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Sample records for influence regional atmospheric

  1. Regional atmospheric influence on the Chandler wobble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotov, L. V.; Bizouard, C.

    2015-03-01

    From the maps of regional contribution to atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) over the period 1948-2011 (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data) time domain excitation in Chandler frequency band was extracted by Panteleev's filtering method. This permits us to investigate the evolution of the regional atmospheric influence on Chandler wobble. It appears that the temperate latitudes bring the strongest inputs. For pressure term they are limited to continents, and highlight the role of Europe. For the wind term they mostly result from ocean area, encompassing in particular North Atlantic. A quasi-20 year cycle is found in the regional patterns of the atmospheric excitation. The integrated AAM is finally compared with the geodetic excitation reconstructed from the observed polar motion.

  2. The influence of atmospheric circulation types on regional patterns of precipitation in Marmara (NW Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltacı, H.; Kındap, T.; Ünal, A.; Karaca, M.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, regional patterns of precipitation in Marmara are described for the first time by means of Ward's hierarchical cluster analysis. Daily values of winter precipitation data based on 19 meteorological stations were used for the period from 1960 to 2012. Five clusters of coherent zones were determined, namely Black Sea-Marmara, Black Sea, Marmara, Thrace, and Aegean sub-regions. To investigate the prevailing atmospheric circulation types (CTs) that cause precipitation occurrence and intensity in these five different rainfall sub-basins, objective Lamb weather type (LWT) methodology was applied to National Centers of Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) reanalysis of daily mean sea level pressure (MSLP) data. Precipitation occurrence suggested that wet CTs (i.e. N, NE, NW, and C) offer a high chance of precipitation in all sub-regions. For the eastern (western) part of the region, the high probability of rainfall occurrence is shown under the influence of E (SE, S, SW) atmospheric CTs. In terms of precipitation intensity, N and C CTs had the highest positive gradients in all the sub-basins of the Marmara. In addition, although Marmara and Black Sea sub-regions have the highest daily rainfall potential during NE types, high daily rainfall totals are recorded in all sub-regions except the Black Sea during NW types.

  3. Influence of sea-land breezes on the tempospatial distribution of atmospheric aerosols over coastal region.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsieh-Hung; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Hung, Chung-Hsuang; Lin, Chitsan; Lin, Yuan-Chung

    2011-04-01

    The influence of sea-land breezes (SLBs) on the spatial distribution and temporal variation of particulate matter (PM) in the atmosphere was investigated over coastal Taiwan. PM was simultaneously sampled at inland and offshore locations during three intensive sampling periods. The intensive PM sampling protocol was continuously conducted over a 48-hr period. During this time, PM2.5 and PM(2.5-10) (PM with aerodynamic diameters < 2.5 microm and between 2.5 and 10 microm, respectively) were simultaneously measured with dichotomous samplers at four sites (two inland and two offshore sites) and PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diameters < or =10 microm) was measured with beta-ray monitors at these same 4 sites and at 10 sites of the Taiwan Air Quality Monitoring Network. PM sampling on a mobile air quality monitoring boat was further conducted along the coastline to collect offshore PM using a beta-ray monitor and a dichotomous sampler. Data obtained from the inland sites (n=12) and offshore sites (n=2) were applied to plot the PM10 concentration contour using Surfer software. This study also used a three-dimensional meteorological model (Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research Meteorological Model 5) and the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions to simulate surface wind fields and spatial distribution of PM10 over the coastal region during the intensive sampling periods. Spatial distribution of PM10 concentration was further used in investigating the influence of SLBs on the transport of PM10 over the coastal region. Field measurement and model simulation results showed that PM10 was transported back and forth across the coastline. In particular, a high PM10 concentration was observed at the inland sites during the day because of sea breezes, whereas a high PM10 concentration was detected offshore at night because of land breezes. This study revealed that the accumulation of PM in the near-ocean region because of SLBs influenced the

  4. Local and Regional Influences on Atmospheric Nutrient Deposition in Southeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, A. G.; Machado, C. M.; Cardoso, A. A.

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this work was to quantify sources of atmospheric nutrients, which are subsequently deposited to agricultural soils and natural ecosystems of São Paulo State (Brazil). The atmospheric concentrations of soluble ions (NO3-, NH4+, PO43-, SO42-, Cl-, K+, Na+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) in aerosol were evaluated, together with the gases NO2, NH3, HNO3 and SO2. Identification of nutrient sources was achieved using principal component analysis (PCA) followed by multiple linear regression analysis (MLRA). Dry deposition fluxes were estimated using the measured atmospheric concentrations together with dry deposition velocities of gases and aerosols to different surface types. Results showed that the main sources of nutrients to the regions atmosphere were fossil and biofuel combustion (N and S species), agricultural biomass burning (N, S, K and P), re-suspension of soils and dusts (Ca and Mg), and to a lesser extent long-range transport (S). NO2 concentrations were more influenced by local emissions and subsequent chemical transformations occurring on a scale of up to 200-300 km. HNO3 was much less spatially variable, with consistently higher concentrations during warmer, drier periods, indicating an agreement with gas phase/aerosol phase thermodynamic equilibrium theory. Scavenging of gaseous HNO3 was a source of nitrate, for which deposition fluxes were higher during the dry season, when significant relationships were obtained between nitrate concentrations and biomass burning intensity. Additional sources were indicated for particulate nitrate and sulphate, such as road transport and secondary reactions. During winter, the main source of gaseous ammonia was biomass burning, while emissions from soils and wastes predominated during summer. Modeled deposition fluxes were highest to tropical forest and lowest to water and pasture surfaces. In agricultural areas, the deposition fluxes of aerosol components N, P and K (0.37, 0.029 and 0.59 kg ha-1 yr-1, respectively

  5. Investigation of aerosol components influencing atmospheric transfer of UV radiation in Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinart, A.; Kikas, Ü.; Tamm, E.

    2006-01-01

    Linking of atmospheric aerosol size distributions and optical properties via predefined aerosol components was investigated. The measured aerosol volume distributions were decomposed to Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) components, and aerosol optical properties were calculated for a mixture of those components. The obtained aerosol optical properties were then used for modeling the surface UV irradiances with the libRadtran radiative transfer code. The results were verified with the columnar aerosol characteristics obtained from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station Tõravere (58.26°N, 26.46°E) and clear-sky surface UV measurements in Pärnu, Estonia (58.38°N, 24.51°E). The best decomposition results were obtained with four OPAC components, when their lookup characteristics varied within ±10%. Variation of aerosol optical properties in 17 days was influenced by the following aerosol components: soot, 1.2 ± 1.4%; insoluble, 23.1 ± 8.3%; water-soluble, 44.0 ± 10.8%; accumulation mode sea salt, 31.6 ± 6.2% of total aerosol volume. The average refractive index (for λ = 440 nm) of the component mixture was of 1.42 - 0.013i. Interpretation of the soot component was disputable, since similarly high soot concentrations corresponded to the secondary particles in polluted atmosphere and the nucleation bursts in clean atmosphere. The sea-salt component showed a correlation with the aerosol residence time over sea. The water-soluble component and the additional "biomass haze" component represented partly the same aerosol volume in the diameter range of 0.18-1.8 μm. The surface UV irradiances modeled with the AERONET data and the fitted aerosol components were highly correlated with each other, but both model results underestimated the UV extinction by aerosol.

  6. Influence of Atmospheric Solar Radiation Absorption on Photodestruction of Ions at D-Region Altitudes of the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of atmospheric solar radiation absorption on the photodetachment, dissociative photodetachment, and photodissociation rate coefficients (photodestruction rate coefficients) of O-, Cl-, O2 -, O3 -, OH-, NO2 -, NO3 -, O4 -, OH-(H2O), CO3 -, CO4 -, ONOO-, HCO3 -, CO3 -(H2O), NO3 -(H2O), O2 +(H2O), O4 +, N4 +, NO+(H2O), NO+(H2O)2, H+(H2O) n for n = 2-4, NO+(N2), and NO+(CO2) at D-region altitudes of the ionosphere is studied. A numerical one-dimensional time-dependent neutral atmospheric composition model has been developed to estimate this influence. The model simulations are carried out for the geomagnetically quiet time period of 15 October 1998 at moderate solar activity over the Boulder ozonesonde. If the solar zenith angle is not more than 90° then the strongest influence of atmospheric solar radiation absorption on photodestruction of ions is found for photodissociation of CO4 - ions when CO3 - ions are formed. It follows from the calculations that decreases in the photodestruction rate coefficients of ions under consideration caused by this influence are less than 2 % at 70 km altitude and above this altitude if the solar zenith angle does not exceed 90°.

  7. Influence of Atmospheric Solar Radiation Absorption on Photodestruction of Ions at D-Region Altitudes of the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of atmospheric solar radiation absorption on the photodetachment, dissociative photodetachment, and photodissociation rate coefficients (photodestruction rate coefficients) of O-, Cl-, O2 -, O3 -, OH-, NO2 -, NO3 -, O4 -, OH-(H2O), CO3 -, CO4 -, ONOO-, HCO3 -, CO3 -(H2O), NO3 -(H2O), O2 +(H2O), O4 +, N4 +, NO+(H2O), NO+(H2O)2, H+(H2O) n for n = 2-4, NO+(N2), and NO+(CO2) at D-region altitudes of the ionosphere is studied. A numerical one-dimensional time-dependent neutral atmospheric composition model has been developed to estimate this influence. The model simulations are carried out for the geomagnetically quiet time period of 15 October 1998 at moderate solar activity over the Boulder ozonesonde. If the solar zenith angle is not more than 90° then the strongest influence of atmospheric solar radiation absorption on photodestruction of ions is found for photodissociation of CO4 - ions when CO3 - ions are formed. It follows from the calculations that decreases in the photodestruction rate coefficients of ions under consideration caused by this influence are less than 2 % at 70 km altitude and above this altitude if the solar zenith angle does not exceed 90°.

  8. Influence of Large-scale Climate Modes on Atmospheric Rivers That Drive Regional Precipitation Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, B.; Molotch, N. P.; Waliser, D. E.; Fetzer, E. J.; Neiman, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow channels of enhanced meridional water vapor transport between the tropics and extratropics that drive precipitation extremes in the west coast areas of North America and other continents. The influence of large-scale climate modes on ARs is analyzed in terms of modulation on AR frequency and AR-related snow water equivalent (SWE) anomalies, with a focus on understanding the causes of the anomalously snowy winter season of 2010/2011 in California's Sierra Nevada. Mean SWE on 1 April 2011 was ~70% above normal averaged over 100 snow sensors. AR occurrence was anomalously high during the season, with 20 AR dates from November to March and 14 dates in the month of December 2010, compared to the mean occurrence of 9 dates per season. Most of the season's ARs occurred during negative phases of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the Pacific-North American (PNA) teleconnection pattern. Analysis of all winter ARs in California during water years 1998-2011 indicates more ARs occur during the negative phase of AO and PNA, with the increase between positive and negative phases being ~90% for AO, and ~50% for PNA. The circulation pattern associated with concurrent negative phases of AO and PNA, characterized by cyclonic anomalies centered northwest of California, provides a favorable dynamical condition for ARs. The analysis suggests that the massive Sierra Nevada snowpack during the 2010/2011 winter season is primarily related to anomalously high frequency of ARs favored by the joint phasing of -AO and -PNA, and that a secondary contribution is from increased snow accumulation during these ARs favored by colder air temperatures associated with -AO, -PNA and La Niña. The results have implications for subseasonal-to-seasonal predictability of AR activities and related weather and water extremes.

  9. Influence of halophyte plantings in arid regions on local atmospheric structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pielke, R. A.; Lee, T. J.; Glenn, E. P.; Avissar, R.

    1993-06-01

    The practicality of modifying climate in arid regions through irrigation has up to now been constrained by the availability of fresh water with which to grow crops. The present results suggest a new paradigm: the use of salt water to grow halophyte crops and modify local climate along coastal deserts and other arid regions where saline water supplies are available.

  10. Possible influence of atmospheric circulations on winter hazy pollution in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X.; Gong, D.; Kim, S.-J.; Mao, R.; Zhao, X.

    2015-08-01

    Using the daily records derived from the synoptic weather stations and the NCEP/NCAR and ERA-Interim reanalysis data, the variability of the winter hazy pollutions (indicated by the mean visibility and number of hazy days) in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region during the period 1981 to 2015 and its relationship to the atmospheric circulations in middle-high latitude were analyzed in this study. The winter hazy pollution in BTH had distinct inter-annual and inter-decadal variabilities without a significant long-term trend. According to the spatial distribution of correlation coefficients, six atmospheric circulation indices (I1 to I6) were defined from the key areas in sea level pressure (SLP), zonal and meridional winds at 850 hPa (U850, V850), geopotential height field at 500 hPa (H500), zonal wind at 200 hPa (U200), and air temperature at 200 hPa (T200), respectively. All of the six indices have significant and stable correlations with the winter visibility and number of hazy days in BTH. Both the visibility and number of hazy days can be estimated well by using the six indices and fitting and the cross-validation with leave-N-out method, respectively. The high level of the prediction statistics and the reasonable mechanism suggested that the winter hazy pollutions in BTH can be forecasted or estimated credibly based on the optimized atmospheric circulation indices. However, we also noted that the statistic estimation models would be largely influenced by the artificial control of a pollutant discharge. Thus it is helpful for government decision-making departments to take actions in advance in dealing with probably severe hazy pollutions in BTH indicated by the atmospheric circulation conditions.

  11. Solar Terrestrial Influences on the D Region as Shown by the Level of Atmospheric Radio Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satori, G.; Schaning, B.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of the integrated atmospheric radio noise field strength at 27 kHz, used here, were made from 1965 to 1975 at Uppsala, Kuhlungsborn, and Prague-Panska Ves. The large scale meteorological situation was considered by comparing solar disturbed and undisturbed periods under similar weather situations. In order to show the effects of the precipitating high energy particle (HEP) flux and of the Forbush decrease on the noise level between pairs of stations were computed as deviations from the monthly median. Delta E (dB), day by day for all six periods was studied. The correlation coefficients for noon as well as for night values were computed. The correlation coefficients were compared with those for solar undisturbed periods.

  12. Processes for Identifying Regional Influences of and Responses to Increasing Atmospheric CO sub 2 and Climate Change --- The MINK Project

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, W.E. III; McKenney, M.S.; Rosenberg, N.J.; Lemon, K.M.

    1991-08-01

    The second report of a series Processes for Identifying Regional Influences of and Responses to Increasing Atmospheric CO{sub 2} and Climate Change -- The MINK Project is composed of two parts. This Report (IIB) deals with agriculture at the level of farms and Major Land Resource Areas (MLRAs). The Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator (EPIC), a crop growth simulation model developed by scientists at the US Department of Agriculture, is used to study the impacts of the analog climate on yields of main crops in both the 1984/87 and the 2030 baselines. The results of this work with EPIC are the basis for the analysis of the climate change impacts on agriculture at the region-wide level undertaken in this report. Report IIA treats agriculture in MINK in terms of state and region-wide production and resource use for the main crops and animals in the baseline periods of 1984/87 and 2030. The effects of the analog climate on the industry at this level of aggregation are considered in both baseline periods. 41 refs., 40 figs., 46 tabs.

  13. Relative Influence of Trans-Pacific and Regional Atmospheric Transport of PAHs in the Pacific Northwest, U.S.

    PubMed

    Lafontaine, Scott; Schrlau, Jill; Butler, Jack; Jia, Yuling; Harper, Barbara; Harris, Stuart; Bramer, Lisa M; Waters, Katrina M; Harding, Anna; Simonich, Staci L Massey

    2015-12-01

    The relative influences of trans-Pacific and regional atmospheric transport on measured concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PAH derivatives (nitro- (NPAH) and oxy-(OPAH)), organic carbon (OC), and particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) were investigated in the Pacific Northwest, U.S. in 2010-2011. Ambient high volume PM2.5 air samples were collected at two sites in the Pacific Northwest: (1.) Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO) in the Oregon Cascade Range (2763 m above sea level (asl)) and 2.) Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the Columbia River Gorge (CRG) (954 m asl). At MBO, the 1,8-dinitropyrene concentration was significantly positively correlated with the time a sampled air mass spent over Asia, suggesting that this NPAH may be a good marker for trans-Pacific atmospheric transport. At CTUIR, NOx, CO2, and SO2 emissions from a 585 MW coal fired power plant, in Boardman OR, were found to be significantly positively correlated with PAH, OPAH, NPAH, OC, and PM2.5 concentrations. By comparing the Boardman Plant operational time frames when the plant was operating to when it was shut down, the plant was found to contribute a large percentage of the measured PAH (67%), NPAH (91%), OPAH (54%), PM2.5 (39%), and OC (38%) concentrations at CTUIR and the CRG prior to Spring 2011 and likely masked trans-Pacific atmospheric transport events to the CRG. Upgrades installed to the Boardman Plant in the spring of 2011 dramatically reduced the plant's contribution to PAH and OPAH concentrations (by ∼72% and ∼40%, respectively) at CTUIR and the CRG, but not NPAH, PM2.5 or OC concentrations. PMID:26151337

  14. Relative Influence of Trans-Pacific and Regional Atmospheric Transport of PAHs in the Pacific Northwest, U.S.

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The relative influences of trans-Pacific and regional atmospheric transport on measured concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PAH derivatives (nitro- (NPAH) and oxy-(OPAH)), organic carbon (OC), and particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) were investigated in the Pacific Northwest, U.S. in 2010–2011. Ambient high volume PM2.5 air samples were collected at two sites in the Pacific Northwest: (1.) Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO) in the Oregon Cascade Range (2763 m above sea level (asl)) and 2.) Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the Columbia River Gorge (CRG) (954 m asl). At MBO, the 1,8-dinitropyrene concentration was significantly positively correlated with the time a sampled air mass spent over Asia, suggesting that this NPAH may be a good marker for trans-Pacific atmospheric transport. At CTUIR, NOx, CO2, and SO2 emissions from a 585 MW coal fired power plant, in Boardman OR, were found to be significantly positively correlated with PAH, OPAH, NPAH, OC, and PM2.5 concentrations. By comparing the Boardman Plant operational time frames when the plant was operating to when it was shut down, the plant was found to contribute a large percentage of the measured PAH (67%), NPAH (91%), OPAH (54%), PM2.5 (39%), and OC (38%) concentrations at CTUIR and the CRG prior to Spring 2011 and likely masked trans-Pacific atmospheric transport events to the CRG. Upgrades installed to the Boardman Plant in the spring of 2011 dramatically reduced the plant’s contribution to PAH and OPAH concentrations (by ∼72% and ∼40%, respectively) at CTUIR and the CRG, but not NPAH, PM2.5 or OC concentrations. PMID:26151337

  15. The effect of regional-scale soil-moisture deficits on mesoscale atmospheric dynamics that influence fire severity

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, J.D.

    1994-09-30

    This study employs a three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic mesoscale model to evaluate the effects of horizontally heterogeneous soil moisture and vegetation type on the atmosphere during two periods in which wildland fires occurred. Numerical sensitivity simulations demonstrate that evapotranspiration significantly affects the boundary-layer structure embedded in the synoptic-scale circulations. In regions with sufficiently moist soils, evapotranspiration increases the humidity and modifies the diurnally varying temperature near the surface. Occasionally, changes in the humidity and temperature fields can also be seen a significant distance downwind of the moist soil regions. The perturbations in the temperature fields ultimately affect the wind speed and direction over or at the boundaries of the moist-soil regions, but only at certain times during the simulation period. The higher humidity also increases the cloudiness and changes the precipitation amounts, indicating that soil moisture and vegetation may play an important role in modifying the spatial distribution and intensity of precipitation. A lower atmospheric stability index, that is an indicator of the potential for wildland fire, is also calculated from the model results. This index is also sensitive to the horizontal distribution of soil moisture and vegetation, especially in regions with relatively moist soils. While only two periods are examined in this study, the impact of surface inhomogeneities in soil moisture and vegetation type on the atmosphere is expected to be highly dependent on the particular synoptic conditions and upon the distribution of soil moisture.

  16. The use of an atmospheric dispersion model to determine influence regions in the Prince George, B.C. airshed from the burning of open wood waste piles.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, B; Jackson, P L

    2009-06-01

    A means of determining air emission source regions adversely influencing the city of Prince George, British Columbia, Canada from potential burning of isolated piles of mountain pine beetle-killed lodge pole pine is presented. The analysis uses the CALPUFF atmospheric dispersion model to identify safe burning regions based on atmospheric stability and wind direction. Model results show that the location and extent of influence regions is sensitive to wind speed, wind direction, atmospheric stability and a threshold used to quantify excessive concentrations. A concentration threshold based on the Canada Wide PM(2.5) Standard is used to delineate the influence regions while Environment Canada's (EC) daily ventilation index (VI) is used to quantify local atmospheric stability. Results from the analysis, to be used by air quality meteorologists in assessing daily requests for burning permits, are presented as a series of maps delineating acceptable burning locations for sources placed at various distances from the city center and under different ventilation conditions. The results show that no burning should be allowed within 10 km of the city center; under poor ventilation conditions, no burning should be allowed within 20 km of the city center; under good ventilation conditions, burning can be allowed within 10-15 km of the city center; under good to fair ventilation conditions, burning can be allowed beyond 15 km of the city center; and if the wind direction can be reliably forecast, burning can be allowed between 5 and 10 km downwind of the city center under good ventilation conditions. PMID:19303193

  17. Possible influence of atmospheric circulations on winter haze pollution in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X.; Gong, D.; Kim, S.-J.; Mao, R.; Zhao, X.

    2016-01-01

    Using the daily records derived from the synoptic weather stations and the NCEP/NCAR and ERA-Interim reanalysis data, the variability of the winter haze pollution (indicated by the mean visibility and number of hazy days) in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region during the period 1981 to 2015 and its relationship with the atmospheric circulations at middle-high latitude were analyzed in this study. The winter haze pollution in BTH had distinct inter-annual and inter-decadal variabilities without a significant long-term trend. According to the spatial distribution of correlation coefficients, six atmospheric circulation indices (I1 to I6) were defined from the key areas in sea level pressure (SLP), zonal and meridional winds at 850 hPa (U850, V850), geopotential height field at 500 hPa (H500), zonal wind at 200 hPa (U200), and air temperature at 200 hPa (T200), respectively. All of the six indices have significant and stable correlations with the winter visibility and number of hazy days in BTH. In the raw (unfiltered) correlations, the correlation coefficients between the six indices and the winter visibility (number of hazy days) varied from 0.57 (0.47) to 0.76 (0.6) with an average of 0.65 (0.54); in the high-frequency ( < 10 years) correlations, the coefficients varied from 0.62 (0.58) to 0.8 (0.69) with an average of 0.69 (0.64). The six circulation indices together can explain 77.7 % (78.7 %) and 61.7 % (69.1 %) variances of the winter visibility and the number of hazy days in the year-to-year (inter-annual) variability, respectively. The increase in Ic (a comprehensive index derived from the six individual circulation indices) can cause a shallowing of the East Asian trough at the middle troposphere and a weakening of the Siberian high-pressure field at sea level, and is then accompanied by a reduction (increase) of horizontal advection and vertical convection (relative humidity) in the lowest troposphere and a reduced boundary layer height in BTH and its

  18. Regional Biases in Droplet Activation Parameterizations: Strong Influence on Aerosol Second Indirect Effect in the Community Atmosphere Model v5.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, R.; Nenes, A.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions constitute one of the most uncertain aspects of anthropogenic climate change estimates. The magnitude of these interactions as represented in climate models strongly depends on the process of aerosol activation. This process is the most direct physical link between aerosols and cloud microphysical properties. Calculation of droplet number in GCMs requires the computation of new droplet formation (i.e., droplet activation), through physically based activation parameterizations. Considerable effort has been placed in ensuring that droplet activation parameterizations have a physically consistent response to changes in aerosol number concentration. However, recent analyses using an adjoint sensitivity approach showed that parameterizations can exhibit considerable biases in their response to other aerosol properties, such as aerosol modal diameter or to the aerosol chemical composition. This is a potentially important factor in estimating aerosol indirect effects since changes in aerosol properties from pre-industrial times to present day exhibit a very strong regional signature. In this work we use the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) to show that the regional imprint of the changes in aerosol properties during the last century interacts with the droplet activation parameterization in a way that these biases are amplified over climatically relevant regions. Two commonly used activation routines, the CAM5 default, Abdul-Razzak and Ghan parameterization, as well as the Fountoukis and Nenes parameterization are used in this study. We further explored the impacts of Nd parameterization biases in the first and second aerosol indirect effects separately, by performing simulations were droplet number was not allowed to intervene in the precipitation initiation process. The simulations performed show that an unphysical response to changes in the diameter of accumulation mode aerosol translates into extremely high Nd concentrations over South

  19. Atmospheric composition - Influence of biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    The variability of atmospheric constituents influenced by biological organisms over various time scales is examined, together with the human contribution to atmospheric sulfur. The biogeochemistry of nitrogen is discussed, with an emphasis on N2O, NO, and microbially mediated reactions in soil and water. Carbon species are bound up mainly in sediments and the deep ocean, but human activities involving combustion may cause a doubling of the atmospheric levels of CO2 in the near future, which could produce a general low-level atmospheric warming. Longer term measurements are required to assess the effects of CH4 augmentation in the atmosphere through fuel combustion. Coal burning effectively doubles the amount of SO2 produced by natural sources, and reduces the pH of rainwater, thus posing hazards to fish, plankton, and mollusc life.

  20. Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, K J; Richardson, S J; Miles, N L

    2007-03-07

    are captured. Influence functions, derived using a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion model driven by the CSU Regional Atmospheric Modeling System and nudged to NCEP reanalysis meteorological fields, are used to determine source regions for the towers. The influence functions are combined with satellite vegetation observations to interpret the observed trends in CO2 concentration. Full inversions will combine these elements in a more formal analytic framework.

  1. Influence of runoff, high frequency atmospheric forcing and model resolution on deep water mass formation regions and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, from a numerical model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Quintana, Yarisbel; Courtois, Peggy; Hu, Xianmin; Pennelly, Clark; Myers, Paul G.

    2016-04-01

    Water mass formation regions act as windows to the deep ocean where surface waters are transformed to intermediate and deep waters. Within the North Atlantic, Labrador Sea Water (LSW) is convectively produced in the Labrador Sea while in the Nordic Seas the source waters for Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW) and Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (NEADW) are formed. They are the main components of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) which forms the lower limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). We explore the changes of the LSW formation rates and in AMOC strength as consequence of runoff glacial melt, high frequency atmospheric forcing influence and variations in model's resolution. We use 1/4° resolution Arctic and Northern Hemisphere Atlantic (ANHA4) configuration from the Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) model. A nest using ANHA4 and the Adaptive Grid Refinement in FORTRAN (AGRIF) package was used to increase the resolution to 1/12° in the sub-polar gyre. The formation rate is calculated based upon a kinematic subduction approach where the exchange through the dynamic mixed layer base is calculated based on shallowing and deepening in the mixed layer, and convergence of horizontal transport into or out of the mixed layer. Lastly we use a Lagrangian tool (Ariane) to track the path of the DSOW and the NEADW from their formation source.

  2. [Atmospheric Influences Analysis on the Satellite Passive Microwave Remote Sensing].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu-bao; Shi, Li-juan; Shi, Jian-cheng; Zhao, Shao-jie

    2016-02-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing offers its all-weather work capabilities, but atmospheric influences on satellite microwave brightness temperature were different under different atmospheric conditions and environments. In order to clarify atmospheric influences on Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), atmospheric radiation were simulated based on AMSR-E configuration under clear sky and cloudy conditions, by using radiative transfer model and atmospheric conditions data. Results showed that atmospheric water vapor was the major factor for atmospheric radiation under clear sky condition. Atmospheric transmittances were almost above 0.98 at AMSR-E's low frequencies (< 18.7 GHz) and the microwave brightness temperature changes caused by atmosphere can be ignored in clear sky condition. Atmospheric transmittances at 36.5 and 89 GHz were 0.896 and 0.756 respectively. The effects of atmospheric water vapor needed to be corrected when using microwave high-frequency channels to inverse land surface parameters in clear sky condition. But under cloud cover or cloudy conditions, cloud liquid water was the key factor to cause atmospheric radiation. When sky was covered by typical stratus cloud, atmospheric transmittances at 10.7, 18.7 and 36.5 GHz were 0.942, 0.828 and 0.605 respectively. Comparing with the clear sky condition, the down-welling atmospheric radiation caused by cloud liquid water increased up to 75.365 K at 36.5 GHz. It showed that the atmospheric correction under different clouds covered condition was the primary work to improve the accuracy of land surface parameters inversion of passive microwave remote sensing. The results also provided the basis for microwave atmospheric correction algorithm development. Finally, the atmospheric sounding data was utilized to calculate the atmospheric transmittance of Hailaer Region, Inner Mongolia province, in July 2013. The results indicated that atmospheric transmittances were close to 1

  3. A Regional Modeling Study of the Influence of Urban Land Cover Change on the Lower Atmosphere in Baltimore-Washington DC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, J.; Gallo, K.; Pielke, R.; Rozoff, C.; Steyaert, L.

    2001-12-01

    The land-use and land cover (LULC) history of the Baltimore-Washington region has been intensively studied through a variety of environmental research collaborations and regional partnerships. One such partnership, the Baltimore-Washington Regional Collaboratory, involved multiple Federal and local agencies cooperating on a 200-year urban growth study in the Chesapeake region. Information from this study on pre-1900 and current LULC conditions for the Baltimore-Washington DC area was integrated with data from other sources to construct different lower boundary conditions for a series of simulations using the Colorado State University (CSU) Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). We use the RAMS simulations to diagnose the extent and nature of the effect of urban anomalies in surface heat, moisture, and momentum on mid-summer local and regional climate. The experimental design adopted for this study takes advantage of the grid-nesting capability of RAMS. A fine grid with 1km horizontal resolution was nested into a coarser 5 km grid, which extends from southern Pennsylvania, Maryland, to parts of Virginia, and West Virginia. Two sets of month-long simulations for July 2000 were conducted with RAMS running in parallel on a 26-processor cluster of computers at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), CSU. In the first set of simulations, we initially used satellite-derived current land cover data as the lower boundary condition in a 31-day RAMS run. We then replaced this data with the pre-1900 land cover data for the same region and ran a similar RAMS simulation. Identical observed meteorology was retained for the lateral boundary conditions in both cases. The model results for the initial run were validated with July 2000 surface climate data and flux measurements of sensible and latent heat from sites located within the fine grid model domain. Additional simulations were conducted to compare RAMS model performance using prescribed land

  4. Energetic particle influences in Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, Karen; Harrison, R. Giles; Nicoll, Keri; Rycroft, Michael; Briggs, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    Energetic particles from outer space, known as galactic cosmic rays, constantly ionise the entire atmosphere. During strong solar storms, solar energetic particles can also reach the troposphere and enhance ionisation. Atmospheric ionisation generates cluster ions. These facilitate current flow in the global electric circuit, which arises from charge separation in thunderstorms driven by meteorological processes. Energetic particles, whether solar or galactic in origin, may influence the troposphere and stratosphere through a range of different mechanisms, each probably contributing a small amount. Some of the suggested processes potentially acting over a wide spatial area in the troposphere include enhanced scavenging of charged aerosol particles, modification of droplet or droplet-droplet behavior by charging, and the direct absorption of infra-red radiation by the bending and stretching of hydrogen bonds inside atmospheric cluster-ions. As well as reviewing the proposed mechanisms by which energetic particles modulate atmospheric properties, we will also discuss new instrumentation for measurement of energetic particles in the atmosphere.

  5. Processes for identifying regional influences of and responses to increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} and climate change - the MINK project: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, N.J.; Crosson, P.R.

    1991-08-01

    Scientists believe that a serious change in the climate of the earth could occur in the course of the next two to five decades as a result of warming caused by the rapid accumulation of radiatively active trace gases in the atmosphere. There is concern that not only the amount of warming but the rate at which it occurs could be unprecedented, at least since the current interglacial period began. Scientific uncertainties remain in our understanding of the climatic changes that may follow from greenhouse warming. Nevertheless, large and rapid changes in regional climate are conceivable. General circulation models (GCMs) predict changes for the central U.S. as large as an 8{degrees}C increase in mean summertime temperature accompanied by a 1 mm/day decrease in mean precipitation. Most predictions are less extreme but, so long as the direction of change is credible, efforts are warranted to identify just what kinds of impacts to expect if society chooses to allow climate to change or cannot stop it from changing, and just what might be done to adjust to those impacts.

  6. Exploring the influence of surface waves in the carbon dioxide transfer velocity between the ocean and atmosphere in the coastal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco Javier; Francisco Herrera, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Loza, Lucía; Osuna, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Field measurements have been carried out in order to better understand the possible influence of ocean surface waves in the transfer of carbon dioxide between the ocean and atmosphere in the coastal zone. The CO2 fluxes are being analysed and results are shown in a contribution by Gutiérrez-Loza et al., in this session. Here we try to highlight the findings regarding the transfer velocity (kCO2) once we have incorporated direct measurements of carbon dioxide concentration in the water side. In this study direct measurements of CO2 fluxes were obtained with an eddy covariance tower located in the shoreline equipped with an infrared open-path gas analyzer (LI-7500, LI-COR) and a sonic anemometer (R3-100 Professional Anemometer, Gill Instruments), both at about 13 m above the mean sea level, and sampling at 20 Hz. For some period of time simultaneous information of waves was recorded with a sampling rate of 2 Hz using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (Workhorse Sentinel, Teledyne RD Instruments) at 10 m depth and 350 m away from the tower. Besides, recently the concentration of CO2 in water has also been recorded making use of a SAMI-CO2 instrument. A subtle effect of the wave field is detected in the estimated kCO2. Looking into details of the surface currents being detected very near the air-sea interface through an ADPC, a certain association can be found with the gas transfer velocity. Furthermore, some of the possible effects of breaking wave induced turbulence in the coastal zone is to be addressed. This work represents a RugDiSMar Project (CONACYT 155793) contribution. The support from CB-2011-01-168173 CONACYT project is greatly acknowledged.

  7. Regional effect on urban atmospheric nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salma, Imre; Németh, Zoltán; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Aalto, Pasi; Nieminen, Tuomo; Weidinger, Tamás; Molnár, Ágnes; Imre, Kornélia; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-07-01

    Secondary aerosol particle production via new particle formation (NPF) has been shown to be a major contributor to the global aerosol load. NPF has also been observed frequently in urban environments. Here, we investigate the effect of regional NPF on urban aerosol load under well-defined atmospheric conditions. The Carpathian Basin, the largest orogenic basin in Europe, represents an excellent opportunity for exploring these interactions. Based on long-term observations, we revealed that NPF seen in a central large city of the basin (Budapest) and its regional background occur in a consistent and spatially coherent way as a result of a joint atmospheric phenomenon taking place on large horizontal scales. We found that NPF events at the urban site are usually delayed by > 1 h relative to the rural site or even inhibited above a critical condensational sink level. The urban processes require higher formation rates and growth rates to be realized, by mean factors of 2 and 1.6, respectively, than the regional events. Regional- and urban-type NPF events sometimes occur jointly with multiple onsets, while they often exhibit dynamic and timing properties which are different for these two event types.

  8. Direct and Indirect ENSO Influences on Regional Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Renguang

    2016-04-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is one of the strongest signals in the tropics and imposes large influences on climate in many regions, such as the Indian summer monsoon, central American precipitation, and the South China Sea precipitation. ENSO affects regional climate variability both directly and indirectly. The direct influence is through concurrent atmospheric circulation response to anomalous heating associated with equatorial central and eastern Pacific SST anomalies. The indirect influence is by first inducing regional SST anomalies through the so-called "atmospheric bridge" and then atmospheric circulation response to the regional SST anomalies. Previous studies are either focused on the direct influence of ENSO via concurrent atmospheric change or the indirect influence of ENSO via regional SST anomalies. In this talk, the presenter will distinguish the direct and indirect influences of ENSO and demonstrate how the two types of influences may play together in leading to regional climate variability. Summer climate anomalies in three regions will be used for illustration: the Indian summer monsoon, central American summer precipitation, and the South China Sea summer precipitation.

  9. Tampa Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkeson, T. D.

    2003-12-01

    The Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) was formed in 1991 to assist in developing a comprehensive plan to restore and protect Tampa Bay in Florida, USA. An ecological indicator of the health of the Bay is the coverage of seagrasses, historically in decline, which are important to the aquatic habitat and food web of the bay. Seagrass decline is linked to excess of plant-stimulating forms of nitrogen to the bay, promoting algae growth, which shades out light needed to sustain seagrasses. One element of the TBEP is a private-local-state, multi-agency Nitrogen Management Consortium that seeks to limit nitrogen loading to the Bay to the 1992-1994 average. Present estimates suggest atmospheric deposition comprises ~ 30% of the nitrogen budget of the Bay. This estimate was based, however, on limited ambient monitoring data and simple models, typical of such national estuary program efforts nationwide. In the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Florida DEP joined with TBEP to increase the intensity, sophistication and spatial scope of monitoring and modeling and provide better information on air quality in the Tampa Bay area. The result will be improved estimates of the effects of local and regional emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) on the Bay and the benefits to be gained from implementation of emissions reduction strategies.

  10. Atmospheric chemistry - Response to human influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, J. A.; Prather, M. J.; Wofsy, S. G.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1978-01-01

    Global atmospheric chemistry is surveyed, and the agreement of models with observed distribution of gases is considered. The influence of human perturbations due to combustion, agriculture, and chloro-carbon releases is examined with emphasis on ozone. Effects of combustion-related releases of CO on the abundances of other gases as well as possible effects of CO on tropospheric ozone are discussed. Other topics include the contribution of the chlorocarbon industry to stratospheric chloride and the recombination of nitrogen fixed by agriculture and combustion.

  11. Influence of CO on Titan atmospheric reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, B.; Carrasco, N.; Gautier, T.; Mahjoub, A.; He, J.; Szopa, C.; Hadamcik, E.; Buch, A.; Cernogora, G.

