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Sample records for influenza survival transmission

  1. Transmission of Flu (Influenza)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Flu (Influenza) Transmission How Flu Spreads Coughing and Sneezing People with flu can ... not be shared without washing thoroughly first. The Flu Is Contagious You may be able to pass ...

  2. Household Transmission of Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Tim K; Lau, Lincoln L H; Cauchemez, Simon; Cowling, Benjamin J

    2016-02-01

    Human influenza viruses cause regular epidemics and occasional pandemics with a substantial public health burden. Household transmission studies have provided valuable information on the dynamics of influenza transmission. We reviewed published studies and found that once one household member is infected with influenza, the risk of infection in a household contact can be up to 38%, and the delay between onset in index and secondary cases is around 3 days. Younger age was associated with higher susceptibility. In the future, household transmission studies will provide information on transmission dynamics, including the correlation of virus shedding and symptoms with transmission, and the correlation of new measures of immunity with protection against infection. PMID:26612500

  3. Transmission of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-05-01

    Influenza A viruses cause respiratory infections that range from asymptomatic to deadly in humans. Widespread outbreaks (pandemics) are attributable to 'novel' viruses that possess a viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene to which humans lack immunity. After a pandemic, these novel viruses form stable virus lineages in humans and circulate until they are replaced by other novel viruses. The factors and mechanisms that facilitate virus transmission among hosts and the establishment of novel lineages are not completely understood, but the HA and basic polymerase 2 (PB2) proteins are thought to play essential roles in these processes by enabling avian influenza viruses to infect mammals and replicate efficiently in their new host. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the contributions of HA, PB2, and other viral components to virus transmission and the formation of new virus lineages. PMID:25812763

  4. Transmission of Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause respiratory infections that range from asymptomatic to deadly in humans. Widespread outbreaks (pandemics) are attributable to ‘novel’ viruses that possess a viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene to which humans lack immunity. After a pandemic, these novel viruses form stable virus lineages in humans and circulate until they are replaced by other novel viruses. The factors and mechanisms that facilitate virus transmission among hosts and the establishment of novel lineages are not completely understood, but the HA and basic polymerase 2 (PB2) proteins are thought to play essential roles in these processes by enabling avian influenza viruses to infect mammals and replicate efficiently in their new host. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the contributions of HA, PB2, and other viral components to virus transmission and the formation of new virus lineages. PMID:25812763

  5. Biology and transmission of avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural host and reservoir for avian influenza is in wild birds where the viral infection is typically asymptomatic. The virus primarily replicates in the enteric tract and transmission is thought to be primarily by fecal-oral transmission. Avian influenza can infect a broad host range, but fo...

  6. Avian influenza biology and disease transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural host and reservoir for avian influenza is in wild birds where the viral infection is typically asymptomatic. The virus primarily replicates in the enteric tract and transmission is thought to be primarily by fecal oral transmission. Avian influenza can infect a broad host range, but fo...

  7. The Global Transmission and Control of Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Matrajt, Laura; Halloran, M. Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M.

    2011-01-01

    New strains of influenza spread around the globe via the movement of infected individuals. The global dynamics of influenza are complicated by different patterns of influenza seasonality in different regions of the world. We have released an open-source stochastic mathematical model of the spread of influenza across 321 major, strategically located cities of the world. Influenza is transmitted between cities via infected airline passengers. Seasonality is simulated by increasing the transmissibility in each city at the times of the year when influenza has been observed to be most prevalent. The spatiotemporal spread of pandemic influenza can be understood through clusters of global transmission and links between them, which we identify using the epidemic percolation network (EPN) of the model. We use the model to explain the observed global pattern of spread for pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009–2010 (pandemic H1N1 2009) and to examine possible global patterns of spread for future pandemics depending on the origin of pandemic spread, time of year of emergence, and basic reproductive number (). We also use the model to investigate the effectiveness of a plausible global distribution of vaccine for various pandemic scenarios. For pandemic H1N1 2009, we show that the biggest impact of vaccination was in the temperate northern hemisphere. For pandemics starting in the temperate northern hemisphere in May or April, vaccination would have little effect in the temperate southern hemisphere and a small effect in the tropics. With the increasing interconnectedness of the world's population, we must take a global view of infectious disease transmission. Our open-source, computationally simple model can help public health officials plan for the next pandemic as well as deal with interpandemic influenza. PMID:21573121

  8. The global transmission and control of influenza.

    PubMed

    Kenah, Eben; Chao, Dennis L; Matrajt, Laura; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M

    2011-01-01

    New strains of influenza spread around the globe via the movement of infected individuals. The global dynamics of influenza are complicated by different patterns of influenza seasonality in different regions of the world. We have released an open-source stochastic mathematical model of the spread of influenza across 321 major, strategically located cities of the world. Influenza is transmitted between cities via infected airline passengers. Seasonality is simulated by increasing the transmissibility in each city at the times of the year when influenza has been observed to be most prevalent. The spatiotemporal spread of pandemic influenza can be understood through clusters of global transmission and links between them, which we identify using the epidemic percolation network (EPN) of the model. We use the model to explain the observed global pattern of spread for pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009-2010 (pandemic H1N1 2009) and to examine possible global patterns of spread for future pandemics depending on the origin of pandemic spread, time of year of emergence, and basic reproductive number (). We also use the model to investigate the effectiveness of a plausible global distribution of vaccine for various pandemic scenarios. For pandemic H1N1 2009, we show that the biggest impact of vaccination was in the temperate northern hemisphere. For pandemics starting in the temperate northern hemisphere in May or April, vaccination would have little effect in the temperate southern hemisphere and a small effect in the tropics. With the increasing interconnectedness of the world's population, we must take a global view of infectious disease transmission. Our open-source, computationally simple model can help public health officials plan for the next pandemic as well as deal with interpandemic influenza. PMID:21573121

  9. Review Article: Influenza Transmission on Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Adlhoch, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Air travel is associated with the spread of influenza through infected passengers and potentially through in-flight transmission. Contact tracing after exposure to influenza is not performed systematically. We performed a systematic literature review to evaluate the evidence for influenza transmission aboard aircraft. Methods: Using PubMed and EMBASE databases, we identified and critically appraised identified records to assess the evidence of such transmission to passengers seated in close proximity to the index cases. We also developed a bias assessment tool to evaluate the quality of evidence provided in the retrieved studies. Results: We identified 14 peer-reviewed publications describing contact tracing of passengers after possible exposure to influenza virus aboard an aircraft. Contact tracing during the initial phase of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic was described in 11 publications. The studies describe the follow-up of 2,165 (51%) of 4,252 traceable passengers. Altogether, 163 secondary cases were identified resulting in an overall secondary attack rate among traced passengers of 7.5%. Of these secondary cases, 68 (42%) were seated within two rows of the index case. Conclusion: We found an overall moderate quality of evidence for transmission of influenza virus aboard an aircraft. The major limiting factor was the comparability of the studies. A majority of secondary cases was identified at a greater distance than two rows from the index case. A standardized approach for initiating, conducting, and reporting contact tracing could help to increase the evidence base for better assessing influenza transmission aboard aircraft. PMID:27253070

  10. Model Analysis of Fomite Mediated Influenza Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jijun; Eisenberg, Joseph E.; Spicknall, Ian H.; Li, Sheng; Koopman, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Fomites involved in influenza transmission are either hand- or droplet-contaminated. We evaluated the interactions of fomite characteristics and human behaviors affecting these routes using an Environmental Infection Transmission System (EITS) model by comparing the basic reproduction numbers (R0) for different fomite mediated transmission pathways. Fomites classified as large versus small surface sizes (reflecting high versus low droplet contamination levels) and high versus low touching frequency have important differences. For example, 1) the highly touched large surface fomite (public tables) has the highest transmission potential and generally strongest control measure effects; 2) transmission from droplet-contaminated routes exceed those from hand-contaminated routes except for highly touched small surface fomites such as door knob handles; and 3) covering a cough using the upper arm or using tissues effectively removes virus from the system and thus decreases total fomite transmission. Because covering a cough by hands diverts pathogens from the droplet-fomite route to the hand-fomite route, this has the potential to increase total fomite transmission for highly touched small surface fomites. An improved understanding and more refined data related to fomite mediated transmission routes will help inform intervention strategies for influenza and other pathogens that are mediated through the environment. PMID:23300585

  11. Quantifying the transmission potential of pandemic influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowell, Gerardo; Nishiura, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    This article reviews quantitative methods to estimate the basic reproduction number of pandemic influenza, a key threshold quantity to help determine the intensity of interventions required to control the disease. Although it is difficult to assess the transmission potential of a probable future pandemic, historical epidemiologic data is readily available from previous pandemics, and as a reference quantity for future pandemic planning, mathematical and statistical analyses of historical data are crucial. In particular, because many historical records tend to document only the temporal distribution of cases or deaths (i.e. epidemic curve), our review focuses on methods to maximize the utility of time-evolution data and to clarify the detailed mechanisms of the spread of influenza. First, we highlight structured epidemic models and their parameter estimation method which can quantify the detailed disease dynamics including those we cannot observe directly. Duration-structured epidemic systems are subsequently presented, offering firm understanding of the definition of the basic and effective reproduction numbers. When the initial growth phase of an epidemic is investigated, the distribution of the generation time is key statistical information to appropriately estimate the transmission potential using the intrinsic growth rate. Applications of stochastic processes are also highlighted to estimate the transmission potential using similar data. Critically important characteristics of influenza data are subsequently summarized, followed by our conclusions to suggest potential future methodological improvements.

  12. Replication and transmission of influenza viruses in Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Natalia V.; Ozaki, Hiroishi; Kida, Hiroshi; Webster, Robert G.; Perez, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Quail have emerged as a potential intermediate host in the spread of avian influenza A viruses in poultry in Hong Kong. To better understand this possible role, we tested the replication and transmission in quail of influenza A viruses of all 15 HA subtypes. Quail supported the replication of at least 14 subtypes. Influenza A viruses replicated predominantly in the respiratory tract. Transmission experiments suggested that perpetuation of avian influenza viruses in quail requires adaptation. Swine influenza viruses were isolated from the respiratory tract of quail at low levels. There was no evidence of human influenza A or B virus replication. Interestingly, a human–avian recombinant containing the surface glycoprotein genes of a quail virus and the internal genes of a human virus replicated and transmitted readily in quail; therefore, quail could function as amplifiers of influenza virus reassortants that have the potential to infect humans and/or other mammalian species. PMID:12788625

  13. Aerosol transmission of influenza A virus: a review of new studies

    PubMed Central

    Tellier, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Over the past few years, prompted by pandemic preparedness initiatives, the debate over the modes of transmission of influenza has been rekindled and several reviews have appeared. Arguments supporting an important role for aerosol transmission that were reviewed included prolonged survival of the virus in aerosol suspensions, demonstration of the low infectious dose required for aerosol transmission in human volunteers, and clinical and epidemiological observations were disentanglements of large droplets and aerosol transmission was possible. Since these reviews were published, several new studies have been done and generated new data. These include direct demonstration of the presence of influenza viruses in aerosolized droplets from the tidal breathing of infected persons and in the air of an emergency department; the establishment of the guinea pig model for influenza transmission, where it was shown that aerosol transmission is important and probably modulated by temperature and humidity; the demonstration of some genetic determinants of airborne transmission of influenza viruses as assessed using the ferret model; and mathematical modelling studies that strongly support the aerosol route. These recent results and their implication for infection control of influenza are discussed in this review. PMID:19773292

  14. Transmission of Influenza B Viruses in the Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Pica, Natalie; Chou, Yi-Ying; Bouvier, Nicole M.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemic influenza is typically caused by infection with viruses of the A and B types and can result in substantial morbidity and mortality during a given season. Here we demonstrate that influenza B viruses can replicate in the upper respiratory tract of the guinea pig and that viruses of the two main lineages can be transmitted with 100% efficiency between inoculated and naïve animals in both contact and noncontact models. Our results also indicate that, like in the case for influenza A virus, transmission of influenza B viruses is enhanced at colder temperatures, providing an explanation for the seasonality of influenza epidemics in temperate climates. We therefore present, for the first time, a small animal model with which to study the underlying mechanisms of influenza B virus transmission. PMID:22301149

  15. Avian Influenza spread and transmission dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bourouiba, Lydia; Gourley, Stephen A.; Liu, Rongsong; Takekawa, John Y.; Wu, Jianhong

    2015-01-01

    The spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of type A of subtype H5N1 has been a serious threat to global public health. Understanding the roles of various (migratory, wild, poultry) bird species in the transmission of these viruses is critical for designing and implementing effective control and intervention measures. Developing appropriate models and mathematical techniques to understand these roles and to evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation strategies have been a challenge. Recent development of the global health surveillance (especially satellite tracking and GIS techniques) and the mathematical theory of dynamical systems combined have gradually shown the promise of some cutting-edge methodologies and techniques in mathematical biology to meet this challenge.

  16. Estimating parameter of influenza transmission using regularized least square

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuraini, N.; Syukriah, Y.; Indratno, S. W.

    2014-02-01

    Transmission process of influenza can be presented in a mathematical model as a non-linear differential equations system. In this model the transmission of influenza is determined by the parameter of contact rate of the infected host and susceptible host. This parameter will be estimated using a regularized least square method where the Finite Element Method and Euler Method are used for approximating the solution of the SIR differential equation. The new infected data of influenza from CDC is used to see the effectiveness of the method. The estimated parameter represents the contact rate proportion of transmission probability in a day which can influence the number of infected people by the influenza. Relation between the estimated parameter and the number of infected people by the influenza is measured by coefficient of correlation. The numerical results show positive correlation between the estimated parameters and the infected people.

  17. The Influence of Meteorology on the Spread of Influenza: Survival Analysis of an Equine Influenza (A/H3N8) Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Firestone, Simon M.; Cogger, Naomi; Ward, Michael P.; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L. M. L.; Moloney, Barbara J.; Dhand, Navneet K.

    2012-01-01

    The influences of relative humidity and ambient temperature on the transmission of influenza A viruses have recently been established under controlled laboratory conditions. The interplay of meteorological factors during an actual influenza epidemic is less clear, and research into the contribution of wind to epidemic spread is scarce. By applying geostatistics and survival analysis to data from a large outbreak of equine influenza (A/H3N8), we quantified the association between hazard of infection and air temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, and wind velocity, whilst controlling for premises-level covariates. The pattern of disease spread in space and time was described using extraction mapping and instantaneous hazard curves. Meteorological conditions at each premises location were estimated by kriging daily meteorological data and analysed as time-lagged time-varying predictors using generalised Cox regression. Meteorological covariates time-lagged by three days were strongly associated with hazard of influenza infection, corresponding closely with the incubation period of equine influenza. Hazard of equine influenza infection was higher when relative humidity was <60% and lowest on days when daily maximum air temperature was 20–25°C. Wind speeds >30 km hour−1 from the direction of nearby infected premises were associated with increased hazard of infection. Through combining detailed influenza outbreak and meteorological data, we provide empirical evidence for the underlying environmental mechanisms that influenced the local spread of an outbreak of influenza A. Our analysis supports, and extends, the findings of studies into influenza A transmission conducted under laboratory conditions. The relationships described are of direct importance for managing disease risk during influenza outbreaks in horses, and more generally, advance our understanding of the transmission of influenza A viruses under field conditions. PMID:22536366

  18. Influenza Transmission in Households During the 1918 Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Christophe; Cummings, Derek A. T.; Klinkenberg, Don; Burke, Donald S.; Ferguson, Neil M.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of historical data has strongly shaped our understanding of the epidemiology of pandemic influenza and informs analysis of current and future epidemics. Here, the authors analyzed previously unpublished documents from a large household survey of the “Spanish” H1N1 influenza pandemic, conducted in 1918, for the first time quantifying influenza transmissibility at the person-to-person level during that most lethal of pandemics. The authors estimated a low probability of person-to-person transmission relative to comparable estimates from seasonal influenza and other directly transmitted infections but similar to recent estimates from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. The authors estimated a very low probability of asymptomatic infection, a previously unknown parameter for this pandemic, consistent with an unusually virulent virus. The authors estimated a high frequency of prior immunity that they attributed to a largely unreported influenza epidemic in the spring of 1918 (or perhaps to cross-reactive immunity). Extrapolating from this finding, the authors hypothesize that prior immunity partially protected some populations from the worst of the fall pandemic and helps explain differences in attack rates between populations. Together, these analyses demonstrate that the 1918 influenza virus, though highly virulent, was only moderately transmissible and thus in a modern context would be considered controllable. PMID:21749971

  19. The Role of Environmental Transmission in Recurrent Avian Influenza Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Breban, Romulus; Drake, John M.; Stallknecht, David E.; Rohani, Pejman

    2009-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) persists in North American wild waterfowl, exhibiting major outbreaks every 2–4 years. Attempts to explain the patterns of periodicity and persistence using simple direct transmission models are unsuccessful. Motivated by empirical evidence, we examine the contribution of an overlooked AIV transmission mode: environmental transmission. It is known that infectious birds shed large concentrations of virions in the environment, where virions may persist for a long time. We thus propose that, in addition to direct fecal/oral transmission, birds may become infected by ingesting virions that have long persisted in the environment. We design a new host–pathogen model that combines within-season transmission dynamics, between-season migration and reproduction, and environmental variation. Analysis of the model yields three major results. First, environmental transmission provides a persistence mechanism within small communities where epidemics cannot be sustained by direct transmission only (i.e., communities smaller than the critical community size). Second, environmental transmission offers a parsimonious explanation of the 2–4 year periodicity of avian influenza epidemics. Third, very low levels of environmental transmission (i.e., few cases per year) are sufficient for avian influenza to persist in populations where it would otherwise vanish. PMID:19360126

  20. Animal models for influenza virus transmission studies: A historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models are used to simulate, under experimental conditions, the complex interactions among host, virus, and environment that affect the person-to-person spread of influenza viruses. The three species that have been most frequently employed, both past and present, as influenza virus transmission models -- ferrets, mice, and guinea pigs -- have each provided unique insights into the factors governing the efficiency with which these viruses pass from an infected host to a susceptible one. This review will highlight a few of these noteworthy discoveries, with a particular focus on the historical contexts in which each model was developed and the advantages and disadvantages of each species with regard to the study of influenza virus transmission among mammals. PMID:26126082

  1. A Novel Nonhuman Primate Model for Influenza Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Dinis, Jorge M.; Weinfurter, Jason T.; Mortimer, Tatum D.; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Brunner, Kevin; Capuano, Saverio V.; Boettcher, Carissa; Post, Jennifer; Johnson, Michael; Bloom, Chalise E.; Weiler, Andrea M.; Friedrich, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of influenza transmission are necessary to predict the pandemic potential of emerging influenza viruses. Currently, both ferrets and guinea pigs are used in such studies, but these species are distantly related to humans. Nonhuman primates (NHP) share a close phylogenetic relationship with humans and may provide an enhanced means to model the virological and immunological events in influenza virus transmission. Here, for the first time, it was demonstrated that a human influenza virus isolate can productively infect and be transmitted between common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a New World monkey species. We inoculated four marmosets with the 2009 pandemic virus A/California/07/2009 (H1N1pdm) and housed each together with a naïve cage mate. We collected bronchoalveolar lavage and nasal wash samples from all animals at regular intervals for three weeks post-inoculation to track virus replication and sequence evolution. The unadapted 2009 H1N1pdm virus replicated to high titers in all four index animals by 1 day post-infection. Infected animals seroconverted and presented human-like symptoms including sneezing, nasal discharge, labored breathing, and lung damage. Transmission occurred in one cohabitating pair. Deep sequencing detected relatively few genetic changes in H1N1pdm viruses replicating in any infected animal. Together our data suggest that human H1N1pdm viruses require little adaptation to replicate and cause disease in marmosets, and that these viruses can be transmitted between animals. Marmosets may therefore be a viable model for studying influenza virus transmission. PMID:24244352

  2. Complexities in Ferret Influenza Virus Pathogenesis and Transmission Models.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Eckert, Alissa M; Tumpey, Terrence M; Maines, Taronna R

    2016-09-01

    Ferrets are widely employed to study the pathogenicity, transmissibility, and tropism of influenza viruses. However, inherent variations in inoculation methods, sampling schemes, and experimental designs are often overlooked when contextualizing or aggregating data between laboratories, leading to potential confusion or misinterpretation of results. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of parameters to consider when planning an experiment using ferrets, collecting data from the experiment, and placing results in context with previously performed studies. This review offers information that is of particular importance for researchers in the field who rely on ferret data but do not perform the experiments themselves. Furthermore, this review highlights the breadth of experimental designs and techniques currently available to study influenza viruses in this model, underscoring the wide heterogeneity of protocols currently used for ferret studies while demonstrating the wealth of information which can benefit risk assessments of emerging influenza viruses. PMID:27412880

  3. What Transmission Precautions Best Control Influenza Spread in a Hospital?

    PubMed

    Blanco, Natalia; Eisenberg, Marisa C; Stillwell, Terri; Foxman, Betsy

    2016-06-01

    Influenza is a significant problem within hospitals, leading to extended hospital stays, excess morbidity and mortality, and economic loss. Prevention and control strategies are generally "bundled"; therefore, the individual effects of particular strategies and the value of combined strategies cannot be determined directly, making it difficult to discern the optimal strategy. To quantify the individual and joint effectiveness of several known influenza infection control measures used in general hospitals, we simulated influenza transmission at a hypothetical hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan, during a 1-year seasonal epidemic (June 2012-June 2013), using a susceptible-exposed-infected-recovered (SEIR) compartmental model. The hospital population comprised patients and health-care workers, interacting with its larger community population. Parameter ranges and values were determined from the literature (both national and local to Ann Arbor) and took into account coverage levels and effects of vaccination. The most effective individual strategies, based on percent reduction of cases, were: hand-washing (11%-27%), health-care worker vaccination (6%-19%), prevaccination of patients (4%-17%), patient isolation (5%-16%), antiviral treatment (4%-14%), and use of face masks (3%-10%). Use of all strategies together with ideal levels of compliance could potentially halve the number of observed hospital cases of influenza; under a more realistic scenario, an almost 40% reduction could be achieved. A multifaceted approach is imperative to control and prevent nosocomial influenza in health-care settings. PMID:27188950

  4. Contrasting the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of influenza spatial transmission

    PubMed Central

    Viboud, Cécile; Nelson, Martha I.; Tan, Yi; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, rapid increases in the availability of high-resolution molecular and epidemiological data, combined with developments in statistical and computational methods to simulate and infer migration patterns, have provided key insights into the spatial dynamics of influenza A viruses in humans. In this review, we contrast findings from epidemiological and molecular studies of influenza virus transmission at different spatial scales. We show that findings are broadly consistent in large-scale studies of inter-regional or inter-hemispheric spread in temperate regions, revealing intense epidemics associated with multiple viral introductions, followed by deep troughs driven by seasonal bottlenecks. However, aspects of the global transmission dynamics of influenza viruses are still debated, especially with respect to the existence of tropical source populations experiencing high levels of genetic diversity and the extent of prolonged viral persistence between epidemics. At the scale of a country or community, epidemiological studies have revealed spatially structured diffusion patterns in seasonal and pandemic outbreaks, which were not identified in molecular studies. We discuss the role of sampling issues in generating these conflicting results, and suggest strategies for future research that may help to fully integrate the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of influenza virus over space and time. PMID:23382422

  5. SURVIVAL AND TRANSMISSION OF PATHOGENS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To provide and apply scientific knowledge regarding the survival and transmission of pathogens in the clinical setting to their potential survival and transmission in the natural environment. Similar to the hospital environment where pathogens reside in organic debris treated wi...

  6. Spatial Transmission of 2009 Pandemic Influenza in the US

    PubMed Central

    Gog, Julia R.; Ballesteros, Sébastien; Viboud, Cécile; Simonsen, Lone; Bjornstad, Ottar N.; Shaman, Jeffrey; Chao, Dennis L.; Khan, Farid; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2014-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic provides a unique opportunity for detailed examination of the spatial dynamics of an emerging pathogen. In the US, the pandemic was characterized by substantial geographical heterogeneity: the 2009 spring wave was limited mainly to northeastern cities while the larger fall wave affected the whole country. Here we use finely resolved spatial and temporal influenza disease data based on electronic medical claims to explore the spread of the fall pandemic wave across 271 US cities and associated suburban areas. We document a clear spatial pattern in the timing of onset of the fall wave, starting in southeastern cities and spreading outwards over a period of three months. We use mechanistic models to tease apart the external factors associated with the timing of the fall wave arrival: differential seeding events linked to demographic factors, school opening dates, absolute humidity, prior immunity from the spring wave, spatial diffusion, and their interactions. Although the onset of the fall wave was correlated with school openings as previously reported, models including spatial spread alone resulted in better fit. The best model had a combination of the two. Absolute humidity or prior exposure during the spring wave did not improve the fit and population size only played a weak role. In conclusion, the protracted spread of pandemic influenza in fall 2009 in the US was dominated by short-distance spatial spread partially catalysed by school openings rather than long-distance transmission events. This is in contrast to the rapid hierarchical transmission patterns previously described for seasonal influenza. The findings underline the critical role that school-age children play in facilitating the geographic spread of pandemic influenza and highlight the need for further information on the movement and mixing patterns of this age group. PMID:24921923

  7. Quantifying influenza virus diversity and transmission in humans

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Leo L.M.; Song, Timothy; Rosenfeld, Roni; Lin, Xudong; Rogers, Matthew B.; Zhou, Bin; Sebra, Robert; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Guan, Yi; Twaddle, Alan; DePasse, Jay V.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Wentworth, David E.; Holmes, Edward C.; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Peiris, Joseph S.M.; Cowling, Benjamin J.; Ghedin, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is characterized by high genetic diversity.1–3 However, most of what we know about influenza evolution has come from consensus sequences sampled at the epidemiological scale4 that only represent the dominant virus lineage within each infected host. Less is known about the extent of intra-host virus diversity and what proportion is transmitted between individuals.5 To characterize those virus variants that achieve sustainable transmission in new hosts, we examined intra-host virus genetic diversity within household donor/recipient pairs from the first wave of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic when seasonal H3N2 was co-circulating. While the same variants were found in multiple members of the community, the relative frequencies of variants fluctuated, with patterns of genetic variation more similar within than between households. We estimated the effective population size of influenza A virus across donor/recipient pairs to be approximately 100–200 contributing members, which enabled the transmission of multiple lineages including antigenic variants. PMID:26727660

  8. Quantifying influenza virus diversity and transmission in humans.

    PubMed

    Poon, Leo L M; Song, Timothy; Rosenfeld, Roni; Lin, Xudong; Rogers, Matthew B; Zhou, Bin; Sebra, Robert; Halpin, Rebecca A; Guan, Yi; Twaddle, Alan; DePasse, Jay V; Stockwell, Timothy B; Wentworth, David E; Holmes, Edward C; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Peiris, Joseph S M; Cowling, Benjamin J; Ghedin, Elodie

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A virus is characterized by high genetic diversity. However, most of what is known about influenza evolution has come from consensus sequences sampled at the epidemiological scale that only represent the dominant virus lineage within each infected host. Less is known about the extent of within-host virus diversity and what proportion of this diversity is transmitted between individuals. To characterize virus variants that achieve sustainable transmission in new hosts, we examined within-host virus genetic diversity in household donor-recipient pairs from the first wave of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic when seasonal H3N2 was co-circulating. Although the same variants were found in multiple members of the community, the relative frequencies of variants fluctuated, with patterns of genetic variation more similar within than between households. We estimated the effective population size of influenza A virus across donor-recipient pairs to be approximately 100-200 contributing members, which enabled the transmission of multiple lineages, including antigenic variants. PMID:26727660

  9. Viral Reassortment and Transmission after Coinfection of Pigs with two Swine Influenza Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A viruses of subtypes H3N2, H1N1 and H1N2 are circulating in U.S. swine. Because influenza A virus contains 8 RNA segments, genetic reassortment can take place when 2 or more influenza viruses infect the same cell. We studied the reassortment potential and transmissibility of swine influen...

  10. The Timeline of Influenza Virus Shedding in Children and Adults in a Household Transmission Study of Influenza in Managua, Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sophia; Lopez, Roger; Kuan, Guillermina; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Gordon, Aubree

    2016-05-01

    In a household transmission study in Nicaragua, children under 6 years old had a longer duration of presymptomatic influenza virus shedding than adults. The duration of postsymptomatic influenza virus shedding was longest in children 0-5 years old, followed by children 6-15 years of age and adults. PMID:26910589

  11. Transmission of influenza on international flights, may 2009.

    PubMed

    Foxwell, A Ruth; Roberts, Leslee; Lokuge, Kamalini; Kelly, Paul M

    2011-07-01

    Understanding the dynamics of influenza transmission on international flights is necessary for prioritizing public health response to pandemic incursions. A retrospective cohort study to ascertain in-flight transmission of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and influenza-like illness (ILI) was undertaken for 2 long-haul flights entering Australia during May 2009. Combined results, including survey responses from 319 (43%) of 738 passengers, showed that 13 (2%) had an ILI in flight and an ILI developed in 32 (5%) passengers during the first week post arrival. Passengers were at 3.6% increased risk of contracting pandemic (H1N1) 2009 if they sat in the same row as or within 2 rows of persons who were symptomatic preflight. A closer exposed zone (2 seats in front, 2 seats behind, and 2 seats either side) increased the risk for postflight disease to 7.7%. Efficiency of contact tracing without compromising the effectiveness of the public health intervention might be improved by limiting the exposed zone. PMID:21762571

  12. Assessing coughing-induced influenza droplet transmission and implications for infection risk control.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y-H; Wang, C-H; You, S-H; Hsieh, N-H; Chen, W-Y; Chio, C-P; Liao, C-M

    2016-01-01

    Indoor transmission of respiratory droplets bearing influenza within humans poses high risks to respiratory function deterioration and death. Therefore, we aimed to develop a framework for quantifying the influenza infection risk based on the relationships between inhaled/exhaled respiratory droplets and airborne transmission dynamics in a ventilated airspace. An experiment was conducted to measure the size distribution of influenza-containing droplets produced by coughing for a better understanding of potential influenza spread. Here we integrated influenza population transmission dynamics, a human respiratory tract model, and a control measure approach to examine the indoor environment-virus-host interactions. A probabilistic risk model was implemented to assess size-specific infection risk for potentially transmissible influenza droplets indoors. Our results found that there was a 50% probability of the basic reproduction number (R0) exceeding 1 for small-size influenza droplets of 0·3-0·4 µm, implicating a potentially high indoor infection risk to humans. However, a combination of public health interventions with enhanced ventilation could substantially contain indoor influenza infection. Moreover, the present dynamic simulation and control measure assessment provide insights into why indoor transmissible influenza droplet-induced infection is occurring not only in upper lung regions but also in the lower respiratory tract, not normally considered at infection risk. PMID:26211781

  13. ESTIMATING WITHIN-SCHOOL CONTACT NETWORKS TO UNDERSTAND INFLUENZA TRANSMISSION

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Gail E.; Handcock, Mark S.; Longini, Ira M.; Halloran, M. Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Many epidemic models approximate social contact behavior by assuming random mixing within mixing groups (e.g., homes, schools, and workplaces). The effect of more realistic social network structure on estimates of epidemic parameters is an open area of exploration. We develop a detailed statistical model to estimate the social contact network within a high school using friendship network data and a survey of contact behavior. Our contact network model includes classroom structure, longer durations of contacts to friends than non-friends and more frequent contacts with friends, based on reports in the contact survey. We performed simulation studies to explore which network structures are relevant to influenza transmission. These studies yield two key findings. First, we found that the friendship network structure important to the transmission process can be adequately represented by a dyad-independent exponential random graph model (ERGM). This means that individual-level sampled data is sufficient to characterize the entire friendship network. Second, we found that contact behavior was adequately represented by a static rather than dynamic contact network. We then compare a targeted antiviral prophylaxis intervention strategy and a grade closure intervention strategy under random mixing and network-based mixing. We find that random mixing overestimates the effect of targeted antiviral prophylaxis on the probability of an epidemic when the probability of transmission in 10 minutes of contact is less than 0.004 and underestimates it when this transmission probability is greater than 0.004. We found the same pattern for the final size of an epidemic, with a threshold transmission probability of 0.005. We also find random mixing overestimates the effect of a grade closure intervention on the probability of an epidemic and final size for all transmission probabilities. Our findings have implications for policy recommendations based on models assuming random mixing, and

  14. Inferring influenza global transmission networks without complete phylogenetic information

    PubMed Central

    Aris-Brosou, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Influenza is one of the most severe respiratory infections affecting humans throughout the world, yet the dynamics of its global transmission network are still contentious. Here, I describe a novel combination of phylogenetics, time series, and graph theory to analyze 14.25 years of data stratified in space and in time, focusing on the main target of the human immune response, the hemagglutinin gene. While bypassing the complete phylogenetic inference of huge data sets, the method still extracts information suggesting that waves of genetic or of nucleotide diversity circulate continuously around the globe for subtypes that undergo sustained transmission over several seasons, such as H3N2 and pandemic H1N1/09, while diversity of prepandemic H1N1 viruses had until 2009 a noncontinuous transmission pattern consistent with a source/sink model. Irrespective of the shift in the structure of H1N1 diversity circulation with the emergence of the pandemic H1N1/09 strain, US prevalence peaks during the winter months when genetic diversity is at its lowest. This suggests that a dominant strain is generally responsible for epidemics and that monitoring genetic and/or nucleotide diversity in real time could provide public health agencies with an indirect estimate of prevalence. PMID:24665342

  15. Pathogenicity, Transmission and Antigenic Variation of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Peirong; Song, Hui; Liu, Xiaoke; Song, Yafen; Cui, Jin; Wu, Siyu; Ye, Jiaqi; Qu, Nanan; Zhang, Tiemin; Liao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was one of the most important avian diseases in poultry production of China, especially in Guangdong province. In recent years, new H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) still emerged constantly, although all poultry in China were immunized with H5N1 vaccinations compulsorily. To better understand the pathogenicity and transmission of dominant clades of the H5N1 HPAIVs in chicken from Guangdong in 2012, we chose a clade 7.2 avian influenza virus named A/Chicken/China/G2/2012(H5N1) (G2) and a clade 2.3.2.1 avian influenza virus named A/Duck/China/G3/2012(H5N1) (G3) in our study. Our results showed that the chickens inoculated with 103 EID50 of G2 or G3 viruses all died, and the titers of virus replication detected in several visceral organs were high but different. In the naive contact groups, virus shedding was not detected in G2 group and all chickens survived, but virus shedding was detected in G3 group and all chickens died. These results showed that the two clades of H5N1 HPAIVs had high pathogenicity in chickens and the contact transmission of them was different in chickens. The results of cross reactive HI assay showed that antigens of G2 and G3 were very different from those of current commercial vaccines isolates (Re-4, Re-6, and D7). And to evaluate the protective efficacy of three vaccines against most isolates form Guangdong belonging to clade 2.3.2.1 in 2012, G3 was chosen to challenge the three vaccines such as Re-4, Re-6, and D7. First, chickens were immunized with 0.3 ml Re-4, Re-6, and D7 inactivated vaccines by intramuscular injection, respectively, and then challenged with 106 EID50 of G3 on day 28 post-vaccination. The D7 vaccine had 100% protection against G3 for chickens, the Re-6 vaccine had 88.9%, and the Re-4 vaccine only had 66.7%. Our results suggested that the D7 vaccine could prevent and control H5N1 virus outbreaks more effectively in Guangdong. From the above, it was

  16. Transmission of Avian Influenza A Viruses Between Animals and People

    MedlinePlus

    ... many different animals, including ducks, chickens, pigs, whales, horses, and seals. However, certain subtypes of influenza A ... pigs, and H7N7 and H3N8 virus infections of horses. Influenza A viruses that typically infect and transmit ...

  17. Animal models for influenza virus pathogenesis, transmission, and immunology

    PubMed Central

    Thangavel, Rajagowthamee R.; Bouvier, Nicole M.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, infection with an influenza A or B virus manifests typically as an acute and self-limited upper respiratory tract illness characterized by fever, cough, sore throat, and malaise. However, influenza can present along a broad spectrum of disease, ranging from sub-clinical or even asymptomatic infection to a severe primary viral pneumonia requiring advanced medical supportive care. Disease severity depends upon the virulence of the influenza virus strain and the immune competence and previous influenza exposures of the patient. Animal models are used in influenza research not only to elucidate the viral and host factors that affect influenza disease outcomes in and spread among susceptible hosts, but also to evaluate interventions designed to prevent or reduce influenza morbidity and mortality in man. This review will focus on the three animal models currently used most frequently in influenza virus research -- mice, ferrets, and guinea pigs -- and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. PMID:24709389

  18. Community transmission of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Tao; Li, Xiao-Feng; Tang, Fang; Wei, Mao-Ti; Yu, Man; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Xue-Dong; Liu, Li-Juan; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2010-09-01

    Prophylaxis and treatment with oseltamivir effectively controlled a community outbreak of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in China. The genetic makeup of strains of different generations seemed to be stable. Travel in confined settings might accelerate the transmission of pandemic influenza in a community outbreak. PMID:20636129

  19. Transmission of SARS and MERS coronaviruses and influenza virus in healthcare settings: the possible role of dry surface contamination.

    PubMed

    Otter, J A; Donskey, C; Yezli, S; Douthwaite, S; Goldenberg, S D; Weber, D J

    2016-03-01

    Viruses with pandemic potential including H1N1, H5N1, and H5N7 influenza viruses, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)/Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronaviruses (CoV) have emerged in recent years. SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and influenza virus can survive on surfaces for extended periods, sometimes up to months. Factors influencing the survival of these viruses on surfaces include: strain variation, titre, surface type, suspending medium, mode of deposition, temperature and relative humidity, and the method used to determine the viability of the virus. Environmental sampling has identified contamination in field-settings with SARS-CoV and influenza virus, although the frequent use of molecular detection methods may not necessarily represent the presence of viable virus. The importance of indirect contact transmission (involving contamination of inanimate surfaces) is uncertain compared with other transmission routes, principally direct contact transmission (independent of surface contamination), droplet, and airborne routes. However, influenza virus and SARS-CoV may be shed into the environment and be transferred from environmental surfaces to hands of patients and healthcare providers. Emerging data suggest that MERS-CoV also shares these properties. Once contaminated from the environment, hands can then initiate self-inoculation of mucous membranes of the nose, eyes or mouth. Mathematical and animal models, and intervention studies suggest that contact transmission is the most important route in some scenarios. Infection prevention and control implications include the need for hand hygiene and personal protective equipment to minimize self-contamination and to protect against inoculation of mucosal surfaces and the respiratory tract, and enhanced surface cleaning and disinfection in healthcare settings. PMID:26597631

  20. Hemagglutinin Stalk Immunity Reduces Influenza Virus Replication and Transmission in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Miller, Matthew S.; Hai, Rong; Ryder, Alex B.; Rose, John K.; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    We assessed whether influenza virus hemagglutinin stalk-based immunity protects ferrets against aerosol-transmitted H1N1 influenza virus infection. Immunization of ferrets by a universal influenza virus vaccine strategy based on viral vectors expressing chimeric hemagglutinin constructs induced stalk-specific antibody responses. Stalk-immunized ferrets were cohoused with H1N1-infected ferrets under conditions that permitted virus transmission. Hemagglutinin stalk-immunized ferrets had lower viral titers and delayed or no virus replication at all following natural exposure to influenza virus. PMID:26719251

  1. Hemagglutinin Stalk Immunity Reduces Influenza Virus Replication and Transmission in Ferrets.

    PubMed

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Miller, Matthew S; Hai, Rong; Ryder, Alex B; Rose, John K; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Krammer, Florian; Albrecht, Randy A

    2016-03-01

    We assessed whether influenza virus hemagglutinin stalk-based immunity protects ferrets against aerosol-transmitted H1N1 influenza virus infection. Immunization of ferrets by a universal influenza virus vaccine strategy based on viral vectors expressing chimeric hemagglutinin constructs induced stalk-specific antibody responses. Stalk-immunized ferrets were cohoused with H1N1-infected ferrets under conditions that permitted virus transmission. Hemagglutinin stalk-immunized ferrets had lower viral titers and delayed or no virus replication at all following natural exposure to influenza virus. PMID:26719251

  2. Aerosol influenza transmission risk contours: A study of humid tropics versus winter temperate zone

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years, much attention has been given to the spread of influenza around the world. With the continuing human outbreak of H5N1 beginning in 2003 and the H1N1 pandemic in 2009, focus on influenza and other respiratory viruses has been increased. It has been accepted for decades that international travel via jet aircraft is a major vector for global spread of influenza, and epidemiological differences between tropical and temperate regions observed. Thus we wanted to study how indoor environmental conditions (enclosed locations) in the tropics and winter temperate zones contribute to the aerosol spread of influenza by travelers. To this end, a survey consisting of 632 readings of temperature (T) versus relative humidity (RH) in 389 different enclosed locations air travelers are likely to visit in 8 tropical nations were compared to 102 such readings in 2 Australian cities, including ground transport, hotels, shops, offices and other publicly accessible locations, along with 586 time course readings from aircraft. Results An influenza transmission risk contour map was developed for T versus RH. Empirical equations were created for estimating: 1. risk relative to temperature and RH, and 2. time parameterized influenza transmission risk. Using the transmission risk contours and equations, transmission risk for each country's locations was compared with influenza reports from the countries. Higher risk enclosed locations in the tropics included new automobile transport, luxury buses, luxury hotels, and bank branches. Most temperate locations were high risk. Conclusion Environmental control is recommended for public health mitigation focused on higher risk enclosed locations. Public health can make use of the methods developed to track potential vulnerability to aerosol influenza. The methods presented can also be used in influenza modeling. Accounting for differential aerosol transmission using T and RH can potentially explain anomalies of influenza

  3. Highly Pathogenic Influenza A(H5N1) Virus Survival in Complex Artificial Aquatic Biotopes

    PubMed Central

    Horm, Viseth Srey; Gutiérrez, Ramona A.; Nicholls, John M.; Buchy, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background Very little is known regarding the persistence of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses in aquatic environments in tropical countries, although environmental materials have been suggested to play a role as reservoirs and sources of transmission for H5N1 viruses. Methodology/Principal Findings The survival of HPAI H5N1 viruses in experimental aquatic biotopes (water, mud, aquatic flora and fauna) relevant to field conditions in Cambodia was investigated. Artificial aquatic biotopes, including simple ones containing only mud and water, and complex biotopes involving the presence of aquatic flora and fauna, were set up. They were experimentally contaminated with H5N1 virus. The persistence of HPAI H5N1 virus (local avian and human isolates) was determined by virus isolation in embryonated chicken eggs and by real-time reverse-polymerase chain reaction. Persistence of infectious virus did not exceed 4 days, and was only identified in rain water. No infectious virus particles were detected in pond and lake water or mud even when high inoculum doses were used. However, viral RNA persisted up to 20 days in rain water and 7 days in pond or lake water. Viral RNA was also detected in mud samples, up to 14 days post-contamination in several cases. Infectious virus and viral RNA was detected in few cases in the aquatic fauna and flora, especially in bivalves and labyrinth fish, although these organisms seemed to be mostly passive carriers of the virus rather than host allowing virus replication. Conclusions/Significance Although several factors for the survival and persistence of HPAI viruses in the environment are still to be elucidated, and are particularly hard to control in laboratory conditions, our results, along with previous data, support the idea that environmental surveillance is of major relevance for avian influenza control programs. PMID:22514622

  4. Remote sensing and avian influenza: A review of image processing methods for extracting key variables affecting avian influenza virus survival in water from Earth Observation satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Annelise; Goutard, Flavie; Chamaillé, Lise; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Lo Seen, Danny

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the potential role of water in the transmission of avian influenza (AI) viruses and the existence of often interacting variables that determine the survival rate of these viruses in water; the two main variables are temperature and salinity. Remote sensing has been used to map and monitor water bodies for several decades. In this paper, we review satellite image analysis methods used for water detection and characterization, focusing on the main variables that influence AI virus survival in water. Optical and radar imagery are useful for detecting water bodies at different spatial and temporal scales. Methods to monitor the temperature of large water surfaces are also available. Current methods for estimating other relevant water variables such as salinity, pH, turbidity and water depth are not presently considered to be effective.

  5. The soft palate is an important site of adaptation for transmissible influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Lakdawala, Seema S; Jayaraman, Akila; Halpin, Rebecca A; Lamirande, Elaine W; Shih, Angela R; Stockwell, Timothy B; Lin, Xudong; Simenauer, Ari; Hanson, Christopher T; Vogel, Leatrice; Paskel, Myeisha; Minai, Mahnaz; Moore, Ian; Orandle, Marlene; Das, Suman R; Wentworth, David E; Sasisekharan, Ram; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-10-01

    Influenza A viruses pose a major public health threat by causing seasonal epidemics and sporadic pandemics. Their epidemiological success relies on airborne transmission from person to person; however, the viral properties governing airborne transmission of influenza A viruses are complex. Influenza A virus infection is mediated via binding of the viral haemagglutinin (HA) to terminally attached α2,3 or α2,6 sialic acids on cell surface glycoproteins. Human influenza A viruses preferentially bind α2,6-linked sialic acids whereas avian influenza A viruses bind α2,3-linked sialic acids on complex glycans on airway epithelial cells. Historically, influenza A viruses with preferential association with α2,3-linked sialic acids have not been transmitted efficiently by the airborne route in ferrets. Here we observe efficient airborne transmission of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus (A/California/07/2009) engineered to preferentially bind α2,3-linked sialic acids. Airborne transmission was associated with rapid selection of virus with a change at a single HA site that conferred binding to long-chain α2,6-linked sialic acids, without loss of α2,3-linked sialic acid binding. The transmissible virus emerged in experimentally infected ferrets within 24 hours after infection and was remarkably enriched in the soft palate, where long-chain α2,6-linked sialic acids predominate on the nasopharyngeal surface. Notably, presence of long-chain α2,6-linked sialic acids is conserved in ferret, pig and human soft palate. Using a loss-of-function approach with this one virus, we demonstrate that the ferret soft palate, a tissue not normally sampled in animal models of influenza, rapidly selects for transmissible influenza A viruses with human receptor (α2,6-linked sialic acids) preference. PMID:26416728

  6. Attitudes of influenza‐vaccinated health care workers toward masks to prevent nosocomial transmission of influenza

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Christian; Rabenau, Holger F.; Wicker, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Brandt et al. (2010) Attitudes of influenza‐vaccinated health care workers toward masks to prevent nosocomial transmission of influenza. . Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 61–66. Background  Influenza viruses are highly contagious. Health care workers (HCWs) are at risk of occupational exposure to influenza and may transmit the infection to their patients and coworkers. Objectives  The aim of the study was to characterize the attitudes of HCWs regarding the use of surgical masks to prevent nosocomial influenza transmission. Furthermore, we assessed the informational needs of HCWs with regard to infection control measures. Methods  A survey was conducted among HCWs, using an anonymous questionnaire, at a German University Hospital during an influenza vaccination campaign. Results  Overall, 40·5% of the HCWs were vaccinated against seasonal influenza, and 35·2% were vaccinated against Influenza A/H1N1 (“swine flu”). In total, 1445 vaccinees completed the anonymous questionnaire. Of all respondents, 70·5% stated that the infection control recommendation “wearing a surgical” mask was appropriate to avoid influenza transmission. The percentage of HCWs who would like to have had more information about the infection control measures was 67·5%. Conclusions  Appropriate interventions ought to be taken to reduce the risk of exposure to influenza viruses among HCWs. Adherence to recommendations for the use of masks among HCWs needs to be evaluated. Further work is required to highlight the informational needs of HCWs to gain an appreciation of infection control measures. PMID:21138542

  7. Influenza in workplaces: transmission, workers’ adherence to sick leave advice and European sick leave recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Tomba, Gianpaolo Scalia; de Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben

    2016-01-01

    Background: Knowledge about influenza transmission in the workplace and whether staying home from work when experiencing influenza-like illness can reduce the spread of influenza is crucial for the design of efficient public health initiatives. Aim: This review synthesizes current literature on sickness presenteeism and influenza transmission in the workplace and provides an overview of sick leave recommendations in Europe for influenza. Methods: A search was performed on Medline, Embase, PsychINFO, Cinahl, Web of Science, Scopus and SweMed to identify studies related to workplace contacts, -transmission, -interventions and compliance with recommendations to take sick leave. A web-based survey on national recommendations and policies for sick leave during influenza was issued to 31 European countries. Results: Twenty-two articles (9 surveys; 13 modelling articles) were eligible for this review. Results from social mixing studies suggest that 20–25% of weekly contacts are made in the workplace, while modelling studies suggest that on average 16% (range 9–33%) of influenza transmission occurs in the workplace. The effectiveness of interventions to reduce workplace presenteeism is largely unknown. Finally, estimates from studies reporting expected compliance with sick leave recommendations ranged from 71 to 95%. Overall, 18 countries participated in the survey of which nine (50%) had issued recommendations encouraging sick employees to stay at home during the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic, while only one country had official recommendations for seasonal influenza. Conclusions: During the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic, many European countries recommended ill employees to take sick leave. Further research is warranted to quantify the effect of reduced presenteeism during influenza illness. PMID:27060594

  8. Novel routes of transmission of influenza viruses in poultry species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to develop better control measures against influenza it’s necessary to understand how the virus transmits in different species. The presence of avian and swine influenza virus genes in the 2009 novel H1N1 pandemic virus (pH1N1) raises the potential for infection in poultry following exposur...

  9. Transmission and control of an emerging influenza pandemic in a small-world airline network.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chaug-Ing; Shih, Hsien-Hung

    2010-01-01

    The avian influenza virus H5N1 and the 2009 swine flu H1N1 are potentially serious pandemic threats to human health, and air travel readily facilitates the spread of infectious diseases. However, past studies have not yet incorporated the effects of air travel on the transmission of influenza in the construction of mathematical epidemic models. Therefore, this paper focused on the human-to-human transmission of influenza, and investigated the effects of air travel activities on an influenza pandemic in a small-world network. These activities of air travel include passengers' consolidation, conveyance and distribution in airports and flights. Dynamic transmission models were developed to assess the expected burdens of the pandemic, with and without control measures. This study also investigated how the small-world properties of an air transportation network facilitate the spread of influenza around the globe. The results show that, as soon as the influenza is spread to the top 50 global airports, the transmission is greatly accelerated. Under the constraint of limited resources, a strategy that first applies control measures to the top 50 airports after day 13 and then soon afterwards to all other airports may result in remarkable containment effectiveness. As the infectiousness of the disease increases, it will expand the scale of the pandemic, and move the start time of the pandemic ahead. PMID:19887149

  10. Transmission of influenza A(H1N1) 2009 pandemic viruses in Australian swine

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yi‐Mo; Iannello, Pina; Smith, Ina; Watson, James; Barr, Ian G.; Daniels, Peter; Komadina, Naomi; Harrower, Bruce; Wong, Frank Y. K.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Deng et al. (2012). Transmission of influenza A(H1N1) 2009 pandemic viruses in Australian swine. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), e42–e47. Background  Swine have receptors for both human and avian influenza viruses and are a natural host for influenza A viruses. The 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic (H1N1pdm) virus that was derived from avian, human and swine influenza viruses has infected pigs in various countries. Objectives  To investigate the relationship between the H1N1pdm viruses isolated from piggery outbreaks in Australia and human samples associated with one of the outbreaks by phylogenetic analysis, and to determine whether there was any reassortment event occurring during the human‐pig interspecies transmission. Methods  Real‐time RT‐PCR and full genome sequencing were carried out on RNA isolated from nasal swabs and/or virus cultures. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using the Geneious package. Results  The influenza H1N1pdm outbreaks were detected in three pig farms located in three different states in Australia. Further analysis of the Queensland outbreak led to the identification of two distinct virus strains in the pigs. Two staff working in the same piggery were also infected with the same two strains found in the pigs. Full genome sequence analysis on the viruses isolated from pigs and humans did not identify any reassortment of these H1N1pdm viruses with seasonal or avian influenza A viruses. Conclusions  This is the first report of swine infected with influenza in Australia and marked the end of the influenza‐free era for the Australian swine industry. Although no reassortment was detected in these cases, the ability of these viruses to cross between pigs and humans highlights the importance of monitoring swine for novel influenza infections. PMID:22336333

  11. Inter-Seasonal Influenza is Characterized by Extended Virus Transmission and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Patterson Ross, Zoe; Komadina, Naomi; Deng, Yi-Mo; Spirason, Natalie; Kelly, Heath A.; Sullivan, Sheena G.; Barr, Ian G.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2015-01-01

    The factors that determine the characteristic seasonality of influenza remain enigmatic. Current models predict that occurrences of influenza outside the normal surveillance season within a temperate region largely reflect the importation of viruses from the alternate hemisphere or from equatorial regions in Asia. To help reveal the drivers of seasonality we investigated the origins and evolution of influenza viruses sampled during inter-seasonal periods in Australia. To this end we conducted an expansive phylogenetic analysis of 9912, 3804, and 3941 hemagglutinnin (HA) sequences from influenza A/H1N1pdm, A/H3N2, and B, respectively, collected globally during the period 2009-2014. Of the 1475 viruses sampled from Australia, 396 (26.8% of Australian, or 2.2% of global set) were sampled outside the monitored temperate influenza surveillance season (1 May – 31 October). Notably, rather than simply reflecting short-lived importations of virus from global localities with higher influenza prevalence, we documented a variety of more complex inter-seasonal transmission patterns including “stragglers” from the preceding season and “heralds” of the forthcoming season, and which included viruses sampled from clearly temperate regions within Australia. We also provide evidence for the persistence of influenza B virus between epidemic seasons, in which transmission of a viral lineage begins in one season and continues throughout the inter-seasonal period into the following season. Strikingly, a disproportionately high number of inter-seasonal influenza transmission events occurred in tropical and subtropical regions of Australia, providing further evidence that climate plays an important role in shaping patterns of influenza seasonality. PMID:26107631

  12. Household Transmission of Zoonotic Influenza Viruses in a Cohort of Egyptian Poultry Growers

    PubMed Central

    Abu Zeid, Dina; Gomaa, Mokhtar R; Tang, Li; McKenzie, Pamela P; Webby, Richard J; Ali, Mohamed A

    2015-01-01

    Background The highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses and the low pathogenic H9N2 viruses are enzootic in Egyptian poultry. Several cases of human infection with H5N1 were reported in Egypt. We previously determined that the seroprevalence of H5N1 antibodies in Egyptians exposed to poultry is 2.1% (15/708), suggesting that mild or subclinical infections with this virus occur. We aim to measure the incidence of avian influenza infection in Egyptians exposed to poultry, study risk factors of infection, study the resulting immune response, study household transmission rates, and characterize the viruses causing infections. Objective The objective of the study is to design a 7-year, prospective, household-based cohort investigation to determine incidence and household transmission of avian influenza viruses in humans exposed to poultry. Methods At baseline, we will collect sera to measure antibodies against influenza A. Field nurses will visit enrolled subjects at least weekly to check for influenza-like illness symptoms and verify influenza infection by a point of care rapid test. From subjects with influenza infection and their household contacts, we will collect nasal swabs, throat swabs, and nasal washes to characterize the antigenic and genetic makeup of influenza viruses infecting humans. The nurse will also obtain 2x 3-ml blood samples, one for serology, and another for isolating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results Results from this cohort will enhance our understanding of the transmission of avian influenza viruses to humans in a country where such viruses are enzootic. Conclusions This may enhance public health efforts aimed at reducing this burden. PMID:26099368

  13. Maternally-derived antibodies do not prevent transmission of swine influenza A virus between pigs.

    PubMed

    Cador, Charlie; Hervé, Séverine; Andraud, Mathieu; Gorin, Stéphane; Paboeuf, Frédéric; Barbier, Nicolas; Quéguiner, Stéphane; Deblanc, Céline; Simon, Gaëlle; Rose, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    A transmission experiment involving 5-week-old specific-pathogen-free (SPF) piglets, with (MDA(+)) or without maternally-derived antibodies (MDA(-)), was carried out to evaluate the impact of passive immunity on the transmission of a swine influenza A virus (swIAV). In each group (MDA(+)/MDA(-)), 2 seeders were placed with 4 piglets in direct contact and 5 in indirect contact (3 replicates per group). Serological kinetics (ELISA) and individual viral shedding (RT-PCR) were monitored for 28 days after infection. MDA waning was estimated using a nonlinear mixed-effects model and survival analysis. Differential transmission rates were estimated depending on the piglets' initial serological status and contact structure (direct contact with pen-mates or indirect airborne contact). The time to MDA waning was 71.3 [52.8-92.1] days on average. The airborne transmission rate was 1.41 [0.64-2.63] per day. The compared shedding pattern between groups showed that MDA(+) piglets had mainly a reduced susceptibility to infection compared to MDA(-) piglets. The resulting reproduction number estimated in MDA(+) piglets (5.8 [1.4-18.9]), although 3 times lower than in MDA(-) piglets (14.8 [6.4-27.1]), was significantly higher than 1. Such an efficient and extended spread of swIAV at the population scale in the presence of MDAs could contribute to swIAV persistence on farms, given the fact that the period when transmission is expected to be impacted by the presence of MDAs can last up to 10 weeks. PMID:27530456

  14. Role of receptor binding specificity in influenza A virus transmission and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Miranda; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2014-01-01

    The recent emergence of a novel avian A/H7N9 influenza virus in poultry and humans in China, as well as laboratory studies on adaptation and transmission of avian A/H5N1 influenza viruses, has shed new light on influenza virus adaptation to mammals. One of the biological traits required for animal influenza viruses to cross the species barrier that received considerable attention in animal model studies, in vitro assays, and structural analyses is receptor binding specificity. Sialylated glycans present on the apical surface of host cells can function as receptors for the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein. Avian and human influenza viruses typically have a different sialic acid (SA)-binding preference and only few amino acid changes in the HA protein can cause a switch from avian to human receptor specificity. Recent experiments using glycan arrays, virus histochemistry, animal models, and structural analyses of HA have added a wealth of knowledge on receptor binding specificity. Here, we review recent data on the interaction between influenza virus HA and SA receptors of the host, and the impact on virus host range, pathogenesis, and transmission. Remaining challenges and future research priorities are also discussed. PMID:24668228

  15. Transmission of Avian Influenza Virus (H3N2) to Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Song, Daesub; Kang, Bokyu; Lee, Chulseung; Jung, Kwonil; Ha, Gunwoo; Kang, Dongseok; Park, Seongjun; Park, Bongkyun

    2008-01-01

    In South Korea, where avian influenza virus subtypes H3N2, H5N1, H6N1, and H9N2 circulate or have been detected, 3 genetically similar canine influenza virus (H3N2) strains of avian origin (A/canine/Korea/01/2007, A/canine/Korea/02/2007, and A/canine/Korea/03/2007) were isolated from dogs exhibiting severe respiratory disease. To determine whether the novel canine influenza virus of avian origin was transmitted among dogs, we experimentally infected beagles with this influenza virus (H3N2) isolate. The beagles shed virus through nasal excretion, seroconverted, and became ill with severe necrotizing tracheobronchitis and bronchioalveolitis with accompanying clinical signs (e.g., high fever). Consistent with histologic observation of lung lesions, large amounts of avian influenza virus binding receptor (SAα 2,3-gal) were identified in canine tracheal, bronchial, and bronchiolar epithelial cells, which suggests potential for direct transmission of avian influenza virus (H3N2) from poultry to dogs. Our data provide evidence that dogs may play a role in interspecies transmission and spread of influenza virus. PMID:18439355

  16. Infection of dogs with equine influenza virus: evidence for transmission from horses during the Australian outbreak.

    PubMed

    Crispe, E; Finlaison, D S; Hurt, A C; Kirkland, P D

    2011-07-01

    During the equine influenza (EI) outbreak, respiratory disease was observed in dogs that were in close proximity to infected horses. Investigations were undertaken to exclude influenza virus infection. Of the 23 dogs that were seropositive in tests using the influenza A/Sydney/2007 virus as the test antigen, 10 showed clinical signs. EI virus appeared to be readily transmitted to dogs that were held in close proximity to infected horses, but there was no evidence of lateral transmission of the virus to other dogs that did not have contact with or were not held in close proximity to horses. PMID:21711279

  17. Transmission of Influenza Virus via Aerosols and Fomites in the Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Mubareka, Samira; Lowen, Anice C.; Steel, John; Coates, Allan L.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Palese, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Limited data on the relative contributions of different routes of transmission for influenza virus are available. Person-to-person transmission is central to seasonal and pandemic spread; nevertheless, the modes of spread are a matter of ongoing debate. Resolution of this discussion is paramount to the development of effective control measures in health care and community settings. Using the guinea pig model, we demonstrated that transmission of influenza A/Panama/2007/1999 (H3N2) virus through the air is efficient, compared with spread through contaminated environmental surfaces (fomites). We also examined the aerosol transmission efficiencies of 2 human influenza virus A strains and found that A/Panama/2007/1999 influenza virus transmitted more efficiently than A/Texas/36/1991 (H1N1) virus in our model. The data provide new and much-needed insights into the modes of influenza virus spread and strain-specific differences in the efficiency of transmission. PMID:19434931

  18. Visualizing real-time influenza virus infection, transmission and protection in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Erik A; Meliopoulos, Victoria A; Savage, Chandra; Livingston, Brandi; Mehle, Andrew; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Influenza transmission efficiency in ferrets is vital for risk-assessment studies. However, the inability to monitor viral infection and transmission dynamics in real time only provides a glimpse into transmissibility. Here we exploit a replication-competent influenza reporter virus to investigate dynamics of infection/transmission in ferrets. Bioluminescent imaging of ferrets infected with A/California/04/2009 H1N1 virus (CA/09) encoding NanoLuc (NLuc) luciferase provides the first real-time snapshot of influenza infection/transmission. Luminescence in the respiratory tract and in less well-characterized extra-pulmonary sites is observed, and imaging identifies infections in animals that would have otherwise been missed by traditional methods. Finally, the reporter virus significantly increases the speed and sensitivity of virological and serological assays. Thus, bioluminescent imaging of influenza infections rapidly determines intra-host dissemination, inter-host transmission and viral load, revealing infection dynamics and pandemic potential of the virus. These results have important implications for antiviral drug susceptibility, vaccine efficacy, transmissibility and pathogenicity studies. PMID:25744559

  19. Visualizing real-time influenza virus infection, transmission and protection in ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Meliopoulos, Victoria A.; Savage, Chandra; Livingston, Brandi; Mehle, Andrew; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Influenza transmission efficiency in ferrets is vital for risk-assessment studies. However, the inability to monitor viral infection and transmission dynamics in real time only provides a glimpse into transmissibility. Here we exploit a replication-competent influenza reporter virus to investigate dynamics of infection/transmission in ferrets. Bioluminescent imaging of ferrets infected with A/California/04/2009 H1N1 virus (CA/09) encoding NanoLuc (NLuc) luciferase provides the first real-time snapshot of influenza infection/transmission. Luminescence in the respiratory tract and in less well-characterized extra-pulmonary sites is observed, and imaging identifies infections in animals that would have otherwise been missed by traditional methods. Finally, the reporter virus significantly increases the speed and sensitivity of virological and serological assays. Thus, bioluminescent imaging of influenza infections rapidly determines intra-host dissemination, inter-host transmission and viral load, revealing infection dynamics and pandemic potential of the virus. These results have important implications for antiviral drug susceptibility, vaccine efficacy, transmissibility and pathogenicity studies. PMID:25744559

  20. Transmission and reassortment of avian influenza viruses at the Asian-North American interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andrew M.; Pearce, John M.; Ely, Craig R.; Guy, Lisa M. Sheffield; Irons, David B.; Derksen, Dirk V.; Ip, Hon S.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty avian influenza viruses were isolated from seven wild migratory bird species sampled at St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. We tested predictions based on previous phylogenetic analyses of avian influenza viruses that support spatially dependent trans-hemispheric gene flow and frequent interspecies transmission at a location situated at the Asian–North American interface. Through the application of phylogenetic and genotypic approaches, our data support functional dilution by distance of trans-hemispheric reassortants and interspecific virus transmission. Our study confirms infection of divergent avian taxa with nearly identical avian influenza strains in the wild. Findings also suggest that H16N3 viruses may contain gene segments with unique phylogenetic positions and that further investigation of how host specificity may impact transmission of H13 and H16 viruses is warranted.

  1. Oseltamivir inhibits influenza virus replication and transmission following ocular-only aerosol inoculation of ferrets.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Creager, Hannah M; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2015-10-01

    Ocular exposure to influenza virus represents an alternate route of virus entry capable of establishing a respiratory infection in mammals, but the effectiveness of currently available antiviral treatments to limit virus replication within ocular tissue or inhibit virus spread from ocular sites to the respiratory tract is poorly understood. Using an inoculation method that delivers an aerosol inoculum exclusively to the ocular surface, we demonstrate that oral oseltamivir administration following ocular-only aerosol inoculation with multiple avian and human influenza viruses protected ferrets from a fatal and systemic infection, reduced clinical signs and symptoms of illness, and decreased virus transmissibility to susceptible contacts when a respiratory infection was initiated. The presence of oseltamivir further inhibited influenza virus replication in primary human corneal epithelial cells. These findings provide critical experimental evidence supporting the use of neuraminidase inhibitors during outbreaks of influenza virus resulting in ocular disease or following ocular exposure. PMID:26142497

  2. Host genetics determine susceptibility to avian influenza infection and transmission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Mwangi, William; Peroval, Marylene; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Ascough, Stephanie; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Boyd, Amy; McCauley, John; Smith, Adrian; Butter, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Host-genetic control of influenza virus infection has been the object of little attention. In this study we determined that two inbred lines of chicken differing in their genetic background , Lines 0 and C-B12, were respectively relatively resistant and susceptible to infection with the low pathogenicity influenza virus A/Turkey/England/647/77 as defined by substantial differences in viral shedding trajectories. Resistant birds, although infected, were unable to transmit virus to contact birds, as ultimately only the presence of a sustained cloacal shedding (and not oropharyngeal shedding) was critical for transmission. Restriction of within-bird transmission of virus occurred in the resistant line, with intra-nares or cloacal infection resulting in only local shedding and failing to transmit fully through the gastro-intestinal-pulmonary tract. Resistance to infection was independent of adaptive immune responses, including the expansion of specific IFNγ secreting cells or production of influenza-specific antibody. Genetic resistance to a novel H9N2 virus was less robust, though significant differences between host genotypes were still clearly evident. The existence of host-genetic determination of the outcome of influenza infection offers tools for the further dissection of this regulation and also for understanding the mechanisms of influenza transmission within and between birds. PMID:27279280

  3. Host genetics determine susceptibility to avian influenza infection and transmission dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Mwangi, William; Peroval, Marylene; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Ascough, Stephanie; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Boyd, Amy; McCauley, John; Smith, Adrian; Butter, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Host-genetic control of influenza virus infection has been the object of little attention. In this study we determined that two inbred lines of chicken differing in their genetic background , Lines 0 and C-B12, were respectively relatively resistant and susceptible to infection with the low pathogenicity influenza virus A/Turkey/England/647/77 as defined by substantial differences in viral shedding trajectories. Resistant birds, although infected, were unable to transmit virus to contact birds, as ultimately only the presence of a sustained cloacal shedding (and not oropharyngeal shedding) was critical for transmission. Restriction of within-bird transmission of virus occurred in the resistant line, with intra-nares or cloacal infection resulting in only local shedding and failing to transmit fully through the gastro-intestinal-pulmonary tract. Resistance to infection was independent of adaptive immune responses, including the expansion of specific IFNγ secreting cells or production of influenza-specific antibody. Genetic resistance to a novel H9N2 virus was less robust, though significant differences between host genotypes were still clearly evident. The existence of host-genetic determination of the outcome of influenza infection offers tools for the further dissection of this regulation and also for understanding the mechanisms of influenza transmission within and between birds. PMID:27279280

  4. Role of environmental survival in transmission of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Bronowski, Christina; James, Chloe E; Winstanley, Craig

    2014-07-01

    Campylobacter species are the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis, with C. jejuni responsible for the majority of these cases. Although it is clear that livestock, and particularly poultry, are the most common source, it is likely that the natural environment (soil and water) plays a key role in transmission, either directly to humans or indirectly via farm animals. It has been shown using multilocus sequence typing that some clonal complexes (such as ST-45) are more frequently isolated from environmental sources such as water, suggesting that strains vary in their ability to survive in the environment. Although C. jejuni are fastidious microaerophiles generally unable to grow in atmospheric levels of oxygen, C. jejuni can adapt to survival in the environment, exhibiting aerotolerance and starvation survival. Biofilm formation, the viable but nonculturable state, and interactions with other microorganisms can all contribute to survival outside the host. By exploiting high-throughput technologies such as genome sequencing and RNA Seq, we are well placed to decipher the mechanisms underlying the variations in survival between strains in environments such as soil and water and to better understand the role of environmental persistence in the transmission of C. jejuni directly or indirectly to humans. PMID:24888326

  5. Role of Temperature, Humidity and Rainfall on Influenza Transmission in Guatemala, El Salvador and Panama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soebiyanto, Radina P.; Bonilla, Luis; Jara, Jorge; McCracken, John; Azziz?-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Kiang, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, seasonal influenza causes about 500,000 deaths and 5 million severe illnesses per year. The environmental drivers of influenza transmission are poorly understood especially in the tropics. We aimed to identify meteorological factors for influenza transmission in tropical Central America. We gathered laboratory-confirmed influenza case-counts by week from Guatemala City, San Salvador Department (El Salvador) and Panama Province from 2006 to 2010. The average total cases per year were: 390 (Guatemala), 99 (San Salvador) and 129 (Panama). Meteorological factors including daily air temperature, rainfall, relative and absolute humidity (RH, AH) were obtained from ground stations, NASA satellites and land models. For these factors, we computed weekly averages and their deviation from the 5-yr means. We assessed the relationship between the number of influenza case-counts and the meteorological factors, including effects lagged by 1 to 4 weeks, using Poisson regression for each site. Our results showed influenza in San Salvador would increase by 1 case within a week of every 1 day with RH>75% (Relative Risk (RR)= 1.32, p=.001) and every 1C increase in minimum temperature (RR=1.29, p=.007) but it would decrease by 1 case for every 1mm-above mean weekly rainfall (RR=0.93,p<.001) (model pseudo-R2=0.55). Within 2 weeks, influenza in Panama was increased by 1 case for every 1% increase in RH (RR=1.04, p=.003), and it was increased by 2 cases for every 1C increase of minimum temperature (RR=2.01, p<.001) (model pseudo-R2=0.4). Influenza counts in Guatemala had 1 case increase for every 1C increase in minimum temperature in the previous week (RR=1.21, p<.001), and for every 1mm/day-above normal increase of rainfall rate (RR=1.03, p=.03) (model pseudo-R2=0.54). Our findings that cases increase with temperature and humidity differ from some temperate-zone studies. But they indicate that climate parameters such as humidity and temperature could be predictive of influenza

  6. Survivability of Eurasian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in water varies between strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquatic habitats play critical role in the transmission and maintenance of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses in wild waterfowl; however the importance of these environments in the ecology of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses is unknown. In laboratory-based studies, L...

