Science.gov

Sample records for information brokering architecture

  1. Agent-Oriented Privacy-Based Information Brokering Architecture for Healthcare Environments

    PubMed Central

    Masaud-Wahaishi, Abdulmutalib; Ghenniwa, Hamada

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare industry is facing a major reform at all levels—locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally. Healthcare services and systems become very complex and comprise of a vast number of components (software systems, doctors, patients, etc.) that are characterized by shared, distributed and heterogeneous information sources with varieties of clinical and other settings. The challenge now faced with decision making, and management of care is to operate effectively in order to meet the information needs of healthcare personnel. Currently, researchers, developers, and systems engineers are working toward achieving better efficiency and quality of service in various sectors of healthcare, such as hospital management, patient care, and treatment. This paper presents a novel information brokering architecture that supports privacy-based information gathering in healthcare. Architecturally, the brokering is viewed as a layer of services where a brokering service is modeled as an agent with a specific architecture and interaction protocol that are appropriate to serve various requests. Within the context of brokering, we model privacy in terms of the entities ability to hide or reveal information related to its identities, requests, and/or capabilities. A prototype of the proposed architecture has been implemented to support information-gathering capabilities in healthcare environments using FIPA-complaint platform JADE. PMID:19325918

  2. Certification for Information Brokers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Deborah C.

    1995-01-01

    The future of the information broker business depends on certification. Some obstacles are lack of commonality, control, a professional title, and time. Core competencies (ethics, professional conduct, and client care) and specialties could determine certification criteria, and a grace period for phasing in established brokers could be initiated.…

  3. Bandwidth broker architecture for VoIP QoS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keith; Mouchtaris, Petros; Samtani, Sunil; Talpade, Rajesh; Wong, Larry

    2001-07-01

    We present a scalable architecture for assuring Quality of Service to VoIP applications in an Internet Service Provider's network. This architecture is based on the Differentiated Services and Bandwidth Broker models, and can also be used by other resource-sensitive applications. In this paper, we elaborate on a number of significant issues involved in the design, implementation, deployment and use of the Bandwidth Broker. The Call Agent architecture is used as the VoIP application. We describe the Bandwidth Broker prototype that is used to validate our approach. Our findings suggest that it is feasible to use the Bandwidth Broker architecture for assuring QoS, and a trade-off exists between the granularity of resource requests and call-setup delay.

  4. Resource brokering service: timely and efficient information resource allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hook, Daniel J.; Ljungberg, Magnus; Shaw, Robert; Ford, Mark; Aubin, Ethan; Konieczny, Eric; Lee, Daniel H.; Brown, Samuel T.

    2010-04-01

    We address supporting unanticipated users and uses of limited information resources (sensors, databases, weapons - any resource intrinsically tied to digital information) in a timely and efficient fashion. Platform-centric systems often preclude users and uses not identified when the system was developed and deployed. Net-centric approaches, however, can address these problems by allowing services and information to be discovered and accessed at run-time. We have developed a resource brokering service that uses net-centric principles and semantic metadata to enable multi-domain information and resource sharing and support for unanticipated users and uses. The resource brokering service uses federated brokering agents and a modular software component framework for dynamically composing and tasking heterogeneous resources including sensors, data feeds, processors, archived data, networks, and even analysts into resilient, mission-oriented workflows. The resource brokering service is applicable to multiple sense-decide-act military domains including missile defense, space situation awareness, ISR, border protection, and cyber defense. In this paper we present a concept and architecture for resource brokering and describe current applications. Our architecture is aligned with the U.S. DoD's NCES (Net-Centric Enterprise Services).

  5. Information Brokers in Victoria: Doing What, for Whom and How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Marianne; Kelson, Deborah

    1984-01-01

    Reports findings of study of information brokers in Victoria, Australia, which identified services offered by individual brokers and information brokerage businesses, resources used to provide those services, their clientele and pricing strategies, the attributes needed for a successful broker, and relationships between brokers and traditional…

  6. Information broker: a useless overhead or a necessity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitan, Jacek

    1996-01-01

    The richness and diversity of information available over the Internet, its size, convenience of access, and its dynamic growth will create new ways to offer better education opportunities in medicine. The Internet will especially benefit medical training process that is expensive and requires continuous updating. The use of the Internet will lower the delivery cost and make medical information available to all potential users. On the other hand, since medical information must be trusted and new policies must be developed to support these capabilities, technologies alone are not enough. In general, we must deal with issues of liability, remuneration for educational and professional services, and general issues of ethics associated with patient-physician relationship in a complicated environment created by a mix of managed and private care combined with modern information technology. In this paper we will focus only on the need to create, to manage and to operate open system over the Internet, or similar low-cost and easy access networks, for the purpose of medical education process. Finally, using business analysis, we argue why the medical education infrastructure needs an information broker, a third party organization that will help the users to access the information and the publishers to display their titles. The first section outlines recent trends in medical education. In the second section, we discuss transfusion medicine requirements. In the third section we provide a summary of the American Red Cross (ARC) transfusion audit system; we discuss the relevance of the assumptions used in this system to other areas of medicine. In the fourth section we describe the overall system architecture and discuss key components. The fifth section covers business issues associated with medical education systems and with the potential role of ARC in particular. The last section provides a summary of findings.

  7. QoS enabled dissemination of managed information objects in a publish-subscribe-query information broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyall, Joseph P.; Carvalho, Marco; Martignoni, Andrew, III; Schmidt, Douglas; Sinclair, Asher; Gillen, Matthew; Edmondson, James; Bunch, Larry; Corman, David

    2009-05-01

    Net-centric information spaces have become a necessary concept to support information exchange for tactical warfighting missions using a publish-subscribe-query paradigm. To support dynamic, mission-critical and time-critical operations, information spaces require quality of service (QoS)-enabled dissemination (QED) of information. This paper describes the results of research we are conducting to provide QED information exchange in tactical environments. We have developed a prototype QoS-enabled publish-subscribe-query information broker that provides timely delivery of information needed by tactical warfighters in mobile scenarios with time-critical emergent targets. This broker enables tailoring and prioritizing of information based on mission needs and responds rapidly to priority shifts and unfolding situations. This paper describes the QED architecture, prototype implementation, testing infrastructure, and empirical evaluations we have conducted based on our prototype.

  8. RSVP as a user signaling protocol in a multilayer bandwidth broker architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolouzou, Eugenia; Tsetsekas, Charilaos; Maniatis, Sotirios; Venieris, Iakovos S.

    2001-07-01

    A lot of research efforts have recently focused on RSVP and the DiffServ architecture to provide end-to-end Quality of Service in the Internet. This paper presents a multi-layer bandwidth broker architecture, based on the DiffServ paradigm that uses RSVP as a user signaling protocol. The paper describes the necessary operations performed to support RSVP, both in terms of the architecture (functionality) and in terms of QoS management (mapping of the traffic descriptors of RSVP and the new architecture). The purpose is to step into design and implementation details that are not covered by RFCs, and to explain in brief what are the actual design decisions adopted by the authors.

  9. 26 CFR 1.6045-1T - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary). 1.6045-1T Section 1.6045-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6045-1T Returns of information of brokers...

  10. 26 CFR 1.6045-1 - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges. 1.6045-1 Section 1.6045-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6045-1 Returns of information of brokers and barter...

  11. 75 FR 67094 - Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security... concerning the: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers (19 CFR Part 111). This request for comment...

  12. 78 FR 76851 - Agency Information Collection Activities: BP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: BP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland... requirement concerning the CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers (19 CFR Part 111). This request...

  13. The Use of an Information Brokering Tool in an Electronic Museum Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Andreas; Lorenz, Andreas; Specht, Marcus

    When art and technology meet, a huge information flow has to be managed. The LISTEN project conducted by the Fraunhofer Institut in St. Augustin (Germany) augments every day environments with audio information. In order to distribute and administer this information in an efficient way, the Institute decided to employ an information brokering tool…

  14. Health Information Brokers in the General Population: An Analysis of the Health Information National Trends Survey 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Kathleen M; Agunwamba, Amenah A; Valluri, Sruthi; Wilson, Patrick M; Sadasivam, Rajani S; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2016-01-01

    Background Health information exchanged between friends or family members can influence decision making, both for routine health questions and for serious health issues. A health information broker is a person to whom friends and family turn for advice or information on health-related topics. Characteristics and online behaviors of health information brokers have not previously been studied in a national population. Objective The objective of this study was to examine sociodemographic characteristics, health information seeking behaviors, and other online behaviors among health information brokers. Methods Data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (2013-2014; n=3142) were used to compare brokers with nonbrokers. Modified Poisson regression was used to examine the relationship between broker status and sociodemographics and online information seeking. Results Over half (54.8%) of the respondents were consulted by family or friends for advice or information on health topics (ie, they acted as health information brokers). Brokers represented 54.1% of respondents earning <$20,000 yearly and 56.5% of respondents born outside the United States. Women were more likely to be brokers (PR 1.34, 95% CI 1.23-1.47) as were those with education past high school (PR 1.42, CI 1.22-1.65). People aged ≥75 were less likely to be brokers as compared to respondents aged 35-49 (PR 0.81, CI 0.67-0.99). Brokers used the Internet more frequently for a variety of online behaviors such as seeking health information, creating and sharing online content, and downloading health information onto a mobile device; and also reported greater confidence in obtaining health information online. Conclusions More than 50% of adults who responded to this national survey, including those with low income and those born abroad, were providing health information or advice to friends and family. These individuals may prove to be effective targets for initiatives supporting patient engagement

  15. Information systems definition architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Calapristi, A.J.

    1996-06-20

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Systems Definition architecture evaluated information Management (IM) processes in several key organizations. The intent of the study is to identify improvements in TWRS IM processes that will enable better support to the TWRS mission, and accommodate changes in TWRS business environment. The ultimate goals of the study are to reduce IM costs, Manage the configuration of TWRS IM elements, and improve IM-related process performance.

  16. 17 CFR 240.17a-25 - Electronic submission of securities transaction information by exchange members, brokers, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... interested, such member, broker or dealer shall submit the following information: (i) Clearing house number, or alpha symbol of the member, broker, or dealer submitting the information; (ii) Clearing house... transaction was a purchase, sale, or short sale; and, if an options contract, whether open long or short...

  17. Information architecture. Volume 3: Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this document, as presented in Volume 1, The Foundations, is to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and promulgating information architecture guidance. This guidance is aimed at increasing the development of information architecture as a Departmentwide management best practice. This document describes departmental information architecture principles and minimum design characteristics for systems and infrastructures within the DOE Information Architecture Conceptual Model, and establishes a Departmentwide standards-based architecture program. The publication of this document fulfills the commitment to address guiding principles, promote standard architectural practices, and provide technical guidance. This document guides the transition from the baseline or defacto Departmental architecture through approved information management program plans and budgets to the future vision architecture. This document also represents another major step toward establishing a well-organized, logical foundation for the DOE information architecture.

  18. 76 FR 163 - Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... Register (75 FR 67094) on November 1, 2010, allowing for a 60-day comment period. This notice allows for an... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland...

  19. 78 FR 78375 - Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers Correction In notice document 2013-30220 appearing on page 76851 of the issue of Thursday, December 19, 2013, make...

  20. 77 FR 20686 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collections: Two DDTC Brokering Collections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... comment on December 19, 2011 (see 76 FR 78578). On that occasion, public comment was sought in the context... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collections: Two DDTC Brokering Collections ACTION: Notice of request...

  1. The NASA Integrated Information Technology Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldridge, Tim

    1997-01-01

    of IT systems, 3) the Technical Architecture: a common, vendor-independent framework for design, integration and implementation of IT systems and 4) the Product Architecture: vendor=specific IT solutions. The Systems Architecture is effectively a description of the end-user "requirements". Generalized end-user requirements are discussed and subsequently organized into specific mission and project functions. The Technical Architecture depicts the framework, and relationship, of the specific IT components that enable the end-user functionality as described in the Systems Architecture. The primary components as described in the Technical Architecture are: 1) Applications: Basic Client Component, Object Creation Applications, Collaborative Applications, Object Analysis Applications, 2) Services: Messaging, Information Broker, Collaboration, Distributed Processing, and 3) Infrastructure: Network, Security, Directory, Certificate Management, Enterprise Management and File System. This Architecture also provides specific Implementation Recommendations, the most significant of which is the recognition of IT as core to NASA activities and defines a plan, which is aligned with the NASA strategic planning processes, for keeping the Architecture alive and useful.

  2. Ensuring consistency and persistence to the Quality Information Model - The role of the GeoViQua Broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigagli, Lorenzo; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Nativi, Stefano; Bastin, Lucy; Masó, Joan

    2013-04-01

    a few products are annotated with their PID; recent studies show that on a total of about 100000 Clearinghouse products, only 37 have the Product Identifier. Furthermore the association should be persistent within the GeoViQua scope. GeoViQua architecture is built on the brokering approach successfully experimented within the EuroGEOSS project and realized by the GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker). Part of the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI), the GEO DAB allows for harmonization and distribution in a transparent way for both users and data providers. This way, GeoViQua can effectively complement and extend the GEO DAB obtaining a Quality-augmentation broker (GeoViQua Broker) which plays a central role in ensuring the consistency of the Producer and User quality models. This work is focused on the typical use case in which the GeoViQua Broker performs data discovery from different data providers, and then integrates in the Quality Information Model the producer quality report with the feedback given by users. In particular, this work highlights the problems faced by the GeoViQua Broker and the techniques adopted to ensure consistency and persistency also for quality reports whose target products are not annotated with a PID. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement n° 265178.

  3. Dynamic Information Architecture System

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, John

    1997-02-12

    The Dynamic Information System (DIAS) is a flexible object-based software framework for concurrent, multidiscplinary modeling of arbitrary (but related) processes. These processes are modeled as interrelated actions caused by and affecting the collection of diverse real-world objects represented in a simulation. The DIAS architecture allows independent process models to work together harmoniously in the same frame of reference and provides a wide range of data ingestion and output capabilities, including Geographic Information System (GIS) type map-based displays and photorealistic visualization of simulations in progress. In the DIAS implementation of the object-based approach, software objects carry within them not only the data which describe their static characteristics, but also the methods, or functions, which describe their dynamic behaviors. There are two categories of objects: (1) Entity objects which have real-world counterparts and are the actors in a simulation, and (2) Software infrastructure objects which make it possible to carry out the simulations. The Entity objects contain lists of Aspect objects, each of which addresses a single aspect of the Entity''s behavior. For example, a DIAS Stream Entity representing a section of a river can have many aspects correspondimg to its behavior in terms of hydrology (as a drainage system component), navigation (as a link in a waterborne transportation system), meteorology (in terms of moisture, heat, and momentum exchange with the atmospheric boundary layer), and visualization (for photorealistic visualization or map type displays), etc. This makes it possible for each real-world object to exhibit any or all of its unique behaviors within the context of a single simulation.

  4. Dynamic Information Architecture System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-02-12

    The Dynamic Information System (DIAS) is a flexible object-based software framework for concurrent, multidiscplinary modeling of arbitrary (but related) processes. These processes are modeled as interrelated actions caused by and affecting the collection of diverse real-world objects represented in a simulation. The DIAS architecture allows independent process models to work together harmoniously in the same frame of reference and provides a wide range of data ingestion and output capabilities, including Geographic Information System (GIS) typemore » map-based displays and photorealistic visualization of simulations in progress. In the DIAS implementation of the object-based approach, software objects carry within them not only the data which describe their static characteristics, but also the methods, or functions, which describe their dynamic behaviors. There are two categories of objects: (1) Entity objects which have real-world counterparts and are the actors in a simulation, and (2) Software infrastructure objects which make it possible to carry out the simulations. The Entity objects contain lists of Aspect objects, each of which addresses a single aspect of the Entity''s behavior. For example, a DIAS Stream Entity representing a section of a river can have many aspects correspondimg to its behavior in terms of hydrology (as a drainage system component), navigation (as a link in a waterborne transportation system), meteorology (in terms of moisture, heat, and momentum exchange with the atmospheric boundary layer), and visualization (for photorealistic visualization or map type displays), etc. This makes it possible for each real-world object to exhibit any or all of its unique behaviors within the context of a single simulation.« less

  5. The DIAS/CEOS Water Portal, distributed system using brokering architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Satoko; Sekioka, Shinichi; Kuroiwa, Kaori; Kudo, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    The DIAS/CEOS Water Portal is a one of the DIAS (Data Integration and Analysis System, http://www.editoria.u-tokyo.ac.jp/projects/dias/?locale=en_US) systems for data distribution for users including, but not limited to, scientists, decision makers and officers like river administrators. This portal has two main functions; one is to search and access data and the other is to register and share use cases which use datasets provided via this portal. This presentation focuses on the first function, to search and access data. The Portal system is distributed in the sense that, while the portal system is located in Tokyo, the data is located in archive centers which are globally distributed. For example, some in-situ data is archived at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, USA. The NWP station time series and global gridded model output data is archived at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPIM) in cooperation with the World Data Center for Climate in Hamburg, Germany. Part of satellite data is archived at DIAS storage at the University of Tokyo, Japan. This portal itself does not store data. Instead, according to requests made by users on the web page, it retrieves data from distributed data centers on-the-fly and lets them download and see rendered images/plots. Although some data centers have unique meta data format and/or data search protocols, our portal's brokering function enables users to search across various data centers at one time, like one-stop shopping. And this portal is also connected to other data brokering systems, including GEOSS DAB (Discovery and Access Broker). As a result, users can search over thousands of datasets, millions of files at one time. Our system mainly relies on the open source software GI-cat (http://essi-lab.eu/do/view/GIcat), Opensearch protocol and OPeNDAP protocol to enable the above functions. Details on how it works will be introduced during the

  6. Secure and Privacy-Preserving Distributed Information Brokering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Fengjun

    2010-01-01

    As enormous structured, semi-structured and unstructured data are collected and archived by organizations in many realms ranging from business to health networks to government agencies, the needs for efficient yet secure inter-organization information sharing naturally arise. Unlike early information sharing approaches that only involve a small…

  7. Integrating hospital information systems in healthcare institutions: a mediation architecture.

    PubMed

    El Azami, Ikram; Cherkaoui Malki, Mohammed Ouçamah; Tahon, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Many studies have examined the integration of information systems into healthcare institutions, leading to several standards in the healthcare domain (CORBAmed: Common Object Request Broker Architecture in Medicine; HL7: Health Level Seven International; DICOM: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine; and IHE: Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise). Due to the existence of a wide diversity of heterogeneous systems, three essential factors are necessary to fully integrate a system: data, functions and workflow. However, most of the previous studies have dealt with only one or two of these factors and this makes the system integration unsatisfactory. In this paper, we propose a flexible, scalable architecture for Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Our main purpose is to provide a practical solution to insure HIS interoperability so that healthcare institutions can communicate without being obliged to change their local information systems and without altering the tasks of the healthcare professionals. Our architecture is a mediation architecture with 3 levels: 1) a database level, 2) a middleware level and 3) a user interface level. The mediation is based on two central components: the Mediator and the Adapter. Using the XML format allows us to establish a structured, secured exchange of healthcare data. The notion of medical ontology is introduced to solve semantic conflicts and to unify the language used for the exchange. Our mediation architecture provides an effective, promising model that promotes the integration of hospital information systems that are autonomous, heterogeneous, semantically interoperable and platform-independent. PMID:22086739

  8. Knowledge brokers, companions, and navigators: a qualitative examination of informal caregivers’ roles in medical tourism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many studies examining the phenomena of medical tourism have identified health equity issues associated with this global health services practice. However, there is a notable lack of attention in this existing research to the informal care provided by the friends and family members who typically accompany medical tourists abroad. To date, researchers have not examined the care roles filled by informal caregivers travelling with medical tourists. In this article, we fill this gap by examining these informal caregivers and the roles they take on towards supporting medical tourists’ health and wellbeing. Methods We conducted 21 interviews with International Patient Coordinators (IPCs) working at medical tourism hospitals across ten countries. IPCs work closely with informal caregivers as providers of non-medical personal assistance, and can therefore offer broad insight on caregiver roles. The interviews were coded and analyzed thematically. Results Three roles emerged: knowledge broker, companion, and navigator. As knowledge brokers, caregivers facilitate the transfer of information between the medical tourist and formal health care providers as well as other staff members at medical tourism facilities. The companion role involves providing medical tourists with physical and emotional care. Meanwhile, responsibilities associated with handling documents and coordinating often complex journeys are part of the navigation role. Conclusions This is the first study to examine informal caregiving roles in medical tourism. Many of the roles identified are similar to those of conventional informal caregivers while others are specific to the transnational context. We conclude that these roles make informal caregivers an integral part of the larger phenomenon of medical tourism. We further contend that examining the roles taken on by a heretofore-unconsidered medical tourism stakeholder group sheds valuable insight into how this industry operates and that such

  9. Virtual management of radiology examinations in the virtual radiology environment using common object request broker architecture services.

    PubMed

    Martinez, R; Rozenblit, J; Cook, J F; Chacko, A K; Timboe, H L

    1999-05-01

    In the Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Medical Command is now embarking on an extremely exciting new project--creating a virtual radiology environment (VRE) for the management of radiology examinations. The business of radiology in the military is therefore being reengineered on several fronts by the VRE Project. In the VRE Project, a set of intelligent agent algorithms determine where examinations are to routed for reading bases on a knowledge base of the entire VRE. The set of algorithms, called the Meta-Manager, is hierarchical and uses object-based communications between medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and medical centers that have digital imaging network picture archiving and communications systems (DIN-PACS) networks. The communications is based on use of common object request broker architecture (CORBA) objects and services to send patient demographics and examination images from DIN-PACS networks in the MTFs to the DIN-PACS networks at the medical centers for diagnosis. The Meta-Manager is also responsible for updating the diagnosis at the originating MTF. CORBA services are used to perform secure message communications between DIN-PACS nodes in the VRE network. The Meta-Manager has a fail-safe architecture that allows the master Meta-Manager function to float to regional Meta-Manager sites in case of server failure. A prototype of the CORBA-based Meta-Manager is being developed by the University of Arizona's Computer Engineering Research Laboratory using the unified modeling language (UML) as a design tool. The prototype will implement the main functions described in the Meta-Manager design specification. The results of this project are expected to reengineer the process of radiology in the military and have extensions to commercial radiology environments. PMID:10342205

  10. Risk communication and informed consent in the medical tourism industry: A thematic content analysis of canadian broker websites

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Medical tourism, thought of as patients seeking non-emergency medical care outside of their home countries, is a growing industry worldwide. Canadians are amongst those engaging in medical tourism, and many are helped in the process of accessing care abroad by medical tourism brokers - agents who specialize in making international medical care arrangements for patients. As a key source of information for these patients, brokers are likely to play an important role in communicating the risks and benefits of undergoing surgery or other procedures abroad to their clientele. This raises important ethical concerns regarding processes such as informed consent and the liability of brokers in the event that complications arise from procedures. The purpose of this article is to examine the language, information, and online marketing of Canadian medical tourism brokers' websites in light of such ethical concerns. Methods An exhaustive online search using multiple search engines and keywords was performed to compile a comprehensive directory of English-language Canadian medical tourism brokerage websites. These websites were examined using thematic content analysis, which included identifying informational themes, generating frequency counts of these themes, and comparing trends in these counts to the established literature. Results Seventeen websites were identified for inclusion in this study. It was found that Canadian medical tourism broker websites varied widely in scope, content, professionalism and depth of information. Three themes emerged from the thematic content analysis: training and accreditation, risk communication, and business dimensions. Third party accreditation bodies of debatable regulatory value were regularly mentioned on the reviewed websites, and discussion of surgical risk was absent on 47% of the websites reviewed, with limited discussion of risk on the remaining ones. Terminology describing brokers' roles was somewhat inconsistent across

  11. Information architecture. Volume 4: Vision

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Vision document marks the transition from definition to implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture Program. A description of the possibilities for the future, supported by actual experience with a process model and tool set, points toward implementation options. The directions for future information technology investments are discussed. Practical examples of how technology answers the business and information needs of the organization through coordinated and meshed data, applications, and technology architectures are related. This document is the fourth and final volume in the planned series for defining and exhibiting the DOE information architecture. The targeted scope of this document includes DOE Program Offices, field sites, contractor-operated facilities, and laboratories. This document paints a picture of how, over the next 7 years, technology may be implemented, dramatically improving the ways business is conducted at DOE. While technology is mentioned throughout this document, the vision is not about technology. The vision concerns the transition afforded by technology and the process steps to be completed to ensure alignment with business needs. This goal can be met if those directing the changing business and mission-support processes understand the capabilities afforded by architectural processes.

  12. Enterprise Information Architecture for Mission Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutra, Jayne

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept of an information architecture to assist in mission development. The integrate information architecture will create a unified view of the information using metadata and the values (i.e., taxonomy).

  13. Architecture for hospital information integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimiak, William J.; Janariz, Daniel L.; Martinez, Ralph

    1999-07-01

    The ongoing integration of hospital information systems (HIS) continues. Data storage systems, data networks and computers improve, data bases grow and health-care applications increase. Some computer operating systems continue to evolve and some fade. Health care delivery now depends on this computer-assisted environment. The result is the critical harmonization of the various hospital information systems becomes increasingly difficult. The purpose of this paper is to present an architecture for HIS integration that is computer-language-neutral and computer- hardware-neutral for the informatics applications. The proposed architecture builds upon the work done at the University of Arizona on middleware, the work of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, and the American College of Radiology. It is a fresh approach to allowing applications engineers to access medical data easily and thus concentrates on the application techniques in which they are expert without struggling with medical information syntaxes. The HIS can be modeled using a hierarchy of information sub-systems thus facilitating its understanding. The architecture includes the resulting information model along with a strict but intuitive application programming interface, managed by CORBA. The CORBA requirement facilitates interoperability. It should also reduce software and hardware development times.

  14. Common object request broker architecture (CORBA)-based security services for the virtual radiology environment.

    PubMed

    Martinez, R; Cole, C; Rozenblit, J; Cook, J F; Chacko, A K

    2000-05-01

    The US Army Great Plains Regional Medical Command (GPRMC) has a requirement to conform to Department of Defense (DoD) and Army security policies for the Virtual Radiology Environment (VRE) Project. Within the DoD, security policy is defined as the set of laws, rules, and practices that regulate how an organization manages, protects, and distributes sensitive information. Security policy in the DoD is described by the Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria (TCSEC), Army Regulation (AR) 380-19, Defense Information Infrastructure Common Operating Environment (DII COE), Military Health Services System Automated Information Systems Security Policy Manual, and National Computer Security Center-TG-005, "Trusted Network Interpretation." These documents were used to develop a security policy that defines information protection requirements that are made with respect to those laws, rules, and practices that are required to protect the information stored and processed in the VRE Project. The goal of the security policy is to provide for a C2-level of information protection while also satisfying the functional needs of the GPRMC's user community. This report summarizes the security policy for the VRE and defines the CORBA security services that satisfy the policy. In the VRE, the information to be protected is embedded into three major information components: (1) Patient information consists of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-formatted fields. The patient information resides in the digital imaging network picture archiving and communication system (DIN-PACS) networks in the database archive systems and includes (a) patient demographics; (b) patient images from x-ray, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US); and (c) prior patient images and related patient history. (2) Meta-Manager information to be protected consists of several data objects. This information is distributed to the Meta-Manager nodes and

  15. Information architecture. Volume 1, The foundations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The Information Management Planning and Architecture Coordinating Team was formed to establish an information architecture framework to meet DOE`s current and future information needs. This department- wide activity was initiated in accordance with the DOE Information Management Strategic Plan; it also supports the Departmental Strategic Plan. It recognizes recent changes in emphasis as reflected in OMB Circular A-130 and the Information Resources Management Planning Process Improvement Team recommendations. Sections of this document provides the foundation for establishing DOE`s Information Architecture: Background, Business Case (reduced duplication of effort, increased integration of activities, improved operational capabilities), Baseline (technology baseline currently in place within DOE), Vision (guiding principles for future DOE Information Architecture), Standards Process, Policy and Process Integration (describes relations between information architecture and business processes), and Next Steps. Following each section is a scenario. A glossary of terms is provided.

  16. The Architecture of Information at Plateau Beaubourg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branda, Ewan Edward

    2012-01-01

    During the course of the 1960s, computers and information networks made their appearance in the public imagination. To architects on the cusp of architecture's postmodern turn, information technology offered new forms, metaphors, and techniques by which modern architecture's technological and utopian basis could be reasserted. Yet by the…

  17. Architecture and the Information Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Porter; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Traces how technological changes affect the architecture of the workplace. Traces these effects from the industrial revolution up through the computer revolution. Offers suggested designs for the computerized office of today and tomorrow. (JM)

  18. Participants’ perceptions of a knowledge-brokering strategy to facilitate evidence-informed policy-making in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence-informed policy-making (EIPM) is optimal when evidence-producers (researchers) and policy developers work collaboratively to ensure the production and use of the best available evidence. This paper examined participants’ perceptions of knowledge-brokering strategies used in the TROPIC (Translational Research in Obesity Prevention in Communities) project to facilitate the use of obesity-related evidence in policy development in Fiji. Method Knowledge-brokers delivered a 12-18 month programme comprising workshops targeting EIPM skills and practical support for developing evidence-informed policy briefs to reduce obesity. The programme was tailored to each of the six participating organizations. Knowledge-brokering strategies included negotiating topics that were aligned to the goals of individual organizations, monitoring and evaluating time-management skills, accommodating other organizational and individual priorities, delivering practical sessions on use of appropriate research tools and supporting individual writing of policy briefs. Two qualitative methods were used to examine individuals’ perceptions of skills obtained, opportunities afforded by the TROPIC project, facilitators and inhibiters to planned policy brief development and suggestions for improved programme delivery. Forty-nine participants completed an electronic word table and then participated in a semi-structured interview. An independent interviewer conducted structured interviews with a high-ranking officer in each organization to examine their perceptions of TROPIC engagement strategies. Data were analyzed descriptively and thematically, with the first author and another experienced qualitative researcher analyzing data sets separately, and then combining analyses. Results Many participants believed that they had increased their skills in acquiring, assessing, adapting and applying evidence, writing policy briefs and presenting evidence-based arguments to higher levels

  19. Seamless integration of data services between spatial information Grid and TeraGrid based on broker-based data management model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yi; Liu, Dingsheng; Li, Guoqing; Yu, Wenyang; Huang, Zhenchun; Song, Carol

    2009-10-01

    Most of the space agencies have built Grid systems to manage large volumes of spatial data archives and products. However, the heterogeneous data structure, the distributed storage location, and the gradual progress of building data service systems, make such spatial grid systems to be grid islands. The broker-based manage model can hide complexity and heterogeneity of spatial data sources, so that the research on broker-based data service is meaningful to promote inter-Grid collaboration for earth observation applications. This paper discusses the special problems of spatial information integration and some features of broker-based data management model. We demonstrate the prototype of building broker-based model to integrate heterogeneous data grid. This work securely provides querying and managing geospatial data and services, and transparent access to the related sources under Grid and Web Service environment. The paper also describe our experiences of case study on seamless integration with Purdue TeraGrid Data by using Storage Resource Broker, which is based on the extensible data service interfaces of China Spatial Information Grid.

  20. A Reference Architecture for Space Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattmann, Chris A.; Crichton, Daniel J.; Hughes, J. Steven; Ramirez, Paul M.; Berrios, Daniel C.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a reference architecture for space information management systems that elegantly overcomes the rigid design of common information systems in many domains. The reference architecture consists of a set of flexible, reusable, independent models and software components that function in unison, but remain separately managed entities. The main guiding principle of the reference architecture is to separate the various models of information (e.g., data, metadata, etc.) from implemented system code, allowing each to evolve independently. System modularity, systems interoperability, and dynamic evolution of information system components are the primary benefits of the design of the architecture. The architecture requires the use of information models that are substantially more advanced than those used by the vast majority of information systems. These models are more expressive and can be more easily modularized, distributed and maintained than simpler models e.g., configuration files and data dictionaries. Our current work focuses on formalizing the architecture within a CCSDS Green Book and evaluating the architecture within the context of the C3I initiative.

  1. 17 CFR 249.617 - Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-17A-5, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form X-17A-5, information... Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of...

  2. 17 CFR 249.617 - Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-17A-5, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Form X-17A-5, information... Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of...

  3. 17 CFR 249.617 - Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-17A-5, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form X-17A-5, information... Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of...

  4. 17 CFR 249.617 - Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-17A-5, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form X-17A-5, information... Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of...

  5. 17 CFR 249.617 - Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-17A-5, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form X-17A-5, information... Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of...

  6. Information Architecture as Reflected in Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Strand, Linda; Fisher, Nancy; Kneip, Jason; Ayoub, Olga

    2002-01-01

    Explores information architecture curricula at North American universities based on an analysis of 40 course descriptions available on the Web. Academic disciplines related to IA education include library and information science, information technology, business administration, literature, arts, and design as well as continuing education programs.…

  7. The EuroGEOSS Brokering Framework for Multidisciplinary Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.; Craglia, M.; Boldrini, E.; Vaccari, L.; Papeschi, F.; Bigagli, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), envisioned by the group of eight most industrialized countries (G-8) in 2003, provides the indispensable framework to integrate the Earth observation efforts at a global level. The European Commission also contributes to the implementation of the GEOSS through research projects funded from its Framework Programme for Research & Development. The EuroGEOSS (A European Approach to GEOSS) project was launched on May 2009 for a three-year period with the aim of supporting existing Earth Observing systems and applications interoperability and use within the GEOSS and INSPIRE frameworks. EuroGEOSS developed a multidisciplinary interoperability infrastructure for the three strategic areas of Drought, Forestry and Biodiversity; this operating capacity is currently being extended to other scientific domains (i.e. Climate Change, Water, Ocean, Weather, etc.) Central to the multidisciplinary infrastructure is the "EuroGEOSS Brokering Framework", which is based on a Brokered SOA (Service Oriented Architecture) Approach. This approach extends the typical SOA archetype introducing "expert" components: the Brokers. The Brokers provide the mediation and distribution functionalities needed to interconnect the distributed and heterogeneous resources characterizing a System of Systems (SoS) environment. Such a solution addresses significant shortcomings characterizing the present SOA implementations for global frameworks, such as multiple protocols and data models interoperability. Currently, the EuroGEOSS multidisciplinary infrastructure is composed of the following brokering components: 1. The Discovery Broker: providing harmonized discovery functionalities by mediating and distributing user queries against tens of heterogeneous services. 2. The Semantic Discovery Augmentation Component: enhancing the capabilities of the discovery broker with semantic query-expansion. 3. The Data Access Broker: enabling users to seamlessly

  8. Shaping Collective Functions in Privatized Agricultural Knowledge and Information Systems: The Positioning and Embedding of a Network Broker in the Dutch Dairy Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klerkx, Laurens; Leeuwis, Cees

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines new organizational arrangements that have emerged in the context of a privatized extension system. It investigates the positioning and embedding of a network broker aimed at enhancing interaction in the privatized agricultural knowledge and information system (AKIS), to assess whether tensions reported in other sectors also…

  9. Information Architecture: The Data Warehouse Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Charles R.

    1997-01-01

    Colleges and universities are initiating data warehouse projects to provide integrated information for planning and reporting purposes. A survey of 40 institutions with active data warehouse projects reveals the kinds of tools, contents, data cycles, and access currently used. Essential elements of an integrated information architecture are…

  10. Information Architecture: Notes toward a New Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Don

    2002-01-01

    Considers the evolution of information architectures as a field of professional education. Topics include the need for an interdisciplinary approach; balancing practical skills with theoretical concepts; and key content areas, including information organization, graphic design, computer science, user and usability studies, and communication.…

  11. Standardizing the information architecture for spacecraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an information architecture developed for the Space Station Freedom as a model from which to derive an information architecture standard for advanced spacecraft. The information architecture provides a way of making information available across a program, and among programs, assuming that the information will be in a variety of local formats, structures and representations. It provides a format that can be expanded to define all of the physical and logical elements that make up a program, add definitions as required, and import definitions from prior programs to a new program. It allows a spacecraft and its control center to work in different representations and formats, with the potential for supporting existing spacecraft from new control centers. It supports a common view of data and control of all spacecraft, regardless of their own internal view of their data and control characteristics, and of their communications standards, protocols and formats. This information architecture is central to standardizing spacecraft operations, in that it provides a basis for information transfer and translation, such that diverse spacecraft can be monitored and controlled in a common way.

  12. The architecture of enterprise hospital information system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong; Li, Haomin; Zhao, Chenhui; An, Jiye

    2005-01-01

    Because of the complexity of the hospital environment, there exist a lot of medical information systems from different vendors with incompatible structures. In order to establish an enterprise hospital information system, the integration among these heterogeneous systems must be considered. Complete integration should cover three aspects: data integration, function integration and workflow integration. However most of the previous design of architecture did not accomplish such a complete integration. This article offers an architecture design of the enterprise hospital information system based on the concept of digital neural network system in hospital. It covers all three aspects of integration, and eventually achieves the target of one virtual data center with Enterprise Viewer for users of different roles. The initial implementation of the architecture in the 5-year Digital Hospital Project in Huzhou Central hospital of Zhejiang Province is also described. PMID:17281875

  13. An Information Technology Architecture for Pharmaceutical Research and Development

    PubMed Central

    Klingler, Daniel E.; Jaffe, Marvin E.

    1990-01-01

    Rationale for and development of an information technology architecture are presented. The architectural approach described produces a technology environment that is integrating, flexible, robust, productive, and future-oriented. Issues accompanying architecture development and potential impediments to success are discussed.

  14. Information Architecture for the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Louis; Morville, Peter

    This book provides effective approaches for designers, information architects, and web site managers who are faced with sites that are becoming difficult to use and maintain. The book is divided into 10 sections. Chapter 1: "What Makes a Web Site Work" considers site users needs when designing the architecture; Chapter 2: "Introduction to…

  15. Information Architecture for Bilingual Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunliffe, Daniel; Jones, Helen; Jarvis, Melanie; Egan, Kevin; Huws, Rhian; Munro, Sian

    2002-01-01

    Discusses creating an information architecture for a bilingual Web site and reports work in progress on the development of a content-based bilingual Web site to facilitate shared resources between speech and language therapists. Considers a structural analysis of existing bilingual Web designs and explains a card-sorting activity conducted with…

  16. BADD phase II: DDS information management architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Thomas P.; DeCleene, Brian T.; Speckert, Glen; Voorhees, Harry L.

    1997-06-01

    The DARPA Battlefield Awareness and Data Dissemination (BADD) Phase II Program will provide the next generation multimedia information management architecture to support the warfighter. One goal of this architecture is proactive dissemination of information to the warfighter through strategies such as multicast and 'smart push and pull' designed to minimize latency and make maximum use of available communications bandwidth. Another goal is to support integration of information from widely distributed legacy repositories. This will enable the next generation of battlefield awareness applications to form a common operational view of the battlefield to aid joint service and/or multi-national peacekeeping forces. This paper discusses the approach we are taking to realize such an architecture for BADD. Our architecture and its implementation, known as the Distributed Dissemination Serivces (DDS) are based on two key concepts: a global database schema and an intelligent, proactive caching scheme. A global schema provides a common logical view of the information space in which the warfighter operates. This schema (or subsets of it) is shared by all warfighters through a distributed object database providing local access to all relevant metadata. This approach provides both scalability to a large number of warfighters, and it supports tethered as well as autonomous operations. By utilizing DDS information integration services that provide transparent access to legacy databases, related information from multiple 'stovepipe' systems are now available to battlefield awareness applications. The second key concept embedded in our architecture is an intelligent, hierarchical caching system supported by proactive dissemination management services which push both lightweight and heavyweight data such as imagery and video to warfighters based on their information profiles. The goal of this approach is to transparently and proactively stage data which is likely to be requested by

  17. Information architecture: Profile of adopted standards

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), like other Federal agencies, is under increasing pressure to use information technology to improve efficiency in mission accomplishment as well as delivery of services to the public. Because users and systems have become interdependent, DOE has enterprise wide needs for common application architectures, communication networks, databases, security, and management capabilities. Users need open systems that provide interoperability of products and portability of people, data, and applications that are distributed throughout heterogeneous computing environments. The level of interoperability necessary requires the adoption of DOE wide standards, protocols, and best practices. The Department has developed an information architecture and a related standards adoption and retirement process to assist users in developing strategies and plans for acquiring information technology products and services based upon open systems standards that support application software interoperability, portability, and scalability. This set of Departmental Information Architecture standards represents guidance for achieving higher degrees of interoperability within the greater DOE community, business partners, and stakeholders. While these standards are not mandatory, particular and due consideration of their applications in contractual matters and use in technology implementations Department wide are goals of the Chief Information Officer.

