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Sample records for influence carbon dissolution

  1. Dissolution rates of coals and graphite in Fe-C-S melts in direct ironmaking: Influence of melt carbon and sulfur on carbon dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Sahajwalla, V.

    2000-04-01

    Carbon dissolution from graphite and coals was investigated by using a carburizer cover technique in an induction furnace. The intent of the study was to investigate the influence of factors governing the rate of carbon dissolution from carbonaceous materials, especially coals, into Fe-C-S melts. The factors studied were the initial melt carbon and sulfur concentrations and the wettability between carbonaceous materials and the melt. It was found that graphite dissolves markedly faster than coal. The rate of carbon dissolution from graphite could be decreased by increasing the sulfur in the melt. Also, poor wetting could retard the rate of carbon dissolution by reducing the surface area for mass transfer. Carbon dissolution from graphite is controlled by mass transfer in the liquid boundary layer adjacent to the solid/liquid interface. The rate of carbon dissolution from coal is more sensitive to the molten iron composition. A higher initial melt carbon and sulfur content retards the rate of carbon dissolution from coal more significantly than from graphite. However, the rate constant of coal char dissolution does not show a strong dependence on the wettability. Carbon dissolution from coals is most likely governed by a mixed-control mechanism that includes liquid-side mass transfer. The mechanisms underlying the influence of bath sulfur on carbon dissolution from graphite and coals are discussed.

  2. Dissolution kinetics of calcium carbonate in equatorial Pacific sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Berelson, W.M.; Hammond, D.E.; McManus, J.; Kilgore, T.E. )

    1994-06-01

    Calcium carbonate dissolution exerts a major influence on the carbonate chemistry of seawater and is an important factor in regulating atmospheric CO2 concentration. The authors use a numerical model, based on an estimate of k determined from benthic chamber flux measurements, the distribution of CO3 2-in the water column and percent of CaCO3 in the sediments, to derive the total alkalinity flux from Pacific Ocean sediments. The significance of this budget is discussed as are the following questions: what is the rate of calcium carbonate dissolution on the deep sea floor what controls carbonate dissolution, organic carbon rain rates, or bottom water carbonate ion concentration what is the equations that relates carbonate dissolution to degree of undersaturation and what is the associate rate constant 43 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTRACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. he purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. he ...

  4. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. Th...

  5. Measuring the Influence of Pearlite Dissolution on the Transient Dynamic Strength of Rapidly Heated Plain Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mates, Steven; Stoudt, Mark; Gangireddy, Sindhura

    2016-05-01

    Carbon steels containing ferrite-pearlite microstructures weaken dramatically when pearlite dissolves into austenite on heating. The kinetics of this phase transformation, while fast, can play a role during dynamic, high-temperature manufacturing processes, including high-speed machining, when the time scale of this transformation is on the order of the manufacturing process itself. In such a regime, the mechanical strength of carbon steel can become time dependent. The present work uses a rapidly heated, high-strain-rate mechanical test to study the effect of temperature and time on the amount of pearlite dissolved and on the resulting transient effect on dynamic strength of a low and a high carbon (eutectoid) steel. Measurements indicate that the transient effect occurs for heating times less than about 3 s. The 1075 steel loses about twice the strength compared to the 1018 steel (85 MPa to 45 MPa) owing to its higher initial pearlite volume fraction. Pearlite dissolution is confirmed by metallographic examination of tested samples. Despite the different starting pearlite fractions, the kinetics of dissolution are comparable for the two steels, owing to the similarity in their initial pearlite morphology.

  6. Measuring the Influence of Pearlite Dissolution on the Transient Dynamic Strength of Rapidly Heated Plain Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mates, Steven; Stoudt, Mark; Gangireddy, Sindhura

    2016-07-01

    Carbon steels containing ferrite-pearlite microstructures weaken dramatically when pearlite dissolves into austenite on heating. The kinetics of this phase transformation, while fast, can play a role during dynamic, high-temperature manufacturing processes, including high-speed machining, when the time scale of this transformation is on the order of the manufacturing process itself. In such a regime, the mechanical strength of carbon steel can become time dependent. The present work uses a rapidly heated, high-strain-rate mechanical test to study the effect of temperature and time on the amount of pearlite dissolved and on the resulting transient effect on dynamic strength of a low and a high carbon (eutectoid) steel. Measurements indicate that the transient effect occurs for heating times less than about 3 s. The 1075 steel loses about twice the strength compared to the 1018 steel (85 MPa to 45 MPa) owing to its higher initial pearlite volume fraction. Pearlite dissolution is confirmed by metallographic examination of tested samples. Despite the different starting pearlite fractions, the kinetics of dissolution are comparable for the two steels, owing to the similarity in their initial pearlite morphology.

  7. Factors influencing dissolution of carbonaceous materials in liquid iron

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, H.P.

    2005-12-01

    Carbon dissolution into liquid iron was investigated by a kinetic model assuming the rate is limited by interfacial carbon dissociation and mass transfer in the liquid iron. The rate influencing factors and the inter-relations among them were discussed with the aid of the kinetic model.

  8. Carbonate ions and arsenic dissolution by groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, M.-J.; Nriagu, J.; Haack, S.

    2000-01-01

    solutions. The effects of pH and redox conditions on As dissolution were examined. Results showed that As was not leached significantly out of the Marshall Sandstone samples after 3 d using either deionized water or groundwater, but As was leached efficiently by sodium bicarbonate, potassium bicarbonate, and ferric chloride solutions. The leaching rate with sodium bicarbonate was about 25% higher than that with potassium bicarbonate. The data indicated that bicarbonate ion was involved primarily in As dissolution and that hydroxyl radical ion did not affect As dissolution to any significant degree. The amount of As leached was dependent upon the sodium bicarbonate concentration, increasing with reaction time for each concentration. Significant As leaching was found in the extreme pH ranges of <1.9 and 8.0-10.4. The resulting arseno-carbonate complexes formed were stable in groundwater.

  9. Helium enrichment during convective carbon dioxide dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T.; Hesse, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by observed variations of the CO2/He ratios in natural carbon dioxide (CO2) reservoirs, such as the Bravo Dome field in northeastern New Mexico, we have performed laboratory experiments equilibrating gas mixtures containing Helium (He) and CO2 with water, at close to ambient conditions in a closed system. The experimental design allows for continuous measurement of headspace pressure as well as timed interval measurements of the CO2/He ratios and the δ13C value of CO2 in the headspace. Results from three dissolution experiments are reported: 1) pure Helium system, 2) 98% CO2 + 2% Nitrogen system, and 3) 97% CO2 and 3% Helium. Final equilibrated experimental results are compared to theoretical results obtained using Henry's Law relationships. The evolution of the amount of dissolved CO2 computed from gas pressure and gas compositions are in good agreement with Henry's Law relationships. For example, the CO2 + N2 system was initially pressurized with pure CO2 to 1323 mbar and after six days it equilibrated to a measured headspace pressure of 596 mbar. This compares very well with a calculated equilibrium headspace pressure of 592 mbar for this system. The CO2 + He system was pressurized to 1398 mbar CO2 and after six days equilibrated to a measured headspace pressure of 397 mbar. This measured pressure is slightly higher than the predicted equilibrated headspace pressure of 341 mbar, indicating a possible leak in the system during this particular experiment. In both experiments the initial pH of the water was 9.3 and the final equilibrated pH was 5.4. The δ13C value of equilibrated headspace CO2 was within 0.25‰ of its starting δ13C value, demonstrating insignificant carbon isotope fractionation at low pH. Measured Helium/ CO2 ratios throughout the CO2+Helium experiment preserve a non-linear trend of increasing He/ CO2 ratios through time that correlate very well with the measured pressure drop from CO2 dissolution. This indicates that gas composition

  10. Dispersion Caused by Carbon Dioxide During Secondary Alumina Dissolution: A Lab-Scale Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Youjian; Gao, Bingliang; Wang, Zhaowen; Shi, Zhongning; Hu, Xianwei; Yu, Jiangyu

    2014-06-01

    Secondary alumina is the byproduct of dry scrubbing in aluminum smelting. Secondary alumina has superior dissolution characteristics to primary alumina. Secondary alumina dissolves in pieces in molten cryolite, which results in larger contact area and better diffusion kinetics. In this work, the dissolution phenomenon of primary alumina, secondary alumina, and primary alumina doped with sodium carbonate or calcium carbonate (mass ratio = 10:1, 20:1) was observed and compared to estimate carbon-induced dispersion in industrial secondary alumina. Temperature fluctuations during sample dissolution were measured to evaluate the benefits of preheating on alumina dissolution. It was found that carbon mixed in secondary alumina significantly influences the dispersion of alumina particles at the moment of feeding, and thermodynamic analysis also shows that the combustion heat from carbon facilitates dispersion.

  11. Abiotic carbonate dissolution traps carbon in a semiarid desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, Keyu; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Yuqing; Qin, Shugao; Wu, Bin; Liu, Jiabin

    2016-03-01

    It is generally considered that desert ecosystems release CO2 to the atmosphere, but recent studies in drylands have shown that the soil can absorb CO2 abiotically. However, the mechanisms and exact location of abiotic carbon absorption remain unclear. Here, we used soil sterilization, 13CO2 addition, and detection methods to trace 13C in the soil of the Mu Us Desert, northern China. After 13CO2 addition, a large amount of 13CO2 was absorbed by the sterilised soil, and 13C was found enriched both in the soil gaseous phase and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Further analysis indicated that about 79.45% of the total 13C absorbed by the soil was trapped in DIC, while the amount of 13C in the soil gaseous phase accounted for only 0.22% of the total absorbed 13C. However, about 20.33% of the total absorbed 13C remained undetected. Our results suggest that carbonate dissolution might occur predominately, and the soil liquid phase might trap the majority of abiotically absorbed carbon. It is possible that the trapped carbon in the soil liquid phase leaches into the groundwater; however, further studies are required to support this hypothesis.

  12. Abiotic carbonate dissolution traps carbon in a semiarid desert

    PubMed Central

    Fa, Keyu; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Yuqing; Qin, Shugao; Wu, Bin; Liu, Jiabin

    2016-01-01

    It is generally considered that desert ecosystems release CO2 to the atmosphere, but recent studies in drylands have shown that the soil can absorb CO2 abiotically. However, the mechanisms and exact location of abiotic carbon absorption remain unclear. Here, we used soil sterilization, 13CO2 addition, and detection methods to trace 13C in the soil of the Mu Us Desert, northern China. After 13CO2 addition, a large amount of 13CO2 was absorbed by the sterilised soil, and 13C was found enriched both in the soil gaseous phase and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Further analysis indicated that about 79.45% of the total 13C absorbed by the soil was trapped in DIC, while the amount of 13C in the soil gaseous phase accounted for only 0.22% of the total absorbed 13C. However, about 20.33% of the total absorbed 13C remained undetected. Our results suggest that carbonate dissolution might occur predominately, and the soil liquid phase might trap the majority of abiotically absorbed carbon. It is possible that the trapped carbon in the soil liquid phase leaches into the groundwater; however, further studies are required to support this hypothesis. PMID:27020762

  13. Convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, Jerome A.; Hesse, Marc A.; Riaz, Amir; Hallworth, Mark A.; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.; Huppert, Herbert E.

    2010-11-01

    Geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is a means of reducing anthropogenic emissions. Dissolution of CO2 into the brine, resulting in stable stratification, increases storage security. The dissolution rate is determined by convection in the brine driven by the increase of brine density with CO2 saturation. We present a new analogue fluid system that reproduces the convective behaviour of CO2-enriched brine. Laboratory experiments and high-resolution numerical simulations show that the convective flux scales with the Rayleigh number to the 4/5 power, in contrast with a classical linear relationship. A scaling argument for the convective flux incorporating lateral diffusion from downwelling plumes explains this nonlinear relationship for the convective flux, provides a physical picture of high Rayleigh number convection in a porous medium, and predicts the CO2 dissolution rates in CO2 accumulations. These estimates of the dissolution rate show that convective dissolution can play an important role in enhancing storage security.

  14. In situ calcium carbonate dissolution in the Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Feely, R. A.; Sabine, Chris; Lee, K.; Millero, F. J.; Lamb, M. F.; Greeley, D.; Bullister, J.L.; Key, Robert; Peng, T.-H.; Kozyr, Alexander; Ono, Tsueno

    2002-01-01

    Over the past several years researchers have been working to synthesize the WOCE/ JGOFS global CO2 survey data to better understand carbon cycling processes in the oceans. The Pacific Ocean data set has over 35,000 sample locations with at least two carbon parameters, oxygen, nutrients, CFC tracers, and hydrographic parameters. In this paper we estimate the in situ CaCO3 dissolution rates in the Pacific Ocean water column. Calcium carbonate dissolution rates ranging from 0.01 1.1 mmol kg1 yr1 are observed in intermediate and deepwater beginning near the aragonite saturation horizon. In the North Pacific Intermediate Water between 400 and 800 m, CaCO3 dissolution rates are more than 7 times faster than observed in middle and deep water depths (average = 0.051 mmol kg1 yr1). The total amount of CaCO3 that is dissolved within the Pacific is determined by integrating excess alkalinity throughout the water column. The total inventory of CaCO3 added by particle dissolution in the Pacific Ocean, north of 40S, is 157 Pg C. This amounts to an average dissolution rate of approximately 0.31 Pg C yr1. This estimate is approximately 74% of the export production of CaCO3 estimated for the Pacific Ocean. These estimates should be considered to be upper limits for in situ carbonate dissolution in the Pacific Ocean, since a portion of the alkalinity increase results from inputs from sediments.

  15. Kinetics of Carbon Dissolution of Coke in Molten Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Dongik; Kim, Yumkyum; Shin, Minsoo; Lee, Joonho

    2012-12-01

    The effect of temperature on the dissolution rate of carbon from coke in molten iron was investigated using a sampling technique in the temperature range of 1723 K to 1923 K (1450 °C to 1650 °C). The dissolution rate of carbon from coke in molten iron increased as the temperature increased. At 1923 K (1650 °C), the rate-determining step was the mass transfer of carbon in the boundary layer adjacent to the metal-carbon interface. At 1723 K (1450 °C), the rate-determining step changed from the mass transfer to the interfacial chemical reaction as the reaction proceeded. At 1823 K (1550 °C), both reaction steps affected the apparent reaction rates. Sulfur dissolution did not affect the carbon dissolution rates in molten iron, so it was considered that the sulfur adsorption at the metal/coke interface was not so significant. The apparent activation energy of the carbon dissolution of coke in molten iron was estimated to be 442 kJ/mol.

  16. Dissolution rates of carbonated hydroxyapatite in hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Hankermeyer, Christine R; Ohashi, Kevin L; Delaney, David C; Ross, John; Constantz, Brent R

    2002-02-01

    Osteoclasts have been shown to dissolve efficiently and effectively the mineral phase of bone by locally controlling the environment surrounding the cell. Although this mineral phase has been identified and well characterized as carbonated hydroxyapatite, there is little understanding of the factors that affect the dissolution properties of this mineral phase. Mimicking the mechanism by which osteoclasts dissolve the mineral phase of bone may provide insight into methods for the decalcification of atherosclerotic mineral deposits in the vascular system. Accordingly, a detailed characterization of the effects of various chemical and mechanical parameters on the dissolution of carbonated hydroxyapatite mineral was investigated in this study. Increases in the mineral dissolution rate (2-10 times) were associated with increases in dissolving solution [H+], osmolality, temperature, and flow rate. Mineral dissolution rate increases (5-8 times) were associated with greater surface area of the mineral and mechanical agitation of the dissolving solution. PMID:11771694

  17. Mesogenetic dissolution: Its role in porosity development in carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, S.J. ); Harris, P.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Models of porosity formation in carbonate rocks have stressed subaerial exposure and attendant shallow meteoric diagenesis. Porosity formation also occurs in deep-burial, or mesogenetic, settings as a result of dissolution enlargement of preexisting pores (porosity enhancement) and creation of new pore systems. Brines charged with organic acids, carbon dioxide, and/or hydrogen sulfide derived from organic matter diagenesis and thermochemical sulfate reduction are the likely fluids causing significant mesogenetic dissolution. Enhanced and newly created mesogenetic pore types can mimic pore types formed in shallow meteoric environments, and therefore, the mesogenetic origin of some porosity may go unrecognized.

  18. CTAB-Influenced Electrochemical Dissolution of Silver Dendrites.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Colm; Zhu, Xi; Zhong, Jun; Anand, Utkarsh; Lu, Jingyu; Su, Haibin; Mirsaidov, Utkur

    2016-04-19

    Dendrite formation on the electrodes of a rechargeable battery during the charge-discharge cycle limits its capacity and application due to short-circuits and potential ignition. However, understanding of the underlying dendrite growth and dissolution mechanisms is limited. Here, the electrochemical growth and dissolution of silver dendrites on platinum electrodes immersed in an aqueous silver nitrate (AgNO3) electrolyte solution was investigated using in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The dissolution of Ag dendrites in an AgNO3 solution with added cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant was compared to the dissolution of Ag dendrites in a pure aqueous AgNO3 solution. Significantly, when CTAB was added, dendrite dissolution proceeded in a step-by-step manner, resulting in nanoparticle formation and transient microgrowth stages due to Ostwald ripening. This resulted in complete dissolution of dendrites and "cleaning" of the cell of any silver metal. This is critical for practical battery applications because "dead" lithium is known to cause short circuits and high-discharge rates. In contrast to this, in a pure aqueous AgNO3 solution, without surfactant, dendrites dissolved incompletely back into solution, leaving behind minute traces of disconnected silver particles. Finally, a mechanism for the CTAB-influenced dissolution of silver dendrites was proposed based on electrical field dependent binding energy of CTA(+) to silver. PMID:27017834

  19. Dissolution of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Carbonate-Peroxide Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2010-01-31

    This study shows that spent UO2 fuel can be completely dissolved in a carbonate-peroxide solution apparently without attacking the metallic Mo-Tc-Ru-Rh-Pd fission product phase. Samples of spent nuclear fuel were pulverized and sieved to a uniform size, then duplicate aliquots were weighed into beakers for analysis. One set was dissolved in near-boiling 10M nitric acid, and the other set was dissolved in a solution of ammonium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide at room temperature. All the resulting fuel solutions were then analyzed for Sr-90, Tc-99, Cs-137, plutonium, and Am-241. For all the samples, the concentrations of Cs-137, Sr-90, plutonium, and Am-241 were the same for both the nitric acid dissolution and the ammonium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide dissolution, but the technetium concentration of the ammonium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide fuel solution was only about 25% of the same fuels dissolved in hot nitric acid.

  20. Late Pleistocene carbonate dissolution in the Venezuela Basin, Caribbean Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Cofer-Shabica, N.B.; Peterson, L.C.

    1985-01-01

    Piston cores from water depths greater than 4000 m in the Venezuela Basin (Caribbean Sea) provide continuous late Pleistocene records of carbonate dissolution and accumulation. The authors examination of multiple dissolution indices indicate that, at least for the last 150,000 years, dissolution of carbonate in the Venezuela Basin has been more intense during interglacial than glacial periods, a pattern opposite to more general observations from the deep Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. By virtue of its shallow sill depth (1815 m), the Venezuela Basin is relatively isolated from the mainstream of Atlantic thermohaline circulation, and presently is filled with homogeneous, relatively warm (3.8/sup 0/C) waters primarily derived from Upper North Atlantic Deep Water. During the last glacial, the enhanced preservation of carbonate in the Venezuela Basin suggests the presence of a less corrosive, more oxygenated water mass in the Atlantic near sill depth. However, this simple interpretations is potentially complicated by past changes in the rain of biogenic materials from surface waters to the deep basin in what must be an essentially closed system below sill depth. Their observations of increased interglacial dissolution may help to explain previously noted discrepancies in the local glacial to interglacial amplitude of delta/sup 18/O variations recorded by coccoliths and planktonic foraminifera.

  1. Influence of Carbide Precipitation and Dissolution on the Microstructure of Ultra-Fine-Grained Intercritically Annealed Medium Manganese Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwon; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of cementite precipitation and dissolution on the formation of the carbide-free, ultra-fine-grained, ferrite + austenite microstructure of medium manganese steel was analyzed. During heating to the intercritical temperature, cementite nucleates at low-angle lath martensite boundaries, austenite subsequently nucleates at ferrite/cementite boundaries, and the cementite is gradually replaced by the growing austenite grains. The intercritical austenite carbon is therefore due to cementite dissolution, rather than carbon partitioning between ferrite and austenite.

  2. Influence of Carbide Precipitation and Dissolution on the Microstructure of Ultra-Fine-Grained Intercritically Annealed Medium Manganese Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwon; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of cementite precipitation and dissolution on the formation of the carbide-free, ultra-fine-grained, ferrite + austenite microstructure of medium manganese steel was analyzed. During heating to the intercritical temperature, cementite nucleates at low-angle lath martensite boundaries, austenite subsequently nucleates at ferrite/cementite boundaries, and the cementite is gradually replaced by the growing austenite grains. The intercritical austenite carbon is therefore due to cementite dissolution, rather than carbon partitioning between ferrite and austenite.

  3. Carbonate dissolution rates at the deep ocean floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, Bernard P.

    2013-02-01

    This paper reexamines experimental data on the seawater dissolution of CaCO3-bearing sediment beds to establish that the dependence of the calcite dissolution rate is linearly dependent on the calcite saturation state of the overlying water. This linearity is inherent to the original data and is not the result of an error in the solubility product for calcite. A comparison between these linear kinetics and the rate of solute transport across the benthic boundary layer further reveals that the overall rate of dissolution at ocean depths below the saturation horizon is controlled by boundary layer transfer. A carbonate mass-balance model for the sediment-water interface, which includes both kinetics and boundary layer effects, predictively reproduces the currently observed CaCO3 depth distribution for two test areas in the oceans. These findings allow important simplifications in modeling CO2 neutralization in the oceans.

  4. Karstification without carbonic acid: bedrock dissolution by gypsum- driven dedolomitization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Julia, R.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The primary karst-forming process at Lake Banyoles is dedolomitization of basement rocks driven by gypsum dissolution. Karstification takes place along the subsurface contact between the gypsiferous Beuda Formation and the dolomitic Perafita Formation. This process is here recognized for the first time to cause karstification on a large scale; this is significant because it proceeds without the addition of soil-generated carbonic acid. -from Authors

  5. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Frances M; Troll, Valentin R; Whitehouse, Martin J; Jolis, Ester M; Freda, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ(11)B values down to -41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of (10)B into the assimilating melt. Loss of (11)B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports (11)B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ(11)B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle. PMID:27488228

  6. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Jolis, Ester M.; Freda, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ11B values down to −41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of 10B into the assimilating melt. Loss of 11B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports 11B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ11B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle. PMID:27488228

  7. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Jolis, Ester M.; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ11B values down to ‑41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of 10B into the assimilating melt. Loss of 11B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports 11B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ11B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  8. Dissolution-Driven Permeability Reduction of a Fractured Carbonate Caprock

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Brian R.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Bromhal, Grant S.; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Tappero, Ryan; Peters, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Geochemical reactions may alter the permeability of leakage pathways in caprocks, which serve a critical role in confining CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. A caprock specimen from a carbonate formation in the Michigan sedimentary Basin was fractured and studied in a high-pressure core flow experiment. Inflowing brine was saturated with CO2 at 40°C and 10 MPa, resulting in an initial pH of 4.6, and had a calcite saturation index of −0.8. Fracture permeability decreased during the experiment, but subsequent analyses did not reveal calcite precipitation. Instead, experimental observations indicate that calcite dissolution along the fracture pathway led to mobilization of less soluble mineral particles that clogged the flow path. Analyses of core sections via electron microscopy, synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction imaging, and the first application of microbeam Ca K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, provided evidence that these occlusions were fragments from the host rock rather than secondary precipitates. X-ray computed tomography showed a significant loss of rock mass within preferential flow paths, suggesting that dissolution also removed critical asperities and caused mechanical closure of the fracture. The decrease in fracture permeability despite a net removal of material along the fracture pathway demonstrates a nonintuitive, inverse relationship between dissolution and permeability evolution in a fractured carbonate caprock. PMID:23633894

  9. Dissolution-Driven Permeability Reduction of a Fractured Carbonate Caprock

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Brian R; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Bromhal, Grant S; McIntyre, Dustin L; Tappero, Ryan; Peters, Catherine

    2013-04-01

    Geochemical reactions may alter the permeability of leakage pathways in caprocks, which serve a critical role in confining CO{sub 2} in geologic carbon sequestration. A caprock specimen from a carbonate formation in the Michigan sedimentary Basin was fractured and studied in a high-pressure core flow experiment. Inflowing brine was saturated with CO{sub 2} at 40°C and 10 MPa, resulting in an initial pH of 4.6, and had a calcite saturation index of −0.8. Fracture permeability decreased during the experiment, but subsequent analyses did not reveal calcite precipitation. Instead, experimental observations indicate that calcite dissolution along the fracture pathway led to mobilization of less soluble mineral particles that clogged the flow path. Analyses of core sections via electron microscopy, synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction imaging, and the first application of microbeam Ca K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, provided evidence that these occlusions were fragments from the host rock rather than secondary precipitates. X-ray computed tomography showed a significant loss of rock mass within preferential flow paths, suggesting that dissolution also removed critical asperities and caused mechanical closure of the fracture. The decrease in fracture permeability despite a net removal of material along the fracture pathway demonstrates a nonintuitive, inverse relationship between dissolution and permeability evolution in a fractured carbonate caprock.

  10. Experimental observations of dolomite dissolution in geologic carbon sequestration conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Kong, X.; Tutolo, B. M.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    One sequestration scenario proposed to reduce CO2 emissions involves injecting CO2 into saline formations or hydrocarbon reservoirs, where dolomite frequently occurs. To better understand fluid-mineral interactions in these sequestration settings, we have conducted a series of single-pass, flow-through experiments on dolomite core samples with CO2-bearing brine. An important component of the experimental design was to maintain the fabric of the rock so as to more accurately simulate fluid flow in natural dolomite-bearing systems. Seven experiments were conducted at 100°C and a pore-fluid pressure of 150 bars with a fluid containing 1 molal NaCl and 0.6 molal dissolved CO2. Flow rates ranged from 0.01 to 1 ml/min. Each experiment was terminated before dissolution breakthrough, but permeability increased by approximately an order of magnitude for all experiments. In general, Ca and Mg concentrations were initially high, but then decreased with reaction progress. We hypothesize that time-dependent changes in fluid chemistry reflect reduction in reactive surface area. Fluid chemistry also indicates preferential removal of Ba, Mn, and Sr with respect to Ca and Mg. In the extreme case, 70% of the Ba was removed from one core, while only 3% of the Ca, Mg, or the entire core mass was removed by dissolution. Ongoing work is focused on identifying elemental distributions throughout the rock to better understand the dissolution process. With fluid chemistry and BET surface area, we model dissolution rate as a function of core length using reactive transport simulations and compare our whole rock, far from equilibrium dissolution rates with analogous data reported in the literature. Finally, X-ray computed tomography images enable reconstructions of dissolution patterns, and they are being used to explore the effect of pore space heterogeneity on flow path development. Geologic carbon sequestration in dolomite will produce significant dissolution at the brine/CO2 interface

  11. Dissolution of Uranium(IV) Oxide in Solutions of Ammonium Carbonate and Hydrogen Peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven C.; Peper, Shane M.; Douglas, Matthew; Ziegelgruber, Kate L.; Finn, Erin C.

    2009-09-12

    Understanding the dissolution characteristics of uranium oxides is of fundamental scientific interest. Bench scale experiments were conducted to determine the optimal dissolution parameters of uranium(IV) oxide (UO2) powder in solutions of ammonium carbonate [(NH4)2CO3] and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Experimental parameters included variable peroxide and carbonate concentrations, and temperature. Results indicate the dissolution rate of UO2 in 1 M (NH4)2CO3 increases linearly with peroxide concentration ranging from 0.05 – 2 M (1:1 to 40:1 mol ratio H2O2:U), with no apparent maximum rate reached under the limited conditions used in our study. Temperature ranging studies show the dissolution rate of UO2 in 1 M (NH4)2CO3 and 0.1 M H2O2 (2:1 mol ratio H2O2:U) increases linearly from 15 °C to 60 °C, again with no apparent maximum rate reached. Dissolution of UO2 in solutions with constant [H2O2] and [(NH4)2CO3] ranging from 0.5 to 2 M showed no difference in rate; however dissolution was significantly reduced in 0.05 M (NH4)2CO3 solution. The results of this study demonstrate the influence of [H2O2], [(NH4)2CO3], and temperature on the dissolution of UO2 in peroxide-containing (NH4)2CO3 solutions. Future studies are planned to elucidate the solution and solid state complexes in these systems.

  12. Dissolution driven convection for carbon dioxide sequestration: the stability problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandre, Shreyas; Guo, Xinjun; Slim, Anja

    2013-11-01

    The dissolution-driven convection in porous media is potentially a rate limiting process for sequestering carbon dioxide in underground aquifers. Super critical carbon dioxide introduced in the aquifer is lighter than the water that fills the surrounding porous rock, and hence quickly rises to the top. However, the solution of carbon dioxide in water is heavier than water. Hence, as the layer of carbon dioxide dissolves in the water, convection may ensue. The threshold criteria for convection is obscured by the continually changing background density profile as the carbon dioxide diffuses through the pores. Commonly used techniques such as frozen coefficient analysis or non-modal theories using transient amplifications yield substantially different results for the threshold, which has been the cause of a debate in the scientific community. We present a general theory for the linear stability of non-autonomous systems and apply it to dissolution driven convection. The theory unifies the classical modal stability theory using eigenvalues, the non-modal approaches using optimal growth of energy and the frozen coefficient analysis. We settle the debate, and demonstrate the existence of a threshold time for convection to commence.

  13. Carbonate mineral dissolution kinetics in high pressure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethlefsen, F.; Dörr, C.; Schäfer, D.; Ebert, M.

    2012-04-01

    The potential CO2 reservoirs in the North German Basin are overlain by a series of Mesozoic barrier rocks and aquifers and finally mostly by Tertiary and Quaternary close-to-surface aquifers. The unexpected rise of stored CO2 from its reservoir into close-to-surface aquifer systems, perhaps through a broken well casing, may pose a threat to groundwater quality because of the acidifying effect of CO2 dissolution in water. The consequences may be further worsening of the groundwater quality due to the mobilization of heavy metals. Buffer mechanisms counteracting the acidification are for instance the dissolution of carbonates. Carbonate dissolution kinetics is comparably fast and carbonates can be abundant in close-to-surface aquifers. The disadvantages of batch experiments compared to column experiments in order to determine rate constants are well known and have for instance been described by v. GRINSVEN and RIEMSDIJK (1992). Therefore, we have designed, developed, tested, and used a high-pressure laboratory column system to simulate aquifer conditions in a flow through setup within the CO2-MoPa project. The calcite dissolution kinetics was determined for CO2-pressures of 6, 10, and 50 bars. The results were evaluated by using the PHREEQC code with a 1-D reactive transport model, applying a LASAGA (1984) -type kinetic dissolution equation (PALANDRI and KHARAKA, 2004; eq. 7). While PALANDRI and KHARAKA (2004) gave calcite dissolution rate constants originating from batch experiments of log kacid = -0.3 and log kneutral = -5.81, the data of the column experiment were best fitted using log kacid = -2.3 and log kneutral = -7.81, so that the rate constants fitted using the lab experiment applying 50 bars pCO2 were approximately 100 times lower than according to the literature data. Rate constants of experiments performed at less CO2 pressure (pCO2 = 6 bars: log kacid = -1.78; log kneutral = -7.29) were only 30 times lower than literature data. These discrepancies in the

  14. Kinetics of carbonate dissolution in CO2-saturated aqueous system at reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng; Crawshaw, John P.; Maitland, Geoffrey; Trusler, J. P. Martin

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, carbon capture and storage (CCS) has emerged as a key technology for limiting anthropogenic CO2 emissions while allowing the continued utilisation of fossil fuels. The most promising geological storage sites are deep saline aquifers because the capacity, integrity and injection economics are most favourable, and the environmental impact can be minimal. Many rock-fluid chemical reactions are known to occur both during and after CO2 injection in saline aquifers. The importance of rock-fluid reactions in the (CO2 + H2O) system can be understood in terms of their impact on the integrity and stability of both the formation rocks and cap rocks. The chemical interactions between CO2-acidified brines and the reservoir minerals can influence the porosity and permeability of the formations, resulting in changes in the transport processes occurring during CO2 storage. Since carbonate minerals are abundant in sedimentary rocks, one of the requirements to safely implement CO2 storage in saline aquifers is to characterise the reactivity of carbonate minerals in aqueous solutions at reservoir conditions. In this work, we reported measurements of the intrinsic rate of carbonate dissolution in CO2-saturated water under high-temperature high-pressure reservoir conditions extending up to 373 K and 14 MPa. The rate of carbonate dissolution in CO2-free HCl(aq) was also measured at ambient pressure at temperatures up to 353 K. Various pure minerals and reservoir rocks were investigated in this study, including single-crystals of calcite and magnesite, and samples of dolomite, chalks and sandstones. A specially-designed batch reactor system, implementing the rotating disc technique, was used to obtain the intrinsic reaction rate at the solid/liquid interface, free of mass transfer effects. The effective area and mineralogy of the exposed surface was determined by a combination of surface characterisation techniques including XRD, SEM, EDX and optical microscopy. The

  15. Fracture Dissolution of Carbonate Rock: An Innovative Process for Gas Storage

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Castle; Ronald W. Falta; David Bruce; Larry Murdoch; Scott E. Brame; Donald Brooks

    2006-10-31

    ) that allow for the easy removal of calcium waste from the well. Physical and chemical analysis of core samples taken from prospective geologic formations for the acid dissolution process confirmed that many of the limestone samples readily dissolved in concentrated hydrochloric acid. Further, some samples contained oily residues that may help to seal the walls of the final cavern structure. These results suggest that there exist carbonate rock formations well suited for the dissolution technology and that the presence of inert impurities had no noticeable effect on the dissolution rate for the carbonate rock. A sensitivity analysis was performed for characteristics of hydraulic fractures induced in carbonate formations to enhance the dissolution process. Multiple fracture simulations were conducted using modeling software that has a fully 3-D fracture geometry package. The simulations, which predict the distribution of fracture geometry and fracture conductivity, show that the stress difference between adjacent beds is the physical property of the formations that has the greatest influence on fracture characteristics by restricting vertical growth. The results indicate that by modifying the fracturing fluid, proppant type, or pumping rate, a fracture can be created with characteristics within a predictable range, which contributes to predicting the geometry of storage caverns created by acid dissolution of carbonate formations. A series of three-dimensional simulations of cavern formation were used to investigate three different configurations of the acid-dissolution process: (a) injection into an open borehole with production from that same borehole and no fracture; (b) injection into an open borehole with production from that same borehole, with an open fracture; and (c) injection into an open borehole connected by a fracture to an adjacent borehole from which the fluids are produced. The two-well configuration maximizes the overall mass transfer from the rock to the

  16. Kinetic model of carbonate dissolution in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, R. E.; Humayun, M.

    2003-09-01

    The magnetites and sulfides located in the rims of carbonate globules in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been claimed as evidence of past life on Mars. Here, we consider the possibility that the rims were formed by dissolution and reprecipitation of the primary carbonate by the action of water. To estimate the rate of these solution-precipitation reactions, a kinetic model of magnesite-siderite carbonate dissolution was applied and used to examine the physicochemical conditions under which these rims might have formed. The results indicate that the formation of the rims could have taken place in < 50 yr of exposure to small amounts of aqueous fluids at ambient temperatures. Plausible conditions pertaining to reactions under a hypothetical ancient Martian atmosphere (1 bar CO 2), the modern Martian atmosphere (8 mbar CO 2), and the present terrestrial atmosphere (0.35 mbar CO 2) were explored to constrain the site of the process. The results indicated that such reactions likely occurred under the latter two conditions. The possibility of Antarctic weathering must be entertained, which, if correct, would imply that the plausibly biogenic minerals (single-domain magnetite of characteristic morphology and sulfide) reported from the rims may be the products of terrestrial microbial activity. This model is discussed in terms of the available isotope data and found to be compatible with the formation of ALH84001 rims. Particularly, anticorrelated variations of radiocarbon with δ 13C indicate that carbonate in ALH84001 was affected by solution-precipitation reactions immediately after its initial fall (˜13,000 yr ago) and then again during its recent exposure prior to collection.

  17. Reassessing the dissolution of marine carbonates: II. Reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlen, M.; Bassinot, F. C.; Chou, L.; McCorkle, D.

    2005-08-01

    We studied dissolution kinetics of the carbonate fraction >150 μm of sediments sampled along two bathymetric transects in the eastern tropical Atlantic: the Sierra Leone Rise (SLR) and the Cape Verde Plateau (CVP). The reaction was followed by monitoring solution pH during freedrift experiments lasting between 46 and 50 h (20 °C, pCO 2≈3100 ppm and 1 atm pressure). The alkalinity reached at the end of the dissolution experiments ranged between 2.444 and 2.798 meq/kg sw. The dissolution time series was extrapolated to equilibrium by fitting an empirical relation to the data. The estimated asymptotic concentration products ([Ca 2+] ∞×[CO 32-] ∞, for t→∞ and dA/dt=0) range from 4.27×10 -7 to 6.77×10 -7 mol 2/kg sw2. These asymptotic concentration products are comparable with the stoichiometric concentration product of aragonite (6.56×10 -7 mol 2/kg sw2) and calcite (4.37 (±0.22)×10 -7 mol 2/kg sw2) derived for the same sediment material during long-term equilibration experiments. They are indicative of the presence of trace amounts of a higher solubility carbonate phase in sediments of the shallow stations (SLR station A, 2637 m; CVP station M, 3104 m). While it is likely that this phase is aragonite, the presence of authigenic carbonate precipitated in contact with supersaturated bottom waters cannot be excluded. Calcite is the main dissolving carbonate mineral in sediments from deeper stations. The order of reaction is always greater than unity. It varies between 1.4 (SLR station C) and 2.8 (CVP station M2), with an average n=2.3±0.4. The higher order reaction is explained in terms of a multiphase system. Specific rate constants range from 0.09 to 0.53 meq/m 2/d.

  18. Dissolution of Calcite in the Twilight Zone: Bacterial Control of Dissolution of Sinking Planktonic Carbonates Is Unlikely

    PubMed Central

    Bissett, Andrew; Neu, Thomas R.; de Beer, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the ability of bacterial communities to colonize and dissolve two biogenic carbonates (Foraminifera and oyster shells). Bacterial carbonate dissolution in the upper water column is postulated to be driven by metabolic activity of bacteria directly colonising carbonate surfaces and the subsequent development of acidic microenvironments. We employed a combination of microsensor measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and image analysis and molecular documentation of colonising bacteria to monitor microbial processes and document changes in shell surface topography. Bacterial communities rapidly colonised shell surfaces, forming dense biofilms with extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) deposits. Despite this, we found no evidence of bacterially mediated carbonate dissolution. Dissolution was not indicated by Ca2+ microprofiles, nor was changes in shell surface structure related to the presence of colonizing bacteria. Given the short time (days) settling carbonate material is actually in the twilight zone (500–1000 m), it is highly unlikely that microbial metabolic activity on directly colonised shells plays a significant role in dissolving settling carbonates in the shallow ocean. PMID:22102861

  19. Reassessing the dissolution of marine carbonates: I. Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlen, M.; Bassinot, F. C.; Chou, L.; McCorkle, D.

