Response in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure and Relationship with Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Cristina; Solà, Elsa; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Fernàndez, Guerau; Huelin, Patricia; Graupera, Isabel; Moreira, Rebeca; de Prada, Gloria; Ariza, Xavier; Pose, Elisa; Fabrellas, Núria; Kalko, Susana G.; Jiménez, Wladimiro; Ginès, Pere

    2016-01-01

    ACLF is characterized by a systemic inflammatory response, but the cytokines involved in this process have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to characterize the systemic inflammatory response in patients with cirrhosis and ACLF and its relationship with prognosis. Fifty-five patients with cirrhosis, 26 with ACLF, were studied prospectively. Systemic inflammatory response was analyzed by measuring a large array of plasma cytokines by using a multiplex kit. A principal component analysis show noticeable differences between ACLF and decompensated cirrhosis without ACLF. Patients with ACLF had significant abnormal levels of 12 cytokines compared to those without ACLF, including: VCAM-1, VEGF-A, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, Eotaxin, IP-10, RANTES, GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-2, ICAM-1, and MCP-1. Cytokines showing the most marked relationship with ACLF were VCAM-1 and VEGF-A (AUCROC 0.77; p = 0.001). There was a significant relationship between some of inflammatory mediators and 3-month mortality, particularly VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and GM-CSF (AUCROC>0.7; p < 0.05). Functional Enrichment Analysis showed that inflammatory markers differentially expressed in ACLF patients were enriched in leukocyte migration, particularly monocytes and macrophages, and chemotaxis pathways. In conclusion, ACLF is characterized by a marked inflammatory reaction with activation of mediators of adhesion and migration of leukocytes. The intensity of the inflammatory reaction correlates with prognosis. PMID:27578545

  4. Characterization of Inflammatory Response in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure and Relationship with Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Solé, Cristina; Solà, Elsa; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Fernàndez, Guerau; Huelin, Patricia; Graupera, Isabel; Moreira, Rebeca; de Prada, Gloria; Ariza, Xavier; Pose, Elisa; Fabrellas, Núria; Kalko, Susana G; Jiménez, Wladimiro; Ginès, Pere

    2016-01-01

    ACLF is characterized by a systemic inflammatory response, but the cytokines involved in this process have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to characterize the systemic inflammatory response in patients with cirrhosis and ACLF and its relationship with prognosis. Fifty-five patients with cirrhosis, 26 with ACLF, were studied prospectively. Systemic inflammatory response was analyzed by measuring a large array of plasma cytokines by using a multiplex kit. A principal component analysis show noticeable differences between ACLF and decompensated cirrhosis without ACLF. Patients with ACLF had significant abnormal levels of 12 cytokines compared to those without ACLF, including: VCAM-1, VEGF-A, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, Eotaxin, IP-10, RANTES, GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-2, ICAM-1, and MCP-1. Cytokines showing the most marked relationship with ACLF were VCAM-1 and VEGF-A (AUCROC 0.77; p = 0.001). There was a significant relationship between some of inflammatory mediators and 3-month mortality, particularly VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and GM-CSF (AUCROC>0.7; p < 0.05). Functional Enrichment Analysis showed that inflammatory markers differentially expressed in ACLF patients were enriched in leukocyte migration, particularly monocytes and macrophages, and chemotaxis pathways. In conclusion, ACLF is characterized by a marked inflammatory reaction with activation of mediators of adhesion and migration of leukocytes. The intensity of the inflammatory reaction correlates with prognosis. PMID:27578545

  5. Gangliosides trigger inflammatory responses via TLR4 in brain glia.

    PubMed

    Jou, Ilo; Lee, Jee Hoon; Park, Soo Young; Yoon, Hee Jung; Joe, Eun-Hye; Park, Eun Jung

    2006-05-01

    Gangliosides participate in various cellular events of the central nervous system and have been closely implicated in many neuronal diseases. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the pathological activity of gangliosides are poorly understood. Here we report that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) may mediate the ganglioside-triggered inflammation in glia, brain resident immune cells. Gangliosides rapidly altered the cell surface expression of TLR4 in microglia and astrocytes within 3 hours. Using TLR4-specific siRNA and a dominant-negative TLR4 gene, we clearly demonstrate the functional importance of TLR4 in ganglioside-triggered activation of glia. Inhibition of TLR4 expression by TLR4-siRNA suppressed nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB-binding activity, NF-kappaB-dependent luciferase activity, and transcription of inflammatory cytokines after exposure to gangliosides. Transient transfection of dominant-negative TLR4 also attenuated NF-kappaB-binding activity and interleukin-6 promoter activity. In contrast, these activities were slightly elevated in cells with wild-type TLR4. In addition, CD14 was required for ganglioside-triggered activation of glia, and lipid raft formation may be associated with ganglioside-stimulated signal propagation. Taken together, these results suggest that TLR4 may provide an explanation for the pathological ability of gangliosides to cause inflammatory conditions in the brain. PMID:16651628

  6. Malarial Pigment Hemozoin and the Innate Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Martin; Van Den Ham, Kristin; Shio, Marina Tiemi; Kassa, Fikregabrail Aberra; Fougeray, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a deadly infectious disease caused by the intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite Plasmodium. The four species of Plasmodium known to affect humans all produce an inorganic crystal called hemozoin (HZ) during the heme detoxification process. HZ is released from the food vacuole into circulation during erythrocyte lysis, while the released parasites further infect additional naive red blood cells. Once in circulation, HZ is rapidly taken up by circulating monocytes and tissue macrophages, inducing the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Over the last few years, it has been reported that HZ, similar to uric acid crystals, asbestos, and silica, is able to trigger IL-1β production via the activation of the NOD-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome complex. Additionally, recent findings have shown that host factors, such as fibrinogen, have the ability to adhere to free HZ and modify its capacity to activate host immune cells. Although much has been discovered regarding NLRP3 inflammasome induction, the mechanism through which this intracellular multimolecular complex is activated remains unclear. In the present review, the most recent discoveries regarding the capacity of HZ to trigger this innate immune complex as well as the impact of HZ on several other inflammatory signaling pathways will be discussed. PMID:24550911

  7. Fatty acid-binding protein 5 limits the anti-inflammatory response in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sherri M; Holt, Vivian V; Malpass, Lillie R; Hines, Ian N; Wheeler, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    The beginning stages of liver damage induced by various etiologies (i.e. high fat diet, alcohol consumption, toxin exposure) are characterized by abnormal accumulation of lipid in liver. Alterations in intracellular lipid transport, storage, and metabolism accompanied by cellular insult within the liver play an important role in the pathogenesis of liver disease, often involving a sustained inflammatory response. The intracellular lipid transporter, fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5), is highly expressed in macrophages and may play an important role in the hepatic inflammatory response after endotoxin exposure in mice. This study tested the hypothesis that FABP5 regulates macrophage response to LPS in male C57bl/6 (wild type) and FABP5 knockout mice, both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with LPS revealed that loss of FABP5 enhances the number of hepatic F4/80(+) macrophages in the liver despite limited liver injury. Conversely, FABP5 knock out mice display higher mRNA levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10, arginase, YM-1, and Fizz-1 in liver compared to wild type mice. Bone marrow derived macrophages stimulated with inflammatory (LPS and IFN-γ) or anti-inflammatory (IL-4) mediators also showed significantly higher expression of anti-inflammatory/regulatory factors. These findings reveal a regulatory role of FABP5 in the acute inflammatory response to LPS-induced liver injury, which is consistent with the principle finding that FABP5 is a regulator of macrophage phenotype. Specifically, these findings demonstrate that loss of FABP5 promotes a more anti-inflammatory response. PMID:26105806

  8. Rosuvastatin improves hepatopulmonary syndrome through inhibition of inflammatory angiogenesis of lung.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Chih; Wang, Sun-Sang; Hsieh, Hsian-Guey; Lee, Wen-Shin; Chuang, Chiao-Lin; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Lee, Shou-Dong; Huang, Hui-Chun

    2015-09-01

    The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is characterized by hypoxia and increased intrapulmonary shunts in cirrhotic patients. Emerging evidence showed promising results of treating HPS by abolishment of intrapulmonary inflammation and angiogenesis. Rosuvastatin is a kind of 3-hydroxy-methyl-3-glutamyl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor. In addition to lipid-lowering effects, it has anti-inflammation and anti-angiogenesis properties. We postulated that rosuvastatin treatment can ameliorate HPS. Common bile duct ligation (CBDL) was applied in an experimental HPS animal model. CBDL rats received 2-week rosuvastatin (20 mg/kg/day) treatments from the fifteenth day after operation. The haemodynamic data, blood gas analysis, liver biochemistries, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were examined after rosuvastatin treatment. The liver and lung tissues were dissected for histopathological studies and protein analyses. In the parallel groups, intrapulmonary shunts were determined. The haemodynamic and liver biochemistries were not changed after rosuvastatin treatment in CBDL rats, but the alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure gradient was significantly decreased, implying that HPS-induced hypoxia was reversed after rosuvastatin treatment. In addition, rosuvastatin treatment reduced intrapulmonary shunts and plasma levels of VEGF and TNF-α. Besides, the intrapulmonary protein expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-1,2 and Rho-associated A kinase were significantly down-regulated and the intrapulmonary angiogenesis was ameliorated. We concluded that rosuvastatin alleviates experimental HPS through blockade of pulmonary inflammatory angiogenesis via TNF-α/NF-κB and VEGF/Rho-associated A kinase pathways down-regulation. PMID:25940601

  9. Overlapping irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: less to this than meets the eye?

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Eamonn M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Though distinct in terms of pathology, natural history and therapeutic approach, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have some features in common. These include shared symptomatology and largely similar demographics. However, in most instances, clinical presentation, together with laboratory, imaging and endoscopic findings will readily permit the differentiation of active IBD from IBS. More problematic is the situation where a subject with IBD, in apparent remission, continues to complain of symptoms which, in aggregate, satisfy commonly employed criteria for the diagnosis of IBS. Access to methodologies, such the assay for levels of calprotectin in feces, now allows identification of ongoing inflammation in some such individuals and prompts appropriate therapy. More challenging is the IBD patient with persisting symptoms and no detectable evidence of inflammation; is this coincident IBS, IBS triggered by IBD or an even more subtle level of IBD activity unrecognized by available laboratory or imaging methods? Arguments can be advanced for each of these proposals; lacking definitive data, this issue remains unresolved. The occurrence of IBS-type symptoms in the IBD patient, together with some data suggesting a very subtle level of ‘inflammation‘ or ‘immune activation‘ in IBS, raises other questions: is IBS a prodromal form of IBD; and are IBS and IBD part of the spectrum of the same disease? All of the available evidence indicates that the answer to both these questions should be a resounding ‘no’. Indeed, the whole issue of overlap between IBS and IBD should be declared moot given their differing pathophysiologies, contrasting natural histories and divergent treatment paths. The limited symptom repertoire of the gastrointestinal tract may well be fundamental to the apparent confusion that has, of late, bedeviled this area. PMID:26929782

  10. Are Probiotics or Prebiotics Useful in Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome or Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Guandalini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are notoriously either inadequate (IBS) or loaded with potentially serious side effects and risks (IBD). In recent years, a growing interest in effective and safer alternatives has focused on the potential role of probiotics and their metabolic substrates, prebiotics. It is in fact conceivable that the microbiome might be targeted by providing the metabolic fuel needed for the growth and expansion of beneficial microorganisms (prebiotics) or by administering to the host such microorganisms (probiotics). This review presents a concise update on currently available data, with a special emphasis on children. Data for prebiotics in IBS are scarce. Low doses have shown a beneficial effect, while high doses are counterproductive. On the contrary, several controlled trials of probiotics have yielded encouraging results. A meta-analysis including nine randomized clinical trials in children showed an improvement in abdominal pain for Lactobacillus GG, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938, and the probiotic mixture VSL#3. The patients most benefiting from probiotics were those with predominant diarrhea or with a post-infectious IBS. In IBD, the use of prebiotics has been tested only rarely and in small scale clinical trials, with mixed results. As for probiotics, data in humans from about three dozens clinical trials offer mixed outcomes. So far, none of the tested probiotics has proven successful in Crohn’s disease, while in ulcerative colitis a recent meta-analysis on 12 clinical trials (1 of them in children) showed efficacy for the probiotic mixture VSL#3 in contributing to induce and to maintain remission. It is evident that this is a rapidly evolving and promising field; more data are very likely to yield a better understanding on what strains should be used in different specific clinical settings and in what doses. PMID:25593899

  11. Obesity and inflammatory arthritis: impact on occurrence, disease characteristics and therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Daïen, Claire I; Sellam, Jérémie

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing worldwide and now reach about one-third of the world's population. Obesity also involves patients with inflammatory arthritis. Knowing the impact of obesity on rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis) is thus an important issue. This article first reviews the epidemiological and clinical data available on obesity in inflammatory rheumatic diseases, that is, its impact on incident disease, disease characteristics and the therapeutic response. The second part of this review gives an overview of the factors potentially involved in the specifics of inflammatory arthritis in patients with obesity, such as limitations in the clinical assessment, diet, microbiota and adipokines. PMID:26509048

  12. The effects of levan on the acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed Central

    Sedgwick, A. D.; Rutman, A.; Sin, Y. M.; Mackay, A. R.; Willoughby, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The fructose polymer levan has been shown to affect the accumulation of leucocytes in inflammatory lesions. The present study has investigated the effect of levan on experimental pleurisy induced by carrageenan and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals. Total pleural polymorphonuclear leucocyte counts and exudate volumes were significantly reduced by levan treatment. We were, however, unable to detect any effect on mononuclear cell numbers. Furthermore, levan treatment significantly reduced peripheral leucocyte numbers. The counter-irritant activity of levan was compared with that of a known counter-irritant, dextran. The ability of levan to reduce pleural polymorph numbers and exudate volume could not be accounted for totally by counter-irritation. Studies using an in-vitro leucocyte adhesion assay system indicate that levan affects leucocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium. PMID:6201184

  13. Inflammatory response and neuronal necrosis in rats with cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingfeng; Zhang, Kunnan; Hu, Guozhu; Yan, Haiyu; Xie, Chen; Wu, Xiaomu

    2014-01-01

    In the middle cerebral artery occlusion model of ischemic injury, inflammation primarily occurs in the infarct and peripheral zones. In the ischemic zone, neurons undergo necrosis and apoptosis, and a large number of reactive microglia are present. In the present study, we investigated the pathological changes in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neuronal necrosis appeared 12 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion, and the peak of neuronal apoptosis appeared 4 to 6 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Inflammatory cytokines and microglia play a role in damage and repair after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Serum intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 levels were positively correlated with the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. These findings indicate that intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 may be involved in blood-brain barrier injury, microglial activation, and neuronal apoptosis. Inhibiting blood-brain barrier leakage may alleviate neuronal injury following ischemia. PMID:25422636

  14. Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Role of ChemR23 Signaling in Pollutant-Induced Inflammatory Lung Responses.

    PubMed

    Provoost, Sharen; De Grove, Katrien C; Fraser, Graeme L; Lannoy, Vincent J; Tournoy, Kurt G; Brusselle, Guy G; Maes, Tania; Joos, Guy F

    2016-02-15

    Inhalation of traffic-related particulate matter (e.g., diesel exhaust particles [DEPs]) is associated with acute inflammatory responses in the lung, and it promotes the development and aggravation of allergic airway diseases. We previously demonstrated that exposure to DEP was associated with increased recruitment and maturation of monocytes and conventional dendritic cells (DCs), resulting in TH2 polarization. Monocytes and immature DCs express the G-protein coupled receptor chemR23, which binds the chemoattractant chemerin. Using chemR23 knockout (KO) and corresponding wild-type (WT) mice, we determined the role of chemR23 signaling in response to acute exposure to DEPs and in response to DEP-enhanced house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airway inflammation. Exposure to DEP alone, as well as combined exposure to DEP plus HDM, elevated the levels of chemerin in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of WT mice. In response to acute exposure to DEPs, monocytes and monocyte-derived DCs accumulated in the lungs of WT mice, but this response was significantly attenuated in chemR23 KO mice. Concomitant exposure to DEP plus HDM resulted in allergic airway inflammation with increased eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia, and TH2 cytokine production in WT mice, which was further enhanced in chemR23 KO mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated an opposing role for chemR23 signaling depending on the context of DEP-induced inflammation. The chemR23 axis showed proinflammatory properties in a model of DEP-induced acute lung inflammation, in contrast to anti-inflammatory effects in a model of DEP-enhanced allergic airway inflammation. PMID:26773141

  15. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  16. Glucocorticoid-Induced Attenuation of the Inflammatory Response in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chatzopoulou, Antonia; Heijmans, Jeroen P M; Burgerhout, Erik; Oskam, Nienke; Spaink, Herman P; Meijer, Annemarie H; Schaaf, Marcel J M

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that are secreted upon stress. Their effects are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor, which acts as a transcription factor. Because the antiinflammatory activity of glucocorticoids has been well established, they are widely used clinically to treat many inflammatory and immune-related diseases. However, the exact specificity, mechanisms, and level of regulation of different inflammatory pathways have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, a tail fin amputation assay was used in 3-day-old zebrafish larvae to study the immunomodulatory effects of the synthetic glucocorticoid beclomethasone. First, a transcriptome analysis was performed, which showed that upon amputation mainly immune-related genes are regulated. This regulation was inhibited by beclomethasone for 86% of regulated genes. For two immune-related genes, tlr4bb and alox5ap, the amputation-induced increase was not attenuated by beclomethasone. Alox5ap is involved in eicosanoid biosynthesis, but the increase in leukotriene B4 concentration upon amputation was abolished, and lipoxin A4 levels were unaffected by beclomethasone. Furthermore, we studied the migration of neutrophils and macrophages toward the wound site. Our results show that amputation induced migration of both types of leukocytes and that this migration was dependent on de novo protein synthesis. Beclomethasone treatment attenuated the migratory behavior of neutrophils in a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent manner but left the migration of macrophages unaffected. In conclusion, beclomethasone has a dramatic inhibitory effect on the amputation-induced proinflammatory gene regulation, and this is reflected in an inhibition of the neutrophil migration but not the migration of macrophages, which are likely to be involved in inflammation resolution. PMID:27219276

  17. The Laminin Response in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Protection or Malignancy?

    PubMed Central

    Spenlé, Caroline; Lefebvre, Olivier; Lacroute, Joël; Méchine-Neuville, Agnès; Barreau, Frédérick; Blottière, Hervé M.; Duclos, Bernard; Arnold, Christiane; Hussenet, Thomas; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Gullberg, Donald; Kedinger, Michèle; Sorokin, Lydia; Orend, Gertraud; Simon-Assmann, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Laminins (LM), basement membrane molecules and mediators of epithelial-stromal communication, are crucial in tissue homeostasis. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) are multifactorial pathologies where the microenvironment and in particular LM play an important yet poorly understood role in tissue maintenance, and in cancer progression which represents an inherent risk of IBD. Here we showed first that in human IBD colonic samples and in murine colitis the LMα1 and LMα5 chains are specifically and ectopically overexpressed with a concomitant nuclear p53 accumulation. Linked to this observation, we provided a mechanism showing that p53 induces LMα1 expression at the promoter level by ChIP analysis and this was confirmed by knockdown in cell transfection experiments. To mimic the human disease, we induced colitis and colitis-associated cancer by chemical treatment (DSS) combined or not with a carcinogen (AOM) in transgenic mice overexpressing LMα1 or LMα5 specifically in the intestine. We demonstrated that high LMα1 or LMα5 expression decreased susceptibility towards experimentally DSS-induced colon inflammation as assessed by histological scoring and decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Yet in a pro-oncogenic context, we showed that LM would favor tumorigenesis as revealed by enhanced tumor lesion formation in both LM transgenic mice. Altogether, our results showed that nuclear p53 and associated overexpression of LMα1 and LMα5 protect tissue from inflammation. But in a mutation setting, the same LM molecules favor progression of IBD into colitis-associated cancer. Our transgenic mice represent attractive new models to acquire knowledge about the paradoxical effect of LM that mediate either tissue reparation or cancer according to the microenvironment. In the early phases of IBD, reinforcing basement membrane stability/organization could be a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:25347196

  18. Sexual dimorphism of stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction: the corticotropin releasing hormone perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakopoulos, Nicholas V.

    1995-01-01

    This review higlghts key aspects of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) biology of potential relevance to the sexual dimorphism of the stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction, and introduces two important new concepts based on the regulatory potential of the human (h) CRH gene: (1) a proposed mechanism to account for the tissue-specific antithetical responses of hCRH gene expression to glucocorticolds, that may also explain the frequently observed antithetical effects of chronic glucocorticoid administration in clinical practice and (2) a heuristic diagram to illustrate the proposed modulation of the stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction by steroid hormones, from the perspective of the CRH system. PMID:18475634

  19. Steroid-responsive and nephrotic syndrome and allergy: clinical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Meadow, S R; Sarsfield, J K

    1981-01-01

    Eighty-four children with steroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome who had been shown to have, or were believed to have, minimal change histology were investigated to study the relationship between steroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome and allergy. They were found to have a greater incidence of the standard atopic disorders--asthma, eczema, recurrent urticaria, and hay fever. Their 1st-degree relatives had an increased incidence of these atopic disorders too. A nasal discharge was a frequent precursor or an accompaniment of nephrotic syndrome, but an overt atrophic disorder at the same time was rare. Such disorders, related to relapse, occurred in only 5 children; in none was it a consistent or recurrent happening at the time of each relapse. No example of pollen hypersensitivity nephrotic syndrome was found, and no particular allergen could be identified with certainty as responsible for a child's nephrotic syndrome. No association was found between the time of relapse and the season of the year, or the season in which the child was born. Children with nephrotic syndrome had a greater incidence of positive skin tests to common antigens, the comparative frequency of positive reactions to different antigens being similar to that found in children with asthma, although the total frequency was about half that of children with asthma. Despite the increased incidence of clinical features of atopy, measures to reduce the frequency of relapse of nephrotic syndrome by allergen avoidance, the use of sodium cromoglycate, and the use of a new oral antiallergic drug were unsuccessful. PMID:6791592

  20. Steroid-responsive and nephrotic syndrome and allergy: clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Meadow, S R; Sarsfield, J K

    1981-07-01

    Eighty-four children with steroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome who had been shown to have, or were believed to have, minimal change histology were investigated to study the relationship between steroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome and allergy. They were found to have a greater incidence of the standard atopic disorders--asthma, eczema, recurrent urticaria, and hay fever. Their 1st-degree relatives had an increased incidence of these atopic disorders too. A nasal discharge was a frequent precursor or an accompaniment of nephrotic syndrome, but an overt atrophic disorder at the same time was rare. Such disorders, related to relapse, occurred in only 5 children; in none was it a consistent or recurrent happening at the time of each relapse. No example of pollen hypersensitivity nephrotic syndrome was found, and no particular allergen could be identified with certainty as responsible for a child's nephrotic syndrome. No association was found between the time of relapse and the season of the year, or the season in which the child was born. Children with nephrotic syndrome had a greater incidence of positive skin tests to common antigens, the comparative frequency of positive reactions to different antigens being similar to that found in children with asthma, although the total frequency was about half that of children with asthma. Despite the increased incidence of clinical features of atopy, measures to reduce the frequency of relapse of nephrotic syndrome by allergen avoidance, the use of sodium cromoglycate, and the use of a new oral antiallergic drug were unsuccessful. PMID:6791592

  1. Role of inflammatory cytokines in the response of solid cancers to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Sun, Jinghai; Cecic, Ivana; Dougherty, Graeme J.