  18. A new architecture for enterprise information systems.

    PubMed

    Covvey, H D; Stumpf, J J

    1999-01-01

    Irresistible economic and technical forces are forcing healthcare institutions to develop regionalized services such as consolidated or virtual laboratories. Technical realities, such as the lack of an enabling enterprise-level information technology (IT) integration infrastructure, the existence of legacy systems, and non-existent or embryonic enterprise-level IT services organizations, are delaying or frustrating the achievement of the desired configuration of shared services. On attempting to address this matter, we discover that the state-of-the-art in integration technology is not wholly adequate, and itself becomes a barrier to the full realization of shared healthcare services. In this paper we report new work from the field of Co-operative Information Systems that proposes a new architecture of systems that are intrinsically cooperation-enabled, and we extend this architecture to both the regional and national scales. PMID:10566455

  19. The informational architecture of the cell.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sara Imari; Kim, Hyunju; Davies, Paul C W

    2016-03-13

    We compare the informational architecture of biological and random networks to identify informational features that may distinguish biological networks from random. The study presented here focuses on the Boolean network model for regulation of the cell cycle of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We compare calculated values of local and global information measures for the fission yeast cell cycle to the same measures as applied to two different classes of random networks: Erdös-Rényi and scale-free. We report patterns in local information processing and storage that do indeed distinguish biological from random, associated with control nodes that regulate the function of the fission yeast cell-cycle network. Conversely, we find that integrated information, which serves as a global measure of 'emergent' information processing, does not differ from random for the case presented. We discuss implications for our understanding of the informational architecture of the fission yeast cell-cycle network in particular, and more generally for illuminating any distinctive physics that may be operative in life. PMID:26857675

  20. Deep Space Network information system architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beswick, C. A.; Markley, R. W. (Editor); Atkinson, D. J.; Cooper, L. P.; Tausworthe, R. C.; Masline, R. C.; Jenkins, J. S.; Crowe, R. A.; Thomas, J. L.; Stoloff, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an architecture for the DSN information system in the years 2000-2010 and to provide guidelines for its evolution during the 1990's. The study scope is defined to be from the front-end areas at the antennas to the end users (spacecraft teams, principal investigators, archival storage systems, and non-NASA partners). The architectural vision provides guidance for major DSN implementation efforts during the next decade. A strong motivation for the study is an expected dramatic improvement in information-systems technologies--i.e., computer processing, automation technology (including knowledge-based systems), networking and data transport, software and hardware engineering, and human-interface technology. The proposed Ground Information System has the following major features: unified architecture from the front-end area to the end user; open-systems standards to achieve interoperability; DSN production of level 0 data; delivery of level 0 data from the Deep Space Communications Complex, if desired; dedicated telemetry processors for each receiver; security against unauthorized access and errors; and highly automated monitor and control.

  1. Deep Space Network information system architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beswick, C. A.; Markley, R. W. (Editor); Atkinson, D. J.; Cooper, L. P.; Tausworthe, R. C.; Masline, R. C.; Jenkins, J. S.; Crowe, R. A.; Thomas, J. L.; Stoloff, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an architecture for the Deep Space Network (DSN) information system in the years 2000-2010 and to provide guidelines for its evolution during the 1990s. The study scope is defined to be from the front-end areas at the antennas to the end users (spacecraft teams, principal investigators, archival storage systems, and non-NASA partners). The architectural vision provides guidance for major DSN implementation efforts during the next decade. A strong motivation for the study is an expected dramatic improvement in information-systems technologies, such as the following: computer processing, automation technology (including knowledge-based systems), networking and data transport, software and hardware engineering, and human-interface technology. The proposed Ground Information System has the following major features: unified architecture from the front-end area to the end user; open-systems standards to achieve interoperability; DSN production of level 0 data; delivery of level 0 data from the Deep Space Communications Complex, if desired; dedicated telemetry processors for each receiver; security against unauthorized access and errors; and highly automated monitor and control.

  2. A layered trust information security architecture.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Albuquerque, Robson; Villalba, Luis Javier García; Orozco, Ana Lucila Sandoval; Buiati, Fábio; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Information can be considered the most important asset of any modern organization. Securing this information involves preserving confidentially, integrity and availability, the well-known CIA triad. In addition, information security is a risk management job; the task is to manage the inherent risks of information disclosure. Current information security platforms do not deal with the different facets of information technology. This paper presents a layered trust information security architecture (TISA) and its creation was motivated by the need to consider information and security from different points of view in order to protect it. This paper also extends and discusses security information extensions as a way of helping the CIA triad. Furthermore, this paper suggests information representation and treatment elements, operations and support components that can be integrated to show the various risk sources when dealing with both information and security. An overview of how information is represented and treated nowadays in the technological environment is shown, and the reason why it is so difficult to guarantee security in all aspects of the information pathway is discussed. PMID:25470490

  3. A Layered Trust Information Security Architecture

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Albuquerque, Robson; García Villalba, Luis Javier; Sandoval Orozco, Ana Lucila; Buiati, Fábio; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Information can be considered the most important asset of any modern organization. Securing this information involves preserving confidentially, integrity and availability, the well-known CIA triad. In addition, information security is a risk management job; the task is to manage the inherent risks of information disclosure. Current information security platforms do not deal with the different facets of information technology. This paper presents a layered trust information security architecture (TISA) and its creation was motivated by the need to consider information and security from different points of view in order to protect it. This paper also extends and discusses security information extensions as a way of helping the CIA triad. Furthermore, this paper suggests information representation and treatment elements, operations and support components that can be integrated to show the various risk sources when dealing with both information and security. An overview of how information is represented and treated nowadays in the technological environment is shown, and the reason why it is so difficult to guarantee security in all aspects of the information pathway is discussed. PMID:25470490

  4. 26 CFR 1.6045-1T - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., see § 1.6045-1 (a) through (k). (l) Use of magnetic media. For information returns filed after... magnetic media and for rules relating to waivers granted for undue hardship. For information returns...

  5. 26 CFR 1.6045-1T - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., see § 1.6045-1 (a) through (k). (l) Use of magnetic media. For information returns filed after... magnetic media and for rules relating to waivers granted for undue hardship. For information returns...

  6. 26 CFR 1.6045-1T - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., see § 1.6045-1 (a) through (k). (l) Use of magnetic media. For information returns filed after... magnetic media and for rules relating to waivers granted for undue hardship. For information returns...

  7. Medicaid information technology architecture: an overview.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Richard H

    2006-01-01

    The Medicaid Information Technology Architecture (MITA) is a roadmap and tool-kit for States to transform their Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS) into an enterprise-wide, beneficiary-centric system. MITA will enable State Medicaid agencies to align their information technology (IT) opportunities with their evolving business needs. It also addresses long-standing issues of interoperability, adaptability, and data sharing, including clinical data, across organizational boundaries by creating models based on nationally accepted technical standards. Perhaps most significantly, MITA allows State Medicaid Programs to actively participate in the DHHS Secretary's vision of a transparent health care market that utilizes electronic health records (EHRs), ePrescribing and personal health records (PHRs). PMID:17427840

  8. 17 CFR 17.00 - Information to be furnished by futures commission merchants, clearing members and foreign brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and foreign broker shall submit a report to the Commission for each business day with respect to all... independent account controller shall, together with other accounts traded by the independent account controller or in which the independent controller has a financial interest, be considered a single...

  9. 17 CFR 17.00 - Information to be furnished by futures commission merchants, clearing members and foreign brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www... and foreign broker shall submit a report to the Commission for each business day with respect to all... independent account controller shall, together with other accounts traded by the independent...

  10. A security architecture for health information networks.

    PubMed

    Kailar, Rajashekar; Muralidhar, Vinod

    2007-01-01

    Health information network security needs to balance exacting security controls with practicality, and ease of implementation in today's healthcare enterprise. Recent work on 'nationwide health information network' architectures has sought to share highly confidential data over insecure networks such as the Internet. Using basic patterns of health network data flow and trust models to support secure communication between network nodes, we abstract network security requirements to a core set to enable secure inter-network data sharing. We propose a minimum set of security controls that can be implemented without needing major new technologies, but yet realize network security and privacy goals of confidentiality, integrity and availability. This framework combines a set of technology mechanisms with environmental controls, and is shown to be sufficient to counter commonly encountered network security threats adequately. PMID:18693862

  11. 26 CFR 1.6045-1 - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... other information required by Form 1099. See 17 CFR 1.33. For this purpose, the end of a year is the... Commodity Credit Corporation under 7 CFR 1470.4 (1990). (iii) Sales involving designated warehouses... warehouse, depository, or other similar entity, designated by a commodity exchange under 7 CFR 1.43...

  12. 26 CFR 1.6045-1 - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... information required by Form 1099. See 17 CFR 1.33. For this purpose, the end of a year is the close of... Commodity Credit Corporation under 7 CFR 1470.4 (1990). (iii) Sales involving designated warehouses... warehouse, depository, or other similar entity, designated by a commodity exchange under 7 CFR 1.43...

  13. 26 CFR 1.6045-1 - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Commission; (ii) Lead, palm oil, rapeseed, tea, tin, or an interest in any of the foregoing; or (iii) Any... information required by Form 1099. See 17 CFR 1.33. For this purpose, the end of a year is the close of... Commodity Credit Corporation under 7 CFR 1470.4 (1990). (iii) Sales involving designated...

  14. 26 CFR 1.6045-1 - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Commission; (ii) Lead, palm oil, rapeseed, tea, tin, or an interest in any of the foregoing; or (iii) Any... information required by Form 1099. See 17 CFR 1.33. For this purpose, the end of a year is the close of... Commodity Credit Corporation under 7 CFR 1470.4 (1990). (iii) Sales involving designated...

  15. Information architecture for coping with aging infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrell, Donald B.

    2000-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory personnel have developed a cost-effective solution for implementing the use of advanced technologies for monitoring the condition and performance of aging industrial facilities. A combination of operations and maintenance (O & M) know-how together with Laboratory technical capabilities have been used to develop and demonstrate the effectiveness of a condition monitoring software system. Already proven in a moderate size pilot heating plant, the system is expected to pay large dividends in the reduction of O & M costs in an aging cogeneration facility. Additional projects are currently underway to develop this technology to its full potential. This advanced architecture was designed to provide each segment of the plant operations and maintenance (O & M) team with understandable information for making safe, cost-effective life-cycle operating decisions. The software will provide plant operators, maintenance technicians, engineering staff and administrators with on-target, on-line information that enables high process efficiency simultaneously with cost- effective, life cycle oriented, capital equipment management. This infrastructure information becomes increasingly critical as the equipment, systems, and the facility itself become older. The result of this research provides the O & M practitioner with the ability to intelligently select the asset management course of action that minimizes both the cost and risk engendered by the operation and maintenance of aging process facilities.

  16. New Course Design: Classification Schemes and Information Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Bella Hass

    2002-01-01

    Describes a course developed at St. John's University (New York) in the Division of Library and Information Science that relates traditional classification schemes to information architecture and Web sites. Highlights include functional aspects of information architecture, that is, the way content is structured; assignments; student reactions; and…

  17. Information architecture as a framework for reuse

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, M.L.; Chang, I.N.

    1995-09-01

    This paper relates two tenets of modern acquisition, Information Architecture (IA) and reuse. An IA is the product of a modeling effort performed at the analysis level of system development that identifies essential information elements and describes the fundamental characteristics and behavior of the objective system. Principles and observations on reuse, including definitions and criteria to be used in applying reuse in the system engineering and software development process, are presented. The two tenets are related to show how the IA supports reuse as an element of an overall system engineering and software development approach, particularly when that approach is intentionally defined to emphasize reuse. The paper draws from recent efforts in the Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) Program to implement modern acquisition practices, emphasize reuse and develop IAs for the National Missile Defense (NMD) Battle Management, Command, Control and Communications (BMC3) system. The intention of this paper is to offer observations and examples that would help system developers achieve successful reusability in their products. Such products would include the IA itself as well as system engineering and software development products generated with an IA-based approach to system development.

  18. Incorporating Brokers within Collaboration Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekar, A.; Moore, R.; de Torcy, A.

    2013-12-01

    A collaboration environment, such as the integrated Rule Oriented Data System (iRODS - http://irods.diceresearch.org), provides interoperability mechanisms for accessing storage systems, authentication systems, messaging systems, information catalogs, networks, and policy engines from a wide variety of clients. The interoperability mechanisms function as brokers, translating actions requested by clients to the protocol required by a specific technology. The iRODS data grid is used to enable collaborative research within hydrology, seismology, earth science, climate, oceanography, plant biology, astronomy, physics, and genomics disciplines. Although each domain has unique resources, data formats, semantics, and protocols, the iRODS system provides a generic framework that is capable of managing collaborative research initiatives that span multiple disciplines. Each interoperability mechanism (broker) is linked to a name space that enables unified access across the heterogeneous systems. The collaboration environment provides not only support for brokers, but also support for virtualization of name spaces for users, files, collections, storage systems, metadata, and policies. The broker enables access to data or information in a remote system using the appropriate protocol, while the collaboration environment provides a uniform naming convention for accessing and manipulating each object. Within the NSF DataNet Federation Consortium project (http://www.datafed.org), three basic types of interoperability mechanisms have been identified and applied: 1) drivers for managing manipulation at the remote resource (such as data subsetting), 2) micro-services that execute the protocol required by the remote resource, and 3) policies for controlling the execution. For example, drivers have been written for manipulating NetCDF and HDF formatted files within THREDDS servers. Micro-services have been written that manage interactions with the CUAHSI data repository, the Data

  19. The information architecture of behavior change websites.

    PubMed

    Danaher, Brian G; McKay, H Garth; Seeley, John R

    2005-01-01

    The extraordinary growth in Internet use offers researchers important new opportunities to identify and test new ways to deliver effective behavior change programs. The information architecture (IA)-the structure of website information--is an important but often overlooked factor to consider when adapting behavioral strategies developed in office-based settings for Web delivery. Using examples and relevant perspectives from multiple disciplines, we describe a continuum of website IA designs ranging from a matrix design to the tunnel design. The free-form matrix IA design allows users free rein to use multiple hyperlinks to explore available content according to their idiosyncratic interests. The more directive tunnel IA design (commonly used in e-learning courses) guides users step-by-step through a series of Web pages that are arranged in a particular order to improve the chances of achieving a goal that is measurable and consistent. Other IA designs are also discussed, including hierarchical IA and hybrid IA designs. In the hierarchical IA design, program content is arranged in a top-down manner, which helps the user find content of interest. The more complex hybrid IA design incorporates some combination of components that use matrix, tunnel, and/or hierarchical IA designs. Each of these IA designs is discussed in terms of usability, participant engagement, and program tailoring, as well as how they might best be matched with different behavior change goals (using Web-based smoking cessation interventions as examples). Our presentation underscores the role of considering and clearly reporting the use of IA designs when creating effective Web-based interventions. We also encourage the adoption of a multidisciplinary perspective as we move towards a more mature view of Internet intervention research. PMID:15914459

  20. Information architecture. Volume 2, Part 1: Baseline analysis summary

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture, Volume 2, Baseline Analysis, is a collaborative and logical next-step effort in the processes required to produce a Departmentwide information architecture. The baseline analysis serves a diverse audience of program management and technical personnel and provides an organized way to examine the Department`s existing or de facto information architecture. A companion document to Volume 1, The Foundations, it furnishes the rationale for establishing a Departmentwide information architecture. This volume, consisting of the Baseline Analysis Summary (part 1), Baseline Analysis (part 2), and Reference Data (part 3), is of interest to readers who wish to understand how the Department`s current information architecture technologies are employed. The analysis identifies how and where current technologies support business areas, programs, sites, and corporate systems.

  1. Information architecture for a planetary 'exploration web'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamarra, N.; McVittie, T.

    2002-01-01

    'Web services' is a common way of deploying distributed applications whose software components and data sources may be in different locations, formats, languages, etc. Although such collaboration is not utilized significantly in planetary exploration, we believe there is significant benefit in developing an architecture in which missions could leverage each others capabilities. We believe that an incremental deployment of such an architecture could significantly contribute to the evolution of increasingly capable, efficient, and even autonomous remote exploration.

  2. SW Architecture for Access to Medical Information for Knowledge Execution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suntae; Shim, Bingu; Kim, Jeong Ah; Cho, Insook

    Recently, many approaches have been studied to author medical knowledge and verify doctor's diagnosis based on the specified knowledge. During the verification, intensive access to medical information is unavoidable. Also, the access approach should consider modifiability in order to cover diverse medical information from the variety of hospitals. This paper presents an approach to generating query language from medical knowledge, and shows software architecture for accessing medical information from hospitals by executing generated query languages. Implementation of this architecture has been deployed in a hospital of South Korea so that it shows the feasibility of the architecture.

  3. The Familial Context of Adolescent Language Brokering within Immigrant Chinese Families in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Josephine M.; Costigan, Catherine L.

    2012-01-01

    Language brokering, whereby children of immigrants provide informal translation and interpretation for others, is considered commonplace. However, the research evidence remains inconsistent concerning how language brokering relates to the psychological health of child language brokers and their relationships with their parents. Furthermore, few…

  4. Practice of information retrieval technique and limitation of database usage (2) - Limitation of retrieval and retrieval by information broker -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shigekazu

    Nowadays everyone can enjoy an information retrieval, thanks for the advancement of computer usage in searching the literatures of science and technology. Regarding limitation for database usage in these days, the author divided searchers into four generations according to their skillful degree for the retrieval technics. In this paper, the author considered a blind spot from the view point of retrieval by searcher after the third generation, who started to have a suspicion to the content of database and emphasised the following three blind spots that we cannot aford to overlook, 1) limitation on input to database, 2) limitation of keyword and code search computer searching, 3) limitation on fitness evaluation of retrieved results.

  5. HL7 document patient record architecture: an XML document architecture based on a shared information model.

    PubMed

    Dolin, R H; Alschuler, L; Behlen, F; Biron, P V; Boyer, S; Essin, D; Harding, L; Lincoln, T; Mattison, J E; Rishel, W; Sokolowski, R; Spinosa, J; Williams, J P

    1999-01-01

    The HL7 SGML/XML Special Interest Group is developing the HL7 Document Patient Record Architecture. This draft proposal strives to create a common data architecture for the interoperability of healthcare documents. Key components are that it is under the umbrella of HL7 standards, it is specified in Extensible Markup Language, the semantics are drawn from the HL7 Reference Information Model, and the document specifications form an architecture that, in aggregate, define the semantics and structural constraints necessary for the exchange of clinical documents. The proposal is a work in progress and has not yet been submitted to HL7's formal balloting process. PMID:10566319

  6. Geospatial Brokering - Challenges and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    An important feature of many brokers is to facilitate straightforward human access to scientific data while maintaining programmatic access to it for system solutions. Standards-based protocols are critical for this, and there are a number of protocols to choose from. In this discussion, we will present a web application solution that leverages certain protocols - e.g., OGC CSW, REST, and OpenSearch - to provide programmatic as well as human access to geospatial resources. We will also discuss managing resources to reduce duplication yet increase discoverability, federated search solutions, and architectures that combine human-friendly interfaces with powerful underlying data management. The changing requirements witnessed in brokering solutions over time, our recent experience participating in the EarthCube brokering hack-a-thon, and evolving interoperability standards provide insight to future technological and philosophical directions planned for geospatial broker solutions. There has been much change over the past decade, but with the unprecedented data collaboration of recent years, in many ways the challenges and opportunities are just beginning.

  7. BCube: Building a Geoscience Brokering Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jodha Khalsa, Siri; Nativi, Stefano; Duerr, Ruth; Pearlman, Jay

    2014-05-01

    BCube is addressing the need for effective and efficient multi-disciplinary collaboration and interoperability through the advancement of brokering technologies. As a prototype "building block" for NSF's EarthCube cyberinfrastructure initiative, BCube is demonstrating how a broker can serve as an intermediary between information systems that implement well-defined interfaces, thereby providing a bridge between communities that employ different specifications. Building on the GEOSS Discover and Access Broker (DAB), BCube will develop new modules and services including: • Expanded semantic brokering capabilities • Business Model support for work flows • Automated metadata generation • Automated linking to services discovered via web crawling • Credential passing for seamless access to data • Ranking of search results from brokered catalogs Because facilitating cross-discipline research involves cultural and well as technical challenges, BCube is also addressing the sociological and educational components of infrastructure development. We are working, initially, with four geoscience disciplines: hydrology, oceans, polar and weather, with an emphasis on connecting existing domain infrastructure elements to facilitate cross-domain communications.

  8. A multiagent architecture for developing medical information retrieval agents.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Steven

    2003-10-01

    Information that is available on the world wide web (WWW) is already more vast than can be comprehensibly studied by individuals and this quantity is increasing at a staggering pace. The quality of service delivered by physicians is dependent on the availability of current information. The agent paradigm offers a means for enabling physicians to filter information and retrieve only information that is relevant to current patient treatments. As with many specialized domains, agent-based information retrieval in medical domains must satisfy several domain-dependent constraints. A multiple agent architecture is developed and described in detail to efficiently provide agent-based information retrieval from the WWW and other explicit information resources. A simulation of the proposed multiple agent architecture shows a 97% decrease in information overload and an 85% increase in information relevancy over existing meta-search tools (with even larger gains over standard search engines). PMID:14584625

  9. ANTARES: a prototype transient broker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhijit; Matheson, Thomas; Snodgrass, Richard; Kececioglu, John; Narayan, Gautham; Seaman, Robert; Jenness, Tim; Axelrod, Tim

    2014-07-01

    The Arizona-NOAO Temporal Analysis and Response to Events System (ANTARES) is a joint project of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory and the Department of Computer Science at the University of Arizona. The goal is to build the software infrastructure necessary to process and filter alerts produced by time-domain surveys, with the ultimate source of such alerts being the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). The ANTARES broker will add value to alerts by annotating them with information from external sources such as previous surveys from across the electromagnetic spectrum. In addition, the temporal history of annotated alerts will provide further annotation for analysis. These alerts will go through a cascade of filters to select interesting candidates. For the prototype, `interesting' is defined as the rarest or most unusual alert, but future systems will accommodate multiple filtering goals. The system is designed to be flexible, allowing users to access the stream at multiple points throughout the process, and to insert custom filters where necessary. We describe the basic architecture of ANTARES and the principles that will guide development and implementation.

  10. An open, interoperable, and scalable prehospital information technology network architecture.

    PubMed

    Landman, Adam B; Rokos, Ivan C; Burns, Kevin; Van Gelder, Carin M; Fisher, Roger M; Dunford, James V; Cone, David C; Bogucki, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    Some of the most intractable challenges in prehospital medicine include response time optimization, inefficiencies at the emergency medical services (EMS)-emergency department (ED) interface, and the ability to correlate field interventions with patient outcomes. Information technology (IT) can address these and other concerns by ensuring that system and patient information is received when and where it is needed, is fully integrated with prior and subsequent patient information, and is securely archived. Some EMS agencies have begun adopting information technologies, such as wireless transmission of 12-lead electrocardiograms, but few agencies have developed a comprehensive plan for management of their prehospital information and integration with other electronic medical records. This perspective article highlights the challenges and limitations of integrating IT elements without a strategic plan, and proposes an open, interoperable, and scalable prehospital information technology (PHIT) architecture. The two core components of this PHIT architecture are 1) routers with broadband network connectivity to share data between ambulance devices and EMS system information services and 2) an electronic patient care report to organize and archive all electronic prehospital data. To successfully implement this comprehensive PHIT architecture, data and technology requirements must be based on best available evidence, and the system must adhere to health data standards as well as privacy and security regulations. Recent federal legislation prioritizing health information technology may position federal agencies to help design and fund PHIT architectures. PMID:21294627

  11. Trust-based information system architecture for personal wellness.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka; Nykänen, Pirkko; Seppälä, Antto; Blobel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Modern eHealth, ubiquitous health and personal wellness systems take place in an unsecure and ubiquitous information space where no predefined trust occurs. This paper presents novel information model and an architecture for trust based privacy management of personal health and wellness information in ubiquitous environment. The architecture enables a person to calculate a dynamic and context-aware trust value for each service provider, and using it to design personal privacy policies for trustworthy use of health and wellness services. For trust calculation a novel set of measurable context-aware and health information-sensitive attributes is developed. The architecture enables a person to manage his or her privacy in ubiquitous environment by formulating context-aware and service provider specific policies. Focus groups and information modelling was used for developing a wellness information model. System analysis method based on sequential steps that enable to combine results of analysis of privacy and trust concerns and the selection of trust and privacy services was used for development of the information system architecture. Its services (e.g. trust calculation, decision support, policy management and policy binding services) and developed attributes enable a person to define situation-aware policies that regulate the way his or her wellness and health information is processed. PMID:25160161

  12. Information Architecture in JASIST: Just Where Did We Come From?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Traces information architecture (IA) to a historical summit, supported by American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T) in May 2000 at Boston, MA. where several hundred gathered to thrash out the questions of just what IA was and what this field might become. Outlines the six IA issues discussed. (JMK)

  13. Reshaping the Enterprise through an Information Architecture and Process Reengineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laudato, Nicholas C.; DeSantis, Dennis J.

    1995-01-01

    The approach used by the University of Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania) in designing a campus-wide information architecture and a framework for reengineering the business process included building consensus on a general philosophy for information systems, using pattern-based abstraction techniques, applying data modeling and application prototyping, and…

  14. 78 FR 14848 - Duties of Brokers, Dealers, and Investment Advisers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Duties of Brokers, Dealers, and Investment Advisers AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Request for data and other information. SUMMARY: The Securities and Exchange Commission...

  15. Integrated brokering framework for multi-disciplinary research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craglia, M.; Vaccari, L.; Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.

    2012-04-01

    EuroGEOSS is a research project supporting the development of the GEOSS Common Infrastructure and the multi-disciplinary research efforts needed to address global sustainability research. The framework it has developed to integrate data, services, and models from different disciplines is based on a brokering approach that advances the traditional Service Oriented Architecture of spatial data infrastructures. In this paper we demonstrate the added value of this approach. The scientific question we address in this example is o identify ecosystems similar to the ones found in the protected area of "Sierra De Queixa Montes De Invernadeiro Nature Park" in Galicia, Spain. To do this, the user would identify an analytical model suitable to address the question such as the eHabitat model developed by the European Commission Joint Research Centre. It would then use the EuroGEOSS broker to look for the data necessary to run the model such boundaries of the select park, mean drought index, %forest cover, temperature and rainfall, and elevation. The eHabitat model is used to compute the likelihood to find ecosystems in the selected window that are similar to the one found in the selected protected area. The end-user would therefore run the model directly on the web as a web processing service with the data identified in the broker (no need to download the data) and use this information to draw a new area to be protected that would have similar ecological conditions to the initial protected area and display the list of endangered species (to be defined) expected to be found in the new location. Finally, the user can also mine Web 2.0 social networks via the broker to identify pictures of the selected species in the area of interest. This integrated approach based on open standards and interfaces allows the user to find, access, and use the data and models in a transparent way focusing on the research questions to be addressed rather than the technology that delivers the inputs

  16. BCube: A Broker Framework for Next Generation Geoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalsa, S. S.; Pearlman, J.; Nativi, S.

    2013-12-01

    EarthCube is an NSF initiative that aims to transform the conduct of research through the creation of community-guided cyberinfrastructure enabling the integration information and data across the geosciences. Following an initial phase of concept and community development activities, NSF has made awards for the development of cyberinfrastructure 'building blocks.' In this talk we describe the goals and methods for one of these projects - BCube, for Brokering Building Blocks. BCube addresses the need for effective and efficient multi-disciplinary collaboration and interoperability through the introduction of brokering technologies. Brokers, as information systems middleware, have existed for many years and are found in diverse domains and industries such as financial systems, business-to-business interfaces, medicine and the automotive industry, to name a few. However, the emergence of brokers in science is relatively new and is now being piloted with great promise in cyberinfrastructure and science communities in the U.S., Europe, and elsewhere. Brokers act as intermediaries between information systems that implement well-defined interfaces, providing a bridge between communities using different specifications. The BCube project is helping to build a truly cross-disciplinary, global platform for data providers, cyberinfrastructure developers, and data users to make data more available and interoperable through a brokering framework. Building on the GEOSS Discover and Access Broker (DAB), BCube will develop new modules and services including * Expanded semantic brokering * Business Model support for work flows * Automated metadata generation * Automated linking to services discovered via web crawling * Plug and play for most community service buses * Credential passing for seamless access to data * Ranking of search results from brokered catalogs Because facilitating cross-discipline research involves cultural and well as technical challenges, BCube is also

  17. The straight-line information security architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, C.

    1995-08-01

    Comprehensive monitoring can provide a wealth of sensor data useful in enhancing the safety, security, and international accountability of stored nuclear material. However, care must be taken to distribute this type of data on a need to know basis to the various types of users. The following paper describes an exploratory effort on behalf of Sandia National Labs to integrate commercially available systems to securely disseminate (on a need to know basis) both classified and unclassified sensor information to a variety of users on the interact.

  18. An agile enterprise regulation architecture for health information security management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Pei; Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chien, Tsan-Nan; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Luh, Jer-Junn; Lai, Jin-Shin; Lai, Feipei; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2010-09-01

    Information security management for healthcare enterprises is complex as well as mission critical. Information technology requests from clinical users are of such urgency that the information office should do its best to achieve as many user requests as possible at a high service level using swift security policies. This research proposes the Agile Enterprise Regulation Architecture (AERA) of information security management for healthcare enterprises to implement as part of the electronic health record process. Survey outcomes and evidential experiences from a sample of medical center users proved that AERA encourages the information officials and enterprise administrators to overcome the challenges faced within an electronically equipped hospital. PMID:20815748

  19. Information Architecture without Internal Theory: An Inductive Design Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haverty, Marsha

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that information architecture design is primarily an inductive process, partly because it lacks internal theory and partly because it is an activity that supports emergent phenomena (user experiences) from basic design components. Suggests a resemblance to Constructive Induction, a design process that locates the best representational…

  20. Comet: Multifunction VOEvent broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, John

    2014-04-01

    Comet is a Python implementation of the VOEvent Transport Protocol (VTP). VOEvent is the IVOA system for describing transient celestial events. Details of transients detected by many projects, including Fermi, Swift, and the Catalina Sky Survey, are currently made available as VOEvents, which is also the standard alert format by future facilities such as LSST and SKA. The core of Comet is a multifunction VOEvent broker, capable of receiving events either by subscribing to one or more remote brokers or by direct connection from authors; it can then both process those events locally and forward them to its own subscribers. In addition, Comet provides a tool for publishing VOEvents to the global VOEvent backbone.

  1. Trust Information-Based Privacy Architecture for Ubiquitous Health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ubiquitous health is defined as a dynamic network of interconnected systems that offers health services independent of time and location to a data subject (DS). The network takes place in open and unsecure information space. It is created and managed by the DS who sets rules that regulate the way personal health information is collected and used. Compared to health care, it is impossible in ubiquitous health to assume the existence of a priori trust between the DS and service providers and to produce privacy using static security services. In ubiquitous health features, business goals and regulations systems followed often remain unknown. Furthermore, health care-specific regulations do not rule the ways health data is processed and shared. To be successful, ubiquitous health requires novel privacy architecture. Objective The goal of this study was to develop a privacy management architecture that helps the DS to create and dynamically manage the network and to maintain information privacy. The architecture should enable the DS to dynamically define service and system-specific rules that regulate the way subject data is processed. The architecture should provide to the DS reliable trust information about systems and assist in the formulation of privacy policies. Furthermore, the architecture should give feedback upon how systems follow the policies of DS and offer protection against privacy and trust threats existing in ubiquitous environments. Methods A sequential method that combines methodologies used in system theory, systems engineering, requirement analysis, and system design was used in the study. In the first phase, principles, trust and privacy models, and viewpoints were selected. Thereafter, functional requirements and services were developed on the basis of a careful analysis of existing research published in journals and conference proceedings. Based on principles, models, and requirements, architectural components and their interconnections

  2. Information Architecture for Quality Management Support in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Álvaro; Freixo, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    Quality Management occupies a strategic role in organizations, and the adoption of computer tools within an aligned information architecture facilitates the challenge of making more with less, promoting the development of a competitive edge and sustainability. A formal Information Architecture (IA) lends organizations an enhanced knowledge but, above all, favours management. This simplifies the reinvention of processes, the reformulation of procedures, bridging and the cooperation amongst the multiple actors of an organization. In the present investigation work we planned the IA for the Quality Management System (QMS) of a Hospital, which allowed us to develop and implement the QUALITUS (QUALITUS, name of the computer application developed to support Quality Management in a Hospital Unit) computer application. This solution translated itself in significant gains for the Hospital Unit under study, accelerating the quality management process and reducing the tasks, the number of documents, the information to be filled in and information errors, amongst others. PMID:26306878

  3. The Solution Space Organization: Linking Information Systems Architecture and Reuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakhli, Salem Ben Dhaou

    Nowadays, improvement of software development productivity is among the main strategies proposed by academics and practitioners to deal with the chronic software crisis. As stressed by many authors during the last two decades, reuse of software artifacts provides efficient instruments to implement this strategy. Nevertheless, despite organizations high investments in defining software reuse plans, implementation of such plans has often failed. We think that the identification and description of the relationships between the areas of information systems architecture and software reuse are required to define a successful reuse approach which takes into account all the dimensions of information systems. In this chapter, we propose a structural and architecture-oriented description of the solution space associated with information systems development. We use such a description to build a reuse approach compliant with all the dimensions of information systems including the organizational, economic, and human dimensions.

  4. Constellation's Command, Control, Communications and Information (C3I) Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.

    2007-01-01

    Operations concepts are highly effective for: 1) Developing consensus; 2) Discovering stakeholder needs, goals, objectives; 3) Defining behavior of system components (especially emergent behaviors). An interoperability standard can provide an excellent lever to define the capabilities needed for system evolution. Two categories of architectures are needed in a program of this size are: 1) Generic - Needed for planning, design and construction standards; 2) Specific - Needed for detailed requirement allocations, interface specs. A wide variety of architectural views are needed to address stakeholder concerns, including: 1) Physical; 2) Information (structure, flow, evolution); 3) Processes (design, manufacturing, operations); 4) Performance; 5) Risk.

  5. Space-Based Information Infrastructure Architecture for Broadband Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Kent M.; Inukai, Tom; Razdan, Rajendev; Lazeav, Yvonne M.

    1996-01-01

    This study addressed four tasks: (1) identify satellite-addressable information infrastructure markets; (2) perform network analysis for space-based information infrastructure; (3) develop conceptual architectures; and (4) economic assessment of architectures. The report concludes that satellites will have a major role in the national and global information infrastructure, requiring seamless integration between terrestrial and satellite networks. The proposed LEO, MEO, and GEO satellite systems have satellite characteristics that vary widely. They include delay, delay variations, poorer link quality and beam/satellite handover. The barriers against seamless interoperability between satellite and terrestrial networks are discussed. These barriers are the lack of compatible parameters, standards and protocols, which are presently being evaluated and reduced.

  6. Data analysis in an Object Request Broker environment

    SciTech Connect

    Malon, D.M.; May, E.N.; Grossman, R.L.; Day, C.T.; Quarrie, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    Computing for the Next Millenium will require software interoperability in heterogeneous, increasingly object-oriented environments. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) is a software industry effort, under the aegis of the Object Management Group (OMG), to standardize mechanisms for software interaction among disparate applications written in a variety of languages and running on a variety of distributed platforms. In this paper, we describe some of the design and performance implications for software that must function in such a brokered environment in a standards-compliant way. We illustrate these implications with a physics data analysis example as a case study.

  7. Data Analysis in AN Object Request Broker Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malon, David M.; May, Edward N.; Grossman, Robert L.; Day, Christopher T.; Quarrie, David R.

    Computing for the Next Millenium will require software interoperability in heterogeneous, increasingly object-oriented environments. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture1 (CORBA) is a software industry effort, under the aegis of the Object Management Group (OMG), to standardize mechanisms for software interaction among disparate applications written in a variety of languages and running on a variety of distributed platforms. In this paper, we describe some of the design and performance implications for software that must function in such a brokered environment in a standards-compliant way. We illustrate these implications with a physics data analysis example as a case study.

  8. Integrating Environmental and Information Systems Management: An Enterprise Architecture Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noran, Ovidiu

    Environmental responsibility is fast becoming an important aspect of strategic management as the reality of climate change settles in and relevant regulations are expected to tighten significantly in the near future. Many businesses react to this challenge by implementing environmental reporting and management systems. However, the environmental initiative is often not properly integrated in the overall business strategy and its information system (IS) and as a result the management does not have timely access to (appropriately aggregated) environmental information. This chapter argues for the benefit of integrating the environmental management (EM) project into the ongoing enterprise architecture (EA) initiative present in all successful companies. This is done by demonstrating how a reference architecture framework and a meta-methodology using EA artefacts can be used to co-design the EM system, the organisation and its IS in order to achieve a much needed synergy.

  9. 17 CFR 240.15g-3 - Broker or dealer disclosure of quotations and other information relating to the penny stock market.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... purchases. (C) If the dealer's bid or offer prices to the customer do not satisfy the criteria of paragraphs... CFR 240.10b-10 of this chapter. (2) A broker or dealer, at the time of making the disclosure pursuant... such disclosure for the period specified in 17 CFR 240.17a-4(b). (c) Definitions. For purposes of...

  10. Information architecture: Standards adoption and retirement process service action plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this Service Action Plan is to announce, as well as provide, a high-level outline of a new Departmental process for the adoption and retirement of information technology standards. This process supports the implementation of a Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture. This plan was prepared with the Department of Energy information technology standards customers and stakeholders in mind. The process described in this plan will be serviced primarily by staff from the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Information Management with assistance from designated program and site Information Technology Standards Points of Contact. We welcome any comments regarding this new Departmental process and encourage the proposal of information technology standards for adoption or retirement.

  11. Fuzzy-Neural Controller in Service Requests Distribution Broker for SOA-Based Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fras, Mariusz; Zatwarnicka, Anna; Zatwarnicki, Krzysztof

    The evolution of software architectures led to the rising importance of the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) concept. This architecture paradigm support building flexible distributed service systems. In the paper the architecture of service request distribution broker designed for use in SOA-based systems is proposed. The broker is built with idea of fuzzy control. The functional and non-functional request requirements in conjunction with monitoring of execution and communication links are used to distribute requests. Decisions are made with use of fuzzy-neural network.

  12. Interconnecting Multidiscilinary Data Infrastructures: From Federation to Brokering Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Standardization and federation activities have been played an essential role to push interoperability at the disciplinary and cross-disciplinary level. However, they demonstrated not to be sufficient to resolve important interoperability challenges, including: disciplinary heterogeneity, cross-organizations diversities, cultural differences. Significant international initiatives like GEOSS, IODE, and CEOS demonstrated that a federation system dealing with global and multi-disciplinary domain turns out to be rater complex, raising more the already high entry level barriers for both Providers and Users. In particular, GEOSS demonstrated that standardization and federation actions must be accompanied and complemented by a brokering approach. Brokering architecture and its implementing technologies are able to implement an effective interoperability level among multi-disciplinary systems, lowering the entry level barriers for both data providers and users. This presentation will discuss the brokering philosophy as a complementary approach for standardization and federation to interconnect existing and heterogeneous infrastructures and systems. The GEOSS experience will be analyzed, specially.

  13. Merging multiple institutions: information architecture problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D

    1999-01-01

    Amalgamating organizations face great challenges when trying to merge their formerly separate information systems. An architectural approach is essential in order to understand the business process and data implications of the new organization's business decisions and application choices. HL7 is useful as a common messaging standard, but does not help to reconcile conflicting local identifier coding systems. The Information Services department has an important role in catalyzing decisions about inconsistent business processes and conflicting universal coding systems within an enterprise framework. PMID:10566467

  14. ABB: active bandwidth broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kason; Law, Eddie

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we shall discuss a novel design on the policy-based management for the Internet. This design deploys the concept of active networking. As opposed to the traditional network design, active network empowers network node with the ability to manipulate data and program code in packets, and configure the network properties according to the needs of different applications. The policy-based management can control network routers in order to realize end-to-end Quality of Service (QoS), such as differentiated and integrated services, across the Internet. For the moment, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has defined the framework of the policy-based management. It employs a simple client/server model that uses Common Open Policy Service (COPS) protocol to facilitate policy management and control. Our design of Active Bandwidth Broker (ABB) belongs to an active application. Our goals are to distribute centralized workload of the policy-based management over multiple active nodes in the active networks, introduce mobility of the bandwidth brokers, and allows load sharing to the policy-based management. This results a network-wide intelligent, highly available, and consistent QoS control that allows performance protection for voice, video and Internet business application while reducing costs for growing networks.

  15. A Proposed Information Architecture for Telehealth System Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.; Craft, R.L.; Parks, R.C.; Gallagher, L.K.; Garcia, R.J.; Funkhouser, D.R.

    1999-04-07

    Telemedicine technology is rapidly evolving. Whereas early telemedicine consultations relied primarily on video conferencing, consultations today may utilize video conferencing, medical peripherals, store-and-forward capabilities, electronic patient record management software, and/or a host of other emerging technologies. These remote care systems rely increasingly on distributed, collaborative information technology during the care delivery process, in its many forms. While these leading-edge systems are bellwethers for highly advanced telemedicine, the remote care market today is still immature. Most telemedicine systems are custom-designed and do not interoperate with other commercial offerings. Users are limited to a set of functionality that a single vendor provides and must often pay high prices to obtain this functionality, since vendors in this marketplace must deliver entire systems in order to compete. Besides increasing corporate research and development costs, this inhibits the ability of the user to make intelligent purchasing decisions regarding best-of-breed technologies. We propose a secure, object-oriented information architecture for telemedicine systems that promotes plug-and-play interaction between system components through standardized interfaces, communication protocols, messaging formats, and data definitions. In this architecture, each component functions as a black box, and components plug together in a lego-like fashion to achieve the desired device or system functionality. The architecture will support various ongoing standards work in the medical device arena.

  16. A Proposed Information Architecture for Telehealth System Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, R.L.; Funkhouser, D.R.; Gallagher, L.K.; Garica, R.J.; Parks, R.C.; Warren, S.