    2005-08-01

    We studied the solubility of the [63-150 μm] and the greater than 150 μm size fractions of sediments from two bathymetric transects in the eastern tropical Atlantic (Sierra Leone rise and Cape Verde Plateau). Both fractions are made mainly of foraminiferal shells and fragments. We determined the calcite crystallinity (full width at half maximum of XRD (104) calcite peak) of the >150 μm size fraction. Equilibration experiments were carried out in artificial seawater (20 °C, pCO 2=3100 ppm) for up to 57 days starting from undersaturation with respect to calcite and supersaturation with respect to aragonite. Experiments starting from supersaturation yielded concentration products close to aragonite solubility for sediments from the shallowest stations, suggesting the presence of trace levels of aragonite in these samples. Concentration products computed for the deeper stations were intermediate between aragonite and calcite solubility. Our results indicate the formation of a high-Mg coating. The equilibration period was too short to allow the complete recrystallization of these Mg-rich overgrowths. Experiments initiated from undersaturation yield concentration products that are between 4% and 24% higher than the reported stoichiometric concentration product of synthetic calcite. These differences between estimates of calcite stoichiometric solubility products are explained in terms of variations in experimental conditions (artificial versus natural seawater) and related choices of carbonic acid dissociation constants. They do not reflect a true difference in solubility between biogenic and synthetic calcite. The thinning of the foraminiferal calcite (104) XRD peak from 0.168°( 2θ) to 0.148°( 2θ) along the depth transects is interpreted as reflecting an improvement in calcite crystallinity. This and the change in specific surface area are consistent with the progressive change of the carbonate assemblage. The evolution of the bulk composition of the carbonate

  20. Calcium isotope evidence for suppression of carbonate dissolution in carbonate-bearing organic-rich sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchyn, Alexandra V.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2011-11-01

    Pore fluid calcium isotope, calcium concentration and strontium concentration data are used to measure the rates of diagenetic dissolution and precipitation of calcite in deep-sea sediments containing abundant clay and organic material. This type of study of deep-sea sediment diagenesis provides unique information about the ultra-slow chemical reactions that occur in natural marine sediments that affect global geochemical cycles and the preservation of paleo-environmental information in carbonate fossils. For this study, calcium isotope ratios (δ 44/40Ca) of pore fluid calcium from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 984 (North Atlantic) and 1082 (off the coast of West Africa) were measured to augment available pore fluid measurements of calcium and strontium concentration. Both study sites have high sedimentation rates and support quantitative sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation. The pattern of change of δ 44/40Ca of pore fluid calcium versus depth at Sites 984 and 1082 differs markedly from that of previously studied deep-sea Sites like 590B and 807, which are composed of nearly pure carbonate sediment. In the 984 and 1082 pore fluids, δ 44/40Ca remains elevated near seawater values deep in the sediments, rather than shifting rapidly toward the δ 44/40Ca of carbonate solids. This observation indicates that the rate of calcite dissolution is far lower than at previously studied carbonate-rich sites. The data are fit using a numerical model, as well as more approximate analytical models, to estimate the rates of carbonate dissolution and precipitation and the relationship of these rates to the abundance of clay and organic material. Our models give mutually consistent results and indicate that calcite dissolution rates at Sites 984 and 1082 are roughly two orders of magnitude lower than at previously studied carbonate-rich sites, and the rate correlates with the abundance of clay. Our calculated rates are conservative for these

  1. Experimental Dissolution of Fine-Fraction Carbonate Sediments From the Paleocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, L. J.; Bralower, T. J.

    2007-12-01

    Pelagic carbonates play a vital role in sequestering CO2 and buffering the oceans through dissolution. The dominant component of deep-sea carbonates is calcareous nannofossils, a group that plays an important role in biostratigraphy, paleoecology and paleoceanography. The composition of assemblages is readily altered by dissolution in the water column, on the seafloor, and within the sediment column. It is therefore necessary to have some understanding of changes in the assemblage composition that may have occurred as well as the dissolution processes involved. Previous studies utilized experiments to constrain the susceptibility of nannofossil taxa during dissolution. While they noted general patterns related to ultrastructure, little is known about how dissolution affects fine-fraction carbonates at the scale of individual crystals of calcite. In this study we use long-term dissolution experiments to recreate dissolution of Paleocene nannofossils from the Indian Ocean in the water through sediment column. This assemblage is diverse and has a range of delicate to robust species and several different calcite morphologies. Detailed observations of subtle changes in the calcite crystals of nannofossils in the SEM reveal information on dissolution processes in pelagic carbonates and the factors that render specific morphologies more susceptible to dissolution. The morphologic alterations of nannofossil species in the light microscope can be used to create a quantitative index for dissolution. This index is based upon etching of rims, the presence of central areas, and the relative abundance of resistant taxa. A quantitative, rather than a subjective, dissolution index will help determine the preservational state of pelagic carbonates from the Paleocene.

  2. Effect of a magnetic field on the dissolution kinetics of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglitskii, N.N.; Kolomiets, A.A.; Kul'skii, L.A.; Rubezhanskii, K.A.; Zhantalai, B.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper gives an account of an investigation into the effect of a magnetic field on the rate of dissolution of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions. The CO/sub 2/ pressure in the system was maintained by a Hoffer valve. The method used for studying the dissolution kinetics of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions is described. The specific rate of dissolution of carbon dioxide in solutions exposed to a magnetic field is lower than in solutions not so exposed. There is a tendency for the equilibrium solubility of CO/sub 2/ to increase in solutions exposed to a magnetic field.

  3. The three steps of the carbonate biogenic dissolution process by microborers in coral reefs (New Caledonia).

    PubMed

    Grange, J S; Rybarczyk, H; Tribollet, A

    2015-09-01

    Biogenic dissolution of carbonates by microborers is one of the main destructive forces in coral reefs and is predicted to be enhanced by eutrophication and ocean acidification by 2100. The chlorophyte Ostreobium sp., the main agent of this process, has been reported to be one of the most responsive of all microboring species to those environmental factors. However, very little is known about its recruitment, how it develops over successions of microboring communities, and how that influences rates of biogenic dissolution. Thus, an experiment with dead coral blocks exposed to colonization by microborers was carried out on a reef in New Caledonia over a year period. Each month, a few blocks were collected to study microboring communities and the associated rates of biogenic dissolution. Our results showed a drastic shift in community species composition between the 4th and 5th months of exposure, i.e., pioneer communities dominated by large chlorophytes such as Phaeophila sp. were replaced by mature communities dominated by Ostreobium sp. Prior the 4th month of exposure, large chlorophytes were responsible for low rates of biogenic dissolution while during the community shift, rates increased exponentially (×10). After 6 months of exposure, rates slowed down and reached a "plateau" with a mean of 0.93 kg of CaCO3 dissolved per m(2) of reef after 12 months of exposure. Here, we show that (a) Ostreobium sp. settled down in new dead substrates as soon as the 3rd month of exposure but dominated communities only after 5 months of exposure and (b) microbioerosion dynamics comprise three distinct steps which fully depend on community development stage and grazing pressure. PMID:25592911

  4. Influence of carbides and microstructure of CoCrMo alloys on their metallic dissolution resistance.

    PubMed

    Valero-Vidal, C; Casabán-Julián, L; Herraiz-Cardona, I; Igual-Muñoz, A

    2013-12-01

    CoCrMo alloys are passive and biocompatible materials widely used as joint replacements due to their good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Electrochemical behaviour of thermal treated CoCrMo alloys with different carbon content in their bulk alloy composition has been analysed. Both the amount of carbides in the CoCrMo alloys and the chemical composition of the simulated body fluid affect the electrochemical properties of these biomedical alloys, thus passive dissolution rate was influenced by the mentioned parameters. Lower percentage of carbon in the chemical composition of the bulk alloy and thermal treatments favour the homogenization of the surface (less amount of carbides), thus increasing the availability of Cr to form the oxide film and improving the corrosion resistance of the alloy. PMID:24094174

  5. Influence of processing-induced phase transformations on the dissolution of theophylline tablets.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Smita; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2004-02-12

    The object of this investigation was to evaluate the influence of (1) processing-induced decrease in drug crystallinity and (2) phase transformations during dissolution, on the performance of theophylline tablet formulations. Anhydrous theophylline underwent multiple transformations (anhydrate --> hydrate --> anhydrate) during processing. Although the crystallinity of the anhydrate obtained finally was lower than that of the unprocessed drug, it dissolved at a slower rate. This decrease in dissolution rate was attributed to the accelerated anhydrate to hydrate transformation during the dissolution run. Water vapor sorption studies proved to be a good predictor of powder dissolution behavior. While a decrease in crystallinity was brought about either by milling or by granulation, the effect on tablet dissolution was pronounced only in the latter. Tablet formulations prepared from the granules exhibited higher hardness, longer disintegration time, and slower dissolution than those containing the milled drug. The granules underwent plastic deformation during compression resulting in harder tablets, with delayed disintegration. The high hardness coupled with rapid anhydrate --> hydrate transformation during dissolution resulted in the formation of a hydrate layer on the tablet surface, which further delayed tablet disintegration and, consequently, dissolution. Phase transformations during processing and, more importantly, during dissolution influenced the observed dissolution rates. Product performance was a complex function of the physical state of the active and the processing conditions. PMID:15198529

  6. Dissolution behaviour of magnetite film formed over carbon steel in dilute organic acid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, A. A. M.; Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S. V.; Ramesh, C.; Murugesan, N.; Raghavan, P. S.; Gopalan, R.

    2001-03-01

    Magnetite is the major corrosion product formed over the carbon steel in the primary heat transport system of the pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). This magnetite usually accumulates radioactivity during reactor operation. The dissolution of the host magnetite is achieved by chemical formulations in order to get rid of the radioactivity trapped in the oxide; the underlying base metal also participates in the process by contributing electron to reduce the ferric ion or by undergoing corrosion. In the present study, the role of base metal in the dissolution of magnetite in various chelating agents has been investigated. The liberated hydrogen was measured by using an amperometric hydrogen sensor. The magnetite dissolution rate and the corrosion rate of carbon steel in the formulations were calculated. The effect of temperature, pH and concentration of the chelating agents on the magnetite film dissolution was studied in detail. The mechanism of base metal aided magnetite dissolution is discussed.

  7. Dissolution along fracture systems in Turonian-Campanian carbonates in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilario Rego Bezerra, Francisco; Cazarin, Caroline; Nogueira, Francisco; Rabelo, Juliana; Bertotti, Giovanni; Bisdom, Kevin; Silva, Carlos; Maia, Rubson

    2015-04-01

    Dissolution occurs by the action of diagenetic fluids of diverse nature along faults. When this process affects carbonate rocks, karst systems develop. Many karst systems evolve from dissolution of selected zones to pervasive karstification and to later burial and diagenesis. These systems resulted from coalesced, collapsed caves that may reach several thousand meters long and more than 100 m thick. We studied the dissolution along faults and fractures in the Turonian-Campanian carbonates in the Potiguar Basin, Brazil. We used an integrated multidisciplinary approach in outcrops and core samples, which combined Quickbird satellite imagery analysis, structural and sedimentary-facies mapping, and petrographic. The units investigated here presents a variety of carbonate facies, which include mudstones to bioclastic, peloidal, intraclastic, and oolitic grainstones. Our results indicate that dissolution occurred along N-S, NE-, and E-W-trending faults, which provided vertical leaching pathways of increased secondary porosity and permeability. Dissolution led to mechanical breakdown and collapse of carbonate blocks, which resulted in the infilling of clastic sediments and formation of collapse breccia in caves. The dissolution led to widespread karstification of the carbonate unit. We conclude that karstified faults and preferential sedimentary facies form the karst system, which makes the karst geometry predictable. We suggest that similar patterns may occur in other paleokarst systems.

  8. In-life pteropod shell dissolution as an indicator of past ocean carbonate saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Smart, Christopher W.; Hart, Malcolm B.

    2013-12-01

    Recent concern over the effects of ocean acidification upon calcifying organisms has highlighted the aragonitic shelled thecosomatous pteropods as being at a high risk. Both in-situ and laboratory studies have shown that an increased dissolved CO2 concentration, leading to decreased water pH and low carbonate concentration, causes reduced calcification rates and enhanced dissolution in the shells of living pteropods. In fossil records unaffected by post-depositional dissolution, this in-life shell dissolution can be detected. Here we present the first evidence of variations of in-life pteropod shell dissolution due to variations in surface water carbonate concentration during the Late Pleistocene by analysing the surface layer of pteropod shells in marine sediment cores from the Caribbean Sea and Indian Ocean. In-life shell dissolution was determined by applying the Limacina Dissolution Index (LDX) to the sub-tropical pteropod Limacina inflata. Average shell size information shows that high in-life dissolution is accompanied by smaller shell sizes in L. inflata, which may indicate a reduction in calcification rate. Comparison of the LDX profile to Late Pleistocene Vostok atmospheric CO2 concentrations, shows that in-life pteropod dissolution is closely associated to variations in past ocean carbonate saturation. This study confirms the findings of laboratory studies, showing enhanced shell dissolution and reduced calcification in living pteropods when surface ocean carbonate concentrations were lower. Results also demonstrate that oceanic pH levels that were less acidic and changing less rapidly than those predicted for the 21st Century, negatively affected pteropods during the Late Pleistocene.

  9. Lithologic controls on morphology of pressure-dissolution surfaces (stylolites and dissolution seams) in Paleozoic carbonate rocks from the mideastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Railsback, L.B. )

    1993-05-01

    Examination of pressure-dissolution surfaces (stylolites and dissolution seams) in carbonate rocks from the mideastern US demonstrates that the morphology of these surfaces varies with rock fabric. In limestones, pressure dissolution causes suturing of intergranular contacts at the microscopic scale and formation of macroscopic pressure-dissolution surfaces. Pressure dissolution thus modifies limestone fabric, and it contributes to destruction of porosity in two ways, by eliminating intergranular space at sites of dissolution and by providing cement to fill pores elsewhere. In addition to these petrologic effects, pressure-dissolution surfaces (1) can generate bedding planes, (2) can account for significant thicknesses of lost section in stratigraphic reconstructions, and (3) can be of economic significance by modifying reservoir properties, by serving as barriers to petroleum migration, and by acting as seals for reservoirs. This paper examines lithologic controls on morphology of stylolites and dissolution seams in relatively undeformed carbonate rocks. It thus addresses many of the same problems on which Buxton and Sibley (1981) focused, but it quantifies, rather than categorizes, morphology of pressure-dissolution surfaces, and examines a more general sample suite from the mideastern US.

  10. The dissolution of carbon doixide in silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M.; Spickenbom, K.; Porbatzki, D.

    2003-04-01

    Carbon dioxide and H_2O are the two most abundant volatile components in Earth's crust, mantle, and in magmatic liquids. In contrast to H_2O there is still little information about the dissolution mechanism of CO_2 in silicate melts. First annealing experiments of CO_2-bearing albitic and dacitic glasses near the glass transition temperature at 0.5 GPa demonstrate that in contrast to previous suggestions [1] the equilibrium of the homogeneous CO_2 species reaction CO_2 (melt) + O2- (melt) = CO_32- (melt) shifts towards molecular CO_2 with increasing temperature [2]. This behaviour was recently confirmed for dissolved CO_2 in jadeitic glasses [3]. In order to provide more insights into the thermodynamics and kinetics of CO_2 in silicate melts we performed additional annealing experiments with dacitic and albitic glasses, especially with different run times. Glass cylinders containing 0.15--0.2 wt% CO_2 were synthesized at 1603 K and 0.5 GPa and rapidly quenched to room temperature. Glass slabs 2--3 mm in height were used for time dependent annealing experiments at ambient P, 0.5 GPa, and at 673--973 K. Run durations were 1--1000 min. MIR micro-spectroscopy was used to determine the peak areas of the molecular CO_2 band at 2350 cm-1 and the CO_32- band system at 1800 to 1250 cm-1. In the temperature range 673--973 K the CO_2 speciation shifts significantly towards molecular CO_2 with increasing temperature, which is in agreement with [2,3]. The CO_2 species concentrations and an ideal solution model were used to derive values for the enthalpy Δ H^0 and entropy Δ S^0 of the homogeneous CO_2 species reaction, assuming that the CO_2 speciation reflects those at annealing temperatures (albitic composition: Δ H^0 = -12 ± 2 kJ mol-1 and Δ S^0 = -23 ± 3 J mol-1 K-1; dacitic composition: Δ H^0 = -29 ± 2 kJ mol-1 and Δ S^0 = -32 ± 3 J mol-1 K-1). Within error the thermodynamic values for dacitic composition derived from annealing experiments at ambient P and at 0

  11. Dissolution and carbonation of Portlandite [Ca(OH)2] single crystals.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; Kudłacz, Krzysztof; Putnis, Christine V; Putnis, Andrew; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    The dissolution and carbonation of portlandite (Ca(OH)2) single crystals was studied by a combination of in situ Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and two-dimensional X-ray diffraction. The dissolution of portlandite {0001} surfaces in water proceeds by the formation and expansion of pseudohexagonal etch pits, with edges parallel to ⟨100⟩ directions. Etch pits on {010} surfaces are elongated along ⟨001⟩, with edges parallel to ⟨101⟩. The interaction between carbonate-bearing solutions and portlandite results in the dissolution of the substrate coupled with the precipitation of thick islands of CaCO3 that appear oriented on the portlandite substrate. Ex situ carbonation of portlandite in contact with air results in the formation of pseudomorphs that fully preserve the external shape of the original portlandite single crystals. Our observations suggest that portlandite carbonation in contact with air and carbonate-bearing solutions occurs by a similar mechanism, i.e. coupled dissolution-precipitation. Calcite grows epitaxially on {0001} portlandite surfaces with the following orientation: ⟨001⟩Cc∥ ⟨001⟩Port. Apparently, no porosity is generated during the reaction, which progresses through the formation of fractures. Our results are of relevance to many processes in which the carbonation of portlandite takes place, such as CO2 capture and storage or the carbonation of cementitious materials. PMID:23915181

  12. Ion-specific effects influencing the dissolution of tricalcium silicate

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoleau, L.; Schreiner, E.; Nonat, A.

    2014-05-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the dissolution kinetics of tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S) is driven by the deviation from its solubility equilibrium. In this article, special attention is paid to ions relevant in cement chemistry likely to interact with C{sub 3}S. In order to determine whether specific effects occur at the interface C{sub 3}S–water, particular efforts have been made to model ion activities using Pitzer's model. It has been found that monovalent cations and monovalent anions interact very little with the surface of C{sub 3}S. On the other side, divalent anions like sulfate slow down the dissolution more strongly by modifying the surface charging of C{sub 3}S. Third, aluminate ions covalently bind to surface silicate monomers and inhibit the dissolution in mildly alkaline conditions. The formation and the breaking of these bonds depend on pH and on [Ca{sup 2+}]. Thermodynamic calculations performed using DFT combined with the COSMO-RS solvation method support the experimental findings.

  13. Predicting carbonate mineral precipitation/dissolution events during progressive diagenesis of clastic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Surdam, R.C.; MacGowan, D.B.; Dunn, T.L. ); Moraes, M. )

    1991-03-01

    There is an observable, regular progression of early and late carbonate cements that is separated by carbonate mineral dissolution in many sandstones during progressive burial and diagenesis. The distribution of early cements is a function of incipient hydration of framework grains, sulfate reduction, and bacterial methanogenesis. These early cements typically precipitate from the sediment water interace to burial depths corresponding to about 80C. The distribution of late carbonate cements is a function of the relationship of organic acid anions, aluminosilicate reactions and CO{sub 2} in formation waters. Elevated PCO{sub 2} in a fluid where the pH is buffered by organic acid anions or aluminosilicates results in precipitation of a late carbonate cement (typically ferroan); these late carbonate cements generally form over the temperature interval of 100-130C. The late and early carbonate cement events are separated in time by a period of carbonate mineral dissolution or nonprecipitation. This dissolution is related to the increase in concentration of carboxylic acid anions resulting from the thermocatalytic cracking of oxygen-bearing functional groups from kerogen and/or redox reactions involving kerogen. Examples of the importance of early carbonate cementation/decementation to hydrocarbon reservoirs include the Campos basin of Brazil and the U.S. Gulf Coast. An example of late carbonate cementation/decementation includes the Norphlet Formation. This observed sequence of cementation and decementation can be modeled, and the modeling results can be used to predict enhanced porosity in the subsurface.

  14. Experimental determination of natural carbonate rock dissolution rates with a focus on temperature dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstein, Jens; Hellevang, Helge; Haile, Beyene G.; Gleixner, Gerd; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2016-05-01

    The denudation of carbonate rocks at landscape scale is controlled by factors like mineral composition, temperature, precipitation, runoff, fracture spacing and vegetation cover. Knowledge on carbonate denudation is important in order to understand landscape development and long-term terrestrial/marine carbon transport, but there are few laboratory studies done on weathering rates of natural carbonate rocks under the low temperatures relevant for glacial-interglacial periods. To enhance the understanding of carbonate dissolution kinetics we studied low-temperature dissolution reactions of various natural Triassic carbonate rocks belonging to the Lower Muschelkalk in Germany. We conducted batch and flow-through experiments investigating the direct correlation of dissolution rates with temperature, and to establish whether the fine-grained carbonate rocks (micrite) are more reactive than the coarser-grained sparitic limestones. By increasing the temperature from 5 to 26 °C far-from-equilibrium dissolution rates of micritic and sparitic limestone samples increased from 2.42 × 10- 07 to 10.88 × 10- 07 and 4.19 × 10- 07 to 7.74 × 10- 07 mol m- 2 s- 1, respectively (Specific Surface Areas (SSA) of about 0.006-0.01 m2/g). The dissolution rates of dolomite rock samples varied only slightly from 1.06 × 10- 07 to 2.02 × 10- 07 mol m- 2 s- 1 (SSA approximately 0.002 m2/g) in the temperature range 5-25 °C at circum-neutral pH. The obtained apparent activation energies are in the range of earlier experiments done at higher temperatures, but there is a distinct difference between the calcite in the micrite (~ 51 kJ/mol) and sparitic (~ 20-22 kJ/mol) lithologies, indicating that the dissolution mechanisms are not the same. Using these activation energies in modelling of natural carbonate denudation we see that there is a clear effect of changing temperature, but this is mostly through the increased solubility at lower temperatures and not through the increasing far

  15. Influence of glyphosate on the copper dissolution in phosphate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, C. F. B.; Silva, M. O.; Machado, S. A. S.; Mazo, L. H.

    2007-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of copper microelectrode in phosphate buffer in the presence of glyphosate was investigated by electrochemical techniques. It was observed that the additions of glyphosate in the phosphate buffer increased the anodic current of copper microelectrode and the electrochemical dissolution was observed. This phenomenon could be associated with the Cu(II) complexation by glyphosate forming a soluble complex. Physical characterization of the surface showed that, in absence of glyphosate, an insoluble layer covered the copper surface; on the other hand, in presence of glyphosate, it was observed a corroded copper surface with the formation of glyphosate complex in solution.

  16. Diurnal variation in rates of calcification and carbonate sediment dissolution in Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Halley, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Water quality and circulation in Florida Bay (a shallow, subtropical estuary in south Florida) are highly dependent upon the development and evolution of carbonate mud banks distributed throughout the Bay. Predicting the effect of natural and anthropogenic perturbations on carbonate sedimentation requires an understanding of annual, seasonal, and daily variations in the biogenic and inorganic processes affecting carbonate sediment precipitation and dissolution. In this study, net calcification rates were measured over diurnal cycles on 27 d during summer and winter from 1999 to 2003 on mud banks and four representative substrate types located within basins between mud banks. Substrate types that were measured in basins include seagrass beds of sparse and intermediate density Thalassia sp., mud bottom, and hard bottom communities. Changes in total alkalinity were used as a proxy for calcification and dissolution. On 22 d (81%), diurnal variation in rates of net calcification was observed. The highest rates of net carbonate sediment production (or lowest rates of net dissolution) generally occurred during daylight hours and ranged from 2.900 to -0.410 g CaCO3 m-2 d-1. The lowest rates of carbonate sediment production (or net sediment dissolution) occurred at night and ranged from 0.210 to -1.900 g CaCO3 m -2 night-1. During typical diurnal cycles, dissolution during the night consumed an average of 29% of sediment produced during the day on banks and 68% of sediment produced during the day in basins. Net sediment dissolution also occurred during daylight, but only when there was total cloud cover, high turbidity, or hypersalinity. Diurnal variation in calcification and dissolution in surface waters and surface sediments of Florida Bay is linked to cycling of carbon dioxide through photosynthesis and respiration. Estimation of long-term sediment accumulation rates from diurnal rates of carbonate sediment production measured in this study indicates an overall average

  17. Lithologic controls on morphology of pressure dissolution surfaces in Paleozoic carbonates from the mideastern U. S

    SciTech Connect

    Railsback, L.B. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative examination of pressure dissolution surfaces (stylolites and dissolution seams) in carbonate rocks from the mideastern US demonstrates that morphology of these surfaces is dependent on rock fabric. Morphology of these pressure dissolution surfaces can be effectively quantified using just four parameters: thickness (T) of the surface, amplitude of irregularity (I) of the surface, amplitude of vertical offsets (O) of the surface, and frequency (F) of offsets along the surface. I and O vary with T, reflecting the progressive development of stylolites, whereas F varies with 1/T, apparently because the physical strength of a stylolite inhibits formation of offsets. Mean values of F, O and T are greater in grainstones and packstones than in mudstones and wackestones, and mean values of T and O are greater in limestones than in dolostones. The proportion of dissolution seams to stylolites decreases through the lithologic spectrum from mudstones to grainstones. These relationships suggest that elaboration of pressure dissolution surfaces depends on the heterogeneity of the carbonate fabric. Maximum values of T and O in grainstones are correlative with abundance of intergranular cement. Within those grainstones, grains disproportionately occur as leading or penetrating elements of stylolite columns, and by contrast cements are apparently disfavored to survive stylolite development. Dissolution seams occur only in rocks containing fine-grained dolomite, and in those seams T and I decrease with increasing dolomite abundance. This relationship, combined with the observations from grainstones, suggests that development of pressure-dissolution surfaces is inhibited by relative abundance of pressure-resistant components such as carbonate grains and dolomite.

  18. Comparative Dissolution Kinetics of Biogenic and Chemogenic Uraninite Under Oxidizing Conditions in the Presence of Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Ilton, Eugene S.; Veeramani, Harish; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Bargar, John; Giammar, Daniel E.

    2009-10-15

    The long-term stability of biogenic uraninite with respect to oxidation is pivotal to the success of in situ bioreduction strategies for the subsurface remediation of uranium legacies. Given the structural homology between biogenic uraninite nanoparticles obtained from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and chemogenic UO2.00, similar surface free energy and reactivity is expected. Batch and flow-through dissolution experiments were conducted along with spectroscopic analyses to compare both materials with respect to their equilibrium solubility, dissolution mechanisms, and dissolution kinetics in water of varied oxygen and carbonate concentrations. Both uraninite materials exhibited a similar intrinsic solubility of ~10-8 M under reducing conditions. The observation of comparable dissolution rates under anoxic as well as oxidizing conditions is consistent with the structural bulk homology of biogenic and stoichiometric uraninite. Carbonate, a ubiquitous groundwater component and strong complexant of U(VI), reversibly promoted the uraninite dissolution not only under moderately oxidizing, but also under reducing conditions, where the biogenic material yielded higher dissolution rates than the chemogenic. This difference is in accordance with the higher proportion of U(V) detected on the biogenic uraninite surface by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Reasonable sources of the intermediate U(V) are discussed. The observed increase of the dissolution rates can be explained by carbonate complexation of U(V) facilitating the detachment of U(V) from the uraninite surface. The fraction of surface U(VI) increased with increasing oxygen concentration; this result is consistent with x-ray absorption near-edge spectra showing evidence of higher-valent U in the form of UO2+x (0 < x ≤ 0.20). In equilibrium with air, combined spectroscopic results support the formation of a near-surface layer of U4O9 (UO2.25) coated by an outer layer of U(VI) corresponding to a metaschoepite

  19. CO2-induced dissolution of low permeability carbonates. Part II: Numerical modeling of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yue; Smith, Megan; Sholokhova, Yelena; Carroll, Susan

    2013-12-01

    We used the 3D continuum-scale reactive transport models to simulate eight core flood experiments for two different carbonate rocks. In these experiments the core samples were reacted with brines equilibrated with pCO2 = 3, 2, 1, 0.5 MPa (Smith et al., 2013 [27]). The carbonate rocks were from specific Marly dolostone and Vuggy limestone flow units at the IEAGHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project in south-eastern Saskatchewan, Canada. Initial model porosity, permeability, mineral, and surface area distributions were constructed from micro tomography and microscopy characterization data. We constrained model reaction kinetics and porosity-permeability equations with the experimental data. The experimental data included time-dependent solution chemistry and differential pressure measured across the core, and the initial and final pore space and mineral distribution. Calibration of the model with the experimental data allowed investigation of effects of carbonate reactivity, flow velocity, effective permeability, and time on the development and consequences of stable and unstable dissolution fronts. The continuum scale model captured the evolution of distinct dissolution fronts that developed as a consequence of carbonate mineral dissolution and pore scale transport properties. The results show that initial heterogeneity and porosity contrast control the development of the dissolution fronts in these highly reactive systems. This finding is consistent with linear stability analysis and the known positive feedback between mineral dissolution and fluid flow in carbonate formations. Differences in the carbonate kinetic drivers resulting from the range of pCO2 used in the experiments and the different proportions of more reactive calcite and less reactive dolomite contributed to the development of new pore space, but not to the type of dissolution fronts observed for the two different rock types. The development of the dissolution front was much more

  20. Experiment and Simulation Study of Hydrodynamic Dispersion and Finger Dynamics for Convective Dissolution of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; DiCarlo, D. A.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage in deep geological formations has the potential to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions from industrial point sources. Dissolution of CO2 into the brine, resulting in stable stratification, has been identified as the key to long-term storage security. Here we present new analogue laboratory experiment method, advanced image processing method and optimized simulation method to characterize CO2 convective dissolution trapping process and gravitational finger behaviors, in order to study the effect of hydrodynamic dispersion on the CO2 convective dissolution process, as well as to study the effect of control physical parameters on the gravitational finger dynamics. Figure 1 shows the image processing method to analyze the finger dynamics. Understanding the effect of hydrodynamic dispersion and the finger dynamics are essential to evaluate whether convective dissolution occurs, as well as to predict how fast it occurs at the geological CO2 storage field scale. The effect of hydrodynamics dispersion and the finger dynamics can be applied to estimate the security of geological CO2 storage fields, in turn. Optimiezed simulation work is conducted to predict the CO2 dissolution rate at geological CO2 storage field. The large experimental assembly will allow us to quantify in detail for the first time the relationship between convective dissolution rate and the controlling factors of the system, including permeability and driven force, which could be essential to trapping process at Bravo Dome geological CO2 storage field. We complement the homogeneous experiments with a detailed study of the scaling law of the convective flux with dispersion effect. The advanced image processing method with Fourier's transform method allow us to understand the finger dynamics and corresponding control factors in porous media, for the first time. By applying the dispersion effect and finger dynamics we found from the experimental study, we optimize the simulation

  1. The Effect of Micrite on Velocity, Its Sensitivity to Pressure, and Dissolution of Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Husseiny, A.; Vanorio, T.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of micrite on the acoustic properties of well-controlled microstructures created in the laboratory to closely mimic carbonate rocks. In particular, we examine the effect of micrite content on the elastic stiffness rock, its sensitivity to pressure, and induced dissolution upon saturation with a reactive fluid. We followed Dunham's classification and fabricated the samples by mixing coarse (sand size) and very fine (micrite size) calcite grains in different ratios, with the addition of cement and then cold-compressing the mixture. The acoustic velocities were measured under bench-top conditions and as functions of confining pressure before and after the injection of a CO2aqueous solution. Our bench-top measurements indicated that micrite makes the frame of the carbonate samples stiffer. Since the sensitivity of the elastic stiffness to pressure decreases as the content of micrite increases (see figure 1), we hypothesize a stiffer pore structure (i.e., rounder pores) in micrite-richer fabrics. Furthermore, the presence of micrite makes the carbonate sample more reactive upon dissolution. The concentration of Ca+2 cations in the fluid measured at the outlet after the injection of the CO2 aqueous solution shows larger dissolution in the micrite-rich samples likely due to the higher surface area of the micrite aggregates. The content of micrite also seems to affect the evolution of stiffness as dissolution proceeds. As the content of micrite increases, the enhanced dissolution translates into a marked softening of the rock frame. We conclude that the content of micrite can play an important role in the complex rock-fluid interaction of carbonates as well as when comparing Gassmann's predictions to velocity measurements of saturated carbonates.

  2. Modeling of dissolution patterns for carbonate acidizing in the porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, Fereshteh; Esmaeilzadeh, Feridun; Mowla, Dariush

    2012-05-01

    Matrix acidizing is a common technique to stimulate wells for improving well inflow performance. In this treatment that is widely used in the oil industry, acid solution is injected into the formation to dissolve some minerals to increase permeability of carbonate near the wellbore. The aim of the treatment is to create empty channels called wormholes. Wormholing in carbonate rocks is a complex 3-D phenomenon. Matrix acidizing generally should be applied when a well has a high skin factor that cannot be attributed to partial penetration, perforation efficiency or other mechanical aspects of the completion. Obviously, it is of extreme importance to quantify the skin factor to evaluate the effectiveness of stimulation treatments. When wormholes extend beyond the damaged zone or connect with natural fissures in the formation, a negative skin effect is obtained. An ideal matrix treatment restores the permeability in the near wellbore region to a value at least as high as the original undamaged permeability; it accomplishes this over the entire completed interval and it leaves the formation in the treated region with high relative permeability to the oil and/or gas phase. Designing a treatment should strive to achieve this ideal at the lowest possible cost, which requires consideration of the many physical and chemical interactions taking place between the injected fluids and the reservoir minerals and fluids. In this work, a threescale continuum model is used to model reactive dissolution of carbonate rocks in radial flow. Both the Darcy and pore scale physics such as mass transfer of acid molecules to the mineral surface and subsequent reaction at the surface, changing pore structure and variations in reservoir permeability are included in this model. Partial differential equations obtained from the model, have been solved by numerical method. The influence of reservoir temperature on optimum injection rate is investigated. Results show that optimum injection rate

  3. Macroscopic rates, microscopic observations, and molecular models of the dissolution of carbonate phases.

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Martin, Scot T.

    2004-05-01

    Bulk and surface energies are calculated for endmembers of the isostructural rhombohedral carbonate mineral family, including Ca, Cd, Co, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, and Zn compositions. The calculations for the bulk agree with the densities, bond distances, bond angles, and lattice enthalpies reported in the literature. The calculated energies also correlate with measured dissolution rates: the lattice energies show a log-linear relationship to the macroscopic dissolution rates at circumneutral pH. Moreover, the energies of ion pairs translated along surface steps are calculated and found to predict experimentally observed microscopic step retreat velocities. Finally, pit formation excess energies decrease with increasing pit size, which is consistent with the nonlinear dissolution kinetics hypothesized for the initial stages of pit formation.

  4. A probabilistic assessment of calcium carbonate export and dissolution in the modern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Gianna; Steinacher, Marco; Joos, Fortunat

    2016-05-01

    The marine cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is an important element of the carbon cycle and co-governs the distribution of carbon and alkalinity within the ocean. However, CaCO3 export fluxes and mechanisms governing CaCO3 dissolution are highly uncertain. We present an observationally constrained, probabilistic assessment of the global and regional CaCO3 budgets. Parameters governing pelagic CaCO3 export fluxes and dissolution rates are sampled using a Monte Carlo scheme to construct a 1000-member ensemble with the Bern3D ocean model. Ensemble results are constrained by comparing simulated and observation-based fields of excess dissolved calcium carbonate (TA*). The minerals calcite and aragonite are modelled explicitly and ocean-sediment fluxes are considered. For local dissolution rates, either a strong or a weak dependency on CaCO3 saturation is assumed. In addition, there is the option to have saturation-independent dissolution above the saturation horizon. The median (and 68 % confidence interval) of the constrained model ensemble for global biogenic CaCO3 export is 0.90 (0.72-1.05) Gt C yr-1, that is within the lower half of previously published estimates (0.4-1.8 Gt C yr-1). The spatial pattern of CaCO3 export is broadly consistent with earlier assessments. Export is large in the Southern Ocean, the tropical Indo-Pacific, the northern Pacific and relatively small in the Atlantic. The constrained results are robust across a range of diapycnal mixing coefficients and, thus, ocean circulation strengths. Modelled ocean circulation and transport timescales for the different set-ups were further evaluated with CFC11 and radiocarbon observations. Parameters and mechanisms governing dissolution are hardly constrained by either the TA* data or the current compilation of CaCO3 flux measurements such that model realisations with and without saturation-dependent dissolution achieve skill. We suggest applying saturation-independent dissolution rates in Earth system

  5. A probabilistic assessment of calcium carbonate export and dissolution in the modern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, G.; Steinacher, M.; Joos, F.

    2015-12-01

    The marine cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is an important element of the carbon cycle and co-governs the distribution of carbon and alkalinity within the ocean. However, CaCO3 fluxes and mechanisms governing CaCO3 dissolution are highly uncertain. We present an observationally-constrained, probabilistic assessment of the global and regional CaCO3 budgets. Parameters governing pelagic CaCO3 export fluxes and dissolution rates are sampled using a Latin-Hypercube scheme to construct a 1000 member ensemble with the Bern3D ocean model. Ensemble results are constrained by comparing simulated and observation-based fields of excess dissolved calcium carbonate (TA*). The minerals calcite and aragonite are modelled explicitly and ocean-sediment fluxes are considered. For local dissolution rates either a strong, a weak or no dependency on CaCO3 saturation is assumed. Median (68 % confidence interval) global CaCO3 export is 0.82 (0.67-0.98) Gt PIC yr-1, within the lower half of previously published estimates (0.4-1.8 Gt PIC yr-1). The spatial pattern of CaCO3 export is broadly consistent with earlier assessments. Export is large in the Southern Ocean, the tropical Indo-Pacific, the northern Pacific and relatively small in the Atlantic. Dissolution within the 200 to 1500 m depth range (0.33; 0.26-0.40 Gt PIC yr-1) is substantially lower than inferred from the TA*-CFC age method (1 ± 0.5 Gt PIC yr-1). The latter estimate is likely biased high as the TA*-CFC method neglects transport. The constrained results are robust across a range of diapycnal mixing coefficients and, thus, ocean circulation strengths. Modelled ocean circulation and transport time scales for the different setups were further evaluated with CFC11 and radiocarbon observations. Parameters and mechanisms governing dissolution are hardly constrained by either the TA* data or the current compilation of CaCO3 flux measurements such that model realisations with and without saturation-dependent dissolution achieve

  6. HLW glass dissolution in the presence of magnesium carbonate: Diffusion cell experiment and coupled modeling of diffusion and geochemical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debure, Mathieu; De Windt, Laurent; Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    The influence of diffusion of reactive species in aqueous solutions on the alteration rate of borosilicate glass of nuclear interest in the presence of magnesium carbonate (hydromagnesite: 4MgCO3·Mg(OH)2·4H2O) is investigated together with the ability of coupled chemistry/transport models to simulate the processes involved. Diffusion cells in which the solids are separated by an inert stainless steel sintered filter were used to establish parameters for direct comparison with batch experiments in which solids are intimately mixed. The chemistry of the solution and solid phases was monitored over time by various analytical techniques including ICP-AES, XRD, and SEM. The primary mechanism controlling the geochemical evolution of the system remains the consumption of silicon from the glass by precipitation of magnesium silicates. The solution chemistry and the dissolution and precipitation of solid phases are correctly described by 2D modeling with the GRAAL model implemented in the HYTEC reactive transport code. The spatial symmetry of the boron concentrations in both compartments of the cells results from dissolution coupled with simple diffusion, whereas the spatial asymmetry of the silicon and magnesium concentrations is due to strong coupling between dissolution, diffusion, and precipitation of secondary phases. A sensitivity analysis on the modeling of glass alteration shows that the choice of these phases and their thermodynamic constants have only a moderate impact whereas the thickness of the filter has a greater barrier effect.

  7. Exploring the Influence of Bioremediation on Dissolution in DNAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abriola, L.; Pennell, K.; Löffler, F.; Ramsburg, A.; Christ, J.; Amos, B.; Suchomel, E.

    2006-12-01

    Microbial reductive dechlorination has emerged as a promising technology for remediation of chlorinated solvent contaminated source zones. Bioremediation of dense nonaqeuous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones can be undertaken as a sole treatment technology or as a "polishing" step following the application of a more aggressive treatment method, such as surfactant flushing. A quantitative assessment of the potential effectiveness of in situ source zone bioremediation requires an understanding of the influence of aggressive treatment on subsequent DNAPL bioavailability, as well as the potential bio-enhancement of DNAPL dissolution under natural gradient conditions. This presentation provides an overview of laboratory and modeling investigations designed to explore bioavailability and the influence of bioactivity on DNAPL dissolution in contaminated sandy media. A novel mathematical model was developed to simulate the interplay between DNAPL architecture, DNAPL dissolution, constituent transport, reductive dechlorination kinetics, and concentration inhibition. Model formulation and parameterization were based on results of batch experiments conducted with selected tetrachloroethene (PCE) -to- cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) dechlorinating isolates. Experiments to explore microbial activity and dissolution enhancement in the vicinity of PCE-NAPL in one dimensional sand columns containing a pure or mixed NAPL (0.25 mol/mol PCE in hexadecane) source zone were used to assess model performance. Experimental results demonstrated PCE to cis-DCE dechlorination in the vicinity of the NAPL, with a four-fold dissolution enhancement. These observations are consistent with numerical model predictions. A model sensitivity analysis reveals that dechlorination kinetics, substrate concentrations, and DNAPL saturation and distribution can each affect the extent of dissolution enhancement. The potential influence of bioactivity on source zone longevity and toxicity is also addressed

  8. Acid dissolution experiments - Carbonates and the 6.8-micrometer bands in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandford, S. A.

    1986-03-01

    A chemical dissolution experiment on an interplanetary dust particle (IDP) showed that carbonates, not acid-insoluble organic compounds, were responsible for virtually all the absorption at 6.8 micrometers seen in the infrared spectra of this particle. The IDP examined had an infrared spectrum characteristic of layer-lattice silicates and belongs to a class of IDP's whose spectra resemble those of protostellar objects like W33 A, which also exhibit a band at 6.8 micrometers.

