Science.gov

Sample records for information brokering architecture

  1. Agent-Oriented Privacy-Based Information Brokering Architecture for Healthcare Environments

    PubMed Central

    Masaud-Wahaishi, Abdulmutalib; Ghenniwa, Hamada

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare industry is facing a major reform at all levels—locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally. Healthcare services and systems become very complex and comprise of a vast number of components (software systems, doctors, patients, etc.) that are characterized by shared, distributed and heterogeneous information sources with varieties of clinical and other settings. The challenge now faced with decision making, and management of care is to operate effectively in order to meet the information needs of healthcare personnel. Currently, researchers, developers, and systems engineers are working toward achieving better efficiency and quality of service in various sectors of healthcare, such as hospital management, patient care, and treatment. This paper presents a novel information brokering architecture that supports privacy-based information gathering in healthcare. Architecturally, the brokering is viewed as a layer of services where a brokering service is modeled as an agent with a specific architecture and interaction protocol that are appropriate to serve various requests. Within the context of brokering, we model privacy in terms of the entities ability to hide or reveal information related to its identities, requests, and/or capabilities. A prototype of the proposed architecture has been implemented to support information-gathering capabilities in healthcare environments using FIPA-complaint platform JADE. PMID:19325918

  2. Certification for Information Brokers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Deborah C.

    1995-01-01

    The future of the information broker business depends on certification. Some obstacles are lack of commonality, control, a professional title, and time. Core competencies (ethics, professional conduct, and client care) and specialties could determine certification criteria, and a grace period for phasing in established brokers could be initiated.…

  3. Bandwidth broker architecture for VoIP QoS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keith; Mouchtaris, Petros; Samtani, Sunil; Talpade, Rajesh; Wong, Larry

    2001-07-01

    We present a scalable architecture for assuring Quality of Service to VoIP applications in an Internet Service Provider's network. This architecture is based on the Differentiated Services and Bandwidth Broker models, and can also be used by other resource-sensitive applications. In this paper, we elaborate on a number of significant issues involved in the design, implementation, deployment and use of the Bandwidth Broker. The Call Agent architecture is used as the VoIP application. We describe the Bandwidth Broker prototype that is used to validate our approach. Our findings suggest that it is feasible to use the Bandwidth Broker architecture for assuring QoS, and a trade-off exists between the granularity of resource requests and call-setup delay.

  4. Resource brokering service: timely and efficient information resource allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hook, Daniel J.; Ljungberg, Magnus; Shaw, Robert; Ford, Mark; Aubin, Ethan; Konieczny, Eric; Lee, Daniel H.; Brown, Samuel T.

    2010-04-01

    We address supporting unanticipated users and uses of limited information resources (sensors, databases, weapons - any resource intrinsically tied to digital information) in a timely and efficient fashion. Platform-centric systems often preclude users and uses not identified when the system was developed and deployed. Net-centric approaches, however, can address these problems by allowing services and information to be discovered and accessed at run-time. We have developed a resource brokering service that uses net-centric principles and semantic metadata to enable multi-domain information and resource sharing and support for unanticipated users and uses. The resource brokering service uses federated brokering agents and a modular software component framework for dynamically composing and tasking heterogeneous resources including sensors, data feeds, processors, archived data, networks, and even analysts into resilient, mission-oriented workflows. The resource brokering service is applicable to multiple sense-decide-act military domains including missile defense, space situation awareness, ISR, border protection, and cyber defense. In this paper we present a concept and architecture for resource brokering and describe current applications. Our architecture is aligned with the U.S. DoD's NCES (Net-Centric Enterprise Services).

  5. Information Brokers in Victoria: Doing What, for Whom and How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Marianne; Kelson, Deborah

    1984-01-01

    Reports findings of study of information brokers in Victoria, Australia, which identified services offered by individual brokers and information brokerage businesses, resources used to provide those services, their clientele and pricing strategies, the attributes needed for a successful broker, and relationships between brokers and traditional…

  6. Information broker: a useless overhead or a necessity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitan, Jacek

    1996-01-01

    The richness and diversity of information available over the Internet, its size, convenience of access, and its dynamic growth will create new ways to offer better education opportunities in medicine. The Internet will especially benefit medical training process that is expensive and requires continuous updating. The use of the Internet will lower the delivery cost and make medical information available to all potential users. On the other hand, since medical information must be trusted and new policies must be developed to support these capabilities, technologies alone are not enough. In general, we must deal with issues of liability, remuneration for educational and professional services, and general issues of ethics associated with patient-physician relationship in a complicated environment created by a mix of managed and private care combined with modern information technology. In this paper we will focus only on the need to create, to manage and to operate open system over the Internet, or similar low-cost and easy access networks, for the purpose of medical education process. Finally, using business analysis, we argue why the medical education infrastructure needs an information broker, a third party organization that will help the users to access the information and the publishers to display their titles. The first section outlines recent trends in medical education. In the second section, we discuss transfusion medicine requirements. In the third section we provide a summary of the American Red Cross (ARC) transfusion audit system; we discuss the relevance of the assumptions used in this system to other areas of medicine. In the fourth section we describe the overall system architecture and discuss key components. The fifth section covers business issues associated with medical education systems and with the potential role of ARC in particular. The last section provides a summary of findings.

  7. QoS enabled dissemination of managed information objects in a publish-subscribe-query information broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyall, Joseph P.; Carvalho, Marco; Martignoni, Andrew, III; Schmidt, Douglas; Sinclair, Asher; Gillen, Matthew; Edmondson, James; Bunch, Larry; Corman, David

    2009-05-01

    Net-centric information spaces have become a necessary concept to support information exchange for tactical warfighting missions using a publish-subscribe-query paradigm. To support dynamic, mission-critical and time-critical operations, information spaces require quality of service (QoS)-enabled dissemination (QED) of information. This paper describes the results of research we are conducting to provide QED information exchange in tactical environments. We have developed a prototype QoS-enabled publish-subscribe-query information broker that provides timely delivery of information needed by tactical warfighters in mobile scenarios with time-critical emergent targets. This broker enables tailoring and prioritizing of information based on mission needs and responds rapidly to priority shifts and unfolding situations. This paper describes the QED architecture, prototype implementation, testing infrastructure, and empirical evaluations we have conducted based on our prototype.

  8. RSVP as a user signaling protocol in a multilayer bandwidth broker architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolouzou, Eugenia; Tsetsekas, Charilaos; Maniatis, Sotirios; Venieris, Iakovos S.

    2001-07-01

    A lot of research efforts have recently focused on RSVP and the DiffServ architecture to provide end-to-end Quality of Service in the Internet. This paper presents a multi-layer bandwidth broker architecture, based on the DiffServ paradigm that uses RSVP as a user signaling protocol. The paper describes the necessary operations performed to support RSVP, both in terms of the architecture (functionality) and in terms of QoS management (mapping of the traffic descriptors of RSVP and the new architecture). The purpose is to step into design and implementation details that are not covered by RFCs, and to explain in brief what are the actual design decisions adopted by the authors.

  9. 26 CFR 1.6045-1T - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary). 1.6045-1T Section 1.6045-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6045-1T Returns of information of brokers...

  10. 26 CFR 1.6045-1 - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges. 1.6045-1 Section 1.6045-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6045-1 Returns of information of brokers and barter...

  11. 75 FR 67094 - Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security... concerning the: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers (19 CFR Part 111). This request for comment...

  12. 78 FR 76851 - Agency Information Collection Activities: BP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: BP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland... requirement concerning the CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers (19 CFR Part 111). This request...

  13. The Use of an Information Brokering Tool in an Electronic Museum Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Andreas; Lorenz, Andreas; Specht, Marcus

    When art and technology meet, a huge information flow has to be managed. The LISTEN project conducted by the Fraunhofer Institut in St. Augustin (Germany) augments every day environments with audio information. In order to distribute and administer this information in an efficient way, the Institute decided to employ an information brokering tool…

  14. Health Information Brokers in the General Population: An Analysis of the Health Information National Trends Survey 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Kathleen M; Agunwamba, Amenah A; Valluri, Sruthi; Wilson, Patrick M; Sadasivam, Rajani S; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2016-01-01

    Background Health information exchanged between friends or family members can influence decision making, both for routine health questions and for serious health issues. A health information broker is a person to whom friends and family turn for advice or information on health-related topics. Characteristics and online behaviors of health information brokers have not previously been studied in a national population. Objective The objective of this study was to examine sociodemographic characteristics, health information seeking behaviors, and other online behaviors among health information brokers. Methods Data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (2013-2014; n=3142) were used to compare brokers with nonbrokers. Modified Poisson regression was used to examine the relationship between broker status and sociodemographics and online information seeking. Results Over half (54.8%) of the respondents were consulted by family or friends for advice or information on health topics (ie, they acted as health information brokers). Brokers represented 54.1% of respondents earning <$20,000 yearly and 56.5% of respondents born outside the United States. Women were more likely to be brokers (PR 1.34, 95% CI 1.23-1.47) as were those with education past high school (PR 1.42, CI 1.22-1.65). People aged ≥75 were less likely to be brokers as compared to respondents aged 35-49 (PR 0.81, CI 0.67-0.99). Brokers used the Internet more frequently for a variety of online behaviors such as seeking health information, creating and sharing online content, and downloading health information onto a mobile device; and also reported greater confidence in obtaining health information online. Conclusions More than 50% of adults who responded to this national survey, including those with low income and those born abroad, were providing health information or advice to friends and family. These individuals may prove to be effective targets for initiatives supporting patient engagement

  15. Information systems definition architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Calapristi, A.J.

    1996-06-20

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Systems Definition architecture evaluated information Management (IM) processes in several key organizations. The intent of the study is to identify improvements in TWRS IM processes that will enable better support to the TWRS mission, and accommodate changes in TWRS business environment. The ultimate goals of the study are to reduce IM costs, Manage the configuration of TWRS IM elements, and improve IM-related process performance.

  16. 17 CFR 240.17a-25 - Electronic submission of securities transaction information by exchange members, brokers, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... interested, such member, broker or dealer shall submit the following information: (i) Clearing house number, or alpha symbol of the member, broker, or dealer submitting the information; (ii) Clearing house... transaction was a purchase, sale, or short sale; and, if an options contract, whether open long or short...

  17. Information architecture. Volume 3: Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this document, as presented in Volume 1, The Foundations, is to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and promulgating information architecture guidance. This guidance is aimed at increasing the development of information architecture as a Departmentwide management best practice. This document describes departmental information architecture principles and minimum design characteristics for systems and infrastructures within the DOE Information Architecture Conceptual Model, and establishes a Departmentwide standards-based architecture program. The publication of this document fulfills the commitment to address guiding principles, promote standard architectural practices, and provide technical guidance. This document guides the transition from the baseline or defacto Departmental architecture through approved information management program plans and budgets to the future vision architecture. This document also represents another major step toward establishing a well-organized, logical foundation for the DOE information architecture.

  18. 77 FR 20686 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collections: Two DDTC Brokering Collections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... comment on December 19, 2011 (see 76 FR 78578). On that occasion, public comment was sought in the context... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collections: Two DDTC Brokering Collections ACTION: Notice of request...

  19. 76 FR 163 - Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... Register (75 FR 67094) on November 1, 2010, allowing for a 60-day comment period. This notice allows for an... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland...

  20. 78 FR 78375 - Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers Correction In notice document 2013-30220 appearing on page 76851 of the issue of Thursday, December 19, 2013, make...

  1. The NASA Integrated Information Technology Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldridge, Tim

    1997-01-01

    of IT systems, 3) the Technical Architecture: a common, vendor-independent framework for design, integration and implementation of IT systems and 4) the Product Architecture: vendor=specific IT solutions. The Systems Architecture is effectively a description of the end-user "requirements". Generalized end-user requirements are discussed and subsequently organized into specific mission and project functions. The Technical Architecture depicts the framework, and relationship, of the specific IT components that enable the end-user functionality as described in the Systems Architecture. The primary components as described in the Technical Architecture are: 1) Applications: Basic Client Component, Object Creation Applications, Collaborative Applications, Object Analysis Applications, 2) Services: Messaging, Information Broker, Collaboration, Distributed Processing, and 3) Infrastructure: Network, Security, Directory, Certificate Management, Enterprise Management and File System. This Architecture also provides specific Implementation Recommendations, the most significant of which is the recognition of IT as core to NASA activities and defines a plan, which is aligned with the NASA strategic planning processes, for keeping the Architecture alive and useful.

  2. Ensuring consistency and persistence to the Quality Information Model - The role of the GeoViQua Broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigagli, Lorenzo; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Nativi, Stefano; Bastin, Lucy; Masó, Joan

    2013-04-01

    a few products are annotated with their PID; recent studies show that on a total of about 100000 Clearinghouse products, only 37 have the Product Identifier. Furthermore the association should be persistent within the GeoViQua scope. GeoViQua architecture is built on the brokering approach successfully experimented within the EuroGEOSS project and realized by the GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker). Part of the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI), the GEO DAB allows for harmonization and distribution in a transparent way for both users and data providers. This way, GeoViQua can effectively complement and extend the GEO DAB obtaining a Quality-augmentation broker (GeoViQua Broker) which plays a central role in ensuring the consistency of the Producer and User quality models. This work is focused on the typical use case in which the GeoViQua Broker performs data discovery from different data providers, and then integrates in the Quality Information Model the producer quality report with the feedback given by users. In particular, this work highlights the problems faced by the GeoViQua Broker and the techniques adopted to ensure consistency and persistency also for quality reports whose target products are not annotated with a PID. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement n° 265178.

  3. Dynamic Information Architecture System

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, John

    1997-02-12

    The Dynamic Information System (DIAS) is a flexible object-based software framework for concurrent, multidiscplinary modeling of arbitrary (but related) processes. These processes are modeled as interrelated actions caused by and affecting the collection of diverse real-world objects represented in a simulation. The DIAS architecture allows independent process models to work together harmoniously in the same frame of reference and provides a wide range of data ingestion and output capabilities, including Geographic Information System (GIS) type map-based displays and photorealistic visualization of simulations in progress. In the DIAS implementation of the object-based approach, software objects carry within them not only the data which describe their static characteristics, but also the methods, or functions, which describe their dynamic behaviors. There are two categories of objects: (1) Entity objects which have real-world counterparts and are the actors in a simulation, and (2) Software infrastructure objects which make it possible to carry out the simulations. The Entity objects contain lists of Aspect objects, each of which addresses a single aspect of the Entity''s behavior. For example, a DIAS Stream Entity representing a section of a river can have many aspects correspondimg to its behavior in terms of hydrology (as a drainage system component), navigation (as a link in a waterborne transportation system), meteorology (in terms of moisture, heat, and momentum exchange with the atmospheric boundary layer), and visualization (for photorealistic visualization or map type displays), etc. This makes it possible for each real-world object to exhibit any or all of its unique behaviors within the context of a single simulation.

  4. Dynamic Information Architecture System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-02-12

    The Dynamic Information System (DIAS) is a flexible object-based software framework for concurrent, multidiscplinary modeling of arbitrary (but related) processes. These processes are modeled as interrelated actions caused by and affecting the collection of diverse real-world objects represented in a simulation. The DIAS architecture allows independent process models to work together harmoniously in the same frame of reference and provides a wide range of data ingestion and output capabilities, including Geographic Information System (GIS) typemore » map-based displays and photorealistic visualization of simulations in progress. In the DIAS implementation of the object-based approach, software objects carry within them not only the data which describe their static characteristics, but also the methods, or functions, which describe their dynamic behaviors. There are two categories of objects: (1) Entity objects which have real-world counterparts and are the actors in a simulation, and (2) Software infrastructure objects which make it possible to carry out the simulations. The Entity objects contain lists of Aspect objects, each of which addresses a single aspect of the Entity''s behavior. For example, a DIAS Stream Entity representing a section of a river can have many aspects correspondimg to its behavior in terms of hydrology (as a drainage system component), navigation (as a link in a waterborne transportation system), meteorology (in terms of moisture, heat, and momentum exchange with the atmospheric boundary layer), and visualization (for photorealistic visualization or map type displays), etc. This makes it possible for each real-world object to exhibit any or all of its unique behaviors within the context of a single simulation.« less

  5. The DIAS/CEOS Water Portal, distributed system using brokering architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Satoko; Sekioka, Shinichi; Kuroiwa, Kaori; Kudo, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    The DIAS/CEOS Water Portal is a one of the DIAS (Data Integration and Analysis System, http://www.editoria.u-tokyo.ac.jp/projects/dias/?locale=en_US) systems for data distribution for users including, but not limited to, scientists, decision makers and officers like river administrators. This portal has two main functions; one is to search and access data and the other is to register and share use cases which use datasets provided via this portal. This presentation focuses on the first function, to search and access data. The Portal system is distributed in the sense that, while the portal system is located in Tokyo, the data is located in archive centers which are globally distributed. For example, some in-situ data is archived at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, USA. The NWP station time series and global gridded model output data is archived at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPIM) in cooperation with the World Data Center for Climate in Hamburg, Germany. Part of satellite data is archived at DIAS storage at the University of Tokyo, Japan. This portal itself does not store data. Instead, according to requests made by users on the web page, it retrieves data from distributed data centers on-the-fly and lets them download and see rendered images/plots. Although some data centers have unique meta data format and/or data search protocols, our portal's brokering function enables users to search across various data centers at one time, like one-stop shopping. And this portal is also connected to other data brokering systems, including GEOSS DAB (Discovery and Access Broker). As a result, users can search over thousands of datasets, millions of files at one time. Our system mainly relies on the open source software GI-cat (http://essi-lab.eu/do/view/GIcat), Opensearch protocol and OPeNDAP protocol to enable the above functions. Details on how it works will be introduced during the

  6. Secure and Privacy-Preserving Distributed Information Brokering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Fengjun

    2010-01-01

    As enormous structured, semi-structured and unstructured data are collected and archived by organizations in many realms ranging from business to health networks to government agencies, the needs for efficient yet secure inter-organization information sharing naturally arise. Unlike early information sharing approaches that only involve a small…

  7. Integrating hospital information systems in healthcare institutions: a mediation architecture.

    PubMed

    El Azami, Ikram; Cherkaoui Malki, Mohammed Ouçamah; Tahon, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Many studies have examined the integration of information systems into healthcare institutions, leading to several standards in the healthcare domain (CORBAmed: Common Object Request Broker Architecture in Medicine; HL7: Health Level Seven International; DICOM: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine; and IHE: Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise). Due to the existence of a wide diversity of heterogeneous systems, three essential factors are necessary to fully integrate a system: data, functions and workflow. However, most of the previous studies have dealt with only one or two of these factors and this makes the system integration unsatisfactory. In this paper, we propose a flexible, scalable architecture for Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Our main purpose is to provide a practical solution to insure HIS interoperability so that healthcare institutions can communicate without being obliged to change their local information systems and without altering the tasks of the healthcare professionals. Our architecture is a mediation architecture with 3 levels: 1) a database level, 2) a middleware level and 3) a user interface level. The mediation is based on two central components: the Mediator and the Adapter. Using the XML format allows us to establish a structured, secured exchange of healthcare data. The notion of medical ontology is introduced to solve semantic conflicts and to unify the language used for the exchange. Our mediation architecture provides an effective, promising model that promotes the integration of hospital information systems that are autonomous, heterogeneous, semantically interoperable and platform-independent. PMID:22086739

  8. Knowledge brokers, companions, and navigators: a qualitative examination of informal caregivers’ roles in medical tourism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many studies examining the phenomena of medical tourism have identified health equity issues associated with this global health services practice. However, there is a notable lack of attention in this existing research to the informal care provided by the friends and family members who typically accompany medical tourists abroad. To date, researchers have not examined the care roles filled by informal caregivers travelling with medical tourists. In this article, we fill this gap by examining these informal caregivers and the roles they take on towards supporting medical tourists’ health and wellbeing. Methods We conducted 21 interviews with International Patient Coordinators (IPCs) working at medical tourism hospitals across ten countries. IPCs work closely with informal caregivers as providers of non-medical personal assistance, and can therefore offer broad insight on caregiver roles. The interviews were coded and analyzed thematically. Results Three roles emerged: knowledge broker, companion, and navigator. As knowledge brokers, caregivers facilitate the transfer of information between the medical tourist and formal health care providers as well as other staff members at medical tourism facilities. The companion role involves providing medical tourists with physical and emotional care. Meanwhile, responsibilities associated with handling documents and coordinating often complex journeys are part of the navigation role. Conclusions This is the first study to examine informal caregiving roles in medical tourism. Many of the roles identified are similar to those of conventional informal caregivers while others are specific to the transnational context. We conclude that these roles make informal caregivers an integral part of the larger phenomenon of medical tourism. We further contend that examining the roles taken on by a heretofore-unconsidered medical tourism stakeholder group sheds valuable insight into how this industry operates and that such

  9. Virtual management of radiology examinations in the virtual radiology environment using common object request broker architecture services.