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) elicits a strong acute inflammatory response that has both local and systemic (acute phase response) attributes. The insult mediated by PDT-induced oxidative stress at the targeted site triggers a complex multifactorial response engaging host defence mechanisms associated with the inflammatory process to participate in the eradication of the treated tumor. Inflammatory cytokines are important mediators of critical events in this process as they regulate the activity of inflammatory, endothelial and other cells. The initial stimulus for enhanced production and release of cytokines likely originates from several types of events, such as activated transcription factors and complement deposition. The PDT-induced complement activation appears to be directly linked to the enhanced expression of various cytokines, including chemokines such as KC (in mouse models), and classic inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α , IL-6 and IL-10. A variety of interventions that modulate the activity of particular cytokines performed in conjunction with PDT were shown to influence the therapy outcome. The treatments such as using blocking antibodies and local or systemic cytokine delivery may either reduce or dramatically improve the curative effect of PDT. The inflammatory and related cytokines that at present appear particularly interesting and merit further investigation for use as adjuvants to PDT are IL-3, IL-8, IL-15, TNF-α, IFN-γ, G-CSF and GM-CSF.

  2. Maternal sleep deprivation inhibits hippocampal neurogenesis associated with inflammatory response in young offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiuying; Peng, Cheng; Wu, Xiaohui; Chen, Yubo; Wang, Cheng; You, Zili

    2014-08-01

    Although sleep complaints are very common among pregnant women, the potential adverse effects of sleep disturbance on the offspring are not well studied. Growing evidence suggests that maternal stress can induce an inflammatory environment on the fetal development. But people are not sure about the consequences of prenatal stress such as the inflammatory responses induced by maternal sleep deprivation (MSD). In the present study, we investigated the effects of MSD on long-term behavioral and cognitive consequences in offspring and its underlying inflammatory response pathway. The pregnant Wistar rats received prolonged sleep deprivation (72h) on gestational day (GD) 4, 9, and 18, respectively. The post-natal day (PND) 21 offspring showed impaired hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory in the Morris Water Maze task and anhedonia in sucrose preference experiment. Quantification of BrdU(+) and DCX(+) cells revealed a significant decrease in hippocampus neurogenesis in prepuberty offspring, especially for the late MSD (GD 18) group. Real-time RT-PCR showed that after MSD, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα) increased in the hippocampus of offspring on PND 1, 7, 14 and 21, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 reduced at the same time. Immunofluorescence found that the cells of activated microglia were higher in the brains of MSD offspring. Taken together, these results suggested that the MSD-induced inflammatory response is an important factor for neurogenesis impairment and neurobehavioral outcomes in prepuberty offspring. PMID:24769004

  3. Time-course of prednisone effects on hormonal and inflammatory responses at rest and during resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Collomp, K; Zorgati, H; Cottin, F; Do, M-C; Labsy, Z; Gagey, O; Lasne, F; Prieur, F; Collomp, R

    2015-06-01

    Glucocorticoids are among the most commonly used drugs. They are widely administered for acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, as well as for several other pain syndromes, although their therapeutic use is sometimes diverted for doping purposes. Their time-course effects on hormonal and inflammatory responses nevertheless remain poorly understood, both at rest and during exercise. We therefore studied the alterations induced by 1 week of prednisone treatment (60 mg daily) in recreationally trained male athletes after 2 days (i. e., acute) and 7 days (i. e., short-term). Hormonal (i. e., DHEA, DHEA-S, aldosterone, and testosterone) and pro- and anti-inflammatory markers (i. e., IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1β) were investigated at rest and after resistance exercise. A significant decrease in DHEA and DHEA-S (p<0.01) without change in the DHEA/DHEA-S ratio, aldosterone, or testosterone was demonstrated after acute prednisone intake. A significant increment in IL-10 and a significant decrement in IL-6 (p<0.05) were also observed with prednisone both at rest and during exercise, without significant change in IL-1β. Continued prednisone treatment led to another significant decrease in both DHEA and DHEA-S (p<0.05), whereas no change in the inflammatory markers was observed between days 2 and 7. Our data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of prednisone were maximal and stable from the beginning of treatment, both in rest and exercise conditions. However, hormonal concentrations continued to decline during short-term intake. Further studies are needed to determine the effects of hormonal time-course alterations with longer glucocorticoid treatment and the clinical consequences. PMID:25611207

  4. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Laurence; Greenshields, Anna; Coombs, Melanie R. Power; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression. PMID:26177198

  5. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Madera, Laurence; Greenshields, Anna; Coombs, Melanie R Power; Hoskin, David W

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression. PMID:26177198

  6. Inflammatory Response Influences Treatment of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Allin, N; Cruz-Almeida, Y; Velsko, I; Vovk, A; Hovemcamp, N; Harrison, P; Huang, H; Aukhil, I; Wallet, S M; Shaddox, L M

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported a systemic hyperinflammatory response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in children with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP). Additionally, different levels of this response were observed within the LAP group. It is unknown whether this hyperinflammatory response influences the clinical response to periodontal treatment in these children. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of LPS responsiveness present prior to treatment on the clinical response to treatment within the LAP cohort. Prior to treatment, peripheral blood was collected from 60 African American participants aged 5 to 21 y, free of systemic diseases, and diagnosed with LAP. Blood was stimulated with ultrapure LPS from Escherichia coli, and Luminex assays were performed to quantify 14 cytokine/chemokine levels. Principal component and cluster analyses were used to find patterns of cytokine/chemokine expression among participants and subdivide them into clusters. Three distinct clusters emerged among LAP participants: a high responder group (high level of response for INFg, IL6, and IL12p40), a mixed responder group (low for some and high for other cytokines/chemokines), and a low responder group (low overall cytokine/chemokine response). Periodontal clinical parameters were compared among these groups prior to and 3, 6, and 12 mo following treatment with mechanical debridement and systemic antibiotics. High responders presented the lowest reductions in clinical parameters after treatment, whereas the low responders presented the highest reductions. In our LAP participants, distinct patterns of LPS response were significantly predictive of changes in clinical parameters after treatment. Future studies are needed to evaluate the underlying mechanisms predicting the heterogeneity of LAP activity, severity, and response to treatment (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01330719). PMID:26917438

  7. Soluble Mediators in Platelet Concentrates Modulate Dendritic Cell Inflammatory Responses in an Experimental Model of Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Perros, Alexis J; Christensen, Anne-Marie; Flower, Robert L; Dean, Melinda M

    2015-10-01

    The transfusion of platelet concentrates (PCs) is widely used to treat thrombocytopenia and severe trauma. Ex vivo storage of PCs is associated with a storage lesion characterized by partial platelet activation and the release of soluble mediators, such as soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), RANTES, and interleukin (IL)-8. An in vitro whole blood culture transfusion model was employed to assess whether mediators present in PC supernatants (PC-SNs) modulated dendritic cell (DC)-specific inflammatory responses (intracellular staining) and the overall inflammatory response (cytometric bead array). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was included in parallel cultures to model the impact of PC-SNs on cell responses following toll-like receptor-mediated pathogen recognition. The impact of both the PC dose (10%, 25%) and ex vivo storage period was investigated [day 2 (D2), day 5 (D5), day 7 (D7)]. PC-SNs alone had minimal impact on DC-specific inflammatory responses and the overall inflammatory response. However, in the presence of LPS, exposure to PC-SNs resulted in a significant dose-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-12, IL-6, IL-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β and storage-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-8. For the overall inflammatory response, IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and inflammatory protein (IP)-10 were significantly suppressed and IL-8, IL-10, and IL-1β significantly increased following exposure to PC-SNs in the presence of LPS. These data suggest that soluble mediators present in PCs significantly suppress DC function and modulate the overall inflammatory response, particularly in the presence of an infectious stimulus. Given the central role of DCs in the initiation and regulation of the immune response, these results suggest that modulation of the DC inflammatory profile is a probable mechanism contributing to transfusion-related complications. PMID:26133961

  8. Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 regulates microglia and macrophage gene expression in response to inflammatory stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Cronk, James C.; Derecki, Noël C.; Ji, Emily; Xu, Yang; Lampano, Aaron E.; Smirnov, Igor; Baker, Wendy; Norris, Geoffrey T.; Marin, Ioana; Coddington, Nathan; Wolf, Yochai; Turner, Stephen D.; Aderem, Alan; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Harris, Tajie H.; Jung, Steffen; Litvak, Vladimir; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mutations in MECP2, encoding the epigenetic regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2, are the predominant cause of Rett syndrome, a disease characterized by both neurological symptoms and systemic abnormalities. Microglial dysfunction is thought to contribute to disease pathogenesis, and here we found microglia become activated and subsequently lost with disease progression in Mecp2-null mice. Mecp2 was found to be expressed in peripheral macrophage and monocyte populations, several of which also became depleted in Mecp2-null mice. RNA-seq revealed increased expression of glucocorticoid- and hypoxia-induced transcripts in Mecp2-null microglia and peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, Mecp2 was found to regulate inflammatory gene transcription in response to TNF stimulation. Postnatal re-expression of Mecp2 using Cx3cr1creER increased the lifespan of otherwise Mecp2-null mice. These data suggest Mecp2 regulates microglia and macrophage responsiveness to environmental stimuli to promote homeostasis. Dysfunction of tissue-resident macrophages may contribute to the systemic pathologies observed in Rett syndrome. PMID:25902482

  9. Steroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome and allergy: immunological studies.

    PubMed Central

    Meadow, S R; Sarsfield, J K; Scott, D G; Rajah, S M

    1981-01-01

    Immunological studies were performed on 84 children with steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome as part of an investigation of the relationship between steroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome and allergy. Serum total IgE levels tended to be raised, particularly in children who had frequent relapses of nephrotic syndrome. Ten children had extremely high levels (greater than 1500 IU/ml) and several of them had neither a history of atopy nor any other identifiable cause. 25% of the children had at least one positive test for specific IgE antibody. IgE was not detected by immunofluorescence in renal biopsy tissue from 25 children, regardless of whether the child was in remission or relapse at the time of biopsy. Serum IgG and IgA levels were depressed particularly at the time of a relapse. Serum IgM tended to be raised and to remain so, even in children who had been in remission for more than a year. No clinically useful relationship was found between the frequency of HLA antigens and the occurrence or course of the syndrome, whether or not accompanied by atopy. Clinical and immunological features of atopy are more common in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. This may be a causal or non-causal association. Pollen sensitivity is a rare cause of nephrotic syndrome; careful search for provocative agents may show other causes. PMID:7271285

  10. Rat lung inflammatory responses after in vivo and in vitro exposure to various stone particles.

    PubMed

    Becher, R; Hetland, R B; Refsnes, M; Dahl, J E; Dahlman, H J; Schwarze, P E

    2001-09-01

    Rat lung alveolar macrophages and type 2 cells were exposed for 20 h in vitro to various stone particles with differing contents of metals and minerals (a type of mylonite, gabbro, feldspar, and quartz). The capability to induce the release of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) was investigated. We found marked differences in potency between the various particles, with mylonite being most potent overall, followed by gabbro, and with feldspar and quartz having an approximately similar order of lower potency. The results also demonstrated differences in cytokine release pattern between the two cell types. For all particle types including quartz, type 2 cells showed the most marked increase in MIP-2 and IL-6 secretion, whereas the largest increase in TNF-alpha release was observed in macrophages. To investigate possible correlations between in vitro and in vivo inflammatory responses, rats were instilled with the same types of particles and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected after 20 h. The results demonstrated a correlation between the in vitro cytokine responses and the number of neutrophilic cells in the BAL fluid. The BAL fluid also showed a strong MIP-2 response to mylonite. However, this was the only particle type to give a significant cytokine response in the BAL fluid. We further examined whether a similar graded inflammatory response would be continued in type 2 cells and alveolar macrophages isolated from the exposed animals. Again a differential cytokine release pattern was observed between type 2 cells and macrophages, although the order of potency between particle types was altered. In conclusion, various stone particles caused differential inflammatory responses after both in vitro and in vivo exposure, with mylonite being the most potent stone particle. The results suggest the alveolar type 2 cell to be an important participant in the

  11. Involvement of glycosphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts in inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are membrane components consisting of hydrophobic ceramide and hydrophilic sugar moieties. GSLs cluster with cholesterol in cell membranes to form GSL-enriched lipid rafts. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that GSL-enriched lipid rafts contain several kinds of transducer molecules, including Src family kinases. Among the GSLs, lactosylceramide (LacCer, CDw17) can bind to various microorganisms, is highly expressed on the plasma membranes of human phagocytes, and forms lipid rafts containing the Src family tyrosine kinase Lyn. LacCer-enriched lipid rafts mediate immunological and inflammatory reactions, including superoxide generation, chemotaxis, and non-opsonic phagocytosis. Therefore, LacCer-enriched membrane microdomains are thought to function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed on microorganisms. LacCer also serves as a signal transduction molecule for functions mediated by CD11b/CD18-integrin (αM/β2-integrin, CR3, Mac-1), as well as being associated with several key cellular processes. LacCer recruits PCKα/ε and phospholipase A2 to stimulate PECAM-1 expression in human monocytes and their adhesion to endothelial cells, as well as regulating β1-integrin clustering and endocytosis on cell surfaces. This review describes the organizational and inflammation-related functions of LacCer-enriched lipid rafts. PMID:25553454

  12. Rosmarinus officinalis Extract Suppresses Propionibacterium acnes–Induced Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Chuang, Lu-Te; Lien, Tsung-Jung; Liing, Yau-Rong; Chen, Wei-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Propionibacterium acnes is a key pathogen involved in the progression of acne inflammation. The development of a new agent possessing antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity against P. acnes is therefore of interest. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract on P. acnes–induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that ethanolic rosemary extract (ERE) significantly suppressed the secretion and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in P. acnes–stimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. In an in vivo mouse model, concomitant intradermal injection of ERE attenuated the P. acnes–induced ear swelling and granulomatous inflammation. Since ERE suppressed the P. acnes–induced nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation and mRNA expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, the suppressive effect of ERE might be due, at least partially, to diminished NF-κB activation and TLR2-mediated signaling pathways. Furthermore, three major constituents of ERE, carnosol, carnosic acid, and rosmarinic acid, exerted different immumodulatory activities in vitro. In brief, rosmarinic acid significantly suppressed IL-8 production, while the other two compounds inhibited IL-1β production. Further study is needed to explore the role of bioactive compounds of rosemary in mitigation of P. acnes–induced inflammation. PMID:23514231

  13. Comparison of Inflammatory Response to Transgastric and Transcolonic NOTES

    PubMed Central

    Hucl, Tomas; Benes, Marek; Kocik, Matej; Splichalova, Alla; Maluskova, Jana; Krak, Martin; Lanska, Vera; Heczkova, Marie; Kieslichova, Eva; Oliverius, Martin; Spicak, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The aim of our study was to determine the physiologic impact of NOTES and to compare the transgastric and transcolonic approaches. Methods. Thirty pigs were randomized to transgastric, transcolonic, or laparoscopic peritoneoscopy. Blood was drawn and analyzed for C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, WBCs, and platelets. Results. Endoscopic closure with an OTSC was successful in all 20 animals. The postoperative course was uneventful in all animals. CRP values rose on day 1 in all animals and slowly declined to baseline levels on day 14 with no differences between the groups (P > 0.05, NS). The levels of TNF-α were significantly increased in the transcolonic group (P < 0.01); however this difference was already present prior to the procedure and remained unchanged. No differences were observed in IL1-β and IL-6 values. There was a temporary rise of WBC on day 1 and of platelets on day 7 in all groups (P > 0.05, NS). Conclusions. Transgastric, transcolonic, and laparoscopic peritoneoscopy resulted in similar changes in systemic inflammatory markers. Our findings do not support the assumption that NOTES is less invasive than laparoscopy. PMID:27403157

  14. Rosmarinus officinalis extract suppresses Propionibacterium acnes-induced inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Chuang, Lu-Te; Lien, Tsung-Jung; Liing, Yau-Rong; Chen, Wei-Yu; Tsai, Po-Jung

    2013-04-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a key pathogen involved in the progression of acne inflammation. The development of a new agent possessing antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity against P. acnes is therefore of interest. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract on P. acnes-induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that ethanolic rosemary extract (ERE) significantly suppressed the secretion and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in P. acnes-stimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. In an in vivo mouse model, concomitant intradermal injection of ERE attenuated the P. acnes-induced ear swelling and granulomatous inflammation. Since ERE suppressed the P. acnes-induced nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation and mRNA expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, the suppressive effect of ERE might be due, at least partially, to diminished NF-κB activation and TLR2-mediated signaling pathways. Furthermore, three major constituents of ERE, carnosol, carnosic acid, and rosmarinic acid, exerted different immumodulatory activities in vitro. In brief, rosmarinic acid significantly suppressed IL-8 production, while the other two compounds inhibited IL-1β production. Further study is needed to explore the role of bioactive compounds of rosemary in mitigation of P. acnes-induced inflammation. PMID:23514231

  15. Comparison of Inflammatory Response to Transgastric and Transcolonic NOTES.

    PubMed

    Hucl, Tomas; Benes, Marek; Kocik, Matej; Splichalova, Alla; Maluskova, Jana; Krak, Martin; Lanska, Vera; Heczkova, Marie; Kieslichova, Eva; Oliverius, Martin; Spicak, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The aim of our study was to determine the physiologic impact of NOTES and to compare the transgastric and transcolonic approaches. Methods. Thirty pigs were randomized to transgastric, transcolonic, or laparoscopic peritoneoscopy. Blood was drawn and analyzed for C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, WBCs, and platelets. Results. Endoscopic closure with an OTSC was successful in all 20 animals. The postoperative course was uneventful in all animals. CRP values rose on day 1 in all animals and slowly declined to baseline levels on day 14 with no differences between the groups (P > 0.05, NS). The levels of TNF-α were significantly increased in the transcolonic group (P < 0.01); however this difference was already present prior to the procedure and remained unchanged. No differences were observed in IL1-β and IL-6 values. There was a temporary rise of WBC on day 1 and of platelets on day 7 in all groups (P > 0.05, NS). Conclusions. Transgastric, transcolonic, and laparoscopic peritoneoscopy resulted in similar changes in systemic inflammatory markers. Our findings do not support the assumption that NOTES is less invasive than laparoscopy. PMID:27403157

  16. Host Transcription Factors in the Immediate Pro-Inflammatory Response to the Parasitic Mite Psoroptes ovis

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Stewart T. G.; McNeilly, Tom N.; Watkins, Craig A.; Nisbet, Alasdair J.; Huntley, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Sheep scab, caused by infestation with the ectoparasitic mite Psoroptes ovis, results in the rapid development of cutaneous inflammation and leads to the crusted skin lesions characteristic of the disease. We described previously the global host transcriptional response to infestation with P. ovis, elucidating elements of the inflammatory processes which lead to the development of a rapid and profound immune response. However, the mechanisms by which this response is instigated remain unclear. To identify novel methods of intervention a better understanding of the early events involved in triggering the immune response is essential. The objective of this study was to gain a clearer understanding of the mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in the instigation of the immediate pro-inflammatory response. Results Through a combination of transcription factor binding site enrichment and pathway analysis we identified key roles for a number of transcription factors in the instigation of cutaneous inflammation. In particular, defined roles were elucidated for the transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1 in the orchestration of the early pro-inflammatory response, with these factors being implicated in the activation of a suite of inflammatory mediators. Conclusions Interrogation of the host temporal response to P. ovis infestation has enabled the further identification of the mechanisms underlying the development of the immediate host pro-inflammatory response. This response involves key regulatory roles for the transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1. Pathway analysis demonstrated that the activation of these transcription factors may be triggered following a host LPS-type response, potentially involving TLR4-signalling and also lead to the intriguing possibility that this could be triggered by a P. ovis allergen. PMID:21915322

  17. Impact of nutrition on immune function and the inflammatory response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The review utilizes data on three micronutrients (vitamin A, zinc and iron), anthropometrically defined undernutrition (stunting, wasting and underweight) and obesity to evaluate the effect on immune function, recovery of immune function in response to nutritional interventions, related health outco...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) THIAMINE-RESPONSIVE MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIA SYNDROME Sources for This Page Baron D, Assaraf YG, Cohen N, Aronheim A. Lack of plasma membrane targeting of a G172D mutant thiamine transporter ...

  19. Effectiveness of Responsive Teaching with Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaaslan, Ozcan; Mahoney, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    A randomized control study was conducted to evaluate Responsive Teaching (RT) with a sample of 15 Turkish preschool aged children with Down syndrome (DS) and their mothers over a six-month period of time. RT is an early intervention curriculum that attempts to promote children's development by encouraging parents to engage in highly…

  20. Auditory Brainstem Evoked Responses in Newborns with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Phan, Ha T. T.; Gardner, Judith M.; Miroshnichenko, Inna; Gordon, Anne; Karmel, Bernard Z.