    1999-04-20

    We propose an object-oriented information architecture for telemedicine systems that promotes secure `plug-and-play' interaction between system components through standardized interfaces, communication protocols, messaging formats, and data definitions. In this architecture, each component functions as a black box, and components plug together in a ''lego-like'' fashion to achieve the desired device or system functionality. Introduction Telemedicine systems today rely increasingly on distributed, collaborative information technology during the care delivery process. While these leading-edge systems are bellwethers for highly advanced telemedicine, most are custom-designed and do not interoperate with other commercial offerings. Users are limited to a set of functionality that a single vendor provides and must often pay high prices to obtain this functionality, since vendors in this marketplace must deliver en- tire systems in order to compete. Besides increasing corporate research and development costs, this inhibits the ability of the user to make intelligent purchasing decisions regarding best-of-breed technologies. This paper proposes a reference architecture for plug-and-play telemedicine systems that addresses these issues.

  17. Shifts in the architecture of the Nationwide Health Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Sundwall, David; Lenert, Michael Edward

    2012-01-01

    In the midst of a US $30 billion USD investment in the Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN) and electronic health records systems, a significant change in the architecture of the NwHIN is taking place. Prior to 2010, the focus of information exchange in the NwHIN was the Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO). Since 2010, the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) has been sponsoring policies that promote an internet-like architecture that encourages point to-point information exchange and private health information exchange networks. The net effect of these activities is to undercut the limited business model for RHIOs, decreasing the likelihood of their success, while making the NwHIN dependent on nascent technologies for community level functions such as record locator services. These changes may impact the health of patients and communities. Independent, scientifically focused debate is needed on the wisdom of ONC's proposed changes in its strategy for the NwHIN. PMID:22268218

  18. Project Integration Architecture: A Practical Demonstration of Information Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    One of the goals of the Project Integration Architecture (PIA) effort is to provide the ability to propagate information between disparate applications. With this ability, applications may then be formed into an application graph constituting a super-application. Such a super-application would then provide all of the analysis appropriate to a given technical system. This paper reports on a small demonstration of this concept in which a Computer Aided Design (CAD) application was connected to an inlet analysis code and geometry information automatically propagated from one to the other. The majority of the work reported involved not the technology of information propagation, but rather the conversion of propagated information into a form usable by the receiving application.

  19. Investigation of possible neural architectures underlying information-geometric measures.

    PubMed

    Tatsuno, Masami; Okada, Masato

    2004-04-01

    A novel analytical method based on information geometry was recently proposed, and this method may provide useful insights into the statistical interactions within neural groups. The link between informationgeometric measures and the structure of neural interactions has not yet been elucidated, however, because of the ill-posed nature of the problem. Here, possible neural architectures underlying information-geometric measures are investigated using an isolated pair and an isolated triplet of model neurons. By assuming the existence of equilibrium states, we derive analytically the relationship between the information-geometric parameters and these simple neural architectures. For symmetric networks, the first- and second-order information-geometric parameters represent, respectively, the external input and the underlying connections between the neurons provided that the number of neurons used in the parameter estimation in the log-linear model and the number of neurons in the network are the same. For asymmetric networks, however, these parameters are dependent on both the intrinsic connections and the external inputs to each neuron. In addition, we derive the relation between the information-geometric parameter corresponding to the two-neuron interaction and a conventional cross-correlation measure. We also show that the information-geometric parameters vary depending on the number of neurons assumed for parameter estimation in the log-linear model. This finding suggests a need to examine the information-geometric method carefully. A possible criterion for choosing an appropriate orthogonal coordinate is also discussed. This article points out the importance of a model-based approach and sheds light on the possible neural structure underlying the application of information geometry to neural network analysis. PMID:15025828

  20. Optimal causal inference: Estimating stored information and approximating causal architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, Susanne; Crutchfield, James P.; Ellison, Christopher J.

    2010-09-01

    We introduce an approach to inferring the causal architecture of stochastic dynamical systems that extends rate-distortion theory to use causal shielding—a natural principle of learning. We study two distinct cases of causal inference: optimal causal filtering and optimal causal estimation. Filtering corresponds to the ideal case in which the probability distribution of measurement sequences is known, giving a principled method to approximate a system's causal structure at a desired level of representation. We show that in the limit in which a model-complexity constraint is relaxed, filtering finds the exact causal architecture of a stochastic dynamical system, known as the causal-state partition. From this, one can estimate the amount of historical information the process stores. More generally, causal filtering finds a graded model-complexity hierarchy of approximations to the causal architecture. Abrupt changes in the hierarchy, as a function of approximation, capture distinct scales of structural organization. For nonideal cases with finite data, we show how the correct number of the underlying causal states can be found by optimal causal estimation. A previously derived model-complexity control term allows us to correct for the effect of statistical fluctuations in probability estimates and thereby avoid overfitting.

  1. A Brokering Solution for Business Process Execution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, M.; Bigagli, L.; Roncella, R.; Mazzetti, P.; Nativi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Predicting the climate change impact on biodiversity and ecosystems, advancing our knowledge of environmental phenomena interconnection, assessing the validity of simulations and other key challenges of Earth Sciences require intensive use of environmental modeling. The complexity of Earth system requires the use of more than one model (often from different disciplines) to represent complex processes. The identification of appropriate mechanisms for reuse, chaining and composition of environmental models is considered a key enabler for an effective uptake of a global Earth Observation infrastructure, currently pursued by the international geospatial research community. The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) Model Web initiative aims to increase present accessibility and interoperability of environmental models, allowing their flexible composition into complex Business Processes (BPs). A few, basic principles are at the base of the Model Web concept (Nativi, et al.): 1. Open access 2. Minimal entry-barriers 3. Service-driven approach 4. Scalability In this work we propose an architectural solution aiming to contribute to the Model Web vision. This solution applies the Brokering approach for facilitiating complex multidisciplinary interoperability. The Brokering approach is currently adopted in the new GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) as was presented at the last GEO Plenary meeting in Istanbul, November 2011. According to the Brokering principles, the designed system is flexible enough to support the use of multiple BP design (visual) tools, heterogeneous Web interfaces for model execution (e.g. OGC WPS, WSDL, etc.), and different Workflow engines. We designed and prototyped a component called BP Broker that is able to: (i) read an abstract BP, (ii) "compile" the abstract BP into an executable one (eBP) - in this phase the BP Broker might also provide recommendations for incomplete BPs and parameter mismatch resolution - and (iii) finally execute the eBP using a

  2. A secure and efficiently searchable health information architecture.

    PubMed

    Yasnoff, William A

    2016-06-01

    Patient-centric repositories of health records are an important component of health information infrastructure. However, patient information in a single repository is potentially vulnerable to loss of the entire dataset from a single unauthorized intrusion. A new health record storage architecture, the personal grid, eliminates this risk by separately storing and encrypting each person's record. The tradeoff for this improved security is that a personal grid repository must be sequentially searched since each record must be individually accessed and decrypted. To allow reasonable search times for large numbers of records, parallel processing with hundreds (or even thousands) of on-demand virtual servers (now available in cloud computing environments) is used. Estimated search times for a 10 million record personal grid using 500 servers vary from 7 to 33min depending on the complexity of the query. Since extremely rapid searching is not a critical requirement of health information infrastructure, the personal grid may provide a practical and useful alternative architecture that eliminates the large-scale security vulnerabilities of traditional databases by sacrificing unnecessary searching speed. PMID:27109933

  3. Project Integration Architecture: Inter-Application Propagation of Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    A principal goal of the Project Integration Architecture (PIA) is to facilitate the meaningful inter-application transfer of application-value-added information. Such exchanging applications may be largely unrelated to each other except through their applicability to an overall project; however, the PIA effort recognizes as fundamental the need to make such applications cooperate despite wide disparaties either in the fidelity of the analyses carried out, or even the disciplines of the analysis. This paper discusses the approach and techniques applied and anticipated by the PIA project in treating this need.

  4. Developing Integrated Taxonomies for a Tiered Information Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutra, Jayne E.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the concept of developing taxonomies for an information architecture. In order to assist people in accessing information required to access information and retrieval, including cross repository searching, a system of nested taxonomies is being developed. Another facet of this developmental project is collecting and documenting attributes about people, to allow for several uses: access management, i.e., who are you and what can you see?; targeted content delivery i.e., what content helps you get your work done?; w ork force planning i.e., what skill sets do you have that we can appl y to work?; and IT Services i.e., How can we provision you with the proper IT services?

  5. Gazetteer Brokering through Semantic Mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobona, G.; Bermudez, L. E.; Brackin, R.

    2013-12-01

    A gazetteer is a geographical directory containing some information regarding places. It provides names, location and other attributes for places which may include points of interest (e.g. buildings, oilfields and boreholes), and other features. These features can be published via web services conforming to the Gazetteer Application Profile of the Web Feature Service (WFS) standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). Against the backdrop of advances in geophysical surveys, there has been a significant increase in the amount of data referenced to locations. Gazetteers services have played a significant role in facilitating access to such data, including through provision of specialized queries such as text, spatial and fuzzy search. Recent developments in the OGC have led to advances in gazetteers such as support for multilingualism, diacritics, and querying via advanced spatial constraints (e.g. search by radial search and nearest neighbor). A challenge remaining however, is that gazetteers produced by different organizations have typically been modeled differently. Inconsistencies from gazetteers produced by different organizations may include naming the same feature in a different way, naming the attributes differently, locating the feature in a different location, and providing fewer or more attributes than the other services. The Gazetteer application profile of the WFS is a starting point to address such inconsistencies by providing a standardized interface based on rules specified in ISO 19112, the international standard for spatial referencing by geographic identifiers. The profile, however, does not provide rules to deal with semantic inconsistencies. The USGS and NGA commissioned research into the potential for a Single Point of Entry Global Gazetteer (SPEGG). The research was conducted by the Cross Community Interoperability thread of the OGC testbed, referenced OWS-9. The testbed prototyped approaches for brokering gazetteers through use of semantic

  6. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company information management technology architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.J.; Lau, P.K.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Information Management Technology Architecture (TA) is being driven by the business objectives of reducing costs and improving effectiveness. The strategy is to reduce the cost of computing through standardization. The Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) TA is a set of standards and products for use at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TA will provide direction for information management resource acquisitions, development of information systems, formulation of plans, and resolution of issues involving LMITCO computing resources. Exceptions to the preferred products may be granted by the Information Management Executive Council (IMEC). Certain implementation and deployment strategies are inherent in the design and structure of LMITCO TA. These include: migration from centralized toward distributed computing; deployment of the networks, servers, and other information technology infrastructure components necessary for a more integrated information technology support environment; increased emphasis on standards to make it easier to link systems and to share information; and improved use of the company`s investment in desktop computing resources. The intent is for the LMITCO TA to be a living document constantly being reviewed to take advantage of industry directions to reduce costs while balancing technological diversity with business flexibility.

  7. Role Domains of Knowledge Brokering: A Model for the Health Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Glegg, Stephanie M; Hoens, Alison

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge brokering is a strategy to support collaborations and partnerships within and across clinical, research, and policy worlds to improve the generation and use of research knowledge. Knowledge brokers function in multiple roles to facilitate the use of evidence by leveraging the power of these partnerships. The application of theory can provide clarity in understanding the processes, influences, expected mechanisms of action, and desired outcomes of knowledge brokering. Viewing knowledge brokering from the perspective of its role domains can provide a means of organizing these elements to advance our understanding of knowledge brokering. The objectives of this special interest article are (1) to describe the context for knowledge brokering in health care, (2) to provide an overview of knowledge translation theories applied to knowledge brokering, and (3) to propose a model outlining the role domains assumed in knowledge brokering. The Role Model for Knowledge Brokering is composed of 5 role domains, including information manager, linking agent, capacity builder, facilitator, and evaluator. We provide examples from the literature and our real-world experience to demonstrate the application of the model. This model can be used to inform the practice of knowledge brokering as well as professional development and evaluation strategies. In addition, it may be used to inform theory-driven research examining the effectiveness of knowledge brokering on knowledge generation and translation outcomes in the health care field, as well as on patient health outcomes.Video Abstract is available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A126). PMID:26937654

  8. 77 FR 27150 - Amendments to Financial Responsibility Rules for Broker-Dealers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 240 RIN 3235-AJ85 Amendments to Financial Responsibility Rules for Broker-Dealers.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 9, 2007 (Exchange Act Release No. 55431, 72 FR 12862 (Mar. 19, 2007)), the... requirements for broker-dealers. They also would update the financial responsibility rules and make...

  9. Genres, Contexts, and Literacy Practices: Literacy Brokering among Sudanese Refugee Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Kristen H.

    2009-01-01

    This ethnographic study examined literacy brokering among Sudanese refugee families in Michigan. Literacy brokering occurs as individuals seek informal help with unfamiliar texts and literacy practices. Data collection involved participant observation, semi-structured interviews, and collection of artifacts over 18 months. Researcher analysis of…

  10. Final report: An enabling architecture for information driven manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmeyer, J.M.

    1997-08-01

    This document is the final report for the LDRD: An Enabling Architecture for Information Driven Manufacturing. The project was motivated by the need to bring quality products to market quickly and to remain efficient and profitable with small lot sizes, intermittent production and short product life cycles. The emphasis is on integration of the product realization process and the information required to drive it. Enterprise level information was not addressed except in so far as the enterprise must provide appropriate information to the production equipment to specify what to produce, and the equipment must return enough information to record what was produced. A production script approach was developed in which the production script specifies all of the information required to produce a quality product. A task sequencer that decomposes the script into process steps which are dispatched to capable Standard Manufacturing Modules. The plug and play interface to these modules allows rapid introduction of new modules into the production system and speeds up the product realization cycle. The results of applying this approach to the Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System are described.

  11. Information architecture project presentation to CIC leaders, March 10 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, T.A.

    1995-09-01

    On March 10, 1995, members of the Laboratory`s Information Architecture (IA) project presented an overview of progress-to-date to Group and Program Leaders and Deputies in the Computing, Information, and Communications (CIC) division. The presentation included progress reports from each of the seven IA teams: desktop, applications, data warehouse, data, infrastructure, financial analysis, metrics, and review. The fundamental purpose was to familiarize the CIC leaders with the IA project and to open a dialog on how CIC and the IA could better work with each other. On April 5, 1995, the IA project held an open forum in the Physics Auditorium that reused many of the viewgraphs from the presentation to CIC leaders.

  12. Developing the architecture for the Climate Information Portal for Copernicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som de Cerff, Wim; Thijsse, Peter; Plieger, Maarten; Pascoe, Stephen; Jukes, Martin; Leadbetter, Adam; Goosen, Hasse; de Vreede, Ernst

    2015-04-01

    environment and society, but will develop an end to end processing chain (indicator toolkit), from comprehensive information on the climate state through to highly aggregated decision relevant products. This processing chain will be demonstrated within three thematic areas: water, rural and urban. Indicators of climate change and climate change impact will be provided, and a toolkit to update and post process the collection of indicators will be integrated into the portal. For the indicators three levels (Tiers) have been loosely defined: Tier 1: field summarising properties of the climate system; e.g. temperature change; Tier 2: expressed in terms of environmental properties outside the climate system; e.g. flooding change; Tier 3: expressed in social and economic impact. For the architecture, CLIPC has two interlocked themes: 1. Harmonised access to climate datasets derived from models, observations and re-analyses 2. A climate impact toolkit to evaluate, rank and aggregate indicators For development of the CLIPC architecture an Agile 'storyline' approach is taken. The storyline is a real world use case and consists of producing a Tier 3 indicator (Urban Heat Vulnerability) and making it available through the CLIPC infrastructure for a user group. In this way architecture concepts can be directly tested and improved. Also, the produced indicator can be shown to users to refine requirements. Main components of the CLIPC architecture are 1) Data discovery and access, 2) Data processing, 3) Data visualization, 4) Knowledge base and 5) User Management. The Data discovery and access component main challenge is to provide harmonized access to various sources of climate data (ngEO, EMODNET/SeaDataNet, ESGF, MyOcean). The discovery service concept will be provided using a CLIPC data and data product catalogue and via a structured data search on selected infrastructures, using NERC vocabulary services and mappings. Data processing will be provided using OGC WPS services, linking

  13. Establishing the role of honest broker: bridging the gap between protecting personal health data and clinical research efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang-Min; Lee, JaeHo; Shin, Soo-Yong; Lyu, Yungman

    2015-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study is to propose the four conditions for the roles of honest brokers through a review of literature published by ten institutions that are successfully utilizing honest brokers. Furthermore, the study aims to examine whether the Asan Medical Center’s (AMC) honest brokers satisfy the four conditions, and examine the need to enhance their roles. Methods. We analyzed the roles, tasks, and types of honest brokers at 10 organizations by reviewing the literature. We also established a Task Force (TF) in our institution for setting the roles and processes of the honest broker system and the honest brokers. The findings of the literature search were compared with the existing systems at AMC—which introduced the honest broker system for the first time in Korea. Results. Only one organization employed an honest broker for validating anonymized clinical data and monitoring the anonymity verifications of the honest broker system. Six organizations complied with HIPAA privacy regulations, while four organizations did not disclose compliance. By comparing functions with those of the AMC, the following four main characteristics of honest brokers were determined: (1) de-identification of clinical data; (2) independence; (3) checking that the data are used only for purposes approved by the IRB; and (4) provision of de-identified data to researchers. These roles were then compared with those of honest brokers at the AMC. Discussion. First, guidelines that regulate the definitions, purposes, roles, and requirements for honest brokers are needed, since there are no currently existing regulations. Second, Korean clinical research institutions and national regulatory departments need to reach a consensus on a Korean version of Limited Data Sets (LDS), since there are no lists that describe the use of personal identification information. Lastly, satisfaction surveys on honest brokers by researchers are necessary to improve the quality of honest

  14. Establishing the role of honest broker: bridging the gap between protecting personal health data and clinical research efficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Joung; Lee, Min Joung; Choi, Chang-Min; Lee, JaeHo; Shin, Soo-Yong; Lyu, Yungman; Park, Yu Rang; Yoo, Soyoung

    2015-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study is to propose the four conditions for the roles of honest brokers through a review of literature published by ten institutions that are successfully utilizing honest brokers. Furthermore, the study aims to examine whether the Asan Medical Center's (AMC) honest brokers satisfy the four conditions, and examine the need to enhance their roles. Methods. We analyzed the roles, tasks, and types of honest brokers at 10 organizations by reviewing the literature. We also established a Task Force (TF) in our institution for setting the roles and processes of the honest broker system and the honest brokers. The findings of the literature search were compared with the existing systems at AMC-which introduced the honest broker system for the first time in Korea. Results. Only one organization employed an honest broker for validating anonymized clinical data and monitoring the anonymity verifications of the honest broker system. Six organizations complied with HIPAA privacy regulations, while four organizations did not disclose compliance. By comparing functions with those of the AMC, the following four main characteristics of honest brokers were determined: (1) de-identification of clinical data; (2) independence; (3) checking that the data are used only for purposes approved by the IRB; and (4) provision of de-identified data to researchers. These roles were then compared with those of honest brokers at the AMC. Discussion. First, guidelines that regulate the definitions, purposes, roles, and requirements for honest brokers are needed, since there are no currently existing regulations. Second, Korean clinical research institutions and national regulatory departments need to reach a consensus on a Korean version of Limited Data Sets (LDS), since there are no lists that describe the use of personal identification information. Lastly, satisfaction surveys on honest brokers by researchers are necessary to improve the quality of honest

  15. Study on architecture and implementation of adaptive spatial information service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhuoyuan; Wang, Yingjie; Luo, Bin

    2007-06-01

    More and more geo-spatial information has been disseminated to the Internet based on WebGIS architecture. Some of these online mapping applications have already been widely used in recent years, such as Google map, MapQuest, go2map, mapbar. However, due to the limitation of web map technology and transmit speed of large geo-spatial data through the Internet, most of these web map systems employ (pyramid-indexed) raster map modeling technology. This method can shorten server's response time but largely reduces the flexibility and visualization effect of the web map provided. It will be difficult for them to adaptively change the map contents or map styles for variant user demands. This paper propose a new system architecture for adaptive web map service by integrating latest network technology and web map technology, such as SVG, Ajax, user modeling. Its main advantages include: Firstly, it is user customized. In this proposed map system, user can design the map contents, styles and interfaces online by themselves; secondly, it is more intelligent. It can record user interactive actions with the system, analyze user profiles, predict user behavior. User's interests will be obtained and tasks will be suggested based on different user models, which are generated from the system. For instance, if a new user login in, the nearest user model will be matched and some interactive suggestions will be provided by the system for the user. It is a more powerful and efficient way for spatial information sharing. This paper first discusses the main system architecture of adaptive spatial information service which consists of three parts: user layer, map application layer and database layer. User layer is distributed on client side which includes Web map (SVG) browser, map renderer and map visualization component. Application layer includes map application server, user interface generation, user analysis and user modeling, etc. Based on user models, map content, style and user

  16. Egg Donation Brokers

    PubMed Central

    Holwell, Eve; Keehn, Jason; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Sauer, Mark V.; Klitzman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare Websites of agencies that broker the services women who provide human eggs for in vitro fertilization versus clinics that recruit egg providers. STUDY DESIGN We examined 207 websites, of which 128 were egg provider agency (40%) or clinic (60%) websites that recruited providers online. We compared them regarding several variables related to adherence to American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) guidelines. RESULTS According to their respective websites, agencies were more likely than clinics to mention ASRM guidelines, be located in the West/Pacific, indicate compensation, offer a fee range, set their minimum > $5,000, specify preferable traits, cap provider age at ≤ 31,require an education minimum, allow both parties to meet, discuss short-term risks, and not acknowledge a possible cancer risk. Only 25.5% of agencies and 19.5% of clinics mention psychological/emotional risks, and 11.8% and 5.2%, respectively, mention risks, to future fertility. CONCLUSIONS This research, the first to systematically compare several key aspects of egg provider agencies versus clinics, suggests significant differences in adherence to guidelines, raising several concerns and suggesting needs for consideration of improved monitoring and regulation by ASRM or others. PMID:25552124

  17. Designing and implementing a Quality Broker: the GeoViQua experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papeschi, Fabrizio; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Masò, Joan; Nativi, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    GeoViQua (QUAlity aware VIsualisation for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems) is an FP7 project aiming at complementing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) with rigorous data quality specifications and quality-aware capabilities, in order to improve reliability in scientific studies and policy decision-making. GeoViQua main scientific and technical objective is to enhance the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) providing the user community with innovative quality-aware search and visualization tools, which will be integrated in the GEOPortal, as well as made available to other end-user interfaces. To this end, GeoViQua will promote the extension of the current standard metadata for geographic information with accurate and expressive quality indicators. Employing and extending several ISO standards such as 19115, 19157 and 19139, a common set of data quality indicators has been selected to be used within the project. The resulting work, in the form of a data model, is expressed in XML Schema Language and encoded in XML. Quality information can be stated both by data producers and by data users, actually resulting in two conceptually distinct data models, the Producer Quality model and the User Quality model (or User Feedback model). GeoViQua architecture is built on the brokering approach successfully experimented within the EuroGEOSS project and realized by the GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker) which is part of the GCI. The GEO DAB allows for harmonization and distribution in a transparent way for both users and data providers. This way, GeoViQua can effectively complement and extend the GEO DAB obtaining a Quality augmentation Broker (DAB-Q) which plays a central role in ensuring the consistency of the Producer and User quality models. The GeoViQua architecture also includes a Feedback Catalog, a particular service brokered by the DAB-Q which is dedicated to the storage and discovery of user feedbacks. A very important issue

  18. Developing the architecture for the Climate Information Portal for Copernicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som de Cerff, Wim; Thijsse, Peter; Plieger, Maarten; Pascoe, Stephen; Jukes, Martin; Leadbetter, Adam; Goosen, Hasse; de Vreede, Ernst

    2015-04-01

    environment and society, but will develop an end to end processing chain (indicator toolkit), from comprehensive information on the climate state through to highly aggregated decision relevant products. This processing chain will be demonstrated within three thematic areas: water, rural and urban. Indicators of climate change and climate change impact will be provided, and a toolkit to update and post process the collection of indicators will be integrated into the portal. For the indicators three levels (Tiers) have been loosely defined: Tier 1: field summarising properties of the climate system; e.g. temperature change; Tier 2: expressed in terms of environmental properties outside the climate system; e.g. flooding change; Tier 3: expressed in social and economic impact. For the architecture, CLIPC has two interlocked themes: 1. Harmonised access to climate datasets derived from models, observations and re-analyses 2. A climate impact toolkit to evaluate, rank and aggregate indicators For development of the CLIPC architecture an Agile 'storyline' approach is taken. The storyline is a real world use case and consists of producing a Tier 3 indicator (Urban Heat Vulnerability) and making it available through the CLIPC infrastructure for a user group. In this way architecture concepts can be directly tested and improved. Also, the produced indicator can be shown to users to refine requirements. Main components of the CLIPC architecture are 1) Data discovery and access, 2) Data processing, 3) Data visualization, 4) Knowledge base and 5) User Management. The Data discovery and access component main challenge is to provide harmonized access to various sources of climate data (ngEO, EMODNET/SeaDataNet, ESGF, MyOcean). The discovery service concept will be provided using a CLIPC data and data product catalogue and via a structured data search on selected infrastructures, using NERC vocabulary services and mappings. Data processing will be provided using OGC WPS services, linking

  19. 7 CFR 926.14 - Broker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.14 Broker. Broker... cranberries or cranberry products. Effective Date Note: At 71 FR 78046, Dec. 28, 2006, § 926.14 was...

  20. 7 CFR 926.14 - Broker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.14 Broker. Broker... cranberries or cranberry products. Effective Date Note: At 71 FR 78046, Dec. 28, 2006, § 926.14 was...

  1. 7 CFR 926.14 - Broker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.14 Broker. Broker... cranberries or cranberry products. Effective Date Note: At 71 FR 78046, Dec. 28, 2006, § 926.14 was...

  2. 7 CFR 926.14 - Broker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.14 Broker. Broker... cranberries or cranberry products. Effective Date Note: At 71 FR 78046, Dec. 28, 2006, § 926.14 was...

  3. Theatre and Cinema Architecture: A Guide to Information Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Richard

    This annotated bibliography cites works related to theatres, movie houses, opera houses, and dance facilities. It is divided into three parts: general references, theatre architecture, and cinema architecture. The part on general references includes bibliographies and periodicals. The second and main part of the guide, on theatre architecture,…

  4. A National Medical Information System for Senegal: Architecture and Services.

    PubMed

    Camara, Gaoussou; Diallo, Al Hassim; Lo, Moussa; Tendeng, Jacques-Noël; Lo, Seynabou

    2016-01-01

    In Senegal, great amounts of data are daily generated by medical activities such as consultation, hospitalization, blood test, x-ray, birth, death, etc. These data are still recorded in register, printed images, audios and movies which are manually processed. However, some medical organizations have their own software for non-standardized patient record management, appointment, wages, etc. without any possibility of sharing these data or communicating with other medical structures. This leads to lots of limitations in reusing or sharing these data because of their possible structural and semantic heterogeneity. To overcome these problems we have proposed a National Medical Information System for Senegal (SIMENS). As an integrated platform, SIMENS provides an EHR system that supports healthcare activities, a mobile version and a web portal. The SIMENS architecture proposes also a data and application integration services for supporting interoperability and decision making. PMID:27577338

  5. 77 FR 58141 - Public Buildings Service; Information Collection; Art-in-Architecture Program National Artist...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... ADMINISTRATION Public Buildings Service; Information Collection; Art-in- Architecture Program National Artist... requirement regarding Art-in Architecture Program National Artist Registry (GSA Form 7437). The Art-in-Architecture Program is the result of a policy decision made in January 1963 by GSA Administrator Bernard...

  6. 78 FR 23116 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Debt Instruments and Options...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... FR 72652) proposed regulations (REG-102988- 11) relating to information reporting by brokers... Return for Publicly Offered Original Issue Discount Instruments,'' for certain debt instruments with original issue discount and temporary regulations relating to information reporting for premium. The...

  7. 7 CFR 1955.129 - Business brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Business brokers. 1955.129 Section 1955.129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.129 Business brokers. The services of business brokers or...

  8. 7 CFR 1955.129 - Business brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Business brokers. 1955.129 Section 1955.129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.129 Business brokers. The services of business brokers or...

  9. 7 CFR 1955.129 - Business brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Business brokers. 1955.129 Section 1955.129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.129 Business brokers. The services of business brokers or...

  10. 7 CFR 1955.129 - Business brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Business brokers. 1955.129 Section 1955.129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.129 Business brokers. The services of business brokers or...

  11. 31 CFR 560.416 - Brokering services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brokering services. 560.416 Section....416 Brokering services. (a) For purposes of the prohibitions in §§ 560.201, 560.204, 560.205, 560.206 and 560.208, the term services includes performing a brokering function. (b) Examples. A person...

  12. 7 CFR 1955.129 - Business brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Business brokers. 1955.129 Section 1955.129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.129 Business brokers. The services of business brokers or...

  13. Information Technology Architectures. New Opportunities for Partnering, CAUSE94. Track VI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1994 CAUSE conference track on information technology architectures as applied to higher education institutions. The papers include: (1) "Reshaping the Enterprise: Building the Next Generation of Information Systems Through Information Architecture and Processing Reengineering," which notes developments at the…

  14. Data de- and redimensioning for optimized brokering access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuka, D. R.; MacAlister, C.; Khalsa, S. S.; Walter, M. T.; Fuka, M. Z.; Pierce, S. A.; Easton, Z. M.

    2013-12-01

    Data brokering systems aim to facilitate the exchange of data and models between disciplines in an increasingly transparent manner thereby accelerating scientific discovery. Researchers from many different, yet complimentary geoscience disciplines need to access cross field datasets from different fields with significantly different data formats, and in most cases differing time and space dimensionality than their own field commonly uses. This causes problems with large datasets with different time and space dimensions, as the difference in dimension often means that the entire dataset has to be read in order to provide the limited information the researcher is interested in. In this poster we present methods for removing the dimensionality from datasets, both physically on the data serving side as well demonstrate de- and redimensioning datasets from a broker based virtual perspective so the data brokering system can quickly access the smaller subset of data in the correct dimensionality for any given field.

  15. 77 FR 74826 - Notice of Intent To Seek OMB Approval To Collect Information: On-Line Architectural Barriers Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Notice of Intent To Seek OMB Approval To Collect Information: On- Line Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Complaint Form AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation...

  16. Knowledge Brokers in the Making: Opportunities to Connect Researchers and Stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, K. G.; Pennell, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Environmental science and engineering graduate students often lack training on how to communicate with policy decision makers who are grappling with questions to which research is responding. They communicate directly with mutual experts, but are many times unable to engage with non-experts about their research, thereby limiting the reach and impact of their findings. This presentation highlights opportunities within environmental science and engineering research to create opportunities for researchers to hone skills as knowledge brokers, so they learn ways to meaningfully engage with a range of stakeholders. A knowledge broker is an individual who connects scientific experts and relevant stakeholders with meaningful and useable information. Recognizing that information must flow in multiple directions, the knowledge broker must quickly and effectively translate needs and questions using established relationships. It is these relationships, as well as the synthesis of scientific knowledge into useable information, on which the success of the knowledge broker lies. Using lessons learned, as well as communication science theory related to knowledge brokering, this presentation highlights training opportunities for knowledge brokers who are primarily educated in science and engineering fields, yet seek to engage with societally relevant stakeholders. We present case study examples of knowledge brokering within two large multi-disciplinary research centers. These centers provide unique experiences for researchers to build relationships with stakeholders, so that the scientific experts not only create novel research within their specific discipline, but also inform policy decision makers, community members and regulatory officials.

  17. 78 FR 48458 - Notice of Reinstatement of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In a notice published in the Federal Register (77 FR 72873) on December 6, 2012, U.S... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Reinstatement of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Reinstatement of customs...

  18. 12 CFR 703.8 - Broker-dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Broker-dealers. 703.8 Section 703.8 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT... business; (2) Information available from State or Federal securities regulators and securities...

  19. Generalized Information Architecture for Managing Requirements in IBM?s Rational DOORS(r) Application.

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, Kathryn M.; Eaton, Shelley M.; McCornack, Marjorie Turner; Shannon, Sharon A.

    2014-12-01

    When a requirements engineering effort fails to meet expectations, often times the requirements management tool is blamed. Working with numerous project teams at Sandia National Laboratories over the last fifteen years has shown us that the tool is rarely the culprit; usually it is the lack of a viable information architecture with well- designed processes to support requirements engineering. This document illustrates design concepts with rationale, as well as a proven information architecture to structure and manage information in support of requirements engineering activities for any size or type of project. This generalized information architecture is specific to IBM's Rational DOORS (Dynamic Object Oriented Requirements System) software application, which is the requirements management tool in Sandia's CEE (Common Engineering Environment). This generalized information architecture can be used as presented or as a foundation for designing a tailored information architecture for project-specific needs. It may also be tailored for another software tool. Version 1.0 4 November 201

  20. 78 FR 41299 - Customs Brokers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 19 CFR Part 111 Customs Brokers CFR Correction In Title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 0 to 140, revised as of April 1, 2013,...

  1. Distributed information system architecture for Primary Health Care.

    PubMed

    Grammatikou, M; Stamatelopoulos, F; Maglaris, B

    2000-01-01

    We present a distributed architectural framework for Primary Health Care (PHC) Centres. Distribution is handled through the introduction of the Roaming Electronic Health Care Record (R-EHCR) and the use of local caching and incremental update of a global index. The proposed architecture is designed to accommodate a specific PHC workflow model. Finally, we discuss a pilot implementation in progress, which is based on CORBA and web-based user interfaces. However, the conceptual architecture is generic and open to other middleware approaches like the DHE or HL7. PMID:11187702

  2. Structured P2P Overlay of Mobile Brokers for Realizing Publish/Subscribe Communication in VANET

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Tulika; Garg, Deepak; Gore, Manoj Madhava

    2014-01-01

    Publish/subscribe communication paradigm provides asynchrony and decoupling, making it an elegant alternative for designing applications in distributed and dynamic environment such as vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). In this paradigm, the broker is the most important component that decouples other two components, namely, publisher and subscriber. Previous research efforts have either utilized the deployment of distributed brokers on stationary road side info-stations or have assigned the role of broker to any moving vehicle on ad hoc basis. In one approach, lots of preinstalled infrastructures are needed whereas, in another, the quality of service is not guaranteed due to unpredictable moving and stopping patterns of vehicles. In this paper, we present the architecture of distributed mobile brokers which are dynamically reconfigurable in the form of structured P2P overlay and act as rendezvous points for matching publications and subscriptions. We have taken city buses in urban settings to act as mobile brokers whereas other vehicles are considered to be in role of publishers and subscribers. These mobile brokers also assist in locating a vehicle for successful and timely transfer of notifications. We have performed an extensive simulation study to compare our approach with previously proposed approaches. Simulation results establish the applicability of our approach. PMID:24523629

  3. Structured P2P overlay of mobile brokers for realizing publish/subscribe communication in VANET.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Tulika; Garg, Deepak; Gore, Manoj Madhava

    2014-01-01

    Publish/subscribe communication paradigm provides asynchrony and decoupling, making it an elegant alternative for designing applications in distributed and dynamic environment such as vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). In this paradigm, the broker is the most important component that decouples other two components, namely, publisher and subscriber. Previous research efforts have either utilized the deployment of distributed brokers on stationary road side info-stations or have assigned the role of broker to any moving vehicle on ad hoc basis. In one approach, lots of preinstalled infrastructures are needed whereas, in another, the quality of service is not guaranteed due to unpredictable moving and stopping patterns of vehicles. In this paper, we present the architecture of distributed mobile brokers which are dynamically reconfigurable in the form of structured P2P overlay and act as rendezvous points for matching publications and subscriptions. We have taken city buses in urban settings to act as mobile brokers whereas other vehicles are considered to be in role of publishers and subscribers. These mobile brokers also assist in locating a vehicle for successful and timely transfer of notifications. We have performed an extensive simulation study to compare our approach with previously proposed approaches. Simulation results establish the applicability of our approach. PMID:24523629

  4. The Role of Knowledge Brokers in International Ocean Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannix, H.

    2013-12-01

    The concept of the 'boundary' between science and policy has been used as a tool to separate and protect the credibility of both parties - the scientist and the policy maker. While this separation is important, it also results in frustration by both sides, a reduction in efficiency and ultimately establishes policy that has the potential to be more effective. Many now agree that the process of knowledge generation and transmission to decision makers, and eventually into effective policy, should not be a one-way, linear push of information, but a multi-party dialogue in which decision makers, scientists and intermediaries work together to increase the effectiveness of the scientific information for the policy process. These intermediaries, or knowledge brokers, are described as persons or organizations that actively facilitate the creation, sharing, and use of knowledge. This work discusses the reasons for the boundary between science and policy and the inherent challenges in bridging the boundary. It examines the role and activities of knowledge brokers and illuminates the process by which scientific and technical knowledge is translated from knowledge generators (i.e. scientists) to knowledge users (i.e. policy makers) in international environmental governance. The study then considers the role of knowledge brokers in practice, through a case study of the ongoing effort to establish marine protected areas in the high seas. Specifically, this study examines who the knowledge brokers are working on this topic, their activities, and what lessons their experiences hold for the effective translation of scientific information to policy makers in other international issues. The study concludes that 1) knowledge brokers and boundary organizations are an essential part of the effective translation of scientific knowledge to policy makers in international environmental governance and 2) both knowledge generators and knowledge users would benefit by recognizing the role of

  5. SANDS: a service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    PubMed

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. The SANDS architecture for decision support has several significant advantages over other architectures for clinical decision support. The most salient of these are: PMID:18434256

  6. Advanced information processing system for advanced launch system: Avionics architecture synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a fault-tolerant distributed computer system architecture that was developed to meet the real time computational needs of advanced aerospace vehicles. One such vehicle is the Advanced Launch System (ALS) being developed jointly by NASA and the Department of Defense to launch heavy payloads into low earth orbit at one tenth the cost (per pound of payload) of the current launch vehicles. An avionics architecture that utilizes the AIPS hardware and software building blocks was synthesized for ALS. The AIPS for ALS architecture synthesis process starting with the ALS mission requirements and ending with an analysis of the candidate ALS avionics architecture is described.

  7. ELISA, a demonstrator environment for information systems architecture design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panem, Chantal

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an approach of reusability of software engineering technology in the area of ground space system design. System engineers have lots of needs similar to software developers: sharing of a common data base, capitalization of knowledge, definition of a common design process, communication between different technical domains. Moreover system designers need to simulate dynamically their system as early as possible. Software development environments, methods and tools now become operational and widely used. Their architecture is based on a unique object base, a set of common management services and they host a family of tools for each life cycle activity. In late '92, CNES decided to develop a demonstrative software environment supporting some system activities. The design of ground space data processing systems was chosen as the application domain. ELISA (Integrated Software Environment for Architectures Specification) was specified as a 'demonstrator', i.e. a sufficient basis for demonstrations, evaluation and future operational enhancements. A process with three phases was implemented: system requirements definition, design of system architectures models, and selection of physical architectures. Each phase is composed of several activities that can be performed in parallel, with the provision of Commercial Off the Shelves Tools. ELISA has been delivered to CNES in January 94, currently used for demonstrations and evaluations on real projects (e.g. SPOT4 Satellite Control Center). It is on the way of new evolutions.

  8. Intelligent Information Retrieval and Web Mining Architecture Using SOA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Bathy, Naser Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    The study of this dissertation provides a solution to a very specific problem instance in the area of data mining, data warehousing, and service-oriented architecture in publishing and newspaper industries. The research question focuses on the integration of data mining and data warehousing. The research problem focuses on the development of…

  9. The Internet information infrastructure: Terrorist tool or architecture for information defense?

    SciTech Connect

    Kadner, S.; Turpen, E.; Rees, B.

    1998-12-01

    The Internet is a culmination of information age technologies and an agent of change. As with any infrastructure, dependency upon the so-called global information infrastructure creates vulnerabilities. Moreover, unlike physical infrastructures, the Internet is a multi-use technology. While information technologies, such as the Internet, can be utilized as a tool of terror, these same technologies can facilitate the implementation of solutions to mitigate the threat. In this vein, this paper analyzes the multifaceted nature of the Internet information infrastructure and argues that policymakers should concentrate on the solutions it provides rather than the vulnerabilities it creates. Minimizing risks and realizing possibilities in the information age will require institutional activities that translate, exploit and convert information technologies into positive solutions. What follows is a discussion of the Internet information infrastructure as it relates to increasing vulnerabilities and positive potential. The following four applications of the Internet will be addressed: as the infrastructure for information competence; as a terrorist tool; as the terrorist`s target; and as an architecture for rapid response.

  10. 17 CFR 21.02 - Special calls for information on open contracts in accounts carried or introduced by futures...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in the call, each futures commission merchant, clearing member, member of a reporting market, introducing broker, or foreign broker, and, in addition, for option information, each reporting market,...

  11. 17 CFR 21.02 - Special calls for information on open contracts in accounts carried or introduced by futures...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in the call, each futures commission merchant, clearing member, member of a reporting market, introducing broker, or foreign broker, and, in addition, for option information, each reporting market,...

  12. 31 CFR 560.416 - Brokering services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provision of goods, services or technology, from whatever source, to or from Iran or the Government of Iran... the Government of Iran; (3) Act as broker for the provision of financing, a financial guarantee or an extension of credit by any person to Iran or the Government of Iran; (4) Act as a broker for the...