    PubMed

    Martinez, R; Rozenblit, J; Cook, J F; Chacko, A K; Timboe, H L

    1999-05-01

    In the Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Medical Command is now embarking on an extremely exciting new project--creating a virtual radiology environment (VRE) for the management of radiology examinations. The business of radiology in the military is therefore being reengineered on several fronts by the VRE Project. In the VRE Project, a set of intelligent agent algorithms determine where examinations are to routed for reading bases on a knowledge base of the entire VRE. The set of algorithms, called the Meta-Manager, is hierarchical and uses object-based communications between medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and medical centers that have digital imaging network picture archiving and communications systems (DIN-PACS) networks. The communications is based on use of common object request broker architecture (CORBA) objects and services to send patient demographics and examination images from DIN-PACS networks in the MTFs to the DIN-PACS networks at the medical centers for diagnosis. The Meta-Manager is also responsible for updating the diagnosis at the originating MTF. CORBA services are used to perform secure message communications between DIN-PACS nodes in the VRE network. The Meta-Manager has a fail-safe architecture that allows the master Meta-Manager function to float to regional Meta-Manager sites in case of server failure. A prototype of the CORBA-based Meta-Manager is being developed by the University of Arizona's Computer Engineering Research Laboratory using the unified modeling language (UML) as a design tool. The prototype will implement the main functions described in the Meta-Manager design specification. The results of this project are expected to reengineer the process of radiology in the military and have extensions to commercial radiology environments. PMID:10342205

  10. Risk communication and informed consent in the medical tourism industry: A thematic content analysis of canadian broker websites

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Medical tourism, thought of as patients seeking non-emergency medical care outside of their home countries, is a growing industry worldwide. Canadians are amongst those engaging in medical tourism, and many are helped in the process of accessing care abroad by medical tourism brokers - agents who specialize in making international medical care arrangements for patients. As a key source of information for these patients, brokers are likely to play an important role in communicating the risks and benefits of undergoing surgery or other procedures abroad to their clientele. This raises important ethical concerns regarding processes such as informed consent and the liability of brokers in the event that complications arise from procedures. The purpose of this article is to examine the language, information, and online marketing of Canadian medical tourism brokers' websites in light of such ethical concerns. Methods An exhaustive online search using multiple search engines and keywords was performed to compile a comprehensive directory of English-language Canadian medical tourism brokerage websites. These websites were examined using thematic content analysis, which included identifying informational themes, generating frequency counts of these themes, and comparing trends in these counts to the established literature. Results Seventeen websites were identified for inclusion in this study. It was found that Canadian medical tourism broker websites varied widely in scope, content, professionalism and depth of information. Three themes emerged from the thematic content analysis: training and accreditation, risk communication, and business dimensions. Third party accreditation bodies of debatable regulatory value were regularly mentioned on the reviewed websites, and discussion of surgical risk was absent on 47% of the websites reviewed, with limited discussion of risk on the remaining ones. Terminology describing brokers' roles was somewhat inconsistent across

  11. Information architecture. Volume 4: Vision

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Vision document marks the transition from definition to implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture Program. A description of the possibilities for the future, supported by actual experience with a process model and tool set, points toward implementation options. The directions for future information technology investments are discussed. Practical examples of how technology answers the business and information needs of the organization through coordinated and meshed data, applications, and technology architectures are related. This document is the fourth and final volume in the planned series for defining and exhibiting the DOE information architecture. The targeted scope of this document includes DOE Program Offices, field sites, contractor-operated facilities, and laboratories. This document paints a picture of how, over the next 7 years, technology may be implemented, dramatically improving the ways business is conducted at DOE. While technology is mentioned throughout this document, the vision is not about technology. The vision concerns the transition afforded by technology and the process steps to be completed to ensure alignment with business needs. This goal can be met if those directing the changing business and mission-support processes understand the capabilities afforded by architectural processes.

  12. Enterprise Information Architecture for Mission Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutra, Jayne

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept of an information architecture to assist in mission development. The integrate information architecture will create a unified view of the information using metadata and the values (i.e., taxonomy).

  13. Architecture for hospital information integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimiak, William J.; Janariz, Daniel L.; Martinez, Ralph

    1999-07-01

    The ongoing integration of hospital information systems (HIS) continues. Data storage systems, data networks and computers improve, data bases grow and health-care applications increase. Some computer operating systems continue to evolve and some fade. Health care delivery now depends on this computer-assisted environment. The result is the critical harmonization of the various hospital information systems becomes increasingly difficult. The purpose of this paper is to present an architecture for HIS integration that is computer-language-neutral and computer- hardware-neutral for the informatics applications. The proposed architecture builds upon the work done at the University of Arizona on middleware, the work of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, and the American College of Radiology. It is a fresh approach to allowing applications engineers to access medical data easily and thus concentrates on the application techniques in which they are expert without struggling with medical information syntaxes. The HIS can be modeled using a hierarchy of information sub-systems thus facilitating its understanding. The architecture includes the resulting information model along with a strict but intuitive application programming interface, managed by CORBA. The CORBA requirement facilitates interoperability. It should also reduce software and hardware development times.

  14. Common object request broker architecture (CORBA)-based security services for the virtual radiology environment.

    PubMed

    Martinez, R; Cole, C; Rozenblit, J; Cook, J F; Chacko, A K

    2000-05-01

    The US Army Great Plains Regional Medical Command (GPRMC) has a requirement to conform to Department of Defense (DoD) and Army security policies for the Virtual Radiology Environment (VRE) Project. Within the DoD, security policy is defined as the set of laws, rules, and practices that regulate how an organization manages, protects, and distributes sensitive information. Security policy in the DoD is described by the Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria (TCSEC), Army Regulation (AR) 380-19, Defense Information Infrastructure Common Operating Environment (DII COE), Military Health Services System Automated Information Systems Security Policy Manual, and National Computer Security Center-TG-005, "Trusted Network Interpretation." These documents were used to develop a security policy that defines information protection requirements that are made with respect to those laws, rules, and practices that are required to protect the information stored and processed in the VRE Project. The goal of the security policy is to provide for a C2-level of information protection while also satisfying the functional needs of the GPRMC's user community. This report summarizes the security policy for the VRE and defines the CORBA security services that satisfy the policy. In the VRE, the information to be protected is embedded into three major information components: (1) Patient information consists of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-formatted fields. The patient information resides in the digital imaging network picture archiving and communication system (DIN-PACS) networks in the database archive systems and includes (a) patient demographics; (b) patient images from x-ray, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US); and (c) prior patient images and related patient history. (2) Meta-Manager information to be protected consists of several data objects. This information is distributed to the Meta-Manager nodes and

  15. Information architecture. Volume 1, The foundations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The Information Management Planning and Architecture Coordinating Team was formed to establish an information architecture framework to meet DOE`s current and future information needs. This department- wide activity was initiated in accordance with the DOE Information Management Strategic Plan; it also supports the Departmental Strategic Plan. It recognizes recent changes in emphasis as reflected in OMB Circular A-130 and the Information Resources Management Planning Process Improvement Team recommendations. Sections of this document provides the foundation for establishing DOE`s Information Architecture: Background, Business Case (reduced duplication of effort, increased integration of activities, improved operational capabilities), Baseline (technology baseline currently in place within DOE), Vision (guiding principles for future DOE Information Architecture), Standards Process, Policy and Process Integration (describes relations between information architecture and business processes), and Next Steps. Following each section is a scenario. A glossary of terms is provided.

  16. The Architecture of Information at Plateau Beaubourg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branda, Ewan Edward

    2012-01-01

    During the course of the 1960s, computers and information networks made their appearance in the public imagination. To architects on the cusp of architecture's postmodern turn, information technology offered new forms, metaphors, and techniques by which modern architecture's technological and utopian basis could be reasserted. Yet by the…

  17. Architecture and the Information Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Porter; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Traces how technological changes affect the architecture of the workplace. Traces these effects from the industrial revolution up through the computer revolution. Offers suggested designs for the computerized office of today and tomorrow. (JM)

  18. Participants’ perceptions of a knowledge-brokering strategy to facilitate evidence-informed policy-making in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence-informed policy-making (EIPM) is optimal when evidence-producers (researchers) and policy developers work collaboratively to ensure the production and use of the best available evidence. This paper examined participants’ perceptions of knowledge-brokering strategies used in the TROPIC (Translational Research in Obesity Prevention in Communities) project to facilitate the use of obesity-related evidence in policy development in Fiji. Method Knowledge-brokers delivered a 12-18 month programme comprising workshops targeting EIPM skills and practical support for developing evidence-informed policy briefs to reduce obesity. The programme was tailored to each of the six participating organizations. Knowledge-brokering strategies included negotiating topics that were aligned to the goals of individual organizations, monitoring and evaluating time-management skills, accommodating other organizational and individual priorities, delivering practical sessions on use of appropriate research tools and supporting individual writing of policy briefs. Two qualitative methods were used to examine individuals’ perceptions of skills obtained, opportunities afforded by the TROPIC project, facilitators and inhibiters to planned policy brief development and suggestions for improved programme delivery. Forty-nine participants completed an electronic word table and then participated in a semi-structured interview. An independent interviewer conducted structured interviews with a high-ranking officer in each organization to examine their perceptions of TROPIC engagement strategies. Data were analyzed descriptively and thematically, with the first author and another experienced qualitative researcher analyzing data sets separately, and then combining analyses. Results Many participants believed that they had increased their skills in acquiring, assessing, adapting and applying evidence, writing policy briefs and presenting evidence-based arguments to higher levels

  19. Seamless integration of data services between spatial information Grid and TeraGrid based on broker-based data management model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yi; Liu, Dingsheng; Li, Guoqing; Yu, Wenyang; Huang, Zhenchun; Song, Carol

    2009-10-01

    Most of the space agencies have built Grid systems to manage large volumes of spatial data archives and products. However, the heterogeneous data structure, the distributed storage location, and the gradual progress of building data service systems, make such spatial grid systems to be grid islands. The broker-based manage model can hide complexity and heterogeneity of spatial data sources, so that the research on broker-based data service is meaningful to promote inter-Grid collaboration for earth observation applications. This paper discusses the special problems of spatial information integration and some features of broker-based data management model. We demonstrate the prototype of building broker-based model to integrate heterogeneous data grid. This work securely provides querying and managing geospatial data and services, and transparent access to the related sources under Grid and Web Service environment. The paper also describe our experiences of case study on seamless integration with Purdue TeraGrid Data by using Storage Resource Broker, which is based on the extensible data service interfaces of China Spatial Information Grid.

  20. A Reference Architecture for Space Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattmann, Chris A.; Crichton, Daniel J.; Hughes, J. Steven; Ramirez, Paul M.; Berrios, Daniel C.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a reference architecture for space information management systems that elegantly overcomes the rigid design of common information systems in many domains. The reference architecture consists of a set of flexible, reusable, independent models and software components that function in unison, but remain separately managed entities. The main guiding principle of the reference architecture is to separate the various models of information (e.g., data, metadata, etc.) from implemented system code, allowing each to evolve independently. System modularity, systems interoperability, and dynamic evolution of information system components are the primary benefits of the design of the architecture. The architecture requires the use of information models that are substantially more advanced than those used by the vast majority of information systems. These models are more expressive and can be more easily modularized, distributed and maintained than simpler models e.g., configuration files and data dictionaries. Our current work focuses on formalizing the architecture within a CCSDS Green Book and evaluating the architecture within the context of the C3I initiative.

  1. 17 CFR 249.617 - Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-17A-5, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form X-17A-5, information... Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of...

  2. 17 CFR 249.617 - Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-17A-5, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Form X-17A-5, information... Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of...

  3. 17 CFR 249.617 - Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-17A-5, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form X-17A-5, information... Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of...

  4. 17 CFR 249.617 - Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-17A-5, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form X-17A-5, information... Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of...

  5. 17 CFR 249.617 - Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-17A-5, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form X-17A-5, information... Form X-17A-5, information required of certain brokers and dealers pursuant to section 17 of...

  6. Information Architecture as Reflected in Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Strand, Linda; Fisher, Nancy; Kneip, Jason; Ayoub, Olga

    2002-01-01

    Explores information architecture curricula at North American universities based on an analysis of 40 course descriptions available on the Web. Academic disciplines related to IA education include library and information science, information technology, business administration, literature, arts, and design as well as continuing education programs.…

  7. The EuroGEOSS Brokering Framework for Multidisciplinary Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.; Craglia, M.; Boldrini, E.; Vaccari, L.; Papeschi, F.; Bigagli, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), envisioned by the group of eight most industrialized countries (G-8) in 2003, provides the indispensable framework to integrate the Earth observation efforts at a global level. The European Commission also contributes to the implementation of the GEOSS through research projects funded from its Framework Programme for Research & Development. The EuroGEOSS (A European Approach to GEOSS) project was launched on May 2009 for a three-year period with the aim of supporting existing Earth Observing systems and applications interoperability and use within the GEOSS and INSPIRE frameworks. EuroGEOSS developed a multidisciplinary interoperability infrastructure for the three strategic areas of Drought, Forestry and Biodiversity; this operating capacity is currently being extended to other scientific domains (i.e. Climate Change, Water, Ocean, Weather, etc.) Central to the multidisciplinary infrastructure is the "EuroGEOSS Brokering Framework", which is based on a Brokered SOA (Service Oriented Architecture) Approach. This approach extends the typical SOA archetype introducing "expert" components: the Brokers. The Brokers provide the mediation and distribution functionalities needed to interconnect the distributed and heterogeneous resources characterizing a System of Systems (SoS) environment. Such a solution addresses significant shortcomings characterizing the present SOA implementations for global frameworks, such as multiple protocols and data models interoperability. Currently, the EuroGEOSS multidisciplinary infrastructure is composed of the following brokering components: 1. The Discovery Broker: providing harmonized discovery functionalities by mediating and distributing user queries against tens of heterogeneous services. 2. The Semantic Discovery Augmentation Component: enhancing the capabilities of the discovery broker with semantic query-expansion. 3. The Data Access Broker: enabling users to seamlessly

  8. Shaping Collective Functions in Privatized Agricultural Knowledge and Information Systems: The Positioning and Embedding of a Network Broker in the Dutch Dairy Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klerkx, Laurens; Leeuwis, Cees

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines new organizational arrangements that have emerged in the context of a privatized extension system. It investigates the positioning and embedding of a network broker aimed at enhancing interaction in the privatized agricultural knowledge and information system (AKIS), to assess whether tensions reported in other sectors also…

  9. Information Architecture: The Data Warehouse Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Charles R.

    1997-01-01

    Colleges and universities are initiating data warehouse projects to provide integrated information for planning and reporting purposes. A survey of 40 institutions with active data warehouse projects reveals the kinds of tools, contents, data cycles, and access currently used. Essential elements of an integrated information architecture are…

  10. Information Architecture: Notes toward a New Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Don

    2002-01-01

    Considers the evolution of information architectures as a field of professional education. Topics include the need for an interdisciplinary approach; balancing practical skills with theoretical concepts; and key content areas, including information organization, graphic design, computer science, user and usability studies, and communication.…

  11. Standardizing the information architecture for spacecraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an information architecture developed for the Space Station Freedom as a model from which to derive an information architecture standard for advanced spacecraft. The information architecture provides a way of making information available across a program, and among programs, assuming that the information will be in a variety of local formats, structures and representations. It provides a format that can be expanded to define all of the physical and logical elements that make up a program, add definitions as required, and import definitions from prior programs to a new program. It allows a spacecraft and its control center to work in different representations and formats, with the potential for supporting existing spacecraft from new control centers. It supports a common view of data and control of all spacecraft, regardless of their own internal view of their data and control characteristics, and of their communications standards, protocols and formats. This information architecture is central to standardizing spacecraft operations, in that it provides a basis for information transfer and translation, such that diverse spacecraft can be monitored and controlled in a common way.

  12. The architecture of enterprise hospital information system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong; Li, Haomin; Zhao, Chenhui; An, Jiye

    2005-01-01

    Because of the complexity of the hospital environment, there exist a lot of medical information systems from different vendors with incompatible structures. In order to establish an enterprise hospital information system, the integration among these heterogeneous systems must be considered. Complete integration should cover three aspects: data integration, function integration and workflow integration. However most of the previous design of architecture did not accomplish such a complete integration. This article offers an architecture design of the enterprise hospital information system based on the concept of digital neural network system in hospital. It covers all three aspects of integration, and eventually achieves the target of one virtual data center with Enterprise Viewer for users of different roles. The initial implementation of the architecture in the 5-year Digital Hospital Project in Huzhou Central hospital of Zhejiang Province is also described. PMID:17281875

  13. An Information Technology Architecture for Pharmaceutical Research and Development

    PubMed Central

    Klingler, Daniel E.; Jaffe, Marvin E.

    1990-01-01

    Rationale for and development of an information technology architecture are presented. The architectural approach described produces a technology environment that is integrating, flexible, robust, productive, and future-oriented. Issues accompanying architecture development and potential impediments to success are discussed.

  14. Information Architecture for the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Louis; Morville, Peter

    This book provides effective approaches for designers, information architects, and web site managers who are faced with sites that are becoming difficult to use and maintain. The book is divided into 10 sections. Chapter 1: "What Makes a Web Site Work" considers site users needs when designing the architecture; Chapter 2: "Introduction to…

  15. Information Architecture for Bilingual Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunliffe, Daniel; Jones, Helen; Jarvis, Melanie; Egan, Kevin; Huws, Rhian; Munro, Sian

    2002-01-01

    Discusses creating an information architecture for a bilingual Web site and reports work in progress on the development of a content-based bilingual Web site to facilitate shared resources between speech and language therapists. Considers a structural analysis of existing bilingual Web designs and explains a card-sorting activity conducted with…

  16. BADD phase II: DDS information management architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Thomas P.; DeCleene, Brian T.; Speckert, Glen; Voorhees, Harry L.

    1997-06-01

    The DARPA Battlefield Awareness and Data Dissemination (BADD) Phase II Program will provide the next generation multimedia information management architecture to support the warfighter. One goal of this architecture is proactive dissemination of information to the warfighter through strategies such as multicast and 'smart push and pull' designed to minimize latency and make maximum use of available communications bandwidth. Another goal is to support integration of information from widely distributed legacy repositories. This will enable the next generation of battlefield awareness applications to form a common operational view of the battlefield to aid joint service and/or multi-national peacekeeping forces. This paper discusses the approach we are taking to realize such an architecture for BADD. Our architecture and its implementation, known as the Distributed Dissemination Serivces (DDS) are based on two key concepts: a global database schema and an intelligent, proactive caching scheme. A global schema provides a common logical view of the information space in which the warfighter operates. This schema (or subsets of it) is shared by all warfighters through a distributed object database providing local access to all relevant metadata. This approach provides both scalability to a large number of warfighters, and it supports tethered as well as autonomous operations. By utilizing DDS information integration services that provide transparent access to legacy databases, related information from multiple 'stovepipe' systems are now available to battlefield awareness applications. The second key concept embedded in our architecture is an intelligent, hierarchical caching system supported by proactive dissemination management services which push both lightweight and heavyweight data such as imagery and video to warfighters based on their information profiles. The goal of this approach is to transparently and proactively stage data which is likely to be requested by

  17. Information architecture: Profile of adopted standards

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), like other Federal agencies, is under increasing pressure to use information technology to improve efficiency in mission accomplishment as well as delivery of services to the public. Because users and systems have become interdependent, DOE has enterprise wide needs for common application architectures, communication networks, databases, security, and management capabilities. Users need open systems that provide interoperability of products and portability of people, data, and applications that are distributed throughout heterogeneous computing environments. The level of interoperability necessary requires the adoption of DOE wide standards, protocols, and best practices. The Department has developed an information architecture and a related standards adoption and retirement process to assist users in developing strategies and plans for acquiring information technology products and services based upon open systems standards that support application software interoperability, portability, and scalability. This set of Departmental Information Architecture standards represents guidance for achieving higher degrees of interoperability within the greater DOE community, business partners, and stakeholders. While these standards are not mandatory, particular and due consideration of their applications in contractual matters and use in technology implementations Department wide are goals of the Chief Information Officer.

  18. A new architecture for enterprise information systems.

    PubMed

    Covvey, H D; Stumpf, J J

    1999-01-01

    Irresistible economic and technical forces are forcing healthcare institutions to develop regionalized services such as consolidated or virtual laboratories. Technical realities, such as the lack of an enabling enterprise-level information technology (IT) integration infrastructure, the existence of legacy systems, and non-existent or embryonic enterprise-level IT services organizations, are delaying or frustrating the achievement of the desired configuration of shared services. On attempting to address this matter, we discover that the state-of-the-art in integration technology is not wholly adequate, and itself becomes a barrier to the full realization of shared healthcare services. In this paper we report new work from the field of Co-operative Information Systems that proposes a new architecture of systems that are intrinsically cooperation-enabled, and we extend this architecture to both the regional and national scales. PMID:10566455

  19. The informational architecture of the cell.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sara Imari; Kim, Hyunju; Davies, Paul C W

    2016-03-13

    We compare the informational architecture of biological and random networks to identify informational features that may distinguish biological networks from random. The study presented here focuses on the Boolean network model for regulation of the cell cycle of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We compare calculated values of local and global information measures for the fission yeast cell cycle to the same measures as applied to two different classes of random networks: Erdös-Rényi and scale-free. We report patterns in local information processing and storage that do indeed distinguish biological from random, associated with control nodes that regulate the function of the fission yeast cell-cycle network. Conversely, we find that integrated information, which serves as a global measure of 'emergent' information processing, does not differ from random for the case presented. We discuss implications for our understanding of the informational architecture of the fission yeast cell-cycle network in particular, and more generally for illuminating any distinctive physics that may be operative in life. PMID:26857675

  20. Deep Space Network information system architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beswick, C. A.; Markley, R. W. (Editor); Atkinson, D. J.; Cooper, L. P.; Tausworthe, R. C.; Masline, R. C.; Jenkins, J. S.; Crowe, R. A.; Thomas, J. L.; Stoloff, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an architecture for the DSN information system in the years 2000-2010 and to provide guidelines for its evolution during the 1990's. The study scope is defined to be from the front-end areas at the antennas to the end users (spacecraft teams, principal investigators, archival storage systems, and non-NASA partners). The architectural vision provides guidance for major DSN implementation efforts during the next decade. A strong motivation for the study is an expected dramatic improvement in information-systems technologies--i.e., computer processing, automation technology (including knowledge-based systems), networking and data transport, software and hardware engineering, and human-interface technology. The proposed Ground Information System has the following major features: unified architecture from the front-end area to the end user; open-systems standards to achieve interoperability; DSN production of level 0 data; delivery of level 0 data from the Deep Space Communications Complex, if desired; dedicated telemetry processors for each receiver; security against unauthorized access and errors; and highly automated monitor and control.