    2009-01-01

    Auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABRs) were compared in 15 newborns with Down syndrome and 15 sex-, age-, and weight-matched control newborns. Participants had normal ABRs based upon values specific to 32- to 42-weeks postconceptional age. Although Wave III and Wave V component latencies and the Wave I-III interpeak latency (IPL) were shorter…

  1. Triclosan Alters Anti-microbial and Inflammatory Responses of Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wallet, Mark A.; Calderon, Nadia L.; Alonso, Tess R.; Choe, Christina S.; Catalfamo, Dana L.; Lalane, Charles J.; Neiva, Kathleen G.; Panagakos, Foti; Wallet, Shannon M.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are a class of pathologies wherein oral microbes induce harmful immune responses in a susceptible host. Therefore, an agent which can both reduce microbial burden and lessen pathogenesis of localized inflammation would have beneficial effects in periodontal disease. 2,4,4-trichloro-2-hydroxydiphenyl-ether [triclosan] is currently used in oral care products due to broad spectrum anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties. Objective To determine effects of triclosan on the response of oral epithelial cells to stimulation with the inflammatory microbial product lipopolysaccharide [LPS], a ligand for toll-like receptor 4 [TLR4]. Materials/Methods Primary human oral epithelial cells were stimulated with LPS in the presence and/or absence of triclosan after which expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, β-defensins, micro-RNAs [miRNAs] or TLR signaling pathway proteins were evaluated. Results Here we demonstrate that triclosan is a potent inhibitor of oral epithelial cell LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses by inducing miRNA regulation of the TLR-signaling pathway. Triclosan was not a pan-suppresser of oral epithelial cell responses as β-defensin 2 [βD2] and βD3 were upregulated by triclosan following LPS-stimulation. Conclusions These data demonstrate both a novel anti-microbial mechanism by which triclosan improves plaque control and an additional anti-inflammatory property which could have beneficial effects in periodontal disease resolution. PMID:24079913

  2. Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on insulin sensitivity and the systemic inflammatory response in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Larsen, Nadja; Pedersen-Skovsgaard, Theis; Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Svendsen, Kira Dynnes; Jakobsen, Mogens; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2010-12-01

    According to animal studies, intake of probiotic bacteria may improve glucose homeostasis. We hypothesised that probiotic bacteria improve insulin sensitivity by attenuating systemic inflammation. Therefore, the effects of oral supplementation with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on insulin sensitivity and the inflammatory response were investigated in subjects with normal or impaired insulin sensitivity. In a double-blinded, randomised fashion, forty-five males with type 2 diabetes, impaired or normal glucose tolerance were enrolled and allocated to a 4-week treatment course with either L. acidophilus NCFM or placebo. L. acidophilus was detected in stool samples by denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR. Separated by the 4-week intervention period, two hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps were performed to estimate insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the systemic inflammatory response was evaluated by subjecting the participants to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide injection (0·3 ng/kg) before and after the treatment course. L. acidophilus NCFM was detected in 75 % of the faecal samples after treatment with the probiotic bacterium. Insulin sensitivity was preserved among volunteers in the L. acidophilus NCFM group, whereas it decreased in the placebo group. Both baseline inflammatory markers and the systemic inflammatory response were, however, unaffected by the intervention. In conclusion, intake of L. acidophilus NCFM for 4 weeks preserved insulin sensitivity compared with placebo, but did not affect the systemic inflammatory response. PMID:20815975

  3. Effects of gelsolin on macrophage inflammatory responses to orthopaedic implant wear debris.

    PubMed

    Mihalko, William M; Djenderedjian, Lev; Cheema, Paramjeet S; Smith, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The local effects of implant wear debris on surrounding tissue has been a major focus of many investigators. Although there have been improvements in implants, significant numbers of revision surgeries are performed to address these issues. Gelsolin (GSN) is a protein in the cytoplasm and circulating serum involved in actin breakdown as well as anti-inflammatory processes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that GSN in the presence of wear debris in vitro decreases the inflammatory response of a human monocyte cell line. We utilized titanium-, polyethylene-, and cobalt-characterized wear particles in a 1:100 and a 1:500 cell-to-particle ratios in the presence of a low (0.2 µM) and normal (2.0 µM) concentrations of GSN and compared the inflammatory response to cells without GSN exposure. The results show that IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α, and PGE₂ all increased with higher concentrations of GSN. Although the anti-inflammatory properties of GSN were not seen in this in vitro experiment, it has previously been shown that GSN does affect the inflammatory response of monocytes to orthopedic implant wear debris. The dose-response curve for GSN may have a bimodal profile, which should be further investigated. PMID:24941406

  4. Guggulsterone Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Inner Medullary Collecting Duct-3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Goo; Bae, Gi-Sang; Jo, Il-Joo; Choi, Sun-Bok; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Jeong, Jun-Hyeok; Kang, Dae-Gil; Lee, Ho-Sub; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2016-02-01

    Guggulsterone (GS) is a phytosterol that has been used to treat inflammatory diseases such as colitis, obesity, and thrombosis. Although many previous studies have examined activities of GS, the effect of GS on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in mouse inner medullary collecting duct-3 (mIMCD-3) cells have not been examined. Therefore, here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory action of GS on mIMCD-3 cells exposed to LPS. LPS treatment on mIMCD-3 cells produced pro-inflammatory molecules such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) significantly; however, GS treatment significantly inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory molecules. In addition, GS inhibited the degradation of Iκ-Bα and translocation of NF-κB on mIMCD-3 cells. These results suggest that GS could inhibit inflammatory responses in collecting duct cells which could contribute to kidney injury during systemic infection. PMID:26260258

  5. Tormentic Acid Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Inflammatory Response in Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Yawei; Wang, Yumin; Zhao, Meng; Jia, Haobo; Li, Bing; Xing, Dan

    2016-06-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) plays critical roles in pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Tormentic acid (TA), a triterpene isolated from Rosa rugosa, has anti-inflammatory activity. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of TA on OA is still unclear. So, in the present study, we examined the effect of TA on IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in primary human OA chondrocytes. Our results demonstrated that TA significantly decreased the IL-1β-stimulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and MMP-13. It also inhibited the IL-1β-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), as well as the production of NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in human OA chondrocytes. Furthermore, TA greatly inhibited the IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation. In conclusion, this study is the first to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory activity of TA in human OA chondrocytes. TA significantly inhibits the IL-1β-induced inflammatory response by suppressing the NF-κB signaling pathway. Thus, TA may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. PMID:27102898

  6. Macrophage-mediated inflammatory response decreases mycobacterial survival in mouse MSCs by augmenting NO production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yongjian; Xie, Heping; Li, Miao; Ming, Siqi; Li, Liyan; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Gong, Sitang; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular microbe, which escapes host immune attack during latent infection. Recent studies reveal that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide a protective niche for MTB to maintain latency. However, the regulation of mycobacterial residency in MSCs in the infectious microenvironment remains largely unknown. Here, we found that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during MTB infection facilitated the clearance of bacilli residing in mouse MSCs. Higher inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were observed in mouse MSCs under macrophage-mediated inflammatory circumstance. Blocking NO production in MSCs increased the survival of intracellular mycobacteria, indicating NO-mediated antimycobacterial activity. Moreover, both nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways were involved in iNOS expression and NO production in inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β could trigger NO production in MSCs and exert anti-mycobacterial activity via NF-κB signaling pathway. Neutralization of interleukin-1β in macrophage-mediated inflammatory microenvironment dampened the ability of mouse MSCs to produce NO. Together, our findings demonstrated that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during mycobacterial infection promotes the clearance of bacilli in mouse MSCs by increasing NO production, which may provide a better understanding of latent MTB infection. PMID:27251437

  7. Macrophage-mediated inflammatory response decreases mycobacterial survival in mouse MSCs by augmenting NO production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yongjian; Xie, Heping; Li, Miao; Ming, Siqi; Li, Liyan; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Gong, Sitang; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular microbe, which escapes host immune attack during latent infection. Recent studies reveal that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide a protective niche for MTB to maintain latency. However, the regulation of mycobacterial residency in MSCs in the infectious microenvironment remains largely unknown. Here, we found that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during MTB infection facilitated the clearance of bacilli residing in mouse MSCs. Higher inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were observed in mouse MSCs under macrophage-mediated inflammatory circumstance. Blocking NO production in MSCs increased the survival of intracellular mycobacteria, indicating NO-mediated antimycobacterial activity. Moreover, both nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways were involved in iNOS expression and NO production in inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β could trigger NO production in MSCs and exert anti-mycobacterial activity via NF-κB signaling pathway. Neutralization of interleukin-1β in macrophage-mediated inflammatory microenvironment dampened the ability of mouse MSCs to produce NO. Together, our findings demonstrated that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during mycobacterial infection promotes the clearance of bacilli in mouse MSCs by increasing NO production, which may provide a better understanding of latent MTB infection. PMID:27251437

  8. Idiopathic Pyoderma Gangrenosum as a Novel Manifestation of the HIV Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Nambudiri, Vinod E; Kersellius, Romona; Harp, Joanna; Maniar, J K; Maurer, Toby A

    2015-07-01

    The initiation of antiretroviral treatment for individuals with HIV may be accompanied by a paradoxical flare of underlying inflammatory diseases, the recurrence of dormant infections, or worsening of prior treated opportunistic infections, termed the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Cutaneous manifestations of IRIS are common. Pyoderma gangrenosum is a neutrophilic dermatosis postulated to reflect disrupted innate immune regulation causing altered neutrophil chemotaxis. It is uncommonly reported in association with HIV. In this case series, we present three cases of IRIS manifesting with pyoderma gangrenosum in individuals with HIV from India and the United States to raise awareness of this previously undescribed presentation and discuss the treatment challenges in the management of these patients. PMID:26731836

  9. Inflammatory cytokines regulate secretion of VEGF and chemokines by human conjunctival fibroblasts: Role in dysfunctional tear syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N; William, Abitha; Cherukuri, Aswini; Samuel, William; Hooks, John J; Detrick, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Ocular surface inflammation is one of the primary mechanisms associated with dysfunctional tear syndrome (DTS), also known as dry eye disease. DTS, more prevalent in older populations, causes ocular discomfort and visual disturbance due to dryness on the surface layer in the eye. We used human conjunctival fibroblast cultures (HCJVF) to investigate the effects of inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β (ITI) on the secretions of VEGF and chemokines. Our results demonstrate the elevated secretion of angiogenic VEGF molecules by ITI without affecting anti-angiogenic molecules, PEDF, endostatin, thrombospondin and sVEGF-R1. The secretion of interferon-γ inducible chemokines, CXCL9, -10, -11 by HCJVF were significantly enhanced by ITI. Our in vitro study supports previously reported observations of elevated VEGF and chemokines in tear fluids of DTS patients, reiterating the role of inflammatory reactions in DTS. PMID:26615568

  10. Paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with cryptococcal meningitis in China: a 5-year retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yan, S; Chen, L; Wu, W; Li, Z; Fu, Z; Zhang, H; Xue, J; Hu, Y; Mou, J; Fu, C

    2015-04-01

    We performed a retrospective cohort study of hospitalised cryptococcal meningitis (CM) patients at a single centre to evaluate the clinical epidemiological features of paradoxical cryptococcal-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (CM-IRIS) in a setting in China. A total of 154 AIDS patients with CM were involved, and 17.5% experienced IRIS at a median of 27 days after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Overall, 3 deaths were directly attributed to IRIS. The occurrences of CM-IRIS were independently associated with the pre-ART CD4+count, pre-C-reactive protein level, and the timing of ART initiation. PMID:25658526

  11. Serum Osteocalcin Is Associated with Inflammatory Factors in Metabolic Syndrome: A Population-Based Study in Chinese Males

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ming; Huang, Lirong; Mao, Yan; Jiang, Yonghua; Yao, Ziting; Lin, Xinggu; Lu, Zheng; Wu, Chunlei; Qin, Xue; Zhang, Haiying; Mo, Zengnan

    2015-01-01

    Osteocalcin (OCN) was potentially associated with inflammatory factors, so we explored the metabolic role in this association in general population. Our findings suggest that OCN was positively associated with IgG while inversely associated with C3, both of which were probably mediated by obesity. Moreover, serum OCN was inversely associated with hsCRP in men with impaired fasting glucose, hyperglycemia, or metabolic syndrome, while its association with IgE was significantly observed in men with a normal metabolic profile. PMID:26578821

  12. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndromes in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Saich, Rebecca; Chapman, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic progressive disorder of unknown aetiology characterised by chronic inflammation and stricture formation of the biliary tree. Symptoms include itch and lethargy and in advanced cases cholangitis and end-stage liver disease, however increasing numbers of asymptomatic individuals are being identified. The disease is rare in the general population but is strongly associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affecting up to 5% of patients with Ulcerative Colitis, with a slightly lower prevalence (up to 3.6%) in Crohn's disease. The strength of this association means that the vast majority (> 90%) of patients with PSC also have IBD, although many may have only mild gastro-intestinal symptoms. Usually IBD presents before PSC, although vice-versa can occur and the onset of both conditions can be separated in some cases by many years. Mean age of diagnosis of PSC is in the fifth decade of life with a strong male predominance. Risk is increased in those with a family history of PSC, suggesting a genetic predisposition and the disease is almost exclusive to non-smokers. The ulcerative colitis associated with PSC is characteristically mild, runs a quiescent course, is associated with rectal sparing, more severe right sided disease, backwash ileitis and has a high risk of pouchitis post-colectomy. Most worrisome is the high risk of colorectal malignancy which necessitates routine colonoscopic surveillance. Cholangiocarcinoma is also a frequent complication of PSC with a 10%-15% lifetime risk of developing this condition. Treatment with high dose ursodeoxycholic acid offers some chemoprotective effects against colorectal malignancy and may decrease symptoms, biochemical and histological progression of liver disease. Small duct PSC patients characteristically have normal cholangiography, and liver biopsy is required for diagnosis, it appears to have a more favourable prognosis. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is also more prevalent

  13. Test of the antiorthostatic suspension model on mice - Effects on the inflammatory cell response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkrans, Charles F., Jr.; Chapes, Stephen K.; Fleming, Sherry D.

    1990-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model was tested for use as a 1G model to study the effects of factors that will be encountered during space travel on inflammation. No differences were found in inflammatory cells induced in antiorthostatically suspended mice. However, the superoxide response (used for oxidative killing of bacteria such as S. aureus) was impaired in antiorthostatically oriented mice compared to control mice. Elevated corticosterone levels were found in antiorthostatically suspended mice, indicating that stress may be a factor in the model. If the stress factor of the model correlates with the physiological stress of space flight, antiorthostatic suspension may be an acceptable model for studying inflammatory responses in mice.

  14. The Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 4 Positive Allosteric Modulator ADX88178 Inhibits Inflammatory Responses in Primary Microglia.

    PubMed

    Ponnazhagan, Ranjani; Harms, Ashley S; Thome, Aaron D; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Gogliotti, Rocco; Niswender, Colleen M; Conn, P Jeffrey; Standaert, David G

    2016-06-01

    While the specific trigger of Parkinson Disease (PD) in most patients is unknown, considerable evidence suggests that the neuroinflammatory response makes an essential contribution to the neurodegenerative process. Drugs targeting metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu receptors), 7 Transmembrane (7TM) spanning/G protein coupled receptors that bind glutamate, are emerging as therapeutic targets for PD and may have anti-inflammatory properties. ADX88178 is novel potent, selective, and brain-penetrant positive allosteric modulator of the mGlu4 which is under evaluation for treatment of PD and other neurological disorders. We used microglia cultured from mouse brain to determine if ADX88178 had direct effects on the inflammatory responses of these cells. We studied both microglia from wild type and Grm4 knock out mice. We found that activation of mGlu4 with ADX88178 attenuated LPS-induced inflammation in primary microglia, leading to a decrease in the expression of TNFα, MHCII, and iNOS, markers of pro-inflammatory responses. These effects were absent in microglia from mice lacking mGlu4. These results demonstrate a cell-autonomous anti-inflammatory effect of ADX88178 mediated mGlu4 activation on microglia, and suggest that this drug or similar activators or potentiators of mGlu4 may have disease-modifying as well as symptomatic effects in PD and other brain disorders with an inflammatory component. PMID:26872456

  15. Stages of the Inflammatory Response in Pathology and Tissue Repair after Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Askenase, Michael H; Sansing, Lauren H

    2016-06-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a major health concern, with high rates of mortality and morbidity and no highly effective clinical interventions. Basic research in animal models of ICH has provided insight into its complex pathology, in particular revealing the role of inflammation in driving neuronal death and neurologic deficits after hemorrhage. The response to ICH occurs in four distinct phases: (1) initial tissue damage and local activation of inflammatory factors, (2) inflammation-driven breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, (3) recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells and subsequent secondary immunopathology, and (4) engagement of tissue repair responses that promote tissue repair and restoration of neurologic function. The development of CNS inflammation occurs over many days after initial hemorrhage and thus may represent an ideal target for treatment of the disease, but further research is required to identify the mechanisms that promote engagement of inflammatory versus anti-inflammatory pathways. In this review, the authors examine how experimental models of ICH have uncovered critical mediators of pathology in each of the four stages of the inflammatory response, and focus on the role of the immune system in these processes. PMID:27214704

  16. Reduced stress and inflammatory responsiveness in experienced meditators compared to a matched healthy control group.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Melissa A; Lutz, Antoine; Perlman, David M; Bachhuber, David R W; Schuyler, Brianna S; MacCoon, Donal G; Davidson, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    Psychological stress is a major contributor to symptom exacerbation across many chronic inflammatory conditions and can acutely provoke increases in inflammation in healthy individuals. With the rise in rates of inflammation-related medical conditions, evidence for behavioral approaches that reduce stress reactivity is of value. Here, we compare 31 experienced meditators, with an average of approximately 9000 lifetime hours of meditation practice (M age=51years) to an age- and sex-matched control group (n=37; M age=48years) on measures of stress- and inflammatory responsivity, and measures of psychological health. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was used to induce psychological stress and a neurogenic inflammatory response was produced using topical application of capsaicin cream to forearm skin. Size of the capsaicin-induced flare response and increase in salivary cortisol and alpha amylase were used to quantify the magnitude of inflammatory and stress responses, respectively. Results show that experienced meditators have lower TSST-evoked cortisol (62.62±2.52 vs. 70.38±2.33; p<.05) and perceived stress (4.18±.41 vs. 5.56±.30; p<.01), as well as a smaller neurogenic inflammatory response (81.55±4.6 vs. 96.76±4.26; p<.05), compared to the control group. Moreover, experienced meditators reported higher levels of psychological factors associated with wellbeing and resilience. These results suggest that the long-term practice of meditation may reduce stress reactivity and could be of therapeutic benefit in chronic inflammatory conditions characterized by neurogenic inflammation. PMID:26970711

  17. dl-2-Hydroxyisocaproic Acid Attenuates Inflammatory Responses in a Murine Candida albicans Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, M. T.; Hernandez, M.; Novak-Frazer, L.; Kuula, H.; Ramage, G.; Bowyer, P.; Warn, P.; Sorsa, T.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic biofilm infections are often accompanied by a chronic inflammatory response, leading to impaired healing and increased, irreversible damage to host tissues. Biofilm formation is a major virulence factor for Candida albicans and a challenge for treatment. Most current antifungals have proved ineffective in eradicating infections attributed to biofilms. The biofilm structure protects Candida species against antifungals and provides a way for them to evade host immune systems. This leads to a very distinct inflammatory response compared to that seen in planktonic infections. Previously, we showed the superior efficacy of dl-2-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) against various bacteria and fungi. However, the immunomodulatory properties of HICA have not been studied. Our aim was to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory response to HICA in vivo. We hypothesized that HICA reduces the levels of immune mediators and attenuates the inflammatory response. In a murine model, a robust biofilm was formed for 5 days in a diffusion chamber implanted underneath mouse skin. The biofilm was treated for 12 h with HICA, while caspofungin and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were used as controls. The pathophysiology and immunoexpression in the tissues surrounding the chamber were determined by immunohistochemistry. Histopathological examination showed an attenuated inflammatory response together with reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) compared to those of chambers containing caspofungin and PBS. Interestingly, the expression of developmental endothelial locus 1 (Del-1), an antagonist of neutrophil extravasation, increased after treatment with HICA. Considering its anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activity, HICA may have enormous therapeutic potential in the treatment of chronic biofilm infections and inflammation, such as those seen with chronic wounds. PMID:24990903

  18. Recombinant thrombomodulin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response by blocking the functions of CD14.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chih-Yuan; Chang, Wei-En; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Chang, Bi-Ying; Cheng, Sheng-En; Shih, Yun-Tai; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-02-15

    CD14, a multiligand pattern-recognition receptor, is involved in the activation of many TLRs. Thrombomodulin (TM), a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, originally was identified as an anticoagulant factor that activates protein C. Previously, we showed that the recombinant TM lectin-like domain binds to LPS and inhibits LPS-induced inflammation, but the function of the recombinant epidermal growth factor-like domain plus serine/threonine-rich domain of TM (rTMD23) in LPS-induced inflammation remains unknown. In the current study, we found that rTMD23 markedly suppressed the activation of intracellular signaling pathways and the production of inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS. The anti-inflammatory activity of rTMD23 was independent of activated protein C. We also found that rTMD23 interacted with the soluble and membrane forms of CD14 and inhibited the CD14-mediated inflammatory response. Knockdown of CD14 in macrophages suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS, and rTMD23 inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 production in CD14-knockdown macrophages. rTMD23 suppressed the binding of LPS to macrophages by blocking the association between monocytic membrane-bound TM and CD14. The administration of rTMD23 in mice, both pretreatment and posttreatment, significantly increased the survival rate and reduced the inflammatory response to LPS. Notably, the serine/threonine-rich domain is essential for the anti-inflammatory activity of rTMD23. To summarize, we show that rTMD23 suppresses the LPS-induced inflammatory response in mice by targeting CD14 and that the serine/threonine-rich domain is crucial for the inhibitory effect of rTMD23 on LPS-induced inflammation. PMID:25609841

  19. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome responsive to pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, FH; Liu, W; Geigel, E; Castaneda, S; Rossi, EM; Schnacky, K

    2015-01-01

    Report three cases of painful legs and moving toes (PLMT) syndrome responsive to pregabalin along with a review of its literature. Three patients with PLMT syndrome improved with pregabalin. The first and third patient reported improvement in pain scores, quality of life, and quality of sleep sustained over time. The second and third patient had near complete remission of toe movements, but pregabalin was discontinued in the second patient due to aggravation of leg edema. PLMT is a rare and debilitating disorder characterized by lower limb pain and involuntary toes or feet movements. Its pathophysiology remains unknown and its therapy refractory to most drugs, except for pregabalin, as shown in this case series. PLMT is a rare and incapacitating syndrome due to the lack of an effective pain therapy. We report three patients with PLMT who favorable responded to pregabalin. We propose pregabalin be considered in the management of PLMT. PMID:25766346

  20. Interaction of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in microglia by Staphylococcus aureus-derived lipoteichoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Bor-Ren; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Tseng, Wen-Pei; Huang, Shiang-Suo; Wu, Chi-Rei; Lin, Chingju; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2013-05-15

    We investigated the interaction between proinflammatory and inflammatory responses caused by Staphylococcus aureus-derived lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in primary cultured microglial cells and BV-2 microglia. LTA induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels increase in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Meanwhile, LTA also increased nitric oxide (NO) and PGE{sub 2} production in microglia. Administration of TLR2 antagonist effectively inhibited LTA-induced NO, iNOS, and COX-2 expression. Moreover, treatment of cells with LTA caused a time-dependent activation of ERK, p38, JNK, as well as AKT. We also found that LTA-induced iNOS and COX-2 up-regulation were attenuated by p38, JNK, and PI3-kinase inhibitors. On the other hand, LTA-enhanced HO-1 expression was attenuated by p38 and PI3-kinase inhibitors. Treatment of cells with NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors antagonized LTA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression. However, only NF-κB inhibitors reduced LTA-induced HO-1 expression in microglia. Furthermore, stimulation of cells with LTA also activated IκBα phosphorylation, p65 phosphorylation at Ser{sup 536}, and c-Jun phosphorylation. Moreover, LTA-induced increases of κB-DNA and AP-1-DNA binding activity were inhibited by p38, JNK, and PI3-kinase inhibitors. HO-1 activator CoPP IX dramatically reversed LTA-induced iNOS expression. Our results provided mechanisms linking LTA and inflammation/anti-inflammation, and indicated that LTA plays a regulatory role in microglia activation. - Highlights: • LTA causes an increase in iNOS, COX-2, and HO-1 expression in microglia. • LTA induces iNOS and COX-2 expression through TLR-2/NF-κB and AP-1 pathways. • HO-1 expression is regulated through p38, JNK, PI3K/AKT and AP-1 pathways. • Induced HO-1 reduces LTA-induced iNOS expression. • LTA plays a regulatory role on inflammatory/anti-inflammatory responses.