  13. 31 CFR 560.416 - Brokering services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for the provision of goods, services or technology, from whatever source, to or from Iran or the Government of Iran; (2) Act as broker for the purchase or swap of crude oil of Iranian origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Iran; (3) Act as broker for the provision of financing, a financial...

  14. 31 CFR 560.416 - Brokering services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provision of goods, services or technology, from whatever source, to or from Iran or the Government of Iran... the Government of Iran; (3) Act as broker for the provision of financing, a financial guarantee or an extension of credit by any person to Iran or the Government of Iran; (4) Act as a broker for the...

  15. 31 CFR 560.416 - Brokering services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for the provision of goods, services or technology, from whatever source, to or from Iran or the Government of Iran; (2) Act as broker for the purchase or swap of crude oil of Iranian origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Iran; (3) Act as broker for the provision of financing, a financial...

  16. Should Nurses Be Knowledge Brokers? Competencies and Organizational Resources to Support the Role.

    PubMed

    Catallo, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    Registered nurses with graduate preparation are in a unique position to act as knowledge brokers owing to their extensive clinical experience and ability to be seen as a credible and respected resource by their peers. Nurse knowledge brokers can bridge the gap between research producers and those that need evidence for decision-making and support capacity development for evidence-informed decision-making (EIDM). Knowledge broker competencies include graduate-level education with exposure to research methods; experience with the EIDM process; and established networking skills to bring researchers, decision-makers, stakeholders and policymakers together. For the knowledge broker to be successful, the nurse leader can cultivate an organizational culture supportive of evidence use with advocacy for mandates that require evidence for decisions, structures in place for each stage of the EIDM process, and physical resources such as library services for evidence retrieval. PMID:26154118

  17. Information Architecture for the Web: The IA Matrix Approach to Designing Children's Portals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Large, Andrew; Beheshti, Jamshid; Cole, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Presents a matrix that can serve as a tool for designing the information architecture of a Web portal in a logical and systematic manner. Highlights include interfaces; metaphors; navigation; interaction; information retrieval; and an example of a children's Web portal to provide access to museum information. (Author/LRW)

  18. Touring by Design: Using Information Architecture To Create a Virtual Library Tour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittelson, Pat; Jones, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development of a Web-based virtual tour of the University of Otago (New Zealand) science library. Highlights include information literacy learning outcomes; information architecture, including information organization and navigation; integrating the tour into course work; and evaluation results. (LRW)

  19. SANDS: A Service-Oriented Architecture for Clinical Decision Support in a National Health Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. PMID:18434256

  20. NaradaBrokering as Middleware Fabric for Grid-based Remote Visualization Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallickara, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Yuen, D.; Fox, G.; Pierce, M.

    2003-12-01

    Remote Visualization Services (RVS) have tended to rely on approaches based on the client server paradigm. The simplicity in these approaches is offset by problems such as single-point-of-failures, scaling and availability. Furthermore, as the complexity, scale and scope of the services hosted on this paradigm increase, this approach becomes increasingly unsuitable. We propose a scheme based on top of a distributed brokering infrastructure, NaradaBrokering, which comprises a distributed network of broker nodes. These broker nodes are organized in a cluster-based architecture that can scale to very large sizes. The broker network is resilient to broker failures and efficiently routes interactions to entities that expressed an interest in them. In our approach to RVS, services advertise their capabilities to the broker network, which manages these service advertisements. Among the services considered within our system are those that perform graphic transformations, mediate access to specialized datasets and finally those that manage the execution of specified tasks. There could be multiple instances of each of these services and the system ensures that load for a given service is distributed efficiently over these service instances. Among the features provided in our approach are efficient discovery of services and asynchronous interactions between services and service requestors (which could themselves be other services). Entities need not be online during the execution of the service request. The system also ensures that entities can be notified about task executions, partial results and failures that might have taken place during service execution. The system also facilitates specification of task overrides, distribution of execution results to alternate devices (which were not used to originally request service execution) and to multiple users. These RVS services could of course be either OGSA (Open Grid Services Architecture) based Grid services or traditional

  1. Towards a Brokering Framework for Business Process Execution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mattia; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Roncella, Roberto; Mazzetti, Paolo; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Advancing our knowledge of environmental phenomena and their interconnections requires an intensive use of environmental models. Due to the complexity of Earth system, the representation of complex environmental processes often requires the use of more than one model (often from different disciplines). The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) launched the Model Web initiative to increase present accessibility and interoperability of environmental models, allowing their flexible composition into complex Business Processes (BPs). A few, basic principles are at the base of the Model Web concept (Nativi, et al.): (i) Open access, (ii) Minimal entry-barriers, (iii) Service-driven approach, and (iv) Scalability. This work proposes an architectural solution, based on the Brokering approach for multidisciplinary interoperability, aiming to contribute to the Model Web vision. The Brokering approach is currently adopted in the new GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) as was presented at the last GEO Plenary meeting in Istanbul, November 2011. We designed and prototyped a component called BP Broker. The high-level functionalities provided by the BP Broker are: • Discover the needed model implementations in an open, distributed and heterogeneous environment; • Check I/O consistency of BPs and provide suggestions for mismatches resolving: • Publish the EBP as a standard model resource for re-use. • Submit the compiled BP (EBP) to a WF-engine for execution. A BP Broker has the following features: • Support multiple abstract BP specifications; • Support encoding in multiple WF-engine languages. According to the Brokering principles, the designed system is flexible enough to support the use of multiple BP design (visual) tools, heterogeneous Web interfaces for model execution (e.g. OGC WPS, WSDL, etc.), and different Workflow engines. The present implementation makes use of BPMN 2.0 notation for BP design and jBPM workflow engine for eBP execution; however, the strong

  2. 12 CFR 220.7 - Broker-dealer credit account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Broker-dealer credit account. 220.7 Section 220... SYSTEM (CONTINUED) CREDIT BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.7 Broker-dealer credit account. (a) Requirements. In a broker-dealer credit account, a creditor may effect or finance transactions in...

  3. 12 CFR 220.7 - Broker-dealer credit account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Broker-dealer credit account. 220.7 Section 220... SYSTEM CREDIT BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.7 Broker-dealer credit account. (a) Requirements. In a broker-dealer credit account, a creditor may effect or finance transactions in...

  4. The holistic architectural approach to integrating the healthcare record in the overall information system.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, F M; Sottile, P A; Grimson, W

    1999-01-01

    The integration and evolution of existing systems represents one of the most urgent problems facing those responsible for healthcare information systems so that the needs of the whole organisation are addressed. The management of the healthcare record represents one of the major requirements in the overall process, however it is also necessary to ensure that the healthcare record and other healthcare information is integrated within the context of an overall healthcare information system. The CEN ENV 12967-1 'Healthcare Information Systems Architecture' standard defines a holistic architectural approach where the various, organisational, clinical, administrative and managerial requirements co-exist and cooperate, relying on a common heritage of information and services. This paper reviews the middleware-based approach adopted by CEN ENV 12967-1 and the specialisation necessary for the healthcare record based on CEN ENV 12265 'Electronic Healthcare Record Architecture'. PMID:10725017

  5. Extending the GI Brokering Suite to Support New Interoperability Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, E.; Papeschi, F.; Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    The GI brokering suite provides the discovery, access, and semantic Brokers (i.e. GI-cat, GI-axe, GI-sem) that empower a Brokering framework for multi-disciplinary and multi-organizational interoperability. GI suite has been successfully deployed in the framework of several programmes and initiatives, such as European Union funded projects, NSF BCube, and the intergovernmental coordinated effort Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Each GI suite Broker facilitates interoperability for a particular functionality (i.e. discovery, access, semantic extension) among a set of brokered resources published by autonomous providers (e.g. data repositories, web services, semantic assets) and a set of heterogeneous consumers (e.g. client applications, portals, apps). A wide set of data models, encoding formats, and service protocols are already supported by the GI suite, such as the ones defined by international standardizing organizations like OGC and ISO (e.g. WxS, CSW, SWE, GML, netCDF) and by Community specifications (e.g. THREDDS, OpenSearch, OPeNDAP, ESRI APIs). Using GI suite, resources published by a particular Community or organization through their specific technology (e.g. OPeNDAP/netCDF) can be transparently discovered, accessed, and used by different Communities utilizing their preferred tools (e.g. a GIS visualizing WMS layers). Since Information Technology is a moving target, new standards and technologies continuously emerge and are adopted in the Earth Science context too. Therefore, GI Brokering suite was conceived to be flexible and accommodate new interoperability protocols and data models. For example, GI suite has recently added support to well-used specifications, introduced to implement Linked data, Semantic Web and precise community needs. Amongst the others, they included: DCAT: a RDF vocabulary designed to facilitate interoperability between Web data catalogs. CKAN: a data management system for data distribution, particularly used by

  6. Information management architecture for an integrated computing environment for the Environmental Restoration Program. Environmental Restoration Program, Volume 3, Interim technical architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This third volume of the Information Management Architecture for an Integrated Computing Environment for the Environmental Restoration Program--the Interim Technical Architecture (TA) (referred to throughout the remainder of this document as the ER TA)--represents a key milestone in establishing a coordinated information management environment in which information initiatives can be pursued with the confidence that redundancy and inconsistencies will be held to a minimum. This architecture is intended to be used as a reference by anyone whose responsibilities include the acquisition or development of information technology for use by the ER Program. The interim ER TA provides technical guidance at three levels. At the highest level, the technical architecture provides an overall computing philosophy or direction. At this level, the guidance does not address specific technologies or products but addresses more general concepts, such as the use of open systems, modular architectures, graphical user interfaces, and architecture-based development. At the next level, the technical architecture provides specific information technology recommendations regarding a wide variety of specific technologies. These technologies include computing hardware, operating systems, communications software, database management software, application development software, and personal productivity software, among others. These recommendations range from the adoption of specific industry or Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) standards to the specification of individual products. At the third level, the architecture provides guidance regarding implementation strategies for the recommended technologies that can be applied to individual projects and to the ER Program as a whole.

  7. Information Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follen, Gregory J.; Naiman, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    The objective of GRC CNIS/IE work is to build a plug-n-play infrastructure that provides the Grand Challenge Applications with a suite of tools for coupling codes together, numerical zooming between fidelity of codes and gaining deployment of these simulations onto the Information Power Grid. The GRC CNIS/IE work will streamline and improve this process by providing tighter integration of various tools through the use of object oriented design of component models and data objects and through the use of CORBA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture).

  8. A software architecture to support a large-scale, multi-tier clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Yungton, J A; Sittig, D F; Reilly, P; Pappas, J; Flammini, S; Chueh, H C; Teich, J M

    1998-01-01

    A robust software architecture is necessary to support a large-scale multi-tier clinical information system. This paper describes our mechanism for enterprise distribution of applications and support files, the consolidation of data-access functions and system utilities stored on the data access tier, and an application framework which implements a coherent clinical computing environment. The software architecture and systems described in this paper have been robust through pilot testing of our applications at Massachusetts General Hospital. PMID:9929212

  9. GI-axe: an access broker framework for the geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, E.; Nativi, S.; Santoro, M.; Papeschi, F.; Mazzetti, P.

    2012-12-01

    The efficient and effective discovery of heterogeneous geospatial resources (e.g. data and services) is currently addressed by implementing "Discovery Brokering components"—such as GI-cat which is successfully used by the GEO brokering framework. A related (and subsequent) problem is the access of discovered resources. As for the discovery case, there exists a clear challenge: the geospatial Community makes use of heterogeneous access protocols and data models. In fact, different standards (and best practices) are defined and used by the diverse Geoscience domains and Communities of practice. Besides, through a client application, Users want to access diverse data to be jointly used in a common Geospatial Environment (CGE): a geospatial environment characterized by a spatio-temporal CRS (Coordinate Reference System), resolution, and extension. Users want to define a CGE and get the selected data ready to be used in such an environment. Finally, they want to download data according to a common encoding (either binary or textual). Therefore, it is possible to introduce the concept of "Access Brokering component" which addresses all these intermediation needs, in a transparent way for both clients (i.e. Users) and access servers (i.e. Data Providers). This work presents GI-axe: a flexible Access Broker which is capable to intermediate the different access standards and to get data according to a CGE, previously specified by the User. In doing that, GI-axe complements the capabilities of the brokered access servers, in keeping with the brokering principles. Let's consider a sample use case of a User needing to access a global temperature dataset available online on a THREDDS Data Server and a rainfall dataset accessible through a WFS—she/he may have obtained the datasets as a search result from a discovery broker. Distribution information metadata accompanying the temperature dataset further indicate that a given OPeNDAP service has to be accessed to retrieve it

  10. A multi-disciplinary approach to honest broker services for tissue banks and clinical data: a pragmatic and practical model

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Rajiv; Patel, Ashok A.; Winters, Sharon; Bisceglia, Michelle; Swanson, Dennis; Aamodt, Roger; Becich, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Honest broker services are essential for tissue- and data-based research. The honest broker provides a firewall between clinical and research activities. Clinical information is stripped of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-denoted personal health identifiers. Research material may have linkage codes, precluding the identification of patients to researchers. The honest broker provides data derived from clinical and research sources. These data are for research use only, and there are rules in place that prohibit reidentification. Very rarely, the institutional review board (IRB) may allow recontact and develop a recontact plan with the honest broker. Certain databases are structured to serve a clinical and research function and incorporate ‘real-time’ updating of information. This complex process needs resolution of a variety of issues regarding the precise role of the HB and their interaction with data. There also is an obvious need for software solutions to make the task of deidentification easier. METHODS The University of Pittsburgh has implemented a novel, IRB-approved mechanism to address honest broker functions to meet the specimen and data needs of researchers. The Tissue Bank stores biologic specimens. The Cancer Registry culls data and annotating information as part of state- and federal-mandated functions and collects data on the clinical progression, treatment, and outcomes of cancer patients. The Cancer Registry also has additional IRB approval to collect data elements only for research purposes. The Clinical Outcomes Group is involved in patient safety and health services research. Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology provide critical treatment related information. Pathology and Oncology Informatics have designed software tools for querying availability of specimens, extracting data, and deidentifying specimens and annotating data for clinical and translational research. These entities partnered and submitted a

  11. Design Principles for the Information Architecture of a SMET Education Digital Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Andy; Agogino, Alice M.

    This implementation paper introduces principles for the information architecture of an educational digital library, principles that address the distinction between designing digital libraries for education and designing digital libraries for information retrieval in general. Design is a key element of any successful product. Good designers and…

  12. Global Information Infrastructure: The Birth, Vision, and Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Targowski, Andrew S.

    A new world has arrived in which computer and communications technologies will transform the national and global economies into information-driven economies. This is triggering the Information Revolution, which will have political and societal impacts every bit as profound as those of the Industrial Revolution. The 21st century is viewed as one…

  13. Stigmergic construction and topochemical information shape ant nest architecture

    PubMed Central

    Khuong, Anaïs; Gautrais, Jacques; Perna, Andrea; Sbaï, Chaker; Combe, Maud; Kuntz, Pascale; Jost, Christian; Theraulaz, Guy

    2016-01-01

    The nests of social insects are not only impressive because of their sheer complexity but also because they are built from individuals whose work is not centrally coordinated. A key question is how groups of insects coordinate their building actions. Here, we use a combination of experimental and modeling approaches to investigate nest construction in the ant Lasius niger. We quantify the construction dynamics and the 3D structures built by ants. Then, we characterize individual behaviors and the interactions of ants with the structures they build. We show that two main interactions are involved in the coordination of building actions: (i) a stigmergic-based interaction that controls the amplification of depositions at some locations and is attributable to a pheromone added by ants to the building material; and (ii) a template-based interaction in which ants use their body size as a cue to control the height at which they start to build a roof from existing pillars. We then develop a 3D stochastic model based on these individual behaviors to analyze the effect of pheromone presence and strength on construction dynamics. We show that the model can quantitatively reproduce key features of construction dynamics, including a large-scale pattern of regularly spaced pillars, the formation and merging of caps over the pillars, and the remodeling of built structures. Finally, our model suggests that the lifetime of the pheromone is a highly influential parameter that controls the growth and form of nest architecture. PMID:26787857

  14. Stigmergic construction and topochemical information shape ant nest architecture.

    PubMed

    Khuong, Anaïs; Gautrais, Jacques; Perna, Andrea; Sbaï, Chaker; Combe, Maud; Kuntz, Pascale; Jost, Christian; Theraulaz, Guy

    2016-02-01

    The nests of social insects are not only impressive because of their sheer complexity but also because they are built from individuals whose work is not centrally coordinated. A key question is how groups of insects coordinate their building actions. Here, we use a combination of experimental and modeling approaches to investigate nest construction in the ant Lasius niger. We quantify the construction dynamics and the 3D structures built by ants. Then, we characterize individual behaviors and the interactions of ants with the structures they build. We show that two main interactions are involved in the coordination of building actions: (i) a stigmergic-based interaction that controls the amplification of depositions at some locations and is attributable to a pheromone added by ants to the building material; and (ii) a template-based interaction in which ants use their body size as a cue to control the height at which they start to build a roof from existing pillars. We then develop a 3D stochastic model based on these individual behaviors to analyze the effect of pheromone presence and strength on construction dynamics. We show that the model can quantitatively reproduce key features of construction dynamics, including a large-scale pattern of regularly spaced pillars, the formation and merging of caps over the pillars, and the remodeling of built structures. Finally, our model suggests that the lifetime of the pheromone is a highly influential parameter that controls the growth and form of nest architecture. PMID:26787857

  15. A resource management architecture for metacomputing systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, K.; Foster, I.; Karonis, N.; Kesselman, C.; Martin, S.; Smith, W.; Tuecke, S.

    1999-08-24

    Metacomputing systems are intended to support remote and/or concurrent use of geographically distributed computational resources. Resource management in such systems is complicated by five concerns that do not typically arise in other situations: site autonomy and heterogeneous substrates at the resources, and application requirements for policy extensibility, co-allocation, and online control. We describe a resource management architecture that addresses these concerns. This architecture distributes the resource management problem among distinct local manager, resource broker, and resource co-allocator components and defines an extensible resource specification language to exchange information about requirements. We describe how these techniques have been implemented in the context of the Globus metacomputing toolkit and used to implement a variety of different resource management strategies. We report on our experiences applying our techniques in a large testbed, GUSTO, incorporating 15 sites, 330 computers, and 3600 processors.

  16. A novel software architecture for the provision of context-aware semantic transport information.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Asier; Perallos, Asier; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Onieva, Enrique; Salaberria, Itziar; Masegosa, Antonio D

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Intelligent Transportation Systems depends largely on the ability to integrate information from diverse sources and the suitability of this information for the specific user. This paper describes a new approach for the management and exchange of this information, related to multimodal transportation. A novel software architecture is presented, with particular emphasis on the design of the data model and the enablement of services for information retrieval, thereby obtaining a semantic model for the representation of transport information. The publication of transport data as semantic information is established through the development of a Multimodal Transport Ontology (MTO) and the design of a distributed architecture allowing dynamic integration of transport data. The advantages afforded by the proposed system due to the use of Linked Open Data and a distributed architecture are stated, comparing it with other existing solutions. The adequacy of the information generated in regard to the specific user's context is also addressed. Finally, a working solution of a semantic trip planner using actual transport data and running on the proposed architecture is presented, as a demonstration and validation of the system. PMID:26016915

  17. A Novel Software Architecture for the Provision of Context-Aware Semantic Transport Information

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Asier; Perallos, Asier; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Onieva, Enrique; Salaberria, Itziar; Masegosa, Antonio D.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Intelligent Transportation Systems depends largely on the ability to integrate information from diverse sources and the suitability of this information for the specific user. This paper describes a new approach for the management and exchange of this information, related to multimodal transportation. A novel software architecture is presented, with particular emphasis on the design of the data model and the enablement of services for information retrieval, thereby obtaining a semantic model for the representation of transport information. The publication of transport data as semantic information is established through the development of a Multimodal Transport Ontology (MTO) and the design of a distributed architecture allowing dynamic integration of transport data. The advantages afforded by the proposed system due to the use of Linked Open Data and a distributed architecture are stated, comparing it with other existing solutions. The adequacy of the information generated in regard to the specific user’s context is also addressed. Finally, a working solution of a semantic trip planner using actual transport data and running on the proposed architecture is presented, as a demonstration and validation of the system. PMID:26016915

  18. Architectural Design for the Global Legal Information Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalpakis, Konstantinos

    1999-01-01

    In this report, we provide a summary of our activities regarding the goals, requirements analysis, design, and prototype implementation for the Global Legal Information Network, a joint effort between the Law Library of Congress and NASA.

  19. Space Power Program, Instrumentation and Control System Architecture, Pre-conceptual Design, for Information

    SciTech Connect

    JM Ross

    2005-10-20

    The purpose of this letter is to forward the Prometheus preconceptual Instrumentation and Control (I&C) system architecture (Enclosure (1)) to NR for information as part of the Prometheus closeout work. The preconceptual 1&C system architecture was considered a key planning document for development of the I&C system for Project Prometheus. This architecture was intended to set the technical approach for the entire I&C system. It defines interfaces to other spacecraft systems, defines hardware blocks for future development, and provides a basis for accurate cost and schedule estimates. Since the system requirements are not known at this time, it was anticipated that the architecture would evolve as the design of the reactor module was matured.

  20. Semantic Mediation via Access Broker: the OWS-9 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mattia; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Craglia, Massimo; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Even with the use of common data models standards to publish and share geospatial data, users may still face semantic inconsistencies when they use Spatial Data Infrastructures - especially in multidisciplinary contexts. Several semantic mediation solutions exist to address this issue; they span from simple XSLT documents to transform from one data model schema to another, to more complex services based on the use of ontologies. This work presents the activity done in the context of the OGC Web Services Phase 9 (OWS-9) Cross Community Interoperability to develop a semantic mediation solution by enhancing the GEOSS Discovery and Access Broker (DAB). This is a middleware component that provides harmonized access to geospatial datasets according to client applications preferred service interface (Nativi et al. 2012, Vaccari et al. 2012). Given a set of remote feature data encoded in different feature schemas, the objective of the activity was to use the DAB to enable client applications to transparently access the feature data according to one single schema. Due to the flexible architecture of the Access Broker, it was possible to introduce a new transformation type in the configured chain of transformations. In fact, the Access Broker already provided the following transformations: Coordinate Reference System (CRS), spatial resolution, spatial extent (e.g., a subset of a data set), and data encoding format. A new software module was developed to invoke the needed external semantic mediation service and harmonize the accessed features. In OWS-9 the Access Broker invokes a SPARQL WPS to retrieve mapping rules for the OWS-9 schemas: USGS, and NGA schema. The solution implemented to address this problem shows the flexibility and extensibility of the brokering framework underpinning the GEO DAB: new services can be added to augment the number of supported schemas without the need to modify other components and/or software modules. Moreover, all other transformations (CRS

  1. Philosophy and Architecture of the EOS Data and Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiden, Martha

    In 2009, NASA's EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is the world's largest distributed data and information system infrastructure principally supporting science, a coupled, complex network of production capabilities and data systems. Data and information are easily available through the World Wide Web from searchable, on-line data stores with sophisticated metadata schema, data dictionaries, and comprehensive scientific and technical documentation of its holdings. NASA is moving towards adoption of a service-oriented approach deploying Web services, which enable users to make connections between distributed and heterogeneous elements of environmental data and services internal to and external from EOSDIS as needed. Pertinent Web services are accessible via EOSDIS. Examples of data services include subsetting, data reformatting, and search services such as a thesaurus. The principal subject matter of this book, the MODIS and ASTER instruments, and their derived data, products and applications owe their existence and success to EOSDIS.

  2. Information Model Driven Semantic Framework Architecture and Design for Distributed Data Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P. A.; Semantic eScience Framework Team

    2011-12-01

    In Earth and space science, the steady evolution away from isolated and single purpose data 'systems' toward systems of systems, data ecosystems, or data frameworks that provide access to highly heterogeneous data repositories is picking up in pace. As a result, common informatics approaches are being sought for how newer architectures are developed and/or implemented. In particular, a clear need to have a repeatable method for modeling, implementing and evolving the information architectures has emerged and one that goes beyond traditional software design. This presentation outlines new component design approaches bases in sets of information model and semantic encodings for mediation.

  3. DIORAMA: dynamic information collection and resource tracking architecture.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Aura; Yu, Xunyi; Schafer, James; D'Hauwe, Sophie; Nathanson, Larry A; Burstein, Jonathan; Ciottone, Gregory R; Lord, Graydon

    2010-01-01

    DIORAMA is a real-time scalable decision support framework built on rapid information collection and accurate resource tracking functionalities. Using RFID technology the proposed system tracks emergency responders and victims at the disaster scene. DIORAMA improves the accuracy and decreases the time it takes rescuers to triage, treat and evacuate victims from a disaster scene, as compared to the traditional methods and process that involves using paper triage tags. The information can then be viewed from a website that shows a satellite image of the disaster area with icons representing the paramedics and victims. PMID:21097191

  4. Brokering technologies as a framework for collaborative data curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmey, L.; Wilcox, H.

    2012-12-01

    Open technologies enable advances in data curation arenas such as data discovery, access, and distribution, and further promise additional functionality in visualization, automated conversions, data processing, etc. With more and more data available online, focus shifts from data sharing to efficient and effective data discovery. The approach used in the Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (ACADIS) project to maximize data discovery is the creation of an Arctic metadata brokering system based on the GI-cat tool. By aggregating metadata outside of their original context, the technical interconnectivity of a brokering system highlights differences in data curation practices among data centers. Resolving these differences to present scientists with comparable metadata requires new communication, governance, and standardization mechanisms. We will present the ACADIS approach to resolving these differences, offer lessons learned from scaling center-specific work into a cross-organization context, discuss the technical challenges in the design and development of the Arctic metadata brokering system, and propose that intra- and inter-center collaboration is key to supporting modern science.

  5. Digital Crust: Information architecture for heterogeneous data integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, S. M.; Zaslavsky, I.; Fan, Y.; Bristol, S.; Peters, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Digital Crust EarthCube Building block is addressing the issue of multiple, heterogeneous but related datasets characteristic of field and sample based research using a 'loose-schema' approach, with linked entity and attribute definitions in an information model (ontology) registry (IMR). Various data entities (RDA 'data types') are defined by mapping entity and attribute definitions to definitions in the IMR. Inclusion (loading) of new data at the simplest level can bring in entities that are not registered, but these will not be 'integratable' with other data until someone does the schema matching into the IMR. New datasets can be designed using registered entity and attributes that will from the beginning be integrated into the system (similar to the approach used by the National Information Exchange Model). The fundamental abstract components in this system are 1) a data repository that allows storage of key-value structured data objects; and 2) a registry that documents information models-- the base data types, attributes and entities -- and mappings from the registered types in the datastore to the registered items. This constitutes the data repository subsystem. Data access is enabled by caching views of aggregated data from the datastore (aggregated based on the semantics of the registered items in the IMR) and creating indexes based on the registered items in the IMR. Contributing data to this system will be greatly facilitated by using existing, documented information models. It can accept datasets that are not 'standardized' as well, but the consequence is that those data will not be integratable with other existing data until the work is done to document the entities and attributes in the data and to map those into existing registered types.

  6. Architecture of next-generation information management systems for digital radiology enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Stephen T. C.; Wang, Huili; Shen, Weimin; Schmidt, Joachim; Chen, George; Dolan, Tom

    2000-05-01

    Few information systems today offer a clear and flexible means to define and manage the automated part of radiology processes. None of them provide a coherent and scalable architecture that can easily cope with heterogeneity and inevitable local adaptation of applications. Most importantly, they often lack a model that can integrate clinical and administrative information to aid better decisions in managing resources, optimizing operations, and improving productivity. Digital radiology enterprises require cost-effective solutions to deliver information to the right person in the right place and at the right time. We propose a new architecture of image information management systems for digital radiology enterprises. Such a system is based on the emerging technologies in workflow management, distributed object computing, and Java and Web techniques, as well as Philips' domain knowledge in radiology operations. Our design adapts the approach of '4+1' architectural view. In this new architecture, PACS and RIS will become one while the user interaction can be automated by customized workflow process. Clinical service applications are implemented as active components. They can be reasonably substituted by applications of local adaptations and can be multiplied for fault tolerance and load balancing. Furthermore, it will provide powerful query and statistical functions for managing resources and improving productivity in real time. This work will lead to a new direction of image information management in the next millennium. We will illustrate the innovative design with implemented examples of a working prototype.

  7. Porphyrin architectures tailored for studies of molecular information storage.

    PubMed

    Carcel, Carole M; Laha, Joydev K; Loewe, Robert S; Thamyongkit, Patchanita; Schweikart, Karl-Heinz; Misra, Veena; Bocian, David F; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2004-10-01

    A molecular approach to information storage employs redox-active molecules tethered to an electroactive surface. Zinc porphyrins tethered to Au(111) or Si(100) provide a benchmark for studies of information storage. Three sets of porphyrins have been synthesized for studies of the interplay of molecular design and charge-storage properties: (1) A set of porphyrins is described for probing the effect of surface attachment atom on electron-transfer kinetics. Each porphyrin bears a meso-CH2X group for surface attachment where X = OH, SAc, or SeAc. (2) A set of porphyrins is described for studying the effect of surface-charge density in monolayers. Each porphyrin bears a benzyl alcohol for surface attachment and three nonlinking meso substituents of a controlled degree of bulkiness. (3) A set of porphyrins is described that enables investigation of on-chip patterning of the electrolyte. Each porphyrin bears a formyl group distal to the surface attachment group for subsequent derivatization with a molecular entity that comprises the electrolyte. Taken together, this collection of molecules enables a variety of studies to elucidate design issues in molecular-based information storage. PMID:15387598

  8. Information-Processing Architectures in Multidimensional Classification: A Validation Test of the Systems Factorial Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fific, Mario; Nosofsky, Robert M.; Townsend, James T.

    2008-01-01

    A growing methodology, known as the systems factorial technology (SFT), is being developed to diagnose the types of information-processing architectures (serial, parallel, or coactive) and stopping rules (exhaustive or self-terminating) that operate in tasks of multidimensional perception. Whereas most previous applications of SFT have been in…

  9. Workflow-enabled distributed component-based information architecture for digital medical imaging enterprises.

    PubMed

    Wong, Stephen T C; Tjandra, Donny; Wang, Huili; Shen, Weimin

    2003-09-01

    Few information systems today offer a flexible means to define and manage the automated part of radiology processes, which provide clinical imaging services for the entire healthcare organization. Even fewer of them provide a coherent architecture that can easily cope with heterogeneity and inevitable local adaptation of applications and can integrate clinical and administrative information to aid better clinical, operational, and business decisions. We describe an innovative enterprise architecture of image information management systems to fill the needs. Such a system is based on the interplay of production workflow management, distributed object computing, Java and Web techniques, and in-depth domain knowledge in radiology operations. Our design adapts the approach of "4+1" architectural view. In this new architecture, PACS and RIS become one while the user interaction can be automated by customized workflow process. Clinical service applications are implemented as active components. They can be reasonably substituted by applications of local adaptations and can be multiplied for fault tolerance and load balancing. Furthermore, the workflow-enabled digital radiology system would provide powerful query and statistical functions for managing resources and improving productivity. This paper will potentially lead to a new direction of image information management. We illustrate the innovative design with examples taken from an implemented system. PMID:14518730

  10. The Use of Supporting Documentation for Information Architecture by Australian Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hider, Philip; Burford, Sally; Ferguson, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of an online survey that examined the development of information architecture of Australian library Web sites with reference to documented methods and guidelines. A broad sample of library Web managers responded from across the academic, public, and special sectors. A majority of libraries used either in-house or…

  11. 19 CFR 111.32 - False information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false False information. 111.32 Section 111.32 Customs... CUSTOMS BROKERS Duties and Responsibilities of Customs Brokers § 111.32 False information. A broker must... procure the giving of, any false or misleading information or testimony in any matter pending before...

  12. A Proposed Clinical Decision Support Architecture Capable of Supporting Whole Genome Sequence Information

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine. PMID:25411644

  13. A proposed clinical decision support architecture capable of supporting whole genome sequence information.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brandon M; Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-04-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine. PMID:25411644

  14. Bridging research and environmental regulatory processes: the role of knowledge brokers.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Kelly G; Thompson, Marcella; Rice, James W; Senier, Laura; Brown, Phil; Suuberg, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Federal funding agencies increasingly require research investigators to ensure that federally sponsored research demonstrates broader societal impact. Specifically, the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Research Program (SRP) requires research centers to include research translation and community engagement cores to achieve broader impacts, with special emphasis on improving environmental health policies through better scientific understanding. This paper draws on theoretical insights from the social sciences to show how incorporating knowledge brokers in research centers can facilitate translation of scientific expertise to influence regulatory processes and thus promote public health. Knowledge brokers connect academic researchers with decision-makers, to facilitate the translation of research findings into policies and programs. In this article, we describe the stages of the regulatory process and highlight the role of the knowledge broker and scientific expert at each stage. We illustrate the cooperation of knowledge brokers, scientific experts and policymakers using a case from the Brown University (Brown) SRP. We show how the Brown SRP incorporated knowledge brokers to engage scientific experts with regulatory officials around the emerging public health problem of vapor intrusion (VI). In the Brown SRP, the knowledge broker brought regulatory officials into the research process, to help scientific experts understand the critical nature of this emerging public health threat, and helped scientific experts develop a research agenda that would inform the development of timely measures to protect public health. Our experience shows that knowledge brokers can enhance the impact of environmental research on public health by connecting policy decision-makers with scientific experts at critical points throughout the regulatory process. PMID:24083557

  15. Bridging Research and Environmental Regulatory Processes: The Role of Knowledge Brokers

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Kelly G.; Thompson, Marcella; Rice, James W.; Senier, Laura; Brown, Phil; Suuberg, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Federal funding agencies increasingly require research investigators to ensure that federally-sponsored research demonstrates broader societal impact. Specifically, the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Research Program (SRP) requires research centers to include research translation and community engagement cores to achieve broader impacts, with special emphasis on improving environmental health policies through better scientific understanding. This paper draws on theoretical insights from the social sciences to show how incorporating knowledge brokers in research centers can facilitate translation of scientific expertise to influence regulatory processes and thus promote public health. Knowledge brokers connect academic researchers with decision-makers, to facilitate the translation of research findings into policies and programs. In this article, we describe the stages of the regulatory process and highlight the role of the knowledge broker and scientific expert at each stage. We illustrate the cooperation of knowledge brokers, scientific experts and policymakers using a case from the Brown University (Brown) SRP. We show how the Brown SRP incorporated knowledge brokers to engage scientific experts with regulatory officials around the emerging public health problem of vapor intrusion. In the Brown SRP, the knowledge broker brought regulatory officials into the research process, to help scientific experts understand the critical nature of this emerging public health threat, and helped scientific experts develop a research agenda that would inform the development of timely measures to protect public health. Our experience shows that knowledge brokers can enhance the impact of environmental research on public health by connecting policy decision-makers with scientific experts at critical points throughout the regulatory process. PMID:24083557

  16. The Architecture of Information Fusion System Ingreenhouse Wireless Sensor Network Based on Multi-Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenting; Chen, Ming

    In view of current unprogressive situation of factory breeding in aquaculture, this article designed a standardized, informationized and intelligentized aquaculture system, proposed a information fusion architecture based on multi-agent in greenhouse wireless sensor network (GWSN), and researched mainly the structural characteristic of the four-classed information fusion based on distributed multi-agent and the method to construct the structure inside of every agent.

  17. Project Integration Architecture: Application Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications is enabled.

  18. Information data systems for a global change technology initiative architecture trade study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Nicholas D.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Change Technology Initiative (GCTI) was established to develop technology which will enable use of satellite systems of Earth observations on a global scale, enable use of the observations to predictively model Earth's changes, and provide scientists, government, business, and industry with quick access to the resulting information. At LaRC, a GCTI Architecture Trade Study was undertaken to develop and evaluate the architectural implications to meet the requirements of the global change studies and the eventual implementation of a global change system. The output of the trade study are recommended technologies for the GCTI. That portion of the study concerned with the information data system is documented. The information data system for an earth global change modeling system can be very extensive and beyond affordability in terms of today's costs. Therefore, an incremental approach to gaining a system is most likely. An options approach to levels of capability versus needed technologies was developed. The primary drivers of the requirements for the information data system evaluation were the needed science products, the science measurements, the spacecraft orbits, the instruments configurations, and the spacecraft configurations and their attendant architectures. The science products requirements were not studied here; however, some consideration of the product needs were included in the evaluation results. The information data system technology items were identified from the viewpoint of the desirable overall information system characteristics.

  19. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS)-based fault tolerant avionics architecture for launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    1990-01-01

    An avionics architecture for the advanced launch system (ALS) that uses validated hardware and software building blocks developed under the advanced information processing system program is presented. The AIPS for ALS architecture defined is preliminary, and reliability requirements can be met by the AIPS hardware and software building blocks that are built using the state-of-the-art technology available in the 1992-93 time frame. The level of detail in the architecture definition reflects the level of detail available in the ALS requirements. As the avionics requirements are refined, the architecture can also be refined and defined in greater detail with the help of analysis and simulation tools. A useful methodology is demonstrated for investigating the impact of the avionics suite to the recurring cost of the ALS. It is shown that allowing the vehicle to launch with selected detected failures can potentially reduce the recurring launch costs. A comparative analysis shows that validated fault-tolerant avionics built out of Class B parts can result in lower life-cycle-cost in comparison to simplex avionics built out of Class S parts or other redundant architectures.

  20. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS)-based fault tolerant avionics architecture for launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    An avionics architecture for the advanced launch system (ALS) that uses validated hardware and software building blocks developed under the advanced information processing system program is presented. The AIPS for ALS architecture defined is preliminary, and reliability requirements can be met by the AIPS hardware and software building blocks that are built using the state-of-the-art technology available in the 1992-93 time frame. The level of detail in the architecture definition reflects the level of detail available in the ALS requirements. As the avionics requirements are refined, the architecture can also be refined and defined in greater detail with the help of analysis and simulation tools. A useful methodology is demonstrated for investigating the impact of the avionics suite to the recurring cost of the ALS. It is shown that allowing the vehicle to launch with selected detected failures can potentially reduce the recurring launch costs. A comparative analysis shows that validated fault-tolerant avionics built out of Class B parts can result in lower life-cycle-cost in comparison to simplex avionics built out of Class S parts or other redundant architectures.

  1. Hydrological Modeling and Repeatability with Brokering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Z. M.; Collick, A.; Srinivasan, R.; Braeckel, A.; Nativi, S.; McAlister, C.; Wright, D. J.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Fuka, D.

    2014-12-01

    Data brokering aims to provide those in the hydrological sciences with access to relevant data to represent physical, biological, and chemical characteristics researchers need to accelerate discovery in their domain. Environmental models are useful tools to understand the behavior of hydrological systems. Unfortunately, parameterization of these models requires many different data sources from different disciplines (e.g., atmospheric, geoscience, ecology). In hydrological modeling, the traditional procedure for model initialization starts with obtaining elevation models, land-use characterizations, soils maps, and weather data. It is often the researcher's past experience with these datasets that determines which datasets will be used in a study, and often newer, more suitable data products exist. An added complexity is that various science communities have differing data formats, storage protocols and manipulation methods, which makes use by a non domain scientist difficult and time consuming. We propose data brokering as a means to address several of these challenges. We present two test case scenarios in which researchers attempt to reproduce hydrological model results using 1) general internet based data gathering techniques, and 2) a scientific data brokering interface. We show that data brokering increases the efficiency with which data are collected, models are initialized, and results are analyzed. As an added benefit, it appears brokering significantly increases the repeatability of a study.

  2. Maximum density of quantum information in a scalable CMOS implementation of the hybrid qubit architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotta, Davide; De Michielis, Marco; Ferraro, Elena; Fanciulli, Marco; Prati, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Scalability from single-qubit operations to multi-qubit circuits for quantum information processing requires architecture-specific implementations. Semiconductor hybrid qubit architecture is a suitable candidate to realize large-scale quantum information processing, as it combines a universal set of logic gates with fast and all-electrical manipulation of qubits. We propose an implementation of hybrid qubits, based on Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) quantum dots, compatible with the CMOS industrial technological standards. We discuss the realization of multi-qubit circuits capable of fault-tolerant computation and quantum error correction, by evaluating the time and space resources needed for their implementation. As a result, the maximum density of quantum information is extracted from a circuit including eight logical qubits encoded by the [[7, 1, 3

  3. Maximum density of quantum information in a scalable CMOS implementation of the hybrid qubit architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotta, Davide; De Michielis, Marco; Ferraro, Elena; Fanciulli, Marco; Prati, Enrico

    2016-06-01

    Scalability from single-qubit operations to multi-qubit circuits for quantum information processing requires architecture-specific implementations. Semiconductor hybrid qubit architecture is a suitable candidate to realize large-scale quantum information processing, as it combines a universal set of logic gates with fast and all-electrical manipulation of qubits. We propose an implementation of hybrid qubits, based on Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) quantum dots, compatible with the CMOS industrial technological standards. We discuss the realization of multi-qubit circuits capable of fault-tolerant computation and quantum error correction, by evaluating the time and space resources needed for their implementation. As a result, the maximum density of quantum information is extracted from a circuit including eight logical qubits encoded by the [[7, 1, 3

  4. Definition of Information Technology Architectures for Continuous Data Management and Medical Device Integration in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, M. Elena; Pascual, Mario; Salvador, Carlos H.; García-Sáez, Gema; Rodríguez-Herrero, Agustín; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Gómez, Enrique J.