  1. Deep Space Network information system architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beswick, C. A.; Markley, R. W. (Editor); Atkinson, D. J.; Cooper, L. P.; Tausworthe, R. C.; Masline, R. C.; Jenkins, J. S.; Crowe, R. A.; Thomas, J. L.; Stoloff, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an architecture for the Deep Space Network (DSN) information system in the years 2000-2010 and to provide guidelines for its evolution during the 1990s. The study scope is defined to be from the front-end areas at the antennas to the end users (spacecraft teams, principal investigators, archival storage systems, and non-NASA partners). The architectural vision provides guidance for major DSN implementation efforts during the next decade. A strong motivation for the study is an expected dramatic improvement in information-systems technologies, such as the following: computer processing, automation technology (including knowledge-based systems), networking and data transport, software and hardware engineering, and human-interface technology. The proposed Ground Information System has the following major features: unified architecture from the front-end area to the end user; open-systems standards to achieve interoperability; DSN production of level 0 data; delivery of level 0 data from the Deep Space Communications Complex, if desired; dedicated telemetry processors for each receiver; security against unauthorized access and errors; and highly automated monitor and control.

  2. A layered trust information security architecture.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Albuquerque, Robson; Villalba, Luis Javier García; Orozco, Ana Lucila Sandoval; Buiati, Fábio; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Information can be considered the most important asset of any modern organization. Securing this information involves preserving confidentially, integrity and availability, the well-known CIA triad. In addition, information security is a risk management job; the task is to manage the inherent risks of information disclosure. Current information security platforms do not deal with the different facets of information technology. This paper presents a layered trust information security architecture (TISA) and its creation was motivated by the need to consider information and security from different points of view in order to protect it. This paper also extends and discusses security information extensions as a way of helping the CIA triad. Furthermore, this paper suggests information representation and treatment elements, operations and support components that can be integrated to show the various risk sources when dealing with both information and security. An overview of how information is represented and treated nowadays in the technological environment is shown, and the reason why it is so difficult to guarantee security in all aspects of the information pathway is discussed. PMID:25470490

  3. A Layered Trust Information Security Architecture

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Albuquerque, Robson; García Villalba, Luis Javier; Sandoval Orozco, Ana Lucila; Buiati, Fábio; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Information can be considered the most important asset of any modern organization. Securing this information involves preserving confidentially, integrity and availability, the well-known CIA triad. In addition, information security is a risk management job; the task is to manage the inherent risks of information disclosure. Current information security platforms do not deal with the different facets of information technology. This paper presents a layered trust information security architecture (TISA) and its creation was motivated by the need to consider information and security from different points of view in order to protect it. This paper also extends and discusses security information extensions as a way of helping the CIA triad. Furthermore, this paper suggests information representation and treatment elements, operations and support components that can be integrated to show the various risk sources when dealing with both information and security. An overview of how information is represented and treated nowadays in the technological environment is shown, and the reason why it is so difficult to guarantee security in all aspects of the information pathway is discussed. PMID:25470490

  4. 26 CFR 1.6045-1T - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., see § 1.6045-1 (a) through (k). (l) Use of magnetic media. For information returns filed after... magnetic media and for rules relating to waivers granted for undue hardship. For information returns...

  5. 26 CFR 1.6045-1T - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., see § 1.6045-1 (a) through (k). (l) Use of magnetic media. For information returns filed after... magnetic media and for rules relating to waivers granted for undue hardship. For information returns...

  6. 26 CFR 1.6045-1T - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., see § 1.6045-1 (a) through (k). (l) Use of magnetic media. For information returns filed after... magnetic media and for rules relating to waivers granted for undue hardship. For information returns...

  7. Medicaid information technology architecture: an overview.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Richard H

    2006-01-01

    The Medicaid Information Technology Architecture (MITA) is a roadmap and tool-kit for States to transform their Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS) into an enterprise-wide, beneficiary-centric system. MITA will enable State Medicaid agencies to align their information technology (IT) opportunities with their evolving business needs. It also addresses long-standing issues of interoperability, adaptability, and data sharing, including clinical data, across organizational boundaries by creating models based on nationally accepted technical standards. Perhaps most significantly, MITA allows State Medicaid Programs to actively participate in the DHHS Secretary's vision of a transparent health care market that utilizes electronic health records (EHRs), ePrescribing and personal health records (PHRs). PMID:17427840

  8. 17 CFR 17.00 - Information to be furnished by futures commission merchants, clearing members and foreign brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and foreign broker shall submit a report to the Commission for each business day with respect to all... independent account controller shall, together with other accounts traded by the independent account controller or in which the independent controller has a financial interest, be considered a single...

  9. 17 CFR 17.00 - Information to be furnished by futures commission merchants, clearing members and foreign brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www... and foreign broker shall submit a report to the Commission for each business day with respect to all... independent account controller shall, together with other accounts traded by the independent...

  10. A security architecture for health information networks.

    PubMed

    Kailar, Rajashekar; Muralidhar, Vinod

    2007-01-01

    Health information network security needs to balance exacting security controls with practicality, and ease of implementation in today's healthcare enterprise. Recent work on 'nationwide health information network' architectures has sought to share highly confidential data over insecure networks such as the Internet. Using basic patterns of health network data flow and trust models to support secure communication between network nodes, we abstract network security requirements to a core set to enable secure inter-network data sharing. We propose a minimum set of security controls that can be implemented without needing major new technologies, but yet realize network security and privacy goals of confidentiality, integrity and availability. This framework combines a set of technology mechanisms with environmental controls, and is shown to be sufficient to counter commonly encountered network security threats adequately. PMID:18693862

  11. 26 CFR 1.6045-1 - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... other information required by Form 1099. See 17 CFR 1.33. For this purpose, the end of a year is the... Commodity Credit Corporation under 7 CFR 1470.4 (1990). (iii) Sales involving designated warehouses... warehouse, depository, or other similar entity, designated by a commodity exchange under 7 CFR 1.43...

  12. 26 CFR 1.6045-1 - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... information required by Form 1099. See 17 CFR 1.33. For this purpose, the end of a year is the close of... Commodity Credit Corporation under 7 CFR 1470.4 (1990). (iii) Sales involving designated warehouses... warehouse, depository, or other similar entity, designated by a commodity exchange under 7 CFR 1.43...

  13. 26 CFR 1.6045-1 - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Commission; (ii) Lead, palm oil, rapeseed, tea, tin, or an interest in any of the foregoing; or (iii) Any... information required by Form 1099. See 17 CFR 1.33. For this purpose, the end of a year is the close of... Commodity Credit Corporation under 7 CFR 1470.4 (1990). (iii) Sales involving designated...

  14. 26 CFR 1.6045-1 - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Commission; (ii) Lead, palm oil, rapeseed, tea, tin, or an interest in any of the foregoing; or (iii) Any... information required by Form 1099. See 17 CFR 1.33. For this purpose, the end of a year is the close of... Commodity Credit Corporation under 7 CFR 1470.4 (1990). (iii) Sales involving designated...

  15. Information architecture for coping with aging infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrell, Donald B.

    2000-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory personnel have developed a cost-effective solution for implementing the use of advanced technologies for monitoring the condition and performance of aging industrial facilities. A combination of operations and maintenance (O & M) know-how together with Laboratory technical capabilities have been used to develop and demonstrate the effectiveness of a condition monitoring software system. Already proven in a moderate size pilot heating plant, the system is expected to pay large dividends in the reduction of O & M costs in an aging cogeneration facility. Additional projects are currently underway to develop this technology to its full potential. This advanced architecture was designed to provide each segment of the plant operations and maintenance (O & M) team with understandable information for making safe, cost-effective life-cycle operating decisions. The software will provide plant operators, maintenance technicians, engineering staff and administrators with on-target, on-line information that enables high process efficiency simultaneously with cost- effective, life cycle oriented, capital equipment management. This infrastructure information becomes increasingly critical as the equipment, systems, and the facility itself become older. The result of this research provides the O & M practitioner with the ability to intelligently select the asset management course of action that minimizes both the cost and risk engendered by the operation and maintenance of aging process facilities.

  16. New Course Design: Classification Schemes and Information Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Bella Hass

    2002-01-01

    Describes a course developed at St. John's University (New York) in the Division of Library and Information Science that relates traditional classification schemes to information architecture and Web sites. Highlights include functional aspects of information architecture, that is, the way content is structured; assignments; student reactions; and…

  17. Information architecture as a framework for reuse

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, M.L.; Chang, I.N.

    1995-09-01

    This paper relates two tenets of modern acquisition, Information Architecture (IA) and reuse. An IA is the product of a modeling effort performed at the analysis level of system development that identifies essential information elements and describes the fundamental characteristics and behavior of the objective system. Principles and observations on reuse, including definitions and criteria to be used in applying reuse in the system engineering and software development process, are presented. The two tenets are related to show how the IA supports reuse as an element of an overall system engineering and software development approach, particularly when that approach is intentionally defined to emphasize reuse. The paper draws from recent efforts in the Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) Program to implement modern acquisition practices, emphasize reuse and develop IAs for the National Missile Defense (NMD) Battle Management, Command, Control and Communications (BMC3) system. The intention of this paper is to offer observations and examples that would help system developers achieve successful reusability in their products. Such products would include the IA itself as well as system engineering and software development products generated with an IA-based approach to system development.

  18. Incorporating Brokers within Collaboration Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekar, A.; Moore, R.; de Torcy, A.

    2013-12-01

    A collaboration environment, such as the integrated Rule Oriented Data System (iRODS - http://irods.diceresearch.org), provides interoperability mechanisms for accessing storage systems, authentication systems, messaging systems, information catalogs, networks, and policy engines from a wide variety of clients. The interoperability mechanisms function as brokers, translating actions requested by clients to the protocol required by a specific technology. The iRODS data grid is used to enable collaborative research within hydrology, seismology, earth science, climate, oceanography, plant biology, astronomy, physics, and genomics disciplines. Although each domain has unique resources, data formats, semantics, and protocols, the iRODS system provides a generic framework that is capable of managing collaborative research initiatives that span multiple disciplines. Each interoperability mechanism (broker) is linked to a name space that enables unified access across the heterogeneous systems. The collaboration environment provides not only support for brokers, but also support for virtualization of name spaces for users, files, collections, storage systems, metadata, and policies. The broker enables access to data or information in a remote system using the appropriate protocol, while the collaboration environment provides a uniform naming convention for accessing and manipulating each object. Within the NSF DataNet Federation Consortium project (http://www.datafed.org), three basic types of interoperability mechanisms have been identified and applied: 1) drivers for managing manipulation at the remote resource (such as data subsetting), 2) micro-services that execute the protocol required by the remote resource, and 3) policies for controlling the execution. For example, drivers have been written for manipulating NetCDF and HDF formatted files within THREDDS servers. Micro-services have been written that manage interactions with the CUAHSI data repository, the Data

  19. The information architecture of behavior change websites.

    PubMed

    Danaher, Brian G; McKay, H Garth; Seeley, John R

    2005-01-01

    The extraordinary growth in Internet use offers researchers important new opportunities to identify and test new ways to deliver effective behavior change programs. The information architecture (IA)-the structure of website information--is an important but often overlooked factor to consider when adapting behavioral strategies developed in office-based settings for Web delivery. Using examples and relevant perspectives from multiple disciplines, we describe a continuum of website IA designs ranging from a matrix design to the tunnel design. The free-form matrix IA design allows users free rein to use multiple hyperlinks to explore available content according to their idiosyncratic interests. The more directive tunnel IA design (commonly used in e-learning courses) guides users step-by-step through a series of Web pages that are arranged in a particular order to improve the chances of achieving a goal that is measurable and consistent. Other IA designs are also discussed, including hierarchical IA and hybrid IA designs. In the hierarchical IA design, program content is arranged in a top-down manner, which helps the user find content of interest. The more complex hybrid IA design incorporates some combination of components that use matrix, tunnel, and/or hierarchical IA designs. Each of these IA designs is discussed in terms of usability, participant engagement, and program tailoring, as well as how they might best be matched with different behavior change goals (using Web-based smoking cessation interventions as examples). Our presentation underscores the role of considering and clearly reporting the use of IA designs when creating effective Web-based interventions. We also encourage the adoption of a multidisciplinary perspective as we move towards a more mature view of Internet intervention research. PMID:15914459

  20. Information architecture. Volume 2, Part 1: Baseline analysis summary

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture, Volume 2, Baseline Analysis, is a collaborative and logical next-step effort in the processes required to produce a Departmentwide information architecture. The baseline analysis serves a diverse audience of program management and technical personnel and provides an organized way to examine the Department`s existing or de facto information architecture. A companion document to Volume 1, The Foundations, it furnishes the rationale for establishing a Departmentwide information architecture. This volume, consisting of the Baseline Analysis Summary (part 1), Baseline Analysis (part 2), and Reference Data (part 3), is of interest to readers who wish to understand how the Department`s current information architecture technologies are employed. The analysis identifies how and where current technologies support business areas, programs, sites, and corporate systems.

  1. Information architecture for a planetary 'exploration web'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamarra, N.; McVittie, T.

    2002-01-01

    'Web services' is a common way of deploying distributed applications whose software components and data sources may be in different locations, formats, languages, etc. Although such collaboration is not utilized significantly in planetary exploration, we believe there is significant benefit in developing an architecture in which missions could leverage each others capabilities. We believe that an incremental deployment of such an architecture could significantly contribute to the evolution of increasingly capable, efficient, and even autonomous remote exploration.

  2. SW Architecture for Access to Medical Information for Knowledge Execution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suntae; Shim, Bingu; Kim, Jeong Ah; Cho, Insook

    Recently, many approaches have been studied to author medical knowledge and verify doctor's diagnosis based on the specified knowledge. During the verification, intensive access to medical information is unavoidable. Also, the access approach should consider modifiability in order to cover diverse medical information from the variety of hospitals. This paper presents an approach to generating query language from medical knowledge, and shows software architecture for accessing medical information from hospitals by executing generated query languages. Implementation of this architecture has been deployed in a hospital of South Korea so that it shows the feasibility of the architecture.

  3. The Familial Context of Adolescent Language Brokering within Immigrant Chinese Families in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Josephine M.; Costigan, Catherine L.

    2012-01-01

    Language brokering, whereby children of immigrants provide informal translation and interpretation for others, is considered commonplace. However, the research evidence remains inconsistent concerning how language brokering relates to the psychological health of child language brokers and their relationships with their parents. Furthermore, few…

  4. Practice of information retrieval technique and limitation of database usage (2) - Limitation of retrieval and retrieval by information broker -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shigekazu

    Nowadays everyone can enjoy an information retrieval, thanks for the advancement of computer usage in searching the literatures of science and technology. Regarding limitation for database usage in these days, the author divided searchers into four generations according to their skillful degree for the retrieval technics. In this paper, the author considered a blind spot from the view point of retrieval by searcher after the third generation, who started to have a suspicion to the content of database and emphasised the following three blind spots that we cannot aford to overlook, 1) limitation on input to database, 2) limitation of keyword and code search computer searching, 3) limitation on fitness evaluation of retrieved results.

  5. HL7 document patient record architecture: an XML document architecture based on a shared information model.

    PubMed

    Dolin, R H; Alschuler, L; Behlen, F; Biron, P V; Boyer, S; Essin, D; Harding, L; Lincoln, T; Mattison, J E; Rishel, W; Sokolowski, R; Spinosa, J; Williams, J P

    1999-01-01

    The HL7 SGML/XML Special Interest Group is developing the HL7 Document Patient Record Architecture. This draft proposal strives to create a common data architecture for the interoperability of healthcare documents. Key components are that it is under the umbrella of HL7 standards, it is specified in Extensible Markup Language, the semantics are drawn from the HL7 Reference Information Model, and the document specifications form an architecture that, in aggregate, define the semantics and structural constraints necessary for the exchange of clinical documents. The proposal is a work in progress and has not yet been submitted to HL7's formal balloting process. PMID:10566319

  6. Geospatial Brokering - Challenges and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    An important feature of many brokers is to facilitate straightforward human access to scientific data while maintaining programmatic access to it for system solutions. Standards-based protocols are critical for this, and there are a number of protocols to choose from. In this discussion, we will present a web application solution that leverages certain protocols - e.g., OGC CSW, REST, and OpenSearch - to provide programmatic as well as human access to geospatial resources. We will also discuss managing resources to reduce duplication yet increase discoverability, federated search solutions, and architectures that combine human-friendly interfaces with powerful underlying data management. The changing requirements witnessed in brokering solutions over time, our recent experience participating in the EarthCube brokering hack-a-thon, and evolving interoperability standards provide insight to future technological and philosophical directions planned for geospatial broker solutions. There has been much change over the past decade, but with the unprecedented data collaboration of recent years, in many ways the challenges and opportunities are just beginning.

  7. BCube: Building a Geoscience Brokering Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jodha Khalsa, Siri; Nativi, Stefano; Duerr, Ruth; Pearlman, Jay

    2014-05-01

    BCube is addressing the need for effective and efficient multi-disciplinary collaboration and interoperability through the advancement of brokering technologies. As a prototype "building block" for NSF's EarthCube cyberinfrastructure initiative, BCube is demonstrating how a broker can serve as an intermediary between information systems that implement well-defined interfaces, thereby providing a bridge between communities that employ different specifications. Building on the GEOSS Discover and Access Broker (DAB), BCube will develop new modules and services including: • Expanded semantic brokering capabilities • Business Model support for work flows • Automated metadata generation • Automated linking to services discovered via web crawling • Credential passing for seamless access to data • Ranking of search results from brokered catalogs Because facilitating cross-discipline research involves cultural and well as technical challenges, BCube is also addressing the sociological and educational components of infrastructure development. We are working, initially, with four geoscience disciplines: hydrology, oceans, polar and weather, with an emphasis on connecting existing domain infrastructure elements to facilitate cross-domain communications.

  8. A multiagent architecture for developing medical information retrieval agents.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Steven

    2003-10-01

    Information that is available on the world wide web (WWW) is already more vast than can be comprehensibly studied by individuals and this quantity is increasing at a staggering pace. The quality of service delivered by physicians is dependent on the availability of current information. The agent paradigm offers a means for enabling physicians to filter information and retrieve only information that is relevant to current patient treatments. As with many specialized domains, agent-based information retrieval in medical domains must satisfy several domain-dependent constraints. A multiple agent architecture is developed and described in detail to efficiently provide agent-based information retrieval from the WWW and other explicit information resources. A simulation of the proposed multiple agent architecture shows a 97% decrease in information overload and an 85% increase in information relevancy over existing meta-search tools (with even larger gains over standard search engines). PMID:14584625

  9. ANTARES: a prototype transient broker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhijit; Matheson, Thomas; Snodgrass, Richard; Kececioglu, John; Narayan, Gautham; Seaman, Robert; Jenness, Tim; Axelrod, Tim

    2014-07-01

    The Arizona-NOAO Temporal Analysis and Response to Events System (ANTARES) is a joint project of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory and the Department of Computer Science at the University of Arizona. The goal is to build the software infrastructure necessary to process and filter alerts produced by time-domain surveys, with the ultimate source of such alerts being the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). The ANTARES broker will add value to alerts by annotating them with information from external sources such as previous surveys from across the electromagnetic spectrum. In addition, the temporal history of annotated alerts will provide further annotation for analysis. These alerts will go through a cascade of filters to select interesting candidates. For the prototype, `interesting' is defined as the rarest or most unusual alert, but future systems will accommodate multiple filtering goals. The system is designed to be flexible, allowing users to access the stream at multiple points throughout the process, and to insert custom filters where necessary. We describe the basic architecture of ANTARES and the principles that will guide development and implementation.

  10. An open, interoperable, and scalable prehospital information technology network architecture.

    PubMed

    Landman, Adam B; Rokos, Ivan C; Burns, Kevin; Van Gelder, Carin M; Fisher, Roger M; Dunford, James V; Cone, David C; Bogucki, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    Some of the most intractable challenges in prehospital medicine include response time optimization, inefficiencies at the emergency medical services (EMS)-emergency department (ED) interface, and the ability to correlate field interventions with patient outcomes. Information technology (IT) can address these and other concerns by ensuring that system and patient information is received when and where it is needed, is fully integrated with prior and subsequent patient information, and is securely archived. Some EMS agencies have begun adopting information technologies, such as wireless transmission of 12-lead electrocardiograms, but few agencies have developed a comprehensive plan for management of their prehospital information and integration with other electronic medical records. This perspective article highlights the challenges and limitations of integrating IT elements without a strategic plan, and proposes an open, interoperable, and scalable prehospital information technology (PHIT) architecture. The two core components of this PHIT architecture are 1) routers with broadband network connectivity to share data between ambulance devices and EMS system information services and 2) an electronic patient care report to organize and archive all electronic prehospital data. To successfully implement this comprehensive PHIT architecture, data and technology requirements must be based on best available evidence, and the system must adhere to health data standards as well as privacy and security regulations. Recent federal legislation prioritizing health information technology may position federal agencies to help design and fund PHIT architectures. PMID:21294627

  11. Trust-based information system architecture for personal wellness.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka; Nykänen, Pirkko; Seppälä, Antto; Blobel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Modern eHealth, ubiquitous health and personal wellness systems take place in an unsecure and ubiquitous information space where no predefined trust occurs. This paper presents novel information model and an architecture for trust based privacy management of personal health and wellness information in ubiquitous environment. The architecture enables a person to calculate a dynamic and context-aware trust value for each service provider, and using it to design personal privacy policies for trustworthy use of health and wellness services. For trust calculation a novel set of measurable context-aware and health information-sensitive attributes is developed. The architecture enables a person to manage his or her privacy in ubiquitous environment by formulating context-aware and service provider specific policies. Focus groups and information modelling was used for developing a wellness information model. System analysis method based on sequential steps that enable to combine results of analysis of privacy and trust concerns and the selection of trust and privacy services was used for development of the information system architecture. Its services (e.g. trust calculation, decision support, policy management and policy binding services) and developed attributes enable a person to define situation-aware policies that regulate the way his or her wellness and health information is processed. PMID:25160161

  12. Information Architecture in JASIST: Just Where Did We Come From?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Traces information architecture (IA) to a historical summit, supported by American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T) in May 2000 at Boston, MA. where several hundred gathered to thrash out the questions of just what IA was and what this field might become. Outlines the six IA issues discussed. (JMK)

  13. Reshaping the Enterprise through an Information Architecture and Process Reengineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laudato, Nicholas C.; DeSantis, Dennis J.