  7. Transmission of Equine Influenza Virus during an Outbreak Is Characterized by Frequent Mixed Infections and Loose Transmission Bottlenecks

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Joseph; Allen, Richard C.; Baguelin, Marc; Hampson, Katie; Baillie, Gregory J.; Elton, Debra; Newton, J. Richard; Kellam, Paul; Wood, James L. N.; Holmes, Edward C.; Murcia, Pablo R.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of influenza A viruses (IAVs) to cross species barriers and evade host immunity is a major public health concern. Studies on the phylodynamics of IAVs across different scales – from the individual to the population – are essential for devising effective measures to predict, prevent or contain influenza emergence. Understanding how IAVs spread and evolve during outbreaks is critical for the management of epidemics. Reconstructing the transmission network during a single outbreak by sampling viral genetic data in time and space can generate insights about these processes. Here, we obtained intra-host viral sequence data from horses infected with equine influenza virus (EIV) to reconstruct the spread of EIV during a large outbreak. To this end, we analyzed within-host viral populations from sequences covering 90% of the infected yards. By combining gene sequence analyses with epidemiological data, we inferred a plausible transmission network, in turn enabling the comparison of transmission patterns during the course of the outbreak and revealing important epidemiological features that were not apparent using either approach alone. The EIV populations displayed high levels of genetic diversity, and in many cases we observed distinct viral populations containing a dominant variant and a number of related minor variants that were transmitted between infectious horses. In addition, we found evidence of frequent mixed infections and loose transmission bottlenecks in these naturally occurring populations. These frequent mixed infections likely influence the size of epidemics. PMID:23308065

  8. Contact transmission of influenza virus between ferrets imposes a looser bottleneck than respiratory droplet transmission allowing propagation of antiviral resistance

    PubMed Central

    Frise, Rebecca; Bradley, Konrad; van Doremalen, Neeltje; Galiano, Monica; Elderfield, Ruth A.; Stilwell, Peter; Ashcroft, Jonathan W.; Fernandez-Alonso, Mirian; Miah, Shahjahan; Lackenby, Angie; Roberts, Kim L.; Donnelly, Christl A.; Barclay, Wendy S.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. It is important to elucidate the stringency of bottlenecks during transmission to shed light on mechanisms that underlie the evolution and propagation of antigenic drift, host range switching or drug resistance. The virus spreads between people by different routes, including through the air in droplets and aerosols, and by direct contact. By housing ferrets under different conditions, it is possible to mimic various routes of transmission. Here, we inoculated donor animals with a mixture of two viruses whose genomes differed by one or two reverse engineered synonymous mutations, and measured the transmission of the mixture to exposed sentinel animals. Transmission through the air imposed a tight bottleneck since most recipient animals became infected by only one virus. In contrast, a direct contact transmission chain propagated a mixture of viruses suggesting the dose transferred by this route was higher. From animals with a mixed infection of viruses that were resistant and sensitive to the antiviral drug oseltamivir, resistance was propagated through contact transmission but not by air. These data imply that transmission events with a looser bottleneck can propagate minority variants and may be an important route for influenza evolution. PMID:27430528

  9. Contact transmission of influenza virus between ferrets imposes a looser bottleneck than respiratory droplet transmission allowing propagation of antiviral resistance.

    PubMed

    Frise, Rebecca; Bradley, Konrad; van Doremalen, Neeltje; Galiano, Monica; Elderfield, Ruth A; Stilwell, Peter; Ashcroft, Jonathan W; Fernandez-Alonso, Mirian; Miah, Shahjahan; Lackenby, Angie; Roberts, Kim L; Donnelly, Christl A; Barclay, Wendy S

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. It is important to elucidate the stringency of bottlenecks during transmission to shed light on mechanisms that underlie the evolution and propagation of antigenic drift, host range switching or drug resistance. The virus spreads between people by different routes, including through the air in droplets and aerosols, and by direct contact. By housing ferrets under different conditions, it is possible to mimic various routes of transmission. Here, we inoculated donor animals with a mixture of two viruses whose genomes differed by one or two reverse engineered synonymous mutations, and measured the transmission of the mixture to exposed sentinel animals. Transmission through the air imposed a tight bottleneck since most recipient animals became infected by only one virus. In contrast, a direct contact transmission chain propagated a mixture of viruses suggesting the dose transferred by this route was higher. From animals with a mixed infection of viruses that were resistant and sensitive to the antiviral drug oseltamivir, resistance was propagated through contact transmission but not by air. These data imply that transmission events with a looser bottleneck can propagate minority variants and may be an important route for influenza evolution. PMID:27430528

  10. Influenza-Sediment Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusiak, A.; Block, K. A.; Katz, A.; Gottlieb, P.; Alimova, A.; Galarza, J.; Wei, H.; Steiner, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    A typical water fowl can secrete 1012 influenza virions per day. Therefore it is not unexpected that influenza virions interact with sediments in the water column. The influence of sediments on avian influenza virions is not known. With the threat of avian influenza emerging into the human population, it is crucial to understand virus survivability and residence time in a body of water. Influenza and clay sediments are colloidal particles and thus aggregate as explained by DLVO (Derjaguin & Landau, Verwey & Overbeek) theory. Of great importance is an understanding of the types of particulate or macromolecular components that bind the virus particles, and whether the virus remains biologically active. We present results of hetero-aggregation and transmission electron microscopy experiments performed with influenza A/PR8/38. Influenza particles are suspended with sediment and minimal nutrients for several days, after which the components are evaluated to determine influenza concentration and survivability. Transmission electron microscopy results are reported on the influenza-sediment aggregates to elucidate structure and morphology of the components.

  11. Airborne Transmission of Highly Pathogenic H7N1 Influenza Virus in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Courtney; Shao, Hongxia; Angel, Matthew; Chen, Hongjun; Capua, Ilaria; Cattoli, Giovanni; Monne, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian H7 influenza viruses are recognized as potential pandemic viruses, as personnel often become infected during poultry outbreaks. H7 infections in humans typically cause mild conjunctivitis; however, the H7N9 outbreak in the spring of 2013 has resulted in severe respiratory disease. To date, no H7 viruses have acquired the ability for sustained transmission among humans. Airborne transmission is considered a requirement for the emergence of pandemic influenza, and advanced knowledge of the molecular changes or signature required for transmission would allow early identification of pandemic vaccine seed stocks, screening and stockpiling of antiviral compounds, and eradication efforts focused on flocks harboring threatening viruses. Thus, we sought to determine if a highly pathogenic influenza A H7N1 (A/H7N1) virus with no history of human infection could become capable of airborne transmission among ferrets. We show that after 10 serial passages, A/H7N1 developed the ability to be transmitted to cohoused and airborne contact ferrets. Four amino acid mutations (PB2 T81I, NP V284M, and M1 R95K and Q211K) in the internal genes and a minimal amino acid mutation (K/R313R) in the stalk region of the hemagglutinin protein were associated with airborne transmission. Furthermore, transmission was not associated with loss of virulence. These findings highlight the importance of the internal genes in host adaptation and suggest that natural isolates carrying these mutations be further evaluated. Our results demonstrate that a highly pathogenic avian H7 virus can become capable of airborne transmission in a mammalian host, and they support ongoing surveillance and pandemic H7 vaccine development. IMPORTANCE The major findings of this report are that a highly pathogenic strain of H7N1 avian influenza virus can be adapted to become capable of airborne transmission in mammals without mutations altering receptor specificity. Changes in receptor specificity have been

  12. Avian influenza shedding patterns in waterfowl: implications for surveillance, environmental transmission, and disease spread

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viviane Henaux; Samuel, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the recognized importance of fecal/oral transmission of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) via contaminated wetlands, little is known about the length, quantity, or route of AI virus shed by wild waterfowl. We used published laboratory challenge studies to evaluate the length and quantity of low pathogenic (LP) and highly pathogenic (HP) virus shed via oral and cloacal routes by AI-infected ducks and geese, and how these factors might influence AI epidemiology and virus detection. We used survival analysis to estimate the duration of infection (from virus inoculation to the last day virus was shed) and nonlinear models to evaluate temporal patterns in virus shedding. We found higher mean virus titer and longer median infectious period for LPAI-infected ducks (10–11.5 days in oral and cloacal swabs) than HPAI-infected ducks (5 days) and geese (7.5 days). Based on the median bird infectious dose, we found that environmental contamination is two times higher for LPAI- than HPAI-infectious ducks, which implies that susceptible birds may have a higher probability of infection during LPAI than HPAI outbreaks. Less environmental contamination during the course of infection and previously documented shorter environmental persistence for HPAI than LPAI suggest that the environment is a less favorable reservoir for HPAI. The longer infectious period, higher virus titers, and subclinical infections with LPAI viruses favor the spread of these viruses by migratory birds in comparison to HPAI. Given the lack of detection of HPAI viruses through worldwide surveillance, we suggest monitoring for AI should aim at improving our understanding of AI dynamics (in particular, the role of the environment and immunity) using long-term comprehensive live bird, serologic, and environmental sampling at targeted areas. Our findings on LPAI and HPAI shedding patterns over time provide essential information to parameterize environmental transmission and virus spread in predictive

  13. Cost-effectiveness of influenza control measures: a dynamic transmission model-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, S-C; Liao, C-M

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the cost-effectiveness of different influenza control strategies in a school setting in Taiwan. A susceptible-exposure-infected-recovery (SEIR) model was used to simulate influenza transmission and we used a basic reproduction number (R 0)-asymptomatic proportion (θ) control scheme to develop a cost-effectiveness model. Based on our dynamic transmission model and economic evaluation, this study indicated that the optimal cost-effective strategy for all modelling scenarios was a combination of natural ventilation and respiratory masking. The estimated costs were US$10/year per person in winter for one kindergarten student. The cost for hand washing was estimated to be US$32/year per person, which was much lower than that of isolation (US$55/year per person) and vaccination (US$86/year per person) in containing seasonal influenza. Transmission model-based, cost-effectiveness analysis can be a useful tool for providing insight into the impacts of economic factors and health benefits on certain strategies for controlling seasonal influenza. PMID:23481024

  14. Pulmonary immunostimulation with MALP-2 in influenza virus-infected mice increases survival after pneumococcal superinfection.

    PubMed

    Reppe, Katrin; Radünzel, Peter; Dietert, Kristina; Tschernig, Thomas; Wolff, Thorsten; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Gruber, Achim D; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary infection with influenza virus is frequently complicated by bacterial superinfection, with Streptococcus pneumoniae being the most prevalent causal pathogen and hence often associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Local immunosuppression due to pulmonary influenza virus infection has been identified as a major cause of the pathogenesis of secondary bacterial lung infection. Thus, specific local stimulation of the pulmonary innate immune system in subjects with influenza virus infection might improve the host defense against secondary bacterial pathogens. In the present study, we examined the effect of pulmonary immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)-stimulating macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) in influenza A virus (IAV)-infected mice on the course of subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. Female C57BL/6N mice infected with IAV were treated with MALP-2 on day 5 and challenged with S. pneumoniae on day 6. Intratracheal MALP-2 application increased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine release and enhanced the recruitment of leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, into the alveolar space of IAV-infected mice, without detectable systemic side effects. Local pulmonary instillation of MALP-2 in IAV-infected mice 24 h before transnasal pneumococcal infection considerably reduced the bacterial number in the lung tissue without inducing exaggerated inflammation. The pulmonary viral load was not altered by MALP-2. Clinically, MALP-2 treatment of IAV-infected mice increased survival rates and reduced hypothermia and body weight loss after pneumococcal superinfection compared to those of untreated coinfected mice. In conclusion, local immunostimulation with MALP-2 in influenza virus-infected mice improved pulmonary bacterial elimination and increased survival after subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. PMID:26371127

  15. Pulmonary Immunostimulation with MALP-2 in Influenza Virus-Infected Mice Increases Survival after Pneumococcal Superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Reppe, Katrin; Radünzel, Peter; Dietert, Kristina; Tschernig, Thomas; Wolff, Thorsten; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Gruber, Achim D.; Suttorp, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infection with influenza virus is frequently complicated by bacterial superinfection, with Streptococcus pneumoniae being the most prevalent causal pathogen and hence often associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Local immunosuppression due to pulmonary influenza virus infection has been identified as a major cause of the pathogenesis of secondary bacterial lung infection. Thus, specific local stimulation of the pulmonary innate immune system in subjects with influenza virus infection might improve the host defense against secondary bacterial pathogens. In the present study, we examined the effect of pulmonary immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)-stimulating macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) in influenza A virus (IAV)-infected mice on the course of subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. Female C57BL/6N mice infected with IAV were treated with MALP-2 on day 5 and challenged with S. pneumoniae on day 6. Intratracheal MALP-2 application increased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine release and enhanced the recruitment of leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, into the alveolar space of IAV-infected mice, without detectable systemic side effects. Local pulmonary instillation of MALP-2 in IAV-infected mice 24 h before transnasal pneumococcal infection considerably reduced the bacterial number in the lung tissue without inducing exaggerated inflammation. The pulmonary viral load was not altered by MALP-2. Clinically, MALP-2 treatment of IAV-infected mice increased survival rates and reduced hypothermia and body weight loss after pneumococcal superinfection compared to those of untreated coinfected mice. In conclusion, local immunostimulation with MALP-2 in influenza virus-infected mice improved pulmonary bacterial elimination and increased survival after subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. PMID:26371127

  16. Microstructure of atmospheric particles revealed by TXM and a new mode of influenza virus transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, L. M.; Zhang, G. L.; Lei, Q. T.; Li, Y.; Li, X. L.; Hwu, Y. K.; Yi, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    For control of influenza, firstly it is important to find the real virus transmission media. Atmospheric aerosol particles are presumably one of the media. In this study, three typical atmospheric inhaled particles in Shanghai were studied by the synchrotron based transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM). Three dimensional microstructure of the particles reveals that there are many pores contained in, particularly the coal combustion fly particles which may be possible virus carrier. The particles can transport over long distance and cause long-range infections due to its light weight. We suggest a mode which is droplet combining with aerosol mode. By this mode the transmission of global and pandemic influenzas and infection between inland avian far from population and poultry or human living in cities along coast may be explained.

  17. Influenza A virus transmission via respiratory aerosols or droplets as it relates to pandemic potential.

    PubMed

    Richard, Mathilde; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2016-01-01

    Many respiratory viruses of humans originate from animals. For instance, there are now eight paramyxoviruses, four coronaviruses and four orthomxoviruses that cause recurrent epidemics in humans but were once confined to other hosts. In the last decade, several members of the same virus families have jumped the species barrier from animals to humans. Fortunately, these viruses have not become established in humans, because they lacked the ability of sustained transmission between humans. However, these outbreaks highlighted the lack of understanding of what makes a virus transmissible. In part triggered by the relatively high frequency of occurrence of influenza A virus zoonoses and pandemics, the influenza research community has started to investigate the viral genetic and biological traits that drive virus transmission via aerosols or respiratory droplets between mammals. Here we summarize recent discoveries on the genetic and phenotypic traits required for airborne transmission of zoonotic influenza viruses of subtypes H5, H7 and H9 and pandemic viruses of subtypes H1, H2 and H3. Increased understanding of the determinants and mechanisms of respiratory virus transmission is not only key from a basic scientific perspective, but may also aid in assessing the risks posed by zoonotic viruses to human health, and preparedness for such risks. PMID:26385895

  18. Frequent global transmission of H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses from humans to swine, 2009-2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a large-scale phylogenetic approach we identify at least 52 human-to-swine transmission events of pandemic A/H1N1/09 influenza virus. These results highlight the global frequency of swine exposure to human influenza viruses and the permeability of the human-swine species barrier, even followin...

  19. A two-amino acid substitution in the 1918 influenza virus hemagglutinin abolishes transmission of the pandemic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 1918 influenza pandemic was a catastrophic series of virus outbreaks that spread across the globe. Herein we show that only a modest change in the 1918 influenza hemagglutinin receptor binding site alters the transmissibility of this pandemic virus. Two amino acid mutations that cause a switch f...

  20. Mammalian-transmissible H5N1 influenza: facts and perspective.

    PubMed

    Osterholm, Michael T; Kelley, Nicholas S

    2012-01-01

    Two recently submitted (but as yet unpublished) studies describe success in creating mutant isolates of H5N1 influenza A virus that can be transmitted via the respiratory route between ferrets; concern has been raised regarding human-to-human transmissibility of these or similar laboratory-generated influenza viruses. Furthermore, the potential release of methods used in these studies has engendered a great deal of controversy around publishing potential dual-use data and also has served as a catalyst for debates around the true case-fatality rate of H5N1 influenza and the capability of influenza vaccines and antivirals to impact any future unintentional or intentional release of H5N1 virus. In this report, we review available seroepidemiology data for H5N1 infection and discuss how case-finding strategies may influence the overall case-fatality rate reported by the WHO. We also provide information supporting the position that if an H5N1 influenza pandemic occurred, available medical countermeasures would have limited impact on the associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:22366820

  1. Seasonal influenza in the United States, France, and Australia: transmission and prospects for control.

    PubMed

    Chowell, G; Miller, M A; Viboud, C

    2008-06-01

    Recurrent epidemics of influenza are observed seasonally around the world with considerable health and economic consequences. A key quantity for the control of infectious diseases is the reproduction number, which measures the transmissibility of a pathogen and determines the magnitude of public health interventions necessary to control epidemics. Here we applied a simple epidemic model to weekly indicators of influenza mortality to estimate the reproduction numbers of seasonal influenza epidemics spanning three decades in the United States, France, and Australia. We found similar distributions of reproduction number estimates in the three countries, with mean value 1.3 and important year-to-year variability (range 0.9-2.1). Estimates derived from two different mortality indicators (pneumonia and influenza excess deaths and influenza-specific deaths) were in close agreement for the United States (correlation=0.61, P60%) in healthy individuals who respond well to vaccine, in addition to periodic re-vaccination due to evolving viral antigens and waning population immunity. PMID:17634159

  2. Environmental Conditions Affect Exhalation of H3N2 Seasonal and Variant Influenza Viruses and Respiratory Droplet Transmission in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, Kortney M.; Belser, Jessica A.; Veguilla, Vic; Zeng, Hui; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Maines, Taronna R.

    2015-01-01

    The seasonality of influenza virus infections in temperate climates and the role of environmental conditions like temperature and humidity in the transmission of influenza virus through the air are not well understood. Using ferrets housed at four different environmental conditions, we evaluated the respiratory droplet transmission of two influenza viruses (a seasonal H3N2 virus and an H3N2 variant virus, the etiologic virus of a swine to human summertime infection) and concurrently characterized the aerosol shedding profiles of infected animals. Comparisons were made among the different temperature and humidity conditions and between the two viruses to determine if the H3N2 variant virus exhibited enhanced capabilities that may have contributed to the infections occurring in the summer. We report here that although increased levels of H3N2 variant virus were found in ferret nasal wash and exhaled aerosol samples compared to the seasonal H3N2 virus, enhanced respiratory droplet transmission was not observed under any of the environmental settings. However, overall environmental conditions were shown to modulate the frequency of influenza virus transmission through the air. Transmission occurred most frequently at 23°C/30%RH, while the levels of infectious virus in aerosols exhaled by infected ferrets agree with these results. Improving our understanding of how environmental conditions affect influenza virus infectivity and transmission may reveal ways to better protect the public against influenza virus infections. PMID:25969995

  3. Patterns of early transmission of pandemic influenza in London – link with deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Balasegaram, Sooria; Ogilvie, Flora; Glasswell, Amy; Anderson, Charlotte; Cleary, Vivien; Turbitt, Deborah; McCloskey, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Balasegaram et al. (2012) Patterns of early transmission of pandemic influenza in London – link with deprivation. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), e35–e41. Background  During the early containment phase in England from April to June 2009, the national strategy for H1N1 pandemic influenza involved case investigation and treatment, and tracing and prophylaxis of contacts. Objective  To describe the relationship between early transmission of H1N1 pandemic influenza in London and age and socio‐economic status. Methods  Epidemiological data on cases of pandemic flu in London reported to the London Flu Response Centre were analysed to determine patterns of transmission. Results  There were 3487 reported cases (2202 confirmed, 1272 presumed and 14 probable) from 20 April to 28 June 2009, during the ‘containment’ period. The highest report rate of 206 per 100 000 (95% CI 195–218) was seen in primary school–age children (5−11 years) followed by 129 (95% CI 119–139) in secondary school–age children (12–18 years). Reports of cases were initially concentrated in affluent areas but overall showed a clear trend with deprivation and risk ratio of 2·32 (95% CI 1·94–2·78) between the most deprived and the least deprived. Conclusion  Early transmissions were highest amongst school‐aged children but linked with socio‐economic deprivation across all age groups. PMID:22236079

  4. Transmission of influenza reflects seasonality of wild birds across the annual cycle.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nichola J; Ma, Eric J; Meixell, Brandt W; Lindberg, Mark S; Boyce, Walter M; Runstadler, Jonathan A

    2016-08-01

    Influenza A Viruses (IAV) in nature must overcome shifting transmission barriers caused by the mobility of their primary host, migratory wild birds, that change throughout the annual cycle. Using a phylogenetic network of viral sequences from North American wild birds (2008-2011) we demonstrate a shift from intraspecific to interspecific transmission that along with reassortment, allows IAV to achieve viral flow across successive seasons from summer to winter. Our study supports amplification of IAV during summer breeding seeded by overwintering virus persisting locally and virus introduced from a wide range of latitudes. As birds migrate from breeding sites to lower latitudes, they become involved in transmission networks with greater connectivity to other bird species, with interspecies transmission of reassortant viruses peaking during the winter. We propose that switching transmission dynamics may be a critical strategy for pathogens that infect mobile hosts inhabiting regions with strong seasonality. PMID:27324078

  5. Influenza transmission during a one‐year period (2009–2010) in a Sahelian city: low temperature plays a major role

    PubMed Central

    Jusot, Jean‐François; Adamou, Lagaré; Collard, Jean‐Marc

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Jusot J‐François et al. (2011) Influenza transmission during a one‐year period (2009–2010) in a Sahelian city: low temperature plays a major role. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2011.00286.x. This work aimed at studying the link between some climatic factors and the occurrence of influenza in Niamey, Niger. Patients with influenza like illness or severe acute respiratory illness were recruited through a sentinel network. A nasopharyngeal swab was sampled and tested for influenza viruses A and B by RT‐PCR. Time series of daily counts of influenza cases and climatic factors were linked using a generalized additive model. Among the 320 patients recruited, 76 were confirmed positive for influenza. Influenza cases increased significantly with minimal temperatures and high visibility. This work brings some valuable explanation to the impact of low temperatures on influenza transmission. PMID:21933356

  6. Transmissibility of the 1918 pandemic influenza in Montreal and Winnipeg of Canada

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shenghai; Yan, Ping; Winchester, Brian; Wang, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Background  The threat of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) is still causing widespread public concern. A comprehensive understanding of the epidemiology of 1918 pandemic influenza commonly referred to as the Spanish flu may be helpful in offering insight into control strategies for the new pandemic. Objective  We explore how the preparedness for a pandemic at the community and individual level impacts the spread of the virus by comparing the transmissibility of the 1918 Spanish flu in two Canadian cities: Montreal and Winnipeg, bearing in mind that each pandemic is unique and the current one may not follow the pattern of the 1918 outbreak. Methods  The historical epidemiological data obtained for Montreal and Winnipeg in Canada is analyzed to estimate the basic reproduction number which is the most important summary measure of transmission potential of the pandemic. Results  The transmissibility of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus in Winnipeg in the fall of 1918 was found to be much lower than in Montreal based on the estimated reproduction number obtained assuming different serial intervals which are the time between onsets of symptoms in an index case and a secondary case. Conclusion  The early preparedness and public health control measures could suggest an explanation for the fact that the number of secondary cases generated by a primary case was significantly reduced in Winnipeg comparing to it in Montreal. PMID:20021504

  7. Influenza A virus acquires enhanced pathogenicity and transmissibility after serial passages in swine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai; Sun, Honglei; Sun, Zhenhong; Sun, Yipeng; Kong, Weili; Pu, Juan; Ma, Guangpeng; Yin, Yanbo; Yang, Hanchun; Guo, Xin; Chang, Kin-Chow; Liu, Jinhua

    2014-10-01

    Genetic and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus was derived from well-established swine influenza lineages; however, there is no convincing evidence that the pandemic virus was generated from a direct precursor in pigs. Furthermore, the evolutionary dynamics of influenza virus in pigs have not been well documented. Here, we subjected a recombinant virus (rH1N1) with the same constellation makeup as the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus to nine serial passages in pigs. The severity of infection sequentially increased with each passage. Deep sequencing of viral quasispecies from the ninth passage found five consensus amino acid mutations: PB1 A469T, PA 1129T, NA N329D, NS1 N205K, and NEP T48N. Mutations in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, however, differed greatly between the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Three representative viral clones with the five consensus mutations were selected for functional evaluation. Relative to the parental virus, the three viral clones showed enhanced replication and polymerase activity in vitro and enhanced replication, pathogenicity, and transmissibility in pigs, guinea pigs, and ferrets in vivo. Specifically, two mutants of rH1N1 (PB1 A469T and a combination of NS1 N205K and NEP T48N) were identified as determinants of transmissibility in guinea pigs. Crucially, one mutant viral clone with the five consensus mutations, which also carried D187E, K211E, and S289N mutations in its HA, additionally was able to infect ferrets by airborne transmission as effectively as the pandemic virus. Our findings demonstrate that influenza virus can acquire viral characteristics that are similar to those of the pandemic virus after limited serial passages in pigs. Importance: We demonstrate here that an engineered reassortant swine influenza virus, with the same gene constellation pattern as the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus and subjected to only nine serial passages in pigs, acquired greatly enhanced virulence and transmissibility

  8. Quantifying Transmission of Highly Pathogenic and Low Pathogenicity H7N1 Avian Influenza in Turkeys

    PubMed Central

    Saenz, Roberto A.; Essen, Steve C.; Brookes, Sharon M.; Iqbal, Munir; Wood, James L. N.; Grenfell, Bryan T.; McCauley, John W.; Brown, Ian H.; Gog, Julia R.

    2012-01-01

    Outbreaks of avian influenza in poultry can be devastating, yet many of the basic epidemiological parameters have not been accurately characterised. In 1999–2000 in Northern Italy, outbreaks of H7N1 low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAI) were followed by the emergence of H7N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI). This study investigates the transmission dynamics in turkeys of representative HPAI and LPAI H7N1 virus strains from this outbreak in an experimental setting, allowing direct comparison of the two strains. The fitted transmission rates for the two strains are similar: 2.04 (1.5–2.7) per day for HPAI, 2.01 (1.6–2.5) per day for LPAI. However, the mean infectious period is far shorter for HPAI (1.47 (1.3–1.7) days) than for LPAI (7.65 (7.0–8.3) days), due to the rapid death of infected turkeys. Hence the basic reproductive ratio, is significantly lower for HPAI (3.01 (2.2–4.0)) than for LPAI (15.3 (11.8–19.7)). The comparison of transmission rates and are critically important in relation to understanding how HPAI might emerge from LPAI. Two competing hypotheses for how transmission rates vary with population size are tested by fitting competing models to experiments with differing numbers of turkeys. A model with frequency-dependent transmission gives a significantly better fit to experimental data than density-dependent transmission. This has important implications for extrapolating experimental results from relatively small numbers of birds to the commercial poultry flock size, and for how control, including vaccination, might scale with flock size. PMID:23028760

  9. Respiratory transmission of an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from a harbour seal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Ip, Hon S.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Yoon, Sun W.; Johnson, Jordan; Beck, Melinda A.; Webby, Richard J.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing human H7N9 influenza infections highlight the threat of emerging avian influenza viruses. In 2011, an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from moribund New England harbour seals was shown to have naturally acquired mutations known to increase the transmissibility of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses. To elucidate the potential human health threat, here we evaluate a panel of avian H3N8 viruses and find that the harbour seal virus displays increased affinity for mammalian receptors, transmits via respiratory droplets in ferrets and replicates in human lung cells. Analysis of a panel of human sera for H3N8 neutralizing antibodies suggests that there is no population-wide immunity to these viruses. The prevalence of H3N8 viruses in birds and multiple mammalian species including recent isolations from pigs and evidence that it was a past human pandemic virus make the need for surveillance and risk analysis of these viruses of public health importance.

  10. Respiratory transmission of an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from a harbour seal

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Ip, Hon S.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Yoon, Sun Woo; Johnson, Jordan; Beck, Melinda A.; Webby, Richard J.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing human H7N9 influenza infections highlight the threat of emerging avian influenza viruses. In 2011, an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from moribund New England harbour seals was shown to have naturally acquired mutations known to increase the transmissibility of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses. To elucidate the potential human health threat, here we evaluate a panel of avian H3N8 viruses and find that the harbour seal virus displays increased affinity for mammalian receptors, transmits via respiratory droplets in ferrets and replicates in human lung cells. Analysis of a panel of human sera for H3N8 neutralizing antibodies suggests that there is no population-wide immunity to these viruses. The prevalence of H3N8 viruses in birds and multiple mammalian species including recent isolations from pigs and evidence that it was a past human pandemic virus make the need for surveillance and risk analysis of these viruses of public health importance. PMID:25183346

  11. Transmission parameters of the A/H1N1 (2009) influenza virus pandemic: a review

    PubMed Central

    Boëlle, Pierre‐Yves; Ansart, Séverine; Cori, Anne; Valleron, Alain‐Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Boëlle P‐Y et al. (2011) Transmission parameters of the A/H1N1 (2009) influenza virus pandemic: a review. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 306–316. Background  The new influenza virus A/H1N1 (2009), identified in mid‐2009, rapidly spread over the world. Estimating the transmissibility of this new virus was a public health priority. Methods  We reviewed all studies presenting estimates of the serial interval or generation time and the reproduction number of the A/H1N1 (2009) virus infection. Results  Thirteen studies documented the serial interval from household or close‐contact studies, with overall mean 3 days (95% CI: 2·4, 3·6); taking into account tertiary transmission reduced this estimate to 2·6 days. Model‐based estimates were more variable, from 1·9 to 6 days. Twenty‐four studies reported reproduction numbers for community‐based epidemics at the town or country level. The range was 1·2–3·1, with larger estimates reported at the beginning of the pandemic. Accounting for under‐reporting in the early period of the pandemic and limiting variation because of the choice of the generation time interval, the reproduction number was between 1·2 and 2·3 with median 1·5. Discussion  The serial interval of A/H1N1 (2009) flu was typically short, with mean value similar to the seasonal flu. The estimates of the reproduction number were more variable. Compared with past influenza pandemics, the median reproduction number was similar (1968) or slightly smaller (1889, 1918, 1957). PMID:21668690

  12. Expression of urease by Haemophilus influenzae during human respiratory tract infection and role in survival in an acid environment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is a common cause of otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infection in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Prior studies have shown that H. influenzae expresses abundant urease during growth in the middle ear of the chinchilla and in pooled human sputum, suggesting that expression of urease is important for colonization and infection in the hostile environments of the middle ear and in the airways in adults. Virtually nothing else is known about the urease of H. influenzae, which was characterized in the present study. Results Analysis by reverse transcriptase PCR revealed that the ure gene cluster is expressed as a single transcript. Knockout mutants of a urease structural gene (ureC) and of the entire ure operon demonstrated no detectable urease activity indicating that this operon is the only one encoding an active urease. The ure operon is present in all strains tested, including clinical isolates from otitis media and COPD. Urease activity decreased as nitrogen availability increased. To test the hypothesis that urease is expressed during human infection, purified recombinant urease C was used in ELISA with pre acquisition and post infection serum from adults with COPD who experienced infections caused by H. influenzae. A total of 28% of patients developed new antibodies following infection indicating that H. influenzae expresses urease during airway infection. Bacterial viability assays performed at varying pH indicate that urease mediates survival of H. influenzae in an acid environment. Conclusions The H. influenzae genome contains a single urease operon that mediates urease expression and that is present in all clinical isolates tested. Nitrogen availability is a determinant of urease expression. H. influenzae expresses urease during human respiratory tract infection and urease is a target of the human antibody response. Expression of urease enhances viability in an acid

  13. Influenza.

    PubMed

    Labella, Angelena M; Merel, Susan E

    2013-07-01

    Influenza is a common virus whose ability to change its genetic makeup allows for disease of pandemic proportion. This article summarizes the different strains of influenza circulating in the United States for the past century, the diagnosis and treatment of influenza, as well as the different ways to prevent disease. This information will be of value to clinicians caring for patients both in the hospital and in the community. PMID:23809717

  14. The role of different social contexts in shaping influenza transmission during the 2009 pandemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajelli, Marco; Poletti, Piero; Melegaro, Alessia; Merler, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    Evaluating the relative importance of different social contexts in which infection transmission occurs is critical for identifying optimal intervention strategies. Nonetheless, an overall picture of influenza transmission in different social contexts has yet to emerge. Here we provide estimates of the fraction of infections generated in different social contexts during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in Italy by making use of a highly detailed individual-based model accounting for time use data and parametrized on the basis of observed age-specific seroprevalence. We found that 41.6% (95%CI: 39-43.7%) of infections occurred in households, 26.7% (95%CI: 21-33.2) in schools, 3.3% (95%CI: 1.7-5%) in workplaces, and 28.4% (95%CI: 24.6-31.9%) in the general community. The above estimates strongly depend on the lower susceptibility to infection of individuals 19+ years old compared to younger ones, estimated to be 0.2 (95%CI 0.12-0.28). We also found that school closure over the weekends contributed to decrease the effective reproduction number of about 8% and significantly affected the pattern of transmission. These results highlight the pivotal role played by schools in the transmission of the 2009 H1N1 influenza. They may be relevant in the evaluation of intervention options and, hence, for informing policy decisions.

  15. Ionizing air affects influenza virus infectivity and prevents airborne-transmission.

    PubMed

    Hagbom, Marie; Nordgren, Johan; Nybom, Rolf; Hedlund, Kjell-Olof; Wigzell, Hans; Svensson, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    By the use of a modified ionizer device we describe effective prevention of airborne transmitted influenza A (strain Panama 99) virus infection between animals and inactivation of virus (>97%). Active ionizer prevented 100% (4/4) of guinea pigs from infection. Moreover, the device effectively captured airborne transmitted calicivirus, rotavirus and influenza virus, with recovery rates up to 21% after 40 min in a 19 m(3) room. The ionizer generates negative ions, rendering airborne particles/aerosol droplets negatively charged and electrostatically attracts them to a positively charged collector plate. Trapped viruses are then identified by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR. The device enables unique possibilities for rapid and simple removal of virus from air and offers possibilities to simultaneously identify and prevent airborne transmission of viruses. PMID:26101102

  16. Ionizing air affects influenza virus infectivity and prevents airborne-transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hagbom, Marie; Nordgren, Johan; Nybom, Rolf; Hedlund, Kjell-Olof; Wigzell, Hans; Svensson, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    By the use of a modified ionizer device we describe effective prevention of airborne transmitted influenza A (strain Panama 99) virus infection between animals and inactivation of virus (>97%). Active ionizer prevented 100% (4/4) of guinea pigs from infection. Moreover, the device effectively captured airborne transmitted calicivirus, rotavirus and influenza virus, with recovery rates up to 21% after 40 min in a 19 m3 room. The ionizer generates negative ions, rendering airborne particles/aerosol droplets negatively charged and electrostatically attracts them to a positively charged collector plate. Trapped viruses are then identified by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR. The device enables unique possibilities for rapid and simple removal of virus from air and offers possibilities to simultaneously identify and prevent airborne transmission of viruses. PMID:26101102

  17. Assessment of transmission, pathogenesis and adaptation of H2 subtype influenza viruses in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Claudia; Yang, Hua; Carney, Paul J; Pearce, Melissa B; Katz, Jacqueline M; Stevens, James; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2015-03-01

    After their disappearance from the human population in 1968, influenza H2 viruses have continued to circulate in the natural avian reservoir. The isolation of this virus subtype from multiple bird species as well as swine highlights the need to better understand the potential of these viruses to spread and cause disease in humans. Here we analyzed the virulence, transmissibility and receptor-binding preference of two avian influenza H2 viruses (H2N2 and H2N3) and compared them to a swine H2N3 (A/swine/Missouri/2124514/2006 [swMO]), and a human H2N2 (A/England/10/1967 [Eng/67]) virus using the ferret model as a mammalian host. Both avian H2 viruses possessed the capacity to spread efficiently between cohoused ferrets, and the swine (swMO) and human (Eng/67) viruses transmitted to naïve ferrets by respiratory droplets. Further characterization of the swMO hemagglutinin (HA) by x-ray crystallography and glycan microarray array identified receptor-specific adaptive mutations. As influenza virus quasispecies dynamics during transmission have not been well characterized, we sequenced nasal washes collected during transmission studies to better understand experimental adaptation of H2 HA. The avian H2 viruses isolated from ferret nasal washes contained mutations in the HA1, including a Gln226Leu substitution, which is a mutation associated with α2,6 sialic acid (human-like) binding preference. These results suggest that the molecular structure of HA in viruses of the H2 subtype continue to have the potential to adapt to a mammalian host and become transmissible, after acquiring additional genetic markers. PMID:25659818

  18. Exhaled Aerosol Transmission of Pandemic and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses in the Ferret

    PubMed Central

    Koster, Frederick; Gouveia, Kristine; Zhou, Yue; Lowery, Kristin; Russell, Robert; MacInnes, Heather; Pollock, Zemmie; Layton, R. Colby; Cromwell, Jennifer; Toleno, Denise; Pyle, John; Zubelewicz, Michael; Harrod, Kevin; Sampath, Rangarajan; Hofstadler, Steven; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yushi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    2012-01-01

    Person-to-person transmission of influenza viruses occurs by contact (direct and fomites) and non-contact (droplet and small particle aerosol) routes, but the quantitative dynamics and relative contributions of these routes are incompletely understood. The transmissibility of influenza strains estimated from secondary attack rates in closed human populations is confounded by large variations in population susceptibilities. An experimental method to phenotype strains for transmissibility in an animal model could provide relative efficiencies of transmission. We developed an experimental method to detect exhaled viral aerosol transmission between unanesthetized infected and susceptible ferrets, measured aerosol particle size and number, and quantified the viral genomic RNA in the exhaled aerosol. During brief 3-hour exposures to exhaled viral aerosols in airflow-controlled chambers, three strains of pandemic 2009 H1N1 strains were frequently transmitted to susceptible ferrets. In contrast one seasonal H1N1 strain was not transmitted in spite of higher levels of viral RNA in the exhaled aerosol. Among three pandemic strains, the two strains causing weight loss and illness in the intranasally infected ‘donor’ ferrets were transmitted less efficiently from the donor than the strain causing no detectable illness, suggesting that the mucosal inflammatory response may attenuate viable exhaled virus. Although exhaled viral RNA remained constant, transmission efficiency diminished from day 1 to day 5 after donor infection. Thus, aerosol transmission between ferrets may be dependent on at least four characteristics of virus-host relationships including the level of exhaled virus, infectious particle size, mucosal inflammation, and viral replication efficiency in susceptible mucosa. PMID:22509254

  19. Factors associated with transmission of influenza-like illness in a cohort of households containing multiple children

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Chelsea R; McCaw, James M; Fairmaid, Emily J; Brown, Lorena E; Leder, Karin; Sinclair, Martha; McVernon, Jodie

    2015-01-01

    Background Household studies of influenza-like illness (ILI) afford opportunities to study determinants of respiratory virus transmission. Objectives We examined predictors of ILI transmission within households containing at least two children. Methods A prospective cohort study recorded ILI symptoms daily for 2712 adult and child participants during the 1998 influenza season in Victoria, Australia. Logistic and Poisson regressions were used to explore predictors of household transmission of ILI and the secondary household attack proportion (SHAP). A date of illness onset during the influenza season was used as a proxy indicator of ILI associated with influenza infection (as opposed to other aetiological causes). Results A total of 1009 ILI episodes were reported by 781 of 2712 (29%) participants residing in 157 households. Transmission, defined as detection of ILI in one or more household members following identification of an index case, was observed in 206 of 705 (29%) household introductions. Transmission of ILI was significantly associated with the onset of ILI in the index case during the peak influenza season compared with the remainder of the observation period (37% versus 27%, odds ratio = 1·59, 95% CI 1·09, 2·31, P = 0·017). The SHAP was 0·12, higher if the index case was of secondary school age [incidence risk ratio (IRR) = 1·80, 95% CI 1·08, 2·98, P = 0·022]. Conclusions Risk of household transmission of ILI was increased during the peak influenza season, indicating an increased burden of disease during the period of influenza circulation. In this cohort, secondary-school-aged children and adults were important transmitters of ILI. PMID:26061755

  20. NADPH Oxidase 1 Is Associated with Altered Host Survival and T Cell Phenotypes after Influenza A Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Amelia R.; De La Cruz, Juan A.; Cao, Weiping; Patel, Jenish; Belser, Jessica A.; McCoy, James; Liepkalns, Justine S.; Amoah, Samuel; Cheng, Guangjie; Ranjan, Priya; Diebold, Becky A.; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Zaki, Sherif; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Lambeth, J. David; Gangappa, Shivaprakash

    2016-01-01

    The role of the reactive oxygen species-producing NADPH oxidase family of enzymes in the pathology of influenza A virus infection remains enigmatic. Previous reports implicated NADPH oxidase 2 in influenza A virus-induced inflammation. In contrast, NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) was reported to decrease inflammation in mice within 7 days post-influenza A virus infection. However, the effect of NADPH oxidase 1 on lethality and adaptive immunity after influenza A virus challenge has not been explored. Here we report improved survival and decreased morbidity in mice with catalytically inactive NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1*/Y) compared with controls after challenge with A/PR/8/34 influenza A virus. While changes in lung inflammation were not obvious between Nox1*/Y and control mice, we observed alterations in the T cell response to influenza A virus by day 15 post-infection, including increased interleukin-7 receptor-expressing virus-specific CD8+ T cells in lungs and draining lymph nodes of Nox1*/Y, and increased cytokine-producing T cells in lungs and spleen. Furthermore, a greater percentage of conventional and interstitial dendritic cells from Nox1*/Y draining lymph nodes expressed the co-stimulatory ligand CD40 within 6 days post-infection. Results indicate that NADPH oxidase 1 modulates the innate and adaptive cellular immune response to influenza virus infection, while also playing a role in host survival. Results suggest that NADPH oxidase 1 inhibitors may be beneficial as adjunct therapeutics during acute influenza infection. PMID:26910342

  1. Evolutionary Analysis of Inter-Farm Transmission Dynamics in a Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Bataille, Arnaud; van der Meer, Frank; Stegeman, Arjan; Koch, Guus

    2011-01-01

    Phylogenetic studies have largely contributed to better understand the emergence, spread and evolution of highly pathogenic avian influenza during epidemics, but sampling of genetic data has never been detailed enough to allow mapping of the spatiotemporal spread of avian influenza viruses during a single epidemic. Here, we present genetic data of H7N7 viruses produced from 72% of the poultry farms infected during the 2003 epidemic in the Netherlands. We use phylogenetic analyses to unravel the pathways of virus transmission between farms and between infected areas. In addition, we investigated the evolutionary processes shaping viral genetic diversity, and assess how they could have affected our phylogenetic analyses. Our results show that the H7N7 virus was characterized by a high level of genetic diversity driven mainly by a high neutral substitution rate, purifying selection and limited positive selection. We also identified potential reassortment in the three genes that we have tested, but they had only a limited effect on the resolution of the inter-farm transmission network. Clonal sequencing analyses performed on six farm samples showed that at least one farm sample presented very complex virus diversity and was probably at the origin of chronological anomalies in the transmission network. However, most virus sequences could be grouped within clearly defined and chronologically sound clusters of infection and some likely transmission events between farms located 0.8–13 Km apart were identified. In addition, three farms were found as most likely source of virus introduction in distantly located new areas. These long distance transmission events were likely facilitated by human-mediated transport, underlining the need for strict enforcement of biosafety measures during outbreaks. This study shows that in-depth genetic analysis of virus outbreaks at multiple scales can provide critical information on virus transmission dynamics and can be used to increase

  2. Replication and transmission of mammalian-adapted H9 subtype influenza virus in pigs and quail.

    PubMed

    Obadan, Adebimpe O; Kimble, Brian J; Rajao, Daniela; Lager, Kelly; Santos, Jefferson J S; Vincent, Amy; Perez, Daniel R

    2015-09-01

    Influenza A virus is a major pathogen of birds, swine and humans. Strains can jump between species in a process often requiring mutations and reassortment, resulting in outbreaks and, potentially, pandemics. H9N2 avian influenza is predominant in poultry across Asia and occasionally infects humans and swine. Pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) is endemic in humans and swine and has a history of reassortment in pigs. Previous studies have shown the compatibility of H9N2 and H1N1pdm for reassortment in ferrets, a model for human infection and transmission. Here, the effects of ferret adaptation of H9 surface gene segments on the infectivity and transmission in at-risk natural hosts, specifically swine and quail, were analysed. Reassortant H9N1 and H9N2 viruses, carrying seven or six gene segments from H1N1pdm, showed infectivity and transmissibility in swine, unlike the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. In quail, only the reassortant H9N2 with the six internal gene segments from the H1N1pdm strain was able to infect and transmit, although less efficiently than the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. These results highlight that ferret-adapted mutations on the haemagglutinin of H9 subtype virus do not restrict the ability of the virus to infect swine and quail, and that the ability to transmit in these species depends on the context of the whole virus. As such, this study emphasizes the threat that H9N2 reassortant viruses pose to humans and agricultural species and the importance of the genetic constellation of the virus to its ability to replicate and transmit in natural hosts of influenza. PMID:25986634

  3. Replication and transmission of mammalian-adapted H9 subtype influenza virus in pigs and quail

    PubMed Central

    Obadan, Adebimpe O.; Kimble, Brian J.; Rajao, Daniela; Lager, Kelly; Santos, Jefferson J. S.; Vincent, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a major pathogen of birds, swine and humans. Strains can jump between species in a process often requiring mutations and reassortment, resulting in outbreaks and, potentially, pandemics. H9N2 avian influenza is predominant in poultry across Asia and occasionally infects humans and swine. Pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) is endemic in humans and swine and has a history of reassortment in pigs. Previous studies have shown the compatibility of H9N2 and H1N1pdm for reassortment in ferrets, a model for human infection and transmission. Here, the effects of ferret adaptation of H9 surface gene segments on the infectivity and transmission in at-risk natural hosts, specifically swine and quail, were analysed. Reassortant H9N1 and H9N2 viruses, carrying seven or six gene segments from H1N1pdm, showed infectivity and transmissibility in swine, unlike the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. In quail, only the reassortant H9N2 with the six internal gene segments from the H1N1pdm strain was able to infect and transmit, although less efficiently than the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. These results highlight that ferret-adapted mutations on the haemagglutinin of H9 subtype virus do not restrict the ability of the virus to infect swine and quail, and that the ability to transmit in these species depends on the context of the whole virus. As such, this study emphasizes the threat that H9N2 reassortant viruses pose to humans and agricultural species and the importance of the genetic constellation of the virus to its ability to replicate and transmit in natural hosts of influenza. PMID:25986634

  4. Transmission of Aerosolized Seasonal H1N1 Influenza A to Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    MacInnes, Heather; Zhou, Yue; Gouveia, Kristine; Cromwell, Jenna; Lowery, Kristin; Layton, R. Colby; Zubelewicz, Michael; Sampath, Rangarajan; Hofstadler, Steven; Liu, Yushi; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Koster, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Influenza virus is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet little quantitative understanding of transmission is available to guide evidence-based public health practice. Recent studies of influenza non-contact transmission between ferrets and guinea pigs have provided insights into the relative transmission efficiencies of pandemic and seasonal strains, but the infecting dose and subsequent contagion has not been quantified for most strains. In order to measure the aerosol infectious dose for 50% (aID50) of seronegative ferrets, seasonal influenza virus was nebulized into an exposure chamber with controlled airflow limiting inhalation to airborne particles less than 5 µm diameter. Airborne virus was collected by liquid impinger and Teflon filters during nebulization of varying doses of aerosolized virus. Since culturable virus was accurately captured on filters only up to 20 minutes, airborne viral RNA collected during 1-hour exposures was quantified by two assays, a high-throughput RT-PCR/mass spectrometry assay detecting 6 genome segments (Ibis T5000™ Biosensor system) and a standard real time RT-qPCR assay. Using the more sensitive T5000 assay, the aID50 for A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) was approximately 4 infectious virus particles under the exposure conditions used. Although seroconversion and sustained levels of viral RNA in upper airway secretions suggested established mucosal infection, viral cultures were almost always negative. Thus after inhalation, this seasonal H1N1 virus may replicate less efficiently than H3N2 virus after mucosal deposition and exhibit less contagion after aerosol exposure. PMID:21949718

  5. Influenza A Virus Coinfection through Transmission Can Support High Levels of Reassortment

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hui; Li, Lian; White, Maria C.; Steel, John

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The reassortment of gene segments between influenza viruses increases genomic diversity and plays an important role in viral evolution. We have shown previously that this process is highly efficient within a coinfected cell and, given synchronous coinfection at moderate or high doses, can give rise to ∼60 to 70% of progeny shed from an animal host. Conversely, reassortment in vivo can be rendered undetectable by lowering viral doses or extending the time between infections. One might also predict that seeding of transmitted viruses into different sites within the target tissue could limit subsequent reassortment. Given the potential for stochastic factors to restrict reassortment during natural infection, we sought to determine its efficiency in a host coinfected through transmission. Two scenarios were tested in a guinea pig model, using influenza A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2) virus (wt) and a silently mutated variant (var) thereof as parental virus strains. In the first, coinfection was achieved by exposing a naive guinea pig to two cagemates, one infected with wt and the other with var virus. When such exposure led to coinfection, robust reassortment was typically seen, with 50 to 100% of isolates carrying reassortant genomes at one or more time points. In the second scenario, naive guinea pigs were exposed to a cagemate that had been coinoculated with wt and var viruses. Here, reassortment occurred in the coinoculated donor host, multiple variants were transmitted, and reassortants were prevalent in the recipient host. Together, these results demonstrate the immense potential for reassortment to generate viral diversity in nature. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses evolve rapidly under selection due to the generation of viral diversity through two mechanisms. The first is the introduction of random errors into the genome by the viral polymerase, which occurs with a frequency of approximately 10−5 errors/nucleotide replicated. The second is reassortment, or the

  6. A mouse model for the study of contact-dependent transmission of influenza A virus and the factors that govern transmissibility.

    PubMed

    Edenborough, Kathryn M; Gilbertson, Brad P; Brown, Lorena E

    2012-12-01

    Influenza A virus transmission by direct contact is not well characterized. Here, we describe a mouse model for investigation of factors regulating contact-dependent transmission. Strains within the H3N2 but not H1N1 subtype of influenza virus were transmissible, and reverse-engineered viruses representing hybrids of these subtypes showed that the viral hemagglutinin is a determinant of the transmissible phenotype. Transmission to contact mice occurred within the first 6 to 54 h after cohousing with directly infected index mice, and the proportion of contacts infected within this period was reduced if the index mice had been preinfected with a heterologous subtype virus. A threshold level of virus present in the saliva of the index mice was identified, above which the likelihood of transmission was greatly increased. There was no correlation with transmission and viral loads in the nose or lung. This model could be useful for preclinical evaluation of antiviral and vaccine efficacy in combating contact-dependent transmission of influenza. PMID:22951824

  7. MS2 Coliphage as a Surrogate for 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus (pH1N1) in Surface Survival Studies on N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators

    PubMed Central

    Coulliette, A.D.; Perry, K.A.; Fisher, E.M.; Edwards, J.R.; Shaffer, R.E.; Noble-Wang, J.

    2015-01-01

    Research on influenza viruses regarding transmission and survival has surged in the recent years due to infectious emerging strains and outbreaks such as the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic. MS2 coliphage has been applied as a surrogate for pathogenic respiratory viruses, such as influenza, as it’s safe for personnel to handle and requires less time and labor to measure virus infectivity. However, direct comparisons to determine the effectiveness of coliphage as a surrogate for influenza virus regarding droplet persistence on personal protective equipment such as N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) are lacking. Persistence of viral droplets deposited on FFRs in healthcare settings is important to discern due to the potential risk of infection via indirect fomite transmission. The objective of this study was to determine if MS2 coliphage could be applied as a surrogate for influenza A viruses for studying persistence when applied to the FFRs as a droplet. The persistence of MS2 coliphage and 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus on FFR coupons in different matrices (viral media, 2% fetal bovine serum, and 5 mg ml−1 mucin) were compared over time (4, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 144 hours) in typical absolute humidity conditions (4.1 × 105 mPa [18°C/20% relative humidity (RH)]). Data revealed significant differences in viral infectivity over the 6-day period (H1N1- P <0.0001; MS2 - P <0.005), although a significant correlation of viral log10 reduction in 2% FBS (P <0.01) was illustrated. Overall, MS2 coliphage was not determined to be a sufficient surrogate for influenza A virus with respect to droplet persistence when applied to the N95 FFR as a droplet. PMID:26500392

  8. Modeling Seasonal Influenza Transmission and Its Association with Climate Factors in Thailand Using Time-Series and ARIMAX Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chadsuthi, Sudarat; Iamsirithaworn, Sopon; Triampo, Wannapong; Modchang, Charin

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a worldwide respiratory infectious disease that easily spreads from one person to another. Previous research has found that the influenza transmission process is often associated with climate variables. In this study, we used autocorrelation and partial autocorrelation plots to determine the appropriate autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model for influenza transmission in the central and southern regions of Thailand. The relationships between reported influenza cases and the climate data, such as the amount of rainfall, average temperature, average maximum relative humidity, average minimum relative humidity, and average relative humidity, were evaluated using cross-correlation function. Based on the available data of suspected influenza cases and climate variables, the most appropriate ARIMA(X) model for each region was obtained. We found that the average temperature correlated with influenza cases in both central and southern regions, but average minimum relative humidity played an important role only in the southern region. The ARIMAX model that includes the average temperature with a 4-month lag and the minimum relative humidity with a 2-month lag is the appropriate model for the central region, whereas including the minimum relative humidity with a 4-month lag results in the best model for the southern region. PMID:26664492

  9. Influenza

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction During the autumn-winter months (influenza seasons), influenza circulates more frequently, causing a greater proportion of influenza-like illness, and sometimes serious seasonal epidemics. The incidence of infection depends on the underlying immunity of the population. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of vaccines to prevent influenza? What are the effects of antiviral chemoprophylaxis of influenza? What are the effects of antiviral medications to treat influenza? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 21 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: vaccines, amantadine, oseltamivir, zanamivir, rimantadine. PMID:19445759

  10. Reconstruction of disease transmission rates: Applications to measles, dengue, and influenza.

    PubMed

    Lange, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Transmission rates are key in understanding the spread of infectious diseases. Using the framework of compartmental models, we introduce a simple method to reconstruct time series of transmission rates directly from incidence or disease-related mortality data. The reconstruction employs differential equations, which model the time evolution of infective stages and strains. Being sensitive to initial values, the method produces asymptotically correct solutions. The computations are fast, with time complexity being quadratic. We apply the reconstruction to data of measles (England and Wales, 1948-1967), dengue (Thailand, 1982-1999), and influenza (U.S., 1910-1927). The Measles example offers comparison with earlier work. Here we re-investigate reporting corrections, include and exclude demographic information. The dengue example deals with the failure of vector-control measures in reducing dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in Thailand. Two competing mechanisms have been held responsible: strain interaction and demographic transitions. Our reconstruction reveals that both explanations are possible, showing that the increase in DHF cases is consistent with decreasing transmission rates resulting from reduced vector counts. The flu example focuses on the 1918/1919 pandemic, examining the transmission rate evolution for an invading strain. Our analysis indicates that the pandemic strain could have circulated in the population for many months before the pandemic was initiated by an event of highly increased transmission. PMID:27105674

  11. Genetic Adaptation of Influenza A Viruses in Domestic Animals and Their Potential Role in Interspecies Transmission: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Olga; De Nardi, Marco; van der Meulen, Karen; van Reeth, Kristien; Koopmans, Marion; Harris, Kate; von Dobschuetz, Sophie; Freidl, Gudrun; Meijer, Adam; Breed, Andrew; Hill, Andrew; Kosmider, Rowena; Banks, Jill; Stärk, Katharina D C; Wieland, Barbara; Stevens, Kim; van der Werf, Sylvie; Enouf, Vincent; Dauphin, Gwenaelle; Dundon, William; Cattoli, Giovanni; Capua, Ilaria

    2016-03-01

    In December 2011, the European Food Safety Authority awarded a Grant for the implementation of the FLURISK project. The main objective of FLURISK was the development of an epidemiological and virological evidence-based influenza risk assessment framework (IRAF) to assess influenza A virus strains circulating in the animal population according to their potential to cross the species barrier and cause infections in humans. With the purpose of gathering virological data to include in the IRAF, a literature review was conducted and key findings are presented here. Several adaptive traits have been identified in influenza viruses infecting domestic animals and a significance of these adaptations for the emergence of zoonotic influenza, such as shift in receptor preference and mutations in the replication proteins, has been hypothesized. Nonetheless, and despite several decades of research, a comprehensive understanding of the conditions that facilitate interspecies transmission is still lacking. This has been hampered by the intrinsic difficulties of the subject and the complexity of correlating environmental, viral and host factors. Finding the most suitable and feasible way of investigating these factors in laboratory settings represents another challenge. The majority of the studies identified through this review focus on only a subset of species, subtypes and genes, such as influenza in avian species and avian influenza viruses adapting to humans, especially in the context of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1. Further research applying a holistic approach and investigating the broader influenza genetic spectrum is urgently needed in the field of genetic adaptation of influenza A viruses. PMID:25630935

  12. Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Transmission between Finches and Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeremy C.; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Webby, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Low pathogenicity avian influenza A(H7N9) virus has been detected in poultry since 2013, and the virus has caused >450 infections in humans. The mode of subtype H7N9 virus transmission between avian species remains largely unknown, but various wild birds have been implicated as a source of transmission. H7N9 virus was recently detected in a wild sparrow in Shanghai, China, and passerine birds, such as finches, which share space and resources with wild migratory birds, poultry, and humans, can be productively infected with the virus. We demonstrate that interspecies transmission of H7N9 virus occurs readily between society finches and bobwhite quail but only sporadically between finches and chickens. Inoculated finches are better able to infect naive poultry than the reverse. Transmission occurs through shared water but not through the airborne route. It is therefore conceivable that passerine birds may serve as vectors for dissemination of H7N9 virus to domestic poultry. PMID:25811839

  13. Mechanisms of transmission and spread of H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus in birds and mammals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Eurasian-African H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus has crossed multiple species barriers to infect poultry, captive and wild birds, carnivorous mammals and humans. The specific transmission mechanisms are unclear in most cases, but experimental studies and field data sug...

  14. Use of non-pharmaceutical interventions to reduce the transmission of influenza in adults: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, Sheree M.S.; SONEGO, Sandra; WALLEN, Gwenyth R.; WATERER, Grant; CHENG, Allen C.; THOMPSON, Philip

    2015-01-01

    During seasonal influenza epidemics and pandemics, virus transmission causes significant public health concern. Reduction of viral transmission by non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPI) has a significant appeal and is often recommended. However, the efficacy of such interventions is unclear. A systematic literature review was undertaken to identify and evaluate the published literature on NPI efficacy to prevent human transmission of influenza virus in adults. Reviewers assessed the quality of eligible studies utilizing the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme for bias and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network for methodological quality. Studies were assessed for risk of bias domains of random sequence generation, allocation concealment, attribution bias, selective reporting and blinding. Relevant citations of 2247 were reduced to 100 for full-text evaluation. Only seven met all selection criteria and pooled analysis was not feasible. Of the seven studies, two were randomized controlled trials (RCT) and five were cluster RCT. The main NPI studied were disinfection and hygiene; barriers; and combined NPI. However, these seven RCT had significant design flaws. Only two studies used laboratory confirmed influenza and poor statistical power was a major problem. Positive significant interventions included professional oral hygiene intervention in the elderly and hand washing. Despite the potential for NPI in preventing influenza transmission, there is very limited data available. Hand washing and dental hygiene may be useful, but other interventions have not been fully assessed. Properly designed studies evaluating large populations including ‘at risk’ patients and in a variety of communities are needed. PMID:25873071

  15. Nosocomial transmission of avian influenza A (H7N9) virus in China: epidemiological investigation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chun-Fu; Ma, Mai-Juan; Zhan, Bing-Dong; Lai, Shi-Ming; Hu, Yi; Yang, Xiao-Xian; Li, Jing; Zhou, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Jian-Min; Wang, Shuang-Qing; Hu, Xiao-Long; Li, Yin-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Cheng, Wei; Yao, Hong-Wu; Li, Xin-Lou; Yi, Huai-Ming; Xu, Wei-Dong; Jiang, Jia-Fu; Gray, Gregory C; Fang, Li-Qun; Chen, En-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Study question Can avian influenza A (H7N9) virus be transmitted between unrelated individuals in a hospital setting? Methods An epidemiological investigation looked at two patients who shared a hospital ward in February 2015, in Quzhou, Zhejiang Province, China. Samples from the patients, close contacts, and local environments were examined by real time reverse transcriptase (rRT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and viral culture. Haemagglutination inhibition and microneutralisation assays were used to detect specific antibodies to the viruses. Primary outcomes were clinical data, infection source tracing, phylogenetic tree analysis, and serological results. Study answer and limitations A 49 year old man (index patient) became ill seven days after visiting a live poultry market. A 57 year old man (second patient), with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, developed influenza-like symptoms after sharing the same hospital ward as the index patient for five days. The second patient had not visited any poultry markets nor had any contact with poultry or birds within 15 days before the onset of illness. H7N9 virus was identified in the two patients, who both later died. Genome sequences of the virus isolated from both patients were nearly identical, and genetically similar to the virus isolated from the live poultry market. No specific antibodies were detected among 38 close contacts. Transmission between the patients remains unclear, owing to the lack of samples collected from their shared hospital ward. Although several environmental swabs were positive for H7N9 by rRT-PCR, no virus was cultured. Owing to delayed diagnosis and frequent hospital transfers, no serum samples were collected from the patients, and antibodies to H7N9 viruses could not be tested. What this study adds Nosocomial H7N9 transmission might be possible between two unrelated individuals. Surveillance on patients with influenza-like illness in hospitals as well as chickens in live

  16. Unseasonal transmission of H3N2 influenza A virus during the swine-origin H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Ghedin, Elodie; Wentworth, David E; Halpin, Rebecca A; Lin, Xudong; Bera, Jayati; DePasse, Jay; Fitch, Adam; Griesemer, Sara; Hine, Erin; Katzel, Daniel A; Overton, Larry; Proudfoot, Kathleen; Sitz, Jeffrey; Szczypinski, Bridget; StGeorge, Kirsten; Spiro, David J; Holmes, Edward C

    2010-06-01

    The initial wave of swine-origin influenza A virus (pandemic H1N1/09) in the United States during the spring and summer of 2009 also resulted in an increased vigilance and sampling of seasonal influenza viruses (H1N1 and H3N2), even though they are normally characterized by very low incidence outside of the winter months. To explore the nature of virus evolution during this influenza "off-season," we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of H1N1 and H3N2 sequences sampled during April to June 2009 in New York State. Our analysis revealed that multiple lineages of both viruses were introduced and cocirculated during this time, as is typical of influenza virus during the winter. Strikingly, however, we also found strong evidence for the presence of a large transmission chain of H3N2 viruses centered on the south-east of New York State and which continued until at least 1 June 2009. These results suggest that the unseasonal transmission of influenza A viruses may be more widespread than is usually supposed. PMID:20237080

  17. Replication and Transmission of H9N2 Influenza Viruses in Ferrets: Evaluation of Pandemic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haichen; Hossain, Md Jaber; Ramirez-Nieto, Gloria; Monne, Isabella; Stevens, James; Cattoli, Giovanni; Capua, Ilaria; Chen, Li-Mei; Donis, Ruben O.; Busch, Julia; Paulson, James C.; Brockwell, Christy; Webby, Richard; Blanco, Jorge; Al-Natour, Mohammad Q.; Perez, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza A viruses are endemic in poultry of many Eurasian countries and have caused repeated human infections in Asia since 1998. To evaluate the potential threat of H9N2 viruses to humans, we investigated the replication and transmission efficiency of H9N2 viruses in the ferret model. Five wild-type (WT) H9N2 viruses, isolated from different avian species from 1988 through 2003, were tested in vivo and found to replicate in ferrets. However these viruses achieved mild peak viral titers in nasal washes when compared to those observed with a human H3N2 virus. Two of these H9N2 viruses transmitted to direct contact ferrets, however no aerosol transmission was detected in the virus displaying the most efficient direct contact transmission. A leucine (Leu) residue at amino acid position 226 in the hemagglutinin (HA) receptor-binding site (RBS), responsible for human virus-like receptor specificity, was found to be important for the transmission of the H9N2 viruses in ferrets. In addition, an H9N2 avian-human reassortant virus, which contains the surface glycoprotein genes from an H9N2 virus and the six internal genes of a human H3N2 virus, showed enhanced replication and efficient transmission to direct contacts. Although no aerosol transmission was observed, the virus replicated in multiple respiratory tissues and induced clinical signs similar to those observed with the parental human H3N2 virus. Our results suggest that the establishment and prevalence of H9N2 viruses in poultry pose a significant threat for humans. PMID:18698430

  18. Multi-scale modeling for the transmission of influenza and the evaluation of interventions toward it

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dongmin; Li, King C.; Peters, Timothy R.; Snively, Beverly M.; Poehling, Katherine A.; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of influenza epidemic is important for analyzing the main cause of the epidemic and finding effective interventions towards it. The epidemic is a dynamic process. In this process, daily infections are caused by people's contacts, and the frequency of contacts can be mainly influenced by their cognition to the disease. The cognition is in turn influenced by daily illness attack rate, climate, and other environment factors. Few existing methods considered the dynamic process in their models. Therefore, their prediction results can hardly be explained by the mechanisms of epidemic spreading. In this paper, we developed a heterogeneous graph modeling approach (HGM) to describe the dynamic process of influenza virus transmission by taking advantage of our unique clinical data. We built social network of studied region and embedded an Agent-Based Model (ABM) in the HGM to describe the dynamic change of an epidemic. Our simulations have a good agreement with clinical data. Parameter sensitivity analysis showed that temperature influences the dynamic of epidemic significantly and system behavior analysis showed social network degree is a critical factor determining the size of an epidemic. Finally, multiple scenarios for vaccination and school closure strategies were simulated and their performance was analyzed. PMID:25757402

  19. Multi-scale modeling for the transmission of influenza and the evaluation of interventions toward it.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongmin; Li, King C; Peters, Timothy R; Snively, Beverly M; Poehling, Katherine A; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of influenza epidemic is important for analyzing the main cause of the epidemic and finding effective interventions towards it. The epidemic is a dynamic process. In this process, daily infections are caused by people's contacts, and the frequency of contacts can be mainly influenced by their cognition to the disease. The cognition is in turn influenced by daily illness attack rate, climate, and other environment factors. Few existing methods considered the dynamic process in their models. Therefore, their prediction results can hardly be explained by the mechanisms of epidemic spreading. In this paper, we developed a heterogeneous graph modeling approach (HGM) to describe the dynamic process of influenza virus transmission by taking advantage of our unique clinical data. We built social network of studied region and embedded an Agent-Based Model (ABM) in the HGM to describe the dynamic change of an epidemic. Our simulations have a good agreement with clinical data. Parameter sensitivity analysis showed that temperature influences the dynamic of epidemic significantly and system behavior analysis showed social network degree is a critical factor determining the size of an epidemic. Finally, multiple scenarios for vaccination and school closure strategies were simulated and their performance was analyzed. PMID:25757402

  20. Mapping risk of avian influenza transmission at the interface of domestic poultry and wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prosser, Diann J.; Hungerford, Laura L.; Erwin, R. Michael; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Takekawa, John Y.; Ellis, Erle C.