  1. Maternal Microbe-Specific Modulation of Inflammatory Response in Extremely Low-Gestational-Age Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Fichorova, Raina N.; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Yamamoto, Hidemi; Delaney, Mary L.; DuBois, Andrea M.; Allred, Elizabeth; Leviton, Alan

    2011-01-01

    The fetal response to intrauterine inflammatory stimuli appears to contribute to the onset of preterm labor as well as fetal injury, especially affecting newborns of extremely low gestational age. To investigate the role of placental colonization by specific groups of microorganisms in the development of inflammatory responses present at birth, we analyzed 25 protein biomarkers in dry blood spots obtained from 527 newborns delivered by Caesarean section in the 23rd to 27th gestation weeks. Bacteria were detected in placentas and characterized by culture techniques. Odds ratios for having protein concentrations in the top quartile for gestation age for individual and groups of microorganisms were calculated. Mixed bacterial vaginosis (BV) organisms were associated with a proinflammatory pattern similar to those of infectious facultative anaerobes. Prevotella and Gardnerella species, anaerobic streptococci, peptostreptococci, and genital mycoplasmas each appeared to be associated with a different pattern of elevated blood levels of inflammation-related proteins. Lactobacillus was associated with low odds of an inflammatory response. This study provides evidence that microorganisms colonizing the placenta provoke distinctive newborn inflammatory responses and that Lactobacillus may suppress these responses. PMID:21264056

  2. A murine model of stress controllability attenuates Th2-dominant airway inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Aniket; Kim, Byung-Jin; Gonzales, Xavier; Caffrey, James; Vishwanatha, Jamboor; Jones, Harlan P.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest a positive correlation between chronic respiratory inflammatory disease and the ability to cope with adverse stress. Interactions between neuroendocrine and immune systems are believed to provide insight toward the biological mechanisms of action. The utility of an experimental murine model was employed to investigate the immunological consequences of stress-controllability and ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. Pre-conditioned uncontrollable stress exacerbated OVA-induced lung histopathological changes that were typical of Th2-predominant inflammatory response along respiratory tissues. Importantly, mice given the ability to exert control over aversive stress attenuated inflammatory responses and reduced lung pathology. This model represents a means of investigating the neuro-immune axis in defining mechanisms of stress and respiratory disease. PMID:20462642

  3. Suppression of LPS-induced inflammatory responses by inflexanin B in BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Youn; Sul, Donggeun; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Yoo, Ki-Yeol; Park, So-Young

    2013-02-01

    Microglia are a type of resident macrophage that functions as an inflammation modulator in the central nervous system. Over-activation of microglia by a range of stimuli disrupts the physiological homeostasis of the brain, and induces inflammatory response and degenerative processes, such as those implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Therefore, we investigated the possible anti-inflammatory mechanisms of inflexanin B in murine microglial BV2 cells. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activated BV2 cells and induced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and cytokines (interleukins-1β and -6, and tumour necrosis factor α). The LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory mediators was associated with the enhancement of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) including ERK1/2 and JNK. Conversely, pretreatment of cells with inflexanin B (10 and 20 μg/mL) significantly reduced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. This was accompanied with the reduced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and reduced activation of MAPKs. These results suggest that inflexanin B attenuated the LPS-induced inflammatory process by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs. PMID:23458198

  4. Lung epithelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles activate macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses via ROCK1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Moon, H-G; Cao, Y; Yang, J; Lee, J H; Choi, H S; Jin, Y

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains poorly understood, thus impeding the development of effective treatment. Diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and lung epithelial cell death are prominent features of ARDS. Lung epithelial cells are the first line of defense after inhaled stimuli, such as in the case of hyperoxia. We hypothesized that lung epithelial cells release 'messenger' or signaling molecules to adjacent or distant macrophages, thereby initiating or propagating inflammatory responses after noxious insult. We found that, after hyperoxia, a large amount of extracellular vesicles (EVs) were generated and released into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). These hyperoxia-induced EVs were mainly derived from live lung epithelial cells as the result of hyperoxia-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. These EVs were remarkably different from epithelial 'apoptotic bodies', as reflected by the significantly smaller size and differentially expressed protein markers. These EVs fall mainly in the size range of the exosomes and smaller microvesicles (MVs) (50-120 nm). The commonly featured protein markers of apoptotic bodies were not found in these EVs. Treating alveolar macrophages with hyperoxia-induced, epithelial cell-derived EVs led to an increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). Robustly increased macrophage and neutrophil influx was found in the lung tissue of the mice intranasally treated with hyperoxia-induced EVs. It was determined that EV-encapsulated caspase-3 was largely responsible for the alveolar macrophage activation via the ROCK1 pathway. Caspase-3-deficient EVs induced less cytokine/MIP-2 release, reduced cell counts in BALF, less neutrophil infiltration and less inflammation in lung parenchyma, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the serum circulating EVs were increased and mainly derived from lung epithelial cells after

  5. Lung epithelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles activate macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses via ROCK1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Moon, H-G; Cao, Y; Yang, J; Lee, J H; Choi, H S; Jin, Y

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains poorly understood, thus impeding the development of effective treatment. Diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and lung epithelial cell death are prominent features of ARDS. Lung epithelial cells are the first line of defense after inhaled stimuli, such as in the case of hyperoxia. We hypothesized that lung epithelial cells release ‘messenger' or signaling molecules to adjacent or distant macrophages, thereby initiating or propagating inflammatory responses after noxious insult. We found that, after hyperoxia, a large amount of extracellular vesicles (EVs) were generated and released into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). These hyperoxia-induced EVs were mainly derived from live lung epithelial cells as the result of hyperoxia-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. These EVs were remarkably different from epithelial ‘apoptotic bodies', as reflected by the significantly smaller size and differentially expressed protein markers. These EVs fall mainly in the size range of the exosomes and smaller microvesicles (MVs) (50–120 nm). The commonly featured protein markers of apoptotic bodies were not found in these EVs. Treating alveolar macrophages with hyperoxia-induced, epithelial cell-derived EVs led to an increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). Robustly increased macrophage and neutrophil influx was found in the lung tissue of the mice intranasally treated with hyperoxia-induced EVs. It was determined that EV-encapsulated caspase-3 was largely responsible for the alveolar macrophage activation via the ROCK1 pathway. Caspase-3-deficient EVs induced less cytokine/MIP-2 release, reduced cell counts in BALF, less neutrophil infiltration and less inflammation in lung parenchyma, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the serum circulating EVs were increased and mainly derived from lung epithelial cells after

  6. Polyphenols rich fraction from Geoffroea decorticans fruits flour affects key enzymes involved in metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress and inflammatory process.

    PubMed

    Costamagna, M S; Zampini, I C; Alberto, M R; Cuello, S; Torres, S; Pérez, J; Quispe, C; Schmeda-Hirschmann, G; Isla, M I

    2016-01-01

    Geoffroea decorticans (chañar), is widely distributed throughout Northwestern Argentina. Its fruit is consumed as flour, arrope or hydroalcoholic beverage. The chañar fruits flour was obtained and 39 phenolic compounds were tentatively identified by HPLC-MS/MS(n). The compounds comprised caffeic acid glycosides, simple phenolics (protocatechuic acid and vanillic acid), a glycoside of vanillic acid, p-coumaric acid and its phenethyl ester as well as free and glycosylated flavonoids. The polyphenols enriched extract with and without gastroduodenal digestion inhibited enzymes associated with metabolic syndrome, including α-amylase, α-glucosidase, lipase and hydroxyl methyl glutaryl CoA reductase. The polyphenolic extract exhibited antioxidant activity by different mechanisms and inhibited the pro-inflammatory enzymes (ciclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and phospholipase A2). The polyphenolic extract did not showed mutagenic effect by Ames test against Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains. These findings add evidence that chañar fruit flour may be considered a functional food with preventive properties against diseases associated with oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators and metabolic syndrome. PMID:26212988

  7. A novel interleukin 33/ST2 signaling regulates inflammatory response in human corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing; Zhang, Lili; Zhao, Guiqiu; Su, Zhitao; Deng, Ruzhi; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Li, De-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL) 33, a member of IL-1 cytokine family, is well known to promote Th2 type immune responses by signaling through its receptor ST2. However, it is not clear whether ST2 is expressed by mucosal epithelium, and how it responds to IL-33 to induce inflammatory mediators. This study was to identify the presence and function of ST2 and explore the role of IL-33/ST2 signaling in regulating the inflammatory cytokine production in corneal epithelial cells. Human corneal tissues and cultured primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) were treated with IL-33 in different concentrations without or with different inhibitors to evaluate the expression, location and signaling pathways of ST2 in regulating production of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine. The mRNA expression was determined by reverse transcription and real time PCR, and protein production was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent staining. ST2 mRNA and protein were detected in donor corneal epithelium and cultured HCECs, and ST2 signal was enhanced by exposure to IL-33. IL-33 significantly stimulated the production of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) and chemokine IL-8 by HCECs at both mRNA and protein levels. The stimulated production of inflammatory mediators by IL-33 was blocked by ST2 antibody or soluble ST2 protein. Interestingly, the IκB-α inhibitor BAY11-7082 or NF-κB activation inhibitor quinazoline blocked NF-κB p65 protein phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, and also suppressed the production of these inflammatory cytokines and chemokine induced by IL-33. These findings demonstrate that ST2 is present in human corneal epithelial cells, and IL-33/ST2 signaling plays an important role in regulating IL-33 induced inflammatory responses in ocular surface. PMID:23585867

  8. A Novel Interleukin 33/ST2 Signaling Regulates Inflammatory Response in Human Corneal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Zhang, Lili; Zhao, Guiqiu; Su, Zhitao; Deng, Ruzhi; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Li, De-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL) 33, a member of IL-1 cytokine family, is well known to promote Th2 type immune responses by signaling through its receptor ST2. However, it is not clear whether ST2 is expressed by mucosal epithelium, and how it responds to IL-33 to induce inflammatory mediators. This study was to identify the presence and function of ST2 and explore the role of IL-33/ST2 signaling in regulating the inflammatory cytokine production in corneal epithelial cells. Human corneal tissues and cultured primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) were treated with IL-33 in different concentrations without or with different inhibitors to evaluate the expression, location and signaling pathways of ST2 in regulating production of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine. The mRNA expression was determined by reverse transcription and real time PCR, and protein production was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent staining. ST2 mRNA and protein were detected in donor corneal epithelium and cultured HCECs, and ST2 signal was enhanced by exposure to IL-33. IL-33 significantly stimulated the production of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) and chemokine IL-8 by HCECs at both mRNA and protein levels. The stimulated production of inflammatory mediators by IL-33 was blocked by ST2 antibody or soluble ST2 protein. Interestingly, the IκB-α inhibitor BAY11-7082 or NF-κB activation inhibitor quinazoline blocked NF-κB p65 protein phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, and also suppressed the production of these inflammatory cytokines and chemokine induced by IL-33. These findings demonstrate that ST2 is present in human corneal epithelial cells, and IL-33/ST2 signaling plays an important role in regulating IL-33 induced inflammatory responses in ocular surface. PMID:23585867

  9. Magnesium lithospermate B reduces inflammatory response in a mouse model of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Song, Shaohua; Liu, Wenyu; Liu, Fang; Wang, Zhengxin; Ding, Guoshan; Guo, Wenyuan; Fu, Zhiren

    2014-06-01

    It has been well proved that acute inflammatory response and hepatocellular apoptosis contributed to the pathogenesis of liver ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury. A vast amount of research has demonstrated that magnesium lithospermate B (MLB) has potent anti-apoptosis and potential anti-inflammatory pharmacological properties. However, it has not previously been examined whether MLB can attenuate hepatic IR injury. Firstly, the optimal dose of MLB to protect against hepatic IR injury was determined using hepatic IR model in mice. Then, the effect of MLB on IR-induced inflammatory response was detected in detail. We found that MLB exhibited protective effect from the beginning of 50 mg/kg and culminated at the doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg. The alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in MLB group were markedly decreased. Severe hepatocellular swelling/necrosis, sinusoidal/vascular congestion and inflammatory cell infiltration were seen and a large number of apoptotic cells were found in the liver samples from Saline group, while minimal damage and very few apoptotic cells were noted in the samples from MLB group. Kuppfer cells infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity and mRNA level of CD11b in MLB group was significantly decreased. Serum TNF-a and IL-6, and mRNA expression of CXCL-10 and ICAM-1 was markedly decreased in the samples from MLB group. Inflammatory signaling pathway activation was largely prevented in MLB group. MLB can significantly attenuate IR-induced hepatocellular damage and hepatocellular apoptosis by preventing inflammatory signaling pathways activation, inflammatory mediators expression and macrophage and neutrophil infiltration. PMID:24385154

  10. microRNA-155 Regulates Alpha-Synuclein-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Models of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Thome, Aaron D; Harms, Ashley S; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A; Standaert, David G

    2016-02-24

    Increasing evidence points to inflammation as a chief mediator of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and widespread aggregates of the protein α-synuclein (α-syn). Recently, microRNAs, small, noncoding RNAs involved in regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, have been recognized as important regulators of the inflammatory environment. Using an array approach, we found significant upregulation of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in an in vivo model of PD produced by adeno-associated-virus-mediated expression of α-syn. Using a mouse with a complete deletion of miR-155, we found that loss of miR-155 reduced proinflammatory responses to α-syn and blocked α-syn-induced neurodegeneration. In primary microglia from miR-155(-/-) mice, we observed a markedly reduced inflammatory response to α-syn fibrils, with attenuation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and proinflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. Treatment of these microglia with a synthetic mimic of miR-155 restored the inflammatory response to α-syn fibrils. Our results suggest that miR-155 has a central role in the inflammatory response to α-syn in the brain and in α-syn-related neurodegeneration. These effects are at least in part due to a direct role of miR-155 on the microglial response to α-syn. These data implicate miR-155 as a potential therapeutic target for regulating the inflammatory response in PD. PMID:26911687

  11. Control of Inflammatory Responses: a New Paradigm for the Treatment of Chronic Neuronal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joo Hong; Lee, Jee Hoon; Kim, Hyunmi; Park, Soo Jung; Joe, Eun-Hye; Jou, Ilo

    2015-06-01

    The term 'inflammation' was first introduced by Celsus almost 2000 years ago. Biological and medical researchers have shown increasing interest in inflammation over the past few decades, in part due to the emerging burden of chronic and degenerative diseases resulting from the increased longevity that has arisen thanks to modern medicine. Inflammation is believed to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of degenerative brain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, researchers have sought to combat such diseases by controlling inflammatory responses. In this review, we describe the endogenous inflammatory stimulators and signaling pathways in the brain. In particular, our group has focused on the JAK-STAT pathway, identifying anti-inflammatory targets and testing the effects of various anti-inflammatory drugs. This work has shown that the JAK-STAT pathway and its downstream are negatively regulated by phosphatases (SHP2 and MKP-1), inhibitory proteins (SOCS1 and SOCS3) and a nuclear receptor (LXR). These negative regulators are controlled at various levels (e.g. transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational). Future study of these proteins could facilitate the manipulation of the inflammatory response, which plays ubiquitous, diverse and ambivalent roles under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26113788

  12. A tetramethoxychalcone from Chloranthus henryi suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in BV2 microglia.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Si-Yu; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Xu, Peng; Pan, Li-Long; Hu, Jin-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Neuroinflammation underlies the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. 2׳-hydroxy-4,3׳,4׳,6׳-tetramethoxychalcone (HTMC) is a known chalcone derivative isolated from Chloranthus henryi with anti-inflammatory activities in BV2 macrophages. However, its pharmacological effects on microglial cells have not been demonstrated. To this end, we examined the effects of HTMC on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in BV2 microglial cells. HTMC concentration-dependently inhibited LPS-induced expression of inflammatory enzymes including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide (NO) production, and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. In addition, HTMC inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by reducing NADPH oxidase (Nox) 2 and Nox4 expression. In addition, HTMC interfered LPS-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK) phosphorylation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. By inhibiting phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Jun, HTMC suppressed LPS-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation. Taken together, our data indicate that HTMC suppresses inflammatory responses in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells by modulating JNK-AP-1 and NADPH oxidases-ROS pathways. HTMC represents a promising therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative and related aging-associated diseases. PMID:26852953

  13. Mice exposed to dim light at night exaggerate inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Fonken, Laura K; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2013-11-01

    The mammalian circadian system regulates many physiological functions including inflammatory responses. Appropriately timed light information is essential for maintaining circadian organization. Over the past ∼120 years, urbanization and the widespread adoption of electric lights have dramatically altered lighting environments. Exposure to light at night (LAN) is pervasive in modern society and disrupts core circadian clock mechanisms. Because microglia are the resident macrophages in the brain and macrophages contain intrinsic circadian clocks, we hypothesized that chronic exposure to LAN would alter microglia cytokine expression and sickness behavior following LPS administration. Exposure to 4 weeks of dim LAN elevated inflammatory responses in mice. Mice exposed to dimly lit, as compared to dark, nights exaggerated changes in body temperature and elevated microglia pro-inflammatory cytokine expression following LPS administration. Furthermore, dLAN mice had a prolonged sickness response following the LPS challenge. Mice exposed to dark or dimly lit nights had comparable sickness behavior directly following the LPS injection; however, dLAN mice showed greater reductions in locomotor activity, increased anorectic behavior, and increased weight loss than mice maintained in dark nights 24h post-LPS injection. Overall, these data suggest that chronic exposure to even very low levels of light pollution may alter inflammatory responses. These results may have important implications for humans and other urban dwelling species that commonly experience nighttime light exposure. PMID:24012645

  14. Dietary L-arginine supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of dietary L-arginine (Arg) supplementation on inflammatory response and innate immunity of broilers. Experiment 1 was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n = 8 cages/treatment; 6 birds/cage) with 3 dietary Arg concentrations (1.05, 1.4...

  15. Dietary L-arginine supplementation modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammatory response in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether dietary supplementation with L-arginine (Arg) could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammatory response through LPS/TLR-4 signaling pathway in broilers. The experiment was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n = 8 cages/treatm...

  16. Progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons induced by inflammatory responses to fipronil.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Park, Youn Sun; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory responses are involved in mechanisms of neuronal cell damage in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the mechanisms whereby inflammatory responses contribute to loss of dopaminergic neurons in fipronil (FPN)-treated rats. After stereotaxic injection of FPN in the substantia nigra (SN), the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons and the levels of TH expression in the SN decreased at 7days, and a significant decrease was observed at 14days with a subsequent reduction in striatal TH expression. Decreases in dopamine (DA) levels, however, began at 3days post-injection, preceding the changes in TH expression. In contrast, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was significantly increased at 3days and persisted for up to 14days post-lesion; these changes in GFAP expression appeared to be inversely correlated with TH expression. Furthermore, we found that FPN administration induced an inflammatory response characterized by increased levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which was mediated by activated microglia following infusion of FPN unilaterally into the SN. Intranigral injection of FPN underwent an inflammatory response with a resultant ongoing loss of dopaminergic neurons, indicating that pesticides may have important implication for the study of PD. PMID:27313094

  17. Age-associated changes in immune and inflammatory response: role of nutritional intervention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aging is associated with dysregulated immune and inflammatory responses. Declined T cell function is best characterized in immuno-senescence. Both intrinsic changes within T cells and extrinsic factors contribute to the age-associated decline in T cell function. T cell defect involves multiple stage...