    2014-08-01

    The atmosphere of Titan is mainly composed of N2 and CH4 which are the source of various CxHyNz photochemical volatiles products. Laboratory simulations of the Titan’s atmospheric reactivity were mainly interested in the study of the complex organic chemistry which leads to the formation of analogues of Titan’s aerosols, called tholins. These studies were mainly interested in the reactivity of the N2/CH4 gaseous mixture and with the primary products of reactions without oxygen. However, the atmosphere of Titan also contains oxygenated volatile species. The most abundant one to have been detected is CO with a concentration about 50 ppmv. The work presented here is an experimental simulation devoted to estimate the influence of CO on the Titan’s atmospheric reactivity. With this aim, CO is introduced in a standard N2/CH4 mixture at different mixing ratio up to 4.5%. The kinetics of the methane consumption is monitored with in situ mass spectrometry and the compositions of the gaseous phase and tholins produced in the reactor are characterized ex situ with GC-MS and elemental analysis. This work shows that CO modifies the composition of the gas phase with the detection of oxygenated compounds: CO2 and N2O. The presence of CO also drastically decreases the production rate of tholins, involving also a perturbation on the methane kinetics. Tholins are produced in lower global amounts, but their sizes are found to be significantly larger than without CO. The oxygen incorporation in tholins is found to be efficient, with an oxygen content of the same order of magnitude as the amount of CO in the initial gas mixture.

  12. Lunar influence on equatorial atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian; Zotov, Leonid; Sidorenkov, Nikolay

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the equatorial atmospheric angular momentum oscillation in the nonrotating frame and the quasi-diurnal lunar tidal potential. Between 2 and 30 days, the corresponding equatorial component, called Celestial Atmospheric Angular Momentum (CEAM), is mostly constituted of prograde circular motions, especially of a harmonic at 13.66 days, a sidelobe at 13.63 days, and of a weekly broadband variation. A simple equilibrium tide model explains the 13.66 day pressure term as a result of the O1 lunar tide. The powerful episodic fluctuations between 5 and 8 days possibly reflect an atmospheric normal mode excited by the tidal waves Q1 (6.86 days) and σ1 (7.095 days). The lunar tidal influence on the spectral band from 2 to 30 days is confirmed by two specific features, not occurring for seasonal band dominated by the solar thermal effect. First, Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute equally and synchronously to the CEAM wind term. Second, the pressure and wind terms are proportional, which follows from angular momentum budget considerations where the topographic and friction torques on the solid Earth are much smaller than the one resulting from the equatorial bulge. Such a configuration is expected for the case of tidally induced circulation, where the surface pressure variation is tesseral and cannot contribute to the topographic torque, and tidal winds blow only at high altitudes. The likely effects of the lunar-driven atmospheric circulation on Earth's nutation are estimated and discussed in light of the present-day capabilities of space geodetic techniques.

  13. Influence of Cenozoic Plateau Growth on Precipitation and Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insel, N.; Poulsen, C. J.; Rowley, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    Large mountain ranges exhibit a first-order control on climate, but it is unclear how climate may have changed over time as topography developed. In this work we use global and regional general circulation models (Genesis3.0, RegCM4) to evaluate dynamical and physical atmospheric changes associated with variations in the Andean and Himalayan topography during the Cenozoic. Our model results show that orogenic plateaus play a critical role in the evolution of climate by affecting atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns. The influence of high topography on regional climate is not purely mechanical through orographic lifting, but also due to modifications of dynamical processes. The uplift of the Andes and Himalaya influence atmospheric flow in the following ways: (1) Orogens act as a barrier to atmospheric flow, thereby changing low-level (800 mbar) wind patterns by causing a reversal and/or significant strengthening of the prevailing winds. The establishment and strength of low-level jets is directly related to mountain elevations. (2) In contrast, monsoonal circulations form without the existence of a plateau, but are modified by high topography through thermal and mechanical effects (e.g. sensible or latent heating, orographic blocking). (3) An increase in the surface pressure gradient between high mountain ranges and the foreland enhances convergence of low-level flow and draws in moisture from adjacent regions. The increase in moisture transport provides the latent heat required to drive convective updrafts and enhances convection and precipitation along the windward flanks of high topography. (4) Regional atmospheric circulation similar to modern are established and amplify as the mountains rise to ~50-75% of their modern elevation. Our model results are largely consistent with proxy evidence of regional climate change, and have implications for the timing and rate of surface plateau uplift. Most importantly, simulated changes in paleoclimate alter

  14. New atmospheric composition observations in the Karakorum region: Influence of local emissions and large-scale circulation during a summer field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putero, D.; Cristofanelli, P.; Laj, P.; Marinoni, A.; Villani, P.; Broquet, A.; Alborghetti, M.; Bonafè, U.; Calzolari, F.; Duchi, R.; Landi, T. C.; Verza, G. P.; Vuillermoz, E.; Bonasoni, P.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we provide an overview of short lived climate forcers (SLCFs) and carbon dioxide variability in the Karakorum, by presenting results deriving from a field campaign carried out at Askole (3015 m a.s.l., Pakistan Northern Areas), by Baltoro glacier. By using an innovative embedded and transportable system, continuous measurements of aerosol particle number concentration (Np, 1571 ± 2670 cm-3), surface ozone (O3, 31.7 ± 10.4 nmol/mol), carbon dioxide (CO2, 394.3 ± 6.9 μmol/mol) and meteorological parameters have been performed from August 20th to November 10th 2012. The domestic combustion from the Askole village emerged as a possible systematic source of contamination in the valley, with short-lasting pollution events probably related to domestic cooking activities characterized by high values of Np (6066 ± 5903 cm-3). By excluding these local contamination events, mountain thermal wind regime dominated the diurnal variability of Np, O3 and CO2. In comparison to night-time, we observed higher Np (+354 cm-3) and O3 (+7 nmol/mol) but lower CO2 (-8 μmol/mol) in air-masses coming from the lower valley during the central part of the day. Part of the day-to-day atmospheric composition variability can be also ascribed to synoptic circulation variability, as observed by using HYSPLIT 5-day back-trajectories.

  15. Influence of atmospheric forcing parameters on land surface simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, H. P.; Mandal, M.; Bhattacharya, A.

    2015-12-01

    The quality of atmospheric forcing plays important role on land surface simulation using decoupled land surface modeling system. In the present study, the influence of the various atmospheric forcing parameters on land surface simulation is assessed through sensitivity experiments. Numerical experiments are conducted towards preparation of land surface analysis for the period Jan-2011 - Dec-2013 using offline 2D-Noah land surface model (LSM) based land data assimilation system (LDAS) over Indian region (5 - 39N, 60 - 100E) hereafter referred as LDASI. The surface temperature, specific humidity, horizontal winds and pressure as atmospheric forcing parameters are derived from Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). The downward (solar and thermal) radiation and precipitation is obtained from European Centre for Medium Range Forecast (ECMWF) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) respectively. The sensitivity experiments are conducted by introducing perturbation in one atmospheric forcing parameter at a time keeping the other parameters unchanged. Influence of temperature, specific humidity, downward (shortwave and long wave) radiation, rain-rate and wind speed is investigated by conducted 13 numerical experiments. It is observed that the land surface analysis from LDASI is most sensitive to the downward longwave radiation and least sensitive to wind speed. The analysis is also substantially influenced by the surface air temperature. The annual mean soil moisture at 5 cm is decreased by 12-15% if the downward long-wave radiation is increased by 20% and it is increased by 15% if the downward long-wave radiation is decreased by 20%. The influence is even more in the Himalayan region but the increase in long-wave radiation leads to increase in soil moisture and similar influence on decrease because downward long-wave radiation leads glacier melting. The annual mean soil temperature in the analysis is increased by 2.2 K if surface

  16. Energetic Particle Influence on the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, Irina A.; Aplin, Karen L.; Arnold, Frank; Bazilevskaya, Galina A.; Harrison, R. Giles; Krivolutsky, Alexei A.; Nicoll, Keri A.; Rozanov, Eugene V.; Turunen, Esa; Usoskin, Ilya G.

    2015-11-01

    This manuscript gives an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of the effects of energetic particle precipitation (EPP) onto the whole atmosphere, from the lower thermosphere/mesosphere through the stratosphere and troposphere, to the surface. The paper summarizes the different sources and energies of particles, principally galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), solar energetic particles (SEPs) and energetic electron precipitation (EEP). All the proposed mechanisms by which EPP can affect the atmosphere are discussed, including chemical changes in the upper atmosphere and lower thermosphere, chemistry-dynamics feedbacks, the global electric circuit and cloud formation. The role of energetic particles in Earth's atmosphere is a multi-disciplinary problem that requires expertise from a range of scientific backgrounds. To assist with this synergy, summary tables are provided, which are intended to evaluate the level of current knowledge of the effects of energetic particles on processes in the entire atmosphere.

  17. Region effects influence local tree species diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ricklefs, Robert E.; He, Fangliang

    2016-01-01

    Global patterns of biodiversity reflect both regional and local processes, but the relative importance of local ecological limits to species coexistence, as influenced by the physical environment, in contrast to regional processes including species production, dispersal, and extinction, is poorly understood. Failure to distinguish regional influences from local effects has been due, in part, to sampling limitations at small scales, environmental heterogeneity within local or regional samples, and incomplete geographic sampling of species. Here, we use a global dataset comprising 47 forest plots to demonstrate significant region effects on diversity, beyond the influence of local climate, which together explain more than 92% of the global variation in local forest tree species richness. Significant region effects imply that large-scale processes shaping the regional diversity of forest trees exert influence down to the local scale, where they interact with local processes to determine the number of coexisting species. PMID:26733680

  18. Region effects influence local tree species diversity.

    PubMed

    Ricklefs, Robert E; He, Fangliang

    2016-01-19

    Global patterns of biodiversity reflect both regional and local processes, but the relative importance of local ecological limits to species coexistence, as influenced by the physical environment, in contrast to regional processes including species production, dispersal, and extinction, is poorly understood. Failure to distinguish regional influences from local effects has been due, in part, to sampling limitations at small scales, environmental heterogeneity within local or regional samples, and incomplete geographic sampling of species. Here, we use a global dataset comprising 47 forest plots to demonstrate significant region effects on diversity, beyond the influence of local climate, which together explain more than 92% of the global variation in local forest tree species richness. Significant region effects imply that large-scale processes shaping the regional diversity of forest trees exert influence down to the local scale, where they interact with local processes to determine the number of coexisting species. PMID:26733680

  19. Data on atmospheric transmission in the IR spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paramonova, N. N.; Kazakova, K. V.; Brounshteyn, A. M.

    1979-01-01

    The weakening of radiation by the atmosphere in the infrared region of the spectrum was studied. The instrument used for the measurements was the IKAU-1 infrared atmospheric unit, and measurements were carried out both on an inclined path and a near-earth horizontal path.

  20. Topographic Influence and Atmospheric Dynamics in the Indian Wells Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uher, Erich J.

    Indian Wells Valley (IWV) is home to the China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) whose operations necessitate regional forecasting and weather analysis relevant to aviation and plume release scenarios. In order to better understand the terrain influenced mesoscale circulations in the varied complex terrain of Indian Wells Valley surrounding Ridgecrest, four seasonal WRF simulations were analyzed using linear shallow water theory and nonlinear theory for flows over two-dimensional mountains. The goal is to better understand the relationships between atmospheric dynamical processes and the wind/thermal structure of the mesoscale at Indian Wells Valley. This will involve exploring relationships linking theoretical meteorology in complex terrain and advanced high resolution atmospheric modeling in this region. The WRF simulation results show several distinct circulations which rely on the interaction between complex terrain and the background weather conditions: 1) In calm synoptic conditions, diurnal processes guide the evolution of boundary layer stability and slope flows. 2) In periods of greatest seasonal surface heating (i.e. summer), the pressure gradient across the Sierra Nevada drives near surface westerlies across IWV. 3) In conditions with strong synoptic scale increase in stability and meridional winds across the Sierra Nevada, a downslope windstorm can develop in IWV. The downslope winds and compensatory gravity wave activity over IWV will conclude once there is a significant change in conditions aloft, or an increase in convective instability at the surface of IWV which prevents air aloft from sinking towards the surface. These results provide a better understanding of the mesoscale meteorology in this region and improve forecast and analysis for plume transport and aviation needs while also laying the groundwork for future projects managing environmental concerns in this region.

  1. Influence of solar activity on Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    The influx of solar energy to different latitudes while Jupiter's orbital motion around the Sun varies significantly. This leads to a change in the optical and physical characteristics of its atmosphere. Analysis of the data for 1850-1991 on determination of the integral magnitude Mj Jupiter in the V filter, and a comparison with the changes of the Wolf numbers W, characterizing the variations of solar activity (SA) - showed that the change of Mj in maxima of the SA - has minima for odd, and maximums - for the even of SA cycles. That is, changing of the Jupiter brightness in visible light is much evident 22.3-year magnetic cycle, and not just about the 11.1-year cycle of solar activity. Analysis of the obtained in 1960-2015 data on the relative distribution of brightness along the central meridian of Jupiter, for which we calculated the ratio of the brightness Aj of northern to the southern part of the tropical and temperate latitudinal zones, allowed to approximate the change of Aj by sinusoid with a period of 11.91±0.07 earth years. Comparison of time variation of Aj from changes in the index of SA R, and the movement of the planet in its orbit - indicates the delay of response of the visible cloud layer in the atmosphere of the Sun's exposure mode for 6 years. This value coincides with the radiative relaxation of the hydrogen-helium atmosphere

  2. Atmospheric influence on volcano-acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Hedlin, Michael; Fee, David; Garcés, Milton; Le Pichon, Alexis

    2010-05-01

    Volcanoes are natural sources of infrasound, useful for studying infrasonic propagation in the atmosphere. Large, explosive volcanic eruptions typically produce signals that can be recorded at ranges of hundreds of kilometers propagating in atmospheric waveguides. In addition, sustained volcanic eruptions can produce smaller-amplitude repetitive signals recordable at >10 km range. These include repetitive impulsive signals and continuous tremor signals. The source functions of these signals can remain relatively invariant over timescales of weeks to months. Observed signal fluctuations from such persistent sources at an infrasound recording station may therefore be attributed to dynamic atmospheric propagation effects. We present examples of repetitive and sustained volcano infrasound sources at Mount St. Helens, Washington and Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, USA. The data recorded at >10 km range show evidence of propagation effects induced by tropospheric variability at the mesoscale and microscale. Ray tracing and finite-difference simulations of the infrasound propagation produce qualitatively consistent results. However, the finite-difference simulations indicate that low-frequency effects such as diffraction, and scattering from topography may be important factors for infrasonic propagation at this scale.

  3. Regional climatic effects of atmospheric SO2 on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postawko, S. E.; Fanale, F. P.

    1992-01-01

    The conditions under which the valley networks on Mars may have formed remains controversial. The magnitude of an atmospheric greenhouse effect by an early massive CO2 atmosphere has recently been questioned by Kasting. Recent calculations indicate that if solar luminosity were less than about 86 percent of its current value, formation of CO2 clouds in the Martian atmosphere would depress the atmospheric lapse rate and reduce the magnitude of surface warming. In light of recent revisions of magma generation on Mars during each Martian epoch, and the suggestions by Wanke et al. that the role of liquid SO2 should be more carefully explored, we have recalculated the potential greenhouse warming by atmospheric SO2 on Mars, with an emphasis on more localized effects. In the vicinity of an active eruption, the concentration of atmospheric SO2 will be higher than if it is assumed that the erupted SO2 is instantaneously globally distributed. The local steady-state concentration of SO2 is a function of the rate at which it is released, its atmospheric lifetime, and the rate at which local winds act to disperse the SO2. We have made estimates of eruption rates, length of eruption, and dispersion rates of volcanically released SO2, for a variety of atmospheric conditions and atmospheric lifetimes of SO2 to explore the maximum regional climatic effect of SO2.

  4. Atmospheric modes influence on Iberian Poleward Current variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deCastro, M.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.; Álvarez, I.; Crespo, A. J. C.

    2011-04-01

    The inter-annual variability of the Iberian Poleward Current (IPC) along the northwestern coast of the Iberian Peninsula (IP) (40-43°N) and its intrusion in the Cantabrian Sea (Navidad, 6-8°W) were analyzed in terms of the atmospheric forcing. The January Sea Surface Temperature (J SST) was obtained from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) NOAA satellite from 1985 to 2006. It is a well documented fact that the existence of a tongue of water warmer than the surrounding ones (IPC) which circulates along the western Iberian shelf edge, turn eastward around Cape Finisterre, and enters in the Cantabrian Sea generating Navidad at the beginning of every winter. However, in the present study it has been highlighted that there are several years (1986, 1987, 1992, 1997, 1999, 2004 and 2005) during which water from coast to the adjacent shelf is much colder than the oceanic one remarking a weak or inexistent IPC during these Januaries. In addition, the dependence of SST on the most representative regional patterns with some influence upon the eastern North Atlantic region was analyzed by means of correlations between November-December atmospheric modes and J SST. The considered modes were: North Atlantic Oscillation pattern (NAO), Eastern Atlantic pattern (EA), Eastern Atlantic Western Russia pattern (EA/WR), Polar/Eurasia pattern (POL) and Scandinavia pattern (SCA). This analysis reveals that two atmospheric patterns (N-D NAO and N-D EA/WR) are responsible of the main variability of the J SST of the western and northern IP. J SST is negatively correlated with N-D NAO and positively correlated with N-D EA/WR. Multivariate analysis involving both modes provides correlation coefficients on the order of 0.7 on both coasts (western and northern). The influence of both modes on J SST was observed to be on the same order of magnitude but with different sign. These correlations were physically interpreted by means of an analysis of extreme events and Sea Level

  5. Sensitivity of Air-sea Exchange In A Regional Scale Coupled Ice/ocean/atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrum, C.; Hübner, U.; Jacob, D.; Podzun, R.

    The sub-systems ice, ocean and atmosphere are coupled on the global as well as the regional scale. However, regional coupled modeling is only in the beginning, full cou- pled models which are able to describe the interaction on the regional scale and the feedback mechanism are rare at the moment. For the North Sea and the Baltic Sea such a coupled model has been developed and exemplary integrated over a full seasonal cy- cle. By comparison of different regionalization studies the impact of the regional at- mospheric modeling and coupling on the air sea fluxes have been investigated. It was shown that the regionalization as well as the coupling show strong influence on the air/sea fluxes and thus on the oceanic conditions. Further problems in regional mod- eling like the description of storm track variability and its influence on the regional ocean model were identified.

  6. Influence of Agricultural Practices on Micrometerological Spatial Variations at Local and Regional Scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfers significantly influence interactions and feedbacks between vegetation and boundary layer in relation with plant phenology and water status. The current study focused on linking micrometeorological conditions to cultural practices at the local and regional scales ...

  7. INFLUENCE OF AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES ON MICROMETEOROLOGICAL SPATIAL VARIATIONS AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL SCALES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil - vegetation - atmosphere transfers significantly influence interactions and feedbacks between vegetation and boundary layer, in relation with plant phenology and water status. The current study focused on linking micrometeorological conditions to cultural practices at the local and regional sc...

  8. Io's surface - Its phase composition and influence on Io's atmosphere and Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanale, F. P.; Banerdt, W. B.; Elson, L. S.; Johnson, T. V.; Zurek, R. W.

    The evidence and interpretations pertaining to the surface phase composition of Io and the mechanisms by which Io's surface influences its atmosphere are discussed. The mechanism by which Io's surface and/or atmosphere supplies neutral and ionic species to the region around the satellite and ultimately to the Jovian magnetosphere is also discussed. A model is suggested in which the global SO2 gas abundance is primarily controlled by buffering in the brightest, coldest regions. The net SO2 flux across the disk is limited by regional cold trapping on high albedo regions and possibly by the resistance of a tenuous non-SO2 residual atmosphere. The continuing migration of SO2 toward cooler regions and those lacking SO2 sources is opposed by SO2 destruction and planetary ejection processes, including sputtering, thus preventing buildup of thick, ubiquitous SO2 coverage.

  9. Influences of Atmospheric Stability State on Wind Turbine Aerodynamic Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh; Lavely, Adam; Brasseur, James; Paterson, Eric; Kinzel, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Wind turbine power and loadings are influenced by the structure of atmospheric turbulence and thus on the stability state of the atmosphere. Statistical differences in loadings with atmospheric stability could impact controls, blade design, etc. Large-eddy simulation (LES) of the neutral and moderately convective atmospheric boundary layer (NBL, MCBL) are used as inflow to the NREL FAST advanced blade-element momentum theory code to predict wind turbine rotor power, sectional lift and drag, blade bending moments and shaft torque. Using horizontal homogeneity, we combine time and ensemble averages to obtain converged statistics equivalent to ``infinite'' time averages over a single turbine. The MCBL required longer effective time periods to obtain converged statistics than the NBL. Variances and correlation coefficients among wind velocities, turbine power and blade loadings were higher in the MCBL than the NBL. We conclude that the stability state of the ABL strongly influences wind turbine performance. Supported by NSF and DOE.

  10. Atmospheric and Climate Aspects of Russian Regions Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golitsyn, G. S.; Dubovsky, S. V.; Ginzburg, A. S.; Mokhov, I. I.; Khomyakov, P. M.

    Russia is one of the first countries created the national program of sustainable devel- opment. The Presidential Decree SOn the national strategy of the Russian Federation & cedil;in the environment protection and sustainable developmentT was issued by in 1994. Atmospheric and climate aspects play very important roles in the sustainable devel- opment at the regional level in Russia as well as at national one. Last year Russian Academy of Sciences in collaboration with some leaders of the local Russian au- thorities started the Project SSustainable development of Russia and its regionsT. In & cedil; this project the problems of Russian socio-economical development are considered together with regional atmospheric and climate changes, environmental and natural resources, population, urbanization, energetic and new technology development, and so on. The main problems of Russian regions socio-economical development related to global and local climate changes, environmental and natural resources, urbanization will be discussed.

  11. Identifying human influences on atmospheric temperature

    PubMed Central

    Santer, Benjamin D.; Painter, Jeffrey F.; Mears, Carl A.; Doutriaux, Charles; Caldwell, Peter; Arblaster, Julie M.; Cameron-Smith, Philip J.; Gillett, Nathan P.; Gleckler, Peter J.; Lanzante, John; Perlwitz, Judith; Solomon, Susan; Stott, Peter A.; Taylor, Karl E.; Terray, Laurent; Thorne, Peter W.; Wehner, Michael F.; Wentz, Frank J.; Wigley, Tom M. L.; Wilcox, Laura J.; Zou, Cheng-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    We perform a multimodel detection and attribution study with climate model simulation output and satellite-based measurements of tropospheric and stratospheric temperature change. We use simulation output from 20 climate models participating in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. This multimodel archive provides estimates of the signal pattern in response to combined anthropogenic and natural external forcing (the fingerprint) and the noise of internally generated variability. Using these estimates, we calculate signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios to quantify the strength of the fingerprint in the observations relative to fingerprint strength in natural climate noise. For changes in lower stratospheric temperature between 1979 and 2011, S/N ratios vary from 26 to 36, depending on the choice of observational dataset. In the lower troposphere, the fingerprint strength in observations is smaller, but S/N ratios are still significant at the 1% level or better, and range from three to eight. We find no evidence that these ratios are spuriously inflated by model variability errors. After removing all global mean signals, model fingerprints remain identifiable in 70% of the tests involving tropospheric temperature changes. Despite such agreement in the large-scale features of model and observed geographical patterns of atmospheric temperature change, most models do not replicate the size of the observed changes. On average, the models analyzed underestimate the observed cooling of the lower stratosphere and overestimate the warming of the troposphere. Although the precise causes of such differences are unclear, model biases in lower stratospheric temperature trends are likely to be reduced by more realistic treatment of stratospheric ozone depletion and volcanic aerosol forcing. PMID:23197824

  12. Application of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System to the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    1998-01-01

    The core dynamics of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), a widely used and powerful mesoscale Earth model, is adapted to the Martian Atmosphere and applied in the study of aeolian surface features. In particular, research efforts focused on the substitution of Martian planetary and atmospheric properties such as rotation rate, and thermodynamic constants in place of hard-wired Earth properties. Application of the model was restricted to three-dimensional flow impinging upon impact craters, and the search for plausible wind patterns that could produce the so-called light and dark streaks downwind of topographic barriers.

  13. Investigating causes of regional variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Katherine D.

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations are rapidly increasing due to anthropogenic activities; however, only about half of the emissions have accumulated in the atmosphere, and the fate of the remaining half remains uncertain. Since atmospheric CO2 concentrations contain information regarding carbon sources and sinks, it is important to understand CO 2 variability. This study investigated causes of atmospheric CO 2 variability, focusing on the relationship between CO2 concentrations and clouds, the impact of heterogeneous land cover and agricultural production, and the effect of redistributing fossil fuel emissions. Due to global coverage and sheer data volume, satellite CO2 concentrations will be used in inverse models to improve carbon source and sink estimates. Satellite concentrations will only retrieve CO2 measurements in clear conditions, and it is important to understand how CO 2 concentrations vary with cloud cover in order to optimally utilize these data. This study evaluated differences between clear-sky and mean concentrations on local, regional, and global scales. Analyses of in situ data, regional model simulations, and global model output all revealed clear-sky differences that were regionally coherent on sub-continental scales and that varied both with time and location. In the mid-latitudes, clear-sky CO2 concentrations were systematically lower than on average, and these differences were not due to biology, but rather to frontal convergence of large-scale gradients that were covered by clouds. Instead of using satellite data to represent temporal averages, inverse models and data assimilation systems that use satellite data to calculate carbon sources and sinks must be sampled consistently with the observations, including precise modeling of winds, clouds, fronts, and frontal timing. Just as CO2 concentrations vary with cloud cover, variability in atmospheric CO2 concentrations is also caused by heterogeneity in land cover and surface fluxes. This study

  14. Influence of atmospheric aerosols and desert reflectance properties on satellite radiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowker, D. E.; Davis, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of surface bidirectional reflectance factors, including shadowing, and of atmospheric aerosol variability are modeled for their effects on the remote sensing of desert targets from space in the 0.7-micron region at high spatial resolution. The white sand reflectance data of Salomonson (1968) are used as the basis for the simulation. The effects of the surface bi-directional reflectance and atmospheric aerosol on the nadir-normalized reflectance measured at the satellite are discussed individually and jointly. The net influence of these two factors is shown to depend on the magnitude of other parameters, such as the surface reflectance and solar zenith angle.

  15. Geomagnetic Activity Influence on Thermobaric Characteristics of the Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubtsova, O. A.; Zherebtsov, G. A.; Kovalenko, V. A.; Molodykh, S. I.

    2009-10-01

    The main points of the model of the solar activity effect on the Earth climatic system are presented. The model is based on the physical mechanism of heliogeophysical factors influence on climatic characteristics and atmospheric circulation in the high-latitude troposphere through the atmospheric electricity. In accordance with this mechanism, the atmospheric electricity parameters in the high latitudes depend on the solar activity; at the same time, they influence the altitude distribution of charged condensation nuclei in the troposphere, as well as the cloudiness formation and radiation balance. The mechanism is proved to operate more efficiently in the high latitudes resulting in additional cloudiness formation in areas with adequate vapour concentration. We present complex analysis results of response of temperature and tropospheric pressure fields to different heliogeophysical disturbances. It is detected that regular changes of the temperature and pressure field dynamic accompany these disturbances.

  16. Fire Influences on Atmospheric Composition, Air Quality, and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Field, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Fires impact atmospheric composition through their emissions, which range from long-lived gases to short-lived gases and aerosols. Effects are typically larger in the tropics and boreal regions but can also be substantial in highly populated areas in the northern mid-latitudes. In all regions, fire can impact air quality and health. Similarly, its effect on large-scale atmospheric processes, including regional and global atmospheric chemistry and climate forcing, can be substantial, but this remains largely unexplored. The impacts are primarily realised in the boundary layer and lower free troposphere but can also be noticeable in upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) region, for the most intense fires. In this review, we summarise the recent literature on findings related to fire impact on atmospheric composition, air quality and climate. We explore both observational and modelling approaches and present information on key regions and on the globe as a whole. We also discuss the current and future directions in this area of research, focusing on the major advances in emission estimates, the emerging efforts to include fire as a component in Earth system modelling and the use of modelling to assess health impacts of fire emissions.

  17. Improving SLCF Science in the Himalayan Region: ICIMOD's Atmosphere Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, A. K.; Pradhan, B. B.; Surapipith, V.

    2013-12-01

    What fraction of the black carbon arriving on Yala Glacier in Langtang, Nepal, is from cooking fires in the houses in the valley below? What fraction is from elsewhere in rural Nepal? What fraction is from industrial and transport sources in Kathmandu? What fraction is from northern India and beyond? What fraction is from the high altitude forest fires that take place during March or April? Effectively mitigating the impacts of black carbon and other short-lived climate forcers requires detailed understanding not just of emissions and impacts, but also of the atmospheric transport pathways that connect the two. In mountainous areas of the Hindu-Kush Himalaya detailed quantitative knowledge about emissions, atmospheric processes, and impacts is still largely missing. The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) is an intergovernmental organization covering Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, China, Bhutan, Bangladesh, and Myanmar. ICIMOD's recently established Atmosphere Initiative not only assesses mitigation options and contributes to policy and capacity building in the region, but also works actively to promote collaboration among researchers in the region, while building up an in-house team whose research will address key questions about SLCF. In Spring 2013 ICIMOD's Atmosphere Initiative, in collaboration with the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam, Germany, carried out the largest field campaign to date in Nepal, hosting instruments belonging to dozens of institutions around the world, at nine field site within and upwind of the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The dataset that has been collected gives unprecedented insights into the emissions and atmospheric processes taking place downwind of and within the largest urban agglomeration in the Himalaya region. Meanwhile, in collaboration with national partner institutions, ICIMOD is in the process of setting up one atmospheric observatory each in Bhutan and in

  18. The Role of Precipitating Energetic Particles in Coupling Atmospheric Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. M.; Randall, C. E.; Solomon, S. C.; Yee, S.; Kozyra, J. U.; Baker, D. N.

    2010-12-01

    A key missing element in our understanding of the Sun-Earth system is the response of the atmosphere when precipitating particle energy is redistributed via dynamical, chemical, and radiative processes. Elucidating the coupling intrinsic to this response is a prerequisite for understanding and predicting variability in and across many atmospheric regions. A priority for future observations is the Energetic Particle Precipitation (EPP) Indirect Effect (IE), by which odd nitrogen compounds produced by EPP in the upper atmosphere descend to the stratosphere, perturbing ozone chemistry and thus the radiative balance of the middle atmosphere. It has been shown that EPP IE occurs nearly every year in both hemispheres, and is modulated by variability in both the EPP and atmospheric meteorology. In this talk, we will summarize the current state of knowledge of EPP IE, the observational evidence for it in the last few decades, and what is required of future observations. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various measurement techniques for observing odd nitrogen and descent, along with uncertainties in the analysis methods.

  19. Arctic Storms in a Regionally Refined Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesler, E. L.; Taylor, M.; Boslough, M.; Sullivan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Regional refinement in an atmospheric general circulation model is a new tool in atmospheric modeling. A regional high-resolution solution can be obtained without the computational cost of running a global high-resolution simulation as global climate models have increasing ability to resolve smaller spatial scales. Previous work has shown high-resolution simulations, i.e. 1/8 degree, and variable resolution utilities have resolved more fine-scale structure and mesoscale storms in the atmosphere than their low-resolution counterparts. We will describe an experiment designed to identify and study Arctic storms at two model resolutions. We used the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5, with the Spectral Element dynamical core at 1/8-degree and 1 degree horizontal resolutions to simulate the climatological year of 1850. Storms were detected using a low-pressure minima and vorticity maxima - finding algorithm. It was found the high-resolution 1/8-degree simulation had more storms in the Northern Hemisphere than the low-resolution 1-degree simulation. A variable resolution simulation with a global low resolution of 1-degree and a high-resolution refined region of 1/8 degree over a region in the Arctic is planned. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND NO. 2014-16460A

  20. Automated Detection of Oscillating Regions in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ireland, J.; Marsh, M. S.; Kucera, T. A.; Young, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    Recently observed oscillations in the solar atmosphere have been interpreted and modeled as magnetohydrodynamic wave modes. This has allowed for the estimation of parameters that are otherwise hard to derive, such as the coronal magnetic-field strength. This work crucially relies on the initial detection of the oscillations, which is commonly done manually. The volume of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) data will make manual detection inefficient for detecting all of the oscillating regions. An algorithm is presented that automates the detection of areas of the solar atmosphere that support spatially extended oscillations. The algorithm identifies areas in the solar atmosphere whose oscillation content is described by a single, dominant oscillation within a user-defined frequency range. The method is based on Bayesian spectral analysis of time series and image filtering. A Bayesian approach sidesteps the need for an a-priori noise estimate to calculate rejection criteria for the observed signal, and it also provides estimates of oscillation frequency, amplitude, and noise, and the error in all of these quantities, in a self-consistent way. The algorithm also introduces the notion of quality measures to those regions for which a positive detection is claimed, allowing for simple post-detection discrimination by the user. The algorithm is demonstrated on two Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) datasets, and comments regarding its suitability for oscillation detection in SDO are made.

  1. Influence of Dust Loading on Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Gronoff, Guillaume; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the radiation environment at the surface of Mars is the primary goal of the Radiation Assessment Detector on the NASA Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover. One of the conditions that Curiosity will likely encounter is a dust storm. The objective of this paper is to compute the cosmic ray ionization in different conditions, including dust storms, as these various conditions are likely to be encountered by Curiosity at some point. In the present work, the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety model, recently modified for Mars, was used along with the Badhwar & O'Neill 2010 galactic cosmic ray model. In addition to galactic cosmic rays, five different solar energetic particle event spectra were considered. For all input radiation environments, radiation dose throughout the atmosphere and at the surface was investigated as a function of atmospheric dust loading. It is demonstrated that for galactic cosmic rays, the ionization depends strongly on the atmosphere profile. Moreover, it is shown that solar energetic particle events strongly increase the ionization throughout the atmosphere, including ground level, and can account for the radio blackout conditions observed by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft. These results demonstrate that the cosmic rays' influence on the Martian surface chemistry is strongly dependent on solar and atmospheric conditions that should be taken into account for future studies.

  2. Influence of dust loading on atmospheric ionizing radiation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Gronoff, Guillaume; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the radiation environment at the surface of Mars is the primary goal of the Radiation Assessment Detector on the NASA Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover. One of the conditions that Curiosity will likely encounter is a dust storm. The objective of this paper is to compute the cosmic ray ionization in different conditions, including dust storms, as these various conditions are likely to be encountered by Curiosity at some point. In the present work, the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety model, recently modified for Mars, was used along with the Badhwar & O'Neill 2010 galactic cosmic ray model. In addition to galactic cosmic rays, five different solar energetic particle event spectra were considered. For all input radiation environments, radiation dose throughout the atmosphere and at the surface was investigated as a function of atmospheric dust loading. It is demonstrated that for galactic cosmic rays, the ionization depends strongly on the atmosphere profile. Moreover, it is shown that solar energetic particle events strongly increase the ionization throughout the atmosphere, including ground level, and can account for the radio blackout conditions observed by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft. These results demonstrate that the cosmic rays' influence on the Martian surface chemistry is strongly dependent on solar and atmospheric conditions that should be taken into account for future studies.

  3. Critical review of studies on atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, D.L.; Kaleel, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study effort was required as a preliminary step prior to initiation of field measurements of atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is in the process of planning an extensive field measurement program to generate data which will serve as improved data bases for licensing decisions, confirmation of regulations, standards, and guides, and for site characterizations. The study being reported here is an effort directed to obtaining as much information as is possible from existing studies that is relevant toward NRC's objectives. For this study, reports covering research and meteorological measurements conducted for industrial purposes, utility needs, military objectives, and academic studies were obtained and critically reviewed in light of NRC's current data needs. This report provides an interpretation of the extent of existing usable information, an indication of the potential for tailoring existing research toward current NRC information needs, and recommendations for several follow-on studies which could provide valuable additional information through reanalysis of the data. Recommendations are also offered regarding new measurement programs. Emphasis is placed on the identification and acquisition of data from atmospheric tracer studies conducted in coastal regions. A total of 225 references were identified which deal with the coastal atmosphere, including meteorological and tracer measurement programs, theoretical descriptions of the relevant processes, and dispersion models.

  4. A Subtropical North Atlantic Regional Atmospheric Moisture Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, F.; D'Addezio, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The synergistic effects of evaporation (E), precipitation (P), and Ekman transport make the SPURS (Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study) region in the subtropical North Atlantic (15-30°N, 30-45°W) the ideal location for the world's highest open ocean sea surface salinity. Using the MERRA and ERA-Interim atmospheric reanalyses, we reproduce the mean hydrologic state of the atmosphere over the SPURS region since 1979 and roughly deduce the change in salinity across the meridional domain due solely to interactions between E-P and Ekman transport. Our findings suggest a region that is highly evaporative at a mean rate of 4.87 mm/day with a standard deviation of 1.2 mm/day and little seasonality. Precipitation is much more variable with an annual fall maximum around 3 mm/day but only a mean rate of 1.37 mm/day with a standard deviation of 1.46 mm/day. The resulting E-P variable has a mean rate of 3.50 mm/day with a standard deviation of 1.92 mm/day and matches well with the moisture flux divergence term although the former is typically larger by a small margin. Strong prevailing easterly trade winds generate northward Ekman transports that advect water northward to the salinity maximum around 25°N. A short calculation shows that atmospheric moisture dynamics could potentially account for almost half of the change in salinity between 15°N and 25°N giving an estimate of the role that surface freshwater flux plays in the maintenance of the salinity maximum.

  5. A subtropical North Atlantic regional atmospheric moisture budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addezio, Joseph M.; Bingham, Frederick M.