    2008-01-01

    The growing availability of continuous data from medical devices in diabetes management makes it crucial to define novel information technology architectures for efficient data storage, data transmission, and data visualization. The new paradigm of care demands the sharing of information in interoperable systems as the only way to support patient care in a continuum of care scenario. The technological platforms should support all the services required by the actors involved in the care process, located in different scenarios and managing diverse information for different purposes. This article presents basic criteria for defining flexible and adaptive architectures that are capable of interoperating with external systems, and integrating medical devices and decision support tools to extract all the relevant knowledge to support diabetes care. PMID:19885276

  5. 17 CFR 156.2 - Registration of broker association.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... association. 156.2 Section 156.2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION BROKER ASSOCIATIONS § 156.2 Registration of broker association. (a) Registration required. It shall be unlawful for any member of a broker association to receive or to execute an order unless the...

  6. 17 CFR 156.2 - Registration of broker association.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... association. 156.2 Section 156.2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION BROKER ASSOCIATIONS § 156.2 Registration of broker association. (a) Registration required. It shall be unlawful for any member of a broker association to receive or to execute an order unless the...

  7. 76 FR 71584 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Customs broker license... of the Code of Federal Regulations at Sec. 111.30(d), the following Customs broker licenses...

  8. 78 FR 48456 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Customs broker license cancellations. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the customs broker licenses and any and all...

  9. 78 FR 48460 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of revocation of a customs broker license. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a customs broker license is being revoked...

  10. 7 CFR 1955.130 - Real estate brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Real estate brokers. 1955.130 Section 1955.130... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.130 Real estate brokers. Contracting authority for the use of real... provide for any licensed real estate broker to provide sales services for any property listed under...

  11. 7 CFR 1955.130 - Real estate brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Real estate brokers. 1955.130 Section 1955.130... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.130 Real estate brokers. Contracting authority for the use of real... provide for any licensed real estate broker to provide sales services for any property listed under...

  12. 7 CFR 1955.130 - Real estate brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Real estate brokers. 1955.130 Section 1955.130... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.130 Real estate brokers. Contracting authority for the use of real... provide for any licensed real estate broker to provide sales services for any property listed under...

  13. Toward an Intelligent Event Broker: Automated Transient Classificaiton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, P.

    In order to succeed, the massive time-domain surveys of the future must automatically identify actionable information from the torrent of imaging data, classify emerging events, and optimize the follow-up strategy. To address this challenge, we are developing a fully autonomous, distributed event broker that will integrate cutting edge machine learning algorithms with high performance computing infrastructure. The talk will give an overview of this work and recent progress on image level variability detection and spectral classification using low resolution spectra.

  14. Building a generic architecture for medical information exchange among healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Li, Y C; Kuo, H S; Jian, W S; Tang, D D; Liu, C T; Liu, L L; Hsu, C Y; Tan, Y K; Hu, C H

    2001-05-01

    Due to the inability to exchange clinical information among hospitals, continuity of care cannot be maintained and a tremendous amount of medical resource has been wasted. This paper describes an architecture that would facilitate exchange of clinical information among heterogeneous hospital information systems. It is dubbed 'Medical Information Exchange Center' or MIEC as part of a six-year Health Information Network Project hosted by the Department of Health. MIEC was designed so that it is innovative yet technically feasible today. It is convenient for authorized users yet secure enough so people can trust and has minimal impact to participated hospitals. Authorized users will be able to access information through two web-based interfaces directed to physician and non-physician users respectively. Hospitals are connected through a virtual private network to exchange patient information and users need to obtain a private key from the certificate authority in order to securely connect to MIEC. A pilot project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of this architecture and the problems encountered were discussed. PMID:11311678

  15. 17 CFR 240.17h-2T - Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Risk assessment reporting... Organizations § 240.17h-2T Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers. (a) Reporting requirements of risk assessment information required to be maintained by section 240.17h-1T. (1) Every...

  16. 17 CFR 240.17h-2T - Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Risk assessment reporting... Organizations § 240.17h-2T Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers. (a) Reporting requirements of risk assessment information required to be maintained by section 240.17h-1T. (1) Every...

  17. 78 FR 64234 - Notice of Reinstatement of Customs Broker Licenses; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In a notice published in the Federal Register (78 FR 48458) on August 8, 2013, CBP... Federal Register (77 FR 72873) notice. This correction notice is being issued to note that certain brokers... In the Federal Register (78 FR 48458) notice of August 8, 2013, on page 48459, correct the list...

  18. 17 CFR 240.17h-2T - Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Risk assessment reporting... Organizations § 240.17h-2T Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers. (a) Reporting requirements of risk assessment information required to be maintained by section 240.17h-1T. (1) Every...

  19. 17 CFR 240.17h-2T - Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Risk assessment reporting... Organizations § 240.17h-2T Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers. (a) Reporting requirements of risk assessment information required to be maintained by section 240.17h-1T. (1) Every...

  20. 17 CFR 240.17h-2T - Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Risk assessment reporting... Organizations § 240.17h-2T Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers. (a) Reporting requirements of risk assessment information required to be maintained by section 240.17h-1T. (1) Every...

  1. More than a Broker: A Case Study of Knowledge Mobilization in a Digital Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Lorayne

    2015-01-01

    This research described here examines the role of e-health and medical informatics through the lens of one e-health knowledge broker in Canada. Eating disorders are an important issue in Canadian health and it is difficult to find accurate information online. Theoretical models examined include those which describe the roles of health knowledge…

  2. 75 FR 71723 - Policies and Procedures Pertaining to Changes in Listing Brokers Participating in the Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Management and Marketing III Program AGENCY: Office of the Assistant... under FHA's Management and Marketing III (M&M III) program. All brokers may participate as Selling.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background A. Management and Marketing Program The Federal Housing...

  3. Cultural and Social Processes of Language Brokering among Arab, Asian, and Latin Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Shu-Sha Angie; Nash, Afaf; Orellana, Marjorie Faulstich

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how language and culture brokering (translating and interpreting language and culture for others) influences the acculturative experiences and self-perceptions of young adults from immigrant Arab, Asian, and Latino American backgrounds. Semi-structured interviews with 10 participants suggest that mediating information for…

  4. 78 FR 25697 - Notice of Intent To Seek OMB Approval To Collect Information: On-Line Architectural Barriers Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Notice of Intent To Seek OMB Approval To Collect Information: On- Line Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Complaint Form AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance... Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) has requested approval by the Office of Management and Budget...

  5. High rate information systems - Architectural trends in support of the interdisciplinary investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Thomas H., Jr.; Preheim, Larry E.

    1990-01-01

    Data systems requirements in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Space Station Freedom (SSF) eras indicate increasing data volume, increased discipline interplay, higher complexity and broader data integration and interpretation. A response to the needs of the interdisciplinary investigator is proposed, considering the increasing complexity and rising costs of scientific investigation. The EOS Data Information System, conceived to be a widely distributed system with reliable communication links between central processing and the science user community, is described. Details are provided on information architecture, system models, intelligent data management of large complex databases, and standards for archiving ancillary data, using a research library, a laboratory and collaboration services.

  6. Questions to Ask Your Liability Insurance Broker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses some important questions to ask an insurance broker regarding liability insurance. The author based these questions on his interviews with Kathryn Hammerback, Craig Hammer, and Mike North: (1) Are centers covered when...?; (2) How can a center director cut costs on this policy?; (3) Is this an "occurrence" or a "claims-made"…

  7. 76 FR 37571 - Broker-Dealer Reports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ...The Securities and Exchange Commission (the ``Commission'') is proposing amendments to the broker-dealer financial reporting rule under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the ``Exchange Act''). The first set of amendments would, among other things, update the existing requirements of Exchange Act Rule 17a-5, facilitate the ability of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the......

  8. Real Estate Brokers View the College Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Grant J.; Williams, Numan A.

    1993-01-01

    Real estate programs of 76 institutions accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) were reviewed. Findings of a survey of real estate brokers (n=178) indicated that business programs within the parameters of the AACSB business curriculum should adequately prepare students for a career in real estate. (JOW)

  9. 7 CFR 926.14 - Broker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Broker. 926.14 Section 926.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DATA COLLECTION, REPORTING AND...

  10. 78 FR 51909 - Broker-Dealer Reports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ..., Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (``Advisers Act'') Release No. 2968 (Dec. 30, 2009), 75 FR 1456 (Jan. 11... Advisers, 75 FR at 1456. In June 2011, the Commission proposed rule amendments and a new form designed... (``SIPC'').\\8\\ \\4\\ See Broker-Dealer Reports, Exchange Act Release No. 64676 (June 15, 2011), 76 FR...

  11. GEOSS authentication/authorization services: a Broker-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    The vision of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) is the achievement of societal benefits through voluntary contribution and sharing of resources to better understand the relationships between the society and the environment where we live. The GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) allows users to search, access, and use the resources contributed by the GEOSS members. The GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker) is the GCI component in charge of interconnecting the heterogeneous data systems contributing to GEOSS. Client applications (i.e. the portals and apps) can connect to GEO DAB as a unique entry point to discover and access resources available through GCI, with no need to implement the many service protocols and models applied by the GEOSS data providers. The GEO DAB implements the brokering approach (Nativi et al., 2013) to build a flexible and scalable System of Systems. User authentication/authorization functionality is becoming more and more important for GEOSS data providers and users. The Providers ask for information about who accessed their resources and, in some cases, want to limit the data download. The Users ask for a profiled interaction with the system based on their needs and expertise level. Besides, authentication and authorization is necessary for GEOSS to provide moderated social services - e.g. feedback messages, data "fit for use" comments, etc. In keeping with the GEOSS principles of building on existing systems and lowering entry-barriers for users, an objective of the authentication/authorization development was to support existing and well-used users' credentials (e.g. Google, Twitter, etc.). Due to the heterogeneity of technologies used by the different providers and applications, a broker-based approach for the authentication/authorization was introduced as a new functionality of GEO DAB. This new capability will be demonstrated at the next GEO XI Plenary (November 2014). This work will be presented and discussed

  12. RFID Based Context Information Security System Architecture for Securing Personal Information under Ubiquitous Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jae-Gu; Park, Gil-Cheol; Kim, Seoksoo

    2007-12-01

    In this study, framework for securing personal information among various contexts collected and utilized under ubiquitous environment is proposed. The proposed framework will analyze relativity among information used to determine the exposure of personal information according to circumstances where personal information is used. In addition, the study will define the definition of role-based structure and propose a structure applying password security system according to access level. Furthermore, the study will propose a method for building information security system using RFID tag information which generates context information.

  13. Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 2: Army fault tolerant architecture design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) hardware architecture and components and the operating system. The architectural and operational theory of the AFTA Fault Tolerant Data Bus is discussed. The test and maintenance strategy developed for use in fielded AFTA installations is presented. An approach to be used in reducing the probability of AFTA failure due to common mode faults is described. Analytical models for AFTA performance, reliability, availability, life cycle cost, weight, power, and volume are developed. An approach is presented for using VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) to describe and design AFTA's developmental hardware. A plan is described for verifying and validating key AFTA concepts during the Dem/Val phase. Analytical models and partial mission requirements are used to generate AFTA configurations for the TF/TA/NOE and Ground Vehicle missions.

  14. Clinical decision support for whole genome sequence information leveraging a service-oriented architecture: a prototype.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brandon M; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time. PMID:25954430

  15. A novel architecture for information retrieval system based on semantic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui

    2011-12-01

    Nowadays, the web has enabled an explosive growth of information sharing (there are currently over 4 billion pages covering most areas of human endeavor) so that the web has faced a new challenge of information overhead. The challenge that is now before us is not only to help people locating relevant information precisely but also to access and aggregate a variety of information from different resources automatically. Current web document are in human-oriented formats and they are suitable for the presentation, but machines cannot understand the meaning of document. To address this issue, Berners-Lee proposed a concept of semantic web. With semantic web technology, web information can be understood and processed by machine. It provides new possibilities for automatic web information processing. A main problem of semantic web information retrieval is that when these is not enough knowledge to such information retrieval system, the system will return to a large of no sense result to uses due to a huge amount of information results. In this paper, we present the architecture of information based on semantic web. In addiction, our systems employ the inference Engine to check whether the query should pose to Keyword-based Search Engine or should pose to the Semantic Search Engine.

  16. Bridges, brokers and boundary spanners in collaborative networks: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bridges, brokers and boundary spanners facilitate transactions and the flow of information between people or groups who either have no physical or cognitive access to one another, or alternatively, who have no basis on which to trust each other. The health care sector is a context that is rich in isolated clusters, such as silos and professional “tribes,” in need of connectivity. It is a key challenge in health service management to understand, analyse and exploit the role of key agents who have the capacity to connect disparate groupings in larger systems. Methods The empirical, peer reviewed, network theory literature on brokerage roles was reviewed for the years 1994 to 2011 following PRISMA guidelines. Results The 24 articles that made up the final literature set were from a wide range of settings and contexts not just healthcare. Methods of data collection, analysis, and the ways in which brokers were identified varied greatly. We found four main themes addressed in the literature: identifying brokers and brokerage opportunities, generation and integration of innovation, knowledge brokerage, and trust. The benefits as well as the costs of brokerage roles were examined. Conclusions Collaborative networks by definition, seek to bring disparate groups together so that they can work effectively and synergistically together. Brokers can support the controlled transfer of specialised knowledge between groups, increase cooperation by liaising with people from both sides of the gap, and improve efficiency by introducing “good ideas” from one isolated setting into another. There are significant costs to brokerage. Densely linked networks are more efficient at diffusing information to all their members when compared to sparsely linked groups. This means that while a bridge across a structural hole allows information to reach actors that were previously isolated, it is not the most efficient way to transfer information. Brokers who become the holders

  17. Communications System Architecture Development for Air Traffic Management and Aviation Weather Information Dissemination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Seana; Olson, Matt; Blythe, Doug; Heletz, Jacob; Hamilton, Griff; Kolb, Bill; Homans, Al; Zemrowski, Ken; Decker, Steve; Tegge, Cindy

    2000-01-01

    This document is the NASA AATT Task Order 24 Final Report. NASA Research Task Order 24 calls for the development of eleven distinct task reports. Each task was a necessary exercise in the development of comprehensive communications systems architecture (CSA) for air traffic management and aviation weather information dissemination for 2015, the definition of the interim architecture for 2007, and the transition plan to achieve the desired End State. The eleven tasks are summarized along with the associated Task Order reference. The output of each task was an individual task report. The task reports that make up the main body of this document include Task 5, Task 6, Task 7, Task 8, Task 10, and Task 11. The other tasks provide the supporting detail used in the development of the architecture. These reports are included in the appendices. The detailed user needs, functional communications requirements and engineering requirements associated with Tasks 1, 2, and 3 have been put into a relational database and are provided electronically.

  18. An information-theoretic approach to motor action decoding with a reconfigurable parallel architecture.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Stefan; Brockmeier, Austin J; George, Alan D; Lam, Herman; Príncipe, José C

    2011-01-01

    Methods for decoding movements from neural spike counts using adaptive filters often rely on minimizing the mean-squared error. However, for non-Gaussian distribution of errors, this approach is not optimal for performance. Therefore, rather than using probabilistic modeling, we propose an alternate non-parametric approach. In order to extract more structure from the input signal (neuronal spike counts) we propose using minimum error entropy (MEE), an information-theoretic approach that minimizes the error entropy as part of an iterative cost function. However, the disadvantage of using MEE as the cost function for adaptive filters is the increase in computational complexity. In this paper we present a comparison between the decoding performance of the analytic Wiener filter and a linear filter trained with MEE, which is then mapped to a parallel architecture in reconfigurable hardware tailored to the computational needs of the MEE filter. We observe considerable speedup from the hardware design. The adaptation of filter weights for the multiple-input, multiple-output linear filters, necessary in motor decoding, is a highly parallelizable algorithm. It can be decomposed into many independent computational blocks with a parallel architecture readily mapped to a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) and scales to large numbers of neurons. By pipelining and parallelizing independent computations in the algorithm, the proposed parallel architecture has sublinear increases in execution time with respect to both window size and filter order. PMID:22255367

  19. Architectural approaches to health information systems for empowering the subject of care.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd; Pharow, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The personal health paradigm puts the citizen in the health services business process center. This enhances the subject of care's opportunities, rights and duties regarding his/her health status and the process for maintaining and improving it. First, the citizen and his/her direct environment have to become part of the health information systems network. This implies diagnostic and therapeutic processes performed to the subject of care independent of time, location and local resources by closing the gap through appropriate mobile and miniaturized medical devices up to an implantable level. The individualization of care delivery services requires individualized diagnostic and therapeutic means based on bioinformatics and genomics methodologies. As the individual needs of a subject of care are not predictable, the system architecture must adaptively and autonomously, integrating all domains defining eHealth. Second, the architecture must be policy-controlled for empowering the subject of care, offering all privacy and security services needed. Third, embedded in the system architecture, the subject needs the knowledge presented in the right way using the right terminology to enable the intended empowerment. PMID:18560097

  20. On the implementation of a real-time information security architecture in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Abhishek; Sarkar, Souvik; Sarkar, Subir Kumar

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the real-time implementation of a watermarking-based information security architecture in frequency domain. The scheme emphasises on the human visual system (HVS)-supported watermarking approach using wavelet-lifting technique. In addition to HVS, image registration algorithm is also introduced in order to increase the resiliency as well as the security of the estimated recovered watermark image. The algorithmic steps with optimisation considerations about the real-time implementation on TMS320CDSK6416/6713 fixed/floating point digital signal processor are also projected.

  1. The dynamic information architecture system : an advanced simulation framework for military and civilian applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A. P.; Hummel, J. R.

    1998-01-08

    DIAS, the Dynamic Information Architecture System, is an object-oriented simulation system that was designed to provide an integrating framework in which new or legacy software applications can operate in a context-driven frame of reference. DIAS provides a flexible and extensible mechanism to allow disparate, and mixed language, software applications to interoperate. DIAS captures the dynamic interplay between different processes or phenomena in the same frame of reference. Finally, DIAS accommodates a broad range of analysis contexts, with widely varying spatial and temporal resolutions and fidelity.

  2. Multilevel and Hybrid Architecture for Device Abstraction and Context Information Management in Smart Home Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peláez, Víctor; González, Roberto; San Martín, Luis Ángel; Campos, Antonio; Lobato, Vanesa

    Hardware device management, and context information acquisition and abstraction are key factors to develop the ambient intelligent paradigm in smart homes. This work presents an architecture that addresses these two problems and provides a usable framework to develop applications easily. In contrast to other proposals, this work addresses performance issues specifically. Results show that the execution performance of the developed prototype is suitable for deployment in a real environment. In addition, the modular design of the system allows the user to develop applications using different techniques and different levels of abstraction.

  3. Brokering Capabilities for EarthCube - supporting Multi-disciplinary Earth Science Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jodha Khalsa, Siri; Pearlman, Jay; Nativi, Stefano; Browdy, Steve; Parsons, Mark; Duerr, Ruth; Pearlman, Francoise

    2013-04-01

    The goal of NSF's EarthCube is to create a sustainable infrastructure that enables the sharing of all geosciences data, information, and knowledge in an open, transparent and inclusive manner. Brokering of data and improvements in discovery and access are a key to data exchange and promotion of collaboration across the geosciences. In this presentation we describe an evolutionary process of infrastructure and interoperability development focused on participation of existing science research infrastructures and augmenting them for improved access. All geosciences communities already have, to a greater or lesser degree, elements of an information infrastructure in place. These elements include resources such as data archives, catalogs, and portals as well as vocabularies, data models, protocols, best practices and other community conventions. What is necessary now is a process for levering these diverse infrastructure elements into an overall infrastructure that provides easy discovery, access and utilization of resources across disciplinary boundaries. Brokers connect disparate systems with only minimal burdens upon those systems, and enable the infrastructure to adjust to new technical developments and scientific requirements as they emerge. Robust cyberinfrastructure will arise only when social, organizational, and cultural issues are resolved in tandem with the creation of technology-based services. This is a governance issue, but is facilitated by infrastructure capabilities that can impact the uptake of new interdisciplinary collaborations and exchange. Thus brokering must address both the cyberinfrastructure and computer technology requirements and also the social issues to allow improved cross-domain collaborations. This is best done through use-case-driven requirements and agile, iterative development methods. It is important to start by solving real (not hypothetical) information access and use problems via small pilot projects that develop capabilities

  4. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System - Supporting Interoperability through a Scalable Architecture (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. E.; Lowe, D. R.; Murphy, K. J.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2013-12-01

    Initiated in 1990, NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is currently a petabyte-scale archive of data designed to receive, process, distribute and archive several terabytes of science data per day from NASA's Earth science missions. Comprised of 12 discipline specific data centers collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, EOSDIS manages over 6800 data products from many science disciplines and sources. NASA supports global climate change research by providing scalable open application layers to the EOSDIS distributed information framework. This allows many other value-added services to access NASA's vast Earth Science Collection and allows EOSDIS to interoperate with data archives from other domestic and international organizations. EOSDIS is committed to NASA's Data Policy of full and open sharing of Earth science data. As metadata is used in all aspects of NASA's Earth science data lifecycle, EOSDIS provides a spatial and temporal metadata registry and order broker called the EOS Clearing House (ECHO) that allows efficient search and access of cross domain data and services through the Reverb Client and Application Programmer Interfaces (APIs). Another core metadata component of EOSDIS is NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) which represents more than 25,000 Earth science data set and service descriptions from all over the world, covering subject areas within the Earth and environmental sciences. With inputs from the ECHO, GCMD and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission metadata models, EOSDIS is developing a NASA ISO 19115 Best Practices Convention. Adoption of an international metadata standard enables a far greater level of interoperability among national and international data products. NASA recently concluded a 'Metadata Harmony Study' of EOSDIS metadata capabilities/processes of ECHO and NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD), to evaluate opportunities for improved data access and use, reduce

  5. 7 CFR 1955.130 - Real estate brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Disposal of Inventory Property Use of Contractors to..., proposed innovative promotion methods, and financial capability. The responsibilities of the broker...

  6. Staying in the Light: Evaluating Sustainability Models for Brokering Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, L. A.; Benedict, K. K.; Best, M.; Fyfe, S.; Jacobs, C. A.; Michener, W. K.; Pearlman, J.; Turner, A.; Nativi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Business Models Team of the Research Data Alliance Brokering Governance Working Group examined several support models proposed to promote the long-term sustainability of brokering middleware. The business model analysis includes examination of funding source, implementation frameworks and obstacles, and policy and legal considerations. The issue of sustainability is not unique to brokering software and these models may be relevant to many applications. Results of this comprehensive analysis highlight advantages and disadvantages of the various models in respect to the specific requirements for brokering services. We offer recommendations based on the outcomes of this analysis while recognizing that all software is part of an evolutionary process and has a lifespan.

  7. Fuselets: an agent based architecture for fusion of heterogeneous information and data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerer, Jürgen; Heizmann, Michael; Sander, Jennifer

    2006-04-01

    A new architecture for fusing information and data from heterogeneous sources is proposed. The approach takes criminalistics as a model. In analogy to the work of detectives, who attempt to investigate crimes, software agents are initiated that pursue clues and try to consolidate or to dismiss hypotheses. Like their human pendants, they can, if questions beyond their competences arise, consult expert agents. Within the context of a certain task, region, and time interval, specialized operations are applied to each relevant information source, e.g. IMINT, SIGINT, ACINT,..., HUMINT, data bases etc. in order to establish hit lists of first clues. Each clue is described by its pertaining facts, uncertainties, and dependencies in form of a local degree-of-belief (DoB) distribution in a Bayesian sense. For each clue an agent is initiated which cooperates with other agents and experts. Expert agents support to make use of different information sources. Consultations of experts, capable to access certain information sources, result in changes of the DoB of the pertaining clue. According to the significance of concentration of their DoB distribution clues are abandoned or pursued further to formulate task specific hypotheses. Communications between the agents serve to find out whether different clues belong to the same cause and thus can be put together. At the end of the investigation process, the different hypotheses are evaluated by a jury and a final report is created that constitutes the fusion result. The approach proposed avoids calculating global DoB distributions by adopting a local Bayesian approximation and thus reduces the complexity of the exact problem essentially. Different information sources are transformed into DoB distributions using the maximum entropy paradigm and considering known facts as constraints. Nominal, ordinal and cardinal quantities can be treated within this framework equally. The architecture is scalable by tailoring the number of agents

  8. Architecture and Functionality of the Advanced Life Support On-Line Project Information System (OPIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, John A.; Levri, Julie A.; Morrow, Rich; Cavazzoni, Jim; Rodriquez, Luis F.; Riano, Rebecca; Whitaker, Dawn R.

    2004-01-01

    An ongoing effort is underway at NASA Amcs Research Center (ARC) tu develop an On-line Project Information System (OPIS) for the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. The objective of this three-year project is to develop, test, revise and deploy OPIS to enhance the quality of decision-making metrics and attainment of Program goals through improved knowledge sharing. OPIS will centrally locate detailed project information solicited from investigators on an annual basis and make it readily accessible by the ALS Community via a web-accessible interface. The data will be stored in an object-oriented relational database (created in MySQL(Trademark) located on a secure server at NASA ARC. OPE will simultaneously serve several functions, including being an R&TD status information hub that can potentially serve as the primary annual reporting mechanism. Using OPIS, ALS managers and element leads will be able to carry out informed research and technology development investment decisions, and allow analysts to perform accurate systems evaluations. Additionally, the range and specificity of information solicited will serve to educate technology developers of programmatic needs. OPIS will collect comprehensive information from all ALS projects as well as highly detailed information specific to technology development in each ALS area (Waste, Water, Air, Biomass, Food, Thermal, and Control). Because the scope of needed information can vary dramatically between areas, element-specific technology information is being compiled with the aid of multiple specialized working groups. This paper presents the current development status in terms of the architecture and functionality of OPIS. Possible implementation approaches for OPIS are also discussed.

  9. Architecture and Functionality of the Advanced Life Support On-Line Project Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, John A.; Levri, Julie A.; Morrow, Rich; Cavazzoni, Jim; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Riano, Rebecca; Whitaker, Dawn R.

    2004-01-01

    An ongoing effort is underway at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) to develop an On-line Project Information System (OPIS) for the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. The objective of this three-year project is to develop, test, revise and deploy OPIS to enhance the quality of decision-making metrics and attainment of Program goals through improved knowledge sharing. OPIS will centrally locate detailed project information solicited from investigators on an annual basis and make it readily accessible by the ALS Community via a Web-accessible interface. The data will be stored in an object-oriented relational database (created in MySQL) located on a secure server at NASA ARC. OPE will simultaneously serve several functions, including being an research and technology development (R&TD) status information hub that can potentially serve as the primary annual reporting mechanism for ALS-funded projects. Using OPIS, ALS managers and element leads will be able to carry out informed R&TD investment decisions, and allow analysts to perform accurate systems evaluations. Additionally, the range and specificity of information solicited will serve to educate technology developers of programmatic needs. OPIS will collect comprehensive information from all ALS projects as well as highly detailed information specific to technology development in each ALS area (Waste, Water, Air, Biomass, Food, Thermal, Controls and Systems Analysis). Because the scope of needed information can vary dramatically between areas, element-specific technology information is being compiled with the aid of multiple specialized working groups. This paper presents the current development status in terms of the architecture and functionality of OPIS. Possible implementation approaches for OPIS are also discussed.

  10. Harnessing the Risk-Related Data Supply Chain: An Information Architecture Approach to Enriching Human System Research and Operations Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buquo, Lynn E.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2011-01-01

    An Information Architecture facilitates the understanding and, hence, harnessing of the human system risk-related data supply chain which enhances the ability to securely collect, integrate, and share data assets that improve human system research and operations. By mapping the risk-related data flow from raw data to useable information and knowledge (think of it as a data supply chain), the Human Research Program (HRP) and Space Life Science Directorate (SLSD) are building an information architecture plan to leverage their existing, and often shared, IT infrastructure.

  11. System architecture and information model for integrated access to distributed biomedical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongkyu; Alaoui, Adil; Levine, Betty; Leondaridis, Leonidas; Shields, Peter; Byers, Steve; Cleary, Kevin

    2009-02-01

    The current trend towards systems medicine will rely heavily on computational and bioinformatics capabilities to collect, integrate, and analyze massive amounts of data from disparate sources. The objective is to use this information to make medical decisions that improve patient care. At Georgetown University Medical Center, we are developing an informatics capability to integrate several research and clinical databases. Our long term goal is to provide researchers at Georgetown's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center better access to aggregated molecular and clinical information facilitating the investigation of new hypotheses that impact patient care. We also recognize the need for data mining tools and intelligent agents to help researchers in these efforts. This paper describes our initial work to create a flexible platform for researchers and physicians that provides access to information sources including clinical records, medical images, genomic, epigenomic, proteomic and metabolomic data. This paper describes the data sources selected for this pilot project and possible approaches to integrating these databases. We present the different database integration models that we considered. We conclude by outlining the proposed Information Model for the project.

  12. Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 1: Army fault tolerant architecture overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Digital computing systems needed for Army programs such as the Computer-Aided Low Altitude Helicopter Flight Program and the Armored Systems Modernization (ASM) vehicles may be characterized by high computational throughput and input/output bandwidth, hard real-time response, high reliability and availability, and maintainability, testability, and producibility requirements. In addition, such a system should be affordable to produce, procure, maintain, and upgrade. To address these needs, the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) is being designed and constructed under a three-year program comprised of a conceptual study, detailed design and fabrication, and demonstration and validation phases. Described here are the results of the conceptual study phase of the AFTA development. Given here is an introduction to the AFTA program, its objectives, and key elements of its technical approach. A format is designed for representing mission requirements in a manner suitable for first order AFTA sizing and analysis, followed by a discussion of the current state of mission requirements acquisition for the targeted Army missions. An overview is given of AFTA's architectural theory of operation.

  13. An Ontology Driven Information Architecture for Big Data and Diverse Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John S.; Crichton, Dan; Hardman, Sean; Joyner, Ron; Ramirez, Paul

    2013-04-01

    The Planetary Data System's has just released the PDS4 system for first use. Its architecture is comprised of three principle parts, an ontology that captures knowledge from the planetary science domain, a federated registry/repository system for product identification, versioning, tracking, and storage, and a REST-based service layer for search, retrieval, and distribution. An ontology modeling tool is used to prescriptively capture product definitions that adhere to object-oriented principles and that are compliant with specific registry, archive, and data dictionary reference models. The resulting information model is product centric, allowing all information to be packaged into products and tracked in the registry. The flexibility required in a diverse domain is provided through the use of object-oriented extensions and a hierarchical governance scheme with common, discipline, and mission levels. Finally all PDS4 data standards are generated or derived from the information model. The federated registry provides identification, versioning, and tracking functionality across federated repositories and is configured for deployment using configuration files generated from the ontology. Finally a REST-based service layer provides for metadata harvest, product transformation, packaging, and search, and portal hosting. A model driven architecture allows the data and software engineering teams to develop in parallel with minimal team interaction. The resulting software remains relatively stable as the domain evolves. Finally the development of a single shared ontology promotes interoperability and data correlation and helps meet the expectations of modern scientists for science data discovery, access and use. This presentation will provide an overview of PDS4 focusing on the data standards, how they were developed, how they are now being used, and will present some of the lessons learned while developing in a diverse scientific community. Copyright 2013 California

  14. Design and Implementation of a Multi-Grid Resource Broker for Grid Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao-Tung; Hu, Wen-Jen

    Grid computing integrates geographical computing resources across multiple virtual organizations to achieve high performance computing. A single grid often could not provide huge resources, because virtual organizations have no adequate of computing resources restriction on the scale of organizations. In this paper, we present a multi-grid, new grid architecture for integrating multiple computational grids from different virtual organizations. A resource broker is built on multiple grid environments; it integrates a number of single grids from different virtual organizations without the limitation of organizations. The multiple grid resource could be utilized efficiently and precisely.

  15. The Swedish strategy and method for development of a national healthcare information architecture.

    PubMed

    Rosenälv, Jessica; Lundell, Karl-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    "We need a precise framework of regulations in order to maintain appropriate and structured health care documentation that ensures that the information maintains a sufficient level of quality to be used in treatment, in research and by the actual patient. The users shall be aided by clearly and uniformly defined terms and concepts, and there should be an information structure that clarifies what to document and how to make the information more useful. Most of all, we need to standardize the information, not just the technical systems." (eHälsa - nytta och näring, Riksdag report 2011/12:RFR5, p. 37). In 2010, the Swedish Government adopted the National e-Health - the national strategy for accessible and secure information in healthcare. The strategy is a revision and extension of the previous strategy from 2006, which was used as input for the most recent efforts to develop a national information structure utilizing business-oriented generic models. A national decision on healthcare informatics standards was made by the Swedish County Councils, which decided to follow and use EN/ISO 13606 as a standard for the development of a universally applicable information structure, including archetypes and templates. The overall aim of the Swedish strategy for development of National Healthcare Information Architecture is to achieve high level semantic interoperability for clinical content and clinical contexts. High level semantic interoperability requires consistently structured clinical data and other types of data with coherent traceability to be mapped to reference clinical models. Archetypes that are formal definitions of the clinical and demographic concepts and some administrative data were developed. Each archetype describes the information structure and content of overarching core clinical concepts. Information that is defined in archetypes should be used for different purposes. Generic clinical process model was made concrete and analyzed. For each decision

  16. Demonstrating NaradaBrokering as a Middleware Fabric for Grid-based Remote Visualization Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallickara, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Yuen, D.; Fox, G.; Pierce, M.

    2003-12-01

    Remote Visualization Services (RVS) have tended to rely on approaches based on the client server paradigm. Here we demonstrate our approach - based on a distributed brokering infrastructure, NaradaBrokering [1] - that relies on distributed, asynchronous and loosely coupled interactions to meet the requirements and constraints of RVS. In our approach to RVS, services advertise their capabilities to the broker network that manages these service advertisements. Among the services considered within our system are those that perform graphic transformations, mediate access to specialized datasets and finally those that manage the execution of specified tasks. There could be multiple instances of each of these services and the system ensures that load for a given service is distributed efficiently over these service instances. We will demonstrate implementation of concepts that we outlined in the oral presentation. This would involve two or more visualization servers interacting asynchronously with multiple clients through NaradaBrokering. The communicating entities may exchange SOAP [2] (Simple Object Access Protocol) messages. SOAP is a lightweight protocol for exchange of information in a decentralized, distributed environment. It is an XML based protocol that consists of three parts: an envelope that describes what is in a message and how to process it, rules for expressing instances of application-defined data types, and a convention for representing remote invocation related operations. Furthermore, we will also demonstrate how clients can retrieve their results after prolonged disconnects or after any failures that might have taken place. The entities, services and clients alike, are not limited by the geographical distances that separate them. We are planning to test this system in the context of trans-Atlantic links separating interacting entities. {[1]} The NaradaBrokering Project: http://www.naradabrokering.org {[2]} Newcomer, E., 2002, Understanding web

  17. Advanced information processing system: The Army Fault-Tolerant Architecture detailed design overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Richard E.; Babikyan, Carol A.; Butler, Bryan P.; Clasen, Robert J.; Harris, Chris H.; Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Masotto, Thomas K.; Nagle, Gail A.; Prizant, Mark J.; Treadwell, Steven

    1994-01-01

    The Army Avionics Research and Development Activity (AVRADA) is pursuing programs that would enable effective and efficient management of large amounts of situational data that occurs during tactical rotorcraft missions. The Computer Aided Low Altitude Night Helicopter Flight Program has identified automated Terrain Following/Terrain Avoidance, Nap of the Earth (TF/TA, NOE) operation as key enabling technology for advanced tactical rotorcraft to enhance mission survivability and mission effectiveness. The processing of critical information at low altitudes with short reaction times is life-critical and mission-critical necessitating an ultra-reliable/high throughput computing platform for dependable service for flight control, fusion of sensor data, route planning, near-field/far-field navigation, and obstacle avoidance operations. To address these needs the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) is being designed and developed. This computer system is based upon the Fault Tolerant Parallel Processor (FTPP) developed by Charles Stark Draper Labs (CSDL). AFTA is hard real-time, Byzantine, fault-tolerant parallel processor which is programmed in the ADA language. This document describes the results of the Detailed Design (Phase 2 and 3 of a 3-year project) of the AFTA development. This document contains detailed descriptions of the program objectives, the TF/TA NOE application requirements, architecture, hardware design, operating systems design, systems performance measurements and analytical models.

  18. Historic Building Information Modelling - Adding intelligence to laser and image based surveys of European classical architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Maurice; McGovern, Eugene; Pavia, Sara

    2013-02-01

    Historic Building Information Modelling (HBIM) is a novel prototype library of parametric objects, based on historic architectural data and a system of cross platform programmes for mapping parametric objects onto point cloud and image survey data. The HBIM process begins with remote collection of survey data using a terrestrial laser scanner combined with digital photo modelling. The next stage involves the design and construction of a parametric library of objects, which are based on the manuscripts ranging from Vitruvius to 18th century architectural pattern books. In building parametric objects, the problem of file format and exchange of data has been overcome within the BIM ArchiCAD software platform by using geometric descriptive language (GDL). The plotting of parametric objects onto the laser scan surveys as building components to create or form the entire building is the final stage in the reverse engineering process. The final HBIM product is the creation of full 3D models including detail behind the object's surface concerning its methods of construction and material make-up. The resultant HBIM can automatically create cut sections, details and schedules in addition to the orthographic projections and 3D models (wire frame or textured) for both the analysis and conservation of historic objects, structures and environments.

  19. Circuit-QED-based scalable architectures for quantum information processing with superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billangeon, P.-M.; Tsai, J. S.; Nakamura, Y.

    2015-03-01

    We discuss different ways of generating entanglement in the original picture of circuit QED (XcQED) and several restrictions that arise in the context of a large-scale quantum architecture. To alleviate some of the issues posed by the presence of the nonlinearities inherent to these systems, we introduce a layout for circuit QED, wherein an artificial atom is coupled to a quantized radiation field via its longitudinal degree of freedom (ZcQED). This system is akin to ion traps used in atomic physics, but it relies on fixed coupling between the atom and the resonator. We describe a scalable architecture for processing quantum information with superconducting qubits, which is free from any type of residual interaction between the atomic and photonic degrees of freedom. Tunable interactions can be realized based on sideband transitions, and the system can be operated out of the Lamb-Dicke regime, allowing it to benefit from the possibility of achieving large coupling strengths between atoms and resonators. We also discuss a readout scheme that does not require any extra circuits and allows a qubit-specific measurement of the state of the quantum register inspired by the electron shelving technique. This scheme is quantum nondemolition (QND)-like, and allows for single-shot determination of the qubit states.

  20. Project Integration Architecture: Architectural Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2001-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. By being a single, self-revealing architecture, the ability to develop single tools, for example a single graphical user interface, to span all applications is enabled. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications becomes possible, Object-encapsulation further allows information to become in a sense self-aware, knowing things such as its own dimensionality and providing functionality appropriate to its kind.

  1. Implementation of an integrated hospital information system using an open-source three-tier architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Marco A.; Furuie, Sergio S.; Rebelo, Marina S.; Pires, Fabio A.; Moreno, Ramon A.; dos Santos, Marcelo

    2004-04-01

    The goal of the current study is to describe the experience of the Heart Institute (InCor) in the implementation of a patient-oriented Hospital Information System (HIS) integrated with the Radiology Information System (RIS) and the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) in an open-source three-tier architecture. The system was designed in modules that permits patient admission, discharge and transfer (ADT), registration of medical activities, registration of diagnoses and therapy, order entry and access of all patient data, including vital signals, images and lab tests. The modules are integrated in a single Web-based application allowing easy and fast navigation through the application. In order to provide high quality of patient care in an efficient and cost-effective manner, thin clients workstations in a Linux environment were used. To access the patient information users have to perform an authentication procedure that uses LDAP protocol, which also defines a profile to the users. The system is fully integrated to the InCor's PACS, allowing instant access to the image database from applications that requires this information, such as diagnostic reports. For displaying the images a Java DICOM viewer was implemented. On the server side, a Java DICOM server was designed to allow communication with all DICOM modalities.

  2. Mother-Child Communication Quality during Language Brokering: Validation of Four Measures of Brokering Interaction Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guntzviller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    One hundred dyads of low-income, Spanish-speaking mothers and their bilingual children (age = 12-18; M = 14.12, SD = 1.89) who have language brokered for the mother (i.e., culturally or linguistically mediated between the mother and English speakers) were surveyed. Multiple goals theory posits that mothers and children who do not recognize and…

  3. Architecture of a framework for providing information services for public transport.

    PubMed

    García, Carmelo R; Pérez, Ricardo; Lorenzo, Alvaro; Quesada-Arencibia, Alexis; Alayón, Francisco; Padrón, Gabino

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents OnRoute, a framework for developing and running ubiquitous software that provides information services to passengers of public transportation, including payment systems and on-route guidance services. To achieve a high level of interoperability, accessibility and context awareness, OnRoute uses the ubiquitous computing paradigm. To guarantee the quality of the software produced, the reliable software principles used in critical contexts, such as automotive systems, are also considered by the framework. The main components of its architecture (run-time, system services, software components and development discipline) and how they are deployed in the transportation network (stations and vehicles) are described in this paper. Finally, to illustrate the use of OnRoute, the development of a guidance service for travellers is explained. PMID:22778585

  4. A new Information Architecture, Website and Services for the CMS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lucas; Rusack, Eleanor; Zemleris, Vidmantas

    2012-12-01

    The age and size of the CMS collaboration at the LHC means it now has many hundreds of inhomogeneous web sites and services, and hundreds of thousands of documents. We describe a major initiative to create a single coherent CMS internal and public web site. This uses the Drupal web Content Management System (now supported by CERN/IT) on top of a standard LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and php/perl). The new navigation, content and search services are coherently integrated with numerous existing CERN services (CDS, EDMS, Indico, phonebook, Twiki) as well as many CMS internal Web services. We describe the information architecture; the system design, implementation and monitoring; the document and content database; security aspects; and our deployment strategy, which ensured continual smooth operation of all systems at all times.