  9. Isotopic tracer evidence for the amorphous calcium carbonate to calcite transformation by dissolution-reprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, Anthony J.; Gagnon, Alexander C.; De Yoreo, James J.; Dove, Patricia M.

    2015-09-01

    Observations that some biogenic and sedimentary calcites grow from amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) raise the question of how this mineralization process influences composition. However, the detailed pathway and geochemical consequences of the ACC to calcite transformation are not well constrained. This experimental study investigated the formation of calcite from ACC by using magnesium and calcium stable isotope labeling to directly probe the transformation pathway and controls on composition. Four processes were considered: dissolution-reprecipitation, solid state transformation, and combinations of these end-members. To distinguish between these scenarios, ACC was synthesized from natural isotope abundance solutions and subsequently transferred to spiked solutions that were enriched in 43Ca and 25Mg for the transformation to calcite. Isotope measurements by NanoSIMS determined the 43Ca/40Ca, and 25Mg/24Mg ratios of the resulting calcite crystals. Analysis of the data shows the transformation is best explained by a dissolution-reprecipitation process. We find that when a small amount of ACC is transferred, the isotopic signals in the resulting calcite are largely replaced by the composition of the surrounding spiked solution. When larger amounts of ACC are transferred, calcite compositions reflect a mixture between the ACC and initial solution end-member. Comparisons of the measurements to the predictions of a simple mixing model indicate that calcite compositions (1) are sensitive to relative amounts of ACC and the surrounding solution reservoir and (2) are primarily governed by the conditions at the time of ACC transformation rather than the initial ACC formation. Shifts in calcite composition over the duration of the transformation period reflect the progressive evolution of the local solution conditions. This dependence indicates the extent to which there is water available would change the end point composition on the mixing line. While these findings have

  10. Impact of geoengineering with olivine dissolution on the carbon cycle and marine biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, P.; Abrams, J.; Völker, C.; Wolf-Gladrow, D. A.; Hartmann, J.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the potential of a specific geoengineering technique: the carbon sequestration by artificially enhanced silicate weathering via the dissolution of olivine. This approach would not only operate against rising temperatures but would also oppose ocean acidification. If details of the marine chemistry are taken into consideration, a new mass ratio of CO2 sequestration per olivine dissolution of about 1 is achieved, 20% smaller than previously assumed. We calculate that this approach has the potential to sequestrate up to 1 Pg of C per year directly, if olivine is distributed as fine powder over land areas of the humid tropics, but this rate is limited by the saturation concentration of silicic acid. These upper limit sequestration rates come at the environmental cost of pH values in the rivers rising to 8.2 in examples for the rivers Amazon and Congo (Köhler et al., 2010). The secondary effects of the input of silicic acid connected with this approach leads in an ecosystem model (ReCOM2.0 in MITgcm) to species shifts aways from the calcifying species towards diatoms, thus altering the biological carbon pumps. Open ocean dissolution of olivine would sequestrate about 1 Pg CO2 per Pg olivine from which about 8% are caused by changes in the biological pumps (increase export of organic matter, decreased export of CaCO3). The chemical impact of open ocean dissolution of olivine (the increased alkalinity input) is therefore less efficient than dissolution on land, but leads due to different chemical impacts to a higher surface ocean pH enhancement to counteract ocean acidification. We finally investigate open ocean dissolution rates of up to 10 Pg olivine per year corresponding to geoengineering rates which might be of interest in the light of expected future emission (e.g. A2 scenario with emissions rising to 30 PgC/yr in 2100 AD). Those rates would still sequestrate only less than 20% of the emission until 2100, but would require that the nowadays available

  11. Citrate influences microbial Fe hydroxide reduction via a dissolution-disaggregation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunschweig, Juliane; Klier, Christine; Schröder, Christian; Händel, Matthias; Bosch, Julian; Totsche, Kai U.; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2014-08-01

    Microbial reduction of ferric iron is partly dependent on Fe hydroxide particle size: nanosized Fe hydroxides greatly exceed the bioavailability of their counterparts larger than 1 μm. Citrate as a low molecular weight organic acid can likewise stabilize colloidal suspensions against aggregation by electrostatic repulsion but also increase Fe bioavailability by enhancing Fe hydroxide solubility. The aim of this study was to see whether adsorption of citrate onto surfaces of large ferrihydrite aggregates results in the formation of a stable colloidal suspension by electrostatic repulsion and how this effect influences microbial Fe reduction. Furthermore, we wanted to discriminate between citrate-mediated colloid stabilization out of larger aggregates and ferrihydrite dissolution and their influence on microbial Fe hydroxide reduction. Dissolution kinetics of ferrihydrite aggregates induced by different concentrations of citrate and humic acids were compared to microbial reduction kinetics with Geobacter sulfurreducens. Dynamic light scattering results showed the formation of a stable colloidal suspension and colloids with hydrodynamic diameters of 69 (±37) to 165 (± 65) nm for molar citrate:Fe ratios of 0.1 to 0.5 and partial dissolution of ferrihydrite at citrate:Fe ratios ⩾ 0.1. No dissolution or colloid stabilization was detected in the presence of humic acids. Adsorption of citrate, necessary for dissolution, reversed the surface charge and led to electrostatic repulsion between sub-aggregates of ferrihydrite and colloid stabilization when the citrate:Fe ratio was above a critical value (⩽ 0.1). Lower ratios resulted in stronger ferrihydrite aggregation instead of formation of a stable colloidal suspension, owing to neutralization of the positive surface charge. At the same time, microbial ferrihydrite reduction increased from 0.029 to 0.184 mM h-1 indicating that colloids stabilized by citrate addition enhanced microbial Fe reduction. Modelling of

  12. Tertiary carbonate-dissolution cycles on the Sierra Leone Rise, eastern equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.; Gardner, J.V.; Cepek, P.

    1981-01-01

    Most of the Tertiary section on Sierra Leone Rise off northwest Africa consists of chalk, marl, and limestone that show cyclic alterations of clay-rich and clay-poor beds about 20-60 cm thick. On the basis of biostratigraphic accumulation rates, the cycles in Oligocene and Miocene chalk have periods which average about 44,000 years, and those in Eocene siliceous limestone have periods of 4000-27,000 years. Several sections were sampled in detail to further define the cycles in terms of content of CaCO3, clay minerals, and relative abundances of calcareous nannofossils. Extending information gained by analyses of Pleistocene cores from the continental margin of northwest Africa to the Tertiary cycles on Sierra Leone Rise, both dilution by noncarbonate material and dissolution of CaCO3 could have contributed to the observed relative variations in clay and CaCO3. However, dissolution of CaCO3 as the main cause of the carbonate-clay cycles on the Sierra Leone Rise, rather than dilution by clay, is suggested by the large amount of change (several thousand percent) in terrigenous influx required to produce the observed variations in amount of clay and by the marked increase in abundance of dissolution-resistant discoasters relative to more easily dissolved coccoliths in low-carbonate parts of cycles. The main cause of dissolution of CaCO3 was shoaling of the carbonate compensation depth (CCD) during the early Neogene and climatically induced fluctuations in the thickness of Antarctic Bottom Water. ?? 1981.

  13. Microfluidics experiments of dissolution in a fracture. Influence of Damköhler and Péclet numbers, and of the geometry on the dissolution pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osselin, Florian; Budek, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Olgierd; Szymczak, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    Dissolution of natural rocks is an ever present phenomenon in nature. The shaping of natural landscapes by the dissolution of limestone gives for example birth to exceptional features like karsts. Currently dissolution is also at the heart of key research topics as Carbon Capture and Storage or Enhanced Oil Recovery. The basics principles of dissolution are well-known, however, the sheer amount of different patterns arising from these mechanisms and the strong dependency on parameters such as pore network, chemical composition and flow rate, make it particularly difficult to study theoretically and experimentally. In this study we present a microfluidic experiment simulating the behavior of a dissolving fluid in a fracture. The experiments consist of a chip of gyspum inserted between two polycarbonate plates and subjected to a constant flow rate of pure water. The point in using microfluidics is that it allows a complete control on the experimental parameters such as geometry and chemical composition of the porous medium, flow rate, fracture aperture, roughness of the fracture walls, and an in situ observation of the geometry evolution which is impossible with 3D natural rocks. Thanks to our experiments we have been able to cover the whole range of dissolution patterns, from wormholing or DLA fingering to homogeneous dissolution, by changing Péclet and Damköhler numbers. Moreover, we have been able to tweak the geometry of our artificial fracture, inserting finger seeds or non-dissolvable obstacles. The comparison of the experimental patterns with the numerical dissolution code dissol (Szymczak and Ladd 2011) has then shown a very good correlation of the patterns, giving confidence in both experiments and modeling.

  14. Calcite cement generations after sulphate dissolution - Evidence for uplift diagenesis in Capitan and Zechstein carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, G. ); Lee, M. ); Darke, G. )

    1991-03-01

    Upper Permian Capitan shelf margin and U.K. Zechstein carbonates contain evidence of former replacive anhydrite, formed early during their diagenetic histories. Both sequences were uplifted during the last 90 Ma with consequent sulfate hydration and dissolution. Resultant open cavities are occluded by calcite cements. Cement generations in the two areas are strikingly similar, although the areas were in contrasting climatic belts during uplift. Earliest uplift cements contain relics/evidence of former sulfates with minor bacteriogenic sulfide and precipitation from sulfate reduction. Two major generations of cavity-lining calcite cements formed after sulfate dissolution. Geochemical and isotopic analyses demonstrate these cements to be aquifer-related. The earlier luminescent cements, precipitated from stagnant anoxic waters, were etched and corroded, before minor iron oxide precipitation. These iron oxides enable paleomagnetic dating of uplift. The corrosion marks an anoxic-oxic transition within the pore fluids, with a later incursion of active oxic fluids, from which were precipitated iron-free nonluminescent columnar cements. Cores through the Zechstein carbonates show that cement phases develop successively as uplift proceeds. Thus cement generations were not precipitated synchronously but are representative of different levels within a downwards-penetrating aquifer. The cements relate to successive stages of aquifer evolution and allow a common history of uplift diagenesis to be determined for both areas, although on different continents and within different climatic zones. A similar cement sequence related to downwards aquifer penetration is thus predicted for other areas where sulfate dissolution has occurred on uplift.

  15. Pore-scale simulation of carbonate dissolution in micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira Nunes, J. P.; Blunt, M. J.; Bijeljic, B.

    2016-02-01

    We present a particle-based method to simulate carbonate dissolution at the pore scale directly on the voxels of three-dimensional micro-CT images. The flow field is computed on the images by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Rock-fluid interaction is modeled using a three-step approach: solute advection, diffusion, and reaction. Advection is simulated with a semianalytical pore-scale streamline tracing algorithm, diffusion by random walk is superimposed, while the reaction rate is defined by the flux of particles through the pore-solid interface. We derive a relationship between the local particle flux and the independently measured batch calcite dissolution rate. We validate our method against a dynamic imaging experiment where a Ketton oolite is imaged during CO2-saturated brine injection at reservoir conditions. The image-calculated increases in porosity and permeability are predicted accurately, and the spatial distribution of the dissolution front is correctly replicated. The experiments and simulations are performed at a high flow rate, in the uniform dissolution regime - Pe ≫ 1 and PeDa ≪ 1—thus extending the reaction throughout the sample. Transport is advection dominated, and dissolution is limited to regions with significant inflow of solute. We show that the sample-averaged reaction rate is 1 order of magnitude lower than that measured in batch reactors. This decrease is the result of restrictions imposed on the flux of solute to the solid surface by the heterogeneous flow field, at the millimeter scale.

  16. Permeability evolution due to dissolution and precipitation of carbonates using reactive transport modeling in pore networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogues, Juan P.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Celia, Michael A.; Peters, Catherine A.

    2013-09-01

    A reactive transport model was developed to simulate reaction of carbonates within a pore network for the high-pressure CO2-acidified conditions relevant to geological carbon sequestration. The pore network was based on a synthetic oolithic dolostone. Simulation results produced insights that can inform continuum-scale models regarding reaction-induced changes in permeability and porosity. As expected, permeability increased extensively with dissolution caused by high concentrations of carbonic acid, but neither pH nor calcite saturation state alone was a good predictor of the effects, as may sometimes be the case. Complex temporal evolutions of interstitial brine chemistry and network structure led to the counterintuitive finding that a far-from-equilibrium solution produced less permeability change than a nearer-to-equilibrium solution at the same pH. This was explained by the pH buffering that increased carbonate ion concentration and inhibited further reaction. Simulations of different flow conditions produced a nonunique set of permeability-porosity relationships. Diffusive-dominated systems caused dissolution to be localized near the inlet, leading to substantial porosity change but relatively small permeability change. For the same extent of porosity change caused from advective transport, the domain changed uniformly, leading to a large permeability change. Regarding precipitation, permeability changes happen much slower compared to dissolution-induced changes and small amounts of precipitation, even if located only near the inlet, can lead to large changes in permeability. Exponent values for a power law that relates changes in permeability and porosity ranged from 2 to 10, but a value of 6 held constant when conditions led to uniform changes throughout the domain.

  17. Effect of magnesium carbonate on the solubility, dissolution and oral bioavailability of fenofibric acid powder as an alkalising solubilizer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Soo; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Jin, Sung Giu; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Dong Shik; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Cho, Kwan Hyung; Li, Dong Xun; Woo, Jong Soo; Choi, Han-Gon

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the possibility of developing a novel oral pharmaceutical product using fenofibric acid instead of choline fenofibrate, the powder properties, solubility, dissolution and pharmacokinetics in rats of fenofibrate, choline fenofibrate and fenofibric acid were compared. Furthermore, the effect of magnesium carbonate, an alkalising agent on the solubility, dissolution and oral bioavailability of fenofibric acid was assessed, a mixture of fenofibric acid and magnesium carbonate being prepared by simple blending at a weight ratio of 2/1. The three fenofibrate derivatives showed different particle sizes and melting points with similar crystalline shape. Fenofibric acid had a significantly higher aqueous solubility and dissolution than fenofibrate, but significantly lower solubility and dissolution than choline fenofibrate. However, the fenofibric acid/magnesium carbonate mixture greatly improved the solubility and dissolution of fenofibric acid with an enhancement to levels similar with those for choline fenofibrate. Fenofibric acid gave lower plasma concentrations, AUC and Cmax values compared to choline fenofibrate in rats. However, the mixture resulted in plasma concentrations, AUC and Cmax values levels not significantly different from those for choline fenofibrate. Specifically, magnesium carbonate increased the aqueous solubility, dissolution and bioavailability of fenofibric acid by about 7.5-, 4- and 1.6-fold, respectively. Thus, the mixture of fenofibric acid and magnesium carbonate at the weight ratio of 2/1 might be a candidate for an oral pharmaceutical product with improved oral bioavailability. PMID:26992922

  18. Influence of pH and temperature on alunite dissolution rates and products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Patricia; Hudson-Edwards, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Aluminium is one of the main elements in most mining-affected environments, where it may influence the mobility of other elements and play a key role on pH buffering. Moreover, high concentrations of Al can have severe effects on ecosystems and humans; Al intake, for example, has been implicated in neurological pathologies (e.g., Alzheimer's disease; Flaten, 2001). The behaviour of Al in mining-affected environments is commonly determined, at least partially, by the dissolution of Al sulphate minerals and particularly by the dissolution of alunite (KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6), which is one of the most important and ubiquitous Al sulphates in mining-affected environments (Nordstrom, 2011). The presence of alunite has been described in other acid sulphate environments, including some soils (Prietzel & Hirsch, 1998) and on the surface of Mars (Swayze et al., 2008). Despite the important role of alunite, its dissolution rates and products, and their controlling factors under conditions similar to those found in these environments, remain largely unknown. In this work, batch dissolution experiments have been carried out in order to shed light on the rates, products and controlling factors of alunite dissolution under different pH conditions (between 3 and 8) and temperatures (between 279 and 313K) similar to those encountered in natural systems. The obtained initial dissolution rates using synthetic alunite, based on the evolution of K concentrations, are between 10-9.7 and 10-10.9 mol-m-2-s-1, with the lowest rates obtained at around pH 4.8, and increases in the rates recorded with both increases and decreases in pH. Increases of temperature in the studied range also cause increases in the dissolution rates. The dissolution of alunite dissolution is incongruent, as has been reported for jarosite (isostructural with alunite) by Welch et al. (2008). Compared with the stoichiometric ratio in the bulk alunite (Al/K=3), K tends to be released to the solution preferentially over Al

  19. CO2-induced dissolution of low permeability carbonates. Part I: Characterization and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Megan M.; Sholokhova, Yelena; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of elevated dissolved CO2 concentrations on compositionally and structurally distinct carbonate sample cores from the Weyburn-Midale CO2-enhanced oil recovery and storage site (Canada) was measured from analysis of 3-D sample characterization and fluid chemistry data from core-flood experiments. Experimental conditions (60 °C; 24.8 MPa confining pressure) and brine composition were chosen to mimic in situ reservoir conditions. Mineralogy and pore space distributions within the eight individual cores were characterized with X-ray computed microtomography and scanning electron microscopy both before and after exposure to brine with 0.5 ⩽ pCO2 ⩽ 3 MPa, while solution chemistry and differential fluid pressures were monitored during experiments. Our experimental study aimed to quantify the relationship between fluid flow, heterogeneity, and reaction specific to carbon storage at the Weyburn-Midale field by integrating characterization imaging, pressure data, and solution chemistry. Through the use of non-invasive microtomographic imaging, a variety of dissolution behaviors were observed, with variable effects on the evolution of solution chemistry and permeability as a result of heterogeneity within these two relatively low permeability carbonate samples. Similar-sized, evenly distributed pores, and steadily advancing dissolution fronts suggested that uniform flow velocities were maintained throughout the duration of the higher permeability “Marly” dolostone core experiments. The development of unstable dissolution fronts and fast pathways occurred in the “Vuggy” sample experiments when fluid velocities varied widely within the sample (as a result of increased pore structure heterogeneity). The overall effect of fast pathway development was to increase bulk permeability values by several orders of magnitude, allowing CO2-acidified fluids to travel through the cores largely unmodified by carbonate mineral reaction, as indicated by a lack of change

  20. Dissolution of Irradiated Commercial UO2 Fuels in Ammonium Carbonate and Hydrogen Peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Johnsen, Amanda M.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Hanson, Brady D.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.; Carson, Katharine J.; Peper, Shane M.

    2011-01-18

    We propose and test a disposition path for irradiated nuclear fuel using ammonium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide media. We demonstrate on a 13 g scale that >98% of the irradiated fuel dissolves. Subsequent expulsion of carbonate from the dissolver solution precipitates >95% of the plutonium, americium, curium, and substantial amounts of fission products, effectively partitioning the fuel at the dissolution step. Uranium can be easily recovered from solution by any of several means, such as ion exchange, solvent extraction, or direct precipitation. Ammonium carbonate can be evaporated from solution and recovered for re-use, leaving an extremely compact volume of fission products, transactinides, and uranium. Stack emissions are predicted to be less toxic, less radioactive, chemically simpler, and simpler to treat than those from the conventional PUREX process.

  1. Carbide Dissolution/Carbon Loss as a Function of Spray Distance in Unshrouded/Shrouded Plasma Sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, S.

    2015-02-01

    Thermal spraying of Cr3C2-NiCr composites generates varying degrees of carbide dissolution into the Ni binder. During high-temperature exposure, the carbide dissolution zones precipitate high concentrations of small carbides which develop into finely structured networks. This raises the possibility of producing unique tailored carbide composite structures through the generation of controlled carbide dissolution and appropriate heat treatment. The first step in this process is to produce a supersaturated Ni-Cr-C solid solution from which the carbide phase could be precipitated. In a previous work, a broad range of plasma parameters were trialed to assess their effect on the degree of carbide dissolution at a fixed spray distance of 100 mm. The current two-part work builds on the most promising plasma parameters from those trials. In Part 1 of this two-part article series, the effect of spray distance on the extent of carbide dissolution and carbon loss during high energy plasma spraying was investigated. The effectiveness of solid shield and gas shrouding is contrasted, and the mechanisms by which they influence the degree of decarburization discussed.

  2. The influence of pressure on the intrinsic dissolution rate of amorphous indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Löbmann, Korbinian; Flouda, Konstantina; Qiu, Danwen; Tsolakou, Theodosia; Wang, Wenbo; Rades, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    New drug candidates increasingly tend to be poorly water soluble. One approach to increase their solubility is to convert the crystalline form of a drug into the amorphous form. Intrinsic dissolution testing is an efficient standard method to determine the intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) of a drug and to test the potential dissolution advantage of the amorphous form. However, neither the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) nor the European Pharmacopeia (Ph.Eur) state specific limitations for the compression pressure in order to obtain compacts for the IDR determination. In this study, the influence of different compression pressures on the IDR was determined from powder compacts of amorphous (ball-milling) indomethacin (IND), a glass solution of IND and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and crystalline IND. Solid state properties were analyzed with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and the final compacts were visually observed to study the effects of compaction pressure on their surface properties. It was found that there is no significant correlation between IDR and compression pressure for crystalline IND and IND-PVP. This was in line with the observation of similar surface properties of the compacts. However, compression pressure had an impact on the IDR of pure amorphous IND compacts. Above a critical compression pressure, amorphous particles sintered to form a single compact with dissolution properties similar to quench-cooled disc and crystalline IND compacts. In such a case, the apparent dissolution advantage of the amorphous form might be underestimated. It is thus suggested that for a reasonable interpretation of the IDR, surface properties of the different analyzed samples should be investigated and for amorphous samples the IDR should be measured also as a function of the compression pressure used to prepare the solid sample for IDR testing. PMID:25140536

  3. Influence of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Tween 80 on Carbamazepine–Nicotinamide Cocrystal Solubility and Dissolution Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingzhong; Qiao, Ning; Wang, Ke

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the surfactants of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and Tween 80 on carbamazepine–nicotinamide (CBZ–NIC) cocrystal solubility and dissolution behaviour has been studied in this work. The solubility of the CBZ–NIC cocrystal was determined by measuring the eutectic concentrations of the drug and the coformer. Evolution of the intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) of the CBZ–NIC cocrystal was monitored by the UV imaging dissolution system during dissolution. Experimental results indicated that SLS and Tween 80 had little influence upon the solubility of the CBZ–NIC cocrystal but they had totally opposite effects on the IDR of the CBZ–NIC cocrystal during dissolution. SLS significantly increased the IDR of the CBZ–NIC cocrystal while Tween 80 decreased its IDR. PMID:24300560

  4. Influence of sodium lauryl sulfate and tween 80 on carbamazepine-nicotinamide cocrystal solubility and dissolution behaviour.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingzhong; Qiao, Ning; Wang, Ke

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the surfactants of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and Tween 80 on carbamazepine-nicotinamide (CBZ-NIC) cocrystal solubility and dissolution behaviour has been studied in this work. The solubility of the CBZ-NIC cocrystal was determined by measuring the eutectic concentrations of the drug and the coformer. Evolution of the intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) of the CBZ-NIC cocrystal was monitored by the UV imaging dissolution system during dissolution. Experimental results indicated that SLS and Tween 80 had little influence upon the solubility of the CBZ-NIC cocrystal but they had totally opposite effects on the IDR of the CBZ-NIC cocrystal during dissolution. SLS significantly increased the IDR of the CBZ-NIC cocrystal while Tween 80 decreased its IDR. PMID:24300560

  5. Formation of a Mineral Layer during Coke Dissolution into Liquid Iron and Its Influence on the Kinetics of Coke Dissolution Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Michael W.; Monaghan, Brian J.; Nightingale, Sharon A.; Mathieson, John G.; Nightingale, Robert J.

    2008-06-01

    The formation and development of the mineral layer that forms between coke and liquid iron during carbon dissolution has been characterized. Coke particles (-2 mm, +0.5 mm) were added to the top surface of an iron 2 mass pct C melt at representative iron-making temperatures, for periods of time between 2 and 120 minutes, before being quenched. The quenched samples were then sectioned, and the solidified coke-melt interfacial region analyzed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Analysis showed that a mineral layer was present at the interface at all experimental temperatures (1450 °C to 1550 °C) from 2 minutes and persisted beyond 120 minutes. The mineral layer was found to be composed of calcium aluminate phases, with the proportions of these phases dictating its morphology. Further, changes observed in the rate of carbon dissolution from the coke were related to the composition and morphology of the mineral layer. The effect of this mineral layer on the rate of carbon dissolution has been interpreted as a change in the reaction control mechanism.

  6. Experimental Study of Convective Dissolution of Carbon Dioxide in Heterogeneous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; DiCarlo, D. A.; Hesse, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage in deep geological formations has the potential to reduce anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial point sources. The technology is only viable, if the long-term security of the geological CO2 storage can be demonstrated. Dissolution of CO2 into the brine, resulting in stable stratification, has been identified as the key to long-term storage security. Here we present new analogue laboratory experiments to characterize convective dissolution and to study the effect of porosity and permeability heterogeneity on the CO2 dissolution rate. Understanding the effect of heterogeneity is essential to evaluate if convective dissolution occurs in the field and, in turn, to estimate the security of geological CO2 storage fields. In particular we want to test if the strong heterogeneity observed at the Bravo Dome natural CO2 field can prevent convective currents, which may explain the persistence of free phase CO2 over millennia. Initial laboratory experiments in homogeneous media confirm that the non-classical scaling of the convective flux scales with the 4/5 power of the Rayleigh number that has recently been reported. The large experimental assembly will allow us to quantify for the first time the relationship between wavenumber of the convective motion and the Rayleigh number of the system, which could be essential to trapping process at Bravo Dome. Figure 1 shows the number of fingers that we can observe in our new experimental setup. Figure 2 shows the same photograph that has been processed to enhance the visibility of the dense plumes descending from the interface. Also we plan to complement the homogeneous experiments with a detailed study of the scaling law of the convective flux in heterogeneous, layered media; in particular. Low permeability layers are ubiquitous in geological storage formations and have been observed at Bravo Dome. We plan to measure the reduction in the convective flux due to these barriers compared

  7. Dissolution of CO2 in Brines and Mineral Reactions during Geological Carbon Storage: AN Eor Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickle, M. J.; Chapman, H.; Galy, A.; Kampman, N.; Dubacq, B.; Ballentine, C. J.; Zhou, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolution of CO2 in formation brines is likely to be a major process which stabilises stored CO2 on longer time scales and mitigates CO2 migrating through storage complexes. However very little is known about the likely rates of CO2 dissolution as CO2 flows through natural heterogeneous brine filled reservoirs. Here we report the results of sampling fluids over 6 months after a phase of CO2 injection commenced for enhanced oil recovery coupled with injection of isotopically enriched 3He and 129Xe. Modelling of the changes in fluid chemistry has previously been interpreted to indicate significant dissolution of silicate minerals where fluids remained close to saturation with calcite. These calculations, which are based on modal decomposition of changes in cation concentrations, are supported by changes in the isotopic compositions of Sr, Li and Mg. Analysis of Sr-isotopic compositions of samples from outcrops of the Frontier Formation, which forms the reservoir sampled by the EOR experiment, reveals substantial heterogeneity. Silicate mineral compositions have 87Sr/86Sr ratios between 0.709 and 0.719 whereas carbonate cements have values around 0.7076. Calculation of CO2 dissolution based on simplified 2-D flow models shows that fluids likely sample reservoir heterogeneities present on a finer scale with CO2 fingers occupying the most permeable horizons and most water flow in the adjacent slightly less permeable zones. Smaller time scale variations in 87Sr/86Sr ratios are interpreted to reflect variations in flow paths on small length scales driven by invading CO2.

  8. Direct observations of the influence of solution composition on magnesite dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Helen E.; Putnis, Christine V.

    2013-05-01

    In situ observations during atomic force microscopy experiments and ex situ observations after static and flow-through experiments were used to explore the effect of three different electrolytes on magnesite (MgCO3) dissolution at pH 2. The experiments showed that the magnesite dissolution rate varied in the order NO3->Cl>SO42- when these anions were present in solution. Under the experimental conditions magnesite dissolution occurred via the removal of successive single surface layers, where changes in magnesite reactivity in the presence of different electrolytes could be observed as variations in the cycle length for the removal of one unit cell layer. The cycles began with the formation of sporadically distributed etch pits followed by the nucleation of homogeneously distributed etch pits. Coalescence of the etch pits formed isolated sections of the remnant surface, which then dissolved away. The timing of sporadic and homogeneous etch pit nucleation was constant despite the presence of different anions. However, the cycles in surface roughness and etch pit spreading rates indicate that the different anions affect step retreat rates and hence dissolution rates. Differences in magnesite reactivity can be attributed to the direct interaction of sulphate with the magnesite surface and the indirect effects of chloride and nitrate on the magnesite surface hydration and hydration of the Mg2+ ion in solution. In all experiments during the dissolution process evidence for the precipitation of a new phase was observed, either directly as precipitates forming on the magnesite surface in the AFM and after the experiments, seen in SEM analysis, or as changes in the Mg outlet concentration during flow-through experiments. EDX and Raman spectroscopy were used to analyse the composition of the precipitate and although it could not be definitively identified, considering previous observations the precipitate is most likely a hydrated Mg-carbonate phase with a MgCO3·xH2O

  9. Mg-calcite dissolution in carbonate sediments: role in ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drupp, P. S.; De Carlo, E. H.; Mackenzie, F. T.

    2014-12-01

    An array of porewater wells at two locations on Hawaiian reefs have been utilized to obtain interstitial pore fluid from various depths in permeable sandy sediments. The total alkalinity (AT) and pH (total scale) were measured for each sample (depths 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 20, 30, 40, and 60 cm) as well as calcium, magnesium, and strontium concentrations. Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations co-vary and appear to be directly related to AT and pH. The ratio of the change in calcium and magnesium (ΔCa, ΔMg) between the overlying water column and the porewater indicates that an 18 mol % Mg-calcite phase is dissolving within the sediment column. This could represent the dissolution of coralline algae such as Porolithon or Lithothamnion both of which produce ~18% Mg-calcite skeletons and are present on Hawaiian reefs. The small changes in Mg concentrations from dissolution/precipitation of high Mg-calcites is typically difficult to measure against the high background matrix of seawater and to our knowledge these data represent some of the first magnesium concentrations measured in permeable sediments. Saturation state (Ω) for Mg-calcites was calculated using both sets of stoichiometric solubility products (K) widely accepted in the literature. Depending on the K used, most of the porewater was undersaturated with respect to the high Mg calcites (>12%). Saturation states were determined using an ion activity product (IAP) calculated from the measured values of calcium and magnesium. This produces a more accurate Ω than assuming calcium and magnesium concentrations based on salinity, as is typically done in surface waters. As surface water becomes more corrosive to carbonate minerals due to enhanced ocean acidification through the next century, it is expected that dissolution of both biogenic high Mg-calcites and abiotic Mg-calcite cements will increase, potentially destabilizing reef framework and altering the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in these environments.

  10. Laboratory experiments on CO2 dissolution in water for carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez de La Reguera, D.; Stute, M.; Matter, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The standard approach to geologic sequestration is the injection of CO2 as a bulk phase into storage reservoirs at depths >800m where it is buoyant with respect to the host rocks and aqueous fluids, and may migrate upward thereby reducing the storage efficiency. The CarbFix pilot project in Iceland tests the feasibility of an alternative storage approach, which is the mineralization of CO2 into stable carbonate minerals through the reaction with basaltic rocks [1]. The mineralization of CO2 is facilitated by the dissolution of CO2 gas into the aqueous phase. Therefore, CarbFix will inject the CO2 fully dissolved in water. Dissolution will occur within the injection well, where water and CO2 are simultaneously injected. A downscaled version of the CarbFix injection system was designed in the laboratory and used to study the dissolution kinetics of CO2 gas bubbles in a water column while injection took place. The injection system consisted of 100 m long ~1 cm inner diameter inner braided PVC tubing, which was deployed in a staircase of a 60m tall building. The tubing was intersected with a series of 10 cm long sections of clear tubing (windows) every eight meters in order to detect the number of bubbles in the flow with a digital camera equipped with a flash system. As CO2 gas was injected through a sparger into the water stream at a constant rate, gas bubbles were created, with bubble size and density decreasing along the vertical flow path, as the CO2 dissolved. The number and volume of gas bubbles were estimated from the digital images taken at each window. Various devices that were supposed to facilitate the dissolution of CO2 were tested. The pressure change due to elevation change and frictional effects was calculated using the Darcy-Weisbach equation and the amount of CO2 per bubble in each window was approximated using the van der Waals equation of state for real gases. The experimental results reveal that bubble size and density decrease along the flow path

  11. Peridotite dissolution and carbonation rates at fracture surfaces under conditions relevant for in situ mineralization of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noort, R.; Spiers, C. J.; Drury, M. R.; Kandianis, M. T.

    2013-04-01

    Whereas the dissolution of pure single phases (e.g. olivine and other mafic minerals) has been the focus of many studies, no investigation has been reported on the progress of reactions at and within polymineralic, transgranular fracture surfaces cutting peridotites. We document experiments that address the evolution of dissolving peridotite surfaces, and the rates of dissolution and carbonation reactions that occur at these surfaces, under both open- and closed-system conditions relevant for in situ CO2-sequestration. The results of experiments, conducted under quasi-open system conditions, on solid samples of peridotite whose surfaces were taken as an analogue of free fracture surfaces, demonstrate apparent rates of olivine dissolution at the free surfaces that are equivalent to or upwards of 100 times greater than those determined for pure olivine under similar conditions. This increase in apparent olivine dissolution rate is ascribed to fluid penetration along grain boundaries and veins, which resulted in increased accessibility of reactive olivine surface area. Apparent dissolution rates under closed system conditions, where serial olivine dissolution and magnesite precipitation take place, are ˜1 order of magnitude slower owing to changes in fluid composition and pH. In both of these reaction environments, it is apparent that serpentinized veins and mineral grain boundaries within the peridotite allowed fluids to penetrate the rock and to promote the release of divalent metals and silica from within the sample or simulated fracture walls. These results indicate that the microstructure of free (fracture) surfaces exerts a dominant control on peridotite dissolution and carbonation rates, relative to the proportion of highly reactive minerals that compose such ultramafic rock. The rapid dissolution we observe under open system conditions implies that CO2-mineralization may be viable, in open systems, if the composition of injected fluids can be maintained at or

  12. Accelerated Carbonate Dissolution as a CO2 Separation and Sequestration Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Caldeira, K G; Knauss, K G; Rau, G H

    2004-02-18

    process is geochemically equivalent to continental and marine carbonate weathering which will otherwise naturally consume anthropogenic CO{sub 2}, but over many millennia (e.g. [7,8,9]). We identify the enhanced form of this process as Accelerated Weathering of Limestone or accelerated carbonate dissolution. Previously, it has been shown that accelerated carbonate dissolution can effectively convert a significant fraction of US CO{sub 2} emissions to long-term storage as bicarbonate in the ocean, while avoiding or possibly reversing environmental impacts associated with either the ongoing passive or the proposed active injection of CO{sub 2} into the ocean [6,10]. Being analogous to the widespread use of wet limestone to desulfurize flue gas, accelerated carbonate dissolution reactors could be retrofitted to many existing coastal power plants at a typical cost estimated to be $20-$30/tonne CO{sub 2} mitigated [5,11]. This paper further explores limestone availability, cost, transportation, and reaction kinetics as well as ocean and environmental impacts, and the overall economics and practicality of accelerated carbonate dissolution CO{sub 2} mitigation.

  13. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was

  14. Relative roles of endolithic algae and carbonate chemistry variability in the skeletal dissolution of crustose coralline algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Nivia, C.; Diaz-Pulido, G.; Dove, S.

    2014-09-01

    The susceptibility of crustose coralline algae (CCA) skeletons to dissolution is predicted to increase as oceans warm and acidify. Skeletal dissolution is caused by bioerosion from endolithic microorganisms and by chemical processes associated with undersaturation of carbonate minerals in seawater. Yet, the relative contribution of algal microborers and seawater carbonate chemistry to the dissolution of organisms that cement reefs under projected pCO2 and temperature (pCO2-T) scenarios have not been quantified. We exposed CCA skeletons (Porolithon onkodes) to four pCO2-T treatments (pre-industrial, present-day, SRES-B1 "reduced" pCO2, and SRES-A1FI "business-as-usual" pCO2 emission scenarios) under natural light cycles vs. constant dark conditions for 8 weeks. Dissolution rates of skeletons without photo-endoliths were dramatically higher (200%) than those colonized by endolithic algae across all pCO2-T scenarios. This suggests that daytime photosynthesis by microborers counteract dissolution by reduced saturation states resulting in lower net erosion rates over day-night cycles. Regardless of the presence or absence of phototrophic microborers, skeletal dissolution increased significantly under the spring A1FI "business-as-usual" scenario, confirming the CCA sensitivity to future oceans. Projected ocean acidity and temperature may significantly disturb the stability of reef frameworks cemented by CCA, but surficial substrates harbouring photosynthetic microborers will be less impacted than those without algal endoliths.

  15. Relative roles of endolithic algae and carbonate chemistry variability in the skeletal dissolution of crustose coralline algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Nivia, C.; Diaz-Pulido, G.; Dove, S.

    2014-02-01

    The susceptibility of crustose coralline algae (CCA) skeletons to dissolution is predicted to increase as oceans warm and acidify. Skeletal dissolution is caused by bioerosion from endolithic microorganisms and by chemical processes associated with undersaturation of carbonate minerals in seawater. Yet, the relative contribution of algal microborers and seawater carbonate chemistry to the dissolution of organisms that cement reefs under projected CO2 and temperature (CO2-T) scenarios have not been quantified. We exposed CCA skeletons (Porolithon onkodes) to four CO2-T treatments (pre-industrial, present-day, SRES-B1 reduced CO2 emission scenario, SRES-A1FI business-as-usual CO2 emission scenario) under natural light cycles vs. constant dark conditions for 8 weeks. Dissolution rates of skeletons without photo-endoliths were dramatically higher (200%) than those colonized by endolithic algae across all CO2-T scenarios. This suggests that daytime photosynthesis by microborers counteract dissolution by reduced saturation states resulting in lower net erosion rates over day-night cycles. Regardless of the presence or absence of phototrophic microborers, skeletal dissolution increased significantly under the spring A1FI "business-as-usual" scenario, confirming the CCA sensitivity to future oceans. Projected ocean acidity and temperature may significantly disturb the stability of reef frameworks cemented by CCA, but surficial substrates harboring photosynthetic microborers will be less impacted than those without algal endoliths.

  16. Kinetic dissolution of carbonates and Mn oxides in acidic water: Measurement of in situ field rates and reactive transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.G.; Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of carbonate and Mn oxide dissolution under acidic conditions were examined through the in situ exposure of pure phase samples to acidic ground water in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona. The average long-term calculated in situ dissolution rates for calcite and dolomite were 1.65??10-7 and 3.64??10-10 mmol/(cm2 s), respectively, which were about 3 orders of magnitude slower than rates derived in laboratory experiments by other investigators. Application of both in situ and lab-derived calcite and dolomite dissolution rates to equilibrium reactive transport simulations of a column experiment did not improve the fit to measured outflow chemistry: at the spatial and temporal scales of the column experiment, the use of an equilibrium model adequately simulated carbonate dissolution in the column. Pyrolusite (MnO2) exposed to acidic ground water for 595 days increased slightly in weight despite thermodynamic conditions that favored dissolution. This result might be related to a recent finding by another investigator that the reductive dissolution of pyrolusite is accompanied by the precipitation of a mixed Mn-Fe oxide species. In PHREEQC reactive transport simulations, the incorporation of Mn kinetics improved the fit between observed and simulated behavior at the column and field scales, although the column-fitted rate for Mn-oxide dissolution was about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the field-fitted rate. Remaining differences between observed and simulated contaminant transport trends at the Pinal Creek site were likely related to factors other than the Mn oxide dissolution rate, such as the concentration of Fe oxide surface sites available for adsorption, the effects of competition among dissolved species for available surface sites, or reactions not included in the model.

  17. Modeling and simulation of NiO dissolution and Ni deposition in molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Suk Woo; Choi, Hyung-Joon; Lim, Tae Hoon

    1996-12-31

    Dissolution of NiO cathode into the electrolyte matrix is an important phenomena limiting the lifetime of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The dissolved nickel diffuses into the matrix and is reduced by dissolved hydrogen leading to the formation of metallic nickel films in the pores of the matrix. The growth of Ni films in the electrolyte matrix during the continuous cell operation results eventually in shorting between cathode and anode. Various mathematical and empirical models have been developed to describe the NiO dissolution and Ni deposition processes, and these models have some success in estimating the lifetime of MCFC by correlating the amount of Ni deposited in the matrix with shorting time. Since the exact mechanism of Ni deposition was not well understood, deposition reaction was assumed to be very fast in most of the models and the Ni deposition region was limited around a point in the matrix. In fact, formation of Ni films takes place in a rather broad region in the matrix, the location and thickness of the film depending on operating conditions as well as matrix properties. In this study, we assumed simple reaction kinetics for Ni deposition and developed a mathematical model to get the distribution of nickel in the matrix.