    1995-01-01

    The approach used by the University of Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania) in designing a campus-wide information architecture and a framework for reengineering the business process included building consensus on a general philosophy for information systems, using pattern-based abstraction techniques, applying data modeling and application prototyping, and…

  14. 78 FR 14848 - Duties of Brokers, Dealers, and Investment Advisers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Duties of Brokers, Dealers, and Investment Advisers AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Request for data and other information. SUMMARY: The Securities and Exchange Commission...

  15. Integrated brokering framework for multi-disciplinary research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craglia, M.; Vaccari, L.; Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.

    2012-04-01

    EuroGEOSS is a research project supporting the development of the GEOSS Common Infrastructure and the multi-disciplinary research efforts needed to address global sustainability research. The framework it has developed to integrate data, services, and models from different disciplines is based on a brokering approach that advances the traditional Service Oriented Architecture of spatial data infrastructures. In this paper we demonstrate the added value of this approach. The scientific question we address in this example is o identify ecosystems similar to the ones found in the protected area of "Sierra De Queixa Montes De Invernadeiro Nature Park" in Galicia, Spain. To do this, the user would identify an analytical model suitable to address the question such as the eHabitat model developed by the European Commission Joint Research Centre. It would then use the EuroGEOSS broker to look for the data necessary to run the model such boundaries of the select park, mean drought index, %forest cover, temperature and rainfall, and elevation. The eHabitat model is used to compute the likelihood to find ecosystems in the selected window that are similar to the one found in the selected protected area. The end-user would therefore run the model directly on the web as a web processing service with the data identified in the broker (no need to download the data) and use this information to draw a new area to be protected that would have similar ecological conditions to the initial protected area and display the list of endangered species (to be defined) expected to be found in the new location. Finally, the user can also mine Web 2.0 social networks via the broker to identify pictures of the selected species in the area of interest. This integrated approach based on open standards and interfaces allows the user to find, access, and use the data and models in a transparent way focusing on the research questions to be addressed rather than the technology that delivers the inputs

  16. BCube: A Broker Framework for Next Generation Geoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalsa, S. S.; Pearlman, J.; Nativi, S.

    2013-12-01

    EarthCube is an NSF initiative that aims to transform the conduct of research through the creation of community-guided cyberinfrastructure enabling the integration information and data across the geosciences. Following an initial phase of concept and community development activities, NSF has made awards for the development of cyberinfrastructure 'building blocks.' In this talk we describe the goals and methods for one of these projects - BCube, for Brokering Building Blocks. BCube addresses the need for effective and efficient multi-disciplinary collaboration and interoperability through the introduction of brokering technologies. Brokers, as information systems middleware, have existed for many years and are found in diverse domains and industries such as financial systems, business-to-business interfaces, medicine and the automotive industry, to name a few. However, the emergence of brokers in science is relatively new and is now being piloted with great promise in cyberinfrastructure and science communities in the U.S., Europe, and elsewhere. Brokers act as intermediaries between information systems that implement well-defined interfaces, providing a bridge between communities using different specifications. The BCube project is helping to build a truly cross-disciplinary, global platform for data providers, cyberinfrastructure developers, and data users to make data more available and interoperable through a brokering framework. Building on the GEOSS Discover and Access Broker (DAB), BCube will develop new modules and services including * Expanded semantic brokering * Business Model support for work flows * Automated metadata generation * Automated linking to services discovered via web crawling * Plug and play for most community service buses * Credential passing for seamless access to data * Ranking of search results from brokered catalogs Because facilitating cross-discipline research involves cultural and well as technical challenges, BCube is also

  17. The straight-line information security architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, C.

    1995-08-01

    Comprehensive monitoring can provide a wealth of sensor data useful in enhancing the safety, security, and international accountability of stored nuclear material. However, care must be taken to distribute this type of data on a need to know basis to the various types of users. The following paper describes an exploratory effort on behalf of Sandia National Labs to integrate commercially available systems to securely disseminate (on a need to know basis) both classified and unclassified sensor information to a variety of users on the interact.

  18. An agile enterprise regulation architecture for health information security management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Pei; Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chien, Tsan-Nan; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Luh, Jer-Junn; Lai, Jin-Shin; Lai, Feipei; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2010-09-01

    Information security management for healthcare enterprises is complex as well as mission critical. Information technology requests from clinical users are of such urgency that the information office should do its best to achieve as many user requests as possible at a high service level using swift security policies. This research proposes the Agile Enterprise Regulation Architecture (AERA) of information security management for healthcare enterprises to implement as part of the electronic health record process. Survey outcomes and evidential experiences from a sample of medical center users proved that AERA encourages the information officials and enterprise administrators to overcome the challenges faced within an electronically equipped hospital. PMID:20815748

  19. Information Architecture without Internal Theory: An Inductive Design Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haverty, Marsha

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that information architecture design is primarily an inductive process, partly because it lacks internal theory and partly because it is an activity that supports emergent phenomena (user experiences) from basic design components. Suggests a resemblance to Constructive Induction, a design process that locates the best representational…

  20. Comet: Multifunction VOEvent broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, John

    2014-04-01

    Comet is a Python implementation of the VOEvent Transport Protocol (VTP). VOEvent is the IVOA system for describing transient celestial events. Details of transients detected by many projects, including Fermi, Swift, and the Catalina Sky Survey, are currently made available as VOEvents, which is also the standard alert format by future facilities such as LSST and SKA. The core of Comet is a multifunction VOEvent broker, capable of receiving events either by subscribing to one or more remote brokers or by direct connection from authors; it can then both process those events locally and forward them to its own subscribers. In addition, Comet provides a tool for publishing VOEvents to the global VOEvent backbone.

  1. Trust Information-Based Privacy Architecture for Ubiquitous Health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ubiquitous health is defined as a dynamic network of interconnected systems that offers health services independent of time and location to a data subject (DS). The network takes place in open and unsecure information space. It is created and managed by the DS who sets rules that regulate the way personal health information is collected and used. Compared to health care, it is impossible in ubiquitous health to assume the existence of a priori trust between the DS and service providers and to produce privacy using static security services. In ubiquitous health features, business goals and regulations systems followed often remain unknown. Furthermore, health care-specific regulations do not rule the ways health data is processed and shared. To be successful, ubiquitous health requires novel privacy architecture. Objective The goal of this study was to develop a privacy management architecture that helps the DS to create and dynamically manage the network and to maintain information privacy. The architecture should enable the DS to dynamically define service and system-specific rules that regulate the way subject data is processed. The architecture should provide to the DS reliable trust information about systems and assist in the formulation of privacy policies. Furthermore, the architecture should give feedback upon how systems follow the policies of DS and offer protection against privacy and trust threats existing in ubiquitous environments. Methods A sequential method that combines methodologies used in system theory, systems engineering, requirement analysis, and system design was used in the study. In the first phase, principles, trust and privacy models, and viewpoints were selected. Thereafter, functional requirements and services were developed on the basis of a careful analysis of existing research published in journals and conference proceedings. Based on principles, models, and requirements, architectural components and their interconnections

  2. The Solution Space Organization: Linking Information Systems Architecture and Reuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakhli, Salem Ben Dhaou

    Nowadays, improvement of software development productivity is among the main strategies proposed by academics and practitioners to deal with the chronic software crisis. As stressed by many authors during the last two decades, reuse of software artifacts provides efficient instruments to implement this strategy. Nevertheless, despite organizations high investments in defining software reuse plans, implementation of such plans has often failed. We think that the identification and description of the relationships between the areas of information systems architecture and software reuse are required to define a successful reuse approach which takes into account all the dimensions of information systems. In this chapter, we propose a structural and architecture-oriented description of the solution space associated with information systems development. We use such a description to build a reuse approach compliant with all the dimensions of information systems including the organizational, economic, and human dimensions.

  3. Information Architecture for Quality Management Support in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Álvaro; Freixo, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    Quality Management occupies a strategic role in organizations, and the adoption of computer tools within an aligned information architecture facilitates the challenge of making more with less, promoting the development of a competitive edge and sustainability. A formal Information Architecture (IA) lends organizations an enhanced knowledge but, above all, favours management. This simplifies the reinvention of processes, the reformulation of procedures, bridging and the cooperation amongst the multiple actors of an organization. In the present investigation work we planned the IA for the Quality Management System (QMS) of a Hospital, which allowed us to develop and implement the QUALITUS (QUALITUS, name of the computer application developed to support Quality Management in a Hospital Unit) computer application. This solution translated itself in significant gains for the Hospital Unit under study, accelerating the quality management process and reducing the tasks, the number of documents, the information to be filled in and information errors, amongst others. PMID:26306878

  4. Constellation's Command, Control, Communications and Information (C3I) Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.

    2007-01-01

    Operations concepts are highly effective for: 1) Developing consensus; 2) Discovering stakeholder needs, goals, objectives; 3) Defining behavior of system components (especially emergent behaviors). An interoperability standard can provide an excellent lever to define the capabilities needed for system evolution. Two categories of architectures are needed in a program of this size are: 1) Generic - Needed for planning, design and construction standards; 2) Specific - Needed for detailed requirement allocations, interface specs. A wide variety of architectural views are needed to address stakeholder concerns, including: 1) Physical; 2) Information (structure, flow, evolution); 3) Processes (design, manufacturing, operations); 4) Performance; 5) Risk.

  5. Space-Based Information Infrastructure Architecture for Broadband Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Kent M.; Inukai, Tom; Razdan, Rajendev; Lazeav, Yvonne M.

    1996-01-01

    This study addressed four tasks: (1) identify satellite-addressable information infrastructure markets; (2) perform network analysis for space-based information infrastructure; (3) develop conceptual architectures; and (4) economic assessment of architectures. The report concludes that satellites will have a major role in the national and global information infrastructure, requiring seamless integration between terrestrial and satellite networks. The proposed LEO, MEO, and GEO satellite systems have satellite characteristics that vary widely. They include delay, delay variations, poorer link quality and beam/satellite handover. The barriers against seamless interoperability between satellite and terrestrial networks are discussed. These barriers are the lack of compatible parameters, standards and protocols, which are presently being evaluated and reduced.

  6. Data analysis in an Object Request Broker environment

    SciTech Connect

    Malon, D.M.; May, E.N.; Grossman, R.L.; Day, C.T.; Quarrie, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    Computing for the Next Millenium will require software interoperability in heterogeneous, increasingly object-oriented environments. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) is a software industry effort, under the aegis of the Object Management Group (OMG), to standardize mechanisms for software interaction among disparate applications written in a variety of languages and running on a variety of distributed platforms. In this paper, we describe some of the design and performance implications for software that must function in such a brokered environment in a standards-compliant way. We illustrate these implications with a physics data analysis example as a case study.

  7. Data Analysis in AN Object Request Broker Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malon, David M.; May, Edward N.; Grossman, Robert L.; Day, Christopher T.; Quarrie, David R.

    Computing for the Next Millenium will require software interoperability in heterogeneous, increasingly object-oriented environments. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture1 (CORBA) is a software industry effort, under the aegis of the Object Management Group (OMG), to standardize mechanisms for software interaction among disparate applications written in a variety of languages and running on a variety of distributed platforms. In this paper, we describe some of the design and performance implications for software that must function in such a brokered environment in a standards-compliant way. We illustrate these implications with a physics data analysis example as a case study.

  8. Integrating Environmental and Information Systems Management: An Enterprise Architecture Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noran, Ovidiu

    Environmental responsibility is fast becoming an important aspect of strategic management as the reality of climate change settles in and relevant regulations are expected to tighten significantly in the near future. Many businesses react to this challenge by implementing environmental reporting and management systems. However, the environmental initiative is often not properly integrated in the overall business strategy and its information system (IS) and as a result the management does not have timely access to (appropriately aggregated) environmental information. This chapter argues for the benefit of integrating the environmental management (EM) project into the ongoing enterprise architecture (EA) initiative present in all successful companies. This is done by demonstrating how a reference architecture framework and a meta-methodology using EA artefacts can be used to co-design the EM system, the organisation and its IS in order to achieve a much needed synergy.

  9. 17 CFR 240.15g-3 - Broker or dealer disclosure of quotations and other information relating to the penny stock market.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... purchases. (C) If the dealer's bid or offer prices to the customer do not satisfy the criteria of paragraphs... CFR 240.10b-10 of this chapter. (2) A broker or dealer, at the time of making the disclosure pursuant... such disclosure for the period specified in 17 CFR 240.17a-4(b). (c) Definitions. For purposes of...

  10. Information architecture: Standards adoption and retirement process service action plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this Service Action Plan is to announce, as well as provide, a high-level outline of a new Departmental process for the adoption and retirement of information technology standards. This process supports the implementation of a Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture. This plan was prepared with the Department of Energy information technology standards customers and stakeholders in mind. The process described in this plan will be serviced primarily by staff from the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Information Management with assistance from designated program and site Information Technology Standards Points of Contact. We welcome any comments regarding this new Departmental process and encourage the proposal of information technology standards for adoption or retirement.

  11. Fuzzy-Neural Controller in Service Requests Distribution Broker for SOA-Based Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fras, Mariusz; Zatwarnicka, Anna; Zatwarnicki, Krzysztof

    The evolution of software architectures led to the rising importance of the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) concept. This architecture paradigm support building flexible distributed service systems. In the paper the architecture of service request distribution broker designed for use in SOA-based systems is proposed. The broker is built with idea of fuzzy control. The functional and non-functional request requirements in conjunction with monitoring of execution and communication links are used to distribute requests. Decisions are made with use of fuzzy-neural network.

  12. Interconnecting Multidiscilinary Data Infrastructures: From Federation to Brokering Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Standardization and federation activities have been played an essential role to push interoperability at the disciplinary and cross-disciplinary level. However, they demonstrated not to be sufficient to resolve important interoperability challenges, including: disciplinary heterogeneity, cross-organizations diversities, cultural differences. Significant international initiatives like GEOSS, IODE, and CEOS demonstrated that a federation system dealing with global and multi-disciplinary domain turns out to be rater complex, raising more the already high entry level barriers for both Providers and Users. In particular, GEOSS demonstrated that standardization and federation actions must be accompanied and complemented by a brokering approach. Brokering architecture and its implementing technologies are able to implement an effective interoperability level among multi-disciplinary systems, lowering the entry level barriers for both data providers and users. This presentation will discuss the brokering philosophy as a complementary approach for standardization and federation to interconnect existing and heterogeneous infrastructures and systems. The GEOSS experience will be analyzed, specially.

  13. Merging multiple institutions: information architecture problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D

    1999-01-01

    Amalgamating organizations face great challenges when trying to merge their formerly separate information systems. An architectural approach is essential in order to understand the business process and data implications of the new organization's business decisions and application choices. HL7 is useful as a common messaging standard, but does not help to reconcile conflicting local identifier coding systems. The Information Services department has an important role in catalyzing decisions about inconsistent business processes and conflicting universal coding systems within an enterprise framework. PMID:10566467

  14. ABB: active bandwidth broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kason; Law, Eddie

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we shall discuss a novel design on the policy-based management for the Internet. This design deploys the concept of active networking. As opposed to the traditional network design, active network empowers network node with the ability to manipulate data and program code in packets, and configure the network properties according to the needs of different applications. The policy-based management can control network routers in order to realize end-to-end Quality of Service (QoS), such as differentiated and integrated services, across the Internet. For the moment, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has defined the framework of the policy-based management. It employs a simple client/server model that uses Common Open Policy Service (COPS) protocol to facilitate policy management and control. Our design of Active Bandwidth Broker (ABB) belongs to an active application. Our goals are to distribute centralized workload of the policy-based management over multiple active nodes in the active networks, introduce mobility of the bandwidth brokers, and allows load sharing to the policy-based management. This results a network-wide intelligent, highly available, and consistent QoS control that allows performance protection for voice, video and Internet business application while reducing costs for growing networks.

  15. A Proposed Information Architecture for Telehealth System Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.; Craft, R.L.; Parks, R.C.; Gallagher, L.K.; Garcia, R.J.; Funkhouser, D.R.

    1999-04-07

    Telemedicine technology is rapidly evolving. Whereas early telemedicine consultations relied primarily on video conferencing, consultations today may utilize video conferencing, medical peripherals, store-and-forward capabilities, electronic patient record management software, and/or a host of other emerging technologies. These remote care systems rely increasingly on distributed, collaborative information technology during the care delivery process, in its many forms. While these leading-edge systems are bellwethers for highly advanced telemedicine, the remote care market today is still immature. Most telemedicine systems are custom-designed and do not interoperate with other commercial offerings. Users are limited to a set of functionality that a single vendor provides and must often pay high prices to obtain this functionality, since vendors in this marketplace must deliver entire systems in order to compete. Besides increasing corporate research and development costs, this inhibits the ability of the user to make intelligent purchasing decisions regarding best-of-breed technologies. We propose a secure, object-oriented information architecture for telemedicine systems that promotes plug-and-play interaction between system components through standardized interfaces, communication protocols, messaging formats, and data definitions. In this architecture, each component functions as a black box, and components plug together in a lego-like fashion to achieve the desired device or system functionality. The architecture will support various ongoing standards work in the medical device arena.

  16. A Proposed Information Architecture for Telehealth System Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, R.L.; Funkhouser, D.R.; Gallagher, L.K.; Garica, R.J.; Parks, R.C.; Warren, S.

    1999-04-20

    We propose an object-oriented information architecture for telemedicine systems that promotes secure `plug-and-play' interaction between system components through standardized interfaces, communication protocols, messaging formats, and data definitions. In this architecture, each component functions as a black box, and components plug together in a ''lego-like'' fashion to achieve the desired device or system functionality. Introduction Telemedicine systems today rely increasingly on distributed, collaborative information technology during the care delivery process. While these leading-edge systems are bellwethers for highly advanced telemedicine, most are custom-designed and do not interoperate with other commercial offerings. Users are limited to a set of functionality that a single vendor provides and must often pay high prices to obtain this functionality, since vendors in this marketplace must deliver en- tire systems in order to compete. Besides increasing corporate research and development costs, this inhibits the ability of the user to make intelligent purchasing decisions regarding best-of-breed technologies. This paper proposes a reference architecture for plug-and-play telemedicine systems that addresses these issues.

  17. Shifts in the architecture of the Nationwide Health Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Sundwall, David; Lenert, Michael Edward

    2012-01-01

    In the midst of a US $30 billion USD investment in the Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN) and electronic health records systems, a significant change in the architecture of the NwHIN is taking place. Prior to 2010, the focus of information exchange in the NwHIN was the Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO). Since 2010, the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) has been sponsoring policies that promote an internet-like architecture that encourages point to-point information exchange and private health information exchange networks. The net effect of these activities is to undercut the limited business model for RHIOs, decreasing the likelihood of their success, while making the NwHIN dependent on nascent technologies for community level functions such as record locator services. These changes may impact the health of patients and communities. Independent, scientifically focused debate is needed on the wisdom of ONC's proposed changes in its strategy for the NwHIN. PMID:22268218

  18. Project Integration Architecture: A Practical Demonstration of Information Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    One of the goals of the Project Integration Architecture (PIA) effort is to provide the ability to propagate information between disparate applications. With this ability, applications may then be formed into an application graph constituting a super-application. Such a super-application would then provide all of the analysis appropriate to a given technical system. This paper reports on a small demonstration of this concept in which a Computer Aided Design (CAD) application was connected to an inlet analysis code and geometry information automatically propagated from one to the other. The majority of the work reported involved not the technology of information propagation, but rather the conversion of propagated information into a form usable by the receiving application.

  19. Investigation of possible neural architectures underlying information-geometric measures.

    PubMed

    Tatsuno, Masami; Okada, Masato

    2004-04-01

    A novel analytical method based on information geometry was recently proposed, and this method may provide useful insights into the statistical interactions within neural groups. The link between informationgeometric measures and the structure of neural interactions has not yet been elucidated, however, because of the ill-posed nature of the problem. Here, possible neural architectures underlying information-geometric measures are investigated using an isolated pair and an isolated triplet of model neurons. By assuming the existence of equilibrium states, we derive analytically the relationship between the information-geometric parameters and these simple neural architectures. For symmetric networks, the first- and second-order information-geometric parameters represent, respectively, the external input and the underlying connections between the neurons provided that the number of neurons used in the parameter estimation in the log-linear model and the number of neurons in the network are the same. For asymmetric networks, however, these parameters are dependent on both the intrinsic connections and the external inputs to each neuron. In addition, we derive the relation between the information-geometric parameter corresponding to the two-neuron interaction and a conventional cross-correlation measure. We also show that the information-geometric parameters vary depending on the number of neurons assumed for parameter estimation in the log-linear model. This finding suggests a need to examine the information-geometric method carefully. A possible criterion for choosing an appropriate orthogonal coordinate is also discussed. This article points out the importance of a model-based approach and sheds light on the possible neural structure underlying the application of information geometry to neural network analysis. PMID:15025828

  20. Optimal causal inference: Estimating stored information and approximating causal architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, Susanne; Crutchfield, James P.; Ellison, Christopher J.

    2010-09-01

    We introduce an approach to inferring the causal architecture of stochastic dynamical systems that extends rate-distortion theory to use causal shielding—a natural principle of learning. We study two distinct cases of causal inference: optimal causal filtering and optimal causal estimation. Filtering corresponds to the ideal case in which the probability distribution of measurement sequences is known, giving a principled method to approximate a system's causal structure at a desired level of representation. We show that in the limit in which a model-complexity constraint is relaxed, filtering finds the exact causal architecture of a stochastic dynamical system, known as the causal-state partition. From this, one can estimate the amount of historical information the process stores. More generally, causal filtering finds a graded model-complexity hierarchy of approximations to the causal architecture. Abrupt changes in the hierarchy, as a function of approximation, capture distinct scales of structural organization. For nonideal cases with finite data, we show how the correct number of the underlying causal states can be found by optimal causal estimation. A previously derived model-complexity control term allows us to correct for the effect of statistical fluctuations in probability estimates and thereby avoid overfitting.