  5. Architecture of a Framework for Providing Information Services for Public Transport

    PubMed Central

    García, Carmelo R.; Pérez, Ricardo; Lorenzo, Álvaro; Quesada-Arencibia, Alexis; Alayón, Francisco; Padrón, Gabino

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents OnRoute, a framework for developing and running ubiquitous software that provides information services to passengers of public transportation, including payment systems and on-route guidance services. To achieve a high level of interoperability, accessibility and context awareness, OnRoute uses the ubiquitous computing paradigm. To guarantee the quality of the software produced, the reliable software principles used in critical contexts, such as automotive systems, are also considered by the framework. The main components of its architecture (run-time, system services, software components and development discipline) and how they are deployed in the transportation network (stations and vehicles) are described in this paper. Finally, to illustrate the use of OnRoute, the development of a guidance service for travellers is explained. PMID:22778585

  6. 17 CFR 155.4 - Trading standards for introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trading standards for introducing brokers. 155.4 Section 155.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION TRADING STANDARDS § 155.4 Trading standards for introducing brokers. (a) Each introducing...

  7. 17 CFR 155.2 - Trading standards for floor brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trading standards for floor brokers. 155.2 Section 155.2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION TRADING STANDARDS § 155.2 Trading standards for floor brokers. Each contract market shall adopt and...

  8. 17 CFR 156.4 - Disclosure of Broker Association Membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Association Membership. 156.4 Section 156.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION BROKER ASSOCIATIONS § 156.4 Disclosure of Broker Association Membership. Each contract market... associations which identifies for each such association the name of each person who is a member or...

  9. 17 CFR 156.4 - Disclosure of Broker Association Membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Association Membership. 156.4 Section 156.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION BROKER ASSOCIATIONS § 156.4 Disclosure of Broker Association Membership. Each contract market... associations which identifies for each such association the name of each person who is a member or...

  10. 76 FR 1626 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... Districts'' published in the Federal Register on September 27, 1995 (60 FR 49971). Section 1893 of the Tax... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2011 AGENCY: Customs and... provides notice to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by...

  11. 78 FR 48457 - Correction of Document Revoking Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... December 6, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR 72873) notice, CBP inadvertently provided the wrong customs broker... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Correction of Document Revoking Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Correction of...

  12. 76 FR 71591 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... License, dated July 25, 2006 (71 FR 42105). The current Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses... SECURITY Bureau of Customs and Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Customs...

  13. 76 FR 65742 - Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and... section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51(b)), the following Customs broker licenses and all associated...

  14. Mental Health Risk Factors Associated with Childhood Language Brokering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Vanessa R.; Flores, Valerie; Morrison, Robert G.; David, E. J. R.; Silton, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    Serving as a language translator (broker) for family members during childhood can affect cognitive and emotional functions in both beneficial and detrimental ways. Child language brokers translate in a variety of contexts including conversations between their parents and financial, legal and medical professionals. Pressure to be involved in these…

  15. 42 CFR 422.2274 - Broker and agent requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Broker and agent requirements. 422.2274 Section 422.2274 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Broker and agent requirements. For purposes of this section “compensation” includes pecuniary or...

  16. 42 CFR 423.2274 - Broker and agent requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Broker and agent requirements. 423.2274 Section 423.2274 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....2274 Broker and agent requirements. For purposes of this section “compensation” includes pecuniary...

  17. 78 FR 51823 - Financial Responsibility Rules for Broker-Dealers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ...- Dealers, Exchange Act Release No. 55431 (Mar. 9, 2007), 72 FR 12862 (Mar. 19, 2007) (``Amendments to... Responsibility Rules for Broker- Dealers, Exchange Act Release No. 66910 (May 3, 2012), 77 FR 27150 (May 9, 2012... FR 25224 (Nov. 29, 1972). \\8\\ See Net Capital Requirements for Brokers and Dealers, Exchange...

  18. 77 FR 74201 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... September 27, 1995 (60 FR 49971). Section 1893 of the Tax Reform Act of 1986 (Pub. L. 99-514) provides that... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2013 AGENCY: U.S. Customs... provides notice to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by...

  19. 76 FR 65741 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... Districts'' published in the Federal Register on September 27, 1995 (60 FR 49971). Section 1893 of the Tax... SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2012 AGENCY: Customs and Border... to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by a...

  20. 12 CFR 303.243 - Brokered deposit waivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brokered deposit waivers. 303.243 Section 303.243 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE FILING PROCEDURES Other Filings § 303.243 Brokered deposit waivers. (a) Scope. Pursuant to section 29 of the FDI...

  1. 12 CFR 221.103 - Loans to brokers or dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CARRYING MARGIN STOCK (REGULATION U) Interpretations § 221.103 Loans to brokers or dealers. Questions have...,” in the case of loans to brokers or dealers secured by margin stock where the proceeds of the loans are to be used to finance customer transactions involving the purchasing or carrying of margin...

  2. 12 CFR 221.103 - Loans to brokers or dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CARRYING MARGIN STOCK (REGULATION U) Interpretations § 221.103 Loans to brokers or dealers. Questions have...,” in the case of loans to brokers or dealers secured by margin stock where the proceeds of the loans are to be used to finance customer transactions involving the purchasing or carrying of margin...

  3. A Service Oriented Architecture Approach to Achieve Interoperability between Immunization Information Systems in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Masoud; Ahmadi, Maryam; Dixon, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems can support vaccine forecasting and immunization reminders; however, immunization decision-making requires data from fragmented, independent systems. Interoperability and accurate data exchange between immunization information systems (IIS) is an essential factor to utilize Immunization CDS systems. Service oriented architecture (SOA) and Health Level 7 (HL7) are dominant standards for web-based exchange of clinical information. We implemented a system based on SOA and HL7 v3 to support immunization CDS in Iran. We evaluated system performance by exchanging 1500 immunization records for roughly 400 infants between two IISs. System turnaround time is less than a minute for synchronous operation calls and the retrieved immunization history of infants were always identical in different systems. CDS generated reports were accordant to immunization guidelines and the calculations for next visit times were accurate. Interoperability is rare or nonexistent between IIS. Since inter-state data exchange is rare in United States, this approach could be a good prototype to achieve interoperability of immunization information. PMID:25954452

  4. A Service Oriented Architecture Approach to Achieve Interoperability between Immunization Information Systems in Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Masoud; Ahmadi, Maryam; Dixon, Brian E

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems can support vaccine forecasting and immunization reminders; however, immunization decision-making requires data from fragmented, independent systems. Interoperability and accurate data exchange between immunization information systems (IIS) is an essential factor to utilize Immunization CDS systems. Service oriented architecture (SOA) and Health Level 7 (HL7) are dominant standards for web-based exchange of clinical information. We implemented a system based on SOA and HL7 v3 to support immunization CDS in Iran. We evaluated system performance by exchanging 1500 immunization records for roughly 400 infants between two IISs. System turnaround time is less than a minute for synchronous operation calls and the retrieved immunization history of infants were always identical in different systems. CDS generated reports were accordant to immunization guidelines and the calculations for next visit times were accurate. Interoperability is rare or nonexistent between IIS. Since inter-state data exchange is rare in United States, this approach could be a good prototype to achieve interoperability of immunization information. PMID:25954452

  5. Architecture of a consent management suite and integration into IHE-based regional health information networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The University Hospital Heidelberg is implementing a Regional Health Information Network (RHIN) in the Rhine-Neckar-Region in order to establish a shared-care environment, which is based on established Health IT standards and in particular Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE). Similar to all other Electronic Health Record (EHR) and Personal Health Record (PHR) approaches the chosen Personal Electronic Health Record (PEHR) architecture relies on the patient's consent in order to share documents and medical data with other care delivery organizations, with the additional requirement that the German legislation explicitly demands a patients' opt-in and does not allow opt-out solutions. This creates two issues: firstly the current IHE consent profile does not address this approach properly and secondly none of the employed intra- and inter-institutional information systems, like almost all systems on the market, offers consent management solutions at all. Hence, the objective of our work is to develop and introduce an extensible architecture for creating, managing and querying patient consents in an IHE-based environment. Methods Based on the features offered by the IHE profile Basic Patient Privacy Consent (BPPC) and literature, the functionalities and components to meet the requirements of a centralized opt-in consent management solution compliant with German legislation have been analyzed. Two services have been developed and integrated into the Heidelberg PEHR. Results The standard-based Consent Management Suite consists of two services. The Consent Management Service is able to receive and store consent documents. It can receive queries concerning a dedicated patient consent, process it and return an answer. It represents a centralized policy enforcement point. The Consent Creator Service allows patients to create their consents electronically. Interfaces to a Master Patient Index (MPI) and a provider index allow to dynamically generate XACML

  6. Building a High Performance Metadata Broker using Clojure, NoSQL and Message Queues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truslove, I.; Reed, S.

    2013-12-01

    In practice, Earth and Space Science Informatics often relies on getting more done with less: fewer hardware resources, less IT staff, fewer lines of code. As a capacity-building exercise focused on rapid development of high-performance geoinformatics software, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) built a prototype metadata brokering system using a new JVM language, modern database engines and virtualized or cloud computing resources. The metadata brokering system was developed with the overarching goals of (i) demonstrating a technically viable product with as little development effort as possible, (ii) using very new yet very popular tools and technologies in order to get the most value from the least legacy-encumbered code bases, and (iii) being a high-performance system by using scalable subcomponents, and implementation patterns typically used in web architectures. We implemented the system using the Clojure programming language (an interactive, dynamic, Lisp-like JVM language), Redis (a fast in-memory key-value store) as both the data store for original XML metadata content and as the provider for the message queueing service, and ElasticSearch for its search and indexing capabilities to generate search results. On evaluating the results of the prototyping process, we believe that the technical choices did in fact allow us to do more for less, due to the expressive nature of the Clojure programming language and its easy interoperability with Java libraries, and the successful reuse or re-application of high performance products or designs. This presentation will describe the architecture of the metadata brokering system, cover the tools and techniques used, and describe lessons learned, conclusions, and potential next steps.

  7. A Prototype External Event Broker for LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elan Alvarez, Gabriella; Stassun, Keivan; Burger, Dan; Siverd, Robert; Cox, Donald

    2015-01-01

    LSST plans to have an alerts system that will automatically identify various types of "events" appearing in the LSST data stream. These events will include things such as supernovae, moving objects, and many other types, and it is expected that there will be millions of events nightly. It is expected that there may be tens of millions of events each night. To help the LSST community parse and make full advantage of the LSST alerts stream, we are working to design an external "events alert broker" that will generate real-time notification of LSST events to users and/or robotic telescope facilities based on user-specified criteria. For example, users will be able to specify that they wish to be notified immediately via text message of urgent events, such as GRB counterparts, or notified only occasionally in digest form of less time-sensitive events, such as eclipsing binaries. This poster will summarize results from a survey of scientists for the most important features that such an alerts notification service needs to provide, and will present a preliminary design for our external event broker.

  8. Learning from Health Information Exchange Technical Architecture and Implementation in Seven Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Douglas B.; Propp, Karen; Cohen, Alexander; Sabharwal, Raj; Schachter, Abigail A.; Rein, Alison L.

    2014-01-01

    As health care providers adopt and make “meaningful use” of health information technology (health IT), communities and delivery systems must set up the infrastructure to facilitate health information exchange (HIE) between providers and numerous other stakeholders who have a role in supporting health and care. By facilitating better communication and coordination between providers, HIE has the potential to improve clinical decision-making and continuity of care, while reducing unnecessary use of services. When implemented as part of a broader strategy for health care delivery system and payment reform, HIE capability also can enable the use of analytic tools needed for population health management, patient engagement in care, and continuous learning and improvement. The diverse experiences of seven communities that participated in the three-year federal Beacon Community Program offer practical insight into factors influencing the technical architecture of exchange infrastructure and its role in supporting improved care, reduced cost, and a healthier population. The case studies also document challenges faced by the communities, such as significant time and resources required to harmonize variations in the interpretation of data standards. Findings indicate that their progress developing community-based HIE strategies, while driven by local needs and objectives, is also influenced by broader legal, policy, and market conditions. PMID:25848591

  9. Learning from health information exchange technical architecture and implementation in seven beacon communities.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Douglas B; Propp, Karen; Cohen, Alexander; Sabharwal, Raj; Schachter, Abigail A; Rein, Alison L

    2014-01-01

    As health care providers adopt and make "meaningful use" of health information technology (health IT), communities and delivery systems must set up the infrastructure to facilitate health information exchange (HIE) between providers and numerous other stakeholders who have a role in supporting health and care. By facilitating better communication and coordination between providers, HIE has the potential to improve clinical decision-making and continuity of care, while reducing unnecessary use of services. When implemented as part of a broader strategy for health care delivery system and payment reform, HIE capability also can enable the use of analytic tools needed for population health management, patient engagement in care, and continuous learning and improvement. The diverse experiences of seven communities that participated in the three-year federal Beacon Community Program offer practical insight into factors influencing the technical architecture of exchange infrastructure and its role in supporting improved care, reduced cost, and a healthier population. The case studies also document challenges faced by the communities, such as significant time and resources required to harmonize variations in the interpretation of data standards. Findings indicate that their progress developing community-based HIE strategies, while driven by local needs and objectives, is also influenced by broader legal, policy, and market conditions. PMID:25848591

  10. 45 CFR 155.220 - Ability of States to permit agents and brokers to assist qualified individuals, qualified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reductions for QHPs. (b) Web site disclosure. The Exchange may elect to provide information regarding licensed agents and brokers on its Web site for the convenience of consumers seeking insurance through that... completion of an eligibility verification and enrollment application through the Exchange Web site...

  11. Data Access Services interoperability in the Geosciences by means of the GI-axe Brokering Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, Enrico; Santoro, Mattia; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Many software tools are in use in the different Geosciences domains to the aim of publishing, accessing, evaluating and using available datasets in a service based environment. These tools/services are often domain-specific and usually support a small and disciplinary set of protocols and data models. On the other hand, multidisciplinary applications need to access many of these tools/services belonging to different domains in order to retrieve heterogeneous datasets (e.g. satellite acquired gridded coverages and in-situ sensor time series), then "uniformly process them" and achieve a deeper insight. Moreover datasets, to be easily processed, should be available according to a given Common Grid Environment (CGE): i.e. a geospatial environment characterized by a common spatio-temporal CRS (Coordinate Reference System), resolution, extension and by a common format encoding. Now, the interoperability effort needed by multidisciplinary applications is ordinarily in charge of data providers servers or user clients: in both cases, this represents a high entry barrier. The GI-axe Access Broker addresses this interoperability issue by taking charge of the needed implementation effort. It acts as an intermediation service between the User Clients and the Data Provider Services, placing itself in a third party (Broker) Layer. Indeed the Access Broker can access datasets available through well known access services in use by the Geosciences communities (e.g. OGC WCS, WMS, WFS, OPeNDAP, FTP, REST APIs, …) and republish them according to the application client interfaces. Moreover, GI-axe transforms datasets according to the a CGE specified by Users. In doing so it may resort to external processing services already in use by the community, supplementing the functionalities already supported by the data provider services. The external processing services list can be configured by Users. GI-axe is also a flexible framework, composed of extensible components. This architecture

  12. Information Practice and Malpractice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Anne P.

    1985-01-01

    Discussion of extent of information malpractice highlights role of information broker, copyrights and fees, special library problems, protection against malpractice, contracts, ready reference risks, education against malpractice, continuing education, personal values, malpractice insurance, information producers, Dun and Bradstreet versus…

  13. Knowledge brokers in a knowledge network: the case of Seniors Health Research Transfer Network knowledge brokers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and reflect on the role of knowledge brokers (KBs) in the Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN). The paper reviews the relevant literature on knowledge brokering, and then describes the evolving role of knowledge brokering in this knowledge network. Methods The description of knowledge brokering provided here is based on a developmental evaluation program and on the experiences of the authors. Data were gathered through qualitative and quantitative methods, analyzed by the evaluators, and interpreted by network members who participated in sensemaking forums. The results were fed back to the network each year in the form of formal written reports that were widely distributed to network members, as well as through presentations to the network’s members. Results The SHRTN evaluation and our experiences as evaluators and KBs suggest that a SHRTN KB facilitates processes of learning whereby people are connected with tacit or explicit knowledge sources that will help them to resolve work-related challenges. To make this happen, KBs engage in a set of relational, technical, and analytical activities that help communities of practice (CoPs) to develop and operate, facilitate exchanges among people with similar concerns and interests, and help groups and individuals to create, explore, and apply knowledge in their practice. We also suggest that the role is difficult to define, emergent, abstract, episodic, and not fully understood. Conclusions The KB role within this knowledge network has developed and matured over time. The KB adapts to the social and technical affordances of each situation, and fashions a unique and relevant process to create relationships and promote learning and change. The ability to work with teams and to develop relevant models and feasible approaches are critical KB skills. The KB is a leader who wields influence rather than power, and who is prepared to adopt whatever roles and

  14. Architecture for biomedical multimedia information delivery on the World Wide Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Goh, Gin-Hua; Neve, Leif; Thoma, George R.

    1997-10-01

    Research engineers at the National Library of Medicine are building a prototype system for the delivery of multimedia biomedical information on the World Wide Web. This paper discuses the architecture and design considerations for the system, which will be used initially to make images and text from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) publicly available. We categorized our analysis as follows: (1) fundamental software tools: we analyzed trade-offs among use of conventional HTML/CGI, X Window Broadway, and Java; (2) image delivery: we examined the use of unconventional TCP transmission methods; (3) database manager and database design: we discuss the capabilities and planned use of the Informix object-relational database manager and the planned schema for the HNANES database; (4) storage requirements for our Sun server; (5) user interface considerations; (6) the compatibility of the system with other standard research and analysis tools; (7) image display: we discuss considerations for consistent image display for end users. Finally, we discuss the scalability of the system in terms of incorporating larger or more databases of similar data, and the extendibility of the system for supporting content-based retrieval of biomedical images. The system prototype is called the Web-based Medical Information Retrieval System. An early version was built as a Java applet and tested on Unix, PC, and Macintosh platforms. This prototype used the MiniSQL database manager to do text queries on a small database of records of participants in the second NHANES survey. The full records and associated x-ray images were retrievable and displayable on a standard Web browser. A second version has now been built, also a Java applet, using the MySQL database manager.

  15. From black box to toolbox: Outlining device functionality, engagement activities, and the pervasive information architecture of mHealth interventions

    PubMed Central

    Danaher, Brian G.; Brendryen, Håvar; Seeley, John R.; Tyler, Milagra S.; Woolley, Tim

    2015-01-01

    mHealth interventions that deliver content via mobile phones represent a burgeoning area of health behavior change. The current paper examines two themes that can inform the underlying design of mHealth interventions: (1) mobile device functionality, which represents the technological toolbox available to intervention developers; and (2) the pervasive information architecture of mHealth interventions, which determines how intervention content can be delivered concurrently using mobile phones, personal computers, and other devices. We posit that developers of mHealth interventions will be better able to achieve the promise of this burgeoning arena by leveraging the toolbox and functionality of mobile devices in order to engage participants and encourage meaningful behavior change within the context of a carefully designed pervasive information architecture. PMID:25750862

  16. 7 CFR 46.28 - Duties of brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING OF PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES REGULATIONS (OTHER THAN RULES OF PRACTICE) UNDER THE PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES ACT, 1930 Brokers § 46.28...

  17. 12 CFR 221.125 - Credit to brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CARRYING MARGIN STOCK (REGULATION U) Interpretations § 221.125 Credit to brokers and dealers. (a) The... margin authority by repealing section 8(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the Exchange Act)...

  18. Using knowledge brokering to promote evidence-based policy-making: The need for support structures.

    PubMed Central

    van Kammen, Jessika; de Savigny, Don; Sewankambo, Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge brokering is a promising strategy to close the "know-do gap" and foster greater use of research findings and evidence in policy-making. It focuses on organizing the interactive process between the producers and users of knowledge so that they can co-produce feasible and research-informed policy options. We describe a recent successful experience with this novel approach in the Netherlands and discuss the requirements for effective institutionalization of knowledge brokering. We also discuss the potential of this approach to assist health policy development in low-income countries based on the experience of developing the Regional East-African Health (REACH)-Policy Initiative. We believe that intermediary organizations, such as regional networks, dedicated institutional mechanisms and funding agencies, can play key roles in supporting knowledge brokering. We recommend the need to support and learn from the brokerage approach to strengthen the relationship between the research and policy communities and hence move towards a stronger culture of evidence-based policy and policy-relevant research. PMID:16917647

  19. Evolution of System Architectures: Where Do We Need to Fail Next?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, Luis; Alameh, Nadine; Percivall, George

    2013-04-01

    (CITE). Compared to the first testbed, OWS-9 did not have a separate common architecture thread. Instead the emphasis was on brokering information models, securing them and making data available efficiently on mobile devices. The outcome is an architecture based on usability and non-intrusiveness while leveraging mediation of information models from different communities. This talk will use lessons learned from the evolution from OGC Testbed phase 1 to phase 9 to better understand how global and complex infrastructures evolve to support many communities including the Earth System Science Community.

  20. Technical architecture of ONC-approved plans for statewide health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Randolph C; Ezzard, John

    2011-01-01

    ONC-approved state plans for HIE were reviewed for descriptions and depictions of statewide HIE technical architecture. Review was complicated by non-standard organizational elements and technical terminology across state plans. Findings were mapped to industry standard, referenced, and defined HIE architecture descriptions and characteristics. Results are preliminary due to the initial subset of ONC-approved plans available, the rapid pace of new ONC-plan approvals, and continuing advancements in standards and technology of HIE, etc. Review of 28 state plans shows virtually all include a direct messaging component, but for participating entities at state-specific levels of granularity (RHIO, enterprise, organization/provider). About ½ of reviewed plans describe a federated architecture, and ¼ of plans utilize a single-vendor "hybrid-federated" architecture. About 1/3 of states plan to leverage new federal and open exchange technologies (DIRECT, CONNECT, etc.). Only one plan describes a centralized architecture for statewide HIE, but others combine central and federated architectural approaches. PMID:22195059

  1. Technical Architecture of ONC-Approved Plans For Statewide Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, Randolph C.; Ezzard, John

    2011-01-01

    ONC-approved state plans for HIE were reviewed for descriptions and depictions of statewide HIE technical architecture. Review was complicated by non-standard organizational elements and technical terminology across state plans. Findings were mapped to industry standard, referenced, and defined HIE architecture descriptions and characteristics. Results are preliminary due to the initial subset of ONC-approved plans available, the rapid pace of new ONC-plan approvals, and continuing advancements in standards and technology of HIE, etc. Review of 28 state plans shows virtually all include a direct messaging component, but for participating entities at state-specific levels of granularity (RHIO, enterprise, organization/provider). About ½ of reviewed plans describe a federated architecture, and ¼ of plans utilize a single-vendor “hybrid-federated” architecture. About 1/3 of states plan to leverage new federal and open exchange technologies (DIRECT, CONNECT, etc.). Only one plan describes a centralized architecture for statewide HIE, but others combine central and federated architectural approaches. PMID:22195059

  2. A generic, web-based clinical information system architecture using HL7 CDA: successful implementation in dermatological routine care.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Thilo; Boeker, Martin; Klar, Rüdiger; Müller, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    The requirements of highly specialized clinical domains are often underrepresented in hospital information systems (HIS). Common consequences are that documentation remains to be paper-based or external systems with insufficient HIS integration are used. This paper presents a solution to overcome this deficiency in the form of a generic framework based on the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture. The central architectural idea is the definition of customized forms using a schema-controlled XML language. These flexible form definitions drive the user interface, the data storage, and standardized data exchange. A successful proof-of-concept application in a dermatologic outpatient wound care department has been implemented, and is well accepted by the clinicians. Our work with HL7 CDA revealed the need for further practical research in the health information standards realm. PMID:17911755

  3. Space Station needs, attributes and architectural options. Volume 2, book 2, part 2, Task 2: Information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Missions to be performed, station operations and functions to be carried out, and technologies anticipated during the time frame of the space station were examined in order to determine the scope of the overall information management system for the space station. This system comprises: (1) the data management system which includes onboard computer related hardware and software required to assume and exercise control of all activities performed on the station; (2) the communication system for both internal and external communications; and (3) the ground segment. Techniques used to examine the information system from a functional and performance point of view are described as well as the analyses performed to derive the architecture of both the onboard data management system and the system for internal and external communications. These architectures are then used to generate a conceptual design of the onboard elements in order to determine the physical parameters (size/weight/power) of the hardware and software. The ground segment elements are summarized.

  4. Brokered dialogue: A new research method for controversial health and social issues

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Dialogue is a foundational feature of social life and an important way in which we come to understand one another. In situations of controversy dialogue is often absent because of a range of social barriers. We have developed a new film-based qualitative research method for studying controversial issues in healthcare and social policy. We call this method Brokered Dialogue. Theoretically informed by the traditions in narrative inquiry and visual anthropology, the method is premised on the idea that dialogue possesses features making it unique as a generator of new knowledge and opportunities for social intervention. Film is not only an extraordinarily rich data source, but an excellent medium for knowledge transfer and dissemination. Discussion The paper introduces the Brokered Dialogue method. We outline its critical steps, including the procedures for sampling, data collection and data analysis of both textual and visual data. Participants in a Brokered Dialogue engage in filmed interviews that capture their perspectives on a given topic; they then share their perspectives with, and pose questions of, one another through the medium of film. Using a participatory editing process, only footage that participants feel comfortable showing to others is incorporated. This technique offers participants a ‘safe’ space for respectful interaction. The editing process itself is analytic, and the final assembly of footage approximates a dialogue on the topic at hand. A link to a film produced from a project piloting the method is provided to demonstrate its real world application. Summary Brokered Dialogue is a method for promoting respectful interactions among those with seemingly divergent views on a controversial topic and for discovering critical points of divergence that may represent pathways for improvement. While the end product is a ‘film’, the goal is to have these films used as catalysts for ongoing respectful dialogue and problem

  5. ANTARES: A Prototype Transient Broker System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheson, Thomas; Saha, A.; Snodgrass, R.; Kececioglu, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Arizona-NOAO Temporal Analysis and Response to Events System (ANTARES) is a joint project of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory and the Department of Computer Science at the University of Arizona. The goal is to build the software infrastructure necessary to process and filter alerts produced by time-domain surveys, with the ultimate source of such alerts being the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). ANTARES will add value to alerts by annotating them with information from external sources such as previous surveys from across the electromagnetic spectrum. In addition, the temporal history of annotated alerts will provide further annotation for analysis. These alerts will go through a cascade of filters to select interesting candidates. For the prototype, 'interesting' is defined as the rarest or most unusual alert, but future systems will accommodate multiple filtering goals. The system is designed to be flexible, allowing users to access the stream at multiple points throughout the process, and to insert custom filters where necessary. We will describe the basic architecture of ANTARES and the principles that will guide development and implementation.

  6. What Do We Know about Knowledge Brokers in Paediatric Rehabilitation? A Systematic Search and Narrative Summary

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Molly C.; Landry, Michel D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To conduct a systematic review of the literature related to the use of knowledge brokers within paediatric rehabilitation, and specifically to determine (1) how knowledge brokers are defined and used in paediatric rehabilitation and (2) whether knowledge brokers in paediatric rehabilitation have demonstrably improved the performance of health care providers or organizations. Methods: The MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and AMED databases were systematically searched to identify studies relating to knowledge brokers or knowledge brokering within paediatric rehabilitation, with no restriction on the study design or primary aim. Following review of titles and abstracts, those studies identified as potentially relevant were assessed based on the inclusion criteria that they: (1) examined some aspect of knowledge brokers/brokering in paediatric rehabilitation; (2) included sufficient descriptive detail on how knowledge brokers/brokering were used; and(3) were peer-reviewed and published in English. Results: Of 1513 articles retrieved, 4 met the inclusion criteria, 3 of which referenced the same knowledge broker initiative. Two papers used mixed methods, one qualitative methodology, and one case presentation. Because of the different methods used in the included studies, the findings are presented in a narrative summary. Conclusions: This study provides an overview of the limited understanding of knowledge brokers within paediatric rehabilitation. Knowledge broker initiatives introduced within paediatric rehabilitation have been anchored in different theoretical frameworks, and no conclusions can be drawn as to the optimum combination of knowledge brokering activities and methods, nor about optimal duration, for sustained results. PMID:24799751

  7. BP-Broker use-cases in the UncertWeb framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncella, Roberto; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Schulz, Michael; Stasch, Christoph; Proß, Benjamin; Jones, Richard; Santoro, Mattia

    2013-04-01

    The UncertWeb framework is a distributed, Web-based Information and Communication Technology (ICT) system to support scientific data modeling in presence of uncertainty. We designed and prototyped a core component of the UncertWeb framework: the Business Process Broker. The BP-Broker implements several functionalities, such as: discovery of available processes/BPs, preprocessing of a BP into its executable form (EBP), publication of EBPs and their execution through a workflow-engine. According to the Composition-as-a-Service (CaaS) approach, the BP-Broker supports discovery and chaining of modeling resources (and processing resources in general), providing the necessary interoperability services for creating, validating, editing, storing, publishing, and executing scientific workflows. The UncertWeb project targeted several scenarios, which were used to evaluate and test the BP-Broker. The scenarios cover the following environmental application domains: biodiversity and habitat change, land use and policy modeling, local air quality forecasting, and individual activity in the environment. This work reports on the study of a number of use-cases, by means of the BP-Broker, namely: - eHabitat use-case: implements a Monte Carlo simulation performed on a deterministic ecological model; an extended use-case supports inter-comparison of model outputs; - FERA use-case: is composed of a set of models for predicting land-use and crop yield response to climatic and economic change; - NILU use-case: is composed of a Probabilistic Air Quality Forecasting model for predicting concentrations of air pollutants; - Albatross use-case: includes two model services for simulating activity-travel patterns of individuals in time and space; - Overlay use-case: integrates the NILU scenario with the Albatross scenario to calculate the exposure to air pollutants of individuals. Our aim was to prove the feasibility of describing composite modeling processes with a high-level, abstract

  8. HYDRA: A Middleware-Oriented Integrated Architecture for e-Procurement in Supply Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alor-Hernandez, Giner; Aguilar-Lasserre, Alberto; Juarez-Martinez, Ulises; Posada-Gomez, Ruben; Cortes-Robles, Guillermo; Garcia-Martinez, Mario Alberto; Gomez-Berbis, Juan Miguel; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro

    The Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) development paradigm has emerged to improve the critical issues of creating, modifying and extending solutions for business processes integration, incorporating process automation and automated exchange of information between organizations. Web services technology follows the SOA's principles for developing and deploying applications. Besides, Web services are considered as the platform for SOA, for both intra- and inter-enterprise communication. However, an SOA does not incorporate information about occurring events into business processes, which are the main features of supply chain management. These events and information delivery are addressed in an Event-Driven Architecture (EDA). Taking this into account, we propose a middleware-oriented integrated architecture that offers a brokering service for the procurement of products in a Supply Chain Management (SCM) scenario. As salient contributions, our system provides a hybrid architecture combining features of both SOA and EDA and a set of mechanisms for business processes pattern management, monitoring based on UML sequence diagrams, Web services-based management, event publish/subscription and reliable messaging service.

  9. (In)Forming: The Affordances of Digital Fabrication in Architectural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrinha, Mark Newell

    2010-01-01

    This research focuses on the effect of technology on the culture of architectural education through the lens of digital fabrication (CAD/CAM). As the computer was introduced into design education long before digital fabrication was accessible, design culture has prioritized image over material experience. Digital fabrication enables a material…

  10. Mobilizing Disability Experience to Inform Architectural Practice: Lessons Learned from a Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeersch, Peter-Willem; Heylighen, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Through their bodily interaction with the designed environment, disabled people can detect obstacles and appreciate spatial qualities architects may not be attuned to. While designers in several disciplines acknowledge disabled people as lead or critical users, in architectural practice their embodied experience is hardly recognized as a valuable…

  11. From the Field and into the Classroom: Information Architecture Assessment and Website Usability Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Michael J.; Hettche, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Although it is difficult these days to find a company that does not have a website, you do not have to look very far for to find a website with significant design and architecture flaws. Getting a visitor to your website is one thing, making the experience effortless and allowing them to find exactly what they need is another story. That being…

  12. Brokering as a framework for hydrological model repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuka, Daniel; Collick, Amy; MacAlister, Charlotte; Braeckel, Aaron; Wright, Dawn; Jodha Khalsa, Siri; Boldrini, Enrico; Easton, Zachary

    2015-04-01

    Data brokering aims to provide those in the the sciences with quick and repeatable access to data that represents physical, biological, and chemical characteristics; specifically to accelerate scientific discovery. Environmental models are useful tools to understand the behavior of hydrological systems. Unfortunately, parameterization of these hydrological models requires many different data, from different sources, and from different disciplines (e.g., atmospheric, geoscience, ecology). In basin scale hydrological modeling, the traditional procedure for model initialization starts with obtaining elevation models, land-use characterizations, soils maps, and weather data. It is often the researcher's past experience with these datasets that determines which datasets will be used in a study, and often newer, or more suitable data products will exist. An added complexity is that various science communities have differing data formats, storage protocols, and manipulation methods, which makes use by a non native user exceedingly difficult and time consuming. We demonstrate data brokering as a means to address several of these challenges. We present two test case scenarios in which researchers attempt to reproduce hydrological model results using 1) general internet based data gathering techniques, and 2) a scientific data brokering interface. We show that data brokering can increase the efficiency with which data are obtained, models are initialized, and results are analyzed. As an added benefit, it appears brokering can significantly increase the repeatability of a given study.

  13. IAIMS Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hripcsak, George

    1997-01-01

    Abstract An information system architecture defines the components of a system and the interfaces among the components. A good architecture is essential for creating an Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) that works as an integrated whole yet is flexible enough to accommodate many users and roles, multiple applications, changing vendors, evolving user needs, and advancing technology. Modularity and layering promote flexibility by reducing the complexity of a system and by restricting the ways in which components may interact. Enterprise-wide mediation promotes integration by providing message routing, support for standards, dictionary-based code translation, a centralized conceptual data schema, business rule implementation, and consistent access to databases. Several IAIMS sites have adopted a client-server architecture, and some have adopted a three-tiered approach, separating user interface functions, application logic, and repositories. PMID:9067884

  14. IAIMS architecture.

    PubMed

    Hripcsak, G

    1997-01-01

    An information system architecture defines the components of a system and the interfaces among the components. A good architecture is essential for creating an Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) that works as an integrated whole yet is flexible enough to accommodate many users and roles, multiple applications, changing vendors, evolving user needs, and advancing technology. Modularity and layering promote flexibility by reducing the complexity of a system and by restricting the ways in which components may interact. Enterprise-wide mediation promotes integration by providing message routing, support for standards, dictionary-based code translation, a centralized conceptual data schema, business rule implementation, and consistent access to databases. Several IAIMS sites have adopted a client-server architecture, and some have adopted a three-tiered approach, separating user interface functions, application logic, and repositories. PMID:9067884

  15. 17 CFR 270.10b-1 - Definition of regular broker or dealer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of the ten brokers or dealers that received the greatest dollar amount of brokerage commissions by... most recent fiscal year; (b) One of the ten brokers or dealers that engaged as principal in the largest... year; or (c) One of the ten brokers or dealers that sold the largest dollar amount of securities of...

  16. 17 CFR 240.17a-5 - Reports to be made by certain brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... security directly to the subscriber or to a custodian bank, if the broker or dealer does not otherwise hold... broker's or dealer's Web site at the specified Internet Uniform Resource Locator (URL); or (B) Calling... broker or dealer publishes the statements on its Web site, accessible by hyperlinks in either textual...

  17. 76 FR 78578 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Registration and Licensing of Brokers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ...The Department of State proposes to amend part 129 of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) relating to brokers and brokering activities. Amendments are also to be made to related provisions of the ITAR. The proposed revisions are intended to clarify registration requirements, the scope of brokering activities, prior approval requirements and exemptions, procedures for obtaining......

  18. 49 CFR 375.409 - May household goods brokers provide estimates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May household goods brokers provide estimates? 375... Estimating Charges § 375.409 May household goods brokers provide estimates? A household goods broker must not provide an individual shipper with an estimate of charges for the transportation of household goods...

  19. Urban spatial information services based on service-oriented grid architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Naixia; Zhang, Lingxian; Ai, Bo; Liu, Wenbao

    2007-11-01

    The need of spatial data sharing is increasing with the rapid urban expansion. However, the methods for spatial data sharing have not been well developed so far. In this paper, we establish a tri-layer geoinformation service framework using the Grid, SOA and web service. First, we integrated three modes that use geoinformation, which were: 1) the simple mode of viewing spatial data, 2) the analysis mode of querying and analyzing geoinformation, and 3) the peer mode of complex computing capabilities. Second, we designed a reasonable, flexible architecture of geoinformation service according to the three modes and expatiated the principles of each part. Then we argued that the middleware should be context-sensitive to provide intelligent services. We also discussed how to decide context detailedly and illustrated the principles of context-sensitive middleware. We found that the service-oriented grid architecture could realize data sharing and service more smoothly and accessibly.

  20. Decentralized Service Allocation in a Broker Overlay Based Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azab, Abdulrahman; Meling, Hein

    Grid computing is based on coordinated resource sharing in a dynamic environment of multi-institutional virtual organizations. Data exchanges, and service allocation, are challenging problems in the field of Grid computing. This is due to the decentralization of Grid systems. Building decentralized Grid systems with efficient resource management and software component mechanisms is a need for achieving the required efficiency and usability of Grid systems. In this work, a decentralized Grid system model is presented in which, the system is divided into virtual organizations each controlled by a broker. An overlay network of brokers is responsible for global resource management and managing allocation of services. Experimental results show that, the system achieves dependable performance with various loads of services, and broker failures.

  1. Study on Information Management for the Conservation of Traditional Chinese Architectural Heritage - 3d Modelling and Metadata Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Y. N.; Weng, K. H.; Huang, H. Y.

    2013-07-01

    After over 30 years of practise and development, Taiwan's architectural conservation field is moving rapidly into digitalization and its applications. Compared to modern buildings, traditional Chinese architecture has considerably more complex elements and forms. To document and digitize these unique heritages in their conservation lifecycle is a new and important issue. This article takes the caisson ceiling of the Taipei Confucius Temple, octagonal with 333 elements in 8 types, as a case study for digitization practise. The application of metadata representation and 3D modelling are the two key issues to discuss. Both Revit and SketchUp were appliedin this research to compare its effectiveness to metadata representation. Due to limitation of the Revit database, the final 3D models wasbuilt with SketchUp. The research found that, firstly, cultural heritage databasesmustconvey that while many elements are similar in appearance, they are unique in value; although 3D simulations help the general understanding of architectural heritage, software such as Revit and SketchUp, at this stage, could onlybe used tomodel basic visual representations, and is ineffective indocumenting additional critical data ofindividually unique elements. Secondly, when establishing conservation lifecycle information for application in management systems, a full and detailed presentation of the metadata must also be implemented; the existing applications of BIM in managing conservation lifecycles are still insufficient. Results of the research recommends SketchUp as a tool for present modelling needs, and BIM for sharing data between users, but the implementation of metadata representation is of the utmost importance.

  2. Insights into Broker - User interactions from the BCube Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.; Pearlman, J.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Fulweiler, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Introducing a broad brokering capability for science interoperability and cross-disciplinary research has many challenges and perspectives. Developing a business model that is sustainable is one aspect. Engaging and supporting the science research community is a second. In working with this community, significant added value must be provided. Various facets of the broker capability from discovery and access to data transformations and mapping are elements that were examined and applied to science use cases. In this presentation, we look at these facets and their benefits and challenges for specific use cases in the areas of ocean, coastal and arctic research . Specific recommendations for future implementations will be discussed.

  3. 17 CFR 240.17a-23 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems. 240.17a-23 Section 240.17a-23 Commodity and Securities... relating to broker-dealer trading systems. (a) Scope of section. This section shall apply to any registered broker or dealer that acts as the sponsor of a broker-dealer trading system. (b) Definitions....