  18. Dissolution along faults-fractures and hypogenic karst in carbonates: examples from Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennes-Silva, Renata; Cazarin, Caroline; Bezerra, Francisco; Auler, Augusto; Klimchouk, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Dissolution along faults-fractures and hypogenic karst in carbonates: examples from Brazil Ennes-Silva, R.A; Cazarin, C.L.; Bezerra, F.H.; Auler, A.S.; Klimchouk, A.B. Dissolution along zones of preferential flow enhances anisotropy in geological media and increases its complexity. Changes in parameters such as porosity and permeability due to diagenesis and presence of ascendant fluids along fractures and faults can be responsible for hypogenic karstic system. The present study investigates the relationship between lithofacies, tectonics and karstification in the Neoproterozoic Salitre Formation, located in the central-eastern Brazil. This unit comprises several systems of caves including the Toca da Boa Vista and da Barriguda hypogenic caves, the largests in South America, and focus of this study. We focused on cave mapping and morphogenetic analysis, determination of petrophysical properties, thin-section description, micro-tomography, and isotopic analysis. The Salitre Formation, deposited in an epicontinental sea, comprises mud/wakestones, grainstones, microbial facies, and fine siliciclastic rocks. Passages occur in several levels within ca. 60 m thick cave-forming section, limited at the top by lithofacies with low permeability and fractures. Cave development occurred in phreatic sluggish-flow environment with overall upwelling flow. Fluids rise via cross-formational fractures and were distributed laterally within the cave-forming section using geological heterogeneities to eventually discharge up through outlets breaching across the upper confining beds. Maps of conduits show preferred directions for development of conduits: NNE-SSW and E-W. These two directions represents a relation between structures and hypogenic morphology. Joints, axis fold and fractures allowed pathways to the fluid rises, and then development of channels of entrance (feeders), outputs (outlets) and some cupolas, which are clearly aligned to fractures. Our data indicate several events

  19. Enhanced olivine carbonation within a basalt as compared to single-phase experiments: the impact of redox and bulk composition on the dissolution kinetics of olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissmann, O.; Brunet, F.; Martinez, I.; Guyot, F. J.; Verlaguet, A.; Pinquier, Y.; Garcia, B.; Chardin, M.; Kohler, E.; Daval, D.

    2014-12-01

    Olivine (Mg,Fe)2SiO4, which is one of the major mineral constituents of mafic and ultramafic rocks, has an attractive potential for CO2 mineral sequestration, as it possesses a high content of carbonate-forming divalent cations and exhibits one of the highest dissolution rate amongst rock-forming minerals. This study reports drastic differences in carbonation yields between experiments performed on olivine-rich basalt samples and on olivine separates (a more restricted chemical system). Batch experiments were conducted in water at 150°C and pCO2 = 280 bars on a Mg-rich tholeiitic basalt (9.3 wt.% MgO and 12.2 wt.% CaO), composed of olivine, Ti-magnetite, plagioclase and clinopyroxene. After 45 days of reaction, 56 wt.% of the initial MgO has reacted with CO2 to form Fe-bearing magnesite (Mg0.8Fe0.2)CO3 along with minor calcium carbonates. The substantial decrease of olivine content upon carbonation supports the idea that ferroan magnesite formation mainly follows from olivine dissolution. In contrast, in experiments performed under similar run durations and P/T conditions with a San Carlos olivine separate (47.8 wt.% MgO) of similar grain size, only 5 wt.% of the initial MgO content reacted to form Fe-bearing magnesite. The overall carbonation kinetics of the basalt is enhanced by a factor of 40. It could be accounted for by differences in chemical and textural properties of the secondary-silica layer which covers reacted olivine grains in both types of sample. A TEM inspection of mineral surfaces shows that the thin amorphous silica layer (~100 nm) is porous in the case of the basalt sample and that it contains significant amounts of iron and aluminum. Thus, we propose that the composition of the olivine environment itself can strongly influence the olivine dissolution-carbonation process. Consequently, laboratory data obtained on olivine separates might yield a conservative estimate of the true carbonation potential of olivine-bearing basaltic rocks. More

  20. Influence of Permian salt dissolution on Cretaceous oil and gas entrapment and reserve potential, Denver basin, Western Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, D.W.; Smosna, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    Location and trap type of Cretaceous oil and gas fields in the D-J Fairway of Nebraska are related to the occurrence of 12 Permian salt zones. Salt distribution is controlled by the configuration of evaporate basins, truncation at a sub-Jurassic unconformity, and post-Jurassic subsurface dissolution. The Sidney Trough, which marks the eastern (regionally updip) limit of Cretaceous oil production in western Nebraska, is a rootless salt-dissolution collapse feature, whose location and origin is controlled by an abrupt linear facies change from thick, porous Lyons Sandstone to Leonardian salt. Eastward gravity-driven groundwater flow within the Lyons occurred in response to hydraulic gradient and recharge along the Front Range Uplift following Laramide orogeny. Dissolution of salt at the facies change caused collapse of overlying strata, producing fractures through which cross-formational flow occurred. Younger salts were dissolved, enhancing relief across the regional depression and subsidiary synclines. Timing of post-Jurassic dissolution influenced entrapment within D and J sandstone reservoirs. Where Early Cretaceous (pre-reservoir) dissolution occurred, structure at the D and J sandstone level is relatively simple, and stratigraphic traps predominate. Where Late Cretaceous - Tertiary (post-reservoir) dissolution occurred, structure is more complex, formation waters are more saline, oil and gas are localized on dissolution-induced anticlines, and per-well reserves are significantly higher.

  1. Solution-state polymer assemblies influence BCS class II drug dissolution and supersaturation maintenance.

    PubMed

    Dalsin, Molly C; Tale, Swapnil; Reineke, Theresa M

    2014-02-10

    Spray dried dispersions (SDDs), solid dispersions of polymer excipients and active pharmaceuticals, are important to the field of oral drug delivery for improving active stability, bioavailability, and efficacy. Herein, we examine the influence of solution-state polymer assemblies on amorphous spray-dried dispersion (SDD) performance with two BCS II model drugs, phenytoin and probucol. These drugs were spray dried with 4 model polymer excipients consisting of poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PEP), N,N,-dimethylacrylamide (DMA), or 2-methacrylamido glucopyranose (MAG): amphiphilic diblock ter- and copolymers, PEP-P(DMA-grad-MAG) and PEP-PDMA, and their respective hydrophilic analogues, P(DMA-grad-MAG) and PDMA. Selective and nonselective solvents for the hydrophilic block of the diblock ter- and copolymers were used to induce or repress solution-state assemblies prior to spray drying. Prespray dried solution-state assemblies of these four polymers were probed with dynamic light scattering (DLS) and showed differences in solution assembly size and structure (free polymer versus aggregates versus micelles). Solid-state structures of spray dried dispersions (SDDs) showed a single glass transition event implying a homogeneous mixture of drug/polymer. Crystallization temperatures and enthalpies indicated that the drugs interact mostly with the DMA-containing portions of the polymers. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine SDD particle size and morphology for the various polymer-drug pairings. In vitro dissolution tests showed excellent performance for one system, spray-dried PEP-PDMA micelles with probucol. Dissolution structures were investigated through DLS to determine drug-polymer aggregates that lead to enhanced SDD performance. Forced aggregation of the polymer into regular micelle structures was found to be a critical factor to increase the dissolution rate and supersaturation maintenance of SDDs, and may be an attractive platform to exploit in excipient

  2. The effect of the carbon dissolution on the crystal structure of a-quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitani, S.; Kyono, A.

    2015-12-01

    Silicon is one of the major and important element that constitutes the Earth's crust and mantle. An enormous amount of carbon is also contained in the Earth's interior, which suggests that silicate could be closely interacted with carbon under high-pressure and high-temperature (Sen et al. 2013, PNAS). It is suggested that carbon dioxide is dissolved in cristobalite and the average composition of CO2-SiO2 solid solution is C0.6(1)Si0.4(1)O2 High-pressure experiment (Santoro et al. 2014, Nat. Commun.). Furthermore, the first-principles calculations suggested the possibility of successive CO2 dissolution in cristobalite at ambient pressure (Aravindh et al. 2007, Solid State Commun.). However, CO2-SiO2 solid solution at ambient pressure has not confirmed in laboratory experiment. In this study, we mixed amorphous silica and amorphous carbon and synthesized CO2-SiO2 solid solution at high-temperature under ambient pressure. Powder amorphous silica and graphite was mixed together in the agate mill in order to be homogenized mixture. They were heated for 1300 ˚C, 3 days under ambient pressure. Then, the samples were quenched at room temperature. The samples of CO2-SiO2 solid solution were carefully examined by powder XRD, EPMA measurement, and so on. From the result of the powder XRD, the products were a-quartz. In this lecture, we report the quantity of carbon dissolved in a-quartz and its effect for the crystal structure of a-quartz in detail.

  3. Tuning the dissolution kinetics of wollastonite via chelating agents for CO2 sequestration with integrated synthesis of precipitated calcium carbonates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huangjing; Park, Youngjune; Lee, Dong Hyun; Park, Ah-Hyung Alissa

    2013-09-28

    Carbon mineralization has recently received much attention as one of the most promising options for CO2 sequestration. The engineered weathering of silicate minerals as a means of permanent carbon storage has unique advantages such as the abundance of naturally occurring calcium and magnesium-bearing minerals and the formation of environmentally-benign and geologically stable solids via a thermodynamically favored carbonation reaction. However, several challenges need to be overcome to successfully deploy carbon mineralization on a large scale. In particular, the acceleration of the rate-limiting mineral dissolution step along with process optimization is essential to ensure the economic feasibility of the proposed carbon storage technology. In this study, the effect of various types of chelating agents on the dissolution rate of calcium-bearing silicate mineral, wollastonite, was explored to accelerate its weathering rate. It was found that chelating agents such as acetic acid and gluconic acid significantly improved the dissolution kinetics of wollastonite even at a much diluted concentration of 0.006 M by complexing with calcium in the mineral matrix. Calcium extracted from wollastonite was then reacted with a carbonate solution to form precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), while tuning the particle size and the morphological structure of PCC to mimic commercially available PCC-based filler materials. PMID:23925694

  4. Dissolution kinetics of {delta} phase and its influence on the notch sensitivity of Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Dayong . E-mail: dayongcai@sina.com.cn; Zhang Weihong; Nie Pulin; Liu Wenchang; Yao Mei

    2007-03-15

    The dissolution kinetics of {delta} phase in Inconel 718 at 980 deg. C, 1000 deg. C and 1020 deg. C and its influence on high temperature notch sensitivity have been studied using a quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) method and high temperature stress rupture life tests of notched specimens. The amount of {delta} phase decreases gradually during holding time at 980 deg. C, 1000 deg. C and 1020 deg. C. The {delta} phase will be fully dissolved in the austenitic matrix at 1020 deg. C for more than 2 h. A certain amount of {delta} phase still exists after holding at 980 deg. C and 1000 deg. C for times up to 6 h; the amount remaining are 3 wt.% and 0.6 wt.%, respectively. The dissolution rate remains at a high level at the beginning, and then decreases gradually with an increase of holding time. A dynamic equilibrium state can be approached after holding at 980 deg. C for more than 30 min and at 1000 deg. C for more than 2 h. The alloy with {delta} phase amounts higher than 0.62 wt.% does not exhibit notch sensitivity, whereas serious notch sensitivity exists if the concentration is below 0.43 wt.%.

  5. Noble gas and carbon isotopic evidence for CO2-driven silicate dissolution in a recent natural CO2 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubacq, Benoît; Bickle, Mike J.; Wigley, Max; Kampman, Niko; Ballentine, Chris J.; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    Secure storage of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) in geological reservoirs requires predicting gas-water-rock interactions over millennial timescales. Noble gases and carbon isotope measurements can be used to shed light on the nature of competing dissolution-precipitation processes over different timescales, from the fast dissolution of gaseous CO2 in groundwater to more sluggish reactions involving dissolution and precipitation of newly formed minerals in the reservoir. Here we study a compilation of gas analyses including noble gases and δ13C of CO2 from nine different natural CO2 reservoirs. Amongst these reservoirs, the Bravo Dome CO2 field (New Mexico, USA) shows distinct geochemical trends which are explained by degassing of noble gases from groundwater altering the composition of the gas phase. This groundwater degassing is synchronous with the dissolution of CO2 in groundwater. Progressive creation of alkalinity via CO2-promoted mineral dissolution is required to explain the observed positive correlation between CO2/3He and δ13C of the gas phase, a unique feature of Bravo Dome. The differences between Bravo Dome and other natural CO2 reservoirs are likely explained by the more recent filling of Bravo Dome, reflecting CO2-water-rock interactions over thousands of years rather than over millions of years in older reservoirs.

  6. Carbon Dissolution in Reduced Silicate and Alloy Melts - a Frontier for Understanding Evolution of Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Chi, H.; Li, Y.; Duncan, M. S.; Tsuno, K.

    2014-12-01

    C-O-H-S-N volatile elements sequestration in and release from silicate and metallic melts are key in controlling the planet scale distribution of these elements and thus are critical for thermo-chemical and dynamic evolution of terrestrial planets. To understand the distribution of carbon during accretion, core formation, magma ocean crystallization, and ongoing evolution of reduced mantles domains such as those of Mars, the Moon, and deep Earth, carbon chemistry in reduced silicates and alloys must be constrained, but currently are poorly known. Here we summarize recent experimental efforts to (1) constrain the speciation and solubility of carbon in graphite-saturated natural mafic melts at fO2 below IW buffer and (2) C solubility in Fe-Ni-rich alloy melts. Quenched glasses and alloys generated to 8 GPa and 2200 °C are analyzed using a combination of electron and ion microprobe, FTIR, and Raman spectroscopy. Dissolved carbonates and bulk C solubility (<200 ppm) of graphite-saturated silicate glasses are observed to increase with decreasing pressure and increasing temperature, melt depolymerization index (e.g., NBO/T), and fO2 from ~IW-1.5 to IW [1,2]. Over the range in fO2, melt H2O content also mildly enhances carbonate dissolution, likely in part owing to the depolymerizing effect of H2O in the melt. At fO2>IW-1.5, dissolved C is a mixture of carbonates and other species, but below ~IW-1.5 the carbonate doublet is undetectable in IR spectra, with Raman spectra indicating the dominant species being methane or other methyl groups. In addition, with diminishing fO2 from IW-2 to IW-5, C solubility trend reverses, i.e., it increases with decreasing fO2 and also shows a much stronger dependence on melt H content [3], consistent with the enhanced solubility of methane in silicate melt with decreasing fO2 and increasing with square of fH2. However, Fe-Ni-rich alloy melts have high C solubility (~0.7-7 wt.%) that diminishes mostly with increasing Ni, Si, and S contents

  7. Experimental approaches to marine and meteoric dissolution-to-repreciptiation cycles of fine-grained marine carbonate sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immenhauser, Adrian; Buhl, Dieter; Riechelmann, Sylvia; Kwiecien, Ola; Lokier, Stephen; Neuser, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    Fine-grained carbonate (carbonate ooze), or microcrystalline carbonate (micrite), its lithified counterpart, forms a main constituent of limestones throughout much of Earth's history. Fine-grained carbonates are deposited below the permanent fair-weather wave base in neritic lagoonal environments or below the storm-wave base in basinal settings. The origin of components forming these fine-grained carbonates often remains poorly understood and represents a major challenge in carbonate sedimentology, particularly when these materials are used as carbonate archives (bulk micrite geochemistry). Here we present a novel experimental approach exposing natural, fine-grained carbonate sediments to dissolution-reprecipitation cycles under non-sterile conditions that mimick earth-surface conditions. In a first stage, the experiment simulated subaerial exposure of an ooid (aragonite) shoal and leaching and carbonate dissolution under meteoric phreatic conditions. In a second stage, CO2 was added to the experimental fluid (natural rainwater) representing soil-zone activity. In a third stage, partly dissolved (micro-karstified) sediments were exposed to marine phreatic conditions simulating renewed flooding of the shoal carbonates. During the third stage, precipitation was induced by degassing the CO2 in the fluid with N2. Degassing induced nucleation and growth of a diagenetic inorganic aragonite (and subordinate calcite) phase upon the surface of carbonate particles. The outcome of these first experiments is promising. The CO2 concentration of the fluid and the air are low under atmospheric conditions and increase as expected due to adding CO2 to the experiment resulting in a lower pH. Carbonate dissolution increases conductivity, alkalinity, and calcium concentration reaching a plateau at the end of the first experimental phase. Small surficial damages to ooids represent zones of weakness and form the preferred sites of dissolution leading to a deepening and widening of these

  8. Loading amorphous Asarone in mesoporous silica SBA-15 through supercritical carbon dioxide technology to enhance dissolution and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengzan; Quan, Guilan; Wu, Qiaoli; Zhou, Chan; Li, Feng; Bai, Xuequn; Li, Ge; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to load amorphous hydrophobic drug into ordered mesoporous silica (SBA-15) by supercritical carbon dioxide technology in order to improve the dissolution and bioavailability of the drug. Asarone was selected as a model drug due to its lipophilic character and poor bioavailability. In vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability of the obtained Asarone-SBA-15 were significantly improved as compared to the micronized crystalline drug. This study offers an effective, safe, and environmentally benign means of solving the problems relating to the solubility and bioavailability of hydrophobic molecules. PMID:25720818

  9. Dynamic Pore-Scale Imaging of Reactive Transport in Heterogeneous Carbonates at Reservoir Conditions Across Multiple Dissolution Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, H. P.; Bijeljic, B.; Andrew, M. G.; Blunt, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sequestering carbon in deep geologic formations is one way of reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions. When supercritical CO2 mixes with brine in a reservoir, the acid generated has the potential to dissolve the surrounding pore structure. However, the magnitude and type of dissolution are condition dependent. Understanding how small changes in the pore structure, chemistry, and flow properties affect dissolution is paramount for successful predictive modelling. Both 'Pink Beam' synchrotron radiation and a Micro-CT lab source are used in dynamic X-ray microtomography to investigate the pore structure changes during supercritical CO2 injection in carbonate rocks of varying heterogeneity at high temperatures and pressures and various flow-rates. Three carbonate rock types were studied, one with a homogeneous pore structure and two heterogeneous carbonates. All samples are practically pure calcium carbonate, but have widely varying rock structures. Flow-rate was varied in three successive experiments by over an order of magnitude whlie keeping all other experimental conditions constant. A 4-mm carbonate core was injected with CO2-saturated brine at 10 MPa and 50oC. Tomographic images were taken at 30-second to 20-minute time-resolutions during a 2 to 4-hour injection period. A pore network was extracted using a topological analysis of the pore space and pore-scale flow modelling was performed directly on the binarized images with connected pathways and used to track the altering velocity distributions. Significant differences in dissolution type and magnitude were found for each rock type and flowrate. At the highest flow-rates, the homogeneous carbonate was seen to have predominately uniform dissolution with minor dissolution rate differences between the pores and pore throats. Alternatively, the heterogeneous carbonates which formed wormholes at high flow rates. At low flow rates the homogeneous rock developed wormholes, while the heterogeneous samples showed evidence

  10. Modeling the Influence of Transport on Chemical Reactivity in Microbial Membranes: Mineral Precipitation/Dissolution Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felmy, A. R.; Liu, C.; Clark, S.; Straatsma, T.; Rustad, J.

    2003-12-01

    It has long been known that microorganisms can alter the chemical composition of their immediate surroundings and influence such processes as ion uptake or adsorption and mineral precipitation dissolution. However, only recently have molecular imaging and molecular modeling capabilities been developed that begin to shed light on the nature of these processes at the nm to um scale at the surface of bacterial membranes. In this presentation we will show the results of recent molecular simulations of microbial surface reactions and describe our efforts to develop accurate non-equilibrium thermodynamic models for the microbial surface that can describe ion uptake and surface induced mineral precipitation. The thermodynamic models include the influence of the bacterial electrical double layer on the uptake of ions from solution and the removal, or exclusion, of ions from the surface of the cell, non-equilibrium diffusion and chemical reaction within the membrane, as well as a new thermodynamic approach to representing ion activities within the microbial membrane. In the latter case, the variability in the water content within the microbial membrane has a significant influence on the calculated mineral saturation indices. In such cases, we will propose the use of recently developed mixed solvent-electrolyte formalisms. Recent experimental data for mixed-solvent electrolyte systems will also be presented to demonstrate the potential impact of the variable water content on calculated ion activities within the membrane.

  11. Processes at the magnesium-bearing carbonates/solution interface. II. kinetics and mechanism of magnesite dissolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Schott, Jacques

    1999-07-01

    Steady-state dissolution rates of magnesite (MgCO 3) were measured at 25°C as a function of pH (from 0.2 to 12), total dissolved carbonate concentration (10 -5 < ΣCO 2 < 0.1 M), and ionic strength (0.002 < I < 0.5 M) using a mixed-flow reactor. Dissolution rates were found to be pH-independent at 0 < pH < 3, proportional to a H+ at 3 < pH < 5, pH-independent at 5 < pH < 8, and decreasing with increasing pH at pH > 8 and ΣCO 2 > 10 -3 M. In the acid pH region (3 ≤ pH ≤ 5), the rates increase significantly with ionic strength. In the alkaline pH region, carbonate and bicarbonate ions and ionic strength inhibit significantly the dissolution rate even at far from equilibrium conditions. The surface complexation model developed by Pokrovsky et al. (1999a) was used to correlate magnesite dissolution kinetics with its surface speciation. Dissolution rates in the acid pH region are controlled by the protonation of >CO 3- surface complexes. In neutral and carbonate-rich alkaline solutions, >MgOH 2+ controls the dissolution kinetics. The following rate equation, consistent with transition state theory was used to describe magnesite dissolution kinetics over the full range of solution composition: R (mol/cm 2/s)=[10 7.198·{>CO 3H°} 3.97+10 5.38·{>MgOH 2+} 3.94]·(1-exp(-4 A/ RT)) where {> i} stands for surface species concentration (mol/m 2), and A refers to the chemical affinity of the overall reaction. This equation reflects the formation of two different precursor-activated complexes which contain four protonated >CO 3H° species in acid solutions and four protonated (hydrated) >MgOH 2+ groups in neutral and alkaline solutions. The very low magnesite dissolution/precipitation rates predicted by this equation, especially at close to equilibrium conditions, are consistent with those deduced from field measurements.

  12. Observations, Measurements, and Simulations of Convectively Enhanced Carbon Dioxide Dissolution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Pruess, K.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon dioxide injected into a porous, permeable rock stratum overlain by low-permeability caprock will flow in response to applied pressures and buoyant, viscous, and capillary forces. Four modes of CO2 storage will occur upon injection, which are (in order of increased security and permanence): 1) free-phase supercritical CO2, 2) capillary-trapped CO2, 3) CO2 dissolved into the brine, and 4) CO2 that has chemically reacted with aqueous species and host rock resulting in precipitation. In the target formation, the injected supercritical CO2 will tend to rise due to buoyancy, and accumulate beneath the caprock. At some distance from the injection well, the CO2/brine interface will be roughly horizontal. In the absence of fluid motion, CO2 dissolution into the brine will be dominated by the slow process of molecular diffusion of the CO2 away from the CO2-brine interface, and the rate of dissolution will decrease with time. As CO2 dissolves into the brine, the density of the brine increases by a small amount, on the order of 0.1 to 1%. This results in a fluid dynamics instability because denser fluid overlies less dense fluid, which induces convective flow of the denser fluid downward. The downward convection of the CO2-bearing denser fluid causes less dense brine to flow upwards and contact the CO2. This is a desirable process because it significantly increases the dissolution of CO2 into the brine. We have performed laboratory visualization tests, quantitative measurements at elevated pressures, and numerical simulations to examine this phenomenon. In our visualization tests, we introduce CO2 into the headspace above water containing a pH sensitive indicator contained in a transparent Hele-Shaw cell. When CO2 dissolves into the water, the pH is lowered and the indicator changes color. Upon introduction of CO2 into the cell, a fairly uniform layer of low pH fluid containing dissolved CO2 slowly enlarges downward from the gas-water interface. At some point, many

  13. EVALUATION OF ARG-1 SAMPLES PREPARED BY CESIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION DURING THE ISOLOK SME ACCEPTABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting

  14. The Dissolution of Synthetic Na-Boltwoodite in Sodium Carbonate Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Liu, Chongxuan; Yantasee, Wassana; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Zachara, John M.

    2006-09-01

    Uranyl silicates such as uranophane and Na-boltwoodite appear to control the solubility of uranium in the contaminated sediments at the US Department of Energy Hanford site (Liu et al., 2004). Consequently, the solubility of synthetic Na-boltwoodite was determined over a wide range of bicarbonate concentrations, from circumneutral to alkaline pH, that are representative of porewater and groundwater compositions at the Hanford site. Results show that Na-boltwoodite dissolution was nearly congruent and its solubility increased with increasing bicarbonate concentration. Calculated solubility constants varied by nearly 2 log units from low bicarbonate (no added NaCO3) to 50 mmol/L bicarbonate. However, the solubility constants only vary by 0.5 log units from 0 added bicarbonate to 1.2 mmol/L bicarbonate, where logKsp = 5.39-5.92 and the average logKsp = 5.63. No systematic trend in logKsp was apparent over this range in bicarbonate concentrations. LogKsp values trended down with increasing bicarbonate concentration, where logKsp = 4.06 at 50 mmol/L bicarbonate. We conclude that the calculated solubility constants at high bicarbonate are compromised by an incomplete or inaccurate uranyl-carbonate speciation model.

  15. Reactive Transport at the Pore Scale with Applications to the Dissolution of Carbonate Rocks for CO2 Sequestration Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boek, E.; Gray, F.; Welch, N.; Shah, S.; Crawshaw, J.

    2014-12-01

    In CO2 sequestration operations, CO2 injected into a brine aquifer dissolves in the liquid to create an acidic solution. This may result in dissolution of the mineral grains in the porous medium. Experimentally, it is hard to investigate this process at the pore scale. Therefore we develop a new hybrid particle simulation algorithm to study the dissolution of solid objects in a laminar flow field, as encountered in porous media flow situations. First, we calculate the flow field using a multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) algorithm implemented on GPUs, which demonstrates a very efficient use of the GPU device and a considerable performance increase over CPU calculations. Second, using a stochastic particle approach, we solve the advection-diffusion equation for a single reactive species and dissolve solid voxels according to our reaction model. To validate our simulation, we first calculate the dissolution of a solid sphere as a function of time under quiescent conditions. We compare with the analytical solution for this problem [1] and find good agreement. Then we consider the dissolution of a solid sphere in a laminar flow field and observe a significant change in the sphericity with time due to the coupled dissolution - flow process. Second, we calculate the dissolution of a cylinder in channel flow in direct comparison with corresponding dissolution experiments. We discuss the evolution of the shape and dissolution rate. Finally, we calculate the dissolution of carbonate rock samples at the pore scale in direct comparison with micro-CT experiments. This work builds on our recent research on calculation of multi-phase flow [2], [3] and hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular propagator distributions for solute transport in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media using LB simulations [4]. It turns out that the hybrid simulation model is a suitable tool to study reactive flow processes at the pore scale. This is of great importance for CO2 storage and

  16. Application of Foraminiferal Calcium Carbonate Chemistry to Proxy Past Ocean Conditions: key roles of Biomineral Formation and Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elderfield, H.

    2001-12-01

    The use of the shell chemistry of foraminiferal calcite and aragonite for seawater paleothermometry and paleochemistry rests on confidence in the calibrations established to link metal uptake or isotope fractionation by the marine biogenic calcium carbonate to modern seawater composition. The early pioneering work in this field led to a period of application, principally of the establishment and expansion of stable oxygen and carbon isotope studies. But new work on trace metals in foraminifera has led to an upsurge of interest in, and reappraisal of, what controls metal uptake and the extent to which foraminifera do a good a job in recording and revealing the ocean's secrets. Two issues are considered: (i) understanding how secretion by the organism takes place and the chemical consequences; (ii) how dissolution changes the initial chemistry. The early work on ultrastructure shows that different, often progressive, layers are formed ranging from anhedral microgranules to euhedral crystallites; and that there is sequential and preferential dissolution of the different textural forms. This forms some basis for understanding, for example, the heterogeneity in foraminiferal Mg/Ca and how this is affected by dissolution. In general, warmer species (higher Mg/Ca) show greatest 104 line broadening and depth (or carbonate ion) related dissolution is accompanied by a decrease both in Mg/Ca and line broadening. Variation in calcification rate has been linked to changes in carbon isotope and Sr/Ca, perhaps through a carbonate ion effect. This is also seen from size fraction data. There is also variability in shell mass both from initial calcification history and from dissolution, and both affect shell chemistry. Shell mass is also associated with changes in normalised size and accompanied by chemical changes. One clear effect of Mg heterogeneity is in its effect on calibrations for thermometry and the extent to which phase differences between temperature (dissolution

  17. Study of dolomite dissolution at various temperatures - Evidence for the formation of nanocrystalline secondary phases at dolomite surface and influence on dolomite interactions with other minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debure, M.; Andreazza, P.; Grangeon, S.; Lerouge, C.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; MADE, B.; Tournassat, C.

    2015-12-01

    In most clay-rock geological formation studied for the storage of nuclear waste, pore water compositions are expected to be at equilibrium with carbonate minerals, which are always included in predictive models for pore water composition calculations [1]. Among the carbonates known to be present, dolomite may be problematic in the pore water composition calculation because its solubility spans a large range of values as a function of its crystallinity in thermodynamic databases. In addition, the composition of dolomite minerals observed in clay-rock formations such as Callovian-Oxfordian or Opalinus clay formation differs from this of a pure dolomite: the Ca/Mg stoichiometry is not ideal, and the minerals contain minor amounts of Fe and traces of many other elements [2]. To understand the influence of secondary phases precipitation during dolomite dissolution on pore water chemistry, the dissolution of monocrystals of dolomite were investigated at 25 °C and at 80 °C in a pH range 3 to 8 for various time periods (30 minutes to 21 days) in sealed PTFE reactors. Solution analyses evidenced a stoichiometric release of Ca and Mg in solution during dolomite dissolution. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Raman and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses did not evidence secondary Mg-bearing minerals precipitation, but revealed the formation of Fe-bearing particles on the dolomite surface. Morphological characterizations performed with Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) evidenced that the precipitation occurs along a specific crystallographic plane of the dolomite monocrystal. Thus, the precipitated nanoparticles clustered on specific surface sites, and are made of Fe-rich phases poorly crystallized (carbonates, oxides and hydroxides). [1] Tournassat et al. 2015. Ch. 3: Chemical Conditions in Clay-Rocks. Natural and Engineered Clay Barriers, Elsevier. [2] Lerouge et al. 2011. Geochim. et Cosmoch. Acta, 2011, 75, 2633-2663.

  18. Influence of extracellular polymeric substances on the long-term fate, dissolution, and speciation of copper-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Conway, Jon R; Perez, Thomas; Rutten, Paige; Keller, Arturo A

    2014-11-01

    The influence of phytoplankton-derived soluble extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), pH, and ionic strength (IS) on the dissolution, speciation, and stability of nano-CuO, nano-Cu, and Kocide (a micron sized Cu(OH)2-based fungicide) was investigated over 90 days. EPS improved the stability of commercial copper-based nanoparticles (CBNPs) in most conditions, in addition to influencing their dissolution. The dissolution rate was pH 4≫pH 7>pH 11. The presence of EPS correlated with higher dissolved Cu at pH 7 and 11, and lower dissolved Cu at pH 4. More dissolution was observed at higher IS (NaCl) due to complexation with Cl-. Dissolution of nano-CuO at pH 7 increased from 0.93% after 90 days (without EPS) to 2.01% (with 5 mg-C EPS/L) at 10 mM IS. Nano-CuO dissolved even more (2.42%) when IS was increased to 100 mM NaCl (with EPS). The ratio of free-Cu2+/total dissolved Cu decreased in the presence of EPS, or as pH and/or IS increased. On a Cu mass basis, Kocide had the highest dissolved and suspended Cu at pH 7. However, dissolution of nano-Cu resulted in a higher fraction of free Cu2+, which may make nano-Cu more toxic to pelagic organisms. PMID:25295836

  19. Dissolution rates of pure methane hydrate and carbon-dioxide hydrate in undersaturated seawater at 1000-m depth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehder, G.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Peltzer, E.T.; Pinkston, J.; Brewer, P.G.

    2004-01-01

    To help constrain models involving the chemical stability and lifetime of gas clathrate hydrates exposed at the seafloor, dissolution rates of pure methane and carbon-dioxide hydrates were measured directly on the seafloor within the nominal pressure-temperature (P/T) range of the gas hydrate stability zone. Other natural boundary conditions included variable flow velocity and undersaturation of seawater with respect to the hydrate-forming species. Four cylindrical test specimens of pure, polycrystalline CH4 and CO2 hydrate were grown and fully compacted in the laboratory, then transferred by pressure vessel to the seafloor (1028 m depth), exposed to the deep ocean environment, and monitored for 27 hours using time-lapse and HDTV cameras. Video analysis showed diameter reductions at rates between 0.94 and 1.20 ??m/s and between 9.0 and 10.6 ?? 10-2 ??m/s for the CO2 and CH4 hydrates, respectively, corresponding to dissolution rates of 4.15 ?? 0.5 mmol CO2/m2s and 0.37 ?? 0.03 mmol CH4/m2s. The ratio of the dissolution rates fits a diffusive boundary layer model that incorporates relative gas solubilities appropriate to the field site, which implies that the kinetics of the dissolution of both hydrates is diffusion-controlled. The observed dissolution of several mm (CH4) or tens of mm (CO2) of hydrate from the sample surfaces per day has major implications for estimating the longevity of natural gas hydrate outcrops as well as for the possible roles of CO2 hydrates in marine carbon sequestration strategies. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Isotopic evidence of enhanced carbonate dissolution at a coal mine drainage site in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Shikha; Sack, Andrea; Adams, James P.; Vesper, Dorothy; J Capo, Rosemary C.; Hartsock, Angela; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotopes were used to determine the sources and fate of dissolved inorganic C (DIC) in the circumneutral pH drainage from an abandoned bituminous coal mine in western Pennsylvania. The C isotope signatures of DIC (δ{sup 13}C{sub DIC}) were intermediate between local carbonate and organic C sources, but were higher than those of contemporaneous Pennsylvanian age groundwaters in the region. This suggests a significant contribution of C enriched in {sup 13}C due to enhanced carbonate dissolution associated with the release of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} from pyrite oxidation. The Sr isotopic signature of the drainage was similar to other regional mine waters associated with the same coal seam and reflected contributions from limestone dissolution and cation exchange with clay minerals. The relatively high δ{sup 34}S{sub SO4} and δ{sup 18}O{sub SO4} isotopic signatures of the mine drainage and the presence of presumptive SO{sub 4}-reducing bacteria suggest that SO{sub 4} reduction activity also contributes C depleted in {sup 13}C isotope to the total DIC pool. With distance downstream from the mine portal, C isotope signatures in the drainage increased, accompanied by decreased total DIC concentrations and increased pH. These data are consistent with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} dissolution of carbonate rocks, enhanced by cation exchange, and C release to the atmosphere via CO{sub 2} outgassing.

  1. Mesoporous silica sub-micron spheres as drug dissolution enhancers: Influence of drug and matrix chemistry on functionality and stability.

    PubMed

    Brigo, Laura; Scomparin, Elisa; Galuppo, Marco; Capurso, Giovanni; Ferlin, Maria Grazia; Bello, Valentina; Realdon, Nicola; Brusatin, Giovanna; Morpurgo, Margherita

    2016-02-01

    Mesoporous silica particles prepared through a simplified Stöber method and low temperature solvent promoted surfactant removal are evaluated as dissolution enhancers for poorly soluble compounds, using a powerful anticancer agent belonging to pyrroloquinolinones as a model for anticancer oral therapy, and anti-inflammatory ibuprofen as a reference compound. Mesoporous powders composed of either pure silica or silica modified with aminopropyl residues are produced. The influence of material composition and drug chemical properties on drug loading capability and dissolution enhancement are studied. The two types of particles display similar size, surface area, porosity, erodibility, drug loading capability and stability. An up to 50% w/w drug loading is reached, showing correlation between drug concentration in adsorption medium and content in the final powder. Upon immersion in simulating body fluids, immediate drug dissolution occurred, allowing acceptor solutions to reach concentrations equal to or greater than drug saturation limits. The matrix composition influenced drug solution maximal concentration, complementing the dissolution enhancement generated by a mesoporous structure. This effect was found to depend on both matrix and drug chemical properties allowing us to hypothesise general prediction behaviour rules. PMID:26652411

  2. Deep-sea benthic foraminifera, carbonate dissolution and species diversity in Hardangerfjord, Norway: An initial assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alve, Elisabeth; Murray, John W.; Skei, Jens

    2011-03-01

    This is the first record of live (stained) deep-sea benthic foraminifera in the 850 m deep silled Hardangerfjord, the second deepest fjord in Western Norway. Estimates of organic carbon flux (˜2.5 g Cm -2 y -1) show that the fjord-values are comparable to similar depths on the continental slope. Accordingly, although these first samples only provide relative abundance data, the low proportion of live to dead individuals in the top cm of the sediment suggests a low foraminifera biomass. Another similarity with the deep sea is that the abiotic environment of the deep basins is stable even though the deepest basins are isolated from the open deep sea by the continental shelf and sills in the outer parts of the fjord suggesting that the deep-sea species are introduced as propagules during deep-water renewals. There is evidence of an increase in dissolution of fragile calcareous tests (e.g., Nonionella iridea) especially in the innermost part of Hardangerfjord since the 1960s and this has led to a relative increase in dead agglutinated assemblages. The presence of larger forms with tests >1 mm provides substrata for the attachment of smaller forms and therefore an increase in species diversity. Indeed, the diversity is comparable both to that of the open deep sea and that of reported macrofauna from the same sites, reflecting similar ecological status. Holtedahl (1965) suggested that there may be some down-slope transport of sediment into the deep basins with the deposition of turbidites. Despite some evidence of transport, no major recent disturbance due to turbidite deposition seems to have occurred and hence Hardangerfjord presents a unique environment with elements of deep-sea faunas in a land-locked setting.

  3. On the Spheroidized Carbide Dissolution and Elemental Partitioning in High Carbon Bearing Steel 100Cr6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wenwen; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Inden, Gerhard; Prahl, Ulrich; Raabe, Dierk; Bleck, Wolfgang

    2014-02-01

    We report on the characterization of high carbon bearing steel 100Cr6 using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography in combination with multi-component diffusion simulations. Scanning electron micrographs show that around 14 vol pct spheroidized carbides are formed during soft annealing and only 3 vol pct remain after dissolution into the austenitic matrix through austenitization at 1123 K (850 °C) for 300 seconds. The spheroidized particles are identified as (Fe, Cr)3C by transmission electron microscopy. Atom probe analysis reveals the redistribution and partitioning of the elements involved, i.e., C, Si, Mn, Cr, Fe, in both, the spheroidized carbides and the bainitic matrix in the sample isothermally heat-treated at 773 K (500 °C) after austenitization. Homogeneous distribution of C and a Cr gradient were detected within the spheroidized carbides. Due to its limited diffusivity in (Fe, Cr)3C, Cr exhibits a maximum concentration at the surface of spheroidized carbides (16 at. pct) and decreases gradually from the surface towards the core down to about 2 at. pct. The atom probe results also indicate that the partially dissolved spheroidized carbides during austenitization may serve as nucleation sites for intermediate temperature cementite within bainite, which results in a relatively softer surface and harder core in spheroidized particles. This microstructure may contribute to the good wear resistance and fatigue properties of the steel. Good agreement between DICTRA simulations and experimental composition profiles is obtained by an increase of mobility of the substitutional elements in cementite by a factor of five, compared to the mobility in the database MOBFE2.