  18. Lactobacilli require physical contact to reduce staphylococcal TSST-1 secretion and vaginal epithelial inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Younes, Jessica A; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2016-06-01

    ITALIC! Staphylococcus aureusbiofilms can be found on vaginal epithelia, secreting toxins and causing inflammation. The co-vaginal species ITALIC! Lactobacilluscan alter staphylococcal-induced epithelial secretion of inflammatory cytokines and quench staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 secretion. It is hypothesized that these effects of lactobacilli require direct physical contact between lactobacilli, staphylococci and the epithelium. Indeed, lactobacilli only reduced ITALIC! S. aureus-induced inflammatory cytokine expression when allowed physical contact with vaginal epithelial cells. Furthermore, a reduction in toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 secretion only occurred when a probiotic ITALIC! Lactobacillusstrain was allowed contact, but not when being physically separated from ITALIC! S. aureus Bacterial-probe atomic force microscopy demonstrated that lactobacilli and staphylococci strongly adhere to epithelial cells, while lactobacilli adhere stronger to staphylococci than staphylococci to each other, giving lactobacilli opportunity to penetrate and reside in staphylococcal biofilms, as visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy with fluorescence ITALIC! in situhybridization probes. These results identify that physical contact and biochemical signaling by lactobacilli are intrinsically linked mechanisms that reduce virulence of ITALIC! S. aureusbiofilm. PMID:27060097

  19. Differential Pro-Inflammatory Responses of Astrocytes and Microglia Involve STAT3 Activation in Response to 1800 MHz Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yonghui; He, Mindi; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Shangcheng; Zhang, Lei; He, Yue; Chen, Chunhai; Liu, Chuan; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Microglia and astrocytes play important role in maintaining the homeostasis of central nervous system (CNS). Several CNS impacts have been postulated to be associated with radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields exposure. Given the important role of inflammation in neural physiopathologic processes, we investigated the pro-inflammatory responses of microglia and astrocytes and the involved mechanism in response to RF fields. Microglial N9 and astroglial C8-D1A cells were exposed to 1800 MHz RF for different time with or without pretreatment with STAT3 inhibitor. Microglia and astrocytes were activated by RF exposure indicated by up-regulated CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). However, RF exposure induced differential pro-inflammatory responses in astrocytes and microglia, characterized by different expression and release profiles of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, PGE2, nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). Moreover, the RF exposure activated STAT3 in microglia but not in astrocytes. Furthermore, the STAT3 inhibitor Stattic ameliorated the RF-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in microglia but not in astrocytes. Our results demonstrated that RF exposure differentially induced pro-inflammatory responses in microglia and astrocytes, which involved differential activation of STAT3 in microglia and astrocytes. Our data provide novel insights into the potential mechanisms of the reported CNS impacts associated with mobile phone use and present STAT3 as a promising target to protect humans against increasing RF exposure. PMID:25275372

  20. HSPA12B inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Li, Xuehan; Huang, Lei; Jiang, Surong; Tu, Fei; Zhang, Xiaojin; Ma, He; Li, Rongrong; Li, Chuanfu; Li, Yuehua; Ding, Zhengnian; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein A12B (HSPA12B) is a newly discovered member of the HSP70 protein family. This study investigated the effects of HSPA12B on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the possible mechanisms involved. A HUVECs inflammatory model was induced by LPS. Overexpression of HSPA12B in HUVECs was achieved by infection with recombinant adenoviruses encoding green fluorescence protein-HSPA12B. Knockdown of HSPA12B was achieved by siRNA technique. Twenty four hours after virus infection or siRNA transfection, HUVECs were stimulated with 1 μg/ml LPS for 4 hrs. Endothelial cell permeability ability was determined by transwell permeability assay. The binding rate of human neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) with HUVECs was examined using myeloperoxidase assay. Cell migrating ability was determined by the wound-healing assay. The mRNA and protein expression levels of interested genes were analyzed by RT-qPCR and Western blot, respectively. The release of cytokines interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α was measured by ELISA. HSPA12B suppressed LPS-induced HUVEC permeability and reduced PMN adhesion to HUVECs. HSPA12B also inhibited LPS-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and inflammatory cytokine expression. By contrast, knockdown of HSPA12B enhanced LPS-induced increases in the expression of adhesion molecules and inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, HSPA12B activated PI3K/Akt signalling pathway and pharmacological inhibition of this pathway by Wortmannin completely abrogated the protection of HSPA12B against inflammatory response in HUVECs. Our results suggest that HSPA12B attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory responses in HUVECs via activation of PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. PMID:25545050

  1. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase 2 Regulates the Inflammatory Response in Sepsis▿

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Timothy T.; Rodenhouse, Paul; Cai, Qing; Sun, Lei; Shanley, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis results from a dysregulation of the regulatory mechanisms of the pro- and anti-inflammatory response to invading pathogens. The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades are key signal transduction pathways involved in the cellular production of cytokines. The dual-specific phosphatase 1 (DUSP 1), mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), has been shown to be an important negative regulator of the inflammatory response by regulating the p38 and Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) MAP kinase pathways to influence pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production. MKP-2, also a dual-specific phosphatase (DUSP 4), is a phosphatase highly homologous with MKP-1 and is known to regulate MAP kinase signaling; however, its role in regulating the inflammatory response is not known. We hypothesized a regulatory role for MKP-2 in the setting of sepsis. Mice lacking the MKP-2 gene had a survival advantage over wild-type mice when challenged with intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or a polymicrobial infection via cecal ligation and puncture. The MKP-2−/− mice also exhibited decreased serum levels of both pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) following endotoxin challenge. Isolated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from MKP-2−/− mice showed increased phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), decreased phosphorylation of JNK and p38, and increased induction of MKP-1 following LPS stimulation. The capacity for cytokine production increased in MKP-2−/− BMDMs following MKP-1 knockdown. These data support a mechanism by which MKP-2 targets ERK deactivation, thereby decreasing MKP-1 and thus removing the negative inhibition of MKP-1 on cytokine production. PMID:20351138

  2. The Role of Dietary Inflammatory Index in Cardiovascular Disease, Metabolic Syndrome and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an underlying pathophysiological process in chronic diseases, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. In fact, a number of systematic reviews have shown the association between inflammatory biomarkers, such as CRP, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-4, or IL-10, and cardio-metabolic diseases. Diet is one of the main lifestyle-related factors which modulates the inflammatory process. Different individual foods and dietary patterns can have a beneficial health effect associated with their anti-inflammatory properties. The dietary inflammatory index (DII) was recently developed to estimate the inflammatory potential of overall diet. The aim of this review is to examine the findings of recent papers that have investigated the association between the DII, cardio-metabolic risk factors and cardiovascular disease. The relevance of the DII score in the association between inflammation and cardio-metabolic diseases is critically appraised, as well as its role in the context of healthy dietary patterns. We conclude that the DII score seems to be a useful tool to appraise the inflammatory capacity of the diet and to better understand the relationships between diet, inflammation, and cardio-metabolic diseases. PMID:27527152

  3. The Role of Dietary Inflammatory Index in Cardiovascular Disease, Metabolic Syndrome and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Martínez-González, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an underlying pathophysiological process in chronic diseases, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. In fact, a number of systematic reviews have shown the association between inflammatory biomarkers, such as CRP, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-4, or IL-10, and cardio-metabolic diseases. Diet is one of the main lifestyle-related factors which modulates the inflammatory process. Different individual foods and dietary patterns can have a beneficial health effect associated with their anti-inflammatory properties. The dietary inflammatory index (DII) was recently developed to estimate the inflammatory potential of overall diet. The aim of this review is to examine the findings of recent papers that have investigated the association between the DII, cardio-metabolic risk factors and cardiovascular disease. The relevance of the DII score in the association between inflammation and cardio-metabolic diseases is critically appraised, as well as its role in the context of healthy dietary patterns. We conclude that the DII score seems to be a useful tool to appraise the inflammatory capacity of the diet and to better understand the relationships between diet, inflammation, and cardio-metabolic diseases. PMID:27527152

  4. IL-8 and IL-6 primarily mediate the inflammatory response in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Mendieta, Danelia; De la Cruz-Aguilera, Dora Luz; Barrera-Villalpando, Maria Isabel; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Arreola, Rodrigo; Hernández-Ferreira, Erick; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra; Pérez-Sánchez, Gilberto; Garcés-Alvarez, María Eugenia; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Pavón, Lenin

    2016-01-15

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic disease that has been linked to inflammatory reactions and changes in the systemic levels of proinflammatory cytokines that modulate responses in the sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We found that concentrations of IL-6 and IL-8 were elevated in FM patients. Both cytokines correlated with clinical scores, suggesting that IL-6 and IL-8 have additive or synergistic effects in perpetuating the chronic pain in FM patients. These findings indicate that IL-6 and IL-8 are two of the most constant inflammatory mediators in FM and that their levels correlate significantly with the severity of symptoms. PMID:26711564

  5. Innate immune sensors stimulate inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses to UVB radiation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Richard L; Bernard, Jamie J

    2014-06-01

    Almost 40 years from when it was first reported that UVB radiation exposure would modulate immune signaling, the photoimmunology field is still trying to understand the mechanisms by which UVB initiates inflammatory responses and modulates immune recognition. This commentary focuses on the ability of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), specifically TLR4 (Ahmad et al., 2014) and ligands such as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from injured cells to stimulate innate immune signaling and inflammatory cytokine production following UVB irradiation. PMID:24825061

  6. Recurrent inflammatory pseudotumor of the jaw with perineural intracranial invasion demonstrating sustained response to Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Bryan A; Tinsley, Sarah; Schellenberger, Thomas; Bobustuc, George C

    2012-12-01

    Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment of inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the head and neck; however, involvement of the skull base and mandible can be unresponsive to steroids and require surgical resection. IPT is known to usually contain a CD20+ lymphocyte subgroup. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody, has been successfully utilized in the treatment of other CD20+ diseases, including the similar idiopathic orbital inflammatory disease. This is the first report to describe successful treatment with Rituximab of a recurrent IPT of the mandible with trigeminal spread and leptomeningeal involvement with clinical and radiologic evidence demonstrating a sustained response to therapy. PMID:22161155

  7. Molecular Inflammatory Responses Measured in Blood of Patients with Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Serrano, Silvia; Dorca, Jordi; Coromines, Mercè; Carratalà, Jordi; Gudiol, Francesc; Manresa, Frederic

    2003-01-01

    In order to analyze the characteristics of the inflammatory response occurring in blood during pneumonia, we studied 38 patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia. Venous and arterial blood samples were collected at study entry and on days 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 after inclusion. The concentrations of proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin 1β [IL-1β], IL-6, and IL-8) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines were determined in order to detect differences related to the origin of the sample, the causative organism, the clinical variables, and the final outcome of the episode. Legionella pneumonia infections showed higher concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. After 24 h, plasma IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 concentrations in pneumococcal episodes increased, whereas in the same time interval, cytokine concentrations in Legionella episodes markedly decreased. The characteristics of the inflammatory response in bacteremic pneumococcal episodes were different from those in nonbacteremic episodes, as indicated by the higher plasma cytokine concentrations in the former group. Finally, our analysis of cytokine concentrations with regard to the outcome—in terms of the need for intensive care unit admittance and/or mechanical ventilation as well as mortality—suggests that there is a direct relationship between the intensity of the inflammatory response measured in blood and the severity of the episode. PMID:12965910

  8. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Enhance Early Inflammatory Response in Sendai Virus-Induced Asthma Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Akk, Antonina; Springer, Luke E; Pham, Christine T N

    2016-01-01

    Paramyxoviral infection in childhood has been linked to a significant increased rate of asthma development. In mice, paramyxoviral infection with the mouse parainfluenza virus type I, Sendai virus (Sev), causes a limited bronchiolitis followed by persistent asthma traits. We have previously shown that the absence of cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) dampened the acute lung inflammatory response and the subsequent asthma phenotype induced by Sev. Adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils into DPPI-deficient mice restored leukocyte influx, the acute cytokine response, and the subsequent mucous cell metaplasia that accompanied Sev-induced asthma phenotype. However, the exact mechanism by which DPPI-sufficient neutrophils promote asthma development following Sev infection is still unknown. We hypothesize that neutrophils recruited to the alveolar space following Sev infection elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that propagate the inflammatory cascade, culminating in the eventual asthma phenotype. Indeed, we found that Sev infection was associated with NET formation in the lung and release of cell-free DNA complexed to myeloperoxidase in the alveolar space and plasma that peaked on day 2 post infection. Absence of DPPI significantly attenuated Sev-induced NET formation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, concomitant administration of DNase 1, which dismantled NETs, or inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), an essential mediator of NET formation, suppressed the early inflammatory responses to Sev infection. Lastly, NETs primed bone marrow-derived cells to release cytokines that can amplify the inflammatory cascade. PMID:27617014

  9. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Enhance Early Inflammatory Response in Sendai Virus-Induced Asthma Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Akk, Antonina; Springer, Luke E.; Pham, Christine T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Paramyxoviral infection in childhood has been linked to a significant increased rate of asthma development. In mice, paramyxoviral infection with the mouse parainfluenza virus type I, Sendai virus (Sev), causes a limited bronchiolitis followed by persistent asthma traits. We have previously shown that the absence of cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) dampened the acute lung inflammatory response and the subsequent asthma phenotype induced by Sev. Adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils into DPPI-deficient mice restored leukocyte influx, the acute cytokine response, and the subsequent mucous cell metaplasia that accompanied Sev-induced asthma phenotype. However, the exact mechanism by which DPPI-sufficient neutrophils promote asthma development following Sev infection is still unknown. We hypothesize that neutrophils recruited to the alveolar space following Sev infection elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that propagate the inflammatory cascade, culminating in the eventual asthma phenotype. Indeed, we found that Sev infection was associated with NET formation in the lung and release of cell-free DNA complexed to myeloperoxidase in the alveolar space and plasma that peaked on day 2 post infection. Absence of DPPI significantly attenuated Sev-induced NET formation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, concomitant administration of DNase 1, which dismantled NETs, or inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), an essential mediator of NET formation, suppressed the early inflammatory responses to Sev infection. Lastly, NETs primed bone marrow-derived cells to release cytokines that can amplify the inflammatory cascade.

  10. Apolipoprotein E knockout induced inflammatory responses related to microglia in neonatal mice brain via astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yimei; Xu, Xiaohua; Dou, Hongbo; Hua, Ying; Xu, Jinwen; Hui, Xu

    2015-01-01

    More and more evidences suggestted that ApoE plays an important role in modulating the systemic and central nervous inflammatory responses. However, there is a lack of exacted mechanism of ApoE. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether apolipoprotein E (ApoE) induced inflammatory responses and apoptosis in neonatal mice brain from ApoE deficient (ApoE-/-) and wildtype (WT). Compared to control group, the microglia cell from ApoE-/- mice showed more severe inflammation and cell death such as iNOS and IL-1β. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory such as TGF-β, IL-10 from microglia and astrocytes in ApoE-/- mice were decreased. On the other way, TGF-β from astrocytes can inhibit inflammation factors secretion from microglia. Our findings suggested that the anti- inflammation factor such as IL-10 mainly from microglia and TGF-β mainly from astrocyte is significant decreased after Loss of ApoE function in ApoE-/- mice which induced severe inflammation. Furthrtmore, anti- inflammation factor such as IL-10 and TGF-β Therefore, we conclude that apolipoprotein E knockout induced inflammatory responses related to microglia in neonatal mice brain via astrocytes. PMID:25785051

  11. Post-traumatic inflammatory response: perhaps a succession of phases with a nutritional purpose.

    PubMed

    Aller, Maria-Angeles; Arias, Jorge-Luis; Arias, Jaime

    2004-01-01

    Post-traumatic inflammatory response, whether this be local or systemic, is considered to be the succession of three functional phases called nervous, immune and endocrine, that could have a nutritional significance. In the nervous phase, ischemia-reperfusion, which causes interstitial and cellular edema, is produced. Both types of edema could represent an ancestral mechanism to feed the cells by diffusion. During the immune phase, the tissues are infiltrated by inflammatory cells and bacteria. Then, extracellular digestion, by enzyme release (fermentation), and intracellular digestion by phagocytosis could be associated with a hypothetical trophic capacity for the neighbouring cells. Finally, in the late or endocrine phase nutrition mediated by the blood capillaries is established. In these three successive phases the inflammatory response goes on from an anaerobic metabolism (ischemia) through a metabolism characterized by a defective oxygen use (reperfusion, oxidative burst and heat hyperproduction) to an oxidative metabolism (oxidative phosphorilation) with a correct use of oxygen to produce usable energy. This type of metabolism is characterized by a large production of ATP, which is used to drive specialized multiple cellular processes. Since the nervous, immune and endocrine phases of the inflammatory response go from ischemia to the development of an oxidative metabolism, It is also tempting to speculate on whether the body reproduces the successive stages by which life passes from its origin without oxygen until it develops an effective, although costly, system for the use of oxygen every time we suffer post-traumatic acute inflammation. PMID:15193345

  12. Decoy Receptor 3 Improves Survival in Experimental Sepsis by Suppressing the Inflammatory Response and Lymphocyte Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, DongYu; Hou, YanQiang; Lou, XiaoLi; Chen, HongWei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Unbalanced inflammatory response and lymphocyte apoptosis is associated with high mortality in septic patients. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, is an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic factor. Recently, DcR3 expression was found to be increased in septic patients. This study evaluated the therapeutic effect and mechanisms of DcR3 on cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were subjected to CLP-induced polymicrobial sepsis. DcR3 Fc was intravenously injected 30 min before and 6 h after CLP. Bacterial clearance, cytokine production, histology, lymphocyte apoptosis and survival were evaluated. Furthermore, we investigated the systemic effects of DcR3 in in vitro lymphocyte apoptosis regulation. Results Our results demonstrated that DcR3 protein treatments significantly improved survival in septic mice (p <0.05). Treatment with DcR3 protein significantly reduced the inflammatory response and decreased lymphocyte apoptosis in the thymus and spleen. Histopathological findings of the lung and liver showed milder impairment after DcR3 administration. In vitro experiments showed that DcR3 Fc inhibited Fas-FasL mediated lymphocyte apoptosis. Conclusions Treatment with the DcR3 protein protects mice from sepsis by suppressing the inflammatory response and lymphocyte apoptosis. DcR3 protein may be useful in treatment of sepsis. PMID:26121476

  13. Gemfibrozil attenuates the inflammatory response and protects rats from abdominal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    CÁMARA-LEMARROY, CARLOS R.; GUZMAN-DE LA GARZA, FRANCISCO J.; CORDERO-PEREZ, PAULA; IBARRA-HERNANDEZ, JUAN M.; MUÑOZ-ESPINOSA, LINDA E.; FERNANDEZ-GARZA, NANCY E.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a serious condition characterized by an infectious process that induces a severe systemic inflammatory response. In this study, the effects of gemfibrozil (GFZ) on the inflammatory response associated with abdominal sepsis were investigated using a rat model of cecal-ligation and puncture (CLP). Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: Sham-operated group (sham), where laparotomy was performed, the intestines were manipulated, and the cecum was ligated but not punctured; control group, subjected to CLP; and GFZ group, which received GFZ prior to undergoing CLP. The groups were then subdivided into three different time-points: 2, 4 and 24 h, indicating the time at which blood samples were obtained for analysis. Serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), malondialdehyde (MDA), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined. The LDH, AST and ALT values were significantly elevated following CLP compared with those in the sham group, and GFZ treatment was able to reduce these elevations. GFZ also reduced the sepsis-induced elevations of TNF-α and IL-1. In conclusion, GFZ treatment was able to attenuate the inflammatory response associated with CLP-induced sepsis, by diminishing the release of inflammatory cytokines, thereby reducing tissue injury and oxidative stress. PMID:25667670

  14. The uptake of PLGA micro or nanoparticles by macrophages provokes distinct in vitro inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Nicolete, Roberto; dos Santos, Daiane F; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2011-10-01

    Biodegradable micro/nanoparticles generated from PLGA have recently attracted attention due to their clinically proven biocompatibility, especially for immunization purposes. These polymeric particulate delivery systems are able to present antigens and activate both humoral and cellular responses. Many studies have discussed the ideal size of these particles in contributing to the generation of the different types of immune response. However, these studies do not demonstrate the effect of micro or nanoparticles, without any encapsulated bioactive, on phagocytic cells after the uptake process. In this context, the aim of this study was to analyze the in vitro inflammatory behavior of J774 murine macrophages after particles' uptake, since nano/microparticles per se can differently activate phagocytic cells, using or not appropriate receptors, inducing distinct inflammatory responses. An o/w emulsion solvent extraction-evaporation method was chosen to prepare the particles. We determined their diameters, zeta potential and morphology. Fluorescent particles' uptake by J774 murine "macrophage-like" cells was also analyzed. To evaluate the in vitro inflammatory profile of these cells after micro or nanoparticles' uptake, we conducted NF-κB translocation assay by confocal microscopy and also determined the pro-inflammatory cytokines production provoked by the particles. PMID:21621649

  15. The HMGB1 signaling pathway activates the inflammatory response in Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Man, Li-li; Liu, Fan; Wang, Ying-jie; Song, Hong-hua; Xu, Hong-bo; Zhu, Zi-wen; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yong-jun

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells are not only myelinating cells, but also function as immune cells and express numerous innate pattern recognition receptors, including the Toll-like receptors. Injury to peripheral nerves activates an inflammatory response in Schwann cells. However, it is unclear whether specific endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern molecules are involved in the inflammatory response following nerve injury. In the present study, we demonstrate that a key damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), is upregulated following rat sciatic nerve axotomy, and we show colocalization of the protein with Schw-ann cells. HMGB1 alone could not enhance expression of Toll-like receptors or the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but was able to facilitate migration of Schwann cells. When Schwann cells were treated with HMGB1 together with lipopolysaccharide, the expression levels of Toll-like receptors and RAGE, as well as inflammatory cytokines were upregulated. Our novel findings demonstrate that the HMGB1 pathway activates the inflammatory response in Schwann cells following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26692874

  16. Microbiota signalling through MyD88 is necessary for a systemic neutrophilic inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Karmarkar, Dipti; Rock, Kenneth L