  4. Information architecture considerations in designing a comprehensive tuberculosis enterprise system in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Gichoya, Judy; Pearce, Chris; Wickramasinghe, Nilmini

    2013-01-01

    Kenya ranks among the twenty-two countries that collectively contribute about 80% of the world's Tuberculosis cases; with a 50-200 fold increased risk of tuberculosis in HIV infected persons versus non-HIV hosts. Contemporaneously, there is an increase in mobile penetration and its use to support healthcare throughout Africa. Many are skeptical that such m-health solutions are unsustainable and not scalable. We seek to design a scalable, pervasive m-health solution for Tuberculosis care to become a use case for sustainable and scalable health IT in limited resource settings. We combine agile design principles and user-centered design to develop the architecture needed for this initiative. Furthermore, the architecture runs on multiple devices integrated to deliver functionality critical for successful Health IT implementation in limited resource settings. It is anticipated that once fully implemented, the proposed m-health solution will facilitate superior monitoring and management of Tuberculosis and thereby reduce the alarming statistic regarding this disease in this region. PMID:23920894

  5. Newborn screening healthcare information system based on service-oriented architecture.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Weng, Yung-Ching; Hsu, Kai-Ping; Chen, Chi-Huang; Tu, Chien-Ming; Wang, Zhenyu; Lai, Feipei

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we established a newborn screening system under the HL7/Web Services frameworks. We rebuilt the NTUH Newborn Screening Laboratory's original standalone architecture, having various heterogeneous systems operating individually, and restructured it into a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), distributed platform for further integrity and enhancements of sample collections, testing, diagnoses, evaluations, treatments or follow-up services, screening database management, as well as collaboration, communication among hospitals; decision supports and improving screening accuracy over the Taiwan neonatal systems are also addressed. In addition, the new system not only integrates the newborn screening procedures among phlebotomy clinics, referral hospitals, as well as the newborn screening center in Taiwan, but also introduces new models of screening procedures for the associated, medical practitioners. Furthermore, it reduces the burden of manual operations, especially the reporting services, those were heavily dependent upon previously. The new system can accelerate the whole procedures effectively and efficiently. It improves the accuracy and the reliability of the screening by ensuring the quality control during the processing as well. PMID:20703906

  6. Learning Brokers in the Workplace: A Typology of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thursfield, Denise; Holden, Rick; Hamblett, John

    2004-01-01

    This article explores the emerging phenomenon of workplace learning brokerage and the extent to which learning brokers can facilitate workplace learning in firms that have little history of employee development. Drawing on research carried out over a 6-year period, the article puts forward a typology of practice and identifies four distinct forms…

  7. Reflections on knowledge brokering within a multidisciplinary research team.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, Robin; Porter, Geoffrey A; Grunfeld, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge brokering (KB) may be one approach of helping researchers and decision makers effectively communicate their needs and abilities, and move toward increased use of evidence in health care. A multidisciplinary research team in Nova Scotia, Canada, has created a dedicated KB position with the goal of improving access to quality colorectal cancer care. The purpose of this paper is to provide an in-progress perspective on KB within this large research team. A KB position ("knowledge broker") was created to perform two primary tasks: (1) facilitate ongoing communication among team members; and (2) develop and maintain collaborations between researchers and decision makers to establish partnerships for the transfer and use of research findings. In this article, we discuss our KB model and its implementation, describe the broker's functions and activities, and present preliminary outcomes. The primary functions of the KB position have included: sustaining team members' engagement; harnessing members' expertise and sharing it with others; developing and maintaining communication tools/strategies; and establishing collaborations between team members and other stakeholders working in cancer care. The broker has facilitated an integrated knowledge translation approach to research conduct and led to the development of new collaborations with external stakeholders and other cancer/health services researchers. KB roles will undoubtedly differ across contexts. However, descriptive assessments can help others determine whether such an approach could be valuable for their research programs and, if so, what to expect during the process. PMID:22189993

  8. Knowledge Brokering in Children's Rehabilitation Organizations: Perspectives from Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Dianne; Russell, Dianne J.; Rivard, Lisa; Darrah, Johanna; Palisano, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Administrators must balance the demands of delivering therapy services with the need to provide staff with educational opportunities promoting evidence-based practice. Increasingly, the use of multifaceted, interactive knowledge translation strategies, such as knowledge brokering, is suggested as an effective way to encourage…

  9. 75 FR 11899 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  10. 75 FR 5618 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 USC 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  11. 77 FR 43609 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  12. 76 FR 22912 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, DHS. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1641), and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations...

  13. 75 FR 76998 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  14. 76 FR 7873 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1641), and the U.S. Customs...

  15. 77 FR 16249 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  16. 76 FR 44032 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  17. 76 FR 2918 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  18. 77 FR 74022 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  19. 76 FR 13205 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  20. 75 FR 11898 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 USC 1641), and the U.S. Customs...

  1. 75 FR 75691 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  2. 75 FR 47825 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 USC 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  3. 77 FR 5819 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 USC 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  4. 76 FR 22912 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs And Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, DHS. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations...

  5. 77 FR 45647 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 USC 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  6. 75 FR 47825 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  7. 78 FR 77140 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... ] Brokerage, Cartage and Lighterage Districts'' published in the Federal Register on September 27, 1995 (60 FR... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2014 AGENCY: U.S. Customs..., 2014. U.S. Customs and Border Protection announces this date of payment for 2014 in accordance with...

  8. Microbial Brokers of Insect-Plant Interactions Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Angela E

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing methods have transformed the field of microbial ecology, making it possible to determine the composition and functional capabilities of uncultured microorganisms. These technologies have been instrumental in the recognition that resident microorganisms can have profound effects on the phenotype and fitness of their animal hosts by modulating the animal signaling networks that regulate growth, development, behavior, etc. Against this backdrop, this review assesses the impact of microorganisms on insect-plant interactions, in the context of the hypothesis that microorganisms are biochemical brokers of plant utilization by insects. There is now overwhelming evidence for a microbial role in insect utilization of certain plant diets with an extremely low or unbalanced nutrient content. Specifically, microorganisms enable insect utilization of plant sap by synthesizing essential amino acids. They also can broker insect utilization of plant products of extremely high lignocellulose content, by enzymatic breakdown of complex plant polysaccharides, nitrogen fixation, and sterol synthesis. However, the experimental evidence for microbial-mediated detoxification of plant allelochemicals is limited. The significance of microorganisms as brokers of plant utilization by insects is predicted to vary, possibly widely, as a result of potentially complex interactions between the composition of the microbiota and the diet and insect developmental age or genotype. For every insect species feeding on plant material, the role of resident microbiota as biochemical brokers of plant utilization is a testable hypothesis. PMID:23793897

  9. 7 CFR 46.28 - Duties of brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Duties of brokers. 46.28 Section 46.28 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING OF PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES REGULATIONS (OTHER THAN RULES OF PRACTICE) UNDER...

  10. Reflections on Knowledge Brokering within a Multidisciplinary Research Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urquhart, Robin; Porter, Geoffrey A.; Grunfeld, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge brokering (KB) may be one approach of helping researchers and decision makers effectively communicate their needs and abilities, and move toward increased use of evidence in health care. A multidisciplinary research team in Nova Scotia, Canada, has created a dedicated KB position with the goal of improving access to quality colorectal…

  11. 42 CFR 438.810 - Expenditures for enrollment broker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... The broker and its subcontractors are independent of any MCO, PIHP, PAHP, PCCM, or other health care... considered “independent” if it— (i) Is an MCO, PIHP, PAHP, PCCM or other health care provider in the State; (ii) Is owned or controlled by an MCO, PIHP, PAHP, PCCM, or other health care provider in the...

  12. 42 CFR 438.810 - Expenditures for enrollment broker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... The broker and its subcontractors are independent of any MCO, PIHP, PAHP, PCCM, or other health care... considered “independent” if it— (i) Is an MCO, PIHP, PAHP, PCCM or other health care provider in the State; (ii) Is owned or controlled by an MCO, PIHP, PAHP, PCCM, or other health care provider in the...

  13. 42 CFR 438.810 - Expenditures for enrollment broker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... The broker and its subcontractors are independent of any MCO, PIHP, PAHP, PCCM, or other health care... considered “independent” if it— (i) Is an MCO, PIHP, PAHP, PCCM or other health care provider in the State; (ii) Is owned or controlled by an MCO, PIHP, PAHP, PCCM, or other health care provider in the...

  14. 42 CFR 438.810 - Expenditures for enrollment broker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... The broker and its subcontractors are independent of any MCO, PIHP, PAHP, PCCM, or other health care... considered “independent” if it— (i) Is an MCO, PIHP, PAHP, PCCM or other health care provider in the State; (ii) Is owned or controlled by an MCO, PIHP, PAHP, PCCM, or other health care provider in the...

  15. Between Indian and White Worlds: The Cultural Broker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szasz, Margaret Connell, Ed.

    During the five centuries of contact between Native and non-Native peoples of the Americas, thousands of intermediaries have moved across the continents' cultural frontiers. These cultural brokers have included traders, missionaries, persons of mixed race, diplomats, Indian schoolchildren attending missionary or government boarding schools, White…

  16. An Education Broker Toolset for Web Course Customization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langenbach, Christian; Bodendorf, Freimut

    Within an electronic education market, an electronic education mall is defined as a virtual service center to support various transaction processes by providing a technological platform with appropriate value-added services and interfaces for suppliers and customers. In this context, an education broker service is of central importance, because…

  17. School Business Community Partnership Brokers. Program Guidelines, 2010-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, 2009

    2009-01-01

    These guidelines for 2010-2013 relate specifically to the Partnership Brokers program. This program is part of the Australian Government's contribution to the Youth Attainment and Transitions National Partnership and will commence on 1 January 2010. These Guidelines set out the requirements for the provision of services by organisations contracted…

  18. As Endowment Values Plummet, Some Institutions Consider Suing Brokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masterson, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that as many as five colleges or charitable foundations whose endowments have suffered significant investment losses or were unable to access money in their accounts in recent months are considering legal action against their brokers or investment managers, alleging misrepresentation of risk or mismanagement. Jacob H.…

  19. Evaluating Sustainability Models for Interoperability through Brokering Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Jay; Benedict, Karl; Best, Mairi; Fyfe, Sue; Jacobs, Cliff; Michener, William; Nativi, Stefano; Powers, Lindsay; Turner, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Sustainability of software and research support systems is an element of innovation that is not often discussed. Yet, sustainment is essential if we expect research communities to make the time investment to learn and adopt new technologies. As the Research Data Alliance (RDA) is developing new approaches to interoperability, the question of uptake and sustainability is important. Brokering software sustainability is one of the areas that is being addressed in RDA. The Business Models Team of the Research Data Alliance Brokering Governance Working Group examined several support models proposed to promote the long-term sustainability of brokering middleware. The business model analysis includes examination of funding source, implementation frameworks and challenges, and policy and legal considerations. Results of this comprehensive analysis highlight advantages and disadvantages of the various models with respect to the specific requirements for brokering services. We offer recommendations based on the outcomes of this analysis that suggest that hybrid funding models present the most likely avenue to long term sustainability.

  20. Designing a Robot for Cultural Brokering in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yanghee

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of English language learning children in U.S. classrooms and the need for effective programs that support these children present a great challenge to the current educational paradigm. The challenge may be met, at least in part, by an innovative humanoid robot serving as a cultural broker that mediates collaborative…

  1. Architecture for a Web-based clinical information system that keeps the design open and the access closed.

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, J. J.; Sengupta, S.; Clayton, P. D.; Patel, V. L.; Kushniruk, A.; Huang, X.

    1998-01-01

    We are developing the Patient Clinical Information System (PatCIS) project at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center to provide patients with access to health information, including their own medical records (permitting them to contribute selected aspects to the record), educational materials and automated decision support. The architecture of the system allows for multiple, independent components which make use of central services for managing security and usage logging functions. The design accommodates a variety of data entry, data display and decision support tools and provides facilities for tracking system usage and questionnaires. The user interface minimizes hypertext-related disorientation and cognitive overload; our success in this regard is the subject of on-going evaluation. Images Figure 1 PMID:9929194

  2. A System Architecture for Sharing De-Identified, Research-Ready Brain Scans and Health Information Across Clinical Imaging Centers

    PubMed Central

    Chervenak, Ann L.; van Erp, Theo G.M.; Kesselman, Carl; D’Arcy, Mike; Sobell, Janet; Keator, David; Dahm, Lisa; Murry, Jim; Law, Meng; Hasso, Anton; Ames, Joseph; Macciardi, Fabio; Potkin, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of brain disorders increasingly relies on the costly collection of large standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. Moreover, the clinical interpretation of brain scans benefits from compare and contrast analyses of scans from patients with similar, and sometimes rare, demographic, diagnostic, and treatment status. A solution to both needs is to acquire standardized, research-ready clinical brain scans and to build the information technology infrastructure to share such scans, along with other pertinent information, across hospitals. This paper describes the design, deployment, and operation of a federated imaging system that captures and shares standardized, de-identified clinical brain images in a federation across multiple institutions. In addition to describing innovative aspects of the system architecture and our initial testing of the deployed infrastructure, we also describe the Standardized Imaging Protocol (SIP) developed for the project and our interactions with the Institutional Review Board (IRB) regarding handling patient data in the federated environment. PMID:22941984

  3. The Information Architecture of E-Commerce: An Experimental Study on User Performance and Preference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Mohd, Wan Abdul Rahim; Md Noor, Nor Laila; Mehad, Shafie

    Too often, designers of e-commerce web sites use models, concepts, guidelines, and designs that focus on the artifacts while ignoring the context in which the artifacts will be used. Furthermore, the link between culture and usability in web site IA phenomenon is still considered as uncharted area, as it lacks much theoretical consideration. In an effort toward addressing the aforementioned issues, our study provides a theoretical and empirical link between cultural and usability through the application of ‘Venustas' (Delight) drawn from the architectural field and Hofstede's cultural dimensions. We use Islamic culture as the case study and report on the experiment to investigate the effect of the IA designs based on the cultural dimensions on e-commerce web sites. The result provides partial empirical support to the theorized link between culture and usability based on the usability measurement on user performance and preference. In addition, practical web site IA cultural design prescriptions are also provided.

  4. Ontology driven health information systems architectures enable pHealth for empowered patients.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd

    2011-02-01

    The paradigm shift from organization-centered to managed care and on to personal health settings increases specialization and distribution of actors and services related to the health of patients or even citizens before becoming patients. As a consequence, extended communication and cooperation is required between all principals involved in health services such as persons, organizations, devices, systems, applications, and components. Personal health (pHealth) environments range over many disciplines, where domain experts present their knowledge by using domain-specific terminologies and ontologies. Therefore, the mapping of domain ontologies is inevitable for ensuring interoperability. The paper introduces the care paradigms and the related requirements as well as an architectural approach for meeting the business objectives. Furthermore, it discusses some theoretical challenges and practical examples of ontologies, concept and knowledge representations, starting general and then focusing on security and privacy related services. The requirements and solutions for empowering the patient or the citizen before becoming a patient are especially emphasized. PMID:21036660

  5. The Brokering Approach for Multidisciplinary Data Discovery and Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Global sustainability research requires an integrated multidisciplinary effort underpinned by a collaborative environment discovering and accessing heterogeneous data across disciplines. Traditionally, interoperability has been achieved by implementing federation of systems. The federating approach entails the adoption of a set of common technologies and standards. This presentation argues that for complex (and uncontrolled) environments such as global, multidisciplinary, and voluntary-based infrastructures, federated solutions proved not to be well-accepted. In fact, the adoption of a limited common set of technologies and standards raises a couple of important issues: (a) high level entry barriers for both data producers and users; (b) lack of appropriateness to address domain specificities. More recently, a new interoperability approach was successfully experimented: the brokering approach. This presentation identifies the principles of brokering, and gives examples of practical implementation relating to data discovery, semantic searching, and data access. The benefit of the brokering approach includes: (a) lowers barriers to participation in distributed systems for both users and resource providers (minimal burden or cost impact on existing systems); (b) accelerates interconnection of disparate systems; (c) facilitates sustainability, reusability, extensibility, and flexibility of multidisciplinary infrastructures; (d) removes need to impose common (e.g. federal, "top-down") specifications and software components enabling a more adaptive "bottom-up" evolution of infrastructures. The Brokering approach was considered and successfully adopted by cross-disciplinary initiatives (e.g. GEOSS: Global Earth Observation System of Systems; several European FP7 programmes, NSIDC, etc. ); recently, the NSF EarthCube initiative funded a project dealing with "Data Broker".

  6. The Brokering Approach for Multidisciplinary Data Discovery and Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nativi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Global sustainability research requires an integrated multidisciplinary effort underpinned by a collaborative environment discovering and accessing heterogeneous data across disciplines. Traditionally, interoperability has been achieved by implementing federation of systems. The federating approach entails the adoption of a set of common technologies and standards. This presentation argues that for complex (and uncontrolled) environments such as global, multidisciplinary, and voluntary-based infrastructures, federated solutions proved not to be well-accepted. In fact, the adoption of a limited common set of technologies and standards raises a couple of important issues: (a) high level entry barriers for both data producers and users; (b) lack of appropriateness to address domain specificities. Recently, a new interoperability approach was successfully experimented: the brokering approach. This presentation identifies the principles of brokering, and gives examples of practical implementation relating to data discovery, semantic searching, and data access. The benefit of the brokering approach includes: (a) lowers barriers to participation in distributed systems for both users and resource providers (minimal burden or cost impact on existing systems); (b) accelerates interconnection of disparate systems; (c) facilitates sustainability, reusability, extensibility, and flexibility of multidisciplinary infrastructures; (d) removes need to impose common (e.g. federal, "top-down") specifications and software components enabling a more adaptive "bottom-up" evolution of infrastructures. The Brokering approach was successfully analyzed and used by cross-disciplinary initiatives (e.g. GEOSS: Global Earth Observation System of Systems; several European FP7 programmes, NSIDC, etc. ); recently, the NSF EarthCube initiative funded a project dealing with "Data Broker".

  7. Harnessing the Risk-Related Data Supply Chain: An Information Architecture Approach to Enriching Human System Research and Operations Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buquo, Lynn; Johnson-Throop, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) and Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD), not unlike many NASA organizations today, struggle with the inherent inefficiencies caused by dependencies on heterogeneous data systems and silos of data and information spread across decentralized discipline domains. The capture of operational and research-based data/information (both in-flight and ground-based) in disparate IT systems impedes the extent to which that data/information can be efficiently and securely shared, analyzed, and enriched into knowledge that directly and more rapidly supports HRP's research-focused human system risk mitigation efforts and SLSD s operationally oriented risk management efforts. As a result, an integrated effort is underway to more fully understand and document how specific sets of risk-related data/information are generated and used and in what IT systems that data/information currently resides. By mapping the risk-related data flow from raw data to useable information and knowledge (think of it as the data supply chain), HRP and SLSD are building an information architecture plan to leverage their existing, shared IT infrastructure. In addition, it is important to create a centralized structured tool to represent risks including attributes such as likelihood, consequence, contributing factors, and the evidence supporting the information in all these fields. Representing the risks in this way enables reasoning about the risks, e.g. revisiting a risk assessment when a mitigation strategy is unavailable, updating a risk assessment when new information becomes available, etc. Such a system also provides a concise way to communicate the risks both within the organization as well as with collaborators. Understanding and, hence, harnessing the human system risk-related data supply chain enhances both organizations' abilities to securely collect, integrate, and share data assets that improve human system research and operations.

  8. The GRID Adventures: SDSC'S Storage Resource Broker and Web Services in Digital Library Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekar, Arcot; Moore, Reagan; Ludascher, Bertram; Zaslavsky, Ilya

    The data handling infrastructure being developed at the San Diego Supercomputer Center, includes a range of approaches and technologies for managing data, information and knowledge, specifically: (1) self-instantiating and self-validating persistent archives; (2) data handling system providing ubiquitous access to data resources stored in a variety of systems, epitomized in the development of SDSC Storage Resource Broker (SRB); (3) data collection management services, with Extensible Metadata Catalog working in conjunction with SRB; (4) digital library services for information navigation and discovery; (5) information integration across multiple heterogeneous sources and web services, based on SDSC XML-based mediation technologies, and (6) model-based knowledge management, providing conceptual-level mediation and ontology services. This paper reviews the key components of the SDSC data handling infrastructure for scientific data, highlighting our experience with the SRB in a variety of application domains; XML-based information integration (mediation) technologies employing grid Web services, and knowledge management techniques.

  9. A Broker-based approach for GEOSS authentication/authorization services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mattia; Nativi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) is a voluntary partnership of governments and international organizations coordinating efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). GEOSS aims to achieve societal benefits through voluntary contribution and sharing of resources to better understand the relationships between the society and the environment where we live. The GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) implements a digital infrastructure (e-infrastructure) that coordinates access to these systems, interconnecting and harmonizing their data, applications, models, and products. The GCI component implementing the needed interoperability arrangements to interconnect the data systems contributing to GEOSS is the GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker). This provides a unique entry point to which client applications (i.e. the portals and apps) can connect for exploiting (search, discover, and access) resources available through GCI. The GEO DAB implements the brokering approach (Nativi et al., 2013) to build a flexible and scalable System of Systems. GEOSS data providers ask for information about who accessed their resources and, in some cases, want to limit the data download. GEOSS users ask for a profiled interaction with the system based on their needs and expertise level. This raised the need for an enrichment of GEO DAB functionalities, i.e. user authentication/authorization. Besides, authentication and authorization is necessary for GEOSS to provide moderated social services - e.g. feedback messages, data "fit for use" comments, etc. In the development of this new functionality, the need to support existing and well-used users' credentials (e.g. Google, Twitter, etc.) stems from GEOSS principles to build on existing systems and lower entry-barriers for users. To cope with these requirements and face the heterogeneity of technologies used by the different data systems and client applications, a broker-based approach for the authentication

  10. 76 FR 51457 - Order Temporarily Exempting the Floor Broker Operations of Broker-Dealers With Market Access That...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ..., 2011), 76 FR 38293 (June 30, 2011). II. Background On November 3, 2010, the Commission adopted Rule...\\ \\6\\ See Exchange Act Release No. 63241 (Nov. 3, 2010), 75 FR 69792 (Nov. 15, 2010) (``Rule 15c3-5... access to trading securities \\7\\ directly on an exchange or ATS, including a broker-dealer...

  11. Intelligent Information Harvesting Architecture: An Application to a High School Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanani, Uri; Frank, Ariel

    In the educational arena, information is conventionally scattered throughout many projects and documents and on many systems. This distribution of data inhibits students and faculty members from searching and accessing information conveniently and efficiently. The research project described in this paper aims to consolidate the disparate data into…

  12. A New Cellular Architecture for Information Retrieval from Sensor Networks through Embedded Service and Security Protocols.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Aamir; Landry, René; Lee, Malrey; Xiong, Naixue; Lee, Jongho; Lee, Changhoon

    2016-01-01

    Substantial changes have occurred in the Information Technology (IT) sectors and with these changes, the demand for remote access to field sensor information has increased. This allows visualization, monitoring, and control through various electronic devices, such as laptops, tablets, i-Pads, PCs, and cellular phones. The smart phone is considered as a more reliable, faster and efficient device to access and monitor industrial systems and their corresponding information interfaces anywhere and anytime. This study describes the deployment of a protocol whereby industrial system information can be securely accessed by cellular phones via a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) server. To achieve the study goals, proprietary protocol interconnectivity with non-proprietary protocols and the usage of interconnectivity services are considered in detail. They support the visualization of the SCADA system information, and the related operations through smart phones. The intelligent sensors are configured and designated to process real information via cellular phones by employing information exchange services between the proprietary protocol and non-proprietary protocols. SCADA cellular access raises the issue of security flaws. For these challenges, a cryptography-based security method is considered and deployed, and it could be considered as a part of a proprietary protocol. Subsequently, transmission flows from the smart phones through a cellular network. PMID:27314351

  13. A New Cellular Architecture for Information Retrieval from Sensor Networks through Embedded Service and Security Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Aamir; Landry, René; Lee, Malrey; Xiong, Naixue; Lee, Jongho; Lee, Changhoon

    2016-01-01

    Substantial changes have occurred in the Information Technology (IT) sectors and with these changes, the demand for remote access to field sensor information has increased. This allows visualization, monitoring, and control through various electronic devices, such as laptops, tablets, i-Pads, PCs, and cellular phones. The smart phone is considered as a more reliable, faster and efficient device to access and monitor industrial systems and their corresponding information interfaces anywhere and anytime. This study describes the deployment of a protocol whereby industrial system information can be securely accessed by cellular phones via a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) server. To achieve the study goals, proprietary protocol interconnectivity with non-proprietary protocols and the usage of interconnectivity services are considered in detail. They support the visualization of the SCADA system information, and the related operations through smart phones. The intelligent sensors are configured and designated to process real information via cellular phones by employing information exchange services between the proprietary protocol and non-proprietary protocols. SCADA cellular access raises the issue of security flaws. For these challenges, a cryptography-based security method is considered and deployed, and it could be considered as a part of a proprietary protocol. Subsequently, transmission flows from the smart phones through a cellular network. PMID:27314351

  14. Using architecture information and real-time resource state to reduce power consumption and communication costs in parallel applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, James M.; Devine, Karen Dragon; Gentile, Ann C.; Leung, Vitus Joseph; Olivier, Stephen Lecler; Pedretti, Kevin; Rajamanickam, Sivasankaran; Bunde, David P.; Deveci, Mehmet; Catalyurek, Umit V.

    2014-09-01

    As computer systems grow in both size and complexity, the need for applications and run-time systems to adjust to their dynamic environment also grows. The goal of the RAAMP LDRD was to combine static architecture information and real-time system state with algorithms to conserve power, reduce communication costs, and avoid network contention. We devel- oped new data collection and aggregation tools to extract static hardware information (e.g., node/core hierarchy, network routing) as well as real-time performance data (e.g., CPU uti- lization, power consumption, memory bandwidth saturation, percentage of used bandwidth, number of network stalls). We created application interfaces that allowed this data to be used easily by algorithms. Finally, we demonstrated the benefit of integrating system and application information for two use cases. The first used real-time power consumption and memory bandwidth saturation data to throttle concurrency to save power without increasing application execution time. The second used static or real-time network traffic information to reduce or avoid network congestion by remapping MPI tasks to allocated processors. Results from our work are summarized in this report; more details are available in our publications [2, 6, 14, 16, 22, 29, 38, 44, 51, 54].

  15. Collaborative development and implementation of a knowledge brokering program to promote research use in Burkina Faso, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Dagenais, Christian; Somé, Télesphore D; Boileau-Falardeau, Michèle; McSween-Cadieux, Esther; Ridde, Valéry

    2015-01-01

    Despite efforts expended over recent decades, there is a persistent gap between the production of scientific evidence and its use. This is mainly due to the difficulty of bringing such knowledge to health workers and decision-makers so that it can inform practices and decisions on a timely basis. One strategy for transferring knowledge to potential users, that is, gaining increasing legitimacy, is knowledge brokering (KB), effectiveness of which in certain conditions has been demonstrated through empirical research. However, little is known about how to implement such a strategy, especially in the African context. The KB program presented here is aimed specifically at narrowing the gap by making scientific knowledge available to users with the potential to improve health-related practices and decision making in Burkina Faso. The program involves Canadian and African researchers, a knowledge broker, health practitioners, and policy-makers. This article presents the collaborative development of the KB strategy and the evaluation of its implementation at year 1. The KB strategy was developed in stages, beginning with a scoping study to ensure the most recent studies were considered. Two one-day workshops were then conducted to explore the problem of low research use and to adapt the strategy to the Burkinabè context. Based on these workshops, the KB program was developed and brokers were recruited and trained. Evaluation of the program's implementation after the first year showed that: 1) the preparatory activities were greatly appreciated by participants, and most considered the content useful for their work; 2) the broker had carried out his role in accordance with the logic model; and 3) this role was seen as important by the participants targeted by the activities and outputs. Participants made suggestions for program improvements in subsequent years, stressing particularly the need to involve decision-makers at the central level. PMID:25630708

  16. Collaborative development and implementation of a knowledge brokering program to promote research use in Burkina Faso, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Dagenais, Christian; Somé, Télesphore D.; Boileau-Falardeau, Michèle; McSween-Cadieux, Esther; Ridde, Valéry

    2015-01-01

    Despite efforts expended over recent decades, there is a persistent gap between the production of scientific evidence and its use. This is mainly due to the difficulty of bringing such knowledge to health workers and decision-makers so that it can inform practices and decisions on a timely basis. One strategy for transferring knowledge to potential users, that is, gaining increasing legitimacy, is knowledge brokering (KB), effectiveness of which in certain conditions has been demonstrated through empirical research. However, little is known about how to implement such a strategy, especially in the African context. The KB program presented here is aimed specifically at narrowing the gap by making scientific knowledge available to users with the potential to improve health-related practices and decision making in Burkina Faso. The program involves Canadian and African researchers, a knowledge broker, health practitioners, and policy-makers. This article presents the collaborative development of the KB strategy and the evaluation of its implementation at year 1. The KB strategy was developed in stages, beginning with a scoping study to ensure the most recent studies were considered. Two one-day workshops were then conducted to explore the problem of low research use and to adapt the strategy to the Burkinabè context. Based on these workshops, the KB program was developed and brokers were recruited and trained. Evaluation of the program's implementation after the first year showed that: 1) the preparatory activities were greatly appreciated by participants, and most considered the content useful for their work; 2) the broker had carried out his role in accordance with the logic model; and 3) this role was seen as important by the participants targeted by the activities and outputs. Participants made suggestions for program improvements in subsequent years, stressing particularly the need to involve decision-makers at the central level. PMID:25630708

  17. Develop an Architecture to Enable Effective Information Process in Mitigating Asteroid's Threat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, M.; Piccione, M.; Sun, M.; Yang, C. P.; Bambacus, M.; Seery, B.

    2015-12-01

    Research on asteroid impacts on Earth is crucial and challenging nationally and globally. Existing efforts for Near Earth Object (NEO) survey such as Catalina Sky Survey and SAO-minor planets center (MPC) have been established. However, our understanding of asteroids still needs to be advanced through physical characterization, modeling of atmospheric entry/breakup, and risk assessments of impacts (land and water), with emphases on small impactors. To achieve the goal of knowledge advancement, activities such as orbit determination, threat analysis, and impact simulation are fundamental, and all require accurate information and effective processing capability. Here we propose a planetary framework including the workflow, information flow, organization dependencies, and most importantly the cyberinfrastructure configuration required to achieve effective information processing. This framework will serve as a foundation for understanding the NEO hazard and building a long-term capability to counter a potential NEO impact threat.

  18. [Study on network architecture of a tele-medical information sharing platform].

    PubMed

    Pan, Lin; Yu, Lun; Chen, Jin-xiong

    2006-07-01

    In the article,a plan of network construction which satisfies the demand of applications for a telemedical information sharing platform is proposed. We choice network access plans in view of user actual situation, through the analysis of the service demand and many kinds of network access technologies. Hospital servers that locate in LAN link sharing platform with node servers, should separate from the broadband network of sharing platform in order to ensure the security of the internal hospital network and the administration management. We use the VPN technology to realize the safe transmission of information in the platform network. Preliminary experiments have proved the plan is practicable. PMID:17039943

  19. An image based information system - Architecture for correlating satellite and topological data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, N. A.; Zobrist, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the development of an image based information system and its use to process a Landsat thematic map showing land use or land cover in conjunction with a census tract polygon file to produce a tabulation of land use acreages per census tract. The system permits the efficient cross-tabulation of two or more geo-coded data sets, thereby setting the stage for the practical implementation of models of diffusion processes or cellular transformation. Characteristics of geographic information systems are considered, and functional requirements, such as data management, geocoding, image data management, and data analysis are discussed. The system is described, and the potentialities of its use are examined.

  20. Evolving Information Technology: A Case Study of the Effects of Constant Change on Information Technology Instructional Design Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helps, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge for Information Technology (IT) programs is that the rapid pace of evolution of computing technology leads to frequent redesign of IT courses. The problem is exacerbated by several factors. Firstly, the changing technology is the subject matter of the discipline and is also frequently used to support instruction; secondly, this…

  1. Multiple expression of molecular information: enforced generation of different supramolecular inorganic architectures by processing of the same ligand information through specific coordination algorithms

    PubMed

    Funeriu; Lehn; Fromm; Fenske

    2000-06-16

    The multisubunit ligand 2 combines two complexation substructures known to undergo, with specific metal ions, distinct self-assembly processes to form a double-helical and a grid-type structure, respectively. The binding information contained in this molecular strand may be expected to generate, in a strictly predetermined and univocal fashion, two different, well-defined output inorganic architectures depending on the set of metal ions, that is, on the coordination algorithm used. Indeed, as predicted, the self-assembly of 2 with eight CuII and four CuI yields the intertwined structure D1. It results from a crossover of the two assembly subprograms and has been fully characterized by crystal structure determination. On the other hand, when the instructions of strand 2 are read out with a set of eight CuI and four MII (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) ions, the architectures C1-C4, resulting from a linear combination of the two subprograms, are obtained, as indicated by the available physico-chemical and spectral data. Redox interconversion of D1 and C4 has been achieved. These results indicate that the same molecular information may yield different output structures depending on how it is processed, that is, depending on the interactional (coordination) algorithm used to read it. They have wide implications for the design and implementation of programmed chemical systems, pointing towards multiprocessing capacity, in a one code/ several outputs scheme, of potential significance for molecular computation processes and possibly even with respect to information processing in biology. PMID:10926214

  2. Serendipity in the Stacks: Libraries, Information Architecture, and the Problems of Accidental Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Patrick L.

    2015-01-01

    Serendipity in the library stacks is generally regarded as a positive occurrence. While acknowledging its benefits, this essay draws on research in library science, information systems, and other fields to argue that, in two important respects, this form of discovery can be usefully framed as a problem. To make this argument, the essay examines…

  3. Develop security architecture for both in-house healthcare information systems and electronic patient record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Chen, Xiaomeng; Zhuang, Jun; Jiang, Jianrong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Dongqing; Huang, H. K.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we presented a new security approach to provide security measures and features in both healthcare information systems (PACS, RIS/HIS), and electronic patient record (EPR). We introduced two security components, certificate authoring (CA) system and patient record digital signature management (DSPR) system, as well as electronic envelope technology, into the current hospital healthcare information infrastructure to provide security measures and functions such as confidential or privacy, authenticity, integrity, reliability, non-repudiation, and authentication for in-house healthcare information systems daily operating, and EPR exchanging among the hospitals or healthcare administration levels, and the DSPR component manages the all the digital signatures of patient medical records signed through using an-symmetry key encryption technologies. The electronic envelopes used for EPR exchanging are created based on the information of signers, digital signatures, and identifications of patient records stored in CAS and DSMS, as well as the destinations and the remote users. The CAS and DSMS were developed and integrated into a RIS-integrated PACS, and the integration of these new security components is seamless and painless. The electronic envelopes designed for EPR were used successfully in multimedia data transmission.

  4. An operational information systems architecture for assessing sustainable transportation planning: principles and design.

    PubMed

    Borzacchiello, Maria Teresa; Torrieri, Vincenzo; Nijkamp, Peter

    2009-11-01

    This paper offers the description of an integrated information system framework for the assessment of transportation planning and management. After an introductory exposition, in the first part of the paper, a broad overview of international experiences regarding information systems on transportation is given, focusing in particular on the relationship between transportation system's performance monitoring and the decision-making process, and on the importance of this connection in the evaluation and planning process, in Italian and European cases. Next, the methodological design of an information system to support efficient and sustainable transportation planning and management aiming to integrate inputs from several different data sources is presented. The resulting framework deploys modular and integrated databases which include data stemming from different national or regional data banks and which integrate information belonging to different transportation fields. For this reason, it allows public administrations to account for many strategic elements that influence their decisions regarding transportation, both from a systemic and infrastructural point of view. PMID:19631382

  5. Clinical document architecture.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, Kai

    2003-01-01

    The Clinical Document Architecture (CDA), a standard developed by the Health Level Seven organisation (HL7), is an ANSI approved document architecture for exchange of clinical information using XML. A CDA document is comprised of a header with associated vocabularies and a body containing the structural clinical information. PMID:15061557

  6. Quality Management and Information Brokerage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Halm, Johan

    1995-01-01

    To compete effectively, information brokers need to adopt management and marketing tools; Total Quality Management can upgrade an organization's performance by using customer feedback of its services. SERVQUAL identifies gaps in service by assessing quality expectations versus quality experiences. (AEF)

  7. Investigating dynamical information transfer in the brain following a TMS pulse: Insights from structural architecture.

    PubMed

    Amico, Enrico; Van Mierlo, Pieter; Marinazzo, Daniele; Laureys, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used for more than 20 years to investigate connectivity and plasticity in the human cortex. By combining TMS with high-density electroencephalography (hd-EEG), one can stimulate any cortical area and measure the effects produced by this perturbation in the rest of the cerebral cortex. The purpose of this paper is to investigate changes of information flow in the brain after TMS from a functional and structural perspective, using multimodal modeling of source reconstructed TMS/hd-EEG recordings and DTI tractography. We prove how brain dynamics induced by TMS is constrained and driven by its structure, at different spatial and temporal scales, especially when considering cross-frequency interactions. These results shed light on the function-structure organization of the brain network at the global level, and on the huge variety of information contained in it. PMID:26737511

  8. The Research of Petroleum Enterprise Information System Architecture Based on the G/S Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Liu; Xirong, Guo; Fang, Miao

    This paper explains the petroleum engineering technologies of petroleum enterprise supported by G/S model, which combine process of exploring, developing, and transporting of petroleum enterprise, these key technologies with spatial information technology supported by Digital Earth Platform, resulting in the improvement of the scientificity, accuracy, and rationality of the petroleum engineering technologies and the reduction of the cost and the increase of the benefits.

  9. OSS Broker/Facilitators: Matching NASA Resources with Education and Public Outreach Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, L.; Coombs, C.

    1999-12-01

    In 1997, NASA's Office of Space Science funded five regionally based broker/facilitators to support its education and outreach efforts. The broker/facilitators serve as catalysts in the process of channeling NASA expertise in directions that will benefit the educational process and contribute to the public understanding of science. A primary function of the broker/facilitators is to assist scientists who wish to develop educational plans to complement their research programs, and to help find educational partners for research groups or individuals. This presentation will describe the broker/facilitator concept in more depth, give a broad overview of current activities, and provide several detailed examples.

  10. Taikongs and Calos: the role of middlemen and brokers in Javanese international migration.

    PubMed

    Spaan, E

    1994-01-01

    "This article discusses international migration from Java in the past and present and the role brokers have played in stimulating this movement. It describes legal and clandestine labor migration to Singapore, Malaysia, and Saudi Arabia, the influence of employment brokers on the process, and the organization of the recruitment networks. The involvement of brokers is crucial but not always beneficial for the migrants. Migrants are dependent on the brokers and risk exploitation. In the case of movement to Saudi Arabia, there is a linkage with religious institutions and the Islamic pilgrimage." PMID:12287280

  11. A SOA broker solution for standard discovery and access services: the GI-cat framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, Enrico

    2010-05-01

    , called GI-go, is an example of the possible applications which may be built on top of the GI-cat broker component. GI-go allows discovering and browsing of the available datasets, retrieving and evaluating their description and performing distributed queries according to any combination of the following criteria: geographic area, temporal interval, topic of interest (free-text and/or keyword selection are allowed) and data source (i.e. where, when, what, who). The results set of a query (e.g. datasets metadata) are then displayed in an incremental way leveraging the asynchronous interactions approach implemented by GI-cat. This feature allows the user to access the intermediate query results. Query interruption and feedback features are also provided to the user. Alternatively, user may perform a browsing task by selecting a catalog resource from the current configuration and navigate through its aggregated and/or leaf datasets. In both cases datasets metadata, expressed according to ISO 19139 (and also Dublin Core and ebRIM if available), are displayed for download, along with a resource portrayal and actual data access (when this is meaningful and possible). The GI-cat distributed catalog service has been successfully deployed and experimented in the framework of different projects and initiative, including the SeaDataNet FP6 project, GEOSS IP3 (Interoperability Process Pilot Project), GEOSS AIP-2 (Architectural Implementation Project - Phase 2), FP7 GENESI-DR, CNR GIIDA, FP7 EUROGEOSS and ESA HMA project.

  12. The Impact of Building Information Modeling on the Architectural Design Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, P. F.; Silva, Neander F.; Lima, Ecilamar M.

    Many benefits of Building Information Modeling, BIM, have been suggested by several authors and by software vendors. In this paper we describe an experiment in which two groups of designers were observed developing an assigned design task. One of the groups used a BIM system, while the other used a standard computer-aided drafting system. The results show that some of the promises of BIM hold true, such as consistency maintenance and error avoidance in the design documentation process. Other promises such as changing the design process itself seemed also promising but they need more research to determine to greater extent the depth of such changes.