    2014-12-01

    The synergistic effects of evaporation (E), precipitation (P), and Ekman transport make the Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study (SPURS-1) region in the subtropical North Atlantic (15-30°N, 30-45°W) the natural location for the world's highest open ocean SSS maximum. Using the MERRA and ERA-Interim atmospheric reanalyses, we reproduce the mean hydrologic state of the atmosphere over the SPURS-1 region since 1979 and roughly deduce the change in salinity across the meridional domain due solely to interactions between E-P and Ekman transport. Our findings suggest a region that is highly evaporative at a mean rate of 4.87 mm/d with a standard deviation of 1.2 mm/d and little seasonality. Precipitation is much more variable with an annual fall maximum around 3 mm/d but only a mean rate of 1.37 mm/d with a standard deviation of 1.46 mm/d. The resulting E-P variable has a mean rate of 3.50 mm/d with a standard deviation of 1.92 mm/d and matches well with the moisture flux divergence term although the former is typically larger by a small margin. Strong prevailing easterly trade winds generate northward Ekman transports that advect water toward the salinity maximum around 25°N. A short calculation shows that atmospheric moisture dynamics could potentially account for about one third of the change in salinity between 15°N and 25°N giving an estimate of the role that surface freshwater flux plays in the maintenance of the salinity maximum.

  6. Atmospheric Pollution and Emission Sources in South Asian Urban Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, K. F.; Husain, Liaquat

    2009-04-01

    Rapid urbanization, and lack of efficient monitoring and control of pollution, along with phenomena like Asian Brown Haze or prolonged episodes of winter fog, makes the South Asian atmospheric chemistry a very complex one. The anthropogenic aerosols released from this region are projected to become the dominant component of anthropogenic aerosols worldwide in the next 25 years (Nakicenovic and Swart, 2000). The region is one of the most densely populated in the world, with present population densities of 100-500 persons km-2. There are six big cities, namely, Delhi, Dhaka, Karachi, Kolkata, Lahore, and Mumbai, each housing a population around or above 10 million. There is now a real concern about the sustainability of the region's ability to support the population due to air pollution, loss of biodiversity and soil degradation. Therefore, we conducted several extensive campaigns over last 10 years in Lahore, Karachi, and Islamabad in Pakistan to (1) chemically characterize the aerosols (PM2.5 mass, concentrations of trace elements, ions, black and organic carbon), and gaseous pollutants (concentrations of NH3, SO2, HONO, HNO3, HCl and (COOH)2, and (2) identify the major emission sources in this region. Exceedingly high concentrations of all species, relative to major urban areas of US and Europe, were observed. Concentrations of PM2.5, BC, Pb, SO42-, NH4+, HONO, NH3 respectively, up to 476, 110, 12, 66, 60, 19.6 and 50 μgm-3 were observed in these cities, which were far in excess of WHO and US EPA air quality standard (Biswas et al., 2008). We use air parcel back trajectories, intercomponent relationships and meteorological observations to explain chemistry and emission sources of aerosol constituents. Carbonaceous aerosols contributed up to 69% of the PM2.5 mass (Husain et al., 2007). Source apportionment was conducted using positive matrix factorization. The analysis has classified six emission sources of aerosol components, namely, industrial activities, wood

  7. The influence of variations of vegetation and soil moisture on surface weather and atmospheric circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of variations of vegetation and soil moisture on surface weather and atmospheric circulation is studied through the use of the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) and the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere interactions (COLA) GCM. Tests for the SiB sensitivity to the conversion of the forest to other short vegetation or bare soil were performed at Amazonian and Great Plains sites, and a North Wales spruce forest site respectively. The results show that deforestation has a significant influence on the local surface energy budget and surface weather. The influence is especially prominent at the Amazon and Great Plains sites, and larger in summer than in other seasons. The influence on the partitioning of surface incoming radiative energy is generally constrained by the local atmospheric boundary condition. The sensitivity of the COLA GCM to changes in initial soil wetness (ISW) is determined by repeating three 10-day model integrations with the same initial and boundary conditions as the control runs except the values of ISW, which are revised at 69 model grid points covering much of the continental U.S. It is found that the relations between the changes in the 5-day mean forecast surface air temperature/surface specific humidity and the changes in ISW depend upon vegetation type and the values of ISW, and can be approximated by regression equations. These relations are also confirmed with independent data. With the ISW revised based on these regression equations the surface forecasts of the revised runs are consistently improved. The spatial scale of the ISW anomaly determines the degree and range of the influence. The influence of a small regional ISW change is mainly confined to the local region and to low atmospheric levels. The influence on surface fluxes is strong and persists for more than one month, but the effects on precipitation are relatively weak, changeable, and complex, particularly when an interactive cloud scheme is used.

  8. A new mechanism for regional atmospheric chemistry modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockwell, William R.; Kirchner, Frank; Kuhn, Michael; Seefeld, Stephan

    1997-11-01

    A new gas-phase chemical mechanism for the modeling of regional atmospheric chemistry, the "Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism" (RACM) is presented. The mechanism is intended to be valid for remote to polluted conditions and from the Earth's surface through the upper troposphere. The RACM mechanism is based upon the earlier Regional Acid Deposition Model, version 2 (RADM2) mechanism [Stockwell et al., 1990] and the more detailed Euro-RADM mechanism [Stockwell and Kley, 1994]. The RACM mechanism includes rate constants and product yields from the most recent laboratory measurements, and it has been tested against environmental chamber data. A new condensed reaction mechanism is included for biogenic compounds: isoprene, α-pinene, and d-limonene. The branching ratios for alkane decay were reevaluated, and in the revised mechanism the aldehyde to ketone ratios were significantly reduced. The relatively large amounts of nitrates resulting from the reactions of unbranched alkenes with NO3 are now included, and the production of HO from the ozonolysis of alkenes has a much greater yield. The aromatic chemistry has been revised through the use of new laboratory data. The yield of cresol production from aromatics was reduced, while the reactions of HO, NO3, and O3 with unsaturated dicarbonyl species and unsaturated peroxynitrate are now included in the RACM mechanism. The peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry and the organic peroxy radical-peroxy radical reactions were revised, and organic peroxy radical +NO3 reactions were added.

  9. Investigation of the influence of atmospheric stability and turbulence on land-atmosphere exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osibanjo, O.; Holmes, H.

    2015-12-01

    Surface energy fluxes are exchanged between the surface of the earth and the atmosphere and impact weather, climate, and air quality. The radiation from the sun triggers the surface-atmosphere interaction during the day as heat is transmitted to the surface and the surface heats the air directly above generating wind (i.e., thermal turbulence) that transports heat, moisture, and momentum in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This process is impacted by greenhouse gasses (i.e., water vapor, carbon dioxide and other trace gases) that absorb heat emitted by the earth's surface. The concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gasses are increasing leading to changes in ABL dynamics as a result of the changing surface energy balance. The ABL processes are important to characterize because they are difficult to parameterize in global and regional scale atmospheric models. Empirical data can be collected using eddy covariance micrometeorological methods to measure turbulent fluxes (e.g., sensible heat, moisture, and CO2) and quantify the exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. The objective of this work is to calculate surface fluxes using observational data collected during one week in September 2014 from a monitoring site in Echo, Oregon. The site is located in the Columbia Basin with rolling terrain, irrigated farmland, and over 100 wind turbines. The 10m tower was placed in a small valley depression to isolate nighttime cold air pools. This work will present observations of momentum, sensible heat, moisture, and carbon dioxide fluxes from data collected at a sampling frequency of 10Hz at four heights. Atmospheric stability is determined using Monin-Obukov length and flux Richardson number, and the impact of stability on surface-atmosphere exchange is investigated. This work will provide a better understanding of surface fluxes and mixing, particularly during stable ABL periods, and the results can be used to compare with numerical models.

  10. The Regional Environmental Impacts of Atmospheric Aerosols over Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakey, Ashraf; Ibrahim, Alaa

    2015-04-01

    Identifying the origin (natural versus anthropogenic) and the dynamics of aerosols over Egypt at varying temporal and spatial scales provide valuable knowledge on the regional climate impacts of aerosols and their ultimate connections to the Earth's regional climate system at the MENA region. At regional scale, Egypt is exposed to air pollution with levels exceeding typical air-quality standards. This is particularly true for the Nile Delta region, being at the crossroads of different aerosol species originating from local urban-industrial and biomass-burning activities, regional dust sources, and European pollution from the north. The Environmental Climate Model (EnvClimA) is used to investigate both of the biogenic and anthropogenic aerosols over Egypt. The dominant natural aerosols over Egypt are due to the sand and dust storms, which frequently occur during the transitional seasons (spring and autumn). In winter, the maximum frequency reaches 2 to 3 per day in the north, which decreases gradually southward with a frequency of 0.5-1 per day. Monitoring one of the most basic aerosol parameters, the aerosol optical depth (AOD), is a main experimental and modeling task in aerosol studies. We used the aerosol optical depth to quantify the amount and variability of aerosol loading in the atmospheric column over a certain areas. The aerosols optical depth from the model is higher in spring season due to the impacts of dust activity over Egypt as results of the westerly wind, which carries more dust particles from the Libyan Desert. The model result shows that the mass load of fine aerosols has a longer life-time than the coarse aerosols. In autumn season, the modelled aerosol optical depth tends to increase due to the biomass burning in the delta of Egypt. Natural aerosol from the model tends to scatter the solar radiation while most of the anthropogenic aerosols tend to absorb the longwave solar radiation. The overall results indicate that the AOD is lowest in winter

  11. Polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in atmospheric air of the Northern Hovsgol region in 2008-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamontova, E. A.; Tarasova, E. N.; Goreglyad, A. V.; Tkachenko, L. L.; Mamontov, A. A.; Kuzmin, M. I.

    2015-10-01

    Results of the study of organochlorine pesticides (OCP) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) from the listing of the Stockholm Convention in atmospheric air of the Northern Hovsgol region at the base of the "Khankh" stationary, Institute of Geochemistry, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, in 2008-2013 in the absence of clear sources of these compounds are considered. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the concentration of PCB and OCP in atmospheric air of the Northern Hovsgol region in 2008-2013 characterizing the influence of natural (annual temperature variations) and anthropogenic (atmospheric transportation from the territories of neighboring countries) are shown.

  12. Analysis of the cathodic region of atmospheric pressure discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, H.; Riemann, K.-U.

    2002-07-01

    The cathodic region of atmospheric pressure arcs is dominated by a number of different mechanisms. This makes a theoretical model extremely difficult. A description of this region based on fundamental physical principles is given. Using a previously published model of the inhomogeneous boundary layer of a Saha plasma (Schmitz H and Riemann K-U 2001 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 34 1193), the description is set on a firm theoretical basis. A number of equations including the energy balances of plasma boundary and cathode body lead to a maximum closure of the system. The values for the boundary conditions toward the plasma column could be motivated by a simple minimum principle argument thus eliminating all arbitrary fitting parameters. Results are given for a variety of external parameters and three different discharge gases. The comparison with experimental results shows excellent agreement.

  13. Characteristics of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 at the Shangdianzi regional background station in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shuang-xi; Tans, Pieter P.; Dong, Fan; Zhou, Huaigang; Luan, Tian

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric CO2 and CH4 have been continuously measured at the Shangdianzi regional background station (SDZ) in China from 2009 to 2013. Based on the influences of local surface wind and long-distance transport, the observed records were flagged into locally influenced, Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) influenced, and Russia, Mongolia, and Inner Mongolia autonomous region influenced (RMI). ∼ 81.4% of CO2 and ∼75.6% of CH4 mole fractions were flagged as locally representative, indicating that the atmospheric CO2 and CH4 at SDZ were strongly influenced by local sources and sinks. Cluster analysis of back trajectories proved that the atmospheric CO2 and CH4 were influenced by air masses from northwest (RMI) or from south and southeast (BTH). The CO2 and CH4 mole fractions in BTH are always higher than in RMI, with the largest difference of 11.5 ± 0.3 ppm for CO2 and 102 ± 1 ppb for CH4 in July. The annual growth rates of CO2 and CH4 in BTH are 3.8 ± 0.01 ppm yr-1 and 10 ± 0.1 ppb yr-1, respectively, which are apparently higher than those of the RMI and the global means. The long-term trends of CO2 and CH4 in BTH are deviating from those in RMI, with ratios of ∼1.0 ppm yr-1 for CO2 and ∼2 ppb yr-1 for CH4, indicating the strengths of CO2 and CH4 emission in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei plain increased more than 20% every year.

  14. Synergies Between Grace and Regional Atmospheric Modeling Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, J.; Springer, A.; Ohlwein, C.; Hartung, K.; Longuevergne, L.; Kollet, S. J.; Keune, J.; Dobslaw, H.; Forootan, E.; Eicker, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the meteorological community, efforts converge towards implementation of high-resolution (< 12km) data-assimilating regional climate modelling/monitoring systems based on numerical weather prediction (NWP) cores. This is driven by requirements of improving process understanding, better representation of land surface interactions, atmospheric convection, orographic effects, and better forecasting on shorter timescales. This is relevant for the GRACE community since (1) these models may provide improved atmospheric mass separation / de-aliasing and smaller topography-induced errors, compared to global (ECMWF-Op, ERA-Interim) data, (2) they inherit high temporal resolution from NWP models, (3) parallel efforts towards improving the land surface component and coupling groundwater models; this may provide realistic hydrological mass estimates with sub-diurnal resolution, (4) parallel efforts towards re-analyses, with the aim of providing consistent time series. (5) On the other hand, GRACE can help validating models and aids in the identification of processes needing improvement. A coupled atmosphere - land surface - groundwater modelling system is currently being implemented for the European CORDEX region at 12.5 km resolution, based on the TerrSysMP platform (COSMO-EU NWP, CLM land surface and ParFlow groundwater models). We report results from Springer et al. (J. Hydromet., accept.) on validating the water cycle in COSMO-EU using GRACE and precipitation, evapotranspiration and runoff data; confirming that the model does favorably at representing observations. We show that after GRACE-derived bias correction, basin-average hydrological conditions prior to 2002 can be reconstructed better than before. Next, comparing GRACE with CLM forced by EURO-CORDEX simulations allows identifying processes needing improvement in the model. Finally, we compare COSMO-EU atmospheric pressure, a proxy for mass corrections in satellite gravimetry, with ERA-Interim over Europe at

  15. Relative Influence of Initial Surface and Atmospheric Conditions on Seasonal Water and Energy Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert J.; Marshall, Susan; Roads, John O.; Robertson, Franklin R.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We constructed and analyzed wet and dry soil moisture composites for the mid-latitude GCIP region of the central US using long climate model simulations made with the NCAR CCM3 and reanalysis products from NCEP. Using the diagnostic composites as a guide, we have completed a series of predictability experiments in which we imposed soil water initial conditions in CCM3 for the GCIP region for June 1 from anomalously wet and dry years, with atmospheric initial conditions taken from June 1 of a year with 'near-normal' soil water, and initial soil water from the near-normal year and atmospheric initial conditions from the wet and dry years. Preliminary results indicate that the initial state of the atmosphere is more important than the initial state of soil water determining the subsequent late spring and summer evolution of sod water over the GCIP region. Surprisingly, neither the composites or the predictability experiments yielded a strong influence of soil moisture on the atmosphere. To explore this further, we have made runs with extreme dry soil moisture initial anomalies imposed over the GCIP region (the soil close to being completely dry). These runs did yield a very strong effect on the atmosphere that persisted for at least three months. We conclude that the magnitude of the initial soil moisture anomaly is crucial, at least in CCM3, and are currently investigating whether a threshold exists, below which little impact is seen. In a complementary study, we compared the impact of the initial condition of snow cover versus the initial atmospheric state over the western US (corresponding to the westward extension of the GAPP program follow-on to GCIP). In this case, the initial prescription of snow cover is far more important than the initial atmospheric state in determining the subsequent evolution of snow cover. We are currently working to understand the very different soil water and snow cover results.

  16. Atmospheric gravitational influence on geodetic satellite orbits - Starlette analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Chan, Joseph C.

    1992-01-01

    The atmosphere is constantly in motion. The changing gravitational force due to the air mass movement will slightly perturb the orbit of a satellite. As the instrument accuracy for geodetic satellites improves, failure to model this perturbation can result in significant systematic errors in the orbit determination. The latter, in turn, will degrade the Earth's gravity solutions. A direct modeling technique to analyze the atmospheric gravitational influence on geodetic satellite is developed. We use the global surface pressure data from the ECMWF Initial Analysis Database to compute the gravitational force due to atmospheric perturbation exerted on given satellite as a function of time during selected orbital arcs. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) tracking data for selected Starlette (altitude 900 km) orbital arcs are used to test the computed force model. Although only a slight reduction in the rms residuals is observed when the atmospheric gravitational perturbation is included in the force model for data reduction of the SLR data, significant improvement is obtained in the predictability of the satellite orbit. Comprehensive studies involving more definitive test criteria and more refined models are still needed.

  17. Ozone formation in biomass burning plumes: Influence of atmospheric dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, D.; Koppmann, R.; Rudolph, J.

    Biomass burning in the tropics contributes substantially to the emission of organic compounds and nitrogen oxides into the troposphere and has an important impact on the global budget of ozone in the troposphere. Since ozone formation is a nonlinear chemical process the rate of formation is also influenced by atmospheric dilution and transport. This paper addresses the production of ozone in a plume emerging from a biomass burning site. Atmospheric mixing processes downwind the fire are expected to influence the total amount of ozone produced. A sensitivity study to assess the influence of dilution on the maximum ozone mixing ratio and on the amount of ozone formed in the entire plume (excess ozone) reveals that both quantities depend strongly on the time scale and the final value of the dilution. Up to 70% difference of the excess ozone as function of the characteristic time of the dilution was observed. Since many global models do not treat the early development of the plume with sufficient resolution in space and time a substantial uncertainty of model predicted ozone formation from biomass burning plumes is to be expected.

  18. Factors influencing atmospheric composition over subarctic North America during summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wofsy, Steven C.; Fan, S. -M.; Blake, D. R.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.; Singh, H. B.; Sachse, G. W.; Harriss, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of hydrocarbons, CO, and nitrogen oxides were observed in extensive haze layers over northeastern Canada in the summer of 1990, during ABLE 3B. Halocarbon concentrations remained near background in most layers, indicating a source from biomass wildfires. Elevated concentrations of C2Cl4 provided a sensitive indicator for pollution from urban/industrial sources. Detailed analysis of regional budgets for CO and hydrocarbons indicates that biomass fires accounted for approximately equal to 70% of the input to the subarctic for most hydrocarbons and for acetone and more than 50% for CO. Regional sources for many species (including CO) exceeded chemical sinks during summer, and the boreal region provided a net source to midlatitudes. Interannual variations and long-term trends in atmospheric composition are sensitive to climatic change; a shift to warmer, drier conditions could increase the areas burned and thus the sources of many trace gases.

  19. Middle Atmosphere Program. Handbook for MAP. Volume 16: Atmospheric Structure and Its Variation in the Region 20 to 120 Km. Draft of a New Reference Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labitzke, K. (Editor); Barnett, J. J. (Editor); Edwards, B. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A draft of a new reference atmosphere for the region between 20 and 80 km which depends largely on recent satellite experiments covering the globe from 80 deg S to 80 deg N is given. A separate international tropical reference atmosphere is given, as well as reference ozone models for the middle atmosphere.

  20. Large-scale atmospheric response to eastern Mediterranean summer-autumn SST anomalies and the associated regional impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Serrano, J.; Polo, I.; Rodríguez-Fonseca, B.; Losada, T.

    2013-11-01

    Since the Mediterranean Sea is halfway between subtropical and middle latitudes, and it represents a marginal oceanic region, research has tended to focus on how large-scale modes of atmospheric variability modulate its surface temperature. Conversely, the present study examines the potential influence of the Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies on the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation. In particular, this work explores the large-scale changes in the global circulation forced/influenced by the eastern Mediterranean summer-autumn SST pattern. To isolate the atmospheric response, AGCM sensitivity experiments with prescribed SST over the Mediterranean Sea and climatology elsewhere are analysed. Observational diagnostics upon the period used to define the boundary conditions (1979-2002) are also interpreted. Our results support the hypothesis of an atmospheric pattern initiated in the Mediterranean basin, pointing out both a local baroclinic response and a barotropic circumglobal anomaly. This atmospheric teleconnection pattern projects onto a hemispheric wave-like structure, reflecting the waveguide effect of the westerly jets. Results suggest, thereby, that the recurrent summer-autumn circumglobal teleconnection pattern can be excited locally by changes in the atmosphere over the Mediterranean region. A linear behaviour is found upon a regional impact over northeastern Africa. The remote impacts present however a nonlinear signature: anomalous warm conditions influencing on northern Europe and Euro-Asia, whereas anomalous cold conditions impacting more on the North Pacific basin. Limitations in our model setup are also discussed.

  1. Atmospheric Impact of Large Methane Emission in the Arctic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Bergmann, D.; Reagan, M. T.; Collins, W.; Elliott, S. M.; Maltrud, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    A highly potent greenhouse gas, methane, is locked in the solid phase as ice-like deposits containing a mixture of water and gas (mostly methane) called clathrates, in ocean sediments and underneath permafrost regions. Clathrates are stable under high pressure and low temperatures. Recent estimates suggest that about 1600 - 2000GtC of clathrates are present in oceans and 400GtC in Arctic permafrost (Archer et al.2009) which is about 4000 times that of current annual emissions. In a warming climate, increase in ocean temperatures could alter the geothermal gradient, which in turn could lead to dissociation of the clathrates and release of methane into the ocean and subsequently into the atmosphere as well. This could be of particular importance in the shallow part of the Arctic Ocean where the clathrates are found in depths of only 300m. In this presentation, we shall show results from our ongoing simulation of a scenario of large scale methane outgassing from clathrate dissociation due to warming ocean temperatures in the Arctic based on ocean sediment modeling. To that end we use the CESM (Community Earth System Model) version 1 with fully active coupled atmosphere-ocean-land model together with fast atmospheric chemistry module to simulate the response to increasing methane emissions in the Barents Sea, Canadian Archipelago and the Sea of Okhotsk. The simulation shows the effect these methane emissions could have on global surface methane, surface ozone, surface air temperature and other related indices. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-491764

  2. Atmospheric energetics in regions of intense convective activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Synoptic-scale budgets of kinetic and total potential energy are computed using 3- and 6-h data at nine times from NASA's fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE IV). Two intense squall lines occurred during the period. Energy budgets for areas that enclose regions of intense convection are shown to have systematic changes that relate to the life cycles of the convection. Some of the synoptic-scale energy processes associated with the convection are found to be larger than those observed in the vicinity of mature cyclones. Volumes enclosing intense convection are found to have large values of cross-contour conversion of potential to kinetic energy and large horizontal export of kinetic energy. Although small net vertical transport of kinetic energy is observed, values at individual layers indicate large upward transport. Transfer of kinetic energy from grid to subgrid scales of motion occurs in the volumes. Latent heat release is large in the middle and upper troposphere and is thought to be the cause of the observed cyclic changes in the budget terms. Total potential energy is found to be imported horizontally in the lower half of the atmosphere, transported aloft, and then exported horizontally. Although local changes of kinetic energy and total potential energy are small, interaction between volumes enclosing convection with surrounding larger volumes is quite large.

  3. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J.; Smith, N.R.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the project was to conduct model simulations for past and future climate change with respect to the proposed Yucca Mtn. repository. The authors report on three main topics, one of which is boundary conditions for paleo-hindcast studies. These conditions are necessary for the conduction of three to four model simulations. The boundary conditions have been prepared for future runs. The second topic is (a) comparing the atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) with observations and other GCMs; and (b) development of a better precipitation data base for the Yucca Mtn. region for comparisons with models. These tasks have been completed. The third topic is preliminary assessments of future climate change. Energy balance model (EBM) simulations suggest that the greenhouse effect will likely dominate climate change at Yucca Mtn. for the next 10,000 years. The EBM study should improve rational choice of GCM CO{sub 2} scenarios for future climate change.

  4. Simulation of fog influence on laser beam distribution in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasinek, Vladimir; Latal, Jan; Koudelka, Petr; Vitasek, Jan; Witas, Karel; Hejduk, Stanislav

    2012-10-01

    Optical fibreless data networks P2P offer fast data transmissions with big transmittance from 1- 10 Gbps on a distance of 1- 6 km. Perfections of such networks are especially flexibility, rapid creation of communications. Sensitivity to atmospheric influences, necessity of light on sight belongs to disadvantages. Transmission through atmosphere be characterized by non-stationarity, inhomogeneity, the influences have random character. It means immediately that it is possible only with difficulty to project conclusions concerning to the measurement on one line upon fiberless line in another position. Contribution tackles a question of forming of the artificial hazy atmospheres, finding the statistical parameters of artificially created foggy atmospheres that could be reproduced to real environment. This work describes created laboratory apparatus powered with fog generator, heat source and ventilating fans, which allow in a controlled way to change the optical transmission inside the bounded space. Laser diode radiation at wavelength of 850 nm is transmitted into created space like this which is scanned with optical power meter after passing of artificially created turbulent vaporous environment. Changes in intensity of the passed lights are captured; the mean value and maximum deviation from the mean value are computed. In this way it is possible to change the reached specific attenuation in dB/km. Owing to turbulences it happens to deviations from the mean value, these abnormalities are characterized by the distribution function that describes the size of turbulences in time. By the help of ergodic theorem then it is possible to deduce that the distribution function of the foggy turbulences gained at continuous time evaluation has same history like the distribution function gained behind the same conditions in the setup in other times. It holds as well that these distribution functions are the same for variety of points in experimental space, provided there are

  5. Assessing the contribution of natural sources to regional atmospheric mercury budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Gustin, M.S.; Lindberg, S.E.

    1997-12-31

    Contributions to the global atmospheric mercury budget originate from natural and anthropogenic sources. Constraining inputs from anthropogenic point sources has been the emphasis of past research leaving the contribution from diffuse natural and anthropogenic mercury enriched landscapes poorly constrained and underestimated. From September 1--4, 1997 mercury researchers convened in Reno, NV, US to intercompare methods used to determine in situ mercury flux from a naturally enriched landscape. Data collected indicate that naturally mercury-enriched areas constitute a significant atmospheric Hg source term. Mercury fluxes of 30 to 2,000 ng/m{sup 2} h were measured at the Steamboat springs Geothermal Area. These values are one to three orders of magnitude greater than that applied for natural sources in global mercury budgets. Air concentrations measured in the area indicate that natural sources can increase ambient levels above background concentrations. Assessment of these and other data indicate that natural sources constitute a significant source of atmospheric mercury that is available to the global mercury budget, and that the strength of the source is influenced significantly by environmental factors. Determining the contribution of mercury to the atmosphere from diffuse terrestrial sources is necessary to develop local and regional baselines for environmental regulations and risk assessments, and valid emission inventories. A scaling up mercury fluxes measured for diffuse terrestrial surfaces suggests that the natural atmospheric mercury source term in the US is comparable to the anthropogenic source term.

  6. Local, regional, and global views of tropospheric carbon monoxide from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, W. Wallace; Yurganov, Leonid

    2008-04-01

    More than five years of CO retrievals from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite reveal variations in tropospheric CO on timescales from twelve hours to five years and on spatial scales from local to global. The shorter timescales are invaluable to monitor daily variations in CO emissions, to enable three-dimensional tracking of atmospheric motions, and to enhance insights into atmospheric mixing. Previous studies have utilized AIRS CO retrievals over the course of days to weeks to track plumes from large forest fires. On the local scale, we will present AIRS observations of pollution from several northern hemisphere Megacities. On the regional scale, we will present AIRS observations of the Mexico City pollution plume. We will illustrate global scale AIRS CO observations of interannual variations linked to the influence of large-scale atmospheric perturbations from the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In particular, we observe a quasi-biennial variation in CO emissions from Indonesia with varying magnitudes in peak emission occurring in 2002, 2004, and 2006. Examining satellite rainfall measurements over Indonesia, we find the enhanced CO emission correlates with occasions of less rainfall during the month of October. Continuing this satellite record of tropospheric CO with measurements from the European IASI instrument will permit construction of a long time-series useful for further investigations of climatological variations in CO emissions and their impact on the health of the atmosphere.

  7. Interactive coupling of regional atmosphere with biosphere in the new generation regional climate system model REMO-iMOVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, C.; Rechid, D.; Jacob, D.

    2014-06-01

    The main objective of this study is the coupling of the regional climate model REMO with a new land surface scheme including dynamic vegetation phenology, and the evaluation of the new model version called REMO with interactive MOsaic-based VEgetation: REMO-iMOVE. First, we focus on the documentation of the technical aspects of the new model constituents and the coupling mechanism. The representation of vegetation in iMOVE is based on plant functional types (PFTs). Their geographical distribution is prescribed to the model which can be derived from different land surface data sets. Here, the PFT distribution is derived from the GLOBCOVER 2000 data set which is available on 1 km × 1 km horizontal resolution. Plant physiological processes like photosynthesis, respiration and transpiration are incorporated into the model. The vegetation modules are fully coupled to atmosphere and soil. In this way, plant physiological activity is directly driven by atmospheric and soil conditions at the model time step (two minutes to some seconds). In turn, the vegetation processes and properties influence the exchange of substances, energy and momentum between land and atmosphere. With the new coupled regional model system, dynamic feedbacks between vegetation, soil and atmosphere are represented at regional to local scale. In the evaluation part, we compare simulation results of REMO-iMOVE and of the reference version REMO2009 to multiple observation data sets of temperature, precipitation, latent heat flux, leaf area index and net primary production, in order to investigate the sensitivity of the regional model to the new land surface scheme and to evaluate the performance of both model versions. Simulations for the regional model domain Europe on a horizontal resolution of 0.44° had been carried out for the time period 1995-2005, forced with ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses data as lateral boundary conditions. REMO-iMOVE is able to simulate the European climate with the same

  8. Lichens as indicators of the atmosphere state in the oil exploration district of Tomsk Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshunova, Tatiana; Ivan, Podkozlin

    2013-04-01

    Lichens are widespread in the vegetative cover of West Siberia, particularly in the north. They play an important role in the migration and transformation of chemical pollutants. Lichens lack waxy cuticles and are largely dependent on the atmosphere for their water and nutrient uptake. Lichens are not only studied and used as indicators, but also as accumulators, e.g. for trace and heavy metals. In fact, lichens are known for their ability to accumulate airborne substances to concentrations far greater those in the atmosphere, and the element contents of lichen thalli proved to be directly correlated with environmental levels. Monitoring of the atmosphere pollution using lichens is more efficient than that using snow cover. Because of the long lichen life it is possible to obtain persistent mean characteristics of the ecosystems state. Epiphytic lichens, growing on tree stems are more appropriate to use than that which grow on soil. Epiphytic lichens are more sensitive to changes of the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Pollutants penetrate in the lichen thalli from the atmosphere together with precipitations and dust. Moreover the precipitations are saturated with pollutants when going through crowns of trees and trickling down the steams and branches. Lichen studies are especially important in territories subjected to excessive human activity. Because a great part of Tomsk region (West Siberia, Russia) is the territory of the oil-field exploration, there the atmosphere monitoring is a necessary part of the whole environmental monitoring. The aim of this investigation is the estimation of the influence of oil exploration industry in Tomsk region on the atmosphere by means of the study of epiphytic lichens. Lichen samples were collected in August and September 2010-2011. Sampling net included seven areas distributed inside the oil-exploration districts of Tomsk region. In total 27 samples were collected. In these samples 53 chemical elements were detected by

  9. The Influence of Large Solar Proton Events on the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) can cause changes in constituents in the Earth s polar middle atmosphere. A number of large SPEs have occurred over the past 50 years and tend to happen most frequently near solar maximum. The highly energetic protons cause ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents. Complicated ion chemistry leads to HOx (H, OH, HO2) production and dissociation of N2 leads to NOy (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2) production. Both the HOx and NOy increases can result in changes to ozone in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The HOx increases lead to short-lived (days) ozone decreases in the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. The NOy increases lead to long-lived (several months) stratospheric ozone changes because of the long lifetime of NOy constituents in this region. UARS HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) instrument observations showed SPE-caused polar stratospheric NOx (NO+NO2) increases over 10 ppbv in September 2000 due to the very large SPE of July 2000, which are reasonably well simulated with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). WACCM-computed SPE-caused polar stratospheric ozone decreases >10% continued for up to 5 months past the largest events in the past 50 years, however, SPE-caused total ozone changes were not found to be statistically significant. Small polar middle atmospheric temperature changes of <4 K have also been predicted to occur as a result of the larger SPEs. The polar atmospheric effects of large SPEs during solar cycle 23 and 24 will be emphasized in this presentation.

  10. Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notaro, M.; Holman, K.; Zarrin, A.; Fluck, E.; Vavrus, S. J.; Bennington, V.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on climate is assessed by comparing two decade-long simulations, with the lakes either included or excluded, using the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model Version 4. The Great Lakes dampen the variability in near-surface air temperature across the surrounding region, while reducing the amplitude of the diurnal cycle and annual cycle of air temperature. The impacts of the Great Lakes on the regional surface energy budget include an increase (decrease) in turbulent fluxes during the cold (warm) season and an increase in surface downward shortwave radiation flux during summer due to diminished atmospheric moisture and convective cloud amount. Changes in the hydrologic budget due to the presence of the Great Lakes include increases in evaporation and precipitation during October-March and decreases during May-August, along with springtime reductions in snowmelt-related runoff. Circulation responses consist of a regionwide decrease in sea-level pressure in autumn-winter and an increase in summer, with enhanced ascent and descent in the two seasons, respectively. The most pronounced simulated impact of the Great Lakes on synoptic systems traversing the basin is a weakening of cold-season anticyclones.

  11. Influence of Transient Atmospheric Circulation on the Surface Heating of the Pacific Warm Pool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chou, Shu-Hsien; Chan, Pui-King

    2003-01-01

    Analyses of data on clouds, winds, and surface heat fluxes show that the transient behavior of basin-wide large-scale circulation has a significant influence on the warm pool sea surface temperature (SST). Trade winds converge to regions of the highest SST in the equatorial western Pacific. These regions have the largest cloud cover and smallest wind speed. Both surface solar heating and evaporative cooling are weak. The reduced evaporative cooling due to weakened winds exceeds the reduced solar heating due to enhanced cloudiness. The result is a maximum surface heating in the strong convective and high SST regions. Data also show that the maximum surface heating in strong convective regions is interrupted by transient atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Due to the seasonal variation of the insolation at the top of the atmosphere, trade winds and clouds also experience seasonal variations. Regions of high SST and low-level convergence follow the Sun, where the surface heating is a maximum. As the Sun moves away from a convective region, the strong trade winds set in, and the evaporative cooling enhances, resulting in a net cooling of the surface. During an El Nino, the maximum SST and convective region shifts eastward from the maritime continent to the equatorial central Pacific. Following the eastward shift of the maximum SST, the region of maximum cloudiness and surface heating also shift eastward. As the atmospheric and oceanic circulation returns to normal situations, the trade winds increase and the surface heating decreases. We conclude that the evaporative cooling associated with the seasonal and interannual variations of trade winds is one of the major factors that modulate the SST distribution of the Pacific warm pool.

  12. The influence of ionization events on atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Atmospheric ionization events can modify the concentration of neutral species in the stratosphere and mesosphere. In particular, ozone is destroyed because of the production of significant quantities of odd nitrogen and hydrogen compounds which react photochemically to destroy ozone. Direct evidence of ozone depletion comes from data taken during and following two solar flares generating large fluxes of 10-100 Mev protons, which bombarded the polar stratosphere and mesosphere. Observations of ozone taken during X-ray emission by solar flares and energetic electron precipitation during aurorae indicates ozone destruction above 50 km by ionization produced odd hydrogen. Lightning is apparently a large contributor to the tropospheric odd nitrogen budget. Ion propulsion induced dumping of the inner proton radiation belt represents a human activity which may influence stratospheric NOx.

  13. Influence of wind direction on pollen concentration in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Palacios, I.; Tormo Molina, R.; Muñoz Rodríguez, A. F.

    The daily pollen concentration in the atmosphere of Badajoz (SW Spain) was analysed over a 6-year period (1993-1998) using a volumetric aerobiological trap. The results for the main pollination period are compared with the number of hours of wind each day in the four quadrants: 1 (NE), 2 (SE), 3 (SW) and 4 (NW). The pollen source distribution allowed 16 pollen types to be analysed as a function of their distribution in the four quadrants with respect to the location of the trap. Four of them correspond to species growing in an irrigated farmland environment (Amaranthaceae-Chenopodiaceae, Plantago, Scirpus, and Typha), five to riparian and woodland species (Salix, Fraxinus, Alnus, Populus, and Eucalyptus), four to urban ornamentals (Ulmus, Arecaceae, Cupressaceae, and Casuarina), and three which include the most frequent pollen grains of widely distributed species (Poaceae, Quercus, and Olea). The results show that the distribution of the sources and the wind direction play a very major role in determining the pollen concentration in the atmosphere when these sources are located in certain quadrants, and that the widely distributed pollen sources show no relationship with wind direction. In some years the values of the correlations were not maintained, which leads one to presume that, in order to draw significant conclusions and establish clear patterns of the influence of wind direction, a continuous and more prolonged study will be required.

  14. Factors influencing atmospheric concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Dien, Nguyen Thanh; Hirai, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Toru; Sakai, Shin-ichi

    2016-02-01

    We used polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) data in air at 38 sites across Japan (2009-2012), which were measured by the Japan Ministry of Environment (JMOE), to elucidate the time trend and seasonality of atmospheric PBDEs. In order to address few (7% for BDE-47) to many (63% for BDE-153 and 183) non-detect data, Tobit model, also called a censored regression model was used. The model revealed that the concentrations of PBDE congeners were influenced by a combination of year, temperature, rainfall rate, and population density. Greater declines were observed for BDE-47, -99, -153 and -183 (-21, -25, -17, -23%/year, p < 0.05) than for BDE-209 (-6%/year, p = 0.065). These trends were consistent with the estimated trends of penta-, octa- and deca-BDE contained in in-use products based on domestic demand for PBDEs in Japan and product lifespan. Seasonal patterns were opposite for light congeners (BDE-47 and -99), which increased with temperature, and heavy congeners (BDE-183, and -209), which decreased with temperature. Temperature-dependent emission (evaporation) for light congeners and temperature-independent emission (abrasion) for heavy congeners, coupled with seasonality of atmospheric boundary layer height, might explain these seasonal patterns. Human population density showed a positive correlation with all PBDE congener concentrations, whereas PBDEs showed negative correlation with rainfall rate. PMID:26583289

  15. Regional High-resolution Coupled Atmosphere Ocean Modelling in the North Sea Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumenil-Gates, Lydia; Bülow, Katharina; Ganske, Anette; Heinrich, Hartmut; Klein, Birgit; Klein, Holger; Möller, Jens; Rosenhagen, Gudrun; Schade, Nils; Hüttl-Kabus, Sabine; Tinz, Birger

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of climate projections in the North Sea area is one of the research tasks of the research programme KLIWAS of the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure. A multi-model ensemble of three coupled regional atmosphere-ocean models was set up comprising very high resolution simulations for the German coastal regions of the North Sea and the Baltic to represent the complex land-sea-atmosphere conditions in the region. The ensemble consists of simulations made in cooperation with the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, the Climate Service Centre and the Max-Planck-Institute for the period of 1950 to 2100. The KLIWAS project thereby adds coupled models to the band-width of possible future climate conditions in the atmosphere as given by the ENSEMBLES project, which were also analyzed. The coupled results are evaluated for present-day climate using a North Sea climatology of maritime conditions at a matching high resolution. In the future climate, while air and water temperatures will rise to the year 2100, the mean wind speed does not show a significant trend, but large decadal variability. The frequency of occurrence of westerly wind directions increases in the majority of simulations and results in an increase of significant wave height in the eastern parts of the North Sea. In an interdisciplinary approach, these results are used to provide regional to local information for the development of adaptation strategies for the estuary, and climate-proofing of infrastructure in the wider context of the project.