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we have found that intestinal flora strongly influence peritoneal neutrophilic inflammatory responses to diverse stimuli, including pathogen-derived particles like zymosan and sterile irritant particles like crystals. When germ-free and flora-deficient (antibiotic-treated) mice are challenged with zymosan intraperitoneally, neutrophils are markedly impaired in their ability to extravasate from blood into the peritoneum. In contrast, in these animals, neutrophils can extravasate in response to an intraperitoneal injection of the chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 2. Neutrophil recruitment upon inflammatory challenge requires stimulation by microbiota through a myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) -dependent pathway. MyD88 signalling is crucial during the development of the immune system but depending upon the ligand it may be dispensable at the time of the actual inflammatory challenge. Furthermore, pre-treatment of flora-deficient mice with a purified MyD88-pathway agonist is sufficient to restore neutrophil migration. In summary, this study provides insight into the role of gut microbiota in influencing acute inflammation at sites outside the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23909393

  17. Fucoidan from sea cucumber may improve hepatic inflammatory response and insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhui; Hu, Shiwei; Jiang, Wei; Song, Wendong; Cai, Lu; Wang, Jingfeng

    2016-02-01

    Nutrition excess-induced inflammation positively contributed to insulin resistance. Fucoidan from sea cucumber can increase glucose translocation in skeletal muscle. However, its effects on inflammation-associated insulin resistance are not understood. We investigated fucoidan from Isostichopus badionotus (Ib-FUC)-alleviated inflammatory response and signaling as well as -improved insulin resistance in the liver of obesity mice. The results showed that Ib-FUC reduced body weight and glucose levels, increased insulin sensitivity, and inhibited serum lipid concentrations. Meanwhile, Hepatic glycogen synthesis was promoted by Ib-FUC via activation of the PI3K/PKB/GSK-3β signaling and regulation of glucose metabolism-related enzymatic activities. Ib-FUC regulated serum inflammatory cytokines and their mRNA expression in the liver. Ib-FUC-induced inactivation of the JNK and IKKβ/NFκB pathways was involved in the activation of insulin signal cascade and inflammatory factor production. These findings suggested that Ib-FUC supplementary-induced alleviation of inflammatory response could be a mechanism responsible for its beneficial effects against hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:26690975

  18. B-Cell-Deficient Mice Show an Exacerbated Inflammatory Response in a Model of Chlamydophila abortus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Buendía, Antonio J.; Del Río, Laura; Ortega, Nieves; Sánchez, Joaquín; Gallego, María C.; Caro, María R.; Navarro, Jose A.; Cuello, Francisco; Salinas, Jesús

    2002-01-01

    The resolution of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) infection is dependent on gamma interferon and CD8+ T cells, and classically, B cells have been considered to play a minimal role in host defense. The role of B cells in the immune response was studied by using a model of infection in mice with genetically modified immunoglobulin M transmembrane domains (μMT). In the absence of B cells, infection with C. abortus leads to an acute severe fatal disease that involves a disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome. μMT mice displayed an increased level of proinflammatory cytokines in serum, and an increased number of neutrophils was observed in the lesions. The possible deleterious role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of disease in μMT mice was determined by depletion of the neutrophils with the monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5. This led to an enhancement of the bacterial burden and early mortality in both μMT and wild-type mice, while necrotic lesions remained. Analysis of the presence of immunoregulatory cytokines showed significantly lower levels of transforming growth factor β in the sera of μMT mice. However, mice lacking mature B cells were able to establish a specific immune response that protected them from a secondary challenge. Taken together, these data suggest an immunomodulatory role for B cells in the early events of C. abortus primary infection that can protect mice against an exaggerated inflammatory response. PMID:12438369

  19. Metformin inhibits inflammatory response via AMPK-PTEN pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Ae; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN was induced by metformin and inhibited by compound C and AMPK siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 and iNOS mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound C and bpv (pic) increased iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B activation was restored by inhibiting AMPK and PTEN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK and PTEN regulated TNF-{alpha}-induced ROS production in VSMCs. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the coronary arteries. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by cytokines and chemokines accelerate the inflammatory response and migrate to the injured endothelium during the progression of atherosclerosis. Activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor maintaining metabolic homeostasis, suppresses the inflammatory response. However, how AMPK regulates the inflammatory response is poorly understood. To identify the mechanism of this response, we focused on phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which is a negative regulator of inflammation. We investigated that activation of AMPK-induced PTEN expression and suppression of the inflammatory response through the AMPK-PTEN pathway in VSMCs. We treated with the well-known AMPK activator metformin to induce PTEN expression. PTEN was induced by metformin (2 mM) and inhibited by compound C (10 {mu}M) and AMPK siRNA. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) was used to induce inflammation. The inflammatory response was confirmed by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B. Metformin suppressed COX-2 and iNOS mRNA and protein expression dose dependently. Treatment with compound C and bpv (pic) in the presence of metformin, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression increased. NF-{kappa}B activation decreased in response to metformin and was restored by inhibiting AMPK

  20. Role of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta in the inflammatory response caused by bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) plays a fundamental role during the inflammatory response induced by bacteria. Depending on the pathogen and its virulence factors, the type of cell and probably the context in which the interaction between host cells and bacteria takes place, GSK3β may promote or inhibit inflammation. The goal of this review is to discuss recent findings on the role of the inhibition or activation of GSK3β and its modulation of the inflammatory signaling in monocytes/macrophages and epithelial cells at the transcriptional level, mainly through the regulation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activity. Also included is a brief overview on the importance of GSK3 in non-inflammatory processes during bacterial infection. PMID:22691598

  1. Three diketopiperazines from marine-derived bacteria inhibit LPS-induced endothelial inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyejin; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Choi, Hyukjae; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-04-15

    Diketopiperazine is a natural products found from bacteria, fungi, marine sponges, gorgonian and red algae. They are cyclic dipeptides possessing relatively simple and rigid structures with chiral nature and various side chains. Endothelial dysfunction is a key pathological feature of many inflammatory diseases, including sepsis. In the present study, three (1-3) of diketopiperazines were isolated from two strains of marine-derived bacteria. The compounds were investigated for their effects against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated endothelial inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. From 1μM, 1-3 inhibited LPS-induced hyperpermeability, adhesion, and migration of leukocytes across a human endothelial cell monolayer and in mice in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that 1-3 may serve as potential scaffolds for the development of therapeutic agents to treat vascular inflammatory disorders. PMID:26988307

  2. Inflammatory response of macrophages cultured with Helicobacter pylori strains was regulated by miR-155.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongliang; Li, Guangxin; Wu, Jianhong; Zhang, Xian; Wang, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-155 plays an important role in the inflammatory response macrophages, while present studies identified that miR-155 was up-expressed in gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori. We found that miR-155 was over expressed in macrophages infected with H. pylori in vivo or in vitro. Subsequently, inflammatory cytokines IL-23, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-8 were increased significantly, and the expression of CD80, CD86 or COX2, NOS2. Were enhanced in H. pylori infection macrophages by regulated with miR-155mimics. Furthermore, the apoptosis of macrophages induced by H. pylori was increased obviously due to the over-expression of miR-155. Therefore, these observations indicated that miR-155 may act as a inflammatory promoter in H. pylori infected macrophages. These findings contribute us to understand the functions of miR-155 in gastritis induced by H. pylori furtherly. PMID:26191144

  3. Effects of Thymol and Carvacrol, Constituents of Thymus vulgaris L. Essential Oil, on the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Fachini-Queiroz, Fernanda Carolina; Kummer, Raquel; Estevão-Silva, Camila Fernanda; Carvalho, Maria Dalva de Barros; Cunha, Joice Maria; Grespan, Renata; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., Lamiaceae) is an aromatic and medicinal plant that has been used in folk medicine, phytopharmaceutical preparations, food preservatives, and as an aromatic ingredient. The effect of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) and its isolated constituents thymol and cavacrol (CVL) were studied in the following experimental models: ear edema, carrageenan-induced pleurisy, and chemotaxis in vitro. In the pleurisy model, TEO, CVL, and thymol significantly inhibited inflammatory edema. However, only TEO and CVL inhibited leukocyte migration. In the in vitro chemotaxis experiment, CVL inhibited leukocyte migration, whereas thymol exerted a potent chemoattractant effect. In the ear edema model, CVL (10 mg/ear), applied topically, reduced edema formation, exerting a topical anti-inflammatory effect. Thymol did not reduce edema formation but rather presented an irritative response, probably dependent on histamine and prostanoid release. Our data suggest that the antiinflammatory effects of TEO and CVL are attributable to the inhibition of inflammatory edema and leukocyte migration. PMID:22919415

  4. Bioinformatics analysis of the early inflammatory response in a rat thermal injury model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eric; Maguire, Timothy; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2007-01-01

    Background Thermal injury is among the most severe forms of trauma and its effects are both local and systemic. Response to thermal injury includes cellular protection mechanisms, inflammation, hypermetabolism, prolonged catabolism, organ dysfunction and immuno-suppression. It has been hypothesized that gene expression patterns in the liver will change with severe burns, thus reflecting the role the liver plays in the response to burn injury. Characterizing the molecular fingerprint (i.e., expression profile) of the inflammatory response resulting from burns may help elucidate the activated mechanisms and suggest new therapeutic intervention. In this paper we propose a novel integrated framework for analyzing time-series transcriptional data, with emphasis on the burn-induced response within the context of the rat animal model. Our analysis robustly identifies critical expression motifs, indicative of the dynamic evolution of the inflammatory response and we further propose a putative reconstruction of the associated transcription factor activities. Results Implementation of our algorithm on data obtained from an animal (rat) burn injury study identified 281 genes corresponding to 4 unique profiles. Enrichment evaluation upon both gene ontologies and transcription factors, verifies the inflammation-specific character of the selections and the rationalization of the burn-induced inflammatory response. Conducting the transcription network reconstruction and analysis, we have identified transcription factors, including AHR, Octamer Binding Proteins, Kruppel-like Factors, and cell cycle regulators as being highly important to an organism's response to burn response. These transcription factors are notable due to their roles in pathways that play a part in the gross physiological response to burn such as changes in the immune response and inflammation. Conclusion Our results indicate that our novel selection/classification algorithm has been successful in selecting out

  5. Dexamethasone Coated Neural Probes Elicit Attenuated Inflammatory Response and Neuronal Loss Compared to Uncoated Neural Probes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yinghui; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2007-01-01

    Glial scar formation around implanted silicon neural probes compromises their ability to facilitate long-term recordings. One approach to modulate the tissue reaction around implanted probes in the brain is to develop probe coatings that locally release antiinflammatory drugs. In this study, we developed a nitrocellulose-based coating for the local delivery of the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone (DEX). Silicon neural probes with and without nitrocellulose-DEX coatings were implanted into rat brains, and inflammatory response was evaluated 1 week and 4 weeks post implantation. DEX coatings significantly reduced the reactivity of microglia and macrophages one week post implantation as evidenced by ED1 immunostaining. CS56 staining demonstrated that DEX treatment significantly reduced chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) expression one week post implantation. Both at one week and at four week time points, GFAP staining for reactive astrocytes and neurofilament (NF) staining revealed that local DEX treatment significantly attenuated astroglial response and reduced neuronal loss in the vicinity of the probes. Weak ED1, neurocan, and NG2 positive signal was detected four weeks post implantation for both coated and uncoated probes, suggesting a stabilization of the inflammatory response over time in this implant model. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the nitrocellulose-DEX coating can effectively attenuate the inflammatory response to the implanted neural probes, and reduce neuronal loss in the vicinity of the coated probes. Thus anti-inflammatory probe coatings may represent a promising approach to attenuate astroglial scar and reduce neural loss around implanted neural probes. PMID:17376408

  6. OXYGEN MITIGATES THE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE IN A MODEL OF HEMORRHAGE AND ZYMOSAN-INDUCED INFLAMMATION.

    PubMed

    Rahat, Michal A; Brod, Vera; Amit-Cohen, Bat-Chen; Henig, Oryan; Younis, Said; Bitterman, Haim

    2016-02-01

    Sequential insults (hits) may change the inflammatory reaction that develops in response to separate single hits (e.g., injury, infection); however, their effects on the long-term clinical outcome are still only partially elucidated. Double-hit models are typically severe and fatal. We characterized in C57BL/6 mice a moderate double-hit model of hemorrhage (35%-40% of total blood volume) and resuscitation, followed by peritoneal injection of zymosan A that induced local and systemic inflammation with 58% mortality. This model allowed exploration of the inflammatory response over time in the surviving mice. We show that after 2 days, mice subjected to the double-hit model had elevated proinflammatory systemic and local peritoneal cytokine response (interleukin [IL]-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6) and moderately elevated anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, transforming growth factor-β), compared with the single-hit and sham mice. However, this dynamically changed, and by day 7, proinflammatory cytokines were reduced, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were markedly (P < 0.05) elevated in the double-hit group. Mice in the double-hit group that inhaled 100% oxygen intermittently for 6 h every day exhibited markedly reduced serum proinflammatory cytokines as early as day 2 (P < 0.05), inhibited macrophage infiltration into the peritoneum (by 13-fold; P < 0.05), and substantially increased survival rates of 85% (P = 0.00144). Oxygen mitigates the inflammatory response and exerts a beneficial effect on survival in a double-hit model of hemorrhage and zymosan-induced inflammation. PMID:26771936

  7. Technical Approach Determines Inflammatory Response after Surgical and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Erdoes, Gabor; Lippuner, Christoph; Kocsis, Istvan; Schiff, Marcel; Stucki, Monika; Carrel, Thierry; Windecker, Stephan; Eberle, Balthasar; Stueber, Frank; Book, Malte

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the periprocedural inflammatory response in patients with isolated aortic valve stenosis undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with different technical approaches. Material and Methods Patients were prospectively allocated to one of the following treatments: SAVR using conventional extracorporeal circulation (CECC, n = 47) or minimized extracorporeal circulation (MECC, n = 15), or TAVI using either transapical (TA, n = 15) or transfemoral (TF, n = 24) access. Exclusion criteria included infection, pre-procedural immunosuppressive or antibiotic drug therapy and emergency indications. We investigated interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR), white blood cell count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and soluble L-selectin (sCD62L) levels before the procedure and at 4, 24, and 48 h after aortic valve replacement. Data are presented for group interaction (p-values for inter-group comparison) as determined by the Greenhouse-Geisser correction. Results SAVR on CECC was associated with the highest levels of IL-8 and hs-CRP (p<0.017, and 0.007, respectively). SAVR on MECC showed the highest descent in levels of HLA-DR and sCD62L (both p<0.001) in the perioperative period. TA-TAVI showed increased intraprocedural concentration and the highest peak of IL-6 (p = 0.017). Significantly smaller changes in the inflammatory markers were observed in TF-TAVI. Conclusion Surgical and interventional approaches to aortic valve replacement result in inflammatory modulation which differs according to the invasiveness of the procedure. As expected, extracorporeal circulation is associated with the most marked pro-inflammatory activation, whereas TF-TAVI emerges as the approach with the most attenuated inflammatory response. Factors such as the pre-treatment patient condition and the extent of myocardial injury also significantly affect inflammatory biomarker patterns

  8. EGCG Attenuates Uric Acid-Induced Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses by Medicating the NOTCH Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hua; Sun, Jianqin; Chen, Yanqiu; Zong, Min; Li, Shijie; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate whether (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can prevent the UA-induced inflammatory effect of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the involved mechanisms in vitro. Methods. HUVEC were subjected to uric acid (UA) with or without EGCG treatment. RT-PCR and western blots were performed to determine the level of inflammation marker. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring scavenged reactive oxygen species (ROS). Functional studies of the role of Notch-1 in HUVEC lines were performed using RNA interference analyses. Results. UA significantly increased the expressions of IL-6, ICAM-1, TNF-α, and MCP-1 and the production of ROS in HUVEC. Meanwhile, the expression of Notch-1 and its downstream effects significantly increased. Using siRNA, inhibition of Notch-1 signaling significantly impeded the expressions of inflammatory cytokines under UA treatment. Interestingly, EGCG suppressed the expressions of inflammatory cytokines and the generation of ROS. Western blot analysis of Notch-1 showed that EGCG significantly decreased the expressions of inflammatory cytokines through Notch-1 signaling pathways. Conclusions. In summary, our findings indicated that Notch-1 plays an important role in the UA-induced inflammatory response, and the downregulation of Notch-1 by EGCG could be an effective approach to decrease inflammation and oxidative stress induced by UA. PMID:26539255

  9. Safflower Yellow regulates microglial polarization and inhibits inflammatory response in LPS-stimulated Bv2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing-Wang; Li, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yong-Fei; Ding, Zhi-Bin; Yu, Jie-Zhong; Liu, Chun-Yun; Liu, Jian-Chun; Jiang, Wei-Jia; Feng, Qian-Jin; Xiao, Bao-Guo; Ma, Cun-Gen

    2016-03-01

    Activated microglia, especially polarized M1 cells, produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and free radicals, thereby contributing directly to neuroinflammation and various brain disorders. Given that excessive or chronic neuroinflammation within the central nervous system (CNS) exacerbates neuronal damage, molecules that modulate neuroinflammation are candidates as neuroprotective agents. In this study, we provide evidence that Safflor yellow (SY), the main active component in the traditional Chinese medicine safflower, modulates inflammatory responses by acting directly on BV2 microglia. LPS stimulated BV2 cells to upregulate expression of TLR4-Myd88 and MAPK-NF-κB signaling pathways and to release IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and COX-2. However, SY treatment inhibited expression of TLR4-Myd88 and p-38/p-JNK-NF-κB, downregulated expression of iNOS, CD16/32, and IL-12, and upregulated CD206 and IL-10. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that SY exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on BV2 microglia, possibly through TLR-4/p-38/p-JNK/NF-κB signaling pathways and the conversion of microglia from inflammatory M1 to an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. PMID:26634402

  10. GBA2-Encoded β-Glucosidase Activity Is Involved in the Inflammatory Response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lampronti, Ilaria; Marchetti, Nicola; Aureli, Massimo; Bassi, Rosaria; Giri, Maria Grazia; Bezzerri, Valentino; Lovato, Valentina; Cantù, Cinzia; Munari, Silvia; Cheng, Seng H.; Cavazzini, Alberto; Gambari, Roberto; Sonnino, Sandro; Cabrini, Giulio; Dechecchi, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Current anti-inflammatory strategies for the treatment of pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) are limited; thus, there is continued interest in identifying additional molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Given the emerging role of sphingolipids (SLs) in various respiratory disorders, including CF, drugs that selectively target the enzymes associated with SL metabolism are under development. Miglustat, a well-characterized iminosugar-based inhibitor of β-glucosidase 2 (GBA2), has shown promise in CF treatment because it reduces the inflammatory response to infection by P. aeruginosa and restores F508del-CFTR chloride channel activity. This study aimed to probe the molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory activity of miglustat by examining specifically the role of GBA2 following the infection of CF bronchial epithelial cells by P. aeruginosa. We also report the anti-inflammatory activity of another potent inhibitor of GBA2 activity, namely N-(5-adamantane-1-yl-methoxy)pentyl)-deoxynojirimycin (Genz-529648). In CF bronchial cells, inhibition of GBA2 by miglustat or Genz-529648 significantly reduced the induction of IL-8 mRNA levels and protein release following infection by P. aeruginosa. Hence, the present data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of miglustat and Genz-529648 are likely exerted through inhibition of GBA2. PMID:25141135

  11. Carvacrol Exerts Neuroprotective Effects Via Suppression of the Inflammatory Response in Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenlan; Hua, Cong; Pan, Xiaoqiang; Fu, Xijia; Wu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that inflammation plays an important role in cerebral ischemia. Carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol, is naturally occurring in various plants belonging to the family Lamiaceae and exerts protective effects in a mice model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by reducing infarct volume and decreasing the expression of cleaved caspase-3. However, the anti-inflammatory mechanisms by which carvacrol protect the brain have yet to be fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of carvacrol on inflammatory reaction and inflammatory mediators in middle cerebral artery occlusion rats. The results of the present study showed that carvacrol inhibited the levels of inflammatory cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the expression of iNOS and COX-2. It also increased SOD activity and decreased MDA level in ischemic cortical tissues. In addition, carvacrol treatment suppressed the ischemia/reperfusion-induced increase in the protein expression of nuclear NF-kB p65. In conclusion, we have shown that carvacrol inhibits the inflammatory response via inhibition of the NF-kB signaling pathway in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Therefore, carvacrol may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of cerebral ischemia injury. PMID:27324156

  12. Paucity of Initial Cerebrospinal Fluid Inflammation in Cryptococcal Meningitis is associated with subsequent Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, David R.; Bonham, Shulamith C.; Meya, David B.; Wiesner, Darin L.; Park, Gregory S.; Kambugu, Andrew; Janoff, Edward N.; Bohjanen, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    Background Cryptococcal meningitis (CM)-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) complicates antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 20–40% of ART-naïve persons with AIDS and prior CM. Pathogenesis is unknown. Methods We compared initial CSF cultures, inflammatory markers and cytokine profiles in ART-naïve AIDS patients who did or did not subsequently develop IRIS after starting ART. We also compared results obtained at IRIS events or CM-relapse. Results Of 85 subjects with CM, 33 (39%) developed CM-IRIS and 5 (6%) developed culture-positive CM-relapse. At CM diagnosis, subjects subsequently developing IRIS had less inflammation, with decreased CSF leukocytes, protein, interferon-gamma (IFN-g), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a) compared with subjects not developing IRIS (P<.05). Initial CSF WBCs ≤25 cells/μL and protein ≤50 mg/dL were associated with development of IRIS (OR=7.2, 95%CI: 2.7 to 18.7, P<.001). Compared to baseline levels, we identified CSF elevations of IFN-g, TNF-a, G-CSF, VEGF, and eotaxin (CCL11) (P<.05) at IRIS but minimal inflammatory changes in those with CM relapse. Conclusions Patients who subsequently develop CM-IRIS exhibit less initial CSF inflammation at the time of CM diagnosis compared to those who do not develop IRIS. The inflammatory CSF cytokine profiles observed at time of IRIS can distinguish IRIS from CM-relapse. PMID:20677939