  4. Transformation, morphology, and dissolution of silicon and carbon in rice straw-derived biochars under different pyrolytic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xin; Chen, Baoliang; Zhu, Lizhong

    2014-03-18

    Biochars are increasingly recognized as environmentally friendly and cheap remediation agents for soil pollution. The roles of silicon in biochars and interactions between silicon and carbon have been neglected in the literature to date, while the transformation, morphology, and dissolution of silicon in Si-rich biochars remain largely unaddressed. In this study, Si-rich biochars derived from rice straw were prepared under 150-700 °C (named RS150-RS700). The transformation and morphology of carbon and silicon in biochar particles were monitored by FTIR, XRD, and SEM-EDX. With increasing pyrolytic temperature, silicon accumulated, and its speciation changed from amorphous to crystalline matter, while the organic matter evolved from aliphatic to aromatic. For rice straw biomass containing amorphous carbon and amorphous silicon, dehydration (<250 °C) made silicic acid polymerize, resulting in a closer integration of carbon and silicon. At medium pyrolysis temperatures (250-350 °C), an intense cracking of carbon components occurred, and, thus, the silicon located in the inside tissue was exposed. At high pyrolysis temperatures (500-700 °C), the biochar became condensed due to the aromatization of carbon and crystallization of silicon. Correspondingly, the carbon release in water significantly decreased, while the silicon release somewhat decreased and then sharply increased with pyrolytic temperature. Along with SEM-EDX images of biochars before and after water washing, we proposed a structural relationship between carbon and silicon in biochars to explain the mutual protection between carbon and silicon under different pyrolysis temperatures, which contribute to the broader understanding of biochar chemistry and structure. The silicon dissolution kinetics suggests that high Si biochars could serve as a novel slow release source of biologically available Si in low Si agricultural soils. PMID:24601595

  5. Thorium-230 profiling in deep-sea sediments: High-resolution records of flux and dissolution of carbonate in the equatorial Atlantic during the last 24,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, Roger; Bacon, Michael P.; Suman, Daniel O.

    1990-10-01

    Variations in carbonate flux and dissolution, which occurred in the equatorial Atlantic during the last 24,000 years, have been estimated by a new approach that allows the point-by-point determination of paleofluxes to the seafloor. An unprecedented time resolution can thus be obtained which allows sequencing of the relatively rapid events occurring during deglaciation. The method is based on observations that the flux of unsupported 230Th into deep-sea sediments is nearly independent of the total mass flux and is close to the production rate. Thus excess 230Th activity in sediments can be used as a reference against which fluxes of other sedimentary components can be estimated. The study was conducted at two sites (Ceará Rise; western equatorial Atlantic, and Sierra Leone Rise; eastern equatorial Atlantic) in cores raised from three different depths at each site. From measurements of 230Th and CaCO3, changes in carbonate flux with time and depth were obtained. A rapid increase in carbonate production, starting at the onset of deglaciation, was found in both areas. This event may have important implications for the postglacial increase in atmospheric CO2 by increasing the global carbonate carbon to organic carbon rain ratio and decreasing the alkalinity of surface waters (and possibly the North Atlantic Deep Water). Increased carbonate dissolution occurred in the two regions during deglaciation, followed by a minimum during mid-Holocene and renewed intensification of dissolution in late Holocene. During the last 16,000 years, carbonate dissolution was consistently more pronounced in the western than in the eastern basin, reflecting the influence of Antarctic Bottom Water in the west. This trend was reversed during stage 2, possibly due to the accumulation of metabolic CO2 below the level of the Romanche Fracture Zone in the eastern basin.

  6. Dissolution kinetics of granular calcium carbonate in concentrated aqueous sodium dichromate solution at pH 6.0-7.0 and 110-130 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiangui; Li, Zuohu

    2005-01-01

    An understanding of the factors controlling calcite dissolution is important for modeling geochemical cycles and impacts of greenhouse gases on climate, diagenesis of sediments, and sedimentary rocks. It also has practical significance in the investigation of behavior of carbonates in petroleum and natural gas reservoirs and in the preservation of buildings and monuments constructed from limestone and marble. A large number of papers have been published on dissolution kinetics of calcium carbonate in aqueous solutions. But few involved the near-equilibrium region, especially at elevated temperatures and in concentrated solutions. In this paper, the dissolution kinetics of calcium carbonate in concentrated aqueous sodium dichromate solutions at pH 6.0-7.0 and 110-130 degrees C were studied in a 2-L autoclave. The results indicate that the dissolution reaction is mix-controlled, with surface reaction as the prevailing factor. The concentration of calcium ions in solution hardly affects the dissolution rate, but carbon dioxide in the vapor phase inhibits the dissolution reaction. The dissolution rate can be expressed by R = k(1)a(2)(H+) + k(2), and the apparent activation energy is 55-84 kJ mol(-1). PMID:15567388

  7. Cellulose Dissolution and In Situ Grafting in a Reversible System using an Organocatalyst and Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Song, Longchu; Yang, Yunlong; Xie, Haibo; Liu, Enhui

    2015-10-12

    Cellulose is a promising renewable material, but cannot easily be processed homogeneously owing to the stiffness of the molecules and the dense packing of its chains, due to intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Cellulose processability can be improved by chemical modification. The reversible reaction of cellulose with carbon dioxide in the presence of 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) allows dissolution of cellulose in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). This DMSO solution is an effective medium for grafting L-lactide (LLA) from cellulose by ring-opening polymerization (ROP) under mild conditions, allowing to prepare cellulose-graft-poly(L-lactide) co-polymers with a molar substitution (MSPLLA ) of poly(L-lactide) in the range of 0.37-5.32, at 80 °C. This makes DBU not only an important reagent to achieve cellulose dissolution, but it also acts as organocatalyst for the subsequent ring-opening polymerization process. Characterization of the structure and thermal properties of the co-polymers by a variety of techniques reveals that they have a single glass-transition temperature (Tg ), which decreases with increasing MSPLLA . Thus, the modification results in a transformation of the originally semirigid cellulose into a thermoplastic material with tunable Tg . The carbon dioxide dissolution strategy is an efficient platform for cellulose derivatization by homogeneous organocatalysis. PMID:26220825

  8. Recovery of uranium from (U,Gd)O 2 nuclear fuel scrap using dissolution and precipitation in carbonate media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang-Wook; Hyun, Jun-Taek; Lee, Eil-Hee; Park, Geun-Il; Lee, Kune-Woo; Yoo, Myung-June; Song, Kee-Chan; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2011-11-01

    This work studied a process to recover uranium from contaminated (U,Gd)O 2 scraps generated from nuclear fuel fabrication processes by using the dissolution of (U,Gd)O 2 scraps in a carbonate with H 2O 2 and the precipitation of the dissolved uranium as UO 4. The dissolution characteristics of uranium, Gd, and impurity metal oxides were tested, and the behaviors of UO 4 precipitation and Gd solubility were evaluated with changes of the pH of the solution. A little Gd was entrained in the UO 4 precipitate to contaminate the uranium precipitate. Below a pH of 3, the uranium dissolved in the form of uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex ions in the carbonate solution was precipitated as UO 4 with a high precipitation yield, and the Gd had a very high solubility. Using these characteristics, the Gd-contaminated UO 4 could be purified using dissolution in a 1-M HNO 3 solution with heating and re-precipitation upon addition of H 2O 2 to the solution. Finally, an environmentally friendly and economical process to recover pure uranium from contaminated (U,Gd)O 2 scraps was suggested.

  9. Carbonate mineral dissolution and the impacts of flood water exchange between conduit and matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spellman, P.; Screaton, E.; Gulley, J. D.; Martin, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Studies of flow and dissolution in karst aquifers have traditionally focused on conduits, and contributions from matrix sources have been generally ignored. This conceptual model works for limestone that has been deeply buried and had its matrix permeability obliterated by cementation (telogenetic) so that most aquifer recharge occurs by conduits. In limestone that has not been deeply buried (eogenetic), however, high matrix permeability is preserved, resulting in greater degrees of interaction between conduit and matrix porosity than occurs in telogenetic limestone. Interactions between conduit and matrix porosity, and how these interactions affect flow and dissolution within aquifers, is particularly important in karst aquifers subject to dynamic changes in head gradients between conduits and aquifers. These exchanges are particularly prevalent in transitional areas between confined and unconfined aquifer conditions. In such transitional areas, allogenic runoff from confining units can increase river stages on adjacent unconfined aquifers faster than infiltration of local rainfall can increase groundwater heads. As a result, normal hydraulic gradients between the aquifer and rivers are reversed, causing river water to flow into springs. Simultaneously, rapid increases in conduit hydraulic head will also reverse gradients between the conduit and the aquifer, driving exchange from the conduit to the matrix. Because allogenic runoff is highly undersaturated with respect to calcite after storm events, dissolution resulting from this exchange can be extensive. The magnitude of dissolution that occurs is a function of the calcite saturation state of the allogenic runoff, the surface area of the limestone in contact with the water, and the time that water remains in contact with the limestone. In eogenetic aquifers, the magnitude of dissolution that occurs during spring reversals should be higher than in telogenetic aquifers because of their elevated matrix

  10. Storm-generated bedforms and relict dissolution pits and channels on the Yucatan carbonate platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Stewart, H. A.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Davis, M. B.; Duncan, D.; Saustrup, S.; Sanford, J. C.; Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2013-12-01

    The Yucatan 2013 (cruise number 2013/4_ECORD) geophysical and geotechnical hazard site survey took place aboard the R/V Justo Sierra in April 2013. Our study was conducted within the Chicxulub impact crater, encompassing three potential IODP drilling sites. The survey was located ~32 km northwest of Progreso, Mexico; data acquired included ~15.6 km2 of complete multibeam bathymetry coverage, ~435 line km of side scan sonar and CHIRP data, 204 line kilometers of magnetometer data, and 194 line kilometers of surface tow boomer profiles. Based on these data, this portion of the Yucatan Shelf consists of flat-lying, hard limestone rock overlain by isolated ribbons of carbonate sand <1.0 m thick. These ribbons are oriented along NE-SW trends and have smaller scale orthogonal sand-waves (~20-100 m wavelengths and relief of ~0.2-0.6 m) on them. The sand waves are anisotropic with steeper slopes facing the NE. The larger scale morphology can be classified as longitudinal bedforms (ribbons), and the smaller scale transverse bedforms formed in response to a NE-directed flow. This flow direction is inconsistent with the ambient west-directed current conditions, and may therefore be indicative of storm-driven currents. Numerous dissolution pits, ~5-50m in diameter, ~0.2-0.5 m deep with steep (0.1-0.5 gradient) walls, are present in the bare rock regions of most of the study area. These occasionally are floored by rippled, highly reflective (coarse) sediments. We interpret these pits as representing karstic morphology formed during the last sub-aerial exposure of the study area interpreted to have occurred during Holocene times given the present day ~17 m average water depth. A sub-surface reflector imaged on the surface tow boomer data lies 1-3 m below the hard seafloor reflection (sand ribbons are below the vertical resolution of the surface tow boomer), which we interpret as a layer within the limestone bedrock. This reflector is flat-lying and undisturbed throughout the

  11. Dissolution-precipitation processes governing the carbonation and silicification of the serpentinite sole of the New Caledonia ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Marc; Muñoz, Manuel; Guillot, Stéphane; Cathelineau, Michel; Picard, Christian; Quesnel, Benoit; Boulvais, Philippe; Couteau, Clément

    2014-01-01

    The weathering of mantle peridotite tectonically exposed to the atmosphere leads commonly to natural carbonation processes. Extensive cryptocrystalline magnesite veins and stock-work are widespread in the serpentinite sole of the New Caledonia ophiolite. Silica is systematically associated with magnesite. It is commonly admitted that Mg and Si are released during the laterization of overlying peridotites. Thus, the occurrence of these veins is generally attributed to a per descensum mechanism that involves the infiltration of meteoric waters enriched in dissolved atmospheric CO2. In this study, we investigate serpentinite carbonation processes, and related silicification, based on a detailed petrographic and crystal chemical study of serpentinites. The relationships between serpentine and alteration products are described using an original method for the analysis of micro-X-ray fluorescence images performed at the centimeter scale. Our investigations highlight a carbonation mechanism, together with precipitation of amorphous silica and sepiolite, based on a dissolution-precipitation process. In contrast with the per descensum Mg/Si-enrichment model that is mainly concentrated in rock fractures, dissolution-precipitation process is much more pervasive. Thus, although the texture of rocks remains relatively preserved, this process extends more widely into the rock and may represent a major part of total carbonation of the ophiolite.

  12. Dissolution-precipitation processes governing the carbonation and silicification of the serpentinite sole of the New Caledonia ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, M.; Munoz, M.; Guillot, S.; Cathelineau, M.; Picard, C.; Quesnel, B.; Boulvais, P.; Couteau, C.

    2014-12-01

    The weathering of mantle peridotite tectonically exposed to the atmosphere leads commonly to natural carbonation processes. Extensive cryptocrystalline magnesite veins and stock-work are widespread in the serpentinite sole of the New Caledonia ophiolite. Silica is systematically associated with magnesite. It is commonly admitted that Mg and Si are released during the laterization of overlying peridotites. Thus, the occurrence of these veins is generally attributed to a per descensum mechanism that involves the infiltration of meteoric waters enriched in dissolved atmospheric CO2. In this study, we investigate serpentinite carbonation processes, and related silicification, based on a detailed petrographic and crystal chemical study of serpentinites. The relationships between serpentine and alteration products are described using an original method for the analysis of micro-X-ray fluorescence images performed at the centimeter scale. Our investigations highlight a carbonation mechanism, together with precipitation of amorphous silica and sepiolite, based on a dissolution-precipitation process. In contrast with the per descensum Mg/Si-enrichment model that is mainly concentrated in rock fractures, dissolution-precipitation process is much more pervasive. Thus, although the texture of rocks remains relatively preserved, this process extends more widely into the rock and may represent a major part of total carbonation of the ophiolite.

  13. Influence of layering on the formation and growth of dissolution pipes in karst systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrus, Karine; Pecelerowicz, Michal; Szymczak, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    In karst systems, hydraulic conduits called dissolution pipes (a.k.a. wormholes) are formed as a result of the dissolution of limestone rocks by the water surcharged with CO2. The dissolution pipes are the end result of a positive feedback between spatial variations in porosity in the initial matrix and the local dissolution rate. A small enhancement in porosity at some point in the reaction front increases the fluid flow in that region, which convects reactant further downstream. By this means any local variation in porosity is amplified as the reaction front passes through and propagates downstream with the front, eventually developing into dissolution pipes. As dissolution proceeds the growing pipes interact, competing for the available flow, and eventually the growth of the shorter ones ceases. Here, we investigate numerically the effect of rock stratification on the dissolution pipe growth, using a simple model system with a number of horizontal bedding planes, which are less porous than the rest of the matrix. Stratification is shown to affect the resulting piping patterns in a variety of ways. First of all, it enhances the competition between the pipes, impeding the growth of the shorter ones and enhancing the flow in the longer ones, which therefore grow longer. Next, it affects the shapes of individual dissolution pipes, with characteristic widening of the profiles in between the layers and narrowing within the layers. These results are in qualitative agreement with the piping morphologies observed in nature. Importantly, measuring the ratio between the pipe diameters in different layers can provide one with information on the conditions prevailing during the formation of the pattern as well as on the physical characteristics of the layers in a given natural system. Additionally, we have investigated the model with layers of the same porosity but a smaller dissolution rate. Interestingly, in this case, the stratification is shown to weaken the competition

  14. New insight into Cm(III) interaction with kaolinite - Influence of mineral dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huittinen, N.; Rabung, Th.; Schnurr, A.; Hakanen, M.; Lehto, J.; Geckeis, H.

    2012-12-01

    Cm(III) speciation in natural kaolinite (St. Austell, UK) suspensions under alkaline conditions was studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The spectroscopic investigations were performed under argon atmosphere (O2 < 1 ppm) using a constant curium concentration, ionic strength and mineral content of 2 × 10-7 M, 1 mM NaClO4 and 0.25 g/L, respectively, throughout the study. The impact of kaolinite mineral dissolution on the speciation of the trivalent actinide was investigated in oversaturation experiments where excess amounts of aluminum and/or silicon were added to alkaline kaolinite suspensions. Only silicon addition was found to influence the curium ligand-field under the experimental conditions indicating the formation of a curium-silicate complex in the kaolinite environment. In experiments with 10-3 M added silicon but no solid phase for curium attachment only the hydrolysis species Cm(OH)2+ could be detected at pH 10. Thus, the formation of colloidal silicate species for the attachment of curium could be excluded and the observed species in alkaline kaolinite environments could be assigned to a ternary kaolinite/curium/silicate complex forming between adsorbed curium at the mineral surface and dissolved silicates in solution. A similar curium-silicate complex with identical spectroscopic features was also found in investigations with α-alumina as sorbent phase upon addition of silicon to the mineral suspensions, suggesting that silicon complexation with surface-bound curium is independent of the sorbent material.

  15. Influence of water on swelling and dissolution of cellulose in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Carina; Idström, Alexander; Nordstierna, Lars; Westman, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    In this study the effect of residual coagulation medium (water) on cellulose dissolution in an ionic liquid is discussed. Solubility of dissolving grade pulp; HWP and SWP, and microcrystalline cellulose in binary solvents, mixtures of 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate and water, was investigated by turbidity measurements, light microscopy, rheometry, and CP/MAS (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. The viscoelastic properties of the cellulose solutions imply that residual water affect the cellulose dissolution. However, it is not obvious that this always necessarily poses serious drawbacks for the solution properties or that the effects are as severe as previously believed. Turbidity measurements, viscosity data and crystallinity of the regenerated cellulose correlated well and an increased conversion to cellulose II was found at low water and cellulose contents with an apparent maximum of conversion at 2-5 wt% water. At high water content, above 10 wt%, dissolution and conversion was largely inhibited. PMID:24274528

  16. Influence of the precursor and the calcination temperature on the dissolution of thorium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, S.; Barthelet, K.; Fourest, B.; Lagarde, G.; Dacheux, N.; Baglan, N.

    2001-08-01

    The effect of the precursor and temperature of calcination on the dissolution of thorium dioxide was carried out. The dissolution of crystallized ThO 2 has been studied as a function of pH to evaluate the solubility product of a high temperature calcinated thorium oxide. However no equilibrium was reached after 4 months (at least in acidic media). Nevertheless, high temperature crystallized ThO 2 is less soluble by two orders of magnitude than the amorphous hydrated ThO 2. We have pointed out a correlation between the surface of the solid and its apparent leachability in acidic perchlorate solutions, resulting mainly in the thorium site concentration differences between the solids. The normalized dissolution rate of crystallized ThO 2 which was found to be 1-3×10 -6 g m-2 d-1 in 0.1 M acid solutions is independent of the way of synthesis of the solid.

  17. Determination of Critical Parameters of Drug Substance Influencing Dissolution: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Bojnanska, Erika; Kalina, Michal; Bartonickova, Eva; Opravil, Tomas; Vesely, Michal; Pekar, Miloslav

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to specify critical parameters (physicochemical characteristics) of drug substance that can affect dissolution profile/dissolution rate of the final drug product manufactured by validated procedure from various batches of the same drug substance received from different suppliers. The target was to design a sufficiently robust drug substance specification allowing to obtain a satisfactory drug product. For this reason, five batches of the drug substance and five samples of the final peroral drug products were analysed with the use of solid state analysis methods on the bulk level. Besides polymorphism, particle size distribution, surface area, zeta potential, and water content were identified as important parameters, and the zeta potential and the particle size distribution of the drug substance seem to be critical quality attributes affecting the dissolution rate of the drug substance released from the final peroral drug formulation. PMID:25317424

  18. Electrolytic recycling of a carbonate salt in a process with a dissolution of spent nuclear fuel in a strong alkaline carbonate media

    SciTech Connect

    Kwang-Wook Kim; In-Tae Kim; Seong-Min Kim; Yeon-Hwa Kim; Eil-Hee Lee; Kwang-Yong Jee

    2007-07-01

    A removal of only uranium from spent nuclear fuel with the concepts of a high proliferation-resistance and a minimal generation of waste is helpful for a spent fuel management in view of a volume reduction of the high level radioactive waste generated from the spent fuel treatment. That can be accomplished by a process using a selective oxidative dissolution of the spent fuel in a carbonate solution of high alkalinity. In this work, an electrolytic method for a de-carbonation and a recovery of CO{sub 2} for recycling the used carbonate solution contaminated with some impurity metal ions generated in such a process with a concept of zero-release of waste solution was studied. A carbonate solution generated from such a system was confirmed to be completely recycled within the system, while the impurity ions being separated from the carbonate solution. (authors)

  19. Influence of Non-homogeneous Particle Distributions on Drug Release in a Couette in vitro Dissolution Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Balaji; Brasseur, James; Wang, Yanxing

    2015-11-01

    Drug dissolution rates from powdered formulations are commonly measured in in vitro devices. Both measurements and models commonly assume perfect mixing of drug and particle within the device. In this study we analyze the potential importance of heterogeneity in particle concentration and distribution using CFD that incorporates physically accurate mathematical representations of hydrodynamic enhancement of mass transport from shear as applicable to drug dissolution in vivo as well as in vitro. We have developed a high-fidelity computational formulation using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) with the parallel particle tracking for a polydisperse collection transported by the flow. Drug release from the small (<100 μm) Lagrangian `point' particles is modeled using a mathematical framework that is built on a validated first principles `quasi-steady state' approximation with correlations for shear enhancement and integrated with the coarser Eulerian LBM flow field using a subgrid formulation Our Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation takes into account spatial variations in particle `bulk' concentration from polydisperse particle distributions with specified particle distribution heterogeneities. We shall discuss the primary influences of heterogeneous bulk concentrations surrounding individual particles and non-homogeneous particle distributions in an in vitro Couette flow device to quantify the relative influences of shear enhancement on drug dissolution in vivo vs. in vitro

  20. Influence of variable rates of neritic carbonate deposition on atmospheric carbon dioxide and pelagic sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C.; Opdyke, B. C.

    1995-01-01

    Short-term imbalances in the global cycle of shallow water calcium carbonate deposition and dissolution may be responsible for much of the observed Pleistocene change in atmospheric carbon dioxide content. However, any proposed changes in the alkalinity balance of the ocean must be reconciled with the sedimentary record of deep-sea carbonates. The possible magnitude of the effect of shallow water carbonate deposition on the dissolution of pelagic carbonate can be tested using numerical simulations of the global carbon cycle. Boundary conditions can be defined by using extant shallow water carbonate accumulation data and pelagic carbonate deposition/dissolution data. On timescales of thousands of years carbonate deposition versus dissolution is rarely out of equilibrium by more than 1.5 x 10(13) mole yr-1. Results indicate that the carbonate chemistry of the ocean is rarely at equilibrium on timescales less than 10 ka. This disequilibrium is probably due to sea level-induced changes in shallow water calcium carbonate deposition/dissolution, an interpretation that does not conflict with pelagic sedimentary data from the central Pacific.

  1. Influence of variable rates of neritic carbonate deposition on atmospheric carbon dioxide and pelagic sediments.

    PubMed

    Walker, J C; Opdyke, B C

    1995-06-01

    Short-term imbalances in the global cycle of shallow water calcium carbonate deposition and dissolution may be responsible for much of the observed Pleistocene change in atmospheric carbon dioxide content. However, any proposed changes in the alkalinity balance of the ocean must be reconciled with the sedimentary record of deep-sea carbonates. The possible magnitude of the effect of shallow water carbonate deposition on the dissolution of pelagic carbonate can be tested using numerical simulations of the global carbon cycle. Boundary conditions can be defined by using extant shallow water carbonate accumulation data and pelagic carbonate deposition/dissolution data. On timescales of thousands of years carbonate deposition versus dissolution is rarely out of equilibrium by more than 1.5 x 10(13) mole yr-1. Results indicate that the carbonate chemistry of the ocean is rarely at equilibrium on timescales less than 10 ka. This disequilibrium is probably due to sea level-induced changes in shallow water calcium carbonate deposition/dissolution, an interpretation that does not conflict with pelagic sedimentary data from the central Pacific. PMID:11540240

  2. Precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate: key processes bridging the bio- and geosciences (Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattuso, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    In this Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky medal lecture, I will focus on the biogeochemical cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) which is arguably one of the best example of a set processes that bridge the bio- and geosciences. The main reactions involved are calcification and dissolution that, respectively, manufacture and destroy calcium carbonate. Biology is intimately involved in these two processes which are key controls of the Earth's climate and leave remains that are of great use to human societies (as building materials) and geoscientists. I will illustrate the bridge between the bio- and geosciences by providing brief examples for each of the following four issues. (1) The marine cycle of CaCO3 and its relationship with climate. The release of CO2 by the precipitation of calcium carbonate and the uptake of CO2 by its dissolution are important controls of atmospheric CO2 and climate. The vertical distribution of Ψ, the ratio of CO2 released/used per CaCO3 precipitated/dissolved in the ocean will be shown to be consistent with the Högbom-Urey reactions. (2) The use of CaCO3 in paleooceanography. The remains of calcium carbonate shells and skeletons are wonderful archives of past environmental changes. Their isotopic composition and the concen-tration of trace elements are invaluable in the reconstruction of past climate. I will address the challenge of calibrating one of the proxies used to reconstruct past ocean pH. (3) The challenge of understanding calcification. Despite having been investigated for decades, many aspects of the physiological and molecular processes involved in calcification by marine organisms remain obscure. Recent breakthroughs, mostly on reef-building corals, will be briefly reviewed. (4) The response of calcification and dissolution to environmental change. The critical importance of CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution as climate controls makes it vital to understand their response to global environmental changes such as ocean warming and

  3. Karst Lands: The dissolution of carbonate rock produces unique landscapes and poses significant hydrological and environmental concerns

    SciTech Connect

    White, W.B.; Culver, D.C.; Herman, J.S.

    1995-09-01

    Karst lands are produced by the action of water on soluble rocks, a process among the most dynamic of all erosive forces that counterbalance the uplifting forces of tectonics. The dissolution of carbonate rock, primarily limestone and dolomite, produces unique landscapes and poses significant hydrological and environmental concerns. The major topic areas discussed in this article include the following: processes that form karst; karst drainage basins; discharge from karst aquifers; caves as paleoclimatic recorders; caves as ecosystems; water issues in karst regions; and sinkholes, soil piping and subsidence. 20 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Single-walled carbon nanotube transparent conductive films fabricated by reductive dissolution and spray coating for organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Ostfeld, Aminy E.; Arias, Ana Claudia; Catheline, Amélie; Ligsay, Kathleen; Kim, Kee-Chan; Fogden, Siân; Chen, Zhihua; Facchetti, Antonio

    2014-12-22

    Solutions of unbundled and unbroken single-walled carbon nanotubes have been prepared using a reductive dissolution process. Transparent conductive films spray-coated from these solutions show a nearly twofold improvement in the ratio of electrical conductivity to optical absorptivity versus those deposited from conventional aqueous dispersions, due to substantial de-aggregation and sizable nanotube lengths. These transparent electrodes have been utilized to fabricate P3HT-PCBM organic solar cells achieving power conversion efficiencies up to 2.3%, comparable to those of solar cells using indium tin oxide transparent electrodes.

  5. A silica-supported solid dispersion of bifendate using supercritical carbon dioxide method with enhanced dissolution rate and oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Cai, Cuifang; Liu, Muhua; Li, Yun; Guo, Bei; Chang, Hui; Zhang, Xiangrong; Yang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Tianhong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to enhance the dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of bifendate, a silica-supported solid dispersion (SD) of bifendate was prepared using supercritical carbon dioxide (ScCO2) technology. The properties of bifendate-silica SD were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (X-RD) and scanning electron microscopy. The pharmacokinetic study was carried out in beagle dogs using commercial bifendate dropping pills as a reference which is a conventional SD formulation of bifendate and PEG6000. A novel method of Ultra Performance Convergence Chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPC(2)™-MS/MS) method was applied to determine bifendate concentration in plasma. The amorphous state of bifendate in bifendate-silica SD was revealed in X-RD and DSC when the ratios of bifendate and silica were 1:15 and 1:19, respectively. In vitro dissolution rate was significantly improved with cumulative release of 67% within 20 min relative to 8% for the physical mixture of bifendate and silica, and which was also higher than the commercial dropping pill of 52%. After storage at 75% relative humidity (RH) for 10 d, no recrystallization was found and reduced dissolution rate was obtained due to the absorption of moisture. In pharmacokinetic study, Cmax and AUC0-t for bifendate-silica SD were 153.1 ng/ml and 979.8 ng h/ml, respectively. AUC0-t of bifendate-silica SDs was ∼1.6-fold higher than that of the commercial dropping pills. These results suggest that adsorbing bifendate onto porous silica via ScCO2 technique could be a feasible method to enhance oral bioavailability together with a higher dissolution rate. PMID:26219343

  6. Experimental study of the influence of chemical reactions on convective dissolution of CO2 in aqueous solutions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Carelle; Lemaigre, Lorena; Haudin, Florence; Zalts, Anita; D'Onofrio, Alejandro; De Wit, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Within the global context of climate change, carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration into deep saline aquifers is one of the technologies being considered in order to tackle the accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere. Upon injection of CO2 into these porous geological formations, the less dense CO2 rises above the aqueous phase, spreads laterally under the upper impermeable cap rock and starts to dissolve into the underlying brine. This leads to a buoyantly unstable stratification of denser CO2-enriched brine on top of less dense brine, which can give rise to density-driven convective fingering in the fluid. This hydrodynamic instability is a favorable process for CO2 sequestration as it accelerates the mixing of CO2 into the aqueous phase and therefore enhances the safety of the storage in the saline aquifer (by reducing the risks of leaks of CO2 to the atmosphere). The influence of chemical reactions and of the physico-chemical characteristics of the geological reservoir on the development of this instability is, however, still not completely understood. In this context, we study experimentally in a laboratory-scale reactor the influence of chemical reactions on convective fingering occurring during dissolution of CO2 in reactive aqueous solutions. Experiments are performed in Hele-Shaw cells (constructed of two vertical transparent plates separated by a thin gap) in which gaseous CO2 at atmospheric pressure flows above aqueous solutions containing chemical reactants. Dynamics occurring within the transparent fluids are visualized by Schlieren techniques, which track dynamical changes in refractive index related to density gradients in the solutions. We show that in some cases the convection can be enhanced by chemical reactions as they accelerate the development of the fingers, shorten their onset time and increase the number of fingers. In particular, we show that the presence of a color indicator (for instance bromocresol green) in the aqueous solution

  7. The dissolution of calcite in aqueous acid: The influence of humic species

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, R.G.; Sanders, G.H.W. )

    1993-07-01

    The kinetics of proton-induced calcite dissolution in aqueous solution in the presence of humic acids and their sodium salts are reported. In equilibrated acid solutions (pH <4) there is no inhibition by humic material and dissolution proceeds at a rate simply determined by the solution pH. Contrastingly the sodium salts of humic acids were found to have a significant inhibitory effect on the acid catalyzed dissolution. This was quantified using a novel channel flow cell experiment which employed two electrodes, the upstream of which was used to inject protons into a neutral solution, which also contained sodium salts of humic acid, via electrolytic oxidation of dissolved hydroquinone. The two electrodes were located immediately upstream and downstream of a calcite crystal so that the proton injection served to dissolve the calcite in the (inhibiting) presence of humic salts unequilibrated with the solution pH. The amount of H[sup +] which survived passage to the downstream detector'' electrode was used to quantify the rate of dissolution and hence the inhibitory effects of the humic acid. The latter were found to operate in a manner not inconsistent with Langmuirian adsorption.

  8. Dynamics of carbonate chemistry, production, and calcification of the Florida Reef Tract (2009-2010): Evidence for seasonal dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehllehner, Nancy; Langdon, Chris; Venti, Alyson; Kadko, David

    2016-05-01

    Ocean acidification is projected to lower the Ωar of reefal waters by 0.3-0.4 units by the end of century, making it more difficult for calcifying organisms to secrete calcium carbonate while at the same time making the environment more favorable for abiotic and biotic dissolution of the reefal framework. There is great interest in being able to project the point in time when coral reefs will cross the tipping point between being net depositional to net erosional in terms of their carbonate budgets. Periodic in situ assessments of the balance between carbonate production and dissolution that spans seasonal time scales may prove useful in monitoring and formulating projections of the impact of ocean acidification on reefal carbonate production. This study represents the first broad-scale geochemical survey of the rates of net community production (NCP) and net community calcification (NCC) across the Florida Reef Tract (FRT). Surveys were performed at approximately quarterly intervals in 2009-2010 across seven onshore-offshore transects spanning the upper, middle, and lower Florida Keys. Averaged across the FRT, the rates of NCP and NCC were positive during the spring/summer at 62 ± 7 and 17 ± 2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively, and negative during the fall/winter at -33 ± 6 and -7 ± 2 mmol m-2 d-1. The most significant finding of the study was that the northernmost reef is already net erosional (-1.1 ± 0.4 kg CaCO3 m-2 yr-1) and midreefs to the south were net depositional on an annual basis (0.4 ± 0.1 kg CaCO3 m-2 yr-1) but erosional during the fall and winter. Only the two southernmost reefs were net depositional year-round. These results indicate that parts of the FRT have already crossed the tipping point for carbonate production and other parts are getting close.

  9. Influence of the pH on the dissolution of TPD and associated solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robisson, A. C.; Dacheux, N.; Aupiais, J.

    2002-12-01

    The dissolution of thorium phosphate diphosphate (TPD) doped or not with trivalent actinides and that of associated solid solutions with tetravalent plutonium was studied from a kinetic point of view as a function of the acidity or the basicity of the leachate. From the evolution of the normalized mass losses, the dissolution rates were determined. For all the solids considered, the values were found between 1.2×10 -5 and 4.4×10 -9 g m -2 d -1 which confirms the very good durability of TPD to aqueous corrosion. The expression of the dissolution rate was given in acidic and in basic media (10 -1-10 -4 M HNO 3 or HClO 4 and 10 -1-10 -4 M NaOH). The partial orders related to the proton and hydroxide ion concentrations were found to be equal to n=0.31-0.40 and to m=0.37, respectively. The associated dissolution rate constant at pH=0 and pH=14 were found to k 298 K,0.1 M'=1.2×10 -5 to 2.4×10 -5 g m -2 d -1 and to k 298 K,0.1 M″, (7.8±1.9)×10 -5 g m -2 d -1, respectively. In these conditions, the dissolution rate value extrapolated in neutral medium was evaluated to 2.4×10 -7 to 3.6×10 -7 g m -2 d -1 at room temperature and to 5.0×10 -6 to 7.5×10 -6 g m -2 d -1 at 90 °C which remains very low by comparison to the other ceramics studied for the same applications.

  10. Characterization of carbonate reservoir property changes due to dissolution for far-field conditions of CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangane, P. O.; Gouze, P.; Luquot, L.

    2012-12-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in reservoir pore fluid (e.g. deep saline aquifers), is one of the diverse technologies being explored for deacreasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. After injecting the CO2 as a supercritical fluid at depth, it will slowly dissolve into the pore water producing low pH fluids with a high capacity for dissolving carbonates and consequently changing irreversibly the hydrodynamical properties of the reservoir. Characterizing these changes is essential for modelling flow and CO2 transport during and after the CO2 injection. Here we report experimental results from the injection of the CO2-saturated brine into two distinct limestone cores (a bioclastic carbonate and an oolitic carbonate) of 9 mm diameter, 18 mm length. 3D high-resolution X-ray microtomography (XRMT) of the rock sample have been performed before and after the experiments. The experiments were performed using in-situ sequestration conditions (P = 12MPa and T = 100°C), and notably, under chemical conditions given at the position far away from the well injection site (i.e area where the volume of dissolved CO2 into the brine is low, due to CO2 consumption by the dissolution processes occured during its transport from the well injection site). Permeability k is calculated from the pressure drop across the sample and porosity Φ is deduced from chemical concentration of the outlet fluid. The change of the pore structure is analysed in terms of connectivity, tortuosity and fluid-rock interface from processing the XRMT images. These experiments show that far from the well injection site, dissolution processes are characterized by slow mass tranfer including, in the case of carbonate rock, transport of fine particles, which locally clog the porous space. Then, that leads to the damage of the carbonate reservoir both in terms of connectivity of the porous space and CO2 hydrodynamical storage capacity. In fact, the results of the two experiments show that the porosity decreased locally

  11. Carbonate dissolution and transport in H2O fluids during subduction revealed by diamond-bearing rocks from the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, M.; Selverstone, J.; Sharp, Z. D.; Compagnoni, R.

    2011-12-01

    Here we discuss the fate of subducted carbonates and its implications for recycling of crustal carbon. Thermodynamic models predict little decarbonation along most subduction geotherms, and the mechanisms by which carbon is transferred from the subducting slab to the overlying mantle remain poorly constrained. Diamond-bearing fluid inclusions in garnet in oceanic metasedimentary rocks from Lago di Cignana (western Alps) represent the first occurrence of diamond from a low-temperature subduction complex of clearly oceanic origin (T ≤600°C; P ≥3.5 GPa). The presence of diamonds in and associated with fluid inclusions provides clear evidence of carbon transport by fluids at depths that are directly relevant to slab-mantle fluid transfer during subduction. At room temperature, the fluid inclusions contain aqueous fluid, a vapor bubble, and multiple solid daughter crystals. Daughter crystals identified by Raman spectroscopy and microprobe analysis include ubiquitous Mg-calcite/calcite and rutile, and less common diamond, quartz, paragonite, dawsonite, rhodochrosite, dypingite, and pentahydrite. Molecular CO2 is absent or in trace amounts. The aqueous liquid phase contains ≥0.2 wt%, HCO3-, CO32-, and SO42- ions. In Raman spectra, broad peaks at 773 and 1017 cm-1 point to the presence of both Si(OH)4(aq) and deprotonated monomers (e.g., SiO(OH)3-(aq), and SiO2(OH)22-(aq)), indicative of alkaline solutions. The absence of CO2 in the vapor, and the presence of carbonate daughter minerals, CO32-(aq), and HCO3-(aq) also show that the trapped fluids are alkaline at ambient conditions. High activities of aqueous carbon species reveal that carbonate dissolution is an important mechanism for mobilizing slab carbon at sub-arc depths (100-200 km) during oceanic subduction. Our results imply that the magnitude of carbon release and transport from the slab at sub-arc depths is greater than experimentally predicted on the basis of decarbonation reactions alone.

  12. Prediction and inhibition of molten carbonate fuel cell shorting by NiO cathode dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takashi; Nirasawa, Hitoshi; Murata, Kenji

    1995-12-31

    A model of time until shorting begins due to NiO dissolution/precipitation in MCFC was developed on the assumption that electronic conduction in the cell would happen when the concentration of dispersed nickel particles exceeded a critical value at the anode/electrolyte interface. The equation for the estimation of time-to-short-beginning (TTS) was derived as: TTS{sup 0.5}/t = A + B/K{sub Ni} pCO{sub 2} (t: matrix thickness, K{sub Ni}: NiO solubility at pCO{sub 2} = 1 atm., and A, B: constant). Life tests under different conditions on several single cells proved the usability of this equation. For the purpose of retarding MCFC shorting, a cell with a low rate of NiO dissolution, with a LiFeO{sub 2} layer, an out-of-cell oxidized NiO cathode, and a Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} eutectic electrolyte was made. The life test results showed that the nickel dissolution rate in the cell was less than 1/5 slower than that in the ordinary cells with an in situ oxidized NiO cathode and high Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} eutectic electrolyte.

  13. Influence of coating material on the flowability and dissolution of dry-coated fine ibuprofen powders.

    PubMed

    Qu, Li; Zhou, Qi Tony; Denman, John A; Stewart, Peter J; Hapgood, Karen P; Morton, David A V

    2015-10-12

    This study investigates the effects of a variety of coating materials on the flowability and dissolution of dry-coated cohesive ibuprofen powders, with the ultimate aim to use these in oral dosage forms. A mechanofusion approach was employed to apply a 1% (w/w) dry coating onto ibuprofen powder with coating materials including magnesium stearate (MgSt), L-leucine, sodium stearyl fumarate (SSF) and silica-R972. No significant difference in particle size or shape was measured following mechanofusion with any material. Powder flow behaviours characterised by the Freeman FT4 system indicated coatings of MgSt, L-leucine and silica-R972 produced a notable surface modification and substantially improved flow compared to the unprocessed and SSF-mechanofused powders. ToF-SIMS provided a qualitative measure of coating extent, and indicated a near-complete layer on the drug particle surface after dry coating with MgSt or silica-R972. Of particular note, the dissolution rates of all mechanofused powders were enhanced even with a coating of a highly hydrophobic material such as magnesium stearate. This surprising increase in dissolution rate of the mechanofused powders was attributed to the lower cohesion and the reduced agglomeration after mechanical coating. PMID:26215464

  14. Influence of Permian salt dissolution on distribution of shallow Niobrara gas fields, eastern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, D.W.; Smosna, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    Subsurface analysis of Permian salt and related strata in the shallow Niobrara gas area on the eastern flank of the Denver basin reveals that the location of faulted anticlines which produce gas from porous chalk is related to the occurrence of six Nippewalla Group (Leonardian) salt zones. Salt distribution is controlled by the configuration of evaporate basins during the Leonardian, truncation at a sub-Jurassic unconformity (which has completely removed Guadalupian salts), and post-Jurassic subsurface dissolution. Significant dissolution took place in response to Laramide orogeny and subsequent eastward regional groundwater flow within the Lyons (Cedar Hills) Sandstone aquifer. Initially, dissolution occurred along a regional facies change from sandstone to salt. Solution collapse allowed for cross-formational flow and removal of younger salts. Shallow Niobrara gas fields are situated above salt outliers or along regionally updip salt edges. No significant Niobrara production exists in areas where salt is absent. Structural relief across fields is related to Leonardian thickness variations, rather than subsalt offset. Seismic data reveal abrupt Leonardian thinning at the regionally updip limit of Eckley field, which has produced over 33 BCFG. Thickness of residual salt may be important in controlling the amount of gas trapped within the Niobrara. Where thick salts are preserved, structural relief is greater, the gas-water transition zone is thicker, and gas saturation is higher at the crests of faulted anticlines.