  1. A Brokering Solution for Business Process Execution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, M.; Bigagli, L.; Roncella, R.; Mazzetti, P.; Nativi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Predicting the climate change impact on biodiversity and ecosystems, advancing our knowledge of environmental phenomena interconnection, assessing the validity of simulations and other key challenges of Earth Sciences require intensive use of environmental modeling. The complexity of Earth system requires the use of more than one model (often from different disciplines) to represent complex processes. The identification of appropriate mechanisms for reuse, chaining and composition of environmental models is considered a key enabler for an effective uptake of a global Earth Observation infrastructure, currently pursued by the international geospatial research community. The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) Model Web initiative aims to increase present accessibility and interoperability of environmental models, allowing their flexible composition into complex Business Processes (BPs). A few, basic principles are at the base of the Model Web concept (Nativi, et al.): 1. Open access 2. Minimal entry-barriers 3. Service-driven approach 4. Scalability In this work we propose an architectural solution aiming to contribute to the Model Web vision. This solution applies the Brokering approach for facilitiating complex multidisciplinary interoperability. The Brokering approach is currently adopted in the new GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) as was presented at the last GEO Plenary meeting in Istanbul, November 2011. According to the Brokering principles, the designed system is flexible enough to support the use of multiple BP design (visual) tools, heterogeneous Web interfaces for model execution (e.g. OGC WPS, WSDL, etc.), and different Workflow engines. We designed and prototyped a component called BP Broker that is able to: (i) read an abstract BP, (ii) "compile" the abstract BP into an executable one (eBP) - in this phase the BP Broker might also provide recommendations for incomplete BPs and parameter mismatch resolution - and (iii) finally execute the eBP using a

  2. A secure and efficiently searchable health information architecture.

    PubMed

    Yasnoff, William A

    2016-06-01

    Patient-centric repositories of health records are an important component of health information infrastructure. However, patient information in a single repository is potentially vulnerable to loss of the entire dataset from a single unauthorized intrusion. A new health record storage architecture, the personal grid, eliminates this risk by separately storing and encrypting each person's record. The tradeoff for this improved security is that a personal grid repository must be sequentially searched since each record must be individually accessed and decrypted. To allow reasonable search times for large numbers of records, parallel processing with hundreds (or even thousands) of on-demand virtual servers (now available in cloud computing environments) is used. Estimated search times for a 10 million record personal grid using 500 servers vary from 7 to 33min depending on the complexity of the query. Since extremely rapid searching is not a critical requirement of health information infrastructure, the personal grid may provide a practical and useful alternative architecture that eliminates the large-scale security vulnerabilities of traditional databases by sacrificing unnecessary searching speed. PMID:27109933

  3. Project Integration Architecture: Inter-Application Propagation of Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    A principal goal of the Project Integration Architecture (PIA) is to facilitate the meaningful inter-application transfer of application-value-added information. Such exchanging applications may be largely unrelated to each other except through their applicability to an overall project; however, the PIA effort recognizes as fundamental the need to make such applications cooperate despite wide disparaties either in the fidelity of the analyses carried out, or even the disciplines of the analysis. This paper discusses the approach and techniques applied and anticipated by the PIA project in treating this need.

  4. Developing Integrated Taxonomies for a Tiered Information Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutra, Jayne E.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the concept of developing taxonomies for an information architecture. In order to assist people in accessing information required to access information and retrieval, including cross repository searching, a system of nested taxonomies is being developed. Another facet of this developmental project is collecting and documenting attributes about people, to allow for several uses: access management, i.e., who are you and what can you see?; targeted content delivery i.e., what content helps you get your work done?; w ork force planning i.e., what skill sets do you have that we can appl y to work?; and IT Services i.e., How can we provision you with the proper IT services?

  5. Gazetteer Brokering through Semantic Mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobona, G.; Bermudez, L. E.; Brackin, R.

    2013-12-01

    A gazetteer is a geographical directory containing some information regarding places. It provides names, location and other attributes for places which may include points of interest (e.g. buildings, oilfields and boreholes), and other features. These features can be published via web services conforming to the Gazetteer Application Profile of the Web Feature Service (WFS) standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). Against the backdrop of advances in geophysical surveys, there has been a significant increase in the amount of data referenced to locations. Gazetteers services have played a significant role in facilitating access to such data, including through provision of specialized queries such as text, spatial and fuzzy search. Recent developments in the OGC have led to advances in gazetteers such as support for multilingualism, diacritics, and querying via advanced spatial constraints (e.g. search by radial search and nearest neighbor). A challenge remaining however, is that gazetteers produced by different organizations have typically been modeled differently. Inconsistencies from gazetteers produced by different organizations may include naming the same feature in a different way, naming the attributes differently, locating the feature in a different location, and providing fewer or more attributes than the other services. The Gazetteer application profile of the WFS is a starting point to address such inconsistencies by providing a standardized interface based on rules specified in ISO 19112, the international standard for spatial referencing by geographic identifiers. The profile, however, does not provide rules to deal with semantic inconsistencies. The USGS and NGA commissioned research into the potential for a Single Point of Entry Global Gazetteer (SPEGG). The research was conducted by the Cross Community Interoperability thread of the OGC testbed, referenced OWS-9. The testbed prototyped approaches for brokering gazetteers through use of semantic

  6. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company information management technology architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.J.; Lau, P.K.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Information Management Technology Architecture (TA) is being driven by the business objectives of reducing costs and improving effectiveness. The strategy is to reduce the cost of computing through standardization. The Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) TA is a set of standards and products for use at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TA will provide direction for information management resource acquisitions, development of information systems, formulation of plans, and resolution of issues involving LMITCO computing resources. Exceptions to the preferred products may be granted by the Information Management Executive Council (IMEC). Certain implementation and deployment strategies are inherent in the design and structure of LMITCO TA. These include: migration from centralized toward distributed computing; deployment of the networks, servers, and other information technology infrastructure components necessary for a more integrated information technology support environment; increased emphasis on standards to make it easier to link systems and to share information; and improved use of the company`s investment in desktop computing resources. The intent is for the LMITCO TA to be a living document constantly being reviewed to take advantage of industry directions to reduce costs while balancing technological diversity with business flexibility.

  7. Role Domains of Knowledge Brokering: A Model for the Health Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Glegg, Stephanie M; Hoens, Alison

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge brokering is a strategy to support collaborations and partnerships within and across clinical, research, and policy worlds to improve the generation and use of research knowledge. Knowledge brokers function in multiple roles to facilitate the use of evidence by leveraging the power of these partnerships. The application of theory can provide clarity in understanding the processes, influences, expected mechanisms of action, and desired outcomes of knowledge brokering. Viewing knowledge brokering from the perspective of its role domains can provide a means of organizing these elements to advance our understanding of knowledge brokering. The objectives of this special interest article are (1) to describe the context for knowledge brokering in health care, (2) to provide an overview of knowledge translation theories applied to knowledge brokering, and (3) to propose a model outlining the role domains assumed in knowledge brokering. The Role Model for Knowledge Brokering is composed of 5 role domains, including information manager, linking agent, capacity builder, facilitator, and evaluator. We provide examples from the literature and our real-world experience to demonstrate the application of the model. This model can be used to inform the practice of knowledge brokering as well as professional development and evaluation strategies. In addition, it may be used to inform theory-driven research examining the effectiveness of knowledge brokering on knowledge generation and translation outcomes in the health care field, as well as on patient health outcomes.Video Abstract is available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A126). PMID:26937654

  8. 77 FR 27150 - Amendments to Financial Responsibility Rules for Broker-Dealers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 240 RIN 3235-AJ85 Amendments to Financial Responsibility Rules for Broker-Dealers.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 9, 2007 (Exchange Act Release No. 55431, 72 FR 12862 (Mar. 19, 2007)), the... requirements for broker-dealers. They also would update the financial responsibility rules and make...

  9. Genres, Contexts, and Literacy Practices: Literacy Brokering among Sudanese Refugee Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Kristen H.

    2009-01-01

    This ethnographic study examined literacy brokering among Sudanese refugee families in Michigan. Literacy brokering occurs as individuals seek informal help with unfamiliar texts and literacy practices. Data collection involved participant observation, semi-structured interviews, and collection of artifacts over 18 months. Researcher analysis of…

  10. Final report: An enabling architecture for information driven manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmeyer, J.M.

    1997-08-01

    This document is the final report for the LDRD: An Enabling Architecture for Information Driven Manufacturing. The project was motivated by the need to bring quality products to market quickly and to remain efficient and profitable with small lot sizes, intermittent production and short product life cycles. The emphasis is on integration of the product realization process and the information required to drive it. Enterprise level information was not addressed except in so far as the enterprise must provide appropriate information to the production equipment to specify what to produce, and the equipment must return enough information to record what was produced. A production script approach was developed in which the production script specifies all of the information required to produce a quality product. A task sequencer that decomposes the script into process steps which are dispatched to capable Standard Manufacturing Modules. The plug and play interface to these modules allows rapid introduction of new modules into the production system and speeds up the product realization cycle. The results of applying this approach to the Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System are described.

  11. Information architecture project presentation to CIC leaders, March 10 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, T.A.

    1995-09-01

    On March 10, 1995, members of the Laboratory`s Information Architecture (IA) project presented an overview of progress-to-date to Group and Program Leaders and Deputies in the Computing, Information, and Communications (CIC) division. The presentation included progress reports from each of the seven IA teams: desktop, applications, data warehouse, data, infrastructure, financial analysis, metrics, and review. The fundamental purpose was to familiarize the CIC leaders with the IA project and to open a dialog on how CIC and the IA could better work with each other. On April 5, 1995, the IA project held an open forum in the Physics Auditorium that reused many of the viewgraphs from the presentation to CIC leaders.

  12. Developing the architecture for the Climate Information Portal for Copernicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som de Cerff, Wim; Thijsse, Peter; Plieger, Maarten; Pascoe, Stephen; Jukes, Martin; Leadbetter, Adam; Goosen, Hasse; de Vreede, Ernst

    2015-04-01

    environment and society, but will develop an end to end processing chain (indicator toolkit), from comprehensive information on the climate state through to highly aggregated decision relevant products. This processing chain will be demonstrated within three thematic areas: water, rural and urban. Indicators of climate change and climate change impact will be provided, and a toolkit to update and post process the collection of indicators will be integrated into the portal. For the indicators three levels (Tiers) have been loosely defined: Tier 1: field summarising properties of the climate system; e.g. temperature change; Tier 2: expressed in terms of environmental properties outside the climate system; e.g. flooding change; Tier 3: expressed in social and economic impact. For the architecture, CLIPC has two interlocked themes: 1. Harmonised access to climate datasets derived from models, observations and re-analyses 2. A climate impact toolkit to evaluate, rank and aggregate indicators For development of the CLIPC architecture an Agile 'storyline' approach is taken. The storyline is a real world use case and consists of producing a Tier 3 indicator (Urban Heat Vulnerability) and making it available through the CLIPC infrastructure for a user group. In this way architecture concepts can be directly tested and improved. Also, the produced indicator can be shown to users to refine requirements. Main components of the CLIPC architecture are 1) Data discovery and access, 2) Data processing, 3) Data visualization, 4) Knowledge base and 5) User Management. The Data discovery and access component main challenge is to provide harmonized access to various sources of climate data (ngEO, EMODNET/SeaDataNet, ESGF, MyOcean). The discovery service concept will be provided using a CLIPC data and data product catalogue and via a structured data search on selected infrastructures, using NERC vocabulary services and mappings. Data processing will be provided using OGC WPS services, linking

  13. Establishing the role of honest broker: bridging the gap between protecting personal health data and clinical research efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang-Min; Lee, JaeHo; Shin, Soo-Yong; Lyu, Yungman

    2015-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study is to propose the four conditions for the roles of honest brokers through a review of literature published by ten institutions that are successfully utilizing honest brokers. Furthermore, the study aims to examine whether the Asan Medical Center’s (AMC) honest brokers satisfy the four conditions, and examine the need to enhance their roles. Methods. We analyzed the roles, tasks, and types of honest brokers at 10 organizations by reviewing the literature. We also established a Task Force (TF) in our institution for setting the roles and processes of the honest broker system and the honest brokers. The findings of the literature search were compared with the existing systems at AMC—which introduced the honest broker system for the first time in Korea. Results. Only one organization employed an honest broker for validating anonymized clinical data and monitoring the anonymity verifications of the honest broker system. Six organizations complied with HIPAA privacy regulations, while four organizations did not disclose compliance. By comparing functions with those of the AMC, the following four main characteristics of honest brokers were determined: (1) de-identification of clinical data; (2) independence; (3) checking that the data are used only for purposes approved by the IRB; and (4) provision of de-identified data to researchers. These roles were then compared with those of honest brokers at the AMC. Discussion. First, guidelines that regulate the definitions, purposes, roles, and requirements for honest brokers are needed, since there are no currently existing regulations. Second, Korean clinical research institutions and national regulatory departments need to reach a consensus on a Korean version of Limited Data Sets (LDS), since there are no lists that describe the use of personal identification information. Lastly, satisfaction surveys on honest brokers by researchers are necessary to improve the quality of honest

  14. Establishing the role of honest broker: bridging the gap between protecting personal health data and clinical research efficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Joung; Lee, Min Joung; Choi, Chang-Min; Lee, JaeHo; Shin, Soo-Yong; Lyu, Yungman; Park, Yu Rang; Yoo, Soyoung

    2015-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study is to propose the four conditions for the roles of honest brokers through a review of literature published by ten institutions that are successfully utilizing honest brokers. Furthermore, the study aims to examine whether the Asan Medical Center's (AMC) honest brokers satisfy the four conditions, and examine the need to enhance their roles. Methods. We analyzed the roles, tasks, and types of honest brokers at 10 organizations by reviewing the literature. We also established a Task Force (TF) in our institution for setting the roles and processes of the honest broker system and the honest brokers. The findings of the literature search were compared with the existing systems at AMC-which introduced the honest broker system for the first time in Korea. Results. Only one organization employed an honest broker for validating anonymized clinical data and monitoring the anonymity verifications of the honest broker system. Six organizations complied with HIPAA privacy regulations, while four organizations did not disclose compliance. By comparing functions with those of the AMC, the following four main characteristics of honest brokers were determined: (1) de-identification of clinical data; (2) independence; (3) checking that the data are used only for purposes approved by the IRB; and (4) provision of de-identified data to researchers. These roles were then compared with those of honest brokers at the AMC. Discussion. First, guidelines that regulate the definitions, purposes, roles, and requirements for honest brokers are needed, since there are no currently existing regulations. Second, Korean clinical research institutions and national regulatory departments need to reach a consensus on a Korean version of Limited Data Sets (LDS), since there are no lists that describe the use of personal identification information. Lastly, satisfaction surveys on honest brokers by researchers are necessary to improve the quality of honest

  15. Study on architecture and implementation of adaptive spatial information service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhuoyuan; Wang, Yingjie; Luo, Bin

    2007-06-01

    More and more geo-spatial information has been disseminated to the Internet based on WebGIS architecture. Some of these online mapping applications have already been widely used in recent years, such as Google map, MapQuest, go2map, mapbar. However, due to the limitation of web map technology and transmit speed of large geo-spatial data through the Internet, most of these web map systems employ (pyramid-indexed) raster map modeling technology. This method can shorten server's response time but largely reduces the flexibility and visualization effect of the web map provided. It will be difficult for them to adaptively change the map contents or map styles for variant user demands. This paper propose a new system architecture for adaptive web map service by integrating latest network technology and web map technology, such as SVG, Ajax, user modeling. Its main advantages include: Firstly, it is user customized. In this proposed map system, user can design the map contents, styles and interfaces online by themselves; secondly, it is more intelligent. It can record user interactive actions with the system, analyze user profiles, predict user behavior. User's interests will be obtained and tasks will be suggested based on different user models, which are generated from the system. For instance, if a new user login in, the nearest user model will be matched and some interactive suggestions will be provided by the system for the user. It is a more powerful and efficient way for spatial information sharing. This paper first discusses the main system architecture of adaptive spatial information service which consists of three parts: user layer, map application layer and database layer. User layer is distributed on client side which includes Web map (SVG) browser, map renderer and map visualization component. Application layer includes map application server, user interface generation, user analysis and user modeling, etc. Based on user models, map content, style and user

  16. Egg Donation Brokers

    PubMed Central

    Holwell, Eve; Keehn, Jason; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Sauer, Mark V.; Klitzman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare Websites of agencies that broker the services women who provide human eggs for in vitro fertilization versus clinics that recruit egg providers. STUDY DESIGN We examined 207 websites, of which 128 were egg provider agency (40%) or clinic (60%) websites that recruited providers online. We compared them regarding several variables related to adherence to American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) guidelines. RESULTS According to their respective websites, agencies were more likely than clinics to mention ASRM guidelines, be located in the West/Pacific, indicate compensation, offer a fee range, set their minimum > $5,000, specify preferable traits, cap provider age at ≤ 31,require an education minimum, allow both parties to meet, discuss short-term risks, and not acknowledge a possible cancer risk. Only 25.5% of agencies and 19.5% of clinics mention psychological/emotional risks, and 11.8% and 5.2%, respectively, mention risks, to future fertility. CONCLUSIONS This research, the first to systematically compare several key aspects of egg provider agencies versus clinics, suggests significant differences in adherence to guidelines, raising several concerns and suggesting needs for consideration of improved monitoring and regulation by ASRM or others. PMID:25552124

  17. Designing and implementing a Quality Broker: the GeoViQua experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papeschi, Fabrizio; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Masò, Joan; Nativi, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    GeoViQua (QUAlity aware VIsualisation for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems) is an FP7 project aiming at complementing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) with rigorous data quality specifications and quality-aware capabilities, in order to improve reliability in scientific studies and policy decision-making. GeoViQua main scientific and technical objective is to enhance the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) providing the user community with innovative quality-aware search and visualization tools, which will be integrated in the GEOPortal, as well as made available to other end-user interfaces. To this end, GeoViQua will promote the extension of the current standard metadata for geographic information with accurate and expressive quality indicators. Employing and extending several ISO standards such as 19115, 19157 and 19139, a common set of data quality indicators has been selected to be used within the project. The resulting work, in the form of a data model, is expressed in XML Schema Language and encoded in XML. Quality information can be stated both by data producers and by data users, actually resulting in two conceptually distinct data models, the Producer Quality model and the User Quality model (or User Feedback model). GeoViQua architecture is built on the brokering approach successfully experimented within the EuroGEOSS project and realized by the GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker) which is part of the GCI. The GEO DAB allows for harmonization and distribution in a transparent way for both users and data providers. This way, GeoViQua can effectively complement and extend the GEO DAB obtaining a Quality augmentation Broker (DAB-Q) which plays a central role in ensuring the consistency of the Producer and User quality models. The GeoViQua architecture also includes a Feedback Catalog, a particular service brokered by the DAB-Q which is dedicated to the storage and discovery of user feedbacks. A very important issue

  18. 7 CFR 926.14 - Broker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.14 Broker. Broker... cranberries or cranberry products. Effective Date Note: At 71 FR 78046, Dec. 28, 2006, § 926.14 was...

  19. 7 CFR 926.14 - Broker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.14 Broker. Broker... cranberries or cranberry products. Effective Date Note: At 71 FR 78046, Dec. 28, 2006, § 926.14 was...

  20. 7 CFR 926.14 - Broker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.14 Broker. Broker... cranberries or cranberry products. Effective Date Note: At 71 FR 78046, Dec. 28, 2006, § 926.14 was...

  1. 7 CFR 926.14 - Broker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.14 Broker. Broker... cranberries or cranberry products. Effective Date Note: At 71 FR 78046, Dec. 28, 2006, § 926.14 was...

  2. Developing the architecture for the Climate Information Portal for Copernicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som de Cerff, Wim; Thijsse, Peter; Plieger, Maarten; Pascoe, Stephen; Jukes, Martin; Leadbetter, Adam; Goosen, Hasse; de Vreede, Ernst

    2015-04-01

    environment and society, but will develop an end to end processing chain (indicator toolkit), from comprehensive information on the climate state through to highly aggregated decision relevant products. This processing chain will be demonstrated within three thematic areas: water, rural and urban. Indicators of climate change and climate change impact will be provided, and a toolkit to update and post process the collection of indicators will be integrated into the portal. For the indicators three levels (Tiers) have been loosely defined: Tier 1: field summarising properties of the climate system; e.g. temperature change; Tier 2: expressed in terms of environmental properties outside the climate system; e.g. flooding change; Tier 3: expressed in social and economic impact. For the architecture, CLIPC has two interlocked themes: 1. Harmonised access to climate datasets derived from models, observations and re-analyses 2. A climate impact toolkit to evaluate, rank and aggregate indicators For development of the CLIPC architecture an Agile 'storyline' approach is taken. The storyline is a real world use case and consists of producing a Tier 3 indicator (Urban Heat Vulnerability) and making it available through the CLIPC infrastructure for a user group. In this way architecture concepts can be directly tested and improved. Also, the produced indicator can be shown to users to refine requirements. Main components of the CLIPC architecture are 1) Data discovery and access, 2) Data processing, 3) Data visualization, 4) Knowledge base and 5) User Management. The Data discovery and access component main challenge is to provide harmonized access to various sources of climate data (ngEO, EMODNET/SeaDataNet, ESGF, MyOcean). The discovery service concept will be provided using a CLIPC data and data product catalogue and via a structured data search on selected infrastructures, using NERC vocabulary services and mappings. Data processing will be provided using OGC WPS services, linking

  3. Theatre and Cinema Architecture: A Guide to Information Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Richard

    This annotated bibliography cites works related to theatres, movie houses, opera houses, and dance facilities. It is divided into three parts: general references, theatre architecture, and cinema architecture. The part on general references includes bibliographies and periodicals. The second and main part of the guide, on theatre architecture,…

  4. A National Medical Information System for Senegal: Architecture and Services.

    PubMed

    Camara, Gaoussou; Diallo, Al Hassim; Lo, Moussa; Tendeng, Jacques-Noël; Lo, Seynabou

    2016-01-01

    In Senegal, great amounts of data are daily generated by medical activities such as consultation, hospitalization, blood test, x-ray, birth, death, etc. These data are still recorded in register, printed images, audios and movies which are manually processed. However, some medical organizations have their own software for non-standardized patient record management, appointment, wages, etc. without any possibility of sharing these data or communicating with other medical structures. This leads to lots of limitations in reusing or sharing these data because of their possible structural and semantic heterogeneity. To overcome these problems we have proposed a National Medical Information System for Senegal (SIMENS). As an integrated platform, SIMENS provides an EHR system that supports healthcare activities, a mobile version and a web portal. The SIMENS architecture proposes also a data and application integration services for supporting interoperability and decision making. PMID:27577338

  5. 77 FR 58141 - Public Buildings Service; Information Collection; Art-in-Architecture Program National Artist...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... ADMINISTRATION Public Buildings Service; Information Collection; Art-in- Architecture Program National Artist... requirement regarding Art-in Architecture Program National Artist Registry (GSA Form 7437). The Art-in-Architecture Program is the result of a policy decision made in January 1963 by GSA Administrator Bernard...