  13. Brokering technologies to realize the hydrology scenario in NSF BCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, Enrico; Easton, Zachary; Fuka, Daniel; Pearlman, Jay; Nativi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    In the National Science Foundation (NSF) BCube project an international team composed of cyber infrastructure experts, geoscientists, social scientists and educators are working together to explore the use of brokering technologies, initially focusing on four domains: hydrology, oceans, polar, and weather. In the hydrology domain, environmental models are fundamental to understand the behaviour of hydrological systems. A specific model usually requires datasets coming from different disciplines for its initialization (e.g. elevation models from Earth observation, weather data from Atmospheric sciences, etc.). Scientific datasets are usually available on heterogeneous publishing services, such as inventory and access services (e.g. OGC Web Coverage Service, THREDDS Data Server, etc.). Indeed, datasets are published according to different protocols, moreover they usually come in different formats, resolutions, Coordinate Reference Systems (CRSs): in short different grid environments depending on the original data and the publishing service processing capabilities. Scientists can thus be impeded by the burden of discovery, access and normalize the desired datasets to the grid environment required by the model. These technological tasks of course divert scientists from their main, scientific goals. The use of GI-axe brokering framework has been experimented in a hydrology scenario where scientists needed to compare a particular hydrological model with two different input datasets (digital elevation models): - the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) dataset, v.2. - the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset, v.3. These datasets were published by means of Hyrax Server technology, which can provide NetCDF files at their original resolution and CRS. Scientists had their model running on ArcGIS, so the main goal was to import the datasets using the available ArcPy library and have EPSG:4326 with the same resolution grid as the

  14. Brokered virtual hubs for facilitating access and use of geospatial Open Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzetti, Paolo; Latre, Miguel; Kamali, Nargess; Brumana, Raffaella; Braumann, Stefan; Nativi, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Open Data is a major trend in current information technology scenario and it is often publicised as one of the pillars of the information society in the near future. In particular, geospatial Open Data have a huge potential also for Earth Sciences, through the enablement of innovative applications and services integrating heterogeneous information. However, open does not mean usable. As it was recognized at the very beginning of the Web revolution, many different degrees of openness exist: from simple sharing in a proprietary format to advanced sharing in standard formats and including semantic information. Therefore, to fully unleash the potential of geospatial Open Data, advanced infrastructures are needed to increase the data openness degree, enhancing their usability. In October 2014, the ENERGIC OD (European NEtwork for Redistributing Geospatial Information to user Communities - Open Data) project, funded by the European Union under the Competitiveness and Innovation framework Programme (CIP), has started. In response to the EU call, the general objective of the project is to "facilitate the use of open (freely available) geographic data from different sources for the creation of innovative applications and services through the creation of Virtual Hubs". The ENERGIC OD Virtual Hubs aim to facilitate the use of geospatial Open Data by lowering and possibly removing the main barriers which hampers geo-information (GI) usage by end-users and application developers. Data and services heterogeneity is recognized as one of the major barriers to Open Data (re-)use. It imposes end-users and developers to spend a lot of effort in accessing different infrastructures and harmonizing datasets. Such heterogeneity cannot be completely removed through the adoption of standard specifications for service interfaces, metadata and data models, since different infrastructures adopt different standards to answer to specific challenges and to address specific use-cases. Thus

  15. Model-based system-of-systems engineering for space-based command, control, communication, and information architecture design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindiy, Oleg V.

    This dissertation presents a model-based system-of-systems engineering (SoSE) approach as a design philosophy for architecting in system-of-systems (SoS) problems. SoS refers to a special class of systems in which numerous systems with operational and managerial independence interact to generate new capabilities that satisfy societal needs. Design decisions are more complicated in a SoS setting. A revised Process Model for SoSE is presented to support three phases in SoS architecting: defining the scope of the design problem, abstracting key descriptors and their interrelations in a conceptual model, and implementing computer-based simulations for architectural analyses. The Process Model enables improved decision support considering multiple SoS features and develops computational models capable of highlighting configurations of organizational, policy, financial, operational, and/or technical features. Further, processes for verification and validation of SoS models and simulations are also important due to potential impact on critical decision-making and, thus, are addressed. Two research questions frame the research efforts described in this dissertation. The first concerns how the four key sources of SoS complexity---heterogeneity of systems, connectivity structure, multi-layer interactions, and the evolutionary nature---influence the formulation of SoS models and simulations, trade space, and solution performance and structure evaluation metrics. The second question pertains to the implementation of SoSE architecting processes to inform decision-making for a subset of SoS problems concerning the design of information exchange services in space-based operations domain. These questions motivate and guide the dissertation's contributions. A formal methodology for drawing relationships within a multi-dimensional trade space, forming simulation case studies from applications of candidate architecture solutions to a campaign of notional mission use cases, and

  16. American School & University Architectural Portfolio 2000 Awards: Landscape Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents photographs and basic information on architectural design, costs, square footage, and principle designers of the award winning school landscaping projects that competed in the American School & University Architectural Portfolio 2000. (GR)

  17. An SMS-based System Architecture (Logical Model) to Support Management of Information Exchange in Emergency Stuations. poLINT-112-SMS PROJECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetulani, Zygmunt; Marciniak, Jacek; Konieczka, Pawel; Walkowska, Justyna

    In the paper we present the architecture of the POLINT-112-SMS system to support information management in emergency situations. The system interprets the text input in form of SMS messages, understands and interprets information provided by the human user. It is supposed to assist a human in taking decisions. The main modules of the system presented here are the following: the SMS gate, the NLP Module (processing Polish), the Situation Analysis Module (SAM) and the Dialogue Maintenance Module (DMM).

  18. 75 FR 77941 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Revision of an Approved Information Collection: Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Revision of an Approved Information Collection: Request for Revocation of Authority Granted AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier... ICR notifies the FMCSA of when a motor carrier, freight forwarder, or property broker requests...

  19. On the Support of Scientific Workflows over Pub/Sub Brokers

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Augusto; Robles, Tomas; Alcarria, Ramon; Cedeño, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    The execution of scientific workflows is gaining importance as more computing resources are available in the form of grid environments. The Publish/Subscribe paradigm offers well-proven solutions for sustaining distributed scenarios while maintaining the high level of task decoupling required by scientific workflows. In this paper, we propose a new model for supporting scientific workflows that improves the dissemination of control events. The proposed solution is based on the mapping of workflow tasks to the underlying Pub/Sub event layer, and the definition of interfaces and procedures for execution on brokers. In this paper we also analyze the strengths and weaknesses of current solutions that are based on existing message exchange models for scientific workflows. Finally, we explain how our model improves the information dissemination, event filtering, task decoupling and the monitoring of scientific workflows. PMID:23966191

  20. Knowledge brokering between researchers and policymakers in Fiji to develop policies to reduce obesity: a process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of using research evidence in decisionmaking at the policy level has been increasingly recognized. However, knowledge brokering to engage researchers and policymakers in government and non-government organizations is challenging. This paper describes and evaluates the knowledge exchange processes employed by the Translational Research on Obesity Prevention in Communities (TROPIC) project that was conducted from July 2009 to April 2012 in Fiji. TROPIC aimed to enhance: the evidence-informed decisionmaking skills of policy developers; and awareness and utilization of local and other obesity-related evidence to develop policies that could potentially improve the nation’s food and physical activity environments. The specific research question was: Can a knowledge brokering approach advance evidence-informed policy development to improve eating and physical activity environments in Fiji. Methods The intervention comprised: recruiting organizations and individuals; mapping policy environments; analyzing organizational capacity and support for evidence-informed policymaking (EIPM); developing EIPM skills; and facilitating development of evidence-informed policy briefs. Flexible timetabling of activities was essential to accommodate multiple competing priorities at both individual and organizational levels. Process diaries captured the duration, frequency and type of each interaction and/or activity between the knowledge brokering team and participants or their organizations. Results Partnerships were formalized with high-level officers in each of the six participating organization. Participants (n = 49) developed EIPM skills (acquire, assess, adapt and apply evidence) through a series of four workshops and applied this knowledge to formulate briefs with ongoing one-to-one support from TROPIC team members. A total of 55% of participants completed the 12 to18 month intervention, and 63% produced one or more briefs (total = 20) that were

  1. Translating into Understanding: Language Brokering and Prosocial Development in Emerging Adults from Immigrant Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Shu-Sha A.; Greenfield, Patricia M.; Orellana, Marjorie F.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-method study assessed the nature of language brokering and the relationship between language brokering and prosocial capacities in a sample of 139 college students from ethnically diverse immigrant families. The prosocial capacities of interest were empathic concern and two forms of perspective-taking: general perspective-taking…

  2. Longitudinal Associations of Language Brokering and Parent-Adolescent Closeness in Immigrant Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilghman-Osborne, Emile M.; Bámaca-Colbert, Mayra; Witherspoon, Dawn; Wadsworth, Martha E.; Hecht, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Language brokering is a common practice for Latino youth with immigrant parents. Yet little is known about how youth's feelings about this responsibility contribute to the parent-adolescent relationship. In this study, we examined the longitudinal associations between language brokering attitudes and parent-adolescent closeness in a sample of…

  3. 17 CFR 41.27 - Prohibition of dual trading in security futures products by floor brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... close of business on the business day following the discovery of error. In the event that a floor broker... floor broker to dual trade while executing orders for such customer's account. An account controller..., provided, that the customer explicitly grants in writing to the individual account controller the...

  4. 48 CFR 204.7206 - Using CAGE codes to identify agents and brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Using CAGE codes to... 204.7206 Using CAGE codes to identify agents and brokers. Authorized agents and brokers are entities and, as such, may be assigned CAGE codes for identification and processing purposes. (a) A single...

  5. 48 CFR 204.7206 - Using CAGE codes to identify agents and brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Using CAGE codes to... 204.7206 Using CAGE codes to identify agents and brokers. Authorized agents and brokers are entities and, as such, may be assigned CAGE codes for identification and processing purposes. (a) A single...

  6. 48 CFR 204.7206 - Using CAGE codes to identify agents and brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Using CAGE codes to... 204.7206 Using CAGE codes to identify agents and brokers. Authorized agents and brokers are entities and, as such, may be assigned CAGE codes for identification and processing purposes. (a) A single...

  7. 48 CFR 204.7206 - Using CAGE codes to identify agents and brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Using CAGE codes to... 204.7206 Using CAGE codes to identify agents and brokers. Authorized agents and brokers are entities and, as such, may be assigned CAGE codes for identification and processing purposes. (a) A single...

  8. 48 CFR 204.7206 - Using CAGE codes to identify agents and brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Using CAGE codes to... 204.7206 Using CAGE codes to identify agents and brokers. Authorized agents and brokers are entities and, as such, may be assigned CAGE codes for identification and processing purposes. (a) A single...

  9. Teacher-as-Knowledge-Broker in a Futures-Oriented Health and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Doune

    2015-01-01

    The concept of brokering is usually aligned with a business model of an intermediary helping the customer/client with their decisions/choices. As knowledge becomes increasingly accessible, and of varied origins, quality and veracity, the number of professionals engaged in knowledge brokering is simultaneously increasing. This paper considers if…

  10. 77 FR 25729 - Notice of Correction of Revoked Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... Broker License, dated November 18, 2011 (76 FR 71584). The below identified licenses are active. Name... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Correction of Revoked Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Reinstatement...

  11. 78 FR 48458 - Notice of Reinstatement of Revoked Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Federal Register (76 FR 71584) on November 18, 2011, CBP erroneously revoked the following broker license... published in the Federal Register (77 FR 72873) on December 6, 2012, CBP erroneously revoked the following... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Reinstatement of Revoked Customs Broker...

  12. 31 CFR 1026.220 - Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... made. In all other respects, the records must be maintained pursuant to the provisions of 17 CFR 1.31... futures commission merchants and introducing brokers. 1026.220 Section 1026.220 Money and Finance..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR FUTURES COMMISSION MERCHANTS AND INTRODUCING BROKERS IN...

  13. 17 CFR 230.139a - Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities. 230.139a Section 230.139a Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General § 230.139a Publications by brokers or...

  14. 17 CFR 230.139a - Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities. 230.139a Section 230.139a Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General § 230.139a Publications by brokers or...

  15. 17 CFR 230.139a - Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities. 230.139a Section 230.139a Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General § 230.139a Publications by brokers or...

  16. 17 CFR 230.139a - Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities. 230.139a Section 230.139a Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General § 230.139a Publications by brokers or...

  17. 17 CFR 230.139a - Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities. 230.139a Section 230.139a Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General § 230.139a Publications by brokers or...

  18. 76 FR 75553 - Completion of the Broker Self-Assessment Outreach Pilot

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ...This document announces the completion of the Broker Self- Assessment (BSA) Outreach Pilot (BSA Pilot), a voluntary partnership with the customs brokerage community, which began in July 2009. CBP has decided to end the BSA pilot without a plan to proceed with another Importer Self-Assessment type model. CBP and the National Customs Brokers and Forwarders Association of America (NCBFAA) have......

  19. 17 CFR 401.9 - Exemption for certain foreign government securities brokers or dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...)) and the regulations of this subchapter provided it complies with the provisions of 17 CFR 240.15a-6... modified to read as follows: “(iii) If the foreign broker or dealer has established a relationship with a... relationship is disclosed in all research reports and all transactions with the foreign broker or dealer...

  20. 17 CFR 401.9 - Exemption for certain foreign government securities brokers or dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...)) and the regulations of this subchapter provided it complies with the provisions of 17 CFR 240.15a-6... modified to read as follows: “(iii) If the foreign broker or dealer has established a relationship with a... relationship is disclosed in all research reports and all transactions with the foreign broker or dealer...

  1. Examining the Effects of Language Brokering on Student Identities and Learning Opportunities in Dual Immersion Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jin Sook; Hill-Bonnet, Laura; Raley, Jason

    2011-01-01

    In settings where speakers of two or more different languages coexist, language brokering, the act of interpreting and translating between culturally and linguistically different speakers, is commonly practiced. Yet the examination of language brokering and its implications in classroom settings have not received much attention in the literature.…

  2. A Typology of Language-Brokering Events in Dual-Language Immersion Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyoca, Anne Marie; Lee, Jin Sook

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines language-brokering events to better understand how children utilize their linguistic resources to create spaces where the coexistence of two languages can enable or restrict understanding and learning of academic content for themselves and others. An analysis of the structure of language-brokering events reveals that different…

  3. 31 CFR 1023.220 - Customer identification programs for broker-dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Customer identification programs for broker-dealers. 1023.220 Section 1023.220 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR BROKERS OR DEALERS IN SECURITIES Programs §...

  4. 78 FR 54720 - Registration and Financial Security Requirements for Brokers of Property and Freight Forwarders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21) concerning persons acting as a broker or a freight forwarder. Section 32915 of MAP-21 requires anyone acting as a broker or a freight... President signed MAP-21 (Pub. L. 112-141, 126 Stat. 405 (2012)) into law, which included a number...

  5. 31 CFR 1026.220 - Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... futures commission merchants and introducing brokers. 1026.220 Section 1026.220 Money and Finance..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR FUTURES COMMISSION MERCHANTS AND INTRODUCING BROKERS IN COMMODITIES Programs § 1026.220 Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and...

  6. 31 CFR 1026.220 - Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... futures commission merchants and introducing brokers. 1026.220 Section 1026.220 Money and Finance..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR FUTURES COMMISSION MERCHANTS AND INTRODUCING BROKERS IN COMMODITIES Programs § 1026.220 Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and...

  7. 31 CFR 1026.220 - Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... futures commission merchants and introducing brokers. 1026.220 Section 1026.220 Money and Finance..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR FUTURES COMMISSION MERCHANTS AND INTRODUCING BROKERS IN COMMODITIES Programs § 1026.220 Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and...

  8. Language Brokering Contexts and Behavioral and Emotional Adjustment among Latino Parents and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Charles R., Jr.; McClure, Heather H.; Eddy, J. Mark

    2009-01-01

    This study examined behavioral and emotional adjustment in family contexts in which there was high versus low demand for adolescents to serve as language brokers in a sample of 73 recently immigrated Latino families with middle-school-aged adolescents. Language brokering was conceptualized as a family process rather than merely an individual…

  9. Feelings about Language Brokering and Family Relations among Mexican American Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisskirch, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Children and adolescents of immigrant and non-English proficient parents often translate for their parents and other adults, a practice known as language brokering. The personal and emotional impact for adolescents of having to language broker for parents is not well understood. Ninety-eight Mexican American 7th graders (female = 47, male = 49,…

  10. 47 CFR 73.3556 - Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. 73.3556 Section 73.3556 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....3556 Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. (a) No commercial AM or...

  11. 78 FR 52680 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Registration and Licensing of Brokers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... Brokers, Brokering Activities, and Related Provisions,'' 76 FR 78578) modifying the provisions relating to... rulemaking provisions of the APA, the Department has published this rule as a proposed rule (76 FR 78578... Stat. 1920; Pub. L. 111-266; Section 1261, Pub. L. 112-239; E.O. 13637, 78 FR 16129. 0 2. Section...

  12. 19 CFR 111.79 - Employment of broker who has lost license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employment of broker who has lost license. 111.79... Monetary Penalty in Lieu of Suspension or Revocation § 111.79 Employment of broker who has lost license... petition will not be approved unless the Assistant Commissioner is satisfied that the petitioner...

  13. 75 FR 13699 - Customs Broker Recordkeeping Requirements Regarding Location and Method of Record Retention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ...-AC12 Customs Broker Recordkeeping Requirements Regarding Location and Method of Record Retention AGENCY... Regulations regarding customs broker recordkeeping requirements as they pertain to the location and method of... following methods: Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov . Follow the instructions...

  14. 77 FR 33964 - Customs Broker Recordkeeping Requirements Regarding Location and Method of Record Retention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ...This document adopts as a final rule, with an additional technical correction, proposed amendments to the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations regarding customs broker recordkeeping requirements as they pertain to the location and method of record retention. The amendments permit a licensed customs broker, under prescribed conditions, to store records relating to his or her customs......

  15. 17 CFR 405.2 - Reports to be made by registered government securities brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... affiliated registered broker or dealer that files Form BD-Y2K subject to 17 CFR 240.17a-5(e)(5) will be... AUDIT § 405.2 Reports to be made by registered government securities brokers and dealers. (a)...

  16. 17 CFR 240.15a-10 - Exemption of certain brokers or dealers with respect to security futures products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or dealers with respect to security futures products. 240.15a-10 Section 240.15a-10 Commodity and... Brokers and Dealers § 240.15a-10 Exemption of certain brokers or dealers with respect to security futures... dealer in security futures products. (b) A broker or dealer that is registered by notice with...

  17. 78 FR 48456 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Customs broker license cancellation due to death of the broker. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby...

  18. 17 CFR 403.5 - Custody of securities held by financial institutions that are government securities brokers or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... financial institutions that are government securities brokers or dealers. 403.5 Section 403.5 Commodity and... financial institutions that are government securities brokers or dealers. (a) A government securities broker or dealer that is a financial institution shall: (1) Comply with part 450 with respect to...

  19. 17 CFR 403.5 - Custody of securities held by financial institutions that are government securities brokers or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... financial institutions that are government securities brokers or dealers. 403.5 Section 403.5 Commodity and... financial institutions that are government securities brokers or dealers. (a) A government securities broker or dealer that is a financial institution shall: (1) Comply with part 450 with respect to...

  20. Economic Incentives, Institutions, and Racial Discrimination: The Case of Real Estate Brokers. Discussion Paper D78-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yinger, John

    This paper examines the economic incentives and institutions that support racial discrimination by real estate brokers. The economic incentives are derived from a search model of broker behavior in which a broker searches for buyers and listings (i.e., sellers who will sell through him) and then attempts to match buyers with his listings. This…

  1. 17 CFR 240.15b11-1 - Registration by notice of security futures product broker-dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... security futures product broker-dealers. 240.15b11-1 Section 240.15b11-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... § 240.15b11-1 Registration by notice of security futures product broker-dealers. (a) A broker or dealer...) Is registered with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission as a futures commission merchant or...

  2. A machine learning classification broker for the LSST transient database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, K. D.

    2008-03-01

    We describe the largest data-producing astronomy project in the coming decade - the LSST (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope). The enormous data output, database contents, knowledge discovery, and community science expected from this project will impose massive data challenges on the astronomical research community. One of these challenge areas is the rapid machine learning, data mining, and classification of all novel astronomical events from each 3-gigapixel (6-GB) image obtained every 20 seconds throughout every night for the project duration of 10 years. We describe these challenges and a particular implementation of a classification broker for this data fire hose.

  3. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia G.

    2004-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. Because the NPSS was developed using the object-oriented paradigm, the resulting architecture is an extensible and flexible framework that is currently being used by a diverse set of participants in government, academia, and the aerospace industry. NPSS is being used by over 15 different institutions to support rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and aerospace. Full system-level simulations as well as subsystems may be modeled using NPSS. The NPSS architecture enables the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail, which is called numerical zooming. The middleware used to enable zooming and distributed simulations is the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA). The NPSS Developer's Kit offers tools for the developer to generate CORBA-based components and wrap codes. The Developer's Kit enables distributed multi-fidelity and multi-discipline simulations, preserves proprietary and legacy codes, and facilitates addition of customized codes. The platforms supported are PC, Linux, HP, Sun, and SGI.

  4. A rhetorical approach to environmental information sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    `Faceted search' has recently been widely adopted as a powerful information discovery framework, enabling users to navigate a complex landscape of information by successive refinement along key dimensions. The compelling user experience that results has seen adoption of faceted search by online retailers, media outlets, and encyclopedic publishers. A key challenge with faceted browse is the choice of suitable search dimensions, or facets. Conventional facet analysis adopts principles of exclusivity and exhaustiveness; identifying facets on their relevance to the subject and discrimination ability (Spiteri, 1998). The rhetoricians of ancient Greece defined seven dimensions (`circumstances') of analytical enquiry: who, what, when, where, why, in what way, by what means. These provide a broadly applicable framework that may be seen in Ranganathan's classic (`PMEST') scheme for facet analysis. The utility of the `Five Ws' is also manifest through their adoption in daily discourse and pedagogical frameworks. If we apply the `Five Ws' to environmental information, we arrive at a model very close to the `O&M' (ISO 19156) conceptual model for standardised exchange of environmental observation and measurements data: * who: metadata * what: observed property * when: time of observation * where: feature of interest * why: metadata * how: procedure Thus, we adopt an approach for distributed environmental information sharing which factors the architecture into components aligned with the `Five Ws' (or O&M). We give an overview of this architecture and its information classes, components, interfaces and standards. We also describe how it extends the classic SDI architecture to provide additional specific benefit for environmental information. Finally, we offer a perspective on the architecture which may be seen as a `brokering' overlay to environmental information resources, enabling an O&M-conformant view. The approach to be presented is being adopted by the Australian Bureau

  5. 17 CFR 240.15b1-5 - Consent to service of process to be furnished by nonresident brokers or dealers and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to be furnished by nonresident brokers or dealers and by nonresident general partners or managing... nonresident general partners or managing agents of brokers or dealers. (a) Each nonresident broker or dealer... registration, and each nonresident managing agent of any other unincorporated broker or dealer which...

  6. 17 CFR 240.15b1-5 - Consent to service of process to be furnished by nonresident brokers or dealers and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to be furnished by nonresident brokers or dealers and by nonresident general partners or managing... nonresident general partners or managing agents of brokers or dealers. (a) Each nonresident broker or dealer... registration, and each nonresident managing agent of any other unincorporated broker or dealer which...

  7. 17 CFR 240.15b1-5 - Consent to service of process to be furnished by nonresident brokers or dealers and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to be furnished by nonresident brokers or dealers and by nonresident general partners or managing... nonresident general partners or managing agents of brokers or dealers. (a) Each nonresident broker or dealer... registration, and each nonresident managing agent of any other unincorporated broker or dealer which...

  8. 17 CFR 240.15b1-5 - Consent to service of process to be furnished by nonresident brokers or dealers and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to be furnished by nonresident brokers or dealers and by nonresident general partners or managing... nonresident general partners or managing agents of brokers or dealers. (a) Each nonresident broker or dealer... registration, and each nonresident managing agent of any other unincorporated broker or dealer which...

  9. 17 CFR 240.15b1-5 - Consent to service of process to be furnished by nonresident brokers or dealers and by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to be furnished by nonresident brokers or dealers and by nonresident general partners or managing... nonresident general partners or managing agents of brokers or dealers. (a) Each nonresident broker or dealer... registration, and each nonresident managing agent of any other unincorporated broker or dealer which...

  10. Architectural design for resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Deters, Ralph; Zhang, W. J.

    2010-05-01

    Resilience has become a new nonfunctional requirement for information systems. Many design decisions have to be made at the architectural level in order to deliver an information system with the resilience property. This paper discusses the relationships between resilience and other architectural properties such as scalability, reliability, and consistency. A corollary is derived from the CAP theorem, and states that it is impossible for a system to have all three properties of consistency, resilience and partition-tolerance. We present seven architectural constraints for resilience. The constraints are elicited from good architectural practices for developing reliable and fault-tolerant systems and the state-of-the-art technologies in distributed computing. These constraints provide a comprehensive reference for architectural design towards resilience.

  11. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  12. Serving Scientists: The DePaul Broker/Facilitator Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettger, E. E.

    1998-09-01

    Educational components are encouraged, sometimes required, in grant-funded research. However, it is not reasonable to expect scientists to master a second field, education. The NASA Office of Space Science has included regional Broker/Facilitator centers in its ``ecosystem" (multidimensional education/outreach network) to help bridge the gap. Broker/Facilitators are to ``work with the space science community to identify high-leverage opportunities for education/outreach and help arrange collaborations between scientists and educators" (www.hq.nas.gov/office/oss/education/edprog.html). The regional center at DePaul University serves six states (IA, IL, IN, MN, MO, and WI). Full activity will begin in August 1998, when staff are in place. Initially, we expect to assist scientists who wish to develop educational plans to complement their research programs, and help find educational partners for research groups or individuals. Further services, activities, and programs are being planned; feedback from researchers and others is being sought. Progress and further details of plans will be presented.

  13. The Path to Convergence: Design, Coordination and Social Issues in the Implementation of a Middleware Data Broker.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slota, S.; Khalsa, S. J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Infrastructures are the result of systems, networks, and inter-networks that accrete, overlay and segment one another over time. As a result, working infrastructures represent a broad heterogeneity of elements - data types, computational resources, material substrates (computing hardware, physical infrastructure, labs, physical information resources, etc.) as well as organizational and social functions which result in divergent outputs and goals. Cyber infrastructure's engineering often defaults to a separation of the social from the technical that results in the engineering succeeding in limited ways, or the exposure of unanticipated points of failure within the system. Studying the development of middleware intended to mediate interactions among systems within an earth systems science infrastructure exposes organizational, technical and standards-focused negotiations endemic to a fundamental trait of infrastructure: its characteristic invisibility in use. Intended to perform a core function within the EarthCube cyberinfrastructure, the development, governance and maintenance of an automated brokering system is a microcosm of large-scale infrastructural efforts. Points of potential system failure, regardless of the extent to which they are more social or more technical in nature, can be considered in terms of the reverse salient: a point of social and material configuration that momentarily lags behind the progress of an emerging or maturing infrastructure. The implementation of the BCube data broker has exposed reverse salients in regards to the overall EarthCube infrastructure (and the role of middleware brokering) in the form of organizational factors such as infrastructural alignment, maintenance and resilience; differing and incompatible practices of data discovery and evaluation among users and stakeholders; and a preponderance of local variations in the implementation of standards and authentication in data access. These issues are characterized by their

  14. Architecture & Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  15. 31 CFR 1023.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers in securities. 1023.520... Special Information Sharing Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1023.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers...

  16. 31 CFR 1023.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers in securities. 1023.520... Special Information Sharing Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1023.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers...

  17. 31 CFR 1023.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers in securities. 1023.520... Special Information Sharing Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1023.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers...

  18. 31 CFR 1023.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers in securities. 1023.520... Special Information Sharing Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1023.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers...

  19. 17 CFR 400.4 - Information concerning associated persons of financial institutions that are government...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... regulatory agency for such financial institution, a statement correcting such information. (c) For the... associated persons of financial institutions that are government securities brokers or dealers. 400.4 Section... associated persons of financial institutions that are government securities brokers or dealers. (a)...

  20. 29 CFR 2580.412-22 - Interests held in agents, brokers and surety companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY BONDING RULES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME... company, or through any agent or broker in whose business operations a plan or any party in interest in...

  1. Project Integration Architecture: Distributed Lock Management, Deadlock Detection, and Set Iteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    The migration of the Project Integration Architecture (PIA) to the distributed object environment of the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) brings with it the nearly unavoidable requirements of multiaccessor, asynchronous operations. In order to maintain the integrity of data structures in such an environment, it is necessary to provide a locking mechanism capable of protecting the complex operations typical of the PIA architecture. This paper reports on the implementation of a locking mechanism to treat that need. Additionally, the ancillary features necessary to make the distributed lock mechanism work are discussed.

  2. Project Integration Architecture: Implementation of the CORBA-Served Application Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) has been demonstrated in a single-machine C++ implementation prototype. The architecture is in the process of being migrated to a Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) implementation. The migration of the Foundation Layer interfaces is fundamentally complete. The implementation of the Application Layer infrastructure for that migration is reported. The Application Layer provides for distributed user identification and authentication, per-user/per-instance access controls, server administration, the formation of mutually-trusting application servers, a server locality protocol, and an ability to search for interface implementations through such trusted server networks.

  3. Green Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Ho

    Today, the environment has become a main subject in lots of science disciplines and the industrial development due to the global warming. This paper presents the analysis of the tendency of Green Architecture in France on the threes axes: Regulations and Approach for the Sustainable Architecture (Certificate and Standard), Renewable Materials (Green Materials) and Strategies (Equipments) of Sustainable Technology. The definition of 'Green Architecture' will be cited in the introduction and the question of the interdisciplinary for the technological development in 'Green Architecture' will be raised up in the conclusion.

  4. Architecture of Chinese Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Chen-Zhou; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2004-06-01

    Virtual Observatory (VO) is brought forward under the background of progresses of astronomical technologies and information technologies. VO architecture design embodies the combination of above two technologies. As an introduction of VO, principle and workflow of Virtual Observatory are given firstly. Then the latest progress on VO architecture is introduced. Based on the Grid technology, layered architecture model and service-oriented architecture model are given for Chinese Virtual Observatory. In the last part of the paper, some problems on architecture design are discussed in detail.

  5. a Virtual Hub Brokering Approach for Integration of Historical and Modern Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, N.; Previtali, M.; Barazzetti, L.; Brumana, R.; Roncella, R.

    2016-06-01

    Geospatial data are today more and more widespread. Many different institutions, such as Geographical Institutes, Public Administrations, collaborative communities (e.g., OSM) and web companies, make available nowadays a large number of maps. Besides this cartography, projects of digitizing, georeferencing and web publication of historical maps have increasingly spread in the recent years. In spite of these variety and availability of data, information overload makes difficult their discovery and management: without knowing the specific repository where the data are stored, it is difficult to find the information required and problems of interconnection between different data sources and their restricted interoperability limit a wide utilization of available geo-data. This paper aims to describe some actions performed to assure interoperability between data, in particular spatial and geographic data, gathered from different data providers, with different features and referring to different historical periods. The article summarizes and exemplifies how, starting from projects of historical map digitizing and Historical GIS implementation, respectively for the Lombardy and for the city of Parma, the interoperability is possible in the framework of the ENERGIC OD project. The European project ENERGIC OD, thanks to a specific component - the virtual hub - based on a brokering framework, copes with the previous listed problems and allows the interoperability between different data sources.

  6. 17 CFR 21.02 - Special calls for information on open contracts in accounts carried or introduced by futures...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special calls for information on open contracts in accounts carried or introduced by futures commission merchants, clearing members, members of reporting markets, introducing brokers, and foreign brokers. 21.02 Section 21.02 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY...

  7. 26 CFR 1.6045-3 - Information reporting for an acquisition of control or a substantial change in capital structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the same transaction, the broker may satisfy the requirements of both sections by filing and... customer in a corporation that the broker knows or has reason to know based on readily available... information with respect to the customer, unless the customer is an exempt recipient as defined in...

  8. Pacific Missile Test Center Information Resources Management Organization (code 0300): The ORACLE client-server and distributed processing architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Beckwith, A. L.; Phillips, J. T.

    1990-06-10

    Computing architectures using distributed processing and distributed databases are increasingly becoming considered acceptable solutions for advanced data processing systems. This is occurring even though there is still considerable professional debate as to what truly'' distributed computing actually is and despite the relative lack of advanced relational database management software (RDBMS) capable of meeting database and system integrity requirements for developing reliable integrated systems. This study investigates the functionally of ORACLE data base management software that is performing distributed processing between a MicroVAX/VMS minicomputer and three MS-DOS-based microcomputers. The ORACLE database resides on the MicroVAX and is accessed from the microcomputers with ORACLE SQL*NET, DECnet, and ORACLE PC TOOL PACKS. Data gathered during the study reveals that there is a demonstrable decrease in CPU demand on the MicroVAX, due to distributed processing'', when the ORACLE PC Tools are used to access the database as opposed to database access from dumb'' terminals. Also discovered were several hardware/software constraints that must be considered in implementing various software modules. The results of the study indicate that this distributed data processing architecture is becoming sufficiently mature, reliable, and should be considered for developing applications that reduce processing on central hosts. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  9. The Italian Cloud-based brokering Infrastructure to sustain Interoperability for Operative Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, E.; Pecora, S.; Bussettini, M.; Bordini, F.; Nativi, S.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents the informatics platform carried out to implement the National Hydrological Operative Information System of Italy. In particular, the presentation will focus on the governing aspects of the cloud infrastructure and brokering software that make possible to sustain the hydrology data flow between heterogeneous user clients and data providers.The Institute for Environmental Protection and Research, ISPRA (Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale) in collaboration with the Regional Agency for Environmental Protection in the Emilia-Romagna region, ARPA-ER (Agenzia Regionale per la Prevenzione e l´Ambiente dell´Emilia-Romagna) and CNR-IIA (National Research Council of Italy) designed and developed an innovative platform for the discovery and access of hydrological data coming from 19 Italian administrative regions and 2 Italian autonomous provinces, in near real time. ISPRA has deployed and governs such a system. The presentation will introduce and discuss the technological barriers for interoperability as well as social and policy ones. The adopted solutions will be described outlining the sustainability challenges and benefits.

  10. Discovering Physical Samples Through Identifiers, Metadata, and Brokering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arctur, D. K.; Hills, D. J.; Jenkyns, R.

    2015-12-01

    Physical samples, particularly in the geosciences, are key to understanding the Earth system, its history, and its evolution. Our record of the Earth as captured by physical samples is difficult to explain and mine for understanding, due to incomplete, disconnected, and evolving metadata content. This is further complicated by differing ways of classifying, cataloguing, publishing, and searching the metadata, especially when specimens do not fit neatly into a single domain—for example, fossils cross disciplinary boundaries (mineral and biological). Sometimes even the fundamental classification systems evolve, such as the geological time scale, triggering daunting processes to update existing specimen databases. Increasingly, we need to consider ways of leveraging permanent, unique identifiers, as well as advancements in metadata publishing that link digital records with physical samples in a robust, adaptive way. An NSF EarthCube Research Coordination Network (RCN) called the Internet of Samples (iSamples) is now working to bridge the metadata schemas for biological and geological domains. We are leveraging the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) that provides a versatile system of registering physical samples, and working to harmonize this with the DataCite schema for Digital Object Identifiers (DOI). A brokering approach for linking disparate catalogues and classification systems could help scale discovery and access to the many large collections now being managed (sometimes millions of specimens per collection). This presentation is about our community building efforts, research directions, and insights to date.

  11. Cool Apps: Building Cryospheric Data Applications With Standards-Based Service Oriented Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, J. A.; Truslove, I.; Billingsley, B. W.; Oldenburg, J.; Brodzik, M.; Lewis, S.; Liu, M.

    2012-12-01

    The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) holds a large collection of cryospheric data, and is involved in a number of informatics research and development projects aimed at improving the discoverability and accessibility of these data. To develop high-quality software in a timely manner, we have adopted a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach for our core technical infrastructure development. Data services at NSIDC are internally exposed to other tools and applications through standards-based service interfaces. These standards include OAI-PMH (Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting), various OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) standards including WMS (Web Map Service) and WFS (Web Feature Service), ESIP (Federation of Earth Sciences Information Partners) OpenSearch, and NSIDC-specific RESTful services. By taking a standards-based approach, we are able to use off-the-shelf tools and libraries to consume, translate and broker these data services, and thus develop applications faster. Additionally, by exposing public interfaces to these services we provide valuable data services to technical collaborators; for example, NASA Reverb (http://reverb.echo.nasa.gov) uses NSIDC's WMS services. Our latest generation of web applications consume these data services directly. The most complete example of this is the Operation IceBridge Data Portal (http://nsidc.org/icebridge/portal) which depends on many of the aforementioned services, and clearly exhibits many of the advantages of building applications atop a service-oriented architecture. This presentation outlines the architectural approach and components and open standards and protocols adopted at NSIDC, demonstrates the interactions and uses of public and internal service interfaces currently powering applications including the IceBridge Data Portal, and outlines the benefits and challenges of this approach.

  12. Measurement equivalence of the language-brokering scale for Chinese American adolescents and their parents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Yeong; Wang, Yijie; Weaver, Scott R; Shen, Yishan; Wu-Seibold, Nina; Liu, Cindy H

    2014-04-01

    Language brokering occurs frequently in immigrant families. Using data from 279 Chinese American families with adolescents who function as language brokers for their parents, the current study developed a comprehensive scale to assess adolescents' and their parents' perceptions of language brokering. Both versions, parent and adolescent, showed stable factor structures. We also examined measurement equivalence, including factorial and construct-validity invariance, for each subscale across parent gender, adolescent gender, adolescent nativity, and translation frequency. In general, metric factorial invariance was observed for most subscales across the different groups; these subscales can thus be used in future studies examining the relations between language brokering and other variables. Further, two adolescent subscales (i.e., adolescent-focused burden, positive relations with parents) and three parent subscales (i.e., parent-focused burden, negative feelings, positive relations with child) demonstrated strong factorial invariance consistently across different groups, and can thus be used in future studies examining mean group differences in language-brokering experiences. In terms of construct-validity equivalence, most subscales were associated with parent-child conflict and adolescent depressive symptoms to a similar degree across parent gender, adolescent gender, and nativity. Implications of the current findings and recommendations for future use are discussed. PMID:24588602

  13. Vegetation species composition and canopy architecture information expressed in leaf water absorption measured in the 1000 nm and 2200 spectral region by an imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Roberts, Dar A.

    1995-01-01

    Plant species composition and plant architectural attributes are critical parameters required for the measuring, monitoring, and modeling of terrestrial ecosystems. Remote sensing is commonly cited as an important tool for deriving vegetation properties at an appropriate scale for ecosystem studies, ranging from local to regional and even synoptic scales. Classical approaches rely on vegetation indices such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to estimate biophysical parameters such as leaf area index or intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR). Another approach is to apply a variety of classification schemes to map vegetation and thus extrapolate fine-scale information about specific sites to larger areas of similar composition. Imaging spectrometry provides additional information that is not obtainable through broad-band sensors and that may provide improved inputs both to direct biophysical estimates as well as classification schemes. Some of this capability has been demonstrated through improved discrimination of vegetation, estimates of canopy biochemistry, and liquid water estimates from vegetation. We investigate further the potential of leaf water absorption estimated from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data as a means for discriminating vegetation types and deriving canopy architectural information. We expand our analysis to incorporate liquid water estimates from two spectral regions, the 1000-nm region and the 2200-nm region. The study was conducted in the vicinity of Jasper Ridge, California, which is located on the San Francisco peninsula to the west of the Stanford University campus. AVIRIS data were acquired over Jasper Ridge, CA, on June 2, 1992, at 19:31 UTC. Spectra from three sites in this image were analyzed. These data are from an area of healthy grass, oak woodland, and redwood forest, respectively. For these analyses, the AVIRIS-measured upwelling radiance spectra for the entire Jasper

  14. PICNIC Architecture.

    PubMed

    Saranummi, Niilo

    2005-01-01

    The PICNIC architecture aims at supporting inter-enterprise integration and the facilitation of collaboration between healthcare organisations. The concept of a Regional Health Economy (RHE) is introduced to illustrate the varying nature of inter-enterprise collaboration between healthcare organisations collaborating in providing health services to citizens and patients in a regional setting. The PICNIC architecture comprises a number of PICNIC IT Services, the interfaces between them and presents a way to assemble these into a functioning Regional Health Care Network meeting the needs and concerns of its stakeholders. The PICNIC architecture is presented through a number of views relevant to different stakeholder groups. The stakeholders of the first view are national and regional health authorities and policy makers. The view describes how the architecture enables the implementation of national and regional health policies, strategies and organisational structures. The stakeholders of the second view, the service viewpoint, are the care providers, health professionals, patients and citizens. The view describes how the architecture supports and enables regional care delivery and process management including continuity of care (shared care) and citizen-centred health services. The stakeholders of the third view, the engineering view, are those that design, build and implement the RHCN. The view comprises four sub views: software engineering, IT services engineering, security and data. The proposed architecture is founded into the main stream of how distributed computing environments are evolving. The architecture is realised using the web services approach. A number of well established technology platforms and generic standards exist that can be used to implement the software components. The software components that are specified in PICNIC are implemented in Open Source. PMID:16160218

  15. 17 CFR 240.17a-23 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-dealer trading system or other automated means, including, but not limited to, notices addressing hours... requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems. 240.17a-23 Section 240.17a-23 Commodity and Securities... relating to broker-dealer trading systems. (a) Scope of section. This section shall apply to any...

  16. 17 CFR 240.17a-23 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-dealer trading system or other automated means, including, but not limited to, notices addressing hours... requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems. 240.17a-23 Section 240.17a-23 Commodity and Securities... relating to broker-dealer trading systems. (a) Scope of section. This section shall apply to any...

  17. 17 CFR 240.17a-23 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-dealer trading system or other automated means, including, but not limited to, notices addressing hours... requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems. 240.17a-23 Section 240.17a-23 Commodity and Securities... relating to broker-dealer trading systems. (a) Scope of section. This section shall apply to any...

  18. 17 CFR 240.17a-23 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-dealer trading system or other automated means, including, but not limited to, notices addressing hours... requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems. 240.17a-23 Section 240.17a-23 Commodity and Securities... relating to broker-dealer trading systems. (a) Scope of section. This section shall apply to any...

  19. 76 FR 22912 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, DHS. ACTION: General notice... 111.51(a), the following individual Customs broker licenses and any and all permits have...

  20. 77 FR 16249 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland... Federal Regulations at section 111.51(a), the following individual Customs broker licenses and any and...