  15. A porous silica rock ("tripoli") in the footwall of the Jurassic Úrkút manganese deposit, Hungary: composition, and origin through carbonate dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Polgari, Marta; Szabo, Zoltan; Szabo-Drubina, Magda; Hein, James R.; Yeh, Hsueh-Wen

    2005-01-01

    The mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic compositions were determined for a white tripoli from the footwall of the Jurassic Úrkút Mn-oxide ore deposit in the Bakony Mountains, Hungary. The tripoli consists of quartz and chalcedony, with SiO2 contents up to 100 wt.%; consequently, trace-element contents are very low. Oxygen isotopes and quartz crystallinity indicate a low-temperature diagenetic origin for this deposit. The tripoli was formed by dissolution of the carbonate portion of the siliceous (sponge spicules) Isztimér Limestone. Dissolution of the carbonate was promoted by inorganic and organic acids generated during diagensis and left a framework composed of diagenetic silica that preserved the original volume of the limestone layer. The relative enrichment of silica and high porosity is the result of that carbonate dissolution. The silty texture of this highly friable rock is due to the structurally weak silica framework.

  16. Effects of acid deposition on dissolution of carbonate stone during summer storms in the Adirondack Mountains, New York, 1987-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Paul F.; Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, S.I.

    1994-01-01

    This study is part of a long-term research program designed to identify and quantify acid rain damage to carbonate stone. Acidic deposition accelerates the dissolution of carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. Sequential sampling of runoff from carbonate-stone (marble) and glass (reference) microcatchments in the Adirondack Mountains in New York State provided a detailed record of the episodic fluctuations in rain rate and runoff chemistry during individual summer storms. Rain rate and chemical concentrations from carbonate-stone and glass runoff fluctuated three to tenfold during storms. Net calcium-ion concentrations from the carbonatestone runoff, a measure of stone dissolution, typically fluctuated twofold during these storms. High net sulfate and net calcium concentrations in the first effective runoff at the start of a storm indicated that atmospheric pollutants deposited on the stone surface during dry periods formed calcium sulfate minerals, an important process in carbonate stone dissolution. Dissolution of the carbonate stone generally increased up to twofold during coincident episodes of low rain rate (less than 5 millimeters per hour) and decreased rainfall (glass runoff) pH (less than 4.0); episodes of high rain rate (cloudbursts) were coincident with a rapid increase in rainfall pH and also a rapid decrease in the dissolution of carbonate-stone. During a storm, it seems the most important factors causing increased dissolution of carbonate stone are coincident periods of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. Dissolution of the carbonate stone decreased slightly as the rain rate exceeded about 5 millimeters per hour, probably in response to rapidly increasing rainfall pH during episodes of high rain rate and shorter contact time between the runoff and the stone surface. High runoff rates resulting from cloudbursts remove calcium sulfate minerals formed during dry periods prior to storms and also remove dissolution products formed in large

  17. The dissolution of synthetic Na-boltwoodite in sodium carbonate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Liu, Chongxuan; Yantasee, Wassana; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Zachara, John M.

    2006-10-01

    Uranyl silicates such as uranophane and Na-boltwoodite appear to control the solubility of uranium in certain contaminated sediments at the US Department of Energy Hanford site [Liu, C., Zachara, J.M., Qafoku, O., McKinley, J.P., Heald, S.M., Wang, Z. 2004. Dissolution of uranyl microprecipitates in subsurface sediments at Hanford Site, USA. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta68, 4519-4537.]. Consequently, the solubility of synthetic Na-boltwoodite, Na(UO 2)(SiO 3OH) · 1.5H 2O, was determined over a wide range of bicarbonate concentrations, from circumneutral to alkaline pH, that are representative of porewater and groundwater compositions at the Hanford site and calcareous environments generally. Experiments were open to air. Results show that Na-boltwoodite dissolution was nearly congruent and its solubility and dissolution kinetics increased with increasing bicarbonate concentration and pH. A consistent set of solubility constants were determined from circumneutral pH (0 added bicarbonate) to alkaline pH (50 mM added bicarbonate). Average logKspo=5.86±0.24 or 5.85 ± 0.0.26; using the Pitzer ion-interaction model or Davies equation, respectively. These values are close to the one determined by [Nguyen, S.N., Silva, R.J., Weed, H.C., Andrews, Jr., J.E., 1992. Standard Gibbs free energies of formation at the temperature 303.15 K of four uranyl silicates: soddyite, uranophane, sodium boltwoodite, and sodium weeksite. J. Chem. Thermodynamics24, 359-376.] under very different conditions (pH 4.5, Ar atmosphere).

  18. Carbide Formation and Dissolution in Biomedical Co-Cr-Mo Alloys with Different Carbon Contents during Solution Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineta, Shingo; Namba, Shigenobu; Yoneda, Takashi; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki

    2010-08-01

    The microstructures of as-cast and heat-treated biomedical Co-Cr-Mo (ASTM F75) alloys with four different carbon contents were investigated. The as-cast alloys were solution treated at 1473 to 1548 K for 0 to 43.2 ks. The precipitates in the matrix were electrolytically extracted from the as-cast and heat-treated alloys. An M23C6 type carbide and an intermetallic σ phase (Co(Cr,Mo)) were detected as precipitates in the as-cast Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.12C alloy; an M23C6 type carbide, a σ phase, an η phase (M6C-M12C type carbide), and a π phase (M2T3X type carbide with a β-manganese structure) were detected in the as-cast Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.15C alloy; and an M23C6 type carbide and an η phase were detected in the as-cast Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.25C and Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.35C alloys. After solution treatment, complete precipitate dissolution occurred in all four alloys. Under incomplete precipitate dissolution conditions, the phase and shape of precipitates depended on the heat-treatment conditions and the carbon content in the alloys. The π phase was detected in the alloys with carbon contents of 0.15, 0.25, and 0.35 mass pct after heat treatment at high temperature such as 1548 K for a short holding time of less than 1.8 ks. The presence of the π phase in the Co-Cr-Mo alloys has been revealed in this study for the first time.

  19. Oxidative dissolution of unirradiated Mimas MOX fuel (U/Pu oxides) in carbonated water under oxic and anoxic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odorowski, Mélina; Jégou, Christophe; De Windt, Laurent; Broudic, Véronique; Peuget, Sylvain; Magnin, Magali; Tribet, Magaly; Martin, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    Few studies exist concerning the alteration of Mimas Mixed-OXide (MOX) fuel, a mixed plutonium and uranium oxide, and data is needed to better understand its behavior under leaching, especially for radioactive waste disposal. In this study, two leaching experiments were conducted on unirradiated MOX fuel with a strong alpha activity (1.3 × 109 Bq.gMOX-1 reproducing the alpha activity of spent MOX fuel with a burnup of 47 GWd·tHM-1 after 60 years of decay), one under air (oxic conditions) for 5 months and the other under argon (anoxic conditions with [O2] < 1 ppm) for one year in carbonated water (10-2 mol L-1). For each experiment, solution samples were taken over time and Eh and pH were monitored. The uranium in solution was assayed using a kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (KPA), plutonium and americium were analyzed by a radiochemical route, and H2O2 generated by the water radiolysis was quantified by chemiluminescence. Surface characterizations were performed before and after leaching using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Probe Microanalyzer (EPMA) and Raman spectroscopy. Solubility diagrams were calculated to support data discussion. The uranium releases from MOX pellets under both oxic and anoxic conditions were similar, demonstrating the predominant effect of alpha radiolysis on the oxidative dissolution of the pellets. The uranium released was found to be mostly in solution as carbonate species according to modeling, whereas the Am and Pu released were significantly sorbed or precipitated onto the TiO2 reactor. An intermediate fraction of Am (12%) was also present as colloids. SEM and EPMA results indicated a preferential dissolution of the UO2 matrix compared to the Pu-enriched agglomerates, and Raman spectroscopy showed the Pu-enriched agglomerates were slightly oxidized during leaching. Unlike Pu-enriched zones, the UO2 grains were much more sensitive to oxidative dissolution, but the presence of carbonates did not enable observation of an

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its δ13C in the Ganga (Hooghly) River estuary, India: Evidence of DIC generation via organic carbon degradation and carbonate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Saumik; Dalai, Tarun K.; Pattanaik, Jitendra K.; Rai, Santosh K.; Mazumdar, Aninda

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we present comprehensive data on dissolved Ca, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its carbon isotope composition (δ13CDIC) of (i) the Ganga (Hooghly) River estuary water sampled during six seasons of contrasting water discharge over 2 years (2012 and 2013), (ii) shallow groundwater from areas adjacent to the estuary and (iii) industrial effluent water and urban wastewater draining into the estuary. Mass balance calculations indicate that processes other than the conservative mixing of seawater and river water are needed to explain the measured DIC and δ13CDIC. Results of mixing calculations in conjunction with the estimated undersaturated levels of dissolved O2 suggest that biological respiration and organic carbon degradation dominate over biological production in the estuary. An important outcome of this study is that a significant amount of DIC and dissolved Ca is produced within the estuary at salinity ⩾10, particularly during the monsoon period. Based on consideration of mass balance and a strong positive correlation observed between the "excess" DIC and "excess" Ca, we contend that the dominant source of DIC generated within the estuary is carbonate dissolution that is inferred to be operating in conjunction with degradation of organic carbon. Calculations show that groundwater cannot account for the observed "excess" Ca in the high salinity zone. Estimated DIC contributions from anthropogenic activity are minor, and they constitute ca. 2-3% of the river water DIC concentrations. The estimated annual DIC flux from the estuary to the Bay of Bengal is ca. (3-4) × 1012 g, of which ca. 40-50% is generated within the estuary. The monsoon periods account for the majority (ca. 70%) of the annual DIC generation in the estuary. The annual DIC flux from the Hooghly estuary accounts for ca. 1% of the global river DIC flux to the oceans. This is disproportionately higher than the water contribution from the Hooghly River to the oceans, which

  1. The influence of amorphization methods on the apparent solubility and dissolution rate of tadalafil.

    PubMed

    Wlodarski, K; Sawicki, W; Paluch, K J; Tajber, L; Grembecka, M; Hawelek, L; Wojnarowska, Z; Grzybowska, K; Talik, E; Paluch, M

    2014-10-01

    This study for the first time investigates the solubility and dissolution rate of amorphous tadalafil (Td)--a poorly water soluble chemical compound which is commonly used for treating the erectile dysfunction. To convert the crystalline form of Td drug to its amorphous counterpart we have employed most of the commercially available amorphization techniques i.e. vitrification, cryogenic grinding, ball milling, spray drying, freeze drying and antisolvent precipitation. Among the mentioned methods only quenched cooling of the molten sample was found to be an inappropriate method of Td amorphization. This is due to the thermal decomposition of Td above 200°C, as proved by the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Disordered character of all examined samples was confirmed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction (PXRD). In the case of most amorphous powders, the largest 3-fold increase of apparent solubility was observed after 5 min, indicating their fast recrystallization in water. On the other hand, the partially amorphous precipitate of Td and hypromellose enhanced the solubility of Td approximately 14 times, as compared with a crystalline substance, which remained constant for half an hour. Finally, disk intrinsic dissolution rate (DIDR) of amorphous forms of Td was also examined. PMID:24907679

  2. Size and composition of synthetic calcium sulfate beads influence dissolution and elution rates in vitro.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Randy; McConoughey, Stephen J; Calhoun, Jason H

    2014-05-01

    Treatments of osteomyelitis lag behind bacterial resistance to antibiotics. We tested different-sized calcium sulfate beads and their ability to elute multiple antibiotics in vitro as a possible method to improve the therapeutic delivery in patients. Two sizes of calcium sulfate beads (4.8 and 3.0 mm diameter) that contained vancomycin, tobramycin, or both were dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline, and the rate of dissolution by weight and antibiotic elution by the disc diffusion assay and high-pressure liquid chromatography were measured. The 4.8 mm beads showed significantly higher dissolution rates relative to the 3.0 mm beads (2.3 mg/day vs. 1.3 mg/day). While the vancomycin-loaded 4.8 mm beads eluted for a longer time relative to the 3.0 mm beads (20 days vs. 10 days), the smaller beads had threefold higher elution for the first 2 days, before dropping to near zero elution by day 4. The presence of tobramycin extended the elution of the vancomycin to day 40, which closely matches the recommended 6 weeks to treat orthopedic staphylococcus infections. These data suggest that size and content of the bead are variables that could affect their clinical success, and both could be exploited to tailor treatments of specific infections and injuries. PMID:24155136

  3. Constraints on the magnitude and rate of carbon dioxide dissolution at Bravo Dome natural gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Hesse, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Bravo Dome field in northeastern New Mexico contains at least 10 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of magmatic CO2. The CO2 has been emplaced in the reservoir for at least 10,000 years, providing a useful analog for geologic CO2 storage. The reservoir is comprised of a CO2 gas layer overlying brine water in a sandstone reservoir. Previous estimates have used differences in the CO2/3He ratio in the gas to infer that locally, half of the CO2 originally emplaced has dissolved into the underlying brine. This study presents the first estimate of the total amount of CO2 dissolved. We incorporate gas pressure, reservoir geometry, and gas layer thickness to show that over 80% of the CO2 originally emplaced is still present in the gas layer. It is generally assumed that the dissolution of CO2 is driven by convective currents in the brine. We present an alternative hypothesis for the spatial differences of the CO2/3He ratio seen in this reservoir. Gas injection theory predicts that as gas displaces a liquid, relatively insoluble gas components will become enriched at the front of the displacement. If the emplacement occurred from west to east this would cause 3He enrichment in the eastern portion of the Bravo Dome field overlying the brine. This effect could be responsible for the spatial differences in the CO2/3He ratio. Mass per area in the gas layer of the reservoir is seen in the 2 right panes. The measured bottom hole pressure data from 1981 is used in combination with CO2/3He measurements to estimate the mass of CO2 originally in place. The water thickness is inversely correlated with the CO2/3He ratio, suggesting that there may be convective dissolution occurring in the eastern part of the reservoir. Present day mass of CO2 is roughly 83% of the original total.

  4. Bovine Serum Albumin binding to CoCrMo nanoparticles and the influence on dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoes, T. A.; Brown, A. P.; Milne, S. J.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2015-10-01

    CoCrMo alloys exhibit good mechanical properties, excellent biocompatibility and are widely utilised in orthopaedic joint replacements. Metal-on-metal hip implant degradation leads to the release of metal ions and nanoparticles, which persist through the implant's life and could be a possible cause of health complications. This study correlates preferential binding between proteins and metal alloy nanoparticles to the alloy's corrosion behaviour and the release of metal ions. TEM images show the formation of a protein corona in all particles immersed in albumin containing solutions. Only molybdenum release was significant in these tests, suggesting high dissolution of this element when CoCrMo alloy nanoparticles are produced as wear debris in the presence of serum albumin. The same trend was observed during extended exposure of molybdenum reference nanoparticles to albumin.

  5. Arsenic incorporation into FeS 2 pyrite and its influence on dissolution: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Marc; Alfredsson, Maria; Brodholt, John; Wright, Kate; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    2007-02-01

    FeS 2 pyrite can incorporate large amounts of arsenic (up to ca. 10 wt%) and hence has a strong impact on the mobility of this toxic metalloid. Focussing on the lowest arsenic concentrations for which the incorporation occurs in solid solution, the substitution mechanisms involved have been investigated by assuming simple incorporation reactions in both oxidising and reducing conditions. The solution energies were calculated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and we predict that the formation of AsS dianion groups is the most energetically favourable mechanism. The results also suggest that the presence of arsenic will accelerate the dissolution and thus the generation of acid drainage, when the crystal dissolves in oxidising conditions.

  6. The influence of surface state and saturation state on the dissolution kinetics of biogenic aragonite in seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Acker, James G.; Byrne, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    Uses several realistic partial molar volume changes (??V) for aragonite dissolution in seawater. Indicates that the molar volume change for aragonite dissolution is within the bounds -37 cm 3/mole ?????V ??? -39.5 cm3/mole. -from Authors

  7. Facilitating Conceptual Understanding of Gas-Liquid Mass Transfer Coefficient through a Simple Experiment Involving Dissolution of Carbon Dioxide in Water in a Surface Aeration Reactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utgikar, Vivek P.; MacPherson, David

    2016-01-01

    Students in the undergraduate "transport phenomena" courses typically have a greater difficulty in understanding the theoretical concepts underlying the mass transport phenomena as compared to the concepts of momentum and energy transport. An experiment based on dissolution of carbon dioxide in water was added to the course syllabus to…

  8. Evaluation of Influence of Various Polymers on Dissolution and Phase Behavior of Carbamazepine-Succinic Acid Cocrystal in Matrix Tablets.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Majeed; Ullah, Hanif; Murtaza, Ghulam; Mahmood, Qaisar; Hussain, Izhar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of current study was to explore the influence of three commonly used polymers, that is, cellulosics and noncellulosics, for example, Methocel K4M, Kollidon VA/64, and Soluplus, on the phase disproportionation and drug release profile of carbamazepine-succinic acid (CBZ-SUC) cocrystal at varying drug to polymer ratios (1 : 1 to 1 : 0.25) in matrix tablets. The polymorphic phase disproportionation during in-depth dissolution studies of CBZ-SUC cocrystals and its crystalline properties were scrutinized by X-ray powder diffractrometry and Raman spectroscopy. The percent drug release from HPMC formulations (CSH) showed inverse relation with the concentration of polymer; that is, drug release increased with decrease in polymer concentration. On contrary, direct relation was observed between percent drug release and polymer concentrations of Kollidon VA 64/Soluplus (CSK, CSS). At similar polymer concentration, drug release from pure carbamazepine was slightly lower with HPMC formulations than that of cocrystal; however, opposite trend in release rate was observed with Kollidon VA/64 and Soluplus. The significant increase in dissolution rate of cocrystal occurred with Kollidon VA/64 and Soluplus at higher polymer concentration. Moreover, no phase change took place in Methocel and Kollidon formulations. No tablet residue was left for Soluplus formulation so the impact of polymer on cocrystal integrity cannot be predicted. PMID:26380301

  9. Evaluation of Influence of Various Polymers on Dissolution and Phase Behavior of Carbamazepine-Succinic Acid Cocrystal in Matrix Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Majeed; Ullah, Hanif; Murtaza, Ghulam; Mahmood, Qaisar; Hussain, Izhar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of current study was to explore the influence of three commonly used polymers, that is, cellulosics and noncellulosics, for example, Methocel K4M, Kollidon VA/64, and Soluplus, on the phase disproportionation and drug release profile of carbamazepine-succinic acid (CBZ-SUC) cocrystal at varying drug to polymer ratios (1 : 1 to 1 : 0.25) in matrix tablets. The polymorphic phase disproportionation during in-depth dissolution studies of CBZ-SUC cocrystals and its crystalline properties were scrutinized by X-ray powder diffractrometry and Raman spectroscopy. The percent drug release from HPMC formulations (CSH) showed inverse relation with the concentration of polymer; that is, drug release increased with decrease in polymer concentration. On contrary, direct relation was observed between percent drug release and polymer concentrations of Kollidon VA 64/Soluplus (CSK, CSS). At similar polymer concentration, drug release from pure carbamazepine was slightly lower with HPMC formulations than that of cocrystal; however, opposite trend in release rate was observed with Kollidon VA/64 and Soluplus. The significant increase in dissolution rate of cocrystal occurred with Kollidon VA/64 and Soluplus at higher polymer concentration. Moreover, no phase change took place in Methocel and Kollidon formulations. No tablet residue was left for Soluplus formulation so the impact of polymer on cocrystal integrity cannot be predicted. PMID:26380301

  10. Dissolution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in alkanol-cholic acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyshin, A. A.; Eliseeva, O. V.; Bondarenko, G. V.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2015-09-01

    A procedure for dispersing the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for preparing stable suspensions with high concentrations of individual nanotubes in various alcohols was described. The obtained suspensions were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The solubility of the single-walled carbon nanotubes in alcohols was found to depend on the concentration of cholic acid. The ethanol-surfactant mixture was shown to be the best solvent for all alkanol-cholic acid mixtures (0.018 mol/kg) under study used for preparing time-stable suspensions of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The dissolving ability of aliphatic alcohols was found to decrease in the series: ethanol-isopropanol- tert-butanol-butanol-propanol.

  11. An ecological mechanism to create regular patterns of surface dissolution in a low-relief carbonate landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. J.; Martin, J. B.; Mclaughlin, D. L.; Osborne, T.; Murray, A.; Watts, A. C.; Watts, D.; Heffernan, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Development of karst landscapes is controlled by focused delivery of water undersaturated with respect to the soluble rock minerals. As that water comes to equilibrium with the rock, secondary porosity is incrementally reinforced creating a positive feedback that acts to augment the drainage network and subsequent water delivery. In most self-organizing systems, spatial positive feedbacks create features (in landscapes: patches; in karst aquifers: conduits) whose size-frequency relationship follows a power function, indicating a higher probability of large features than would occur with a random or Gaussian genesis process. Power functions describe several aspects of secondary porosity in the Upper Floridan Aquifer in north Florida. In contrast, a different pattern arises in the karst landscape in southwest Florida (Big Cypress National Preserve; BICY), where low-relief and a shallow aquiclude govern regional hydrology. There, the landscape pattern is highly regular (Fig. 1), with circular cypress-dominated wetlands occupying depressions that are hydrologically isolated and distributed evenly in a matrix of pine uplands. Regular landscape patterning results from spatially coupled feedbacks, one positive operating locally that expands patches coupled to another negative that operates at distance, eventually inhibiting patch expansion. The positive feedback in BICY is thought to derive from the presence of surface depressions, which sustain prolonged inundation in this low-relief setting, and facilitate wetland development that greatly augments dissolution potential of infiltrating water in response to ecosystem metabolic processes. In short, wetlands "drill" into the carbonate leading to both vertical and lateral basin expansion. Wetland expansion occurs at the expense of surrounding upland area, which is the local catchment that subsidizes water availability. A distal inhibitory feedback on basin expansion thus occurs as the water necessary to sustain prolonged

  12. Submarine Dissolution During the Late-Miocene Carbonate Crash and Subsequent Mega-Pockmark Formation on the Cocos Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluesner, J.; Silver, E. A.; Bangs, N. L.; McIntosh, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    A large field (245km2) seabed mega-pockmarks (~1 km to 4 km in diameter) was recently imaged on the western edge of the Cocos Ridge near the Middle American Trench. The pockmarks are part of a vast mega-pockmark field (~10x150 km) and were imaged using high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and backscatter and 3D seismic reflection data. On the seafloor, multiple pockmarks exhibit a two-tiered geomorphology, some of which contain small high-backscatter mounds, possibly indicating recent seafloor seepage. 3D seismic data reveal that the two-tiered morphology is caused by collapse structures at depth with large pockmarks above the walls of the former. Observed collapse structures are characterized by steep walls that truncate surrounding strata, apparent normal "ring" faults, chaotic internal reflections interpreted as infill, and circular morphologies. Younger pockmarks located above the walls of the collapse structures are larger in diameter, have gently dipping walls that do not truncate surrounding strata, and typically show elliptical morphologies. Physical properties results at IODP Site U1414 that intersects the 3D seismic volume suggest that observed reverse polarity lens-shaped zones, which are truncated by the deeper collapse structures, represent anomalous regions of high porosity and low density. In addition, a rapid drop in Ca concentrations observed within this interval at Site U1414 suggests a relationship with possible carbonate dissolution. Correlation of the collapse structures stratigraphic timing with nanno-fossil data at Site U1414 suggests formation occurred ~8-10 Ma, approximately during the Late Miocene eastern Pacific carbonate crash. Based on 3D seismic analysis and recent drilling results, we propose a two-stage formation process that consists of initial collapse caused by carbonate dissolution during the late Miocene, followed by sustained fluid-flow along the walls of established collapse features, resulting in pockmark formation. This

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF EXCIPIENTS ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF TABLETS AND DISSOLUTION OF CAFFEINE.

    PubMed

    Szumiło, Michał; Świader, Katarzyna; Belniak, Piotr; Wojciechowska, Jessica; Poleszak, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is a common component of everyday diet but also a popular ingredient of some analgesics. Before it is administered to a patient, it has to be properly prepared using appropriate procedures to get the suitable drug form with various excipients. The tablets with caffeine were obtained using a wet granulation method. Three groups with four series of tablets were obtained with the constant concentration of caffeine but with different combinations of excipients, including potato starch and lactose, microcrystalline cellulose and lactose and D-mannitol alone. The binder solution of polyvinylpyrrolidone was added in all series of granules used in tabletting but in different quantities. A number of pharmacopoeial tests were conducted to determine the properties of the obtained tablets. All series of tablets positively passed physical tests. More than 80% of caffeine dissolved after 45 min from most series. Only two of 12 series of tablets did not meet pharmacopoeial requirements in a dissolution test. The results of the study indicated that proposed compositions of the tablets are suitable for administration of caffeine in that drug form. PMID:26647637

  14. Is there a component of Pleistocene CO2 change associated with carbonate dissolution cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keir, Robin S.

    1995-10-01

    The only processes which could have decreased atmospheric CO2 during glacial climates without appreciably changing the carbon isotope distribution in the sea appear to be (1) dissolved calcium carbonate input to the ocean, e.g., coral reef buildup and erosion, (2) the ocean solubility pump, due to changes in surface temperature or air-sea exchange, or (3) decreased biological production of calcium carbonate. It is assumed here that one of these mechanisms caused part of the atmospheric CO2 changes recorded in the 200-kyr-long Vostok ice core. Two residual CO2 records are generated by scaling the δ13C difference between planktonic and benthic foraminifera in marine sediment cores to -82 ppm CO2 per 1‰ increase in Δδ13C and subtracting from this the measured CO2 concentration in the ice core. Both residual CO2 records exhibit two broad maximums between about 20-50 ka and 140-200 ka, indicating that during these times, about 40 ppm of the CO2 decrease from interglacial levels cannot be explained by the interaction of the ocean's biological and vertical mixing cycles. The shape of the residual CO2 curve is similar qualitatively to the variation of calcium carbonate in central equatorial Pacific sediments during this time period, which would imply that changes in dissolved carbonate input to the ocean contributed the added component of CO2 change. However, recent models of atmospheric CO2 change in response to changing alkaline input to the ocean exhibit about a 25 to 35 ppm decrease per 1013 mol yr-1 increase in dissolved CaCO3 input. If compensation for the changing input is occurring mostly within an area of about 40 × 106 km² below the lysocline in the Indo-Pacific, the change in carbonate accumulation rate corresponding to a -40 ppm CO2 change would be a minimum of 3 mg cm-2 yr-1. This can be compared to glacial increases of 0.5 to 1.0 mg cm-2 yr-1 during the last 200 kyr in central equatorial Pacific sediments. Thus, the added glacial accumulation of

  15. Effects of suspension pH and mineral dissolution on carbon dioxide hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Lamorena, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    CO2 sequestration as a form of hydrate into geological formations could be significantly affected by soil mineral heterogeneity potentially contributing to the stochastic behavior of hydrate formation. In this study, we controlled the pH of soil mineral suspensions (Na-montmorillonite, kaolinite mixture, and pyrite) by the addition of 2M/10M NaOH and 2M/10M HCl before the dissolution of CO2. The soil mineral suspensions were prepared in deionized water (DIW) and NaCl (3.5 %) solutions. The formation of mass of CO2 hydrates was observed in most of the soil mineral suspensions at 30 bar and 0.3°C. In montmorillonite and kaolinite mixture suspensions with and without NaCl near neutral (pH 6~8) suspension pHs can provide the fastest hydrate formation kinetics followed by basic (~pH 12.0) and acidic (pH 2.0) suspension pHs. Acidic suspension pH gives the fastest kinetics in pyrite suspensions without NaCl followed by neutral and basic pHs, while no hydrate formations were observed in basic and near neutral pyrite suspensions with NaCl. The experimental results suggest that different types of soil mineral structures and chemical species can form under different suspension pHs, significantly affecting the hydrate formation time. Chemical species (e.g. Al+3) that could potentially affect hydrate formation times were identified by a chemical equilibrium modeling software, PHREEQC. The results obtained from this research could provide promising avenues for hydrate formation mechanism studies.

  16. Elevated pCO2 effects on the geochemistry of carbonate aquifers: calcite dissolution as a driver of elevated metal concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, A.; Navarre-Sitchler, A. K.; Moore, J.; McCray, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Geological carbon capture, utilization and storage has gained momentum in the last decade as a viable option of reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2, with several demonstration projects completed, in progress or planned for upcoming years. However, large-scale CO2-injection operations are accompanied by concerns of CO2 leakage from deep geological repositories and subsequent contact with shallower aquifers, such as underground sources of drinking water. Direct toxicity of CO2 is of lesser concern; rather, it is the acidification of aquifers from increased CO2 partial-pressures (pCO2), which may lead to release of metals into groundwater through mineral dissolution and metal desorption. Previous geochemical studies have suggested that the presence of calcite in aquifer material would reduce the hazard of metal release by effectively buffering acidity via calcite dissolution at elevated pCO2, thus placing carbonate aquifers at lesser risk in case of CO2 leakage. Yet calcite is rarely found in pure form, and often contains a wide range of impurities, including metals such as As, Cr, and Pb, in solid-solution. Dissolution of calcite during acidity buffering is accompanied by release of these impurities from the calcite lattice. We show through experimental work that dissolution of calcite is the primary mechanism responsible for elevated concentrations of metals in carbonate aquifers at high pCO2. It is also evident that the mechanism responsible for metal release, i.e. dissolution or desorption, is metal-specific and pCO2-specific. Modeling work based on our experimental results suggests that in reducing aquifers calcite can contribute more to release of metals than sulfides, which are generally viewed as likely sources of metals in aquifers, during a hypothetical 30-year CO2 leak. In addition, modeling work suggests that when sulfide minerals are present in a carbonate aquifer, metals release would be more sensitive to pO2 than to pCO2.

  17. Glacial magnetite dissolution in abyssal NW Pacific sediments - evidence for carbon trapping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korff, Lucia; von Dobeneck, Tilo; Frederichs, Thomas; Kasten, Sabine; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The abyssal North Pacific Ocean's large volume, depth, and terminal position on the deep oceanic conveyor make it a candidate site for deep carbon trapping as postulated by climate theory to explain the massive glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2. As the major basins of the North Pacific have depths of 5500-6500m, far below the modern and glacial Calcite Compensation Depths (CCD), these abyssal sediments are carbonate-free and therefore not suitable for carbonate-based paleoceanographic proxy reconstructions. Instead, paleo-, rock and environmental magnetic methods are generally well applicable to hololytic abyssal muds and clays. In 2009, the international paleoceanographic research cruise SO 202 INOPEX ('Innovative North Pacific Experiment') of the German RV SONNE collected two ocean-spanning EW sediment core transects of the North Pacific and Bering Sea recovering a total of 50 piston and gravity cores from 45 sites. Out of seven here considered abyssal Northwest Pacific piston cores collected at water depths of 5100 to 5700m with mostly coherent shipboard susceptibility logs, the 20.23m long SO202-39-3, retrieved from 5102 m water depth east of northern Shatsky Rise (38°00.70'N, 164°26.78'E), was rated as the stratigraphically most promising record of the entire core transect and selected for detailed paleo- and environmental magnetic, geochemical and sedimentological investigations. This core was dated by correlating its RPI and Ba/Ti records to well-dated reference records and obviously provides a continuous sequence of the past 940 kyrs. The most striking orck magnetic features are coherent magnetite-depleted zones corresponding to glacial periods. In the interglacial sections, detrital, volcanic and even submicron bacterial magnetite fractions are excellently preserved. These alternating magnetite preservation states seem to reflect dramatic oxygenation changes in the deep North Pacific Ocean and hint at large-scale benthic glacial carbon trapping

  18. Direct electrolytic dissolution of silicate minerals for air CO2 mitigation and carbon-negative H2 production

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Greg H.; Carroll, Susan A.; Bourcier, William L.; Singleton, Michael J.; Smith, Megan M.; Aines, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the direct coupling of silicate mineral dissolution with saline water electrolysis and H2 production to effect significant air CO2 absorption, chemical conversion, and storage in solution. In particular, we observed as much as a 105-fold increase in OH− concentration (pH increase of up to 5.3 units) relative to experimental controls following the electrolysis of 0.25 M Na2SO4 solutions when the anode was encased in powdered silicate mineral, either wollastonite or an ultramafic mineral. After electrolysis, full equilibration of the alkalized solution with air led to a significant pH reduction and as much as a 45-fold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. This demonstrated significant spontaneous air CO2 capture, chemical conversion, and storage as a bicarbonate, predominantly as NaHCO3. The excess OH− initially formed in these experiments apparently resulted via neutralization of the anolyte acid, H2SO4, by reaction with the base mineral silicate at the anode, producing mineral sulfate and silica. This allowed the NaOH, normally generated at the cathode, to go unneutralized and to accumulate in the bulk electrolyte, ultimately reacting with atmospheric CO2 to form dissolved bicarbonate. Using nongrid or nonpeak renewable electricity, optimized systems at large scale might allow relatively high-capacity, energy-efficient (<300 kJ/mol of CO2 captured), and inexpensive (<$100 per tonne of CO2 mitigated) removal of excess air CO2 with production of carbon-negative H2. Furthermore, when added to the ocean, the produced hydroxide and/or (bi)carbonate could be useful in reducing sea-to-air CO2 emissions and in neutralizing or offsetting the effects of ongoing ocean acidification. PMID:23729814

  19. Direct electrolytic dissolution of silicate minerals for air CO2 mitigation and carbon-negative H2 production.

    PubMed

    Rau, Greg H; Carroll, Susan A; Bourcier, William L; Singleton, Michael J; Smith, Megan M; Aines, Roger D

    2013-06-18

    We experimentally demonstrate the direct coupling of silicate mineral dissolution with saline water electrolysis and H2 production to effect significant air CO2 absorption, chemical conversion, and storage in solution. In particular, we observed as much as a 10(5)-fold increase in OH(-) concentration (pH increase of up to 5.3 units) relative to experimental controls following the electrolysis of 0.25 M Na2SO4 solutions when the anode was encased in powdered silicate mineral, either wollastonite or an ultramafic mineral. After electrolysis, full equilibration of the alkalized solution with air led to a significant pH reduction and as much as a 45-fold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. This demonstrated significant spontaneous air CO2 capture, chemical conversion, and storage as a bicarbonate, predominantly as NaHCO3. The excess OH(-) initially formed in these experiments apparently resulted via neutralization of the anolyte acid, H2SO4, by reaction with the base mineral silicate at the anode, producing mineral sulfate and silica. This allowed the NaOH, normally generated at the cathode, to go unneutralized and to accumulate in the bulk electrolyte, ultimately reacting with atmospheric CO2 to form dissolved bicarbonate. Using nongrid or nonpeak renewable electricity, optimized systems at large scale might allow relatively high-capacity, energy-efficient (<300 kJ/mol of CO2 captured), and inexpensive (<$100 per tonne of CO2 mitigated) removal of excess air CO2 with production of carbon-negative H2. Furthermore, when added to the ocean, the produced hydroxide and/or (bi)carbonate could be useful in reducing sea-to-air CO2 emissions and in neutralizing or offsetting the effects of ongoing ocean acidification. PMID:23729814

  20. Studies of second phase particles in different zirconium alloys using extractive carbon replica and an electrolytic anodic dissolution procedure [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Brachet, Jean-Christophe; Jago, Gilles

    2002-10-01

    Zirconium alloys are widely studied for applications as cladding tubes and structural components of PWR fuel assemblies. Due to their influence on some of the alloys properties (corrosion resistance, irradiation growth, …), the crystallographic structure and the chemical stoichiometry of the second phase particles (SPP) precipitated in these alloys have to be well established. The aim of this paper is to present the results obtained using two methods of SPP extractions. The first one, the extractive carbon replica method, allowed us to determine the chemical composition of SPP in different zirconium alloys: Zr-Sn-Fe-Cr (Zircaloy-4 ®), Zr-Sn-Fe-Cr-(V,Mo), Zr-Nb and Zr-Nb-Fe alloys. The second one, an anodic dissolution procedure of the matrix, is an interesting way of isolating SPP from the surrounding α-Zr matrix, giving access to a precise determination of the crystallographic structure and lattice parameters of the SPP by X-ray diffraction. This procedure was validated for Zy-4 by comparing the SPP size distribution obtained by extraction with that directly measured on a massive Zy-4 alloy (i.e. the SPP size distributions were the same for both measurements).

  1. The Role of Sulfur Oxidation in Carbonate Precipitation and Dissolution Within Sulfidic Hot Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, S. E.; Kapitulčinová, D.; Kotrc, B.; Langerhuus, A. T.; Berelson, W.; Dawson, S.; Corsetti, F.; Hanselmann, K.; Johnson, H.; Spear, J.; Stevenson, B. S.; de La Torre, J.; 2008, G.

    2008-12-01

    Geothermal waters that have interacted with subsurface limestones often precipitate aragonite and calcite (travertine) upon cooling and degassing of CO2, forming terraced travertine deposits like those at Mammoth Hot Springs (MHS) in Yellowstone National Park. It has been shown that surfaces of filamentous microbial "Aquificales-dominated streamer communities" comprising the Apron and Channel Facies in these systems can act as nucleation sites for carbonate precipitation leading to the fine-scale tubular micro-structures consistently observed in travertine terraces, modern and ancient. The expected carbonate precipitates were found on streamer communities on the proximal Slope facies, however, ESEM imaging and EDX analysis revealed sulfur crystals, rather than carbonate precipitates, in association with Aquificales-dominated communities collected near the mouth of Narrow Gauge (pH 6.43, T 73.5°C), a sulfidic bicarbonate spring within the MHS system. Thermodynamic analysis of geochemical spring water datasets (data from Angel Terrace Spring applied to the Narrow Gauge site) demonstrates that lowering of the acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of spring waters can be achieved by sulfur oxidation. Although the first step of oxidation from H2S to S° cannot account for the lack of aragonite on the streamer biofilms, oxidation of even small amounts of S° to S2O32- and further to SO42- markedly decreases ANC. This microbially mediated reaction may lead to a shift in the local pH and a shift in the ion activity product (IAP) for Ca2+ x CO32- to below the solubility product (Ksp) of CaCO3. Our calculations suggest that this reaction, sulfur oxidation with oxygen to sulfate, can liberate sufficient protons to drive aragonite to undersaturation, if the initial sulfur concentration is 5 mM, and the [Ca] and [CO3] concentrations are initially 0.01 M and 1-10 uM, respectively. The potential importance of sulfur oxidation in hot springs, the molecular signatures of this process

  2. DISSOLUTION OF METAL OXIDES AND SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM LANTHANIDES AND ACTINIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO2 modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO2 and counter current stripping columns is presented.

  3. Dissolution of metal oxides and separation of uranium from lanthanides and actinides in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Quach, D.L.; Wai, C.M.; Mincher, B.J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO{sub 2} modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO{sub 2} modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO{sub 2} and counter current stripping columns is presented. (authors)

  4. The influence of co-formers on the dissolution rates of co-amorphous sulfamerazine/excipient systems.

    PubMed

    Gniado, Katarzyna; Löbmann, Korbinian; Rades, Thomas; Erxleben, Andrea

    2016-05-17

    A comprehensive study on the dissolution properties of three co-amorphous sulfamerazine/excipient systems, namely sulfamerazine/deoxycholic acid, sulfamerazine/citric acid and sulfamerazine/sodium taurocholate (SMZ/DA, SMZ/CA and SMZ/NaTC; 1:1 molar ratio), is reported. While all three co-formers stabilize the amorphous state during storage, only co-amorphization with NaTC provides a dissolution advantage over crystalline SMZ and the reasons for this were analyzed. In the case of SMZ/DA extensive gelation of DA protects the amorphous phase from crystallization upon contact with buffer, but at the same time prevents the release of SMZ into solution. Disk dissolution studies showed an improved dissolution behavior of SMZ/CA compared to crystalline SMZ. However, enhanced dissolution properties were not seen in powder dissolution testing due to poor dispersibility. Co-amorphization of SMZ and NaTC resulted in a significant increase in dissolution rate, both in powder and disk dissolution studies. PMID:26992818

  5. Uranium carbide dissolution in nitric solution: Sonication vs. silent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virot, Matthieu; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Chave, Tony; Dacheux, Nicolas; Moisy, Philippe; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2013-10-01

    The dissolution of uranium carbide (UC) in nitric acid media is considered by means of power ultrasound (sonication) or magnetic stirring. The induction period required to initiate UC dissolution was found to be dramatically shortened when sonicating a 3 M nitric solution (Ar, 20 kHz, 18 W cm-2, 20 °C). At higher acidity, magnetic stirring offers faster dissolution kinetics compared to sonication. Ultrasound-assisted UC dissolution is found to be passivated after ∼60% dissolution and remains incomplete whatever the acidity which is confirmed by ICP-AES, LECO and SEM-EDX analyses. In general, the kinetics of UC dissolution is linked to the in situ generation of nitrous acid in agreement with the general mechanism of UC dissolution; the nitrous acid formation is reported to be faster under ultrasound at low acidity due to the nitric acid sonolysis. The carbon balance shared between the gaseous, liquid, and solid phases is strongly influenced by the applied dissolution procedure and HNO3 concentration.