  6. 78 FR 23116 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Debt Instruments and Options...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... FR 72652) proposed regulations (REG-102988- 11) relating to information reporting by brokers... Return for Publicly Offered Original Issue Discount Instruments,'' for certain debt instruments with original issue discount and temporary regulations relating to information reporting for premium. The...

  7. 7 CFR 1955.129 - Business brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Business brokers. 1955.129 Section 1955.129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.129 Business brokers. The services of business brokers or...

  8. 7 CFR 1955.129 - Business brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Business brokers. 1955.129 Section 1955.129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.129 Business brokers. The services of business brokers or...

  9. 7 CFR 1955.129 - Business brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Business brokers. 1955.129 Section 1955.129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.129 Business brokers. The services of business brokers or...

  10. 7 CFR 1955.129 - Business brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Business brokers. 1955.129 Section 1955.129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.129 Business brokers. The services of business brokers or...

  11. 7 CFR 1955.129 - Business brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Business brokers. 1955.129 Section 1955.129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.129 Business brokers. The services of business brokers or...

  12. 31 CFR 560.416 - Brokering services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brokering services. 560.416 Section....416 Brokering services. (a) For purposes of the prohibitions in §§ 560.201, 560.204, 560.205, 560.206 and 560.208, the term services includes performing a brokering function. (b) Examples. A person...

  13. Information Technology Architectures. New Opportunities for Partnering, CAUSE94. Track VI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1994 CAUSE conference track on information technology architectures as applied to higher education institutions. The papers include: (1) "Reshaping the Enterprise: Building the Next Generation of Information Systems Through Information Architecture and Processing Reengineering," which notes developments at the…

  14. Data de- and redimensioning for optimized brokering access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuka, D. R.; MacAlister, C.; Khalsa, S. S.; Walter, M. T.; Fuka, M. Z.; Pierce, S. A.; Easton, Z. M.

    2013-12-01

    Data brokering systems aim to facilitate the exchange of data and models between disciplines in an increasingly transparent manner thereby accelerating scientific discovery. Researchers from many different, yet complimentary geoscience disciplines need to access cross field datasets from different fields with significantly different data formats, and in most cases differing time and space dimensionality than their own field commonly uses. This causes problems with large datasets with different time and space dimensions, as the difference in dimension often means that the entire dataset has to be read in order to provide the limited information the researcher is interested in. In this poster we present methods for removing the dimensionality from datasets, both physically on the data serving side as well demonstrate de- and redimensioning datasets from a broker based virtual perspective so the data brokering system can quickly access the smaller subset of data in the correct dimensionality for any given field.

  15. 77 FR 74826 - Notice of Intent To Seek OMB Approval To Collect Information: On-Line Architectural Barriers Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Notice of Intent To Seek OMB Approval To Collect Information: On- Line Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Complaint Form AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation...

  16. Knowledge Brokers in the Making: Opportunities to Connect Researchers and Stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, K. G.; Pennell, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Environmental science and engineering graduate students often lack training on how to communicate with policy decision makers who are grappling with questions to which research is responding. They communicate directly with mutual experts, but are many times unable to engage with non-experts about their research, thereby limiting the reach and impact of their findings. This presentation highlights opportunities within environmental science and engineering research to create opportunities for researchers to hone skills as knowledge brokers, so they learn ways to meaningfully engage with a range of stakeholders. A knowledge broker is an individual who connects scientific experts and relevant stakeholders with meaningful and useable information. Recognizing that information must flow in multiple directions, the knowledge broker must quickly and effectively translate needs and questions using established relationships. It is these relationships, as well as the synthesis of scientific knowledge into useable information, on which the success of the knowledge broker lies. Using lessons learned, as well as communication science theory related to knowledge brokering, this presentation highlights training opportunities for knowledge brokers who are primarily educated in science and engineering fields, yet seek to engage with societally relevant stakeholders. We present case study examples of knowledge brokering within two large multi-disciplinary research centers. These centers provide unique experiences for researchers to build relationships with stakeholders, so that the scientific experts not only create novel research within their specific discipline, but also inform policy decision makers, community members and regulatory officials.

  17. 78 FR 48458 - Notice of Reinstatement of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In a notice published in the Federal Register (77 FR 72873) on December 6, 2012, U.S... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Reinstatement of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Reinstatement of customs...

  18. 12 CFR 703.8 - Broker-dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Broker-dealers. 703.8 Section 703.8 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT... business; (2) Information available from State or Federal securities regulators and securities...

  19. Generalized Information Architecture for Managing Requirements in IBM?s Rational DOORS(r) Application.

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, Kathryn M.; Eaton, Shelley M.; McCornack, Marjorie Turner; Shannon, Sharon A.

    2014-12-01

    When a requirements engineering effort fails to meet expectations, often times the requirements management tool is blamed. Working with numerous project teams at Sandia National Laboratories over the last fifteen years has shown us that the tool is rarely the culprit; usually it is the lack of a viable information architecture with well- designed processes to support requirements engineering. This document illustrates design concepts with rationale, as well as a proven information architecture to structure and manage information in support of requirements engineering activities for any size or type of project. This generalized information architecture is specific to IBM's Rational DOORS (Dynamic Object Oriented Requirements System) software application, which is the requirements management tool in Sandia's CEE (Common Engineering Environment). This generalized information architecture can be used as presented or as a foundation for designing a tailored information architecture for project-specific needs. It may also be tailored for another software tool. Version 1.0 4 November 201

  20. 78 FR 41299 - Customs Brokers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 19 CFR Part 111 Customs Brokers CFR Correction In Title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 0 to 140, revised as of April 1, 2013,...

  1. Distributed information system architecture for Primary Health Care.

    PubMed

    Grammatikou, M; Stamatelopoulos, F; Maglaris, B

    2000-01-01

    We present a distributed architectural framework for Primary Health Care (PHC) Centres. Distribution is handled through the introduction of the Roaming Electronic Health Care Record (R-EHCR) and the use of local caching and incremental update of a global index. The proposed architecture is designed to accommodate a specific PHC workflow model. Finally, we discuss a pilot implementation in progress, which is based on CORBA and web-based user interfaces. However, the conceptual architecture is generic and open to other middleware approaches like the DHE or HL7. PMID:11187702

  2. Structured P2P Overlay of Mobile Brokers for Realizing Publish/Subscribe Communication in VANET

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Tulika; Garg, Deepak; Gore, Manoj Madhava

    2014-01-01

    Publish/subscribe communication paradigm provides asynchrony and decoupling, making it an elegant alternative for designing applications in distributed and dynamic environment such as vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). In this paradigm, the broker is the most important component that decouples other two components, namely, publisher and subscriber. Previous research efforts have either utilized the deployment of distributed brokers on stationary road side info-stations or have assigned the role of broker to any moving vehicle on ad hoc basis. In one approach, lots of preinstalled infrastructures are needed whereas, in another, the quality of service is not guaranteed due to unpredictable moving and stopping patterns of vehicles. In this paper, we present the architecture of distributed mobile brokers which are dynamically reconfigurable in the form of structured P2P overlay and act as rendezvous points for matching publications and subscriptions. We have taken city buses in urban settings to act as mobile brokers whereas other vehicles are considered to be in role of publishers and subscribers. These mobile brokers also assist in locating a vehicle for successful and timely transfer of notifications. We have performed an extensive simulation study to compare our approach with previously proposed approaches. Simulation results establish the applicability of our approach. PMID:24523629

  3. Structured P2P overlay of mobile brokers for realizing publish/subscribe communication in VANET.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Tulika; Garg, Deepak; Gore, Manoj Madhava

    2014-01-01

    Publish/subscribe communication paradigm provides asynchrony and decoupling, making it an elegant alternative for designing applications in distributed and dynamic environment such as vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). In this paradigm, the broker is the most important component that decouples other two components, namely, publisher and subscriber. Previous research efforts have either utilized the deployment of distributed brokers on stationary road side info-stations or have assigned the role of broker to any moving vehicle on ad hoc basis. In one approach, lots of preinstalled infrastructures are needed whereas, in another, the quality of service is not guaranteed due to unpredictable moving and stopping patterns of vehicles. In this paper, we present the architecture of distributed mobile brokers which are dynamically reconfigurable in the form of structured P2P overlay and act as rendezvous points for matching publications and subscriptions. We have taken city buses in urban settings to act as mobile brokers whereas other vehicles are considered to be in role of publishers and subscribers. These mobile brokers also assist in locating a vehicle for successful and timely transfer of notifications. We have performed an extensive simulation study to compare our approach with previously proposed approaches. Simulation results establish the applicability of our approach. PMID:24523629

  4. The Role of Knowledge Brokers in International Ocean Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannix, H.

    2013-12-01

    The concept of the 'boundary' between science and policy has been used as a tool to separate and protect the credibility of both parties - the scientist and the policy maker. While this separation is important, it also results in frustration by both sides, a reduction in efficiency and ultimately establishes policy that has the potential to be more effective. Many now agree that the process of knowledge generation and transmission to decision makers, and eventually into effective policy, should not be a one-way, linear push of information, but a multi-party dialogue in which decision makers, scientists and intermediaries work together to increase the effectiveness of the scientific information for the policy process. These intermediaries, or knowledge brokers, are described as persons or organizations that actively facilitate the creation, sharing, and use of knowledge. This work discusses the reasons for the boundary between science and policy and the inherent challenges in bridging the boundary. It examines the role and activities of knowledge brokers and illuminates the process by which scientific and technical knowledge is translated from knowledge generators (i.e. scientists) to knowledge users (i.e. policy makers) in international environmental governance. The study then considers the role of knowledge brokers in practice, through a case study of the ongoing effort to establish marine protected areas in the high seas. Specifically, this study examines who the knowledge brokers are working on this topic, their activities, and what lessons their experiences hold for the effective translation of scientific information to policy makers in other international issues. The study concludes that 1) knowledge brokers and boundary organizations are an essential part of the effective translation of scientific knowledge to policy makers in international environmental governance and 2) both knowledge generators and knowledge users would benefit by recognizing the role of

  5. SANDS: a service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    PubMed

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. The SANDS architecture for decision support has several significant advantages over other architectures for clinical decision support. The most salient of these are: PMID:18434256

  6. Advanced information processing system for advanced launch system: Avionics architecture synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a fault-tolerant distributed computer system architecture that was developed to meet the real time computational needs of advanced aerospace vehicles. One such vehicle is the Advanced Launch System (ALS) being developed jointly by NASA and the Department of Defense to launch heavy payloads into low earth orbit at one tenth the cost (per pound of payload) of the current launch vehicles. An avionics architecture that utilizes the AIPS hardware and software building blocks was synthesized for ALS. The AIPS for ALS architecture synthesis process starting with the ALS mission requirements and ending with an analysis of the candidate ALS avionics architecture is described.

  7. ELISA, a demonstrator environment for information systems architecture design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panem, Chantal

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an approach of reusability of software engineering technology in the area of ground space system design. System engineers have lots of needs similar to software developers: sharing of a common data base, capitalization of knowledge, definition of a common design process, communication between different technical domains. Moreover system designers need to simulate dynamically their system as early as possible. Software development environments, methods and tools now become operational and widely used. Their architecture is based on a unique object base, a set of common management services and they host a family of tools for each life cycle activity. In late '92, CNES decided to develop a demonstrative software environment supporting some system activities. The design of ground space data processing systems was chosen as the application domain. ELISA (Integrated Software Environment for Architectures Specification) was specified as a 'demonstrator', i.e. a sufficient basis for demonstrations, evaluation and future operational enhancements. A process with three phases was implemented: system requirements definition, design of system architectures models, and selection of physical architectures. Each phase is composed of several activities that can be performed in parallel, with the provision of Commercial Off the Shelves Tools. ELISA has been delivered to CNES in January 94, currently used for demonstrations and evaluations on real projects (e.g. SPOT4 Satellite Control Center). It is on the way of new evolutions.

  8. Intelligent Information Retrieval and Web Mining Architecture Using SOA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Bathy, Naser Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    The study of this dissertation provides a solution to a very specific problem instance in the area of data mining, data warehousing, and service-oriented architecture in publishing and newspaper industries. The research question focuses on the integration of data mining and data warehousing. The research problem focuses on the development of…

  9. The Internet information infrastructure: Terrorist tool or architecture for information defense?

    SciTech Connect

    Kadner, S.; Turpen, E.; Rees, B.

    1998-12-01

    The Internet is a culmination of information age technologies and an agent of change. As with any infrastructure, dependency upon the so-called global information infrastructure creates vulnerabilities. Moreover, unlike physical infrastructures, the Internet is a multi-use technology. While information technologies, such as the Internet, can be utilized as a tool of terror, these same technologies can facilitate the implementation of solutions to mitigate the threat. In this vein, this paper analyzes the multifaceted nature of the Internet information infrastructure and argues that policymakers should concentrate on the solutions it provides rather than the vulnerabilities it creates. Minimizing risks and realizing possibilities in the information age will require institutional activities that translate, exploit and convert information technologies into positive solutions. What follows is a discussion of the Internet information infrastructure as it relates to increasing vulnerabilities and positive potential. The following four applications of the Internet will be addressed: as the infrastructure for information competence; as a terrorist tool; as the terrorist`s target; and as an architecture for rapid response.

  10. 17 CFR 21.02 - Special calls for information on open contracts in accounts carried or introduced by futures...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in the call, each futures commission merchant, clearing member, member of a reporting market, introducing broker, or foreign broker, and, in addition, for option information, each reporting market,...

  11. 17 CFR 21.02 - Special calls for information on open contracts in accounts carried or introduced by futures...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in the call, each futures commission merchant, clearing member, member of a reporting market, introducing broker, or foreign broker, and, in addition, for option information, each reporting market,...

  12. 31 CFR 560.416 - Brokering services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provision of goods, services or technology, from whatever source, to or from Iran or the Government of Iran... the Government of Iran; (3) Act as broker for the provision of financing, a financial guarantee or an extension of credit by any person to Iran or the Government of Iran; (4) Act as a broker for the...

  13. 31 CFR 560.416 - Brokering services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for the provision of goods, services or technology, from whatever source, to or from Iran or the Government of Iran; (2) Act as broker for the purchase or swap of crude oil of Iranian origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Iran; (3) Act as broker for the provision of financing, a financial...

  14. 31 CFR 560.416 - Brokering services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provision of goods, services or technology, from whatever source, to or from Iran or the Government of Iran... the Government of Iran; (3) Act as broker for the provision of financing, a financial guarantee or an extension of credit by any person to Iran or the Government of Iran; (4) Act as a broker for the...

  15. 31 CFR 560.416 - Brokering services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for the provision of goods, services or technology, from whatever source, to or from Iran or the Government of Iran; (2) Act as broker for the purchase or swap of crude oil of Iranian origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Iran; (3) Act as broker for the provision of financing, a financial...

  16. Should Nurses Be Knowledge Brokers? Competencies and Organizational Resources to Support the Role.

    PubMed

    Catallo, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    Registered nurses with graduate preparation are in a unique position to act as knowledge brokers owing to their extensive clinical experience and ability to be seen as a credible and respected resource by their peers. Nurse knowledge brokers can bridge the gap between research producers and those that need evidence for decision-making and support capacity development for evidence-informed decision-making (EIDM). Knowledge broker competencies include graduate-level education with exposure to research methods; experience with the EIDM process; and established networking skills to bring researchers, decision-makers, stakeholders and policymakers together. For the knowledge broker to be successful, the nurse leader can cultivate an organizational culture supportive of evidence use with advocacy for mandates that require evidence for decisions, structures in place for each stage of the EIDM process, and physical resources such as library services for evidence retrieval. PMID:26154118

  17. Information Architecture for the Web: The IA Matrix Approach to Designing Children's Portals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Large, Andrew; Beheshti, Jamshid; Cole, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Presents a matrix that can serve as a tool for designing the information architecture of a Web portal in a logical and systematic manner. Highlights include interfaces; metaphors; navigation; interaction; information retrieval; and an example of a children's Web portal to provide access to museum information. (Author/LRW)

  18. Touring by Design: Using Information Architecture To Create a Virtual Library Tour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittelson, Pat; Jones, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development of a Web-based virtual tour of the University of Otago (New Zealand) science library. Highlights include information literacy learning outcomes; information architecture, including information organization and navigation; integrating the tour into course work; and evaluation results. (LRW)

  19. SANDS: A Service-Oriented Architecture for Clinical Decision Support in a National Health Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. PMID:18434256

  20. NaradaBrokering as Middleware Fabric for Grid-based Remote Visualization Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallickara, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Yuen, D.; Fox, G.; Pierce, M.

    2003-12-01

    Remote Visualization Services (RVS) have tended to rely on approaches based on the client server paradigm. The simplicity in these approaches is offset by problems such as single-point-of-failures, scaling and availability. Furthermore, as the complexity, scale and scope of the services hosted on this paradigm increase, this approach becomes increasingly unsuitable. We propose a scheme based on top of a distributed brokering infrastructure, NaradaBrokering, which comprises a distributed network of broker nodes. These broker nodes are organized in a cluster-based architecture that can scale to very large sizes. The broker network is resilient to broker failures and efficiently routes interactions to entities that expressed an interest in them. In our approach to RVS, services advertise their capabilities to the broker network, which manages these service advertisements. Among the services considered within our system are those that perform graphic transformations, mediate access to specialized datasets and finally those that manage the execution of specified tasks. There could be multiple instances of each of these services and the system ensures that load for a given service is distributed efficiently over these service instances. Among the features provided in our approach are efficient discovery of services and asynchronous interactions between services and service requestors (which could themselves be other services). Entities need not be online during the execution of the service request. The system also ensures that entities can be notified about task executions, partial results and failures that might have taken place during service execution. The system also facilitates specification of task overrides, distribution of execution results to alternate devices (which were not used to originally request service execution) and to multiple users. These RVS services could of course be either OGSA (Open Grid Services Architecture) based Grid services or traditional

  1. Towards a Brokering Framework for Business Process Execution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mattia; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Roncella, Roberto; Mazzetti, Paolo; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Advancing our knowledge of environmental phenomena and their interconnections requires an intensive use of environmental models. Due to the complexity of Earth system, the representation of complex environmental processes often requires the use of more than one model (often from different disciplines). The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) launched the Model Web initiative to increase present accessibility and interoperability of environmental models, allowing their flexible composition into complex Business Processes (BPs). A few, basic principles are at the base of the Model Web concept (Nativi, et al.): (i) Open access, (ii) Minimal entry-barriers, (iii) Service-driven approach, and (iv) Scalability. This work proposes an architectural solution, based on the Brokering approach for multidisciplinary interoperability, aiming to contribute to the Model Web vision. The Brokering approach is currently adopted in the new GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) as was presented at the last GEO Plenary meeting in Istanbul, November 2011. We designed and prototyped a component called BP Broker. The high-level functionalities provided by the BP Broker are: • Discover the needed model implementations in an open, distributed and heterogeneous environment; • Check I/O consistency of BPs and provide suggestions for mismatches resolving: • Publish the EBP as a standard model resource for re-use. • Submit the compiled BP (EBP) to a WF-engine for execution. A BP Broker has the following features: • Support multiple abstract BP specifications; • Support encoding in multiple WF-engine languages. According to the Brokering principles, the designed system is flexible enough to support the use of multiple BP design (visual) tools, heterogeneous Web interfaces for model execution (e.g. OGC WPS, WSDL, etc.), and different Workflow engines. The present implementation makes use of BPMN 2.0 notation for BP design and jBPM workflow engine for eBP execution; however, the strong

  2. 12 CFR 220.7 - Broker-dealer credit account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Broker-dealer credit account. 220.7 Section 220... SYSTEM (CONTINUED) CREDIT BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.7 Broker-dealer credit account. (a) Requirements. In a broker-dealer credit account, a creditor may effect or finance transactions in...

  3. 12 CFR 220.7 - Broker-dealer credit account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Broker-dealer credit account. 220.7 Section 220... SYSTEM CREDIT BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.7 Broker-dealer credit account. (a) Requirements. In a broker-dealer credit account, a creditor may effect or finance transactions in...