  13. Mitochondrial Ca2+-dependent NLRP3 activation exacerbates the Pseudomonas aeruginosa-driven inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rimessi, Alessandro; Bezzerri, Valentino; Patergnani, Simone; Marchi, Saverio; Cabrini, Giulio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The common pathological manifestation of cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with an excessive lung inflammatory response characterized by interleukin-1β accumulation. CF airway epithelial cells show an exacerbated pro-inflammatory response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa; however, it is unclear whether this heightened inflammatory response is intrinsic to cells lacking CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Here we demonstrate that the degree and quality of the inflammatory response in CF are supported by P. aeruginosa-dependent mitochondrial perturbation, in which flagellin is the inducer and mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) is a signal-integrating organelle member for NLRP3 activation and IL-1β and IL-18 processing. Our work elucidates the regulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by mitochondrial Ca(2+) in the P. aeruginosa-dependent inflammatory response and deepens our understanding of the significance of mitochondria in the Ca(2+)-dependent control of inflammation. PMID:25648527

  14. Sexually dimorphic myeloid inflammatory and metabolic responses to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C; Lanzetta, N; Eter, L; Singer, K

    2016-08-01

    It is well known in clinical and animal studies that women and men have different disease risk as well as different disease physiology. Women of reproductive age are protected from metabolic and cardiovascular disease compared with postmenopausal women and men. Most murine studies are skewed toward the use of male mice to study obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction because of similar protection in female mice. We have investigated dietary obesity in a mouse model and have directly compared inflammatory responses in males and females. In this review we will summarize what is known about sex differences in diet-induced inflammation and will summarize our data on this topic. It is clear that sex differences in high-fat diet-induced inflammatory activation are due to cell intrinsic differences in hematopoietic responses to obesogenic cues, but further research is needed to understand what leads to sexually dimorphic responses. PMID:27252473

  15. Fasciola hepatica Kunitz Type Molecule Decreases Dendritic Cell Activation and Their Ability to Induce Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Falcón, Cristian R.; Masih, Diana; Gatti, Gerardo; Sanchez, María Cecilia; Motrán, Claudia C.; Cervi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The complete repertoire of proteins with immunomodulatory activity in Fasciola hepatica (Fh) has not yet been fully described. Here, we demonstrated that Fh total extract (TE) reduced LPS-induced DC maturation, and the DC ability to induce allogeneic responses. After TE fractionating, a fraction lower than 10 kDa (F<10 kDa) was able to maintain the TE properties to modulate the DC pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production induced by LPS. In addition, TE or F<10 kDa treatment decreased the ability of immature DC to stimulate the allogeneic responses and induced a novo allogeneic CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. In contrast, treatment of DC with T/L or F<10 kDa plus LPS (F<10/L) induced a regulatory IL-27 dependent mechanism that diminished the proliferative and Th1 and Th17 allogeneic responses. Finally, we showed that a Kunitz type molecule (Fh-KTM), present in F<10 kDa, was responsible for suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production in LPS-activated DC, by printing tolerogenic features on DC that impaired their ability to induce inflammatory responses. These results suggest a modulatory role for this protein, which may be involved in the immune evasion mechanisms of the parasite. PMID:25486609

  16. Mycobacterium fortuitum induces A20 expression that impairs macrophage inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gippeum Joy; Lee, Hye-Mi; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyung; Sohn, Kyung Mok; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rapidly growing mycobacterium that has been regarded as an etiological agent of a variety of human infections. However, little is known about the host inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms by which MF-induced inflammation is regulated in macrophages. In this study, we report that MF infection leads to the induction of an anti-inflammatory molecule, A20 (also known as TNFAIP3), which is essential for the regulation of MF-induced inflammatory responses in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). MF triggered the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in BMDMs through signaling of the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88. Additionally, MF rapidly induced the expression of A20, which inhibited proinflammatory cytokine expression and nuclear factor (NF)-κB reporter gene activities in BMDMs. Notably, MF-induced activation of NF-κB signaling was required for A20 expression and proinflammatory responses in BMDMs. Furthermore, the rough morphotype of the MF clinical strain induced a higher level of proinflammatory signaling activation, but less A20 induction in BMDMs, compared to the smooth morphotype. Taken together, these results suggest that MF-induced activation of host proinflammatory responses is negatively regulated through TLR2-dependent A20 expression. PMID:26940588

  17. Intensity modulated radiotherapy induces pro-inflammatory and pro-survival responses in prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    EL-SAGHIRE, HOUSSEIN; VANDEVOORDE, CHARLOT; OST, PIET; MONSIEURS, PIETER; MICHAUX, ARLETTE; DE MEERLEER, GERT; BAATOUT, SARAH; THIERENS, HUBERT

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of the modern conformal radiotherapies that is widely used within the context of cancer patient treatment. It uses multiple radiation beams targeted to the tumor, however, large volumes of the body receive low doses of irradiation. Using γ-H2AX and global genome expression analysis, we studied the biological responses induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in prostate cancer patients following IMRT. By means of different bioinformatics analyses, we report that IMRT induced an inflammatory response via the induction of viral, adaptive, and innate immune signaling. In response to growth factors and immune-stimulatory signaling, positive regulation in the progression of cell cycle and DNA replication were induced. This denotes pro-inflammatory and pro-survival responses. Furthermore, double strand DNA breaks were induced in every patient 30 min after the treatment and remaining DNA repair and damage signaling continued after 18–24 h. Nine genes belonging to inflammatory responses (TLR3, SH2D1A and IL18), cell cycle progression (ORC4, SMC2 and CCDC99) and DNA damage and repair (RAD17, SMC6 and MRE11A) were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. This study emphasizes that the risk assessment of health effects from the out-of-field low doses during IMRT should be of concern, as these may increase the risk of secondary cancers and/or systemic inflammation. PMID:24435511

  18. Potential Use of Salivary Markers for Longitudinal Monitoring of Inflammatory Immune Responses to Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Garssen, Johan; Sandalova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination, designed to trigger a protective immune response against infection, is a trigger for mild inflammatory responses. Vaccination studies can address the question of inflammation initiation, levels, and resolution as well as its regulation for respective studied pathogens. Such studies largely based on analyzing the blood components including specific antibodies and cytokines were usually constrained by number of participants and volume of collected blood sample. Hence, blood-based studies may not be able to cover the full dynamic range of inflammation responses induced by vaccination. In this review, the potential of using saliva in addition to blood for studying the kinetics of inflammatory response studies was assessed. Saliva sampling is noninvasive and has a great potential to be used for studies aimed at analysing the magnitude, time course, and variance in immune responses, including inflammation after vaccination. Based on a literature survey of inflammatory biomarkers that can be determined in saliva and an analysis of how these biomarkers could help to understand the mechanisms and dynamics of immune reactivity and inflammation, we propose that the saliva-based approach might have potential to add substantial value to clinical studies, particularly in vulnerable populations such as infants, toddlers, and ill individuals. PMID:27022211

  19. NETs are a source of citrullinated autoantigens and stimulate inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Khandpur, Ritika; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Gizinski, Alison; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Knight, Jason S.; Friday, Sean; Li, Sam; Patel, Rajiv M.; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul; Chen, Pojen; Fox, David A.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2013-01-01

    The early events leading to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain unclear but formation of autoantibodies to citrullinated antigens (ACPA) is considered a key pathogenic phenomenon. Neutrophils isolated from patients with various autoimmune diseases display enhanced extracellular trap formation (NETs), a phenomenon that externalizes autoantigens and immunostimulatory molecules. We investigated whether aberrant NETosis occurs in RA, determined its triggers and examined its deleterious inflammatory consequences. Enhanced NETosis was observed in circulating and synovial fluid RA neutrophils, compared to neutrophils from healthy controls and from patients with osteoarthritis. Further, netting neutrophils infiltrated RA synovial tissue, rheumatoid nodules and skin. NETosis correlated with ACPA presence and levels and with systemic inflammatory markers. RA sera and immunoglobulin fractions from RA patients with high levels of ACPA and/or rheumatoid factor significantly enhanced NETosis, and the NETs induced by these autoantibodies displayed distinct protein content. During NETosis, neutrophils externalized citrullinated autoantigens implicated in RA pathogenesis, whereas anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies potently induced NET formation. The inflammatory cytokines IL-17A and TNF-α induced NETosis in RA neutrophils. In turn, NETs significantly augmented inflammatory responses in RA and OA synovial fibroblasts, including induction of IL-6, IL-8, chemokines and adhesion molecules. These observations implicate accelerated NETosis in RA pathogenesis, through externalization of citrullinated autoantigens and immunostimulatory molecules that may promote aberrant adaptive and innate immune responses in the joint and in the periphery, and perpetuate pathogenic mechanisms in this disease. PMID:23536012

  20. Deer Bone Oil Extract Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses in RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Im, Suji; Park, Yooheon; Hong, Ki-Bae; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of deer bone oil extract (DBOE) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells. DBOE was fractionated by liquid-liquid extraction to obtain two fractions: methanol fraction (DBO-M) and hexane fraction (DBO-H). TLC showed that DBO-M had relatively more hydrophilic lipid complexes, including unsaturated fatty acids, than DBOE and DBO-H. The relative compositions of tetradecenoyl carnitine, α-linoleic acid, and palmitoleic acid increased in the DBO-M fraction by 61, 38, and 32%, respectively, compared with DBOE. The concentration of sugar moieties was 3-fold higher in the DBO-M fraction than DBOE and DBO-H. DBO-M significantly decreased LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. This DBO-M-mediated decrease in NO production was due to downregulation of mRNA and protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In addition, mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenase (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-12β, was suppressed by DBO-M. Our data showed that DBO-M, which has relatively higher sugar content than DBOE and DBO-H, could play an important role in suppressing inflammatory responses by controlling pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators. PMID:27040632

  1. The Sbi Protein Contributes to Staphylococcus aureus Inflammatory Response during Systemic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Cintia Daniela; Garófalo, Ailin; Gómez, Marisa I.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that causes infections that may present high morbidity and mortality. Among its many virulence factors protein A (SpA) and Staphylococcal binding immunoglobulin protein (Sbi) bind the Fc portion of IgG interfering with opsonophagocytosis. We have previously demonstrated that SpA interacts with the TNF-α receptor (TNFR) 1 through each of the five IgG binding domains and induces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The IgG binding domains of Sbi are homologous to those of SpA, which allow us to hypothesize that Sbi might also have a role in the inflammatory response induced by S. aureus. We demonstrate that Sbi is a novel factor that participates in the induction of the inflammatory response during staphylococcal infections via TNFR1 and EGFR mediated signaling as well as downstream MAPKs. The expression of Sbi significantly contributed to IL-6 production and modulated CXCL-1 expression as well as neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection, thus demonstrating for the first time its relevance as a pro-inflammatory staphylococcal antigen in an in vivo model. PMID:26126119

  2. Evidence that mesothelial cells regulate the acute inflammatory response in talc pleurodesis.

    PubMed

    Marchi, E; Vargas, F S; Acencio, M M; Antonangelo, L; Genofre, E H; Teixeira, L R

    2006-11-01

    Intrapleural instillation of talc is used to produce pleurodesis in cases of recurrent malignant pleural effusions. The mechanisms by which pleurodesis is produced remain unknown but may involve either injury or activation of the mesothelium. The aim of the current study was to assess the inflammatory response of pleural mesothelial cells to talc in an experimental model in rabbits. A group of 10 rabbits were injected intrapleurally with talc (200 mg.kg(-1)) and undiluted pleural fluid was collected after 6, 24 or 48 h for measurement of interleukin (IL)-8, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1. Samples of pleura were studied to assess the inflammatory infiltrate and mesothelial cell viability. The pleural fluid IL-8 concentration peaked at 6 h, whereas VEGF and TGF-beta1 concentrations increased steadily over 48 h. Immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin showed a preserved layer of mesothelial cells despite the intense inflammatory pleural reaction. In conclusion, it is proposed that the mesothelial cell, although injured by the talc, may actively mediate the primary inflammatory pleural response in talc-induced pleurodesis. PMID:16870666

  3. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T(reg) and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. PMID:25264193

  4. Identification of Pharmacological Modulators of HMGB1-Induced Inflammatory Response by Cell-Based Screening

    PubMed Central

    Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Módis, Katalin; Pribis, John P.; Al-Abed, Yousef; Yang, Huan; Chevan, Sangeeta; Billiar, Timothy R.; Tracey, Kevin J.; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a highly conserved, ubiquitous protein, is released into the circulation during sterile inflammation (e.g. arthritis, trauma) and circulatory shock. It participates in the pathogenesis of delayed inflammatory responses and organ dysfunction. While several molecules have been identified that modulate the release of HMGB1, less attention has been paid to identify pharmacological inhibitors of the downstream inflammatory processes elicited by HMGB1 (C23-C45 disulfide C106 thiol form). In the current study, a cell-based medium-throughput screening of a 5000+ compound focused library of clinical drugs and drug-like compounds was performed in murine RAW264.7 macrophages, in order to identify modulators of HMGB1-induced tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) production. Clinically used drugs that suppressed HMGB1-induced TNFα production included glucocorticoids, beta agonists, and the anti-HIV compound indinavir. A re-screen of the NIH clinical compound library identified beta-agonists and various intracellular cAMP enhancers as compounds that potentiate the inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids on HMGB1-induced TNFα production. The molecular pathways involved in this synergistic anti-inflammatory effect are related, at least in part, to inhibition of TNFα mRNA synthesis via a synergistic suppression of ERK/IκB activation. Inhibition of TNFα production by prednisolone+salbutamol pretreatment was also confirmed in vivo in mice subjected to HMGB1 injection; this effect was more pronounced than the effect of either of the agents administered separately. The current study unveils several drug-like modulators of HMGB1-mediated inflammatory responses and offers pharmacological directions for the therapeutic suppression of inflammatory responses in HMGB1-dependent diseases. PMID:23799067

  5. BET Inhibition Attenuates Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammatory Response by Suppressing Inflammatory Gene Transcription and Enhancer Activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinjing; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Xiangming; Chen, Ruichuan; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2016-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. H. pylori-initiated chronic gastritis is characterized by enhanced expression of many NF-κB-regulated inflammatory cytokines. Brd4 has emerged as an important NF-κB regulator and regulates the expression of many NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. In this study, we demonstrated that Brd4 was not only actively involved in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene mRNA transcription but also H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene enhancer RNA (eRNA) synthesis. Suppression of H. pylori-induced eRNA synthesis impaired H. pylori-induced mRNA synthesis. Furthermore, H. pylori stimulated NF-κB-dependent recruitment of Brd4 to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes to facilitate the RNA polymerase II-mediated eRNA and mRNA synthesis. Inhibition of Brd4 by JQ1 attenuated H. pylori-induced eRNA and mRNA synthesis for a subset of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. JQ1 also inhibited H. pylori-induced interaction between Brd4 and RelA and the recruitment of Brd4 and RNA polymerase II to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes. Finally, we demonstrated that JQ1 suppressed inflammatory gene expression, inflammation, and cell proliferation in H. pylori-infected mice. These studies highlight the importance of Brd4 in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene expression and suggest that Brd4 could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of H. pylori-triggered inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27084101

  6. Functional Role of Milk Fat Globule-Epidermal Growth Factor VIII in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses and Inflammatory/Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation involves a series of complex biological processes mediated by innate immunity for host defense against pathogen infection. Chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the major causes of serious diseases, including a number of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological diseases. Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8) is a secreted protein found in vertebrates and was initially discovered as a critical component of the milk fat globule. Previously, a number of studies have reported that MFG-E8 contributes to various biological functions including the phagocytic removal of damaged and apoptotic cells from tissues, the induction of VEGF-mediated neovascularization, the maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis, and the promotion of mucosal healing. Recently, emerging studies have reported that MFG-E8 plays a role in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. This review describes the characteristics of MFG-E8-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes recent findings supporting the roles of MFG-E8 in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases, and discusses MFG-E8 targeting as a potential therapeutic strategy for the development of anti-inflammatory/autoimmune disease drugs. PMID:27429513

  7. Endothelial Inflammatory Transcriptional Responses Induced by Plasma Following Inhalation of Diesel Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Ronnebaum, Sarah M.; Madden, Michael; Channell, Meghan M.; Campen, Matthew J.; Willis, Monte S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Air pollution, especially emissions derived from traffic sources, is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, it remains unclear how inhaled factors drive extrapulmonary pathology. Objectives Previously, we found that canonical inflammatory response transcripts were elevated in cultured endothelial cells treated with plasma obtained after exposure compared with pre-exposure samples or filtered air (sham) exposures. While the findings confirmed the presence of bioactive factor(s) in the plasma after diesel inhalation, we wanted to better examine the complete genomic response to investigate 1) major responsive transcripts and 2) collected response pathways and ontogeny that may help to refine this method and inform the pathogenesis. Methods We assayed endothelial RNA with gene expression microarrays, examining the responses of cultured endothelial cells to plasma obtained from 6 healthy human subjects exposed to 100 μg/m3 diesel exhaust or filtered air for 2 h on separate occasions. In addition to pre-exposure baseline samples, we investigated samples obtained immediately-post and 24h-post exposure. Results Microarray analysis of the coronary artery endothelial cells challenged with plasma identified 855 probes that changed over time following diesel exhaust exposure. Over-representation analysis identified inflammatory cytokine pathways were upregulated both at the 2 and 24 h condition. Novel pathways related to FOX transcription factors and secreted extracellular factors were also identified in the microarray analysis. Conclusions These outcomes are consistent with our recent findings that plasma contains bioactive and inflammatory factors following pollutant inhalation. The specific study design implicates a novel pathway related to inflammatory blood borne components that may drive the extrapulmonary toxicity of ambient air pollutants. PMID:25942053

  8. The role of TLR2 in the acute inflammatory response induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Vanessa; Teixeira, Catarina; Borges da Silva, Henrique; D'Império Lima, Maria Regina; Dos-Santos, Maria Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Envenomation by snakes of the species Bothrops atrox induces local and systemic effects. Local effects include drastic tissue damage and a marked inflammatory response as a result of the synthesis and release of a variety of protein and lipid mediators. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways can play an important role in this response, leading to synthesis of these inflammatory mediators. This study investigated the influence of TLR2 on the acute inflammatory response induced by Bothrops atrox venom. Wild-type C57BL/6 mice (WT) and TLR2 gene knockout mice (TLR2(-/-)) were injected with Bothrops atrox venom (BaV), and the following responses to the venom were assessed in peritoneal exudate: leukocyte accumulation; release of mediators, including CCL-2, IL-10, IL-1β, IL-6 and LTB4; protein expression of COX-1 and COX-2; and quantification of their products PGE2 and TXA2. After injection with BaV, the TLR2(-/-) mice (TLR2(-/-)BaV) had higher levels of IL-6 and CCL-2 than WT animals kept under the same conditions (WTBaV), together with an accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), inhibition of IL-1β and LTB4 and reduced mononuclear leukocyte influx. However, no significant differences in COX-2 protein expression or PGE2, TXA2 and IL-10 production between the TLR2(-/-)BaV and WTBav animals were observed. Together, these results indicate that the signaling pathway activated by TLR2 acts by modulating the induced inflammatory response to BaV through the direct action of venom-associated molecular patterns (VAMPs) or indirectly by forming damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and that this may have important therapeutic implications. PMID:27109323

  9. Central inflammatory response to experimental stroke is inhibited by a neuroprotective dose of dietary soy.

    PubMed

    Shambayati, Maryam; Patel, Maharshi; Ma, Yulin; Cunningham, Rebecca L; Schreihofer, Derek A

    2014-12-17

    Dietary soy and soy isoflavones are neuroprotective in experimental cerebral ischemia. Because the isoflavones in soy that are responsible for this neuroprotective effect act as phytoestrogens, we hypothesized that they would mimic the beneficial effects of estrogens on the innate inflammatory response to cerebral ischemia. Ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a soy free diet or a diet containing high dietary levels of soy for 5 weeks, after which they were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) for 90min. Dietary soy was associated with a reduced inflammatory response in the cerebral cortex during the acute innate period 4 and 24h after tMCAO, including significant (>2-fold) reductions in interleukins 1 beta, 2, and 13, and the chemokine CXCL1. However, there was no effect of soy on tumor necrosis factor-alpha or interferon-gamma. Dietary soy was also associated with a 40 percent reduction in the nuclear translocation of p65 nuclear factor kappa B despite an increase in the expression of p65 RELA mRNA. In support of an early effect on the innate immune response to stroke, soy-fed rats had 44 percent fewer activated microglia in the infarct core than soy free rats. Interestingly, despite increased expression following injury, the steady state mRNA levels of inflammatory factors were not altered in soy-fed rats even though inflammatory proteins were. These data suggest that dietary soy isoflavones, like estrogens, inhibit of the innate immune response to injury. However, post-transcriptional mechanisms may play an important role in the mechanism of this action. Coupled with previously published data, these results support an early and rapid effect of dietary soy on the evolution of brain injury following stroke. PMID:25261694

  10. Novel markers of inflammatory response and hepatic dysfunction in canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Alexandre A; Calado, Andréa M C; Bottari, Nathieli B; Dalenogare, Diéssica; Thomé, Gustavo R; Duarte, Thiago; Duarte, Marta M M F; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria R C; Alves, Leucio C; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-02-01

    Dogs are the main host of Leishmania infantum, and the clinical presentation may range from asymptomatic to systemic manifestations. The immune mechanisms in infected, but clinically healthy dogs, prevails Th1 response mediated by cytokines. In this sense, adenosine deaminase (ADA) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) are considered as key enzymes in several physiological processes, including the modulation of inflammatory process. Considering the variable immune response against Leishmania and the known participation of ADA and BChE, the aim of this study was to assess the relation between these two enzymes with the inflammatory response as well as hepatic function in dogs naturally infected with L. infantum. For this purpose, the activity of ADA and BChE was assessed in sera of 24 dogs naturally infected with L. infantum, plus 17 healthy dogs. The naturally infected dogs had clinical signs compatible with leishmaniasis and sera activities of ADA (P<0.01) and BChE (P<0.05) decreased, when compared to the healthy group. The reduction of ADA activity probably represented an effect on inflammatory response, especially due to the decreased hydrolysis of extracellular adenosine, might in order to protect against tissue damage and, also, setting a down-regulation on pro-inflammatory cytokines. BChE enzyme had no effect on modulating the immune response in leishmaniasis, but it decreased, a fact may related to deficiency of synthesis in the liver. Therefore, ADA and BChE activities reduced probably in order to protect against extra tissue damage and due failure in synthesis, respectively. PMID:26454326