    2013-01-01

    Emergence of avian influenza viruses with high lethality to humans, such as the currently circulating highly pathogenic A(H5N1) (emerged in 1996) and A(H7N9) cause serious concern for the global economic and public health sectors. Understanding the spatial and temporal interface between wild and domestic populations, from which these viruses emerge, is fundamental to taking action. This information, however, is rarely considered in influenza risk models, partly due to a lack of data. We aim to identify areas of high transmission risk between domestic poultry and wild waterfowl in China, the epicenter of both viruses. Two levels of models were developed: one that predicts hotspots of novel virus emergence between domestic and wild birds, and one that incorporates H5N1 risk factors, for which input data exists. Models were produced at 1 and 30 km spatial resolution, and two temporal seasons. Patterns of risk varied between seasons with higher risk in the northeast, central-east, and western regions of China during spring and summer, and in the central and southeastern regions during winter. Monte-Carlo uncertainty analyses indicated varying levels of model confidence, with lowest errors in the densely populated regions of eastern and southern China. Applications and limitations of the models are discussed within.

  1. The Transmissibility of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Commercial Poultry in Industrialised Countries

    PubMed Central

    Garske, Tini; Clarke, Paul; Ghani, Azra C.

    2007-01-01

    Background With the increased occurrence of outbreaks of H5N1 worldwide there is concern that the virus could enter commercial poultry farms with severe economic consequences. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyse data from four recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in commercial poultry to estimate the farm-to-farm reproductive number for HPAI. The reproductive number is a key measure of the transmissibility of HPAI at the farm level because it can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the control measures. In these outbreaks the mean farm-to-farm reproductive number prior to controls ranged from 1.1 to 2.4, with the maximum farm-based reproductive number in the range 2.2 to 3.2. Enhanced bio-security, movement restrictions and prompt isolation of the infected farms in all four outbreaks substantially reduced the reproductive number, but it remained close to the threshold value 1 necessary to ensure the disease will be eradicated. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that depending on the particular situation in which an outbreak of avian influenza occurs, current controls might not be enough to eradicate the disease, and therefore a close monitoring of the outbreak is required. The method we used for estimating the reproductive number is straightforward to implement and can be used in real-time. It therefore can be a useful tool to inform policy decisions. PMID:17406673

  2. Zoonotic transmission of avian influenza virus (H5N1), Egypt, 2006-2009.

    PubMed

    Kandeel, Amr; Manoncourt, Serge; Abd el Kareem, Eman; Mohamed Ahmed, Abdel Nasser; El-Refaie, Samir; Essmat, Hala; Tjaden, Jeffrey; de Mattos, Cecilia C; Earhart, Kenneth C; Marfin, Anthony A; El-Sayed, Nasr

    2010-07-01

    During March 2006-March 2009, a total of 6,355 suspected cases of avian influenza (H5N1) were reported to the Ministry of Health in Egypt. Sixty-three (1%) patients had confirmed infections; 24 (38%) died. Risk factors for death included female sex, age > or = 15 years, and receiving the first dose of oseltamivir >2 days after illness onset. All but 2 case-patients reported exposure to domestic poultry probably infected with avian influenza virus (H5N1). No cases of human-to-human transmission were found. Greatest risks for infection and death were reported among women > or = 15 years of age, who accounted for 38% of infections and 83% of deaths. The lower case-fatality rate in Egypt could be caused by a less virulent virus clade. However, the lower mortality rate seems to be caused by the large number of infected children who were identified early, received prompt treatment, and had less severe clinical disease. PMID:20587181

  3. Interspecies transmission and limited persistence of low pathogenic avian influenza genomes among Alaska dabbling ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, Andrew B.; Pearce, John M.; Ramey, Andy M.; Meixell, Brandt; Runstadler, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    The reassortment and geographic distribution of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) virus genes are well documented, but little is known about the persistence of intact LPAI genomes among species and locations. To examine persistence of entire LPAI genome constellations in Alaska, we calculated the genetic identities among 161 full-genome LPAI viruses isolated across 4 years from five species of duck: northern pintail (Anas acuta), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), American green-winged teal (Anas crecca), northern shoveler (Anas clypeata) and American wigeon (Anas Americana). Based on pairwise genetic distance, highly similar LPAI genomes (>99 percent identity) were observed within and between species and across a range of geographic distances (up to and >1000 km), but most often between isolates collected 0-10 km apart. Highly similar viruses were detected between years, suggesting inter-annual persistence, but these were rare in our data set with the majority occurring within 0-9 days of sampling. These results identify LPAI transmission pathways in the context of species, space and time, an initial perspective into the extent of regional virus distribution and persistence, and insight into why no completely Eurasian genomes have ever been detected in Alaska. Such information will be useful in forecasting the movement of foreign-origin avian influenza strains should they be introduced to North America.

  4. Interspecies transmission and limited persistence of low pathogenic avian influenza genomes among Alaska dabbling ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, A.B.; Pearce, J.M.; Ramey, A.M.; Meixell, B.W.; Runstadler, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The reassortment and geographic distribution of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) virus genes are well documented, but little is known about the persistence of intact LPAI genomes among species and locations. To examine persistence of entire LPAI genome constellations in Alaska, we calculated the genetic identities among 161 full-genome LPAI viruses isolated across 4. years from five species of duck: northern pintail (Anas acuta), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), American green-winged teal (Anas crecca), northern shoveler (Anas clypeata) and American wigeon (Anas americana). Based on pairwise genetic distance, highly similar LPAI genomes (>99% identity) were observed within and between species and across a range of geographic distances (up to and >1000 km), but most often between isolates collected 0-10. km apart. Highly similar viruses were detected between years, suggesting inter-annual persistence, but these were rare in our data set with the majority occurring within 0-9. days of sampling. These results identify LPAI transmission pathways in the context of species, space and time, an initial perspective into the extent of regional virus distribution and persistence, and insight into why no completely Eurasian genomes have ever been detected in Alaska. Such information will be useful in forecasting the movement of foreign-origin avian influenza strains should they be introduced to North America. ?? 2011.

  5. Influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The term "influenza" originally referred to epidemics of acute, rapidly spreading catarrhal fevers of humans caused by viruses in the family Orthomyxoviridae. Today, orthomyxoviruses are recognized as the cause of significant numbers of natural infections and disease, usually of the upper respirato...

  6. H5N1 influenza virulence, pathogenicity and transmissibility: what do we know?

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Highly pathogenic influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype have infected more than 600 people since 1997, resulting in the deaths of approximately 60% of those infected. Multiple studies have established the viral hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein as the major determinant of H5N1 virulence. HA mediates host-specific virus binding to cells, and mutations that allow efficient binding to viral receptors on mammalian cells are critical (although not sufficient) for H5N1 transmissibility among mammals. The viral polymerase PB2 protein is also a critical virulence determinant, and adaptive mutations in this protein are crucial for efficient H5N1 virus replication in mammals. Additionally, viral proteins (such as NS1 and PB1-F2) with roles in innate immune responses also affect the virulence of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. PMID:26617665

  7. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  8. Transmission of avian influenza A viruses among species in an artificial barnyard.

    PubMed

    Achenbach, Jenna E; Bowen, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    Waterfowl and shorebirds harbor and shed all hemagglutinin and neuraminidase subtypes of influenza A viruses and interact in nature with a broad range of other avian and mammalian species to which they might transmit such viruses. Estimating the efficiency and importance of such cross-species transmission using epidemiological approaches is difficult. We therefore addressed this question by studying transmission of low pathogenic H5 and H7 viruses from infected ducks to other common animals in a quasi-natural laboratory environment designed to mimic a common barnyard. Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) recently infected with H5N2 or H7N3 viruses were introduced into a room housing other mallards plus chickens, blackbirds, rats and pigeons, and transmission was assessed by monitoring virus shedding (ducks) or seroconversion (other species) over the following 4 weeks. Additional animals of each species were directly inoculated with virus to characterize the effect of a known exposure. In both barnyard experiments, virus accumulated to high titers in the shared water pool. The H5N2 virus was transmitted from infected ducks to other ducks and chickens in the room either directly or through environmental contamination, but not to rats or blackbirds. Ducks infected with the H7N2 virus transmitted directly or indirectly to all other species present. Chickens and blackbirds directly inoculated with these viruses shed significant amounts of virus and seroconverted; rats and pigeons developed antiviral antibodies, but, except for one pigeon, failed to shed virus. PMID:21483843

  9. Risks of avian influenza transmission in areas of intensive free-ranging duck production with wild waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cappelle, Julien; Zhao, Delong; Gilbert, Marius; Newman, Scott H.; Takekawa, John Y.; Gaidet, Nicolas; Prosser, Diann J.; Liu, Ying; Li, Peng; Shu, Yuelong; Xiao, Xiangming

    2014-01-01

    For decades, southern China has been considered to be an important source for emerging influenza viruses since key hosts live together in high densities in areas with intensive agriculture. However, the underlying conditions of emergence and spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV) have not been studied in detail, particularly the complex spatiotemporal interplay of viral transmission between wild and domestic ducks, two major actors of AIV epidemiology. In this synthesis, we examine the risks of avian influenza spread in Poyang Lake, an area of intensive free-ranging duck production and large numbers of wild waterfowl. Our synthesis shows that farming of free-grazing domestic ducks is intensive in this area and synchronized with wild duck migration. The presence of juvenile domestic ducks in harvested paddy fields prior to the arrival and departure of migrant ducks in the same fields may amplify the risk of AIV circulation and facilitate the transmission between wild and domestic populations. We provide evidence associating wild ducks migration with the spread of H5N1 in the spring of 2008 from southern China to South Korea, Russia, and Japan, supported by documented wild duck movements and phylogenetic analyses of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 sequences. We suggest that prevention measures based on a modification of agricultural practices may be implemented in these areas to reduce the intensity of AIV transmission between wild and domestic ducks. This would require involving all local stakeholders to discuss feasible and acceptable solutions.

  10. Inducing Herd Immunity against Seasonal Influenza in Long-Term Care Facilities through Employee Vaccination Coverage: A Transmission Dynamics Model

    PubMed Central

    Wendelboe, Aaron M.; Grafe, Carl; McCumber, Micah; Anderson, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Vaccinating healthcare workers (HCWs) in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) may effectively induce herd immunity and protect residents against influenza-related morbidity and mortality. We used influenza surveillance data from all LTCFs in New Mexico to validate a transmission dynamics model developed to investigate herd immunity induction. Material and Methods. We adjusted a previously published transmission dynamics model and used surveillance data from an active system among 76 LTCFs in New Mexico during 2006-2007 for model validation. We used a deterministic compartmental model with a stochastic component for transmission between residents and HCWs in each facility in order to simulate the random variation expected in such populations. Results. When outbreaks were defined as a dichotomous variable, our model predicted that herd immunity could be induced. When defined as an attack rate, the model demonstrated a curvilinear trend, but insufficiently strong to induce herd immunity. The model was sensitive to changes in the contact parameter β but was robust to changes in the visitor contact probability. Conclusions. These results further elucidate previous studies' findings that herd immunity may not be induced by vaccinating HCWs in LTCFs; however, increased influenza vaccination coverage among HCWs reduces the probability of influenza infection among residents. PMID:26101542

  11. Risks of avian influenza transmission in areas of intensive free-ranging duck production with wild waterfowl.

    PubMed

    Cappelle, Julien; Zhao, Delong; Gilbert, Marius; Nelson, Martha I; Newman, Scott H; Takekawa, John Y; Gaidet, Nicolas; Prosser, Diann J; Liu, Ying; Li, Peng; Shu, Yuelong; Xiao, Xiangming

    2014-01-01

    For decades, southern China has been considered to be an important source for emerging influenza viruses since key hosts live together in high densities in areas with intensive agriculture. However, the underlying conditions of emergence and spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV) have not been studied in detail, particularly the complex spatiotemporal interplay of viral transmission between wild and domestic ducks, two major actors of AIV epidemiology. In this synthesis, we examine the risks of avian influenza spread in Poyang Lake, an area of intensive free-ranging duck production and large numbers of wild waterfowl. Our synthesis shows that farming of free-grazing domestic ducks is intensive in this area and synchronized with wild duck migration. The presence of juvenile domestic ducks in harvested paddy fields prior to the arrival and departure of migrant ducks in the same fields may amplify the risk of AIV circulation and facilitate the transmission between wild and domestic populations. We provide evidence associating wild ducks migration with the spread of H5N1 in the spring of 2008 from southern China to South Korea, Russia, and Japan, supported by documented wild duck movements and phylogenetic analyses of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 sequences. We suggest that prevention measures based on a modification of agricultural practices may be implemented in these areas to reduce the intensity of AIV transmission between wild and domestic ducks. This would require involving all local stakeholders to discuss feasible and acceptable solutions. PMID:24652313

  12. Cultural Transmission and Survival in Contemporary Micmac Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battiste, Marie

    1977-01-01

    The Micmacs of Canada have only had a couple of hundred years of contact with the white man and although at first glance their reserves appear acculturated, they are distinct cultural and linguistic entities who have survived the tortures, rigors, and challenges of Christianity and civilization. (JC)

  13. Household Transmission of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in the Pandemic and Post-Pandemic Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Casado, Itziar; Martínez-Baz, Iván; Burgui, Rosana; Irisarri, Fátima; Arriazu, Maite; Elía, Fernando; Navascués, Ana; Ezpeleta, Carmen; Aldaz, Pablo; Castilla, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Background The transmission of influenza viruses occurs person to person and is facilitated by contacts within enclosed environments such as households. The aim of this study was to evaluate secondary attack rates and factors associated with household transmission of laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in the pandemic and post-pandemic seasons. Methods During the 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 influenza seasons, 76 sentinel physicians in Navarra, Spain, took nasopharyngeal and pharyngeal swabs from patients diagnosed with influenza-like illness. A trained nurse telephoned households of those patients who were laboratory-confirmed for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 to ask about the symptoms, risk factors and vaccination status of each household member. Results In the 405 households with a patient laboratory-confirmed for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, 977 susceptible contacts were identified; 16% of them (95% CI 14–19%) presented influenza-like illness and were considered as secondary cases. The secondary attack rate was 14% in 2009–2010 and 19% in the 2010–2011 season (p = 0.049), an increase that mainly affected persons with major chronic conditions. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the risk of being a secondary case was higher in the 2010–2011 season than in the 2009–2010 season (adjusted odds ratio: 1.72; 95% CI 1.17–2.54), and in children under 5 years, with a decreasing risk in older contacts. Influenza vaccination was associated with lesser incidence of influenza-like illness near to statistical significance (adjusted odds ratio: 0.29; 95% CI 0.08–1.03). Conclusion The secondary attack rate in households was higher in the second season than in the first pandemic season. Children had a greater risk of infection. Preventive measures should be maintained in the second pandemic season, especially in high-risk persons. PMID:25254376

  14. Replication and transmission of mammalian-adapted H9 subtype influenza virus in pigs and quail

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A is a major pathogen of birds, swine, and humans. Strains can jump from one species to another in a process that often requires genetic mutation and genome reassortment and results in outbreaks and, potentially, pandemics. H9N2 avian influenza is one of the most predominant influenza subt...

  15. Multiple Estimates of Transmissibility for the 2009 Influenza Pandemic Based on Influenza-like-Illness Data from Small US Military Populations

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Pete; Ben-Nun, Michal; Armenta, Richard; Linker, Jon A.; Eick, Angela A.; Sanchez, Jose L.; George, Dylan; Bacon, David P.; Riley, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly characterizing the amplitude and variability in transmissibility of novel human influenza strains as they emerge is a key public health priority. However, comparison of early estimates of the basic reproduction number during the 2009 pandemic were challenging because of inconsistent data sources and methods. Here, we define and analyze influenza-like-illness (ILI) case data from 2009–2010 for the 50 largest spatially distinct US military installations (military population defined by zip code, MPZ). We used publicly available data from non-military sources to show that patterns of ILI incidence in many of these MPZs closely followed the pattern of their enclosing civilian population. After characterizing the broad patterns of incidence (e.g. single-peak, double-peak), we defined a parsimonious SIR-like model with two possible values for intrinsic transmissibility across three epochs. We fitted the parameters of this model to data from all 50 MPZs, finding them to be reasonably well clustered with a median (mean) value of 1.39 (1.57) and standard deviation of 0.41. An increasing temporal trend in transmissibility (, p-value: 0.013) during the period of our study was robust to the removal of high transmissibility outliers and to the removal of the smaller 20 MPZs. Our results demonstrate the utility of rapidly available – and consistent – data from multiple populations. PMID:23696723

  16. ICAM-1 regulates the survival of influenza virus in lung epithelial cells during the early stages of infection.

    PubMed

    Othumpangat, Sreekumar; Noti, John D; McMillen, Cynthia M; Beezhold, Donald H

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is an inducible cell surface glycoprotein that is expressed on many cell types. Influenza virus infection enhanced ICAM-1 expression and messenger RNA levels. Human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEpC) and nasal epithelial cells, on exposure to different strains of influenza virus (H1N1, H3N2, and H9N1) showed significant increase in ICAM-1 gene expression (p<0.001) along with the ICAM-1 protein levels (surface and secreted). Depleting ICAM-1 in HBEpC with ICAM-1 siRNA and subsequently infecting with H1N1 showed increased viral copy numbers. Influenza virus infection in HBEpC resulted in up-regulation of NF-ĸB protein and the lack of ICAM-1 decreased NF-ĸB activity in NF-ĸB luciferase reporter assay. Addition of exogenous IL-1β to HBEpC induced the ICAM-1 expression and decreased matrix gene copy number. Taken together, HBEpC induced ICAM-1 plays a key role in modulating the influenza virus survival possibly through the NF-ĸB pathway. PMID:26499045

  17. The impact of media coverage on the transmission dynamics of human influenza

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need to understand how the provision of information influences individual risk perception and how this in turn shapes the evolution of epidemics. Individuals are influenced by information in complex and unpredictable ways. Emerging infectious diseases, such as the recent swine flu epidemic, may be particular hotspots for a media-fueled rush to vaccination; conversely, seasonal diseases may receive little media attention, despite their high mortality rate, due to their perceived lack of newness. Methods We formulate a deterministic transmission and vaccination model to investigate the effects of media coverage on the transmission dynamics of influenza. The population is subdivided into different classes according to their disease status. The compartmental model includes the effect of media coverage on reporting the number of infections as well as the number of individuals successfully vaccinated. Results A threshold parameter (the basic reproductive ratio) is analytically derived and used to discuss the local stability of the disease-free steady state. The impact of costs that can be incurred, which include vaccination, education, implementation and campaigns on media coverage, are also investigated using optimal control theory. A simplified version of the model with pulse vaccination shows that the media can trigger a vaccinating panic if the vaccine is imperfect and simplified messages result in the vaccinated mixing with the infectives without regard to disease risk. Conclusions The effects of media on an outbreak are complex. Simplified understandings of disease epidemiology, propogated through media soundbites, may make the disease significantly worse. PMID:21356134

  18. Consequences of resistance: in vitro fitness, in vivo infectivity, and transmissibility of oseltamivir‐resistant influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Govorkova, Elena A.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Govorkova EA. (2012) Consequences of resistance: in vitro fitness, in vivo infectivity, and transmissibility of oseltamivir‐resistant influenza A viruses. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 7(Suppl. 1), 50–57. The development of drug resistance is a major drawback to any antiviral therapy, and the specific anti‐influenza drugs, the neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs), are not excluded from this rule. The impact of drug resistance depends on the degree of reduction in fitness of the particular drug‐resistant virus. If the resistance mutations lead to only a modest biological fitness cost and the virus remains highly transmissible, the effectiveness of antiviral use is likely to be reduced. This review focuses on the fitness of oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal H1N1 and H3N2, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm09), and highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza A viruses carrying clinically derived NAI resistance‐associated NA mutations. PMID:23279897

  19. Lack of Group X Secreted Phospholipase A2 Increases Survival Following Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kelvin, Alyson A.; Degousee, Norbert; Banner, David; Stefanski, Eva; Leon, Alberto J.; Angoulvant, Denis; Paquette, Stéphane G.; Huang, Stephen S. H.; Danesh, Ali; Robbins, Clinton S.; Noyan, Hossein; Husain, Mansoor; Lambeau, Gerard; Gelb, Michael H.; Kelvin, David J.; Rubin, Barry B.

    2014-01-01

    The role of Group X secreted phospholipase A2 (GX-sPLA2) during influenza infection has not been previously investigated. We examined the role of (Reviewer 2 Minor Comment 2) GX-sPLA2 during H1N1 pandemic influenza infection in a GX-sPLA2 gene targeted mouse (GX−/−) model and found that survival after infection was significantly greater in GX−/− mice than in GX+/+ mice. Downstream products of GX-sPLA2 activity, PGD2, PGE2, LTB4, cysteinyl leukotrienes and Lipoxin A4 were significantly lower in GX−/− mice BAL fluid. Lung microarray analysis identified an earlier and more robust induction of T and B cell associated genes in GX−/− mice. Based on the central role of sPLA2 enzymes as key initiators of inflammatory processes, we propose that activation of GX-sPLA2 during H1N1pdm infection is an early step of pulmonary inflammation and its (Reviewer 2 Minor Comment 2) inhibition increases adaptive immunity and improves survival. Our findings suggest that GX-sPLA2 may be a potential therapeutic target during influenza. PMID:24725934

  20. Lack of group X secreted phospholipase A₂ increases survival following pandemic H1N1 influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Kelvin, Alyson A; Degousee, Norbert; Banner, David; Stefanski, Eva; Leόn, Alberto J; Angoulvant, Denis; Paquette, Stéphane G; Huang, Stephen S H; Danesh, Ali; Robbins, Clinton S; Noyan, Hossein; Husain, Mansoor; Lambeau, Gerard; Gelb, Michael; Kelvin, David J; Rubin, Barry B

    2014-04-01

    The role of Group X secreted phospholipase A2 (GX-sPLA2) during influenza infection has not been previously investigated. We examined the role of GX-sPLA2 during H1N1 pandemic influenza infection in a GX-sPLA2 gene targeted mouse (GX(-/-)) model and found that survival after infection was significantly greater in GX(-/-) mice than in GX(+/+) mice. Downstream products of GX-sPLA2 activity, PGD2, PGE2, LTB4, cysteinyl leukotrienes and Lipoxin A4 were significantly lower in GX(-/-) mice BAL fluid. Lung microarray analysis identified an earlier and more robust induction of T and B cell associated genes in GX(-/-) mice. Based on the central role of sPLA2 enzymes as key initiators of inflammatory processes, we propose that activation of GX-sPLA2 during H1N1pdm infection is an early step of pulmonary inflammation and its inhibition increases adaptive immunity and improves survival. Our findings suggest that GX-sPLA2 may be a potential therapeutic target during influenza. PMID:24725934

  1. Transmission Characteristics of the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: Comparison of 8 Southern Hemisphere Countries

    PubMed Central

    Opatowski, Lulla; Fraser, Christophe; Griffin, Jamie; de Silva, Eric; Van Kerkhove, Maria D.; Lyons, Emily J.; Cauchemez, Simon; Ferguson, Neil M.

    2011-01-01

    While in Northern hemisphere countries, the pandemic H1N1 virus (H1N1pdm) was introduced outside of the typical influenza season, Southern hemisphere countries experienced a single wave of transmission during their 2009 winter season. This provides a unique opportunity to compare the spread of a single virus in different countries and study the factors influencing its transmission. Here, we estimate and compare transmission characteristics of H1N1pdm for eight Southern hemisphere countries/states: Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, New Zealand, South Africa and Victoria (Australia). Weekly incidence of cases and age-distribution of cumulative cases were extracted from public reports of countries' surveillance systems. Estimates of the reproduction numbers, R0, empirically derived from the country-epidemics' early exponential phase, were positively associated with the proportion of children in the populations (p = 0.004). To explore the role of demography in explaining differences in transmission intensity, we then fitted a dynamic age-structured model of influenza transmission to available incidence data for each country independently, and for all the countries simultaneously. Posterior median estimates of R0 ranged 1.2–1.8 for the country-specific fits, and 1.29–1.47 for the global fits. Corresponding estimates for overall attack-rate were in the range 20–50%. All model fits indicated a significant decrease in susceptibility to infection with age. These results confirm the transmissibility of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was relatively low compared with past pandemics. The pattern of age-dependent susceptibility found confirms that older populations had substantial – though partial - pre-existing immunity, presumably due to exposure to heterologous influenza strains. Our analysis indicates that between-country-differences in transmission were at least partly due to differences in population demography. PMID:21909272

  2. Transmission characteristics of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic: comparison of 8 Southern hemisphere countries.

    PubMed

    Opatowski, Lulla; Fraser, Christophe; Griffin, Jamie; de Silva, Eric; Van Kerkhove, Maria D; Lyons, Emily J; Cauchemez, Simon; Ferguson, Neil M

    2011-09-01

    While in Northern hemisphere countries, the pandemic H1N1 virus (H1N1pdm) was introduced outside of the typical influenza season, Southern hemisphere countries experienced a single wave of transmission during their 2009 winter season. This provides a unique opportunity to compare the spread of a single virus in different countries and study the factors influencing its transmission. Here, we estimate and compare transmission characteristics of H1N1pdm for eight Southern hemisphere countries/states: Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, New Zealand, South Africa and Victoria (Australia). Weekly incidence of cases and age-distribution of cumulative cases were extracted from public reports of countries' surveillance systems. Estimates of the reproduction numbers, R(0), empirically derived from the country-epidemics' early exponential phase, were positively associated with the proportion of children in the populations (p = 0.004). To explore the role of demography in explaining differences in transmission intensity, we then fitted a dynamic age-structured model of influenza transmission to available incidence data for each country independently, and for all the countries simultaneously. Posterior median estimates of R₀ ranged 1.2-1.8 for the country-specific fits, and 1.29-1.47 for the global fits. Corresponding estimates for overall attack-rate were in the range 20-50%. All model fits indicated a significant decrease in susceptibility to infection with age. These results confirm the transmissibility of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was relatively low compared with past pandemics. The pattern of age-dependent susceptibility found confirms that older populations had substantial--though partial--pre-existing immunity, presumably due to exposure to heterologous influenza strains. Our analysis indicates that between-country-differences in transmission were at least partly due to differences in population demography. PMID:21909272

  3. Possible Role of Songbirds and Parakeets in Transmission of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeremy C.; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Koçer, Zeynep A.; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Seiler, Patrick; Shu, Yuelong; Zhu, Huachen; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Malik; Webby, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Avian-origin influenza A(H7N9) recently emerged in China, causing severe human disease. Several subtype H7N9 isolates contain influenza genes previously identified in viruses from finch-like birds. Because wild and domestic songbirds interact with humans and poultry, we investigated the susceptibility and transmissibility of subtype H7N9 in these species. Finches, sparrows, and parakeets supported replication of a human subtype H7N9 isolate, shed high titers through the oropharyngeal route, and showed few disease signs. Virus was shed into water troughs, and several contact animals seroconverted, although they shed little virus. Our study demonstrates that a human isolate can replicate in and be shed by such songbirds and parakeets into their environment. This finding has implications for these birds’ potential as intermediate hosts with the ability to facilitate transmission and dissemination of A(H7N9) virus. PMID:24572739

  4. Possible role of songbirds and parakeets in transmission of influenza A(H7N9) virus to humans.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremy C; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Koçer, Zeynep A; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Seiler, Patrick; Shu, Yuelong; Zhu, Huachen; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Malik; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2014-03-01

    Avian-origin influenza A(H7N9) recently emerged in China, causing severe human disease. Several subtype H7N9 isolates contain influenza genes previously identified in viruses from finch-like birds. Because wild and domestic songbirds interact with humans and poultry, we investigated the susceptibility and transmissibility of subtype H7N9 in these species. Finches, sparrows, and parakeets supported replication of a human subtype H7N9 isolate, shed high titers through the oropharyngeal route, and showed few disease signs. Virus was shed into water troughs, and several contact animals seroconverted, although they shed little virus. Our study demonstrates that a human isolate can replicate in and be shed by such songbirds and parakeets into their environment. This finding has implications for these birds' potential as intermediate hosts with the ability to facilitate transmission and dissemination of A(H7N9) virus. PMID:24572739

  5. A generic model of contagious disease and its application to human-to-human transmission of avian influenza.

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Gary B.

    2007-03-01

    Modeling contagious diseases has taken on greater importance over the past several years as diseases such as SARS and avian influenza have raised concern about worldwide pandemics. Most models developed to consider projected outbreaks have been specific to a single disease. This paper describes a generic System Dynamics contagious disease model and its application to human-to-human transmission of a mutant version of avian influenza. The model offers the option of calculating rates of new infections over time based either on a fixed ''reproductive number'' that is traditional in contagious disease models or on contact rates for different sub-populations and likelihood of transmission per contact. The paper reports on results with various types of interventions. These results suggest the potential importance of contact tracing, limited quarantine, and targeted vaccination strategies as methods for controlling outbreaks, especially when vaccine supplies may initially be limited and the efficacy of anti-viral drugs uncertain.

  6. Genetics, receptor binding property, and transmissibility in mammals of naturally isolated H9N2 Avian Influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuyong; Shi, Jianzhong; Guo, Jing; Deng, Guohua; Zhang, Qianyi; Wang, Jinliang; He, Xijun; Wang, Kaicheng; Chen, Jiming; Li, Yuanyuan; Fan, Jun; Kong, Huiui; Gu, Chunyang; Guan, Yuantao; Suzuki, Yasuo; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Liu, Liling; Jiang, Yongping; Tian, Guobin; Li, Yanbing; Bu, Zhigao; Chen, Hualan

    2014-11-01

    H9N2 subtype influenza viruses have been detected in different species of wild birds and domestic poultry in many countries for several decades. Because these viruses are of low pathogenicity in poultry, their eradication is not a priority for animal disease control in many countries, which has allowed them to continue to evolve and spread. Here, we characterized the genetic variation, receptor-binding specificity, replication capability, and transmission in mammals of a series of H9N2 influenza viruses that were detected in live poultry markets in southern China between 2009 and 2013. Thirty-five viruses represented 17 genotypes on the basis of genomic diversity, and one specific "internal-gene-combination" predominated among the H9N2 viruses. This gene combination was also present in the H7N9 and H10N8 viruses that have infected humans in China. All of the 35 viruses preferentially bound to the human-like receptor, although two also retained the ability to bind to the avian-like receptor. Six of nine viruses tested were transmissible in ferrets by respiratory droplet; two were highly transmissible. Some H9N2 viruses readily acquired the 627K or 701N mutation in their PB2 gene upon infection of ferrets, further enhancing their virulence and transmission in mammals. Our study indicates that the widespread dissemination of H9N2 viruses poses a threat to human health not only because of the potential of these viruses to cause an influenza pandemic, but also because they can function as "vehicles" to deliver different subtypes of influenza viruses from avian species to humans. PMID:25411973

  7. Genetics, Receptor Binding Property, and Transmissibility in Mammals of Naturally Isolated H9N2 Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guohua; Zhang, Qianyi; Wang, Jinliang; He, Xijun; Wang, Kaicheng; Chen, Jiming; Li, Yuanyuan; Fan, Jun; Kong, Huiui; Gu, Chunyang; Guan, Yuantao; Suzuki, Yasuo; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Liu, Liling; Jiang, Yongping; Tian, Guobin; Li, Yanbing; Bu, Zhigao; Chen, Hualan

    2014-01-01

    H9N2 subtype influenza viruses have been detected in different species of wild birds and domestic poultry in many countries for several decades. Because these viruses are of low pathogenicity in poultry, their eradication is not a priority for animal disease control in many countries, which has allowed them to continue to evolve and spread. Here, we characterized the genetic variation, receptor-binding specificity, replication capability, and transmission in mammals of a series of H9N2 influenza viruses that were detected in live poultry markets in southern China between 2009 and 2013. Thirty-five viruses represented 17 genotypes on the basis of genomic diversity, and one specific “internal-gene-combination” predominated among the H9N2 viruses. This gene combination was also present in the H7N9 and H10N8 viruses that have infected humans in China. All of the 35 viruses preferentially bound to the human-like receptor, although two also retained the ability to bind to the avian-like receptor. Six of nine viruses tested were transmissible in ferrets by respiratory droplet; two were highly transmissible. Some H9N2 viruses readily acquired the 627K or 701N mutation in their PB2 gene upon infection of ferrets, further enhancing their virulence and transmission in mammals. Our study indicates that the widespread dissemination of H9N2 viruses poses a threat to human health not only because of the potential of these viruses to cause an influenza pandemic, but also because they can function as “vehicles” to deliver different subtypes of influenza viruses from avian species to humans. PMID:25411973

  8. Cytomegalovirus Survival on Common Environmental Surfaces: Opportunities for Viral Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Jennifer D.; Forlin-Passoni, Daniela; Din, Erica; Radford, Kay; Brown, Denise; White, Audrey; Bate, Sheri L.; Dollard, Sheila C.; Bialek, Stephanie R.; Cannon, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) affects ∼1 of 150 births and is a leading cause of hearing loss and intellectual disability. It has been suggested that transmission may occur via contaminated surfaces. CMV AD169 in filtered human saliva, applied to environmental surfaces, was recovered at various time points. Samples were evaluated by culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction. CMV was found viable on metal and wood to 1 hour, glass and plastic to 3 hours, and rubber, cloth, and cracker to 6 hours. CMV was cultured from 83 of 90 wet and 5 of 40 dry surfaces. CMV was more likely to be isolated from wet, highly absorbent surfaces at earlier time points. PMID:22116837

  9. Emergence and possible transmission of amantadine-resistant viruses during nursing home outbreaks of influenza A (H3N2).

    PubMed

    Mast, E E; Harmon, M W; Gravenstein, S; Wu, S P; Arden, N H; Circo, R; Tyszka, G; Kendal, A P; Davis, J P

    1991-11-01

    Outbreaks of influenza A (H3N2, A/Shanghai/11/87-like) occurred in two partially (60% and 79%) vaccinated nursing home populations in January 1988. A retrospective cohort study using chart review was designed to assess the effectiveness of influenza vaccination and amantadine prophylaxis (100 mg per day) in controlling the outbreaks and to determine the amantadine susceptibility of influenza viruses isolated from case-patients. The point estimate of vaccine efficacy in preventing influenza-like illness was -33% (95% confidence interval -115% to 18%). However, 9% of vaccinated case-patients died within 14 days after onset of influenza-like illness compared with 26% of unvaccinated case-patients (relative risk = 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0.1-1.0). There was no significant difference in illness severity among case-patients who became ill before amantadine prophylaxis was started (n = 84) compared with those who became ill while taking amantadine (n = 34). Four virus isolates obtained before amantadine prophylaxis was started demonstrated 52-68% inhibition by 1 microgram/ml of amantadine; by comparison, six isolates (resistant viruses) obtained from residents who became ill while taking amantadine demonstrated 1-18% inhibition. The resistant viruses had four different RNA sequences in the gene coding for the M2 protein transmembrane region. Three resistant viruses with identical RNA sequences were isolated from residents living in contiguous rooms who had onset of signs and symptoms during a 6-day interval. Further studies are needed to determine how frequently and under what circumstances resistant viruses occur when antiviral agents are used to control institutional influenza A outbreaks. Strategies for antiviral agent administration that limit the emergence and transmission of resistant virus strains may be needed. PMID:1951297

  10. Transmission of Novel Influenza A(H1N1) in Households with Post-Exposure Antiviral Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    van Boven, Michiel; Donker, Tjibbe; van der Lubben, Mariken; van Gageldonk-Lafeber, Rianne B.; te Beest, Dennis E.; Koopmans, Marion; Meijer, Adam; Timen, Aura; Swaan, Corien; Dalhuijsen, Anton; Hahné, Susan; van den Hoek, Anneke; Teunis, Peter; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; Wallinga, Jacco

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite impressive advances in our understanding of the biology of novel influenza A(H1N1) virus, little is as yet known about its transmission efficiency in close contact places such as households, schools, and workplaces. These are widely believed to be key in supporting propagating spread, and it is therefore of importance to assess the transmission levels of the virus in such settings. Methodology/Principal Findings We estimate the transmissibility of novel influenza A(H1N1) in 47 households in the Netherlands using stochastic epidemic models. All households contained a laboratory confirmed index case, and antiviral drugs (oseltamivir) were given to both the index case and other households members within 24 hours after detection of the index case. Among the 109 household contacts there were 9 secondary infections in 7 households. The overall estimated secondary attack rate is low (0.075, 95%CI: 0.037–0.13). There is statistical evidence indicating that older persons are less susceptible to infection than younger persons (relative susceptibility of older persons: 0.11, 95%CI: 0.024–0.43. Notably, the secondary attack rate from an older to a younger person is 0.35 (95%CI: 0.14–0.61) when using an age classification of ≤12 versus >12 years, and 0.28 (95%CI: 0.12–0.50) when using an age classification of ≤18 versus >18 years. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the overall household transmission levels of novel influenza A(H1N1) in antiviral-treated households were low in the early stage of the epidemic. The relatively high rate of adult-to-child transmission indicates that control measures focused on this transmission route will be most effective in minimizing the total number of infections. PMID:20628642

  11. Comparison of the Levels of Infectious Virus in Respirable Aerosols Exhaled by Ferrets Infected with Influenza Viruses Exhibiting Diverse Transmissibility Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, Kortney M.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses pose a major public health burden to communities around the world by causing respiratory infections that can be highly contagious and spread rapidly through the population. Despite extensive research on influenza viruses, the modes of transmission occurring most often among humans are not entirely clear. Contributing to this knowledge gap is the lack of an understanding of the levels of infectious virus present in respirable aerosols exhaled from infected hosts. Here, we used the ferret model to evaluate aerosol shedding patterns and measure the amount of infectious virus present in exhaled respirable aerosols. By comparing these parameters among a panel of human and avian influenza viruses exhibiting diverse respiratory droplet transmission efficiencies, we are able to report that ferrets infected by highly transmissible influenza viruses exhale a greater number of aerosol particles and more infectious virus within respirable aerosols than ferrets infected by influenza viruses that do not readily transmit. Our findings improve our understanding of the ferret transmission model and provide support for the potential for influenza virus aerosol transmission. PMID:23658443

  12. Staying Alive: Vibrio cholerae's Cycle of Environmental Survival, Transmission, and Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Conner, Jenna G; Teschler, Jennifer K; Jones, Christopher J; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diseases kill nearly 9 million people annually. Bacterial pathogens are responsible for a large proportion of these diseases, and the bacterial agents of pneumonia, diarrhea, and tuberculosis are leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Increasingly, the crucial role of nonhost environments in the life cycle of bacterial pathogens is being recognized. Heightened scrutiny has been given to the biological processes impacting pathogen dissemination and survival in the natural environment, because these processes are essential for the transmission of pathogenic bacteria to new hosts. This chapter focuses on the model environmental pathogen Vibrio cholerae to describe recent advances in our understanding of how pathogens survive between hosts and to highlight the processes necessary to support the cycle of environmental survival, transmission, and dissemination. We describe the physiological and molecular responses of V. cholerae to changing environmental conditions, focusing on its survival in aquatic reservoirs between hosts and its entry into and exit from human hosts. PMID:27227302

  13. Environmental role in influenza virus outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Sooryanarain, Harini; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2015-01-01

    The environmental drivers of influenza outbreaks are largely unknown. Despite more than 50 years of research, there are conflicting lines of evidence on the role of the environment in influenza A virus (IAV) survival, stability, and transmissibility. With the increasing and looming threat of pandemic influenza, it is important to understand these factors for early intervention and long-term control strategies. The factors that dictate the severity and spread of influenza would include the virus, natural and acquired hosts, virus-host interactions, environmental persistence, virus stability and transmissibility, and anthropogenic interventions. Virus persistence in different environments is subject to minor variations in temperature, humidity, pH, salinity, air pollution, and solar radiations. Seasonality of influenza is largely dictated by temperature and humidity, with cool-dry conditions enhancing IAV survival and transmissibility in temperate climates in high latitudes, whereas humid-rainy conditions favor outbreaks in low latitudes, as seen in tropical and subtropical zones. In mid-latitudes, semiannual outbreaks result from alternating cool-dry and humid-rainy conditions. The mechanism of virus survival in the cool-dry or humid-rainy conditions is largely determined by the presence of salts and proteins in the respiratory droplets. Social determinants of heath, including health equity, vaccine acceptance, and age-related illness, may play a role in influenza occurrence and spread. PMID:25422855

  14. Interspecies transmission of equine influenza virus (H3N8) to dogs by close contact with experimentally infected horses.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Takashi; Nemoto, Manabu; Tsujimura, Koji; Kondo, Takashi; Matsumura, Tomio

    2009-11-18

    In horse populations, influenza A virus subtype H3N8 (equine influenza virus, EIV) is a very important pathogen that leads to acute respiratory disease. Recently, EIV has emerged in dogs, and has become widespread among the canine population in the United States. The interspecies transmission route had thus far remained unclear. Here, we tested whether the interspecies transmission of EIV to dogs could occur as a result of close contact with experimentally EIV-infected horses. Three pairs consisting of an EIV-infected horse and a healthy dog were kept together in individual stalls for 15 consecutive days. A subsequent hemagglutination inhibition test revealed that all three dogs exhibited seroconversion. Moreover, two of the three dogs exhibited virus shedding. However, the dogs exhibited no clinical signs throughout the course of the study. These data suggest that the interspecies transmission of EIV to dogs could occur as a result of close contact with EIV-infected horses without clinical symptoms. Although the interspecies transmission of EIV is unlikely to become an immediate threat to canine hygiene, close contact between EIV-infected horses and dogs should be avoided during an EI epidemic. PMID:19596528

  15. Symbiont survival and host-symbiont disequilibria under differential vertical transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, M S; Arnold, J; Asmussen, M A

    2000-01-01

    Interspecific genetic interactions in host-symbiont systems raise intriguing coevolutionary questions and may influence the effectiveness of public health and management policies. Here we present an analytical and numerical investigation of the effects of host genetic heterogeneity in the rate of vertical transmission of a symbiont. We consider the baseline case with a monomorphic symbiont and a single diallelic locus in its diploid host, where vertical transmission is the sole force. Our analysis introduces interspecific disequilibria to quantify nonrandom associations between host genotypes and alleles and symbiont presence/absence. The transient and equilibrium behavior is examined in simulations with randomly generated initial conditions and transmission parameters. Compared to the case where vertical transmission rates are uniform across host genotypes, differential transmission (i) increases average symbiont survival from 50% to almost 60%, (ii) dramatically reduces the minimum average transmission rate for symbiont survival from 0.5 to 0.008, and (iii) readily creates permanent host-symbiont disequilibria de novo, whereas uniform transmission can neither create nor maintain such associations. On average, heterozygotes are slightly more likely to carry and maintain the symbiont in the population and are more randomly associated with the symbiont. Results show that simple evolutionary forces can create substantial nonrandom associations between two species. PMID:10757775

  16. The Effect of Age on Transmission of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) in a Camp and Associated Households

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Jonathan D.; Borse, Nagesh N.; Ta, Myduc L.; Stockman, Lauren J.; Fischer, Gayle E.; Yang, Yang; Halloran, M. Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M.; Duchin, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Background A major portion of influenza disease burden during the 2009 pandemic was observed among young people. Methods We examined the effect of age on the transmission of influenza-like illness associated with the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (pH1N1) for an April–May 2009 outbreak among youth-camp participants and household contacts in Washington State. Results An influenza-like illness attack rate of 51% was found among 96 camp participants. We observed a cabin secondary attack rate of 42% (95% confidence interval = 21%–66%) and a camp local reproductive number of 2.7 (1.7–4.1) for influenza-like illness among children (less than 18 years old). Among the 136 contacts in the 41 households with an influenza-like illness index case who attended the camp, the influenza-like illness secondary attack rate was 11% for children (5%–21%) and 4% for adults (2%–8%). The odds ratio for influenza-like illness among children versus adults was 3.1 (1.3–7.3). Conclusions The strong age effect, combined with the low number of susceptible children per household (1.2), plausibly explains the lower-than-expected household secondary attack rate for influenza-like illness, illustrating the importance of other venues where children congregate for sustaining community transmission. Quantifying the effects of age on pH1N1 transmission is important for informing effective intervention strategies. PMID:21233714

  17. Survival away from sheep and alternative methods of transmission of sheep lice (Bovicola ovis).

    PubMed

    Crawford, S; James, P J; Maddocks, S

    2001-01-01

    Transmission of sheep lice is thought to occur mainly by sheep to sheep contact although the possibility of other sources of infestation is often suggested. This study investigated the period of survival of Bovicola ovis after removal from sheep under varying conditions and assessed the likelihood of new infestations arising from contaminated facilities, wool caught on fences and shearers' footwear. In laboratory studies with lice held away from sheep at 4, 20, 25 and 36.5 degrees C, adults and nymphs survived longest at 25 degrees C (LT90 of 11.7 and 24.1 days for adults and large nymphs, respectively). Nymphs survived longer than adults and lice provided with raw wool survived longer than lice provided with wool that had been degreased. Nymphal lice survived for up to 29 days on unscoured wool at 36.5 degrees C, but the LT50 was less than 9 days in most experiments. In shearing sheds in winter and early spring lice survived for up to 14 and 16 days, respectively. These periods of survival are considerably longer than previously indicated for B. ovis. Most lice dropped out of wool staples attached to a fence within 1 h and only two of a total of 225 lice were still present after 24 h, suggesting that sheep are unlikely to become infested from wool caught on fences. Adult and nymphal lice readily transferred to shearers' moccasins and survived there for up to 10 days, indicating that transmission of lice on the footwear of shearers or other sheep handlers may be a cause of new infestations. Microwaving each moccasin for 5 min killed all lice and may provide a simple method of reducing the likelihood of transmission of B. ovis between properties. PMID:11113551

  18. Eurasian-Origin Gene Segments Contribute to the Transmissibility, Aerosol Release, and Morphology of the 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawala, Seema S.; Lamirande, Elaine W.; Suguitan, Amorsolo L.; Wang, Weijia; Santos, Celia P.; Vogel, Leatrice; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lindsley, William G.; Jin, Hong; Subbarao, Kanta

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiological success of pandemic and epidemic influenza A viruses relies on the ability to transmit efficiently from person-to-person via respiratory droplets. Respiratory droplet (RD) transmission of influenza viruses requires efficient replication and release of infectious influenza particles into the air. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus originated by reassortment of a North American triple reassortant swine (TRS) virus with a Eurasian swine virus that contributed the neuraminidase (NA) and M gene segments. Both the TRS and Eurasian swine viruses caused sporadic infections in humans, but failed to spread from person-to-person, unlike the pH1N1 virus. We evaluated the pH1N1 and its precursor viruses in a ferret model to determine the contribution of different viral gene segments on the release of influenza virus particles into the air and on the transmissibility of the pH1N1 virus. We found that the Eurasian-origin gene segments contributed to efficient RD transmission of the pH1N1 virus likely by modulating the release of influenza viral RNA-containing particles into the air. All viruses replicated well in the upper respiratory tract of infected ferrets, suggesting that factors other than viral replication are important for the release of influenza virus particles and transmission. Our studies demonstrate that the release of influenza viral RNA-containing particles into the air correlates with increased NA activity. Additionally, the pleomorphic phenotype of the pH1N1 virus is dependent upon the Eurasian-origin gene segments, suggesting a link between transmission and virus morphology. We have demonstrated that the viruses are released into exhaled air to varying degrees and a constellation of genes influences the transmissibility of the pH1N1 virus. PMID:22241979

  19. A topology for computer networks with good survivability characteristics and low transmission delays between node computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, G. L.; Jiang, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    Various network topologies are developed which have not appeared in the literature before which result in minimum diameter graphs for computer networks having connectivity four. The topologies presented have good survivability characteristics and result in more topologies being available for computer network designers which achieve the minimum diameter resulting in small transmission delays.

  20. Inter‐ and intraspecies transmission of canine influenza virus (H3N2) in dogs, cats, and ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyekwon; Song, Daesub; Moon, Hyoungjoon; Yeom, Minjoo; Park, Seongjun; Hong, Minki; Na, Woonseong; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.; Park, Bongkyun; Kim, Jeong‐Ki; Kang, Bokyu

    2012-01-01

    Background  The emergence of zoonotic viruses in domestic animals is a significant public health concern. Canine influenza virus (CIV) H3N2 is a virus that can infect companion animals and is, therefore, a potential public health concern. Objective  This study investigated the inter‐ and intraspecies transmission of CIV among dogs, cats, and ferrets, under laboratory conditions, to determine whether transmission of the virus was possible between as well as within these domestic animal species. Method  The transmission routes for inter‐ and intraspecies transmission were airborne and direct contact, respectively. Transmission was conducted through intranasal infection of dogs followed by exposure to either cats or ferrets and by comingling infected and naïve animals of the same species. Results  The interspecies transmission of CIV H3N2 via airborne was only observed from dogs to cats and not from dogs to ferrets. However, direct intranasal infection of either cats or ferrets with CIV could induce influenza‐like clinical signs, viral shedding, and serological responses. Additionally, naïve cats and ferrets could be infected by CIV via direct contact with infected animals of the same species. Conclusion  Cats appear to be another susceptible host of CIV H3N2, whereas ferrets are not likely natural hosts. The molecular‐based mechanism of interspecies and intraspecies transmission of CIV H3N2 should be further studied. PMID:22616918

  1. Molecular Infectious Disease Epidemiology: Survival Analysis and Algorithms Linking Phylogenies to Transmission Trees

    PubMed Central

    Kenah, Eben; Britton, Tom; Halloran, M. Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has attempted to use whole-genome sequence data from pathogens to reconstruct the transmission trees linking infectors and infectees in outbreaks. However, transmission trees from one outbreak do not generalize to future outbreaks. Reconstruction of transmission trees is most useful to public health if it leads to generalizable scientific insights about disease transmission. In a survival analysis framework, estimation of transmission parameters is based on sums or averages over the possible transmission trees. A phylogeny can increase the precision of these estimates by providing partial information about who infected whom. The leaves of the phylogeny represent sampled pathogens, which have known hosts. The interior nodes represent common ancestors of sampled pathogens, which have unknown hosts. Starting from assumptions about disease biology and epidemiologic study design, we prove that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the possible assignments of interior node hosts and the transmission trees simultaneously consistent with the phylogeny and the epidemiologic data on person, place, and time. We develop algorithms to enumerate these transmission trees and show these can be used to calculate likelihoods that incorporate both epidemiologic data and a phylogeny. A simulation study confirms that this leads to more efficient estimates of hazard ratios for infectiousness and baseline hazards of infectious contact, and we use these methods to analyze data from a foot-and-mouth disease virus outbreak in the United Kingdom in 2001. These results demonstrate the importance of data on individuals who escape infection, which is often overlooked. The combination of survival analysis and algorithms linking phylogenies to transmission trees is a rigorous but flexible statistical foundation for molecular infectious disease epidemiology. PMID:27070316

  2. Molecular Infectious Disease Epidemiology: Survival Analysis and Algorithms Linking Phylogenies to Transmission Trees.

    PubMed

    Kenah, Eben; Britton, Tom; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has attempted to use whole-genome sequence data from pathogens to reconstruct the transmission trees linking infectors and infectees in outbreaks. However, transmission trees from one outbreak do not generalize to future outbreaks. Reconstruction of transmission trees is most useful to public health if it leads to generalizable scientific insights about disease transmission. In a survival analysis framework, estimation of transmission parameters is based on sums or averages over the possible transmission trees. A phylogeny can increase the precision of these estimates by providing partial information about who infected whom. The leaves of the phylogeny represent sampled pathogens, which have known hosts. The interior nodes represent common ancestors of sampled pathogens, which have unknown hosts. Starting from assumptions about disease biology and epidemiologic study design, we prove that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the possible assignments of interior node hosts and the transmission trees simultaneously consistent with the phylogeny and the epidemiologic data on person, place, and time. We develop algorithms to enumerate these transmission trees and show these can be used to calculate likelihoods that incorporate both epidemiologic data and a phylogeny. A simulation study confirms that this leads to more efficient estimates of hazard ratios for infectiousness and baseline hazards of infectious contact, and we use these methods to analyze data from a foot-and-mouth disease virus outbreak in the United Kingdom in 2001. These results demonstrate the importance of data on individuals who escape infection, which is often overlooked. The combination of survival analysis and algorithms linking phylogenies to transmission trees is a rigorous but flexible statistical foundation for molecular infectious disease epidemiology. PMID:27070316

  3. What infection control measures will people carry out to reduce transmission of pandemic influenza? A focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Leanne G; Yardley, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    Background Pandemic influenza poses a future health threat against which infection control behaviours may be an important defence. However, there is little qualitative research examining perceptions of infection control measures in the context of pandemic influenza. Methods Eight focus groups and one interview were conducted with a purposive sample of 31 participants. Participants were invited to discuss their perceptions of infection transmission and likely adherence to infection control measures in both non-pandemic and pandemic contexts. Infection control measures discussed included handwashing, social distancing and cough hygiene (e.g. covering mouth, disposing of tissues immediately etc.). Results Thematic analysis revealed that although participants were knowledgeable about infection transmission, most expressed unfavourable attitudes toward control behaviours in non-pandemic situations. However, with the provision of adequate education about control measures and appropriate practical support (e.g. memory aids, access to facilities), most individuals report that they are likely to adhere to infection control protocols in the event of a pandemic. Of the behaviours likely to influence infection transmission, handwashing was regarded by our participants as more feasible than cough and sneeze hygiene and more acceptable than social distancing. Conclusion Handwashing could prove a useful target for health promotion, but interventions to promote infection control may need to address a number of factors identified within this study as potential barriers to carrying out infection control behaviours. PMID:19627568

  4. No evidence for zoonotic transmission of H3N8 canine influenza virus among US adults occupationally exposed to dogs

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Whitney S; Heil, Gary L; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Gray, Gregory C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The zoonotic potential of H3N8 canine influenza virus (CIV) has not been previously examined; yet considering the popularity of dogs as a companion animal and the zoonotic capabilities of other influenza viruses, the public health implications are great. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of antibodies against CIV among a US cohort. Design A cross-sectional seroepidemiological study was conducted between 2007 and 2010. Setting Recruitments primarily occurred in Iowa and Florida. Participants were enrolled at dog shows, or at their home or place of employment. Sample Three hundred and four adults occupationally exposed to dogs and 101 non-canine-exposed participants completed a questionnaire and provided a blood sample. Main outcome measures Microneutralization and neuraminidase inhibition assays were performed to detect human sera antibodies against A/Canine/Iowa/13628/2005(H3N8). An enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) was adapted to detect antibodies against a recombinant N8 neuraminidase protein from A/Equine/Pennsylvania/1/2007(H3N8). Results For all assays, no significant difference in detectable antibodies was observed when comparing the canine-exposed subjects to the non-canine-exposed subjects. Conclusion While these results do not provide evidence for cross-species CIV transmission, influenza is predictably unpredictable. People frequently exposed to ill dogs should continually be monitored for novel zoonotic CIV infections. PMID:24237615

  5. A Hypothesis: Supplementation with Mushroom-Derived Active Compound Modulates Immunity and Increases Survival in Response to Influenza Virus (H1N1) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chunchao, Han; Guo, Jian-you

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that the mushroom-derived active compound may be a potential strategy for increasing survival in response to influenza virus (H1N1) infection through the stimulation of host innate immune response. The validity of the hypothesis can be tested by immune response to influenza infection as seen through survival percentage, virus clearance, weight loss, natural killer cell cytotoxicity, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) and Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) levels, lytic efficiency in the spleens of mice and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA expressions in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. The hypothesis may improve people's quality of life, reduce the medical cost of our healthcare system and eliminate people's fears of influenza outbreak. PMID:21660092

  6. Serial killers, spiders and cybersex: Social and survival information bias in the transmission of urban legends.

    PubMed

    Stubbersfield, Joseph M; Tehrani, Jamshid J; Flynn, Emma G

    2015-05-01

    This study uses urban legends to examine the effects of the social information bias and survival information bias on cultural transmission across three phases of transmission: the choose-to-receive phase, the encode-and-retrieve phase, and the choose-to-transmit phase. In line with previous research into content biases, a linear transmission chain design with 60 participants aged 18-52 was used to examine the encode-and-retrieve phase, while participants were asked to rank their interest in reading the story behind a headline and passing a story on for the other two phases. Legends which contained social information (Social Type), legends which contained survival information (Survival Type), and legends which contained both forms of information (Combined Type) were all recalled with significantly greater accuracy than control material, while Social and Combined Type legends were recalled with significantly greater accuracy than Survival Type legends. In another study with 30 participants aged 18-22, no significant differences were found between legend types in either the choose-to-receive phase or the choose-to-transmit phase. PMID:24975479

  7. Prevalence, genetics, and transmissibility in ferrets of Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huanliang; Chen, Yan; Qiao, Chuanling; He, Xijun; Zhou, Hong; Sun, Yu; Yin, Hang; Meng, Shasha; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Qianyi; Kong, Huihui; Gu, Chunyang; Li, Chengjun; Bu, Zhigao; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Chen, Hualan

    2016-01-01

    Pigs are important intermediate hosts for generating novel influenza viruses. The Eurasian avian-like H1N1 (EAH1N1) swine influenza viruses (SIVs) have circulated in pigs since 1979, and human cases associated with EAH1N1 SIVs have been reported in several countries. However, the biologic properties of EAH1N1 SIVs are largely unknown. Here, we performed extensive influenza surveillance in pigs in China and isolated 228 influenza viruses from 36,417 pigs. We found that 139 of the 228 strains from pigs in 10 provinces in China belong to the EAH1N1 lineage. These viruses formed five genotypes, with two distinct antigenic groups, represented by A/swine/Guangxi/18/2011 and A/swine/Guangdong/104/2013, both of which are antigenically and genetically distinct from the current human H1N1 viruses. Importantly, the EAH1N1 SIVs preferentially bound to human-type receptors, and 9 of the 10 tested viruses transmitted in ferrets by respiratory droplet. We found that 3.6% of children (≤10 y old), 0% of adults, and 13.4% of elderly adults (≥60 y old) had neutralization antibodies (titers ≥40 in children and ≥80 in adults) against the EAH1N1 A/swine/Guangxi/18/2011 virus, but none of them had such neutralization antibodies against the EAH1N1 A/swine/Guangdong/104/2013 virus. Our study shows the potential of EAH1N1 SIVs to transmit efficiently in humans and suggests that immediate action is needed to prevent the efficient transmission of EAH1N1 SIVs to humans. PMID:26711995

  8. Prevalence, genetics, and transmissibility in ferrets of Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanliang; Chen, Yan; Qiao, Chuanling; He, Xijun; Zhou, Hong; Sun, Yu; Yin, Hang; Meng, Shasha; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Qianyi; Kong, Huihui; Gu, Chunyang; Li, Chengjun; Bu, Zhigao; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Chen, Hualan

    2016-01-12

    Pigs are important intermediate hosts for generating novel influenza viruses. The Eurasian avian-like H1N1 (EAH1N1) swine influenza viruses (SIVs) have circulated in pigs since 1979, and human cases associated with EAH1N1 SIVs have been reported in several countries. However, the biologic properties of EAH1N1 SIVs are largely unknown. Here, we performed extensive influenza surveillance in pigs in China and isolated 228 influenza viruses from 36,417 pigs. We found that 139 of the 228 strains from pigs in 10 provinces in China belong to the EAH1N1 lineage. These viruses formed five genotypes, with two distinct antigenic groups, represented by A/swine/Guangxi/18/2011 and A/swine/Guangdong/104/2013, both of which are antigenically and genetically distinct from the current human H1N1 viruses. Importantly, the EAH1N1 SIVs preferentially bound to human-type receptors, and 9 of the 10 tested viruses transmitted in ferrets by respiratory droplet. We found that 3.6% of children (≤10 y old), 0% of adults, and 13.4% of elderly adults (≥60 y old) had neutralization antibodies (titers ≥40 in children and ≥80 in adults) against the EAH1N1 A/swine/Guangxi/18/2011 virus, but none of them had such neutralization antibodies against the EAH1N1 A/swine/Guangdong/104/2013 virus. Our study shows the potential of EAH1N1 SIVs to transmit efficiently in humans and suggests that immediate action is needed to prevent the efficient transmission of EAH1N1 SIVs to humans. PMID:26711995

  9. Serological evidence of transmission of human influenza A and B viruses to Caspian seals (Phoca caspica).

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Kazue; Ninomiya, Ai; Kida, Hiroshi; Park, Chun-Ho; Maruyama, Tadashi; Arai, Takaomi; Katsumata, Etsuko; Tobayama, Teruo; Boltunov, Andrei N; Khuraskin, Lev S; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki

    2002-01-01

    Seroepidemiological surveillance of influenza in Caspian seals (Phoca caspica) was conducted. Antibodies to influenza A virus were detected in 54% (7/13), 57% (4/7), 40% (6/15) and 26% (11/42) of the serum samples collected in 1993, 1997, 1998 and 2000 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In an hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test using H1-H15 reference influenza A viruses as antigens, more than half of the examined ELISA-positive sera reacted with an H3N2 prototype strain A/Aichi/2/68. These sera were then examined by HI test with a series of naturally occurring antigenic variants of human H3N2 virus, and H3 viruses of swine, duck, and equine origin. The sera reacted strongly with the A/Bangkok/1/79 (H3N2) strain, which was prevalent in humans in 1979-1981. The present results indicate that human A/Bangkok/1/79-like virus was transmitted to Caspian seals probably in the early 1980s, and was circulated in the population. Antibodies to influenza B virus were detected by ELISA in 14% (1/7) and 10% (4/42) serum samples collected from Caspian seals in 1997 and 2000, respectively. Our findings indicate that seal might be a reservoir of both influenza A and B viruses originated from humans. PMID:12437032

  10. Influenza A virus nucleoprotein selectively decreases neuraminidase gene-segment packaging while enhancing viral fitness and transmissibility

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Christopher B.; Ince, William L.; Wei, Jiajie; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    The influenza A virus (IAV) genome is divided into eight distinct RNA segments believed to be copackaged into virions with nearly perfect efficiency. Here, we describe a mutation in IAV nucleoprotein (NP) that enhances replication and transmission in guinea pigs while selectively reducing neuraminidase (NA) gene segment packaging into virions. We show that incomplete IAV particles lacking gene segments contribute to the propagation of the viral population through multiplicity reactivation under conditions of widespread coinfection, which we demonstrate commonly occurs in the upper respiratory tract of guinea pigs. NP also dramatically altered the functional balance of the viral glycoproteins on particles by selectively decreasing NA expression. Our findings reveal novel functions for NP in selective control of IAV gene packaging and balancing glycoprotein expression and suggest a role for incomplete gene packaging during host adaptation and transmission. PMID:25385602

  11. Transmission of an H5N8-Subtype Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus from Infected Hens to Laid Eggs.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yuko; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Tanikawa, Taichiro; Kanehira, Katsushi; Saito, Takehiko

    2016-06-01

    We showed here that an H5N8-subtype highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) was transmitted to both the internal contents and shells of eggs laid by white leghorn hens experimentally infected with the virus. Seven of eight HPAIV-infected hens laid eggs until 4 days postinoculation (dpi). The mean number of eggs laid per head daily decreased significantly from 0.58 before inoculation to 0.18 after viral inoculation. The virus was detected in the eggs laid by three of the seven hens. Viral transmission was detectable beginning on 3 dpi, and virus titers in tracheal and cloacal swabs from the hens that laid the contaminated eggs exceeded 2.9 log10 EID50. The level of viral replication and its timing when virus replicates enough to be detected in oviduct after virus inoculation appear to be key factors in the transmission of H5N8 HPAIV from infected hens to laid eggs. PMID:27309286

  12. Comparison of the Infectivity and Transmission of Contemporary Canine and Equine H3N8 Influenza Viruses in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, Heidi L; Bennett, Susi; Garretson, Kristina; Quintana, Ayshea M; Lunn, Katharine F; Landolt, Gabriele A

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses indicate that canine influenza viruses (CIVs) (H3N8) evolved from contemporary equine influenza virus (EIV). Despite the genetic relatedness of EIV and CIV, recent evidence suggests that CIV is unable to infect, replicate, and spread among susceptible horses. To determine whether equine H3N8 viruses have equally lost the ability to infect, cause disease, and spread among dogs, we evaluated the infectivity and transmissibility of a recent Florida sublineage EIV isolate in dogs. Clinical signs, nasal virus shedding, and serological responses were monitored in dogs for 21 days after inoculation. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR and hemagglutination inhibition assays showed that both the viruses have maintained the ability to infect and replicate in dogs and result in seroconversion. Transmission of EIV from infected to sentinel dogs, however, was restricted. Furthermore, both CIV and EIV exhibited similar sialic acid- α 2,3-gal receptor-binding preferences upon solid-phase binding assays. The results of the in vivo experiments reported here suggesting that dogs are susceptible to EIV and previous reports by members of our laboratory showing limited CIV infection in horses have been mirrored in CIV and EIV infections studies in primary canine and equine respiratory epithelial cells. PMID:24198997

  13. A Bird's Eye View of Influenza A Virus Transmission: Challenges with Characterizing Both Sides of a Co-Evolutionary Dynamic.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nichola J; Runstadler, Jonathan A

    2016-08-01

    In nature, wild birds and influenza A viruses (IAV) are continually co-evolving, locked into a back-and-forth of resistance and conquest that has approached a stable equilibrium over time. This co-evolutionary relationship between bird host and IAV may appear stable at the organismal level, but is highly dynamic at the molecular level manifesting in a constant trade-off between transmissibility and virulence of the virus. Characterizing both sides of the host-virus dynamic has presented a challenge for ecologists and virologists alike, despite the potential for this approach to provide insights into which conditions destabilize the equilibrium state resulting in outbreaks or mortality of hosts in extreme cases. The use of different methods that are either host-centric or virus-centric has made it difficult to reconcile the disparate fields of host ecology and virology for investigating and ultimately predicting wild bird-mediated transmission of IAV. This review distills some of the key lessons learned from virological and ecological studies and explores the promises and pitfalls of both approaches. Ultimately, reconciling ecological and virological approaches hinges on integrating scales for measuring host-virus interactions. We argue that prospects for finding common scales for measuring wild bird-influenza dynamics are improving due to advances in genomic sequencing, host-tracking technology and remote sensing data, with the unit of time (months, year, or seasons) providing a starting point for crossover. PMID:27252222

  14. Wild Birds and Increased Transmission of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (H5N1) among Poultry, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Keawcharoen, Juthatip; van den Broek, Jan; Bouma, Annemarie; Tiensin, Thanawat; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E

    2011-01-01

    Since the outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) subtype H5N1 virus, wild birds have been suspected of transmitting this virus to poultry. On January 23, 2004, the Ministry of Public Health in Thailand informed the World Health Organization of an avian influenza A (H5N1) outbreak. To determine the epidemiology of this viral infection and its relation to poultry outbreaks in Thailand from 2004 through 2007, we investigated how wild birds play a role in transmission. A total of 24,712 serum samples were collected from migratory and resident wild birds. Reverse transcription PCR showed a 0.7% HPAI (H5N1) prevalence. The highest prevalence was observed during January–February 2004 and March–June 2004, predominantly in central Thailand, which harbors most of the country’s poultry flocks. Analysis of the relationship between poultry and wild bird outbreaks was done by using a nonhomogeneous birth and death statistical model. Transmission efficiency among poultry flocks was 1.7× higher in regions with infected wild birds in the given or preceding month. The joint presence of wild birds and poultry is associated with increased spread among poultry flocks. PMID:21749762

  15. Analysis of spatial distribution and transmission characters for highly pathogenic avian influenza in Chinese mainland in 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. L.; Wei, C. J.; Yan, L.; Chi, T. H.; Wu, X. B.; Xiao, C. S.