  4. The holistic architectural approach to integrating the healthcare record in the overall information system.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, F M; Sottile, P A; Grimson, W

    1999-01-01

    The integration and evolution of existing systems represents one of the most urgent problems facing those responsible for healthcare information systems so that the needs of the whole organisation are addressed. The management of the healthcare record represents one of the major requirements in the overall process, however it is also necessary to ensure that the healthcare record and other healthcare information is integrated within the context of an overall healthcare information system. The CEN ENV 12967-1 'Healthcare Information Systems Architecture' standard defines a holistic architectural approach where the various, organisational, clinical, administrative and managerial requirements co-exist and cooperate, relying on a common heritage of information and services. This paper reviews the middleware-based approach adopted by CEN ENV 12967-1 and the specialisation necessary for the healthcare record based on CEN ENV 12265 'Electronic Healthcare Record Architecture'. PMID:10725017

  5. Extending the GI Brokering Suite to Support New Interoperability Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, E.; Papeschi, F.; Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    The GI brokering suite provides the discovery, access, and semantic Brokers (i.e. GI-cat, GI-axe, GI-sem) that empower a Brokering framework for multi-disciplinary and multi-organizational interoperability. GI suite has been successfully deployed in the framework of several programmes and initiatives, such as European Union funded projects, NSF BCube, and the intergovernmental coordinated effort Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Each GI suite Broker facilitates interoperability for a particular functionality (i.e. discovery, access, semantic extension) among a set of brokered resources published by autonomous providers (e.g. data repositories, web services, semantic assets) and a set of heterogeneous consumers (e.g. client applications, portals, apps). A wide set of data models, encoding formats, and service protocols are already supported by the GI suite, such as the ones defined by international standardizing organizations like OGC and ISO (e.g. WxS, CSW, SWE, GML, netCDF) and by Community specifications (e.g. THREDDS, OpenSearch, OPeNDAP, ESRI APIs). Using GI suite, resources published by a particular Community or organization through their specific technology (e.g. OPeNDAP/netCDF) can be transparently discovered, accessed, and used by different Communities utilizing their preferred tools (e.g. a GIS visualizing WMS layers). Since Information Technology is a moving target, new standards and technologies continuously emerge and are adopted in the Earth Science context too. Therefore, GI Brokering suite was conceived to be flexible and accommodate new interoperability protocols and data models. For example, GI suite has recently added support to well-used specifications, introduced to implement Linked data, Semantic Web and precise community needs. Amongst the others, they included: DCAT: a RDF vocabulary designed to facilitate interoperability between Web data catalogs. CKAN: a data management system for data distribution, particularly used by

  6. Information management architecture for an integrated computing environment for the Environmental Restoration Program. Environmental Restoration Program, Volume 3, Interim technical architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This third volume of the Information Management Architecture for an Integrated Computing Environment for the Environmental Restoration Program--the Interim Technical Architecture (TA) (referred to throughout the remainder of this document as the ER TA)--represents a key milestone in establishing a coordinated information management environment in which information initiatives can be pursued with the confidence that redundancy and inconsistencies will be held to a minimum. This architecture is intended to be used as a reference by anyone whose responsibilities include the acquisition or development of information technology for use by the ER Program. The interim ER TA provides technical guidance at three levels. At the highest level, the technical architecture provides an overall computing philosophy or direction. At this level, the guidance does not address specific technologies or products but addresses more general concepts, such as the use of open systems, modular architectures, graphical user interfaces, and architecture-based development. At the next level, the technical architecture provides specific information technology recommendations regarding a wide variety of specific technologies. These technologies include computing hardware, operating systems, communications software, database management software, application development software, and personal productivity software, among others. These recommendations range from the adoption of specific industry or Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) standards to the specification of individual products. At the third level, the architecture provides guidance regarding implementation strategies for the recommended technologies that can be applied to individual projects and to the ER Program as a whole.

  7. Information Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follen, Gregory J.; Naiman, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    The objective of GRC CNIS/IE work is to build a plug-n-play infrastructure that provides the Grand Challenge Applications with a suite of tools for coupling codes together, numerical zooming between fidelity of codes and gaining deployment of these simulations onto the Information Power Grid. The GRC CNIS/IE work will streamline and improve this process by providing tighter integration of various tools through the use of object oriented design of component models and data objects and through the use of CORBA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture).

  8. A software architecture to support a large-scale, multi-tier clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Yungton, J A; Sittig, D F; Reilly, P; Pappas, J; Flammini, S; Chueh, H C; Teich, J M

    1998-01-01

    A robust software architecture is necessary to support a large-scale multi-tier clinical information system. This paper describes our mechanism for enterprise distribution of applications and support files, the consolidation of data-access functions and system utilities stored on the data access tier, and an application framework which implements a coherent clinical computing environment. The software architecture and systems described in this paper have been robust through pilot testing of our applications at Massachusetts General Hospital. PMID:9929212

  9. GI-axe: an access broker framework for the geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, E.; Nativi, S.; Santoro, M.; Papeschi, F.; Mazzetti, P.

    2012-12-01

    The efficient and effective discovery of heterogeneous geospatial resources (e.g. data and services) is currently addressed by implementing "Discovery Brokering components"—such as GI-cat which is successfully used by the GEO brokering framework. A related (and subsequent) problem is the access of discovered resources. As for the discovery case, there exists a clear challenge: the geospatial Community makes use of heterogeneous access protocols and data models. In fact, different standards (and best practices) are defined and used by the diverse Geoscience domains and Communities of practice. Besides, through a client application, Users want to access diverse data to be jointly used in a common Geospatial Environment (CGE): a geospatial environment characterized by a spatio-temporal CRS (Coordinate Reference System), resolution, and extension. Users want to define a CGE and get the selected data ready to be used in such an environment. Finally, they want to download data according to a common encoding (either binary or textual). Therefore, it is possible to introduce the concept of "Access Brokering component" which addresses all these intermediation needs, in a transparent way for both clients (i.e. Users) and access servers (i.e. Data Providers). This work presents GI-axe: a flexible Access Broker which is capable to intermediate the different access standards and to get data according to a CGE, previously specified by the User. In doing that, GI-axe complements the capabilities of the brokered access servers, in keeping with the brokering principles. Let's consider a sample use case of a User needing to access a global temperature dataset available online on a THREDDS Data Server and a rainfall dataset accessible through a WFS—she/he may have obtained the datasets as a search result from a discovery broker. Distribution information metadata accompanying the temperature dataset further indicate that a given OPeNDAP service has to be accessed to retrieve it

  10. A multi-disciplinary approach to honest broker services for tissue banks and clinical data: a pragmatic and practical model

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Rajiv; Patel, Ashok A.; Winters, Sharon; Bisceglia, Michelle; Swanson, Dennis; Aamodt, Roger; Becich, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Honest broker services are essential for tissue- and data-based research. The honest broker provides a firewall between clinical and research activities. Clinical information is stripped of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-denoted personal health identifiers. Research material may have linkage codes, precluding the identification of patients to researchers. The honest broker provides data derived from clinical and research sources. These data are for research use only, and there are rules in place that prohibit reidentification. Very rarely, the institutional review board (IRB) may allow recontact and develop a recontact plan with the honest broker. Certain databases are structured to serve a clinical and research function and incorporate ‘real-time’ updating of information. This complex process needs resolution of a variety of issues regarding the precise role of the HB and their interaction with data. There also is an obvious need for software solutions to make the task of deidentification easier. METHODS The University of Pittsburgh has implemented a novel, IRB-approved mechanism to address honest broker functions to meet the specimen and data needs of researchers. The Tissue Bank stores biologic specimens. The Cancer Registry culls data and annotating information as part of state- and federal-mandated functions and collects data on the clinical progression, treatment, and outcomes of cancer patients. The Cancer Registry also has additional IRB approval to collect data elements only for research purposes. The Clinical Outcomes Group is involved in patient safety and health services research. Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology provide critical treatment related information. Pathology and Oncology Informatics have designed software tools for querying availability of specimens, extracting data, and deidentifying specimens and annotating data for clinical and translational research. These entities partnered and submitted a

  11. Design Principles for the Information Architecture of a SMET Education Digital Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Andy; Agogino, Alice M.

    This implementation paper introduces principles for the information architecture of an educational digital library, principles that address the distinction between designing digital libraries for education and designing digital libraries for information retrieval in general. Design is a key element of any successful product. Good designers and…

  12. Global Information Infrastructure: The Birth, Vision, and Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Targowski, Andrew S.

    A new world has arrived in which computer and communications technologies will transform the national and global economies into information-driven economies. This is triggering the Information Revolution, which will have political and societal impacts every bit as profound as those of the Industrial Revolution. The 21st century is viewed as one…

  13. Stigmergic construction and topochemical information shape ant nest architecture

    PubMed Central

    Khuong, Anaïs; Gautrais, Jacques; Perna, Andrea; Sbaï, Chaker; Combe, Maud; Kuntz, Pascale; Jost, Christian; Theraulaz, Guy

    2016-01-01

    The nests of social insects are not only impressive because of their sheer complexity but also because they are built from individuals whose work is not centrally coordinated. A key question is how groups of insects coordinate their building actions. Here, we use a combination of experimental and modeling approaches to investigate nest construction in the ant Lasius niger. We quantify the construction dynamics and the 3D structures built by ants. Then, we characterize individual behaviors and the interactions of ants with the structures they build. We show that two main interactions are involved in the coordination of building actions: (i) a stigmergic-based interaction that controls the amplification of depositions at some locations and is attributable to a pheromone added by ants to the building material; and (ii) a template-based interaction in which ants use their body size as a cue to control the height at which they start to build a roof from existing pillars. We then develop a 3D stochastic model based on these individual behaviors to analyze the effect of pheromone presence and strength on construction dynamics. We show that the model can quantitatively reproduce key features of construction dynamics, including a large-scale pattern of regularly spaced pillars, the formation and merging of caps over the pillars, and the remodeling of built structures. Finally, our model suggests that the lifetime of the pheromone is a highly influential parameter that controls the growth and form of nest architecture. PMID:26787857

  14. Stigmergic construction and topochemical information shape ant nest architecture.

    PubMed

    Khuong, Anaïs; Gautrais, Jacques; Perna, Andrea; Sbaï, Chaker; Combe, Maud; Kuntz, Pascale; Jost, Christian; Theraulaz, Guy

    2016-02-01

    The nests of social insects are not only impressive because of their sheer complexity but also because they are built from individuals whose work is not centrally coordinated. A key question is how groups of insects coordinate their building actions. Here, we use a combination of experimental and modeling approaches to investigate nest construction in the ant Lasius niger. We quantify the construction dynamics and the 3D structures built by ants. Then, we characterize individual behaviors and the interactions of ants with the structures they build. We show that two main interactions are involved in the coordination of building actions: (i) a stigmergic-based interaction that controls the amplification of depositions at some locations and is attributable to a pheromone added by ants to the building material; and (ii) a template-based interaction in which ants use their body size as a cue to control the height at which they start to build a roof from existing pillars. We then develop a 3D stochastic model based on these individual behaviors to analyze the effect of pheromone presence and strength on construction dynamics. We show that the model can quantitatively reproduce key features of construction dynamics, including a large-scale pattern of regularly spaced pillars, the formation and merging of caps over the pillars, and the remodeling of built structures. Finally, our model suggests that the lifetime of the pheromone is a highly influential parameter that controls the growth and form of nest architecture. PMID:26787857

  15. A resource management architecture for metacomputing systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, K.; Foster, I.; Karonis, N.; Kesselman, C.; Martin, S.; Smith, W.; Tuecke, S.

    1999-08-24

    Metacomputing systems are intended to support remote and/or concurrent use of geographically distributed computational resources. Resource management in such systems is complicated by five concerns that do not typically arise in other situations: site autonomy and heterogeneous substrates at the resources, and application requirements for policy extensibility, co-allocation, and online control. We describe a resource management architecture that addresses these concerns. This architecture distributes the resource management problem among distinct local manager, resource broker, and resource co-allocator components and defines an extensible resource specification language to exchange information about requirements. We describe how these techniques have been implemented in the context of the Globus metacomputing toolkit and used to implement a variety of different resource management strategies. We report on our experiences applying our techniques in a large testbed, GUSTO, incorporating 15 sites, 330 computers, and 3600 processors.

  16. A Novel Software Architecture for the Provision of Context-Aware Semantic Transport Information

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Asier; Perallos, Asier; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Onieva, Enrique; Salaberria, Itziar; Masegosa, Antonio D.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Intelligent Transportation Systems depends largely on the ability to integrate information from diverse sources and the suitability of this information for the specific user. This paper describes a new approach for the management and exchange of this information, related to multimodal transportation. A novel software architecture is presented, with particular emphasis on the design of the data model and the enablement of services for information retrieval, thereby obtaining a semantic model for the representation of transport information. The publication of transport data as semantic information is established through the development of a Multimodal Transport Ontology (MTO) and the design of a distributed architecture allowing dynamic integration of transport data. The advantages afforded by the proposed system due to the use of Linked Open Data and a distributed architecture are stated, comparing it with other existing solutions. The adequacy of the information generated in regard to the specific user’s context is also addressed. Finally, a working solution of a semantic trip planner using actual transport data and running on the proposed architecture is presented, as a demonstration and validation of the system. PMID:26016915

  17. A novel software architecture for the provision of context-aware semantic transport information.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Asier; Perallos, Asier; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Onieva, Enrique; Salaberria, Itziar; Masegosa, Antonio D

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Intelligent Transportation Systems depends largely on the ability to integrate information from diverse sources and the suitability of this information for the specific user. This paper describes a new approach for the management and exchange of this information, related to multimodal transportation. A novel software architecture is presented, with particular emphasis on the design of the data model and the enablement of services for information retrieval, thereby obtaining a semantic model for the representation of transport information. The publication of transport data as semantic information is established through the development of a Multimodal Transport Ontology (MTO) and the design of a distributed architecture allowing dynamic integration of transport data. The advantages afforded by the proposed system due to the use of Linked Open Data and a distributed architecture are stated, comparing it with other existing solutions. The adequacy of the information generated in regard to the specific user's context is also addressed. Finally, a working solution of a semantic trip planner using actual transport data and running on the proposed architecture is presented, as a demonstration and validation of the system. PMID:26016915

  18. Architectural Design for the Global Legal Information Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalpakis, Konstantinos

    1999-01-01

    In this report, we provide a summary of our activities regarding the goals, requirements analysis, design, and prototype implementation for the Global Legal Information Network, a joint effort between the Law Library of Congress and NASA.

  19. Space Power Program, Instrumentation and Control System Architecture, Pre-conceptual Design, for Information

    SciTech Connect

    JM Ross

    2005-10-20

    The purpose of this letter is to forward the Prometheus preconceptual Instrumentation and Control (I&C) system architecture (Enclosure (1)) to NR for information as part of the Prometheus closeout work. The preconceptual 1&C system architecture was considered a key planning document for development of the I&C system for Project Prometheus. This architecture was intended to set the technical approach for the entire I&C system. It defines interfaces to other spacecraft systems, defines hardware blocks for future development, and provides a basis for accurate cost and schedule estimates. Since the system requirements are not known at this time, it was anticipated that the architecture would evolve as the design of the reactor module was matured.

  20. Semantic Mediation via Access Broker: the OWS-9 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mattia; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Craglia, Massimo; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Even with the use of common data models standards to publish and share geospatial data, users may still face semantic inconsistencies when they use Spatial Data Infrastructures - especially in multidisciplinary contexts. Several semantic mediation solutions exist to address this issue; they span from simple XSLT documents to transform from one data model schema to another, to more complex services based on the use of ontologies. This work presents the activity done in the context of the OGC Web Services Phase 9 (OWS-9) Cross Community Interoperability to develop a semantic mediation solution by enhancing the GEOSS Discovery and Access Broker (DAB). This is a middleware component that provides harmonized access to geospatial datasets according to client applications preferred service interface (Nativi et al. 2012, Vaccari et al. 2012). Given a set of remote feature data encoded in different feature schemas, the objective of the activity was to use the DAB to enable client applications to transparently access the feature data according to one single schema. Due to the flexible architecture of the Access Broker, it was possible to introduce a new transformation type in the configured chain of transformations. In fact, the Access Broker already provided the following transformations: Coordinate Reference System (CRS), spatial resolution, spatial extent (e.g., a subset of a data set), and data encoding format. A new software module was developed to invoke the needed external semantic mediation service and harmonize the accessed features. In OWS-9 the Access Broker invokes a SPARQL WPS to retrieve mapping rules for the OWS-9 schemas: USGS, and NGA schema. The solution implemented to address this problem shows the flexibility and extensibility of the brokering framework underpinning the GEO DAB: new services can be added to augment the number of supported schemas without the need to modify other components and/or software modules. Moreover, all other transformations (CRS

  1. Philosophy and Architecture of the EOS Data and Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiden, Martha

    In 2009, NASA's EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is the world's largest distributed data and information system infrastructure principally supporting science, a coupled, complex network of production capabilities and data systems. Data and information are easily available through the World Wide Web from searchable, on-line data stores with sophisticated metadata schema, data dictionaries, and comprehensive scientific and technical documentation of its holdings. NASA is moving towards adoption of a service-oriented approach deploying Web services, which enable users to make connections between distributed and heterogeneous elements of environmental data and services internal to and external from EOSDIS as needed. Pertinent Web services are accessible via EOSDIS. Examples of data services include subsetting, data reformatting, and search services such as a thesaurus. The principal subject matter of this book, the MODIS and ASTER instruments, and their derived data, products and applications owe their existence and success to EOSDIS.

  2. Information Model Driven Semantic Framework Architecture and Design for Distributed Data Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P. A.; Semantic eScience Framework Team

    2011-12-01

    In Earth and space science, the steady evolution away from isolated and single purpose data 'systems' toward systems of systems, data ecosystems, or data frameworks that provide access to highly heterogeneous data repositories is picking up in pace. As a result, common informatics approaches are being sought for how newer architectures are developed and/or implemented. In particular, a clear need to have a repeatable method for modeling, implementing and evolving the information architectures has emerged and one that goes beyond traditional software design. This presentation outlines new component design approaches bases in sets of information model and semantic encodings for mediation.

  3. DIORAMA: dynamic information collection and resource tracking architecture.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Aura; Yu, Xunyi; Schafer, James; D'Hauwe, Sophie; Nathanson, Larry A; Burstein, Jonathan; Ciottone, Gregory R; Lord, Graydon

    2010-01-01

    DIORAMA is a real-time scalable decision support framework built on rapid information collection and accurate resource tracking functionalities. Using RFID technology the proposed system tracks emergency responders and victims at the disaster scene. DIORAMA improves the accuracy and decreases the time it takes rescuers to triage, treat and evacuate victims from a disaster scene, as compared to the traditional methods and process that involves using paper triage tags. The information can then be viewed from a website that shows a satellite image of the disaster area with icons representing the paramedics and victims. PMID:21097191

  4. Brokering technologies as a framework for collaborative data curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmey, L.; Wilcox, H.

    2012-12-01

    Open technologies enable advances in data curation arenas such as data discovery, access, and distribution, and further promise additional functionality in visualization, automated conversions, data processing, etc. With more and more data available online, focus shifts from data sharing to efficient and effective data discovery. The approach used in the Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (ACADIS) project to maximize data discovery is the creation of an Arctic metadata brokering system based on the GI-cat tool. By aggregating metadata outside of their original context, the technical interconnectivity of a brokering system highlights differences in data curation practices among data centers. Resolving these differences to present scientists with comparable metadata requires new communication, governance, and standardization mechanisms. We will present the ACADIS approach to resolving these differences, offer lessons learned from scaling center-specific work into a cross-organization context, discuss the technical challenges in the design and development of the Arctic metadata brokering system, and propose that intra- and inter-center collaboration is key to supporting modern science.

  5. Digital Crust: Information architecture for heterogeneous data integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, S. M.; Zaslavsky, I.; Fan, Y.; Bristol, S.; Peters, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Digital Crust EarthCube Building block is addressing the issue of multiple, heterogeneous but related datasets characteristic of field and sample based research using a 'loose-schema' approach, with linked entity and attribute definitions in an information model (ontology) registry (IMR). Various data entities (RDA 'data types') are defined by mapping entity and attribute definitions to definitions in the IMR. Inclusion (loading) of new data at the simplest level can bring in entities that are not registered, but these will not be 'integratable' with other data until someone does the schema matching into the IMR. New datasets can be designed using registered entity and attributes that will from the beginning be integrated into the system (similar to the approach used by the National Information Exchange Model). The fundamental abstract components in this system are 1) a data repository that allows storage of key-value structured data objects; and 2) a registry that documents information models-- the base data types, attributes and entities -- and mappings from the registered types in the datastore to the registered items. This constitutes the data repository subsystem. Data access is enabled by caching views of aggregated data from the datastore (aggregated based on the semantics of the registered items in the IMR) and creating indexes based on the registered items in the IMR. Contributing data to this system will be greatly facilitated by using existing, documented information models. It can accept datasets that are not 'standardized' as well, but the consequence is that those data will not be integratable with other existing data until the work is done to document the entities and attributes in the data and to map those into existing registered types.

  6. Architecture of next-generation information management systems for digital radiology enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Stephen T. C.; Wang, Huili; Shen, Weimin; Schmidt, Joachim; Chen, George; Dolan, Tom

    2000-05-01

    Few information systems today offer a clear and flexible means to define and manage the automated part of radiology processes. None of them provide a coherent and scalable architecture that can easily cope with heterogeneity and inevitable local adaptation of applications. Most importantly, they often lack a model that can integrate clinical and administrative information to aid better decisions in managing resources, optimizing operations, and improving productivity. Digital radiology enterprises require cost-effective solutions to deliver information to the right person in the right place and at the right time. We propose a new architecture of image information management systems for digital radiology enterprises. Such a system is based on the emerging technologies in workflow management, distributed object computing, and Java and Web techniques, as well as Philips' domain knowledge in radiology operations. Our design adapts the approach of '4+1' architectural view. In this new architecture, PACS and RIS will become one while the user interaction can be automated by customized workflow process. Clinical service applications are implemented as active components. They can be reasonably substituted by applications of local adaptations and can be multiplied for fault tolerance and load balancing. Furthermore, it will provide powerful query and statistical functions for managing resources and improving productivity in real time. This work will lead to a new direction of image information management in the next millennium. We will illustrate the innovative design with implemented examples of a working prototype.