  11. Vagal nerve stimulation blocks peritoneal macrophage inflammatory responsiveness after severe burn injury.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Nicole E; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Costantini, Todd W; De Maio, Antonio; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P; Coimbra, Raul

    2012-08-01

    Large surface area burn injuries lead to activation of the innate immune system, which can be blocked by parasympathetic inputs mediated by the vagus nerve. We hypothesized that vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) would alter the inflammatory response of peritoneal macrophages after severe burn injury. Male BALB/c mice underwent right cervical VNS before 30% total body surface area steam burn and were compared with animals subjected to burn alone. Peritoneal macrophages were harvested at several time points following injury and exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in culture conditions. The inflammatory response of peritoneal macrophages was measured by analyzing changes in nuclear factor κB p65 phosphorylation using flow cytometry. We found that peritoneal macrophages isolated from mice subjected to burn injury were hyperresponsive to LPS challenge, suggesting burn-induced macrophage activation. We identified a protective role for VNS in blocking peritoneal macrophage activation. Analysis of the phosphorylation state of nuclear factor κB pathway mediator, p65 Rel A, revealed a VNS-mediated reduction in p65 phosphorylation levels after exposure to LPS compared with burn alone. In combination, these studies suggest VNS mediates the inflammatory response in peritoneal macrophages by affecting the set point of LPS responsiveness. PMID:22683732

  12. miR-709 modulates LPS-induced inflammatory response through targeting GSK-3β.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Chen, Hu; Chen, Luxi; Chen, Yaosheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Mo, Delin

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs which modulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by either translational inhibition or mRNA degradation. MicroRNAs play important roles in both innate and adaptive immune response, including TLR-triggered immune response. In this study, we found that the expression of miR-709 was up-regulated in primary macrophage and RAW264.7 cells during the stimulation of LPS. Overexpression of miR-709 in RAW264.7 cells led to reduced production and gene expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β) during activation by LPS, whereas knockdown of miR-709 had completely opposite effects. We used bioinformatics and experimental techniques to demonstrate that GSK-3β is a direct target of miR-709. miR-709 mimics decreased GSK-3β protein but not mRNA level. We also found that miR-709 regulated the LPS-induced inflammatory response by targeting GSK-3β and elevating β-catenin. In conclusion, our data revealed a novel role for miR-709 in regulation of inflammatory response by targeting GSK-3β. PMID:27232654

  13. Absence of inflammatory response from upper airway epithelial cells after X irradiation.

    PubMed

    Reiter, R; Deutschle, T; Wiegel, T; Riechelmann, H; Bartkowiak, D

    2009-03-01

    Radiotherapy of head and neck tumors causes adverse reactions in normal tissue, especially mucositis. The dose- and time-dependent response of upper airway cells to X radiation should be analyzed in terms of the pro-inflammatory potential. Immortalized BEAS-2B lung epithelial cells were treated with 2, 5 and 8 Gy. Out of 1232 genes, those that were transcribed differentially after 2, 6 and 24 h were assigned to biological themes according to the Gene Ontology Consortium. Enrichment of differentially regulated gene clusters was determined with GOTree ( http://bioinfo.vanderbilt.edu/gotm ). Eleven cytokines were measured in culture supernatants. The cell cycle response up to 24 h and induction of apoptosis up to 4 days after exposure were determined by flow cytometry. A significant dose- and time-dependent gene activation was observed for the categories response to DNA damage, oxidative stress, cell cycle arrest and cell death/apoptosis but not for immune/inflammatory response. This correlated with functional G(2) arrest and apoptosis. Pro-inflammatory cytokines accumulated in supernatants of control cells but not of X-irradiated cells. The complex gene expression pattern of X-irradiated airway epithelial cells is accompanied by cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. In vivo, this may impair the epithelial barrier. mRNA and protein expression suggest at most an indirect contribution of epithelial cells to early radiogenic mucositis. PMID:19267554

  14. The absence of microbiota delays the inflammatory response to Cryptococcus gattii.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marliete Carvalho; Santos, Julliana Ribeiro Alves; Ribeiro, Maira Juliana Andrade; Freitas, Gustavo José Cota de; Bastos, Rafael Wesley; Ferreira, Gabriella Freitas; Miranda, Aline Silva; Arifa, Raquel Duque Nascimento; Santos, Patrícia Campi; Martins, Flaviano Dos Santos; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Teixeira, Antonio Lúcio; Souza, Danielle G; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2016-06-01

    The inflammatory response plays a crucial role in infectious diseases, and the intestinal microbiota is linked to maturation of the immune system. However, the association between microbiota and the response against fungal infections has not been elucidated. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of microbiota on Cryptococcus gattii infection. Germ-free (GF), conventional (CV), conventionalized (CVN-mice that received feces from conventional animals), and LPS-stimulated mice were infected with C. gattii. GF mice were more susceptible to infection, showing lower survival, higher fungal burden in the lungs and brain, increased behavioral changes, reduced levels of IFN-γ, IL-1β and IL-17, and lower NFκBp65 phosphorylation compared to CV mice. Low expression of inflammatory cytokines was associated with smaller yeast cells and polysaccharide capsules (the main virulence factor of C. gattii) in the lungs, and less tissue damage. Furthermore, macrophages from GF mice showed reduced ability to engulf, produce ROS, and kill C. gattii. Restoration of microbiota (CVN mice) or LPS administration made GF mice more responsive to infection, which was associated with increased survival and higher levels of inflammatory mediators. This study is the first to demonstrate the influence of microbiota in the host response against C. gattii. PMID:27083265

  15. Oral metronidazole, an effective treatment for Sweet's syndrome in a patient with associated inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Banet, D E; McClave, S A; Callen, J P

    1994-09-01

    A 39-year-old woman with chronic, recurrent Sweet's syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) and possible Crohn's disease was successfully treated with oral metronidazole. After 4 years of recurrent skin lesions which involved the hands and face, our patient developed genital and perianal ulcerations which were also histopathologically characterized by a neutrophilic infiltrate. In addition, she had a nondeforming polyarthritis that accompanied recurrences of her skin lesions. The patient was given oral metronidazole, an agent frequently used for perianal Crohn's disease, and achieved complete resolution of the perianal and perineal ulcers, the cutaneous lesions of Sweet's syndrome and the associated polyarthritis. PMID:7799365

  16. Polyhexamethylene guanidine phosphate aerosol particles induce pulmonary inflammatory and fibrotic responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Ryong; Lee, Kyuhong; Park, Chang We; Song, Jeong Ah; Shin, Da Young; Park, Yong Joo; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2016-03-01

    Polyhexamethylene guanidine (PHMG) phosphate was used as a disinfectant for the prevention of microorganism growth in humidifiers, without recognizing that a change of exposure route might cause significant health effects. Epidemiological studies reported that the use of humidifier disinfectant containing PHMG-phosphate can provoke pulmonary fibrosis. However, the pulmonary toxicity of PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles is unknown yet. This study aimed to elucidate the toxicological relationship between PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles and pulmonary fibrosis. An in vivo nose-only exposure system and an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) co-culture model were applied to confirm whether PHMG-phosphate induces inflammatory and fibrotic responses in the respiratory tract. Seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles for 3 weeks and recovered for 3 weeks in a nose-only exposure chamber. In addition, three human lung cells (Calu-3, differentiated THP-1 and HMC-1 cells) were cultured at ALI condition for 12 days and were treated with PHMG-phosphate at set concentrations and times. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, airway barrier injuries and inflammatory and fibrotic responses were evaluated in vivo and in vitro. The rats exposed to PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles in nanometer size showed pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis including inflammatory cytokines and fibronectin mRNA increase, as well as histopathological changes. In addition, PHMG-phosphate triggered the ROS generation, airway barrier injuries and inflammatory responses in a bronchial ALI co-culture model. Those results demonstrated that PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles cause pulmonary inflammatory and fibrotic responses. All features of fibrogenesis by PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles closely resembled the pathology of fibrosis that was reported in epidemiological studies. Finally, we expected that PHMG-phosphate infiltrated into the lungs in the form

  17. Ulcerating type 1 lepra reaction mimicking lazarine leprosy: an unusual presentation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ramesh; Pinto, Malcolm; Dandakeri, Sukumar; Kambil, Srinath

    2013-12-01

    Leprosy maybe "unmasked" in the context of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and treating dermatologists, particularly in highly endemic areas for Hansen's disease, need to be cognizant to this possibility. It may also reflect emergence of a previously clinically silent infection in the course of immunologic restoration. PMID:24216029

  18. Evasion and interference: intracellular pathogens modulate caspase-dependent inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Mary K; Cookson, Brad T

    2016-06-01

    Pathogens have evolved to complete the virulence cycle of colonization, replication and dissemination in intimate association with a complex network of extracellular and intracellular surveillance systems that guard tissue spaces. In this Review, we discuss the strategies used by bacteria and viruses to evade or inhibit intracellular detection that is coupled to pro-inflammatory caspase-dependent protective responses. Such strategies include alterations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structures, the regulated expression of components of type III secretion systems, and the utilization of proteins that inhibit inflammasome formation, the enzymatic activity of caspases and cytokine signalling. Inflammation is crucial in response to exposure to pathogens, but is potentially damaging and thus tightly regulated. The threshold for the activation of pro-inflammatory caspases is determined by the immediate stimulus in the context of previous signals. Pathogen, genetic and situational factors modulate this threshold, which determines the ability of the host to resist infection while minimizing harm. PMID:27174147

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inflammatory responses and cellular senescence: pathogenesis and pharmacological targets for chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Yue, Li; Yao, Hongwei

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, which couple the various cellular processes that regulate metabolism, cell proliferation and survival. Environmental stress can cause mitochondrial dysfunction and dynamic changes including reduced mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production, as well as mitophagy impairment, which leads to increased ROS, inflammatory responses and cellular senescence. Oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular senescence all have important roles in the pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary fibrosis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In this review, we discuss the current state on how mitochondrial dysfunction affects inflammatory responses and cellular senescence, the mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction underlying the pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases and the potential of mitochondrial transfer and replacement as treatments for these diseases. PMID:27189175

  20. Topology and dynamics of signaling networks: in search of transcriptional control of the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Androulakis, Ioannis P; Kamisoglu, Kubra; Mattick, John S

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several decades, to develop a fundamental understanding of inflammation's progression, research has focused on extracellular mediators, such as cytokines, as characteristic components of inflammatory response. These efforts have recently been complemented by advances in proteomics that allow analysis of multiple signaling proteins in parallel, to provide more complete mechanistic models of inflammation. In this review, we discuss various techniques for assessing protein activity, as well as computational techniques that are well suited for interpreting large amounts of proteomic data to generate signaling networks or for modeling the dynamics of known network interactions. We also discuss examples that explore these experimental and computational techniques in tandem to generate signaling networks under various conditions and that link those networks to transcriptional activity. Further advancements in this field will likely provide an explicit description of inflammatory response, paving the way for better diagnostics and therapies in clinic. PMID:23862674

  1. Corpse Engulfment Generates a Molecular Memory that Primes the Macrophage Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Weavers, Helen; Evans, Iwan R; Martin, Paul; Wood, Will

    2016-06-16

    Macrophages are multifunctional cells that perform diverse roles in health and disease. Emerging evidence has suggested that these innate immune cells might also be capable of developing immunological memory, a trait previously associated with the adaptive system alone. While recent studies have focused on the dramatic macrophage reprogramming that follows infection and protects against secondary microbial attack, can macrophages also develop memory in response to other cues? Here, we show that apoptotic corpse engulfment by Drosophila macrophages is an essential primer for their inflammatory response to tissue damage and infection in vivo. Priming is triggered via calcium-induced JNK signaling, which leads to upregulation of the damage receptor Draper, thus providing a molecular memory that allows the cell to rapidly respond to subsequent injury or infection. This remarkable plasticity and capacity for memory places macrophages as key therapeutic targets for treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27212238

  2. Inflammatory Cytokine Profile Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario; Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Vargas, Guadalupe; Gonzalez, Baldomero; Isibasi, Armando; Archundia-Riveros, Irma; Mendoza, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, TNF, IL-8, resistin, and adiponectin in type 1 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and to determine the cut-off point of the estimated glucose disposal rate that accurately differentiated these groups. Design. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of all patients in our type 1 diabetes clinic from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were considered to have metabolic syndrome when they fulfilled the joint statement criteria and were evaluated for clinical, biochemical, and immunological features. Methods. We determined serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF with flow cytometry and adiponectin and resistin concentrations with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. We also compared estimated glucose disposal rate between groups. Results. We tested 140 patients. Forty-four percent fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (n = 61), 54% had central obesity, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia, 29% had hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and 19% had hypertension. We observed that resistin concentrations were higher in patients with MS. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of MS in Mexican patients with T1D. The increased level of resistin may be related to the increased fat mass and could be involved in the development of insulin resistance. PMID:26273680

  3. Associations among gut permeability, inflammatory markers, and symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alterations in gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and immune measures are present in some patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) but the relationship to symptoms is poorly defined. In adults with IBS, we compared permeability, unstimulated peripheral blood monocyte (PBMC) interleukin-10 (IL-10...

  4. Nickel chloride (NiCl2)-caused inflammatory responses via activation of NF-κB pathway and reduction of anti-inflammatory mediator expression in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Wu, Bangyuan; Chen, Kejie

    2015-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) or Ni compounds target a number of organs and produce multiple toxic effects. Kidney is the major organ for Ni accumulation and excretion. There are no investigations on the Ni- or Ni compounds-induced renal inflammatory responses in human beings and animals at present. Therefore, we determined NiCl2-caused alteration of inflammatory mediators, and functional damage in the broiler's kidney by the methods of biochemistry, immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg caused the renal inflammatory responses that characterized by increasing mRNA expression levels of the pro-inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) via the activation of nucleic factor κB (NF-κB), and decreasing mRNA expression levels of the anti-inflammatory mediators including interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-13 (IL-13). Concurrently, NiCl2 caused degeneration, necrosis and apoptosis of the tubular cells, which was consistent with the alteration of renal function parameters including elevated alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity, and reduced activities of sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+-ATPase), calcium adenosine triphosphatase (Ca2+-ATPase), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in the kidney. The above-mentioned results present that the activation of NF-κB pathway and reduction of anti-inflammatory mediator expression are main mechanisms of NiCl2-caused renal inflammatory responses and that the renal function is decreased or impaired after NiCl2-treated. PMID:26417933

  5. Nickel chloride (NiCl2)-caused inflammatory responses via activation of NF-κB pathway and reduction of anti-inflammatory mediator expression in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongrui; Deng, Huidan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Wu, Bangyuan; Chen, Kejie

    2015-10-01

    Nickel (Ni) or Ni compounds target a number of organs and produce multiple toxic effects. Kidney is the major organ for Ni accumulation and excretion. There are no investigations on the Ni- or Ni compounds-induced renal inflammatory responses in human beings and animals at present. Therefore, we determined NiCl2-caused alteration of inflammatory mediators, and functional damage in the broiler's kidney by the methods of biochemistry, immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg caused the renal inflammatory responses that characterized by increasing mRNA expression levels of the pro-inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) via the activation of nucleic factor κB (NF-κB), and decreasing mRNA expression levels of the anti-inflammatory mediators including interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-13 (IL-13). Concurrently, NiCl2 caused degeneration, necrosis and apoptosis of the tubular cells, which was consistent with the alteration of renal function parameters including elevated alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity, and reduced activities of sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase), calcium adenosine triphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in the kidney. The above-mentioned results present that the activation of NF-κB pathway and reduction of anti-inflammatory mediator expression are main mechanisms of NiCl2-caused renal inflammatory responses and that the renal function is decreased or impaired after NiCl2-treated. PMID:26417933

  6. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  7. Diminazene Aceturate (Berenil) Modulates the Host Cellular and Inflammatory Responses to Trypanosoma congolense Infection

    PubMed Central

    Onyilagha, Chukwunonso; Singh, Rani; Jia, Ping; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma congolense are extracellular and intravascular blood parasites that cause debilitating acute or chronic disease in cattle and other domestic animals. Diminazene aceturate (Berenil) has been widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent for trypanosomiasis in livestock since 1955. As in livestock, treatment of infected highly susceptible BALB/c mice with Berenil leads to rapid control of parasitemia and survival from an otherwise lethal infection. The molecular and biochemical mechanisms of action of Berenil are still not very well defined and its effect on the host immune system has remained relatively unstudied. Here, we investigated whether Berenil has, in addition to its trypanolytic effect, a modulatory effect on the host immune response to Trypanosoma congolense. Methodology/Principal Findings BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were infected intraperitoneally with T. congolense, treated with Berenil and the expression of CD25 and FoxP3 on splenic cells was assessed directly ex vivo. In addition, serum levels and spontaneous and LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by splenic and hepatic CD11b+ cells were determined by ELISA. Berenil treatment significantly reduced the percentages of CD25+ cells, a concomitant reduction in the percentage of regulatory (CD4+Foxp3+) T cells and a striking reduction in serum levels of disease exacerbating pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, IL-12, TNF and IFN-γ. Furthermore, Berenil treatment significantly suppressed spontaneous and LPS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines by splenic and liver macrophages and significantly ameliorated LPS-induced septic shock and the associated cytokine storm. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, these results provide evidence that in addition to its direct trypanolytic effect, Berenil also modulates the host immune response to the parasite in a manner that dampen excessive immune activation and production of pathology-promoting pro-inflammatory cytokines

  8. Novel immune genes associated with excessive inflammatory and antiviral responses to rhinovirus in COPD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhinovirus (RV) is a major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, and primarily infects bronchial epithelial cells. Immune responses from BECs to RV infection are critical in limiting viral replication, and remain unclear in COPD. The objective of this study is to investigate innate immune responses to RV infection in COPD primary BECs (pBECs) in comparison to healthy controls. Methods Primary bronchial epithelial cells (pBECs) from subjects with COPD and healthy controls were infected with RV-1B. Cells and cell supernatant were collected and analysed using gene expression microarray, qPCR, ELISA, flow cytometry and titration assay for viral replication. Results COPD pBECs responded to RV-1B infection with an increased expression of antiviral and pro-inflammatory genes compared to healthy pBECs, including cytokines, chemokines, RNA helicases, and interferons (IFNs). Similar levels of viral replication were observed in both disease groups; however COPD pBECs were highly susceptible to apoptosis. COPD pBECs differed at baseline in the expression of 9 genes, including calgranulins S100A8/A9, and 22 genes after RV-1B infection including the signalling proteins pellino-1 and interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase 2. In COPD, IFN-β/λ1 pre-treatment did not change MDA-5/RIG-I and IFN-β expression, but resulted in higher levels IFN-λ1, CXCL-10 and CCL-5. This led to reduced viral replication, but did not increase pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusions COPD pBECs elicit an exaggerated pro-inflammatory and antiviral response to RV-1B infection, without changing viral replication. IFN pre-treatment reduced viral replication. This study identified novel genes and pathways involved in potentiating the inflammatory response to RV in COPD. PMID:23384071

  9. Lipopolysaccharide induces the expression of an autocrine prolactin loop enhancing inflammatory response in monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prolactin from pituitary gland helps maintain homeostasis but it is also released in immune cells where its function is not completely understood. Pleiotropic functions of prolactin (PRL) might be mediated by different isoforms of its receptor (PRLr). Methods The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the eventual synthesis of PRL and PRLr isoforms with the inflammatory response in monocytes. We used THP-1 and monocytes isolated from healthy subjects stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Western blot, real time PCR and immunocytochemistry were performed to identify both molecules. The bioactivity of the PRL was assessed using a bioassay and ELISA to detect pro inflammatory cytokines. Results PRLr mRNA and PRL mRNA were synthesized in THP-1 monocytes activated with LPS with peaks of 300-fold and 130-fold, respectively. The long (100 kDa) and the intermediate (50 kDa) isoforms of PRLr and big PRL (60 kDa) were time-dependent upregulated for monocytes stimulated with LPS. This expression was confirmed in monocytes from healthy subjects. The PRLr intermediate isoform and the big PRL were found soluble in the culture media and later in the nucleus in THP-1 monocytes stimulated with LPS. Big PRL released by monocytes showed bioactivity in Nb2 Cells, and both PRL and PRLr, synthesized by monocytes were related with levels of nitrites and proinflammatory citokines. Conclusions Our results suggest the expression of a full-autocrine loop of PRL enhances the inflammatory response in activated monocytes. This response mediated by big PRL may contribute to the eradication of potential pathogens during innate immune response in monocytes but may also contribute to inflammatory disorders. PMID:23731754

  10. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Lee, K. Monica; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures. - Highlights: ► Obesity modulates inflammatory markers in BAL fluid after LPS exposure. ► Obese animals have a unique transcriptional signature in lung after LPS exposure. ► Obesity elevates inflammatory stress and reduces antioxidant capacity in the lung

  11. SWCNT suppress inflammatory mediator responses in human lung epithelium in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Eva Byrne, Hugh J.; Casey, Alan; Davoren, Maria; Lenz, Anke-Gabriele; Maier, Konrad L.; Duschl, Albert; Oostingh, Gertie Janneke

    2009-02-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have gained enormous popularity due to a variety of potential applications which will ultimately lead to increased human and environmental exposure to these nanoparticles. This study was carried out in order to evaluate the inflammatory response of immortalised and primary human lung epithelial cells (A549 and NHBE) to single-walled carbon nanotube samples (SWCNT). Special focus was placed on the mediating role of lung surfactant on particle toxicity. The toxicity of SWCNT dispersed in cell culture medium was compared to that of nanotubes dispersed in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, the main component of lung lining fluid). Exposure was carried out for 6 to 48 h with the latter time-point showing the most significant responses. Moreover, exposure was performed in the presence of the pro-inflammatory stimulus tumour necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) in order to mimic exposure of stimulated cells, as would occur during infection. Endpoints evaluated included cell viability, proliferation and the analysis of inflammatory mediators such as interleukin (IL)-8