    2006-03-01

    After the outbreak of highly pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in South Korea in the end of year 2003, estimates of the impact of HPAI in affected countries vary greatly, the total direct losses are about 3 billion US dollars, and it caused 15 million birds and poultry flocks death. It is significant to understand the spatial distribution and transmission characters of HPAI for its prevention and control. According to 50 outbreak cases for HPAI in Chinese mainland during 2004, this paper introduces the approach of spatial distribution and transmission characters for HPAI and its results. Its approach is based on remote sensing and GIS techniques. Its supporting data set involves normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and land surface temperature (Ts) derived from a time-series of remote sensing data of 1 kilometer-resolution NOAA/AVHRR, birds' migration routes, topology geographic map, lake and wetland maps, and meteorological observation data. In order to analyze synthetically using these data, a supporting platform for analysis Avian Influenza epidemic situation (SPAS/AI) was developed. Supporting by SPAS/AI, the integrated information from multi-sources can be easily used to the analysis of the spatial distribution and transmission character of HPAI. The results show that the range of spatial distribution and transmission of HPAI in China during 2004 connected to environment factors NDVI, Ts and the distributions of lake and wetland, and especially to bird migration routes. To some extent, the results provide some suggestions for the macro-decision making for the prevention and control of HPAI in the areas of potential risk and reoccurrence.

  16. Assessing Potential Risks of Influenza A Virus Transmission at the Pig-Human Interface in Thai Small Pig Farms Using a Questionnaire Survey.

    PubMed

    Netrabukkana, P; Robertson, I D; Kasemsuwan, S; Wongsathapornchai, K; Fenwick, S

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses pose a major public health threat worldwide, especially due to the potential for inter-species transmission. Farmers could be among the first people to be infected with a novel reassortant virus in a pig herd and may serve as a source of the virus for their communities. In this study, the pig production systems of smallholders in rural Thailand were examined to qualitatively evaluate the potential risks that may contribute to the spread of influenza A viruses. The investigation was based on questionnaire interviews regarding pig farmers' practices and trading activities. We found that extensive pig-human contacts, commingling of pigs and chickens and suboptimal biosecurity practices adopted by farmers and traders may constitute substantial risks for inter-species influenza virus transmission, thereby posing a threat to pig populations and human public health. The regular practices of using manure as field fertilizer, hiring boars from outside and trading activities could contribute to the potential spread of influenza viruses in the local community. To mitigate the potential risks of influenza A virus transmission and spread in the local community, it is recommended that appropriate public health strategies and disease prevention policies for farmers and traders should be developed including improving biosecurity, encouraging separation of animals raised on farms and minimizing the exposure between pigs and humans. Furthermore, surveillance systems for pig diseases should be targeted around the festival months, and on-farm identification of pigs should be promoted. PMID:24735120

  17. Influenza virus respiratory infection and transmission following ocular inoculation in ferrets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While influenza viruses are a common respiratory pathogen, sporadic reports of conjunctivitis following human infection demonstrates the ability of this virus to cause disease outside of the respiratory tract. The ocular surface represents both a potential site of virus replication and a portal of e...

  18. Airborne transmission of H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza viruses during simulated home slaughter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most H5N1 human infections have occurred following exposure to H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus-infected poultry, especially when poultry are home slaughtered or slaughtered in live poultry markets. Previous studies have demonstrated that slaughter of clade 1 isolate A/Vietnam/1...

  19. Pathogenesis and transmission of H7N9 influenza virus in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The recent and ongoing outbreak of H7N9 influenza in China has resulted in many human cases with a high fatality rate. Poultry have been suspected as the source of infection based on sequence analysis and virus isolations from live bird markets; however it’s not clear which species of ...

  20. Pathogenesis and transmission of H7N9 influenza virus in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent outbreaks of H7N9 influenza in China has resulted in many human cases with a high fatality rate. Poultry have been suspected as the source of infection based on sequence analysis and virus isolations from live bird markets, but it’s not clear which species of birds are most likely to be ...

  1. Evidence of person-to-person transmission of oseltamivir-resistant pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus in a hematology unit.

    PubMed

    Moore, Catherine; Galiano, Monica; Lackenby, Angie; Abdelrahman, Tamer; Barnes, Rosemary; Evans, Meirion R; Fegan, Christopher; Froude, Susannah; Hastings, Mark; Knapper, Steven; Litt, Emma; Price, Nicola; Salmon, Roland; Temple, Mark; Davies, Eleri

    2011-01-01

    We describe the first confirmed person-to-person transmission of oseltamivir-resistant pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus that occurred in a hematology unit in the United Kingdom. Eleven cases of (H1N1) 2009 virus infection were identified, of which, ten were related as shown by sequence analysis of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. H275Y analysis demonstrated that 8 of 10 case patients had oseltamivir-resistant virus, with 4 of 8 case patients infected by direct transmission of resistant virus. Zanamivir should be considered as first-line therapy for influenza in patients with lymphopenic hematological conditions and uptake of influenza vaccination encouraged to further reduce the number of susceptible individuals. PMID:21148492

  2. Experimental transmission of avian‐like swine H1N1 influenza virus between immunologically naïve and vaccinated pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Lucy E.; Jonczyk, Magdalena; Jervis, Carley M.; Flack, Deborah J.; Lyall, John; Foote, Alasdair; Mumford, Jennifer A.; Brown, Ian H.; Wood, James L.; Elton, Debra M.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Lloyd et al. (2011) Experimental transmission of avian‐like swine H1N1 influenza virus between immunologically naïve and vaccinated pigs. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 357–364. Background  Infection of pigs with swine influenza has been studied experimentally and in the field; however, little information is available on the natural transmission of this virus in pigs. Two studies in an experimental transmission model are presented here, one in immunologically naïve and one in a combination of vaccinated and naïve pigs. Objectives  To investigate the transmission of a recent ‘avian‐like’ swine H1N1 influenza virus in naive piglets, to assess the antibody response to a commercially available vaccine and to determine the efficiency of transmission in pigs after vaccination. Methods  Transmission chains were initiated by intranasal challenge of two immunologically naïve pigs. Animals were monitored daily for clinical signs and virus shedding. Pairs of pigs were sequentially co‐housed, and once virus was detected in recipients, prior donors were removed. In the vaccination study, piglets were vaccinated and circulating antibody levels were monitored by haemagglutination inhibition assay. To study transmission in vaccinates, a pair of infected immunologically naïve animals was co‐housed with vaccinated recipient pigs and further pairs of vaccinates were added sequentially as above. The chain was completed by the addition of naive pigs. Results and conclusions  Transmission of the H1N1 virus was achieved through a chain of six pairs of naïve piglets and through four pairs of vaccinated animals. Transmission occurred with minimal clinical signs and, in vaccinates, at antibody levels higher than previously reported to protect against infection. PMID:21668691

  3. Experimental adaptation of an influenza H5HA strain confers respiratory droplet transmission to reassortant H5H/H1N1 virus strain in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Jacyr

    2012-01-01

    An evaluation of the role - if any - of censorship in scientific papers, based on the publishing of the article that shows it is possible to modify the genetics of the H5N1 aviary influenza virus, enhancing its transmission among mammals, which was followed by much ado and ethical discussion. PMID:23386026

  4. Spatial Modeling of Wild Bird Risk Factors for Highly Pathogenic A(H5N1) Avian Influenza Virus Transmission.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Diann J; Hungerford, Laura L; Erwin, R Michael; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Takekawa, John Y; Newman, Scott H; Xiao, Xiangming; Ellis, Erle C

    2016-05-01

    One of the longest-persisting avian influenza viruses in history, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) A(H5N1), continues to evolve after 18 yr, advancing the threat of a global pandemic. Wild waterfowl (family Anatidae) are reported as secondary transmitters of HPAIV and primary reservoirs for low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses, yet spatial inputs for disease risk modeling for this group have been lacking. Using geographic information software and Monte Carlo simulations, we developed geospatial indices of waterfowl abundance at 1 and 30 km resolutions and for the breeding and wintering seasons for China, the epicenter of H5N1. Two spatial layers were developed: cumulative waterfowl abundance (WAB), a measure of predicted abundance across species, and cumulative abundance weighted by H5N1 prevalence (WPR), whereby abundance for each species was adjusted based on prevalence values and then totaled across species. Spatial patterns of the model output differed between seasons, with higher WAB and WPR in the northern and western regions of China for the breeding season and in the southeast for the wintering season. Uncertainty measures indicated highest error in southeastern China for both WAB and WPR. We also explored the effect of resampling waterfowl layers from 1 to 30 km resolution for multiscale risk modeling. Results indicated low average difference (less than 0.16 and 0.01 standard deviations for WAB and WPR, respectively), with greatest differences in the north for the breeding season and southeast for the wintering season. This work provides the first geospatial models of waterfowl abundance available for China. The indices provide important inputs for modeling disease transmission risk at the interface of poultry and wild birds. These models are easily adaptable, have broad utility to both disease and conservation needs, and will be available to the scientific community for advanced modeling applications. PMID:27309075

  5. Annual survival of ruddy turnstones is not affected by natural infection with low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Maxted, Angela M; Porter, Ronald R; Luttrell, M Page; Goekjian, Virginia H; Dey, Amanda D; Kalasz, Kevin S; Niles, Lawrence J; Stallknecht, David E

    2012-09-01

    The population of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres morinella) that migrates through Delaware Bay has undergone severe declines in recent years, attributable to reduced availability of horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) eggs at this critical spring migration stopover site. Concurrently, this population has experienced annual low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (AIV) epidemics at this same site. Using a prospective cohort study design with birds individually flagged during May-June 2006-2008, we evaluated resighting rates (a proxy for annual survival) between AIV-infected and uninfected birds at 1 yr after capture, testing, and measurement. Overall resighting rate was 46%, which varied by year and increased with relative mass of the bird when captured. Resighting rates were not different between AIV-infected and uninfected birds in any period. In multivariate analyses, infection status was also unrelated to resighting rate after controlling for year, day, state, sex, body size, mass index, or whether the bird was blood-sampled. Thus, apparent annual survival in ruddy turnstones was not reduced by AIV infection at this migratory stopover. However, it is unknown whether intestinal AIV infection might cause subtle reductions in weight gain which could negatively influence reproduction. PMID:23050475

  6. Unseasonal Transmission of H3N2 Influenza A Virus During the Swine-Origin H1N1 Pandemic▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ghedin, Elodie; Wentworth, David E.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Lin, Xudong; Bera, Jayati; DePasse, Jay; Fitch, Adam; Griesemer, Sara; Hine, Erin; Katzel, Daniel A.; Overton, Larry; Proudfoot, Kathleen; Sitz, Jeffrey; Szczypinski, Bridget; StGeorge, Kirsten; Spiro, David J.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2010-01-01

    The initial wave of swine-origin influenza A virus (pandemic H1N1/09) in the United States during the spring and summer of 2009 also resulted in an increased vigilance and sampling of seasonal influenza viruses (H1N1 and H3N2), even though they are normally characterized by very low incidence outside of the winter months. To explore the nature of virus evolution during this influenza “off-season,” we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of H1N1 and H3N2 sequences sampled during April to June 2009 in New York State. Our analysis revealed that multiple lineages of both viruses were introduced and cocirculated during this time, as is typical of influenza virus during the winter. Strikingly, however, we also found strong evidence for the presence of a large transmission chain of H3N2 viruses centered on the south-east of New York State and which continued until at least 1 June 2009. These results suggest that the unseasonal transmission of influenza A viruses may be more widespread than is usually supposed. PMID:20237080

  7. Contribution of Company Affiliation and Social Contacts to Risk Estimates of Between-Farm Transmission of Avian Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Leibler, Jessica H.; Carone, Marco; Silbergeld, Ellen K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Models of between-farm transmission of pathogens have identified service vehicles and social groups as risk factors mediating the spread of infection. Because of high levels of economic organization in much of the poultry industry, we examined the importance of company affiliation, as distinct from social contacts, in a model of the potential spread of avian influenza among broiler poultry farms in a poultry-dense region in the United States. The contribution of company affiliation to risk of between-farm disease transmission has not been previously studied. Methodology/Principal Findings We obtained data on the nature and frequency of business and social contacts through a national survey of broiler poultry growers in the United States. Daily rates of contact were estimated using Monte Carlo analysis. Stochastic modeling techniques were used to estimate the exposure risk posed by a single infectious farm to other farms in the region and relative risk of exposure for farms under different scenarios. The mean daily rate of vehicular contact was 0.82 vehicles/day. The magnitude of exposure risk ranged from <1% to 25% under varying parameters. Risk of between-farm transmission was largely driven by company affiliation, with farms in the same company group as the index farm facing as much as a 5-fold increase in risk compared to farms contracted with different companies. Employment of part-time workers contributed to significant increases in risk in most scenarios, notably for farms who hired day-laborers. Social visits were significantly less important in determining risk. Conclusions/Significance Biosecurity interventions should be based on information on industry structure and company affiliation, and include part-time workers as potentially unrecognized sources of viral transmission. Modeling efforts to understand pathogen transmission in the context of industrial food animal production should consider company affiliation in addition to geospatial

  8. Effect of individual protective behaviors on influenza transmission: an agent-based model.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Elnaz; Schmitt, Ketra; Akgunduz, Ali

    2015-09-01

    It is well established in the epidemiological literature that individual behaviors have a significant effect on the spread of infectious diseases. Agent-based models are increasingly being recognized as the next generation of epidemiological models. In this research, we use the ability of agent-based models to incorporate behavior into simulations by examining the relative importance of vaccination and social distancing, two common measures for controlling the spread of infectious diseases, with respect to seasonal influenza. We modeled health behaviour using the result of a Health Belief Model study focused on influenza. We considered a control and a treatment group to explore the effect of education on people's health-related behaviors patterns. The control group reflects the behavioral patterns of students based on their general knowledge of influenza and its interventions while the treatment group illustrates the level of behavioral changes after individuals have been educated by a health care expert. The results of this study indicate that self-initiated behaviors are successful in controlling an outbreak in a high contact rate location such as a university. Self-initiated behaviors resulted in a population attack rate decrease of 17% and a 25% reduction in the peak number of cases. The simulation also provides significant evidence for the effect of an HBM theory-based educational program to increase the rate of applying the target interventions (vaccination by 22% percent and social distancing by 41%) and consequently to control the outbreak. PMID:25578039

  9. Transmission of H7N9 Influenza Viruses with a Polymorphism at PB2 Residue 627 in Chickens and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Geraldine S. M.; Leung, Connie Y. H.; Sia, Sin Fun; Choy, Ka-Tim; Zhou, Jie; Ho, Candy C. K.; Cheung, Peter P. H.; Lee, Elaine F.; Wai, Chris K. L.; Li, Pamela C. H.; Ip, Sin-Ming; Poon, Leo L. M.; Lindsley, William G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poultry exposure is a major risk factor for human H7N9 zoonotic infections, for which the mode of transmission remains unclear. We studied the transmission of genetically related poultry and human H7N9 influenza viruses differing by four amino acids, including the host determinant PB2 residue 627. A/Silkie chicken/HK/1772/2014 (SCk1772) and A/HK/3263/14 (HK3263) replicated to comparable titers in chickens, with superior oropharyngeal over cloacal shedding; both viruses transmitted efficiently among chickens via direct contact but inefficiently via the airborne route. Interspecies transmission via the airborne route was observed for ferrets exposed to the SCk1772- or HK3263-infected chickens, while low numbers of copies of influenza viral genome were detected in the air, predominantly at particle sizes larger than 4 μm. In ferrets, the human isolate HK3263 replicated to higher titers and transmitted more efficiently via direct contact than SCk1772. We monitored “intrahost” and “interhost” adaptive changes at PB2 residue 627 during infection and transmission of the Sck1772 that carried E627 and HK3263 that carried V/K/E polymorphism at 60%, 20%, and 20%, respectively. For SCk1772, positive selection for K627 over E627 was observed in ferrets during the chicken-to-ferret or ferret-to-ferret transmission. For HK3263 that contained V/K/E polymorphism, mixed V627 and E627 genotypes were transmitted among chickens while either V627 or K627 was transmitted to ferrets with a narrow transmission bottleneck. Overall, our results suggest direct contact as the main mode for H7N9 transmission and identify the PB2-V627 genotype with uncompromised fitness and transmissibility in both avian and mammalian species. IMPORTANCE We studied the modes of H7N9 transmission, as this information is crucial for developing effective control measures for prevention. Using chicken (SCk1772) and human (HK3263) H7N9 isolates that differed by four amino acids, including the host

  10. From Exit to Entry: Long-term Survival and Transmission of Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Waldner, Landon L.; MacKenzie, Keith D.; Köster,, Wolfgang; White, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella spp. are a leading cause of human infectious disease worldwide and pose a serious health concern. While we have an improving understanding of pathogenesis and the host-pathogen interactions underlying the infection process, comparatively little is known about the survival of pathogenic Salmonella outside their hosts. This review focuses on three areas: (1) in vitro evidence that Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods of time under harsh conditions; (2) observations and conclusions about Salmonella persistence obtained from human outbreaks; and (3) new information revealed by genomic- and population-based studies of Salmonella and related enteric pathogens. We highlight the mechanisms of Salmonella persistence and transmission as an essential part of their lifecycle and a prerequisite for their evolutionary success as human pathogens. PMID:25436767

  11. Hendra virus survival does not explain spillover patterns and implicates relatively direct transmission routes from flying foxes to horses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gerardo; Plowright, Raina; Chen, Carla; Kault, David; Selleck, Paul; Skerratt, Lee F

    2015-06-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is lethal to humans and horses, and little is known about its epidemiology. Biosecurity restrictions impede advances, particularly on understanding pathways of transmission. Quantifying the environmental survival of HeV can be used for making decisions and to infer transmission pathways. We estimated HeV survival with a Weibull distribution and calculated parameters from data generated in laboratory experiments. HeV survival rates based on air temperatures 24 h after excretion ranged from 2 to 10 % in summer and from 12 to 33 % in winter. Simulated survival across the distribution of the black flying fox (Pteropus alecto), a key reservoir host, did not predict spillover events. Based on our analyses we concluded that the most likely pathways of transmission did not require long periods of virus survival and were likely to involve relatively direct contact with flying fox excreta shortly after excretion. PMID:25667321

  12. Medfly Ceratitis capitata as Potential Vector for Fire Blight Pathogen Erwinia amylovora: Survival and Transmission.

    PubMed

    Ordax, Mónica; Piquer-Salcedo, Jaime E; Santander, Ricardo D; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Biosca, Elena G; López, María M; Marco-Noales, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the ability of bacterial plant pathogens to survive in insects is required for elucidating unknown aspects of their epidemiology and for designing appropriate control strategies. Erwinia amylovora is a plant pathogenic bacterium that causes fire blight, a devastating disease in apple and pear commercial orchards. Studies on fire blight spread by insects have mainly focused on pollinating agents, such as honeybees. However, the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most damaging fruit pests worldwide, is also common in pome fruit orchards. The main objective of the study was to investigate whether E. amylovora can survive and be transmitted by the medfly. Our experimental results show: i) E. amylovora can survive for at least 8 days inside the digestive tract of the medfly and until 28 days on its external surface, and ii) medflies are able to transmit the bacteria from inoculated apples to both detached shoots and pear plants, being the pathogen recovered from lesions in both cases. This is the first report on E. amylovora internalization and survival in/on C. capitata, as well as the experimental transmission of the fire blight pathogen by this insect. Our results suggest that medfly can act as a potential vector for E. amylovora, and expand our knowledge on the possible role of these and other insects in its life cycle. PMID:25978369

  13. Medfly Ceratitis capitata as Potential Vector for Fire Blight Pathogen Erwinia amylovora: Survival and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ordax, Mónica; Piquer-Salcedo, Jaime E.; Santander, Ricardo D.; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Biosca, Elena G.; López, María M.; Marco-Noales, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the ability of bacterial plant pathogens to survive in insects is required for elucidating unknown aspects of their epidemiology and for designing appropriate control strategies. Erwinia amylovora is a plant pathogenic bacterium that causes fire blight, a devastating disease in apple and pear commercial orchards. Studies on fire blight spread by insects have mainly focused on pollinating agents, such as honeybees. However, the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most damaging fruit pests worldwide, is also common in pome fruit orchards. The main objective of the study was to investigate whether E. amylovora can survive and be transmitted by the medfly. Our experimental results show: i) E. amylovora can survive for at least 8 days inside the digestive tract of the medfly and until 28 days on its external surface, and ii) medflies are able to transmit the bacteria from inoculated apples to both detached shoots and pear plants, being the pathogen recovered from lesions in both cases. This is the first report on E. amylovora internalization and survival in/on C. capitata, as well as the experimental transmission of the fire blight pathogen by this insect. Our results suggest that medfly can act as a potential vector for E. amylovora, and expand our knowledge on the possible role of these and other insects in its life cycle. PMID:25978369

  14. Estimating transmission of avian influenza in wild birds from incomplete epizootic data: implications for surveillance and disease spreac

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viviane Henaux; Jane Parmley; Catherine Soos; Samuel, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis and applications. Our study highlights the potential of integrating incomplete surveillance data with epizootic models to quantify disease transmission and immunity. This modelling approach provides an important tool to understand spatial and temporal epizootic dynamics and inform disease surveillance. Our findings suggest focusing highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIv) surveillance on postbreeding areas where mortality of immunologically naïve hatch-year birds is most likely to occur, and collecting serology to enhance HPAIv detection. Our modelling approach can integrate various types of disease data facilitating its use with data from other surveillance programs (as illustrated by the estimation of infection rate during an HPAIv outbreak in mute swansCygnus olor in Europe).

  15. Dps promotes survival of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in biofilm communities in vitro and resistance to clearance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Bing; Hong, Wenzhou; Kock, Nancy D.; Swords, W. Edward

    2012-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common airway commensal and opportunistic pathogen that persists within surface-attached biofilm communities. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that bacterial stress-responses are activated within biofilms. Transcripts for several factors associated with bacterial resistance to environmental stress were increased in biofilm cultures as compared to planktonic cultures. Among these, a homolog of the DNA-binding protein from starved cells (dps) was chosen for further study. An isogenic NTHi 86-028NP dps mutant was generated and tested for resistance to environmental stress, revealing a significant survival defects in high-iron conditions, which was mediated by oxidative stress and was restored by genetic complementation. As expected, NTHi 86-028NP dps had a general stress-response defect, exhibiting decreased resistance to many types of environmental stress. While no differences were observed in density and structure of NTHi 86-028NP and NTHi 86-028NP dps biofilms, bacterial survival was decreased in NTHi 86-028NP dps biofilms as compared to the parental strain. The role of dps persistence in vivo was tested in animal infection studies. NTHi 86-028NP dps had decreased resistance to clearance after pulmonary infection of elastase-treated mice as compared to NTHi 86-028NP, whereas minimal differences were observed in clearance from mock-treated mice. Similarly, lower numbers of NTHi 86-028NP dps were recovered from middle-ear effusions and bullar homogenates in the chinchilla model for otitis media (OM). Therefore, we conclude that Dps promotes bacterial survival within NTHi biofilm communities both in vitro and in chronic infections in vivo. PMID:22919649

  16. Pathobiology and transmission of highly and low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in European quail (Coturnix c. coturnix)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    European quail (Coturnix c. coturnix) may share with Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) its potential as an intermediate host and reservoir of avian influenza viruses (AIV). To elucidate this question, European quail were experimentally challenged with two highly pathogenic AIV (HPAIV) (H7N1/HP and H5N1/HP) and one low pathogenic AIV (LPAIV) (H7N2/LP). Contact animals were also used to assess the viral transmission among birds. Severe neurological signs and mortality rates of 67% (H7N1/HP) and 92% (H5N1/HP) were observed. Although histopathological findings were present in both HPAIV-infected groups, H5N1/HP-quail displayed a broader viral antigen distribution and extent of microscopic lesions. Neither clinical nor pathological involvement was observed in LPAIV-infected quail. Consistent long-term viral shedding and effective transmission to naive quail was demonstrated for the three studied AIV. Drinking water arose as a possible transmission route and feathers as a potential origin of HPAIV dissemination. The present study demonstrates that European quail may play a major role in AI epidemiology, highlighting the need to further understand its putative role as an intermediate host for avian/mammalian reassortant viruses. PMID:23537387

  17. Transmission Dynamics, Border Entry Screening, and School Holidays during the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) Pandemic, China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongjie; Cauchemez, Simon; Donnelly, Christl A.; Zhou, Lei; Feng, Luzhao; Xiang, Nijuan; Zheng, Jiandong; Ye, Min; Huai, Yang; Liao, Qiaohong; Peng, Zhibin; Feng, Yunxia; Jiang, Hui; Yang, Weizhong; Wang, Yu; Feng, Zijian

    2012-01-01

    Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus spread rapidly around the world in 2009. We used multiple data sources from surveillance systems and specific investigations to characterize the transmission patterns of this virus in China during May–November 2009 and analyze the effectiveness of border entry screening and holiday-related school closures on transmission. In China, age distribution and transmission dynamic characteristics were similar to those in Northern Hemisphere temperate countries. The epidemic was focused in children, with an effective reproduction number of ≈1.2–1.3. The 8 days of national holidays in October reduced the effective reproduction number by 37% (95% credible interval 28%–45%) and increased underreporting by ≈20%–30%. Border entry screening detected at most 37% of international travel–related cases, with most (89%) persons identified as having fever at time of entry. These findings suggest that border entry screening was unlikely to have delayed spread in China by >4 days. PMID:22515989

  18. Impact of Prior Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Vaccination or Infection on Protection and Transmission of Emerging Variants of Influenza A(H3N2)v Virus in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Katherine V.; Pearce, Melissa B.; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza H3N2 A viruses continue to circulate in swine and occasionally infect humans, resulting in outbreaks of variant influenza H3N2 [A(H3N2)v] virus. It has been previously demonstrated in ferrets that A(H3N2)v viruses transmit as efficiently as seasonal influenza viruses, raising concern over the pandemic potential of these viruses. However, A(H3N2)v viruses have not acquired the ability to transmit efficiently among humans, which may be due in part to existing cross-reactive immunity to A(H3N2)v viruses. Although current seasonal H3N2 and A(H3N2)v viruses are antigenically distinct from one another, historical H3N2 viruses have some antigenic similarity to A(H3N2)v viruses and previous exposure to these viruses may provide a measure of immune protection sufficient to dampen A(H3N2)v virus transmission. Here, we evaluated whether prior seasonal H3N2 influenza virus vaccination or infection affects virus replication and transmission of A(H3N2)v virus in the ferret animal model. We found that the seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza virus vaccine (TIV) or a monovalent vaccine prepared from an antigenically related 1992 seasonal influenza H3N2 (A/Beijing/32/1992) virus failed to substantially reduce A(H3N2)v (A/Indiana/08/2011) virus shedding and subsequent transmission to naive hosts. Conversely, ferrets primed by seasonal H3N2 virus infection displayed reduced A(H3N2)v virus shedding following challenge, which blunted transmission to naive ferrets. A higher level of specific IgG and IgA antibody titers detected among infected versus vaccinated ferrets was associated with the degree of protection offered by seasonal H3N2 virus infection. The data demonstrate in ferrets that the efficiency of A(H3N2)v transmission is disrupted by preexisting immunity induced by seasonal H3N2 virus infection. PMID:24089569

  19. Efficacy of inactivated and live-attenuated influenza virus vaccines in pigs against infection and transmission of emerging H3N2 similar to the 2011-2012 H3N2v

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines provide a primary means to limit disease but may not be effective at blocking infection and pathogen transmission. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of commercial inactivated swine influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines and experimental live-attenuated influenza viru...

  20. West nile virus in American white pelican chicks: transmission, immunity, and survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sovada, Marsha A.; Pietz, Pamela J.; Hofmeister, Erik K.; Bartos, Alisa J.

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes significant mortality of American White Pelican chicks at northern plains colonies. We tested oropharyngeal/cloacal swabs from moribund chicks for shed WNV. Such shedding could enable chick-to-chick transmission and help explain why WNV spreads rapidly in colonies. WNV was detected on swabs from 11% of chicks in 2006 and 52% of chicks in 2007; however, viral titers were low. Before onset of WNV mortality, we tested blood from < 3-week-old chicks for antibodies to WNV; 5% of chicks were seropositive, suggesting passive transfer of maternal antibodies. Among near-fledged chicks, 41% tested positive for anti-WNV antibodies, indicating that they survived infection. Among years and colonies, cumulative incidence of WNV in chicks varied from 28% to 81%, whereas the proportion of chicks surviving WNV (i.e., seropositive) was 64–75%. Our data revealed that WNV kills chicks that likely would fledge in the absence of WNV, that infection of chicks is pervasive, and that significant numbers of chicks survive infection.

  1. Genetics, Receptor Binding, Replication, and Mammalian Transmission of H4 Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Live Poultry Markets in China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Libin; Deng, Guohua; Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Qianyi; Kong, Huihui; Gu, Chunyang; Guan, Yuntao; Suzuki, Yasuo; Li, Yanbing; Jiang, Yongping; Tian, Guobin; Liu, Liling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT H4 avian influenza virus (AIV) is one of the most prevalent influenza virus subtypes in the world. However, whether H4 AIVs pose a threat to public health remains largely unclear. Here, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships, receptor binding properties, replication, and transmissibility in mammals of H4 AIVs isolated from live poultry markets in China between 2009 and 2012. Genomic sequence analysis of 36 representative H4 viruses revealed 32 different genotypes, indicating that these viruses are undergoing complex and frequent reassortment events. All 32 viruses tested could replicate in the respiratory organs of infected mice without prior adaptation. Receptor binding analysis demonstrated that the H4 AIVs bound to α-2,6-linked glycans, although they retained the binding preference for α-2,3-linked glycans. When we tested the direct-contact transmission of 10 H4 viruses in guinea pigs, we found that three viruses did not transmit to any of the contact animals, one virus transmitted to one of three contact animals, and six viruses transmitted to all three contact animals. When we further tested the respiratory droplet transmissibility of four of the viruses that transmitted efficiently via direct contact, we found that three of them could transmit to one or two of the five exposed animals. Our study demonstrates that the current circulating H4 AIVs can infect, replicate in, and transmit to mammalian hosts, thereby posing a potential threat to human health. These findings emphasize the continual need for enhanced surveillance of H4 AIVs. IMPORTANCE Numerous surveillance studies have documented the wide distribution of H4 AIVs throughout the world, yet the biological properties of H4 viruses have not been well studied. In this study, we found that multiple genotypes of H4 viruses are cocirculating in the live poultry markets of China and that H4 viruses can replicate in mice, possess human-type receptor binding specificity, and transmit between

  2. When fur and feather occur together: interclass transmission of avian influenza A virus from mammals to birds through common resources

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey Root, J.; Shriner, Susan A.; Ellis, Jeremy W.; VanDalen, Kaci K.; Sullivan, Heather J.; Franklin, Alan B.

    2015-01-01

    The potential role of wild mammals in avian influenza A virus (IAV) transmission cycles has received some attention in recent years and cases where birds have transmitted IAV to mammals have been documented. However, the contrasting cycle, wherein a mammal could transmit an avian IAV to birds, has been largely overlooked. We experimentally tested the abilities of two mammalian species to transmit avian IAV to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in simulated natural environments. Results suggested that striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) can successfully transmit avian IAV to mallards through indirect contact with shared resources, as transmission was noted in 1 of 4 of the mallards tested. Cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus sp.) exhibited a similar pattern, as one of five cottontail rabbits successfully transmitted IAV to a mallard, likely through environmental contamination. For each mammalian species tested, the mallards that became infected were those paired with the individual mammals with the lowest shedding levels but were anecdotally observed to be the most active animals. Mammals associated with and around poultry rearing facilities should be taken into consideration in biosecurity plans. PMID:26400374

  3. When fur and feather occur together: interclass transmission of avian influenza A virus from mammals to birds through common resources.

    PubMed

    Root, J Jeffrey; Shriner, Susan A; Ellis, Jeremy W; VanDalen, Kaci K; Sullivan, Heather J; Franklin, Alan B

    2015-01-01

    The potential role of wild mammals in avian influenza A virus (IAV) transmission cycles has received some attention in recent years and cases where birds have transmitted IAV to mammals have been documented. However, the contrasting cycle, wherein a mammal could transmit an avian IAV to birds, has been largely overlooked. We experimentally tested the abilities of two mammalian species to transmit avian IAV to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in simulated natural environments. Results suggested that striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) can successfully transmit avian IAV to mallards through indirect contact with shared resources, as transmission was noted in 1 of 4 of the mallards tested. Cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus sp.) exhibited a similar pattern, as one of five cottontail rabbits successfully transmitted IAV to a mallard, likely through environmental contamination. For each mammalian species tested, the mallards that became infected were those paired with the individual mammals with the lowest shedding levels but were anecdotally observed to be the most active animals. Mammals associated with and around poultry rearing facilities should be taken into consideration in biosecurity plans. PMID:26400374

  4. Bayesian uncertainty quantification for transmissibility of influenza, norovirus and Ebola using information geometry.

    PubMed

    House, Thomas; Ford, Ashley; Lan, Shiwei; Bilson, Samuel; Buckingham-Jeffery, Elizabeth; Girolami, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Infectious diseases exert a large and in many contexts growing burden on human health, but violate most of the assumptions of classical epidemiological statistics and hence require a mathematically sophisticated approach. Viral shedding data are collected during human studies-either where volunteers are infected with a disease or where existing cases are recruited-in which the levels of live virus produced over time are measured. These have traditionally been difficult to analyse due to strong, complex correlations between parameters. Here, we show how a Bayesian approach to the inverse problem together with modern Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms based on information geometry can overcome these difficulties and yield insights into the disease dynamics of two of the most prevalent human pathogens-influenza and norovirus-as well as Ebola virus disease. PMID:27558850

  5. Bayesian uncertainty quantification for transmissibility of influenza, norovirus and Ebola using information geometry

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Ashley; Lan, Shiwei; Bilson, Samuel; Buckingham-Jeffery, Elizabeth; Girolami, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases exert a large and in many contexts growing burden on human health, but violate most of the assumptions of classical epidemiological statistics and hence require a mathematically sophisticated approach. Viral shedding data are collected during human studies—either where volunteers are infected with a disease or where existing cases are recruited—in which the levels of live virus produced over time are measured. These have traditionally been difficult to analyse due to strong, complex correlations between parameters. Here, we show how a Bayesian approach to the inverse problem together with modern Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms based on information geometry can overcome these difficulties and yield insights into the disease dynamics of two of the most prevalent human pathogens—influenza and norovirus—as well as Ebola virus disease. PMID:27558850

  6. Poultry food products--a source of avian influenza virus transmission to humans?

    PubMed

    Harder, T C; Buda, S; Hengel, H; Beer, M; Mettenleiter, T C

    2016-02-01

    Global human mobility and intercontinental connectivity, expansion of livestock production and encroachment of wildlife habitats by invasive agricultural land use contribute to shape the complexity of influenza epidemiology. The OneHealth approach integrates these and further elements into considerations to improve disease control and prevention. Food of animal origin for human consumption is another integral aspect; if produced from infected livestock such items may act as vehicles of spread of animal pathogens, and, in case of zoonotic agents, as a potential human health hazard. Notifiable zoonotic avian influenza viruses (AIV) have become entrenched in poultry populations in several Asian and northern African countries since 2003. Highly pathogenic (HP) AIV (e.g. H5N1) cause extensive poultry mortality and severe economic losses. HPAIV and low pathogenic AIV (e.g. H7N9) with zoonotic propensities pose risks for human health. More than 1500 human cases of AIV infection have been reported, mainly from regions with endemically infected poultry. Intense human exposure to AIV-infected poultry, e.g. during rearing, slaughtering or processing of poultry, is a major risk factor for acquiring AIV infection. In contrast, human infections through consumption of AIV-contaminated food have not been substantiated. Heating poultry products according to kitchen standards (core temperatures ≥70°C, ≥10 s) rapidly inactivates AIV infectivity and renders fully cooked products safe. Nevertheless, concerted efforts must ensure that poultry products potentially contaminated with zoonotic AIV do not reach the food chain. Stringent and sustained OneHealth measures are required to better control and eventually eradicate, HPAIV from endemic regions. PMID:26686812

  7. Impact of live poultry market closure in reducing bird-to-human transmission of avian influenza A(H7N9) virus: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongjie; Wu, Joseph T.; Cowling, Benjamin J.; Liao, Qiaohong; Fang, Vicky J.; Zhou, Sheng; Wu, Peng; Zhou, Hang; Lau, Eric H. Y.; Guo, Danhuai; Ni, Michael Y.; Peng, Zhibin; Feng, Luzhao; Jiang, Hui; Luo, Huiming; Li, Qun; Feng, Zijian; Wang, Yu; Yang, Weizhong; Leung, Gabriel M.

    2014-01-01

    Background A novel influenza A(H7N9) virus has emerged in China during the past few months. Inter-species zoonotic transmission appears to be the predominant route of spread. Live poultry markets (LPMs) in the major cities of Shanghai, Hangzhou, Huzhou and Nanjing, where the majority of cases have occurred, were swiftly closed as a precautionary public health measure. Our objective was to quantify the impact of LPM closure in reducing bird-to-human transmission of avian influenza A(H7N9) virus. Methods We used data on the illness onset dates and geographical locations of laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H7N9) cases that were officially announced by 7 June 2013. We constructed a statistical model to explain the patterns in incident cases reported in each city based on the assumption of a constant force of infection prior to closure, and a different constant force of infection after closure. We fitted the model using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Findings There were 85 confirmed influenza A(H7N9) cases in Shanghai, Hangzhou, Huzhou and Nanjing out of a total of 130 confirmed cases in mainland China by 7 June 2013. Closure of LPMs in those four cities reduced the risk of human infections by 97%–99% (range 68%–100%) in each city. Given that LPMs were the predominant source of influenza A(H7N9) exposure in those locations, we estimated the mean incubation period to be 3.3 days. Interpretation LPM closures were extremely effective in controlling human risk of influenza A(H7N9). If the influenza A(H7N9) epizootic/epidemic continues, LPM closure should be sustained in at-risk areas and implemented in any urban areas where influenza A(H7N9) reappears in future. In the longer term, evidence-based discussions and deliberations about the role of central slaughtering of all live poultry should be renewed. Funding Ministry of Science and Technology, China; Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease and University Grants Committee, Hong Kong Special

  8. Enhanced Mammalian Transmissibility of Seasonal Influenza A/H1N1 Viruses Encoding an Oseltamivir-Resistant Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Rahmat, Saad; Pica, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, oseltamivir resistance developed among seasonal influenza A/H1N1 (sH1N1) virus isolates at an exponential rate, without a corresponding increase in oseltamivir usage. We hypothesized that the oseltamivir-resistant neuraminidase (NA), in addition to being relatively insusceptible to the antiviral effect of oseltamivir, might confer an additional fitness advantage on these viruses by enhancing their transmission efficiency among humans. Here we demonstrate that an oseltamivir-resistant clinical isolate, an A/Brisbane/59/2007(H1N1)-like virus isolated in New York State in 2008, transmits more efficiently among guinea pigs than does a highly similar, contemporaneous oseltamivir-sensitive isolate. With reverse genetics reassortants and point mutants of the two clinical isolates, we further show that expression of the oseltamivir-resistant NA in the context of viral proteins from the oseltamivir-sensitive virus (a 7:1 reassortant) is sufficient to enhance transmissibility. In the guinea pig model, the NA is the critical determinant of transmission efficiency between oseltamivir-sensitive and -resistant Brisbane/59-like sH1N1 viruses, independent of concurrent drift mutations that occurred in other gene products. Our data suggest that the oseltamivir-resistant NA (specifically, one or both of the companion mutations, H275Y and D354G) may have allowed resistant Brisbane/59-like viruses to outtransmit sensitive isolates. These data provide in vivo evidence of an evolutionary mechanism that would explain the rapidity with which oseltamivir resistance achieved fixation among sH1N1 isolates in the human reservoir. PMID:22532693

  9. Influenza Transmission in the Mother-Infant Dyad Leads to Severe Disease, Mammary Gland Infection, and Pathogenesis by Regulating Host Responses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Stephen S. H.; Almansa, Raquel; Leon, Alberto; Xu, Luoling; Bartoszko, Jessica; Kelvin, David J.; Kelvin, Alyson A.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza viruses are typically restricted to the human upper respiratory tract whereas influenza viruses with greater pathogenic potential often also target extra-pulmonary organs. Infants, pregnant women, and breastfeeding mothers are highly susceptible to severe respiratory disease following influenza virus infection but the mechanisms of disease severity in the mother-infant dyad are poorly understood. Here we investigated 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection and transmission in breastfeeding mothers and infants utilizing our developed infant-mother ferret influenza model. Infants acquired severe disease and mortality following infection. Transmission of the virus from infants to mother ferrets led to infection in the lungs and mother mortality. Live virus was also found in mammary gland tissue and expressed milk of the mothers which eventually led to milk cessation. Histopathology showed destruction of acini glandular architecture with the absence of milk. The virus was localized in mammary epithelial cells of positive glands. To understand the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland infection, we performed global transcript analysis which showed downregulation of milk production genes such as Prolactin and increased breast involution pathways indicated by a STAT5 to STAT3 signaling shift. Genes associated with cancer development were also significantly increased including JUN, FOS and M2 macrophage markers. Immune responses within the mammary gland were characterized by decreased lymphocyte-associated genes CD3e, IL2Ra, CD4 with IL1β upregulation. Direct inoculation of H1N1 into the mammary gland led to infant respiratory infection and infant mortality suggesting the influenza virus was able to replicate in mammary tissue and transmission is possible through breastfeeding. In vitro infection studies with human breast cells showed susceptibility to H1N1 virus infection. Together, we have shown that the host-pathogen interactions of influenza virus

  10. Influenza Transmission in the Mother-Infant Dyad Leads to Severe Disease, Mammary Gland Infection, and Pathogenesis by Regulating Host Responses.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Stéphane G; Banner, David; Huang, Stephen S H; Almansa, Raquel; Leon, Alberto; Xu, Luoling; Bartoszko, Jessica; Kelvin, David J; Kelvin, Alyson A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal influenza viruses are typically restricted to the human upper respiratory tract whereas influenza viruses with greater pathogenic potential often also target extra-pulmonary organs. Infants, pregnant women, and breastfeeding mothers are highly susceptible to severe respiratory disease following influenza virus infection but the mechanisms of disease severity in the mother-infant dyad are poorly understood. Here we investigated 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection and transmission in breastfeeding mothers and infants utilizing our developed infant-mother ferret influenza model. Infants acquired severe disease and mortality following infection. Transmission of the virus from infants to mother ferrets led to infection in the lungs and mother mortality. Live virus was also found in mammary gland tissue and expressed milk of the mothers which eventually led to milk cessation. Histopathology showed destruction of acini glandular architecture with the absence of milk. The virus was localized in mammary epithelial cells of positive glands. To understand the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland infection, we performed global transcript analysis which showed downregulation of milk production genes such as Prolactin and increased breast involution pathways indicated by a STAT5 to STAT3 signaling shift. Genes associated with cancer development were also significantly increased including JUN, FOS and M2 macrophage markers. Immune responses within the mammary gland were characterized by decreased lymphocyte-associated genes CD3e, IL2Ra, CD4 with IL1β upregulation. Direct inoculation of H1N1 into the mammary gland led to infant respiratory infection and infant mortality suggesting the influenza virus was able to replicate in mammary tissue and transmission is possible through breastfeeding. In vitro infection studies with human breast cells showed susceptibility to H1N1 virus infection. Together, we have shown that the host-pathogen interactions of influenza virus

  11. TLR2 Signaling Decreases Transmission of Streptococcus pneumoniae by Limiting Bacterial Shedding in an Infant Mouse Influenza A Co-infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Aimee L.; Siegel, Steven J.; Erikson, Jan; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    While the importance of transmission of pathogens is widely accepted, there is currently little mechanistic understanding of this process. Nasal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is common in humans, especially in early childhood, and is a prerequisite for the development of disease and transmission among hosts. In this study, we adapted an infant mouse model to elucidate host determinants of transmission of S. pneumoniae from inoculated index mice to uninfected contact mice. In the context of co-infection with influenza A virus, the pneumococcus was transmitted among wildtype littermates, with approximately half of the contact mice acquiring colonization. Mice deficient for TLR2 were colonized to a similar density but transmitted S. pneumoniae more efficiently (100% transmission) than wildtype animals and showed decreased expression of interferon α and higher viral titers. The greater viral burden in tlr2−/− mice correlated with heightened inflammation, and was responsible for an increase in bacterial shedding from the mouse nose. The role of TLR2 signaling was confirmed by intranasal treatment of wildtype mice with the agonist Pam3Cys, which decreased inflammation and reduced bacterial shedding and transmission. Taken together, these results suggest that the innate immune response to influenza virus promotes bacterial shedding, allowing the bacteria to transit from host to host. These findings provide insight into the role of host factors in the increased pneumococcal carriage rates seen during flu season and contribute to our overall understanding of pathogen transmission. PMID:25166617

  12. Survival of Treponema pallidum in banked blood for prevention of Syphilis transmission

    PubMed Central

    Adegoke, Adeolu O.; Akanni, Olufemi E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Every year, millions of people are exposed to avoidable, life-threatening risks through the trans-fusion of unsafe blood. Aim: To determine the survival time of Treponema pallidum in banked donor blood. Material and Methods: Two groups of male Wistar rats (group A and B) were inoculated intratesticularly with 0.5ml of artificially infected donor blood (final density of Nichols treponemes: 5×105 /ml) stored at 4°C for various periods of time. In group A, a pair each of the rats was injected every 12 hours, starting at 0 hr, up to a maximal storage time of 96 hr. In group B, the rats were injected after 72, 120, 192 and 336 hours of storage of the treponemes-blood mixture. Group C which is a control group was injected with blood only, while group D rats were injected with heat-killed treponemes suspended in blood every 12 hours. The detection of Treponema pallidum IgG/IgM was based on the principle of double antigen sandwich immunoassay, in which purified recombinant antigens are employed sufficiently to identify antibodies to Syphilis. The outcomes of interest included the proportion of Syphilis positive rats and the maximal survival hours of T. pallidum in banked blood. Results: 14 rats (77.8%) out of the 18 rats that were involved in group A developed orchitis and positive serology up to 72 hours of storage time, p<0.05. 2 rats (25%) in group B developed orchitis after 72hrs of storage time. All the 18 rats (100%) in the control group C and D showed neither clinical nor serological changes. Conclusion: It was concluded that the survival time of T. pallidum in banked donor blood lies between 72-120hrs in this study. Regardless of blood banking temperature, T. pallidum and other transfusion transmissible infections should be screened for prior to allogeneic transfusion. PMID:22540107

  13. Household transmission of 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus after a school-based outbreak in New York City, April-May 2009.

    PubMed

    France, Anne Marie; Jackson, Michael; Schrag, Stephanie; Lynch, Michael; Zimmerman, Christopher; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Hadler, James

    2010-04-01

    In April 2009, an outbreak due to infection with the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (pH1N1) was investigated in a New York City high school. We surveyed household contacts of ill students to characterize the extent of transmission within households, identify contact groups at highest risk for illness, and assess the potential for preventing household transmission. Influenza-like illness (ILI) was reported by 79 of 702 household contacts (11.3% attack rate). Multivariate analysis showed that older age was protective: for each increasing year of age, the risk of ILI was reduced 5%. Additional protective factors included antiviral prophylaxis and having had a household discussion about influenza. Providing care for the index case patient and watching television with the index case patient were risk factors among parents and siblings, respectively. Fifty percent of cases occurred within 3 days of onset of illness in the student. These factors have implications for mitigating the impact of pH1N1 transmission. PMID:20187740

  14. Perinatal survival and health after maternal influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination: A cohort study of pregnancies stratified by trimester of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Baum, Ulrike; Leino, Tuija; Gissler, Mika; Kilpi, Terhi; Jokinen, Jukka

    2015-09-11

    Large cohort studies demonstrated the safety of vaccination with the AS03 adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine, but data on first trimester vaccination safety are limited. We conducted a nationwide register-based retrospective cohort study in Finland, included singleton pregnancies present on 01 November 2009 and followed them from 01 November 2009 until delivery. Pregnancies with abortive outcome, pregnancies that started before 01 February 2009 and pregnancies of women, who received the AS03 adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine prior to the onset of pregnancy, were excluded. Our main outcome measures were hazard ratios comparing the risk of stillbirth, early neonatal death, moderately preterm birth, very preterm birth, moderately low birth weight, very low birth weight, and being small for gestational age between pregnancies exposed and unexposed to maternal influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. The study population comprised 43,604 pregnancies; 34,241 (78.5%) women were vaccinated at some stage during pregnancy. The rates of stillbirth, early neonatal death, moderately preterm birth, and moderately low birth weight were similar between pregnant women exposed and unexposed to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. After adjusting for known risk factors, the relative rates were 0.90 (95% confidence interval 0.55-1.45) for very preterm birth, 0.84 (0.61-1.16) for very low birth weight, and 1.17 (0.98-1.40) for being small for gestational age. Also, in the subanalysis of 7839 women vaccinated during the first trimester, the rates did not indicate that maternal vaccination during the first trimester had any adverse impact on perinatal survival and health. The risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes was not associated with the exposure to the AS03 adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine. This study adds reassuring evidence on the safety of AS03 adjuvanted influenza vaccines when given in the first trimester and supports the recommendation of influenza vaccination to all

  15. Different routes of transmission of low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses in chicken layers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous studies in which the infectivity and transmissibility of the pandemic H1N1 virus was examined in different poultry species, it was determined that no or minimal infection occurred in chickens and turkeys intranasally inoculated with the virus. However, the virus could infect laying turke...

  16. Interspecies and intraspecies transmission of triple reassortant H3N2 influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, Hadi M; Al-Natour, Mohammad Q; Lee, Chang-Won; Saif, Yehya M

    2007-01-01

    The triple reassortant H3N2 viruses were isolated for the first time from pigs in 1998 and are known to be endemic in swine and turkey populations in the United States. In 2004, we isolated two H3N2 triple reassortant viruses from two turkey breeder flocks in Ohio and Illinois. Infected hens showed no clinical signs, but experienced a complete cessation of egg production. In this study, we evaluated three triple reassortant H3N2 isolates of turkey origin and one isolate of swine origin for their transmission between swine and turkeys. Although all 4 viruses tested share high genetic similarity in all 8 genes, only the Ohio strain (A/turkey/Ohio/313053/04) was shown to transmit efficiently both ways between swine and turkeys. One isolate, A/turkey/North Carolina/03, was able to transmit from pigs to turkeys but not vice versa. Neither of the other two viruses transmitted either way. Sequence analysis of the HA1 gene of the Ohio strain showed one amino acid change (D to A) at residue 190 of the receptor binding domain upon transmission from turkeys to pigs. The Ohio virus was then tested for intraspecies transmission in three different avian species. The virus was shown to replicate and transmit among turkeys, replicate but does not transmit among chickens, and did not replicate in ducks. Identifying viruses with varying inter- and intra-species transmission potential should be useful for further studies on the molecular basis of interspecies transmission. PMID:18045494

  17. Avian-to-human transmission of the PB1 gene of influenza A viruses in the 1957 and 1968 pandemics.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaoka, Y; Krauss, S; Webster, R G

    1989-01-01

    We determined the origin and evolutionary pathways of the PB1 genes of influenza A viruses responsible for the 1957 and 1968 human pandemics and obtained information on the variable or conserved region of the PB1 protein. The evolutionary tree constructed from nucleotide sequences suggested the following: (i) the PB1 gene of the 1957 human pandemic strain, A/Singapore/1/57 (H2N2), was probably introduced from avian species and was maintained in humans until 1968; (ii) in the 1968 pandemic strain, A/NT/60/68 (H3N2), the PB1 gene was not derived from the previously circulating virus in humans but probably from another avian virus; and (iii) a current human H3N2 virus inherited the PB1 gene from an A/NT/60/68-like virus. Nucleotide sequence analysis also showed that the avian PB1 gene was introduced into pigs. Hence, transmission of the PB1 gene from avian to mammalian species is a relatively frequent event. Comparative analysis of deduced amino acid sequences disclosed highly conserved regions in PB1 proteins, which may be key structures required for PB1 activities. PMID:2795713

  18. Ecology and geography of avian influenza (HPAI H5N1) transmission in the Middle East and northeastern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Richard AJ; Peterson, A Townsend

    2009-01-01

    Background The emerging highly pathogenic avian influenza strain H5N1 ("HPAI-H5N1") has spread broadly in the past decade, and is now the focus of considerable concern. We tested the hypothesis that spatial distributions of HPAI-H5N1 cases are related consistently and predictably to coarse-scale environmental features in the Middle East and northeastern Africa. We used ecological niche models to relate virus occurrences to 8 km resolution digital data layers summarizing parameters of monthly surface reflectance and landform. Predictive challenges included a variety of spatial stratification schemes in which models were challenged to predict case distributions in broadly unsampled areas. Results In almost all tests, HPAI-H5N1 cases were indeed occurring under predictable sets of environmental conditions, generally predicted absent from areas with low NDVI values and minimal seasonal variation, and present in areas with a broad range of and appreciable seasonal variation in NDVI values. Although we documented significant predictive ability of our models, even between our study region and West Africa, case occurrences in the Arabian Peninsula appear to follow a distinct environmental regime. Conclusion Overall, we documented a variable environmental "fingerprint" for areas suitable for HPAI-H5N1 transmission. PMID:19619336

  19. Early Characterization of the Severity and Transmissibility of Pandemic Influenza Using Clinical Episode Data from Multiple Populations

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Pete; Ben-Nun, Michal; Linker, Jon A.; Cost, Angelia A.; Sanchez, Jose L.; George, Dylan; Bacon, David P.; Riley, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The potential rapid availability of large-scale clinical episode data during the next influenza pandemic suggests an opportunity for increasing the speed with which novel respiratory pathogens can be characterized. Key intervention decisions will be determined by both the transmissibility of the novel strain (measured by the basic reproductive number R 0) and its individual-level severity. The 2009 pandemic illustrated that estimating individual-level severity, as described by the proportion p C of infections that result in clinical cases, can remain uncertain for a prolonged period of time. Here, we use 50 distinct US military populations during 2009 as a retrospective cohort to test the hypothesis that real-time encounter data combined with disease dynamic models can be used to bridge this uncertainty gap. Effectively, we estimated the total number of infections in multiple early-affected communities using the model and divided that number by the known number of clinical cases. Joint estimates of severity and transmissibility clustered within a relatively small region of parameter space, with 40 of the 50 populations bounded by: p C, 0.0133–0.150 and R 0, 1.09–2.16. These fits were obtained despite widely varying incidence profiles: some with spring waves, some with fall waves and some with both. To illustrate the benefit of specific pairing of rapidly available data and infectious disease models, we simulated a future moderate pandemic strain with p C approximately ×10 that of 2009; the results demonstrating that even before the peak had passed in the first affected population, R 0 and p C could be well estimated. This study provides a clear reference in this two-dimensional space against which future novel respiratory pathogens can be rapidly assessed and compared with previous pandemics. PMID:26402446

  20. Pathogenicity and transmissibility of reassortant H9 influenza viruses with genes from pandemic H1N1 virus

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Chuanling; Liu, Qinfang; Bawa, Bhupinder; Shen, Huigang; Qi, Wenbao; Chen, Ying; Mok, Chris Ka Pun; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2012-01-01

    Both H9N2 avian influenza and 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses (pH1N1) are able to infect humans and swine, which has raised concerns that novel reassortant H9 viruses with pH1N1 genes might be generated in these hosts by reassortment. Although previous studies have demonstrated that reassortant H9 viruses with pH1N1 genes show increased virulence in mice and transmissibility in ferrets, the virulence and transmissibility of reassortant H9 viruses in natural hosts such as chickens and swine remain unknown. This study generated two reassortant H9 viruses (H9N2/CA09 and H9N1/CA09) in the background of the pH1N1 A/California/04/2009 (CA09) virus by replacing either both the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes or only the HA gene with the respective genes from the A/quail/Hong Kong/G1/1997 (H9N2) virus and evaluated their replication, pathogenicity and transmission in chickens and pigs compared with the parental viruses. Chickens that were infected with the parental H9N2 and reassortant H9 viruses seroconverted. The parental H9N2 and reassortant H9N2/CA09 viruses were transmitted to sentinel chickens, but H9N1/CA09 virus was not. The parental H9N2 replicated poorly and was not transmitted in pigs, whereas both H9N2/CA09 and H9N1/CA09 viruses replicated and were transmitted efficiently in pigs, similar to the pH1N1 virus. These results demonstrated that reassortant H9 viruses with pH1N1 genes show enhanced replication and transmissibility in pigs compared with the parental H9N2 virus, indicating that they may pose a threat for humans if such reassortants arise in swine. PMID:22875253

  1. Persistence of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses in Natural Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Feare, Chris J.; Renaud, François; Thomas, Frédéric; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Understanding of ecologic factors favoring emergence and maintenance of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses is limited. Although low pathogenic avian influenza viruses persist and evolve in wild populations, HPAI viruses evolve in domestic birds and cause economically serious epizootics that only occasionally infect wild populations. We propose that evolutionary ecology considerations can explain this apparent paradox. Host structure and transmission possibilities differ considerably between wild and domestic birds and are likely to be major determinants of virulence. Because viral fitness is highly dependent on host survival and dispersal in nature, virulent forms are unlikely to persist in wild populations if they kill hosts quickly or affect predation risk or migratory performance. Interhost transmission in water has evolved in low pathogenic influenza viruses in wild waterfowl populations. However, oropharyngeal shedding and transmission by aerosols appear more efficient for HPAI viruses among domestic birds. PMID:20587174

  2. Evolution of 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses during the pandemic correlates with increased viral pathogenicity and transmissibility in the ferret model.

    PubMed

    Otte, Anna; Marriott, Anthony C; Dreier, Carola; Dove, Brian; Mooren, Kyra; Klingen, Thorsten R; Sauter, Martina; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Bennett, Allan; Klingel, Karin; van Riel, Debby; McHardy, Alice C; Carroll, Miles W; Gabriel, Gülsah

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses have evolved after pandemic onset giving rise to severe epidemics in subsequent waves. However, it still remains unclear which viral determinants might have contributed to disease severity after pandemic initiation. Here, we show that distinct mutations in the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus genome have occurred with increased frequency after pandemic declaration. Among those, a mutation in the viral hemagglutinin was identified that increases 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus binding to human-like α2,6-linked sialic acids. Moreover, these mutations conferred increased viral replication in the respiratory tract and elevated respiratory droplet transmission between ferrets. Thus, our data show that 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses have evolved after pandemic onset giving rise to novel virus variants that enhance viral replicative fitness and respiratory droplet transmission in a mammalian animal model. These findings might help to improve surveillance efforts to assess the pandemic risk by emerging influenza viruses. PMID:27339001

  3. Evolution of 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses during the pandemic correlates with increased viral pathogenicity and transmissibility in the ferret model

    PubMed Central

    Otte, Anna; Marriott, Anthony C.; Dreier, Carola; Dove, Brian; Mooren, Kyra; Klingen, Thorsten R.; Sauter, Martina; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Bennett, Allan; Klingel, Karin; van Riel, Debby; McHardy, Alice C.; Carroll, Miles W.; Gabriel, Gülsah

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses have evolved after pandemic onset giving rise to severe epidemics in subsequent waves. However, it still remains unclear which viral determinants might have contributed to disease severity after pandemic initiation. Here, we show that distinct mutations in the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus genome have occurred with increased frequency after pandemic declaration. Among those, a mutation in the viral hemagglutinin was identified that increases 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus binding to human-like α2,6-linked sialic acids. Moreover, these mutations conferred increased viral replication in the respiratory tract and elevated respiratory droplet transmission between ferrets. Thus, our data show that 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses have evolved after pandemic onset giving rise to novel virus variants that enhance viral replicative fitness and respiratory droplet transmission in a mammalian animal model. These findings might help to improve surveillance efforts to assess the pandemic risk by emerging influenza viruses. PMID:27339001

  4. Molecular Signatures Associated with Mx1-Mediated Resistance to Highly Pathogenic Influenza Virus Infection: Mechanisms of Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cilloniz, Cristian; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J.; Ni, Chester; Carter, Victoria S.; Korth, Marcus J.; Swayne, David E.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the role of host factors during lethal influenza virus infection is critical to deciphering the events that determine the fate of the host. One such factor is encoded by the Mx1 gene, which confers resistance to influenza virus infection. Here, we compared pathology and global gene expression profiles in lung tissue from BALB/c (Mx1−) and BALB · A2G-Mx1 mice (Mx1+/+) infected with the fully reconstructed 1918 pandemic influenza virus. Mx1+/+ mice showed less tissue damage than Mx− animals, and pathology and mortality were further reduced by treating the mice with interferon prior to infection. Using global transcriptional profiling, we identified distinct molecular signatures associated with partial protection, complete protection, and the contribution of interferon to the host response. In the absence of interferon treatment, partial protection was characterized by the generation of an acute response with the upregulation of genes associated with apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, and cell migration. Complete protection was characterized by the downregulation of cytokine and chemokine genes previously associated with influenza virus pathogenesis. The contribution of interferon treatment to total protection in virus-infected Mx1+/+ mice was characterized by the altered regulation of cell cycle genes. These genes were upregulated in Mx1+/+ mice treated with interferon but downregulated in the absence of interferon treatment. Our results suggest that Mx1+/+ mice generate a protective antiviral response by controlling the expression of key modulator molecules associated with influenza virus lethality. PMID:22190720

  5. Unifying Viral Genetics and Human Transportation Data to Predict the Global Transmission Dynamics of Human Influenza H3N2

    PubMed Central

    Lemey, Philippe; Rambaut, Andrew; Bedford, Trevor; Faria, Nuno; Bielejec, Filip; Baele, Guy; Russell, Colin A.; Smith, Derek J.; Pybus, Oliver G.; Brockmann, Dirk; Suchard, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Information on global human movement patterns is central to spatial epidemiological models used to predict the behavior of influenza and other infectious diseases. Yet it remains difficult to test which modes of dispersal drive pathogen spread at various geographic scales using standard epidemiological data alone. Evolutionary analyses of pathogen genome sequences increasingly provide insights into the spatial dynamics of influenza viruses, but to date they have largely neglected the wealth of information on human mobility, mainly because no statistical framework exists within which viral gene sequences and empirical data on host movement can be combined. Here, we address this problem by applying a phylogeographic approach to elucidate the global spread of human influenza subtype H3N2 and assess its ability to predict the spatial spread of human influenza A viruses worldwide. Using a framework that estimates the migration history of human influenza while simultaneously testing and quantifying a range of potential predictive variables of spatial spread, we show that the global dynamics of influenza H3N2 are driven by air passenger flows, whereas at more local scales spread is also determined by processes that correlate with geographic distance. Our analyses further confirm a central role for mainland China and Southeast Asia in maintaining a source population for global influenza diversity. By comparing model output with the known pandemic expansion of H1N1 during 2009, we demonstrate that predictions of influenza spatial spread are most accurate when data on human mobility and viral evolution are integrated. In conclusion, the global dynamics of influenza viruses are best explained by combining human mobility data with the spatial information inherent in sampled viral genomes. The integrated approach introduced here offers great potential for epidemiological surveillance through phylogeographic reconstructions and for improving predictive models of disease control

  6. Unifying viral genetics and human transportation data to predict the global transmission dynamics of human influenza H3N2.