  7. Porphyrin architectures tailored for studies of molecular information storage.

    PubMed

    Carcel, Carole M; Laha, Joydev K; Loewe, Robert S; Thamyongkit, Patchanita; Schweikart, Karl-Heinz; Misra, Veena; Bocian, David F; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2004-10-01

    A molecular approach to information storage employs redox-active molecules tethered to an electroactive surface. Zinc porphyrins tethered to Au(111) or Si(100) provide a benchmark for studies of information storage. Three sets of porphyrins have been synthesized for studies of the interplay of molecular design and charge-storage properties: (1) A set of porphyrins is described for probing the effect of surface attachment atom on electron-transfer kinetics. Each porphyrin bears a meso-CH2X group for surface attachment where X = OH, SAc, or SeAc. (2) A set of porphyrins is described for studying the effect of surface-charge density in monolayers. Each porphyrin bears a benzyl alcohol for surface attachment and three nonlinking meso substituents of a controlled degree of bulkiness. (3) A set of porphyrins is described that enables investigation of on-chip patterning of the electrolyte. Each porphyrin bears a formyl group distal to the surface attachment group for subsequent derivatization with a molecular entity that comprises the electrolyte. Taken together, this collection of molecules enables a variety of studies to elucidate design issues in molecular-based information storage. PMID:15387598

  8. Workflow-enabled distributed component-based information architecture for digital medical imaging enterprises.

    PubMed

    Wong, Stephen T C; Tjandra, Donny; Wang, Huili; Shen, Weimin

    2003-09-01

    Few information systems today offer a flexible means to define and manage the automated part of radiology processes, which provide clinical imaging services for the entire healthcare organization. Even fewer of them provide a coherent architecture that can easily cope with heterogeneity and inevitable local adaptation of applications and can integrate clinical and administrative information to aid better clinical, operational, and business decisions. We describe an innovative enterprise architecture of image information management systems to fill the needs. Such a system is based on the interplay of production workflow management, distributed object computing, Java and Web techniques, and in-depth domain knowledge in radiology operations. Our design adapts the approach of "4+1" architectural view. In this new architecture, PACS and RIS become one while the user interaction can be automated by customized workflow process. Clinical service applications are implemented as active components. They can be reasonably substituted by applications of local adaptations and can be multiplied for fault tolerance and load balancing. Furthermore, the workflow-enabled digital radiology system would provide powerful query and statistical functions for managing resources and improving productivity. This paper will potentially lead to a new direction of image information management. We illustrate the innovative design with examples taken from an implemented system. PMID:14518730

  9. Information-Processing Architectures in Multidimensional Classification: A Validation Test of the Systems Factorial Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fific, Mario; Nosofsky, Robert M.; Townsend, James T.

    2008-01-01

    A growing methodology, known as the systems factorial technology (SFT), is being developed to diagnose the types of information-processing architectures (serial, parallel, or coactive) and stopping rules (exhaustive or self-terminating) that operate in tasks of multidimensional perception. Whereas most previous applications of SFT have been in…

  10. The Use of Supporting Documentation for Information Architecture by Australian Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hider, Philip; Burford, Sally; Ferguson, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of an online survey that examined the development of information architecture of Australian library Web sites with reference to documented methods and guidelines. A broad sample of library Web managers responded from across the academic, public, and special sectors. A majority of libraries used either in-house or…

  11. A Proposed Clinical Decision Support Architecture Capable of Supporting Whole Genome Sequence Information

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine. PMID:25411644

  12. A proposed clinical decision support architecture capable of supporting whole genome sequence information.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brandon M; Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-04-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine. PMID:25411644

  13. 19 CFR 111.32 - False information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false False information. 111.32 Section 111.32 Customs... CUSTOMS BROKERS Duties and Responsibilities of Customs Brokers § 111.32 False information. A broker must... procure the giving of, any false or misleading information or testimony in any matter pending before...

  14. Bridging research and environmental regulatory processes: the role of knowledge brokers.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Kelly G; Thompson, Marcella; Rice, James W; Senier, Laura; Brown, Phil; Suuberg, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Federal funding agencies increasingly require research investigators to ensure that federally sponsored research demonstrates broader societal impact. Specifically, the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Research Program (SRP) requires research centers to include research translation and community engagement cores to achieve broader impacts, with special emphasis on improving environmental health policies through better scientific understanding. This paper draws on theoretical insights from the social sciences to show how incorporating knowledge brokers in research centers can facilitate translation of scientific expertise to influence regulatory processes and thus promote public health. Knowledge brokers connect academic researchers with decision-makers, to facilitate the translation of research findings into policies and programs. In this article, we describe the stages of the regulatory process and highlight the role of the knowledge broker and scientific expert at each stage. We illustrate the cooperation of knowledge brokers, scientific experts and policymakers using a case from the Brown University (Brown) SRP. We show how the Brown SRP incorporated knowledge brokers to engage scientific experts with regulatory officials around the emerging public health problem of vapor intrusion (VI). In the Brown SRP, the knowledge broker brought regulatory officials into the research process, to help scientific experts understand the critical nature of this emerging public health threat, and helped scientific experts develop a research agenda that would inform the development of timely measures to protect public health. Our experience shows that knowledge brokers can enhance the impact of environmental research on public health by connecting policy decision-makers with scientific experts at critical points throughout the regulatory process. PMID:24083557

  15. Bridging Research and Environmental Regulatory Processes: The Role of Knowledge Brokers

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Kelly G.; Thompson, Marcella; Rice, James W.; Senier, Laura; Brown, Phil; Suuberg, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Federal funding agencies increasingly require research investigators to ensure that federally-sponsored research demonstrates broader societal impact. Specifically, the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Research Program (SRP) requires research centers to include research translation and community engagement cores to achieve broader impacts, with special emphasis on improving environmental health policies through better scientific understanding. This paper draws on theoretical insights from the social sciences to show how incorporating knowledge brokers in research centers can facilitate translation of scientific expertise to influence regulatory processes and thus promote public health. Knowledge brokers connect academic researchers with decision-makers, to facilitate the translation of research findings into policies and programs. In this article, we describe the stages of the regulatory process and highlight the role of the knowledge broker and scientific expert at each stage. We illustrate the cooperation of knowledge brokers, scientific experts and policymakers using a case from the Brown University (Brown) SRP. We show how the Brown SRP incorporated knowledge brokers to engage scientific experts with regulatory officials around the emerging public health problem of vapor intrusion. In the Brown SRP, the knowledge broker brought regulatory officials into the research process, to help scientific experts understand the critical nature of this emerging public health threat, and helped scientific experts develop a research agenda that would inform the development of timely measures to protect public health. Our experience shows that knowledge brokers can enhance the impact of environmental research on public health by connecting policy decision-makers with scientific experts at critical points throughout the regulatory process. PMID:24083557

  16. Project Integration Architecture: Application Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications is enabled.

  17. The Architecture of Information Fusion System Ingreenhouse Wireless Sensor Network Based on Multi-Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenting; Chen, Ming

    In view of current unprogressive situation of factory breeding in aquaculture, this article designed a standardized, informationized and intelligentized aquaculture system, proposed a information fusion architecture based on multi-agent in greenhouse wireless sensor network (GWSN), and researched mainly the structural characteristic of the four-classed information fusion based on distributed multi-agent and the method to construct the structure inside of every agent.

  18. Information data systems for a global change technology initiative architecture trade study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Nicholas D.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Change Technology Initiative (GCTI) was established to develop technology which will enable use of satellite systems of Earth observations on a global scale, enable use of the observations to predictively model Earth's changes, and provide scientists, government, business, and industry with quick access to the resulting information. At LaRC, a GCTI Architecture Trade Study was undertaken to develop and evaluate the architectural implications to meet the requirements of the global change studies and the eventual implementation of a global change system. The output of the trade study are recommended technologies for the GCTI. That portion of the study concerned with the information data system is documented. The information data system for an earth global change modeling system can be very extensive and beyond affordability in terms of today's costs. Therefore, an incremental approach to gaining a system is most likely. An options approach to levels of capability versus needed technologies was developed. The primary drivers of the requirements for the information data system evaluation were the needed science products, the science measurements, the spacecraft orbits, the instruments configurations, and the spacecraft configurations and their attendant architectures. The science products requirements were not studied here; however, some consideration of the product needs were included in the evaluation results. The information data system technology items were identified from the viewpoint of the desirable overall information system characteristics.

  19. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS)-based fault tolerant avionics architecture for launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    1990-01-01

    An avionics architecture for the advanced launch system (ALS) that uses validated hardware and software building blocks developed under the advanced information processing system program is presented. The AIPS for ALS architecture defined is preliminary, and reliability requirements can be met by the AIPS hardware and software building blocks that are built using the state-of-the-art technology available in the 1992-93 time frame. The level of detail in the architecture definition reflects the level of detail available in the ALS requirements. As the avionics requirements are refined, the architecture can also be refined and defined in greater detail with the help of analysis and simulation tools. A useful methodology is demonstrated for investigating the impact of the avionics suite to the recurring cost of the ALS. It is shown that allowing the vehicle to launch with selected detected failures can potentially reduce the recurring launch costs. A comparative analysis shows that validated fault-tolerant avionics built out of Class B parts can result in lower life-cycle-cost in comparison to simplex avionics built out of Class S parts or other redundant architectures.

  20. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS)-based fault tolerant avionics architecture for launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    An avionics architecture for the advanced launch system (ALS) that uses validated hardware and software building blocks developed under the advanced information processing system program is presented. The AIPS for ALS architecture defined is preliminary, and reliability requirements can be met by the AIPS hardware and software building blocks that are built using the state-of-the-art technology available in the 1992-93 time frame. The level of detail in the architecture definition reflects the level of detail available in the ALS requirements. As the avionics requirements are refined, the architecture can also be refined and defined in greater detail with the help of analysis and simulation tools. A useful methodology is demonstrated for investigating the impact of the avionics suite to the recurring cost of the ALS. It is shown that allowing the vehicle to launch with selected detected failures can potentially reduce the recurring launch costs. A comparative analysis shows that validated fault-tolerant avionics built out of Class B parts can result in lower life-cycle-cost in comparison to simplex avionics built out of Class S parts or other redundant architectures.

  1. Hydrological Modeling and Repeatability with Brokering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Z. M.; Collick, A.; Srinivasan, R.; Braeckel, A.; Nativi, S.; McAlister, C.; Wright, D. J.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Fuka, D.

    2014-12-01

    Data brokering aims to provide those in the hydrological sciences with access to relevant data to represent physical, biological, and chemical characteristics researchers need to accelerate discovery in their domain. Environmental models are useful tools to understand the behavior of hydrological systems. Unfortunately, parameterization of these models requires many different data sources from different disciplines (e.g., atmospheric, geoscience, ecology). In hydrological modeling, the traditional procedure for model initialization starts with obtaining elevation models, land-use characterizations, soils maps, and weather data. It is often the researcher's past experience with these datasets that determines which datasets will be used in a study, and often newer, more suitable data products exist. An added complexity is that various science communities have differing data formats, storage protocols and manipulation methods, which makes use by a non domain scientist difficult and time consuming. We propose data brokering as a means to address several of these challenges. We present two test case scenarios in which researchers attempt to reproduce hydrological model results using 1) general internet based data gathering techniques, and 2) a scientific data brokering interface. We show that data brokering increases the efficiency with which data are collected, models are initialized, and results are analyzed. As an added benefit, it appears brokering significantly increases the repeatability of a study.

  2. Definition of Information Technology Architectures for Continuous Data Management and Medical Device Integration in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, M. Elena; Pascual, Mario; Salvador, Carlos H.; García-Sáez, Gema; Rodríguez-Herrero, Agustín; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Gómez, Enrique J.

    2008-01-01

    The growing availability of continuous data from medical devices in diabetes management makes it crucial to define novel information technology architectures for efficient data storage, data transmission, and data visualization. The new paradigm of care demands the sharing of information in interoperable systems as the only way to support patient care in a continuum of care scenario. The technological platforms should support all the services required by the actors involved in the care process, located in different scenarios and managing diverse information for different purposes. This article presents basic criteria for defining flexible and adaptive architectures that are capable of interoperating with external systems, and integrating medical devices and decision support tools to extract all the relevant knowledge to support diabetes care. PMID:19885276

  3. Maximum density of quantum information in a scalable CMOS implementation of the hybrid qubit architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotta, Davide; De Michielis, Marco; Ferraro, Elena; Fanciulli, Marco; Prati, Enrico

    2016-06-01

    Scalability from single-qubit operations to multi-qubit circuits for quantum information processing requires architecture-specific implementations. Semiconductor hybrid qubit architecture is a suitable candidate to realize large-scale quantum information processing, as it combines a universal set of logic gates with fast and all-electrical manipulation of qubits. We propose an implementation of hybrid qubits, based on Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) quantum dots, compatible with the CMOS industrial technological standards. We discuss the realization of multi-qubit circuits capable of fault-tolerant computation and quantum error correction, by evaluating the time and space resources needed for their implementation. As a result, the maximum density of quantum information is extracted from a circuit including eight logical qubits encoded by the [[7, 1, 3

  4. Maximum density of quantum information in a scalable CMOS implementation of the hybrid qubit architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotta, Davide; De Michielis, Marco; Ferraro, Elena; Fanciulli, Marco; Prati, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Scalability from single-qubit operations to multi-qubit circuits for quantum information processing requires architecture-specific implementations. Semiconductor hybrid qubit architecture is a suitable candidate to realize large-scale quantum information processing, as it combines a universal set of logic gates with fast and all-electrical manipulation of qubits. We propose an implementation of hybrid qubits, based on Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) quantum dots, compatible with the CMOS industrial technological standards. We discuss the realization of multi-qubit circuits capable of fault-tolerant computation and quantum error correction, by evaluating the time and space resources needed for their implementation. As a result, the maximum density of quantum information is extracted from a circuit including eight logical qubits encoded by the [[7, 1, 3

  5. 7 CFR 1955.130 - Real estate brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Real estate brokers. 1955.130 Section 1955.130... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.130 Real estate brokers. Contracting authority for the use of real... provide for any licensed real estate broker to provide sales services for any property listed under...

  6. 7 CFR 1955.130 - Real estate brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Real estate brokers. 1955.130 Section 1955.130... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.130 Real estate brokers. Contracting authority for the use of real... provide for any licensed real estate broker to provide sales services for any property listed under...

  7. 7 CFR 1955.130 - Real estate brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Real estate brokers. 1955.130 Section 1955.130... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.130 Real estate brokers. Contracting authority for the use of real... provide for any licensed real estate broker to provide sales services for any property listed under...

  8. 17 CFR 156.2 - Registration of broker association.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... association. 156.2 Section 156.2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION BROKER ASSOCIATIONS § 156.2 Registration of broker association. (a) Registration required. It shall be unlawful for any member of a broker association to receive or to execute an order unless the...

  9. 17 CFR 156.2 - Registration of broker association.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... association. 156.2 Section 156.2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION BROKER ASSOCIATIONS § 156.2 Registration of broker association. (a) Registration required. It shall be unlawful for any member of a broker association to receive or to execute an order unless the...

  10. 76 FR 71584 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Customs broker license... of the Code of Federal Regulations at Sec. 111.30(d), the following Customs broker licenses...

  11. 78 FR 48456 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Customs broker license cancellations. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the customs broker licenses and any and all...

  12. 78 FR 48460 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of revocation of a customs broker license. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a customs broker license is being revoked...

  13. Toward an Intelligent Event Broker: Automated Transient Classificaiton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, P.

    In order to succeed, the massive time-domain surveys of the future must automatically identify actionable information from the torrent of imaging data, classify emerging events, and optimize the follow-up strategy. To address this challenge, we are developing a fully autonomous, distributed event broker that will integrate cutting edge machine learning algorithms with high performance computing infrastructure. The talk will give an overview of this work and recent progress on image level variability detection and spectral classification using low resolution spectra.

  14. Building a generic architecture for medical information exchange among healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Li, Y C; Kuo, H S; Jian, W S; Tang, D D; Liu, C T; Liu, L L; Hsu, C Y; Tan, Y K; Hu, C H

    2001-05-01

    Due to the inability to exchange clinical information among hospitals, continuity of care cannot be maintained and a tremendous amount of medical resource has been wasted. This paper describes an architecture that would facilitate exchange of clinical information among heterogeneous hospital information systems. It is dubbed 'Medical Information Exchange Center' or MIEC as part of a six-year Health Information Network Project hosted by the Department of Health. MIEC was designed so that it is innovative yet technically feasible today. It is convenient for authorized users yet secure enough so people can trust and has minimal impact to participated hospitals. Authorized users will be able to access information through two web-based interfaces directed to physician and non-physician users respectively. Hospitals are connected through a virtual private network to exchange patient information and users need to obtain a private key from the certificate authority in order to securely connect to MIEC. A pilot project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of this architecture and the problems encountered were discussed. PMID:11311678

  15. 17 CFR 240.17h-2T - Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Risk assessment reporting... Organizations § 240.17h-2T Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers. (a) Reporting requirements of risk assessment information required to be maintained by section 240.17h-1T. (1) Every...

  16. 17 CFR 240.17h-2T - Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Risk assessment reporting... Organizations § 240.17h-2T Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers. (a) Reporting requirements of risk assessment information required to be maintained by section 240.17h-1T. (1) Every...

  17. 17 CFR 240.17h-2T - Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Risk assessment reporting... Organizations § 240.17h-2T Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers. (a) Reporting requirements of risk assessment information required to be maintained by section 240.17h-1T. (1) Every...

  18. More than a Broker: A Case Study of Knowledge Mobilization in a Digital Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Lorayne

    2015-01-01

    This research described here examines the role of e-health and medical informatics through the lens of one e-health knowledge broker in Canada. Eating disorders are an important issue in Canadian health and it is difficult to find accurate information online. Theoretical models examined include those which describe the roles of health knowledge…

  19. 75 FR 71723 - Policies and Procedures Pertaining to Changes in Listing Brokers Participating in the Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Management and Marketing III Program AGENCY: Office of the Assistant... under FHA's Management and Marketing III (M&M III) program. All brokers may participate as Selling.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background A. Management and Marketing Program The Federal Housing...

  20. 17 CFR 240.17h-2T - Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Risk assessment reporting... Organizations § 240.17h-2T Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers. (a) Reporting requirements of risk assessment information required to be maintained by section 240.17h-1T. (1) Every...

  1. 17 CFR 240.17h-2T - Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Risk assessment reporting... Organizations § 240.17h-2T Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers. (a) Reporting requirements of risk assessment information required to be maintained by section 240.17h-1T. (1) Every...

  2. 78 FR 64234 - Notice of Reinstatement of Customs Broker Licenses; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In a notice published in the Federal Register (78 FR 48458) on August 8, 2013, CBP... Federal Register (77 FR 72873) notice. This correction notice is being issued to note that certain brokers... In the Federal Register (78 FR 48458) notice of August 8, 2013, on page 48459, correct the list...

  3. Cultural and Social Processes of Language Brokering among Arab, Asian, and Latin Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Shu-Sha Angie; Nash, Afaf; Orellana, Marjorie Faulstich

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how language and culture brokering (translating and interpreting language and culture for others) influences the acculturative experiences and self-perceptions of young adults from immigrant Arab, Asian, and Latino American backgrounds. Semi-structured interviews with 10 participants suggest that mediating information for…

  4. 78 FR 25697 - Notice of Intent To Seek OMB Approval To Collect Information: On-Line Architectural Barriers Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Notice of Intent To Seek OMB Approval To Collect Information: On- Line Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Complaint Form AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance... Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) has requested approval by the Office of Management and Budget...

  5. High rate information systems - Architectural trends in support of the interdisciplinary investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Thomas H., Jr.; Preheim, Larry E.

    1990-01-01

    Data systems requirements in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Space Station Freedom (SSF) eras indicate increasing data volume, increased discipline interplay, higher complexity and broader data integration and interpretation. A response to the needs of the interdisciplinary investigator is proposed, considering the increasing complexity and rising costs of scientific investigation. The EOS Data Information System, conceived to be a widely distributed system with reliable communication links between central processing and the science user community, is described. Details are provided on information architecture, system models, intelligent data management of large complex databases, and standards for archiving ancillary data, using a research library, a laboratory and collaboration services.

  6. 76 FR 37571 - Broker-Dealer Reports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ...The Securities and Exchange Commission (the ``Commission'') is proposing amendments to the broker-dealer financial reporting rule under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the ``Exchange Act''). The first set of amendments would, among other things, update the existing requirements of Exchange Act Rule 17a-5, facilitate the ability of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the......

  7. Real Estate Brokers View the College Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Grant J.; Williams, Numan A.

    1993-01-01

    Real estate programs of 76 institutions accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) were reviewed. Findings of a survey of real estate brokers (n=178) indicated that business programs within the parameters of the AACSB business curriculum should adequately prepare students for a career in real estate. (JOW)

  8. Questions to Ask Your Liability Insurance Broker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses some important questions to ask an insurance broker regarding liability insurance. The author based these questions on his interviews with Kathryn Hammerback, Craig Hammer, and Mike North: (1) Are centers covered when...?; (2) How can a center director cut costs on this policy?; (3) Is this an "occurrence" or a "claims-made"…

  9. 78 FR 51909 - Broker-Dealer Reports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ..., Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (``Advisers Act'') Release No. 2968 (Dec. 30, 2009), 75 FR 1456 (Jan. 11... Advisers, 75 FR at 1456. In June 2011, the Commission proposed rule amendments and a new form designed... (``SIPC'').\\8\\ \\4\\ See Broker-Dealer Reports, Exchange Act Release No. 64676 (June 15, 2011), 76 FR...

  10. 7 CFR 926.14 - Broker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Broker. 926.14 Section 926.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DATA COLLECTION, REPORTING AND...