  6. Dissolution effect and cytotoxicity of diamond-like carbon coatings on orthodontic archwires.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Ohgoe, Yasuharu; Ozeki, Kazuhide; Hirakuri, Kenji; Aoki, Hideki

    2007-12-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) has been used for implants in orthodontics due to the unique properties such as shape memory effect and superelasticity. However, NiTi alloys are eroded in the oral cavity because they are immersed by saliva with enzymolysis. Their reactions lead corrosion and nickel release into the body. The higher concentrations of Ni release may generate harmful reactions. Ni release causes allergenic, toxic and carcinogenic reactions. It is well known that diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have excellent properties, such as extreme hardness, low friction coefficients, high wear resistance. In addition, DLC film has many other superior properties as a protective coating for biomedical applications such as biocompatibility and chemical inertness. Therefore, DLC film has received enormous attention as a biocompatible coating. In this study, DLC film coated NiTi orthodontic archwires to protect Ni release into the oral cavity. Each wire was immersed in physiological saline at the temperature 37 degrees C for 6 months. The release concentration of Ni ions was detected using microwave induced plasma mass spectrometry (MIP-MS) with the resolution of ppb level. The toxic effect of Ni release was studied the cell growth using squamous carcinoma cells. These cells were seeded in 24 well culture plates and materials were immersed in each well directly. The concentration of Ni ions in the solutions had been reduced one-sixth by DLC films when compared with non-coated wire. This study indicated that DLC films have the protective effect of the diffusion and the non-cytotoxicity in corrosive environment. PMID:17562139

  7. Dissolution of Columbia River Basalt Under Mildly Acidic Conditions as a Function of Temperature: Experimental Results Relevant to the Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2009-05-01

    Increasing attention is being focused on the rapid rise of carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, which many believe to be the major contributing factor to global climate change. Sequestering CO2 in deep geological formations has been proposed as a long-term solution to help stabilize CO2 levels. However, before such technology can be developed and implemented, a basic understanding of H2O-CO2 systems and the chemical interactions of these fluids with the host formation must be obtained. Important issues concerning mineral stability, reaction rates, and carbonate formation are all controlled or at least significantly impacted by the kinetics of rock-water reactions in mildly acidic, CO2-saturated solutions. Basalt has recently been identified as a potentially important host formation for geological sequestration. Dissolution kinetics of the Columbia River Basalt (CRB) were measured for a range of temperatures (25° to 90°C) under mildly acidic to neutral pH conditions using the single-pass flow-through test method. Under anaerobic conditions, the normalized dissolution rates for CRB decrease with increasing pH (3≤pH≤7) with a slope, η, of -0.12 ± 0.02. An activation energy, Ea, has been estimated at 30.3 ± 2.4 kJ mol-1. Dissolution kinetics measurements like these are essential for modeling the rate at which the CO2 reacts with basalt and ultimately converted to carbonate minerals in situ.

  8. The difference between surface ocean carbonate chemistry and calcite dissolution in deep sea sediments as observed in tests of Globorotalia menardii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, M.; Mekik, F.

    2010-12-01

    The Globorotalia menardii Fragmentation Index (MFI) was developed to trace deep sea calcite dissolution within sediments. While this proxy has a multi-basin core top calibration ranging the tropical and subtropical world ocean, the effect of the surface ocean [CO32-] on thickness of whole G. menardii shells has not been previously tested. If the size-normalized shell weight (SNSW) of G. menardii tests were affected by the [CO32-] of ambient habitat waters, this would put constraints on the applicability of MFI as a reliable bulk sediment calcite dissolution proxy. We present new SNSW data from G. menardii shells within core tops in the eastern equatorial Pacific where there is both a strong gradient to surface ocean [CO32-] and calcite dissolution in the sediments. We compare our G.menardii SNSW data with that of other species in the region, such as Neogloboquadrina dutertrei and Pulleniatina obliquiloculata. While SNSW of both N. dutertrei and P. obliquiloculata have clear relationships with surface ocean [CO32-], we do not find a similar relationship between G. menardii SNSW and surface ocean parameters, particularly [CO32-]. This bolsters our confidence in the reliability of MFI as a deep sea carbonate dissolution tracer.

  9. Coupled alkai fieldspar dissolution and secondary mineral precipatation in batch systems-2: New experiments with supercritical CO2 and implications for carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Peng; Fu, Qi; Seyfried, William E. Jr.; Hedges, Sheila W.; Soong, Yee; Jones, Kyle; Zhua, Chen

    2013-01-01

    In order to evaluate the extent of CO{sub 2}–water–rock interactions in geological formations for C sequestration, three batch experiments were conducted on alkali feldspars–CO{sub 2}–brine interactions at 150–200 °C and 300 bars. The elevated temperatures were necessary to accelerate the reactions to facilitate attainable laboratory measurements. Temporal evolution of fluid chemistry was monitored by major element analysis of in situ fluid samples. SEM, TEM and XRD analysis of reaction products showed extensive dissolution features (etch pits, channels, kinks and steps) on feldspars and precipitation of secondary minerals (boehmite, kaolinite, muscovite and paragonite) on feldspar surfaces. Therefore, these experiments have generated both solution chemistry and secondary mineral identity. The experimental results show that partial equilibrium was not attained between secondary minerals and aqueous solutions for the feldspar hydrolysis batch systems. Evidence came from both solution chemistry (supersaturation of the secondary minerals during the entire experimental duration) and metastable co-existence of secondary minerals. The slow precipitation of secondary minerals results in a negative feedback in the dissolution–precipitation loop, reducing the overall feldspar dissolution rates by orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the experimental data indicate the form of rate laws greatly influence the steady state rates under which feldspar dissolution took place. Negligence of both the mitigating effects of secondary mineral precipitation and the sigmoidal shape of rate–ΔG{sub r} relationship can overestimate the extent of feldspar dissolution during CO{sub 2} storage. Finally, the literature on feldspar dissolution in CO{sub 2}-charged systems has been reviewed. The data available are insufficient and new experiments are urgently needed to establish a database on feldspar dissolution mechanism, rates and rate laws, as well as secondary mineral

  10. Fast dissolving cyclodextrin complex of piroxicam in solid dispersion part I: influence of β-CD and HPβ-CD on the dissolution rate of piroxicam.

    PubMed

    Bouchal, F; Skiba, M; Chaffai, N; Hallouard, F; Fatmi, S; Lahiani-Skiba, M

    2015-01-30

    Sublingual drug delivery is an interesting route for drug having significant hepatic first-pass metabolism or requiring rapid pharmacological effect as for patients suffering from swallowing difficulties, nausea or vomiting. Sublingual absorption could however be limited by the kinetic of drug dissolution. This study evaluated influences of cyclodextrins (β-CD or HP-β-CD) and their different inclusion process (spray-drying or freeze-drying) on the drug dissolution kinetic of solid dispersions in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG, Mw 6000Da) of piroxicam, used as poor hydrosoluble drug model. A secondary objective was to determine influences of drug dispersion process in PEG (evaporation or melting methods) on the drug dissolution kinetic of piroxicam. Piroxicam solid dispersions containing or not cyclodextrins were characterized by different scanning calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravometry analyser (TGA) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In vitro drug dissolution study of these solid dispersions was then performed. The results demonstrated the high potential and interest of solid dispersions of drug previously included in cyclodextrins for sublingual delivery of hydrophobic drugs. This study also showed the advantages of evaporation method on the melting ones during drug dispersion in PEG. Indeed, drug complexation with cyclodextrins as dispersion by melting prevented the presence in solid dispersions of drug in crystalline form which can represent up to 63%. Moreover, dispersion in PEG by evaporation method gave more porous drug delivery system than with melting methods. This allowed complete (limited at most at 80-90% with melting methods) and quick drug dissolution without rebound effect like with melting ones. PMID:25522828

  11. Influence of polymer molecular weight on in vitro dissolution behavior and in vivo performance of celecoxib:PVP amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Matthias Manne; Nguyen, Julia Hoang; Becker, Christian; Francke, Nadine Monika; Jørgensen, Erling B; Holm, Per; Holm, René; Mu, Huiling; Rades, Thomas; Langguth, Peter

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the influence of the molecular weight of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on the non-sink in vitro dissolution and in vivo performance of celecoxib (CCX):PVP amorphous solid dispersions were investigated. The dissolution rate of CCX from the amorphous solid dispersions increased with decreasing PVP molecular weight and crystallization inhibition was increased with increasing molecular weight of PVP, but reached a maximum for PVP K30. This suggested that the crystallization inhibition was not proportional with molecular weight of the polymer, but rather there was an optimal molecular weight where the crystallization inhibition was strongest. Consistent with the findings from the non-sink in vitro dissolution tests, the amorphous solid dispersions with the highest molecular weight PVPs (K30 and K60) resulted in significantly higher in vivo bioavailability (AUC0-24h) compared with pure amorphous and crystalline CCX. A linear relationship between the in vitro and in vivo parameter AUC0-24h indicated that the simple non-sink in vitro dissolution method used in this study could be used to predict the in vivo performance of amorphous solid dispersion with good precision, which enabled a ranking between the different formulations. In conclusion, the findings of this study demonstrated that the in vitro and in vivo performance of CCX:PVP amorphous solid dispersions were significantly controlled by the molecular weight of the polymer. PMID:26899127

  12. Desorption and dissolution of heavy metals from contaminated soil using Shewanella sp. (HN-41) amended with various carbon sources and synthetic soil organic matters.

    PubMed

    Ayyasamy, Pudukadu Munusamy; Chun, Saho; Lee, Sanghoon

    2009-01-30

    Heavy metals in soil are considered a major environmental problem facing many countries around the world. Contamination of heavy metals occurs in soil due to both anthropogenic and natural causes. During the last two decades, extensive attention has been paid to the management and control of soil contamination. Decontamination of heavy metals in the soil has been a challenge for a long time. Microbial solubilization is one of promising process for remediation of heavy metals from contaminated sites. In this study, we attempted to treat soil contaminated with heavy metals using a facultative anaerobic bacterium Shewanella sp. (HN-41). The effect of carbon sources on the dissolution and conversion of heavy metals was first investigated using a defined medium containing 1 g of highly contaminated soil to select the most effective carbon source. Among three carbon sources, namely glucose, acetic acid and lactic acid, glucose at 10 mM was found to be the most effective. Therefore, glucose was used as a representative carbon source for the second part of the biological treatment in the defined medium, amended with humic acid (HA) and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (ADQS), respectively. Among the heavy metals, iron and manganese exhibited the highest dissolution efficiency in the medium supplemented with glucose at 10mM. The rates of dissolution and removal of heavy metals were little bit higher in the medium amended with humic acid and ADQS. Per these results outlined above, a combined system of humic acid and ADQS incorporated with glucose was found to be effective for the removal of heavy metals from soil. PMID:18541365

  13. Forsterite dissolution in saline water at elevated temperature and high CO2 pressure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Giammar, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    The rates and mechanisms of magnesium silicate dissolution can control the aqueous chemistry in ways that influence carbonate mineral precipitation during geologic carbon sequestration (GCS). A series of batch experiments was performed with forsterite (Mg(1.81)Fe(0.19)SiO(4)) powder to determine the effects of pressure (10-100 bar CO(2)), temperature (25-100 °C), and salinity (0-50,000 mg/L NaCl) on its dissolution rate at conditions relevant to GCS. Dissolution rates and products were determined by analysis of the aqueous phase, equilibrium and reaction path modeling, and solid phase characterization by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. After an initially rapid dissolution period, the dissolution rate declined significantly, an effect that is attributed to the formation of a silica-rich layer at the forsterite surface. The initial dissolution rate increased with increasing temperature and increasing CO(2) pressure; the effect of CO(2) was through its influence on the pH. The dissolution rate was enhanced by NaCl, which may have been due to its inhibition of the formation of a silica-rich surface layer. The experimental results provide information about magnesium silicate dissolution at conditions that will be encountered during GCS that can be used to predict the fate of CO(2) and the evolution of subsurface geochemistry following CO(2) injection. PMID:22650147

  14. Electrochemical in-situ dissolution study of structurally ordered, disordered and gold doped PtCu3 nanoparticles on carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovič, Primož; Šelih, Vid Simon; Šala, Martin; Hočevar, Samo B.; Pavlišič, Andraž; Gatalo, Matija; Bele, Marjan; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Čekada, Miha; Hodnik, Nejc; Gaberšček, Miran

    2016-09-01

    Commercial deployment of low-temperature-fuel cells is still hugely restricted by platinum alloy catalysts corrosion. Extensive research of the last years is focused on increasing stability of the catalyst composite, however a comprehensive understanding is still lacking. In pursuing this fundamentally and practically very important objective we present a comparative corrosion study of a PtCu3 nano-alloy system by investigating the effects of structural ordering and gold doping. For that purpose a recently developed electrochemical flow cell (EFC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) is employed. This approach provides potential- and time-resolved insight into dissolution process at extremely low concentrations (ppb level). Our results show a structure-dependent copper corrosion, where ordering and gold-doping significantly improve copper retention in the native alloy. Two assumptions can be drawn from the measured Pt dissolution profiles: (i) a better Pt re-deposition efficiency in catalysts with higher porosity and (ii) the beneficial effect of Au surface doping that lowers the amount of dissolved Pt amount and shifts the Pt cathodic dissolution to lower potentials. A 2.6 nm Pt/C standard catalyst with the same carbon loading shows a much lower stability which is due to the well-known particle size effect.

  15. Thermodynamic characterization of metal dissolution and inhibitor adsorption processes in the low carbon steel/mimosa tannin/sulfuric acid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Sanja; Stern, Ivica

    2002-10-01

    The corrosion rates in the presence of mimosa tannin as a low carbon steel corrosion inhibitor in sulfuric acid media, were measured by the weight loss method, in the range of temperatures from 20 to 60 °C. The Temkin, Frumkin and Freundlich isotherms were tested for their fit to the experimental data. The free energies and enthalpies for the adsorption process and the apparent activation energies, enthalpies and entropies of the dissolution process were determined. The fundamental thermodynamic functions were used to glean important information about the mimosa tannin inhibitory behavior. The results were explained in terms of chemical thermodynamics.

  16. Influence of chitosan and its glutamate and hydrochloride salts on naproxen dissolution rate and permeation across Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Maestrelli, F; Zerrouk, N; Chemtob, C; Mura, P

    2004-03-01

    Chitosan and its glutamate and hydrochloride salts were evaluated for their efficacy in improving the dissolution behaviour of naproxen (a poorly water-soluble antiinflammatory drug) and its transport in vitro across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Drug-polymer physical mixtures and coground products, prepared at two different w/w ratios (30/70 and 10/90), were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, and tested for dissolution properties. Coground systems were more effective than physical mixtures in improving drug dissolution and chitosan base, in spite of its lower water solubility, showed higher solubilizing power than its salts. According to the solid state analyses results, this effect was directly related to its stronger amorphizing power. Transport studies showed that only coground mixtures with chitosan glutamate salt allowed a significant drug apparent permeability improvement; however, they did not exhibit appreciable effects on the Caco-2 tight junctions (measured by the trans-epithelial electrical resistance variations), thus indicating that their enhancer effect was mainly due to an improved naproxen transport by transcellular passive diffusion rather than through the paracellular route. The direct compression properties and antiulcerogenic activity together with the demonstrated dissolution and permeation enhancer abilities toward naproxen make chitosan glutamate an optimal carrier for developing fast-action oral solid dosage forms of this drug. PMID:15129993

  17. Influence of Microscopic Diffusive Process on Uranyl Precipitation and Dissolution in Subsurface Sediments at Hanford Site, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Zheming; Majors, Paul D.

    2004-03-29

    Uranium in DOE Hanford sediments was found to be distributed as uranyl silicate precipitates almost exclusively within interiors of sediment grains. The precipitates were minute, generally 1-3 {micro}m across in either radiating or parallel arrays in intraparticle microfractures of a few microns width and variable connectivity to particle surfaces. Grain-scale porosity, tortuosity and diffusivity of tracer (H2O) and U(VI) were measured and imaged using various spectroscopic techniques. Simulations using a microscopic reactive diffusion model suggested that diffusion-limited mass transport generated a favorable thermodynamic condition within the grain microfractures for precipitation and concentration of uranium from waste plumes. The rate and extent of uranyl precipitate dissolution were studied in various electrolytes with variable pH under ambient CO2 pressure. Uranium speciation and distribution before and after dissolution were monitored by spectroscopic and imaging techniques . Experimental, spectroscopic and modeling results collectively indicated that dissolution of uranyl precipitates was controlled by diffusion-limited dissolution kinetics.

  18. Influence of spray drying and dispersing agent on surface and dissolution properties of griseofulvin micro and nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dhaval A; Patel, Manan; Murdande, Sharad B; Dave, Rutesh H

    2016-11-01

    The purpose for the current research is to compare and evaluate physiochemical properties of spray-dried (SD) microcrystals (MCs), nanocrystals (NCs), and nanocrystals with a dispersion agent (NCm) from a poorly soluble compound. The characterization was carried out by performing size and surface analysis, interfacial tension (at particle moisture interface), and in-vitro drug dissolution rate experiments. Nanosuspensions were prepared by media milling and were spray-dried. The SD powders that were obtained were characterized morphologically using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and Flowchem. Solid-state characterization was performed using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for the identification of the crystalline nature of all the SD powders. The powders were characterized for their redispersion tendency in the water and in pH 1.2. Significant differences in redispersion were noted for both the NCs in both dissolution media. The interfacial tension for particle moisture interface was determined by applying the BET (Braunauer-Emmett-Teller) equation to the vapor sorption data. No significant reduction in the interfacial tension was observed between MCs and NCs; however, a significant reduction in the interfacial tension was observed for NCm at both 25 °C and 35 °C temperatures. The difference in interfacial tension and redispersion behavior can be attributed to a difference in the wetting tendency for all the SD powders. The dissolution studies were carried out under sink and under non-sink conditions. The non-sink dissolution approach was found suitable for quantification of the dissolution rate enhancement, and also for providing the rank order to the SD formulations. PMID:27080146

  19. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  20. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition.

    PubMed

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  1. Influence of Carbon on the Electrical Properties of Crustal Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Mathez, E. A.

    2002-11-19

    The report summarizes work to determine the nature and distribution of carbon on microcracks in crystalline rocks by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. It also summarizes the results of a workshop devoted to investigating how carbon in rocks influences electrical conductivity and whether carbon on fracture surfaces can account for the electrical conductivity structure of the crust.

  2. Mineral Influence on Microbial Survival During Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, E. U.; Shanahan, T. M.; Wolfe, W. W.; Bennett, P.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 sequestered in a deep saline aquifer will perturb subsurface biogeochemistry by acidifying the groundwater and accelerating mineral diagenesis. Subsurface microbial communities heavily influence geochemistry through their metabolic processes, such as with dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB). However, CO2 also acts as a sterilant and will perturb these communities. We investigated the role of mineralogy and its effect on the survival of microbes at high PCO2 conditions using the model DIRB Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Batch cultures of Shewanella were grown to stationary phase and exposed to high PCO2 using modified Parr reactors. Cell viability was then determined by plating cultures after exposure. Results indicate that at low PCO2 (2 bar), growth and iron reduction are decreased and cell death occurs within 1 hour when exposed to CO2 pressures of 10 bar or greater. Further, fatty acid analysis indicates microbial lipid degradation with C18 fatty acids being the slowest lipids to degrade. When cultures were grown in the presence of rocks or minerals representative of the deep subsurface such as carbonates and silicates and exposed to 25 bar CO2, survival lasted beyond 2 hours. The most effective protecting substratum was quartz sandstone, with cultures surviving beyond 8 hours of CO2 exposure. Scanning electron microscope images reveal biofilm formation on the mineral surfaces with copious amounts of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) present. EPS from these biofilms acts as a reactive barrier to the CO2, slowing the penetration of CO2 into cells and resulting in increased survival. When biofilm cultures were grown with Al and As to simulate the release of toxic metals from minerals such as feldspars and clays, survival time decreased, indicating mineralogy may also enhance microbial death. Biofilms were then grown on iron-coated quartz sand to determine conversely what influence biofilms may have on mineral dissolution during CO2 perturbation

  3. Influence of Mineral Precipitation and Dissolution on Hydrologic Properties of Porous Media in Static and Dynamic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Saripalli, Kanaka P.; Meyer, Philip D.

    2003-01-01

    A critical component is determining the suitability of disposing glassified, low activity waste is the identification of key mineral assemblages affecting the porosity and permeability of both the glass and near- and far- field materials. In this study, two different classes of geochemical models are used to identify minerals percipitation and dissolution potentials for an immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) disposal facility in Hanford, Washington. The first is a static geochemical model that does not consider the effects of transport. The second model is dynamic, and combines geochemical reactions with hydrogeological processes such as advection, diffusion and dispersion. This reactive transport model also includes an innovative application of a depositional film model for determining changes in permeability due to mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions. Although both models describe solid-aqueous phase reactions kinetically, the two models identify two different sets of mineral assemblages affecting the porosity and permeability of the media.

  4. Influence of aqueous environment on agglomeration and dissolution of thiol-functionalised mesoporous silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Othman; Zhang, Yue; Banks, Charles J

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present research work is to investigate the stability and dissolution of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) and thiol-functionalised mesoporous silica-coated magnetite NPs (TF-SCMNPs). The state of NPs in an aqueous environment was investigated under different pH conditions. Changes in the NPs' mean diameter due to aggregation were measured over a specific time. The effects of contact time and pH on the dissolution of NPs were also investigated. In order to avoid possible aggregation, Fe3O4 NPs were coated with silica and functionalised further with thiol organic groups. These methods imparted excellent stability to magnetite NPs in an aqueous medium over a wide range of pH values with reasonable hydrodynamic size. The organic group bound magnetite NPs allowed these particles to circulate over a long time in the aqueous system, and particle aggregation and sedimentation did not occur. The trend of decreasing zeta potential was observed after grafting thiol onto the surface of the SCMNPs. The results also revealed that silica exhibited a noteworthy efficient in eliminating the pH dependence and enhancing the NP stability of SCMNPs and SH-SCMNPs in aqueous medium. On the other hand, the dissolution of Fe3O4 NPs was found to be detrimental at pH 2.0 and 4.0 or had a long contact time. PMID:24898295

  5. Solubility and dissolution kinetics of gypsum as a function of CO2 partial pressure: Implications for geological carbon sequestration William Wolfe, Philip Bennett The University of Texas at Austin, Jackson School of Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, W. W.; Bennett, P.

    2011-12-01

    The storage of carbon dioxide in deep saline (non-potable) aquifers has received increasing attention as a possible near term solution to the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. As a result of CO2 introduction, a wide array of geochemical reactions will occur involving both the aqueous phase and the solid mineral phase. Potential CO2 storage formations are typically saline Na:Cl or NaCa:ClSO4 type water. To gain insight into the dynamics of this system under the conditions of carbon sequestration we examined the solubility and dissolution/precipitation rates of gypsum in aqueous solutions as a function of CO2 partial pressure. Experimental variables ranged from 30-60 degrees C, 0.1-5 molar NaCl, and 1-130 atmospheres of CO2. Most standard geochemical models predict that gypsum solubility will increase with increasing dissolved CO2 due to the increased acidity driving the protonation of sulfate to form bisulfate: H+ + SO4= <=> HSO4- Thus decreasing sulfate concentration and driving further dissolution of gypsum. However, our findings show that increasing dissolved CO2 results in the precipitation of gypsum, with gypsum solubility decreasing by up to 30-50% at all temperatures examined. Solutions initially at equilibrium with gypsum will nucleate and precipitate gypsum as pCO2 increases. This behavior was predicted by Li and Duan, (2011) based on model results but no experimental evidence was found by the authors. Potential factors for this behavior include a decrease in the activity of water due to hydration of dissolved CO2, or possibly the destabilization of the CaSO4 neutral complex increasing the activity of free Ca++ and SO4= in solution, driving the precipitation of gypsum. We are exploring both of these possible scenarios. The saline aquifers of the Texas gulf coast are a potential target for carbon dioxide sequestration, and many of these aquifers have high Ca and SO4 concentrations due to reaction with gypsum. Precipitation of gypsum under high

  6. Pore-scale simulation of calcium carbonate precipitation and dissolution under highly supersaturated conditions in a microfludic pore network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.; Valocchi, A. J.; Werth, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Dissolved CO2 during geological CO2 storage may react with minerals in fractured rocks or confined aquifers and cause mineral precipitation. The overall rate of reaction can be affected by coupled processes among hydrodynamics, transport, and reactions at pore-scale. Pore-scale models of coupled fluid flow, reactive transport, and CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution are applied to account for transient experimental results of CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution under highly supersaturated conditions in a microfluidic pore network (i.e., micromodel). Pore-scale experiments in the micromodel are used as a basis for understanding coupled physics of systems perturbed by geological CO2 injection. In the micromodel, precipitation is induced by transverse mixing along the centerline in pore bodies. Overall, the pore-scale model qualitatively captured the governing physics of reactions such as precipitate morphology, precipitation rate, and maximum precipitation area in first few pore spaces. In particular, we found that proper estimation of the effective diffusion coefficient and the reactive surface area is necessary to adequately simulate precipitation and dissolution rates. As the model domain increases, the effect of flow patterns affected by precipitation on the overall reaction rate also increases. The model is also applied to account for the effect of different reaction rate laws on mineral precipitation and dissolution at pore-scale. Reaction rate laws tested include the linear rate law, nonlinear power law, and newly-developed rate law based on in-situ measurements at nano scale in the literature. Progress on novel methods for upscaling pore-scale models for reactive transport are discussed, and are being applied to mineral precipitation patterns observed in natural analogues. H.Y. and T. D. were supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of

  7. Microstructural record of cataclastic and dissolution-precipitation processes from shallow crustal carbonate strike-slip faults, Northern Calcareous Alps (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Helene; Grasemann, Bernhard; Decker, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The concept of coseismic slip and aseismic creep deformation along faults is supported by the variability of natural fault rocks and their microstructures. Faults in carbonate rocks are characterized by very narrow principal slip zones (cm to mm wide) containing (ultra)cataclastic fault rocks that accommodate most of the fault displacement. Fluidization of ultracataclastic sub layers and thermal decomposition of calcite due to frictional heating have been proposed as possible indicators for seismic slip. Dissolution-precipitation (DP) processes are possible mechanism of aseismic sliding, resulting in spaced cleavage solution planes and associated veins, indicating diffusive mass transfer and precipitation in pervasive vein networks. We investigated exhumed, sinistral strike-slip faults in carbonates of the Northern Calcareous Alps. The study presents microstructural investigations of natural carbonate fault rocks that formed by cataclastic and dissolution-precipitation related deformation processes. Faults belong to the eastern segment of the Salzachtal-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP) fault system that was formed during eastward lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps in Oligocene to Lower Miocene. The investigated faults accommodated sinistral slip between several tens and few hundreds of meters. Microstructural analysis of fault rocks was done with scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. Deformation experiments of natural fault rocks are planned to be conducted at the Sapienza University of Roma and should be available at the meeting. The investigated fault rocks give record of alternating cataclastic deformation and DP creep. DP fault rocks reveal various stages of evolution including early stylolites, pervasive pressure solution seams and cleavage, localized shear zones with syn-kinematic calcite fibre growth and mixed DP/cataclastic microstructures, involving pseudo sc- and scc'-fabrics. Pressure solution seams host fine grained kaolinit, chlorite

  8. Arsenic release from flooded paddy soils is influenced by speciation, Eh, pH, and iron dissolution.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, N; Nakamura, T; Dong, D; Takahashi, Y; Amachi, S; Makino, T

    2011-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is highly mobilized when paddy soil is flooded, causing increased uptake of As by rice. We investigated factors controlling soil-to-solution partitioning of As under anaerobic conditions. Changes in As and iron (Fe) speciation due to flooded incubation of two paddy soils (soils A and B) were investigated by HPLC/ICP-MS and XANES. The flooded incubation resulted in a decrease in Eh, a rise in pH, and an increase in the As(III) fraction in the soil solid phase up to 80% of the total As in the soils. The solution-to-soil ratio of As(III) and As(V) (R(L/S)) increased with pH due to the flooded incubation. The R(L/S) for As(III) was higher than that for As(V), indicating that As(III) was more readily released from soil to solution than was As(V). Despite the small differences in As concentrations between the two soils, the amount of As dissolved by anaerobic incubation was lower in soil A. With the development of anaerobic conditions, Fe(II) remained in the soil solid phase as the secondary mineral siderite, and a smaller amount of Fe was dissolved from soil A than from soil B. The dissolution of Fe minerals rather than redox reaction of As(V) to As(III) explained the different dissolution amounts of As in the two paddy soils. Anaerobic incubation for 30 d after the incomplete suppression of microbial activity caused a drop in Eh. However, this decline in Eh did not induce the transformation of As(V) to As(III) in either the soil solid or solution phases, and the dissolution of As was limited. Microbial activity was necessary for the reductive reaction of As(V) to As(III) even when Eh reached the condition necessary for the dominance of As(III). Ratios of released As to Fe from the soils were decreased with incubation time during both anaerobic incubation and abiotic dissolution by sodium ascorbate, suggesting that a larger amount of As was associated with an easily soluble fraction of Fe (hydr) oxide in amorphous phase and/or smaller particles. PMID

  9. Uniform nano-sized valsartan for dissolution and bioavailability enhancement: influence of particle size and crystalline state.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiuping; Sun, Hongrui; Che, Erxi; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Tongying; Sun, Changshan; Wang, Siling

    2013-01-30

    The central purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of drug particle size and crystalline state on valsartan (VAL) formulations in order to improve its dissolution and bioavailability. VAL microsuspension (mean size 22 μm) and nanosuspension (30-80nm) were prepared by high speed dispersing and anti-solvent precipitation method and converted into powders through spray drying. Differential scanning calorimetry studies indicated amorphization of VAL in the spray-dried valsartan nanosuspension (SD-VAL-Nano) but recrystallization occurred after 6 months storage at room temperature. The spray-dried valsartan microsuspension (SD-VAL-Micro) conserved the crystalline form. The VAL dissolution rate and extent were markedly enhanced with both SD-VAL-Micro and SD-VAL-Nano as compared to crude VAL crystals over the pH range of 1.2-6.8. Pharmacokinetic studies in rats demonstrated a 2.5-fold increase in oral bioavailability in the case of SD-VAL-Nano compared with the commercial product while the SD-VAL-Micro provided a much less desirable pharmacokinetic profile. In conclusion, reducing particle size to the nano-scale appears to be a worthwhile and promising approach to obtain VAL products with optimum bioavailability. In addition, the impact of crystalline state on the bioavailability of nano-sized VAL might be not as big as that of particle size. PMID:23266761

  10. Influence of carbon nanomaterials on the properties of paint coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanok, S. A.; Krauklis, A. V.; Borisevich, K. O.; Prokopchuk, N. P.; Nikolaichik, A. V.; Stanovoi, P. G.

    2011-11-01

    The conditions for obtaining carbon nanomaterials with the use of a low-temperature plasma are described. The product obtained was analyzed using the electron microscopy and a laser diffraction particle-size analyzer. The influence of the carbon nanomaterials on the physicochemical properties of paint coatings, their adhesion, impact and bending strengths, hardness, and protection characteristics was investigated.

  11. Homonuclear decoupling for spectral simplification of carbon-13 enriched molecules in solution-state NMR enhanced by dissolution DNP.

    PubMed

    Chinthalapalli, Srinivas; Bornet, Aurélien; Carnevale, Diego; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-04-20

    Complex overlapping multiplets due to scalar couplings (n)J((13)C, (13)C) in fully (13)C-enriched molecules can be simplified by polychromatic irradiation of selected spins. The signal intensities of the remaining non-irradiated signals are proportional to the concentrations, as shown in this work for the anomeric (13)C signals of the α- and β-conformers of glucose. Homonuclear decoupling can therefore be useful for quantitative NMR studies. The resulting decoupled lineshapes show residual fine structures that have been investigated by means of numerical simulations. Simulations also show that homonuclear decoupling schemes remain effective despite inhomogeneous static fields that tend to hamper in cellulo and in vivo studies. Homonuclear decoupling schemes can be combined with dissolution DNP to obtain signal enhancements of more than four orders of magnitude. Polychromatic irradiation of selected spins does not cause significant losses of hyperpolarization of the remaining non-irradiated spins. PMID:27058951

  12. Investigating Eastern Equatorial Pacific Export Production and Carbonate Dissolution with XRF Core Scanning at ODP Site 846 Over the Last 5 Million Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C.; Robinson, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal and equatorial upwelling in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) are responsible for about 10% of the ocean's total production. The deep, cold, nutrient-rich waters supplied by upwelling originate in high latitudes, linking changes at high latitudes to the tropics. The Pliocene/Pleistocene transition which started around 2.7-3 million years ago (Ma) marked a period of higher variability in biological production and sea surface temperatures dominated by glacial/interglacial cycles. In addition, secular changes in the development of both Walker and Hadley cells appear to have impacted the strength of equatorial upwelling. However, the large positive production excursions, such as those found from 1.6 to 2.2 Ma, remain only moderately well characterized and both changes in high latitude nutrient supply and regional upwelling strength are implicated. ODP Site 846 is located in the heart of the EEP upwelling cold tongue and has ideal characteristics for examining these links and excursions. We present high-resolution (~0.5 ky) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) chemical profiles of Ca, Si, Ba, Mn, Fe, Al, and Ti, as well as a total nitrogen (TN%) record for the last 5 million years from ODP Site 846. We use these high resolution profiles in conjunction with other regional data to assess biogeochemical processes in the EEP over the last 5 million years. CaCO3 and SiO2 are the two dominant biogenic components and account for more than 95% of the sediment. BaSO4 and the discrete TN% measurements record total productivity. MnO and Fe2O3 are redox-sensitive species and are particularly suited to tracing dissolution related to excess bottom-water metabolic processes driven by high export production at the high-alkalinity Site 846. Al2O3 and TiO2 are tracers of terrigenous input. A transition between low amplitude and high amplitude carbonate cycles occurs at 2.8 Ma, coinciding with the Pliocene/Pleistocene transition to higher amplitude glacial cycles. Notable excursions from

  13. Modelling of time resolved and long contact time dissolution studies of spent nuclear fuel in 10 mM carbonate solution A comparison between two different models and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Trygve E.; Jonsson, Mats; Merino, Juan

    2008-04-01

    Using two different models, radiation induced dissolution of spent UO 2 fuel has been simulated. One of the models is conventional homogeneous radiolysis simulations where two different geometrical constraints were used and the second model is the recently developed steady-state model. The results of the simulations are compared to each other and to experimental results from spent fuel leaching experiments performed in carbonate containing aqueous solution under Ar-atmosphere. The influence of radiolytically produced H 2 is incorporated (on the basis of a recently suggested mechanism) in both models and this reproduces the experimentally observed inhibition of spent fuel dissolution fairly well. The conventional radiolysis model reproduces the experimental concentrations of the radiolysis products H 2 and O 2 very well while it fails to reproduce the experimental H 2O 2 concentration. The reasons for this are discussed. The general trend in uranium concentration as a function of time is reproduced by both the conventional radiolysis model and the steady-state model. The conventional radiolysis model (in which the radiation dose is homogeneously distributed in the whole liquid volume) underestimates the uranium concentration while the steady-state model, which represents the worst case scenario, overestimates the concentrations to some extent. When applying the conventional radiolysis model, assuming that all the radiation energy is deposited within 40 μm from the fuel surface, the uranium concentrations during the initial part of the experiments are reproduced quantitatively. The differences between the models and the applicability of the models are discussed in some detail.

  14. Dissolution of barite for the analysis of strontium isotopes and other chemical and isotopic variations using aqueous sodium carbonate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breit, G.N.; Simmons, E.C.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    A simple procedure for preparing barite samples for chemical and isotopic analysis is described. Sulfate ion, in barite, in the presence of high concentrations of aqueous sodium carbonate, is replaced by carbonate. This replacement forms insoluble carbonates with the cations commonly in barite: Ba, Sr, Ca and Pb. Sulfate is released into the solution by the carbonate replacement and is separated by filtration. The aqueous sulfate can then be reprecipitated for analysis of the sulfur and oxygen isotopes. The cations in the carbonate phase can be dissolved by acidifying the solid residue. Sr can be separated from the solution for Sr isotope analysis by ion-exchange chromatography. The sodium carbonate used contains amounts of Sr which will affect almost all barite 87Sr 86Sr ratios by less than 0.00001 at 1.95?? of the mean. The procedure is preferred over other techniques used for preparing barite samples for the determination of 87Sr 86Sr ratios because it is simple, rapid and enables simultaneous determination of many compositional parameters on the same material. ?? 1985.

  15. Impact of nitrogenous fertilizers on carbonate dissolution in small agricultural catchments: Implications for weathering CO 2 uptake at regional and global scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Anne-Sophie; Probst, Anne; Probst, Jean-Luc

    2008-07-01

    The goal of this study was to highlight the occurrence of an additional proton-promoted weathering pathway of carbonate rocks in agricultural areas where N-fertilizers are extensively spread, and to estimate its consequences on riverine alkalinity and uptake of CO 2 by weathering. We surveyed 25 small streams in the calcareous molassic Gascogne area located in the Garonne river basin (south-western France) that drain cultivated or forested catchments for their major element compositions during different hydrologic periods. Among these catchments, the Hay and the Montoussé, two experimental catchments, were monitored on a weekly basis. Studies in the literature from other small carbonate catchments in Europe were dissected in the same way. In areas of intensive agriculture, the molar ratio (Ca + Mg)/HCO 3 in surface waters is significantly higher (0.7 on average) than in areas of low anthropogenic pressure (0.5). This corresponds to a decrease in riverine alkalinity, which can reach 80% during storm events. This relative loss of alkalinity correlates well with the NO3- content in surface waters. In cultivated areas, the contribution of atmospheric/soil CO 2 to the total riverine alkalinity (CO 2 ATM-SOIL/HCO 3) is less than 50% (expected value for carbonate basins), and it decreases when the nitrate concentration increases. This loss of alkalinity can be attributed to the substitution of carbonic acid (natural weathering pathway) by protons produced by nitrification of N-fertilizers (anthropogenic weathering pathway) occurring in soils during carbonate dissolution. As a consequence of these processes, the alkalinity over the last 30 years shows a decreasing trend in the Save river (one of the main Garonne river tributaries, draining an agricultural catchment), while the nitrate and calcium plus magnesium contents are increasing. We estimated that the contribution of atmospheric/soil CO 2 to riverine alkalinity decreased by about 7-17% on average for all the studied

  16. Kinetic Controls on the Desorption/Dissolution of Sorbed U(VI) and their Influence on Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Chongxuan Liu; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; McKinley, James P.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Davis, James A.