    PubMed

    Lemey, Philippe; Rambaut, Andrew; Bedford, Trevor; Faria, Nuno; Bielejec, Filip; Baele, Guy; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Pybus, Oliver G; Brockmann, Dirk; Suchard, Marc A

    2014-02-01

    Information on global human movement patterns is central to spatial epidemiological models used to predict the behavior of influenza and other infectious diseases. Yet it remains difficult to test which modes of dispersal drive pathogen spread at various geographic scales using standard epidemiological data alone. Evolutionary analyses of pathogen genome sequences increasingly provide insights into the spatial dynamics of influenza viruses, but to date they have largely neglected the wealth of information on human mobility, mainly because no statistical framework exists within which viral gene sequences and empirical data on host movement can be combined. Here, we address this problem by applying a phylogeographic approach to elucidate the global spread of human influenza subtype H3N2 and assess its ability to predict the spatial spread of human influenza A viruses worldwide. Using a framework that estimates the migration history of human influenza while simultaneously testing and quantifying a range of potential predictive variables of spatial spread, we show that the global dynamics of influenza H3N2 are driven by air passenger flows, whereas at more local scales spread is also determined by processes that correlate with geographic distance. Our analyses further confirm a central role for mainland China and Southeast Asia in maintaining a source population for global influenza diversity. By comparing model output with the known pandemic expansion of H1N1 during 2009, we demonstrate that predictions of influenza spatial spread are most accurate when data on human mobility and viral evolution are integrated. In conclusion, the global dynamics of influenza viruses are best explained by combining human mobility data with the spatial information inherent in sampled viral genomes. The integrated approach introduced here offers great potential for epidemiological surveillance through phylogeographic reconstructions and for improving predictive models of disease control

  7. Shedding Light on Avian Influenza H4N6 Infection in Mallards: Modes of Transmission and Implications for Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    VanDalen, Kaci K.; Franklin, Alan B.; Mooers, Nicole L.; Sullivan, Heather J.; Shriner, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Wild mallards (Anas platyrhychos) are considered one of the primary reservoir species for avian influenza viruses (AIV). Because AIV circulating in wild birds pose an indirect threat to agriculture and human health, understanding the ecology of AIV and developing risk assessments and surveillance systems for prevention of disease is critical. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, mallards were experimentally infected with an H4N6 subtype of AIV by oral inoculation or contact with an H4N6 contaminated water source. Cloacal swabs, oropharyngeal swabs, fecal samples, and water samples were collected daily and tested by real-time RT-PCR (RRT-PCR) for estimation of viral shedding. Fecal samples had significantly higher virus concentrations than oropharyngeal or cloacal swabs and 6 month old ducks shed significantly more viral RNA than 3 month old ducks regardless of sample type. Use of a water source contaminated by AIV infected mallards, was sufficient to transmit virus to naïve mallards, which shed AIV at higher or similar levels as orally-inoculated ducks. Conclusions Bodies of water could serve as a transmission pathway for AIV in waterfowl. For AIV surveillance purposes, water samples and fecal samples appear to be excellent alternatives or additions to cloacal and oropharyngeal swabbing. Furthermore, duck age (even within hatch-year birds) may be important when interpreting viral shedding results from experimental infections or surveillance. Differential shedding among hatch-year mallards could affect prevalence estimates, modeling of AIV spread, and subsequent risk assessments. PMID:20877466

  8. Competitive exclusion in a multi-strain immuno-epidemiological influenza model with environmental transmission.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yan-Xia; Li, Xue-Zhi; Martcheva, Maia

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a multi-strain model that links immunological and epidemiological dynamics across scales is formulated. On the within-host scale, the n strains eliminate each other with the strain having the largest immunological reproduction number persisting. However, on the population scale, we extend the competitive exclusion principle to a multi-strain model of SI-type for the dynamics of highly pathogenic flu in poultry that incorporates both the infection age of infectious individuals and biological age of pathogen in the environment. The two models are linked through the age-since-infection structure of the epidemiological variables. In addition the between-host transmission rate, the shedding rate of individuals infected by strain j and the disease-induced death rate depend on the within-host viral load. The immunological reproduction numbers [Formula: see text] and the epidemiological reproduction numbers [Formula: see text] are computed. By constructing a suitable Lyapunov function, the global stability of the infection-free equilibrium in the system is obtained if all reproduction numbers are smaller or equal to one. If [Formula: see text], the reproduction number of strain j is larger than one, then a single-strain equilibrium, corresponding to strain j exists. This single-strain equilibrium is globally stable whenever [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] is the unique maximal reproduction number and all of the reproduction numbers are distinct. That is, the strain with the maximal basic reproduction number competitively excludes all other strains. PMID:27608293

  9. Identification of Amino Acids in HA and PB2 Critical for the Transmission of H5N1 Avian Influenza Viruses in a Mammalian Host

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuwei; Zhang, Ying; Shinya, Kyoko; Deng, Guohua; Jiang, Yongping; Li, Zejun; Guan, Yuntao; Tian, Guobin; Li, Yanbing; Shi, Jianzhong; Liu, Liling; Zeng, Xianying; Bu, Zhigao; Xia, Xianzhu; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Chen, Hualan

    2009-01-01

    Since 2003, H5N1 influenza viruses have caused over 400 known cases of human infection with a mortality rate greater than 60%. Most of these cases resulted from direct contact with virus-contaminated poultry or poultry products. Although only limited human-to-human transmission has been reported to date, it is feared that efficient human-to-human transmission of H5N1 viruses has the potential to cause a pandemic of disastrous proportions. The genetic basis for H5N1 viral transmission among humans is largely unknown. In this study, we used guinea pigs as a mammalian model to study the transmission of six different H5N1 avian influenza viruses. We found that two viruses, A/duck/Guangxi/35/2001 (DKGX/35) and A/bar-headed goose/Qinghai/3/2005(BHGQH/05), were transmitted from inoculated animals to naïve contact animals. Our mutagenesis analysis revealed that the amino acid asparagine (Asn) at position 701 in the PB2 protein was a prerequisite for DKGX/35 transmission in guinea pigs. In addition, an amino acid change in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein (Thr160Ala), resulting in the loss of glycosylation at 158–160, was responsible for HA binding to sialylated glycans and was critical for H5N1 virus transmission in guinea pigs. These amino acids changes in PB2 and HA could serve as important molecular markers for assessing the pandemic potential of H5N1 field isolates. PMID:20041223

  10. Pathogenicity and Transmissibility of Novel Reassortant H3N2 Influenza Viruses with 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Genes in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jingjiao; Shen, Huigang; Liu, Qinfang; Bawa, Bhupinder; Qi, Wenbao; Duff, Michael; Lang, Yuekun; Lee, Jinhwa; Yu, Hai; Bai, Jianfa; Tong, Guangzhi; Hesse, Richard A.; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT At least 10 different genotypes of novel reassortant H3N2 influenza viruses with 2009 pandemic H1N1 [A(H1N1)pdm09] gene(s) have been identified in U.S. pigs, including the H3N2 variant with a single A(H1N1)pdm09 M gene, which has infected more than 300 people. To date, only three genotypes of these viruses have been evaluated in animal models, and the pathogenicity and transmissibility of the other seven genotype viruses remain unknown. Here, we show that three H3N2 reassortant viruses that contain 3 (NP, M, and NS) or 5 (PA, PB2, NP, M, and NS) genes from A(H1N1)pdm09 were pathogenic in pigs, similar to the endemic H3N2 swine virus. However, the reassortant H3N2 virus with 3 A(H1N1)pdm09 genes and a recent human influenza virus N2 gene was transmitted most efficiently among pigs, whereas the reassortant H3N2 virus with 5 A(H1N1)pdm09 genes was transmitted less efficiently than the endemic H3N2 virus. Interestingly, the polymerase complex of reassortant H3N2 virus with 5 A(H1N1)pdm09 genes showed significantly higher polymerase activity than those of endemic and reassortant H3N2 viruses with 3 A(H1N1)pdm09 genes. Further studies showed that an avian-like glycine at position 228 at the hemagglutinin (HA) receptor binding site is responsible for inefficient transmission of the reassortant H3N2 virus with 5 A(H1N1)pdm09 genes. Taken together, our results provide insights into the pathogenicity and transmissibility of novel reassortant H3N2 viruses in pigs and suggest that a mammalian-like serine at position 228 in the HA is critical for the transmissibility of these reassortant H3N2 viruses. IMPORTANCE Swine influenza is a highly contagious zoonotic disease that threatens animal and public health. Introduction of 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus [A(H1N1)pdm09] into swine herds has resulted in novel reassortant influenza viruses in swine, including H3N2 and H1N2 variants that have caused human infections in the United States. We showed that reassortant H3N2 influenza

  11. Transmission of the First Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Pandemic Wave in Australia Was Driven by Undetected Infections: Pandemic Response Implications

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, James E.; Kelly, Heath A.; Glass, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Background During the first wave of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Victoria, Australia the rapid increase in notified cases and the high proportion with relatively mild symptoms suggested that community transmission was established before cases were identified. This lead to the hypothesis that those with low-level infections were the main drivers of the pandemic. Methods A deterministic susceptible-infected-recovered model was constructed to describe the first pandemic wave in a population structured by disease severity levels of asymptomatic, low-level symptoms, moderate symptoms and severe symptoms requiring hospitalisation. The model incorporated mixing, infectivity and duration of infectiousness parameters to calculate subgroup-specific reproduction numbers for each severity level. Results With stratum-specific effective reproduction numbers of 1.82 and 1.32 respectively, those with low-level symptoms, and those with asymptomatic infections were responsible for most of the transmission. The effective reproduction numbers for infections resulting in moderate symptoms and hospitalisation were less than one. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the importance of parameters relating to asymptomatic individuals and those with low-level symptoms. Conclusions Transmission of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was largely driven by those invisible to the health system. This has implications for control measures–such as distribution of antivirals to cases and contacts and quarantine/isolation–that rely on detection of infected cases. Pandemic plans need to incorporate milder scenarios, with a graded approach to implementation of control measures. PMID:26692335

  12. NB protein does not affect influenza B virus replication in vitro and is not required for replication in or transmission between ferrets.

    PubMed

    Elderfield, Ruth A; Koutsakos, Marios; Frise, Rebecca; Bradley, Konrad; Ashcroft, Jonathan; Miah, Shanhjahan; Lackenby, Angie; Barclay, Wendy S

    2016-03-01

    The influenza B virus encodes a unique protein, NB, a membrane protein whose function in the replication cycle is not, as yet, understood. We engineered a recombinant influenza B virus lacking NB expression, with no concomitant difference in expression or activity of viral neuraminidase (NA) protein, an important caveat since NA is encoded on the same segment and initiated from a start codon just 4 nt downstream of NB. Replication of the virus lacking NB was not different to wild-type virus with full-length NB in clonal immortalized or complex primary cell cultures. In the mouse model, virus lacking NB induced slightly lower IFN-α levels in infected lungs, but this did not affect virus titres or weight loss. In ferrets infected with a mixture of viruses that did or did not express NB, there was no fitness advantage for the virus that retained NB. Moreover, virus lacking NB protein was transmitted following respiratory droplet exposure of sentinel animals. These data suggest no role for NB in supporting replication or transmission in vivo in this animal model. The role of NB and the nature of selection to retain it in all natural influenza B viruses remain unclear. PMID:26703440

  13. Influenza. Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Regan, Sean F; Fowler, Christianne

    2002-11-01

    Influenza is a viral infection of the respiratory tract spread by airborne transmission. Vaccination remains the best strategy for influenza prevention, and is especially recommended for high-risk groups, such as residents of nursing or residential homes, as well as those with diabetes, chronic renal failure, or chronic respiratory conditions. The clinician must realize the importance of active surveillance in addition to symptomatology interpretation and diagnostic testing to reliably and efficiently diagnose influenza. Active surveillance allows the clinician to monitor regional patterns of influenza movement to know when influenza is present in any given area. Surveillance data allows the practitioner to effectively time vaccination programs and implement prophylaxis protocols as indicated. An influenza management protocol ensuring the prompt recognition and management of influenza outbreaks should be devised and implemented for high-risk facilities. Managing clients with influenza requires prompt diagnosis and initiation of therapy, including use of antivirals available for the prevention or treatment of influenza. Because of the severity of morbidity and mortality caused by the influenza virus among older adults in particular, it is imperative that gerontological nurses have expert knowledge related to influenza. The clinician who participates in active influenza surveillance, promotes vaccination programs, implements influenza management protocols, and stays abreast of recent breakthroughs in the arena of influenza research--such as the development of neuraminidase inhibitors--will be able to contribute to diminishing the morbidity and mortality impact associated with influenza. PMID:12465200

  14. Seasonal Influenza Epidemics and El Niños.

    PubMed

    Oluwole, Olusegun Steven Ayodele

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza epidemics occur annually during the winter in the northern and southern hemispheres, but timing of peaks and severity vary seasonally. Low humidity, which enhances survival and transmission of influenza virus, is the major risk factor. Both El Niño and La Niña phases of El Niño-southern oscillation (ENSO), which determine inter-annual variation of precipitation, are putative risk factors. This study was done to determine if seasonality, timing of peak, and severity of influenza epidemics are coupled to phases of ENSO. Monthly time series of positive specimens for influenza viruses and of multivariate El Niño-Southern Oscillation Index from January 2000 to August 2015 were analyzed. Seasonality, wavelet spectra, and cross-wavelet spectra analyses were performed. Of 31 countries in the dataset, 21 were in the northern hemisphere and 10 in the southern hemisphere. The highest number of influenza cases occurred in January in the northern hemisphere, but in July in the southern hemisphere, p < 0.0001. Seasonal influenza epidemic was coupled to El Niño, while low occurrence was coupled to La Niña. The moderate La Niña of 2010-2011 was followed by weak seasonal influenza epidemic. The influenza pandemic of 2009-2010 followed the moderate El Niño of 2009-2010, which had three peaks. Spectrograms showed time-varying periodicities of 6-48 months for ENSO, 6-24 months for influenza in the northern hemisphere, and 6-12 months for influenza in the southern hemisphere. Cross spectrograms showed time-varying periodicities at 6-36 months for ENSO and influenza in both hemispheres, p < 0.0001. Phase plots showed that influenza time series lagged ENSO in both hemispheres. Severity of seasonal influenza increases during El Niño, but decreases during La Niña. Coupling of seasonality, timing, and severity of influenza epidemics to the strength and waveform of ENSO indicate that forecast models of El Niño should be integrated into

  15. Seasonal Influenza Epidemics and El Niños

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, Olusegun Steven Ayodele

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza epidemics occur annually during the winter in the northern and southern hemispheres, but timing of peaks and severity vary seasonally. Low humidity, which enhances survival and transmission of influenza virus, is the major risk factor. Both El Niño and La Niña phases of El Niño-southern oscillation (ENSO), which determine inter-annual variation of precipitation, are putative risk factors. This study was done to determine if seasonality, timing of peak, and severity of influenza epidemics are coupled to phases of ENSO. Monthly time series of positive specimens for influenza viruses and of multivariate El Niño-Southern Oscillation Index from January 2000 to August 2015 were analyzed. Seasonality, wavelet spectra, and cross-wavelet spectra analyses were performed. Of 31 countries in the dataset, 21 were in the northern hemisphere and 10 in the southern hemisphere. The highest number of influenza cases occurred in January in the northern hemisphere, but in July in the southern hemisphere, p < 0.0001. Seasonal influenza epidemic was coupled to El Niño, while low occurrence was coupled to La Niña. The moderate La Niña of 2010–2011 was followed by weak seasonal influenza epidemic. The influenza pandemic of 2009–2010 followed the moderate El Niño of 2009–2010, which had three peaks. Spectrograms showed time-varying periodicities of 6–48 months for ENSO, 6–24 months for influenza in the northern hemisphere, and 6–12 months for influenza in the southern hemisphere. Cross spectrograms showed time-varying periodicities at 6–36 months for ENSO and influenza in both hemispheres, p < 0.0001. Phase plots showed that influenza time series lagged ENSO in both hemispheres. Severity of seasonal influenza increases during El Niño, but decreases during La Niña. Coupling of seasonality, timing, and severity of influenza epidemics to the strength and waveform of ENSO indicate that forecast models of El Niño should be integrated

  16. Amino acid substitutions in the neuraminidase protein of an H9N2 avian influenza virus affect its airborne transmission in chickens.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Wei, Liangmeng; Yang, Yan; Wang, Bingxiao; Liang, Wei; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu; Gao, Lili; Cai, Yumei; Hou, Peiqiang; Yang, Huili; Wang, Airong; Huang, Rong; Gao, Jing; Chai, Tongjie

    2015-01-01

    Cases of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry are increasing throughout many Eurasian countries, and co-infections with other pathogens have resulted in high morbidity and mortality in poultry. Few studies have investigated the genetic factors of virus airborne transmission which determine the scope of this epidemic. In this study, we used specific-pathogen-free chickens housed in isolators to investigate the airborne transmissibility of five recombinant H9N2 AIV rescued by reverse genetic technology. The results show that airborne transmission of A/Chicken/Shandong/01/2008 (SD01) virus was related to the neuraminidase (NA) gene, and four amino acid mutations (D368E, S370L, E313K and G381D) within the head region of the SD01 NA, reduced virus replication in the respiratory tract of chickens, reduced virus NA activity, and resulted in a loss of airborne transmission ability in chickens. Similarly, reverse mutations of these four amino acids in the NA protein of r01/NASS virus, conferred an airborne transmission ability to the recombinant virus. We conclude that these four NA residues may be significant genetic markers for evaluating potential disease outbreak of H9N2 AIV, and propose that immediate attention should be paid to the airborne transmission of this virus. PMID:25928577

  17. Southward autumn migration of waterfowl facilitates cross-continental transmission of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanjie; Gong, Peng; Wielstra, Ben; Si, Yali

    2016-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza subtype H5N1 (HPAI H5N1) is a worldwide zoonotic infectious disease, threatening humans, poultry and wild birds. The role of wild birds in the spread of HPAI H5N1 has previously been investigated by comparing disease spread patterns with bird migration routes. However, the different roles that the southward autumn and northward spring migration might play in virus transmission have hardly been explored. Using direction analysis, we analyze HPAI H5N1 transmission directions and angular concentration of currently circulating viral clades, and compare these with waterfowl seasonal migration directions along major waterfowl flyways. Out of 22 HPAI H5N1 transmission directions, 18 had both a southward direction and a relatively high concentration. Differences between disease transmission and waterfowl migration directions were significantly smaller for autumn than for spring migration. The four northward transmission directions were found along Asian flyways, where the initial epicenter of the virus was located. We suggest waterfowl first picked up the virus from East Asia, then brought it to the north via spring migration, and then spread it to other parts of world mainly by autumn migration. We emphasize waterfowl autumn migration plays a relatively important role in HPAI H5N1 transmission compared to spring migration. PMID:27507581

  18. Southward autumn migration of waterfowl facilitates cross-continental transmission of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanjie; Gong, Peng; Wielstra, Ben; Si, Yali

    2016-08-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza subtype H5N1 (HPAI H5N1) is a worldwide zoonotic infectious disease, threatening humans, poultry and wild birds. The role of wild birds in the spread of HPAI H5N1 has previously been investigated by comparing disease spread patterns with bird migration routes. However, the different roles that the southward autumn and northward spring migration might play in virus transmission have hardly been explored. Using direction analysis, we analyze HPAI H5N1 transmission directions and angular concentration of currently circulating viral clades, and compare these with waterfowl seasonal migration directions along major waterfowl flyways. Out of 22 HPAI H5N1 transmission directions, 18 had both a southward direction and a relatively high concentration. Differences between disease transmission and waterfowl migration directions were significantly smaller for autumn than for spring migration. The four northward transmission directions were found along Asian flyways, where the initial epicenter of the virus was located. We suggest waterfowl first picked up the virus from East Asia, then brought it to the north via spring migration, and then spread it to other parts of world mainly by autumn migration. We emphasize waterfowl autumn migration plays a relatively important role in HPAI H5N1 transmission compared to spring migration.

  19. Southward autumn migration of waterfowl facilitates cross-continental transmission of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanjie; Gong, Peng; Wielstra, Ben; Si, Yali

    2016-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza subtype H5N1 (HPAI H5N1) is a worldwide zoonotic infectious disease, threatening humans, poultry and wild birds. The role of wild birds in the spread of HPAI H5N1 has previously been investigated by comparing disease spread patterns with bird migration routes. However, the different roles that the southward autumn and northward spring migration might play in virus transmission have hardly been explored. Using direction analysis, we analyze HPAI H5N1 transmission directions and angular concentration of currently circulating viral clades, and compare these with waterfowl seasonal migration directions along major waterfowl flyways. Out of 22 HPAI H5N1 transmission directions, 18 had both a southward direction and a relatively high concentration. Differences between disease transmission and waterfowl migration directions were significantly smaller for autumn than for spring migration. The four northward transmission directions were found along Asian flyways, where the initial epicenter of the virus was located. We suggest waterfowl first picked up the virus from East Asia, then brought it to the north via spring migration, and then spread it to other parts of world mainly by autumn migration. We emphasize waterfowl autumn migration plays a relatively important role in HPAI H5N1 transmission compared to spring migration. PMID:27507581

  20. Increased Acid Stability of the Hemagglutinin Protein Enhances H5N1 Influenza Virus Growth in the Upper Respiratory Tract but Is Insufficient for Transmission in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Zaraket, Hassan; Bridges, Olga A.; Duan, Susu; Baranovich, Tatiana; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Reed, Mark L.; Salomon, Rachelle; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus entry is mediated by the acidic-pH-induced activation of hemagglutinin (HA) protein. Here, we investigated how a decrease in the HA activation pH (an increase in acid stability) influences the properties of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus in mammalian hosts. We generated isogenic A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) (VN1203) viruses containing either wild-type HA protein (activation pH 6.0) or an HA2-K58I point mutation (K to I at position 58) (activation pH 5.5). The VN1203-HA2-K58I virus had replication kinetics similar to those of wild-type VN1203 in MDCK and normal human bronchial epithelial cells and yet had reduced growth in human alveolar A549 cells, which were found to have a higher endosomal pH than MDCK cells. Wild-type and HA2-K58I viruses promoted similar levels of morbidity and mortality in C57BL/6J mice and ferrets, and neither virus transmitted efficiently to naive contact cage-mate ferrets. The acid-stabilizing HA2-K58I mutation, which diminishes H5N1 replication and transmission in ducks, increased the virus load in the ferret nasal cavity early during infection while simultaneously reducing the virus load in the lungs. Overall, a single, acid-stabilizing mutation was found to enhance the growth of an H5N1 influenza virus in the mammalian upper respiratory tract, and yet it was insufficient to enable contact transmission in ferrets in the absence of additional mutations that confer α(2,6) receptor binding specificity and remove a critical N-linked glycosylation site. The information provided here on the contribution of HA acid stability to H5N1 influenza virus fitness and transmissibility in mammals in the background of a non-laboratory-adapted virus provides essential information for the surveillance and assessment of the pandemic potential of currently circulating H5N1 viruses. PMID:23824818

  1. Viral reassortment and transmission after co-infection of pigs with classical H1N1 and triple-reassortant H3N2 swine influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjun; Lager, Kelly M.; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Ulery, Eva S.; Janke, Bruce H.; Solórzano, Alicia; Webby, Richard J.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2010-01-01

    Triple-reassortant swine influenza viruses circulating in North American pigs contain the internal genes derived from swine (matrix, non-structural and nucleoprotein), human [polymerase basic 1 (PB1)] and avian (polymerase acidic and PB2) influenza viruses forming a constellation of genes that is well conserved and is called the triple-reassortant internal gene (TRIG) cassette. In contrast, the external genes [haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA)] are less conserved, reflecting multiple reassortant events that have produced viruses with different combinations of HA and NA genes. This study hypothesized that maintenance of the TRIG cassette confers a selective advantage to the virus. To test this hypothesis, pigs were co-infected with the triple-reassortant H3N2 A/Swine/Texas/4199-2/98 (Tx/98) and the classical H1N1 A/Swine/Iowa/15/1930 viruses and co-housed with a group of sentinel animals. This direct contact group was subsequently moved into contact with a second group of naïve animals. Four different subtypes (H1N1, H1N2, H3N1 and H3N2) of influenza virus were identified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid collected from the lungs of the experimentally infected pigs, with most of the viruses containing TRIG from the Tx/98 virus. Interestingly, only the intact H3N2 Tx/98 virus was transmitted from the infected pigs to the direct-contact animals and from them to the second contact group of pigs. These results demonstrated that multiple reassortments can occur within a host; however, only specific gene constellations are readily transmissible. It was concluded that certain HA and NA gene pairs, in conjunction with the TRIG cassette, may have a competitive advantage over other combinations for transmission and maintenance in swine. PMID:20484565

  2. Oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum strain AYA enhances IgA secretion and provides survival protection against influenza virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yosuke; Kunitoh-Asari, Ayami; Hayakawa, Katsuyuki; Imai, Shinjiro; Kasuya, Kenji; Abe, Kimio; Adachi, Yu; Fukudome, Shin-Ichi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Hachimura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system provides the first line of defense against inhaled and ingested pathogenic microbacteria and viruses. This defense system, to a large extent, is mediated by the actions of secretory IgA. In this study, we screened 140 strains of lactic acid bacteria for induction of IgA production by murine Peyer's patch cells. We selected one strain and named it Lactobacillus plantarum AYA. We found that L. plantarum AYA-induced production of IL-6 in Peyer's patch dendritic cells, with this production promoting IgA(+) B cells to differentiate into IgA-secreting plasma cells. We also observed that oral administration of L. plantarum AYA in mice caused an increase in IgA production in the small intestine and lung. This production of IgA correlated strongly with protective ability, with the treated mice surviving longer than the control mice after lethal influenza virus infection. Our data therefore reveals a novel immunoregulatory role of the L. plantarum AYA strain which enhances mucosal IgA production and provides protection against respiratory influenza virus infection. PMID:24466081

  3. Detection of oseltamivir-resistant pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm2009 in Brazil: can community transmission be ruled out?

    PubMed

    Souza, Thiago Moreno L; Resende, Paola C; Fintelman-Rodrigues, Natalia; Gregianini, Tatiana Schaffer; Ikuta, Nilo; Fernandes, Sandra Bianchini; Cury, Ana Luisa Furtado; Rosa, Maria do Carmo Debur; Siqueira, Marilda M

    2013-01-01

    Although surveillance efforts that monitor the emergence of drug-resistant strains of influenza are critical, systematic analysis is overlooked in most developing countries. We report on the occurrence of strains of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 with resistance and decreased susceptibility to oseltamivir (OST) in Brazil in 2009, 2011 and 2012. We found 7 mutant viruses, 2 with the mutation S247N and other 5 with the mutation H275Y. Most of these viruses were from samples concentrated in the southern region of Brazil. Some of these resistant viruses were detected prior to the initiation of OST treatment, suggesting that community transmission of mutant viruses may exist. Moreover, we show that one of these OST-resistant (H275Y) strains of A(H1N1)pdm09 was discovered in the tri-border region between Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay, highlighting that this strain could also be found in other Latin American countries. Our findings reinforce the importance of enhanced antiviral resistance surveillance in Brazil and in other Latin American countries to confirm or rule out the community transmission of OST-resistant strains of A(H1N1)pdm09. PMID:24244615

  4. Moraxella catarrhalis Outer Membrane Vesicles Carry β-Lactamase and Promote Survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae by Inactivating Amoxicillin▿

    PubMed Central

    Schaar, Viveka; Nordström, Therése; Mörgelin, Matthias; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a common pathogen found in children with upper respiratory tract infections and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during exacerbations. The bacterial species is often isolated together with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released by M. catarrhalis and contain phospholipids, adhesins, and immunomodulatory compounds such as lipooligosaccharide. We have recently shown that M. catarrhalis OMVs exist in patients upon nasopharyngeal colonization. As virtually all M. catarrhalis isolates are β-lactamase positive, the goal of this study was to investigate whether M. catarrhalis OMVs carry β-lactamase and to analyze if OMV consequently can prevent amoxicillin-induced killing. Recombinant β-lactamase was produced and antibodies were raised in rabbits. Transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and Western blotting verified that OMVs carried β-lactamase. Moreover, enzyme assays revealed that M. catarrhalis OMVs contained active β-lactamase. OMVs (25 μg/ml) incubated with amoxicillin for 1 h completely hydrolyzed amoxicillin at concentrations up to 2.5 μg/ml. In functional experiments, preincubation of amoxicillin (10× MIC) with M. catarrhalis OMVs fully rescued amoxicillin-susceptible M. catarrhalis, S. pneumoniae, and type b or nontypeable H. influenzae from β-lactam-induced killing. Our results suggest that the presence of amoxicillin-resistant M. catarrhalis originating from β-lactamase-containing OMVs may pave the way for respiratory pathogens that by definition are susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:21576428

  5. Interpreting the transmissibility of the avian influenza A(H7N9) infection from 2013 to 2015 in Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Chong, K C; Wang, X; Liu, S; Cai, J; Su, X; Zee, B C; Tam, G; Wang, M H; Chen, E

    2016-06-01

    Three epidemic waves of human influenza A(H7N9) were documented in several different provinces in China between 2013 and 2015. With limited understanding of the potential for human-to-human transmission, it was difficult to implement control measures efficiently or to inform the public adequately about the application of interventions. In this study, the human-to-human transmission rate for the epidemics that occurred between 2013 and 2015 in Zhejiang Province, China, was analysed. The reproduction number (R), a key indicator of transmission intensity, was estimated by fitting the number of infections from poultry to humans and from humans to humans into a mathematical model. The posterior mean R for human-to-human transmission was estimated to be 0·27, with a 95% credible interval of 0·14-0·44 for the first wave, whereas the posterior mean Rs decreased to 0·15 in the second and third waves. Overall, these estimates indicate that a human H7N9 pandemic is unlikely to occur in Zhejiang. The reductions in the viral transmissibility and the number of poultry-transmitted infections after the first epidemic may be attributable to the various intervention measures taken, including changes in the extent of closures of live poultry markets. PMID:26645357

  6. What are the possible transmission methods for H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza viruses to people

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus has caused an unprecedented epizootic affecting poultry in Asia, Africa and parts of Europe, but has crossed multiple species barriers to infect captive and wild birds, carnivorous mammals and humans. Human infections (391 infections with 247...

  7. Comparable Fitness and Transmissibility between Oseltamivir-Resistant Pandemic 2009 and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses with the H275Y Neuraminidase Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Diana D. Y.; Choy, Ka-Tim; Chan, Renee W. Y.; Sia, Sin Fun; Chiu, Hsin-Ping; Cheung, Peter P. H.; Chan, Michael C. W.

    2012-01-01

    Limited antiviral compounds are available for the control of influenza, and the emergence of resistant variants would further narrow the options for defense. The H275Y neuraminidase (NA) mutation, which confers resistance to oseltamivir carboxylate, has been identified among the seasonal H1N1 and 2009 pandemic influenza viruses; however, those H275Y resistant variants demonstrated distinct epidemiological outcomes in humans. Specifically, dominance of the H275Y variant over the oseltamivir-sensitive viruses was only reported for a seasonal H1N1 variant during 2008-2009. Here, we systematically analyze the effect of the H275Y NA mutation on viral fitness and transmissibility of A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses. The NA genes from A(H1N1)pdm09 A/California/04/09 (CA04), seasonal H1N1 A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (NewCal), and A/Brisbane/59/2007 (Brisbane) were individually introduced into the genetic background of CA04. The H275Y mutation led to reduced NA enzyme activity, an increased Km for 3′-sialylactose or 6′-sialylactose, and decreased infectivity in mucin-secreting human airway epithelial cells compared to the oseltamivir-sensitive wild-type counterparts. Attenuated pathogenicity in both RG-CA04NA-H275Y and RG-CA04 × BrisbaneNA-H275Y viruses was observed in ferrets compared to RG-CA04 virus, although the transmissibility was minimally affected. In parallel experiments using recombinant Brisbane viruses differing by hemagglutinin and NA, comparable direct contact and respiratory droplet transmissibilities were observed among RG-NewCalHA,NA, RG-NewCalHA,NA-H275Y, RG-BrisbaneHA,NA-H275Y, and RG-NewCalHA × BrisbaneNA-H275Y viruses. Our results demonstrate that, despite the H275Y mutation leading to a minor reduction in viral fitness, the transmission potentials of three different antigenic strains carrying this mutation were comparable in the naïve ferret model. PMID:22811535

  8. Role of vaccination-induced immunity and antigenic distance in the transmission dynamics of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1.

    PubMed

    Sitaras, Ioannis; Rousou, Xanthoula; Kalthoff, Donata; Beer, Martin; Peeters, Ben; de Jong, Mart C M

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 epidemics in poultry cause huge economic losses as well as sporadic human morbidity and mortality. Vaccination in poultry has often been reported as being ineffective in preventing transmission and as a potential driving force in the selection of immune escape mutants. We conducted transmission experiments to evaluate the transmission dynamics of HPAI H5N1 strains in chickens vaccinated with high and low doses of immune escape mutants we have previously selected, and analysed the data using mathematical models. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the effect of antigenic distances between the vaccine and challenge strains used in this study is too small to influence the transmission dynamics of the strains used. This is because the effect of a sufficient vaccine dose on antibody levels against the challenge viruses is large enough to compensate for any decrease in antibody titres due to antigenic differences between vaccine and challenge strains. Our results show that at least under experimental conditions, vaccination will remain effective even after antigenic changes as may be caused by the initial selection in vaccinated birds. PMID:26763336

  9. Experimental infection of highly and low pathogenic avian influenza viruses to chickens, ducks, tree sparrows, jungle crows, and black rats for the evaluation of their roles in virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Hiono, Takahiro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ogasawara, Kohei; Endo, Mayumi; Kuribayashi, Saya; Shichinohe, Shintaro; Motohashi, Yurie; Chu, Duc-Huy; Suzuki, Mizuho; Ichikawa, Takaya; Nishi, Tatsuya; Abe, Yuri; Matsuno, Keita; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Tanigawa, Tsutomu; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-15

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) have spread in both poultry and wild birds. Determining transmission routes of these viruses during an outbreak is essential for the control of avian influenza. It has been widely postulated that migratory ducks play crucial roles in the widespread dissemination of HPAIVs in poultry by carrying viruses along with their migrations; however close contacts between wild migratory ducks and poultry are less likely in modern industrial poultry farming settings. Therefore, we conducted experimental infections of HPAIVs and low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) to chickens, domestic ducks, tree sparrows, jungle crows, and black rats to evaluate their roles in virus transmission. The results showed that chickens, ducks, sparrows, and crows were highly susceptible to HPAIV infection. Significant titers of virus were recovered from the sparrows and crows infected with HPAIVs, which suggests that they potentially play roles of transmission of HPAIVs to poultry. In contrast, the growth of LPAIVs was limited in each of the animals tested compared with that of HPAIVs. The present results indicate that these common synanthropes play some roles in influenza virus transmission from wild birds to poultry. PMID:26711036

  10. Spatial modeling of wild bird risk factors to investigate highly pathogenic A(H5N1) avian influenza virus transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prosser, Diann J.; Hungerford, Laura L.; Erwin, R. Michael; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Takekawa, John Y.; Newman, Scott H.; Xiao, Xianming; Ellis, Erie C.

    2016-01-01

    One of the longest-persisting avian influenza viruses in history, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) A(H5N1), continues to evolve after 18 years, advancing the threat of a global pandemic. Wild waterfowl (family Anatidae), are reported as secondary transmitters of HPAIV, and primary reservoirs for low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses, yet spatial inputs for disease risk modeling for this group have been lacking. Using GIS and Monte Carlo simulations, we developed geospatial indices of waterfowl abundance at 1 and 30 km resolutions and for the breeding and wintering seasons for China, the epicenter of H5N1. Two spatial layers were developed: cumulative waterfowl abundance (WAB), a measure of predicted abundance across species, and cumulative abundance weighted by H5N1 prevalence (WPR), whereby abundance for each species was adjusted based on prevalence values then totaled across species. Spatial patterns of the model output differed between seasons, with higher WAB and WPR in the northern and western regions of China for the breeding season and in the southeast for the wintering season. Uncertainty measures indicated highest error in southeastern China for both WAB and WPR. We also explored the effect of resampling waterfowl layers from 1 km to 30 km resolution for multi-scale risk modeling. Results indicated low average difference (less than 0.16 and 0.01 standard deviations for WAB and WPR, respectively), with greatest differences in the north for the breeding season and southeast for the wintering season. This work provides the first geospatial models of waterfowl abundance available for China. The indices provide important inputs for modeling disease transmission risk at the interface of poultry and wild birds. These models are easily adaptable, have broad utility to both disease and conservation needs, and will be available to the scientific community for advanced modeling applications.

  11. The first cases of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in the United States: a serologic investigation demonstrating early transmission

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Alicia M.; Hancock, Kathy; Patel, Minal; Gladden, Matthew; Doshi, Saumil; Blau, Dianna M.; Sugerman, David; Veguilla, Vic; Lu, Xiuhua; Noland, Heather; Bai, Yaohui; Maroufi, Azarnoush; Kao, Annie; Kriner, Paula; Lopez, Karla; Ginsberg, Michele; Jain, Seema; Olsen, Sonja J.; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Fry et al. (2012) The first cases of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in the United States: a serologic investigation demonstrating early transmission. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), e48–e53. Background  The first two laboratory‐confirmed cases of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (H1N1pdm09) infection were detected in San Diego (SD) and Imperial County (IC) in southern California, April 2009. Objectives  To describe H1N1pdm09 infections and transmission early in the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Patients/Methods  We identified index case‐patients from SD and IC with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)‐confirmed H1N1pdm09 infections and investigated close contacts for a subset of case‐patients from April 17–May 6, 2009. Acute and convalescent serum was collected. Serologic evidence for H1N1pdm09 infection was determined by microneutralization and hemagglutination inhibition assays. Results  Among 75 close contacts of seven index case‐patients, three reported illness onset prior to patient A or B, including two patient B contacts and a third with no links to patient A or B. Among the 69 close contacts with serum collected >14 days after the onset of index case symptoms, 23 (33%) were seropositive for H1N1pdm09, and 8 (35%) had no fever, cough, or sore throat. Among 15 household contacts, 8 (53%) were seropositive for H1N1pdm09. The proportion of contacts seropositive for H1N1pdm09 was highest in persons aged 5–24 years (50%) and lowest in persons aged ≥50 years (13%) (P = 0·07). Conclusions  By the end of April 2009, before H1N1pdm09 was circulating widely in the community, a third of persons with close contact to confirmed H1N1pdm09 cases had H1N1pdm09 infection in SD and IC. Three unrelated clusters during March 21–30 suggest that transmission of H1N1pdm09 had begun earlier in southern California. PMID:22353441

  12. Pathogenesis and transmission of the novel swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1 after experimental infection of pigs.

    PubMed

    Lange, Elke; Kalthoff, Donata; Blohm, Ulrike; Teifke, Jens P; Breithaupt, Angele; Maresch, Christina; Starick, Elke; Fereidouni, Sasan; Hoffmann, Bernd; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Beer, Martin; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W

    2009-09-01

    Influenza virus A/H1N1, which is currently causing a pandemic, contains gene segments with ancestors in the North American and Eurasian swine lineages. To get insights into virus replication dynamics, clinical symptoms and virus transmission in pigs, we infected animals intranasally with influenza virus A/Regensburg/D6/09/H1N1. Virus excretion in the inoculated pigs was detected in nasal swabs from 1 day post-infection (p.i.) onwards and the pigs developed generally mild symptoms, including fever, sneezing, nasal discharge and diarrhoea. Contact pigs became infected, shed virus and developed clinical symptoms similar to those in the inoculated animals. Plasma samples of all animals remained negative for virus RNA. Nucleoprotein- and haemagglutinin H1-specific antibodies could be detected by ELISA 7 days p.i. CD4(+) T cells became activated immediately after infection and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell populations expanded from 3 to 7 days p.i., coinciding with clinical signs. Contact chickens remained uninfected, as judged by the absence of virus excretion, clinical signs and seroconversion. PMID:19592456

  13. Influenza Virus Infection of Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, Sasan; Munoz, Olga; Von Dobschuetz, Sophie; De Nardi, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Interspecies transmission may play a key role in the evolution and ecology of influenza A viruses. The importance of marine mammals as hosts or carriers of potential zoonotic pathogens such as highly pathogenic H5 and H7 influenza viruses is not well understood. The fact that influenza viruses are some of the few zoonotic pathogens known to have caused infection in marine mammals, evidence for direct transmission of influenza A virus H7N7 subtype from seals to man, transmission of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses to seals and also limited evidence for long-term persistence of influenza B viruses in seal populations without significant genetic change, makes monitoring of influenza viruses in marine mammal populations worth being performed. In addition, such monitoring studies could be a great tool to better understand the ecology of influenza viruses in nature. PMID:25231137

  14. Survival and transmission of potato virus Y, pepino mosaic virus, and potato spindle tuber viroid in water.

    PubMed

    Mehle, N; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, I; Prezelj, N; Delic, D; Vidic, U; Ravnikar, M

    2014-02-01

    Hydroponic systems and intensive irrigation are used widely in horticulture and thus have the potential for rapid spread of water-transmissible plant pathogens. Numerous plant viruses have been reported to occur in aqueous environments, although information on their survival and transmission is minimal, due mainly to the lack of effective detection methods and to the complexity of the required transmission experiments. We have assessed the role of water as a source of plant infection using three mechanically transmissible plant pathogens that constitute a serious threat to tomato and potato production: pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), potato virus Y (PVY), and potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd). PepMV remains infectious in water at 20 ± 4°C for up to 3 weeks, PVY (NTN strain) for up to 1 week, and PSTVd for up to 7 weeks. Experiments using a hydroponic system show that PepMV (Ch2 genotype) and PVY (NTN strain) can be released from plant roots into the nutrient solution and can infect healthy plants through their roots, ultimately spreading to the green parts, where they can be detected after a few months. In addition, tubers developed on plants grown in substrate watered with PSTVd-infested water were confirmed to be the source of viroid infection. Our data indicate that although well-known pathways of virus spread are more rapid than water-mediated infection, like insect or mechanical transmission through leaves, water is a route that provides a significant bridge for rapid virus/viroid spread. Consequently, water should be taken into account in future epidemiology and risk assessment studies. PMID:24334672

  15. g-FLUA2H: a web-based application to study the dynamics of animal-to-human mutation transmission for influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    g-FLUA2H is a web-based application focused on the analysis of the dynamics of influenza virus animal-to-human (A2H) mutation transmissions. The application only requires the viral protein sequences from both the animal and human host populations as input datasets. The comparative analyses between the co-aligned sequences of the two viral populations is based on a sliding window approach of size nine for statistical significance and data application to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and T-cell receptor (TCR) immune response mechanisms. The sequences at each of the aligned overlapping nonamer positions for the respective virus hosts are classified as four patterns of characteristic diversity motifs, as a basis for quantitative analyses: (i) "index", the most prevalent sequence; (ii) "major" variant, the second most common sequence and the single most prevalent variant of the index, with at least one amino acid mutation; (iii) "minor" variants, multiple different sequences, each with an incidence (percent occurrence) less than that of the major variant; and (iv) "unique" variants, each with only one occurrence in the alignment. The diversity motifs and their incidences at each of the nonamer positions allow evaluation of the mutation transmission dynamics and selectivity of the viral sequences in relation to the animal and the human hosts. g-FLUA2H is facilitated by a grid back-end for parallel processing of large sequence datasets. The web-application is publicly available at http://bioinfo.perdanauniversity.edu.my/g-FLUA2H. It can be used for a detailed characterization of the composition and incidence of mutations present in the proteomes of influenza viruses from animal and human host populations, for a better understanding of host tropism. PMID:26680743

  16. Susceptibility to and transmission of H5N1 and H7N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in bank voles (Myodes glareolus).

    PubMed

    Romero Tejeda, Aurora; Aiello, Roberta; Salomoni, Angela; Berton, Valeria; Vascellari, Marta; Cattoli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The study of influenza type A (IA) infections in wild mammals populations is a critical gap in our knowledge of how IA viruses evolve in novel hosts that could be in close contact with avian reservoir species and other wild animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility to infection, the nasal shedding and the transmissibility of the H7N1 and H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses in the bank vole (Myodes glareolus), a wild rodent common throughout Europe and Asia. Two out of 24 H5N1-infected voles displayed evident respiratory distress, while H7N1-infected voles remained asymptomatic. Viable virus was isolated from nasal washes collected from animals infected with both HPAI viruses, and extra-pulmonary infection was confirmed in both experimental groups. Histopathological lesions were evident in the respiratory tract of infected animals, although immunohistochemistry positivity was only detected in lungs and trachea of two H7N1-infected voles. Both HPAI viruses were transmitted by direct contact, and seroconversion was confirmed in 50% and 12.5% of the asymptomatic sentinels in the H7N1 and H5N1 groups, respectively. Interestingly, viable virus was isolated from lungs and nasal washes collected from contact sentinels of both groups. The present study demonstrated that two non-rodent adapted HPAI viruses caused asymptomatic infection in bank voles, which shed high amounts of the viruses and were able to infect contact voles. Further investigations are needed to determine whether bank voles could be involved as silent hosts in the transmission of HPAI viruses to other mammals and domestic poultry. PMID:25963535

  17. Meteorological Influence on the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) Pandemic in Mainland China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Cai, J.; Feng, D.; Bai, Y.; Xu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Since May 2009, a novel influenza A (H1N1) pandemic has spread rapidly in mainland China from Mexico. Although there has been substantial analysis of this influenza, reliable work estimating its spatial dynamics and determinants remain scarce. The survival and transmission of this pandemic virus not only depends on its biological properties, but also a correlation with external environmental factors. In this study, we collected daily influenza A (H1N1) cases and corresponding annual meteorological factors in mainland China from May 2009 to April 2010. By analyzing these data at county-level, a similarity index, which considered the spatio-temporal characteristics of the disease, was proposed to evaluate the role and lag time of meteorological factors in the influenza transmission. The results indicated that the influenza spanned a large geographical area, following an overall trend from east to west across the country. The spatio-temporal transmission of the disease was affected by a series of meteorological variables, especially absolute humidity with a 3-week lag. These findings confirmed that the absolute humidity and other meteorological variables contributed to the local occurrence and dispersal of influenza A (H1N1). The impact of meteorological variables and their lag effects could be involved in the improvement of effective strategies to control and prevent disease outbreaks.

  18. Thermal inactivation of avian influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus in a fat-free egg product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) and Avian Paramyxovirus Type-1 (AMPV-1) viruses can survive on the carcasses, in organ tissue of infected birds, on fomites, and have the potential for egg transmission and egg product contamination. With the increase in global trade, there are concerns that egg products could ...

  19. Inhibition of A/Human/Hubei/3/2005 (H3N2) influenza virus infection by silver nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Dongxi; Zheng, Yang; Duan, Wei; Li, Xiujing; Yin, Jianjian; Shigdar, Sarah; O’Connor, Michael Liam; Marappan, Manju; Zhao, Xiaojuan; Miao, Yingqiu; Xiang, Bin; Zheng, Conglong

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted much attention as antimicrobial agents and have demonstrated efficient inhibitory activity against various viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and Tacaribe virus. In this study, we investigated if AgNPs could have antiviral and preventive effects in A/Human/Hubei/3/2005 (H3N2) influenza virus infection. Madin-Darby canine kidney cells infected with AgNP-treated H3N2 influenza virus showed better viability (P<0.05 versus influenza virus control) and no obvious cytopathic effects compared with an influenza virus control group and a group treated with the solvent used for preparation of the AgNPs. Hemagglutination assay indicated that AgNPs could significantly inhibit growth of the influenza virus in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (P<0.01 versus the influenza virus control). AgNPs significantly reduced cell apoptosis induced by H3N2 influenza virus at three different treatment pathways (P<0.05 versus influenza virus control). H3N2 influenza viruses treated with AgNPs were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and found to interact with each other, resulting in destruction of morphologic viral structures in a time-dependent manner in a time range of 30 minutes to 2 hours. In addition, intranasal AgNP administration in mice significantly enhanced survival after infection with the H3N2 influenza virus. Mice treated with AgNPs showed lower lung viral titer levels and minor pathologic lesions in lung tissue, and had a marked survival benefit during secondary intranasal passage in vivo. These results provide evidence that AgNPs have beneficial effects in preventing H3N2 influenza virus infection both in vitro and in vivo, and demonstrate that AgNPs can be used as potential therapeutics for inhibiting outbreaks of influenza. PMID:24204140

  20. Spillback transmission of European H1N1 avian-like swine influenza viruses to turkeys: A strain-dependent possibility?

    PubMed

    Bonfante, Francesco; Fusaro, Alice; Tassoni, Luca; Patrono, Livia Victoria; Milani, Adelaide; Maniero, Silvia; Salviato, Annalisa; Terregino, Calogero

    2016-04-15

    In 1979, an avian influenza virus of the H1N1 subtype began to circulate in European swine herds, rapidly replacing classical swine H1N1 viruses. Spill-back transmissions to turkeys were recorded occasionally, but they might have been underreported due to the asymptomatic nature of the infection and the lack of specific surveillance. In our study, we evaluated the infectivity and transmissibility in turkeys of seven strains of H1N1 avian-like swine viruses isolated from 1979 to 2006, and compared them with their closest progenitor A/duck/Bavaria/1/77 (H1N1), to establish whether the adaptation to pigs has gradually decreased their fitness in turkeys. Our data indicate that the circulation of European H1N1 in pigs might have impaired the possibility of infecting turkeys. Nevertheless, the two swine-origin strains, which showed the ability to replicate and transmit in turkeys, possess typical swine-like genetic traits, not different from the rest of the tested isolates, suggesting replication of avian-like swine H1N1 viruses in turkeys as a strain-dependent polygenic feature. PMID:27016764

  1. Characteristics of commercial and traditional village poultry farming in Mali with a focus on practices influencing the risk of transmission of avian influenza and Newcastle disease.

    PubMed

    Molia, Sophie; Traoré, Idrissa; Kamissoko, Badian; Diakité, Adama; Sidibé, Maimouna Sanogo; Sissoko, Kadiatou Diarra; Pfeiffer, Dirk Udo

    2015-10-01

    We aimed at characterizing commercial and traditional village poultry farming in Mali, with a focus on practices influencing the risk of transmission of avian influenza and Newcastle disease. Surveys were conducted in 2009-2011 in a study area covering approximately 98% of the Malian poultry population. Among the 282 commercial farms investigated, of which 64 had not been known by the government authorities, 83% were located within a 50km radius from the capitals of the country and regions and 54% had low biosecurity standard. Among the 152 randomly selected village household flocks investigated, characteristics were overall similar to those in other African countries but some differences were notable including a large flock size (median 44 poultry), a low presence of ducks and geese (11% and 1.1% of flocks, respectively), vaccination against Newcastle disease being common (49% of flocks), a low proportion of households selling sick and dead birds (0.7% and 0%, respectively) and limited cohabitation between poultry and humans at night. Our recommendations to limit the risk of disease transmission include (1) for commercial farms, to introduce compulsory farm registration and accreditation, to increase technical proficiency and access to credit for farms with low biosecurity, and to support poultry producer associations; (2) for village poultry, to promote better quarantine and management of sick and dead birds. Such detailed knowledge of country-specific characteristics of poultry production systems is essential to be able to develop more efficient disease risk management policies. PMID:26113175

  2. Epidemiological and Evolutionary Inference of the Transmission Network of the 2014 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N2 Outbreak in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wanhong; Berhane, Yohannes; Dubé, Caroline; Liang, Binhua; Pasick, John; VanDomselaar, Gary; Alexandersen, Soren

    2016-01-01

    The first North American outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) involving a virus of Eurasian A/goose/Guangdong/1/1996 (H5N1) lineage began in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada in late November 2014. A total of 11 commercial and 1 non-commercial (backyard) operations were infected before the outbreak was terminated. Control measures included movement restrictions that were placed on a total of 404 individual premises, 150 of which were located within a 3 km radius of an infected premise(s) (IP). A complete epidemiological investigation revealed that the source of this HPAI H5N2 virus for 4 of the commercial IPs and the single non-commercial IP likely involved indirect contact with wild birds. Three IPs were associated with the movement of birds or service providers and localized/environmental spread was suspected as the source of infection for the remaining 4 IPs. Viral phylogenies, as determined by Bayesian Inference and Maximum Likelihood methods, were used to validate the epidemiologically inferred transmission network. The phylogenetic clustering of concatenated viral genomes and the median-joining phylogenetic network of the viruses supported, for the most part, the transmission network that was inferred by the epidemiologic analysis. PMID:27489095

  3. Migratory movements of waterfowl in Central Asia and avian influenza emergence: sporadic transmission of H5N1 from east to west

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Samuel A.; Gavrilov, Andrei; Katzner, Todd E.; Takekawa, John Y.; Miller, Tricia A.; Hagemeijer, Ward; Mundkur, Taej; Sivananinthaperumal, Balachandran; DeMattos, Carlos C.; Ahmed, Lu'ay S.; Newman, Scott H.

    2011-01-01

    Waterfowl in the genera Anas and Tadorna are suspected as vectors in the long-distance transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1. The former Soviet Republics of Central Asia are situated at an important migratory crossroads for these and other species of birds that bridges regions where the disease is prevalent. However, waterfowl movements through Central Asia are poorly quantified. In this study, historical data derived from over 80 years of bird ringing are combined with recent satellite tracking data to delineate migration routes, movement chronology and habitat use patterns of waterfowl in relation to H5N1 outbreak locations. Results confirm migratory linkage between breeding and moulting areas in northern Kazakhstan and southern Siberia, with nonbreeding areas in the Caspian, Black and eastern Mediterranean Sea basins, as well as with South Asia. However, unlike the situation in neighbouring regions, most notably western China, H5N1 outbreaks have not been recurrent in Central Asia after they were first reported during summer 2005 and spring 2006. These findings have implications in relation to potential sampling biases, species-specific variation in migratory behaviour and continuing regional H5N1 transmission risks.

  4. Epidemiological and Evolutionary Inference of the Transmission Network of the 2014 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N2 Outbreak in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanhong; Berhane, Yohannes; Dubé, Caroline; Liang, Binhua; Pasick, John; VanDomselaar, Gary; Alexandersen, Soren

    2016-01-01

    The first North American outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) involving a virus of Eurasian A/goose/Guangdong/1/1996 (H5N1) lineage began in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada in late November 2014. A total of 11 commercial and 1 non-commercial (backyard) operations were infected before the outbreak was terminated. Control measures included movement restrictions that were placed on a total of 404 individual premises, 150 of which were located within a 3 km radius of an infected premise(s) (IP). A complete epidemiological investigation revealed that the source of this HPAI H5N2 virus for 4 of the commercial IPs and the single non-commercial IP likely involved indirect contact with wild birds. Three IPs were associated with the movement of birds or service providers and localized/environmental spread was suspected as the source of infection for the remaining 4 IPs. Viral phylogenies, as determined by Bayesian Inference and Maximum Likelihood methods, were used to validate the epidemiologically inferred transmission network. The phylogenetic clustering of concatenated viral genomes and the median-joining phylogenetic network of the viruses supported, for the most part, the transmission network that was inferred by the epidemiologic analysis. PMID:27489095

  5. The controversy over H5N1 transmissibility research

    PubMed Central

    Fedson, David S.; Opal, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Since December 2011, influenza virologists and biosecurity experts have been engaged in a controversial debate over research on the transmissibility of H5N1 influenza viruses. Influenza virologists disagreed with the NSABB’s recommendation not to publish experimental details of their findings, whereas biosecurity experts wanted the details to be withheld and future research restricted. The virologists initially declared a voluntary moratorium on their work, but later the NSABB allowed their articles to be published, and soon transmissibility research will resume. Throughout the debate, both sides have had understandable views, but both have overlooked the more important question of whether anything could be done if one of these experimentally derived viruses or a naturally occurring and highly virulent influenza virus should emerge and cause a global pandemic. This is a crucial question, because during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, more than 90% of the world’s people had no access to timely supplies of affordable vaccines and antiviral agents. Observational studies suggest that inpatient statin treatment reduces mortality in patients with laboratory-confirmed seasonal influenza. Other immunomodulatory agents (glitazones, fibrates and AMPK agonists) improve survival in mice infected with influenza viruses. These agents are produced as inexpensive generics in developing countries. If they were shown to be effective, they could be used immediately to treat patients in any country with a basic health care system. For this reason alone, influenza virologists and biosecurity experts need to join with public health officials to develop an agenda for laboratory and clinical research on these agents. This is the only approach that could yield practical measures for a global response to the next influenza pandemic. PMID:23391967

  6. Limited transmission of emergent H7N9 influenza A virus in a simulated live animal market: Do chickens pose the principal transmission threat?

    PubMed

    Bosco-Lauth, Angela M; Bowen, Richard A; Root, J Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Emergent H7N9 influenza A virus has caused multiple public health and financial hardships. While some epidemiological studies have recognized infected chickens as an important bridge for human infections, the generality of this observation, the minimum infectious dose, and the shedding potential of chickens have received conflicting results. We experimentally tested the ability of domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) to transmit H7N9 to co-housed chickens and to several other animal species in an experimental live animal market. Results indicated that an infected chicken failed to initiate viral shedding of H7N9 to naïve co-housed chickens. The infected chicken did, however, successfully transmit the virus to quail (Coturnix sp.) located directly below the infected chicken cage. Oral shedding by indirectly infected quail was, on average, greater than ten-fold that of directly inoculated chickens. Best management practices in live animal market systems should consider the position of quail in stacked-cage settings. PMID:27236304

  7. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Seifried, Erhard; Fournier, Claudia; Tonn, Torsten

    2015-07-01

    In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34(+) cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60-85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤ 0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼ 30-35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼ 25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼ 70% and ∼ 40% for 1 Gy of carbon ions and X-rays, respectively), with a higher fraction of non-transmissible aberrations. In contrast, for both radiation qualities the percentage of clones with chromosomal abnormalities was similar (40%). Using the frequency of colonies with clonal aberrations as a surrogate marker for the leukemia risk following radiotherapy of solid tumors, charged particle therapy is not expected to lead to an increased risk of

  8. Seroprevalence of antibodies to influenza A/H1N1/2009 among transmission risk groups after the second wave in Mexico, by a virus-free ELISA method

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo-Montemayor, Leticia; Alvarez, Mario M.; Hernández-Torre, Martín; Ugalde-Casas, Patricia A.; Lam-Franco, Lorena; Bustamante-Careaga, Humberto; Castilleja-Leal, Fernando; Contreras-Castillo, Julio; Moreno-Sánchez, Héctor; Tamargo-Barrera, Daniela; López-Pacheco, Felipe; Freiden, Pamela J.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective No serological studies have been performed in Mexico to assess the seroprevalence of influenza A/H1N1/2009 in groups of people according to the potential risk of transmission. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of antibodies against influenza A/H1N1/2009 in subjects in Mexico grouped by risk of transmission. Methods Two thousand two hundred and twenty-two subjects were categorized into one of five occupation groups according to the potential risk of transmission: (1) students, (2) teachers, (3) healthcare workers, (4) institutional home residents aged >60 years, and (5) general population. Seroprevalence by potential transmission group and by age grouped into decades was determined by a virus-free ELISA method based on the recombinant receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin of influenza A/H1N1/2009 virus as antigen (85% sensitivity; 95% specificity). The Wilson score, Chi-square test, and logistic regression models were used for the statistical analyses. Results Seroprevalence for students was 47.3%, for teachers was 33.9%, for older adults was 36.5%, and for the general population was 33.0%, however it was only 24.6% for healthcare workers (p = 0.011). Of the students, 56.6% of those at middle school, 56.4% of those at high school, 52.7% of those at elementary school, and 31.1% of college students showed positive antibodies (p < 0.001). Seroprevalence was 44.6% for college teachers, 31.6% for middle school teachers, and 29.8% for elementary school teachers, but was only 20.3% for high school teachers (p = 0.002). Conclusions The student group was the group most affected by influenza A/H1N1/2009, while the healthcare worker group showed the lowest prevalence. Students represent a key target for preventive measures. PMID:21855383

  9. Transmission rate and reproductive number of the H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus during the December 2005-July 2008 epidemic in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bett, B; Henning, J; Abdu, P; Okike, I; Poole, J; Young, J; Randolph, T F; Perry, B D

    2014-02-01

    We quantified the between-village transmission rate, β (the rate of transmission of H5N1 HPAI virus per effective contact), and the reproductive number, Re (the average number of outbreaks caused by one infectious village during its entire infectious period), of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus in Nigeria using outbreak data collected between December 2005 and July 2008. We classified the outbreaks into two phases to assess the effectiveness of the control measures implemented. Phase 1 (December 2005-October 2006) represents the period when the Federal Government of Nigeria managed the HPAI surveillance and response measures, while Phase 2 (November 2006-July 2008) represents the time during which the Nigeria Avian Influenza Control and Human Pandemic Preparedness project (NAICP), funded by a World Bank credit of US$ 50 million, had taken over the management of most of the interventions. We used a total of 204 outbreaks from 176 villages that occurred in 78 local government areas of 25 states. The compartmental susceptible-infectious model was used as the analytical tool. Means and 95% percentile confidence intervals were obtained using bootstrapping techniques. The overall mean β (assuming a duration of infectiousness, T, of 12 days) was 0.07/day (95% percentile confidence interval: 0.06-0.09). The first and second phases of the epidemic had comparable β estimates of 0.06/day (0.04-0.09) and 0.08/day (0.06-0.10), respectively. The Re of the virus associated with these β and T estimates was 0.9 (0.7-1.1); the first and second phases of the epidemic had Re of 0.84 (0.5-1.2) and 0.9 (0.6-1.2), respectively. We conclude that the intervention measures implemented in the second phase of the epidemic had comparable effects to those implemented during the first phase and that the Re of the epidemic was low, indicating that the Nigeria H5N1 HPAI epidemic was unstable. PMID:22925404

  10. Assessing the risk of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 transmission through poultry movements in Bali, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Roche, Sharon E; Cogger, Naomi; Garner, M Graeme; Putra, Anak Agung Gde; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L

    2014-03-01

    Indonesia continues to report the highest number of human and poultry cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1. The disease is considered to be endemic on the island of Bali. Live bird markets are integral in the poultry supply chain on Bali and are important, nutritionally and culturally, for the rural and urban human populations. Due to the lack of biosecurity practiced along the supply chain from producer to live bird markets, there is a need to understand the risks associated with the spread of H5N1 through live bird movements for effective control. Resources to control H5N1 in Indonesia are very limited and cost effective strategies are needed. We assessed the probability a live bird market is infected through live poultry movements and assessed the effects of implementing two simple and low cost control measures on this risk. Results suggest there is a high risk a live bird market is infected (0.78), and risk mitigation strategies such as detecting and removing infected poultry from markets reduce this risk somewhat (range 0.67-0.76). The study demonstrates the key role live poultry movements play in transmitting H5N1 and the need to implement a variety of control measures to reduce disease spread. PMID:24439035

  11. Tracking domestic ducks: A novel approach for documenting poultry market chains in the context of avian influenza transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, Chang-Yong; Takekawa, John Y.; Xiong, Yue; Wikelski, Martin; Heine, George; Prosser, Diann J.; Newman, Scott H.; Edwards, John; Guo, Fusheng; Xiao, Xiangming

    2016-01-01

    Agro-ecological conditions associated with the spread and persistence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) are not well understood, but the trade of live poultry is suspected to be a major pathway. Although market chains of live bird trade have been studied through indirect means including interviews and questionnaires, direct methods have not been used to identify movements of individual poultry. To bridge the knowledge gap on quantitative movement and transportation of poultry, we introduced a novel approach for applying telemetry to document domestic duck movements from source farms at Poyang Lake, China. We deployed recently developed transmitters that record Global Positioning System (GPS) locations and send them through the Groupe Spécial Mobile (GSM) cellular telephone system. For the first time, we were able to track individually marked ducks from 3 to 396 km from their origin to other farms, distribution facilities, or live bird markets. Our proof of concept test showed that the use of GPS-GSM transmitters may provide direct, quantitative information to document the movement of poultry and reveal their market chains. Our findings provide an initial indication of the complexity of source-market network connectivity and highlight the great potential for future telemetry studies in poultry network analyses.

  12. Pathogenesis and Transmission of Novel Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N2 and H5N8 Viruses in Ferrets and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A.; Sun, Xiangjie; Creager, Hannah M.; Zeng, Hui; Belser, Jessica A.; Maines, Taronna R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N8 virus, first detected in January 2014 in poultry and wild birds in South Korea, has spread throughout Asia and Europe and caused outbreaks in Canada and the United States by the end of the year. The spread of H5N8 and the novel reassortant viruses, H5N2 and H5N1 (H5Nx), in domestic poultry across multiple states in the United States pose a potential public health risk. To evaluate the potential of cross-species infection, we determined the pathogenicity and transmissibility of two Asian-origin H5Nx viruses in mammalian animal models. The newly isolated H5N2 and H5N8 viruses were able to cause severe disease in mice only at high doses. Both viruses replicated efficiently in the upper and lower respiratory tracts of ferrets; however, the clinical symptoms were generally mild, and there was no evidence of systemic dissemination of virus to multiple organs. Moreover, these influenza H5Nx viruses lacked the ability to transmit between ferrets in a direct contact setting. We further assessed viral replication kinetics of the novel H5Nx viruses in a human bronchial epithelium cell line, Calu-3. Both H5Nx viruses replicated to a level comparable to a human seasonal H1N1 virus, but significantly lower than a virulent Asian-lineage H5N1 HPAI virus. Although the recently isolated H5N2 and H5N8 viruses displayed moderate pathogenicity in mammalian models, their ability to rapidly spread among avian species, reassort, and generate novel strains underscores the need for continued risk assessment in mammals. IMPORTANCE In 2015, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 viruses have caused outbreaks in domestic poultry in multiple U.S. states. The economic losses incurred with H5N8 and H5N2 subtype virus infection have raised serious concerns for the poultry industry and the general public due to the potential risk of human infection. This recent outbreak underscores the need to better understand the pathogenesis and

  13. A novel neutralizing antibody against diverse clades of H5N1 influenza virus and its mutants capable of airborne transmission.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruiping; Li, Xingxing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Cao, Zhiliang; Qiu, Zonglin; Zhou, Yusen; Zheng, Bo-Jian; He, Yuxian

    2014-06-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus H5N1 continues to spread among poultry and has frequently broken the species barrier to humans. Recent studies have shown that a laboratory-mutated or reassortant H5N1 virus bearing hemagglutinin (HA) with as few as four or five mutations was capable of transmitting more efficiently via respiratory droplets between ferrets, posing a serious threat to public health and underscoring the priority of effective vaccines and therapeutics. In this study, we identified a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb) named HAb21, that has a broadly neutralizing activity against all tested strains of H5N1 covering clades 0, 1, 2.2, 2.3.4, and 2.3.2.1. Importantly, HAb21 efficiently neutralized diverse H5N1 variants with single or combination forms of mutations capable of airborne transmission. We demonstrated that HAb21 blocked viral entry during the receptor-binding step by targeting a previously uncharacterized epitope at the tip of the HA head. This novel epitope closely neighbors the receptor-binding site (RBS) and the interface of HA trimer and is highly conserved among divergent H5N1 strains. Our studies provide a new tool for use either for therapeutic purposes or as a basis of vaccine development. PMID:24681124

  14. Surviving the crisis: Adaptive wisdom, coping mechanisms and local responses to avian influenza threats in Haining, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Letian; Pan, Tianshu

    2008-04-01

    Based on ethnographic research conducted in the summer of 2006, this paper examines local responses to the imminent threat of avian flu in Haining County of Zhejiang Province. During our field investigation, we conducted interviews with officials from local medical institutions (including the hospitals, the animal husbandry and veterinary station, and health clinics), to bureaus of public health and agro-economy. We also visited chicken farms, restaurants and farming households. We address the following factors that commonly structured the perceptions and actions of different social actors in the area of study: The changing mode of information-sharing and communication practices in the local communities; the official drive to professionalize the emergency response management system in the county; and the coping mechanisms that helped the villagers and town residents to weather the storm of avian flu. Our field research suggests that collective survival consciousness was translated into a spirit of voluntarism during the crisis. One important practical lesson we have learned from this study is that the adaptive wisdom embedded in local memories demonstrated its operational worth as a resourceful knowledge base for ordinary farmers to deal with food shortage, famine, plague and future pandemics. PMID:27268990

  15. Living in "survival mode:" Intergenerational transmission of trauma from the Holodomor genocide of 1932-1933 in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Bezo, Brent; Maggi, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    Qualitative methodology was used to investigate the intergenerational impact of the 1932-1933 Holodomor genocide on three generations in 15 Ukrainian families. Each family, residing in Ukraine, consisted of a first generation survivor, a second generation adult child and a third generation adult grandchild of the same line. The findings show that the Holodomor, a genocide that claimed millions of lives by forced starvation, still exerts substantial effects on generations born decades later. Specifically, thematic analysis of the 45 semi-structured, in-depth interviews, done between July and November 2010, revealed that a constellation of emotions, inner states and trauma-based coping strategies emerged in the survivors during the genocide period and were subsequently transmitted into the second and third generations. This constellation, summarized by participants as living in "survival mode," included horror, fear, mistrust, sadness, shame, anger, stress and anxiety, decreased self-worth, stockpiling of food, reverence for food, overemphasis on food and overeating, inability to discard unneeded items, an indifference toward others, social hostility and risky health behaviours. Since both the family and community-society were found to be involved in trauma transmission, the findings highlight the importance of multi-framework approaches for studying and healing collective trauma. PMID:25931287

  16. Towards multiscale modeling of influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Murillo, Lisa N.; Murillo, Michael S.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Aided by recent advances in computational power, algorithms, and higher fidelity data, increasingly detailed theoretical models of infection with influenza A virus are being developed. We review single scale models as they describe influenza infection from intracellular to global scales, and, in particular, we consider those models that capture details specific to influenza and can be used to link different scales. We discuss the few multiscale models of influenza infection that have been developed in this emerging field. In addition to discussing modeling approaches, we also survey biological data on influenza infection and transmission that is relevant for constructing influenza infection models. We envision that, in the future, multiscale models that capitalize on technical advances in experimental biology and high performance computing could be used to describe the large spatial scale epidemiology of influenza infection, evolution of the virus, and transmission between hosts more accurately. PMID:23608630

  17. Viral Reassortment and Transmission after Coinfection of Pigs with Classical H1N1 and Triple Reassortant H3N2 Swine Influenza Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triple reassortant swine influenza viruses circulating in North American pigs contain the internal genes derived from swine (NP, M, NS), human (PB1) and avian (PA and PB2) influenza viruses forming a constellation of genes that is well conserved and called the triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG)...

  18. Flu (Influenza)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Flu (Influenza) Overview Influenza, or flu, is a respiratory infection ... the flu and its complications every year. Seasonal Flu Seasonal flu refers to the flu outbreaks that ...

  19. Incidence of Avian Influenza in Adamawa State, Nigeria: The Epidemiology, Economic Losses and the Possible Role of Wild Birds in the Transmission of the Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ja`Afar-Furo, M. R.; Balla, H. G.; Tahir, A. S.; Haskainu, C.

    Reducing the huge economic losses due to diseases in poultry as the second largest industry in Nigeria after oil means improving the protein intake of the majority. Similarly, this will also promotes a steady income for the teeming farmers. This study investigated the incidence of the lethal avian influenza in Adamawa State, Nigeria, with particular emphasis on the socio-economic and cultural activities of the poultry farmers, economic losses and the possible role of wild birds in the transmission of the disease. Data were collected from 316 and 458 direct and indirect respondents, respectively, from 6 affected villages and a town in 2 Local Government Areas (LGAs): Girei and Yola-North. Results revealed that a larger (25.71%) proportion of the respondents fell within the age range of 31-40 years, with majority (54.91%) as females. While the bulk (54.65%) of the respondents were illiterates, 95.47% of the direct respondents derived their incomes from crop production, whereas 59.17% of the indirect respondents from livestock rearing. About 26,049 birds worth N13, 454,800.00 was cumulative economic loss incurred by the poultry farmers, whereas that of the government was put at N1, 119,781.10. Of the mortalities experienced in the wildlife before the outbreak of the disease, Bubulcus ibis (64.29) and Tadarida nigeriae (86.36) were the highest. The study recommends a massive rural extension on Poultry Production with absolute biosecurity, involving all stakeholders (Veterinary Surgeons, Animal Scientists/health workers, wildlife specialists, Agricultural Economists, Information Officers etc.) in a collaborative form for high synergistic effects.

  20. Antiviral Effects of Black Raspberry (Rubus coreanus) Seed and Its Gallic Acid against Influenza Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Oh, Mi; Seok, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Sella; Lee, Dan Bi; Bae, Garam; Bae, Hae-In; Bae, Seon Young; Hong, Young-Min; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Lee, Dong-Hun; Song, Chang-Seon; Mun, Ji Young; Chung, Mi Sook; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a serious public health concern worldwide, as it causes significant morbidity and mortality. The emergence of drug-resistant viral strains requires new approaches for the treatment of influenza. In this study, Rubus coreanus seed (RCS) that is left over from the production of wine or juice was found to show antiviral activities against influenza type A and B viruses. Using the time-of-addition plaque assay, viral replication was almost completely abolished by simultaneous treatment with the RCS fraction of less than a 1-kDa molecular weight (RCSF1). One of the polyphenols derived from RCSF1, gallic acid (GA), identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, showed inhibitory effects against both influenza type A and B viruses, albeit at relatively high concentrations. RCSF1 was bound to hemagglutinin protein, inhibited hemagglutination significantly and disrupted viral particles, whereas GA was found to only disrupt the viral particles by using transmission electron microscopy. In BALB/c mice infected with influenza virus, oral administration of RCSF1 significantly improved the survival rate and reduced the viral titers in the lungs. Our results demonstrate that RCSF1 and GA show potent and broad antiviral activity against influenza A and B type viruses and are promising sources of agents that target virus particles. PMID:27275830

  1. Antiviral Effects of Black Raspberry (Rubus coreanus) Seed and Its Gallic Acid against Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Oh, Mi; Seok, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Sella; Lee, Dan Bi; Bae, Garam; Bae, Hae-In; Bae, Seon Young; Hong, Young-Min; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Lee, Dong-Hun; Song, Chang-Seon; Mun, Ji Young; Chung, Mi Sook; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a serious public health concern worldwide, as it causes significant morbidity and mortality. The emergence of drug-resistant viral strains requires new approaches for the treatment of influenza. In this study, Rubus coreanus seed (RCS) that is left over from the production of wine or juice was found to show antiviral activities against influenza type A and B viruses. Using the time-of-addition plaque assay, viral replication was almost completely abolished by simultaneous treatment with the RCS fraction of less than a 1-kDa molecular weight (RCSF1). One of the polyphenols derived from RCSF1, gallic acid (GA), identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, showed inhibitory effects against both influenza type A and B viruses, albeit at relatively high concentrations. RCSF1 was bound to hemagglutinin protein, inhibited hemagglutination significantly and disrupted viral particles, whereas GA was found to only disrupt the viral particles by using transmission electron microscopy. In BALB/c mice infected with influenza virus, oral administration of RCSF1 significantly improved the survival rate and reduced the viral titers in the lungs. Our results demonstrate that RCSF1 and GA show potent and broad antiviral activity against influenza A and B type viruses and are promising sources of agents that target virus particles. PMID:27275830

  2. Avian influenza

    MedlinePlus

    Bird flu; H5N1; H5N2; H5N8; H7N9; Avian influenza A (HPAI) H5 ... The first avian influenza in humans was reported in Hong Kong in 1997. It was called avian influenza (H5N1). The outbreak was linked ...

  3. Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza A Virus Carrying a Q136K Mutation in the Neuraminidase Gene Is Resistant to Zanamivir but Exhibits Reduced Fitness in the Guinea Pig Transmission Model

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Michael M.; Ohnemus, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Resistance of influenza A viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors can arise through mutations in the neuraminidase (NA) gene. We show here that a Q136K mutation in the NA of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus confers a high degree of resistance to zanamivir. Resistance is accompanied by reduced numbers of NA molecules in viral particles and reduced intrinsic enzymatic activity of mutant NA. Interestingly, the Q136K mutation strongly impairs viral fitness in the guinea pig transmission model. PMID:23192869

  4. Revealing the True Incidence of Pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza in Finland during the First Two Seasons - An Analysis Based on a Dynamic Transmission Model.

    PubMed

    Shubin, Mikhail; Lebedev, Artem; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Auranen, Kari

    2016-03-01

    The threat of the new pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 imposed a heavy burden on the public health system in Finland in 2009-2010. An extensive vaccination campaign was set up in the middle of the first pandemic season. However, the true number of infected individuals remains uncertain as the surveillance missed a large portion of mild infections. We constructed a transmission model to simulate the spread of influenza in the Finnish population. We used the model to analyse the two first years (2009-2011) of A(H1N1)pdm09 in Finland. Using data from the national surveillance of influenza and data on close person-to-person (social) contacts in the population, we estimated that 6% (90% credible interval 5.1 - 6.7%) of the population was infected with A(H1N1)pdm09 in the first pandemic season (2009/2010) and an additional 3% (2.5 - 3.5%) in the second season (2010/2011). Vaccination had a substantial impact in mitigating the second season. The dynamic approach allowed us to discover how the proportion of detected cases changed over the course of the epidemic. The role of time-varying reproduction number, capturing the effects of weather and changes in behaviour, was important in shaping the epidemic. PMID:27010206

  5. Revealing the True Incidence of Pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza in Finland during the First Two Seasons — An Analysis Based on a Dynamic Transmission Model

    PubMed Central

    Shubin, Mikhail; Lebedev, Artem; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Auranen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    The threat of the new pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 imposed a heavy burden on the public health system in Finland in 2009-2010. An extensive vaccination campaign was set up in the middle of the first pandemic season. However, the true number of infected individuals remains uncertain as the surveillance missed a large portion of mild infections. We constructed a transmission model to simulate the spread of influenza in the Finnish population. We used the model to analyse the two first years (2009-2011) of A(H1N1)pdm09 in Finland. Using data from the national surveillance of influenza and data on close person-to-person (social) contacts in the population, we estimated that 6% (90% credible interval 5.1 – 6.7%) of the population was infected with A(H1N1)pdm09 in the first pandemic season (2009/2010) and an additional 3% (2.5 – 3.5%) in the second season (2010/2011). Vaccination had a substantial impact in mitigating the second season. The dynamic approach allowed us to discover how the proportion of detected cases changed over the course of the epidemic. The role of time-varying reproduction number, capturing the effects of weather and changes in behaviour, was important in shaping the epidemic. PMID:27010206

  6. PB1-F2 Protein Does Not Impact the Virulence of Triple-Reassortant H3N2 Swine Influenza Virus in Pigs but Alters Pathogenicity and Transmission in Turkeys

    PubMed Central

    Deventhiran, Jagadeeswaran; Kumar, Sandeep R. P.; Raghunath, Shobana; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT PB1-F2 protein, the 11th influenza A virus (IAV) protein, is considered to play an important role in primary influenza virus infection and postinfluenza secondary bacterial pneumonia in mice. The functional role of PB1-F2 has been reported to be a strain-specific and host-specific phenomenon. Its precise contribution to the pathogenicity and transmission of influenza virus in mammalian host, such as swine, and avian hosts, such as turkeys, remain largely unknown. In this study, we explored the role of PB1-F2 protein of triple-reassortant (TR) H3N2 swine influenza virus (SIV) in pigs and turkeys. Using the eight-plasmid reverse genetics system, we rescued wild-type SIV A/swine/Minnesota/1145/2007 (H3N2) (SIV 1145-WT), a PB1-F2 knockout mutant (SIV 1145-KO), and its N66S variant (SIV 1145-N66S). The ablation of PB1-F2 in SIV 1145 modulated early-stage apoptosis but did not affect the viral replication in swine alveolar macrophage cells. In pigs, PB1-F2 expression did not affect nasal shedding, lung viral load, immunophenotypes, and lung pathology. On the other hand, in turkeys, SIV 1145-KO infected poults, and its in-contacts developed clinical signs earlier than SIV 1145-WT groups and also displayed more extensive histopathological changes in intestine. Further, turkeys infected with SIV 1145-N66S displayed poor infectivity and transmissibility. The more extensive histopathologic changes in intestine and relative transmission advantage observed in turkeys infected with SIV 1145-KO need to be further explored. Taken together, these results emphasize the host-specific roles of PB1-F2 in the pathogenicity and transmission of IAV. IMPORTANCE Novel triple-reassortant H3N2 swine influenza virus emerged in 1998 and spread rapidly among the North American swine population. Subsequently, it showed an increased propensity to reassort, generating a range of reassortants. Unlike classical swine influenza virus, TR SIV produces a full-length PB1-F2 protein, which is

  7. Long-term survival and seed transmission of Acidovorax avenae ssp. citrulli in melon and watermelon seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed transmission of Acidovorax avenae ssp. citrulli (Aac) is a key factor in the dissemination of bacterial fruit blotch of cucurbits. In this study, we report seed transmission of Aac from 34-year-old watermelon seed (Citrullus lanatus) and from 40-year-old melon seed (Cucumis melo). The seed lo...

  8. Swine as a model for influenza A virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) infect a variety of hosts, including humans, swine, and various avian species. The annual influenza disease burden in the human population remains significant even with current vaccine usage and much about the pathogenesis and transmission of influenza viruses in human rema...

  9. Reverse zoonosis of influenza to swine: new perspectives on the human–animal interface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The origins of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in swine are unknown, highlighting gaps in our understanding of influenza A virus (IAV) ecology and evolution. We review how recently strengthened influenza virus surveillance in pigs has revealed that influenza virus transmission from humans to sw...

  10. On-farm study of human contact networks to document potential pathways for avian influenza transmission between commercial poultry farms in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Burns, T E; Guerin, M T; Kelton, D; Ribble, C; Stephen, C

    2011-12-01

    Human movements associated with poultry farming create contact networks that might facilitate transmission of avian influenza (AI) between farms during outbreaks. In Canada, no information is available about how these networks connect poultry farms. The purpose of this study was to document human contacts between commercial poultry farms in Ontario, Canada, to learn how AI might be transmitted during outbreaks. We used face-to-face interviews with people entering the farm biosecurity perimeter on four layer, one turkey and three broiler breeder poultry farms in Ontario to collect information on between-farm contacts and biosecurity practices. Over a four-day study period on each farm, a median of 10.5 people entered the farm biosecurity perimeter (range 2-31). Ninety-six per cent (111/118) of people consented to be interviewed. Of these, fifty-three per cent (59/111) had contact with one or more (median 2, degree range 1-14) other poultry farms within 72 h. A median of 25 (range 7-65) human contacts linked study farms to other poultry farms. The mean distance of between-farm contacts was 53 km. Eighty-six per cent of people who answered the biosecurity questions (94/109) reported using one or more biosecurity practices. However, on 7/8 farms, at least one person reported that they did not use any biosecurity practices. Fifty per cent of social visitors used biosecurity, whereas 96% of all other people used biosecurity. Ninety-two per cent of people that entered the poultry barns (46/50) used one or more biosecurity practices, whereas 81% of people (48/59) that did not enter the poultry barns used one or more biosecurity practices. Because our study documented farm visitors who did not use any biosecurity practices and moved between commercial poultry farms, we suggest that rapid trace-out of human movements is as important as containment zoning to limiting disease spread during an outbreak of highly pathogenic AI in Ontario. PMID:21624106

  11. International flight-related transmission of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09: an historical cohort study of the first identified cases in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Young, Nicholas; Pebody, Richard; Smith, Gillian; Olowokure, Babatunde; Shankar, Giri; Hoschler, Katja; Galiano, Monica; Green, Helen; Wallensten, Anders; Hogan, Angela; Oliver, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Background Transporting over two billion passengers per year, global airline travel has the potential to spread emerging infectious diseases, both via transportation of infectious cases and through in-flight transmission. Current World Health Organization (WHO) guidance recommends contact tracing of passengers seated within two rows of a case of influenza during air travel. Objectives The objectives of this study were to describe flight-related transmission of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during a commercial flight carrying the first cases reported in the United Kingdom and to test the specific hypothesis that passengers seated within two rows of an infectious case are at greater risk of infection. Methods An historical cohort study, supplemented by contact tracing, enhanced surveillance data and laboratory testing, was used to establish a case status for passengers on board the flight. Results Data were available for 239 of 278 (86·0%) of passengers on the flight, of whom six were considered infectious in-flight and one immune. The attack rate (AR) was 10 of 232 (4·3%; 95% CI 1·7–6·9%). There was no evidence that the AR for those seated within two rows of an infectious case was different from those who were not (relative risk 0·9; 95% CI 0·2–3·1; P = 1·00). Laboratory testing using PCR and/or serology, available for 118 of 239 (49·4%) of the passengers, was largely consistent with clinically defined case status. Conclusions This study of A(H1N1)pdm09 does not support current WHO guidance regarding the contact tracing of passengers seated within two rows of an infectious case of influenza during air travel. PMID:24373291

  12. Comparison against 186 canid whole-genome sequences reveals survival strategies of an ancient clonally transmissible canine tumor

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Brennan; Davis, Brian W.; Rimbault, Maud; Long, Adrienne H.; Karlins, Eric; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Reiman, Rebecca; Parker, Heidi G.; Drögemüller, Cord; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Chapman, Erica S.; Trent, Jeffery M.; Leeb, Tosso; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Wayne, Robert K.; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2015-01-01

    Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is a parasitic cancer clone that has propagated for thousands of years via sexual transfer of malignant cells. Little is understood about the mechanisms that converted an ancient tumor into the world's oldest known continuously propagating somatic cell lineage. We created the largest existing catalog of canine genome-wide variation and compared it against two CTVT genome sequences, thereby separating alleles derived from the founder's genome from somatic mutations that must drive clonal transmissibility. We show that CTVT has undergone continuous adaptation to its transmissible allograft niche, with overlapping mutations at every step of immunosurveillance, particularly self-antigen presentation and apoptosis. We also identified chronologically early somatic mutations in oncogenesis- and immune-related genes that may represent key initiators of clonal transmissibility. Thus, we provide the first insights into the specific genomic aberrations that underlie CTVT's dogged perseverance in canids around the world. PMID:26232412

  13. Avian influenza virus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shelan; Sha, Jianping; Yu, Zhao; Hu, Yan; Chan, Ta-Chien; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Pan, Hao; Cheng, Wei; Mao, Shenghua; Zhang, Run Ju; Chen, Enfu

    2016-07-01

    The unprecedented epizootic of avian influenza viruses, such as H5N1, H5N6, H7N1 and H10N8, has continued to cause disease in humans in recent years. In 2013, another novel influenza A (H7N9) virus emerged in China, and 30% of those patients died. Pregnant women are particularly susceptible to avian influenza and are more likely to develop severe complications and to die, especially when infection occurs in the middle and late trimesters. Viremia is believed to occur infrequently, and thus vertical transmission induced by avian influenza appears to be rare. However, avian influenza increases the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including spontaneous abortion, preterm birth and fatal distress. This review summarises 39 cases of pregnant women and their fetuses from different countries dating back to 1997, including 11, 15 and 13 infections with H7N9, H5N1 and the 2009 pandemic influenza (H1N1), respectively. We analysed the epidemic features, following the geographical, population and pregnancy trimester distributions; underlying diseases; exposure history; medical timelines; human-to-human transmission; pathogenicity and vertical transmission; antivirus treatments; maternal severity and mortality and pregnancy outcome. The common experiences reported in different countries and areas suggest that early identification and treatment are imperative. In the future, vigilant virologic and epidemiologic surveillance systems should be developed to monitor avian influenza viruses during pregnancy. Furthermore, extensive study on the immune mechanisms should be conducted, as this will guide safe, rational immunomodulatory treatment among this high-risk population. Most importantly, we should develop a universal avian influenza virus vaccine to prevent outbreaks of the different subtypes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27187752

  14. [Influenza surveillance].

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Karolina; Hallmann-Szelińska, Ewelina; Kondratiuk, Katarzyna; Brydak, Lidia B

    2016-01-01

    Influenza surveillance was established in 1947. From this moment WHO (World Health Organization) has been coordinating international cooperation, with a goal of monitoring influenza virus activity, effective diagnostic of the circulating viruses and informing society about epidemics or pandemics, as well as about emergence of new subtypes of influenza virus type A. Influenza surveillance is an important task, because it enables people to prepare themselves for battle with the virus that is constantly mutating, what leads to circulation of new and often more virulent strains of influenza in human population. As vaccination is the most effective method of fighting the virus, one of the major tasks of GISRS is developing an optimal antigenic composition of the vaccine for the current epidemic season. European Influenza Surveillance Network (EISN) has also developed over the years. EISN is running integrated epidemiological and virological influenza surveillance, to provide appropriate data to public health experts in member countries, to enable them undertaking relevant activities based on the current information about influenza activity. In close cooperation with GISRS and EISN are National Influenza Centres--national institutions designated by the Ministry of Health in each country. PMID:27117107

  15. Novel Highly Pathogenic Avian A(H5N2) and A(H5N8) Influenza Viruses of Clade 2.3.4.4 from North America Have Limited Capacity for Replication and Transmission in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Bryan S.; Russier, Marion; Jeevan, Trushar; Marathe, Bindumadhav; Govorkova, Elena A.; Russell, Charles J.; Kim-Torchetti, Mia; Choi, Young Ki; Brown, Ian; Saito, Takehiko; Stallknecht, David E.; Krauss, Scott

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Highly pathogenic influenza A(H5N8) viruses from clade 2.3.4.4 were introduced to North America by migratory birds in the fall of 2014. Reassortment of A(H5N8) viruses with avian viruses of North American lineage resulted in the generation of novel A(H5N2) viruses with novel genotypes. Through sequencing of recent avian influenza viruses, we identified PB1 and NP gene segments very similar to those in the viruses isolated from North American waterfowl prior to the introduction of A(H5N8) to North America, highlighting these bird species in the origin of reassortant A(H5N2) viruses. While they were highly virulent and transmissible in poultry, we found A(H5N2) viruses to be low pathogenic in mice and ferrets, and replication was limited in both hosts compared with those of recent highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses. Molecular characterization of the hemagglutinin protein from A(H5N2) viruses showed that the receptor binding preference, cleavage, and pH of activation were highly adapted for replication in avian species and similar to those of other 2.3.4.4 viruses. In addition, North American and Eurasian clade 2.3.4.4 H5NX viruses replicated to significantly lower titers in differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells than did seasonal human A(H1N1) and highly pathogenic A(H5N1) viruses isolated from a human case. Thus, despite their having a high impact on poultry, our findings suggest that the recently emerging North American A(H5N2) viruses are not expected to pose a substantial threat to humans and other mammals without further reassortment and/or adaptation and that reassortment with North American viruses has not had a major impact on viral phenotype. IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic H5 influenza viruses have been introduced into North America from Asia, causing extensive morbidity and mortality in domestic poultry. The introduced viruses have reassorted with North American avian influenza viruses, generating viral genotypes

  16. Novel Highly Pathogenic Avian A(H5N2) and A(H5N8) Influenza Viruses of Clade 2.3.4.4 from North America Have Limited Capacity for Replication and Transmission in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Bryan S; Russier, Marion; Jeevan, Trushar; Marathe, Bindumadhav; Govorkova, Elena A; Russell, Charles J; Kim-Torchetti, Mia; Choi, Young Ki; Brown, Ian; Saito, Takehiko; Stallknecht, David E; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic influenza A(H5N8) viruses from clade 2.3.4.4 were introduced to North America by migratory birds in the fall of 2014. Reassortment of A(H5N8) viruses with avian viruses of North American lineage resulted in the generation of novel A(H5N2) viruses with novel genotypes. Through sequencing of recent avian influenza viruses, we identified PB1 and NP gene segments very similar to those in the viruses isolated from North American waterfowl prior to the introduction of A(H5N8) to North America, highlighting these bird species in the origin of reassortant A(H5N2) viruses. While they were highly virulent and transmissible in poultry, we found A(H5N2) viruses to be low pathogenic in mice and ferrets, and replication was limited in both hosts compared with those of recent highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses. Molecular characterization of the hemagglutinin protein from A(H5N2) viruses showed that the receptor binding preference, cleavage, and pH of activation were highly adapted for replication in avian species and similar to those of other 2.3.4.4 viruses. In addition, North American and Eurasian clade 2.3.4.4 H5NX viruses replicated to significantly lower titers in differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells than did seasonal human A(H1N1) and highly pathogenic A(H5N1) viruses isolated from a human case. Thus, despite their having a high impact on poultry, our findings suggest that the recently emerging North American A(H5N2) viruses are not expected to pose a substantial threat to humans and other mammals without further reassortment and/or adaptation and that reassortment with North American viruses has not had a major impact on viral phenotype. IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic H5 influenza viruses have been introduced into North America from Asia, causing extensive morbidity and mortality in domestic poultry. The introduced viruses have reassorted with North American avian influenza viruses, generating viral genotypes not seen on

  17. Role of Absolute Humidity in the Inactivation of Influenza Viruses on Stainless Steel Surfaces at Elevated Temperatures ▿

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, James; Rudnick, Stephen; First, Melvin; Spengler, John

    2010-01-01

    Influenza virus has been found to persist in the environment for hours to days, allowing for secondary transmission of influenza via inanimate objects known as fomites. We evaluated the efficacy of heat and moisture for the decontamination of surfaces for the purpose of preventing of the spread of influenza. Aqueous suspensions of influenza A virus were deposited onto stainless steel coupons, allowed to dry under ambient conditions, and exposed to temperatures of 55°C, 60°C, or 65°C and relative humidity (RH) of 25%, 50%, or 75% for up to 1 h. Quantitative virus assays were performed on the solution used to wash the viruses from these coupons, and results were compared with the solution used to wash coupons treated similarly but left under ambient conditions. Inactivation of influenza virus on surfaces increased with increasing temperature, RH, and exposure time. Reductions of greater than 5 logs of influenza virus on surfaces were achieved at temperatures of 60 and 65°C, exposure times of 30 and 60 min, and RH of 50 and 75%. Our data also suggest that absolute humidity is a better predictor of surface inactivation than RH and allows the prediction of survival using two parameters rather than three. Modest amounts of heat and adequate moisture can provide effective disinfection of surfaces while not harming surfaces, electrical systems, or mechanical components, leaving no harmful residues behind after treatment and requiring a relatively short amount of time. PMID:20435770

  18. IMPACT OF DIFFERENT HUSBANDRY CONDITIONS ON CONTACT AND AIRBORNE TRANSMISSION OF H5N1 HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS TO CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Typically highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses spread very rapidly among chickens within sheds. However, the spread was slower than expected for the initial 10 days of the index farm in Japan during 2004. This slow spread as well as the lack of gross lesions, clinical signs or high morta...

  19. Use of Nonpharmaceutical Interventions to Reduce Transmission of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (pH1N1) in Pennsylvania Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jeffrey R.; Short, Vanessa L.; Wu, Henry M.; Waller, Kirsten; Mead, Paul; Kahn, Emily; Bahn, Beth A; Dale, Jon W.; Nasrullah, Muazzam; Walton, Sabrina E.; Urdaneta, Veronica; Ostroff, Stephen; Averhoff, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Background: School-based recommendations for nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) were issued in response to the threat of 2009 pandemic influenza A (pH1N1). The implementation and effectiveness of these recommendations has not been assessed. Methods: In November 2009, a Web-based survey of all Pennsylvania public schools was conducted to assess…

  20. Comparison of pig and ferret models for evaluation of respiratory versus alimentary transmission of H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) have caused over 300 human infections and over 200 deaths since 2003. The majority of the cases have involved close direct or indirect contact with infected poultry but a few cases have incriminated consumption of uncooked poultry p...

  1. Virulence determinants of pandemic influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tscherne, Donna M.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause recurrent, seasonal epidemics and occasional global pandemics with devastating levels of morbidity and mortality. The ability of influenza A viruses to adapt to various hosts and undergo reassortment events ensures constant generation of new strains with unpredictable degrees of pathogenicity, transmissibility, and pandemic potential. Currently, the combination of factors that drives the emergence of pandemic influenza is unclear, making it impossible to foresee the details of a future outbreak. Identification and characterization of influenza A virus virulence determinants may provide insight into genotypic signatures of pathogenicity as well as a more thorough understanding of the factors that give rise to pandemics. PMID:21206092

  2. The controversy over H5N1 transmissibility research: an opportunity to define a practical response to a global threat.

    PubMed

    Fedson, David S; Opal, Steven M

    2013-05-01

    Since December 2011, influenza virologists and biosecurity experts have been engaged in a controversial debate over research on the transmissibility of H5N1 influenza viruses. Influenza virologists disagreed with the NSABB's recommendation not to publish experimental details of their findings, whereas biosecurity experts wanted the details to be withheld and future research restricted. The virologists initially declared a voluntary moratorium on their work, but later the NSABB allowed their articles to be published, and soon transmissibility research will resume. Throughout the debate, both sides have had understandable views, but both have overlooked the more important question of whether anything could be done if one of these experimentally derived viruses or a naturally occurring and highly virulent influenza virus should emerge and cause a global pandemic. This is a crucial question, because during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, more than 90% of the world's people had no access to timely supplies of affordable vaccines and antiviral agents. Observational studies suggest that inpatient statin treatment reduces mortality in patients with laboratory-confirmed seasonal influenza. Other immunomodulatory agents (glitazones, fibrates and AMPK agonists) improve survival in mice infected with influenza viruses. These agents are produced as inexpensive generics in developing countries. If they were shown to be effective, they could be used immediately to treat patients in any country with a basic health care system. For this reason alone, influenza virologists and biosecurity experts need to join with public health officials to develop an agenda for laboratory and clinical research on these agents. This is the only approach that could yield practical measures for a global response to the next influenza pandemic. PMID:23391967

  3. Emergence of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Webby, R J; Webster, R G

    2001-01-01

    Pandemic influenza in humans is a zoonotic disease caused by the transfer of influenza A viruses or virus gene segments from animal reservoirs. Influenza A viruses have been isolated from avian and mammalian hosts, although the primary reservoirs are the aquatic bird populations of the world. In the aquatic birds, influenza is asymptomatic, and the viruses are in evolutionary stasis. The aquatic bird viruses do not replicate well in humans, and these viruses need to reassort or adapt in an intermediate host before they emerge in human populations. Pigs can serve as a host for avian and human viruses and are logical candidates for the role of intermediate host. The transmission of avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses directly to humans during the late 1990s showed that land-based poultry also can serve between aquatic birds and humans as intermediate hosts of influenza viruses. That these transmission events took place in Hong Kong and China adds further support to the hypothesis that Asia is an epicentre for influenza and stresses the importance of surveillance of pigs and live-bird markets in this area. PMID:11779380

  4. Patterns of spread of influenza A in Canada

    PubMed Central

    He, Daihai; Dushoff, Jonathan; Eftimie, Raluca; Earn, David J. D.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding spatial patterns of influenza transmission is important for designing control measures. We investigate spatial patterns of laboratory-confirmed influenza A across Canada from October 1999 to August 2012. A statistical analysis (generalized linear model) of the seasonal epidemics in this time period establishes a clear spatio-temporal pattern, with influenza emerging earlier in western provinces. Early emergence is also correlated with low temperature and low absolute humidity in the autumn. For the richer data from the 2009 pandemic, a mechanistic mathematical analysis, based on a transmission model, shows that both school terms and weather had important effects on pandemic influenza transmission. PMID:24026815

  5. Avian influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) is a viral infection of birds that varies in severity from asymptomatic infections to mild respiratory and reproductive diseases to an acute, highly fatal systemic disease of chickens, turkeys, guinea fowls, and other avian species. Avian influenza viruses are divided into two ...

  6. Cause of Flu (Influenza)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Flu (Influenza) Cause About the Flu Virus Influenza, or flu, is a respiratory infection ... the virus. Influenza A virus. Credit: CDC Where Influenza Comes From In nature, the flu virus is ...

  7. Protective effects of phillyrin against influenza A virus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xin-Yan; Li, Qing-Jun; Zhang, Hui-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Shi, Peng-Hui; Zhang, Xiu-Juan; Yang, Jing; Zhou, Zhe; Wang, Sheng-Qi

    2016-07-01

    Influenza A virus infection represents a great threat to public health. However, owing to side effects and the emergence of resistant virus strains, the use of currently available anti-influenza drugs may be limited. In order to identify novel anti-influenza drugs, we investigated the antiviral effects of phillyrin against influenza A virus infection in vivo. The mean survival time, lung index, viral titers, influenza hemagglutinin (HA) protein and serum cytokines levels, and histopathological changes in lung tissue were examined. Administration of phillyrin at a dose of 20 mg/kg/day for 3 days significantly prolonged the mean survival time, reduced the lung index, decreased the virus titers and interleukin-6 levels, reduced the expression of HA, and attenuated lung tissue damage in mice infected with influenza A virus. Taken together, these data showed that phillyrin had potential protective effects against infection caused by influenza A virus. PMID:27323762

  8. Evolution and ecology of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, R G; Bean, W J; Gorman, O T; Chambers, T M; Kawaoka, Y

    1992-01-01

    In this review we examine the hypothesis that aquatic birds are the primordial source of all influenza viruses in other species and study the ecological features that permit the perpetuation of influenza viruses in aquatic avian species. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence of influenza A virus RNA segments coding for the spike proteins (HA, NA, and M2) and the internal proteins (PB2, PB1, PA, NP, M, and NS) from a wide range of hosts, geographical regions, and influenza A virus subtypes support the following conclusions. (i) Two partly overlapping reservoirs of influenza A viruses exist in migrating waterfowl and shorebirds throughout the world. These species harbor influenza viruses of all the known HA and NA subtypes. (ii) Influenza viruses have evolved into a number of host-specific lineages that are exemplified by the NP gene and include equine Prague/56, recent equine strains, classical swine and human strains, H13 gull strains, and all other avian strains. Other genes show similar patterns, but with extensive evidence of genetic reassortment. Geographical as well as host-specific lineages are evident. (iii) All of the influenza A viruses of mammalian sources originated from the avian gene pool, and it is possible that influenza B viruses also arose from the same source. (iv) The different virus lineages are predominantly host specific, but there are periodic exchanges of influenza virus genes or whole viruses between species, giving rise to pandemics of disease in humans, lower animals, and birds. (v) The influenza viruses currently circulating in humans and pigs in North America originated by transmission of all genes from the avian reservoir prior to the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic; some of the genes have subsequently been replaced by others from the influenza gene pool in birds. (vi) The influenza virus gene pool in aquatic birds of the world is probably perpetuated by low-level transmission within that species throughout the year. (vii

  9. Protection against H1N1 influenza challenge by a DNA vaccine expressing H3/H1 subtype hemagglutinin combined with MHC class II-restricted epitopes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple subtypes of avian influenza viruses have crossed the species barrier to infect humans and have the potential to cause a pandemic. Therefore, new influenza vaccines to prevent the co-existence of multiple subtypes within a host and cross-species transmission of influenza are urgently needed. Methods Here we report a multi-epitope DNA vaccine targeted towards multiple subtypes of the influenza virus. The protective hemagglutinin (HA) antigens from H5/H7/H9 subtypes were screened for MHC II class-restricted epitopes overlapping with predicted B cell epitopes. We then constructed a DNA plasmid vaccine, pV-H3-EHA-H1, based on HA antigens from human influenza H3/H1 subtypes combined with the H5/H7/H9 subtype Th/B epitope box. Results Epitope-specific IFN-γ ELISpot responses were significantly higher in the multi-epitope DNA group than in other vaccine and control groups (P < 0.05). The multi-epitope group significantly enhanced Th2 cell responses as determined by cytokine assays. The survival rate of mice given the multi-epitope vaccine was the highest among the vaccine groups, but it was not significantly different compared to those given single antigen expressing pV-H1HA1 vaccine and dual antigen expressing pV-H3-H1 vaccine (P > 0.05). No measurable virus titers were detected in the lungs of the multi-epitope immunized group. The unique multi-epitope DNA vaccine enhanced virus-specific antibody and cellular immunity as well as conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) influenza strain in mice. Conclusions This approach may be a promising strategy for developing a universal influenza vaccine to prevent multiple subtypes of influenza virus and to induce long-term protective immune against cross-species transmission. PMID:21134292

  10. Experimental Transmission of African Swine Fever (ASF) Low Virulent Isolate NH/P68 by Surviving Pigs.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, C; Soler, A; Nieto, R; Sánchez, M A; Martins, C; Pelayo, V; Carrascosa, A; Revilla, Y; Simón, A; Briones, V; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Arias, M

    2015-12-01

    African swine fever (ASF) has persisted in Eastern Europe since 2007, and two endemic zones have been identified in the central and southern parts of the Russian Federation. Moderate- to low-virulent ASF virus isolates are known to circulate in endemic ASF-affected regions. To improve our knowledge of virus transmission in animals recovered from ASF virus infection, an experimental in vivo study was carried out. Four domestic pigs were inoculated with the NH/P68 ASF virus, previously characterized to develop a chronic form of ASF. Two additional in-contact pigs were introduced at 72 days post-inoculation (dpi) in the same box for virus exposure. The inoculated pigs developed a mild form of the disease, and the virus was isolated from tissues in the inoculated pigs up to 99 dpi (pigs were euthanized at 36, 65, 99 and 134 dpi). In-contact pigs showed mild or no clinical signs, but did become seropositive, and a transient viraemia was detected at 28 days post-exposure (dpe), thereby confirming late virus transmission from the inoculated pigs. Virus transmission to in-contact pigs occurred at four weeks post-exposure, over three months after the primary infection. These results highlight the potential role of survivor pigs in disease maintenance and dissemination in areas where moderate- to low-virulent viruses may be circulating undetected. This study will help design better and more effective control programmes to fight against this disease. PMID:26432068

  11. How Ambient Humidity May Affect the Transmission of Viral Infectious Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wan; Marr, Linsey; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2013-04-01

    Viral infectious diseases such as influenza have been a great burden to public health. The airborne transmission route is an important venue for the spread of many respiratory viral diseases. Many airborne viruses have been shown to be sensitive to ambient humidity, yet the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain elusive. A thorough understanding of this phenomenon may provide insight into the temporal and spatial distribution of diseases. For instance, studies have repeatedly suggested ambient humidity as an important environmental determinant in the transmission of influenza in temperate regions. Further, knowing how to optimize humidity so as to minimize virus survival may have practical implications for disease prevention. In this talk, we will discuss multiple mechanisms that may account for the association between humidity and viability of viruses in aerosols, including water activity, surface inactivation, salt toxicity, and conformational changes to the virus in response to varying pH. As a case study, we will discuss our work on the effect of relative humidity (RH) on survival of influenza A virus (IAV) and how it may contribute to the transmission patterns of seasonal flu around the world. We measured the change in viability of IAV in droplets at various RHs. Results suggest three potential regimes defined by humidity: physiological (~100% RH) with high viability, concentrated (~50% to near 100% RH) with lower viability, and dry (<~50% RH) with high viability. Based on these results, we propose a mechanistic basis for the dependence of IAV's transmission on humidity. In temperate regions, the increase in influenza activity in winter may be due to enhanced transmission via the aerosol route thanks to IAV's higher viability in droplets at low RH. In tropical regions, transmission could be enhanced due to high viability of IAV at extremely high RH (rainy season), as observed in our study, possibly through both the aerosol route and the contact

  12. Avian Influenza

    MedlinePlus

    ... infectious viral disease of birds. Most avian influenza viruses do not infect humans; however some, such as ... often causing no apparent signs of illness. AI viruses can sometimes spread to domestic poultry and cause ...

  13. Low Virulence and Lack of Airborne Transmission of the Dutch Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus H5N8 in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Lexmond, Pascal; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Koopmans, Marion; Kuiken, Thijs; Fouchier, Ron A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N8 viruses that emerged in poultry in East Asia spread to Europe and North America by late 2014. Here we show that the European HPAI H5N8 viruses differ from the Korean and Japanese HPAI H5N8 viruses by several amino acids and that a Dutch HPAI H5N8 virus had low virulence and was not transmitted via the airborne route in ferrets. The virus did not cross-react with sera raised against pre-pandemic H5 vaccine strains. This data is useful for public health risk assessments. PMID:26090682

  14. A review of factors that affect transmission and survival of verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli in the European farm to fork beef chain.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Geraldine; Burgess, Catherine M; Bolton, Declan J

    2014-07-01

    Verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) are a significant foodborne public health hazard in Europe, where most human infections are associated with six serogroups (O157, O26, O103, O145, O111 and O104). With the exception of O104, these serogroups are associated with bovine animals and beef products. This paper reviews our current knowledge of VTEC in the beef chain focusing on transmission and the factors which impact on survival from the farm through transport, lairage, slaughter, dressing, processing and distribution, in the context of the European beef industry. It provides new information on beef farm and animal hide prevalence, distribution and virulence factors as well as pre-chilled carcass and ground beef prevalence, generated by the recently completed EU Framework research project, ProSafeBeef. In the concluding section, emerging issues and data gaps are addressed with a view to increasing our understanding of this pathogen and developing new thinking on detection and control. PMID:24548772

  15. Pathogenesis and transmissibility of highly (H7N1) and low (H7N9) pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An experimental infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) and low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) was carried out in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) in order to study clinical signs, gross and microscopic lesions, and viral distribution in tissues and viral shedding. Birds were infected with a HPAIV subtype H7N1 (A/Chicken/Italy/5093/1999) and a LPAIV subtype H7N9 (A/Anas crecca/Spain/1460/2008). Uninoculated birds were included as contacts in both groups. In HPAIV infected birds, the first clinical signs were observed at 3 dpi, and mortality started at 4 dpi, reaching 100% at 8 dpi. The presence of viral antigen in tissues and viral shedding were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRRT-PCR), respectively, in all birds infected with HPAIV. However, neither clinical signs nor histopathological findings were observed in LPAIV infected partridges. In addition, only short-term viral shedding together with seroconversion was detected in some LPAIV inoculated animals. The present study demonstrates that the red-legged partridge is highly susceptible to the H7N1 HPAIV strain, causing severe disease, mortality and abundant viral shedding and thus contributing to the spread of a potential local outbreak of this virus. In contrast, our results concerning H7N9 LPAIV suggest that the red-legged partridge is not a reservoir species for this virus. PMID:21314907

  16. Long-term survival and transmission of INI1-mutation via nonpenetrant males in a family with rhabdoid tumour predisposition syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ammerlaan, A C J; Ararou, A; Houben, M P W A; Baas, F; Tijssen, C C; Teepen, J L J M; Wesseling, P; Hulsebos, T J M

    2007-01-01

    Rhabdoid tumour predisposition syndrome (RTPS) is a rare syndrome caused by inheritance of a mutated INI1 gene for which only two multigeneration families have been reported. To further characterise the genotype and phenotype of RTPS, we present a third family in which at least three cousins developed an atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour (AT/RT) at a young age. Two of these patients showed unusual long survival, and one of these developed an intracranial meningioma and a myoepithelioma of the lip in adulthood. Mutation analysis of INI1 revealed a germline G>A mutation in the donor splice site of exon 4 (c.500+1G>A) in the patients and in their unaffected fathers. This mutation prevents normal splicing and concomitantly generates a stop codon, resulting in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Biallelic inactivation of INI1 in the tumours, except for the meningioma, was confirmed by absence of nuclear INI1-protein staining. The myoepithelioma of one of the patients carried an identical somatic rearrangement in the NF2 gene as the AT/RT, indicating that both tumours originated from a common precursor cell. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time transmission of a germline INI1-mutation in a RTPS family via nonpenetrant males, long-term survival of two members of this family with an AT/RT, and involvement of INI1 in the pathogenesis of myoepithelioma. PMID:18087273

  17. Influenza reverse genetics: dissecting immunity and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Siying; Evans, Justin G; Stambas, John

    2014-01-01

    Reverse genetics systems allow artificial generation of non-segmented and segmented negative-sense RNA viruses, like influenza viruses, entirely from cloned cDNA. Since the introduction of reverse genetics systems over a decade ago, the ability to generate 'designer' influenza viruses in the laboratory has advanced both basic and applied research, providing a powerful tool to investigate and characterise host-pathogen interactions and advance the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The list of applications for reverse genetics has expanded vastly in recent years. In this review, we discuss the development and implications of this technique, including the recent controversy surrounding the generation of a transmissible H5N1 influenza virus. We will focus on research involving the identification of viral protein function, development of live-attenuated influenza virus vaccines, host-pathogen interactions, immunity and the generation of recombinant influenza virus vaccine vectors for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:24528628

  18. Avian influenza A viruses in birds of the order Psittaciformes: reports on virus isolations, transmission experiments and vaccinations and initial studies on innocuity and efficacy of oseltamivir in ovo.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Blanco Peña, K M; Yilmaz, A; Redmann, T; Hofheinz, S

    2007-07-01

    Birds of the order Psittaciformes are - besides chickens, turkeys and other birds - also susceptible to infection with avian influenza A viruses (AIV) and succumb following severe disease within one week. Published data prove that various parakeets, amazons, cockatoos, African grey parrots and budgerigars (genera Barnardius, Psittacula, Cacatua, Eolophus, Amazona, Myiopsitta, Psittacus and Melopsittacus) were found dead following natural infections. Natural infections of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) of the haemagglutinin subtypes H5 and H7 cause severe disease and high rates of mortality. Experimental transmission studies with AlVs of the subtypes H5 and H7 confirm these data. Viruses of the subtypes H3N8, H4N6, H4N8, H11N6 and H11N8 may cause also clinical signs and occasionally losses in naturally infected psittacine birds. Clinical signs and losses were also noted following experimental infection of budgerigars with a H4N6 virus. In the EU and in other countries, vaccination of exposed exotic and rare birds and poultry is a possible and an acceptable measure to provide protection. Currently, the EU Commission accepts inactivated adjuvanted vaccines whereas in some other countries recently developed vector vaccines are applied. However, birds remain susceptible during the time interval between application of any vaccine and the development of immunity. This critical period can be bridged with antiviral drugs. Our in ovo studies demonstrate that the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir is non-toxic for chicken embryos at concentrations of 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 mg/kg body weight. These dosages prevented entirely the replication of a HPAIV of the subtype H7N1 when this drug is given shortly prior to, simultaneously or soon after inoculation of chicken embryos with this AIV. Thus, we speculate that exposed valuable birds such as psittacines at risk can be successfully treated. PMID:17724934

  19. Confined animal feeding operations as amplifiers of influenza.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Roberto A; Hethcote, Herbert W; Gray, Gregory C

    2006-01-01

    Influenza pandemics occur when a novel influenza strain, often of animal origin, becomes transmissible between humans. Domestic animal species such as poultry or swine in confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) could serve as local amplifiers for such a new strain of influenza. A mathematical model is used to examine the transmission dynamics of a new influenza virus among three sequentially linked populations: the CAFO species, the CAFO workers (the bridging population), and the rest of the local human population. Using parameters based on swine data, simulations showed that when CAFO workers comprised 15-45% of the community, human influenza cases increased by 42-86%. Successful vaccination of at least 50% of CAFO workers cancelled the amplification. A human influenza epidemic due to a new virus could be locally amplified by the presence of confined animal feeding operations in the community. Thus vaccination of CAFO workers would be an effective use of a pandemic vaccine. PMID:17187567

  20. Targeted social distancing design for pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Glass, Robert J; Glass, Laura M; Beyeler, Walter E; Min, H Jason

    2006-11-01

    Targeted social distancing to mitigate pandemic influenza can be designed through simulation of influenza's spread within local community social contact networks. We demonstrate this design for a stylized community representative of a small town in the United States. The critical importance of children and teenagers in transmission of influenza is first identified and targeted. For influenza as infectious as 1957-58 Asian flu (=50% infected), closing schools and keeping children and teenagers at home reduced the attack rate by >90%. For more infectious strains, or transmission that is less focused on the young, adults and the work environment must also be targeted. Tailored to specific communities across the world, such design would yield local defenses against a highly virulent strain in the absence of vaccine and antiviral drugs. PMID:17283616

  1. Targeted Social Distancing Designs for Pandemic Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Laura M.; Beyeler, Walter E.; Min, H. Jason

    2006-01-01

    Targeted social distancing to mitigate pandemic influenza can be designed through simulation of influenza's spread within local community social contact networks. We demonstrate this design for a stylized community representative of a small town in the United States. The critical importance of children and teenagers in transmission of influenza is first identified and targeted. For influenza as infectious as 1957–58 Asian flu (≈50% infected), closing schools and keeping children and teenagers at home reduced the attack rate by >90%. For more infectious strains, or transmission that is less focused on the young, adults and the work environment must also be targeted. Tailored to specific communities across the world, such design would yield local defenses against a highly virulent strain in the absence of vaccine and antiviral drugs. PMID:17283616

  2. Avian Influenza.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Gary Adam; Maslow, Melanie Jane

    2005-05-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate more than 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantining, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent an increase in human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short-interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems, offer promise should a pandemic occur. PMID:15847721

  3. Avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Gary A; Maslow, Melanie J

    2006-03-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004 alone, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate over 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantines, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent increased human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short, interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems offer promise, should a pandemic occur. PMID:16566867

  4. Equine Influenza A(H3N8) Virus Infection in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shuo; Wang, Lifang; Fu, Xinliang; He, Shuyi; Hong, Malin; Zhou, Pei; Gray, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Interspecies transmission of equine influenza A(H3N8) virus has resulted in establishment of a canine influenza virus. To determine if something similar could happen with cats, we experimentally infected 14 cats with the equine influenza A(H3N8) virus. All showed clinical signs, shed virus, and transmitted the virus to a contact cohort. PMID:25417790

  5. HIV transmission and 24-month survival in a randomized trial of HAART to prevent MTCT during pregnancy and breastfeeding in Botswana (The Mma Bana Study)

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Roger L.; Kitch, Douglas; Ogwu, Anthony; Hughes, Michael D.; Lockman, Shahin; Powis, Kathleen; Souda, Sajini; Moffat, Claire; Moyo, Sikhulile; McIntosh, Kenneth; van Widenfelt, Erik; Zwerski, Sheryl; Mazhani, Loeto; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Max

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (MTCT) may impact long-term survival of mothers and children. Design Randomized clinical trial. Methods HIV–infected pregnant women with CD4 ≥200 cells/mm3 were randomly assigned to abacavir, zidovudine, lamivudine (Arm A) or lopinavir–ritonavir, zidovudine–lamivudine (Arm B) from week 26–34 gestation through planned weaning by 6 months postpartum. Women with baseline CD4 <200 received nevirapine–zidovudine–lamivudine indefinitely (Obs arm), as did randomized women later qualifying for treatment. Results Among 560 randomized and 170 observational women enrolled, there were 14 deaths (1.9%); 1 antenatally (Obs), 3 from delivery though 6 months postpartum (1 Arm A, 2 Obs), and 10 from 6–24 months postpartum (5 Arm A, 3 Arm B, 2 Obs). Time to death or CD4 <200 was shorter in Arm A vs. B (p=0.03). Of 709 live-born children, 97% breastfed for median 5.8 months. Of 37 (5.2%) deaths by 24 months, 9 were before breastfeeding initiated (3 Arm A, 2 Arm B, 4 Obs); 6 while breastfeeding (1 Arm A, 2 Arm B, 3 Obs); and 22 after weaning (9 Arm A, 11 Arm B, 2 Obs). Only 8 children (1.1%) were HIV-infected at 24 months (6 Arm A, 1 Arm B, 1 Obs), all before 6 months. Conclusions Low MTCT was maintained through extended follow-up in all arms. Disease progression appeared slower after discontinuing protease inhibitor-based HAART, but a concerning number of maternal deaths occurred after stopping either regimen. Strategies to improve maternal and child survival in the post-intervention period are required. PMID:24180000

  6. Synchrony, Waves, and Spatial Hierarchies in the Spread of Influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viboud, Cécile; Bjørnstad, Ottar N.; Smith, David L.; Simonsen, Lone; Miller, Mark A.; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2006-04-01

    Quantifying long-range dissemination of infectious diseases is a key issue in their dynamics and control. Here, we use influenza-related mortality data to analyze the between-state progression of interpandemic influenza in the United States over the past 30 years. Outbreaks show hierarchical spatial spread evidenced by higher pairwise synchrony between more populous states. Seasons with higher influenza mortality are associated with higher disease transmission and more rapid spread than are mild ones. The regional spread of infection correlates more closely with rates of movement of people to and from their workplaces (workflows) than with geographical distance. Workflows are described in turn by a gravity model, with a rapid decay of commuting up to around 100 km and a long tail of rare longer range flow. A simple epidemiological model, based on the gravity formulation, captures the observed increase of influenza spatial synchrony with transmissibility; high transmission allows influenza to spread rapidly beyond local spatial constraints.

  7. Avian influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses infect domestic poultry and wild birds. In domestic poultry, AI viruses are typically of low pathogenicity (LP) causing subclinical infections, respiratory disease or drops in egg production. However, a few AI viruses cause severe systemic disease with high mortality; i....

  8. AVIAN INFLUENZA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian Influenza (AI) viruses infect domestic poultry and wild birds. In domestic poultry, AI viruses are typically of low pathogenicity (LP) causing subclinical infections, respiratory disease or drops in egg production. However, a few AI viruses cause severe systemic disease with high mortality; ...

  9. Influenza Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C., Image Smith 18 "Convalescing, 1918 influenza epidemic" www.vaccineinformation.org/ ... Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C., Image Smith 3 About • Contact • A-Z Index • Site Map • ...

  10. Avian influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural host for avian influenza virus (AIV) is in wild birds, including ducks, gulls, and shorebirds, where the virus causes primarily an enteric infection with little disease. However, AIV can infect a wide variety of host species, and with a certain level of adaptation for the aberrant host ...

  11. Influenza: Can we cope better with the unpredictable?

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Gaël; Neumeier, Elisabeth; Bekkat-Berkani, Rafik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Seasonal influenza vaccines are unique because they are regularly reformulated and prepared in anticipation of the upcoming influenza season. Selection of vaccine strains occurs in advance of the influenza season, allowing time for vaccine production. Influenza viruses constantly evolve, and mismatches between vaccine strains and circulating strains have occurred in the past, impacting on vaccine effectiveness. The public health impact of a mismatch depends on multiple factors including strain virulence and transmission dynamics, pre-existing population immunity to the drift strain, and cross-reactivity induced by vaccination. Influenza vaccine effectiveness thus varies unpredictably from year to year, and may differ across European and northern American regions. Here we highlight the unpredictability associated with influenza virus circulation and present a comprehensive picture of circulating influenza strains in the northern hemisphere as compared to WHO recommendations for vaccine strains over the last 15 y. In years when vaccine mismatch occurs, such as the 2014–15 influenza season, public health agencies continue to recommend influenza vaccination as the preferred means by which to protect against influenza and influenza-associated complications. Research is on-going to optimise strain selection and vaccine composition to improve effectiveness. PMID:26360135

  12. The effect of healthcare environments on a pandemic influenza outbreak.

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Daniel C.; Davey, Victoria J.; Glass, Robert John, Jr.

    2010-12-01

    The objectives of this presentation are: (1) To determine if healthcare settings serve as intensive transmission environments for influenza epidemics, increasing effects on communities; (2) To determine which mitigation strategies are best for use in healthcare settings and in communities to limit influenza epidemic effects; and (3) To determine which mitigation strategies are best to prevent illness in healthcare workers.

  13. Isolation of an influenza A virus of unusual subtype (H1N7) from pigs in England, and the subsequent experimental transmission from pig to pig.

    PubMed

    Brown, I H; Alexander, D J; Chakraverty, P; Harris, P A; Manvell, R J

    1994-03-01

    A novel H1N7 influenza virus (A/swine/Eng/191973/92) was isolated from nasal swabs collected from two pigs on a farm where there had been recent clinical disease due to infection with an H1N1 virus (A/swine/Eng/195852/92). Antigenically, the haemagglutinin (HA) of the H1N7 virus was related most closely to the HA of A/USSR/90/77, whilst the neuraminidase (NA) appeared to be related most closely to the NA of A/equine/Prague/1/56 (H7N7). Pigs infected experimentally with A/swine/Eng/191973/92 developed mild clinical signs, excreted virus into the nasal passages for up to nine days after infection, appeared normal at necropsy, transmitted the virus to sentinel pigs, but seven out of eight pigs failed to seroconvert. These findings suggest that the H1N7 virus has a low pathogenicity for pigs, resulting in limited virus multiplication which is insufficient to stimulate a detectable primary humoral immune response. PMID:8203118

  14. A Comprehensive Breath Plume Model for Disease Transmission via Expiratory Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloran, S. K.; Wexler, A. S.; Ristenpart, W. D.

    2012-11-01

    The peak in influenza incidence during wintertime represents a longstanding unresolved scientific question. One hypothesis is that the efficacy of airborne transmission via aerosols is increased at low humidity and temperature, conditions that prevail in wintertime. Recent experiments with guinea pigs suggest that transmission is indeed maximized at low humidity and temperature, a finding which has been widely interpreted in terms of airborne influenza virus survivability. This interpretation, however, neglects the effect of the airflow on the transmission probability. Here we provide a comprehensive model for assessing the probability of disease transmission via expiratory aerosols between test animals in laboratory conditions. The spread of aerosols emitted from an infected animal is modeled using dispersion theory for a homogeneous turbulent airflow. The concentration and size distribution of the evaporating droplets in the resulting ``Gaussian breath plume'' are calculated as functions of downstream position. We demonstrate that the breath plume model is broadly consistent with the guinea pig experiments, without invoking airborne virus survivability. Moreover, the results highlight the need for careful characterization of the airflow in airborne transmission experiments.

  15. Nosocomial Co-Transmission of Avian Influenza A(H7N9) and A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses between 2 Patients with Hematologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huazhong; Liu, Shelan; Liu, Jun; Chai, Chengliang; Mao, Haiyan; Yu, Zhao; Tang, Yuming; Zhu, Geqin; Chen, Haixiao X; Zhu, Chengchu; Shao, Hui; Tan, Shuguang; Wang, Qianli; Bi, Yuhai; Zou, Zhen; Liu, Guang; Jin, Tao; Jiang, Chengyu; Gao, George F; Peiris, Malik; Yu, Hongjie; Chen, Enfu

    2016-04-01

    A nosocomial cluster induced by co-infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) and A(H1N1)pdm09 (pH1N1) viruses occurred in 2 patients at a hospital in Zhejiang Province, China, in January 2014. The index case-patient was a 57-year-old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who had been occupationally exposed to poultry. He had co-infection with H7N9 and pH1N1 viruses. A 71-year-old man with polycythemia vera who was in the same ward as the index case-patient for 6 days acquired infection with H7N9 and pH1N1 viruses. The incubation period for the second case-patient was estimated to be <4 days. Both case-patients died of multiple organ failure. Virus genetic sequences from the 2 case-patients were identical. Of 103 close contacts, none had acute respiratory symptoms; all were negative for H7N9 virus. Serum samples from both case-patients demonstrated strong proinflammatory cytokine secretion but incompetent protective immune responses. These findings strongly suggest limited nosocomial co-transmission of H7N9 and pH1N1 viruses from 1 immunocompromised patient to another. PMID:26982379

  16. Nosocomial Co-Transmission of Avian Influenza A(H7N9) and A(H1N1)pdm09 Viruses between 2 Patients with Hematologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huazhong; Liu, Shelan; Liu, Jun; Chai, Chengliang; Mao, Haiyan; Yu, Zhao; Tang, Yuming; Zhu, Geqin; Chen, Haixiao X.; Zhu, Chengchu; Shao, Hui; Tan, Shuguang; Wang, Qianli; Bi, Yuhai; Zou, Zhen; Liu, Guang; Jin, Tao; Jiang, Chengyu; Gao, George F.; Peiris, Malik

    2016-01-01

    A nosocomial cluster induced by co-infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) and A(H1N1)pdm09 (pH1N1) viruses occurred in 2 patients at a hospital in Zhejiang Province, China, in January 2014. The index case-patient was a 57-year-old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who had been occupationally exposed to poultry. He had co-infection with H7N9 and pH1N1 viruses. A 71-year-old man with polycythemia vera who was in the same ward as the index case-patient for 6 days acquired infection with H7N9 and pH1N1 viruses. The incubation period for the second case-patient was estimated to be <4 days. Both case-patients died of multiple organ failure. Virus genetic sequences from the 2 case-patients were identical. Of 103 close contacts, none had acute respiratory symptoms; all were negative for H7N9 virus. Serum samples from both case-patients demonstrated strong proinflammatory cytokine secretion but incompetent protective immune responses. These findings strongly suggest limited nosocomial co-transmission of H7N9 and pH1N1 viruses from 1 immunocompromised patient to another. PMID:26982379

  17. Impaired Haemophilus influenzae Type b Transplacental Antibody Transmission and Declining Antibody Avidity through the First Year of Life Represent Potential Vulnerabilities for HIV-Exposed but -Uninfected Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rakhola, Jeremy T.; Onyango-Makumbi, Carolyne; Mubiru, Michael; Westcott, Jamie E.; Krebs, Nancy F.; Asturias, Edwin J.; Fowler, Mary Glenn; McFarland, Elizabeth; Janoff, Edward N.

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether immune function is impaired among HIV-exposed but -uninfected (HEU) infants born to HIV-infected mothers and to identify potential vulnerabilities to vaccine-preventable infection, we characterized the mother-to-infant placental transfer of Haemophilus influenzae type b-specific IgG (Hib-IgG) and its levels and avidity after vaccination in Ugandan HEU infants and in HIV-unexposed U.S. infants. Hib-IgG was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 57 Ugandan HIV-infected mothers prenatally and in their vaccinated HEU infants and 14 HIV-unexposed U.S. infants at birth and 12, 24, and 48 weeks of age. Antibody avidity at birth and 48 weeks of age was determined with 1 M ammonium thiocyanate. A median of 43% of maternal Hib-IgG was transferred to HEU infants. Although its level was lower in HEU infants than in U.S. infants at birth (P < 0.001), Hib-IgG was present at protective levels (>1.0 μg/ml) at birth in 90% of HEU infants and all U.S. infants. HEU infants had robust Hib-IgG responses to a primary vaccination. Although Hib-IgG levels declined from 24 to 48 weeks of age in HEU infants, they were higher than those in U.S. infants (P = 0.002). Antibody avidity, comparable at birth, declined by 48 weeks of age in both populations. Early vaccination of HEU infants may limit an initial vulnerability to Hib disease resulting from impaired transplacental antibody transfer. While initial Hib vaccine responses appeared adequate, the confluence of lower antibody avidity and declining Hib-IgG levels in HEU infants by 12 months support Hib booster vaccination at 1 year. Potential immunologic impairments of HEU infants should be considered in the development of vaccine platforms for populations with high maternal HIV prevalence. PMID:25298109

  18. The Effect of School Dismissal on Rates of Influenza-Like Illness in New York City Schools during the Spring 2009 Novel H1N1 Outbreak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egger, Joseph R.; Konty, Kevin J.; Wilson, Elisha; Karpati, Adam; Matte, Thomas; Weiss, Don; Barbot, Oxiris

    2012-01-01

    Background: The effects of individual school dismissal on influenza transmission have not been well studied. During the spring 2009 novel H1N1 outbreak, New York City implemented an individual school dismissal policy intended to limit influenza transmission at schools with high rates of influenza-like illness (ILI). Methods: Active disease…

  19. Global Seasonal Influenza Epidemics and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamerius, James

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that low specific humidity conditions facilitate the transmission of the influenza virus in temperate regions and result in annual winter epidemics. However, this relationship does not account for the epidemiology of influenza in tropical and subtropical regions where epidemics often occur during the rainy season or transmit year-round without a well-defined season. We assessed the role of specific humidity and other local climatic variables on influenza virus seasonality by modeling epidemiological and climatic information from 78 study sites sampled globally. We substantiated that there are two types of environmental conditions associated with seasonal influenza epidemics: "cold-dry" and "humid-rainy". For sites where monthly average specific humidity or temperature decreases below thresholds of approximately 11-12 g/kg and 18-21 °C during the year, influenza activity peaks during the cold-dry season (i.e., winter) when specific humidity and temperature are at minimal levels. For sites where specific humidity and temperature do not decrease below these thresholds, seasonal influenza activity is more likely to peak in months when average precipitation totals are maximal and greater than 150 mm per month. Based on these findings, we develop Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Recovered-Susceptible (SEIRS) models forced by daily weather observations of specific humidity and precipitation that simulate the diversity of seasonal influenza signals worldwide.

  20. Increasing herd immunity with influenza revaccination.

    PubMed

    Mooring, E Q; Bansal, S

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal influenza is a significant public health concern globally. While influenza vaccines are the single most effective intervention to reduce influenza morbidity and mortality, there is considerable debate surrounding the merits and consequences of repeated seasonal vaccination. Here, we describe a two-season influenza epidemic contact network model and use it to demonstrate that increasing the level of continuity in vaccination across seasons reduces the burden on public health. We show that revaccination reduces the influenza attack rate not only because it reduces the overall number of susceptible individuals, but also because it better protects highly connected individuals, who would otherwise make a disproportionately large contribution to influenza transmission. We also demonstrate that our results hold on an empirical contact network, in the presence of assortativity in vaccination status, and are robust for a range of vaccine coverage and efficacy levels. Our work contributes a population-level perspective to debates about the merits of repeated influenza vaccination and advocates for public health policy to incorporate individual vaccine histories. PMID:26482721

  1. Pathogenesis and transmission of H7 and H5 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in mallards including the recent intercontinental H5 viruses (H5N8 and H5N2)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV’s) remain a threat to poultry worldwide. Avian influenza viruses, including HPAIV, are usually non-pathogenic for ducks and other wild aquatic birds, with the exception of Asian lineage H5N1, and recently H5N8, HPAIVs, which can cause moderate to sev...

  2. The role of weather on the relation between influenza and influenza-like illness.

    PubMed

    van Noort, Sander P; Águas, Ricardo; Ballesteros, Sébastien; Gomes, M Gabriela M

    2012-04-01

    Influenza epidemics, enabled by viral antigenic drift, occur invariably each winter in temperate climates. However, attempts to correlate the magnitude of virus change and epidemic size have been unsatisfactory. The incidence of influenza is not typically measured directly, but rather derived from the incidence of influenza-like illness (ILI), a clinical syndrome. Weather factors have been shown to influence the manifestation of influenza-like symptoms. We fitted an influenza transmission model to time series of influenza-like illness as monitored from 2003 to 2010 by two independent symptomatic surveillance systems (Influenzanet and EISN) in three European countries. By assuming that seasonality only acts upon the manifestation of symptoms, the model shows a significant correlation between the absolute humidity and temperature at the time of infection, and the proportion of influenza infections fulfilling the clinical ILI case definition, the so-called ILI factor. When a weather-dependent ILI factor is included in the model, the epidemic size of influenza-like illness becomes dependent not only on the susceptibility of the population at the beginning of the epidemic season but also on the weather conditions during which the epidemic unfolds. The combination reduces season-to-season variation in epidemic size and, interestingly, leads to a non-monotonic trend whereby the largest ILI epidemic occurs for moderate initial susceptibility. PMID:22214751

  3. Influenza virus vaccine for neglected hosts: horses and dogs.

    PubMed

    Na, Woonsung; Yeom, Minjoo; Yuk, Huijoon; Moon, Hyoungjoon; Kang, Bokyu; Song, Daesub

    2016-07-01

    This study provides information regarding vaccine research and the epidemiology of influenza virus in neglected hosts (horses and dogs). Equine influenza virus (EIV) causes a highly contagious disease in horses and other equids, and outbreaks have occurred worldwide. EIV has resulted in costly damage to the horse industry and has the ability of cross the host species barrier from horses to dogs. Canine influenza is a virus of equine or avian origin and infects companion animals that live in close contact with humans; this results in possible exposure to the seasonal epizootic influenza virus. There have been case reports of genetic reassortment between human and canine influenza viruses, which results in high virulence and the ability of transmission to ferrets. This emphasizes the need for vaccine research on neglected hosts to update knowledge on current strains and to advance technology for controlling influenza outbreaks for public health. PMID:27489801

  4. Influenza virus vaccine for neglected hosts: horses and dogs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study provides information regarding vaccine research and the epidemiology of influenza virus in neglected hosts (horses and dogs). Equine influenza virus (EIV) causes a highly contagious disease in horses and other equids, and outbreaks have occurred worldwide. EIV has resulted in costly damage to the horse industry and has the ability of cross the host species barrier from horses to dogs. Canine influenza is a virus of equine or avian origin and infects companion animals that live in close contact with humans; this results in possible exposure to the seasonal epizootic influenza virus. There have been case reports of genetic reassortment between human and canine influenza viruses, which results in high virulence and the ability of transmission to ferrets. This emphasizes the need for vaccine research on neglected hosts to update knowledge on current strains and to advance technology for controlling influenza outbreaks for public health. PMID:27489801

  5. Host genetic determinants of influenza pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsai-Yu; Brass, Abraham L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite effective vaccines, influenza remains a major global health threat due to the morbidity and mortality caused by seasonal epidemics, as well as the 2009 pandemic. Also of profound concern are the rare but potentially catastrophic transmissions of avian influenza to humans, highlighted by a recent H7N9 influenza outbreak. Murine and human studies reveal that the clinical course of influenza is the result of a combination of both host and viral genetic determinants. While viral pathogenicity has long been the subject of intensive efforts, research to elucidate host genetic determinants, particularly human, is now in the ascendant, and the goal of this review is to highlight these recent insights. PMID:23933004

  6. Cleavage of Hemagglutinin-Bearing Lentiviral Pseudotypes and Their Use in the Study of Influenza Virus Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Sawoo, Olivier; Dublineau, Amélie; Batéjat, Christophe; Zhou, Paul; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Leclercq, India

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are a major cause of infectious respiratory human diseases and their transmission is dependent upon the environment. However, the role of environmental factors on IAV survival outside the host still raises many questions. In this study, we used lentiviral pseudotypes to study the influence of the hemagglutinin protein in IAV survival. High-titered and cleaved influenza-based lentiviral pseudoparticles, through the use of a combination of two proteases (HAT and TMPRSS2) were produced. Pseudoparticles bearing hemagglutinin proteins derived from different H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1 IAV strains were subjected to various environmental parameters over time and tested for viability through single-cycle infectivity assays. We showed that pseudotypes with different HAs have different persistence profiles in water as previously shown with IAVs. Our results also showed that pseudotypes derived from H1N1 pandemic virus survived longer than those derived from seasonal H1N1 virus from 1999, at high temperature and salinity, as previously shown with their viral counterparts. Similarly, increasing temperature and salinity had a negative effect on the survival of the H3N2 and H5N1 pseudotypes. These results showed that pseudotypes with the same lentiviral core, but which differ in their surface glycoproteins, survived differently outside the host, suggesting a role for the HA in virus stability. PMID:25166303

  7. Susceptibility of Swine to Low Pathogenic H5 and H7 Avian Influenza Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: The emergence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus from swine origin viruses (1) reinforced the concern about transmission of animal influenza viruses to man. This follows the transmission of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses from birds to people identified in the late 1990s and cont...

  8. Transmission and pathogenicity of novel reassortants derived from Eurasian avian-like and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in mice and guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weili; Liu, Qinfang; Sun, Yipeng; Wang, Yu; Gao, Huijie; Liu, Lirong; Qin, Zhihua; He, Qiming; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Wang, Dayan; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun; Chang, Kin-Chow; Shu, Yuelong; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    Given the present extensive co-circulation in pigs of Eurasian avian-like (EA) swine H1N1 and 2009 pandemic (pdm/09) H1N1 viruses, reassortment between them is highly plausible but largely uncharacterized. Here, experimentally co-infected pigs with a representative EA virus and a pdm/09 virus yielded 55 novel reassortant viruses that could be categorized into 17 genotypes from Gt1 to Gt17 based on segment segregation. Majority of novel reassortants were isolated from the lower respiratory tract. Most of reassortant viruses were more pathogenic and contagious than the parental EA viruses in mice and guinea pigs. The most transmissible reassortant genotypes demonstrated in guinea pigs (Gt2, Gt3, Gt7, Gt10 and Gt13) were also the most lethal in mice. Notably, nearly all these highly virulent reassortants (all except Gt13) were characterized with possession of EA H1 and full complement of pdm/09 ribonucleoprotein genes. Compositionally, we demonstrated that EA H1-222G contributed to virulence by its ability to bind avian-type sialic acid receptors, and that pdm/09 RNP conferred the most robust polymerase activity to reassortants. The present study revealed high reassortment compatibility between EA and pdm/09 viruses in pigs, which could give rise to progeny reassortant viruses with enhanced virulence and transmissibility in mice and guinea pig models. PMID:27252023

  9. Transmission and pathogenicity of novel reassortants derived from Eurasian avian-like and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weili; Liu, Qinfang; Sun, Yipeng; Wang, Yu; Gao, Huijie; Liu, Lirong; Qin, Zhihua; He, Qiming; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Wang, Dayan; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun; Chang, Kin-Chow; Shu, Yuelong; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    Given the present extensive co-circulation in pigs of Eurasian avian-like (EA) swine H1N1 and 2009 pandemic (pdm/09) H1N1 viruses, reassortment between them is highly plausible but largely uncharacterized. Here, experimentally co-infected pigs with a representative EA virus and a pdm/09 virus yielded 55 novel reassortant viruses that could be categorized into 17 genotypes from Gt1 to Gt17 based on segment segregation. Majority of novel reassortants were isolated from the lower respiratory tract. Most of reassortant viruses were more pathogenic and contagious than the parental EA viruses in mice and guinea pigs. The most transmissible reassortant genotypes demonstrated in guinea pigs (Gt2, Gt3, Gt7, Gt10 and Gt13) were also the most lethal in mice. Notably, nearly all these highly virulent reassortants (all except Gt13) were characterized with possession of EA H1 and full complement of pdm/09 ribonucleoprotein genes. Compositionally, we demonstrated that EA H1-222G contributed to virulence by its ability to bind avian-type sialic acid receptors, and that pdm/09 RNP conferred the most robust polymerase activity to reassortants. The present study revealed high reassortment compatibility between EA and pdm/09 viruses in pigs, which could give rise to progeny reassortant viruses with enhanced virulence and transmissibility in mice and guinea pig models. PMID:27252023

  10. Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Krauss, Scott; Franson, J. Christian; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Stallknecht, David E.; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) have been reported in shorebirds, especially at Delaware Bay, USA, during spring migration. However, data on patterns of virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome are lacking. The ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres) is the shorebird species with the highest prevalence of influenza virus at Delaware Bay. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to experimentally assess the patterns of influenza virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome in ruddy turnstones. Methods: We experimentally challenged ruddy turnstones using a common LPAIV shorebird isolate, an LPAIV waterfowl isolate, or a highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus. Cloacal and oral swabs and sera were analyzed from each bird. Results: Most ruddy turnstones had pre-existing antibodies to avian influenza virus, and many were infected at the time of capture. The infectious doses for each challenge virus were similar (103·6–104·16 EID50), regardless of exposure history. All infected birds excreted similar amounts of virus and showed no clinical signs of disease or mortality. Influenza A-specific antibodies remained detectable for at least 2 months after inoculation. Conclusions: These results provide a reference for interpretation of surveillance data, modeling, and predicting the risks of avian influenza transmission and movement in these important hosts.

  11. Advances in influenza vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Reperant, Leslie A.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus infections yearly cause high morbidity and mortality burdens in humans, and the development of a new influenza pandemic continues to threaten mankind as a Damoclean sword. Influenza vaccines have been produced by using egg-based virus growth and passaging techniques that were developed more than 60 years ago, following the identification of influenza A virus as an etiological agent of seasonal influenza. These vaccines aimed mainly at eliciting neutralizing antibodies targeting antigenically variable regions of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, which requires regular updates to match circulating seasonal influenza A and B virus strains. Given the relatively limited protection induced by current seasonal influenza vaccines, a more universal influenza vaccine that would protect against more—if not all—influenza viruses is among the largest unmet medical needs of the 21st century. New insights into correlates of protection from influenza and into broad B- and T-cell protective anti-influenza immune responses offer promising avenues for innovative vaccine development as well as manufacturing strategies or platforms, leading to the development of a new generation of vaccines. These aim at the rapid and massive production of influenza vaccines that provide broad protective and long-lasting immunity. Recent advances in influenza vaccine research demonstrate the feasibility of a wide range of approaches and call for the initiation of preclinical proof-of-principle studies followed by clinical trials in humans. PMID:24991424

  12. Neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza B virus infection: efficacy and resistance

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Andrew J.; Baranovich, Tatiana; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of the biology and epidemiology of influenza B viruses are far less studied than for influenza A viruses, and one of these aspects is effectiveness and resistance to the clinically available antiviral drugs, the neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs). Acute respiratory infections are one of the leading causes of death in children and adults, and influenza is among the few respiratory infections that can be prevented and treated by vaccination and antiviral treatment. Recent data has suggested that influenza B virus infections are of specific concern to pediatric patients because of the increased risk of severe disease. Treatment of influenza B is a challenging task for the following reasons: NAIs (e.g., oseltamivir and zanamivir) are the only FDA-approved class of antivirals available for treatment;the data suggest that oseltamivir is less effective than zanamivir in pediatric patients;zanamivir is not prescribed to patients younger than 7;influenza B viruses are less susceptible than influenza A viruses to NAIs in vitro;although the level of resistance to NAIs is low, the number of different molecular markers of resistance is higher than for influenza A viruses, and they are not well defined;the relationship between levels of NAI phenotypic resistance and known molecular markers, frequency of emergence, transmissibility, and fitness of NAI-resistant variants are not well established. This review presents current knowledge of the effectiveness of NAIs for influenza B virus and antiviral resistance in clinical, surveillance, and experimental studies. PMID:24013000

  13. Delaying the International Spread of Pandemic Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ben S; Pitman, Richard J; Edmunds, W. John; Gay, Nigel J

    2006-01-01

    Background The recent emergence of hypervirulent subtypes of avian influenza has underlined the potentially devastating effects of pandemic influenza. Were such a virus to acquire the ability to spread efficiently between humans, control would almost certainly be hampered by limited vaccine supplies unless global spread could be substantially delayed. Moreover, the large increases that have occurred in international air travel might be expected to lead to more rapid global dissemination than in previous pandemics. Methods and Findings To evaluate the potential of local control measures and travel restrictions to impede global dissemination, we developed stochastic models of the international spread of influenza based on extensions of coupled epidemic transmission models. These models have been shown to be capable of accurately forecasting local and global spread of epidemic and pandemic influenza. We show that under most scenarios restrictions on air travel are likely to be of surprisingly little value in delaying epidemics, unless almost all travel ceases very soon after epidemics are detected. Conclusions Interventions to reduce local transmission of influenza are likely to be more effective at reducing the rate of global spread and less vulnerable to implementation delays than air travel restrictions. Nevertheless, under the most plausible scenarios, achievable delays are small compared with the time needed to accumulate substantial vaccine stocks. PMID:16640458

  14. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Avian Influenza H5 Viruses in the United States Updates and Publications Information ... Humans Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza Viruses Outbreaks Health Care and Laboratorian Guidance HPAI A ...

  15. Haemophilus influenza organism (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prior to the widespread use of the H. influenza vaccine). The large red-colored objects are cells in the spinal fluid. A vaccine to prevent infection by Haemophilus influenza (type B) is available as one of the ...

  16. Treating Influenza (Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be used to treat influenza illness. Antiviral drugs fight influenza viruses in your body. They are different from ... chills and fatigue. Your doctor may prescribe antiviral drugs to treat your flu illness. Should Istill get aflu vaccine? Yes. Antiviral ...

  17. [Influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Antoniukas, Linas

    2007-01-01

    Every year, especially during the cold season, many people catch an acute respiratory disease, namely flu. It is easy to catch this disease; therefore, it spreads very rapidly and often becomes an epidemic or a global pandemic. Airway inflammation and other body ailments, which form in a very short period, torment the patient several weeks. After that, the symptoms of the disease usually disappear as quickly as they emerged. The great epidemics of flu have rather unique characteristics; therefore, it is possible to identify descriptions of such epidemics in historic sources. Already in the 4th century bc, Hippocrates himself wrote about one of them. It is known now that flu epidemics emerge rather frequently, but there are no regular intervals between those events. The epidemics can differ in their consequences, but usually they cause an increased mortality of elderly people. The great flu epidemics of the last century took millions of human lives. In 1918-19, during "The Spanish" pandemic of flu, there were around 40-50 millions of deaths all over the world; "Pandemic of Asia" in 1957 took up to one million lives, etc. Influenza virus can cause various disorders of the respiratory system: from mild inflammations of upper airways to acute pneumonia that finally results in the patient's death. Scientist Richard E. Shope, who investigated swine flu in 1920, had a suspicion that the cause of this disease might be a virus. Already in 1933, scientists from the National Institute for Medical Research in London - Wilson Smith, Sir Christopher Andrewes, and Sir Patrick Laidlaw - for the first time isolated the virus, which caused human flu. Then scientific community started the exhaustive research of influenza virus, and the great interest in this virus and its unique features is still active even today. PMID:18182834

  18. Avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza, which is adapted to an avian host. Although avian influenza has been isolated from numerous avian species, the primary natural hosts for the virus are dabbling ducks, shorebirds, and gulls. The virus can be found world-wide in these species and in o...

  19. About Haemophilus influenzae Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... one that most people are familiar with is Haemophilus influenzae type b, or Hib. There’s a vaccine that can prevent disease caused by Hib, but not the other types of Haemophilus influenzae . Types of Infection Haemophilus influenzae Can Cause Infections ...

  20. The contrasting phylodynamics of human influenza B viruses.

    PubMed

    Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Holmes, Edward C; Joseph, Udayan; Fourment, Mathieu; Su, Yvonne C F; Halpin, Rebecca; Lee, Raphael T C; Deng, Yi-Mo; Gunalan, Vithiagaran; Lin, Xudong; Stockwell, Timothy B; Fedorova, Nadia B; Zhou, Bin; Spirason, Natalie; Kühnert, Denise; Bošková, Veronika; Stadler, Tanja; Costa, Anna-Maria; Dwyer, Dominic E; Huang, Q Sue; Jennings, Lance C; Rawlinson, William; Sullivan, Sheena G; Hurt, Aeron C; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Wentworth, David E; Smith, Gavin J D; Barr, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    A complex interplay of viral, host, and ecological factors shapes the spatio-temporal incidence and evolution of human influenza viruses. Although considerable attention has been paid to influenza A viruses, a lack of equivalent data means that an integrated evolutionary and epidemiological framework has until now not been available for influenza B viruses, despite their significant disease burden. Through the analysis of over 900 full genomes from an epidemiological collection of more than 26,000 strains from Australia and New Zealand, we reveal fundamental differences in the phylodynamics of the two co-circulating lineages of influenza B virus (Victoria and Yamagata), showing that their individual dynamics are determined by a complex relationship between virus transmission, age of infection, and receptor binding preference. In sum, this work identifies new factors that are important determinants of influenza B evolution and epidemiology. PMID:25594904

  1. The contrasting phylodynamics of human influenza B viruses

    PubMed Central

    Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Holmes, Edward C; Joseph, Udayan; Fourment, Mathieu; Su, Yvonne CF; Halpin, Rebecca; Lee, Raphael TC; Deng, Yi-Mo; Gunalan, Vithiagaran; Lin, Xudong; Stockwell, Timothy B; Fedorova, Nadia B; Zhou, Bin; Spirason, Natalie; Kühnert, Denise; Bošková, Veronika; Stadler, Tanja; Costa, Anna-Maria; Dwyer, Dominic E; Huang, Q Sue; Jennings, Lance C; Rawlinson, William; Sullivan, Sheena G; Hurt, Aeron C; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Wentworth, David E; Smith, Gavin JD; Barr, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    A complex interplay of viral, host, and ecological factors shapes the spatio-temporal incidence and evolution of human influenza viruses. Although considerable attention has been paid to influenza A viruses, a lack of equivalent data means that an integrated evolutionary and epidemiological framework has until now not been available for influenza B viruses, despite their significant disease burden. Through the analysis of over 900 full genomes from an epidemiological collection of more than 26,000 strains from Australia and New Zealand, we reveal fundamental differences in the phylodynamics of the two co-circulating lineages of influenza B virus (Victoria and Yamagata), showing that their individual dynamics are determined by a complex relationship between virus transmission, age of infection, and receptor binding preference. In sum, this work identifies new factors that are important determinants of influenza B evolution and epidemiology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05055.001 PMID:25594904

  2. Conserved and host-specific features of influenza virion architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Edward C; Charles, Philip D; Hester, Svenja S; Thomas, Benjamin; Trudgian, David; Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Fodor, Ervin

    2014-01-01

    Viruses use virions to spread between hosts, and virion composition is therefore the primary determinant of viral transmissibility and immunogenicity. However, the virions of many viruses are complex and pleomorphic, making them difficult to analyse in detail. Here we address this by identifying and quantifying virion proteins with mass spectrometry, producing a complete and quantified model of the hundreds of viral and host-encoded proteins that make up the pleomorphic virions of influenza viruses. We show that a conserved influenza virion architecture is maintained across diverse combinations of virus and host. This ‘core’ architecture, which includes substantial quantities of host proteins as well as the viral protein NS1, is elaborated with abundant host-dependent features. As a result, influenza virions produced by mammalian and avian hosts have distinct protein compositions. Finally we note that influenza virions share an underlying protein composition with exosomes, suggesting that influenza virions form by subverting microvesicle production. PMID:25226414

  3. Homo- and Heterosubtypic Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza Exposure on H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Infection in Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa)

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Taiana P.; Brown, Justin D.; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Stallknecht, David E.; Swayne, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Wild birds in the Orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes are the natural reservoirs for avian influenza (AI) viruses. Although they are often infected with multiple AI viruses, the significance and extent of acquired immunity in these populations is not understood. Pre-existing immunity to AI virus has been shown to modulate the outcome of a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus infection in multiple domestic avian species, but few studies have addressed this effect in wild birds. In this study, the effect of pre-exposure to homosubtypic (homologous hemagglutinin) and heterosubtypic (heterologous hemagglutinin) low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses on the outcome of a H5N1 HPAI virus infection in wood ducks (Aix sponsa) was evaluated. Pre-exposure of wood ducks to different LPAI viruses did not prevent infection with H5N1 HPAI virus, but did increase survival associated with H5N1 HPAI virus infection. The magnitude of this effect on the outcome of the H5N1 HPAI virus infection varied between different LPAI viruses, and was associated both with efficiency of LPAI viral replication in wood ducks and the development of a detectable humoral immune response. These observations suggest that in naturally occurring outbreaks of H5N1 HPAI, birds with pre-existing immunity to homologous hemagglutinin or neuraminidase subtypes of AI virus may either survive H5N1 HPAI virus infection or live longer than naïve birds and, consequently, could pose a greater risk for contributing to viral transmission and dissemination. The mechanisms responsible for this protection and/or the duration of this immunity remain unknown. The results of this study are important for surveillance efforts and help clarify epidemiological data from outbreaks of H5N1 HPAI virus in wild bird populations. PMID:21253608

  4. Novel reassortant influenza viruses between pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and other influenza viruses pose a risk to public health.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weili; Wang, Feibing; Dong, Bin; Ou, Changbo; Meng, Demei; Liu, Jinhua; Fan, Zhen-Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is characterized by eight single-stranded, negative sense RNA segments, which allows for gene reassortment among different IAV subtypes when they co-infect a single host cell simultaneously. Genetic reassortment is an important way to favor the evolution of influenza virus. Novel reassortant virus may pose a pandemic among humans. In history, three human pandemic influenza viruses were caused by genetic reassortment between avian, human and swine influenza viruses. Since 2009, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (pdm/09 H1N1) influenza virus composed of two swine influenza virus genes highlighted the genetic reassortment again. Due to wide host species and high transmission of the pdm/09 H1N1 influenza virus, many different avian, human or swine influenza virus subtypes may reassert with it to generate novel reassortant viruses, which may result in a next pandemic among humans. So, it is necessary to understand the potential threat of current reassortant viruses between the pdm/09 H1N1 and other influenza viruses to public health. This study summarized the status of the reassortant viruses between the pdm/09 H1N1 and other influenza viruses of different species origins in natural and experimental conditions. The aim of this summarization is to facilitate us to further understand the potential threats of novel reassortant influenza viruses to public health and to make effective prevention and control strategies for these pathogens. PMID:26344393

  5. Ferrets develop fatal influenza after inhaling small particle aerosols of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is limited knowledge about the potential routes for H5N1 influenza virus transmission to and between humans, and it is not clear whether humans can be infected through inhalation of aerosolized H5N1 virus particles. Ferrets are often used as a surrogate for humans in influenza pathogenicity a...

  6. Continuing challenges in influenza

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Robert G.; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza is an acute respiratory disease in mammals and domestic poultry that emerges from zoonotic reservoirs in aquatic birds and bats. Although influenza viruses are among the most intensively studied pathogens, existing control options require further improvement. Influenza vaccines must be regularly updated because of continuous antigenic drift and sporadic antigenic shifts in the viral surface glycoproteins. Currently, influenza therapeutics are limited to neuraminidase inhibitors; novel drugs and vaccine approaches are therefore urgently needed. Advances in vaccinology and structural analysis have revealed common antigenic epitopes on hemagglutinins across all influenza viruses and suggest that a universal influenza vaccine is possible. In addition, various immunomodulatory agents and signaling pathway inhibitors are undergoing preclinical development. Continuing challenges in influenza include the emergence of pandemic H1N1 influenza in 2009, human infections with avian H7N9 influenza in 2013, and sporadic human cases of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza. Here, we review the challenges facing influenza scientists and veterinary and human public health officials; we also discuss the exciting possibility of achieving the ultimate goal of controlling influenza’s ability to change its antigenicity. PMID:24891213

  7. [Influenza in heterothermic animals].

    PubMed

    Mancini, Dalva Assunção Portari; Mendonça, Rita Maria Zucatelli; Cianciarullo, Aurora Marques; Kobashi, Leonardo Setsuo; Trindade, Hermínio Gomes; Fernandes, Wilson; Pinto, José Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to study Orthomyxovirus in heterothermic animals. Blood samples from snakes (genus Bothrops and Crotalus) and from toads and frogs (genus Bufo and Rana) were collected to evaluate the red cell receptors and antibodies specific to influenza virus by the hemagglutination and hemagglutination inhibition tests, respectively. Both snakes and toads kept in captivity presented receptors in their red cells and antibodies specific to either influenza virus type A (human and equine origin) or influenza type B. The same was observed with recently captured snakes. Concerning the influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibodies protective levels were observed in the reptiles' serum, against influenza type A and type B. Unlike the toads, 83.3% of the frogs presented mean levels of Ab 40HIU for some influenza strains. It was concluded that heterothermic animals could offer host conditions to the influenza virus and also susceptibility to the infection. PMID:15330057

  8. Research update on avian influenza viruses and H1N1 influenza virus in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) remains an economic threat to commercial poultry throughout the world by negatively impacting animal health and trade. Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory conducts research on many areas related to AI including pathogenesis and transmission studies, use of vaccination, virus ...

  9. Influenza virus reservoirs and intermediate hosts: dogs, horses, and new possibilities for influenza virus exposure of humans.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Colin R; Murcia, Pablo R; Holmes, Edward C

    2015-03-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infections in hosts outside the main aquatic bird reservoirs occur periodically. Although most such cross-species transmission events result in limited onward transmission in the new host, sustained influenza outbreaks have occurred in poultry and in a number of mammalian species, including humans, pigs, horses, seals, and mink. Recently, two distinct strains of IAV have emerged in domestic dogs, with each circulating widely for several years. Here, we briefly outline what is known about the role of intermediate hosts in influenza emergence, summarize our knowledge of the new canine influenza viruses (CIVs) and how they provide key new information on the process of host adaptation, and assess the risk these viruses pose to human populations. PMID:25540375

  10. Influenza Virus Reservoirs and Intermediate Hosts: Dogs, Horses, and New Possibilities for Influenza Virus Exposure of Humans

    PubMed Central

    Murcia, Pablo R.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infections in hosts outside the main aquatic bird reservoirs occur periodically. Although most such cross-species transmission events result in limited onward transmission in the new host, sustained influenza outbreaks have occurred in poultry and in a number of mammalian species, including humans, pigs, horses, seals, and mink. Recently, two distinct strains of IAV have emerged in domestic dogs, with each circulating widely for several years. Here, we briefly outline what is known about the role of intermediate hosts in influenza emergence, summarize our knowledge of the new canine influenza viruses (CIVs) and how they provide key new information on the process of host adaptation, and assess the risk these viruses pose to human populations. PMID:25540375

  11. Influenza Virus Evolution, Host Adaptation and Pandemic Formation

    PubMed Central

    Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Kash, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Newly emerging or `re-emerging' viral diseases continue to pose significant global public health threats. Prototypic are influenza viruses that are major causes of human respiratory infections and mortality. Influenza viruses can cause zoonotic infections and adapt to humans leading to sustained transmission and emergence of novel viruses. Mechanisms by which viruses evolve in one host, cause zoonotic infection and adapt to a new host species remain unelucidated. Here we review evolution of influenza A viruses in their reservoir hosts and discuss genetic changes associated with introduction of novel viruses into humans leading to pandemics and the establishment of seasonal viruses. PMID:20542248

  12. Equine Influenza A(H3N8) Virus Isolated from Bactrian Camel, Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Yondon, Myagmarsukh; Zayat, Batsukh; Nelson, Martha I.; Heil, Gary L.; Anderson, Benjamin D.; Lin, Xudong; Halpin, Rebecca A.; McKenzie, Pamela P.; White, Sarah K.; Wentworth, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Because little is known about the ecology of influenza viruses in camels, 460 nasal swab specimens were collected from healthy (no overt illness) Bactrian camels in Mongolia during 2012. One specimen was positive for influenza A virus (A/camel/Mongolia/335/2012[H3N8]), which is phylogenetically related to equine influenza A(H3N8) viruses and probably represents natural horse-to-camel transmission. PMID:25418532

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates the immune response to influenza virus infection and vaccination in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Nathan W; Weaver, Eric A; May, Shannon M; Croatt, Anthony J; Foreman, Oded; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A; Barry, Michael A; Nath, Karl A; Badley, Andrew D

    2012-07-01

    Underlying mechanisms of individual variation in severity of influenza infection and response to vaccination are poorly understood. We investigated the effect of reduced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression on vaccine response and outcome of influenza infection. HO-1-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice (kingdom, Animalia; phylum, Chordata; genus/species, Mus musculus) were infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 with or without prior vaccination with an adenoviral-based influenza vaccine. A genome-wide association study evaluated the expression of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HO-1 gene and the response to influenza vaccination in healthy humans. HO-1-deficient mice had decreased survival after influenza infection compared to WT mice (median survival 5.5 vs. 6.5 d, P=0.016). HO-1-deficient mice had impaired production of antibody following influenza vaccination compared to WT mice (mean antibody titer 869 vs. 1698, P=0.02). One SNP in HO-1 and one SNP in the constitutively expressed isoform HO-2 were independently associated with decreased antibody production after influenza vaccination in healthy human volunteers (P=0.017 and 0.014, respectively). HO-1 deficient mice were paired with sex- and age-matched WT controls. HO-1 affects the immune response to both influenza infection and vaccination, suggesting that therapeutic induction of HO-1 expression may represent a novel adjuvant to enhance influenza vaccine effectiveness. PMID:22490782

  14. Influenza vaccines for avian species.

    PubMed

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Swayne, David E

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in Southeast Asia in 2003, a multinational epizootic outbreak of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was identified in commercial poultry and wild bird species. This lineage, originally identified in Southern China in 1996 and then Hong Kong in 1997, caused severe morbidity and mortality in many bird species, was responsible for considerable economic losses via trade restrictions, and crossed species barriers (including its recovery from human cases). To date, these H5N1 HPAI viruses have been isolated in European, Middle Eastern, and African countries, and are considered endemic in many areas where regulatory control and different production sectors face substantial hurdles in controlling the spread of this disease. While control of avian influenza (AI) virus infections in wild bird populations may not be feasible at this point, control and eradiation of AI from commercial, semicommercial, zoo, pet, and village/backyard birds will be critical to preventing events that could lead to the emergence of epizootic influenza virus. Efficacious vaccines can help reduce disease, viral shedding, and transmission to susceptible cohorts. However, only when vaccines are used in a comprehensive program including biosecurity, education, culling, diagnostics and surveillance can control and eradication be considered achievable goals. In humans, protection against influenza is provided by vaccines that are chosen based on molecular, epidemiologic, and antigenic data. In poultry and other birds, AI vaccines are produced against a specific hemagglutinin subtype of AI, and use is decided by government and state agricultural authorities based on risk and economic considerations, including the potential for trade restrictions. In the current H5N1 HPAI epizootic, vaccines have been used in a variety of avian species as a part of an overall control program to aid in disease management and control. PMID:19768403

  15. Nasal commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis counteracts influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Kuo, Sherwin; Zhang, Xing-Quan; Schooley, Robert T.; Rohde, Holger; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Several microbes, including Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), a Gram-positive bacterium, live inside the human nasal cavity as commensals. The role of these nasal commensals in host innate immunity is largely unknown, although bacterial interference in the nasal microbiome may promote ecological competition between commensal bacteria and pathogenic species. We demonstrate here that S. epidermidis culture supernatants significantly suppressed the infectivity of various influenza viruses. Using high-performance liquid chromatography together with mass spectrometry, we identified a giant extracellular matrix-binding protein (Embp) as the major component involved in the anti-influenza effect of S. epidermidis. This anti-influenza activity was abrogated when Embp was mutated, confirming that Embp is essential for S. epidermidis activity against viral infection. We also showed that both S. epidermidis bacterial particles and Embp can directly bind to influenza virus. Furthermore, the injection of a recombinant Embp fragment containing a fibronectin-binding domain into embryonated eggs increased the survival rate of virus-infected chicken embryos. For an in vivo challenge study, prior Embp intranasal inoculation in chickens suppressed the viral titres and induced the expression of antiviral cytokines in the nasal tissues. These results suggest that S. epidermidis in the nasal cavity may serve as a defence mechanism against influenza virus infection. PMID:27306590

  16. Reduced experimental infectivity and transmissibility of intercontinental H5 (H5N8 and H5N2) compared to Eurasian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses for chickens, turkeys, and Japanese quail

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus (HPAIV) emerged in 1996 in Guangdong China and has since spread to infect and cause deaths in wild birds, poultry and humans in over 63 countries in Asia, Europe and Africa; and more recently a reassortant H5N8 clade 2.3.4.4 HPAI virus has spread ...

  17. Transmission of H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus to Herring gulls (Larus argentatus) through intranasal inoculation of virus and ingestion of virus-infected chicken meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to evaluate the susceptibility of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) to H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus under natural routes of infection, we exposed gulls to two Asian lineage H5N1 HPAI viruses (A/whooper swan/Mongolia/244/05 and A/duck meat/Anyang/AVL-1/01) via intranasa...

  18. [Recommendations for the management of influenza in pediatrics (2009-2010).

    PubMed

    Marès, J; Rodrigo, C; Moreno-Pérez, D; Cilleruelo, M J; Barrio, F; Buñuel, J C; González, M P; González de Dios, J; Aparicio, M; Arístegui, J; Hernández-Sampelayo, T

    2010-02-01

    Specific action plans from various institutions, governments and scientific societies have been identified and implemented to combat the A H1N1 2009 influenza virus pandemic. This document sets out the recommendations of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics for the management of influenza in children for influenza season 2009-2010. The risk factors for influenza A H1N1 2009 in pediatric patients, the clinical course, severity and complications are similar to seasonal influenza. In most cases, the diagnosis of influenza will be based on clinical suspicion, without viral subtype differentiation. In a patient with influenza virus infection, the criteria for referral and hospital admission will be based broadly on the signs of clinical severity or complications, regardless of the causative virus. Children with influenza but with no signs of clinical severity or complications do not require antiviral treatment. Physical measures of hygiene and isolation are essential to reduce the transmissibility of the disease. The influenza vaccines in infancy, for both seasonal influenza and for influenza A H1N1 2009, should be directed primarily at patients with risk factors. PMID:20133214

  19. Social Determinants of Influenza Illness and Outbreaks in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cordoba, Evette; Aiello, Allison E

    2016-01-01

    Social determinants-such as education, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, access to health care services and vaccination, neighborhood-level stressors, and workplace or school policies-can impact influenza illness and outbreaks in the United States. To reduce transmission and disparities in influenza infection, policies should focus on removing existing vaccination barriers and supporting equitable social policies. PMID:27621346

  20. Susceptibility of avian species to north american H13 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gulls are widely recognized reservoirs for low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses; however, the subtypes maintained in these populations and/or the transmission mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Although, a wide diversity of influenza viruses have been isolated from gulls, two hemag...

  1. Comparative susceptibility of avian species to low pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H13 subtype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gulls are widely recognized reservoirs for low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses; however, the subtypes maintained in these populations and/or the transmission mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Although, a wide diversity of influenza viruses have been isolated from gulls, two hemag...

  2. Domestic pigs have low susceptibility to H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Genetic reassortment of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAI) with currently circulating human influenza A strains is one possibility that could lead to efficient human-to-human transmissibility. Domestic pigs which are susceptible to infection with both human and avian ...

  3. Sickness Absenteeism Rate in Iranian Schools during the 2009 Epidemic of Type a Influenza

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pourabbasi, Ata; Shirvani, Mahbubeh Ebrahimnegad; Khashayar, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Influenza pandemic was a global event in 2009 and intraschool transmission was its main spread method. The present study was designed to evaluate the absenteeism rate during the type A influenza epidemic. Four hundred and eight students from both a guidance school and high school in the Iranian capital were recruited in this retrospective study.…

  4. Low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses infect chicken layers by different routes of inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to develop better control measures against avian influenza (AI) it’s necessary to understand how the virus transmits in poultry. In a previous study in which the infectivity and transmissibility of the pandemic H1N1influenza virus was examined in different poultry species, we found that no ...

  5. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Humans Key Facts about Human Infections with Variant Viruses Interim Guidance for Clinicians on Human Infections Background, Risk Assessment & Reporting Reported Infections with Variant Influenza Viruses in the United States since 2005 Prevention Treatment ...

  6. Partner testing, linkage to care, and HIV-free survival in a program to prevent parent-to-child transmission of HIV in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Carmone, Andy; Bomai, Korai; Bongi, Wayaki; Frank, Tarua Dale; Dalepa, Huleve; Loifa, Betty; Kiromat, Mobumo; Das, Sarthak; Franke, Molly F.

    2014-01-01

    Background To eliminate new pediatric HIV infections, interventions that facilitate adherence, including those that minimize stigma, enhance social support, and mitigate the influence of poverty, will likely be required in addition to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined the relationship between partner testing and infant outcome in a prevention of parent-to-child transmission of HIV program, which included a family-centered case management approach and a supportive environment for partner disclosure and testing. Design We analyzed routinely collected data for women and infants who enrolled in the parent-to-child transmission of HIV program at Goroka Family Clinic, Eastern Highlands Provincial Hospital, Papua New Guinea, from 2007 through 2011. Results Two hundred and sixty five women were included for analysis. Of these, 226 (85%) had a partner, 127 (56%) of whom had a documented HIV test. Of the 102 HIV-infected partners, 81 (79%) had been linked to care. In adjusted analyses, we found a significantly higher risk of infant death, infant HIV infection, or loss to follow-up among mother–infant pairs in which the mother reported having no partner or a partner who was not tested or had an unknown testing status. In a second multivariable analysis, infants born to women with more time on ART or who enrolled in the program in later years experienced greater HIV-free survival. Conclusions In a program with a patient-oriented and family-centered approach to prevent vertical HIV transmission, the majority of women's partners had a documented HIV test and, if positive, linkage to care. Having a tested partner was associated with program retention and HIV-free survival for infants. Programs aiming to facilitate diagnosis disclosure, partner testing, and linkage to care may contribute importantly to the elimination of pediatric HIV. PMID:25172429

  7. Recent zoonoses caused by influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Alexander, D J; Brown, I H

    2000-04-01

    result of the segmented genome of the virus) of avian and human influenza A viruses infecting the same host direct transfer of whole virus from another species the re-emergence of a virus which may have caused an epidemic many years earlier. Since 1996, the viruses H7N7, H5N1 and H9N2 have been transmitted from birds to humans but have apparently failed to spread in the human population. Such incidents are rare, but transmission between humans and other animals has also been demonstrated. This has led to the suggestion that the proposed reassortment of human and avian viruses occurs in an intermediate animal with subsequent transference to the human population. Pigs have been considered the leading contender for the role of intermediary because these animals may serve as hosts for productive infections of both avian and human viruses and, in addition, the evidence strongly suggests that pigs have been involved in interspecies transmission of influenza viruses, particularly the spread of H1N1 viruses to humans. Global surveillance of influenza is maintained by a network of laboratories sponsored by the World Health Organization. The main control measure for influenza in human populations is immunoprophylaxis, aimed at the epidemics occurring between pandemics. PMID:11189716

  8. Effectiveness of influenza vaccination of schoolchildren in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Gattás, Vera L; Cardoso, Maria Regina A; Mondini, Gabriela; Machado, Clarisse M; Luna, Expedito J A

    2015-01-01

    Background Children play an important role in maintaining the transmission of influenza. Evidence suggests that vaccination of school-age children can reduce transmission to unvaccinated household contacts. We evaluated the direct and indirect effectiveness of the 2009 inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine in vaccinated schoolchildren and their unvaccinated household contacts. Methods This was a double-blind cluster randomized trial involving 10 schools and 1742 schoolchildren as well as 5406 household contacts. The schools were randomly assigned to receive the influenza vaccine or the control vaccine. After vaccination, the schoolchildren and household contacts were followed for 6 months to identify cases of acute respiratory infection (ARI). Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed for the diagnosis of influenza. Results A total of 632 ARI cases were detected. Of those, 103 tested positive for influenza virus (influenza virus A[H1N1]pdm09 virus in 55 and seasonal influenza viruses in 48). The effectiveness of the vaccine in protecting against seasonal influenza virus infection was 65·0% for the household contacts (95% CI, 19·6–84·3) and 65·0% for the schoolchildren (95% CI, 20·9–84·5). Conclusion Vaccination of schoolchildren significantly protected them and their household contacts against seasonal influenza. PMID:26018131

  9. Update: Influenza Activity - United States.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sophie; Blanton, Lenee; Kniss, Krista; Mustaquim, Desiree; Steffens, Craig; Reed, Carrie; Bramley, Anna; Flannery, Brendan; Fry, Alicia M; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Bresee, Joseph; Wallis, Teresa; Garten, Rebecca; Xu, Xiyan; Elal, Anwar Isa Abd; Gubareva, Larisa; Barnes, John; Wentworth, David E; Burns, Erin; Katz, Jacqueline; Jernigan, Daniel; Brammer, Lynnette

    2015-12-11

    CDC collects, compiles, and analyzes data on influenza activity year-round in the United States. The influenza season generally begins in the fall and continues through the winter and spring months; however, the timing and severity of circulating influenza viruses can vary by geographic location and season. Influenza activity in the United States remained low through October and November in 2015. Influenza A viruses have been most frequently identified, with influenza A (H3) viruses predominating. This report summarizes U.S. influenza activity for the period October 4-November 28, 2015. PMID:26656182

  10. CDC Pregnancy Flu Line: monitoring severe illness among pregnant women with influenza

    PubMed Central

    Ailes, Elizabeth C.; Newsome, Kimberly; Williams, Jennifer L.; McIntyre, Anne F.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Finelli, Lyn; Honein, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention implemented the Pregnancy Flu Line during the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (pH1N1) pandemic and continued operation through the 2010–11 influenza season to collect reports of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and deaths among pregnant women with influenza. The system documented the severe impact of influenza on pregnant women during both seasons with 181 ICU/survivals and 37 deaths reported during the 2009 fall pandemic wave and 69 ICU/survivals and 10 deaths reported in the subsequent influenza season (2010–11). A health department survey suggests PFL participants perceived public health benefits and minimum time burdens. PMID:24368408

  11. CDC Pregnancy Flu Line: monitoring severe illness among pregnant women with influenza.

    PubMed

    Ailes, Elizabeth C; Newsome, Kimberly; Williams, Jennifer L; McIntyre, Anne F; Jamieson, Denise J; Finelli, Lyn; Honein, Margaret A

    2014-09-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention implemented the Pregnancy Flu Line (PFL) during the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (pH1N1) pandemic and continued operation through the 2010-2011 influenza season to collect reports of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and deaths among pregnant women with influenza. The system documented the severe impact of influenza on pregnant women during both seasons with 181 ICU/survivals and 37 deaths reported during the 2009 fall pandemic wave and 69 ICU/survivals and ten deaths reported in the subsequent influenza season (2010-2011). A health department survey suggests PFL participants perceived public health benefits and minimum time burdens. PMID:24368408

  12. INFLUENZA VIRUS IN POULTRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is normally found in wild birds, particularly in ducks and shorebirds, where it does not cause any perceptible clinical disease. However, poultry, including chickens and turkeys, are not normal hosts for avian influenza, but if the virus is introduced it can result in mi...

  13. Influenza A virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A viruses are important veterinary and human health pathogens around the world. Avian influenza (AI) virus in poultry is unusual in that it can cause a range of disease symptoms from a subclinical infection to being highly virulent with 100% mortality. The difference between low pathogen...

  14. Seasonal Influenza: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Christina; Freedman, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. It also has major social and economic consequences in the form of high rates of absenteeism from school and work as well as significant treatment and hospitalization costs. In fact, annual influenza epidemics and the resulting deaths and lost days of productivity…

  15. Influenza vaccination during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    In a randomised, double-blind trial in pregnant women, a seasonal inactivated influenza vaccine without a lipid adjuvant and covering strain A/H1N1v was partially effective: the incidence of influenza in the mothers and their infants was about 1.8% with the vaccine versus 3.6% with placebo. No noteworthy adverse reactions were reported. PMID:27042735

  16. Haemophilus Influenzae Type b

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Haemophilus Influenzae type b Page Content Article Body If you’re like many parents, you may have been unfamiliar with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infections until your pediatrician recommended a vaccine ...

  17. Swine Influenza Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On April 24, 2009, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) confirmed an influenza epidemic was occurring in people and the genetic lineage was most closely related to influenza viruses known to be circulating in swine. The outbreak epicenter appeared to be in central Mexico and the virus spread to th...

  18. Influenza Virus Aerosols in the Air and Their Infectiousness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Influenza is one of the most contagious and rapidly spreading infectious diseases and an important global cause of hospital admissions and mortality. There are some amounts of the virus in the air constantly. These amounts is generally not enough to cause disease in people, due to infection prevention by healthy immune systems. However, at a higher concentration of the airborne virus, the risk of human infection increases dramatically. Early detection of the threshold virus concentration is essential for prevention of the spread of influenza infection. This review discusses different approaches for measuring the amount of influenza A virus particles in the air and assessing their infectiousness. Here we also discuss the data describing the relationship between the influenza virus subtypes and virus air transmission, and distribution of viral particles in aerosol drops of different sizes. PMID:25197278

  19. Investigating Influenza A Virus Infection: Tools To Track Infection and Limit Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Fiege, Jessica K.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses display a broad cellular tropism within the respiratory tracts of mammalian hosts. Uncovering the relationship between tropism and virus immunity, pathogenesis, and transmission will be critical for the development of therapeutic interventions. Here we discuss recent developments of several recombinant strains of influenza A virus. These viruses have inserted reporters to track tropism, microRNA target sites to restrict tropism, or barcodes to assess transmission dynamics, expanding our understanding of pathogen-host interactions. PMID:25855737

  20. Early Indicators of Disease in Ferrets Infected with a High Dose of Avian Influenza H5N1

    PubMed Central

    Long, James P.; Vela, Eric M.; Stark, Gregory V.; Jones, Kelly J.; Miller, Stephen T.; Bigger, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses are widespread in birds, contagious in humans, and are categorized as low pathogenicity avian influenza or highly pathogenic avian influenza. Ferrets are susceptible to infection with avian and human influenza A and B viruses and have been widely used as a model to study pathogenicity and vaccine efficacy. In this report, the natural history of the H5N1 influenza virus A/Vietnam/1203/04 influenza infection in ferrets was examined to determine clinical and laboratory parameters that may indicate (1) the onset of disease and (2) survival. In all, twenty of 24 animals infected with 7 × 105 TCID50 of A/Vietnam/1203/04 succumbed. A statistical analysis identified a combination of parameters including weight loss, nasal wash TCID50, eosinophils, and liver enzymes such as alanine amino transferase that might possibly serve as indicators of both disease onset and challenge survival. PMID:23240077

  1. Reverse zoonosis of influenza to swine: new perspectives on the human-animal interface.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Vincent, Amy L

    2015-03-01

    The origins of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in swine are unknown, highlighting gaps in our understanding of influenza A virus (IAV) ecology and evolution. We review how recently strengthened influenza virus surveillance in pigs has revealed that influenza virus transmission from humans to swine is far more frequent than swine-to-human zoonosis, and is central in seeding swine globally with new viral diversity. The scale of global human-to-swine transmission represents the largest 'reverse zoonosis' of a pathogen documented to date. Overcoming the bias towards perceiving swine as sources of human viruses, rather than recipients, is key to understanding how the bidirectional nature of the human-animal interface produces influenza threats to both hosts. PMID:25564096

  2. Reverse zoonosis of influenza to swine: new perspectives on the human-animal interface

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha I.; Vincent, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    The origins of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic of 2009 in swine are unknown, highlighting gaps in our understanding of influenza A virus ecology and evolution. Here we review how recently strengthened influenza virus surveillance in pigs has revealed that influenza virus transmission from humans to swine is far more frequent than swine-to-human zoonosis, and is central in seeding swine globally with new viral diversity. The scale of global human-to-swine transmission represents the largest ‘reverse zoonosis’ of a pathogen documented to date. Overcoming the bias towards perceiving swine as sources of human viruses, rather than recipients, is key to understanding how the bidirectional nature of the human-animal interface produces influenza threats to both hosts. PMID:25564096

  3. Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus in households with young children

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Ville; Teros‐Jaakkola, Tamara; Rulli, Maris; Toivonen, Laura; Broberg, Eeva; Waris, Matti; Mertsola, Jussi

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Peltola et al. (2011) Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus in households with young children. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), e21–e24. Abstract Background  Influenza viruses may cause a severe infection in infants and young children. The transmission patterns of pandemic 2009 influenza A (H1N1) within households with young children are poorly characterized. Methods  Household members of six children younger than 1·5 years with documented 2009 influenza A (H1N1) infection were studied by daily symptom diaries and serial parent‐collected nasal swab samples for detection of influenza A by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT‐PCR) assay. Results  Laboratory‐confirmed, symptomatic influenza was documented in 11 of 15 household contacts of young children with pandemic influenza (73%; 95% CI, 48–99). In five contact cases symptoms started earlier, in three cases on the same day, and in three cases after the onset of symptoms in the youngest child. The first case with influenza A (H1N1) within the household was an elder sibling in two households, father in two households, the youngest child in one household, and the youngest child at the same time with a sibling in one household. The median copy number of influenza virus was higher in children than in adults (4·2 × 107 versus 4·9 × 104, P = 0·02). Conclusions  This study demonstrates the feasibility of nasal swab sampling by parents in investigation of household transmission of influenza. The results support influenza vaccination of all household contacts of young children. PMID:21951638

  4. Imperfection works: Survival, transmission and persistence in the system of Heliothis virescens ascovirus 3h (HvAV-3h), Microplitis similis and Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shun-Ji; Hopkins, Richard J.; Zhao, Yi-Pei; Zhang, Yun-Xuan; Hu, Jue; Chen, Xu-Yang; Xu, Zhi; Huang, Guo-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ascoviruses are insect-specific large DNA viruses that mainly infect noctuid larvae, and are transmitted by parasitoids in the fields. Heliothis virescens ascovirus 3h (HvAV-3h) has been recently isolated from Spodoptera exigua, without parasitoid vector identified previously. Here we report that Microplitis similis, a solitary endoparasitoid wasp, could transmit HvAV-3h between S. exigua larvae in the laboratory. When the female parasitoid wasp acquired the virus and served as a vector, the period of virion viability on the ovipositor was 4.1 ± 1.4 days. Infected host larvae were still acceptable for egg laying by parasitoids, and the parasitoids thereafter transmitted virus to healthy hosts. Virus acquisition occurred only from donor hosts between 3 and 9 days post infection. The peak of virus acquisition (80.9 ± 6.3%) was found when M. similis wasps oviposited in larvae that had been inoculated with the virus 7 days previously. When virus infection of the host took place during the life cycle of the parasitoid wasp, it caused 1- to 4-day-old immature parasitoids death in the host, whilst a small proportion of 5- to 6-day-old and the majority of 7-day-old parasitoids larvae survived from the virus-infected hosts. Viral contamination did not reduce the life span or fecundity of female M. similis. PMID:26878829

  5. Imperfection works: Survival, transmission and persistence in the system of Heliothis virescens ascovirus 3h (HvAV-3h), Microplitis similis and Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Ji; Hopkins, Richard J; Zhao, Yi-Pei; Zhang, Yun-Xuan; Hu, Jue; Chen, Xu-Yang; Xu, Zhi; Huang, Guo-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ascoviruses are insect-specific large DNA viruses that mainly infect noctuid larvae, and are transmitted by parasitoids in the fields. Heliothis virescens ascovirus 3h (HvAV-3h) has been recently isolated from Spodoptera exigua, without parasitoid vector identified previously. Here we report that Microplitis similis, a solitary endoparasitoid wasp, could transmit HvAV-3h between S. exigua larvae in the laboratory. When the female parasitoid wasp acquired the virus and served as a vector, the period of virion viability on the ovipositor was 4.1 ± 1.4 days. Infected host larvae were still acceptable for egg laying by parasitoids, and the parasitoids thereafter transmitted virus to healthy hosts. Virus acquisition occurred only from donor hosts between 3 and 9 days post infection. The peak of virus acquisition (80.9 ± 6.3%) was found when M. similis wasps oviposited in larvae that had been inoculated with the virus 7 days previously. When virus infection of the host took place during the life cycle of the parasitoid wasp, it caused 1- to 4-day-old immature parasitoids death in the host, whilst a small proportion of 5- to 6-day-old and the majority of 7-day-old parasitoids larvae survived from the virus-infected hosts. Viral contamination did not reduce the life span or fecundity of female M. similis. PMID:26878829

  6. [Effect of Deletion of the Carboxyl Terminal of the NS1 Protein on Pathogenicity of the Influenza B Virus].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Yu, Zhijun; Sun, Weiyang; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Tiecheng; Yang, Songtao; Huang, Geng; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu; Zhang, Xuemei

    2015-07-01

    To analyze the molecular basis of the variation of the pathogenicity of the influenza B virus, we rescued a recombinant virus with a deletion in the carboxyl terminal of the NS1 protein using reverse genetics based on the parental virus B-S9 of B/Yamagata/16/88. A mutant strain with a deletion of 171 amino acids in the carboxyl terminal of the NS1 protein was named "B-L5". BALB/c mice were inoculated with 3 X 105 EID50 of B-L5 and the parental virus B-S9, respectively. Then, weight changes, survival, and viral titers were documented. During 3 days post-inoculation (dpi) to 7 dpi, the weight of mice infected with B-S9 decreased. However, the weight of mice infected with B-L5 showed weight decreases only at 2 dpi, and quickly recovered at 3 dpi. B-S9 and B-L5 could replicate in the lungs of BALB/c mice. However, viral titers in the lungs of mice infected with B-L5 were 7900-times lower than those of mice infected with B-S9 at 3 dpi. Viral titers in the lungs of mice infected with B-L5 were not detected at 6 dpi. These results showed that, compared with the parent virus B-S9, the mutant virus B-L5 showed lower pathogenicity in BALB/c mice. Our study suggests that deletion of the carboxyl terminal of the NS1 protein decreases the pathogenicity of the influenza B virus. Establishment of a reverse-genetics system for the B influenza virus will provide a platform for studying its pathogenesis, and mechanism of transmission, and for developing live-attenuated influenza B virus vaccines. PMID:26524913

  7. Stability of influenza vaccine coated onto microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyo-Jick; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Bondy, Brian J.; Quan, Fu-Shi; Compans, Richard W.; Kang, Sang-Moo; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    A microneedle patch coated with vaccine simplifies vaccination by using a patch-based delivery method and targets vaccination to the skin for superior immunogenicity compared to intramuscular injection. Previous studies of microneedles have demonstrated effective vaccination using freshly prepared microneedles, but the issue of long-term vaccine stability has received only limited attention. Here, we studied the long-term stability of microneedles coated with whole inactivated influenza vaccine guided by the hypothesis that crystallization and phase separation of the microneedle coating matrix damages influenza vaccine coated onto microneedles. In vitro showed that the vaccine lost stability as measured by hemagglutination activity in proportion to the degree of coating matrix crystallization and phase separation. Transmission electron microscopy similarly showed damaged morphology of the inactivated virus vaccine associated with crystallization. In vivo assessment of immune response and protective efficacy in mice further showed reduced vaccine immunogenicity after influenza vaccination using microneedles with crystallized or phase-separated coatings. This work shows that crystallization and phase separation of the dried coating matrix are important factors affecting long-term stability of influenza vaccine-coated microneedles. PMID:22361098

  8. Zanamivir in the treatment of influenza.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Douglas M

    2003-05-01

    Influenza is a common illness, affecting many people every winter, with a considerable impact on mortality, hospital admissions, healthcare utilisation and sickness absence from work and school. Influenza management is currently focused on annual vaccinations for those in certain risk groups. Risk is determined by age and chronic illness, particularly diabetes, chronic respiratory and cardiac disease, and persons immunocompromised from disease or concomitant therapy. Amantadine (and in some countries, rimantadine is available but has not been widely used, because it is only effective against influenza A infections. The use of amantadines for treatment has been associated with the rapid emergence of resistant viruses capable of transmission, compromising its potential as a prophylactic, as well as a treatment. Side effects are well recognised and are a particular problem in the most vulnerable elderly populations, where dose restriction is necessary and prior knowledge of creatinine clearance desirable. The potential market for a new influenza treatment is large and the potential role of neuraminidase inhibitors in addressing this market has been covered in several review articles [1-4]. This review reports on the introduction of zanamivir (Relenza) to the market with particular reference to experience in the UK. PMID:12740002

  9. Intranasal vaccination with a plant-derived H5 HA vaccine protects mice and ferrets against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Major, Diane; Chichester, Jessica A; Pathirana, Rishi D; Guilfoyle, Kate; Shoji, Yoko; Guzman, Carlos A; Yusibov, Vidadi; Cox, Rebecca J

    2015-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 infection remains a public health threat and vaccination is the best measure of limiting the impact of a potential pandemic. Mucosal vaccines have the advantage of eliciting immune responses at the site of viral entry, thereby preventing infection as well as further viral transmission. In this study, we assessed the protective efficacy of hemagglutinin (HA) from the A/Indonesia/05/05 (H5N1) strain of influenza virus that was produced by transient expression in plants. The plant-derived vaccine, in combination with the mucosal adjuvant (3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanylic acid (c-di-GMP) was used for intranasal immunization of mice and ferrets, before challenge with a lethal dose of the A/Indonesia/05/05 (H5N1) virus. Mice vaccinated with 15 μg or 5 μg of adjuvanted HA survived the viral challenge, while all control mice died within 10 d of challenge. Vaccinated animals elicited serum hemagglutination inhibition, IgG and IgA antibody titers. In the ferret challenge study, all animals vaccinated with the adjuvanted plant vaccine survived the lethal viral challenge, while 50% of the control animals died. In both the mouse and ferret models, the vaccinated animals were better protected from weight loss and body temperature changes associated with H5N1 infection compared with the non-vaccinated controls. Furthermore, the systemic spread of the virus was lower in the vaccinated animals compared with the controls. Results presented here suggest that the plant-produced HA-based influenza vaccine adjuvanted with c-di-GMP is a promising vaccine/adjuvant combination for the development of new mucosal influenza vaccines. PMID:25714901

  10. The epidemiological impact of childhood influenza vaccination using live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) in Germany: predictions of a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Routine annual influenza vaccination is primarily recommended for all persons aged 60 and above and for people with underlying chronic conditions in Germany. Other countries have already adopted additional childhood influenza immunisation programmes. The objective of this study is to determine the potential epidemiological impact of implementing paediatric influenza vaccination using intranasally administered live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) in Germany. Methods A deterministic age-structured model is used to simulate the population-level impact of different vaccination strategies on the transmission dynamics of seasonal influenza in Germany. In our base-case analysis, we estimate the effects of adding a LAIV-based immunisation programme targeting children 2 to 17 years of age to the existing influenza vaccination policy. The data used in the model is based on published evidence complemented by expert opinion. Results In our model, additional vaccination of children 2 to 17 years of age with LAIV leads to the prevention of 23.9 million influenza infections and nearly 16 million symptomatic influenza cases within 10 years. This reduction in burden of disease is not restricted to children. About one third of all adult cases can indirectly be prevented by LAIV immunisation of children. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that vaccinating children 2–17 years of age is likely associated with a significant reduction in the burden of paediatric influenza. Furthermore, annual routine childhood vaccination against seasonal influenza is expected to decrease the incidence of influenza among adults and older people due to indirect effects of herd protection. In summary, our model provides data supporting the introduction of a paediatric influenza immunisation programme in Germany. PMID:24450996

  11. Cross-Reactive, Cell-Mediated Immunity and Protection of Chickens from Lethal H5N1 Influenza Virus Infection in Hong Kong Poultry Markets

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sang Heui; Webster, Robert G.

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, avian H5N1 influenza virus transmitted from chickens to humans resulted in 18 confirmed infections. Despite harboring lethal H5N1 influenza viruses, most chickens in the Hong Kong poultry markets showed no disease signs. At this time, H9N2 influenza viruses were cocirculating in the markets. We investigated the role of H9N2 influenza viruses in protecting chickens from lethal H5N1 influenza virus infections. Sera from chickens infected with an H9N2 influenza virus did not cross-react with an H5N1 influenza virus in neutralization or hemagglutination inhibition assays. Most chickens primed with an H9N2 influenza virus 3 to 70 days earlier survived the lethal challenge of an H5N1 influenza virus, but infected birds shed H5N1 influenza virus in their feces. Adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes or CD8+ T cells from inbred chickens (B2/B2) infected with an H9N2 influenza virus to naive inbred chickens (B2/B2) protected them from lethal H5N1 influenza virus. In vitro cytotoxicity assays showed that T lymphocytes or CD8+ T cells from chickens infected with an H9N2 influenza virus recognized target cells infected with either an H5N1 or H9N2 influenza virus in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings indicate that cross-reactive cellular immunity induced by H9N2 influenza viruses protected chickens from lethal infection with H5N1 influenza viruses in the Hong Kong markets in 1997 but permitted virus shedding in the feces. Our findings are the first to suggest that cross-reactive cellular immunity can change the outcome of avian influenza virus infection in birds in live markets and create a situation for the perpetuation of H5N1 influenza viruses. PMID:11222674

  12. Evaluating the Impact of Zimbabwe’s Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission Program: Population-Level Estimates of HIV-Free Infant Survival Pre-Option A

    PubMed Central

    Buzdugan, Raluca; McCoy, Sandra I.; Watadzaushe, Constancia; Kang Dufour, Mi-Suk; Petersen, Maya; Dirawo, Jeffrey; Mushavi, Angela; Mujuru, Hilda Angela; Mahomva, Agnes; Musarandega, Reuben; Hakobyan, Anna; Mugurungi, Owen; Cowan, Frances M.; Padian, Nancy S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We estimated HIV-free infant survival and mother-to-child HIV transmission (MTCT) rates in Zimbabwe, some of the first community-based estimates from a UNAIDS priority country. Methods In 2012 we surveyed mother-infant pairs residing in the catchment areas of 157 health facilities randomly selected from 5 of 10 provinces in Zimbabwe. Enrolled infants were born 9–18 months before the survey. We collected questionnaires, blood samples for HIV testing, and verbal autopsies for deceased mothers/infants. Estimates were assessed among i) all HIV-exposed infants, as part of an impact evaluation of Option A of the 2010 WHO guidelines (rolled out in Zimbabwe in 2011), and ii) the subgroup of infants unexposed to Option A. We compared province-level MTCT rates measured among women in the community with MTCT rates measured using program monitoring data from facilities serving those communities. Findings Among 8568 women with known HIV serostatus, 1107 (12.9%) were HIV-infected. Among all HIV-exposed infants, HIV-free infant survival was 90.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 88.7–92.7) and MTCT was 8.8% (95% CI: 6.9–11.1). Sixty-six percent of HIV-exposed infants were still breastfeeding. Among the 762 infants born before Option A was implemented, 90.5% (95% CI: 88.1–92.5) were alive and HIV-uninfected at 9–18 months of age, and 9.1% (95%CI: 7.1–11.7) were HIV-infected. In four provinces, the community-based MTCT rate was higher than the facility-based MTCT rate. In Harare, the community and facility-based rates were 6.0% and 9.1%, respectively. Conclusion By 2012 Zimbabwe had made substantial progress towards the elimination of MTCT. Our HIV-free infant survival and MTCT estimates capture HIV transmissions during pregnancy, delivery and breastfeeding regardless of whether or not mothers accessed health services. These estimates also provide a baseline against which to measure the impact of Option A guidelines (and subsequently Option B+). PMID:26248197

  13. Factor V Leiden mutation does not affect coagulopathy or outcome in lethal H1N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Schouten, M; van der Sluijs, K F; Roelofs, J J T H; Levi, M; Van't Veer, C; van der Poll, T

    2010-12-01

    Influenza A is a major cause of mortality. Knowledge on coagulation activation in influenza infection is limited. The factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation is possibly subject to positive selection pressure. It is unknown whether this mutation impacts on the outcome of severe influenza. In the present study, the effect of lethal influenza on pulmonary and systemic coagulation activation and whether or not FVL mutation alters coagulation activation in and the course of lethal influenza, was determined. Wild-type mice, and mice heterozygous or homozygous for FVL were infected intranasally with a lethal dose of H1N1 (haemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1) influenza A. Mice were sacrificed after 48 or 96 h for determination of coagulation activation, histopathology, pulmonary inflammatory parameters and viral load, or were observed in a survival study. Extensive local and systemic coagulation activation during lethal influenza was demonstrated by increased lung and plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes and fibrin degradation products, and by pulmonary fibrin deposition. FVL mutation did not influence the procoagulant response, lung histopathology or survival. FVL mice demonstrated elevated viral loads 48 h after infection. In conclusion, coagulation is activated locally and systemically during lethal murine influenza A infection. The FVL mutation does not influence coagulation activation, lung inflammation or survival in lethal influenza A. PMID:20413539

  14. [Influenza infection and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Anselem, Olivia; Floret, Daniel; Tsatsaris, Vassilis; Goffinet, François; Launay, Odile

    2013-11-01

    Pregnant woman have an increased risk of respiratory complications and hospitalization related to influenza. The flu, like any systemic infection, may also be responsible for uterine contractions constituting a threat of miscarriage or premature labor according to gestational age at which it occurs. There is no specific recommendation regarding the management of influenza-like illness in pregnant women, but a nasopharyngeal sample can be performed in the presence of respiratory or general symptoms occurring during an epidemic to search influenza and establish if a specific treatment with oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®)). Surveillance in hospital or intensive care unit may be necessary. Vaccination against influenza provides a satisfactory immunity in pregnant women and reduces the risk of respiratory complications. Transplacental passage of maternal antibody protects newborns who are more likely to have severe influenza infection and because the vaccine cannot be administered before the age of 6 months. The available data show good tolerance influenza vaccination performed during pregnancy. Since 2012, vaccination against seasonal influenza is recommended for pregnant women, whatever the stage of pregnancy at the time of the vaccination campaign. PMID:23683385

  15. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection. PMID:27486731

  16. Epidemiology and control of influenza.

    PubMed

    Rao, B L

    2003-01-01

    Influenza causes frequent epidemics and periodic pandemics, and is a major public health problem. Pandemics occurred in 1918 (swine influenza), 1957 (Asian influenza), 1968 (Hong Kong influenza) and 1977 (Russian influenza) due to major antigenic variation of the type A influenza virus. Frequent epidemics occur after pandemics as a result of minor antigenic variation of the pandemic virus strains. Minor antigenic variant strains of type A (H1N1), A (H3N2) and type B influenza viruses are currently circulating globally, causing frequent epidemics. The World Health Organization (WHO) has established a network of National Influenza Centres all over the world to study the epidemiology and ecology of influenza, and collaborating centres for updating the influenza vaccines and other research activities. As a part of this programme, it has set up the WHO Flunet for disseminating updates on the global influenza situation, current vaccines and antiviral drugs. Some National Influenza Centres in India have investigated and reported pandemics and epidemics caused by global influenza virus strains during the past 50 years. There is a need to expand influenza surveillance in our country, as only a few centres are conducting these studies. PMID:12929857

  17. New treatments for influenza

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Influenza has a long history of causing morbidity and mortality in the human population through routine seasonal spread and global pandemics. The high mutation rate of the RNA genome of the influenza virus, combined with assortment of its multiple genomic segments, promote antigenic diversity and new subtypes, allowing the virus to evade vaccines and become resistant to antiviral drugs. There is thus a continuing need for new anti-influenza therapy using novel targets and creative strategies. In this review, we summarize prospective future therapeutic regimens based on recent molecular and genomic discoveries. PMID:22973873

  18. Optimal strategies of social distancing and vaccination against seasonal influenza.

    PubMed

    Shim, Eunha

    2013-01-01

    Optimal control strategies for controlling seasonal influenza transmission in the US are of high interest, because of the significant epidemiological and economic burden of influenza. To evaluate optimal strategies of vaccination and social distancing, we used an age-structured dynamic model of seasonal influenza. We applied optimal control theory to identify the best way of reducing morbidity and mortality at a minimal cost. In combination with the Pontryagins maximum principle, we calculated time-dependent optimal policies of vaccination and social distancing to minimize the epidemiological and economic burden associated with seasonal influenza. We computed optimal age-specific intervention strategies and analyze them under various costs of interventions and disease transmissibility. Our results show that combined strategies have a stronger impact on the reduction of the final epidemic size. Our results also suggest that the optimal vaccination can be achieved by allocating most vaccines to preschool-age children (age under five) followed by young adults (age 20-39) and school age children (age 6-19). We find that the optimal vaccination rates for all age groups are highest at the beginning of the outbreak, requiring intense effort at the early phase of an epidemic. On the other hand, optimal social distancing of clinical cases tends to last the entire duration of an outbreak, and its intensity is relatively equal for all age groups. Furthermore, with higher transmissibility of the influenza virus (i.e. higher R0), the optimal control strategy needs to include more efforts to increase vaccination rates rather than efforts to encourage social distancing. Taken together, public health agencies need to consider both the transmissibility of the virus and ways to encourage early vaccination as well as voluntary social distancing of symptomatic cases in order to determine optimal intervention strategies against seasonal influenza. PMID:24245639

  19. Avian Influenza A Viruses: Evolution and Zoonotic Infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Mi; Kim, Young-Il; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Choi, Young Ki

    2016-08-01

    Although efficient human-to-human transmission of avian influenza virus has yet to be seen, in the past two decades avian-to-human transmission of influenza A viruses has been reported. Influenza A/H5N1, in particular, has repeatedly caused human infections associated with high mortality, and since 1998 the virus has evolved into many clades of variants with significant antigenic diversity. In 2013, three (A/H7N9, A/H6N1, and A/H10N8) novel avian influenza viruses (AIVs) breached the animal-human host species barrier in Asia. In humans, roughly 35% of A/H7N9-infected patients succumbed to the zoonotic infection, and two of three A/H10N8 human infections were also lethal; however, neither of these viruses cause influenza-like symptoms in poultry. While most of these cases were associated with direct contact with infected poultry, some involved sustained human-to-human transmission. Thus, these events elicited concern regarding potential AIV pandemics. This article reviews the human incursions associated with AIV variants and the potential role of pigs as an intermediate host that may hasten AIV evolution. In addition, we discuss the known influenza A virus virulence and transmission factors and their evaluation in animal models. With the growing number of human AIV infections, constant vigilance for the emergence of novel viruses is of utmost importance. In addition, careful characterization and pathobiological assessment of these novel variants will help to identify strains of particular concern for future pandemics. PMID:27486732

  20. Conducting influenza virus pathogenesis studies in avian species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian infection studies with influenza A are an important means of assessing host susceptibility, viral pathogenesis, host responses to infection, mechanisms of transmission and viral pathotype. Complex systems and natural settings may also be explored with carefully designed infection studies. In ...

  1. Early control of H5N1 influenza virus replication by the Type I interferon response in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Widespread distribution of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses in domesticated and wild birds continues to pose a threat to public health as interspecies transmission of virus has resulted in increasing numbers of human disease. Although the pathogenic mechanism(s) of H5N1 influenza viru...

  2. Continual re-introduction of human pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses into US swine, 2009-2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human-to-swine transmission of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses (pH1N1) increased the genetic diversity of influenza A viruses in swine (swIAVs) globally and is linked to the emergence of new pandemic threats, including H3N2v variants. Through phylogenetic analysis of contemporary swIAVs in the Unit...

  3. Recombinant influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sedova, E S; Shcherbinin, D N; Migunov, A I; Smirnov, Iu A; Logunov, D Iu; Shmarov, M M; Tsybalova, L M; Naroditskiĭ, B S; Kiselev, O I; Gintsburg, A L

    2012-10-01

    This review covers the problems encountered in the construction and production of new recombinant influenza vaccines. New approaches to the development of influenza vaccines are investigated; they include reverse genetics methods, production of virus-like particles, and DNA- and viral vector-based vaccines. Such approaches as the delivery of foreign genes by DNA- and viral vector-based vaccines can preserve the native structure of antigens. Adenoviral vectors are a promising gene-delivery platform for a variety of genetic vaccines. Adenoviruses can efficiently penetrate the human organism through mucosal epithelium, thus providing long-term antigen persistence and induction of the innate immune response. This review provides an overview of the practicability of the production of new recombinant influenza cross-protective vaccines on the basis of adenoviral vectors expressing hemagglutinin genes of different influenza strains. PMID:23346377

  4. The pig as a mixing vessel for influenza viruses: Human and veterinary implications

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjun; Kahn, Robert E; Richt, Juergen A

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are highly infectious respiratory pathogens that can infect many species. Birds are the reservoir for all known influenza A subtypes; and novel influenza viruses can emerge from birds and infect mammalian species including humans. Because swine are susceptible to infection with both avian and human influenza viruses, novel reassortant influenza viruses can be generated in this mammalian species by reassortment of influenza viral segments leading to the “mixing vessel” theory. There is no direct evidence that the reassortment events culminating in the 1918, 1957 or 1968 pandemic influenza viruses originated from pigs. Genetic reassortment among avian, human and/or swine influenza virus gene segments has occurred in pigs and some novel reassortant swine viruses have been transmitted to humans. Notably, novel reassortant H2N3 influenza viruses isolated from the US pigs, most likely infected with avian influenza viruses through surface water collected in ponds for cleaning barns and watering animals, had a similar genetic make-up to early isolates (1957) of the H2N2 human pandemic. These novel H2N3 swine viruses were able to cause disease in swine and mice and were infectious and highly transmissible in swine and ferrets without prior adaptation. The preceding example shows that pigs could transmit novel viruses from an avian reservoir to other mammalian species. Importantly, H2 viruses pose a substantial risk to humans because they have been absent from mammalian species since 1968 and people born after 1968 have little preexisting immunity to the H2 subtype. It is difficult to predict which virus will cause the next human pandemic and when that pandemic might begin. Importantly, the establishment and spread of a reassorted mammalian-adapted virus from pigs to humans could happen anywhere in the world. Therefore, both human and veterinary research needs to give more attention to potential cross-species transmission capacity of influenza A

  5. Animal Models for Influenza Viruses: Implications for Universal Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Margine, Irina; Krammer, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the human population. Depending on the virulence of the influenza virus strain, as well as the immunological status of the infected individual, the severity of the respiratory disease may range from sub-clinical or mild symptoms to severe pneumonia that can sometimes lead to death. Vaccines remain the primary public health measure in reducing the influenza burden. Though the first influenza vaccine preparation was licensed more than 60 years ago, current research efforts seek to develop novel vaccination strategies with improved immunogenicity, effectiveness, and breadth of protection. Animal models of influenza have been essential in facilitating studies aimed at understanding viral factors that affect pathogenesis and contribute to disease or transmission. Among others, mice, ferrets, pigs, and nonhuman primates have been used to study influenza virus infection in vivo, as well as to do pre-clinical testing of novel vaccine approaches. Here we discuss and compare the unique advantages and limitations of each model. PMID:25436508

  6. Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA): a target for antivirals and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jagadesh, Anitha; Salam, Abdul Ajees Abdul; Mudgal, Piya Paul; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2016-08-01

    Influenza, the most common infectious disease, poses a great threat to human health because of its highly contagious nature and fast transmissibility, often leading to high morbidity and mortality. Effective vaccination strategies may aid in the prevention and control of recurring epidemics and pandemics associated with this infectious disease. However, antigenic shifts and drifts are major concerns with influenza virus, requiring effective global monitoring and updating of vaccines. Current vaccines are standardized primarily based on the amount of hemagglutinin, a major surface antigen, which chiefly constitutes these preparations along with the varying amounts of neuraminidase (NA). Anti-influenza drugs targeting the active site of NA have been in use for more than a decade now. However, NA has not been approved as an effective antigenic component of the influenza vaccine because of standardization issues. Although some studies have suggested that NA antibodies are able to reduce the severity of the disease and induce a long-term and cross-protective immunity, a few major scientific issues need to be addressed prior to launching NA-based vaccines. Interestingly, an increasing number of studies have shown NA to be a promising target for future influenza vaccines. This review is an attempt to consolidate studies that reflect the strength of NA as a suitable vaccine target. The studies discussed in this article highlight NA as a potential influenza vaccine candidate and support taking the process of developing NA vaccines to the next stage. PMID:27255748

  7. The role of influenza in the epidemiology of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sourya; Foxman, Betsy; Berus, Joshua; van Panhuis, Willem G; Steiner, Claudia; Viboud, Cécile; Rohani, Pejman

    2015-01-01

    Interactions arising from sequential viral and bacterial infections play important roles in the epidemiological outcome of many respiratory pathogens. Influenza virus has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several respiratory bacterial pathogens commonly associated with pneumonia. Though clinical evidence supporting this interaction is unambiguous, its population-level effects-magnitude, epidemiological impact and variation during pandemic and seasonal outbreaks-remain unclear. To address these unknowns, we used longitudinal influenza and pneumonia incidence data, at different spatial resolutions and across different epidemiological periods, to infer the nature, timing and the intensity of influenza-pneumonia interaction. We used a mechanistic transmission model within a likelihood-based inference framework to carry out formal hypothesis testing. Irrespective of the source of data examined, we found that influenza infection increases the risk of pneumonia by ~100-fold. We found no support for enhanced transmission or severity impact of the interaction. For model-validation, we challenged our fitted model to make out-of-sample pneumonia predictions during pandemic and non-pandemic periods. The consistency in our inference tests carried out on several distinct datasets, and the predictive skill of our model increase confidence in our overall conclusion that influenza infection substantially enhances the risk of pneumonia, though only for a short period. PMID:26486591

  8. The role of influenza in the epidemiology of pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sourya; Foxman, Betsy; Berus, Joshua; van Panhuis, Willem G.; Steiner, Claudia; Viboud, Cécile; Rohani, Pejman

    2015-01-01

    Interactions arising from sequential viral and bacterial infections play important roles in the epidemiological outcome of many respiratory pathogens. Influenza virus has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several respiratory bacterial pathogens commonly associated with pneumonia. Though clinical evidence supporting this interaction is unambiguous, its population-level effects—magnitude, epidemiological impact and variation during pandemic and seasonal outbreaks—remain unclear. To address these unknowns, we used longitudinal influenza and pneumonia incidence data, at different spatial resolutions and across different epidemiological periods, to infer the nature, timing and the intensity of influenza-pneumonia interaction. We used a mechanistic transmission model within a likelihood-based inference framework to carry out formal hypothesis testing. Irrespective of the source of data examined, we found that influenza infection increases the risk of pneumonia by ~100-fold. We found no support for enhanced transmission or severity impact of the interaction. For model-validation, we challenged our fitted model to make out-of-sample pneumonia predictions during pandemic and non-pandemic periods. The consistency in our inference tests carried out on several distinct datasets, and the predictive skill of our model increase confidence in our overall conclusion that influenza infection substantially enhances the risk of pneumonia, though only for a short period. PMID:26486591

  9. Exploring Secondary Students' Knowledge and Misconceptions about Influenza: Development, validation, and implementation of a multiple-choice influenza knowledge scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romine, William L.; Barrow, Lloyd H.; Folk, William R.

    2013-07-01

    Understanding infectious diseases such as influenza is an important element of health literacy. We present a fully validated knowledge instrument called the Assessment of Knowledge of Influenza (AKI) and use it to evaluate knowledge of influenza, with a focus on misconceptions, in Midwestern United States high-school students. A two-phase validation process was used. In phase 1, an initial factor structure was calculated based on 205 students of grades 9-12 at a rural school. In phase 2, one- and two-dimensional factor structures were analyzed from the perspectives of classical test theory and the Rasch model using structural equation modeling and principal components analysis (PCA) on Rasch residuals, respectively. Rasch knowledge measures were calculated for 410 students from 6 school districts in the Midwest, and misconceptions were verified through the χ 2 test. Eight items measured knowledge of flu transmission, and seven measured knowledge of flu management. While alpha reliability measures for the subscales were acceptable, Rasch person reliability measures and PCA on residuals advocated for a single-factor scale. Four misconceptions were found, which have not been previously documented in high-school students. The AKI is the first validated influenza knowledge assessment, and can be used by schools and health agencies to provide a quantitative measure of impact of interventions aimed at increasing understanding of influenza. This study also adds significantly to the literature on misconceptions about influenza in high-school students, a necessary step toward strategic development of educational interventions for these students.

  10. [Pandemic influenza A(H1N1): the experience of the Spanish Laboratories of Influenza Network (ReLEG)].

    PubMed

    Cuevas González-Nicolás, María Teresa; Ledesma Moreno, Juan; Pozo Sánchez, Francisco; Casas Flecha, Inmaculada; Pérez-Breña, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    There are three types of influenza viruses: A, B, C. These viruses evolves constantly due to two main characteristics: the first one is the lack of the correction ability of the viral polymerase which causes the accumulation of single nucleotide mutations in the viral genes introduced by an error-prone viral RNA polymerase, (antigenic shift). The second one is the nature of their genome, formed by eight segments, which allows the interchange of genes between two different viral strains (antigenic drift). This viral plasticity, has allowed to the influenza A viruses to infect new host species and to cause infections with a pandemic characteristics. The Spanish influenza surveillance system, SVGE (its Spanish acronym), arises as a response to the possibility of facing a pandemic situation, especially after the transmission of avian influenza viruses to humans. This surveillance system is formed by sixteen physician and paediatrics network, nineteen epidemiological services coordinated by the National Epidemiological Centre (CNE) and eighteen laboratories , the Spanish Laboratories of Influenza network (ReLEG), coordinated by the National Centre of Microbiology. The aim of this article is to show the action of the ReLEG, in the pandemic caused by the influenza virus A(H1N1) during the season 2009-2010. The main objective of this network is the surveillance of the circulating viruses by means of their detection and their subsequent antigenic and genetic characterization, including the detection of resistance mutations against the main drugs, such as Oseltamivir. PMID:21203714

  11. Cyclic di-GMP modulates gene expression in Lyme disease spirochetes at the tick-mammal interface to promote spirochete survival during the blood meal and tick-to-mammal transmission.

    PubMed

    Caimano, Melissa J; Dunham-Ems, Star; Allard, Anna M; Cassera, Maria B; Kenedy, Melisha; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete, couples environmental sensing and gene regulation primarily via the Hk1/Rrp1 two-component system (TCS) and Rrp2/RpoN/RpoS pathways. Beginning with acquisition, we reevaluated the contribution of these pathways to spirochete survival and gene regulation throughout the enzootic cycle. Live imaging of B. burgdorferi caught in the act of being acquired revealed that the absence of RpoS and the consequent derepression of tick-phase genes impart a Stay signal required for midgut colonization. In addition to the behavioral changes brought on by the RpoS-off state, acquisition requires activation of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthesis by the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS; B. burgdorferi lacking either component is destroyed during the blood meal. Prior studies attributed this dramatic phenotype to a metabolic lesion stemming from reduced glycerol uptake and utilization. In a head-to-head comparison, however, the B. burgdorferi Δglp mutant had a markedly greater capacity to survive tick feeding than B. burgdorferi Δhk1 or Δrrp1 mutants, establishing unequivocally that glycerol metabolism is only one component of the protection afforded by c-di-GMP. Data presented herein suggest that the protective response mediated by c-di-GMP is multifactorial, involving chemotactic responses, utilization of alternate substrates for energy generation and intermediary metabolism, and remodeling of the cell envelope as a means of defending spirochetes against threats engendered during the blood meal. Expression profiling of c-di-GMP-regulated genes through the enzootic cycle supports our contention that the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS functions primarily, if not exclusively, in ticks. These data also raise the possibility that c-di-GMP enhances the expression of a subset of RpoS-dependent genes during nymphal transmission. PMID:25987708

  12. Cyclic di-GMP Modulates Gene Expression in Lyme Disease Spirochetes at the Tick-Mammal Interface To Promote Spirochete Survival during the Blood Meal and Tick-to-Mammal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Dunham-Ems, Star; Allard, Anna M.; Cassera, Maria B.; Kenedy, Melisha; Radolf, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete, couples environmental sensing and gene regulation primarily via the Hk1/Rrp1 two-component system (TCS) and Rrp2/RpoN/RpoS pathways. Beginning with acquisition, we reevaluated the contribution of these pathways to spirochete survival and gene regulation throughout the enzootic cycle. Live imaging of B. burgdorferi caught in the act of being acquired revealed that the absence of RpoS and the consequent derepression of tick-phase genes impart a Stay signal required for midgut colonization. In addition to the behavioral changes brought on by the RpoS-off state, acquisition requires activation of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthesis by the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS; B. burgdorferi lacking either component is destroyed during the blood meal. Prior studies attributed this dramatic phenotype to a metabolic lesion stemming from reduced glycerol uptake and utilization. In a head-to-head comparison, however, the B. burgdorferi Δglp mutant had a markedly greater capacity to survive tick feeding than B. burgdorferi Δhk1 or Δrrp1 mutants, establishing unequivocally that glycerol metabolism is only one component of the protection afforded by c-di-GMP. Data presented herein suggest that the protective response mediated by c-di-GMP is multifactorial, involving chemotactic responses, utilization of alternate substrates for energy generation and intermediary metabolism, and remodeling of the cell envelope as a means of defending spirochetes against threats engendered during the blood meal. Expression profiling of c-di-GMP-regulated genes through the enzootic cycle supports our contention that the Hk1/Rrp1 TCS functions primarily, if not exclusively, in ticks. These data also raise the possibility that c-di-GMP enhances the expression of a subset of RpoS-dependent genes during nymphal transmission. PMID:25987708

  13. Purification and visualization of influenza a viral ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Winco W H; Weaver, Lindsay L; Panté, Nelly

    2009-01-01

    The influenza A viral genome consists of eight negative-sense, single stranded RNA molecules, individually packed with multiple copies of the influenza A nucleoprotein (NP) into viral ribonulceoprotein particles (vRNPs). The influenza vRNPs are enclosed within the viral envelope. During cell entry, however, these vRNP complexes are released into the cytoplasm, where they gain access to the host nuclear transport machinery. In order to study the nuclear import of influenza vRNPs and the replication of the influenza genome, it is useful to work with isolated vRNPs so that other components of the virus do not interfere with these processes. Here, we describe a procedure to purify these vRNPs from the influenza A virus. The procedure starts with the disruption of the influenza A virion with detergents in order to release the vRNP complexes from the enveloped virion. The vRNPs are then separated from the other components of the influenza A virion on a 33-70% discontinuous glycerol gradient by velocity sedimentation. The fractions obtained from the glycerol gradient are then analyzed on via SDS-PAGE after staining with Coomassie blue. The peak fractions containing NP are then pooled together and concentrated by centrifugation. After concentration, the integrity of the vRNPs is verified by visualization of the vRNPs by transmission electron microscopy after negative staining. The glycerol gradient purification is a modification of that from Kemler et al. (1994)(1), and the negative staining has been performed by Wu et al. (2007).(2). PMID:19229188

  14. Pregnant Women and Influenza (Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medscape Podcasts Public Service Announcements (PSAs) Virus Images Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Pregnant Women & Influenza (Flu) Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook ...

  15. Predicting host tropism of influenza A virus proteins using random forest

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    models capable of directly predicting interspecies transmission of influenza viruses. The models are available for prediction at http://fluleap.bic.nus.edu.sg. PMID:25521718

  16. Oral Administration of a Prodrug of the Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Inhibitor GS 4071 Protects Mice and Ferrets against Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Dirk B.; Tai, Chun Y.; Escarpe, Paul A.; Li, Weixing; Sidwell, Robert W.; Huffman, John H.; Sweet, Clive; Jakeman, Kenneth J.; Merson, James; Lacy, Steven A.; Lew, Willard; Williams, Matthew A.; Zhang, Lijun; Chen, Ming S.; Bischofberger, Norbert; Kim, Choung U.

    1998-01-01

    We have recently described GS 4071, a carbocyclic transition-state analog inhibitor of the influenza virus neuraminidase, which has potent inhibitory activity comparable to that of 4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en (GG167; zanamivir) when tested against influenza A virus replication and neuraminidase activity in vitro. We now report that GS 4071 is active against several strains of influenza A and B viruses in vitro and that oral GS 4104, an ethyl ester prodrug which is converted to GS 4071 in vivo, is active in the mouse and ferret models of influenza virus infection. Oral administration of 10 mg of GS 4104 per kg of body weight per day caused a 100-fold reduction in lung homogenate viral titers and enhanced survival in mice infected with influenza A or B viruses. In ferrets, a 25-mg/kg dose of GS 4104 given twice daily reduced peak viral titers in nasal washings and eliminated constitutional responses to influenza virus infection including fever, increased nasal signs (sneezing, nasal discharge, mouth breathing), and decreased activity. Consistent with our demonstration that the parent compound is highly specific for influenza virus neuraminidases, no significant drug-related toxicity was observed after the administration of oral dosages of GS 4104 of up to 800 mg/kg/day for 14 days in nonclinical toxicology studies with rats. These results indicate that GS 4104 is a novel, orally active antiviral agent with the potential to be used for the prophylaxis and treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. PMID:9517945

  17. Improving pandemic influenza risk assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessing the pandemic risk posed by specific non-human influenza A viruses remains a complex challenge. As influenza virus genome sequencing becomes cheaper, faster and more readily available, the ability to predict pandemic potential from sequence data could transform pandemic influenza risk asses...

  18. Influenza Vaccines: Challenges and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Katherine; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is the best method for the prevention and control of influenza. Vaccination can reduce illness and lessen severity of infection. This review focuses on how currently licensed influenza vaccines are generated in the U.S., why the biology of influenza poses vaccine challenges, and vaccine approaches on the horizon that address these challenges. PMID:25766291

  19. Impact of Influenza on Outpatient Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths by Using a Time Series Poisson Generalized Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ru-ning; Zheng, Hui-zhen; Ou, Chun-quan; Huang, Li-qun; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Can-kun; Lin, Jin-yan; Zhong, Hao-jie; Song, Tie; Luo, Hui-ming

    2016-01-01

    Background The disease burden associated with influenza in developing tropical and subtropical countries is poorly understood owing to the lack of a comprehensive disease surveillance system and information-exchange mechanisms. The impact of influenza on outpatient visits, hospital admissions, and deaths has not been fully demonstrated to date in south China. Methods A time series Poisson generalized additive model was used to quantitatively assess influenza-like illness (ILI) and influenza disease burden by using influenza surveillance data in Zhuhai City from 2007 to 2009, combined with the outpatient, inpatient, and respiratory disease mortality data of the same period. Results The influenza activity in Zhuhai City demonstrated a typical subtropical seasonal pattern; however, each influenza virus subtype showed a specific transmission variation. The weekly ILI case number and virus isolation rate had a very close positive correlation (r = 0.774, P < 0.0001). The impact of ILI and influenza on weekly outpatient visits was statistically significant (P < 0.05). We determined that 10.7% of outpatient visits were associated with ILI and 1.88% were associated with influenza. ILI also had a significant influence on the hospitalization rates (P < 0.05), but mainly in populations <25 years of age. No statistically significant effect of influenza on hospital admissions was found (P > 0.05). The impact of ILI on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was most significant (P < 0.05), with 33.1% of COPD-related deaths being attributable to ILI. The impact of influenza on the mortality rate requires further evaluation. Conclusions ILI is a feasible indicator of influenza activity. Both ILI and influenza have a large impact on outpatient visits. Although ILI affects the number of hospital admissions and deaths, we found no consistent influence of influenza, which requires further assessment. PMID:26894876

  20. Influenza pandemic planning.

    PubMed

    Cox, Nancy J; Tamblyn, Susan E; Tam, Theresa

    2003-05-01

    Periodically, novel influenza viruses emerge and spread rapidly through susceptible populations, resulting in worldwide epidemics or pandemics. Three pandemics occurred in the 20th century. The first and most devastating of these, the "Spanish Flu" (A/H1N1) pandemic of 1918-1919, is estimated to have resulted in 20-50 million or more deaths worldwide, with unusually high mortality among young adults [C.W. Potter, Chronicle of influenza pandemics, in: K.G. Nicholson, R.G. Webster, A.J. Hay (Eds.), Textbook of Influenza, Blackwell Science, Oxford, 1998, p. 3]. Mortality associated with the 1957 "Asian Flu" (A/H2N2) and the 1968 "Hong Kong Flu" (A/H3N2) pandemics was less severe, with the highest excess mortality in the elderly and persons with chronic diseases [J. Infect. Dis. 178 (1998) 53]. However, considerable morbidity, social disruption and economic loss occurred during both of these pandemics [J. Infect. Dis. 176 (Suppl. 1) (1997) S4]. It is reasonable to assume that future influenza pandemics will occur, given historical evidence and current understanding of the biology, ecology, and epidemiology of influenza. Influenza viruses are impossible to eradicate, as there is a large reservoir of all subtypes of influenza A viruses in wild aquatic birds. In agricultural-based communities with high human population density such as are found in China, conditions exist for the emergence and spread of pandemic viruses. It is also impossible to predict when the next pandemic will occur. Moreover, the severity of illness is also unpredictable, so contingency plans must be put in place now during the inter-pandemic period. These plans must be flexible enough to respond to different levels of disease. PMID:12686098

  1. Increased influenza pneumonia mortality of mice adoptively immunized with node and spleen cells sensitized by inactivated but not live virus.

    PubMed Central

    Cate, T R; Mold, N G

    1975-01-01

    Syngeneic mice adoptively immunized intravenously with 25 million washed node and spleen cells from donors vaccinated subcutaneously with formolized influenza A PR8 had a higher mortality with influenza pneumonia after challenge with homologous virus than occurred in recipients of similar cells from unsensitized donors, and this increased mortality was prevented by treatment of the sensitized cells with antithymocyte serum. Mice adoptively immunized with cells from donors vaccinated with formolized influenza A PR8 also had a higher mortality than recipients of unsensitized cells after challenge with heterologous influenza B Lee. Mice who received PR8-sensitized cells and survived challenge with influenza B Lee developed antibody only to the challenge virus, and serum antibody titers to the challenge virus in surviving recipients of sensitized cells were similar to those of recipients of unsensitized cells in all studies. Influenza mortality of recipients of antibody-containing mouse serum after homologous virus challenge was similar to that of recipients of antibody-free mouse serum in this model. Washed node and spleen cells from donor mice who had survived respiratory infection or received subcutaneous vaccination with live influenza A PR8 and those from donor mice given typhoid vaccine subcutaneously all failed to alter mortality from that observed in recipients of unsensitized cells after challenge with influenza A PR8. These results suggest that subcutaneous vaccination with inactivated influenza establishes a reactivity of the cell-mediated immunologic system which can increase the severity of influenza infection of the respiratory tract under certain conditions, and that sensitization by live influenza fails to produce this effect. PMID:47313

  2. Hand hygiene and risk of influenza virus infections in the community: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Valerie W. Y.; Cowling, Benjamin J.; Aiello, Alison E.

    2016-01-01

    Community-based prevention strategies for seasonal and pandemic influenza are essential to minimize their potential threat to public health. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of hand hygiene interventions in reducing influenza transmission in the community and to investigate the possible modifying effects of latitude, temperature and humidity on hand hygiene efficacy. We identified 979 articles in the initial search and 10 randomized controlled trials met our inclusion criteria. The combination of hand hygiene with facemasks was found to have statistically significant efficacy against laboratory-confirmed influenza while hand hygiene alone did not. Our meta-regression model did not identify statistically significant effects of latitude, temperature or humidity on the efficacy of hand hygiene. Our findings highlight the potential importance of interventions that protect against multiple modes of influenza transmission, and the modest efficacy of hand hygiene suggests that additional measures besides hand hygiene may also be important to control influenza. PMID:24572643

  3. Personalized medicine in severe influenza.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Sánchez, F; Valenzuela-Méndez, B; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, J F; Rello, J

    2016-06-01

    Existing therapies against infectious diseases may only be effective in limited subpopulations during specific phases of diseases, incorporating theranostics, and there is a clear need to individualize different therapeutic approaches depending on the host. Influenza A virus infection evolves into a severe respiratory failure in some young adult patients, related to an exaggerated inflammatory response. Mortality rates remain high despite antiviral treatment and aggressive respiratory support. The influenza A virus (IAV) infection will induce a proinflammatory innate immune response through recognition of viral RNA by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 and retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) molecules by nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB route). Anti-inflammatory therapies focused on modulating this inflammatory response to "all patients" have not been satisfactory. Steroids should be avoided because they do not improve survival and promote superinfections. Since clinical judgment has often been proven inadequate, interest in the use of biomarkers to monitor host response and to assess severity and complications is growing. It is well known that, if used appropriately, these can be helpful tools to predict not only severity but also mortality. We need more biomarkers that predict host response: it is time to change lactate measurement to proteomics and transcriptomics. Theranostics describes an approach covering both diagnosis and coupled therapy. Death is usually a fatal complication of a dysregulated immune response more than the acute virulence of the infectious agent. Future research demonstrating the usefulness of adjunctive therapy in a subset of critically ill patients with IAV pneumonia is an unmet clinical need. PMID:26936615

  4. Influenza A Virus Infection, Innate Immunity, and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Bria M.; Staricha, Kelly L.; Wiese, Kristin M.; Ridge, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A virus is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in children worldwide. While it is apparent that adequate activation of the innate immune system is essential for pathogen clearance and host survival, an excessive inflammatory response to infection is detrimental to the young host. A review of the literature indicates that innate immune responses change throughout childhood. Whether these changes are genetically programmed or triggered by environmental cues is unknown. The objectives of this review are to summarize the role of innate immunity in influenza A virus infection in the young child and to highlight possible differences between children and adults that may make children more susceptible to severe influenza A infection. A better understanding of age-related differences in innate immune signaling will be essential to improve care for this high-risk population. PMID:26237589

  5. Persistent Infection of Drug-resistant Influenza A Virus during Chemotherapy for Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Toru; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Kawakami, Fumihiro; Isobe, Rei; Kaneko, Naoto; Mimura, Yuto; Ito, Toshiro; Furuta, Kiyoshi; Shimazaki, Mami; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Kitano, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of an 80-year-old man with malignant lymphoma who became persistently infected with influenza A virus. Although he was repeatedly treated with NA inhibitors, such as oseltamivir or peramivir, nasal cavity swab tests for influenza A antigen continued to be positive for more than 2 months. Virological analyses revealed that he was infected with the NA inhibitor-resistant A (H3N2) virus possessing an R292K substitution in the NA protein. These findings suggest that a drug-resistant influenza virus strain might selectively survive antiviral therapy in elderly patients with refractory malignant lymphoma undergoing multiple chemotherapies. PMID:27374689

  6. Generation of Influenza Virus from Avian Cells Infected by Salmonella Carrying the Viral Genome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Kong, Wei; Wanda, Soo-Young; Xin, Wei; Alamuri, Praveen; Curtiss, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Domestic poultry serve as intermediates for transmission of influenza A virus from the wild aquatic bird reservoir to humans, resulting in influenza outbreaks in poultry and potential epidemics/pandemics among human beings. To combat emerging avian influenza virus, an inexpensive, heat-stable, and orally administered influenza vaccine would be useful to vaccinate large commercial poultry flocks and even migratory birds. Our hypothesized vaccine is a recombinant attenuated bacterial strain able to mediate production of attenuated influenza virus in vivo to induce protective immunity against influenza. Here we report the feasibility and technical limitations toward such an ideal vaccine based on our exploratory study. Five 8-unit plasmids carrying a chloramphenicol resistance gene or free of an antibiotic resistance marker were constructed. Influenza virus was successfully generated in avian cells transfected by each of the plasmids. The Salmonella carrier was engineered to allow stable maintenance and conditional release of the 8-unit plasmid into the avian cells for recovery of influenza virus. Influenza A virus up to 107 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50)/ml were recovered from 11 out of 26 co-cultures of chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF) and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells upon infection by the recombinant Salmonella carrying the 8-unit plasmid. Our data prove that a bacterial carrier can mediate generation of influenza virus by delivering its DNA cargoes into permissive host cells. Although we have made progress in developing this Salmonella influenza virus vaccine delivery system, further improvements are necessary to achieve efficient virus production, especially in vivo. PMID:25742162

  7. Identification of avian RIG-I responsive genes during influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Megan RW; Aldridge, Jerry R; Fleming-Canepa, Ximena; Wang, Yong-Dong; Webster, Robert G; Magor, Katharine E

    2013-01-01

    Ducks can survive infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses that are lethal to chickens. We showed that the influenza detector, RIG-I, can initiate antiviral responses in ducks, but this gene is absent in chickens. We can reconstitute this pathway by transfecting chicken DF-1 embryonic fibroblast cells with duck RIG-I, which augments their antiviral response to influenza and decreases viral titre. However, the genes downstream of duck RIG-I that mediate this antiviral response to influenza are not known. Using microarrays, we compared the transcriptional profile of chicken embryonic fibroblasts transfected with duck RIG-I or empty vector, and infected with low or highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Transfected duck RIG-I expressed in chicken cells was associated with the marked induction of many antiviral innate immune genes upon infection with both viruses. We used real-time PCR to confirm upregulation of a subset of these antiviral genes including MX1, PKR, IFIT5, OASL, IFNB, and downregulation of the influenza matrix gene. These results provide some insight into the genes induced by duck RIG-I upon influenza infection, and provide evidence that duck RIG-I can function to elicit an interferon-driven, antiviral response against influenza in chicken embryonic fibroblasts. PMID:23220072

  8. Recent discoveries of influenza A drug target sites to combat virus replication.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hershna; Kukol, Andreas

    2016-06-15

    Sequence variations in the binding sites of influenza A proteins are known to limit the effectiveness of current antiviral drugs. Clinically, this leads to increased rates of virus transmission and pathogenicity. Potential influenza A inhibitors are continually being discovered as a result of high-throughput cell based screening studies, whereas the application of computational tools to aid drug discovery has further increased the number of predicted inhibitors reported. This review brings together the aspects that relate to the identification of influenza A drug target sites and the findings from recent antiviral drug discovery strategies. PMID:27284062

  9. Exposure to ozone reduces influenza disease severity and alters distribution of influenza viral antigens in murine lungs.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, J A; Zee, Y C; Osebold, J W

    1982-09-01

    Exposure to ambient levels of ozone (0.5 ppm) was shown to alter the pathogenesis of respiratory infection after aerosol infection of mice with influenza A virus. A semiquantitative method for determination of the sites of virus replication by direct immunofluorescence indicated that exposure to ozone reduced the involvement of respiratory epithelium in the infectious process and resulted in a less widespread infection of the alveolar parenchyma. Furthermore, the ozone-mediated alteration in viral antigen distribution was consistent with significantly reduced influenza disease mortality and prolonged survival time, but only when the oxidant was present during the course of infection. Reduced disease severity in ozone-exposed animals appeared to be independent of peak pulmonary virus titers, pulmonary interferon titers, and pulmonary and serum-neutralizing antibody titers. These studies suggested that the distribution of influenza virus in the murine lung was a key factor in disease severity. PMID:6182839

  10. Measuring Cellular Immunity to Influenza: Methods of Detection, Applications and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Lynda; Lambe, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a respiratory pathogen which causes both seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics; infection continues to be a significant cause of mortality worldwide. Current influenza vaccines principally stimulate humoral immune responses that are largely directed towards the variant surface antigens of influenza. Vaccination can result in an effective, albeit strain-specific antibody response and there is a need for vaccines that can provide superior, long-lasting immunity to influenza. Vaccination approaches targeting conserved viral antigens have the potential to provide broadly cross-reactive, heterosubtypic immunity to diverse influenza viruses. However, the field lacks consensus on the correlates of protection for cellular immunity in reducing severe influenza infection, transmission or disease outcome. Furthermore, unlike serological methods such as the standardized haemagglutination inhibition assay, there remains a large degree of variation in both the types of assays and method of reporting cellular outputs. T-cell directed immunity has long been known to play a role in ameliorating the severity and/or duration of influenza infection, but the precise phenotype, magnitude and longevity of the requisite protective response is unclear. In order to progress the development of universal influenza vaccines, it is critical to standardize assays across sites to facilitate direct comparisons between clinical trials. PMID:26343189

  11. Inhaled Nitric Oxide Therapy Fails to Improve Outcome in Experimental Severe Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Ilyse; Miller, Chris; Kain, Kevin C.; Liles, W. Conrad

    2012-01-01

    In vitro, nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to have antimicrobial activity against a wide range of viruses, including influenza A virus. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) would increase survival in vivo by reducing the viral load in C57Bl/6 mice infected with a lethal dose of influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1; WSN/33) virus. NO was delivered to influenza-infected mice either continuously or intermittently at 80 or 160 ppm, respectively, using both prophylactic and post-infection treatment strategies. Murine survival and weight loss were assessed, and lung viral load was quantified via plaque assay. Here, we report that iNO administered prophylactically or post-influenza infection failed to improve survival of infected mice. No difference in lung viral load was observed between experimental groups. Although NO has antiviral activity against influenza A virus in vitro, iNO therapy provided no apparent benefit when used for treatment of influenza A virus infection in vivo. PMID:22253563

  12. Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza A Viruses in US Exhibition Swine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Wentworth, David E; Das, Suman R; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Killian, Mary L; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Slemons, Richard D; Bowman, Andrew S

    2016-01-15

    The role of exhibition swine in influenza A virus transmission was recently demonstrated by >300 infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses among individuals who attended agricultural fairs. Through active influenza A virus surveillance in US exhibition swine and whole-genome sequencing of 380 isolates, we demonstrate that exhibition swine are actively involved in the evolution of influenza A viruses, including zoonotic strains. First, frequent introduction of influenza A viruses from commercial swine populations provides new genetic diversity in exhibition pigs each year locally. Second, genomic reassortment between viruses cocirculating in exhibition swine increases viral diversity. Third, viral migration between exhibition swine in neighboring states demonstrates that movements of exhibition pigs contributes to the spread of genetic diversity. The unexpected frequency of viral exchange between commercial and exhibition swine raises questions about the understudied interface between these populations. Overall, the complexity of viral evolution in exhibition swine indicates that novel viruses are likely to continually reemerge, presenting threats to humans. PMID:26243317

  13. Global Dynamics of Avian Influenza Epidemic Models with Psychological Effect

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sanhong; Pang, Liuyong; Ruan, Shigui

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sectional surveys conducted in Thailand and China after the outbreaks of the avian influenza A H5N1 and H7N9 viruses show a high degree of awareness of human avian influenza in both urban and rural populations, a higher level of proper hygienic practice among urban residents, and in particular a dramatically reduced number of visits to live markets in urban population after the influenza A H7N9 outbreak in China in 2013. In this paper, taking into account the psychological effect toward avian influenza in the human population, a bird-to-human transmission model in which the avian population exhibits saturation effect is constructed. The dynamical behavior of the model is studied by using the basic reproduction number. The results demonstrate that the saturation effect within avian population and the psychological effect in human population cannot change the stability of equilibria but can affect the number of infected humans if the disease is prevalent. Numerical simulations are given to support the theoretical results and sensitivity analyses of the basic reproduction number in terms of model parameters that are performed to seek for effective control measures for avian influenza. PMID:25861378

  14. Influenza Vaccines: Unmet Needs and Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Ji Yun

    2013-01-01

    Influenza is a worldwide public health concern. Since the introduction of trivalent influenza vaccine in 1978, vaccination has been the primary means of prevention and control of influenza. Current influenza vaccines have moderate efficacy, good safety, and acceptable tolerability; however, they have unsatisfactory efficacy in older adults, are dependent on egg supply for production, and are time-consuming to manufacture. This review outlines the unmet medical needs of current influenza vaccines. Recent developments in influenza vaccines are also described. PMID:24475351

  15. A Novel H1N2 Influenza Virus Related to the Classical and Human Influenza Viruses from Pigs in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yafen; Wu, Xiaowei; Wang, Nianchen; Ouyang, Guowen; Qu, Nannan; Cui, Jin; Qi, Yan; Liao, Ming; Jiao, Peirong

    2016-01-01

    Southern China has long been considered to be an epicenter of pandemic influenza viruses. The special environment, breeding mode, and lifestyle in southern China provides more chances for wild aquatic birds, domestic poultry, pigs, and humans to be in contact. This creates the opportunity for interspecies transmission and generation of new influenza viruses. In this study, we reported a novel reassortant H1N2 influenza virus from pigs in southern China. According to the phylogenetic trees and homology of the nucleotide sequence, the virus was confirmed to be a novel triple-reassortant H1N2 virus containing genes from classical swine (PB2, PB1, HA, NP, and NS genes), triple-reassortant swine (PA and M genes), and recent human (NA gene) lineages. It indicated that the novel reassortment virus among human and swine influenza viruses occurred in pigs in southern China. The isolation of the novel reassortant H1N2 influenza viruses provides further evidence that pigs are “mixing vessels,” and swine influenza virus surveillance in southern China will provide important information about genetic evaluation and antigenic variation of swine influenza virus to formulate the prevention and control measures for the viruses. PMID:27458456

  16. A Novel H1N2 Influenza Virus Related to the Classical and Human Influenza Viruses from Pigs in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Song, Yafen; Wu, Xiaowei; Wang, Nianchen; Ouyang, Guowen; Qu, Nannan; Cui, Jin; Qi, Yan; Liao, Ming; Jiao, Peirong

    2016-01-01

    Southern China has long been considered to be an epicenter of pandemic influenza viruses. The special environment, breeding mode, and lifestyle in southern China provides more chances for wild aquatic birds, domestic poultry, pigs, and humans to be in contact. This creates the opportunity for interspecies transmission and generation of new influenza viruses. In this study, we reported a novel reassortant H1N2 influenza virus from pigs in southern China. According to the phylogenetic trees and homology of the nucleotide sequence, the virus was confirmed to be a novel triple-reassortant H1N2 virus containing genes from classical swine (PB2, PB1, HA, NP, and NS genes), triple-reassortant swine (PA and M genes), and recent human (NA gene) lineages. It indicated that the novel reassortment virus among human and swine influenza viruses occurred in pigs in southern China. The isolation of the novel reassortant H1N2 influenza viruses provides further evidence that pigs are "mixing vessels," and swine influenza virus surveillance in southern China will provide important information about genetic evaluation and antigenic variation of swine influenza virus to formulate the prevention and control measures for the viruses. PMID:27458456

  17. Ferrets develop fatal influenza after inhaling small particle aerosols of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is limited knowledge about the potential routes for H5N1 influenza virus transmission to and between humans, and it is not clear whether humans can be infected through inhalation of aerosolized H5N1 virus particles. Ferrets are often used as a animal model for humans in influenza pathogenicity and transmissibility studies. In this manuscript, a nose-only bioaerosol inhalation exposure system that was recently developed and validated was used in an inhalation exposure study of aerosolized A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) virus in ferrets. The clinical spectrum of influenza resulting from exposure to A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) through intranasal verses inhalation routes was analyzed. Results Ferrets were successfully infected through intranasal instillation or through inhalation of small particle aerosols with four different doses of Influenza virus A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1). The animals developed severe influenza encephalomyelitis following intranasal or inhalation exposure to 101, 102, 103, or 104 infectious virus particles per ferret. Conclusions Aerosolized Influenza virus A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) is highly infectious and lethal in ferrets. Clinical signs appeared earlier in animals infected through inhalation of aerosolized virus compared to those infected through intranasal instillation. PMID:20843329

  18. Modeling risk of occupational zoonotic influenza infection in swine workers.

    PubMed

    Paccha, Blanca; Jones, Rachael M; Gibbs, Shawn; Kane, Michael J; Torremorell, Montserrat; Neira-Ramirez, Victor; Rabinowitz, Peter M

    2016-08-01

    Zoonotic transmission of influenza A virus (IAV) between swine and workers in swine production facilities may play a role in the emergence of novel influenza strains with pandemic potential. Guidelines to prevent transmission of influenza to swine workers have been developed but there is a need for evidence-based decision-making about protective measures such as respiratory protection. A mathematical model was applied to estimate the risk of occupational IAV exposure to swine workers by contact and airborne transmission, and to evaluate the use of respirators to reduce transmission.  The Markov model was used to simulate the transport and exposure of workers to IAV in a swine facility. A dose-response function was used to estimate the risk of infection. This approach is similar to methods previously used to estimate the risk of infection in human health care settings. This study uses concentration of virus in air from field measurements collected during outbreaks of influenza in commercial swine facilities, and analyzed by polymerase chain reaction.  It was found that spending 25 min working in a barn during an influenza outbreak in a swine herd could be sufficient to cause zoonotic infection in a worker. However, this risk estimate was sensitive to estimates of viral infectivity to humans. Wearing an excellent fitting N95 respirator reduced this risk, but with high aerosol levels the predicted risk of infection remained high under certain assumptions.  The results of this analysis indicate that under the conditions studied, swine workers are at risk of zoonotic influenza infection. The use of an N95 respirator could reduce such risk. These findings have implications for risk assessment and preventive programs targeting swine workers. The exact level of risk remains uncertain, since our model may have overestimated the viability or infectivity of IAV. Additionally, the potential for partial immunity in swine workers associated with repeated low

  19. Seasonal influenza: an overview.

    PubMed

    Li, Christina; Freedman, Marian

    2009-02-01

    Seasonal influenza is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. It also has major social and economic consequences in the form of high rates of absenteeism from school and work as well as significant treatment and hospitalization costs. In fact, annual influenza epidemics and the resulting deaths and lost days of productivity are estimated to cost US$10.4 billion in direct medical expenses and US$16.4 billion in lost potential earnings. Given the enormous burden of seasonal influenza and the important role that school-age children play in the cycle of disease, school nurses need to be knowledgeable about all aspects of this condition, including its clinical course and how it is transmitted; the range of options for preventing and treating the disease; and steps that can be taken to improve the rates of immunization against influenza. School nurses also can help by making sure that they themselves are vaccinated in a timely manner. PMID:19197008

  20. [Influenza pandemic: Mexico's response].

    PubMed

    Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Betancourt-Cravioto, Miguel; Velázquez-Monroy, Oscar; Alvarez-Lucas, Carlos; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    In 1992, a new type of influenza virus appeared in Southeast Asia. This new strain has caused to date, more than 120 cases and over 60 deaths in Cambodia,Vietnam, Indonesia and Thailand. This situation is seen by the experts as the possible genesis of a new influenza pandemic with the corresponding negative effects on the health of the population, international commerce and world economy. In order to face the coming challenge, the World Health Organization (WHO) has asked member countries to develop national preparedness and response plans for an influenza pandemic. Within the framework of the National Committee for Health Security, Mexico has developed a National Preparedness and Response Plan for an Influenza Pandemic with the aim of protecting the health of the population with timely and effective measures. The Plan is based on a risk scale and five lines of action: Coordination, Epidemiological Surveillance, Medical Care, Risk Communication and Strategic Stockpile. It is currently impossible to predict when the next pandemic will start or what will be its impact. Nevertheless, it is fundamental that national and regional health authorities establish measures for protecting the health of the population in case this emergency occurs. PMID:16555537

  1. INFLUENZA AND PNEUMONIA

    PubMed Central

    1916-01-01

    This symposium summarizes the opinions of several widely known health workers on the modes of infection, spread, prevalence and nature, epidemiology, and legislative and executive management of influenza and pneumonia—the two diseases which so greatly increased our morbidity rates during the winter season. PMID:18009431

  2. Avian influenza: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Capua, Ilaria; Alexander, Dennis J

    2004-08-01

    This paper reviews the worldwide situation regarding avian influenza infections in poultry from 1997 to March 2004. The increase in the number of primary introductions and the scientific data available on the molecular basis of pathogenicity have generated concerns particularly for legislative purposes and for international trade. This has led to a new proposed definition of 'avian influenza' to extend all infections caused by H5 and H7 viruses regardless of their virulence as notifiable diseases, although this has encountered some difficulties in being approved. The paper also reviews the major outbreaks caused by viruses of the H5 or H7 subtype and the control measures applied. The zoonotic aspects of avian influenza, which until 1997 were considered to be of limited relevance in human medicine, are also discussed. The human health implications have now gained importance, both for illness and fatalities that have occurred following natural infection with avian viruses, and for the potential of generating a reassortant virus that could give rise to the next human influenza pandemic. PMID:15370036

  3. Avian influenza (fowl plague)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses infect domestic poultry and wild birds. In domestic poultry, AI viruses are typically of low pathogenicity (LP) causing subclinical infections, respiratory disease or drops in egg production. However, a few AI viruses cause severe systemic disease with high mortality; ...

  4. Communicability of H1N1 and seasonal influenza among household contacts of cases in large families

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Ashry G.; BinSaeed, Abdulaziz A.; Al‐Habib, Hannan; Al‐Saif, Hytham

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Mohamed et al. (2011) Communicability of H1N1 and seasonal influenza among household contacts of cases in large families. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), e25–e29. Background  Quantitative knowledge of the transmissibility of influenza is crucial to its prevention and control. Objectives  To quantify the transmission of influenza A (H1N1) and seasonal influenza in household contacts of patients with influenza diagnosed in a large university hospital. Patients/Methods  A prospective study was conducted between September and October 2009 in which all confirmed cases of influenza diagnosed at King Khalid University Hospital were included. All household contacts were followed by telephone calls every other day for 12 days. They were asked about the development of influenza symptoms in addition to their age and nationality. Results  Overall, 432 household contacts of 69 influenza A (H1N1) cases and 417 contacts of 91 seasonal influenza cases were included. Suspected influenza was diagnosed in 16·9% and 14·4% of household contacts of H1N1 and seasonal influenza patients, respectively. Household reproduction numbers were 1·06 (0·84–1·28) for H1N1 and 0·66 (0·51–0·81) for seasonal influenza. Children in households were more susceptible than were adults (22·2% versus 13·7%, respectively). Evidence of coughing in the index case tripled the risk of infection in households afflicted with the H1N1 influenza [relative risk (RR) = 3·28, CI = 1·24–8·69], while evidence of a runny nose doubled it (RR = 1·89, CI = 1·19–2·92). Conclusions  Communicability of influenza in households in Riyadh is comparable to that in other countries. Children are more susceptible to influenza infection. The presence of a cough or runny nose in the index cases increases the risk of infection. PMID:22118477

  5. Selective Bottlenecks Shape Evolutionary Pathways Taken during Mammalian Adaptation of a 1918-like Avian Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Moncla, Louise H; Zhong, Gongxun; Nelson, Chase W; Dinis, Jorge M; Mutschler, James; Hughes, Austin L; Watanabe, Tokiko; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Friedrich, Thomas C

    2016-02-10

    Avian influenza virus reassortants resembling the 1918 human pandemic virus can become transmissible among mammals by acquiring mutations in hemagglutinin (HA) and polymerase. Using the ferret model, we trace the evolutionary pathway by which an avian-like virus evolves the capacity for mammalian replication and airborne transmission. During initial infection, within-host HA diversity increased drastically. Then, airborne transmission fixed two polymerase mutations that do not confer a detectable replication advantage. In later transmissions, selection fixed advantageous HA1 variants. Transmission initially involved a "loose" bottleneck, which became strongly selective after additional HA mutations emerged. The stringency and evolutionary forces governing between-host bottlenecks may therefore change throughout host adaptation. Mutations occurred in multiple combinations in transmitted viruses, suggesting that mammalian transmissibility can evolve through multiple genetic pathways despite phenotypic constraints. Our data provide a glimpse into avian influenza virus adaptation in mammals, with broad implications for surveillance on potentially zoonotic viruses. PMID:26867176

  6. Using quantitative disease dynamics as a tool for guiding response to avian influenza in poultry in the United States of America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild birds are the primary source of genetic diversity for influenza A viruses that eventually emerge in poultry and humans. Much progress has been made in the descriptive ecology of avian influenza viruses (AIVs), but contributions from quantitative studies are less evident. Transmission between ho...

  7. Development of a cross protective high growth reasssortant H7N7/PR8 virus for clinical evaluation as an inactivated pre-pandemic influenza vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interspecies transmission of high pathogenicity (HP) H7N7 subtype avian influenza viruses in the Netherlands in 2003 caused zoonotic infections in 89 people, including one fatal case of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Public health preparedness approaches against emerging HP H7N7 influenza vir...

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal (Stem) Cell Therapy Fails to Improve Outcomes in Experimental Severe Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Ilyse; Banner, David; Mubareka, Samira; Kim, Hani; Besla, Rickvinder; Kelvin, David J.; Kain, Kevin C.; Liles, W. Conrad

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Severe influenza remains a major public health threat and is responsible for thousands of deaths annually. Increasing antiviral resistance and limited effectiveness of current therapies highlight the need for new approaches to influenza treatment. Extensive pre-clinical data have shown that mesenchymal stromal (stem) cell (MSC) therapy can induce anti-inflammatory effects and enhance repair of the injured lung. We hypothesized that MSC therapy would improve survival, dampen lung inflammation and decrease acute lung injury (ALI) in a murine model of severe influenza. Methods C57Bl/6 mice were infected with influenza A/PuertoRico/8/34 (mouse-adapted H1N1) or influenza A/Mexico/4108/2009 (swine-origin pandemic H1N1) and administered human or mouse MSCs via the tail vein, either pre- or post- infection. MSC efficacy was evaluated as both an independent and adjunctive treatment strategy in combination with the antiviral agent, oseltamivir. Weight loss and survival were monitored. Inflammatory cells, cytokine/chemokines (IFN-γ, CXCL10, CCL2 and CCL5) and markers of ALI (total protein and IgM), were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung parenchyma. Results Administration of murine MSCs or human MSCs in a prophylactic or therapeutic regimen failed to improve survival, decrease pulmonary inflammation/inflammatory cell counts or prevent ALI in influenza virus-infected mice. MSCs administered in combination with oseltamivir also failed to improve outcomes. Conclusions Despite similarities in the clinical presentation and pathobiology of ALI and severe influenza, our findings suggest that MSC therapy may not be effective for prevention and/or treatment of acute severe influenza. PMID:23967240

  9. A cross-sectional study of avian influenza in one district of Guangzhou, 2013.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiming; Peng, Cong; Duan, Xiaodong; Shen, Dan; Lan, Guanghua; Xiao, Wutao; Tan, Hai; Wang, Ling; Hou, Jialei; Zhu, Jiancui; He, Riwen; Zhang, Haibing; Zheng, Lilan; Yang, Jianyu; Zhang, Zhen; Zhou, Zhiwei; Li, Wenhua; Hu, Mailing; Zhong, Jinhui; Chen, Yuhua

    2014-01-01

    Since Feb, 2013, more than 100 human beings had been infected with novel H7N9 avian influenza virus. As of May 2013, several H7N9 viruses had been found in retail live bird markets (LBMs) in Guangdong province of southern China where several human cases were confirmed later. However, the real avian influenza virus infection status especially H7N9 in Guangzhou remains unclear. Therefore, a cross-sectional study of avian influenza in commercial poultry farms, the wholesale LBM and retail LBMs in one district of Guangzhou was conducted from October to November, 2013. A total of 1505 cloacal and environmental samples from 52 commercial poultry farms, 1 wholesale LBM and 18 retail LBMs were collected and detected using real-time RT-PCR for type A, H7, H7N9 and H9 subtype avian influenza virus, respectively. Of all the flocks randomly sampled, 6 farms, 12 vendors of the wholesale LBM and 18 retail LBMs were type A avian influenza virus positive with 0, 3 and 11 positive for H9, respectively. The pooled prevalence and individual prevalence of type A avian influenza virus were 33.9% and 7.9% which for H9 subtype was 7.6% and 1.6%, respectively. None was H7 and H7N9 subtype virus positive. Different prevalence and prevalence ratio were found in different poultry species with partridges having the highest prevalence for both type A and H9 subtype avian influenza virus. Our results suggest that LBM may have a higher risk for sustaining and transmission of avian influenza virus than commercial poultry farms. The present study also indicates that different species may play different roles in the evolution and transmission of avian influenza virus. Therefore, risk-based surveillance and management measures should be conducted in future in this area. PMID:25356738

  10. Influenza infection in wild raccoons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, J.S.; Bentler, K.T.; Landolt, G.; Elmore, S.A.; Minnis, R.B.; Campbell, T.A.; Barras, S.C.; Root, J.J.; Pilon, J.; Pabilonia, K.; Driscoll, C.; Slate, D.; Sullivan, H.; McLean, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Raccoons (Procyon lotor) are common, widely distributed animals that frequently come into contact with wild waterfowl, agricultural operations, and humans. Serosurveys showed that raccoons are exposed to avian influenza virus. We found antibodies to a variety of influenza virus subtypes (H10N7, H4N6, H4N2, H3, and H1) with wide geographic variation in seroprevalence. Experimental infection studies showed that raccoons become infected with avian and human influenza A viruses, shed and transmit virus to virus-free animals, and seroconvert. Analyses of cellular receptors showed that raccoons have avian and human type receptors with a similar distribution as found in human respiratory tracts. The potential exists for co-infection of multiple subtypes of influenza virus with genetic reassortment and creation of novel strains of influenza virus. Experimental and field data indicate that raccoons may play an important role in influenza disease ecology and pose risks to agriculture and human health.

  11. Recent progress in designing inhibitors that target the drug-resistant M2 proton channels from the influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Li, Fang; Ma, Chunlong

    2015-07-01

    Influenza viruses are the causative agents for seasonal influenza, which results in thousands of deaths and millions of hospitalizations each year. Moreover, sporadic transmission of avian or swan influenza viruses to humans often leads to an influenza pandemic, as there is no preimmunity in the human body to fight against such novel strains. The metastable genome of the influenza viruses, coupled with the reassortment of different strains from a wide range of host origins, leads to the continuous evolution of the influenza virus diversity. Such characteristics of influenza viruses present a grand challenge in devising therapeutic strategies to combat influenza virus infection. This review summarizes recent progress in designing small molecule inhibitors that target the drug-resistant influenza A virus M2 proton channels and highlights the contribution of mechanistic studies of proton conductance to drug discovery. The lessons learned throughout the course of M2 drug discovery might provide insights for designing inhibitors that target other therapeutically important ion channels. PMID:25663018

  12. Mapping the Risks of Malaria, Dengue and Influenza Using Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, R. K.; Soebiyanto, R. P.

    2012-07-01

    It has long been recognized that environment and climate may affect the transmission of infectious diseases. The effects are most obvious for vector-borne infectious diseases, such as malaria and dengue, but less so for airborne and contact diseases, such as seasonal influenza. In this paper, we examined the meteorological and environmental parameters that influence the transmission of malaria, dengue and seasonal influenza. Remotely sensed parameters that provide such parameters were discussed. Both statistical and biologically inspired, processed based models can be used to model the transmission of these diseases utilizing the remotely sensed parameters as input. Examples were given for modelling malaria in Thailand, dengue in Indonesia, and seasonal influenza in Hong Kong.

  13. Evolution of canine and equine influenza (H3N8) viruses co-circulating between 2005 and 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Rivailler, Pierre; Perry, Ijeoma A.; Jang Yunho; Davis, C. Todd; Chen Limei; Dubovi, Edward J.; Donis, Ruben O.

    2010-12-05

    Influenza virus, subtype H3N8, was transmitted from horses to greyhound dogs in 2004 and subsequently spread to pet dog populations. The co-circulation of H3N8 viruses in dogs and horses makes bi-directional virus transmission between these animal species possible. To understand the dynamics of viral transmission, we performed virologic surveillance in dogs and horses between 2005 and 2008 in the United States. The genomes of influenza A H3N8 viruses isolated from 36 dogs and horses were sequenced to determine their origin and evolution. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that H3N8 influenza viruses from horses and dogs were monophyletic and distinct. There was no evidence of canine influenza virus infection in horses with respiratory disease or new introductions of equine influenza viruses into dogs in the United States. Analysis of a limited number of equine influenza viruses suggested substantial separation in the transmission of viruses causing clinically apparent influenza in dogs and horses.

  14. Influenza A Virus Attenuation by Codon Deoptimization of the NS Gene for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Aitor; Baker, Steven F.; Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Dewhurst, Stephen; Topham, David J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza viral infection represents a serious public health problem that causes contagious respiratory disease, which is most effectively prevented through vaccination to reduce transmission and future infection. The nonstructural (NS) gene of influenza A virus encodes an mRNA transcript that is alternatively spliced to express two viral proteins, the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) and the nuclear export protein (NEP). The importance of the NS gene of influenza A virus for viral replication and virulence has been well described and represents an attractive target to generate live attenuated influenza viruses with vaccine potential. Considering that most amino acids can be synthesized from several synonymous codons, this study employed the use of misrepresented mammalian codons (codon deoptimization) for the de novo synthesis of a viral NS RNA segment based on influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) (PR8) virus. We generated three different recombinant influenza PR8 viruses containing codon-deoptimized synonymous mutations in coding regions comprising the entire NS gene or the mRNA corresponding to the individual viral protein NS1 or NEP, without modifying the respective splicing and packaging signals of the viral segment. The fitness of these synthetic viruses was attenuated in vivo, while they retained immunogenicity, conferring both homologous and heterologous protection against influenza A virus challenges. These results indicate that influenza viruses can be effectively attenuated by synonymous codon deoptimization of the NS gene and open the possibility of their use as a safe vaccine to prevent infections with these important human pathogens. IMPORTANCE Vaccination serves as the best therapeutic option to protect humans against influenza viral infections. However, the efficacy of current influenza vaccines is suboptimal, and novel approaches are necessary for the prevention of disease cause by this important human respiratory pathogen. The nonstructural

  15. Host Genetic Background Strongly Influences the Response to Influenza A Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Barkha; Błażejewska, Paulina; Heßmann, Manuela; Bruder, Dunja; Geffers, Robert; Mauel, Susanne; Gruber, Achim D.; Schughart, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The genetic make-up of the host has a major influence on its response to combat pathogens. For influenza A virus, several single gene mutations have been described which contribute to survival, the immune response and clearance of the pathogen by the host organism. Here, we have studied the influence of the genetic background to influenza A H1N1 (PR8) and H7N7 (SC35M) viruses. The seven inbred laboratory strains of mice analyzed exhibited different weight loss kinetics and survival rates after infection with PR8. Two strains in particular, DBA/2J and A/J, showed very high susceptibility to viral infections compared to all other strains. The LD50 to the influenza virus PR8 in DBA/2J mice was more than 1000-fold lower than in C57BL/6J mice. High susceptibility in DBA/2J mice was also observed after infection with influenza strain SC35M. In addition, infected DBA/2J mice showed a higher viral load in their lungs, elevated expression of cytokines and chemokines, and a more severe and extended lung pathology compared to infected C57BL/6J mice. These findings indicate a major contribution of the genetic background of the host to influenza A virus infections. The overall response in highly susceptible DBA/2J mice resembled the pathology described for infections with the highly virulent influenza H1N1-1918 and newly emerged H5N1 viruses. PMID:19293935

  16. Enhanced immune responses by skin vaccination with influenza subunit vaccine in young hosts.

    PubMed

    Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G; Esser, E Stein; McMaster, Sean R; Kalluri, Priya; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Prausnitz, Mark R; Skountzou, Ioanna; Denning, Timothy L; Kohlmeier, Jacob E; Compans, Richard W

    2015-09-01

    Skin has gained substantial attention as a vaccine target organ due to its immunological properties, which include a high density of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Previous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of this vaccination route not only in animal models but also in adults. Young children represent a population group that is at high risk from influenza infection. As a result, this group could benefit significantly from influenza vaccine delivery approaches through the skin and the improved immune response it can induce. In this study, we compared the immune responses in young BALB/c mice upon skin delivery of influenza vaccine with vaccination by the conventional intramuscular route. Young mice that received 5 μg of H1N1 A/Ca/07/09 influenza subunit vaccine using MN demonstrated an improved serum antibody response (IgG1 and IgG2a) when compared to the young IM group, accompanied by higher numbers of influenza-specific antibody secreting cells (ASCs) in the bone marrow. In addition, we observed increased activation of follicular helper T cells and formation of germinal centers in the regional lymph nodes in the MN immunized group, rapid clearance of the virus from their lungs as well as complete survival, compared with partial protection observed in the IM-vaccinated group. Our results support the hypothesis that influenza vaccine delivery through the skin would be beneficial for protecting the high-risk young population from influenza infection. PMID:25744228

  17. Well-tolerated Spirulina extract inhibits influenza virus replication and reduces virus-induced mortality

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Hsiang; Chang, Gi-Kung; Kuo, Shu-Ming; Huang, Sheng-Yu; Hu, I-Chen; Lo, Yu-Lun; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is one of the most common human respiratory diseases, and represents a serious public health concern. However, the high mutability of influenza viruses has hampered vaccine development, and resistant strains to existing anti-viral drugs have also emerged. Novel anti-influenza therapies are urgently needed, and in this study, we describe the anti-viral properties of a Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) cold water extract. Anti-viral effects have previously been reported for extracts and specific substances derived from Spirulina, and here we show that this Spirulina cold water extract has low cellular toxicity, and is well-tolerated in animal models at one dose as high as 5,000 mg/kg, or 3,000 mg/kg/day for 14 successive days. Anti-flu efficacy studies revealed that the Spirulina extract inhibited viral plaque formation in a broad range of influenza viruses, including oseltamivir-resistant strains. Spirulina extract was found to act at an early stage of infection to reduce virus yields in cells and improve survival in influenza-infected mice, with inhibition of influenza hemagglutination identified as one of the mechanisms involved. Together, these results suggest that the cold water extract of Spirulina might serve as a safe and effective therapeutic agent to manage influenza outbreaks, and further clinical investigation may be warranted. PMID:27067133

  18. Well-tolerated Spirulina extract inhibits influenza virus replication and reduces virus-induced mortality.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hsiang; Chang, Gi-Kung; Kuo, Shu-Ming; Huang, Sheng-Yu; Hu, I-Chen; Lo, Yu-Lun; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is one of the most common human respiratory diseases, and represents a serious public health concern. However, the high mutability of influenza viruses has hampered vaccine development, and resistant strains to existing anti-viral drugs have also emerged. Novel anti-influenza therapies are urgently needed, and in this study, we describe the anti-viral properties of a Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) cold water extract. Anti-viral effects have previously been reported for extracts and specific substances derived from Spirulina, and here we show that this Spirulina cold water extract has low cellular toxicity, and is well-tolerated in animal models at one dose as high as 5,000 mg/kg, or 3,000 mg/kg/day for 14 successive days. Anti-flu efficacy studies revealed that the Spirulina extract inhibited viral plaque formation in a broad range of influenza viruses, including oseltamivir-resistant strains. Spirulina extract was found to act at an early stage of infection to reduce virus yields in cells and improve survival in influenza-infected mice, with inhibition of influenza hemagglutination identified as one of the mechanisms involved. Together, these results suggest that the cold water extract of Spirulina might serve as a safe and effective therapeutic agent to manage influenza outbreaks, and further clinical investigation may be warranted. PMID:27067133

  19. Antiviral Effect of Methylated Flavonol Isorhamnetin against Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Choi, Hye Yeon; Kim, Young Bong; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is an infectious respiratory disease with frequent seasonal epidemics that causes a high rate of mortality and morbidity in humans, poultry, and animals. Influenza is a serious economic concern due to the costly countermeasures it necessitates. In this study, we compared the antiviral activities of several flavonols and other flavonoids with similar, but distinct, hydroxyl or methyl substitution patterns at the 3, 3′, and 4′ positions of the 15-carbon flavonoid skeleton, and found that the strongest antiviral effect was induced by isorhamnetin. Similar to quercetin and kaempferol, isorhamnetin possesses a hydroxyl group on the C ring, but it has a 3′-methyl group on the B ring that is absent in quercetin and kaempferol. Co-treatment and pre-treatment with isorhamnetin produced a strong antiviral effect against the influenza virus A/PR/08/34(H1N1). However, isorhamnetin showed the most potent antiviral potency when administered after viral exposure (post-treatment method) in vitro. Isorhamnetin treatment reduced virus-induced ROS generation and blocked cytoplasmic lysosome acidification and the lipidation of microtubule associated protein1 light chain 3-B (LC3B). Oral administration of isorhamnetin in mice infected with the influenza A virus significantly decreased lung virus titer by 2 folds, increased the survival rate which ranged from 70–80%, and decreased body weight loss by 25%. In addition, isorhamnetin decreased the virus titer in ovo using embryonated chicken eggs. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) of isorhamnetin could explain its strong anti-influenza virus potency; the methyl group located on the B ring of isorhamnetin may contribute to its strong antiviral potency against influenza virus in comparison with other flavonoids. PMID:25806943

  20. GM-CSF modulates pulmonary resistance to influenza A infection

    PubMed Central

    Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Murthy, Aditi; Davis, Jeremy; Florence, Jon Matthew; Kurdowska, Anna; Krupa, Agnieszka; Tichelaar, Jay W.; White, Mitchell R.; Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Kobzik, Lester; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Chroneos, Zissis C.

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar type II epithelial or other pulmonary cells secrete GM-CSF that regulates surfactant catabolism and mucosal host defense through its capacity to modulate the maturation and activation of alveolar macrophages. GM-CSF enhances expression of scavenger receptors MARCO and SR-A. The alveolar macrophage SP-R210 receptor binds the surfactant collectin SP-A mediating clearance of respiratory pathogens. The current study determined the effects of epithelial-derived GM-CSF in host resistance to influenza A pneumonia. The results demonstrate that GM-CSF enhanced resistance to infection with 1.9 × 104 ffc of the mouse-adapted influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) H1N1 strain, as indicated by significant differences in mortality and mean survival of GM-CSF-deficient (GM−/−) mice compared to GM−/− mice in which GM-CSF is expressed at increased levels. Protective effects of GM-CSF were observed both in mice with constitutive and inducible GM-CSF expression under the control of the pulmonary-specific SFTPC or SCGB1A1 promoters, respectively. Mice that continuously secrete high levels of GM-CSF developed desquamative interstitial pneumonia that impaired long-term recovery from influenza. Conditional expression of optimal GM-CSF levels at the time of infection, however, resulted in alveolar macrophage proliferation and focal lymphocytic inflammation of distal airways. GM-CSF enhanced alveolar macrophage activity as indicated by increased expression of SP-R210 and CD11c. Infection of mice lacking the GM-CSF-regulated SR-A and MARCO receptors revealed that MARCO decreases resistance to influenza in association with increased levels of SP-R210 in MARCO−/− alveolar macrophages. In conclusion, GM-CSF enhances early host resistance to influenza. Targeting of MARCO may reinforce GM-CSF-mediated host defense against pathogenic influenza. PMID:21925209

  1. Pathogenesis of H5N1 influenza virus infections in mice and ferret models differ between respiratory and digestive system exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory data suggests H5N1 influenza viruses are transmitted through and predominantly affect the respiratory system of mammals. Some data suggests digestive system involvement. However, direct evidence of alimentary transmission and infection in mammal...

  2. H1N1 influenza (Swine flu)

    MedlinePlus

    Swine flu; H1N1 type A influenza ... of the H1N1 virus were found in pigs (swine). Over time, the virus changed (mutated) and infected ... 25654610 . Treanor JJ. Influenza (including avian influenza and swine influenza). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, ...

  3. Use of Hangeul Twitter to Track and Predict Human Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eui-Ki; Seok, Jong Hyeon; Oh, Jang Seok; Lee, Hyong Woo; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Influenza epidemics arise through the accumulation of viral genetic changes. The emergence of new virus strains coincides with a higher level of influenza-like illness (ILI), which is seen as a peak of a normal season. Monitoring the spread of an epidemic influenza in populations is a difficult and important task. Twitter is a free social networking service whose messages can improve the accuracy of forecasting models by providing early warnings of influenza outbreaks. In this study, we have examined the use of information embedded in the Hangeul Twitter stream to detect rapidly evolving public awareness or concern with respect to influenza transmission and developed regression models that can track levels of actual disease activity and predict influenza epidemics in the real world. Our prediction model using a delay mode provides not only a real-time assessment of the current influenza epidemic activity but also a significant improvement in prediction performance at the initial phase of ILI peak when prediction is of most importance. PMID:23894447

  4. Current developments in avian influenza vaccines, including safety of vaccinated birds as food.

    PubMed

    Swayne, D E; Suarez, D L

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, most vaccines against avian influenza were based on oil-emulsified inactivated low- or high-pathogenicity viruses. Now, recombinant fowl pox and avian paramyxovirus type 1 vaccines with avian influenza H5 gene inserts (+ or - N1 gene insert) are available and licensed. New technologies might overcome existing limitations to make available vaccines that can be grown in tissue culture systems for more rapid production; provide optimized protection, as a result of closer genetic relations to field viruses; allow mass administration by aerosol, in drinking-water or in ovo; and allow easier strategies for identifying infected birds within vaccinated populations (DIVA). The technologies include avian influenza viruses with partial gene deletions, avian influenza-Newcastle disease virus chimeras, vectored vaccines such as adenoviruses and Marek's disease virus, and subunit vaccines. These new methods should be licensed only after their purity, safety, efficacy and potency against avian influenza viruses have been demonstrated, and, for live vectored vaccines, restriction of viral transmission to unvaccinated birds. Use of vaccines in countries affected by highly pathogenic avian influenza will not only protect poultry but will provide additional safety for consumers. Experimental studies have shown that birds vaccinated against avian influenza have no virus in meat and minimal amounts in eggs after HPAI virus challenge, and that replication and shedding from their respiratory and alimentary tracts is greatly reduced. PMID:18411943

  5. Shingles Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Shingles Immunization Action Coalition Chickenpox Q&As Transmission Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Prevention & Treatment Related Pages Preventing Varicella Zoster Virus Transmission in Healthcare Settings Related Links Medline Plus NIH ...

  6. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2016-02-01

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  7. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Michael G.; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M.; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza. IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza

  8. Matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus blocks autophagosome fusion with lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gannagé, Monique; Schmid, Dorothee; Albrecht, Randy; Dengjel, Jörn; Torossi, Tania; Rämer, Patrick C.; Lee, Monica; Strowig, Till; Arrey, Frida; Conenello, Gina; Pypaert, Marc; Andersen, Jens; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Münz, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A virus is an important human pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality every year and threatening the human population with epidemics and pandemics. Therefore, it is important to understand the biology of this virus to develop strategies to control its pathogenicity. Here we demonstrate that live influenza A virus infection causes accumulation of autophagosomes by blocking their fusion with lysosomes. Matrix protein 2 is sufficient and necessary for this inhibition of autophagosome degradation. Macroautophagy inhibition compromises cell survival of influenza virus infected cells, but does not influence viral replication. We propose that infl