  16. Influence of seasonal cycles in Martian atmosphere on entry, descent and landing sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčeta, Dušan; Šegan, Stevo; Rašuo, Boško

    2014-05-01

    The phenomena like high eccentricity of Martian orbit, obliquity of the orbital plane and close alignment of the winter solstice and the orbital perihelion, separately or together can significantly alter not only the level of some Martian atmospheric parameters but also the characteristics of its diurnal and seasonal cycle. Considering that entry, descent and landing (EDL) sequence is mainly driven by the density profile of the atmosphere and aerodynamic characteristic of the entry vehicle. We have performed the analysis of the influence of the seasonal cycles of the atmospheric parameters on EDL profiles by using Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM). Since the height of the deployment of the parachute and the time passed from the deployment to propulsion firing (descent time) are of crucial importance for safe landing and the achievable landing site elevation we paid special attention to the influence of the areocentric longitude of the Sun (Ls) on these variables. We have found that these variables have periodic variability with respect to Ls and can be very well approximated with a sine wave function whose mean value depends only on the landing site elevation while the amplitudes and phases depend only on the landing site latitude. The amplitudes exhibit behavior which is symmetric with respect to the latitude but the symmetry is shifted from the equator to the northern mid-tropics. We have also noticed that the strong temperature inversions which are usual for middle and higher northern latitudes while Mars is around its orbital perihelion significantly alter the descent time without influencing the height of the parachute deployment. At last, we applied our model to determine the dependence of the accessible landing region on Ls and found that this region reaches maximum when Mars is around the orbital perihelion and can vary 50° in latitude throughout the Martian year.

  17. Influence of longitudinal argon flow on DC glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sha; Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Xu, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was employed to investigate the influence of longitudinal argon flow on the DC glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. It is found that the charges exhibit distinct dynamic behaviors at different argon flow velocities, accompanied by a considerable change in the discharge structure. The positive argon flow allows for the reduction of charge densities in the positive column and negative glow regions, and even leads to the disappearance of negative glow. The negative argon flow gives rise to the enhancement of charge densities in the positive column and negative glow regions. These observations are attributed to the fact that the gas flow convection influences the transport of charges through different manners by comparing the argon flow velocity with the ion drift velocity. The findings are important for improving the chemical activity and work efficiency of the plasma source by controlling the gas flow in practical applications.

  18. Natural sources of atmospheric aerosols influencing air quality across Europe.

    PubMed

    Viana, M; Pey, J; Querol, X; Alastuey, A; de Leeuw, F; Lükewille, Anke

    2014-02-15

    Atmospheric aerosols are emitted by natural and anthropogenic sources. Contributions from natural sources to ambient aerosols vary widely with time (inter-annual and seasonal variability) and as a function of the distance to source regions. This work aims to identify the main natural sources of atmospheric aerosols affecting air quality across Europe. The origin, frequency, magnitude, and spatial and temporal variability of natural events were assessed for the years 2008 and 2009. The main natural sources of atmospheric aerosols identified were African dust, sea spray and wildfires. Primary biological particles were not included in the present work. Volcanic eruptions did not affect air quality significantly in Europe during the study period. The impact of natural episodes on air quality was significant in Southern and Western Europe (Cyprus, Spain, France, UK, Greece, Malta, Italy and Portugal), where they contributed to surpass the PM10 daily and annual limit values. In Central and Northern Europe (Germany, Austria and Latvia) the impact of these events was lower, as it resulted in the exceedance of PM daily but not annual limit values. Contributions from natural sources to mean annual PM10 levels in 2008 and 2009 ranged between 1 and 2 μg/m(3) in Italy, France and Portugal, between 1 and 4 μg/m(3) in Spain (10 μg/m(3) when including the Canary Islands), 5 μg/m(3) in UK, between 3 and 8 μg/m(3) in Greece, and reached up to 13 μg/m(3) in Cyprus. The evaluation of the number of monitoring stations per country reporting natural exceedances of the daily limit value (DLV) is suggested as a potential tool for air quality monitoring networks to detect outliers in the assessment of natural contributions. It is strongly suggested that a reference methodology for the identification and quantification of African dust contributions should be adopted across Europe. PMID:24342088

  19. Regional and Global Atmospheric CO2 Measurements Using 1.57 Micron IM-CW Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Obland, Michael; Nehrir, Amin; Browell, Edward; Harrison, F. Wallace; Dobler, Jeremy; Campbell, Joel; Kooi, Susan; Meadows, Byron; Fan, Tai-Fang; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 is a critical forcing for the Earth's climate, and knowledge of its distribution and variations influences predictions of the Earth's future climate. Accurate observations of atmospheric CO2 are also crucial to improving our understanding of CO2 sources, sinks and transports. To meet these science needs, NASA is developing technologies for the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission, which is aimed at global CO2 observations. Meanwhile an airborne investigation of atmospheric CO2 distributions as part of the NASA Suborbital Atmospheric Carbon and Transport â€" America (ACT-America) mission will be conducted with lidar and in situ instrumentation over the central and eastern United States during all four seasons and under a wide range of meteorological conditions. In preparing for the ASCENDS mission, NASA Langley Research Center and Exelis Inc./Harris Corp. have jointly developed and demonstrated the capability of atmospheric CO2 column measurements with an intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) lidar. Since 2005, a total of 14 flight campaigns have been conducted. A measurement precision of approx.0.3 ppmv for a 10-s average over desert and vegetated surfaces has been achieved, and the lidar CO2 measurements also agree well with in-situ observations. Significant atmospheric CO2 variations on various spatiotemporal scales have been observed during these campaigns. For example, around 10-ppm CO2 changes were found within free troposphere in a region of about 200A-300 sq km over Iowa during a summer 2014 flight. Results from recent flight campaigns are presented in this paper. The ability to achieve the science objectives of the ASCENDS mission with an IM-CW lidar is also discussed in this paper, along with the plans for the ACT-America aircraft investigation that begins in the winter of 2016.

  20. Soil occupation and atmospheric variations over Sobradinho Lake area. Part two: a regional modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, M. F.; da Silva Dias, M. A. F.; da Silva Aragão, M. R.

    2006-11-01

    The impact of the changes on soil cover and land use brought about by the construction of the Sobradinho Dam in the semi-arid region of the São Francisco River Hydrographic Basin is analyzed by means of a numerical model RAMS. Disregarding the influence of a large scale flow, a set of factors were responsible for the creation of a rather complex circulation system that includes mountain-valley winds, lake breeze (LB) and non-conventional circulation all induced by the surface non-homogeneous aspect. Results have demonstrated that the implementation of works of such magnitude brings about environmental changes in an area that stretches far beyond the surroundings of the reservoir. The soil cover alterations due to the ever increasing development of the area with the presence of irrigated crops in a sparsely vegetated region ( caatinga) does affect land surface characteristics, occasioning for that matter the splitting of the available energy into latent and sensible heat fluxes. LB behavior varies in accordance with atmospheric conditions and also in view of the type of vegetation found in the lake surrounding areas. Hydro availability in root zones, even under adverse atmospheric conditions (high temperature and low air humidity) brings up the high rates of evaporation and plant transpiration that contribute towards the increase of humidity and the fall of temperature in lower atmospheric layers.

  1. Influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes: A large-eddy simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation is combined with a turbine model to investigate the influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes. In the simulations, subgrid-scale turbulent fluxes are parameterized using tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic models. These models optimize the local value of the model coefficients based on the dynamics of the resolved scales. The turbine-induced forces are parameterized with an actuator-disk model with rotation. In this technique, blade-element theory is used to calculate the lift and drag forces acting on the blades. Emphasis is placed on the structure and characteristics of wind-turbine wakes in the cases where the incident flows to the turbine have the same mean velocity at the hub height but different stability conditions. The simulation results show that atmospheric stability has a significant effect on the spatial distribution of the mean velocity deficit and turbulent fluxes in the wake region. In particular, the magnitude of the velocity deficit increases with increasing stability in the atmosphere. In addition, the locations of the maximum turbulence intensity and turbulent stresses are closer to the turbine in convective boundary layer compared with neutral and stable ones. Detailed analysis of the resolved turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget inside the wake reveals also that the thermal stratification of the incoming wind considerably affects the magnitude and spatial distribution of the turbulent production, transport term and dissipation rate (transfer of energy to the subgrid scales). It is also shown that the near-wake region can be extended to a farther distance downstream in stable condition compared with neutral and unstable counterparts. In order to isolate the effect of atmospheric stability, additional simulations of neutrally-stratified atmospheric boundary layers are performed with the same turbulence intensity at hub height as convective and stable ones. The results show that the

  2. Regional scale evaporation and the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlange, Marc B.; Eichinger, William E.; Albertson, John D.

    1995-01-01

    In this review we briefly summarize some current models of evaporation and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and discuss new experimental and computational oppurtunities that may aid our understanding of evaporation at these larger scales. In particular, consideration is given to remote sensing of the atmosphere, computational fluid dynamics and the role numerical models can play in understanding land-atmosphere interactions. These powerful modeling and measurement tools are allowing us to visualize and study spatial and temporal scales previously untouched, thereby increasing the oppurtunities to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere interaction.

  3. Global and Regional Constraints on Exchanges of CO2 Between the Atmosphere and Terrestrial Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, S. C.

    2001-12-01

    , respectively. Both the O2 and 13C/12C methods have complications and limitations that will be discussed. To partition the global biospheric flux further to zonal or regional detail or to shorter time steps, atmospheric models are required to simulate the transport of tracer from source regions to individual stations where air is sampled. An ongoing collaborative project to compare atmospheric models has highlighted significant differences in transport characteristics, mainly owing to differences in how the boundary layer is modeled. Accordingly, a recent compilation of model calculations showed a wide range of estimates for the tropical biosphere, from a significant release of CO2 to an uptake over recent decades; however, the calculations showed reasonable agreement on a significant northern biospheric sink. Fluxes of biospheric CO2 can be determined accurately at the global scale as well as at individual sites. An ingenious blend of observations and models will be required to bridge the gap between these two extreme spatial scales, and thereby gain an understanding sufficient to predict the influence of the terrestrial biosphere on variations in atmospheric CO2.

  4. Atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI): Status and the aerosol explanation for extra window region emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Revercomb, H.E.; Knuteson, R.O.; Best, F.A.; Dirkx, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    High spectral resolution observations of downwelling emission from 3 to 19 microns have been made by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Prototype at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiative Testbed (CART) site for over two years. The spectral data set from AERI provides a basis for improving clear sky radiative transfer; determining the radiative impact of clouds, including the derivation of cloud radiative properties; defining the influences of aerosols in the window regions; and retrieving boundary layer state properties, including temperature, water vapor, and other trace gases. The data stream of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated radiances is routinely provided by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to those science teams requesting it, and further information on the instrument and data characteristics is available in the ARM Science Team proceedings for 1993 and 1994 and in several conference publications. This paper describes the AERI status, calibration, field experiment wit a new AERI-01 and schedule, window region emissions, and future AERI plans.

  5. The impacts of precipitation on land- atmosphere interaction over the semi-arid Loess Plateau region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, G.; Huang, J.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the impacts of precipitation on land-atmosphere interactions over semi-arid regions, 6-year continuous measurements data in situ were analyzed to investigate the influence of precipitation on soil moisture, evapotranspiration, energy partitioning and plant growing over Loess Plateau in northwest China. Results show that annual precipitation had obvious inter-annual variability, and the variation of soil moisture; evaporation and CO2 flux were very consistently with the annual cycle and intensity of precipitation. Soil moisture is the key participant in land-atmosphere interaction. However, as the water shortage and disconnected from water table over the semi-arid region, it is much more sensitive with precipitation compensation and evaporation feedbacks. Soil water can cooling the near surface air temperature by evaporation (latent heat flux), and also as the main energy partitioning consumer of net radiation in humid area or pluvial period in arid area, yet it was water limited in arid and semi-arid region, sensible heat flux predominated net radiation for enhancing the surface air temperature. We also found that soil moisture profile significantly affected the plant physiology, which was also consistent with the annual cycle and intensity of precipitation.

  6. Regional Feedbacks Between the Ocean and the Atmosphere in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L.; Garcia, M.; Kelly, K. A.; Booth, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The ocean acts to buffer changes in the climate system with the upper 800m of the ocean taking up more than 90% of the excess heat in the climate system. On interannual time scales, surface heat fluxes damp the low-frequency heat content anomalies in some areas of the ocean where heat anomalies can be released back to the atmosphere. Analysis of satellite altimetry observations of SSH (sea surface height) as a proxy for upper ocean heat content and net suface heat flux from OAFlux (Objectively Analyzed air-sea fluxes) 993-2009 allows the identification of the times of the year and the locations in the North Atlantic where heat content anomalies are driving surface fluxes. Heat content has six month persistence while surface flux has at most one month persistence. Times series for each month of the year at each location are created to examine the lagged correlation between upper ocean heat content and the net surface heat fluxes. The heat content anomalies south of the Gulf Stream in June through November are negatively correlated with surface fluxes in November with a warmer ocean leading to surface fluxes out of the ocean. In this region, the mixed-layer by November reaches 100 m and the previous summer's stored heat is accessible to the atmosphere. The high correlations continue into December and January. By February, the correlation is no longer significant. In the region between 15N and 40N off the coast of Africa, January through May heat content are anti-correlated with surface fluxes in May. In May at this location, the climatological sensible heat flux is into the ocean, the planetary boundary layer is stable and stratocumulus clouds are common. Significant correlations in the summer are also found in the central subpolar North Atlantic. This analysis suggests that locally ocean heat content anomalies can feedback to the atmosphere, but only during certain times of the year. The impact on the atmosphere in late fall and early winter can influence of the

  7. The Long-term Middle Atmospheric Influence of Very Large Solar Proton Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Vitt, Francis M.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Randall, Cora E.; Fleming, Eric L.; Frith, Stacey M.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term variations in ozone have been caused by both natural and humankind related processes. The humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone originates from the chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine) and has led to international regulations greatly limiting the release of these substances. Certain natural ozone influences are also important in polar regions and are caused by the impact of solar charged particles on the atmosphere. Such natural variations have been studied in order to better quantify the human influence on polar ozone. Large-scale explosions on the Sun near solar maximum lead to emissions of charged particles (mainly protons and electrons), some of which enter the Earth's magnetosphere and rain down on the polar regions. "Solar proton events" have been used to describe these phenomena since the protons associated with these solar events sometimes create a significant atmospheric disturbance. We have used the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to study the long-term (> few months) influences of solar proton events from 1963 through 2004 on stratospheric ozone and temperature. There were extremely large solar proton events in 1972, 1989,2000,2001, and 2003. These events caused very distinctive polar changes in layers of the Earth's atmosphere known as the stratosphere (12-50 km; -7-30 miles) and mesosphere (50-90 km; 30-55 miles). The solar protons connected with these events created hydrogen- and nitrogen-containing compounds, which led to the polar ozone destruction. The nitrogen-containing compounds, called odd nitrogen, lasted much longer than the hydrogen-containing compounds and led to long-lived stratospheric impacts. An extremely active period for these events occurred in the five-year period, 2000- 2004, and caused increases in odd nitrogen which lasted for several months after individual events. Associated stratospheric ozone decreases of >lo% were calculated

  8. The Anthropogenic Influence on Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide: Implications for Inverse Analysis of Process-Level Carbon Cycle Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumkehr, A. L.; Hilton, T. W.; Whelan, M.; Smith, S. J.; Campbell, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur containing gas in the troposphere and a significant precursor to stratospheric aerosol. Recent insights on the plant uptake of atmospheric COS suggest that plant uptake is the largest component of the global COS budget and that COS may provide a powerful new tool for partitioning sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 at regional to global scales. However, alternative sources and sinks of COS must also be accounted for to minimize the uncertainty of this carbon cycle tracer approach. Here we focus on direct and indirect sources of atmospheric COS from anthropogenic activities. We construct bottom-up gridded inventories of anthropogenic COS sources and compare these to previous estimates that were based on relatively sparse emissions data. Furthermore, we simulate COS concentrations with an regional atmospheric chemistry model to show the influence of these alternative source estimates in relation to plant uptake at a range of surface and airborne monitoring sites.

  9. A study of the influence of forest gaps on fire-atmosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Michael T.; Heilman, Warren E.; Zhong, Shiyuan; Charney, Joseph J.; Bian, Xindi

    2016-07-01

    Much uncertainty exists regarding the possible role that gaps in forest canopies play in modulating fire-atmosphere interactions in otherwise horizontally homogeneous forests. This study examines the influence of gaps in forest canopies on atmospheric perturbations induced by a low-intensity fire using the ARPS-CANOPY model, a version of the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) model with a canopy parameterization. A series of numerical experiments are conducted with a stationary low-intensity fire, represented in the model as a line of enhanced surface sensible heat flux. Experiments are conducted with and without forest gaps, and with gaps in different positions relative to the fire line. For each of the four cases considered, an additional simulation is performed without the fire to facilitate comparison of the fire-perturbed atmosphere and the background state. Analyses of both mean and instantaneous wind velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, air temperature, and turbulent mixing of heat are presented in order to examine the fire-perturbed atmosphere on multiple timescales. Results of the analyses indicate that the impact of the fire on the atmosphere is greatest in the case with the gap centered on the fire and weakest in the case with the gap upstream of the fire. It is shown that gaps in forest canopies have the potential to play a role in the vertical as well as horizontal transport of heat away from the fire. Results also suggest that, in order to understand how the fire will alter wind and turbulence in a heterogeneous forest, one needs to first understand how the forest heterogeneity itself influences the wind and turbulence fields without the fire.

  10. Influence of Industrialization in the Campinas Rural Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Alfonso Trujillo

    The Campinas region of Brazil was studied to determine if the introduction of industrial plants in rural areas influenced the life of the rural population. The purpose of this study was to obtain an insight into the manner by which the industrialization influence is functioning in the Campinas rural area. The region and its rural population were…

  11. Neutral Middle Atmospheric Influences by the Extremely Large October 2003 Solar Proton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    The huge coronal mass ejection (CME) on October 28, 2003 caused an extremely large solar proton event (SPE) 3t the Earth, which impacted the middle atmospheric polar cap regions. The highly energetic protons produce ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents, which lead to the production of HO(x) (H, OH, HO2) and NO(y) (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2). The total production of middle atmospheric NO(y) molecules by individual SPEs can be used to compare their sizes. Using this scale, the extremely large October 2003 SPE was the fourth largest in the past 40 years and the second largest of solar cycle 23. Only the October 1989, August 1972, and July 2000 SPEs were larger. The Goddard Space Flight Center (CSFC) Two-dimensional (2D)) Model was used in computing the influence of this gigantic SPE The NO(y) amount was increased by over two orders of Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements as a result of this noteworthy SPE. The model also calculated polar middle mesosphere ozone decreases of over 70% during the SPE. Other atmospheric impacts from both model predictions and measurements as a result of this major SPE will be discussed in this paper.

  12. Neutral Middle Atmospheric Influences by the Extremely Large October 2003 Solar Proton Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    The huge coronal mass ejection (CME) on October 28,2003 caused an extremely large solar proton event (SPE) at the Earth, which impacted the middle atmospheric polar cap regions. The highly energetic protons produce ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents, which lead to the production of HOx (H, OH, HO2) and NOy (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2). The total production of middle atmospheric NOy molecules by individual SPEs can be used to compare their sizes. Using this scale, the extremely large October 2003 SPE was the fourth largest in the past 40 years and the second largest of solar cycle 23. Only the October 1989, August 1972, and July 2000 SPEs were larger. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Two-dimensional (2D) Model was used in computing the influence of this gigantic SPE. The NOy amount was increased by over two orders of magnitude in the mesosphere in both the GSFC 2D Model computations and Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements as a result of this noteworthy SPE. The model also calculated polar middle mesospheric ozone decreases of over 70% during the SPE. Other atmospheric impacts from both model predictions and measurements as a result of this major SPE will be discussed in this paper.

  13. Reconstruction of atmospheric soot history in inland regions from lake sediments over the past 150 years.

    PubMed

    Han, Y M; Wei, C; Huang, R-J; Bandowe, B A M; Ho, S S H; Cao, J J; Jin, Z D; Xu, B Q; Gao, S P; Tie, X X; An, Z S; Wilcke, W

    2016-01-01

    Historical reconstruction of atmospheric black carbon (BC, in the form of char and soot) is still constrained for inland areas. Here we determined and compared the past 150-yr records of BC and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in sediments from two representative lakes, Huguangyan (HGY) and Chaohu (CH), in eastern China. HGY only receives atmospheric deposition while CH is influenced by riverine input. BC, char, and soot have similar vertical concentration profiles as PACs in both lakes. Abrupt increases in concentrations and mass accumulation rates (MARs) of soot have mainly occurred since ~1950, the establishment of the People's Republic of China, when energy usage changed to more fossil fuel contributions reflected by the variations in the concentration ratios of char/soot and individual PACs. In HGY, soot MARs increased by ~7.7 times in the period 1980-2012 relative to the period 1850-1950. Similar increases (~6.7 times) were observed in CH. The increase in soot MARs is also in line with the emission inventory records in the literature and the fact that the submicrometer-sized soot particles can be dispersed regionally. The study provides an alternative method to reconstruct the atmospheric soot history in populated inland areas. PMID:26750586

  14. Reconstruction of atmospheric soot history in inland regions from lake sediments over the past 150 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. M.; Wei, C.; Huang, R.-J.; Bandowe, B. A. M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Cao, J. J.; Jin, Z. D.; Xu, B. Q.; Gao, S. P.; Tie, X. X.; An, Z. S.; Wilcke, W.

    2016-01-01

    Historical reconstruction of atmospheric black carbon (BC, in the form of char and soot) is still constrained for inland areas. Here we determined and compared the past 150-yr records of BC and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in sediments from two representative lakes, Huguangyan (HGY) and Chaohu (CH), in eastern China. HGY only receives atmospheric deposition while CH is influenced by riverine input. BC, char, and soot have similar vertical concentration profiles as PACs in both lakes. Abrupt increases in concentrations and mass accumulation rates (MARs) of soot have mainly occurred since ~1950, the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, when energy usage changed to more fossil fuel contributions reflected by the variations in the concentration ratios of char/soot and individual PACs. In HGY, soot MARs increased by ~7.7 times in the period 1980-2012 relative to the period 1850-1950. Similar increases (~6.7 times) were observed in CH. The increase in soot MARs is also in line with the emission inventory records in the literature and the fact that the submicrometer-sized soot particles can be dispersed regionally. The study provides an alternative method to reconstruct the atmospheric soot history in populated inland areas.

  15. Reconstruction of atmospheric soot history in inland regions from lake sediments over the past 150 years

    PubMed Central

    Han, Y. M.; Wei, C.; Huang, R.-J.; Bandowe, B. A. M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Cao, J. J.; Jin, Z. D.; Xu, B. Q.; Gao, S. P.; Tie, X. X.; An, Z. S.; Wilcke, W.

    2016-01-01

    Historical reconstruction of atmospheric black carbon (BC, in the form of char and soot) is still constrained for inland areas. Here we determined and compared the past 150-yr records of BC and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in sediments from two representative lakes, Huguangyan (HGY) and Chaohu (CH), in eastern China. HGY only receives atmospheric deposition while CH is influenced by riverine input. BC, char, and soot have similar vertical concentration profiles as PACs in both lakes. Abrupt increases in concentrations and mass accumulation rates (MARs) of soot have mainly occurred since ~1950, the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, when energy usage changed to more fossil fuel contributions reflected by the variations in the concentration ratios of char/soot and individual PACs. In HGY, soot MARs increased by ~7.7 times in the period 1980–2012 relative to the period 1850–1950. Similar increases (~6.7 times) were observed in CH. The increase in soot MARs is also in line with the emission inventory records in the literature and the fact that the submicrometer-sized soot particles can be dispersed regionally. The study provides an alternative method to reconstruct the atmospheric soot history in populated inland areas. PMID:26750586

  16. Rare earth element components in atmospheric particulates in the Bayan Obo mine region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao; Zhang, Qian; Li, Kexin

    2014-05-01

    The Bayan Obo mine, located in Inner Mongolia, China, is the largest light rare earth body ever found in the world. The research for rare earth elements (REEs) enrichment in atmospheric particulates caused by mining and ore processing is fairly limited so far. In this paper, atmospheric particulates including total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and particles with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) were collected around the Bayan Obo mine region, in August 2012 and March 2013, to analyze the levels and distributions of REEs in particles. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP were 149.8 and 239.6 ng/m(3), and those for PM10 were 42.8 and 68.9 ng/m(3), in August 2012 and March 2013, respectively. Enrichment factor was calculated for all 14 REEs in the TSP and PM10 and the results indicated that REEs enrichment in atmosphere particulates was caused by anthropogenic sources and influenced by the strong wind in springtime. The spatial distribution of REEs in TSP showed a strong gradient concentration in the prevailing wind direction. REE chondrite normalized patterns of TSP and PM10 were similar and the normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light REEs and heavy REE, which supported by the chondrite normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La(N)/Yb(N), La(N)/Sm(N), Gd(N)/Yb(N)). PMID:24657942

  17. Atmospheric moisture budget during winter seasons in the western Himalayan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sarita; Kar, Sarat C.; Bhatla, R.

    2016-04-01

    Winter precipitation in the western Himalayas occurs under the influence of western disturbances (WDs) that move in synoptic timescale from west to east across the Himalayan region. The main objective of the study is to examine the water vapor budget during life cycles of WDs using the high-resolution global climate forecast system reanalysis data. It is found that over western Kashmir, even in climatological mean, a westerly trough is seen in moisture flux. Precipitation exceeds evaporation over most of Jammu and Kashmir, Hindukush region and the region to the west in winter seasons. Large interannual variability is noticed in all components of the moisture budget in the region. In order to understand the mechanism of moisture transport and atmospheric moisture budget over study area during the life cycle of WDs, an EOF analysis has been carried out using geopotential height at 500 hPa. The first two leading modes represent eastward moving WDs. Composite analysis of moisture budget (both atmospheric and surface) has been made using the dates from the EOF analysis. It is found that large variations in moisture transport occur during different phases of the WDs. When a cyclonic circulation is around 72°E, strong meridional moisture transport (from Arabian Sea) occurs and moisture convergence over western Himalayas enhances precipitation over the region. After the circulation moves further east, moisture convergence decreases and precipitation reduces. However, evaporation amount increases marginally due to clear sky conditions. During the life cycle of WDs, large variation in meridional transport of moisture flux is noticed as compared to zonal transport.

  18. Influence of aerosols on atmospheric variables in the HARMONIE model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamarchuk, Iuliia; Ivanov, Sergiy; Ruban, Igor; Pavlova, Hanna

    2016-03-01

    The mesoscale HARMONIE model is used to investigate the potential influence of aerosols on weather forecasts, and in particular, on precipitation. The study considers three numerical experiments over the Atlantic-Europe-Northern Africa region during 11-16 August 2010 with the following configurations: (a) no aerosols, (b) only the sea aerosols, and (c) the four types of the aerosols: sea, land, organic, and dust aerosols. The spatio-temporal analysis of forecast differences highlights the impact of aerosols on the prediction of main meteorological variables such as air temperature, humidity, precipitation, and cloud cover as well as their vertical profiles. The variations occur through changes in radiation fluxes and microphysics properties. The sensitivity experiments with the inclusion of climatological aerosol concentrations demonstrate the importance of aerosol effects on weather prediction.

  19. Two centuries of observed atmospheric variability and change over the North Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stendel, Martin; van den Besselaar, Else; Hannachi, Abdel; Kent, Elizabeth; Lefebvre, Christiana; Rosenhagen, Gudrun; Schenk, Frederik; van der Schrier, Gerard; Woollings, Tim

    2016-04-01

    In the upcoming North Sea Region Climate Change Assessment (NOSCCA), we present a synthesis of current knowledge about past, present and possible future climate change in the North Sea region. A climate change assessment from published scientific work has been conducted as a kind of regional IPCC report, and a book has been produced that will be published by Springer in 2016. In the framework of the NOSCCA project, we examine past and present studies of variability and changes in atmospheric variables within the North Sea region over the instrumental period, roughly the past 200 years, based on observations and reanalyses. The variables addressed in this presentation are large-scale circulation, pressure and wind, surface air temperature, precipitation and radiative properties (clouds, solar radiation, and sunshine duration). While air temperature over land, not unexpectedly, has increased everywhere in the North Sea region, with strongest trends in spring and in the north of the region, a precipitation increase has been observed in the north and a decrease in the south of the region. This pattern goes along with a north-eastward shift of storm tracks and is in agreement with climate model projections under enhanced greenhouse gas concentrations. For other variables, it is not obvious which part of the observed changes may be due to anthropogenic activities and which is internally forced. It remains also unclear to what extent atmospheric circulation over the North Sea region is influenced by distant factors, in particular Arctic sea-ice decline in recent decades. There are indications of an increase in the number of deep cyclones (but not in the total number of cyclones), while storminess since the late 19th century shows no robust trends. The persistence of circulation types appears to have increased over the last century, and consequently, there is an indication for 'more extreme' extreme events. However, changes in extreme weather events are difficult to assess

  20. Using Search Algorithms and Probabilistic Graphical Models to Understand the Influence of Atmospheric Circulation on Western US Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malevich, S. B.; Woodhouse, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    This work explores a new approach to quantify cool-season mid-latitude circulation dynamics as they relate western US streamflow variability and drought. This information is used to probabilistically associate patterns of synoptic atmospheric circulation with spatial patterns of drought in western US streamflow. Cool-season storms transport moisture from the Pacific Ocean and are a primary source for western US streamflow. Studies overthe past several decades have emphasized that the western US hydroclimate is influenced by the intensity and phasing of ocean and atmosphere dynamics and teleconnections, such as ENSO and North Pacific variability. These complex interactions are realized in atmospheric circulation along the west coast of North America. The region's atmospheric circulation can encourage a preferential flow in winter storm tracks from the Pacific, and thus influence the moisture conditions of a given river basin over the course of the cool season. These dynamics have traditionally been measured with atmospheric indices based on values from fixed points in space or principal component loadings. This study uses collective search agents to quantify the position and intensity of potentially non-stationary atmosphere features in climate reanalysis datasets, relative to regional hydrology. Results underline the spatio-temporal relationship between semi-permanent atmosphere characteristics and naturalized streamflow from major river basins of the western US. A probabilistic graphical model quantifies this relationship while accounting for uncertainty from noisy climate processes, and eventually, limitations from dataset length. This creates probabilities for semi-permanent atmosphere features which we hope to associate with extreme droughts of the paleo record, based on our understanding of atmosphere-streamflow relations observed in the instrumental record.

  1. Mesoscale Modeling of Water Vapor and Dust in Valles Marineris: Atmospheric Influences on Recurring Slope Lineae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, C. W. S.; Rafkin, S. C.; McEwen, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extensive recurring slope lineae (RSL) activity has been detected in Valles Marineris on Mars and coincides with regions where water ice fogs appear [1]. The origin of the water driving RSL flow is not well understood, but observational evidence suggests atmospheric processes play a crucial role [2]. Provided the atmospheric vapor concentration is high enough, water ice fogs can form overnight if the surface temperature cools below the condensation temperature. Correlations between dust storms and flow rates suggest that atmospheric dust opacity, and its influence on air temperature, also has a significant effect on RSL activity. We investigate planetary boundary layer processes that govern the hydrological cycle and dust cycle on Mars using a mesoscale atmospheric model to simulate the distribution of water and dust with respect to regional atmospheric circulations. Our simulations in Valles Marineris show a curious temperature structure, where the inside of the canyon appears warmer relative to the plateaus immediately outside. For a well-mixed atmosphere, this temperature structure indicates that when the atmosphere inside the canyon is saturated and fog is present within Valles Marineris, fog and low-lying clouds should also be present on the cooler surrounding plateaus as well. However, images taken with the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) show instances where water ice fog appeared exclusively inside the canyon. These results have important implications for the origin and concentration of water vapor in Valles Marineris, with possible connections to RSL. The potential temperatures from our simulations show a high level of stability inside the canyon produced dynamically by sinking air. However, afternoon updrafts along the canyon walls indicate that over time, water vapor within the chasm would escape along the sides of the canyon. Again, this suggests a local source or mechanism to concentrate water vapor is needed to explain the fog

  2. Investigating the atmospheric energy spectra using ECMWF analysis: Regional dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, P.; Zhang, M.

    2010-12-01

    The atmospheric turbulence energy spectrum has been a subject of active research for a long time. Beginning with Kolmogorov’s theory of three-dimensional turbulence, to Kraichnan’s two-dimensional turbulence and its extension to the quasi-geostrophic case by Charney, various theoretical models and hypothesis have tried to explain the energy spectrum slope. However, the success or failure of a theory can only be gauged by comparing its output with actual observational data. Nastrom and Gage were able to do just that by analyzing thousands of flight observation data and plotting the wave number spectra of wind and temperature in 1980’s. But, the flight data was confined only to the upper atmosphere and mostly mid-latitudes of northern hemisphere. We use the high-resolution ECMWF analysis data, as a part of Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) to study the atmospheric energy spectra over a wide range of conditions. We compared and interpreted the differences of the atmospheric energy spectra in the tropics and mid-latitudes, in the winter (DJF) and summer (JJA), at the surface and in the upper troposphere. Our results conform to the previously observed -3 power law for mid-latitude data in the upper troposphere, but the slope of the energy spectrum from the surface wind data and for the tropics exhibited quite different shapes. The causes of these differences are discussed.

  3. REGIONAL MODELING OF THE ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model has been developed by the U.S. EPA that is capable of addressing the atmospheric fate, transport and deposition of some common trace toxics. An initial, 36-km rectangular grid-cell application for atrazine has been...

  4. Incremental Reactivity Effects on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in Urban Atmospheres with and without Biogenic Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacarab, Mary; Li, Lijie; Carter, William P. L.; Cocker, David R., III

    2016-04-01

    Two different surrogate mixtures of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were developed to study secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation at atmospheric reactivities similar to urban regions with varying biogenic influence levels. Environmental chamber simulations were designed to enable the study of the incremental aerosol formation from select anthropogenic (m‑Xylene, 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene, and 1-Methylnaphthalene) and biogenic (α-pinene) precursors under the chemical reactivity set by the two different surrogate mixtures. The surrogate reactive organic gas (ROG) mixtures were based on that used to develop the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) factors for evaluation of O3 forming potential. Multiple incremental aerosol formation experiments were performed in the University of California Riverside (UCR) College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) dual 90m3 environmental chambers. Incremental aerosol yields were determined for each of the VOCs studied and compared to yields found from single precursor studies. Aerosol physical properties of density, volatility, and hygroscopicity were monitored throughout experiments. Bulk elemental chemical composition from high-resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) data will also be presented. Incremental yields and SOA chemical and physical characteristics will be compared with data from previous single VOC studies conducted for these aerosol precursors following traditional VOC/NOx chamber experiments. Evaluation of the incremental effects of VOCs on SOA formation and properties are paramount in evaluating how to best extrapolate environmental chamber observations to the ambient atmosphere and provides useful insights into current SOA formation models. Further, the comparison of incremental SOA from VOCs in varying surrogate urban atmospheres (with and without strong biogenic influence) allows for a unique perspective on the impacts

  5. Rare earth element components in atmospheric particulates in the Bayan Obo mine region

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lingqing Liang, Tao Zhang, Qian; Li, Kexin

    2014-05-01

    The Bayan Obo mine, located in Inner Mongolia, China, is the largest light rare earth body ever found in the world. The research for rare earth elements (REEs) enrichment in atmospheric particulates caused by mining and ore processing is fairly limited so far. In this paper, atmospheric particulates including total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and particles with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM{sub 10}) were collected around the Bayan Obo mine region, in August 2012 and March 2013, to analyze the levels and distributions of REEs in particles. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP were 149.8 and 239.6 ng/m{sup 3}, and those for PM{sub 10} were 42.8 and 68.9 ng/m{sup 3}, in August 2012 and March 2013, respectively. Enrichment factor was calculated for all 14 REEs in the TSP and PM{sub 10} and the results indicated that REEs enrichment in atmosphere particulates was caused by anthropogenic sources and influenced by the strong wind in springtime. The spatial distribution of REEs in TSP showed a strong gradient concentration in the prevailing wind direction. REE chondrite normalized patterns of TSP and PM{sub 10} were similar and the normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light REEs and heavy REE, which supported by the chondrite normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La{sub N}/Yb{sub N}, La{sub N}/Sm{sub N}, Gd{sub N}/Yb{sub N}). - Highlights: • TSP and PM{sub 10} samples were collected to analyze the levels and distributions of REE. • Enrichment factors indicated that REE enrichment was caused by anthropogenic sources. • The distribution of REEs showed a strong gradient in the prevailing wind direction. • Obvious fractionation between LREEs and HREEs is observed in atmospheric particulates.

  6. The influence of ozone on Martian atmospheric temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, W. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Postawko, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Radiative equilibrium temperature calculations for Mars are presented, using the model of Kuhn et al. (1978). The maximum amount of ozone measured was 57 microns over the polar hood during winter. Results indicate that, although a minor constituent in the Martian atmosphere, ozone may play a significant role in controlling the rate of carbon dioxide deposition and thus the atmospheric pressure.

  7. Influence of Atmospheric CO2 Variation on Strom Track Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynova, Yuliya; Krupchatnikov, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    The storm tracks are the regions of strong baroclinicity where surface cyclones occur. The effect of increase with following decrease of anthropogenic load on storm tracks activity in the Northern Hemisphere was studied. The global climate system model of intermediate complexity ('Planet Simulator', Fraedrich K. et al., 2005) was used in this study. Anthropogenic forcing was set according to climatic scenario RCP8.5 continued till 4000 AD with fixed CO2 concentration till 3000 AD and linear decrease of anthropogenic load to preindustrial value at two different rates: for 100 and 1000 years. Modeling data analysis showed meridional shift of storm tracks due to atmospheric CO2 concentration variation. When CO2 concentration increases storm tracks demonstrate poleward shifting. When CO2 concentration decreases to preindustrial value storm tracks demonstrate a tendency to equator-ward shifting. Storm tracks, however, don't recover their original activity and location to the full. This manifests itself particularly for 'fast' CO2 concentration decrease. Heat and moisture fluxes demonstrate the same behavior. In addition, analysis of eddy length scale (Kidston J. Et al., 2011) showed their increase at mid-latitudes and decrease at tropic latitudes due to intensive CO2 concentration increase. This might cause poleward shift of mid-latitude jets. Acknowledgements. This work is partially supported by SB RAS project VIII.80.2.1, RFBR grant 13-05-12034, 13-05-00480, 14-05-00502 and grant of the President of the Russian Federation. Fraedrich K., Jansen H., Kirk E., Luksch U., and Lunkeit F. The Planet Simulator: Towards a user friendly model // Meteorol. Zeitschrift. 2005, 14, 299-304. Kidston J., Vallis G.K., Dean S.M., Renwick J.A. Can the increase in the eddy length scale ander global warming cause the poleward shift of the jet streams? // J. Climate. 2011, V.24. P. 3764-3780.

  8. On validation of regional atmosphere and wave models for the Black Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulov, Vladimir; Shokurov, Mikhail; Chechina, Katerina; Soukissian, Takvor; Malinovsky, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Mesoscale atmospheric models MM5 and WRF adapted to the Black Sea region in Marine Hydrophysical Institute (MHI, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine) together with wave model WAM are widely using in the last decade. Black Sea meteorological and wave climate assessing, 3-5 days operational forecast, researches of various physical phenomena typical for the Black Sea coastal zone are examples of application of such regional model calculations. Therefore we made some inspection of their quality. Results of operational regional forecast of catastrophic weather events in the Black Sea region are considered. Flooding of 6-7 July 2012 in the Krasnodar Region, Russia caused a loss of more than 170 lives and huge economic damage. Hazardous storm of 11 November 2007 near the Crimean coast caused accidents and sinks of many vessels including ones carrying fuel oil and sulfur, more than 20 members of the crews were missing and severe ecological damage was suffered. However, the forecast of rainfall intensity had appeared five days before the flood at free access on the Internet website http://vao.hydrophys.org and the forecast of the wave height appeared on the same website three days before the storm. Quality of the regional forecast and its advantages over the global forecast are discussed. In situ wave data including 2D wave spectra obtained at the MHI Black Sea Research Platform in 2012-2013 over all seasons were compared with model calculations. The distance of the Platform to the shore is 0.5 km where the sea depth is 28 m. Only part of wave spectrum belonging to wave frequencies lower than 0.4 Hz was considered to filter out waves developing from the coastal line. It is concluded that scatter indexes for modeled significant wave height and mean frequency are about of 50% and 15%. Some systematic defects of model calculations are revealed but the use of the model-based forecasts could lead to significant reduction in human losses and economic damage from catastrophic

  9. Internal wave activity in the polar atmospheric regions during 2006 - 2009 revealed by COSMIC radio occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillovich, Ivan; Gubenko, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Alexander; Liou, Yuei-An

    ) and Scandinavian Peninsula. In this work, the results of an analysis of the wave activity and factors influencing upon it in the polar stratosphere of Arctic and Antarctic have been presented and discussed. A statistical analysis of the IGW activity in Polar Regions (latitudes more than 60º) of the Earth’s atmosphere using Formosat-3/COSMIC RO temperature data collected from July 2006 to March 2009 is performed. Geographic and seasonal distributions of the IGW potential energy per unit mass (wave activity indicator) in the altitude interval from 15 to 35 km are determined and analyzed. This work was partially supported by the RFBR grant 13-02-00526-а and Program 22 of the RAS Presidium.

  10. High frequency and wavenumber ocean-ice-atmosphere coupling in the Regional Arctic Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A.; Maslowski, W.; Jakacki, J.; Higgins, M.; Craig, T.; Cassano, J. J.; Gutowski, W. J.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    We present results from the fully coupled version of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM) on the spectral and noise characteristics of high-frequency (20-minute) dynamic coupling between the 9km Parallel Ocean Program/Community Ice Code (POP/CICE) and 50km Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF) using the CPL7 framework. We have employed an array of signal processing techniques to investigate: 1) Synchronization of the inertial response of POP and CICE to the passage of storms in WRF, and wavelet coherence of these results with in-situ observations of drift and deformation in the Arctic Ocean; 2) High-wavenumber signals in the sea ice deformation pattern resulting super-inertial coupling and aliasing of the wind field in CPL7, and the influence of these factors on the transmission of wind stress curl into the deep ocean; 3) The impact of high frequency ocean-ice-atmosphere coupling on the modeled sea ice thickness distribution. For this last set of experiments, we have run a set of winter band-limited integrations, filtering out high-frequency WRF inputs to the sea ice and ocean components. These experiments suggest the most pronounced regional influence of super-inertial coupling on sea ice mass extends from the Greenland Sea through Fram Strait to the North Pole, although there is also a significant basin-wide deformation pattern emanating from high spatiotemporal coupling in RACM.

  11. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry MechanismsChemistry Mechanisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2) into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU). Compared to CB05TU, RAC...

  12. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Fourth year report

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R.

    1994-05-01

    The scope of the report is to present the results of the fourth year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  13. Atmospheric influences on infrared-laser signals used for occultation measurements between Low Earth Orbit satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, S.; Kirchengast, G.; Proschek, V.

    2011-10-01

    LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO) is a new occultation technique between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites, which applies signals in the short wave infrared spectral range (SWIR) within 2 μm to 2.5 μm. It is part of the LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO) method that enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity) and altitude levels from microwave signals and profiles of greenhouse gases and further variables such as line-of-sight wind speed from simultaneously measured LIO signals. Due to the novelty of the LMIO method, detailed knowledge of atmospheric influences on LIO signals and of their suitability for accurate trace species retrieval did not yet exist. Here we discuss these influences, assessing effects from refraction, trace species absorption, aerosol extinction and Rayleigh scattering in detail, and addressing clouds, turbulence, wind, scattered solar radiation and terrestrial thermal radiation as well. We show that the influence of refractive defocusing, foreign species absorption, aerosols and turbulence is observable, but can be rendered small to negligible by use of the differential transmission principle with a close frequency spacing of LIO absorption and reference signals within 0.5%. The influences of Rayleigh scattering and terrestrial thermal radiation are found negligible. Cloud-scattered solar radiation can be observable under bright-day conditions, but this influence can be made negligible by a close time spacing (within 5 ms) of interleaved laser-pulse and background signals. Cloud extinction loss generally blocks SWIR signals, except very thin or sub-visible cirrus clouds, which can be addressed by retrieving a cloud layering profile and exploiting it in the trace species retrieval. Wind can have a small influence on the trace species absorption, which can be made negligible by using a simultaneously retrieved or a moderately accurate background wind speed profile. We conclude that

  14. Regional Assimilation of NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Lapenta, William; Jediovec, Gary J.; McCarty, William; Mecikalski, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Center seeks to accelerate the infusion of NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NW S forecast operations and decision-making. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), is expected to advance climate research and weather prediction into the 21 st century. It is one of six instruments onboard Aqua, a satellite that is part of NASA s Earth Observing System. AIRS, along with two partner microwave sounding instruments, represents the most advanced atmospheric sounding system ever deployed in space. The system is capable of measuring the atmospheric temperature in the troposphere with radiosonde accuracies of 1 K over 1 km-thick layers under both clear and cloudy conditions, while the accuracy of the derived moisture profiles will exceed that obtained by radiosondes. It is imperative that the scientific community is prepared to take full advantage of next-generation satellite data that will become available within the next decade. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure designed to optimally assimilate AIRS data at high spatial resolution over both land and ocean. The assimilation system used in this study is the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) developed at the Forecast System Laboratory used extensively around the globe. Results will focus on quality control issues associated with AIRS, optimal assimilation strategies, and the impact of the AIRS data on subsequent numerical forecasts at 12 km produced by the next generation Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model.

  15. A zonally symmetric model for volcanic influence upon atmospheric circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of volcanic activity upon zonal wind flow in a model atmosphere are considered. A low latitude volcanic eruption could lower the tropospheric pole to equator temperature difference and thereby affect the atmospheric motions. When the temperature contrast decreases, the zonal wind velocities at high altitudes are reduced. To conserve angular momentum, the velocities in the lower atmosphere near the surface must increase, thus providing a momentum source for ocean currents. It is suggested that this momentum source may have played a role as a trigger for inducing the 1982-83 anomalous El Nino and possibly other climate changes.

  16. Regional atmospheric CO2 inversion reveals seasonal and geographic differences in Amazon net biome exchange.

    PubMed

    Alden, Caroline B; Miller, John B; Gatti, Luciana V; Gloor, Manuel M; Guan, Kaiyu; Michalak, Anna M; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T; Touma, Danielle; Andrews, Arlyn; Basso, Luana S; Correia, Caio S C; Domingues, Lucas G; Joiner, Joanna; Krol, Maarten C; Lyapustin, Alexei I; Peters, Wouter; Shiga, Yoichi P; Thoning, Kirk; van der Velde, Ivar R; van Leeuwen, Thijs T; Yadav, Vineet; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2016-10-01

    Understanding tropical rainforest carbon exchange and its response to heat and drought is critical for quantifying the effects of climate change on tropical ecosystems, including global climate-carbon feedbacks. Of particular importance for the global carbon budget is net biome exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere (NBE), which represents nonfire carbon fluxes into and out of biomass and soils. Subannual and sub-Basin Amazon NBE estimates have relied heavily on process-based biosphere models, despite lack of model agreement with plot-scale observations. We present a new analysis of airborne measurements that reveals monthly, regional-scale (~1-8 × 10(6)  km(2) ) NBE variations. We develop a regional atmospheric CO2 inversion that provides the first analysis of geographic and temporal variability in Amazon biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange and that is minimally influenced by biosphere model-based first guesses of seasonal and annual mean fluxes. We find little evidence for a clear seasonal cycle in Amazon NBE but do find NBE sensitivity to aberrations from long-term mean climate. In particular, we observe increased NBE (more carbon emitted to the atmosphere) associated with heat and drought in 2010, and correlations between wet season NBE and precipitation (negative correlation) and temperature (positive correlation). In the eastern Amazon, pulses of increased NBE persisted through 2011, suggesting legacy effects of 2010 heat and drought. We also identify regional differences in postdrought NBE that appear related to long-term water availability. We examine satellite proxies and find evidence for higher gross primary productivity (GPP) during a pulse of increased carbon uptake in 2011, and lower GPP during a period of increased NBE in the 2010 dry season drought, but links between GPP and NBE changes are not conclusive. These results provide novel evidence of NBE sensitivity to short-term temperature and moisture extremes in the Amazon, where monthly and sub

  17. Regionality of Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Feedback in the Central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tentinger, B.; Pan, Z.

    2006-12-01

    Soil moisture has been found to greatly impact the partitioning of energy fluxes at the surface-atmosphere interface and thus precipitation systems. Using the NCAR/Penn State mesoscale model MM5 with the NOAH land surface scheme, this study carried out four experiments to examine this impact along with soil moisture- precipitation feedbacks over different regions of varying climate regimes. The first and second experiments were performed by multiplying the initial soil moisture values by 0.5 and 1.5 (SMinitX0.5 and SMinitX1.5) for the 1-month simulation. The third and forth experiments were carried out by forcing the soil moisture to the saturation and wilting-point values (SatSM and WiltSM) throughout the month-long simulation. The SMinitX0.5 and SMinitX1.5 mimic circumstances with pre-existing abnormally dry or wet soil conditions, while SatSM and WiltSM represent situations where the soil surface was kept at extreme levels and not allowed to dry out or recharge for the month. The results show that on a sub-seasonal scale (a month) during summer, in the dry Great Plains region, soil moisture can have a significant effect on both local atmospheric processes, and downstream remote atmospheric structure and stability. In contrast in the relatively wet Midwest, soil moisture was found to have a much weaker influence. The differences in soil moisture effects are associated with varying responses of boundary-layer heights, convective stability, and the low-level jets. In the Great Plains where the boundary layer is deeper and convection is more surfaced-based, soil moisture tends to play a larger role, whereas in the Midwest where the boundary layer is generally shallower and convection is more elevated, soil moisture plays a smaller role. Among all four experiments, the SatSM simulation produced shallowest boundary layer and weakest low-level jets, and thus resulted in the least amount of rainfall for both regions, suggesting that soil moisture has a negative feedback

  18. Effect of East Asia summer blocking on the atmospheric circulation over the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joong-Bae; Park, Yong-Jun

    2015-04-01

    The influence of the boreal summer blocking on atmospheric circulation in East Asia was examined. The summer blocking occurred mostly in North Europe, Ural region, Sea of Okhotsk (OK), and northeastern Pacific. The summer blocking was the major mode in these four regions according to principal component analysis using 500 hPa geopotential heights. Among the four blocking regions, OK blocking frequencies (OK BFs) showed negative and positive correlations with summer temperature and precipitation of Northeast Asia centered around the East Sea/Sea of Japan, respectively. In particular, the OK BF had a statistically significant correlation coefficient of -0.54 with summer temperatures in the Korean Peninsula. This indicates that the summer temperature and precipitation in this region were closely related to the OK blocking. According to the composite analysis for the years of higher-than-average BF (positive BF years), the OK High became stronger and expanded, while the North Pacific High was weakened over the Korean Peninsula and Japan and an anomalously deep trough was developed in the upper layer (200 hPa). As the cool OK High expanded, the temperature decreased over Northeast Asia centered around the East Sea/Sea of Japan and the lower level (850 hPa) air converged cyclonically, resulting in the increased precipitation, which induced the divergence in the upper layer and thereby strengthened the jet stream. Thus, the boreal summer OK blocking systematically influencing the area as the most dominant mode. Acknowledgements This work was carried out with the support of Rural Development Administration Cooperative Research Program for Agriculture Science and Technology Development under grant project PJ009353 and Korea Meteorological Administration Research and Development Program under grant CATER 2012-3100, Republic of Korea.

  19. Influences of land-ocean-atmosphere dynamics and emissions sectors on atmospheric chemical transport during VOCALS REx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spak, S.; Mena, M.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2009-12-01

    Measurements and modeling from the VOCALS REx campaign have identified a range of transport regimes based on synoptic meteorology, and suggested roles for the marine boundary layer inversion, downslope katabatic winds from the Andean cordillera, and Hadley cell subsidence as primary causes for observed aerosol and trace gas concentration gradients over the Southeast Pacific. This study employs atmospheric chemical transport modeling and airmass trajectory analyses to more directly address the influence of orographic winds, boundary layer dynamics, coastal circulations, and large-scale circulation by the subtropical high on the diurnal and episodic variability of pollution transport in the region. Using hourly simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model and the STEM chemical transport model at 12 km x 12 km resolution, we introduce tracer emissions within and above the boundary layer at representative locations--including the western slopes of the Andes, on-shore and off-shore coastal areas, metropolitan Santiago, the Chilean altiplano, and the free troposphere over the open ocean--and follow their transport and fate throughout the REx experiment of October-November 2008. Comparison between trajectories and tracer concentrations illustrate long range airmass history and allow for an understanding of the representativeness of instantaneous trajectories on transport phenomena. We further assess the contributions of emissions from power generation, copper smelters, natural sources, and anthropogenic area sources to aerosol concentrations over the Southeast Pacific, identifying their role in each transport regime.

  20. Atmospheric mercury deposition and its contribution of the regional atmospheric transport to mercury pollution at a national forest nature reserve, southwest China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Wang, Dingyong; Du, Hongxia; Sun, Tao; Zhao, Zheng; Wei, Shiqing

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric mercury deposition by wet and dry processes contributes to the transformation of mercury from atmosphere to terrestrial and aquatic systems. Factors influencing the amount of mercury deposited to subtropical forests were identified in this study. Throughfall and open field precipitation samples were collected in 2012 and 2013 using precipitation collectors from forest sites located across Mt. Jinyun in southwest China. Samples were collected approximately every 2 weeks and analyzed for total (THg) and methyl mercury (MeHg). Forest canopy was the primary factor on THg and MeHg deposition. Simultaneously, continuous measurements of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) were carried out from March 2012 to February 2013 at the summit of Mt. Jinyun. Atmospheric GEM concentrations averaged 3.8 ± 1.5 ng m(-3), which was elevated compared with global background values. Sources identification indicated that both regional industrial emissions and long-range transport of Hg from central, northeast, and southwest China were corresponded to the elevated GEM levels. Precipitation deposition fluxes of THg and MeHg in Mt. Jinyun were slightly higher than those reported in Europe and North America, whereas total fluxes of MeHg and THg under forest canopy on Mt. Jiuyun were 3 and 2.9 times of the fluxes of THg in wet deposition in the open. Highly elevated litterfall deposition fluxes suggest that even in remote forest areas of China, deposition of atmospheric Hg(0) via uptake by vegetation leaf may be a major pathway for the deposition of atmospheric Hg. The result illustrates that areas with greater atmospheric pollution can be expected to have greater fluxes of Hg to soils via throughfall and litterfall. PMID:26298336

  1. Ionospheric E-region electron density and neutral atmosphere variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stick, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Electron density deviations from a basic variation with the solar zenith angle were investigated. A model study was conducted in which the effects of changes in neutral and relative densities of atomic and molecular oxygen on calculated electron densities were compared with incoherent scatter measurements in the height range 100-117 km at Arecibo, Puerto Rico. The feasibility of determining tides in the neutral atmosphere from electron density profiles was studied. It was determined that variations in phase between the density and temperature variation and the comparable magnitudes of their components make it appear improbable that the useful information on tidal modes can be obtained in this way.

  2. Atmospheric Rivers Induced Heavy Precipitation and Flooding in the Western U.S. Simulated by the WRF Regional Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

    2009-02-12

    Twenty years of regional climate simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model for North America has been analyzed to study the influence of the atmospheric rivers and the role of the land surface on heavy precipitation and flooding in the western U.S. Compared to observations, the simulation realistically captured the 95th percentile extreme precipitation, mean precipitation intensity, as well as the mean precipitation and temperature anomalies of all the atmospheric river events between 1980-1999. Contrasting the 1986 President Day and 1997 New Year Day atmospheric river events, differences in atmospheric stability are found to have an influence on the spatial distribution of precipitation in the Coastal Range of northern California. Although both cases yield similar amounts of heavy precipitation, the 1997 case was found to produce more runoff compared to the 1986 case. Antecedent soil moisture, the ratio of snowfall to total precipitation (which depends on temperature), and existing snowpack all seem to play a role, leading to a higher runoff to precipitation ratio simulated for the 1997 case. This study underscores the importance of characterizing or simulating atmospheric rivers and the land surface conditions for predicting floods, and for assessing the potential impacts of climate change on heavy precipitation and flooding in the western U.S.

  3. Regional spatial and temporal interpolation of atmospheric PCBs: Interpretation of Lake Michigan mass balance data

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.L.; Depinto, J.V.; Sweet, C.; Hornbuckle, K.C.

    2000-05-01

    During the Lake Michigan Mass Balance (LMMB) Project, over 600 atmospheric samples were collected at eight shoreline sites and during seven cruises. These samples were analyzed for persistent organic pollutants, including PCB congeners, atrazine, and trans-nonachlor. The authors have developed a method for interpreting the gas-phase data that includes fractionating the observed PCB concentration into land- and water-based sources. This approach accounts for differences in gas-phase atmospheric PCB concentration over water and over land. Using this fractionation approach, they have interpolated the measured data over time and space to predict PCB air concentrations over the lake during the LMMB field period. The results predict gas-phase {Sigma}PCB (sum of {approximately}98 congener groups) concentrations for each of 2,319 grid cells over the lake, on a monthly basis. The authors estimate that lake-wide monthly average {sigma}PCB gas-phase concentrations range from 0.136 to 1.158 ng/m{sup 3}, with an annual average PCB concentration of 0.457 ng/m{sup 3}. As expected, the highest concentrations of PCBs over the lake when the winds are from the southwest (out of the Chicago-Gary region) and when land surface temperatures are elevated. The predicted influence of Chicago is described on a monthly basis as a zone of elevated PCB concentrations for approximately 40 km into Lake Michigan.

  4. Solar activity influences on atmospheric electricity and on some structures in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, Reinhold

    1989-01-01

    Only processes in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere are reviewed. General aspects of global atmospheric electricity are summarized in Chapter 3 of NCR (1986); Volland (1984) has outlined the overall problems of atmospheric electrodynamics; and Roble and Hays (1982) published a summary of solar effects on the global circuit. The solar variability and its atmospheric effects (overview by Donelly et al, 1987) and the solar-planetary relationships (survey by James et al. 1983) are so extremely complex that only particular results and selected papers of direct relevance or historical importance are compiled herein.

  5. The influence of scales of atmospheric motion on air pollution over Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Ana; Trigo, Ricardo; Mendes, Manuel; Jerez, Sonia; Gouveia, Célia Marina

    2014-05-01

    Air pollution is determined by the combination of different factors, namely, emissions, physical constrains, meteorology and chemical processes [1,2,3]. The relative importance of such factors is influenced by their interaction on diverse scales of atmospheric motion. Each scale depicts different meteorological conditions, which, when combined with the different air pollution sources and photochemistry, result in varying ambient concentrations [2]. Identifying the dominant scales of atmospheric motion over a given airshed can be of great importance for many applications such as air pollution and pollen dispersion or wind energy management [2]. Portugal has been affected by numerous air pollution episodes during the last decade. These episodes are often related to peak emissions from local industry or transport, but can also be associated to regional transport from other urban areas or to exceptional emission events, such as forest fires. This research aims to identify the scales of atmospheric motion which contribute to an increase of air pollution. A method is proposed for differentiating between the scales of atmospheric motion that can be applied on a daily basis from data collected at several wind-measuring sites in a given airshed and to reanalysis datasets. The method is based on the daily mean wind recirculation and the mean and standard deviation between sites. The determination of the thresholds between scales is performed empirically following the approach of Levy et al. [2] and also through a automatic statistical approach computed taking into account the tails of the distributions (e.g. 95% and 99% percentile) of the different wind samples. A comparison is made with two objective approaches: 1) daily synoptic classification for the same period over the region [4] and 2) a 3-D backward trajectory approach [5,6] for specific episodes. Furthermore, the outcomes are expected to support the Portuguese authorities on the implementation of strategies for a

  6. Atmospheric correction analysis on LANDSAT data over the Amazon region. [Manaus, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Dias, L. A. V.; Dossantos, J. R.; Formaggio, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Amazon Region natural resources were studied in two ways and compared. A LANDSAT scene and its attributes were selected, and a maximum likelihood classification was made. The scene was atmospherically corrected, taking into account Amazonic peculiarities revealed by (ground truth) of the same area, and the subsequent classification. Comparison shows that the classification improves with the atmospherically corrected images.

  7. The Influence of Solar Proton Events in Solar Cycle 23 on the Neutral Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; vonKonig, Miriam; Anderson, John; Roble, Raymond G.; McPeters, Richard D.; Fleming, Eric L.; Russell, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) can cause changes in constituents in the Earth's middle atmosphere. The highly energetic protons cause ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents, which lead to the production of HO(x) (H, OH, HO2) and NO(y) (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2). The HO(x) increases lead to short-lived ozone decreases in the mesosphere and upper stratosphere due to the short lifetimes of the HO, constituents. The NO(x) increases lead to long-lived stratospheric ozone changes because of the long lifetime of NO(y) constituents in this region. Solar cycle 23 was quite active with SPEs and very large fluxes of high energy protons occurred in July and November 2000, November 200 1, and April 2002. Smaller, but still substantial, proton fluxes impacted the Earth during other months in the 1997-2003 time period. The impact of the very large SPEs on the neutral middle atmosphere during solar cycle 23 will be discussed, including the HO(x), NO(y), ozone variations and induced atmospheric transport changes. Two multi-dimensional models, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Two-dimensional (2D) Model and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM), were used in computing the influence of the SPEs. The results of the GSFC 2D Model and the TIME-GCM will be shown along with comparisons to the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet 2 (SBUV/2) instruments.

  8. The solar atmosphere and the structure of active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1974-01-01

    The existence of 'holes' in the corona is reported characterized by abnormally low densities and temperatures. It was found that such coronal holes appear to be the source of high-velocity, enhanced-density streams in the solar wind as observed at the earth's orbit. It was further noted that coronal holes appear to be associated with regions of diverging magnetic fields in the corona. Models were developed to accomplish the objective for the principal energy flows in the transition region and corona.

  9. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Third year report

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R.

    1994-05-01

    This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  10. Atmospheric influences on infrared-laser signals used for occultation measurements between Low Earth Orbit satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, S.; Kirchengast, G.; Proschek, V.

    2011-05-01

    be as well made negligible by a design with a close time spacing (within 5 ms) of interleaved laser-pulse and background signals. Cloud extinction loss generally blocks SWIR signals, except very thin or sub-visible cirrus clouds, which can be addressed by a design allowing retrieval of a cloud layering profile from reference signals and its use in trace species retrieval when scanning through intermittent upper tropospheric cloudiness. Wind can have a small influence via Doppler shift resulting in a slightly modified trace species absorption in comparison to calm air, which can be made negligible by using a simultaneously retrieved wind speed profile or a moderately accurate (to about 10 m s-1) background wind profile. Considering all these influences, we conclude that the set of SWIR channels proposed for implementing the LMIO method (Kirchengast et al., 2010; Kirchengast and Schweitzer, 2011) provides adequate sensitivity to accurately retrieve eight greenhouse gas/isotope trace species of key importance to climate and atmospheric chemistry (H2O, 12CO2, 13CO2, C18OO, CH4, N2O, O3, CO) in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere region outside clouds under all atmospheric conditions. Two further isotope species (HDO, H218O) can be retrieved in the upper troposphere.

  11. MODELING REGIONAL-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY USING RELMAP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Regional Lagrangian Model of Air Pollution (RELMAP) is used to simulate the emission, transport and diffusion, chemical transformation, and wet and dry deposition of elemental mercury gas, divalent mercury gas and particulate mercury. ased on recent modeling advances in Europ...

  12. Regional Influence of Aerosol Emissions from Wildfires Driven by Combustion Efficiency: Insights from the BBOP Campaign.

    PubMed

    Collier, Sonya; Zhou, Shan; Onasch, Timothy B; Jaffe, Daniel A; Kleinman, Lawrence; Sedlacek, Arthur J; Briggs, Nicole L; Hee, Jonathan; Fortner, Edward; Shilling, John E; Worsnop, Douglas; Yokelson, Robert J; Parworth, Caroline; Ge, Xinlei; Xu, Jianzhong; Butterfield, Zachary; Chand, Duli; Dubey, Manvendra K; Pekour, Mikhail S; Springston, Stephen; Zhang, Qi

    2016-08-16

    Wildfires are important contributors to atmospheric aerosols and a large source of emissions that impact regional air quality and global climate. In this study, the regional and nearfield influences of wildfire emissions on ambient aerosol concentration and chemical properties in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States were studied using real-time measurements from a fixed ground site located in Central Oregon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (∼2700 m a.s.l.) as well as near their sources using an aircraft. The regional characteristics of biomass burning aerosols were found to depend strongly on the modified combustion efficiency (MCE), an index of the combustion processes of a fire. Organic aerosol emissions had negative correlations with MCE, whereas the oxidation state of organic aerosol increased with MCE and plume aging. The relationships between the aerosol properties and MCE were consistent between fresh emissions (∼1 h old) and emissions sampled after atmospheric transport (6-45 h), suggesting that biomass burning organic aerosol concentration and chemical properties were strongly influenced by combustion processes at the source and conserved to a significant extent during regional transport. These results suggest that MCE can be a useful metric for describing aerosol properties of wildfire emissions and their impacts on regional air quality and global climate. PMID:27398804

  13. Regional earth-atmosphere energy balance estimates based on assimilations with a GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Michael A.; Schubert, Siegfried D.

    1990-01-01

    The Oort and Vonder Haar (1976) column-budget technique is presently used to evaluate the physical consistency and accuracy of regional earth-atmosphere energy balance estimates for (1) atmospheric budget terms, (2) net radiation at the top of the atmosphere, and (3) time tendency and flux divergence of energy, for Special Observing Periods of the FGGE year. It is found that, during winter, the midlatitude oceans supply large quantities of energy to the overlying atmosphere, which then transports the energy to the continental heat-sinks; the energy flows in the opposite direction during summer.

  14. Regional scale atmospheric dispersion simulation of accidental releases of radionuclides from Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, C. V.; Venkatesan, R.; Baskaran, R.; Rajagopal, V.; Venkatraman, B.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the results of regional scale atmospheric dispersion simulation of accidental emission of radionuclides from the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor, Japan following the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami event on 11 March 2011. The objective was to study the temporal behaviour of plume trajectory, concentration, deposition and radiation dose pattern over an 80 km range around the reactor. The time-varying meteorological parameters during the release period were simulated with a multi-scale nested atmospheric model WRF ARW and the trajectory, plume dispersion were computed with Lagrangian Particle Dispersion models HYSPLIT, FLEXPART using the available information on accidental source term. The simulations indicated that the wind flow over Japan during the release period was driven by the large scale extra-tropical westerly waves and associated low pressure systems. In the lower levels, the flow was influenced by the local topography/sea breeze causing occasional landward wind shift on the east coast of Japan. Simulated airflow trajectories revealed that the plume stayed over the ocean by westerly winds on most days and the radioactivity dispersed over sea surface. Landward trajectories were found on a few days due to southeasterly, easterly and northeasterly flow (15-17, 19-21 March 2011) during which much of the radionuclides deposited over the land region. The hotspot of depositions occurred over east Pacific Ocean near to Japan. Over the land relatively high depositions were simulated in a narrow zone of 20 km width and 80 km length in the northwest sector in agreement with monitor data. Simulations showed wet depositions over the land to be higher than the dry depositions during 12-30 March due to occurrence of rainfall on some days. Comparison of activity deposition and air dose values with available observations confirmed that the plume pattern in a finer length scale around the site could be simulated realistically and agree with the measurements

  15. Atmospheric Extreme Events in the North Atlantic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzke, C.

    2012-04-01

    An important part of European weather and climate are storms. European winter storms cause economic damage and insurance losses on the order of billions of Euro per year. European winter storms rank as the second highest cause of global natural catastrophe insurance loss. Many of these hazard events are not independent; for instance, severe storms can occur in trains of storms. Recent examples of such subsequently occurring storms include January 2008 (Paula and Resi) and March 2008 (Emma, Johanna and Kirsten). Each of these trains of storms caused damages on the order of ~€1bn. Extreme value statistics are based on the premise that extreme events are iid but this is rarely the case in natural systems where extreme events tend to cluster. Thus, no account is taken of memory and correlation that characterise many natural time series; this fundamentally limits our ability to forecast and to estimate return periods of extreme events. In my presentation I will discuss two possible causes of this clustering: (i) The propensity of extreme events to depend on large-scale circulation regimes and (ii) the long-range correlation properties of surface windspeeds enhances the likelihood of extreme events to cluster. These two characteristics affect the return periods of atmospheric extreme events and thus insurance pricing.

  16. Coordinated radar observations of atmospheric diurnal tides in equatorial regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Toshitaka; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Isoda, Fusako; Nakamura, Takuji; Vincent, Robert A.; Reid, Iain M.; Harijono, Sri Woro B.; Sribimawati, Tien; Nuryanto, Agus; Wiryosumarto, Harsono

    1999-07-01

    The long-term behavior of atmospheric tides in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere has been observed with the meteor wind radar (MWR) in Jakarta, Indonesia (6°S, 107°E) from November 1992 to August 1997. The amplitudes and phases of the diurnal tides show systematic seasonal variations, particularly distinct in the meridional component. In addition, substantial interannual variability is evident, characterized by a biennial periodicity of tidal parameters, and considerably small tidal amplitudes exclusively seen in 1996. The MWR results are compared with the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM) as well as MF radar data collected in two equatorial sites in Pontianak (0.03°N, 109°E) and Christmas Island (2°N, 158°W) for November 1995-July 1997 and January 1996-October 1997, respectively. Comparison studies of these radar data have revealed the detailed latitudinal structure of the diurnal tide near the equator. The GSWM has successfully described the general characteristics of the radar results, although some discrepancies are recognized. In 1996 when radar data are available at all the three sites, the monthly mean values of tidal amplitudes at 90 km agreed very well between Jakarta and Pontianak, while significant discrepancy was found for Christmas Island, suggesting the existence of geographical effects such as non-migrating tides.

  17. Atmospheric winter conditions 2007/08 over the Arctic Ocean based on NP-35 data and regional model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, M.; Zinoviev, N. S.; Dethloff, K.; Rinke, A.; Kustov, V. J.; Makshtas, A. P.; Sokolov, V. T.; Neuber, R.; Maturilli, M.; Klaus, D.; Handorf, D.; Graeser, J.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric measurements on the drifting Arctic sea ice station "North Pole-35" crossing the Eastern part of the Arctic Ocean during winter 2007/2008 have been compared with regional atmospheric HIRHAM model simulations. The observed near-surface temperature, mean sea level pressure and the vertical temperature, wind and humidity profiles are satisfactorily reproduced by the model. The strongest temperature differences between observations and the simulations occur near the surface due to an overestimated vertical mixing of heat in the stable Arctic boundary layer (ABL). The observations show very strong temperature inversions near the surface, whereas the simulated inversions occur frequently between the surface and 415 m at too high levels. The simulations are not able to reproduce the observed inversion strength. The regional model underestimates the wind speeds and the sharp vertical wind gradients. The strength of internal atmospheric dynamics on the temporal development of atmospheric surface variables and vertical profiles of temperature, wind and relative humidity has been examined. Although the HIRHAM model systematically overestimates relative humidity and produces too high long-wave downward radiation during winter, two different atmospheric circulation states, which are connected to higher or lower pressure systems over the Eastern part of the Arctic Ocean, are simulated in agreement with the NP-35 observations. Sensitivity studies with reduced vertical mixing of heat in the stable ABL have been carried out. A slower increase in the stability functions with decreasing Richardson number under stable stratification has an impact on the horizontal and vertical atmospheric structure. Changes in synoptical cyclones on time scales from 1-3 days over the North Atlantic cyclone path are generated, which influences the atmospheric baroclinic and planetary waves on time scales up to 20 days over the Arctic Ocean basin. The use of increased vertical stability in

  18. Volcanoes and atmospheres; catastrophic influences on the planets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    For a rare and brief instant in geologic time, we can imagine that the sulfurous, chromatic surface of Io (one of the satellites of Jupiter) lies quiet. Perhaps stars glisten brilliantly through the tenuous nigh sky. Here and there, thick icy fogs enshroud fumaroles where sulfur dioxide leaks from the underworld. Suddenly, a fissure splits the surface and billowing clouds of sulfurous gases and ice hurl orange and black ash into the atmosphere. Minute by minute, the intensity of the eruption builds; stars begin disappearing from the night sky. The rising plume inhales the nearby atmosphere, mixing it with the exhalations from the volcano. Particles of sulfur, sulfur dioxide snow and ash rise to 300 kilometers, later raining down across the planet a thousand kilometers away. 

  19. Influence of Atmospheric Pressure Torch Plasma Irradiation on Plant Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyoshi, Yusuke; Hayashi, Nobuya; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2011-10-01

    Growth stimulation characteristics of plants seeds are investigated by an atmospheric discharge irradiation into plasma seeds. Atmospheric pressure plasma torch is consisted of alumina ceramics tube and the steel mesh electrodes wind inside and outside of the tube. When AC high voltage (8 kHz) is applied to the electrode gap, the barrier discharge plasma is produced inside the alumina ceramics tube. The barrier discharge plasma is blown outside with the gas flow in ceramics tube. Radish sprouts seeds locate at 1 cm from the torch edge. The growth stimulation was observed in the length of a stem and a root after the plasma irradiation. The stem length increases approximately 2.8 times at the cultivation time of 24 h. And the growth stimulation effect is found to be maintained for 40 h, after sowing seeds. The mechanism of the growth stimulation would be the redox reaction inside plant cells induced by oxygen radicals.

  20. Carbonaceous aerosols influencing atmospheric radiation: Black and organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere may both scatter and absorb solar radiation. The fraction associated with the absorbing component is generally referred to as black carbon (BC) and is mainly produced from incomplete combustion processes. The fraction associated with condensed organic compounds is generally referred to as organic carbon (OC) or organic matter and is mainly scattering. Absorption of solar radiation by carbonaceous aerosols may heat the atmosphere, thereby altering the vertical temperature profile, while scattering of solar radiation may lead to a net cooling of the atmosphere/ocean system. Carbonaceous aerosols may also enhance the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the fine particle (D < 2.5 {mu}m) source rates of both OC and BC. The source rates for anthropogenic organic aerosols may be as large as the source rates for anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, suggesting a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The role of BC in decreasing the amount of reflected solar radiation by OC and sulfates is discussed. The total estimated forcing depends on the source estimates for organic and black carbon aerosols which are highly uncertain. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is also described.

  1. Atmospheric Mercury Transport Across Southern Lake Michigan: Influence from the Chicago/Gary Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, L. E.; Keeler, G. J.; Dvonch, J. T.

    2008-12-01

    The local and regional impacts of mercury emissions from major urban and industrial areas are critical to quantify in order to further understand mercury cycling in the environment. The Chicago/Gary urban area is one such location in which mercury emissions from industrial sources are significant and regional mercury transport needs to be further examined. Speciated atmospheric mercury was measured in Chicago, IL and Holland, MI from July to November 2007 to better characterize the impact of Chicago/Gary on southwest Michigan. Previous work under the 1994-1995 Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study (LMMBS) indicated that the highest levels of mercury deposition in southwest Michigan occurred with transport from the Chicago/Gary area, particularly with rapid transport where less mercury was deposited close to sources(1). However, at that time it was not possible to measure reactive gas phase mercury (RGM), a highly-soluble form of mercury in industrial emissions that is readily removed from the atmosphere. Since the LMMBS, the development of speciated mercury systems has made it possible to continuously monitor gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0), particulate mercury (HgP), and RGM. These measurements are useful for understanding atmospheric mercury chemistry and differentiating between local and regional source impacts due to the different behaviors of reactive and elemental mercury. Results from 2007 show that, on average, Hg0 and HgP were 1.5 times higher and RGM was 2 times higher in Chicago than in Holland. Mean mercury wet deposition was nearly 3 times higher in Chicago than in Holland. Meteorological analysis indicates that transport across the lake from Chicago/Gary occurred frequently during the study. Additional measurements of O3, SO2, meteorological parameters, event mercury and trace element precipitation samples, and modeled back-trajectories are used to discern regional transport events from local deposition and characterize the impact of the Chicago/Gary urban

  2. Influence of the solar atmosphere on the p-mode eigenoscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhalilov, N. S.; Staude, J.; Arlt, K.

    2000-09-01

    An asymptotic theory of global adiabatic p-modes is developed, taking into account the influence of the solar atmosphere. It is shown that waves of the whole frequency range nu ~ 2-10 mHz may reach the chromosphere-corona transition region (CCTR) by means of a tunneling through the atmospheric barriers. The primary acoustic cavity inside the Sun becomes considerably extended by this way, leading to a change of frequencies: low frequencies are increased, while high frequencies are decreased. The transition from low p-mode frequencies to high peak frequencies (nu >~ 6;mHz) is smooth. The locations of the turning points are determined from the wave equation for {div}*/rightarrow{v}. It is shown that the internal turning point of the acoustic cavity is strongly shifted toward the center of the Sun, while the upper turning point is shifted from the surface to CCTR. That means, the turning points cannot be located in the convective zone. A new complex integral dispersion relation for the eigenfrequencies is derived. The imaginary parts of the frequencies indicate a decay of the amplitudes, resulting from considerable energy losses by tunneling from the main cavity. It is shown that waves with a decaying amplitude (complex frequency) may exist in a limited area only, penetration of linear p-modes to the corona is impossible. The CCTR acts as a free surface. We conclude that the p-modes may drive forced surface gravity waves at this surface.

  3. Regional model studies of the atmospheric dispersion of fine volcanic ash after the eruption of Eyjafjallajoekull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmann, B.; Hort, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    During the eruption of Eyjafjallajoekull on Iceland in April/May 2010 air traffic over Europe was repeatedly interrupted because of volcanic ash in the atmosphere. This completely unusual situation in Europe leads to the demand of improved crisis management, e.g. European wide regulations of volcanic ash thresholds and improved forecasts of theses thresholds. However, the quality of the forecast of fine volcanic ash concentrations in the atmosphere depends to a great extent on a realistic description of the erupted mass flux of fine ash particles, which is rather uncertain. Numerous aerosol measurements (ground based and satellite remote sensing, and in situ measurements) all over Europe have tracked the volcanic ash clouds during the eruption of Eyjafjallajoekull offering the possibility for an interdisciplinary effort between volcanologists and aerosol researchers to analyse the release and dispersion of fine volcanic ash in order to better understand the needs for realistic volcanic ash forecasts. This contribution describes the uncertainties related to the amount of fine volcanic ash released from Eyjafjallajoekull and its influence on the dispersion of volcanic ash over Europe by numerical modeling. We use the three-dimensional Eulerian atmosphere-chemistry/aerosol model REMOTE (Langmann et al., 2008) to simulate the distribution of volcanic ash as well as its deposition after the eruptions of Eyjafjallajoekull during April and May 2010. The model has been used before to simulate the fate of the volcanic ash after the volcanic eruptions of Kasatochi in 2008 (Langmann et al., 2010) and Mt. Pinatubo in 1991. Comparing our model results with available measurements for the Eyjafjallajoekull eruption we find a quite good agreement with available ash concentrations data measured over Europe as well as with the results from other models. Langmann, B., K. Zakšek and M. Hort, Atmospheric distribution and removal of volcanic ash after the eruption of Kasatochi volcano

  4. Precipitating electron interaction with the atmosphere. II - The dayside cusp region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. S.; Strickland, D. J.; Chiu, Y. T.

    1985-01-01

    Interaction of precipitating low-energy magnetosheath electrons with the atmosphere in the dayside cusp region has been studied. Both pitch angle and energy distributions of the fluxes as well as excitation functions for selected N2 and O UV emissions were obtained by numerically solving the multiangle equations of electron transport. There is some possibility that atmospheric emissions may be used for remote measurements of incident soft energy flux, because the ratios of molecular to atomic emission line intensities in the low-energy region are quite different from those in the high-energy region.

  5. Studies of regional-scale climate variability and change. Hidden Markov models and coupled ocean-atmosphere modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghil, M.; Kravtsov, S.; Robertson, A. W.; Smyth, P.

    2008-10-14

    This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding, in which we had developed a twin approach of probabilistic network (PN) models (sometimes called dynamic Bayesian networks) and intermediate-complexity coupled ocean-atmosphere models (ICMs) to identify the predictable modes of climate variability and to investigate their impacts on the regional scale. We had developed a family of PNs (similar to Hidden Markov Models) to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale GCM seasonal predictions. Using an idealized atmospheric model, we had established a novel mechanism through which ocean-induced sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies might influence large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns on interannual and longer time scales; we had found similar patterns in a hybrid coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea-ice model. The goal of the this continuation project was to build on these ICM results and PN model development to address prediction of rainfall and temperature statistics at the local scale, associated with global climate variability and change, and to investigate the impact of the latter on coupled ocean-atmosphere modes. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling together with the development of associated software; new intermediate coupled models; a new methodology of inverse modeling for linking ICMs with observations and GCM results; and, observational studies of decadal and multi-decadal natural climate results, informed by ICM results.

  6. The Influence of High Aerosol Concentration on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Temperature Stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Khaykin, M.N.; Kadygrove, E.N.; Golitsyn, G.S.

    2005-03-18

    Investigations of the changing in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) radiation balance as cased by natural and anthropogenic reasons is an important topic of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The influence of aerosol on temperature stratification of ABL while its concentration was extremely high within a long period of time was studied experimentally. The case was observed in Moscow region (Russia) with the transport of combustion products from peat-bog and forest fires in July-September, 2002. At this time the visibility was some times at about 100-300 m. Aerosol concentration measured by Moscow University Observatory and A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics field station in Zvenigorod (55.7 N; 36.6 E) for several days was in 50-100 times more than background one (Gorchakov at al 2003). The high aerosol concentration can change the radiation balance at ABL, and so to change thermal stratification in ABL above the mega lopolis. For the analysis the data were used of synchronous measurements by MTP-5 (Microwave Temperature Profiler operating at wavelength 5 mm) in two locations, namely: downtown Moscow and country-side which is 50 km apart to the West (Zvenigorod station). (Kadygrov and Pick 1998; Westwater at al 1999; Kadygrov at al 2002). Zvenigorod station is located in strongly continental climate zone which is in between of the climates of ARM sites (NSANorth Slope of Alaska and SGP-Southern Great Plains). The town of Zvenigorod has little industry, small traffic volume and topography conductive to a good air ventilation of the town. For these reasons Zvenigorod can be considered as an undisturbed rural site. For the analysis some days were chosen with close meteorological parameters (average temperature, humidity, wind, pressure and cloud form) but strongly differing in aerosol concentration level.

  7. Quantifying the influences of atmospheric stability on air pollution in Lanzhou, China, using a radon-based stability monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Scott D.; Wang, Fenjuan; Williams, Alastair G.; Xiaodong, Deng; Zhang, Hua; Lonati, Giovanni; Crawford, Jagoda; Griffiths, Alan D.; Ianniello, Antonietta; Allegrini, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Commercially-available "stability monitors" based on in situ atmospheric radon progeny measurements remain underutilised as a tool for urban pollution studies, due in part to difficulties experienced in relating their standard output directly to the atmospheric mixing state in a consistent manner. The main confounding factor has been a lack of attention to the fact that the observed near-surface atmospheric radon concentration includes large synoptic and fetch-related components in addition to the local stability influence. Here, a technique recently developed for stability classification using a research-quality dual-flow-loop two-filter radon detector is adapted for use with a commercially-available radon-based stability monitor. Performance of the classification scheme is then tested in Lanzhou, China, a topographically-complex region renowned for low mean annual wind speeds (0.8 m s-1) and winter stagnation episodes. Based on an 11-month composite, a factor of seven difference is estimated between peak NOx concentrations in the city's industrial region and a rural background location under stable conditions. The radon-based scheme is evaluated against the Pasquil-Gifford "radiation" (PGR) scheme, and assigns pollutant concentrations more consistently between defined atmospheric stability states than the PGR scheme. Furthermore, the PGR scheme consistently underestimates all peak pollutant concentrations under stable conditions compared with the radon-based scheme, in some cases (e.g. CO in the industrial region) by 25%.

  8. Influence of interplanetary trajectory selection on Mars atmospheric entry velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striepe, Scott A.; Braun, Robert D.; Powell, Richard W.; Fowler, Wallace T.

    1993-01-01

    Many current manned Mars mission studies are using low lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) vehicles to aerobrake at both Mars and Earth. The use of these low L/D vehicles could limit the allowable velocity at the atmospheric interface. This paper will demonstrate that if entry velocity constraints are incorporated into the interplanetary analysis of aerobraking Mars missions, many opportunities can be achieved for a small increase in initial mass in low-Earth orbit (IMLEO). These opportunities result from varying the initial launch date and the encounter dates and possibly using a powered Venus swingby on either the inbound or outbound transfer. This paper demonstrates this technique by using three atmospheric entry velocity ranges at Mars arrival (6.0-8.5, 6.4-8.1, and 7.2-7.3 km/s), unconstrained Mars entry velocities, and an Earth return entry velocity below 14 km/s. The results indicate that, by carefully selecting the interplanetary trajectory, an optimum IMLEO mission can be found for even highly restrictive entry velocity missions in practically all of the 15 yr studied.

  9. Influence of modified atmosphere packaging on 'Star Ruby' grapefruit phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Priyanka R; Jayaprakasha, G K; Porat, Ron; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2015-01-28

    Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) can extend the shelf life of salads, vegetables, and fruits by generating a storage environment with low O2, high CO2, and high humidity. The current study investigates the effect of modified atmosphere and humidity generated by two plastic films, microperforated bags (MIPBs) and macroperforated bags (MAPBs), on the levels of phytochemicals present in 'Star Ruby' grapefruits (Citrus paradisi, Macf.) stored for 16 weeks at 10 °C. Control fruits were stored without any packaging film. Juice samples were analyzed every 4 weeks for ascorbic acid, carotenoids, limonoids, flavonoids, and furocoumarins and assessed for quality parameters. MAP significantly reduced weight loss compared to control grapefruits. Control fruits had more β-carotene, lycopene, and furocoumarin compared with the fruits in MAP. Flavonoid content was highest in fruits stored in MAPB (P < 0.05), while fruits stored in MIPB showed no significant difference in flavonoid content compared to control (P > 0.05). The MAP treatments did not significantly affect ascorbic acid, limonoids, or fruit quality parameters, including total soluble solids, acidity, ripening ratio, decay and disorders, fruit taste, and off-flavors after 16 weeks of storage. These results suggest that MAP can be used to maintain the quality of 'Star Ruby' grapefruit with no detrimental effect on health-promoting phytochemicals. PMID:25547121

  10. Regional sources of atmospheric formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, and implications for atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luecken, D. J.; Hutzell, W. T.; Strum, M. L.; Pouliot, G. A.

    2012-02-01

    Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations over the Eastern half of the United States are simulated with a 3-D air quality model to identify the most important chemical precursors under January and July conditions. We find that both aldehydes primarily result from photochemical production, although 25% or more result from direct emissions in urban areas during winter. Isoprene is the major precursor of formaldehyde in most areas during summer, contributing 20-60% of total production, with the magnitude being spatially variable. Other alkenes from anthropogenic and/or biogenic emissions dominate formaldehyde production in winter, contributing 60-85% of total formation, and are prominent contributors in summer. Alkenes, including biogenic alkenes, dominate acetaldehyde production during both seasons. These conclusions are based on the degradation of emitted VOCs described by the SAPRC07TB chemical mechanism, but even this detailed model has difficulty reproducing observed values better than a factor of 2. The substantial role of isoprene and other alkenes in aldehyde formation emphasizes that we examine and improve emission estimates of these compounds. Until we can estimate the emissions and understand the chemistry of VOC precursors to aldehyde formation with greater certainty, it will be difficult to accurately predict atmospheric concentrations of aldehydes and develop strategies to reduce their concentrations.

  11. Atmospheric sensitivity to roughness length in a regional atmospheric model over the Ohio-Tennessee River Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanar, Arturo I.; Mahmood, Rezaul; Suarez, Astrid; Leeper, Ronnie

    2016-06-01

    The response of a regional atmospheric model to small changes in roughness length of two vegetation categories (crops and deciduous broadleaf forest) was analyzed for three synoptic events in June 2006. These were characterized by two convective events (June 11 and 22) and one prefrontal event (June 17). The responses of the model, for precipitation, equivalent potential temperature and wind field were notable in general. However, the response became muted as roughness lengths were increased or decreased. Atmospheric response to these changes varied for different convective events. A small dependence on roughness length was found for the sensible and latent heat fluxes and planetary boundary layer heights during the convective event of June 11. For the June 22 event, the model response was weaker for the crop-only and forest-only roughness length experiments compared to the response when both the crop and forest-only roughness length were changed in combination.

  12. Atmospheric sensitivity to roughness length in a regional atmospheric model over the Ohio-Tennessee River Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanar, Arturo I.; Mahmood, Rezaul; Suarez, Astrid; Leeper, Ronnie

    2015-11-01

    The response of a regional atmospheric model to small changes in roughness length of two vegetation categories (crops and deciduous broadleaf forest) was analyzed for three synoptic events in June 2006. These were characterized by two convective events (June 11 and 22) and one prefrontal event (June 17). The responses of the model, for precipitation, equivalent potential temperature and wind field were notable in general. However, the response became muted as roughness lengths were increased or decreased. Atmospheric response to these changes varied for different convective events. A small dependence on roughness length was found for the sensible and latent heat fluxes and planetary boundary layer heights during the convective event of June 11. For the June 22 event, the model response was weaker for the crop-only and forest-only roughness length experiments compared to the response when both the crop and forest-only roughness length were changed in combination.

  13. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking, Version 2(RATCHET2)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, James V.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

    2006-07-01

    This manual describes the atmospheric model and computer code for the Atmospheric Transport Module within SAC. The Atmospheric Transport Module, called RATCHET2, calculates the time-integrated air concentration and surface deposition of airborne contaminants to the soil. The RATCHET2 code is an adaptation of the Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emissions Tracking (RATCHET). The original RATCHET code was developed to perform the atmospheric transport for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Fundamentally, the two sets of codes are identical; no capabilities have been deleted from the original version of RATCHET. Most modifications are generally limited to revision of the run-specification file to streamline the simulation process for SAC.

  14. Comparison of Regional Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from Atmospheric Inversions and Inventories in the Mid-Continent Intensive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, S. M.; Cooley, D. S.; Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A.; Davis, K. J.; West, T. O.; Breidt, F. J.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric inversions and inventories represent two lines of evidence on the carbon budget of regions. Inversions rely on repeated CO2 concentration measurements to infer fluxes between the terrestrial surface and atmosphere. Inventories are typically conducted using models to predict changes in C pools, or CO2 fluxes directly, based on various driving variables influencing uptake and release of CO2 from the terrestrial surface. Both of the approaches have their strengths and weaknesses, and one of the key objectives of the Mid-Continent Intensive (MCI) for the North American Carbon Program (NACP) is to reconcile differences in estimates between these approaches, to the extent possible. An exploratory approach has been undertaken to compare inventory and inversions using graphical tools, testing for spatial and temporal autocorrelations, and a regression analysis where the differences between the inventories and inversions are regressed against both inventory estimates and land-use characteristics. Results from a pre-campaign time period (2000-05) suggest limited agreement between the inversions and inventory results that is due to a lack of atmospheric observations in the MCI region. However, sampling density is much greater during the campaign years (2007-08), and inventory and inversion data are more comparable given the improved observational constraint on the high resolution inversions. Overall, this synthesis activity is improving diagnosis of regional carbon fluxes, which is a key objective of the NACP.

  15. The evolution of solar ultraviolet luminosity. [influence on planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1982-01-01

    Astronomical observations of stars analogous to the sun are used to construct a tentative account of the evolution of solar UV luminosity. Evidence exists that the young sun was a much more powerful source of energetic particles and radiation than it is today, and while on the main sequence, solar activity has declined as an inverse power law of age as a consequence of angular momentum loss to the solar wind. Observations of pre-main sequence stars indicate that before the sun reached the main sequence, it may have emitted as much as ten thousand times the amount of ultraviolet radiation that it does today. The impact of the results on knowledge of photochemistry and escape of constituents of primordial planetary atmospheres is discussed.

  16. Atmospheric general circulation and its low frequency variance - Radiative influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanathan, V.

    1987-01-01

    The possible effects of radiation on the evolution of the atmosphere on time scales ranging from about a week to about 90 days are examined with reference to the available observational and modeling studies. The clear-sky and cloud radiative processes are shown to exert significant vertical, latitudinal, and longitudinal gradients in the diabatic heating within the troposphere and the stratosphere. The meridional heating gradient, which drives the general circulation, is altered significantly by clouds. The major conclusion of the study is that the observed negative anomalies in the outgoing IR radiation following intense warm episodes of tropicl sea-surface temperature (El Nino) are indeed anomalies in the cloud-radiative forcing.

  17. Spectroscopy in the study of planetary atmospheres - Abundances from the visible region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, B. L.

    1978-01-01

    Spectrophotometric studies of three molecular constituents - hydrogen, methane, and ammonia - identified in the visible region of the spectra of the outer planets are reviewed. The history of quadrupole line observations for hydrogen molecules and the significance of the HD molecule for the dipole spectrum are considered. Approaches to quantitative estimates of methane concentration in planetary atmospheres are explained, and the detection of ammonia in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn is described.

  18. Sensitivity of Boreal-Summer Circulation and Precipitation to Atmospheric Aerosols in Selected Regions. Part 2; The Americas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, E. M.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G.

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol perturbations over selected land regions are imposed in Version-4 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-4) general circulation model (GCM) to assess the influence of increasing aerosol concentrations on regional circulation patterns and precipitation in four selected regions: India, Africa, and North and South America. Part 1 of this paper addresses the responses to aerosol perturbations in India and Africa. This paper presents the same for aerosol perturbations over the Americas. GEOS-4 is forced with prescribed aerosols based on climatological data, which interact with clouds using a prognostic scheme for cloud microphysics including aerosol nucleation of water and ice cloud hydrometeors. In clear-sky conditions the aerosols interact with radiation. Thus the model includes comprehensive physics describing the aerosol direct and indirect effects on climate (hereafter ADE and AIE respectively). Each simulation is started from analyzed initial conditions for 1 May and was integrated through June-July-August of each of the six years: 1982 1987 to provide a 6-ensemble set. Results are presented for the difference between simulations with double the climatological aerosol concentration and one-half the climatological aerosol concentration for three experiments: two where the ADE and AIE are applied separately and one in which both the ADE and AIE are applied. The ADE and AIE both yield reductions in net radiation at the top of the atmosphere and surface while the direct absorption of shortwave radiation contributes a net radiative heating in the atmosphere. A large net heating of the atmosphere is also apparent over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean that is attributable to the large aerosol perturbation imposed over Africa. This atmospheric warming and the depression of the surface pressure over North America contribute to a northward shift of the inter-Tropical Convergence Zone over northern America, an increase in precipitation over Central America

  19. Water vapor transport from the Indian monsoon region: the phenomenon of Atmospheric River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghav R., Sree; Mrudula, G.

    2016-05-01

    An Atmospheric/Tropospheric River (AR/TR) is a relatively narrow corridor of concentrated moisture where horizontal transport occurs in the lower atmosphere. They transport moisture from tropical regions towards the poles across the mid latitudes. Research of Atmospheric River over the Indian Monsoon region is not reported in literature. In this paper an attempt is made to examine the existence of AR in Indian Ocean and surrounding region. Meteorological parameters such as precipitable water, rainfall, air temperature and wind have been analyzed for the same. Analysis shows a clear evidence of the presence of Atmospheric River during the pre-monsoon and monsoon period. It is seen that there are variations in the origin, orientation, duration and also the formation of the river according to the vapor content in the Indian Ocean. During Elnino phase there is a pronounced transport of moisture through an Atmospheric River and also a high intensity transport occurs during monsoon period (JJA), even if moisture prevails over Indian monsoon region during other seasons also. Detailed results and extension to model forecasts will be presented in the paper.

  20. Atmospheric modes influence on the inter- annual variability of the Iberian Poleward Current from 1985 to 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decastro, M.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.; Álvarez, I.; Crespo, A. J. C.; Ramos, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    The inter-annual variability of the Iberian poleward current (IPC) along the northwestern coast of the Iberian Peninsula (IP) (40- 43N) and its intrusion in the Cantabrian Sea (Navidad, 6- 8W) were analyzed. The January Sea Surface Temperature (J SST) was obtained from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) NOAA satellite from 1985 to 2006. In addition, the dependence of IPC SST on the most representative regional patterns with some influence upon the eastern North Atlantic region was analyzed by means of correlations between November- December atmospheric modes and J SST. The considered modes were: North Atlantic Oscillation pattern (NAO), Eastern Atlantic pattern (EA), Eastern Atlantic Western Russia pattern (EA/WR), Polar/Eurasia pattern (POL) and Scandinavia pattern (SCA). In the present study it has been highlighted that: (1) there are several years (1986, 1987, 1992, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2004 and 2005) during which water in the IPC region is colder than the oceanic one remarking a weak or inexistent IPC during these Januaries and (2) three atmospheric patterns (N-D NAO, N-D EA/WR and N-D POL) are responsible of the main variability of the J SST in the IPC region of the western IP and only two indices (N-D EA/WR, N-D NAO) have shown to be significant to explain the variability of the J SST in the IPC region of the northern IP region.

  1. Use of a regional atmospheric model to simulate lake-atmosphere feedbacks associated with Pleistocene Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.W.; Giorgi, F.

    1992-01-01

    A regional model of the atmosphere (version 4 of the NCAR mesoscale model, MM4) was used to assess whether lake-effect precipitation was a significant component of the late-Pleistocene hydrologic budgets of Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville. Control simulations for January and July of 1979 were made using MM4, and the Pleistocene highstand surface areas of the lakes were added to the model and the simulations repeated. In the January simulations, 18% of the moisture added to the modeled atmosphere by Lake Lahontan returned to the Lahontan basin as precipitation, while 32% of the water evaporated from Lake Bonneville fell as precipitation over the Bonneville basin. In the July simulations, 7% of the moisture added to the modeled atmosphere by Lake Lahontan returned to the Lahontan basin as precipitation, and 4% of the water evaporated from Lake Bonneville fell as precipitation over the Bonneville basin. An additonal January simulation was made with the lake surface areas set at onehalf their highstand extents (the average surface area 20 to 15 ka BP). Results from this simulation were similar to the simulation with the highstand lakes, indicating lake-effect precipitation could have been a significant component of the hyrologic budgets of the lakes before and during the highstand period. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Processes influencing rainfall features in the Amazonian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, T.; Chamecki, M.; Fuentes, J. D.; Katul, G. G.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.; Manzi, A. O.; Nascimento dos Santos, R. M.; von Randow, C.; Stoy, P. C.; Tota, J.; Trowbridge, A.; Schumacher, C.; Machado, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Amazon is globally unique as it experiences the deepest atmospheric convection with important teleconnections to other parts of the Earth's climate system. In the Amazon Basin a large fraction of the local evapotranspiration is recycled through the formation of deep convective precipitating storms. Deep convection occurs due to moist thermodynamic conditions associated with elevated amounts of convective available potential energy. Aerosols invigorate the formation of convective storms in the Amazon via their unique concentrations, physical size, and chemical composition to activate into cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), but important aspects of aerosol/precipitation feedbacks remain unresolved. During the wet season, low atmospheric aerosol concentrations prevail in the pristine tropical air masses. These conditions have led to the Green Ocean hypothesis, which compares the clean tropical air to maritime air-masses and emphasizes biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks, to explain the features of the convective-type rainfall events in the Amazon. Field studies have been designed to investigate these relationships and the development of mesoscale convective systems through the Green Ocean Amazon project and the GOAmazon Boundary Layer Experiment. From March to October 2014 a field experiment was conducted at the Cuieiras Biological Reserve (2°51' S, 54°58' W), 80 km north of the city of Manaus, Brazil. This investigation spans the biological, chemical, and physical conditions influencing emissions and reactions of precursors (biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds, VOCs), formation of aerosols and CCNs and transport out of the ABL, and their role in cloud formation and precipitation triggers. In this presentation we will show results on the magnitude turbulent fluxes of latent and sensible heat, CCN concentrations, and rain droplet size distribution for both the wet and dry season. Such influencing factors on precipitation, will be contrasted with the

  3. The Influence of Tropospheric Processes in Modeling the Middle Atmosphere with Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Drob, D. P.; Porter, H. S.

    2002-01-01

    Our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM) extends from the ground up into the thermosphere and has a vertical grid point resolution of about 0.5 km to resolve the interactions of gravity waves (GWs) described with Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization (DSP). This model produces in the stratosphere and mesosphere the major features of QBO, SAO, tides, and planetary waves. The purpose of this paper is to discuss results from an initial study with our 3D model that shows how certain tropospheric processes can affect the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. Under the influence of tropospheric heating, and augmented by GW interactions, two distinct but related processes can be identified. (1) A meridional circulation develops in the stratosphere, with rising motions at low latitudes that are in magnitude comparable to the downward propagation of the QBO. As Dunkerton pointed out, a larger GW source is then required to reproduce the observed QBO, which tends to move us closer to the values recommended for the DSP. This has significant consequences for our model results that describe the upper mesosphere, considering the general importance of GWs for this region and in influencing planetary waves (e.g., 2-day wave) and tides in particular. (2) Tropospheric heating produces zonal jets near the tropopause that are related to latitudinal variations in pressure and reversing temperature variations (resembling the dynamical conditions near the mesopause), which in turn is conducive to generate baroclinic instability. Modeling results show that our ability to generate the QBO critically depends on the magnitude of the temperature reversal that is a measure of this instability. Planetary waves are generated in this process, which can apparently interfere with or augment the GW interactions. As originally demonstrated by Lindzen and Holton, the eastward propagating Kelvin waves and westward propagating Rossby gravity waves (generated by tropospheric convection) can in principle provide

  4. Influence of atmospheric deposition on Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Jackson, B.P.

    1995-01-01

    Designation of Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge (Georgia) as a Class I Air Quality Area affords mandatory protection of the airshed through permit-review processes for planned developments. Rainfall is the major source of water to the swamp, and potential impacts from developments in the airshed are high. To meet management needs for baseline information, chemical contributions from atmospheric deposition and partitioning of anions and cations in various matrices of the swamp, with emphasis on mercury and lead, were determined during this study. Chemistry of rainfall was measured on an event basis from one site and quarterly on surface water, pore water, floc, and sediment from four locations. A sediment core collected from the Refuge interior was sectioned, aged, and analyzed for mercury. Rainfall was acidic (pH 4.7-4.9), with average total and methyl mercury concentrations of 9 ng/L and 0.1 ng/L, respectively. Surface waters were acidic (pH 3.8-4.1), dilute (specific conductance 35-60 pS), and highly organic (dissolved organic carbon 35-50 mg/L). Total mercury was 1-3.5 ng/L in surface and pore water, and methyl mercury was 0.02-0.20 ng/L. Total mercury in sediments and floc was 100-200 ng/g dry weight, and methyl mercury was 4-16 ng/g. Lead was 0-1.7 pg/L in rainfall, not detectable in surface water, 3.4-5.4 pg/L in pore water, and 3.9-4.9 mg/kg in floc and sediment. Historical patterns of mercury deposition showed an increase in total mercury from pre-1800 concentrations of 250 ng/g to 500 ng/g in 1950, with concentrations declining thereafter to present.

  5. Influence of atmospheric deposition on Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Jackson, B.P.

    1995-12-31

    Designation of Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge (Georgia) as a Class 1 Air Quality Area affords mandatory protection of the airshed through permit-review processes for planned developments. Rainfall is the major source of water to the swamp, and potential impacts from developments in the airshed are high. To meet management needs for baseline information, chemical contributions from atmospheric deposition and partitioning of anions and cations in various matrices of the swamp, with emphasis on mercury and lead, were determined during this study. Chemistry of rainfall was measured on an event basis from one site and quarterly on surface water, pore water, floc, and sediment from four locations. A sediment core collected from the Refuge concentrations of 9 ng/L and 0.1 ng/L, respectively. Surface waters were acidic (pH 4.7--4.9), with average total and methyl mercury highly organic (dissolved organic carbon 35--50 mg/L). Total mercury was 1--3.5 ng/L in surface and pore water, and methyl mercury was 0.02--0.20 ng/L. Total mercury in sediments and floc was 100--200 ng/g dry weight, and methyl mercury was 4--16ng/g. Lead was 0--1.7 {micro}g/L in rainfall, not detectable in surface water, 3.4--5.4 {micro}g/L in pore water, and 3.9--4.9 mg/kg in floc and sediment. Historical patterns of mercury deposition showed an increase in total mercury from pre-1800 concentrations of 250 ng/g to 500 ng/g in 1950, with concentrations declining thereafter to present.

  6. Vertical variations in the influence of the amount effect: South American Summer Monsoon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels-Crow, K. E.; Galewsky, J.; Worden, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that convective recycling of atmospheric water vapor gives rise to the isotope "amount effect" in which d values are lower than predicted by simple Rayleigh distillation processes (i.e. (DdD = dDvapor ­- dDRayleigh < 0‰). Several studies have linked isotopes in precipitation [e.g. Vimeux et al., 2009] and atmospheric water vapor [e.g. Samuels-Crow et al., 2014] in the tropical Andes to upwind convection associated with the South American Summer Monsoon (SASM). The vertical structure of this convective influence, however, remains unknown. Understanding the vertical structure of the amount effect over South America is essential for improving theoretical constraints and developing better models of the influence of the SASM on southern hemisphere humidity. Additionally, evaluating the vertical and lateral extent of the SASM's convective influence can provide important constraints for interpreting paleoclimate proxies in the region. We use data from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) to examine the vertical structure of the amount effect associated with the SASM and relate these results to regional convective precipitation and local subcloud equivalent potential temperature. Preliminary results show that DdD is below 0‰ from the boundary layer through the mid-troposphere over tropical South America during austral summer, and meridional averages show that convective precipitation is highest over these areas where DdD < 0‰ extends higher in the atmosphere. We hypothesize that the depth of convection in the monsoon region controls the vertical structure of DdD, which should also be coherently linked to local equivalent potential temperature. References Vimeux et al. (2009), Palaeogeogr Palaeocl, 281(3-4), 229-241, doi:10.1016/j.palaeo.2008.03.054. Samuels-Crow et al. (2014), J Geophys Res-Atmos, doi:10.1002/(ISSN)2169-8996.

  7. Permafrost Thaw and Redistribution of Carbon from Lands and Oceans to the Atmosphere: the East Siberian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiletov, I. P.; Shakhova, N. E.; Pipko, I.; Dudarev, O.; Charkin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Unlike other oceans, the Arctic Ocean is completely surrounded by permafrost, which is being degraded at an increasing rate under warming conditions most pronounced in East Siberian region and Alaska. The thaw and release of organic carbon (OC) from Arctic permafrost is postulated to be one of the most powerful mechanisms causing the net redistribution of carbon from lands and oceans to the atmosphere. The East Siberian Arctic shelf (ESAS) is the world's largest continental shelf, containing more than 80 % of the world oceans' subsea permafrost and the largest hydrocarbon reservoir on the planet, while the stability of this sequestered carbon, which exists primarily as CH4, is highly uncertain. This area is heavily influenced by subsea permafrost thaw, and CH4 seeps from subsea permafrost reservoirs under warming conditions. Various other phenomena influence the area, including coastal erosion, mostly caused by onshore permafrost/coastal ice complex thaw; the input of dissolved and particulate OC through the Lena, Indigirka, and Kolyma rivers. The ESAS is also of particular interest for its carbon-climate couplings because thawing of onshore and offshore permafrost leads to the CH4 and CO2 emission to the atmosphere. The overall goal of the current research is to provide a quantitative, observation-based assessment of the dynamics of different ESAS carbon cycle components with emphasize on the emission of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere under changing climatic and environmental conditions.

  8. Quantifying Carbon-Climate Processes at the Regional Scale Using Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Elliott; Berry, Joe; Torn, Margaret; David, Billesbach; Seibt, Ulrike

    2013-10-08

    Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) analysis has the potentially transformative capability for partitioning the regional carbon flux into respiration and photosynthesis components. This emerging approach is based on the observation that continental atmospheric CO2 gradients are dominated by net ecosystem fluxes while continental atmospheric COS gradients are dominated by photosynthesis-related plant uptake. Regional flux partitioning represents a critical knowledge gap due to a lack of robust methods for regional-scale flux partitioning and large uncertainties in forecasting carbon-climate feedbacks. Our completed project characterized the relationship between COS and CO2 surface fluxes using a novel measurement and modeling system in a winter wheat field at the U.S. Department of Energy?s Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement program Central Facility (DOE-ARM CF). The scope of this project included canopy flux measurements, soil flux measurements, regional atmospheric modeling, and analysis of COS and CO2 airborne observations at SGP. Three critical discoveries emerged from this investigation: (1) the new measurement system provided the first field evidence of a robust relationship between COS leaf fluxes and GPP; (2) a previously unknown seasonal soil source of COS was observed and characterized; (3) the regional atmospheric analysis of airborne measurements provided the first COS-based constraints on GPP parameterizations used in earth systems models. Dissemination of these results includes three publications [Billesbach et al., In Press; Campbell et al., In Preparation; Seibt et al., In Review], three presentations at the AGU Fall Meeting (2012), and four invited presentations to department seminars. We have leveraged this foundational project to continue our work on understanding carbon cycle processes at large scales through one funded project (DOE Lab Fee, 2012-2015) and one proposal that is under review (DOE/NASA/USDA/NOAA, 2014-2016).

  9. The Influence of Atmospheric Transport Regimes on Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Concentrations Measured at Zeppelin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubl, S.; Scheringer, M.; Hungerbuehler, K.

    2013-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants (POPs) of exclusively anthropogenic origin. PCBs are toxic, bioaccumulative and have a great potential of long-range transport. PCBs have been banned globally under the Stockholm convention on POPs since 2004. We analysed times series of 21 PCB congeners ranging from PCB 18 to PCB 187 that have been measured at Zeppelin (Spitsbergen) since 1993. Although primary PCB emissions have been steadily reduced, a strong decreasing trend is not observed in the PCB concentrations in the Arctic. In order to investigate the influence of atmospheric transport on the PCB concentrations and to identify the potential source regions of the PCBs, we calculated footprints for the Zeppelin measurement site using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. Footprints can be interpreted as potential source regions where PCBs may have been picked up. Based on various statistical analyses of the footprints (cluster analysis, k-medoid, silhouette), we identified the prevailing transport regimes for Zeppelin which were represented by 5 different clusters. Cluster 1 and 3 belong to transport regimes with highest residence times over Europe (cluster 1) and North-America (cluster 3); both transport regimes dominantly occur from late fall to early spring. Clusters 2 and 4 represent air masses with surface contact predominantly over the Atlantic Ocean (cluster 2), only occurring during the summer months, and the Arctic Ocean (cluster 4) mainly observed in spring and autumn, but also in summer. Cluster 5 is representative of air originating from the Pacific ocean and eastern Asia; this transport regime occurs mainly in spring and fall. We grouped the PCB concentrations measured at Zeppelin according to the 5 different clusters and calculated the median for each cluster and PCB congener. The median for medium to heavier PCBs is highest for cluster 1 and 3, which represent transport regimes over the continent, suggesting that

  10. A profile of UK unemployment: regional versus demographic influences.

    PubMed

    Brown, S; Sessions, J G

    1997-06-01

    "This paper profiles the incidence of unemployment in the [United Kingdom] over the period 1985-91 using data derived from the British Social Attitudes Survey. The approach of the paper is to quantify the differential probabilities of unemployment faced by particular groups within the population, focusing in particular on the relative effects of demographic and regional influences. Our results indicate that, even after controlling for a plethora of demographic characteristics, regional disparities in unemployment risk are prevalent, with individuals in Northern Ireland, Wales, the North and West Midlands of England facing a higher chance of unemployment ceteris paribus." (EXCERPT) PMID:12293417

  11. The atmospheric frontal response to SST perturbations in the Gulf Stream region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfitt, Rhys; Czaja, Arnaud; Minobe, Shoshiro; Kuwano-Yoshida, Akira

    2016-03-01

    The link between sea surface temperature (SST) gradients and atmospheric fronts is explored in a general circulation model across the Gulf Stream (GS) region from December to February 1981-2000. Two model experiments are analyzed, one with a realistic control SST distribution and one with a spatially smoothed SST distribution. The analysis shows a noticeable change in regional atmospheric frontal frequency between the two experiments (up to 30%), with the distribution of change exhibiting a clear imprint of the GS SST front. Further analysis of the surface sensible heat flux gradient across cold fronts reveals the pattern of change to be mediated by a thermal interaction between the oceanic and atmospheric fronts ("thermal damping and strengthening"). These results not only emphasize the significance of the GS SST gradient for storm development in the North Atlantic but also highlight the importance of resolution in assessing the role of frontal air-sea interaction in midlatitude climate variability.

  12. Influence of high-resolution surface databases on the modeling of local atmospheric circulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, L. M. S.; Bodstein, G. C. R.; Pimentel, L. C. G.

    2014-08-01

    Large-eddy simulations are performed using the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) code at horizontal grid resolutions as fine as 300 m to assess the influence of detailed and updated surface databases on the modeling of local atmospheric circulation systems of urban areas with complex terrain. Applications to air pollution and wind energy are sought. These databases are comprised of 3 arc-sec topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, 10 arc-sec vegetation-type data from the European Space Agency (ESA) GlobCover project, and 30 arc-sec leaf area index and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation data from the ESA GlobCarbon project. Simulations are carried out for the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro using six one-way nested-grid domains that allow the choice of distinct parametric models and vertical resolutions associated to each grid. ARPS is initialized using the Global Forecasting System with 0.5°-resolution data from the National Center of Environmental Prediction, which is also used every 3 h as lateral boundary condition. Topographic shading is turned on and two soil layers are used to compute the soil temperature and moisture budgets in all runs. Results for two simulated runs covering three periods of time are compared to surface and upper-air observational data to explore the dependence of the simulations on initial and boundary conditions, grid resolution, topographic and land-use databases. Our comparisons show overall good agreement between simulated and observational data, mainly for the potential temperature and the wind speed fields, and clearly indicate that the use of high-resolution databases improves significantly our ability to predict the local atmospheric circulation.

  13. Snow-atmosphere coupling and extremes over North America in the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diro, G. T.; Sushama, L.; Huziy, O.

    2015-12-01

    Given the importance of land in the climate system, we investigate the influence of land surface, in particular the variation in snow characteristics, on climate variability and extremes over North America using the fifth generation of Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5). To this end, we carried out two CRCM5 simulations driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis, where snow is either prescribed (uncoupled) or evolves interactively (coupled) during the model integration. Results indicate a systematic influence of snow on the inter-annual variability of air and surface temperature throughout the winter and spring seasons. In the coupled simulations, where the snow depth and snow cover were allowed to evolve freely, the inter-annual variability of surface and near surface air temperatures were found to be larger. Comparison with the uncoupled simulation suggests that snow depth/cover variability accounts for about 70% of the total surface temperature variability over the northern Great Plains and Canadian Prairies for the winter and spring seasons. The snow-atmosphere coupling is stronger in spring than in winter, since in spring season both the albedo and the latent heat flux contribute to the variability in temperature. Snow is also found to modulate extreme temperature events such as the number of cold days over Prairies during weak La-Nina episodes. These results suggest that initializing forecast models with realistic snow condition could potentially help to improve seasonal/sub-seasonal prediction skill over these snow-atmosphere coupling hotspot regions.

  14. REPRESENTATION OF ATMOSPHERIC MOTION IN MODELS OF REGIONAL-SCALE AIR POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method is developed for generating ensembles of wind fields for use in regional scale (1000 km) models of transport and diffusion. The underlying objective is a methodology for representing atmospheric motion in applied air pollution models that permits explicit treatment of th...

  15. Understanding hydrologic sensitivity and land-atmosphere interactions through remote sensing and high resolution regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil

    2016-05-01

    In this study we investigated the impact of land surface surface process & land-atmospheric interaction on weather and surface hydrology. The ultimate goal is to integrate remote sense data into numerical mesoscale weather prediction and regional climate model in order to improve prediction of the impacts of land-atmosphere interactions and land-surface processes on regional weather, and hydrology. We have used climatology based green vegetation fraction and 8-day Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) based green vegetation fraction and integrated in the Land Information System to conduct uncoupled simulation to understand the impact on surface and hydrological parameters in the summer season. The vegetation response is also realized through coupled regional climate simulation in which climatological based greenness and 8-days varying vegetation is investigated and quantify the impact of vegetation on summertime precipitation process. This study has bought following findings (a) Satellite based vegetation indices captures vegetation temporal patterns more realistic than climatological vegetation data and detects early/late spring signature through vegetation indices, (b) Integrated satellite vegetation greenness input data in regional weather model resolved much better soil moisture and soil temperature including the diurnal cycle of surface heat fluxes and surface temperature in the simulation. Secondly, integration of the TRMM based satellite rainfall product into coupled hydrological and Atmospheric model and results shows better resolved soil moisture patterns in the remote regions of the Asia Mountain regions.

  16. Influence of the E region dynamo on equatorial spread F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, W. B.; Sanatani, S.; Patterson, T. N. L.

    1983-01-01

    The integrated E region Pedersen conductivity can be an important parameter in determining whether the bottomside of the equatorial F layer will be stable against the Rayleigh-Taylor gravitational instability. The F layer is observed to become unstable when it rises to great heights after sunset. One effect of this height rise is to decrease the stabilizing influence of ion-neutral collisions at F region heights. It is shown here that the same eastward electric field that raises the F layer also decreases the Pedersen conductivity of the E region, which further destabilizes convective overturning. Because the conductivity of magnetic tubes that penetrate the main F layer is large compared to the E layer contribution, these effects are important only for the bottomside of the equatorial F layer.

  17. Mapping Distant Continental Influences in the Remote Pacific Atmosphere; Simulations of CO Relevant to the Photochemistry of Oxidants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield Robert B.; Guo, Z.; Sachse, G.; Singh, H.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An animated sequence of maps of simulated carbon monoxide concentrations graphically portrays the extent of residual continental influence upon the tropical Pacific Ocean as studied by NASA aircraft during the PEM-Tropics B intensive sampling campaign. We used the MM5 at a 90 km resolution in a globally wrapped grid to simulate the meteorology of transport, and our GRACES model to follow the basic chemistry. The CO we simulate derives from different sources, and so we distinguish anthropogenic, natural terpenoid oxidation, biomass burning, and pervasive CH4-oxidation influences. "Influence" is always judged with an implicit timescale, and these maps describe influence on the 15-45 day timescale appropriate for CO oxidation. In consequence, the maps are useful in assessing the origins of slowly reacting compounds like acetone, methanol, and the lightest hydrocarbons. At 8 km altitude, The Eastern South Pacific to ca. 130 W (eastern Polynesia) was frequently affected by continental influences but NASA's DC-8's flight path did not happen to take it into these regions very often. Near the surface, continentally influenced air crossed into t he Western South Pacific, in the region northwest of the Southern Pacific Convergence Zone but south of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. This air originated from the NE Pacific, and partly from North America. Comparisons are made to CO and other compounds measured aboard the DC-8 and the P-3 aircraft. We will also use tracers to describe the influence of marine convection in the upper troposphere. As time allows, we will discuss the "age" of ozone within the very cleanest region sampled in portions of the near-equatorial Western South Pacific, using a simple chemical mechanism for ozone levels. These simulations describe the chemistry of an atmosphere with very low ozone.

  18. Non-stationarities in land-atmosphere-climate interactions in Europe and the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romberg, Karin; Hertig, Elke; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere are of major importance for the regional and global climate. Soil moisture thereby plays a key role: availability of water in the soils is one of the drivers of evaporation and thus impacts on temperature and precipitation. Regions of strong soil moisture-atmosphere coupling include the Mediterranean area while in other regions of Europe non-local effects such as the advection of dry (moist) air are more important. However, previous studies have also shown that climate is fundamentally non-stationary and that such non-stationarities occur on various spatial and temporal scales. These studies have mainly focused on sea-surface-atmosphere interactions or circulation-climate interactions. Thus, the question arises whether soil-moisture-atmosphere-climate interactions also show a non-stationary behavior. As a first step, Varimax-rotated s-mode principal component analysis (PCA) is used to reduce dimensions of soil moisture fields, circulation variables as well as of 2m temperature fields. The resulting PC loadings represent the spatial patterns while the PC scores are the corresponding time coefficients. For the analysis of non-stationarities, the time coefficients of soil moisture and temperature are further used in 30-year running correlation and feedback parameter analyses. Furthermore, correlation analyses are carried out for the circulation variables and soil moisture or temperature, as changes of the atmospheric circulation are a potential source of non-stationarities. All analyses focus on the boreal summer season 1950-2009. Results show substantial non-stationaries in the relationship between soil moisture and temperature in several regions in the European and Mediterranean domain. Depending on the region considered, these changes are accompanied by modifications in different large-scale circulation patterns such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, the Scandinavia pattern or a high pressure system centered

  19. Flood regionalization: A hybrid geographic and predictor-variable region-of-influence regression method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eng, K.; Milly, P.C.D.; Tasker, Gary D.

    2007-01-01

    To facilitate estimation of streamflow characteristics at an ungauged site, hydrologists often define a region of influence containing gauged sites hydrologically similar to the estimation site. This region can be defined either in geographic space or in the space of the variables that are used to predict streamflow (predictor variables). These approaches are complementary, and a combination of the two may be superior to either. Here we propose a hybrid region-of-influence (HRoI) regression method that combines the two approaches. The new method was applied with streamflow records from 1,091 gauges in the southeastern United States to estimate the 50-year peak flow (Q50). The HRoI approach yielded lower root-mean-square estimation errors and produced fewer extreme errors than either the predictor-variable or geographic region-of-influence approaches. It is concluded, for Q50 in the study region, that similarity with respect to the basin characteristics considered (area, slope, and annual precipitation) is important, but incomplete, and that the consideration of geographic proximity of stations provides a useful surrogate for characteristics that are not included in the analysis. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  20. The large-scale biosphere-atmosphere experiment in Amazonia: Analyzing regional land use change effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Michael; Silva-Dias, Maria Assunção; Nepstad, Daniel C.; Silva-Andreae, Meinrat O.

    The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is a multi-disciplinary, multinational scientific project led by Brazil. LBA researchers seek to understand Amazonia in its global context especially with regard to regional and global climate. Current development activities in Amazonia including deforestation, logging, cattle ranching, and agriculture significantly perturb regional and global carbon budgets and the atmospheric radiation budget through both greenhouse gas inputs and the increase in atmospheric particulates generated by fires. The Brazilian Amazon currently releases about 0.2 Pg-C to the atmosphere each year as a result of net deforestation. Logging and forest fire activity are poorly quantified but certainly increase this amount by more than 10%. Fires associated with land management activities generate smoke that leads to heating of the lower atmosphere, decreases in overall cloudiness, increases in cloud lifetimes, and the suppression of rainfall. There are considerable uncertainties associated with our understanding of smoke effects. Present development trends point to agricultural intensification in the Brazilian Amazon. This intensification and the associated generation of wealth present an opportunity to enhance governance on the frontier and to minimize the damaging effects of fires.

  1. Distinct atmospheric patterns and associations with acute heat-induced mortality in five regions of England.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Ilias; Dimitriou, Konstantinos; Kassomenos, Pavlos

    2015-10-01

    The main objective of this paper was to identify possible acute heat-induced summer mortality in five regions of England namely the Yorkshire and the Humber, West Midlands, North East, North West and South East regions and reveal associations with specific air flows. For this purpose, backward air mass trajectories corresponding to daily episodes of increased temperatures were produced and divided to clusters, in order to define atmospheric pathways associated with warm air mass intrusions. A statistically significant at 95 % confidence interval increase in daily total mortality (DTMORT) was observed during the selected episodes at all five regions and thus, heat-induced mortality was indicated. The calculated raise was more intense in the West Midlands, North West and South East regions, whereas the results in the North East and Yorkshire and the Humber regions were less evident. Large fractions of thermal episodes, elevated average temperature values and higher average DTMORT levels were primarily associated with the short-medium range South West (SW) and/or East-South East (E-SE) trajectory clusters, suggesting relations among heat-induced mortality and specific atmospheric circulations. Short-medium length of SW and E-SE airflows, calculated by an application of Haversine formula along the centroid trajectory of each cluster, implies the arrival of slow moving air masses. Atmospheric stagnation could enhance human thermal stress due to low wind speed. PMID:25605407

  2. Distinct atmospheric patterns and associations with acute heat-induced mortality in five regions of England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Ilias; Dimitriou, Konstantinos; Kassomenos, Pavlos

    2015-10-01

    The main objective of this paper was to identify possible acute heat-induced summer mortality in five regions of England namely the Yorkshire and the Humber, West Midlands, North East, North West and South East regions and reveal associations with specific air flows. For this purpose, backward air mass trajectories corresponding to daily episodes of increased temperatures were produced and divided to clusters, in order to define atmospheric pathways associated with warm air mass intrusions. A statistically significant at 95 % confidence interval increase in daily total mortality (DTMORT) was observed during the selected episodes at all five regions and thus, heat-induced mortality was indicated. The calculated raise was more intense in the West Midlands, North West and South East regions, whereas the results in the North East and Yorkshire and the Humber regions were less evident. Large fractions of thermal episodes, elevated average temperature values and higher average DTMORT levels were primarily associated with the short-medium range South West (SW) and/or East-South East (E-SE) trajectory clusters, suggesting relations among heat-induced mortality and specific atmospheric circulations. Short-medium length of SW and E-SE airflows, calculated by an application of Haversine formula along the centroid trajectory of each cluster, implies the arrival of slow moving air masses. Atmospheric stagnation could enhance human thermal stress due to low wind speed.

  3. Regional atmospheric circulation over Europe during the Last Glacial Maximum and its links to precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Patrick; Schaffernicht, Erik J.; Shao, Yaping; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2016-03-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) exhibits different large-scale atmospheric conditions compared to present-day climate due to altered boundary conditions. The regional atmospheric circulation and associated precipitation patterns over Europe are characterized for the first time with a weather typing approach (circulation weather types, CWT) for LGM paleoclimate simulations. The CWT approach is applied to four representative regions across Europe. While the CWTs over Western Europe are prevailing westerly for both present-day and LGM conditions, considerable differences are identified elsewhere: Southern Europe experienced more frequent westerly and cyclonic CWTs under LGM conditions, while Central and Eastern Europe was predominantly affected by southerly and easterly flow patterns. Under LGM conditions, rainfall is enhanced over Western Europe but is reduced over most of Central and Eastern Europe. These differences are explained by changing CWT frequencies and evaporation patterns over the North Atlantic Ocean. The regional differences of the CWTs and precipitation patterns are linked to the North Atlantic storm track, which was stronger over Europe in all considered models during the LGM, explaining the overall increase of the cyclonic CWT. Enhanced evaporation over the North Atlantic leads to higher moisture availability over the ocean. Despite the overall cooling during the LGM, this explains the enhanced precipitation over southwestern Europe, particularly Iberia. This study links large-scale atmospheric dynamics to the regional circulation and associated precipitation patterns and provides an improved regional assessment of the European climate under LGM conditions.

  4. Influence of atmospheric properties on detection of wood-warbler nocturnal flight calls.

    PubMed

    Horton, Kyle G; Stepanian, Phillip M; Wainwright, Charlotte E; Tegeler, Amy K

    2015-10-01

    Avian migration monitoring can take on many forms; however, monitoring active nocturnal migration of land birds is limited to a few techniques. Avian nocturnal flight calls are currently the only method for describing migrant composition at the species level. However, as this method develops, more information is needed to understand the sources of variation in call detection. Additionally, few studies examine how detection probabilities differ under varying atmospheric conditions. We use nocturnal flight call recordings from captive individuals to explore the dependence of flight call detection on atmospheric temperature and humidity. Height or distance from origin had the largest influence on call detection, while temperature and humidity also influenced detectability at higher altitudes. Because flight call detection varies with both atmospheric conditions and flight height, improved monitoring across time and space will require correction for these factors to generate standardized metrics of songbird migration. PMID:25601781

  5. Influence of atmospheric properties on detection of wood-warbler nocturnal flight calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Kyle G.; Stepanian, Phillip M.; Wainwright, Charlotte E.; Tegeler, Amy K.

    2015-10-01

    Avian migration monitoring can take on many forms; however, monitoring active nocturnal migration of land birds is limited to a few techniques. Avian nocturnal flight calls are currently the only method for describing migrant composition at the species level. However, as this method develops, more information is needed to understand the sources of variation in call detection. Additionally, few studies examine how detection probabilities differ under varying atmospheric conditions. We use nocturnal flight call recordings from captive individuals to explore the dependence of flight call detection on atmospheric temperature and humidity. Height or distance from origin had the largest influence on call detection, while temperature and humidity also influenced detectability at higher altitudes. Because flight call detection varies with both atmospheric conditions and flight height, improved monitoring across time and space will require correction for these factors to generate standardized metrics of songbird migration.

  6. Influence of Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide on Transcriptional Responses of Bradyrhizobium japonicum in the Soybean Rhizoplane

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Masayuki; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 can influence the structure and function of rhizoplane and rhizosphere microorganisms by altering root growth and the quality and quantity of compounds released into the rhizoplane and rhizosphere via root exudation. In these studies we investigated the transcriptional responses of Bradyrhizobium japonicum cells growing in the rhizoplane of soybean plants exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2. The results of microarray analyses indicated that elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration indirectly influenced the expression of a large number of genes in Bradyrhizobium attached to soybean roots. In addition, relative to plants and bacteria grown under ambient CO2 growth conditions, genes involved in C1 metabolism, denitrification and FixK2-associated genes, including those involved in nitrogen fixation, microaerobic respiration, respiratory nitrite reductase, and heme biosynthesis, were significantly up-regulated under conditions of elevated CO2 in the rhizosphere. The expression profile of genes involved in lipochitooligosaccharide Nod factor biosynthesis and negative transcriptional regulators of nodulation genes, nolA and nodD2, were also influenced by plant growth under conditions of elevated CO2. Taken together, the results of these studies indicate that the growth of soybeans under conditions of elevated atmospheric CO2 influences gene expressions in B. japonicum in the soybean rhizoplane, resulting in changes to carbon/nitrogen metabolism, respiration, and nodulation efficiency. PMID:23666536

  7. Intra-annual variation of atmospheric static stability in the Mediterranean region: a 60-year climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolis, C. J.; Bartzokas, A.; Lagouvardos, K.; Metaxas, D. A.

    2012-10-01

    The seasonal characteristics of atmospheric static stability in the Mediterranean region are examined, for the 60-year period 1948-2007 and for the four 15-year sub-periods 1948-1962, 1963-1977, 1978-1992 and 1993-2007. S-Mode and T-Mode Factor Analysis are applied to the mean 5-day values of K static stability index over the Mediterranean region. Three dominant modes are revealed for both, the intra-annual variation and the spatial distribution of K-index. It is found that these modes are connected to the seasonal characteristics of the main atmospheric circulation systems affecting the region and the thermal properties of the Earth's surface (land or sea). The differences among the results of the four sub-periods partially reflect the inter-decadal variations of the strength of the above factors.

  8. The Influence of Atmospheric Conditions on the Production of Ozone during VOC Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J.; Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a short-lived climate forcing pollutant that is detrimental to human health and crop growth. Reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the presence of sunlight produce ozone. Ozone production is a non-linear function of the concentrations of both NOx and VOC, with VOC acting as the "fuel" for ozone production and NOx as the "catalyst". Different VOC, due to their differing structure and carbon content, have different maximum potential to produce ozone. Due to different degrees of reactivity, VOC also differ in the time taken to reach this maximum ozone production potential under ideal conditions. Ozone production is also influenced by meteorological factors such as radiation, temperature, advection and mixing, which may alter the rate of ozone production, and the degree to which VOC are able to reach their maximum ozone production potential. Identifying the chemical and meteorological processes responsible for controlling the degree to which VOC are able to reach their maximum ozone production potential could inform decisions on emission control to efficiently tackle high levels of tropospheric ozone. In this study we use a boxmodel to determine the chemical processes affecting ozone production under different meteorological and chemical conditions. The chemistry scheme used by the boxmodel is "tagged" for each initial VOC enabling attribution of ozone production to its VOC source. We systematically vary a number of meteorological parameters along with the source of NOx within the box model to simulate a range of atmospheric conditions. These simulations are compared with a control simulation done under conditions of maximum ozone formation to determine which parameters affect the rate at which VOC produce ozone and the extent to which they reach their maximum potential to produce ozone. We perform multi-day simulations in order to examine whether these processes can influence ozone production over

  9. Improved PPP Ambiguity Resolution Considering the Stochastic Characteristics of Atmospheric Corrections from Regional Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Yihe; Li, Bofeng; Gao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    With the increased availability of regional reference networks, Precise Point Positioning (PPP) can achieve fast ambiguity resolution (AR) and precise positioning by assimilating the satellite fractional cycle biases (FCBs) and atmospheric corrections derived from these networks. In such processing, the atmospheric corrections are usually treated as deterministic quantities. This is however unrealistic since the estimated atmospheric corrections obtained from the network data are random and furthermore the interpolated corrections diverge from the realistic corrections. This paper is dedicated to the stochastic modelling of atmospheric corrections and analyzing their effects on the PPP AR efficiency. The random errors of the interpolated corrections are processed as two components: one is from the random errors of estimated corrections at reference stations, while the other arises from the atmospheric delay discrepancies between reference stations and users. The interpolated atmospheric corrections are then applied by users as pseudo-observations with the estimated stochastic model. Two data sets are processed to assess the performance of interpolated corrections with the estimated stochastic models. The results show that when the stochastic characteristics of interpolated corrections are properly taken into account, the successful fix rate reaches 93.3% within 5 min for a medium inter-station distance network and 80.6% within 10 min for a long inter-station distance network. PMID:26633400

  10. Improved PPP Ambiguity Resolution Considering the Stochastic Characteristics of Atmospheric Corrections from Regional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yihe; Li, Bofeng; Gao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    With the increased availability of regional reference networks, Precise Point Positioning (PPP) can achieve fast ambiguity resolution (AR) and precise positioning by assimilating the satellite fractional cycle biases (FCBs) and atmospheric corrections derived from these networks. In such processing, the atmospheric corrections are usually treated as deterministic quantities. This is however unrealistic since the estimated atmospheric corrections obtained from the network data are random and furthermore the interpolated corrections diverge from the realistic corrections. This paper is dedicated to the stochastic modelling of atmospheric corrections and analyzing their effects on the PPP AR efficiency. The random errors of the interpolated corrections are processed as two components: one is from the random errors of estimated corrections at reference stations, while the other arises from the atmospheric delay discrepancies between reference stations and users. The interpolated atmospheric corrections are then applied by users as pseudo-observations with the estimated stochastic model. Two data sets are processed to assess the performance of interpolated corrections with the estimated stochastic models. The results show that when the stochastic characteristics of interpolated corrections are properly taken into account, the successful fix rate reaches 93.3% within 5 min for a medium inter-station distance network and 80.6% within 10 min for a long inter-station distance network. PMID:26633400

  11. Long-range atmospheric transport of heavy metals from industrial regions of Ural and Norilsk to siberian environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Anna; Maksimenkov, Leonid; Pogarskii, Fedor

    2010-05-01

    The main idea of the work is to analyze atmospheric transport of heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Pb) from the industries of the region of Norilsk, and the Ural over the territory of Siberia. The basic data were 5-days air mass trajectories from the sources calculated for every day of January, April, July, and October during 28 years from 1981 to 2008. NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis Data Files and HYSPLIT 4 model were used. Spatial, seasonal and long-term variations in heavy metal (HM) concentrations in surface air and precipitations, as well as in fluxes of these elements onto the surface were studied. The obtained results (presented as maps) may be used as assessment of anthropogenic influence of the sources under investigation on the environment of remote and hard-to-reach areas. The HM air concentrations and fluxes onto the surface depend on surface properties and precipitation regime, and experience great seasonal and spatial variations. The maximal air concentrations are in cold seasons, whereas the maximal fluxes onto the surface occur in warm period. In comparison anthropogenic loadings at different places the cleanest air does not guarantees the minimal vertical fluxes. The pollution trends (modulo) caused only by the transformation of air circulation processes are quite comparable with the contributions of source-emissions' changes. The main result is the decreasing of Siberian environment pollution through the atmosphere from regarded sources during the last years. At a distance about 2000 km from a large source under investigation its atmospheric emissions form only the background levels of HM in the surface environment, and the real pollution levels are determined by local anthropogenic sources (with less emissions) if they exist. So, for the Lake Baikal the HM inputs from our distant sources through atmosphere to the water surface are insignificant in comparison with the flowing rivers' ones, and lake water pollution occurs mainly due to rivers' pollution. However, annual

  12. XeCl laser ablation of polyimide: Influence of ambient atmosphere on particulate and gaseous products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Donald L.; Paraskevopoulos, George; Irwin, Robert S.

    1989-10-01

    The gaseous and particulate products of the XeCl (308 nm) laser ablation of polyimide (Kapton H) are quantitatively determined and compared with the mass loss of the polymer in atmospheres of He, N2, air, or O2. In air and in pure O2, the observed mass balance is about 90%, but is lower for inert atmospheres. With increasing oxygen content in the atmosphere, the yield of CO2 increases at the expense of particulates and acetylene. The influence of laser fluence and nature of the ambient atmosphere on the product distribution is interpreted in terms of ejection of small reactive species which are involved in the competitive reactions of particulate formation and oxidation to CO2.

  13. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on optical measurement: a case report and review of literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Linshen; Shang, Yang; Fu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    When videogammetry (optical measurement) was carried outdoor or under cruel indoor circumstance, the results would be inevitably affected by the atmosphere turbulence. As a result, the precision of surveying was destroyed. The field of air turbulence's impact on optical measurement was neglected by scholars for a long time, the achievements massed about laser optics and optical communications. The mostly adapted method was noise filtration when the pixel wandering could not be rejected in engineering application, which got little improvement on usual conditions. The principle of influence under atmospheric turbulence on optical measurement is presented in this paper. And experiments data and applications are carried out to announce the impact of atmospheric turbulence. Combining with relevant researches, some essential issues and expectations of the atmospheric turbulence research are proposed.

  14. Predictability and Ensemble Modeling of the Space-Atmosphere Interaction Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, T.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Akmaev, R. A.; Wang, H.; Fang, T. W.; Ide, K.; Kleist, D. T.; Whitaker, J. S.; Yue, X.; Codrescu, M.; Richmond, A. D.; Immel, T. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Liu, J. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Space-Atmosphere Interaction Region (SAIR), encompassing the mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere, is an intersection between geospace and the Earth's atmosphere, and is exposed to vacillating conditions of both space and terrestrial weather. Recent observational and modeling studies have revealed clear reaches of terrestrial weather far beyond the mesosphere lower-thermosphere region into the topside ionosphere. At the same time, the region lends itself to forcing originating from the Sun and solar-wind magnetosphere interactions. The predictability of the SAIR is a fundamental question in Heliophysics, and calls for a paradigm shift from a deterministic to a probabilistic modeling framework. To meet with this contemporary modeling and simulation challenge, we will systematically compare and combine ensemble simulations of a comprehensive whole atmosphere model, coupled with an ionosphere and plasmasphere model called the Integrated Dynamics in Earth's Atmosphere (IDEA) with global Earth and geospace observations. Building on the National Weather Service's operational ensemble forecasting and data assimilation systems as well as our earlier efforts, we will construct an ensemble forecasting and data assimilation system that will ultimately be capable of assimilating observations from the ground to SAIR. We will present the project overview along with some initial results from our new interdisciplinary initiatives.

  15. Combined influence of atmospheric physics and soil hydrology on the simulated meteorology at the SIRTA atmospheric observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheruy, F.; Campoy, A.; Dupont, J.-C.; Ducharne, A.; Hourdin, F.; Haeffelin, M.; Chiriaco, M.; Idelkadi, A.

    2013-05-01

    The identification of the land-atmosphere interactions as one of the key source of uncertainty in climate models calls for process-level assessment of the coupled atmosphere/land continental surface system in numerical climate models. To this end, we propose a novel approach and apply it to evaluate the standard and new parametrizations of boundary layer/convection/clouds in the Earth System Model (ESM) of Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), which differentiate the IPSL-CM5A and IPSL-CM5B climate change simulations produced for the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 5 exercise. Two different land surface hydrology parametrizations are also considered to analyze different land-atmosphere interactions. Ten-year simulations of the coupled land surface/atmospheric ESM modules are confronted to observations collected at the SIRTA (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédection Atmosphérique), located near Paris (France). For sounder evaluation of the physical parametrizations, the grid of the model is stretched and refined in the vicinity of the SIRTA, and the large scale component of the modeled circulation is adjusted toward ERA-Interim reanalysis outside of the zoomed area. This allows us to detect situations where the parametrizations do not perform satisfactorily and can affect climate simulations at the regional/continental scale, including in full 3D coupled runs. In particular, we show how the biases in near surface state variables simulated by the ESM are explained by (1) the sensible/latent heat partitionning at the surface, (2) the low level cloudiness and its radiative impact at the surface, (3) the parametrization of turbulent transport in the surface layer, (4) the complex interplay between these processes. We also show how the new set of parametrizations can improve these biases.

  16. The Influence of the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectral Energy Distribution on the Structure and Composition of the Upper Atmosphere of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. H.; Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi

    2016-02-01

    By varying the profiles of stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we tested the influences of stellar EUV SEDs on the physical and chemical properties of an escaping atmosphere. We apply our model to study four exoplanets: HD 189733b, HD 209458b, GJ 436b, and Kepler-11b. We find that the total mass loss rates of an exoplanet, which are determined mainly by the integrated fluxes, are moderately affected by the profiles of the EUV SED, but the composition and species distributions in the atmosphere can be dramatically modified by the different profiles of the EUV SED. For exoplanets with a high hydrodynamic escape parameter (λ), the amount of atomic hydrogen produced by photoionization at different altitudes can vary by one to two orders of magnitude with the variation of stellar EUV SEDs. The effect of photoionization of H is prominent when the EUV SED is dominated by the low-energy spectral region (400-900 Å), which pushes the transition of H/H+ to low altitudes. In contrast, the transition of H/H+ moves to higher altitudes when most photons are concentrated in the high-energy spectral region (50-400 Å). For exoplanets with a low λ, the lower temperatures of the atmosphere make many chemical reactions so important that photoionization alone can no longer determine the composition of the escaping atmosphere. For HD 189733b, it is possible to explain the time variability of Lyα between 2010 and 2011 by a change in the EUV SED of the host K-type star, yet invoking only thermal H i in the atmosphere.

  17. Extensive release of methane from Arctic seabed west of Svalbard during summer 2014 does not influence the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, C. Lund; Ferré, B.; Platt, S. M.; Silyakova, A.; Hermansen, O.; Allen, G.; Pisso, I.; Schmidbauer, N.; Stohl, A.; Pitt, J.; Jansson, P.; Greinert, J.; Percival, C.; Fjaeraa, A. M.; O'Shea, S. J.; Gallagher, M.; Le Breton, M.; Bower, K. N.; Bauguitte, S. J. B.; Dalsøren, S.; Vadakkepuliyambatta, S.; Fisher, R. E.; Nisbet, E. G.; Lowry, D.; Myhre, G.; Pyle, J. A.; Cain, M.; Mienert, J.

    2016-05-01

    We find that summer methane (CH4) release from seabed sediments west of Svalbard substantially increases CH4 concentrations in the ocean but has limited influence on the atmospheric CH4 levels. Our conclusion stems from complementary measurements at the seafloor, in the ocean, and in the atmosphere from land-based, ship and aircraft platforms during a summer campaign in 2014. We detected high concentrations of dissolved CH4 in the ocean above the seafloor with a sharp decrease above the pycnocline. Model approaches taking potential CH4 emissions from both dissolved and bubble-released CH4 from a larger region into account reveal a maximum flux compatible with the observed atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios of 2.4-3.8 nmol m-2 s-1. This is too low to have an impact on the atmospheric summer CH4 budget in the year 2014. Long-term ocean observatories may shed light on the complex variations of Arctic CH4 cycles throughout the year.

  18. Influence of stochastic sea ice parametrization on climate and the role of atmosphere-sea ice-ocean interaction.

    PubMed

    Juricke, Stephan; Jung, Thomas

    2014-06-28

    The influence of a stochastic sea ice strength parametrization on the mean climate is investigated in a coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean model. The results are compared with an uncoupled simulation with a prescribed atmosphere. It is found that the stochastic sea ice parametrization causes an effective weakening of the sea ice. In the uncoupled model this leads to an Arctic sea ice volume increase of about 10-20% after an accumulation period of approximately 20-30 years. In the coupled model, no such increase is found. Rather, the stochastic perturbations lead to a spatial redistribution of the Arctic sea ice thickness field. A mechanism involving a slightly negative atmospheric feedback is proposed that can explain the different responses in the coupled and uncoupled system. Changes in integrated Antarctic sea ice quantities caused by the stochastic parametrization are generally small, as memory is lost during the melting season because of an almost complete loss of sea ice. However, stochastic sea ice perturbations affect regional sea ice characteristics in the Southern Hemisphere, both in the uncoupled and coupled model. Remote impacts of the stochastic sea ice parametrization on the mean climate of non-polar regions were found to be small. PMID:24842027

  19. Regional atmospheric circulation over Europe during the Last Glacial Maximum and its links to precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Patrick; Schaffernicht, Erik; Shao, Yaping; Pinto, Joaquim

    2016-04-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) exhibits different large-scale atmospheric patterns compared to present-day climate due to altered boundary conditions. The impacts on the regional atmospheric circulation and associated precipitation patterns over Europe for the LGM are characterized for the first time with a weather typing approach (circulation weather types, CWT) from (paleo-) climate simulations. While the CWTs over Western Europe are prevailing westerly for both present-day and LGM conditions, considerable differences are identified elsewhere: Southern Europe experienced more frequent westerly and cyclonic CWTs under LGM conditions, while Central and Eastern Europe was predominantly affected by southerly and easterly flow patterns. Precipitation patterns under LGM conditions show increased rainfall in Western Europe but are reduced over most of Central and Eastern Europe. These differences are explained by changing CWT frequencies and evaporation patterns over the North Atlantic Ocean. The regional differences of the CWTs and precipitation patterns are linked to the North Atlantic storm track, which was stronger over Europe in all considered models during LGM, explaining the overall increase of the cyclonic CWT. Enhanced evaporation over the North Atlantic lead to an increased amount of available moisture over the ocean. Despite the overall cooling during the LGM, this explains the enhanced precipitation amounts over southwestern parts of Europe, particularly Iberia. This study links large scale atmospheric dynamics to the regional circulation and associated precipitation patterns and provides an improved regional assessment for climate conditions in Europe under LGM conditions.

  20. Charge structure of a summer thunderstorm in North China: Simulation using a Regional Atmospheric Model System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongxia; Qie, Xiushu; Peng, Liang; Li, Wanli

    2014-09-01

    Electrification and simple discharge schemes are coupled into a 3D Regional Atmospheric Model System (RAMS) as microphysical parameterizations, in accordance with electrical experiment results. The dynamics, microphysics, and electrification components are fully integrated into the RAMS model, and the inductive and non-inductive electrification mechanisms are considered in the charging process. The results indicate that the thunderstorm mainly had a normal tripole charge structure. The simulated charge structure and lightning frequency are basically consistent with observations of the lightning radiation source distribution. The non-inductive charging mechanism contributed to the electrification during the whole lifetime of the thunderstorm, while the inductive electrification mechanism played a significant role in the development period and the mature stage when the electric field reached a large value. The charge structure in the convective region and the rearward region are analyzed, showing that the charge density in the convective region was double that in the rearward region.

  1. Yak dung combustion aerosols in the Tibetan Plateau: Chemical characteristics and influence on the local atmospheric environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pengfei; Kang, Shichang; Bai, Jiankun; Sillanpää, Mika; Li, Chaoliu

    2015-04-01

    The study of the source areas of atmospheric pollutants in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) - one of the most remote regions in the world - has raised a great deal of concern. It is generally considered that the majority of pollutants in this region are transported from outside the TP. This research investigated the water soluble elements and carbonaceous matter from aerosols emitted from yak dung combustion by local residents and re-analyzed previous OC and BC data at Nam Co - a remote area of the TP. The compositions of the water soluble elements of the studied aerosols were similar to those in precipitation and snow samples of the region under investigation. Some heavy metal elements (e.g. Cd and As) even had higher enrichment factor (EF) values (1793 and 2355, respectively) compared to those in precipitation and snow samples, implying that previously reported high EF values for precipitation and snow did not completely reflect the long-range transported pollutants from outside the TP. Accordingly, the contributions of local sources needed to be considered. Organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) accounted for 55.2% and 3.63% of the studied aerosol, respectively. The OC/BC ratio of the studied aerosols was close to the corresponding value for the outdoor aerosols, further indicating the influence of local sources on the atmosphere of Nam Co. It was proposed that air masses from South Asia cause high BC concentrations in the Nam Co region. It was, however, discovered that air masses from the TP itself also induce high BC concentrations, suggesting that not all the BC of Nam Co was transported from South Asia. Therefore, it is proposed that pollutants of atmospheric aerosols of the Nam Co region were derived from a variety of sources from both the TP and outside. In other words, the influence of yak dung burning by local residents on the atmosphere of the TP cannot be overlooked. Correspondingly, long-range transported pollutants can penetrate into the inland TP only

  2. The influence of an atmospheric Two-Way coupled model system on the predictability of extratropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Mareike; Thürkow, Markus; Weiher, Stefan; Kirchner, Ingo; Ulbrich, Uwe; Will, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    A general bias of global atmosphere ocean models, and also of the MPI-ESM, is an under-representation of the high latitude cyclone activity and an overestimation of the mid latitude cyclone activity in the North Atlantic, thus representing the extra-tropical storm track too zonal. We will show, that this effect can be antagonized by applying an atmospheric Two-Way Coupling (TWC). In this study we present a newly developed Two-Way Coupled model system, which is based on the MPI-ESM, and show that it is able to capture the mean storm track location more accurate. It also influences the sub-decadal deterministic predictability of extra-tropical cyclones and shows significantly enhanced skill compared to the "uncoupled" MPI-ESM standalone system. This study evaluates a set of hindcast experiments performed with said Two-Way Coupled model system. The regional model COSMO CLM is Two-Way Coupled to the atmosphere of the global Max-Plack-Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) and therefore integrates and exchanges the state of the atmosphere every 10 minutes (MPI-TWC-ESM). In the coupled source region (North Atlantic), mesoscale processes which are relevant for the formation and early-stage development of cyclones are expected to be better represented, and therefore influence the large scale dynamics of the target region (Europe). The database covers 102 "uncoupled" years and 102 Two-Way Coupled years of the recent climate (1960-2010). Results are validated against the ERA-Interim reanalysis. Besides the climatological point of view, the design of this single model ensemble allows for an analysis of the predictability of the first and second leadyears of the hindcasts. As a first step to understand the improved predictability of cyclones, we will show a detailed analysis of climatologies for specific cyclone categories, sorted by season and region. Especially for cyclones affecting Europe, the TWC is capable to counteract the AOGCM's biases in the North Atlantic. Also

  3. Influence of solar-probe inherent atmosphere on in-situ observations

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, A.I.; Konkashbaev, I.K.; Nikandrov, L.B.

    1998-08-01

    The solar corona is the source of the solar wind, which is responsible for the heliosphere and plays a crucial role in solar/terrestrial phenomena. A comprehensive understanding of these phenomena can be established only by directly measuring ion and electron velocity distributions, plasma waves, and fluxes of energetic particles near the sun. The problem resulting from the inherent atmosphere of a spacecraft moving in the vicinity of the sun and the influence of this atmosphere on in-situ measurements of the solar corona plasma is key to the realization and success of any solar probe mission. To evaluate the influence of the probe-inherent atmosphere on in-situ observations, the authors have developed comprehensive radiation hydrodynamic models. The physics of plasma/probe/vapor interaction are also being developed in a self-consistent model to predict the effect of probe inherent atmosphere on in-situ measurements of corona parameters during solar flares. Interaction of the ionized atmosphere with the ambient natural plasma will create a turbulent shock wave that can affect in-situ measurements and must be taken into account in designing the spacecraft and its scientific components.

  4. Characteristics in the jet region of helium radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge with array generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Bin; Nie, Qiu-Yue

    2015-09-01

    The two-dimensional spatially extended atmospheric plasma arrays by many parallel radio-frequency glow discharge plasma jets packed densely, represent a feature option of large-scale low-temperature atmospheric plasma technologies with distinct capability of directed delivery of reactive species and good insusceptibility to sample variations. However, it is still a challenge to form plasma jet with large area of uniform active species on a downstream substrate due to the complex interactions between individual jets. This paper proposes to numerically study the strategy and mechanism of control/modulation for the array discharge to produce two-dimensional plasma uniformity in the downstream working area. In this work, a two dimensional fluid model is employed to investigate the characteristics in the jet region of helium radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (RF APGD) with array generators. The influences of upstream discharge characteristics, gas flow and their cooperative effects on the distribution of species densities, gas temperatures and the uniformity of active species in the material treating area is studied, and the essential strategy for the modulation method is acquired. The results will be significant for deep understanding of coupling behaviors of multiple plasma plumes in the RF APGD array and applications of the technology.

  5. On the effects of constraining atmospheric circulation in a coupled atmosphere-ocean Arctic regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Peter; Döscher, Ralf; Koenigk, Torben

    2015-08-01

    Impacts of spectral nudging on simulations of Arctic climate in coupled simulations have been investigated in a set of simulations with a regional climate model (RCM). The dominantly circumpolar circulation in the Arctic lead to weak constraints on the lateral boundary conditions (LBCs) for the RCM, which causes large internal variability with strong deviations from the driving model. When coupled to an ocean and sea ice model, this results in sea ice concentrations that deviate from the observed spatial distribution. Here, a method of spectral nudging is applied to the atmospheric model RCA4 in order to assess the potentials for improving results for the sea ice concentrations when coupled to the RCO ocean-sea ice model. The spectral nudging applied to reanalysis driven simulations significantly improves the generated sea ice regarding its temporal evolution, extent and inter-annual trends, compared to simulations with standard LBC nesting. The method is furthermore evaluated with driving data from two CMIP5 GCM simulations for current and future conditions. The GCM biases are similar to the RCA4 biases with ERA-Interim, however, the spectral nudging still improves the surface winds enough to show improvements in the simulated sea ice. For both GCM downscalings, the spectrally nudged version retains a larger sea ice extent in September further into the future. Depending on the sea ice formulation in the GCM, the temporal evolution of the regional sea ice model can deviate strongly.

  6. On the effects of constraining atmospheric circulation in a coupled atmosphere-ocean Arctic regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Peter; Döscher, Ralf; Koenigk, Torben

    2016-06-01

    Impacts of spectral nudging on simulations of Arctic climate in coupled simulations have been investigated in a set of simulations with a regional climate model (RCM). The dominantly circumpolar circulation in the Arctic lead to weak constraints on the lateral boundary conditions (LBCs) for the RCM, which causes large internal variability with strong deviations from the driving model. When coupled to an ocean and sea ice model, this results in sea ice concentrations that deviate from the observed spatial distribution. Here, a method of spectral nudging is applied to the atmospheric model RCA4 in order to assess the potentials for improving results for the sea ice concentrations when coupled to the RCO ocean-sea ice model. The spectral nudging applied to reanalysis driven simulations significantly improves the generated sea ice regarding its temporal evolution, extent and inter-annual trends, compared to simulations with standard LBC nesting. The method is furthermore evaluated with driving data from two CMIP5 GCM simulations for current and future conditions. The GCM biases are similar to the RCA4 biases with ERA-Interim, however, the spectral nudging still improves the surface winds enough to show improvements in the simulated sea ice. For both GCM downscalings, the spectrally nudged version retains a larger sea ice extent in September further into the future. Depending on the sea ice formulation in the GCM, the temporal evolution of the regional sea ice model can deviate strongly.

  7. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  8. Climate change and climate systems influence and control the atmospheric dispersion of desert dust: implications for human health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.

    2010-01-01

    The global dispersion of desert dust through Earth’s atmosphere is greatly influenced by temperature. Temporal analyses of ice core data have demonstrated that enhanced dust dispersion occurs during glacial events. This is due to an increase in ice cover, which results in an increase in drier terrestrial cover. A shorter temporal analysis of dust dispersion data over the last 40 years has demonstrated an increase in dust transport. Climate systems or events such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, the Indian Ocean subtropical High, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and El Nino-Sothern Oscillation are known to influence global short-term dust dispersion occurrence and transport routes. Anthropogenic influences on dust transport include deforestation, harmful use of topsoil for agriculture as observed during the American Dust Bowl period, and the creation of dry seas (Aral Sea) and lakes (Lake Owens in California and Lake Chad in North Africa) through the diversion of source waters (for irrigation and drinking water supplies). Constituents of desert dust both from source regions (pathogenic microorganisms, organic and inorganic toxins) and those scavenged through atmospheric transport (i.e., industrial and agricultural emissions) are known to directly impact human and ecosystem health. This presentation will present a review of global scale dust storms and how these events can be both a detriment and benefit to various organisms in downwind environments.

  9. [Concentration distribution of metal elements in atmospheric aerosol under different weather conditions in Qingdao Coastal Region].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Jian-Hua; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Xiang-Yu; Shen, Heng-Qing; Liu, Ming-Xu

    2014-10-01

    To know the influence of different weather conditions on the concentration of metal elements in aerosols in the coastal region, total suspended particles (TSP) samples were collected from April to May 2012, and August 2012 to March 2013 in the Qingdao coastal region, and common trace metals were analyzed by using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results showed that Al, Ca, Fe, Na, K and Mg were the dominant metal elements in TSP, and the sum of the six elements accounted for 94.2% of the sum of all metals. TSP and metal elements had significant monthly variations, Fe, Al, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Ba, Mn, Ti, Sr and Li had the highest concentration in November and January, while Be, Sc, Co, Ni and Cr showed the highest value in January. Na had the highest concentration in August, November and February, and the lowest in December. Pb had the highest concentration in January and February, and the lowest in August and December. Enrichment factors indicated that Be, Co, Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Sr and Ti were mainly affected by natural sources; Li, Cr, Ni, Zn, Ba and Na were affected by natural sources and part of anthropogenic sources; Pb was mainly from anthropogenic sources. Different weather conditions had great impact on TSP and metal elements concentrations, all the measured metals had the highest concentrations in smog except Ti. Compared with the sunny day, the concentration of atmospheric particulate Ti decreased, while the other elements increased by 1 to 4 times in smog. Li, Be, Cr, Ni, Al, Fe, Mg and Mn had little variation in concentration in foggy day, and the concentration of Pb and Na increased considerably. The concentration of Co, Ca and Ti reduced obviously in fog. Except for Cr, Co and Ti, the other elements increased by 1 to 3 times in haze. Most of the elements had the minimal enrichment factors in sunny day, while the other had the maximal enrichment factor in

  10. Snow-atmosphere coupling in current and future climates over North America in the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefera Diro, Gulilat; Sushama, Laxmi

    2016-04-01

    The influence of snow variation on climate variability over North America is assessed using the fifth generation of Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5). For this, we first carried out a suite of CRCM5 simulations driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis, whereby the snow was either prescribed (uncoupled) or allowed to evolve interactively (coupled) during the model integration. Results indicate a systematic influence of snow on the inter-annual variability of air and surface temperature throughout winter and spring seasons. In the coupled simulations, where the snow depth and snow cover were allowed to evolve freely, the inter-annual variability of surface and near surface air temperatures were found to be larger and explains up to 70% of the surface temperature variation over northern Great Plains and Canadian Prairies. The impact of snow is found to be stronger in spring than in winter, since in spring season both albedo and hydrological effects contribute to the variability in temperature. To study projected changes to snow-atmosphere coupling in future climate, coupled and uncoupled CRCM5 simulations, driven by coupled GCMs, were performed, for current (1981-2010) and future (2071-2100) climates. Coupling regions in the GCM-driven current climate simulations are similar to those obtained with ERA-Interim driven CRCM5 simulations discussed above. In future climate, snow-temperature coupling shows some change in spatial structures and in magnitudes. These results suggest that accurate initialization of snow condition could potentially be helpful to improve seasonal prediction skill over these snow-atmosphere coupling hotspot regions.

  11. Assessment of dynamical downscaling in Japan using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairaku, K.; Pielke, R. A.; Beltran-Przekurat, A. B.; Iizuka, S.; Sasaki, W.

    2009-12-01

    The responses of the climate system to increases in carbon dioxide concentrations and to changes in land use/land cover and the subsequent impacts of climatic variability on humans and natural ecosystems are of fundamental concern. Because regional responses of surface hydrological and biogeochemical changes are particularly complex, it is necessary to add spatial resolution to accurately assess critical interactions within the regional climate system for climate change impacts assessments. We quantified the confidence and the uncertainties of Type II dynamical downscaling which the lateral and bottom boundary conditions were obtained from Japanese 25-year ReAnalysis (JRA-25) and assessed the value (skill) added by the downscaling to a climate simulation in Japan. We investigated the reproducibility of present climate using two regional climate models with 20 km horizontal grid spacing, the atmosphere-biosphere-river coupling regional climate model (NIED-RAMS) and the Meteorological Research Institute Nonhydrostatic Model (MRI-NHM), both of which used JRA-25 as boundary conditions. Two key variables for impact studies, surface air temperature and precipitation, were compared with the Japanese high-resolution surface observation, Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS) on 78 river basins. Results simulated by the two models were relatively in good agreement with the observation on the basin scale. The NIED-RAMS bias of 2 m air temperature (2mT) were less than 0.5K and the bias of precipitation (P) were around 10% in most of the river basins on annual averages for three years (2002-2004). The biases over 29 years shown in the long term experiment are similar to those of the three year simulation. The model could add some information as to where the larger scale information was obtained. A regional climate model often has sensitivity to model configurations, such as domain size and nudging scheme. We conducted sensitivity experiments to domain size

  12. Regional-scale evaluation of a land surface scheme from atmospheric boundary layer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noilhan, J.; Donier, S.; LacarrèRe, P.; Sarrat, C.; Le Moigne, P.

    2011-01-01

    The study describes an evaluation of three configurations of the Interactions Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface scheme fully coupled with the Meso-NH mesoscale atmospheric model. The ability of the modeling system to correctly reproduce the screen-level variables as well as the boundary layer characteristics is examined for more than 30 clear convective days monitored during the CERES 2005 and 2007 field campaigns. For the horizontal resolution considered (8 km), this study shows that the boundary layer characteristics and the low-level variables are better simulated when the subgrid-scale surface process variability is simulated explicitly using the so-called "tiling method." An additional improvement is brought when the CO2 diurnal cycle is used interactively because of the physical link between the stomatal conductance used both for CO2 assimilation and plant transpiration. The parameterization of this link between CO2 and evaporation fluxes improves the simulation of the Bowen ratio and therefore of the atmospheric boundary layer. The last part of the paper discusses the realism of the simulated regional field of CO2 when the carbon configuration is activated in the mesoscale model. Large regional variability of CO2 within the atmospheric boundary layer is found in response to the spatial and seasonal variability of CO2 surface fluxes with respect to the three main land covers in the area: pine forest, extensive winter (wheat), and summer (maize) crops.

  13. Vertical and horizontal structure of atmospheric waves observed with the Indonesian regional CPEA radar network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Sridharan, S.; Tsuda, T.; Vincent, R.; Kozu, T.

    Although the global structure of tides and planetary waves in the middle atmosphere including MLT Mesosphere Lower Thermosphere has extensively been studied with ground-based and satellite observations structures of atmospheric waves within thousands of km are rarely reported by observations Such structures of a regional scale should reflect locality and are expected to include information of wave sources as well as interactions with smaller scale waves We have carried out meteor MF radar observations in the MLT region at three locations Kototabang 100E 0S West Sumatra Pontianak 109E 0N West Kalimantan and Pameungpeuk 107 5E 7 5S West Jawa in Indonesia as an activity of CPEA Coupling Processes of Equatorial Atmosphere project The diurnal variaiton of wind velocities over the equator at Pontianak and Kototabang with an average amplitude of 10 - 20 m s at 86 - 90 km showed significant difference indicating strong effect of non-migrating diurnal tides The significant phase difference between the two site 9 deg distance suggesting existence of high zonal wave number 4 waves Enhancement of diurnal variation of MLT wind seems to correlate with the enhancement of diurnal oscillation in the OLR outgoing longwave radiation of the Asia-Pacific area Vertical propagation of tides and other atmospheric waves are also addressed by comparing OLR data radiosonde observations during CPEA campaigns and other observational data

  14. Regional US carbon sinks from three-dimensional atmospheric CO2 sampling

    PubMed Central

    Crevoisier, Cyril; Sweeney, Colm; Gloor, Manuel; Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Tans, Pieter P.

    2010-01-01

    Studies diverge substantially on the actual magnitude of the North American carbon budget. This is due to the lack of appropriate data and also stems from the difficulty to properly model all the details of the flux distribution and transport inside the region of interest. To sidestep these difficulties, we use here a simple budgeting approach to estimate land-atmosphere fluxes across North America by balancing the inflow and outflow of CO2 from the troposphere. We base our study on the unique sampling strategy of atmospheric CO2 vertical profiles over North America from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Earth System Research Laboratory aircraft network, from which we infer the three-dimensional CO2 distribution over the continent. We find a moderate sink of 0.5 ± 0.4 PgC y-1 for the period 2004–2006 for the coterminous United States, in good agreement with the forest-inventory-based estimate of the first North American State of the Carbon Cycle Report, and averaged climate conditions. We find that the highest uptake occurs in the Midwest and in the Southeast. This partitioning agrees with independent estimates of crop uptake in the Midwest, which proves to be a significant part of the US atmospheric sink, and of secondary forest regrowth in the Southeast. Provided that vertical profile measurements are continued, our study offers an independent means to link regional carbon uptake to climate drivers. PMID:20937899

  15. Regional US carbon sinks from three-dimensional atmospheric CO2 sampling.

    PubMed

    Crevoisier, Cyril; Sweeney, Colm; Gloor, Manuel; Sarmiento, Jorge L; Tans, Pieter P

    2010-10-26

    Studies diverge substantially on the actual magnitude of the North American carbon budget. This is due to the lack of appropriate data and also stems from the difficulty to properly model all the details of the flux distribution and transport inside the region of interest. To sidestep these difficulties, we use here a simple budgeting approach to estimate land-atmosphere fluxes across North America by balancing the inflow and outflow of CO(2) from the troposphere. We base our study on the unique sampling strategy of atmospheric CO(2) vertical profiles over North America from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Earth System Research Laboratory aircraft network, from which we infer the three-dimensional CO(2) distribution over the continent. We find a moderate sink of 0.5 ± 0.4 PgC y(-1) for the period 2004-2006 for the coterminous United States, in good agreement with the forest-inventory-based estimate of the first North American State of the Carbon Cycle Report, and averaged climate conditions. We find that the highest uptake occurs in the Midwest and in the Southeast. This partitioning agrees with independent estimates of crop uptake in the Midwest, which proves to be a significant part of the US atmospheric sink, and of secondary forest regrowth in the Southeast. Provided that vertical profile measurements are continued, our study offers an independent means to link regional carbon uptake to climate drivers. PMID:20937899

  16. Atmospheric water balance over oceanic regions as estimated from satellite, merged, and reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyo-Jin; Shin, Dong-Bin; Yoo, Jung-Moon

    2013-05-01

    The column integrated atmospheric water balance over the ocean was examined using satellite-based and merged data sets for the period from 2000 to 2005. The data sets for the components of the atmospheric water balance include evaporation from the HOAPS, GSSTF, and OAFlux and precipitation from the HOAPS, CMAP, and GPCP. The water vapor tendency was derived from water vapor data of HOAPS. The product for water vapor flux convergence estimated using satellite observation data was used. The atmospheric balance components from the MERRA reanalysis data were also examined. Residuals of the atmospheric water balance equation were estimated using nine possible combinations of the data sets over the ocean between 60°N and 60°S. The results showed that there was considerable disagreement in the residual intensities and distributions from the different combinations of the data sets. In particular, the residuals in the estimations of the satellite-based atmospheric budget appear to be large over the oceanic areas with heavy precipitation such as the intertropical convergence zone, South Pacific convergence zone, and monsoon regions. The lack of closure of the atmospheric water cycle may be attributed to the uncertainties in the data sets and approximations in the atmospheric water balance equation. Meanwhile, the anomalies of the residuals from the nine combinations of the data sets are in good agreement with their variability patterns. These results suggest that significant consideration is needed when applying the data sets of water budget components to quantitative water budget studies, while climate variability analysis based on the residuals may produce similar results.

  17. Source regions of some persistent organic pollutants measured in the atmosphere at Birkenes, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhardt, S.; Breivik, K.; Li, Y. F.; Manø, S.; Stohl, A.

    2009-09-01

    A key feature of POPs (Persistent Organic Pollutants) is their potential for long-range atmospheric transport. In order to better understand and predict atmospheric source-receptor relationships of POPs, we have modified an existing Lagrangian transport model (FLEXPART) to include some of the key processes that control the atmospheric fate of POPs. We also present four years (2004-2007) of new atmospheric measurement data for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) obtained at Birkenes, an EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) site in southern Norway. The model overestimates measured PCB-28 and γ-HCH concentrations by factors of 2 and 8, respectively, which is most likely because the emissions used as input to the model are overestimated. FLEXPART captures the temporal variability in the measurements very well and, depending on season, explains 31-67% (14-62%) of the variance of measured PCB-28 (γ-HCH) concentrations. FLEXPART, run in a time-reversed (adjoint) mode, was used to identify the source regions responsible for the POP loading at the Birkenes station. Emissions in Central Europe and Eastern Europe contributed 32% and 24%, respectively, to PCB-28 at Birkenes, while Western Europe was found to be the dominant source (50%) for γ-HCH. Intercontinental transport from North America contributed 13% γ-HCH. While FLEXPART has no treatment of the partitioning of POPs between different surface media, it was found a very useful tool for studying atmospheric source-receptor relationships for POPs and POP-like chemicals that do not sorb strongly to atmospheric particles and whose atmospheric levels are believed to be mainly controlled by primary sources.

  18. Regional Variation and Trends in IASI-Observed Atmospheric Ammonia Concentrations over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiferl, L. D.; Heald, C. L.; Van Damme, M.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying atmospheric ammonia is a critical first step in investigating its role in the formation of fine particulate matter and ecosystem change. This study uses five years (2008-2012) of a new measurement of ammonia column concentrations derived from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instrument to explore ammonia levels in several regions (e.g. the Midwest, California, the Southeast) of the United States. These satellite measurements offer extensive daily coverage, providing a constraint on the evolution and spatial variation of ammonia across the United States. We identify observed ammonia variation between the regions in terms of both intra-annual (seasonal) change and trends throughout the entire time period. These variations are related to factors controlling ammonia emissions, chemistry and deposition, such as human and animal populations, farming practices, land use change and meteorological variables. These variations can also be used to drive Earth system model simulations of ammonia's effects on air quality, radiation balance and environmental degradation.

  19. Studies of Molecular Lasers, Atmospheric Molecules and Imaging in the Millimeter/submillimeter Spectral Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crownover, Richard L.

    The millimeter/submillimeter portion of the electromagnetic spectrum is able to address fundamental questions in astronomy, cosmology, atmospheric science, molecular physics, quantum electronics, plasma physics, and other fields. Also, this spectral region has transmission characteristics which make it desirable for communications within the atmosphere and potentially for imaging. In order to demonstrate that detector technology in this region is sufficiently mature to permit the construction of reliable quasi-optical devices using off the shelf components, we have generated passive images using a broadband detector cooled to 0.35 K with a commercially produced ^3He refrigerator. We have shown the possibility of an extremely simple, highly sensitive, passive imaging system which operates in an attractive spectral region and is capable of upscaling to provide practical spatial resolution and real time operation over useful ranges. International public concern about acid rain, ozone depletion, and urban smog has spurred intense study of atmospheric chemistry. Spectra of two minor atmospheric constituents (HNO_3, ^ {16}O^{18}O) have been studied in the laboratory to assist with remote monitoring of atmospheric dynamics, modelling of atmospheric chemistry, and selection of communication frequencies which have some immunity to atmospheric perturbations. The nitric acid observations have allowed us to determine effective rotational constants for the first five vibrational states (nu_0, nu_9 , nu_7, nu _6, nu_8) and assign transitions in the perturbed nu_5 state. In addition, the concentration of ^{16}O^{18 }O in interstellar molecular clouds has been identified as a key discriminator between competing models of stellar formation; the measurements presented here will assist astronomers attempting to determine the abundance of this species in molecular clouds and proto-stars. We have recorded and analyzed the spectra of two important lasing species (^{12} CH_3F, ^{12 }CH_2

  20. Regional emission and loss budgets of atmospheric methane (2002-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, T.; Patra, P. K.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Ishijima, K.; Umezawa, T.; Ito, A.; Aoki, S.; Morimoto, S.; Kort, E. A.; Crotwell, A. M.; Ravi Kumar, K.; Nakazawa, T.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4) plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry and short-term forcing of climate. Clear understanding of atmospheric CH4's budget of emissions and losses is required to aid sustainable development of Earth's future environment. We used an atmospheric chemistry-transport model (JAMSTEC's ACTM) for simulating atmospheric CH4. An inverse modeling system has been developed for estimating CH4 emissions (7 ensemble cases) from 53 land regions for 2002-2012 using measurements at 39 sites. Global net CH4 emissions varied between 505-509 and 524-545 Tg/yr during 2002-2004 and 2010-2012, respectively (ranges based on 6 inversion cases), with a step like increase in 2007 in agreement with atmospheric measurement. The inversion system did not account for interannual variations in radicals reacting with CH4 in atmosphere. Our results suggest that the recent update of EDGAR inventory (version 4.2FT2010) overestimated global total emissions by at least 25 Tg/yr in 2010. Increase in CH4 emission since 2004 originated in the tropical and southern hemisphere regions, with timing consistent with an increase of non-dairy cattle stocks by ~10% in 2012 from 1056 million heads in 2002, leading to ~10 Tg/yr increase in emissions from enteric fermentation. All 7 inversions robustly estimated the interannual variations in emissions, but poorly constrained the seasonal cycle amplitude or phase consistently for all regions due to sparse observational network. Forward simulation results using both the a priori and a posteriori emissions are compared with independent aircraft measurements for validation. By doing that we are able to reject the upper limit (545 Tg/yr) of global total emissions as 14 Tg/yr too high during 2008-2012, which allows us to further conclude that CH4 emission increase rate over the East Asia (China mainly) region was 7-8 Tg/yr between the 2002-2006 and 2008-2012 periods, contrary to 1-17 Tg/yr in the a priori emissions.

  1. The Influence of Atmospheric Aerosols on Air Quality Status of the Egyptian Nile Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Askary, H. M.; Zakey, A.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the combination of natural and anthropogenic sources of emission over the Nile Delta region, the air quality status is very poor and has a significant health hazards impacts on the population. Here we focused on the optical and chemical characterizations of atmospheric aerosols in the Nile Delta using the online integrated Environmental-Climate Aerosols model (EnvClimA) during a 10 year period 2000-2010. Observations from MODIS and SeaWiFS measurements supplemented by CALIPSO and some ground-based data from AERONET, are used to validate the EnvClimA model and to illustrate the aerosol characteristics and their sources. CALIPSO measurements were used to characterize the vertical structure of aerosols and their shapes (spherical and non-spherical) for major dust storms and biomass burning events. In this study we discussed the synoptic patterns and features, which are associated with either the dust storm or high pollution events. We used MODIS derived aerosol parameters to study seasonal changes in aerosol parameters due to the influence of dust storms, anthropogenic pollution and biomass (crop residue) burning. MODIS derived deep blue AOD provided better representation of aerosol loading over north Africa (Sahara region) along with dark-target AOD and related parameters. AERONET data provided aerosol optical depth, angstrom, fine mode fraction, size fraction, volume, effective radius, refractive index, single scattering albedo, and radiative forcing during different seasons dominated by dust storms, anthropogenic pollution and biomass burning (black cloud phenomena). The results indicated that the observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events. Ground-based AERONET data support the "Dark Product" MODIS retrievals, as they typically show a fall peak in the 500 nm region. The number of dust distribution frequencies over Egypt has more frequency in the southeast and northwest of Egypt (5-7.5 days

  2. The Influence of Locally Increased Gravity Wave Drag on the Middle Atmosphere Circulation - A Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilienthal, Friederike; Sacha, Petr; Jacobi, Christoph; Pisoft, Petr

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves (GW) are one of the most dominant features in the middle atmosphere. They are a main contributor for energy and angular momentum transport and thus play an important role for atmospheric dynamics such as the Quasi Biennial Oscillation or the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC). GPS radio occultation measurements (e.g. Sacha et al., 2015) have shown that GW can appear in local hotspots, e.g. in the lower stratosphere of the Eastern Asia/North-western Pacific (EA/NP) region. Using these data as an input for the GW parameterization of a 3D primitive equation model for the middle and upper atmosphere (MUAM) we study the dynamical effects of such a localized breaking region. We further introduce an additional artificial GW drag in the lower stratosphere EA/NP region and show that a localized GW forcing is more efficient in creating planetary waves (PWs) than zonally uniform GW forcing. We observe PWs propagating both equatorward and poleward and upward along the edge of the polar vortex. Possible consequences for the polar vortex stability and stratosphere-troposphere exchange in the tropical region are discussed. Finally, applying 3D wave activity flux and 3D residual circulation diagnostics, we investigated the possible role of this area in the longitudinal variability of the BDC with a hypothesis of its enhanced downwelling branch in this region.

  3. Influence of ocean surface conditions on atmospheric vertical thermodynamic structure and deep convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Rong; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Rossow, William B.

    1994-01-01

    The authors analyze the influence of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and surface wind divergence on atmospheric thermodynamic structure and the resulting effects on the occurrence of deep convection using National Meteorological Center radiosonde data and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program data for July 1983-July 1985. The onset of deep convection requires not only the existence of positive convective available potential energy (CAPE), but also an unstable planetary boundary layer (PBL). A stable PBL is observed to suppress deep convection even when CAPE is positive. Variations of SST have a major effect on CAPE, but surface wind divergence can also affect deep convection by changing the lapse rate in the lower troposphere and humidity in the PBL. Specifically, when SST is greater than or equal to 28 C, CAPE is always positive, and surface wind divergence does not qualitatively change the buoyancy profile above the PBL. Strong surface wind divergence, however, stabilizes the PBL so as to suppress the initiation of deep convection. In warm SST regions, CAPE is greater than 0 regardless of assumptions about condensate loading, although the pseudoadiabatic limit is more consistent with the observed deep convection than the reversible moist-adiabatic limit under these circumstances. When SST is less than 27 C, CAPE is usually negative and inhibits convection, but strong surface wind convergence can destabilize the inversion layer and moisten the PBL enough to make the atmosphere neutrally stable in the mean. As a result, deep convection is generally enhanced either when SST is greater than or equal to 28 C in the absence of strong surface wind divergence or when strong surface wind convergence occurs even if SST is less than 27 C. The anomalous suppression of deep convection in the warm area of the equatorial west Pacific lying between the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and south Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ) is probably caused by dryness in the

  4. Influence of Subtropical Region Strawberry Cultivars on Jelly Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Curi, Paula Nogueira; de Sousa Tavares, Bruna; de Almeida, Aline Botelho; Pio, Rafael; Peche, Pedro Maranha; de Souza, Vanessa Rios

    2016-06-01

    At the end of the production period of strawberries grown in subtropical regions, postharvest durability is severely diminished due to rising temperatures which compromises the commercialization of fresh fruit. An ideal option would be to process strawberries in the form of preserves, jams, and jellies. Along this line it becomes extremely important to conduct a survey of which cultivars grown in subtropical regions are more suitable for processing in the form of jelly, as well as to understand what the consumer profile is for this product. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of different strawberry cultivars grown in subtropical regions of Brazil (Camarosa, Festival, San Andreas, Oso Grande, Camino Real, and Albion) on the physicochemical characteristics, rheological properties and sensory acceptance of the resulting jelly in order to identify cultivars with the greatest potential for industrial use. The strawberry cultivars presented different physicochemical characteristics which resulted in jellies with different physicochemical and rheological characteristics. In this study, however, we verified that all cultivars have potential to be processed in the form of jelly due to good acceptance of all formulations prepared. In general consumers prefer a lighter-colored strawberry jelly, with a less intense red color, more acidic, and less consistent/firm. PMID:27115540

  5. Evaluating Observation Influence on Regional Water Budgets in Reanalyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Mocko, David; Robertson, Franklin R.; daSilva, Arlindo M.

    2014-01-01

    The assimilation of observations in reanalyses incurs the potential for the physical terms of budgets to be balanced by a term relating the fit of the observations relative to a forecast first guess analysis. This may indicate a limitation in the physical processes of the background model, or perhaps inconsistencies in the observing system and its assimilation. In the MERRA reanalysis, an area of long term moisture flux divergence over land has been identified over the Central United States. Here, we evaluate the water vapor budget in this region, taking advantage of two unique features of the MERRA diagnostic output; 1) a closed water budget that includes the analysis increment and 2) a gridded diagnostic output data set of the assimilated observations and their innovations (e.g. forecast departures). In the Central United States, an anomaly occurs where the analysis adds water to the region, while precipitation decreases and moisture flux divergence increases. This is related more to a change in the observing system than to a deficiency in the model physical processes. MERRAs Gridded Innovations and Observations (GIO) data narrow the observations that influence this feature to the ATOVS and Aqua satellites during the 06Z and 18Z analysis cycles. Observing system experiments further narrow the instruments that affect the anomalous feature to AMSUA (mainly window channels) and AIRS. This effort also shows the complexities of the observing system, and the reactions of the regional water budgets in reanalyses to the assimilated observations.

  6. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on detecting performance of all-day star sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yue; Wang, Hu; Shen, Yang; Xue, Yaoke; Liu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    All-day star sensor makes it possible to observe stars in all-day time in the atmosphere. But the detecting performance is influenced by atmospheric turbulence. According to the characteristic of turbulence in long-exposure model, the modulation transfer function, point spread function and encircled power of the imaging system have been analyzed. Combined with typical star sensor optical system, the signal to noise ratio and the detectable stellar magnitude limit affected by turbulence have been calculated. The result shows the ratio of aperture diameter to atmospheric coherence length is main basis for the evaluation of the impact of turbulence. In condition of medium turbulence in day time, signal to noise ratio of the star sensor with diameter 120mm will drop about 4dB at most in typical work environment, and the detectable stellar limit will drop 1 magnitude.

  7. Influence of Atmospheric Processes on the Solubility and Composition of Iron in Saharan Dust.

    PubMed

    Longo, Amelia F; Feng, Yan; Lai, Barry; Landing, William M; Shelley, Rachel U; Nenes, Athanasios; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Violaki, Kalliopi; Ingall, Ellery D

    2016-07-01

    Aerosol iron was examined in Saharan dust plumes using a combination of iron near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and wet-chemical techniques. Aerosol samples were collected at three sites located in the Mediterranean, the Atlantic, and Bermuda to characterize iron at different atmospheric transport lengths and time scales. Iron(III) oxides were a component of aerosols at all sampling sites and dominated the aerosol iron in Mediterranean samples. In Atlantic samples, iron(II and III) sulfate, iron(III) phosphate, and iron(II) silicates were also contributors to aerosol composition. With increased atmospheric transport time, iron(II) sulfates are found to become more abundant, aerosol iron oxidation state became more reduced, and aerosol acidity increased. Atmospheric processing including acidic reactions and photoreduction likely influence the form of iron minerals and oxidation state in Saharan dust aerosols and contribute to increases in aerosol-iron solubility. PMID:27286140

  8. On the simulation of allergenic pollen exposition and its atmospheric transport on regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernath, Christian; Klein, Christian; Hoffmann, Peter; Gayler, Sebastian; Priesack, Eckart

    2013-04-01

    In Germany approximately 30% of the population is vulnerable to pollinosis (hay fever). Exposure to allergenic pollen affects vulnerable persons recurring seasonally, but depending on the individual susceptibility to individual pollen species. To prevent the suffering the patients usually use preventive drugs and rely on the current pollen forecast. However, recently used pollen forecast models mainly consider temperature sums to predict pollen exposition by different plant species. The models often fail to describe the impact of regionally variable environmental conditions on plant growth which depends on the soil characteristics that affect the water and nutrient availability. Furthermore, water and nutrient availability may significantly affect the pollen yield and its allergenic potential. Thus, the improvement of the simulations of the exposition of allergenic pollen by plants and atmospheric pollen loads on the regional scale could improve the preventive medication of vulnerable persons. We propose a new soil-plant-atmosphere model system that allows a dynamic ressource aquisition for the plant biomass growth to account for the allergenic potential of exposed pollen and the subsequent pollen transport in the atmosphere. Therefore, to simulate pollen exposure the land surface model Expert-N (soil-plant-system model) was coupled to the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF). Expert-N uses site specific physical soil properties to simulate the nutrient and water transport, and the carbon and nitrogen turnover, as well as the interactions between plant and soil. The allergenic potential of pollen yield is simulated using a new C- and N-allocation model which accounts for the production of carbon-based secondary compounds (CBSCs). These CBSCs are involved in the determination of the allergenic potential of pollen. The WRF model is used to predict the weather conditions for plant growth. Depending on the weather conditions pollen exposed by the plants is then

  9. Influence of 21st century atmospheric and sea surface temperature forcing on West African climate

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Chris B; Ashfaq, Moetasim; Diffenbaugh, Noah

    2011-01-01

    he persistence of extended drought events throughout West Africa during the 20th century has motivated a substantial effort to understand the mechanisms driving African climate variability, as well as the possible response to elevated greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. We use an ensemble of global climate model experiments to examine the relative roles of future direct atmospheric radiative forcing and SST forcing in shaping potential future changes in boreal summer precipitation over West Africa. We find that projected increases in precipitation throughout the Western Sahel result primarily from direct atmospheric radiative forcing. The changes in atmospheric forcing generate a slight northward displacement and weakening of the African easterly jet (AEJ), a strengthening of westward monsoon flow onto West Africa and an intensification of the tropical easterly jet (TEJ). Alternatively, we find that the projected decreases in precipitation over much of the Guinea Coast region are caused by SST changes that are induced by the atmospheric radiative forcing. The changes in SSTs generate a weakening of the monsoon westerlies and the TEJ, as well as a decrease in low-level convergence and resultant rising air throughout the mid levels of the troposphere. Our experiments suggest a potential shift in the regional moisture balance of West Africa should global radiative forcing continue to increase, highlighting the importance of climate system feedbacks in shaping the response of regional-scale climate to global-scale changes in radiative forcing.

  10. The influence of several changes in atmospheric states over semi-arid areas on the incidence of mental health disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yackerson, Naomy S.; Zilberman, Arkadi; Todder, Doron; Kaplan, Zeev

    2011-05-01

    The incidence of suicide attempts [Deliberate Self Harm (DSH); ICD-10: X60-X84] and psychotic attacks (PsA; ICD-10, F20-F29) in association with atmospheric states, typical for areas close to big deserts, was analyzed. A retrospective study is based on the 4,325 cases of DSH and PsA registered in the Mental Health Center (MHC) of Ben-Gurion University (Be'er-Sheva, Israel) during 2001-2003. Pearson and Spearman test correlations were used; the statistical significance was tested at p < 0.1. The influence of temperature and humidity on suicide attempts ( N SU ) and psychotic attacks ( N PS ) was weakly pronounced ( p > 0.1). Correlation coefficients between N SU and N PS and speed WS of westerly wind reaches 0.3 ( p < 0.05), while their dependence on easterly WS was weaker ( p > 0.09). Variations in easterly wind direction WD influence N SU and N PS values ( p < 0.04), but no corresponding correlation with westerly winds was found ( p > 0.3). Obviously ,in transition areas located between different regions ,the main role of air streams in meteorological-biological impact can scarcely be exaggerated. An unstable balance in the internal state of a weather-sensitive person is disturbed when the atmospheric state is changed by specific desert winds, which can provoke significant perturbations in meteorological parameters. Results indicate the importance of wind direction, defining mainly the atmospheric situation in semi-arid areas: changes in direction of the easterly wind influence N SU and N PS , while changes in WS are important for mental health under westerly air streams. Obviously, N SU and N PS are more affected by the disturbance of weather from its normal state, for a given season, to which the local population is accustomed, than by absolute values of meteorological parameters.