    2006-04-05

    A number of published studies have sought to understand geochemical kinetic process of uranium (U) that are relevant to nuclear waste sites and repositories by studying the weathering of U ore bodies and downgradient transport of weathering products. Such studies have provided important insights on processes operative over many thousand to millions of years. This project also seeks knowledge on the geochemical kinetics of U, but for shorter in-ground time periods (e.g., 20-50 years) relevant to DOE legacy waste sites. Several representative field sites were selected for intense study at Hanford as part of EMSP research to provide: (1) fundamental insights on intermediate duration geochemical events of U controlling fate and transport, and (2) key scientific information needed for remedial action assessment and informed decision making. The site discussed in this poster is the 300 A uranium plume. This plume is located at the south end of Hanford and discharges directly to the Columbia River. The plume resulted from the discharge of fuels fabrication wastes (nitric acid solutions containing U and Cu) and cladding dissolution wastes (basic sodium aluminate) to the North and South Process Ponds between 1943 and 1975 near the Columbia River. A Kd-based remedial action assessment fifteen years ago predicted that the plume would dissipate to concentrations below the DWS within 10 y. As a result of this assessment, an interim, MNA remedial decision was agreed to by DOE and state/federal regulators. It has been 15 y since the above assessment, and groundwater concentrations have not decreased (attenuated) as projected. Stakeholders are now demanding remedial intervention, and DOE seeks science-based conceptual and numeric models for more accurate future projections. The objectives are: (1) Identify the chemical speciation (e.g., adsorption complexes precipitates), mineral residence, and physical location of contaminant U in a depth sequence of sediments from the disposal

  17. Preparation of a novel starch-derived three-dimensional ordered macroporous carbon for improving the dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of water-insoluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Chao; Hao, Yanna; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Ying; Qiu, Yang; Jiang, Jie; Yu, Tong; Ji, Peng

    2016-01-25

    In our study, soluble starch was applied as a novel carbon source for preparing three-dimensional ordered macroporous carbon (3DOMC) using monodisperse silica nanospheres as the hard template. The 3DOMC was used as an insoluble drug carrier when it was found that it could markedly improve the water solubility of felodipine (FDP). The structural features of 3DOMC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The 3DOMC structure was found to have a higher drug loading than microporous and mesoporous structures, and the interconnected nanostructure effectively inhibited the formation of drug crystals. FDP, belonging to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System II (BCSII), was chosen as the model drug and was loaded into the 3DOMC structure by solvent evaporation. The state of FDP in the 3DOMC structure was characterized by powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results obtained showed that FDP was present in the pores in an amorphous or microcrystalline state. In vivo and in vitro experiments indicated that 3DOMC could significantly improve the drug dissolution rate, but the FDP-3DOMC self-made common tablets had the disadvantage of a burst effect. For this reason, osmotic pump technology was used to control the drug release rate. We developed a potentially useful insoluble drug carrier for pharmaceutical applications. PMID:26580824

  18. Influence of different microphysical schemes on the prediction of dissolution of nonreactive gases by cloud droplets and raindrops

    SciTech Connect

    Huret, N.; Chaumerliac, N.; Isaka, H.; Nickerson, E.C. |

    1994-09-01

    Three microphysical formulations are closely compared to evaluate their impact upon gas scavenging and wet deposition processes. They range from a classical bulk approach to a fully spectral representation, including an intermediate semispectral parameterization. Detailed comparisons among the microphysical rates provided by these three parameterizations are performed with special emphasis on evaporation rate calculations. This comparative study is carried out in the context of a mountain wave simulation. Major differences are essentially found in the contrasted spreading of the microphysical fields on the downwind side of the mountain. A detailed chemical module including the dissolution of the species and their transfer between phases (air, cloud, and rain) is coupled with the three microphysical parameterizations in the framework of the dynamical mesoscale model. An assessment of the accuracy of each scheme is then proposed by comparing their ability to represent the drop size dependency of chemical wet processes. The impact of evaporation (partial versus total) upon the partition of species between gas and aqueous phases is also studied in detail.

  19. Alginic Acid Accelerates Calcite Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, T. D.; Duckworth, O. W.; McNamara, C. J.; Martin, S. T.; Mitchell, R.

    2003-12-01

    Accelerated carbonate weathering through biological activity affects both geochemical cycling and the local pH and alkalinity of terrestrial and marine waters. Microbes affect carbonate dissolution through metabolic activity, production of acidic or chelating exudates, and cation binding by cell walls. Dissolution occurs within microbial biofilms - communities of microorganisms attached to stone in an exopolymer matrix. We investigated the effect of alginic acid, a common biological polymer produced by bacteria and algae, on calcite dissolution using a paired atomic force microscopy/flow-through reactor apparatus. The alginic acid caused up to an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate at 3 < pH < 12. Additionally, the polymer preferentially binds to the obtuse pit steps and increases step velocity. We propose that the polymer is actively chelating surficial cations reducing the activation energy and increasing dissolution rate. The role of biologically produced polymers in mineral weathering is important in the protection of cultural heritage materials and understanding of marine and terrestrial systems.

  20. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM CONTAINING CARRIER PRECIPITATE BY CARBONATE METATHESIS AND SEPARATION OF SULFIDE IMPURITIES THEREFROM BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for recovering plutonium from foreign products wherein a carrier precipitate of lanthanum fluoride containing plutonium is obtained and includes the steps of dissolving the carrier precipitate in an alkali metal carbonate solution, adding a soluble sulfide, separating the sulfide precipitate, adding an alkali metal hydroxide, separating the resulting precipitate, washing, and dissolving in a strong acid.

  1. Influence of carbonate facies on fault zone architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michie, E. A. H.; Haines, T. J.; Healy, D.; Neilson, J. E.; Timms, N. E.; Wibberley, C. A. J.

    2014-08-01

    Normal faults on Malta were studied to analyse fault propagation and evolution in different carbonate facies. Deformation of carbonate facies is controlled by strength, particle size and pore structure. Different deformation styles influence the damage characteristics surrounding faults, and therefore the fault zone architecture. The carbonates were divided into grain- and micrite-dominated carbonate lithofacies. Stronger grain-dominated carbonates show localised deformation, whereas weaker micrite-dominated carbonates show distributed deformation. The weaker micrite-dominated carbonates overlie stronger grain-dominated carbonates, creating a mechanical stratigraphy. A different architecture of damage, the ‘Fracture Splay Zone’ (FSZ), is produced within micrite-dominated carbonates due to this mechanical stratigraphy. Strain accumulates at the point of juxtaposition between the stronger grain-dominated carbonates in the footwall block and the weaker micrite-dominated carbonates in the hanging wall block. New slip surfaces nucleate and grow from these points, developing an asymmetric fault damage zone segment. The development of more slip surfaces within a single fault zone forms a zone of intense deformation, bound between two slip surfaces within the micrite-dominated carbonate lithofacies (i.e., the FSZ). Rather than localisation onto a single slip surface, allowing formation of a continuous fault core, the deformation will be dispersed along several slip surfaces. The dispersed deformation can create a highly permeable zone, rather than a baffle/seal, in the micrite-dominated carbonate lithofacies. The formation of a Fracture Splay Zone will therefore affect the sealing potential of the fault zone. The FSZ, by contrast, is not observed in the majority of the grain-dominated carbonates.

  2. [Modeling the Influencing Factors of Karstification and Karst Carbon Cycle in Laboratory].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui-yi; Lü, Xian-fu; Duan, Yi-fan

    2015-08-01

    To analyze the influencing factors of karstification and karst carbon cycle, a simulation experiment was carried out and 6 soil columns were designed. The results showed that the content of H2O4, hydrodynamic condition and thickness of the soil had important influence on karstification and karst carbon cycle. For the soil columns which were covered by the same thickness of soil, the concentrations of Ca2+ + Mg2+ and SO4(2-) followed the order of B20-2 > B20-1 > B20-3, B50-2 > B50-1 > B50-3. This meant that input of H2SO4 enhanced the karstification and increasing infiltration water had significant dilution effect on the chemical properties. For the soil columns with different thickness of soil but with the same slag pile and hydrodynamic conditions, the concentrations of Ca2+ + Mg2+ and SO4(2-) followed the order of B50-1 > B20-1, B50-2 > B20-2, B50-3 > B20-3. It was demonstrated that more carbonate rock was dissolved under the thick soil columns. In addition, the net consumption of CO2 mainly depended on the content of H2SO4 in this experiment due to slight contribution of H2CO3 to carbonate rock dissolution. More content of H2SO4 brought about less net consumption of C02, but B50-2 was an exception. Organic matter and other nutrients might be input into deep soil with the slag pile, and they promoted the production of soil C)2. Therefore, more CO2 was consumed due to the increased contribution of H2CO to karstification. PMID:26592011

  3. Influence of carbonization methods on the aromaticity of pyrogenic dissolved organic carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) components of soil amendments such as biochar will influence the fundamental soil chemistry including the metal speciation, nutrient availability, and microbial activity. Quantitative correlation is necessary between (i) pyrogenic DOC components of varying aromaticity...

  4. The influence of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) processing conditions on drug loading and physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Robert J; Crean, Abina M; Ryan, Katie B

    2012-12-15

    Poor water solubility of drugs can complicate their commercialisation because of reduced drug oral bioavailability. Formulation strategies such as increasing the drug surface area are frequently employed in an attempt to increase dissolution rate and hence, improve oral bioavailability. Maximising the drug surface area exposed to the dissolution medium can be achieved by loading drug onto a high surface area carrier like mesoporous silica (SBA-15). The aim of this work was to investigate the impact of altering supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) processing conditions, in an attempt to enhance drug loading onto SBA-15 and increase the drug's dissolution rate. Other formulation variables such as the mass ratio of drug to SBA-15 and the procedure for combining the drug and SBA-15 were also investigated. A model drug with poor water solubility, fenofibrate, was selected for this study. High drug loading efficiencies were obtained using SC-CO(2), which were influenced by the processing conditions employed. Fenofibrate release rate was enhanced greatly after loading onto mesoporous silica. The results highlighted the potential of this SC-CO(2) drug loading approach to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs. PMID:23041132

  5. Influence of public transport in black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Y.; Oyola, P.; Gramsch, E. V.; Moreno, F.; Rubio, M.

    2013-05-01

    As a consequence of poor air quality in Santiago de Chile, several measures were taken by the local authorities to improve the environmental conditions and protect the public health. In year 2005 the Chilean government implemented a project called "Transantiago" aimed to introduce major modifications in the public transportation system. The primary objectives of this project were to: provide an economically, socially and environmentally sustainable service and improve the quality of service without increasing fares. In this work we evaluate the impact of the Transantiago system on the black carbon pollution along four roads directly affected by the modification to the transport system. The black carbon has been used to evaluate changes in air quality due to changes in traffic. The assessment was done using measurements of black carbon before Transantiago (June-July 2005) and after its implementation (June-July 2007). Four sites were selected to monitor black carbon at street levels, one site (Alameda) that represents trunk-bus streets, i.e., buses crossing the city through main avenues. Buses using these streets had an important technological update with respect to 2005. Two streets (Usach and Departamental) show a mixed condition, i.e., they combine feeder and trunk buses. These streets combine new EURO III buses with old buses with more than 3 years of service. The last street (Eliodoro Yañez) represent private cars road without public transportation and did not experience change. Hence, the results from the years 2005 and 2007 can be directly compared using an appropriate methodology. To ensure that it was not the meteorological conditions that drive the trends, the comparison between year 2005 and 2007 was done using Wilcoxon test and a regression model. A first assessment at the four sites suggested a non decrease in black carbon concentration from 2005 to 2007, except for Alameda. A first statistical approach confirmed small increases in BC in Usach and E

  6. Cyclic magnetite dissolution in Pleistocene sediments of the abyssal northwest Pacific Ocean: Evidence for glacial oxygen depletion and carbon trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korff, Lucia; Dobeneck, Tilo; Frederichs, Thomas; Kasten, Sabine; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    The carbonate-free abyss of the North Pacific defies most paleoceanographic proxy methods and hence remains a "blank spot" in ocean and climate history. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic, geochemical, and sedimentological methods were combined to date and analyze seven middle to late Pleistocene northwest Pacific sediment cores from water depths of 5100 to 5700 m. Besides largely coherent tephra layers, the most striking features of these records are nearly magnetite-free zones corresponding to glacial marine isotope stages (MISs) 22, 12, 10, 8, 6, and 2. Magnetite depletion is correlated with organic carbon and quartz content and anticorrelated with biogenic barite and opal content. Within interglacial sections and mid-Pleistocene transition glacial stages MIS 20, 18, 16, and 14, magnetite fractions of detrital, volcanic, and bacterial origin are all well preserved. Such alternating successions of magnetic iron mineral preservation and depletion are known from sapropel-marl cycles, which accumulated under periodically changing bottom water oxygen and redox conditions. In the open central northwest Pacific Ocean, the only conceivable mechanism to cause such abrupt change is a modified glacial bottom water circulation. During all major glaciations since MIS 12, oxygen-depleted Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW)-sourced bottom water seems to have crept into the abyssal northwest Pacific below ~5000 m depth, thereby changing redox conditions in the sediment, trapping and preserving dissolved and particulate organic matter and, in consequence, reducing and dissolving both, biogenic and detrital magnetite. At deglaciation, a downward progressing oxidation front apparently remineralized and released these sedimentary carbon reservoirs without replenishing the magnetite losses.

  7. Structural implications of water dissolution in haplogranitic glasses from NMR spectroscopy: influence of total water content and mixed alkali effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, B. C.; Riemer, T.; Kohn, S. C.; Holtz, F.; Dupree, R.

    2001-09-01

    that water dissolution in aluminosilicate glasses might involve several mechanisms of hydroxyl formation. NMR data for Series II showed only a significant mixed alkali effect (nonlinear behaviour) on NMR parameters for 23Na but not for 29Si or 27Al. Therefore, these data suggest that the mixed alkali effect is related to the charge balancing cation rather than a modified aluminosilicate network.

  8. Diamond dissolution and the production of methane and other carbon-bearing species in hydrothermal diamond-anvil cells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Anderson, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    Raman analysis of the vapor phase formed after heating pure water to near critical (355-374 ??C) temperatures in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) reveals the synthesis of abiogenic methane. This unexpected result demonstrates the chemical reactivity of diamond at relatively low temperatures. The rate of methane production from the reaction between water and diamond increases with increasing temperature and is enhanced by the presence of a metal gasket (Re, Ir, or Inconel) which is compressed between the diamond anvils to seal the aqueous sample. The minimum detection limit for methane using Raman spectroscopy was determined to be ca. 0.047 MPa, indicating that more than 1.4 nanograms (or 8.6 ?? 10-11 mol) of methane were produced in the HDAC at 355 ??C and 30 MPa over a period of ten minutes. At temperatures of 650 ??C and greater, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were detected in addition to methane. The production of abiogenic methane, observed in all HDAC experiments where a gasket was used, necessitates a reexamination of the assumed chemical systems and intensive parameters reported in previous hydrothermal investigations employing diamonds. The results also demonstrate the need to minimize or eliminate the production of methane and other carbonic species in experiments by containing the sample within a HDAC without using a metal gasket.

  9. Dissolution of man-made vitreous fibers in rat alveolar macrophage culture and Gamble's saline solution: influence of different media and chemical composition of the fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Luoto, K; Holopainen, M; Karppinen, K; Perander, M; Savolainen, K

    1994-01-01

    The effect of different chemical compositions of man-made vitreous fibers (MMVF) on their dissolution by alveolar macrophages (AM) in culture and in Gamble's solution was studied. The fibers were exposed to cultured rat AMs, culture medium alone; or Gamble's saline solution for 2, 4, or 8 days. The dissolution of the fibers was studied by measuring the amount of silicon (Si), iron (Fe), and aluminum (Al) in each medium. The AMs in culture dissolved Fe and Al from the fibers but the dissolution of Si was more marked in the cell culture medium without cells and in the Gamble's solution. The dissolution of Si, Fe, and Al was different for different fibers, and increased as a function of time. The Fe and Al content of the fibers correlated negatively with the dissolution of Si by AMs from the MMVF, i.e., when the content of Fe and Al of the fibers increased the dissolution of Si decreased. These results suggest that the chemical composition of MMVFs has a marked effect on their dissolution. AMs seem to affect the dissolution of Fe and Al from the fibers. This suggests that in vitro models with cells in the media rather than only culture media or saline solutions would be preferable in dissolution studies of MMVFs. PMID:7882911

  10. Lead deposition onto fractured vitreous carbon: influence of electrochemical pretreated electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, E.; Carreño, G.; Ponce-de-León, C.; Oropeza, M. T.; Morales, M.; González, I.; Batina, N.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the electrochemical deposition of Pb(II) onto Fractured Vitreous Carbon (FVC) electrodes from solutions containing very low concentrations of lead in different electrolytes (sulfate or chloride). To examine how the FVC surface state influences the lead deposition efficiency, the electrodes were subjected to different electrochemical pretreatments prior to the actual deposition process. The FVC electrode was used as a representative model of the vitreous carbon (VC) bulk, avoiding the polishing procedure that could change the surface. Electrochemical pretreatment was carried out by cyclic voltammetry in electrolytes containing chloride or nitrate anions and in some cases, ferrocyanide. Before and after the electrochemical pretreatment, the electrode surface morphology was assessed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging. The quantity of lead deposited on the FVC electrode surface (lead deposition efficiency) in each experiment was estimated from the charge under the lead anodic, dissolution peak. Electrochemical pretreatment of electrodes in chloride or nitrate electrolytic baths consistently reduced the lead deposition efficiency. A detailed analysis, correlating lead deposition efficiencies to surface roughness and fractal dimension of the freshly prepared and electrochemically pretreated FVC electrodes, indicated that the decrease in efficiency corresponded to the change in electrode surface geometry. The greater efficiency of lead deposition observed in the chloride-containing electrolyte was due to the interaction between chloride and deposited lead rather than a chloride interaction with the FVC substrate.

  11. The influence of organic carbon flux on benthic foraminiferal proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corliss, B. H.; Sun, X.; Brown, C. W.; Showers, W. J.

    2005-12-01

    During the last 30 years, deep-sea benthic foraminifera have been widely used in reconstructing environmental conditions in the deep sea. Initial suggestions of faunal-water mass associations were never substantiated and, instead, organic carbon flux was identified as a primary influence on species and assemblage patterns. Organic carbon flux also impacts the chemistry of deep water masses and is reflected in the stable isotopic and trace element composition of a number of deep-sea taxa. The timing of delivery of organic carbon can also have an affect on foraminiferal chemistry. Carbon-13 data of Holocene Epistominella exigua from the North Atlantic show a 0.9 per mil change over 60 degrees of latitude that can be correlated to seasonality of productivity, based on a comparison of SeaWIFS satellite imagery. Seasonality and mean annual primary productivity do not affect the carbon-13 of Planulina wuellerstorfi in the North Atlantic, although P. wuellerstorfi exhibits significant variability. Our results suggest that the carbon-13 of E. exigua in conjunction with P. wuellerstorfi can be used to reconstruct seasonality of primary productivity. These findings raise the possibility that other geochemical proxies influenced by particle flux from the surface may be affected by periodic flux events that create phytodetritus layers and change the chemistry of the microhabitats occupied by some benthic foraminiferal species. Existing studies suggest that organic carbon flux and seasonality of flux influence both faunal and geochemical signals from benthic foraminiferal. These relationships can be used to reconstruct primary productivity and seasonality, in addition to deep-water circulation, and illustrate the importance of incorporating ecological information in the interpretation of geochemical data from deep sea taxa.

  12. An experimental study of magnesite dissolution rates at neutral to alkaline conditions and 150 and 200 °C as a function of pH, total dissolved carbonate concentration, and chemical affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Schott, Jacques; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2010-11-01

    Steady-state magnesite dissolution rates were measured in mixed-flow reactors at 150 and 200 °C and 4.6 < pH < 8.4, as a function of ionic strength (0.001 M ⩽ I ⩽ 1 M), total dissolved carbonate concentration (10 -4 M < ΣCO 2 < 0.1 M), and distance from equilibrium. Rates were found to increase with increasing ionic strength, but decrease with increasing temperature from 150 to 200 °C, pH, and aqueous CO 32- activity. Measured rates were interpreted using the surface complexation model developed by Pokrovsky et al. (1999a) in conjunction with transition state theory ( Eyring, 1935). Within this formalism, magnesite dissolution rates are found to be consistent with r=k{>MgOH2+}41-exp (-4ART), where rd represents the BET surface area normalized dissolution rate, {>MgOH2+} stands for the concentration of hydrated magnesium centers on the magnesite surface, kMg designates a rate constant, A refers to the chemical affinity of the overall reaction, R denotes the gas constant, and T symbolizes absolute temperature. Within this model decreasing rates at far-from-equilibrium conditions (1) at constant pH with increasing temperature and (2) at constant temperature with increasing pH and ΣCO 2 stem from a corresponding decrease in {>MgOH2+}. This decrease in {>MgOH2+} results from the increasing stability of the >MgCO3- and >MgOH° surface species with increasing temperature, pH and CO 32- activity. The decrease in constant pH dissolution rates yields negative apparent activation energies. This behavior makes magnesite resistant to re-dissolution if formed as part of mineral carbon sequestration efforts in deep geologic formations.

  13. Factors influencing organic carbon preservation in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The organic matter that escapes decomposition is buried and preserved in marine sediments, with much debate as to whether the amount depends on bottom-water O2 concentration. One group argues that decomposition is more efficient with O2, and hence, organic carbon will be preferentially oxidized in its presence, and preserved in its absence. Another group argues that the kinetics of organic matter decomposition are similar in the presence and absence of O2, and there should be no influence of O2 on preservation. A compilation of carbon preservation shows that both groups are right, depending on the circumstances of deposition. At high rates of deposition, such as near continental margins, little difference in preservation is found with varying bottom-water O2. It is important that most carbon in these sediments decomposes by anaerobic pathways regardless of bottom-water O2. Hence, little influence of bottom-water O2 on preservation would, in fact, be expected. As sedimentation rate drops, sediments deposited under oxygenated bottom water become progressively more aerobic, while euxinic sediments remain anaerobic. Under these circumstances, the relative efficiencies of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition could affect preservation. Indeed, enhanced preservation is observed in low-O2 and euxinic environments. To explore in detail the factors contributing to this enhanced carbon preservation, aspects of the biochemistries of the aerobic and anaerobic process are reviewed. Other potential influences on preservation are also explored. Finally, a new model for organic carbon decomposition, the "pseudo-G" model, is developed. This model couples the degradation of refractory organic matter to the overall metabolic activity of the sediment, and has consequences for carbon preservation due to the mixing together of labile and refractory organic matter by bioturbation.

  14. Light noble gas dissolution into ring structure-bearing materials and lattice influences on noble gas recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Colin R. M.; Parman, Stephen W.; Kelley, Simon P.; Cooper, Reid F.

    2015-06-01

    Light noble gas (He-Ne-Ar) solubility has been experimentally determined in a range of materials with six-member, tetrahedral ring structures: beryl, cordierite, tourmaline, antigorite, muscovite, F-phlogopite, actinolite, and pargasite. Helium solubility in these materials is relatively high, 4 × 10-10 to 3 × 10-7 mol g-1 bar-1, which is ∼100 to 100,000× greater than He solubility in olivine, pyroxene, or spinel. Helium solubility broadly correlates with the topology of ring structures within different minerals. Distinctive He-Ne-Ar solubility patterns are associated with the different ring structure topologies. Combined, these observations suggest ring structures have a strong influence on noble gas solubility in materials and could facilitate the recycling of noble gases, along with other volatiles (i.e., water, chlorine, and fluorine), into the mantle. Measurements of Ne and Ar solubility in antigorite, however, are highly variable and correlated with each other, suggesting multiple factors contribute the solubility of noble gases in serpentine-rich materials.

  15. Dissolution Dominating Calcification Process in Polar Pteropods Close to the Point of Aragonite Undersaturation

    PubMed Central

    Bednaršek, Nina; Tarling, Geraint A.; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Fielding, Sophie; Feely, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Thecosome pteropods are abundant upper-ocean zooplankton that build aragonite shells. Ocean acidification results in the lowering of aragonite saturation levels in the surface layers, and several incubation studies have shown that rates of calcification in these organisms decrease as a result. This study provides a weight-specific net calcification rate function for thecosome pteropods that includes both rates of dissolution and calcification over a range of plausible future aragonite saturation states (Ωar). We measured gross dissolution in the pteropod Limacina helicina antarctica in the Scotia Sea (Southern Ocean) by incubating living specimens across a range of aragonite saturation states for a maximum of 14 days. Specimens started dissolving almost immediately upon exposure to undersaturated conditions (Ωar∼0.8), losing 1.4% of shell mass per day. The observed rate of gross dissolution was different from that predicted by rate law kinetics of aragonite dissolution, in being higher at Ωar levels slightly above 1 and lower at Ωar levels of between 1 and 0.8. This indicates that shell mass is affected by even transitional levels of saturation, but there is, nevertheless, some partial means of protection for shells when in undersaturated conditions. A function for gross dissolution against Ωar derived from the present observations was compared to a function for gross calcification derived by a different study, and showed that dissolution became the dominating process even at Ωar levels close to 1, with net shell growth ceasing at an Ωar of 1.03. Gross dissolution increasingly dominated net change in shell mass as saturation levels decreased below 1. As well as influencing their viability, such dissolution of pteropod shells in the surface layers will result in slower sinking velocities and decreased carbon and carbonate fluxes to the deep ocean. PMID:25285916

  16. The influence of xanthan on the crystallization of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodeng; Xu, Guiying

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) was crystallized in xanthan (XC) aqueous solutions. The CaCO 3 particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) methods. The concentrations of XC, Ca 2+ and CO 32- ions and the ratios [Ca 2+]/[CO 32-] and [Mg 2+]/[Ca 2+] show evident influence on the aggregation and growth of CaCO 3 particles. The presence of Mg 2+ ions influences not only the morphology, but also the polymorph of CaCO 3.

  17. Influence of Cd, Co, and Zn on inorganic carbon acquisition and carbon metabolism in Emiliania huxleyi.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, J. N.; Boye, M.; De La Broise, D.; Probert, I.

    2014-12-01

    Trace elements are essential micronutrients for primary producers; hence they influence the global carbon cycle and contribute to the regulation of Earth's climate. Over the past 25 years, the influence of Fe concentration on phytoplankton production has been well studied and this research has been instrumental in our understanding of the influence that biology has on the sequestration of atmospheric CO2. However, other trace elements that are directly involved in carbon metabolism by primary producers, such as Zn, Cd, and Co, have received less attention. We examined the physiological response of two strains of Emiliania huxleyi to a range of realistic trace element concentrations (Zn, Cd, Co) in the marine environment under batch, semi-continuous, and continuous culture conditions. In addition, the continuous culture system was maintained at a pH of 8.15 ±0.02 by a sensor and regulator-controlled CO2­ injection system. The results from this study will highlight the influence that trace element composition of seawater has on the growth rate, elemental quota, inorganic carbon uptake, and carbon metabolism of Emiliania huxleyi. Potential limitations for the interpretation of paleo-productivity records will be discussed.

  18. The Influence of Drug Physical State on the Dissolution Enhancement of Solid Dispersions Prepared Via Hot-Melt Extrusion: A Case Study Using Olanzapine

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Maria Fátima; Zhao, Min; Pinto, João F; Sousa, João J; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examine the relationship between the physical structure and dissolution behavior of olanzapine (OLZ) prepared via hot-melt extrusion in three polymers [polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K30, polyvinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate (PVPVA) 6:4, and Soluplus® (SLP)]. In particular, we examine whether full amorphicity is necessary to achieve a favorable dissolution profile. Drug–polymer miscibility was estimated using melting point depression and Hansen solubility parameters. Solid dispersions were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. All the polymers were found to be miscible with OLZ in a decreasing order of PVP>PVPVA>SLP. At a lower extrusion temperature (160°C), PVP generated fully amorphous dispersions with OLZ, whereas the formulations with PVPVA and SLP contained 14%–16% crystalline OLZ. Increasing the extrusion temperature to 180°C allowed the preparation of fully amorphous systems with PVPVA and SLP. Despite these differences, the dissolution rates of these preparations were comparable, with PVP showing a lower release rate despite being fully amorphous. These findings suggested that, at least in the particular case of OLZ, the absence of crystalline material may not be critical to the dissolution performance. We suggest alternative key factors determining dissolution, particularly the dissolution behavior of the polymers themselves. PMID:24765654

  19. The influence of drug physical state on the dissolution enhancement of solid dispersions prepared via hot-melt extrusion: a case study using olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Pina, Maria Fátima; Zhao, Min; Pinto, João F; Sousa, João J; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we examine the relationship between the physical structure and dissolution behavior of olanzapine (OLZ) prepared via hot-melt extrusion in three polymers [polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K30, polyvinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate (PVPVA) 6:4, and Soluplus® (SLP)]. In particular, we examine whether full amorphicity is necessary to achieve a favorable dissolution profile. Drug–polymer miscibility was estimated using melting point depression and Hansen solubility parameters. Solid dispersions were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. All the polymers were found to be miscible with OLZ in a decreasing order of PVP>PVPVA>SLP. At a lower extrusion temperature (160°C), PVP generated fully amorphous dispersions with OLZ, whereas the formulations with PVPVA and SLP contained 14%-16% crystalline OLZ. Increasing the extrusion temperature to 180°C allowed the preparation of fully amorphous systems with PVPVA and SLP. Despite these differences, the dissolution rates of these preparations were comparable, with PVP showing a lower release rate despite being fully amorphous. These findings suggested that, at least in the particular case of OLZ, the absence of crystalline material may not be critical to the dissolution performance. We suggest alternative key factors determining dissolution, particularly the dissolution behavior of the polymers themselves. PMID:24765654

  20. Influence of pore morphology and topology on capillary trapping in geological carbon dioxide sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, L.; Harper, E.; Herring, A. L.; Wildenschild, D.

    2012-12-01

    Current carbon capture and storage (CCS) techniques could reduce the release of anthropogenic CO2 into the atmosphere by subsurface sequestration of CO2 in saline aquifers. In geological storage CO2 is injected into deep underground porous formations where CO2 is in the supercritical state. Deep saline aquifers are particularly attractive because of their abundance and potentially large storage volumes. Despite very broad research efforts there are still substantial uncertainties related to the effectiveness of the trapping, dissolution, and precipitation processes controlling the permanent storage of CO2. After injection of CO2 the saline water (brine) will imbibe back and reoccupy the pore space as the CO2 moves upwards, trapping a large part of the CO2. This trapping mechanism is known as capillary trapping and occurs as isolated CO2 bubbles are locked in the brine inside the pores of the porous rock. The large-scale movement of CO2 within the brine is thereby prevented. This mechanism thus constitutes an important storage mechanism after the CO2 injection until the subsequent dissolution trapping and precipitation of carbonate mineral. The capillary trapping of CO2 depends largely on the shape and interconnectivity of the pore space and it is therefore important to study the influence of pore scale morphology and topology to understand and optimize large scale capillary trapping. We use a high pressure set-up, designed for supercritical CO2 conditions, with a flow cell compatible with synchrotron-based X-ray computed micro-tomography (CMT) to generate high-resolution images to study capillary trapping. We use sintered glass bead columns as an approximation for unconsolidated reservoir systems. The smooth surface glass bead data allow us to separate the chemistry and surface roughness effects of the porous medium from the effect of the morphology and topology on the capillary trapping. We will relate these aspects of the pore space to the distribution of the

  1. Influence of carbon steel grade on the initial attachment of bacteria and microbiologically influenced corrosion.

    PubMed

    Javed, M A; Neil, W C; Stoddart, P R; Wade, S A

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the composition and microstructure of different carbon steel grades on the initial attachment (≤ 60 min) of Escherichia coli and subsequent longer term (28 days) corrosion was investigated. The initial bacterial attachment increased with time on all grades of carbon steel. However, the rate and magnitude of bacterial attachment varied on the different steel grades and was significantly less on the steels with a higher pearlite phase content. The observed variations in the number of bacterial cells attached across different steel grades were significantly reduced by applying a fixed potential to the steel samples. Longer term immersion studies showed similar levels of biofilm formation on the surface of the different grades of carbon steel. The measured corrosion rates were significantly higher in biotic conditions compared to abiotic conditions and were found to be positively correlated with the pearlite phase content of the different grades of carbon steel coupons. PMID:26785935

  2. The influence of aliphatic amines, diamines, and amino acids on the polymorph of calcium carbonate precipitated by the introduction of carbon dioxide gas into calcium hydroxide aqueous suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuajiw, Wittaya; Takatori, Kazumasa; Igarashi, Teruki; Hara, Hiroki; Fukushima, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The influence of aliphatic organic additives including amines, diamines and amino acids, on the polymorph of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitated from a calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) suspensions and carbon dioxide gas (CO2) was studied by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The amorphous calcium carbonate, vaterite, aragonite and calcite were observed for the precipitated samples with organic additives. While the precipitation without organic additive, only the stable phase; calcite was obtained. The observed crystal phases were related with the alkyl chain length in the aliphatic part of additives. These results suggested that hydrophobic interactions due to the van der Waals force between organic additives and surface of inorganic precipitates could not be ignored. We concluded that covering or adsorbing of these organic additives on the precipitates surfaces retarded the successive dissolution/recrystallisation process in the aqueous systems. The results revealed that not only the polar interaction from the hydrophilic functional groups, as the former reports proposed, but also the van der Waals interactions from the hydrophobic alkyl groups played the important role in the phase transformation of CaCO3.

  3. Dissolution of Uranium Oxides Under Alkaline Oxidizing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven C.; Peper, Shane M.; Douglas, Matthew; Ziegelgruber, Kate L.; Finn, Erin C.

    2009-11-01

    Bench scale experiments were conducted to determine the dissolution characteristics of uranium oxide powders (UO2, U3O8, and UO3) in aqueous peroxide-carbonate solutions. Experimental parameters included H2O2 concentration, carbonate counter cation (NH4+, Na+, K+, and Rb+), and pH. Results indicate the dissolution rate of UO2 in 1 M (NH4)2CO3 increases linearly with peroxide concentration ranging from 0.05 – 2 M. The three uranium oxide powders exhibited different dissolution patterns however, UO3 exhibited prompt complete dissolution. Carbonate counter cation affected the dissolution kinetics. There is minimal impact of solution pH, over the range 8.8 to 10.6, on initial dissolution rate.

  4. Stirring effect on kaolinite dissolution rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Volker; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2001-10-01

    Experiments were carried out measuring kaolinite dissolution rates using stirred and nonstirred flow-through reactors at pHs 2 to 4 and temperatures of 25°C, 50°C, and 70°C. The results show an increase of kaolinite dissolution rate with increasing stirring speed. The stirring effect is reversible, i.e., as the stirring slows down the dissolution rate decreases. The effect of stirring speed on kaolinite dissolution rate is higher at 25°C than at 50°C and 70°C and at pH 4 than at pHs 2 and 3. It is suggested that fine kaolinite particles are formed as a result of stirring-induced spalling or abrasion of kaolinite. These very fine particles have an increased ratio of reactive surface area to specific surface area, which results in enhancement of kaolinite dissolution rate. A balance between production and dissolution of the fine particles explains both the reversibility and the temperature and pH dependence of the stirring effect. Since the stirring effect on kaolinite dissolution rate varies with temperature and pH, measurement of kinetic parameters such as activation energy may be influenced by stirring. Therefore, standard use of nonagitated reaction vessels for kinetic experiments of mineral dissolution and precipitation is recommended, at least for slow reactions that are surface controlled.

  5. Buoyant currents arrested by convective dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Christopher W.; Juanes, Ruben

    2013-05-01

    When carbon dioxide (CO2) dissolves into water, the density of water increases. This seemingly insubstantial phenomenon has profound implications for geologic carbon sequestration. Here we show, by means of laboratory experiments with analog fluids, that the up-slope migration of a buoyant current of CO2 is arrested by the convective dissolution that ensues from a fingering instability at the moving CO2-groundwater interface. We consider the effectiveness of convective dissolution as a large-scale trapping mechanism in sloping aquifers, and we show that a small amount of slope is beneficial compared to the horizontal case. We study the development and coarsening of the fingering instability along the migrating current and predict the maximum migration distance of the current with a simple sharp-interface model. We show that convective dissolution exerts a powerful control on CO2 plume dynamics and, as a result, on the potential of geologic carbon sequestration.

  6. The Alkaline Dissolution Rate of Calcite.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Jean

    2016-07-01

    Due to the widespread presence of calcium carbonate on Earth, several geochemical systems, among which is the global CO2 cycle, are controlled to a large extent by the dissolution and precipitation of this mineral. For this reason, the dissolution of calcite has been thoroughly investigated for decades. Despite this intense activity, a consensual value of the dissolution rate of calcite has not been found yet. We show here that the inconsistency between the reported values stems mainly from the variability of the chemical and hydrodynamic conditions of measurement. The spreading of the values, when compared in identical conditions, is much less than expected and is interpreted in terms of sample surface topography. This analysis leads us to propose benchmark values of the alkaline dissolution rate of calcite compatible with all the published values, and a method to use them in various chemical and hydrodynamic contexts. PMID:27282839

  7. Influence of sulfur compounds on the terrestrial carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Using the climate model developed at the A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS CM), numerical experiments have been conducted in line with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), but scaling the anthropogenic emissions of sulfur compounds into the troposphere by ±25%. Two types of impacts of sulfur compounds on climate and the global carbon cycle are considered: climate impact (CI, associated with the influence of tropospheric sulfates on climate and, as a consequence, on the carbon cycle characteristics) and ecological impact (EI, associated with the influence of SO2 on the rate of photosynthesis of terrestrial plants). The climate impact was found to be generally more important than the ecological one. However, in a number of regions, the EI is comparable to CI, including in the southeast parts of North America and, especially, of Asia. The contribution of EI to the change in global characteristics of terrestrial ecosystems in the 20th century is likewise considerable. The CI is generally more sensitive to the uncertainty in anthropogenic emissions of sulfur compounds into the troposphere than the EI.

  8. Anticorrosive Influence of Acetobacter aceti Biofilms on Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Danielle Cook

    2016-07-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel infrastructure is an emerging environmental and cost issue for the ethanol fuel industry, yet its examination lacks rigorous quantification of microbiological parameters that could reveal effective intervention strategies. To quantitatively characterize the effect of cell concentration on MIC of carbon steel, numbers of bacteria exposed to test coupons were systematically controlled to span four orders of magnitude throughout a seven-day test. The bacterium studied, Acetobacter aceti, has been found in ethanol fuel environments and can convert ethanol to the corrosive species acetic acid. A. aceti biofilms formed during the test were qualitatively evaluated with fluorescence microscopy, and steel surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. During exposure, biofilms developed more quickly, and test reactor pH decreased at a faster rate, when cell exposure was higher. Resulting corrosion rates, however, were inversely proportional to cell exposure, indicating that A. aceti biofilms are able to protect carbon steel surfaces from corrosion. This is a novel demonstration of corrosion inhibition by an acid-producing bacterium that occurs naturally in corrosive environments. Mitigation techniques for MIC that harness the power of microbial communities have the potential to be scalable, inexpensive, and green solutions to industrial problems.

  9. The Volcanic History of Mars and Influences on Carbon Outgassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Whelley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Exploration of Mars has revealed some of the most impressive volcanic landforms found throughout the solar system. Volatiles outgassed from volcanoes were likely to have strongly influenced atmospheric chemistry and affected the martian climate. On Earth the role of carbon involved in volcanic outgassing is strongly influenced by tectonic setting, with the greatest weight percent contributions coming from partial mantle melts associated with hot spot volcanism. Most martian volcanic centers appear to represent this style of volcanism. Thus, one important factor in understanding the martian carbon cycle through time is understanding this volatile's link to the planet's volcanic history. The identified volcanic constructs on Mars are not unlike those of the Earth suggesting similar magmatic and eruptive processes. However, the dimensions of many martian volcanic features are significantly larger. The distribution of volcanoes and volcanic deposits on Mars are not spatially or temporally uniform. Large volcanoes (> 100 km diameter) are spatially concentrated in volcanic provinces that likely represent focused upwellings or zones of crustal weakness that enabled magma ascension. Smaller (10s km diameters) volcanoes such as cones, low shields and fissures are often grouped into fields and their lava flows coalesce to produce low slope plains. In some cases plains lava fields are quite extensive with little to no evidence for the volcanic constructs. Although martian volcanism appears to have been dominated by effusive eruptions with likely contributions from passive degassing from the interior, explosive volcanic centers and deposits are known to exist. After the development of a martian crust the planet's volcanic style appears to have evolved from early explosive activity to effusive activity centered at major volcanoes to effusive distributed activity in fields. However, questions remain as to whether or not these styles significantly overlapped in time and if so

  10. Influence of soil moisture-carbon cycle interactions on the terrestrial carbon cycle over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mystakidis, Stefanos; Davin, Edouard L.; Gruber, Nicolas; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    Water availability is a crucial limiting factor for terrestrial ecosystems, but relatively few studies have quantitatively assessed the influence of soil moisture variability on the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here, we investigate the role of soil moisture variability and state in the contemporary terrestrial carbon cycle over Europe. For this we use a Regional Earth System Model (RESM) based on the COSMO-CLM Regional Climate Model, coupled to the Community Land Model version 4.0 (CLM4.0) and its carbon-nitrogen module. The simulation setup consists of a control simulation over the period 1979-2010 in which soil moisture is interactive and three sensitivity simulations in which soil moisture is prescribed to a mean, a very dry or a very wet seasonal cycle without inter-annual variability. The cumulative net biome productivity varies markedly between the different experiments ranging from a strong sink of up to 6PgC in the wet experiment to a source of up to 1.2PgC in the dry experiment. Changes in the land carbon uptake are driven by a combination of two factors: the direct impact of soil moisture on plant's carbon uptake (essentially in southern Europe) and an indirect effect through changes in temperature affecting ecosystem respiration (mainly in central and northern Europe). We find that removing temporal variations in soil moisture dampens interannual variations in terrestrial carbon fluxes (Gross Primary Productivity, respiration, Net Biome Productivity) by more than 50% over most of Europe. Moreover, the analysis reveals that on annual scale about two-thirds of central Europe and about 70% of southern Europe display statistically significant effect of drying and/or wetting on the terrestrial carbon budget and its components. Our findings confirm the crucial role of soil moisture in determining the magnitude and the inter-annual variability in land CO2 uptake which is a key contributor to the year-to-year variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration.