Science.gov

Sample records for information front minutes

  1. Kinetic information from detonation front curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P. C., LLNL

    1998-06-15

    The time constants for time-dependent modeling may be estimated from reaction zone lengths, which are obtained from two sources One is detonation front curvature, where the edge lag is close to being a direct measure The other is the Size Effect, where the detonation velocity decreases with decreasing radius as energy is lost to the cylinder edge A simple theory that interlocks the two effects is given A differential equation for energy flow in the front is used, the front is described by quadratic and sixth-power radius terms The quadratic curvature comes from a constant power source of energy moving sideways to the walls Near the walls, the this energy rises to the total energy of detonation and produces the sixth-power term The presence of defects acting on a short reaction zone can eliminate the quadratic part while leaving the wall portion of the cuvature A collection of TNT data shows that the reaction zone increases with both the radius and the void fraction

  2. Front-End Processor For Metrology-Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muse, Walter S.; Sammet, Charles B.; Maxwell, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Front-end processor for NASA Metrology Information System (NMIS) is real-time relational data-base computer system designed to distribute processing for NMIS mainframe system or run as stand-alone local-area-network data-base system. System used in large calibration laboratories for work control and to maintain records of calibration, repair, costs, manpower usage, traceability, and other pertinent facts about instruments supported by laboratories. Provides enhancements to existing NASA Metrology Information System and batches upload to minimize mainframe I/O at times of heavy usage.

  3. Informing the Front Line about Common Respiratory Viral Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Gesteland, Per H; Samore, Matthew H; Pavia, Andrew T; Srivastava, Rajendu; Korgenski, Kent; Gerber, Kristine; Daly, Judy A; Mundorff, Michael B; Rolfs, Robert T; James, Brent C.; Byington, Carrie L.

    2007-01-01

    The nature of clinical medicine is to focus on individuals rather than the populations from which they originate. This orientation can be problematic in the context of acute healthcare delivery during routine winter outbreaks of viral respiratory disease where an individual’s likelihood of viral infection depends on knowledge of local disease incidence. The level of interest in and perceived utility of community and regional infection data for front line clinicians providing acute care is unclear. Based on input from clinicians, we developed an automated analysis and reporting system that delivers pathogen-specific epidemic curves derived from a viral panel that tests for influenza, RSV, adenovirus, parainfluenza and human metapneumovirus. Surveillance summaries were actively e-mailed to clinicians practicing in emergency, urgent and primary care settings and posted on a web site for passive consumption. We demonstrated the feasibility and sustainability of a system that provides both timely and clinically useful surveillance information. PMID:18693841

  4. Accessing Real-Life Episodic Information from Minutes versus Hours Earlier Modulates Hippocampal and High-Order Cortical Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Honey, C J; Simony, E; Arcaro, M J; Norman, K A; Hasson, U

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that formation of new episodic memories depends on hippocampus, but in real-life settings (e.g., conversation), hippocampal amnesics can utilize information from several minutes earlier. What neural systems outside hippocampus might support this minutes-long retention? In this study, subjects viewed an audiovisual movie continuously for 25 min; another group viewed the movie in 2 parts separated by a 1-day delay. Understanding Part 2 depended on retrieving information from Part 1, and thus hippocampus was required in the day-delay condition. But is hippocampus equally recruited to access the same information from minutes earlier? We show that accessing memories from a few minutes prior elicited less interaction between hippocampus and default mode network (DMN) cortical regions than accessing day-old memories of identical events, suggesting that recent information was available with less reliance on hippocampal retrieval. Moreover, the 2 groups evinced reliable but distinct DMN activity timecourses, reflecting differences in information carried in these regions when Part 1 was recent versus distant. The timecourses converged after 4 min, suggesting a time frame over which the continuous-viewing group may have relied less on hippocampal retrieval. We propose that cortical default mode regions can intrinsically retain real-life episodic information for several minutes. PMID:26240179

  5. Disaster and exercise performance information collection tool: capturing observations in four minutes or less.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stewart D; Smith, Richard; Albanese, Joseph; Forte, Elaine; Paturas, James; Halstead, William; Tomassoni, Anthony

    The objectives of the work described in this paper were to: (a) identify existing gaps in data collection, processing and dissemination across all types of emergencies; (b) build a tool that permits documentation, manipulation and propagation of relevant observations in emergency preparedness exercises or real-world incidents to inform critical decision makers in real time and to facilitate the elaboration of lessons learned, best practices and pioneering strategies for the management of future disasters; (c) validate the efficacy of the tool for collecting, processing and disseminating disaster-related information, through its integration in a series of exercises. The disaster and exercise performance information collection tool (DEPICT) was developed to address needs identified via the analysis of survey responses provided by representatives of military and civilian organisations with disaster response experience. Consensus discussions were held to identify criteria and operational parameters for the tool. As the development of DEPICT progressed, feedback and recommendations for improvements were provided to the developers, who incorporated the recommendations in successive iterations, resulting in increased refinements of the tool. DEPICT was subsequently tested for feasibility through operations-based exercises centred on catastrophic earthquakes in three diverse geographic locations of the USA. Feedback regarding DEPICT's functional performance during the exercises was used to inform further refinements to the program. The authors developed the DEPICT software on a PHP platform to accomplish two goals: (1) offer a core that supports user interaction and data management requirements (eg data capture, transmission and storage); (2) present a user-friendly interface with a shallow learning curve to facilitate a better user experience. DEPICT is a user-friendly, web-based application that is accessible through various mobile web-enabled devices. The application

  6. Analysis of Technological Information Transfer among Japanese Computer Scientists at a Research Front.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takayama, Masaya

    1986-01-01

    Describes the methodology and results of a study that examined information flow at the technological research front by analyzing a Japanese national project in computer technology. Various formats of information dissemination are identified, and a classification of researchers and engineers by information transfer activities is presented. (4…

  7. 3.6 Minutes per Day: The Scarcity of Informational Texts in First Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Nell K.

    2000-01-01

    Provides basic, descriptive information about informational text experiences offered to children in 20 first-grade classrooms selected from very low and very high socio-economic-status school districts. Finds a scarcity of informational texts in these classroom print environments (particularly the low socio-economic status schools)--there were…

  8. Distinct Prefrontal Molecular Mechanisms for Information Storage Lasting Seconds versus Minutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runyan, Jason D.; Dash, Pramod K.

    2005-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is known to actively hold information "online" for a period of seconds in working memory for guiding goal-directed behavior. It has been proposed that relevant information is stored in other brain regions, which is retrieved and held in working memory for subsequent assimilation by the PFC in order to guide behavior. It…

  9. Geothermal Energy and the Eastern US: Fifth technical information interchange meeting, Minutes

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    The technical interchange meeting documented here is the fifth meeting where people interested in geothermal energy in the Eastern US have met to interchange technical information. These meetings are intended to assist all in the difficult task of balancing time and effort in doing their assigned jobs and keeping track of what others are doing in similar or related tasks. All of the aforementioned meetings have served their intended purpose and further regional and national meetings are sure to follow.

  10. Misunderstanding of Front-Of-Package Nutrition Information on US Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M. Soederberg; Cassady, Diana L.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Applegate, Elizabeth A.; Wilson, Machelle D.; Gibson, Tanja N.; Ellwood, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Front-of-package nutrition symbols (FOPs) are presumably readily noticeable and require minimal prior nutrition knowledge to use. Although there is evidence to support this notion, few studies have focused on Facts Up Front type symbols which are used in the US. Participants with varying levels of prior knowledge were asked to view two products and decide which was more healthful. FOPs on packages were manipulated so that one product was more healthful, allowing us to assess accuracy. Attention to nutrition information was assessed via eye tracking to determine what if any FOP information was used to make their decisions. Results showed that accuracy was below chance on half of the comparisons despite consulting FOPs. Negative correlations between attention to calories, fat, and sodium and accuracy indicated that consumers over-relied on these nutrients. Although relatively little attention was allocated to fiber and sugar, associations between attention and accuracy were positive. Attention to vitamin D showed no association to accuracy, indicating confusion surrounding what constitutes a meaningful change across products. Greater nutrition knowledge was associated with greater accuracy, even when less attention was paid. Individuals, particularly those with less knowledge, are misled by calorie, sodium, and fat information on FOPs. PMID:25922942

  11. Supra Arcade Downflows with XRT Informed by Dipolarization Fronts with THEMIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobelski, Adam; Savage, Sabrina Leah; Malaspina, David

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection can rapidly reconfigure the magnetic field of the corona, accelerating plasma through the site of reconnection. Ambiguities due to the nature of remote sensing have complicated the interpretation of observations of the inflowing and outflowing plasma in reconnecting regions. In particular, the interpretation of sunward moving density depletions above flare arcades (known as Supra Arcade Downflows - SADs) is still debated. Hinode/XRT has provided a wealth of observations for SADs and helped inform our current understanding of these structures. SADs have been interpreted as wakes behind newly reconnected and outflowing loops (Supra Arcade Downflowing Loops - SADLs). Models have shown the plausibility of this interpretation, though this interpretation has not yet been fully accepted. We present here observations of newly reconnected outflowing loops observed via in situ instruments in the magnetosphere. These observations, provided by five THEMIS spacecraft, show that around retracting loops (dipolarization fronts in this context) similar dynamic temperature and density structures are found as seen in SADs. We compare data from multiple SADs and dipolarization fronts to show that the observational signatures implied in the corona can be directly observed in similar plasma regimes in the magnetosphere, strongly favoring the interpretation of SADs as wakes behind retracting loops.

  12. Ensemble-based analysis of Front Range severe convection on 6-7 June 2012: Forecast uncertainty and communication of weather information to Front Range decision-makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincente, Vanessa

    The variation of topography in Colorado not only adds to the beauty of its landscape, but also tests our ability to predict warm season severe convection. Deficient radar coverage and limited observations make quantitative precipitation forecasting quite a challenge. Past studies have suggested that greater forecast skill of mesoscale convection initiation and precipitation characteristics are achievable considering an ensemble with explicitly predicted convection compared to one that has parameterized convection. The range of uncertainty and probabilities in these forecasts can help forecasters in their precipitation predictions and communication of weather information to emergency managers (EMs). EMs serve an integral role in informing and protecting communities in anticipation of hazardous weather. An example of such an event occurred on the evening of 6 June 2012, where areas to the lee of the Rocky Mountain Front Range were impacted by flash-flood-producing severe convection that included heavy rain and copious amounts of hail. Despite the discrepancy in the timing, location and evolution of convection, the convection-allowing ensemble forecasts generally outperformed those of the convection-parameterized ensemble in representing the mesoscale processes responsible for the 6-7 June severe convective event. Key features sufficiently reproduced by several of the convection-allowing ensemble members resembled the observations: 1) general location of a convergence boundary east of Denver, 2) convective initiation along the boundary, 3) general location of a weak cold front near the Wyoming/Nebraska border, and 4) cold pools and moist upslope characteristics that contributed to the backbuilding of convection. Members from the convection-parameterized ensemble that failed to reproduce these results displaced the convergence boundary, produced a cold front that moved southeast too quickly, and used the cold front for convective initiation. The convection

  13. Scholars' Access to Information: Public Responsibility/Private Initiative. Minutes of the Ninety-Ninth Meeting, October 29-30, 1981, Washington, D.C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC.

    This set of minutes from a semiannual meeting of the Association of Research Libraries includes two presentations: "Some Reflections on User Needs and the Information Transfer Process," a talk on government publications and the public's right to know by Joseph Morehead, and "A Commentary on the NCLIS Public Sector/Private Sector Task Force and Its…

  14. Development of a data management front-end for use with a LANDSAT-based information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    The development and implementation of a data management front-end system for use with a LANDSAT based information system that facilitates the processsing of both LANDSAT and ancillary data was examined. The final tasks, reported on here, involved; (1) the implementation of the VICAR image processing software system at Penn State and the development of a user-friendly front-end for this system; (2) the implementation of JPL-developed software based on VICAR, for mosaicking LANDSAT scenes; (3) the creation and storage of a mosiac of 1981 summer LANDSAT data for the entire state of Pennsylvania; (4) demonstrations of the defoliation assessment procedure for Perry and Centre Counties, and presentation of the results at the 1982 National Gypsy Moth Review Meeting, and (5) the training of Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry personnel in the use of the defoliation analysis system.

  15. To See or Not to See: Do Front of Pack Nutrition Labels Affect Attention to Overall Nutrition Information?

    PubMed Central

    Bix, Laura; Sundar, Raghav Prashant; Bello, Nora M.; Peltier, Chad; Weatherspoon, Lorraine J.; Becker, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Front of pack (FOP) nutrition labels are concise labels located on the front of food packages that provide truncated nutrition information. These labels are rapidly gaining prominence worldwide, presumably because they attract attention and their simplified formats enable rapid comparisons of nutritional value. Methods Eye tracking was conducted as US consumers interacted with actual packages with and without FOP labels to (1) assess if the presence of an FOP label increases attention to nutrition information when viewers are not specifically tasked with nutrition-related goals; and (2) study the effect of FOP presence on consumer use of more comprehensive, traditional nutrition information presented in the Nutritional Facts Panel (NFP), a mandatory label for most packaged foods in the US. Results Our results indicate that colored FOP labels enhanced the probability that any nutrition information was attended, and resulted in faster detection and longer viewing of nutrition information. However, for cereal packages, these benefits were at the expense of attention to the more comprehensive NFP. Our results are consistent with a potential short cut effect of FOP labels, such that if an FOP was present, participants spent less time attending the more comprehensive NFP. For crackers, FOP labels increased time spent attending to nutrition information, but we found no evidence that their presence reduced the time spent on the nutrition information in the NFP. Conclusions The finding that FOP labels increased attention to overall nutrition information by people who did not have an explicit nutritional goal suggests that these labels may have an advantage in conveying nutrition information to a wide segment of the population. However, for some food types this benefit may come with a short-cut effect; that is, decreased attention to more comprehensive nutrition information. These results have implications for policy and warrant further research into the

  16. Point of care information services: a platform for self-directed continuing medical education for front line decision makers

    PubMed Central

    Moja, Lorenzo; Kwag, Koren Hyogene

    2015-01-01

    The structure and aim of continuing medical education (CME) is shifting from the passive transmission of knowledge to a competency-based model focused on professional development. Self-directed learning is emerging as the foremost educational method for advancing competency-based CME. In a field marked by the constant expansion of knowledge, self-directed learning allows physicians to tailor their learning strategy to meet the information needs of practice. Point of care information services are innovative tools that provide health professionals with digested evidence at the front line to guide decision making. By mobilising self-directing learning to meet the information needs of clinicians at the bedside, point of care information services represent a promising platform for competency-based CME. Several points, however, must be considered to enhance the accessibility and development of these tools to improve competency-based CME and the quality of care. PMID:25655251

  17. The Naval Enlisted Professional Development Information System (NEPDIS): Front End Analysis (FEA) Process. Technical Report 159.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aagard, James A.; Ansbro, Thomas M.

    The Naval Enlisted Professional Development Information System (NEPDIS) was designed to function as a fully computerized information assembly and analysis system to support labor force, personnel, and training management. The NEPDIS comprises separate training development, instructional, training record and evaluation, career development, and…

  18. In backyards, on front lawns: examining informal risk communication and communicators.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Laura N

    2011-09-01

    Risk communicators are often envisioned as government officials, public relations practitioners, or health workers. Yet much of the public's risk information comes from informal messages and unofficial carriers. Referred to in this study as "informal risk communicators" (IRCs), these individuals are often service workers who relay risk information to public audiences, though often outside of their formal job descriptions. Literatures in the health communication, science and technology studies, and risk communication fields have considered ideas relevant to explaining these individuals, and the risk communication work they perform. To further explore this category of individuals, this study examines the communicative practices of commercial pesticide applicators, using both in-depth interviews and surveys. Through their interactions with clients, these individuals offer care, as well as project expertise and identity; however, the extent to which this work is recognized and validated is less clear. Both applied and theoretical implications of this research are considered. PMID:22164704

  19. Cloud Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02171 Cloud Front

    These clouds formed in the south polar region. The faintness of the cloud system likely indicates that these are mainly ice clouds, with relatively little dust content.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -86.7N, Longitude 212.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Ten Minute Writing Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markus, Sharyn

    Designed with junior high school students in mind, the activities in this booklet are offered as ways to stimulate interest in writing using as little as ten minutes of class time. The activities are arranged in six sections: (1) developing observation skills and paying attention to details; (2) word play, descriptive words, and word collections…

  1. 10 Minutes of Bliss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Olynda

    2014-01-01

    For many of us, it is challenging to find the time to sleep enough each night or to sit down for a meal. So how can this author convince you that taking 10 minutes to do anything every day is actually worth it? The benefits of meditation--increased calm, clarity, compassion, and empathy, to name a few--have been known for centuries. Recently,…

  2. Surface properties of ocean fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, P. M.; Hubert, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    Background information on oceanic fronts is presented and the results of several models which were developed to study the dynamics of oceanic fronts and their effects on various surface properties are described. The details of the four numerical models used in these studies are given in separate appendices which contain all of the physical equations, program documentation and running instructions for the models.

  3. A technical description of enhancements to the front-end user interface for the Worldwide Household Goods Information System for Transportation Modernization (WHIST-MOD)

    SciTech Connect

    Loftis, J.P.; Spears, P.M. ); James, T.L. )

    1990-08-01

    The Directorate of Personal Property of the Military Traffic Management Command (MTMC) asked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to design a decision support system, the Worldwide Household Goods Information System for Transportation Modernization. This decision support system will automate tasks and provide analysis tools for evaluating the Personal Property Program, predicting impacts to the program, and planning modifications to the program to meet the evolving needs of military service members and the transportation industry. The system designed by ORNL consists of three application modules: system dictionary applications, data acquisition and administration applications, and user applications. The user applications module is divided into two phases: the data selection front-end interface and the postprocessing back-end interface. This paper describes the prototyped front-end interface using ORACLE SQL*Forms, part of the ORACLE Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) toolset. The focus of this paper is a discussion of the need for enhancements to the initial design of the interface and the coding techniques used to prototype the enhancements. These enhancements make the front-end interface more flexible and easier to use by giving users options for identifying data to be used by the back-end interface. This report is based on in-depth interviews of MTMC staff, prototype meetings with the users, and the research and design work conducted at ORNL.

  4. Building a New Agenda: Economic Pressures, Technological Innovation, and Access to Information. Minutes of the Meeting (119th, Washington, D.C., October 23-25, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Sarah E., Ed.

    The following 12 papers in this report from the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) address management and preservation of research library resources, access to information resources, scholarly communication, research collections, and information policies: (1) "Management Issues That Keep Directors Awake at Night: (Joanne Euster); (2) "ARL…

  5. Government Information in Electronic Format. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (110th, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, May 7-8, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Ed.

    This document begins by presenting the text of "Technology & U.S. Government Information Policies: Catalysts for New Partnerships," which is the third report of the Task Force on Government Information in Electronic Format. Topics covered by the report include the impact of technology, private sector roles and government responsibilities for…

  6. The Behavior of Gust Fronts in West Africa Based on Radar and Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw-Herdeg, M.; Williams, E.

    2009-12-01

    M. McGraw-Herdeg, E. Williams. If we are to understand the global influence of dust storms in the tropical Sahelian region of West Africa, we must first understand what factors affect how these large storms develop, how far they travel, how fast they travel, and how much particulate matter they carry. Observations link the gust fronts of these large, dusty storms to new moist convection. As a first step, we test available theories against measured data by comparing the density current model's predictions of gust front speed (measured at using temperature-drop data measured by the ARM Mobile Facility and speed measurements derived from the MIT C-band radar site, both in Niamey, Niger for the AMMA (African Monsoon and Multidisciplinary Analysis) in 2006. We track intersections of CALIPSO satellite images with the front, as seen by the MIT radar. With speed information for 20 gust fronts tracked by the MIT radar site, we can show how a gust front's speed declines over time as it mixes with its dry environment. By interpreting these data alongside Meteosat satellite dust information (SEVIRI), we describe the average "lifespan" of these gust fronts and their maximum distance of propagation, which may range from 24-36 hours or 1000-1500 km. This analysis contributes precise speed data for a large number of gust fronts measured by the MIT radar. We have measured speeds for 20 gust fronts with 10-minute speeds calculated across a 150-km or 250-km radar circle. The average speed was 14.8 m/s; the average 10-minute speed as the fronts crossed the radar circle was 15.6 m/s. SEVIRI imagery indicates that nearly all the events which crossed the radar site originated at about the same place, and most started within two hours of 15:00, suggesting that local geography and the diurnal cycle plays significant roles in formation of gust fronts. Surface temperature drops as the gust front crosses the radar site were found to be weakly linearly correlated with velocity at crossing

  7. 100 Minutes: Making Every Minute Count in the Literacy Block

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    It is possible to create a literacy block where teachers meet with students for guided reading and writing conferences, and provide daily explicit instruction in both reading and writing. A comprehensive look at literacy and learning, "100 Minutes" shows teachers how to fit balanced literacy into a daily 100-minute literacy block using a framework…

  8. Creating a Positive Classroom Culture: Minute by Minute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Ali

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a peek into high school math teacher Ali Wright's typical school day, which includes time-tested strategies that she uses to build a positive culture in her classroom. Scheduled timeframes and activities include before school starts, five minutes before class, during announcements, during class, last five minutes of class,…

  9. Front-end Evaluation as Part of a Comprehensive Approach to Inform the Development of a New Climate Exhibit at NCAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristvey, J. D., Jr.; Brinkworth, C.; Hatheway, B.; Williams, V.

    2015-12-01

    In an era of discord in public views of climate change, communicating atmospheric and related sciences to the public at a large research facility like the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) can be a daunting challenge yet one that is filled with many possibilities. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Center for Science Education (SciEd) is responsible for education and outreach activities at UCAR, including the exhibits program. Over 90,000 people visit the NCAR Mesa Lab each year to enjoy a number of exhibits that showcase our community's research. The current climate exhibit is twelve years old, and with advances in our understanding of climate science and exhibit design, SciEd staff are developing a new exhibit that is as cutting edge as the research conducted at NCAR. Based on listening sessions with NCAR scientists, the following big ideas for the exhibit emerged: How the climate system works The climate system is changing How scientists study our climate Regional impacts Solutions The goal of the new climate exhibit is to reach people using a variety of learning styles, including offerings for visitors who learn by doing, as well as providing informative text and images (Hatheway, 2014). Developers and evaluators are working together to conduct front-end, formative, and summative evaluations to understand of the needs of our visitors and collect ongoing data to inform development. The purpose of the front-end evaluation, conducted in the summer of 2014 was to develop informed data-driven strategies to move forward with exhibit design. The evaluation results to be shared in this session include: The demographics and behaviors of visitors Trends in visitors' experiences Visitor input on exhibit design (Williams and Tarsi, 2014). In this presentation, we will share the results, significance, and application of the front-end evaluation as part of a comprehensive approach to study both how we convey information about climate

  10. Front matter.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    "If you build it, they will come." In the past, this seemed to be the dominant paradigm for technology development and implementation in healthcare. This initial paradigm often led to poor user satisfaction and failed implementations of healthcare information technology. In the last few decades, informatics has embraced user-centered design principles to improve both the design and adoption of information and communication technologies. However, frequently the end-user is perceived to only be the clinician. Although the data in healthcare are about and are received from patients, patients are not usually perceived of as end-users of health information or health information technology. In the popular press, we are seeing a grass-roots effort from patients to change their role in their own health management. A change to a more dynamic partnership with clinicians means we need tools that are able to support patients as well as clinicians in this partnership. New online tools and mobile applications are sprouting up to fill the demand, but rigorous evaluation of these tools can be lacking; leading to questionable quality and concerns for patient safety. The informatics field has the expertise to provide critical leadership in this area. The call for this year's conference asked for authors to consider the role and voice of the patient. Patients themselves were invited to contribute papers describing their experiences in healthcare and their use of their own data. The papers here reflect not only the informatics innovations in the field, but also explore how to include the patients when considering design, implementation and long-term adoption of health information systems. We hope that the knowledge shared between ITCH 2015 participants will generate further discussions and collaborations and lead to breakthroughs in delivering effective and inclusive healthcare worldwide. Karen Courtney School of Health Information Science University of Victoria Victoria, British

  11. Delivery times for caesarean section at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi: is a 30-minute 'informed to start of operative delivery time' achievable?

    PubMed

    O'Regan, M

    2003-08-01

    A timesheet questionnaire was used to assess the time it took from informing the anaesthetist about a case to the start of operative delivery in 78 consecutive patients undergoing caesarean section. Median (IQR [range]) times for grade-1 cases (immediate threat to the life of the mother or fetus) and grade-2 cases (fetal or maternal compromise without immediate threat to life) were 20 (17-35 [6-75]) min and 41 (27-60 [17-136]) min, respectively. Delays occurred in all the component time intervals examined. The primary avoidable delay was the patient's late arrival in theatre. Many significant delays were apparently not perceived by the anaesthetist. In nine (69%) grade-1 cases, the 30-min target decreed by the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain & Ireland and the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association was achieved. PMID:12859467

  12. Front Matter.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Can bad health informatics kill? A similar question has been asked a decade ago by one of the editors of this book on evidence-based health informatics [1]. And indeed, when informatics methodology and information and communication technology (ICT) are used inappropriately this can cause severe negative effects. On the other hand we will probably all agree with her, when she writes in the same article that it "is evident that the use of modern ICT offers tremendous opportunities to support health care professionals and to increase efficiency, effectiveness and appropriateness of care" [1]. Even earlier, more than 15 years ago, the other editor stated that it "is unfortunately a truism in health care informatics… that evaluation is undertaken rarely and inadequately" and he concludes, among others, that "integrated information systems also give new opportunity to provide effective health care service evaluation, and thus a much more robust future evidence base" [2]. As perspective he writes that "a deeper and longer-term evaluation philosophy is needed which does not stop after the initial confirmation of system functioning, but continues on with a deepening into the effects on the individual clinical services, and then on the host user organisation" [2]. Both colleagues worked during recent years continuously and intensively on how to better evaluate health care processes and outcomes in the context of health information systems, so that informatics tools and information management strategies are not 'just' applied in this context, but that their evidence has also been evaluated according to current good scientific practice. It is probably no surprise to find later joint papers of them on evidence-based health informatics, reporting about their international activities there [3]. Today there is indeed still a discrepancy in making decisions on health information system architectures, infrastructures and tools, related to considerable investments for health care

  13. Use of phase information with a stepper motor to control frequency for tuning system of the Front End Test Stand Radio Frequency Quadrupole at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsari, S.; Aslaninejad, M.; Pozimski, J.

    2015-03-01

    For the Front End Test Stand (FETS) linear accelerator project at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, a 4 m, 4 vanes Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) with a resonant frequency of 324 MHz has been designed. The RF power feeding the RFQ gives rise to the temperature increase in the RFQ, which in turn, results in shifting the resonant frequency of the RFQ. The frequency shift and the stability in the RFQ frequency can be maintained based on the reflected power or signal phase information. We have, however, investigated restoration of the RFQ nominal frequency based on the RF signal phases driving a stepper motor. The concept and the system set-up and electronics are described in detail. Results of the measurements indicating the full restoration of the RFQ nominal frequency based on the RF signal phases and stepper motor are presented. Moreover, measured sensitivity of tuner with respect to its position is given.

  14. Front Matter.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    There's never been a more exciting time to be involved with health informatics. In the last few decades, health informaticians have established the knowledge base and practical expertise to facilitate the development of ever-more capable technical systems, increasing connectivity, expanding access and greater mobility of e-health and information management systems. We have seen the evolution from simple computer based records to systems that allow intra-organisational, national, even international communication and information exchange. We have also seen progress in e-health and most recently m-health, facilitating access to information and advice almost anytime, anywhere. The health informatics community is now building on this strong foundation, taking a central role in the digital transformation of the healthcare sector. The Australian National Health Informatics Conference (HIC), Australia's premier health informatics event, is a key avenue for facilitating this transformation. This Conference, organised by the Health Informatics Society of Australia (HISA), with the support of the Australasian College of Health Informatics (ACHI), provides the ideal professional and social environment for clinicians, researchers, health IT professionals, industry and consumers to integrate, educate and share their knowledge to drive innovative thinking, to enhance services and allow greater consumer involvement. This is emphasised in the primary theme of the 2016 Conference: Digital Health Innovation for Consumers, Clinicians, Connectivity, Community. The papers in this volume reflect this theme, highlighting the cutting edge research evidence, technology updates and innovations that are seeing the digital transformation of the healthcare sector. The papers are indicative of the wide spectrum of work encompassing major theoretical concepts, examples of key applications of new technologies and important new developments in the field of health informatics. They emphasise the

  15. Front Matter.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    policy level. There are 24 paper sessions, 20 poster sessions, 23 panel discussions, 14 workshops, 1 demonstration, 8 tutorials and 6 student competitions to attend. The exhibit hall will provide attendees with the opportunity to learn about the latest products and services in health and nursing information and information technology. The NI 2016 is adding two new features, a Wearable Fashion Show and an Interoperability Showcase. The Wearable Fashion Show will present how technology and fashion can be merged for healthcare. The Interoperability Showcase will present how EHR Applications, Devices and Apps communicate patient data electronically using HL7 standards and IHE profiles. This showcase is jointly organized by the HL7 Nurses Work Group with HL7 PCWG EHRWG, CICWG and Associations such as IMIA-NI, ICN, HIMSS and IHE. I hope that all participants have the opportunity to learn from and network with others through tutorials, keynotes, paper sessions, poster sessions, panel discussions, and workshops and find new and exciting ideas to inspire them. I am very grateful to the contributors for their contributions and the reviewers for providing expert reviews. I am especially grateful to Patrick Weber, Chair of the NI 2016 Local Organizing Committee, and Maria Muller-Staub and Margie Kennedy, Co-chairs of the Scientific Program Committee, for their leadership and strong support. We are in Geneva, Switzerland and I hope you find some time before or after the conference to enjoy this beautiful city and country. Hyeoun-Ae Park, PhD, RN, FAAN Chair, Scientific Program Committee, Professor in College of Nursing and Systems Biomedical Informatics Research Center, Seoul National University. PMID:27332498

  16. Front Matter.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI) Association is the leading organisation in medical informatics in Europe as a federation of national societies of 30 countries. EFMI is organized as a non-profit organization concerned with the theory and practice of information science and technology within health and health science in a European context. The objectives of the EFMI are: • To advance international co-operation and dissemination of information in medical informatics at the European level; • To promote high standards in the application of medical informatics; • To promote research and development in medical informatics; • To encourage high standards in education in medical informatics; • To function as the autonomous European Regional Council of IMIA. This year is a special year for EFMI as it celebrates its 40th anniversary; the Federation was founded in 1976. Therefore, different special events have been organized including several conferences, work shops special issues in journals. In view of this special year for EFMI also the Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) conference, one of EFMI's top conferences, is organized in a special way. Considering the complexity and interrelation of the health domain and as a sign of the long-lasting collaboration of major societies in the field a special joint conference was set up that unities the conferences of the German Association for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (GMDS), the German Society for Epidemiology (DGEpi), the International Epidemiological Association - European Region and the European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI). The societies involved have longstanding experience in integrating the disciplines of medical informatics, biometry, epidemiology and health data management. The collaboration will not only offer a unique opportunity for integration but also strengthen each of the disciplines involved both on a national and international level. The event is

  17. Front Matter.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Special Topic Conference (STC) of the European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI). The organisation of the STC is part of a long tradition of EFMI working groups to organise scientific events focused on important trends in medical informatics and eHealth. In 2016, the special topic is "Transforming Healthcare with the Internet of Things" in relation to the EFMI working group Personal Portable Devices (PPD). STC 2016 takes place in Paris, France, organised by the Laboratoire d'Informatique Médicale et d'Ingénierie des Connaissances en e-Santé (LIMICS) under the auspices of EFMI and the French Association for Medical Informatics (AIM). Only a few years ago, devices were limited to health cards and personal portable devices. Since then, devices have dramatically evolved to include wearables, sensors, and actuators for measuring health values. The application of such technologies in the field of health, social care and wellness has attracted the attention of both patients and members of the general public interested in supporting or improving their health and wellbeing. One of the characteristics of these 'devices' (sometimes too small to observe thanks to nanotechnology) is to be 'connected' and to communicate with other connected devices and systems. This has been the game changer, as it replaces the cumbersome and often error-prone intervention of the human being who was previously necessary to enter data. The Internet of Things (IoT) is thus turning out to have a major impact on the information paradigm in healthcare. The patient can now become their own Chief Operational Officer, as described by Eric Topol in his recent book The Patient will see you now Eric Topol, The Patient Will See You Now, Basic Books, New York, 2015. . By providing tools that are able to generate large quantities of data that must be processed in real time, the IoT can have a potentially

  18. Front Matter.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The pHealth 2016 Conference is the 13th in a series of scientific events bringing together expertise from medical, technological, political, administrative, legal and social domains. pHealth 2016 opens a new chapter in the success story of the series of international conferences on wearable or implantable micro, nano and biotechnologies for personalized health. Starting in 2003 with personal health management systems, pHealth has continuously extended its scope evolving to a truly interdisciplinary event by covering technological and biomedical facilities, legal, ethical, social, and organizational requirements and impacts as well as necessary basic research for enabling the future proof care paradigms. Thereby, pHealth increasingly combines medical devices and eHealth based services with public health, prevention, social and elderly care, wellness and personal fitness to establish participatory, predictive, personalized, preventive, and effective care settings. Smart mobile systems, eHealth and telemedicine have become important enablers for ubiquitous pervasive health as the next generation health services. Social media and gamification has added even further knowledge to pHealth both as a business domain and as a community safety-net. The pHealth2016 conference aims to further emphasise on the integration of biology and medical data, systems and information using mobile technologies through the development of micro-nano-bio smart systems for pHealth emphasizing on personalized health, virtual care, precision medicine, big bio-data management and analytics as well as security, privacy and safety issues. We welcome you to the city of Heraklion on the beautiful island of Crete for the pHealth 2016 conference to share experiences and results, and to open up for the future! Following a long-term tradition, pHealth 2016 is supported by the European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI)but also the HL7 International. The pHealth 2016 presentations are complemented

  19. Snowplow Injection Front Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Buzulukova, N.; Collinson, G. A.; Kepko, E. L.; Garcia-Sage, K. S.; Henderson, M. G.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    As the Polar spacecraft apogee precessed through the magnetic equator in 2001, Polar encountered numerous substorm events in the region between geosynchronous orbit and 10 RE geocentric distance; most of them in the plasma sheet boundary layers. Of these, a small number was recorded near the neutral sheet in the evening sector. Polar/Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment provides a unique perspective on the lowest-energy ion plasma, showing that these events exhibited a damped wavelike character, initiated by a burst of radially outward flow transverse to the local magnetic field at approximately 80 km/s. They then exhibit strongly damped cycles of inward/outward flow with a period of several minutes. After one or two cycles, they culminated in a hot plasma electron and ion injection, quite similar to those observed at geosynchronous orbit. Cold plasmaspheric plasmas comprise the outward flow cycles, while the inward flow cycles contain counterstreaming field-parallel polar wind-like flows. The observed wavelike structure, preceding the arrival of an earthward moving substorm injection front, suggests an outward displacement driven by the inward motion at local times closer to midnight, that is, a "snowplow" effect. The damped in/out flows are consistent with interchange oscillations driven by the arrival at the observed local time by an injection originating at greater radius and local time.

  20. Front Matter.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    . • Products, services, and environments should also be aesthetically pleasing as well as non-discriminatory and non-stigmatising. Most of these elaborations are enshrined in the Principles of Universal Design. This is a set of seven principles that were developed to lay out guidance for the design of environments, products and communications, to evaluate existing designs, and to educate both designers and consumers about the characteristics of more usable products and environments. In addition, other terms have come into being, responding to the need to explain different aspects of the Universal Design spectrum. In 1998, at the "Designing for the 21st Century Conference" Ron Mace's presentation differentiated between the meanings and practices associated with the terms "Barrier-Free Design", "Assistive Technology" and "Universal Design" [2]. At the turn of the millennium, "Design for All" was the term adopted by the European Commission which focused on ensuring that environments, products, services and interfaces of the Information Society Technologies (ISTs) work for people of all ages and abilities in different situations and under various circumstances [6, 8]. It spelt out the "adaptation or specialized design" with a three-part strategy: • Design of IST products, services and applications which are demonstrably suitable for most of the potential users without any modifications. • Design of products which are easily adaptable to different users (e.g. by incorporating adaptable or customisable user interfaces). • Design of products which have standardised interfaces, capable of being accessed by specialised user interaction devices [6]. Alongside setting out this strategy, the definition of Design for All made a conscious effort to make the concept more widely acceptable by explaining how Design for All could benefit not just consumers of ISTs, but also producers, and give wider social and economic benefit. Amongst other things, adopting a Design for All

  1. Gotta Minute? Get a Good Workout

    MedlinePlus

    ... minute cool-down, and two minutes of easy cycling for recovery between the intense sprints. Total time: ... moderate workout group did 45 minutes of continuous cycling at a moderate pace, plus the same warmup ...

  2. 5 experiments in 5 minutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hut, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Show, don't tell. When kids ask about your research, show, don't tell. We, the ambassadors of science, shouldn't be boring our nieces and nephews at family dinners with parameter distributions, we should make them excited about science. Getting people excited: show, don't tell. In 5 minutes, I will perform 5 experiments that anyone can do using everyday household items to get kids interested in science. Bring safety glasses.

  3. 50 CFR 510.8 - Minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minutes. 510.8 Section 510.8 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ACT § 510.8 Minutes. Detailed minutes shall be kept of each portion of each committee meeting. The minutes shall include:...

  4. 50 CFR 510.8 - Minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minutes. 510.8 Section 510.8 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ACT § 510.8 Minutes. Detailed minutes shall be kept of each portion of each committee meeting. The minutes shall include:...

  5. 50 CFR 510.8 - Minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minutes. 510.8 Section 510.8 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ACT § 510.8 Minutes. Detailed minutes shall be kept of each portion of each committee meeting. The minutes shall include:...

  6. 50 CFR 510.8 - Minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minutes. 510.8 Section 510.8 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ACT § 510.8 Minutes. Detailed minutes shall be kept of each portion of each committee meeting. The minutes shall include:...

  7. 50 CFR 510.8 - Minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minutes. 510.8 Section 510.8 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ACT § 510.8 Minutes. Detailed minutes shall be kept of each portion of each committee meeting. The minutes shall include:...

  8. Mechanical Working Group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This documents contains the minutes and viewgraphs from the October 27--28, 1992 meeting on the subject of power generation and delivery systems for military applications. Attendees represented the US Air Force and NASA. The thermal management panel reported on the capillary pump loop test facility, thermal control systems and compressors, and the oxygen heat pipe flight experiment. The aerospace power panel reported on the integrated power unit for the more electric airplane, the solar dynamic power system, the modular high temperature gas cooled reactor-gas-turbine program, the multi-megawatt CBC power system, and analytical modeling for heat pipe performance. The terrestrial power panel reported on a free piston stirling engine power generation system, fuel cell vehicles, and the advanced gas turbine project.

  9. Fronts, fish, and predators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Hunt, George L.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Zamon, Jeannette E.; Schick, Robert S.; Prieto, Rui; Brodziak, Jon; Teo, Steven L. H.; Thorne, Lesley; Bailey, Helen; Itoh, Sachihiko; Munk, Peter; Musyl, Michael K.; Willis, Jay K.; Zhang, Wuchang

    2014-09-01

    Ocean fronts play a key role in marine ecosystems. Fronts shape oceanic landscapes and affect every trophic level across a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, from meters to thousands of kilometers, and from days to millions of years. At some fronts, there is an elevated rate of primary production, whereas at others, plankton is aggregated by advection and by the behavior of organisms moving against gradients in temperature, salinity, light irradiance, hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical and biological factors. Lower trophic level organisms - phytoplankton and zooplankton - that are aggregated in sufficient densities, attract organisms from higher trophic levels, from planktivorous schooling fish to squid, large piscivorous fish, seabirds and marine mammals. Many species have critical portions of their life stages or behaviors closely associated with fronts, including spawning, feeding, ontogenetic development, migrations, and other activities cued to frontal dynamics. At different life stages, an individual species or population might be linked to different fronts. The nature and strength of associations between fronts and biota depend on numerous factors such as the physical nature and spatio-temporal scales of the front and the species and their life stages in question. In other words, fronts support many different niches and micro/macro-habitats over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales.

  10. Advanced RF Front End Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M. I.; Valas, S.; Katehi, L. P. B.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to achieve low-mass low-cost micro/nanospacecraft for Deep Space exploration requires extensive miniaturization of all subsystems. The front end of the Telecommunication subsystem is an area in which major mass (factor of 10) and volume (factor of 100) reduction can be achieved via the development of new silicon based micromachined technology and devices. Major components that make up the front end include single-pole and double-throw switches, diplexer, and solid state power amplifier. JPL's Center For Space Microsystems - System On A Chip (SOAC) Program has addressed the challenges of front end miniaturization (switches and diplexers). Our objectives were to develop the main components that comprise a communication front end and enable integration in a single module that we refer to as a 'cube'. In this paper we will provide the latest status of our Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) switches and surface micromachined filter development. Based on the significant progress achieved we can begin to provide guidelines of the proper system insertion for these emerging technologies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  12. Combustion front propagation in underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, R.L. II; Krantz, W.B.

    1990-10-01

    Reverse Combustion (RC) enhances coal seam permeability prior to Underground Coal Gasification. Understanding RC is necessary to improve its reliability and economics. A curved RC front propagation model is developed, then solved by high activation energy asymptotics. It explicitly incorporates extinction (stoichiometric and thermal) and tangential heat transport (THT) (convection and conduction). THT arises from variation in combustion front temperature caused by tangential variation in the oxidant gas flux to the channel surface. Front temperature depends only weakly on THT; front velocity is strongly affected, with heat loss slowing propagation. The front propagation speed displays a maximum with respect to gas flux. Combustion promoters speed front propagation; inhibitors slow front propagation. The propagation model is incorporated into 2-D simulations of RC channel evolution utilizing the boundary element method with cubic hermetian elements to solve the flow from gas injection wells through the coal to the convoluted, temporally evolving, channel surface, and through the channel to a gas production well. RC channel propagation is studied using 17 cm diameter subbituminous horizontally drilled coal cores. Sixteen experiments at pressures between 2000 and 3600 kPa, injected gas oxygen contents between 21% and 75%, and flows between 1 and 4 standard liters per minute are described. Similarity analysis led to scaling-down of large RC ({approx}1 m) to laboratory scale ({approx}5 cm). Propagation velocity shows a strong synergistic increase at high levels of oxygen, pressure, and gas flow. Char combustion is observed, leaving ash-filled, irregularly shaped channels. Cracks are observed to penetrate the char zone surrounding the channel cores. 69 refs., 54 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Exercise 30 minutes a day (image)

    MedlinePlus

    You get the most benefit from exercise if you do it for at least 30 minutes a day for 5 to 6 days a week. But you do not have to do 30 minutes in a row. Studies suggest that you ... for 10 minutes 3 times a day as you do during a longer session.

  14. Minute pirate bugs (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pirate bugs (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) are important sources of biological control of pests in orchards, vegetable crops, forests, on ornamental plants, and in greenhouses. The systematics and biology of the Anthocoridae is briefly reviewed, and information on life history, systematics and taxon...

  15. Development of a data management front end for use with a LANDSAT based information system. [assessing gypsy moth defoliation damage in Pennsylvania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, B. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A user friendly front end was constructed to facilitate access to the LANDSAT mosaic data base supplied by JPL and to process both LANDSAT and ancillary data. Archieval and retrieval techniques were developed to efficiently handle this data base and make it compatible with requirements of the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry. Procedures are ready for: (1) forming the forest/nonforest mask in ORSER compressed map format using GSFC-supplied classification procedures; (2) registering data from a new scene (defoliated) to the mask (which may involve mosaicking if the area encompasses two LANDSAT scenes; (3) producing a masked new data set using the MASK program; (4) analyzing this data set to produce a map showing degrees of defoliation, output on the Versatec plotter; and (5) producing color composite maps by a diazo-type process.

  16. Stories from the Front.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melnick, Blake

    2002-01-01

    Shares some of the author's personal experiences from the "front line" to illustrate the potential of computer-supported learning environments. Concludes that technology, if used in conjunction with sound pedagogy, allows students to tep outside the confines of the traditional classroom and school structure and take responsibility for both their…

  17. Nanoparticle Oscillations and Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Wang, Dawei; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-09-30

    Chemical oscillations can be coupled to the dynamic self-assembly of nanoparticles. Periodic pH changes translate into protonation and deprotonation of the ligands that stabilize the nanoparticles, thus altering repulsive and attractive interparticle forces. In a continuous stirred-tank reactor, rhythmic aggregation and dispersion is observed; in spatially distributed media, propagation of particle aggregation fronts is seen.

  18. Front Range Branch Officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Front Range Branch of AGU has installed officers for 1990: Ray Noble, National Center for Atmospheric Research, chair; Sherry Oaks, U.S. Geological Survey, chair-elect; Howard Garcia, NOAA, treasurer; Catharine Skokan, Colorado School of Mines, secretary. JoAnn Joselyn of NOAA is past chair. Members at large are Wallace Campbell, NOAA; William Neff, USGS; and Stephen Schneider, NCAR.

  19. Importance of...and Methods for...Writing Board Minutes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wettengel, Winona

    The Oklahoma State Board of Education prepared this handbook to serve as a guide for local board presidents, clerks, and secretaries in recording the minutes of school board meetings. The information that is compiled and presented was gleaned from reference books listed in the bibliography. Chapters of the guide describe board of education…

  20. 49 CFR 1012.5 - Transcripts; minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transcripts; minutes. 1012.5 Section 1012.5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS MEETINGS OF THE BOARD § 1012.5 Transcripts; minutes. (a) A verbatim transcript, sound...

  1. 29 CFR 1912a.11 - Minutes; transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minutes; transcript. 1912a.11 Section 1912a.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH § 1912a.11 Minutes; transcript....

  2. 48 CFR 9901.312 - Minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minutes. 9901.312 Section 9901.312 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET ADMINISTRATION RULES AND PROCEDURES 9901.312 Minutes....

  3. The five-minute chemical engineer

    SciTech Connect

    Korchinski, W.J.; Turpin, L.E.

    1996-01-01

    Engineering offices are filled with computers and state-of-the-art software. Given the right set of circumstances, refinery engineers are delighted to use all of this stuff: technology is at their fingertips and, if time permits, one can grind out an answer to full machine precision. But, many really useful refinery calculations can be simplified using miscellaneous bits of information and a few rules. These calculation techniques provide a quick way to evaluate whether something is worth pursuing in more detail, or whether time would be better spent performing other activities. These estimates also provide reasonable answers in a timely manner, when engineers do not have access to all of the high-tech tools on their desktop. In most cases all that is required is an inexpensive calculator and five minutes of your time. Only a few really important constants are needed to do most quick-and-dirty refining calculations. These constants are summarized in four tables along with a set of commonly used equations. Examples are provided that illustrate use of the constants and equations. Some examples may be familiar: can a heat exchanger be used in a particular service; what size driver would be needed to compress a stream from one pressure to the next; how much fuel is being used by a boiler or process heater; how much energy can be saved by cutting reflux? The intent is to provide the tools to quickly estimate answers to these questions.

  4. 35. EAST FRONT OF POWERHOUSE AND CAR BARN: East front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. EAST FRONT OF POWERHOUSE AND CAR BARN: East front of powerhouse and car barn. 'Annex' is right end of building. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. 9. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF FRONT PORCH SHOWING FRONT ENTRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF FRONT PORCH SHOWING FRONT ENTRY (LEFT) AND BLANK WALL (CENTER) CORRESPONDING TO LOCATION OF INTERIOR VAULTS. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  6. View of portion of the front entry on the front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of portion of the front entry on the front (west) side of the Mueller house, looking northeast. Sheds are in the background. - Ernst Mueller House, 6563 East Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. 3. VIEW NORTH, SOUTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHEAST SIDE Front and side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTH, SOUTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHEAST SIDE Front and side elevation. Note gasoline sign post added. Flush store window not altered, 1900 clapboard siding and panelling remaining. - 510 Central Avenue (Commercial Building), Ridgely, Caroline County, MD

  8. Exploring Market State and Stock Interactions on the Minute Timescale

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Bo; Ouyang, Fang-Yan

    2016-01-01

    A stock market is a non-stationary complex system. The stock interactions are important for understanding the state of the market. However, our knowledge on the stock interactions on the minute timescale is limited. Here we apply the random matrix theory and methods in complex networks to study the stock interactions and sector interactions. Further, we construct a new kind of cross-correlation matrix to investigate the correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes within one trading day. Based on 50 million minute-to-minute price data in the Shanghai stock market, we discover that the market states in the morning and afternoon are significantly different. The differences mainly exist in three aspects, i.e. the co-movement of stock prices, interactions of sectors and correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes. In the afternoon, the component stocks of sectors are more robust and the structure of sectors is firmer. Therefore, the market state in the afternoon is more stable. Furthermore, we reveal that the information of the sector interactions can indicate the financial crisis in the market, and the indicator based on the empirical data in the afternoon is more effective. PMID:26900948

  9. Exploring Market State and Stock Interactions on the Minute Timescale.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Bo; Ouyang, Fang-Yan

    2016-01-01

    A stock market is a non-stationary complex system. The stock interactions are important for understanding the state of the market. However, our knowledge on the stock interactions on the minute timescale is limited. Here we apply the random matrix theory and methods in complex networks to study the stock interactions and sector interactions. Further, we construct a new kind of cross-correlation matrix to investigate the correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes within one trading day. Based on 50 million minute-to-minute price data in the Shanghai stock market, we discover that the market states in the morning and afternoon are significantly different. The differences mainly exist in three aspects, i.e. the co-movement of stock prices, interactions of sectors and correlation between the stock interactions at different minutes. In the afternoon, the component stocks of sectors are more robust and the structure of sectors is firmer. Therefore, the market state in the afternoon is more stable. Furthermore, we reveal that the information of the sector interactions can indicate the financial crisis in the market, and the indicator based on the empirical data in the afternoon is more effective. PMID:26900948

  10. ARIEL front end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Baartman, R. A.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ARIEL project at TRIUMF will greatly expand the variety and availability of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) (Laxdal, Nucl Inst Methods Phys Res B 204:400-409, 2003). The ARIEL front end connects the two ARIEL target stations to the existing ISAC facility to expand delivery to two and eventually three simultaneous RIB beams with up to two simultaneous accelerated beams (Laxdal et al. 2008). The low-energy beam transport lines and mass separators are designed for maximum flexibility to allow a variety of operational modes in order to optimize the radioactive ion beam delivery. A new accelerator path is conceived for high mass delivery from an EBIS charge state breeder. The front-end design utilizes the experience gained in 15 years of ISAC beam delivery.

  11. Front Range Report, Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, William

    The second regional conference of the Front Range Branch, AGU, was attended by more than 80 professionals and some 20 outstanding high school students. The conference included 2 days of interdisciplinary talks, and lots of discussion, that primarily were keyed to geophysical studies of Colorado, Wyoming, and New Mexico. Other talks reported on nonregional, and sometimes global, studies being done by geophypsicists of the Front Range region.Topics included tectonics of the Front Range and the Colorado Plateau, pollution of the Arkansas and Mississippi rivers, and a supreme polluting event that caused the late-Cretaceous extinctions. Other notable talks were on toxic cleanup, microburst (wind shear) detection at U.S. airports, and other meteorological studies. Several talks treated the audience to the excitement of new work and surprise discoveries. The meeting was multimedia, including the playing of two videos through a projection TV and the playing of a fascinating tape between an airport control tower and incoming pilots during a severe microburst event.

  12. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  13. Theory of pinned fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissmann, Haim; Shnerb, Nadav M.; Kessler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of a front between two different phases in the presence of a smoothly inhomogeneous external field that takes its critical value at the crossing point is analyzed. Two generic scenarios are studied. In the first, the system admits a bistable solution and the external field governs the rate in which one phase invades the other. The second mechanism corresponds to a continuous transition that, in the case of reactive systems, takes the form of a transcritical bifurcation at the crossing point. We solve for the front shape and for the response of competitive fronts to external noise, showing that static properties and also some of the dynamical features cannot discriminate between the two scenarios. A reliable indicator turns out to be the fluctuation statistics. These take a Gaussian form in the bifurcation case and a double-peaked shape in a bistable system. Our results are discussed in the context of biological processes, such as species and communities dynamics in the presence of a resource gradient.

  14. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-07-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence.

  15. Thermal Fronts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  16. Database for the Geologic Map of the Skykomish River 30-Minute by 60-Minute Quadrangle, Washington (I-1963)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tabor, R.W.; Frizzell, V.A., Jr.; Booth, D.B.; Waitt, R.B.; Whetten, J.T.; Zartman, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    This digital map database has been prepared from the published geologic map of the Skykomish River 30- by 60-minute quadrangle by the senior author. Together with the accompanying text files as PDF, it provides information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The authors mapped most of the bedrock geology at 1:100,000 scale, but compiled Quaternary units at 1:24,000 scale. The Quaternary contacts and structural data have been much simplified for the 1:100,000-scale map and database. The spatial resolution (scale) of the database is 1:100,000 or smaller. From the eastern-most edges of suburban Seattle, the Skykomish River quadrangle stretches east across the low rolling hills and broad river valleys of the Puget Lowland, across the forested foothills of the North Cascades, and across high meadowlands to the bare rock peaks of the Cascade crest. The Straight Creek Fault, a major Pacific Northwest structure which almost bisects the quadrangle, mostly separates unmetamorphosed and low-grade metamorphic Paleozoic and Mesozoic oceanic rocks on the west from medium- to high-grade metamorphic rocks on the east. Within the quadrangle the lower grade rocks are mostly Mesozoic melange units. To the east, the higher-grade terrane is mostly the Chiwaukum Schist and related gneisses of the Nason terrane and invading mid-Cretaceous stitching plutons. The Early Cretaceous Easton Metamorphic Suite crops out on both sides of the Straight Creek fault and records it's dextral displacement. On the south margin of the quadrangle, the fault separates the lower Eocene Swauk Formation on the east from the upper Eocene and Oligocene(?) Naches Formation and, farther north, its correlative Barlow Pass Volcanics the west. Stratigraphically equivalent rocks of the Puget Group crop out farther to the west. Rocks of

  17. [OR minute myth : Guidelines for calculation of DRG revenues per OR minute].

    PubMed

    Waeschle, R M; Hinz, J; Bleeker, F; Sliwa, B; Popov, A; Schmidt, C E; Bauer, M

    2016-02-01

    The economic situation in German Hospitals is tense and needs the implementation of differentiated controlling instruments. Accordingly, parameters of revenue development of different organizational units within a hospital are needed. This is particularly necessary in the revenue and cost-intensive operating theater field. So far there are only barely established productivity data for the control of operating room (OR) revenues during the year available. This article describes a valid method for the calculation of case-related revenues per OR minute conform to the diagnosis-related groups (DRG).For this purpose the relevant datasets from the OR information system and the § 21 productivity report (DRG grouping) of the University Medical Center Göttingen were combined. The revenues defined in the DRG browser of the Institute for Hospital Reimbursement (InEK) were assigned to the corresponding process times--incision-suture time (SNZ), operative preparation time and anesthesiology time--according to the InEK system. All full time stationary DRG cases treated within the OR were included and differentiated according to the surgical department responsible. The cost centers "OR section" and "anesthesia" were isolated to calculate the revenues of the operating theater. SNZ clusters and cost type groups were formed to demonstrate their impact on the revenues per OR minute. A surgical personal simultaneity factor (GZF) was calculated by division of the revenues for surgeons and anesthesiologists. This factor resembles the maximum DRG financed personnel deployment for surgeons in German hospitals.The revenue per OR minute including all cost types and DRG was 16.63 €/min. The revenues ranged from 10.45 to 24.34 €/min depending on the surgical field. The revenues were stable when SNZ clusters were analyzed. The differentiation of cost type groups revealed a revenue reduction especially after exclusion of revenues for implants and infrastructure. The calculated GZF over

  18. From the front

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The causes of recent dynamic thinning of Greenland's outlet glaciers have been debated. Realistic simulations suggest that changes at the marine fronts of these glaciers are to blame, implying that dynamic thinning will cease once the glaciers retreat to higher ground. For the last decade, many outlet glaciers in Greenland that terminate in the ocean have accelerated, thinned, and retreated. To explain these dynamic changes, two hypotheses have been discussed. Atmospheric warming has increased surface melting and may also have increased the amount of meltwater reaching the glacier bed, increasing lubrication at the base and hence the rate of glacier sliding. Alternatively, a change in the delicate balance of forces where the glacier fronts meet the ocean could trigger the changes. Faezeh Nick and colleagues5 present ice-sheet modeling experiments that mimic the observations on Helheim glacier, East Greenland, and suggest that the dynamic behaviour of outlet glaciers follows from perturbations at their marine fronts. Greenland's ice sheet loses mass partly through surface melting and partly through fast flowing outlet glaciers that connect the vast plateau of inland ice with the ocean. Earlier ice sheet models have failed to reproduce the dynamic variability exhibited by ice sheets over time. It has therefore not been possible to distinguish with confidence between basal lubrication from surface meltwater and changes at the glaciers' marine fronts as causes for the observed changes on Greenland's outlet glaciers. But this distinction bears directly on future sea-level rise, the raison d'etre of much of modern-day glaciology: If the recent dynamic mass loss Greenland's outlet glaciers is linked to changing atmospheric temperatures, it may continue for as long as temperatures continue to increase. On the other hand, if the source of the dynamic mass loss is a perturbation at the ice-ocean boundary, these glaciers will lose contact with that perturbation after a finite

  19. 49 CFR 1012.5 - Transcripts; minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transcripts; minutes. 1012.5 Section 1012.5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT... made and retained. (b) The Board will make available free of charge, upon request, in a public...

  20. 49 CFR 1012.5 - Transcripts; minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transcripts; minutes. 1012.5 Section 1012.5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT... made and retained. (b) The Board will make available free of charge, upon request, in a public...

  1. Minutes of Midyear Executive Board Meeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counseling Psychologist, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Presents minutes of midyear executive board meeting of American Psychological Association's Division 17, Counseling Psychology. Reviews standing committee reports from education and training, ethics and cultural diversity, hospitality suite, independent practice, membership, nominations, professional affairs, program committee, scientific affairs,…

  2. Programme Feedback: It Only Takes a Minute!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Graeme

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to examine the practicalities of implementing the one-minute paper (OMP) concept and to consider whether claimed benefits are likely to be achieved without significant increases in resources. Design/methodology/approach: The study makes use of a literature review to establish the claimed OMP benefits. These benefits are…

  3. Ten Minutes Wide: Human Walking Capacities and the Experiential Quality of Campus Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spooner, David

    2011-01-01

    Whether a campus is large or small, the idea of a 10-minute walk is an important human-scaled design standard that affects an institution in significant ways beyond just getting students to class on time. Designing a 10-minute walk seems like a simple exercise. Based on earlier information, all one needs to do is provide a walking surface and make…

  4. Observational evidence for thermal wave fronts in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Simnett, G. M.; Smith, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Images in 3.5-30 keV X-rays obtained during the first few minutes of seven solar flares show rapid motions. In each case X-ray emission first appeared at one end of a magnetic field structure, and then propagated along the field at a velocity between 800 and 1700 km/s. The observed X-ray structures were 45,000-230,000 km long. Simultaneous H-alpha images were available in three cases; they showed brightenings when the fast-moving fronts arrived at the chromosphere. The fast-moving fronts are interpreted as electron thermal conduction fronts since their velocities are consistent with conduction at the observed temperatures of 1-3 x 10 to the 7th K. The inferred conductive heat flux of up to 10-billion ergs/s sq cm accounts for most of the energy released in the flares, implying that the flares were primarily thermal phenomena.

  5. FACILITY 209, SINGLESTORY DUPLEX, FRONT OBLIQUE VIEW OF FRONT FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 209, SINGLE-STORY DUPLEX, FRONT OBLIQUE VIEW OF FRONT FROM CENTER DRIVE, FACING SW. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Housing Area 1, Single Story Duplex Type, Bounded by Kamehameha Highway, Plantation Drive, South Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. FACILITY 1042. FRONT OBLIQUE SHOWING ROYAL PALMS LINING FRONT WALK. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 1042. FRONT OBLIQUE SHOWING ROYAL PALMS LINING FRONT WALK. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Hale Alii, Junior Officers' Quarters Type, 9-10 Hale Alii Avenue, 1-2 Eighth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. MMS Observations of Dipolarization Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, K. J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Sibeck, D. G.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Nakamura, R.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Moore, T. E.; Ergun, R. E.; Pollock, C. J.; Mauk, B.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present MMS observations of dipolarization fronts. Dipolarization fronts commonly observed in Earth's plasma sheet are characterized by intense gradients in the current sheet-normal component of the magnetic field and plasma/magnetic pressure across the front. These fronts are often embedded within fast earthward flows, i.e., bursty bulk flows. Analysis using data from all four spacecraft shows the presence of both typical and atypical dipolarization fronts. Typically dipolarization fronts propagate earthward and their normals point radially inward, however, we have identified dipolarization fronts propagating tailward with normals pointing significantly away from the radial direction. Atypical dipolarization fronts observed on 7 May 2015 and 21 July 2015 are preceded or accompanied by a rapid decrease in the Bx or By components of the magnetic field. These decreases indicate that the magnetotail is first thinning and then thickening. The resulting magnetic pile-up can cause the local Bz to increase rapidly, indicating propagation tailward, as observed. These new high time resolution field and plasma observations from MMS provide exciting new insights about the dynamical changes of magnetotail topology.

  8. Liquid immersion apparatus for minute articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, J. G., Jr.; Hollis, B. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus is disclosed for immersing minute integrated circuit chips in an etching solution in manufacturing integrated circuits during research and development. The apparatus includes a holder, having a handle and basket support for carrying a removable unitary basket and lid structure where fluid flow-through passages are formed, and wherein graduated openings in the handle provide for adjustably supporting the basket in a breaker at a desired level.

  9. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  10. Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the minutes and viewgraphs from a meeting of military personnel on the subject of power generation and distribution systems for military applications. Topics include heating and cooling systems for standard shelters, SDIO power programs, solar dynamic space power systems, hybrid solar dynamic/ photovoltaic systems, pulsed power technology, high-{Tc} superconductors, and actuators and other electronic equipment for aerospace vehicles. Attendees represented the US Air Force, Army, Navy, and NASA. (GHH)

  11. Fronts in Large Marine Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Cornillon, Peter C.; Sherman, Kenneth

    2009-04-01

    Oceanic fronts shape marine ecosystems; therefore front mapping and characterization are among the most important aspects of physical oceanography. Here we report on the first global remote sensing survey of fronts in the Large Marine Ecosystems (LME). This survey is based on a unique frontal data archive assembled at the University of Rhode Island. Thermal fronts were automatically derived with the edge detection algorithm of Cayula and Cornillon (1992, 1995, 1996) from 12 years of twice-daily, global, 9-km resolution satellite sea surface temperature (SST) fields to produce synoptic (nearly instantaneous) frontal maps, and to compute the long-term mean frequency of occurrence of SST fronts and their gradients. These synoptic and long-term maps were used to identify major quasi-stationary fronts and to derive provisional frontal distribution maps for all LMEs. Since SST fronts are typically collocated with fronts in other water properties such as salinity, density and chlorophyll, digital frontal paths from SST frontal maps can be used in studies of physical-biological correlations at fronts. Frontal patterns in several exemplary LMEs are described and compared, including those for: the East and West Bering Sea LMEs, Sea of Okhotsk LME, East China Sea LME, Yellow Sea LME, North Sea LME, East and West Greenland Shelf LMEs, Newfoundland-Labrador Shelf LME, Northeast and Southeast US Continental Shelf LMEs, Gulf of Mexico LME, and Patagonian Shelf LME. Seasonal evolution of frontal patterns in major upwelling zones reveals an order-of-magnitude growth of frontal scales from summer to winter. A classification of LMEs with regard to the origin and physics of their respective dominant fronts is presented. The proposed classification lends itself to comparative studies of frontal ecosystems.

  12. Super-heated flooding fronts on tidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehimer, J. P.; Thomson, J. M.; Chickadel, C.

    2012-12-01

    The flooding tide over a tidal flat is a thin fluid flow with complex dynamics and relation to benthic activity. Temperature observations (Figure 1) on the Skagit Bay, WA, USA tidal flats during the summer suggest that the leading edge of the flooding front is up to 5 °C warmer than the exposed sediment and 15 °C warmer than the bulk tide water. Using a numerical model, we evaluate the thermodynamic budget of this thin layer in a Lagrangian frame following the flood tide. Both local and flux heating terms are significant. The local heating is modulated by the turbidity of the flooding front, which controls the uptake of solar radiation, and by the exchange of heat between the flooding front and the sediment. The flux mechanisms include horizontal diffusion and advection due to net circulation within the frontal control volume. Due to the no-slip condition at the bed, circulation of warmer water near the surface moves toward the front while cooler water leaves the volume near the bed.Airborne infrared imagery taken during the flood tide at Skagit Bay, WA, USA on 23 June 2009 starting at 3:00 PM PDT. Cooler surface temperatures are darker The exposed tidal flats are warmer than the Skagit Bay water due to solar heating while exposed. The leading edge of the flood front is indicated and is up to 5 °C warmer than the exposed sediment. The airborne imagery was taken over 50 minutes and mosaicked together.

  13. Can we use ice calving on glacier fronts as a proxy for rock slope failures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abellan, Antonio; Penna, Ivanna; Daicz, Sergio; Carrea, Dario; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Riquelme, Adrian; Tomas, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Ice failures on glacier terminus show very similar fingerprints to rock-slope failure (RSF) processes, nevertheless, the investigation of gravity-driven instabilities that shape rock cliffs and glacier's fronts are currently dissociated research topics. Since both materials (ice and rocks) have very different rheological properties, the development of a progressive failure on mountain cliffs occurs at a much slower rate than that observed on glacier fronts, which leads the latter a good proxy for investigating RSF. We utilized a terrestrial Laser Scanner (Ilris-LR system from Optech) for acquiring successive 3D point clouds of one of the most impressive calving glacier fronts, the Perito Moreno glacier located in the Southern Patagonian Ice Fields (Argentina). We scanned the glacier terminus during five days (from 10th to 14th of March 2014) with very high accuracy (0.7cm standard deviation of the error at 100m) and a high density of information (200 points per square meter). Each data series was acquired at a mean interval of 20 minutes. The maximum attainable range for the utilized wavelength of the Ilris-LR system (1064 nm) was around 500 meters over massive ice (showing no-significant loss of information), being this distance considerably reduced on crystalline or wet ice short after the occurrence of calving events. As for the data treatment, we have adapted our innovative algorithms originally developed for the investigation of both precursory deformation and rockfalls to study calving events. By comparing successive three-dimensional datasets, we have investigated not only the magnitude and frequency of several ice failures at the glacier's terminus (ranging from one to thousands of cubic meters), but also the characteristic geometrical features of each failure. In addition, we were able to quantify a growing strain rate on several areas of the glacier's terminus shortly after their final collapse. For instance, we investigated the spatial extent of the

  14. Flame front as hydrodynamic discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2012-11-01

    We applied generalized Rankine-Hugoniot conditions to study the dynamics of unsteady and curved fronts as a hydrodynamic discontinuity. It is shown that the front is unstable and Landau-Darrieus instability develops only if three conditions are satisfied (1) large-scale vorticity is generated in the fluid bulk; (2) energy flux across the front is imbalanced; (3) the energy imbalance is large. The structure of the solution is studied in details. Flows with and without gravity and thermal diffusion are analyzed. Stabilization mechanisms are identified. NSF 1004330.

  15. Asymmetric counterpropagating fronts without flow.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Silva, I; Clerc, M G; Odent, V

    2015-06-01

    Out-of-equilibrium systems exhibit domain walls between different states. These walls, depending on the type of connected states, can display rich spatiotemporal dynamics. In this Rapid Communication, we investigate the asymmetrical counterpropagation of fronts in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the different front shapes and propagation speeds. These fronts present dissimilar elastic deformations that are responsible for their asymmetric speeds. Theoretically, using a phenomenological model, we describe the observed dynamics with fair agreement. PMID:26172647

  16. Minute Temperature Fluctuations Detected in Eta Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-11-01

    periods around 20 minutes. These periods are longer than those of the Sun, as expected for a star that is larger and heavier than the Sun. The figure accompanying this Press Release shows these oscillations in the form of a "power spectrum", i.e., the amount of temperature change at different values of the period. Most of the highest peaks correspond to the real oscillations in the star. The changes (fluctuations) of the temperature of Eta Bootis vary with the oscillation mode and, at the time of these observations, were mostly between 0.03 and 0.08 degrees. This diagramme provides the first strong evidence ever for solar-type oscillations in a star other than the Sun. An article with the detailed results will soon appear in the "Astronomical Journal". Agreement with Stellar Theory The measured periods of the main oscillation modes give important information about the interior of Eta Bootis. Theoretical models of the star have now been compared with these observations and the astronomers were pleased to find that the agreement is excellent, implying that current stellar theory is remarkably good. This shows that we apparently understand stars quite well, but there is of course still much to be learned. Future observations of this kind, with ground-based telescopes and possibly in a more distant future also from space, promise to open up a new and exciting way of studying stars. From now on, we will be able "to look inside" stars in great detail. Appendix: Spectral Analysis Dark spectral lines were first seen in the solar spectrum by the German physicist Johann Fraunhofer in 1814. Later, in the mid-nineteenth century, such lines were also seen in the spectra of other stars. It is now known that they are due to the upper, cooler layers in the solar and stellar atmospheres, whose atoms and molecules absorb the radiation from the hotter, deeper layers at specific wavelengths. These wavelengths serve as "footprints" of these atoms and molecules and allow astronomers to

  17. PRECISION INTEGRATOR FOR MINUTE ELECTRIC CURRENTS

    DOEpatents

    Hemmendinger, A.; Helmer, R.J.

    1961-10-24

    An integrator is described for measuring the value of integrated minute electrical currents. The device consists of a source capacitor connected in series with the source of such electrical currents, a second capacitor of accurately known capacitance and a source of accurately known and constant potential, means responsive to the potentials developed across the source capacitor for reversibly connecting the second capacitor in series with the source of known potential and with the source capacitor and at a rate proportional to the potential across the source capacitor to maintain the magnitude of the potential across the source capacitor at approximately zero. (AEC)

  18. Light storage on the time scale of a minute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudin, Y. O.; Li, L.; Kuzmich, A.

    2013-03-01

    Light storage on the minute scale is an important capability for future scalable quantum information networks spanning intercontinental distances. We employ an ultracold atomic gas confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice for long-term light storage. The differential ac Stark shift of the ground-level microwave transition used for storage is reduced to a sub-Hz level by the application of a magic-valued magnetic field. The 1/e lifetime for storage of coherent states of light is prolonged up to 16 s by a microwave dynamic decoupling protocol.

  19. The Relationship Between Propulsive Force in Tethered Swimming and 200-m Front Crawl Performance.

    PubMed

    Santos, Karini B; Bento, Paulo C B; Pereira, Gleber; Rodacki, André L F

    2016-09-01

    Santos, KB, Bento, PCB, Pereira, G, and Rodacki, ALF. The relationship between propulsive force in tethered swimming and 200-m front crawl performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2500-2507, 2016-The aims of this study were to determine whether propulsive force (peak force, mean force, impulse, and rate of force development) and stroke rate change during 2 minutes of front crawl tethered swimming and to correlate them with the stroke rate and swimming velocity in 200-m front crawl swimming. Twenty-one swimmers (21.6 ± 4.8 years, 1.78 ± 0.06 m, 71.7 ± 8.1 kg), with 200-m front crawl swimming performance equivalent to 78% of the world record (140.4 ± 10.1 seconds), were assessed during 2 minutes of maximal front crawl tethered swimming (propulsive forces and stroke rate) and 200-m front crawl swimming (stroke rate and clean velocity). Propulsive forces decreased between the beginning and the middle instants (∼20%; p ≤ 0.05) but remained stable between the middle and the end instants (∼6%; p > 0.05). The peak force was positively correlated with the clean velocity in the 200-m front crawl swimming (mean r = 0.61; p < 0.02). The stroke rates of the tethered swimming and 200-m front crawl swimming were positively correlated (r = 45; p≤ 0.01) at the middle instant. Therefore, the propulsive force and stroke rate changed throughout the 2 minutes of tethered swimming, and the peak force is the best propulsive force variable tested that correlated with 200-m front crawl swimming performance. PMID:24531436

  20. Radiative magnetized thermal conduction fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Balbus, Steven A.; Fristrom, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of plane-parallel magnetized thermal conduction fronts in the interstellar medium (ISM) was studied. Separating the coronal ISM phase and interstellar clouds, these fronts have been thought to be the site of the intermediate-temperature regions whose presence was inferred from O VI absorption-line studies. The front evolution was followed numerically, starting from the initial discontinuous temperature distribution between the hot and cold medium, and ending in the final cooling stage of the hot medium. It was found that, for the typical ISM pressure of 4000 K/cu cm and the hot medium temperature of 10 to the 6th K, the transition from evaporation to condensation in a nonmagnetized front occurs when the front thickness is 15 pc. This thickness is a factor of 5 smaller than previously estimated. The O VI column densities in both evaporative and condensation stages agree with observations if the initial hot medium temperature Th exceeds 750,000 K. Condensing conduction fronts give better agreement with observed O VI line profiles because of lower gas temperatures.

  1. Restless rays, steady wave fronts.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2007-12-01

    Observations of underwater acoustic fields with vertical line arrays and numerical simulations of long-range sound propagation in an ocean perturbed by internal gravity waves indicate that acoustic wave fronts are much more stable than the rays comprising these wave fronts. This paper provides a theoretical explanation of the phenomenon of wave front stability in a medium with weak sound-speed perturbations. It is shown analytically that at propagation ranges that are large compared to the correlation length of the sound-speed perturbations but smaller than ranges at which ray chaos develops, end points of rays launched from a point source and having a given travel time are scattered primarily along the wave front corresponding to the same travel time in the unperturbed environment. The ratio of root mean square displacements of the ray end points along and across the unperturbed wave front increases with range as the ratio of ray length to correlation length of environmental perturbations. An intuitive physical explanation of the theoretical results is proposed. The relative stability of wave fronts compared to rays is shown to follow from Fermat's principle and dimensional considerations. PMID:18247745

  2. "Take ten minutes": a dedicated ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Walsh, E K; Cussen, K

    2010-09-01

    Multiple and inappropriate medications are often the cause for poor health status in the elderly. Medication reviews can improve prescribing. This study aimed to determine if a ten minute medication review by a general practitioner could reduce polypharmacy and inappropriate prescribing in elderly patients. A prospective, randomised study was conducted. Patients over the age of 65 (n = 50) underwent a 10-minute medication review. Inappropriate medications, dosage errors, and discrepancies between prescribed versus actual medication being consumed were recorded. A questionnaire to assess satisfaction was completed following review. The mean number of medications taken by patients was reduced (p < 0.001). A medication was stopped in 35 (70%) patients. Inappropriate medications were detected in 27 (54%) patients and reduced (p < 0.001). Dose errors were detected in 16 (32%). A high level of patient satisfaction was reported. A ten minute medication review reduces polypharmacy, improves prescribing and is associated with high levels of patient satisfaction. PMID:21046863

  3. Minutes of the Sixth CEOS Plenary Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observations Satellites (CEOS) minutes for the sixth plenary meeting held in London, December 9-11, 1992 are presented. Attending as prospective members were the Russian Space Agency (RSA), the Committee for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring of the Ministry for Ecology and Natural resources of the Russian Federation (ROSCOMGIDROMET), the Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST) and the National Remote Sensing Center of China (NRSCC). Actions taken at the meeting included membership issues, CEOS proposals, data policy, and working group reports. Data requirements of CEOS affiliates were also reported on. Additional summations and statements as well as lists of participants and future meetings are included. In general, topics covered related to remote sensing and global change.

  4. Calorimetry measurements in less than 20 minutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, R. B.; Cremers, T.

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a new series of 10 watt Bulk Plutonium Assay Calorimeters (BPAC10). The calorimeter measures bulk samples of plutonium bearing material in containers up to 5 in. in diameter and 7 in. high. The average measurement time is 19.7 minutes compared to 2-9 hours for the same sample measured in a water bath calorimeter. Measurement precision in the range of 1-10 watts is 1 to 0.1 percent and it is 0.010 watt for sample power less than 1 watt. The BPAC10 series calorimeters are in use in two plutonium facilities at the EG&G Rocky Flats Plant and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory TA55 Plutonium Facility. The paper presents a description of the calorimeter, discusses operating experience at Los Alamos, and presents a comparison of data on typical samples measured with both types of calorimeters.

  5. Validity of estimating minute-by-minute energy expenditure of continuous walking bouts by accelerometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Objective measurement of physical activity remains an important challenge. For wearable monitors such as accelerometer-based physical activity monitors, more accurate methods are needed to convert activity counts into energy expenditure (EE). Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of the refined Crouter 2-Regression Model (C2RM) for estimating EE during the transition from rest to walking and walking to rest. A secondary purpose was to determine the extent of overestimation in minute-by-minute EE between the refined C2RM and the 2006 C2RM. Methods Thirty volunteers (age, 28 ± 7.7 yrs) performed 15 minutes of seated rest, 8 minutes of over-ground walking, and 8 minutes of seated rest. An ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer and Cosmed K4b2 portable metabolic system were worn during all activities. Participants were randomly assigned to start the walking bout at 0, 20, or 40 s into the minute (according to the ActiGraph clock). Acceleration data were analyzed by two methods: 2006 Crouter model and a new refined model. Results The 2006 Crouter 2-Regression model over-predicted measured kcal kg-1 hr-1 during the first and last transitional minutes of the 20-s and 40-s walking conditions (P < 0.001). It also over-predicted the average EE for a walking bout (4.0 ± 0.5 kcal kg-1 hr-1), compared to both the measured kcal kg-1 hr-1 (3.6 ± 0.7 kcal kg-1 hr-1) and the refined Crouter model (3.5 ± 0.5 kcal kg-1 hr-1) (P < 0.05). Conclusion The 2006 Crouter 2-regression model over-predicts EE at the beginning and end of walking bouts, due to high variability in accelerometer counts during the transitional minutes. The new refined model eliminates this problem and results in a more accurate prediction of EE during walking. PMID:21864359

  6. Research fronts analysis : A bibliometric to identify emerging fields of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Sayaka; Ando, Satoko

    Research fronts analysis identifies emerging areas of research through observing co-clustering in highly-cited papers. This article introduces the concept of research fronts analysis, explains its methodology and provides case examples. It also demonstrates developing research fronts in Japan by looking at the past winners of Thomson Reuters Research Fronts Awards. Research front analysis is currently being used by the Japanese government to determine new trends in science and technology. Information professionals can also utilize this bibliometric as a research evaluation tool.

  7. Comparison of walking performance over the first 2 minutes and the full 6 minutes of the Six-Minute Walk Test

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), as recommended by the American Thoracic Society, is widely used as a measure of functional endurance, it may not be applicable in some settings and populations. We sought to examine, therefore, performance over the first 2 minutes and the full 6 minutes of the 6MWT. Specifically, we investigated completion rates, distances walked, test-retest reliability, and the relationship between distances walked over the first 2 and the full 6 minutes of the 6MWT. Methods Community-dwelling children and adults age 3–85 years (n = 337) were asked to walk back and forth on a 15.24 meter (50 ft) course as far as possible without running over a 6 minute period. Test completion and the distance covered by the participants at 2 and 6 minutes were documented. The reliability of distances covered at 2 and 6 minutes was determined by retesting a subsample of 54 participants 6 to 10 days later. The relationship between distances covered at 2 and 6 minutes was determined for the 330 participants completing the 6MWT. Results All 337 participants completed at least 2 minutes of walking, but 7 children less than 5 years of age ceased walking before 6 minutes had elapsed. For the remaining 330 participants the mean distance walked was 186 meters at 2 minutes and 543 meters at 6 minutes. The distances covered at 2 and 6 minutes were reliable between sessions (intraclass correlation coefficients = 0.888 and 0.917, respectively). The distances covered over 2 and 6 minutes were highly correlated (r = 0.968). Conclusions The completion rate, values obtained, test-retest reliability, and relationship of the distances walked in 2 and 6 minutes support documentation of 2 minute distance during the 6MWT. The findings also provide support for use of a Two-Minute Walk Test as the endurance component in the Motor Battery of the NIH Toolbox. PMID:24767634

  8. Self-turbulizing flame fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavin, P.; Searby, G.

    A heuristic derivation of a flame front model is presented that takes into account the effects of gravity, nonlinear effects introduced by advection of the front, and gradients in the tangential component of the flow. A local equation is defined to relate the normal flame speed to the upstream gas flow characteristics. Jump conditions are obtained from an asymptotic analysis of the local structure of the wrinkled flame in order to address the hydrodynamic problem possed by the front being treated as a free boundary between fresh and burnt gases. The expression for the jump conditions is defined in Fourier space. The model extends the equations defined in Fourier space. The model extends the equations defined by Sivashinsky (1977) to cover the effects of gas expansion.

  9. Lagrangian fronts in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.; Budyansky, M. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    We introduce the concept of Lagrangian fronts (LFs) in the ocean and describe their importance for analyzing water mixing and transport and the specific features and differences from hydrological fronts. A method of calculating LFs in a given velocity field is proposed. Based on altimeter velocity fields from AVISO data in the northwestern Pacific, we calculate the Lagrangian synoptic maps and identify LFs of different spatial and temporal scales. Using statistical analysis of saury catches in different years according to the Goskomrybolovstvo (State Fisheries Committee of the Russian Federation), we show that LFs can serve as good indicators of places that are favorable for fishing.

  10. 46 CFR 535.704 - Filing of minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... telephone, electronic device, or other means are included. (c) Content of minutes. Minutes shall include the..., whether presented by oral, written, electronic, or other means. Where the aforementioned materials...

  11. Uganda opens new fronts.

    PubMed

    Tebere, R

    1991-03-01

    AIDS and HIV figures released in June 1990 by Uganda's AIDS Control Programme (ACP) prompted the revamping of the country's national AIDS initiative, the passage of legislation designed to stamp out sexual exploitation of minors and a reluctant pledge by President Yoweri Museveni to advocate condom use. Uganda has a massive AIDS prevention campaign estimated to reach 80% of the population, but AIDS cases are doubling every 6 months according to Health Minister Zack Kaheru. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have been linked as a co-factor in HIV transmission, therefore treatment of STDs will be linked to the anti-AIDS campaign in free clinics for the treatment of STDs operating in Kampala and Jinja and in new ones planned for Mbale, Mbarara and Fort Portal. The Uganda Aids Commission was created in an effort to strengthen the ACP by insuring that all government departments address AIDS prevention. New laws designed to curb the spread of the disease by sexual contact raised the age of consent for sexual intercourse from 14 to 18 years of age, made prostitution and homosexuality illegal and redefined incest to include extended family members. President Museveni urged Ugandans to use condoms to protect themselves from HIV infection. Because condoms are not 100% reliable, and because their use is not a popular option among rural people due to cultural and religious beliefs, President Museveni and ACP Director Dr. Warren Namara agree that the ultimate weapon against AIDS is educating people to rethink their sexual attitudes and actions. Hopeful signs include more openness about AIDS and more seeking of information about AIDS among the people. PMID:12283896

  12. 16 CFR 16.10 - Minutes and transcripts of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minutes and transcripts of meetings. 16.10 Section 16.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.10 Minutes and transcripts of meetings. (a) Detailed minutes of...

  13. 16 CFR 16.10 - Minutes and transcripts of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minutes and transcripts of meetings. 16.10 Section 16.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.10 Minutes and transcripts of meetings. (a) Detailed minutes of each advisory committee meeting shall be...

  14. 16 CFR 16.10 - Minutes and transcripts of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minutes and transcripts of meetings. 16.10 Section 16.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.10 Minutes and transcripts of meetings. (a) Detailed minutes of...

  15. 16 CFR 16.10 - Minutes and transcripts of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minutes and transcripts of meetings. 16.10 Section 16.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.10 Minutes and transcripts of meetings. (a) Detailed minutes of...

  16. 16 CFR 16.10 - Minutes and transcripts of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minutes and transcripts of meetings. 16.10 Section 16.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.10 Minutes and transcripts of meetings. (a) Detailed minutes of...

  17. Align the Front End First.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Jim

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of management styles and front-end analysis focuses on a review of Douglas McGregor's theories. Topics include Theories X, Y, and Z; leadership skills; motivational needs of employees; intrinsic and extrinsic rewards; and faulty implementation of instructional systems design processes. (LRW)

  18. Teaching the French Popular Front.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Irwin M.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the French Popular Front of 1936 as a vehicle to investigate the turbulent decade of the 1930s. Reviews current historiography and discusses various facets of Leon Blum's government, examining the interrelationship of major economic and political forces. Concludes that the French Left still faces Blum's dilemma of implementing socialism…

  19. Front Matter and Contents.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    ATCG model described in [1] ('Applied Theory accounting for human moleCular Genetics'), which constitutes a solid foundation for the present work. The author has a master degree in biochemistry, a master degree in computer science (systems development, informatics) and a European Doctorate and PhD in health informatics. The author has had a full-time research position for about 35 years, divided on a university hospital, the software industry and a university, while cross-fertilising the two professions; the time in the industry and the university mainly was dedicated to participation in large and advanced EU R&D Research projects. This combination of professional experience has enabled the present study. The present study was performed outside of any job or grant affiliation, while the author had an emeritus position at the Aalborg University. The author has since the year 2000 been a member of the scientific team describing the Mereon Matrix (for this, see [2]), went on early retirement in 2011 to work full time on the Mereon Matrix, and is independently continuing such scientific investigations on the matrix. Contact information: jytte@brender.dk and jbr@hst.aau.dk. Acknowledgements The author is deeply grateful for her position as Emeritus Assoc. Professor at her former university affiliation at Aalborg University, Dept. of Health Science and Technology, as this enabled a full and free access to most of the original scientific literature. Without this, the present study would have been critically hampered. The author is deeply grateful for continuous brainstorming and constructive feedback on and in the process with her husband, Dr. Peter McNair, retired director of the Medical Genetics Laboratory, KennedyCenter (DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark). Conflicting Interests The author declares that there was and is no conflicting interests, financial or otherwise, that would or could have influenced the outcome of the study. The author's work on the Mereon Matrix was not

  20. Fluctuation-controlled front propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Douglas Thacher

    1997-09-01

    A number of fundamental pattern-forming systems are controlled by fluctuations at the front. These problems involve the interaction of an infinite dimensional probability distribution with a strongly nonlinear, spatially extended pattern-forming system. We have examined fluctuation-controlled growth in the context of the specific problems of diffusion-limited growth and biological evolution. Mean field theory of diffusion-limited growth exhibits a finite time singularity. Near the leading edge of a diffusion-limited front, this leads to acceleration and blowup. This may be resolved, in an ad hoc manner, by introducing a cutoff below which growth is weakened or eliminated (8). This model, referred to as the BLT model, captures a number of qualitative features of global pattern formation in diffusion-limited aggregation: contours of the mean field match contours of averaged particle density in simulation, and the modified mean field theory can form dendritic features not possible in the naive mean field theory. The morphology transition between dendritic and non-dendritic global patterns requires that BLT fronts have a Mullins-Sekerka instability of the wavefront shape, in order to form concave patterns. We compute the stability of BLT fronts numerically, and compare the results to fronts without a cutoff. A significant morphological instability of the BLT fronts exists, with a dominant wavenumber on the scale of the front width. For standard mean field fronts, no instability is found. The naive and ad hoc mean field theories are continuum-deterministic models intended to capture the behavior of a discrete stochastic system. A transformation which maps discrete systems into a continuum model with a singular multiplicative noise is known, however numerical simulations of the continuum stochastic system often give mean field behavior instead of the critical behavior of the discrete system. We have found a new interpretation of the singular noise, based on maintaining

  1. Observations and Effects of Dipolarization Fronts Observed in Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Dipolarization fronts in Earth's magnetotail are characterized by sharp jumps in magnetic field, a drop in density, and often follow earthward fast plasma flow. They are commonly detected near the equatorial plane of Earth s tail plasma sheet. Sometimes, but not always, dipolarization fronts are associated with global substorms and auroral brightenings. Both Cluster, THEMIS, and other spacecraft have detected dipolarization fronts in a variety of locations in the magnetotail. Using multi-spacecraft analyses together with simulations, we have investigated the propagation and evolution of some dipolarization events. We have also investigated the acceleration of electrons and ions that results from such magnetic-field changes. In some situations, the velocities of fast earthward flows are comparable to the Alfven speed, indicating that the flow bursts might have been generated by bursty reconnection that occurred tailward of the spacecraft. Based on multi-spacecraft timing analysis, dipolarization fronts are found to propagate mainly earthward at 160-335 km/s and have thicknesses of 900-1500 km, which corresponds to the ion inertial length or gyroradius scale. Following the passage of dipolarization fronts, significant fluctuations are observed in the x and y components of the magnetic field. These peaks in the magnetic field come approximately 1-2 minutes after passage of the dipolarization front. These Bx and By fluctuations propagate primarily dawnward and earthward. Field-aligned electron beams are observed coincident with those magnetic field fluctuations. Non-Maxwellian electron and ion distributions are observed that are associated with the dipolarization that may be unstable to a range of electrostatic and/or whistler instabilities. Enhanced electrostatic broadband noise at frequencies below and near the lower-hybrid frequency is also observed at or very close to these fronts. This broadband noise is thought to play a role in further energizing the particles

  2. IFA - INTELLIGENT FRONT ANNOTATION PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    An important aspect of an ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) design process is verification. The design must not only be functionally accurate, but it must also maintain the correct timing. After a circuit has been laid out, one can utilize the Back Annotation (BA) method to simulate the design and obtain an accurate estimate of performance. However, this can lead to major design changes. It is therefore preferable to eliminate potential problems early in this process. IFA, the Intelligent Front Annotation program, assists in verifying the timing of the ASIC early in the design process. Many difficulties can arise during ASIC design. In a synchronous design, both long path and short path problems can be present. In modern ASIC technologies, the delay through a gate is very dependent on loading. This loading has two main components, the capacitance of the gates being driven and the capacitance of the metal tracks (wires). When using GaAs gate arrays, the metal line capacitance is often the dominating factor. Additionally, the RC delay through the wire itself is significant in sub-micron technologies. Since the wire lengths are unknown before place and route of the entire chip, this would seem to postpone any realistic timing verification until towards the end of the design process, obviously an undesirable situation. The IFA program estimates the delays in an ASIC before layout. Currently the program is designed for Vitesse GaAs gate arrays and, for input, requires the expansion file which is output by the program GED; however, the algorithm is appropriate for many different ASIC types and CAE platforms. IFA is especially useful for devices whose delay is extremely dependent on the interconnection wiring. It estimates the length of the interconnects using information supplied by the user and information in the netlist. The resulting wire lengths are also used to constrain the Place and Route program, ensuring reasonable results. IFA takes locality into

  3. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cribbin, Laura B.; Winstanley, Henry F.; Mitchell, Sarah L.; Fowler, Andrew C.; Sander, Graham C.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front.

  4. AIRS Storm Front Approaching California (animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the AIRS Storm Front Approaching California Animation

    NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument is able to peel back cloud cover to reveal 3-D structure of a storm's water vapor content, information that can be used to improve weather forecast models.

    In this animation the initial visible cloud image series shows a front moving toward the West Coast of the United States as a low pressure area moves into the Pacific Northwest. The 'Pineapple Express,' a stream of moisture that originates in the tropics South of Hawaii and usually crosses Mexico to enter New Mexico and Texas, has shifted Westward and is also visible moving into Baja California. The area preceding the front appears to be relatively clear in the visible images.

    As the view shifts from the visible to the infrared wavelengths which highlight water vapor, we see both cloud areas contain heavy burdens of moisture. The area which appears clear in the visible images is seen to contain water vapor near the coastline as well. The viewpoint then rotates so that we can see the vertical cross section of the fronts. The variability of the vertical extent of water vapor and the amount is now clearly visible. The storm moving in from the Gulf of Alaska is more heavily laden with water vapor than that moving in from the Southwest. The moisture is concentrated in the lower atmosphere. The colors indicate the amount of water vapor present. Blue areas denote low water vapor content; green areas are medium water vapor content; red areas signify high water vapor content. The vertical grid for the final frame ranges from 250 millibar pressure at the top to 1000 millibar pressure at the bottom. The top is about 10 km (6.2 miles) above the surface of the Earth.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in

  5. Weather fronts and acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kveton, Vit

    1991-03-01

    Some methodological aspects are discussed of the investigation of acute infarct myocarditis (AIM) in relation to weather fronts. Results of a new method of analysis are given. Data were analysed from about the hour of the onset of symptoms, and led to the diagnosis of AIM either immediately or within a few hours or days (3019 cases observed over 4.5 years during 1982 1986 in Plzen, Czechoslovakia). Weather classification was based on three factors (the type of the foregoing front, the type of the subsequent front, the time section of the time interval demarcated by the passage of the surfaces of the fronts). AIM occurrence increased in particular types of weather fronts: (i) by 30% during 7 12 h after a warm front, if the time span between fronts exceeded 24 h; (ii) by 10% in time at least 36 h distant from the foregoing cold or occlusion front and from the succeeding warm or occlusion front; (iii) by 20% during 0 2 h before the passage of the front, provided the foregoing front was not warm and the interval between fronts exceeded 5 h. AIM occurrence decreased by 15% 20% for time span between fronts > 24 h at times 6 11, 6 23 and 6 35 h before a coming warm or occlusion front (for interfrontal intervals 25 48, 49 72 and possibly > 72 h), and also at 12 23 and possibly 12 35 h before a cold front (for intervals 49 72 and possibly > 72 h), if the foregoing front was cold or an occlusion front.

  6. Firing up the front line.

    PubMed

    Katzenbach, J R; Santamaria, J A

    1999-01-01

    For many organizations, achieving competitive advantage means eliciting superior performance from employees on the front line--the burger flippers, hotel room cleaners, and baggage handlers whose work has an enormous effect on customers. That's no easy task. Front line workers are paid low wages, have scant hope of advancement, and--not surprisingly--often care little about the company's performance. But then how do some companies succeed in engaging the emotional energy of rank-and-file workers? A team of researchers at McKinsey & Company and the Conference Board recently explored that question and discovered that one highly effective route is demonstrated by the U.S. Marine Corps. The Marines' approach to motivation follows the "mission, values, and pride" path, which researchers say is practical and relevant for the business world. More specifically, the authors say the Marines follow five practices: they over-invest in cultivating core value; prepare every person to lead, including front line supervisors; learn when to create teams and when to create single-leader work groups; attend to all employees, not just the top half; and encourage self-discipline as a way of building pride. The authors admit there are critical differences between the Marines and most businesses. But using vivid examples from companies such as KFC and Marriott International, the authors illustrate how the Marines' approach can be translated for corporate use. Sometimes, the authors maintain, minor changes in a company's standard operating procedure can have a powerful effect on front line pride and can result in substantial payoffs in company performance. PMID:10387573

  7. Transaural virtual reality applied to front-back localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peter Xinya; Hartmann, William M.

    2005-04-01

    Human sound localization can be studied by measuring head-related transfer functions for different source locations and subsequently using the data to simulate different spatial locations using headphone presentation. This technique fails to adequately simulate the difference between front and back locations because the frequencies relevant to pinna cues are so high. A transaural (cross-talk cancellation) technique has been developed that is accurate up to 16 kHz. By controlling the levels and phases of spectral components, as measured by probe microphones in the ear canals, the technique eliminates significant differences between the baseline simulation and reality. The technique has been used, with modifications to the baseline simulation, to study the front-back information content in different frequency bands by eliminating the information while maintaining the energy. It has also been used to test for orthogonality between front-back localization and azimuthal localization based on simple interaural differences. The technique has verified that front-back discrimination cannot be mediated by interaural differences alone. By flattening the level spectrum in one ear while leaving the other ear unchanged it has been possible to demonstrate an ear advantage for front-back discrimination. [Work supported by the NIDCD, grant DC 00181.

  8. Assessing attentional prioritization of front-of-pack nutrition labels using change detection.

    PubMed

    Becker, Mark W; Sundar, Raghav Prashant; Bello, Nora; Alzahabi, Reem; Weatherspoon, Lorraine; Bix, Laura

    2016-05-01

    We used a change detection method to evaluate attentional prioritization of nutrition information that appears in the traditional "Nutrition Facts Panel" and in front-of-pack nutrition labels. Results provide compelling evidence that front-of-pack labels attract attention more readily than the Nutrition Facts Panel, even when participants are not specifically tasked with searching for nutrition information. Further, color-coding the relative nutritional value of key nutrients within the front-of-pack label resulted in increased attentional prioritization of nutrition information, but coding using facial icons did not significantly increase attention to the label. Finally, the general pattern of attentional prioritization across front-of-pack designs was consistent across a diverse sample of participants. Our results indicate that color-coded, front-of-pack nutrition labels increase attention to the nutrition information of packaged food, a finding that has implications for current policy discussions regarding labeling change. PMID:26851468

  9. Database for the geologic map of the Chelan 30-minute by 60-minute quadrangle, Washington (I-1661)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tabor, R.W.; Frizzell, V.A., Jr.; Whetten, J.T.; Waitt, R.B.; Swanson, D.A.; Byerly, G.R.; Booth, D.B.; Hetherington, M.J.; Zartman, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    This digital map database has been prepared by R. W. Tabor from the published Geologic map of the Chelan 30-Minute Quadrangle, Washington. Together with the accompanying text files as PDF, it provides information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The authors mapped most of the bedrock geology at 1:100,000 scale, but compiled Quaternary units at 1:24,000 scale. The Quaternary contacts and structural data have been much simplified for the 1:100,000-scale map and database. The spatial resolution (scale) of the database is 1:100,000 or smaller. This database depicts the distribution of geologic materials and structures at a regional (1:100,000) scale. The report is intended to provide geologic information for the regional study of materials properties, earthquake shaking, landslide potential, mineral hazards, seismic velocity, and earthquake faults. In addition, the report contains information and interpretations about the regional geologic history and framework. However, the regional scale of this report does not provide sufficient detail for site development purposes.

  10. Database for the geologic map of the Sauk River 30-minute by 60-minute quadrangle, Washington (I-2592)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tabor, R.W.; Booth, D.B.; Vance, J.A.; Ford, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    This digital map database has been prepared by R.W. Tabor from the published Geologic map of the Sauk River 30- by 60 Minute Quadrangle, Washington. Together with the accompanying text files as PDF, it provides information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The authors mapped most of the bedrock geology at 1:100,000 scale, but compiled most Quaternary units at 1:24,000 scale. The Quaternary contacts and structural data have been much simplified for the 1:100,000-scale map and database. The spatial resolution (scale) of the database is 1:100,000 or smaller. This database depicts the distribution of geologic materials and structures at a regional (1:100,000) scale. The report is intended to provide geologic information for the regional study of materials properties, earthquake shaking, landslide potential, mineral hazards, seismic velocity, and earthquake faults. In addition, the report contains information and interpretations about the regional geologic history and framework. However, the regional scale of this report does not provide sufficient detail for site development purposes.

  11. Dynamic jamming fronts in iceberg-choked fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo; Amundson, Jason; Cassotto, Ryan; Fahnestock, Mark; Darnell, Kristopher; Truffer, Martin; Zhang, Wendy

    2015-03-01

    During summertime at the glacier terminus at Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland, calving events are followed by rapid motion in the ice mélange in front of the terminus. Understanding the dynamics of ice mélange is important because it acts as a resisting force to calving events. We analyze this motion using time-lapse photography and terrestrial radar images. Large calving events last for approximately 5 minutes, during which ~1014 J of potential energy is released. Motion in the ice mélange quickly spreads out over at least 16 km down the fjord, and relaxes in about 1 hour. The ice mélange can be viewed as a dense granular system, which is packed close to the jamming point. A jammed ice mélange resists expansion of the glacier terminus much more strongly and reduces iceberg calving, which may therefore play a significant role in glacier evolution. In our images, we observe dynamic jamming fronts, which propagate one order of magnitude faster than the instantaneous speed of the calving iceberg. From the ratio between the speed of the front and the calving iceberg we calculate a compaction that agrees with estimated compaction that we observe directly.

  12. Life on the front lines.

    PubMed

    Hern, W M

    1993-01-01

    A physician who owns and operates an abortion clinic in Boulder, Colorado, in the US relates how he came to offer this procedure to women and how this choice has affected his life. The physician had worked as a medical student at a Schweitzer-inspired hospital in the Peruvian Amazon in 1964 and later as a Peace Corps physician in Brazil. He performed his first abortion in 1970, in Washington, D. C., for a 17-year-old high school student whose future plans would have been derailed by her pregnancy. At that time, the physician was working to change the federal government's restrictions on abortion funding and he began to correspond with abortion rights groups and heard the Supreme Court arguments in the landmark abortion cases. As part-time medical director of a family planning training program in the Rocky Mountain region, part of his job was to provide information about new abortion techniques. In 1973, he was asked to help start an abortion clinic in Boulder, and he accepted the position of medical director reporting to an executive director. He had to struggle to acquire privileges at Boulder Community Hospital in order to admit patients with complications. In addition, a "Fight the Abortion Clinic Committee" tried to have the clinic closed by the Colorado Board of Health. Further obstacles were placed by members of the Boulder County Medical Society who formed another committee with the intent of closing the clinic. After a tour of the clinic, the committee chairman declared that the clinic met the highest standards of medical care, so that effort was ended. In November 1973, antiabortion groups began to picket the clinic and the physician began to receive threatening phone calls at home. He purchased a rifle and kept it by his bed. In the summer of 1974, he participated in a debate on Denver television. He had to be secreted out a back door after a subsequent debate. The same summer, the Denver chapter of the National Organization for Women held a rally to

  13. Audiotactile interactions in front and rear space.

    PubMed

    Occelli, Valeria; Spence, Charles; Zampini, Massimiliano

    2011-01-01

    The last few years have seen a growing interest in the assessment of audiotactile interactions in information processing in peripersonal space. In particular, these studies have focused on investigating peri-hand space [corrected] and, more recently, on the functional differences that have been demonstrated between the space close to front and back of the head (i.e., the peri-head space). In this review, the issue of how audiotactile interactions vary as a function of the region of space in which stimuli are presented (i.e., front vs. rear, peripersonal vs. extra-personal) will be described. We review evidence from both monkey and human studies. This evidence, providing insight into the differential attributes qualifying the frontal and the rear regions of space, sheds light on an until now neglected research topic and may help to contribute to the formulation of new rehabilitative approaches to disorders of spatial representation. A tentative explanation of the evolutionary reasons underlying these particular patterns of results, as well as suggestions for possible future developments, are also provided. PMID:20621120

  14. AFEII Analog Front End Board Design Specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinov, Paul; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This document describes the design of the 2nd iteration of the Analog Front End Board (AFEII), which has the function of receiving charge signals from the Central Fiber Tracker (CFT) and providing digital hit pattern and charge amplitude information from those charge signals. This second iteration is intended to address limitations of the current AFE (referred to as AFEI in this document). These limitations become increasingly deleterious to the performance of the Central Fiber Tracker as instantaneous luminosity increases. The limitations are inherent in the design of the key front end chips on the AFEI board (the SVXIIe and the SIFT) and the architecture of the board itself. The key limitations of the AFEI are: (1) SVX saturation; (2) Discriminator to analog readout cross talk; (3) Tick to tick pedestal variation; and (4) Channel to channel pedestal variation. The new version of the AFE board, AFEII, addresses these limitations by use of a new chip, the TriP-t and by architectural changes, while retaining the well understood and desirable features of the AFEI board.

  15. Argonne explains nuclear recycling in 4 minutes

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Currently, when using nuclear energy only about five percent of the uranium used in a fuel rod gets fissioned for energy; after that, the rods are taken out of the reactor and put into permanent storage. There is a way, however, to use almost all of the uranium in a fuel rod. Recycling used nuclear fuel could produce hundreds of years of energy from just the uranium we've already mined, all of it carbon-free. Problems with older technology put a halt to recycling used nuclear fuel in the United States, but new techniques developed by scientists at Argonne National Laboratory address many of those issues. For more information, visit http://www.anl.gov/energy/nuclear-energy.

  16. Argonne explains nuclear recycling in 4 minutes

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-04-19

    Currently, when using nuclear energy only about five percent of the uranium used in a fuel rod gets fissioned for energy; after that, the rods are taken out of the reactor and put into permanent storage. There is a way, however, to use almost all of the uranium in a fuel rod. Recycling used nuclear fuel could produce hundreds of years of energy from just the uranium we've already mined, all of it carbon-free. Problems with older technology put a halt to recycling used nuclear fuel in the United States, but new techniques developed by scientists at Argonne National Laboratory address many of those issues. For more information, visit http://www.anl.gov/energy/nuclear-energy.

  17. HINS Linac front end focusing system R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; Carcagno, R.H.; Dimarco, J.; Huang, Y.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Orris, D.F.; Page, T.M.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab /Argonne

    2008-08-01

    This report summarizes current status of an R&D program to develop a focusing system for the front end of a superconducting RF linac. Superconducting solenoids will be used as focusing lenses in the low energy accelerating sections of the front end. The development of focusing lenses for the first accelerating section is in the production stage, and lens certification activities are in preparation at FNAL. The report contains information about the focusing lens design and performance, including solenoid, dipole corrector, and power leads, and about cryogenic system design and performance. It also describes the lens magnetic axis position measurement technique and discusses scope of an acceptance/certification process.

  18. Shock-front broadening in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, J. L.; Kadau, K.

    2008-04-01

    We analyze a model for the evolution of shock fronts in polycrystalline materials. This model is based on the idea of Meyers and Carvalho [Mater. Sci. Eng. 24, 131 (1976)] that the shock velocity anisotropy within the polycrystal is the most important factor in shock front broadening. Our analysis predicts that the shock front width increases as the 1/2 power of the front penetration distance into the crystal. Our theoretical prediction is in plausible agreement with previous experimental results for the elastic precursor rise time, and it should therefore provide a useful shock width estimate. Furthermore, our theoretical framework is also applicable to other problems involving front propagation in heterogeneous media.

  19. Cluster Observations of Multiple Dipolarization Fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Kyoung-Joo; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lee, Ensang; Pickett, Jolene S.

    2011-01-01

    We present Cluster observations of a series of dipolarization fronts (DF 1 to 6) at the central current sheet in Earth's magnetotail. The velocities of fast earthward flow following behind each DF 1-3, are comparable to the Alfven velocity, indicating that the flow bursts might have been generated by bursty reconnection that occurred tailward of the spacecraft. Based on multi-spacecraft timing analysis, DF normals are found to propagate mainly earthward at $160-335$ km/s with a thickness of 900-1500 km, which corresponds to the ion inertial length or gyroradius scale. Each DF is followed by significant fluctuations in the $x$ and $y$ components of the magnetic field whose peaks are found 1-2 minutes after the DF passage. These $(B_{x},B_{y} )$-fluctuations propagate dawnward (mainly) and earthward. Strongly enhanced field-aligned beams are observed coincidently with $(B_{x},B_{y})$ fluctuations, while an enhancement of cross-tail currents is associated with the DFs. From the observed pressure imbalance and flux-tube entropy changes between the two regions separated by the DF, we speculate that interchange instability destabilizes the DFs and causes the deformation of the mid-tail magnetic topology. This process generates significant field-aligned currents, and might power the auroral brightening in the ionosphere. However, this event is neither associated with the main substorm auroral breakup nor the poleward expansion, which might indicate that the observed multiple DFs have been dissipated before they reach the inner plasma sheet boundary.

  20. 12 CFR 701.3 - Member inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... substantial financial harm; (3) That portion contains nonpublic personal information as defined in 12 CFR 1016... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Member inspection of credit union books... inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes. (a) Member inspection rights. A group of members of...

  1. 28 CFR 16.206 - Transcripts, minutes, and miscellaneous documents concerning Commission meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transcripts, minutes, and miscellaneous documents concerning Commission meetings. 16.206 Section 16.206 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL OR INFORMATION Public Observation of Parole...

  2. 28 CFR 16.206 - Transcripts, minutes, and miscellaneous documents concerning Commission meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transcripts, minutes, and miscellaneous documents concerning Commission meetings. 16.206 Section 16.206 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL OR INFORMATION Public Observation of Parole...

  3. 45 CFR 1802.7 - Transcripts, recordings, minutes of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., minutes of meetings. (a) The Board of Trustees shall maintain a complete transcript or electronic... of each of the views expressed on any item and the record of any roll call vote (reflecting the vote... complete copy of the minutes, or a complete electronic recording of each meeting or portion of a...

  4. The One-Minute Paper: Some Empirical Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chizmar, John F.; Ostrosky, Anthony L

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that using the one-minute paper to teach an introductory economics course increases economic knowledge regardless of student ability level and instructor characteristics. The one-minute paper is a form of feedback where the students answer a few basic questions about the lesson at the end of the class. (MJP)

  5. Econometric Assessment of "One Minute" Paper as a Pedagogic Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, Amaresh

    2010-01-01

    This paper makes an econometric testing of one-minute paper used as a tool to manage and assess instruction in my statistics class. One of our findings is that the one minute paper when I have tested it by using an OLS estimate in a controlled Vs experimental design framework is found to statistically significant and effective in enhancing…

  6. One-Minute Paper: Student Perception of Learning Gains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Deborah; Burns, Shari

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine students' perceptions of learning gains when using the one-minute paper. Thirty-one students from the Physical Therapy (PT) and Nurse Anesthesia (NA) programs participated in this study. Students completed the one-minute paper in three classes. An email to students clarified the "muddy"…

  7. 77 FR 59416 - Notice of Meeting, Front Range Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Front Range Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land..., Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Front Range Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below... Range District Office, 3028 East Main Street, Ca on City, CO 81212. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  8. 43 CFR 2.1 - What should you know up front?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What should you know up front? 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT; RECORDS AND TESTIMONY Introduction § 2.1 What should you know up front? (a) Subparts A through I of...

  9. 43 CFR 2.1 - What should you know up front?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What should you know up front? 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT; RECORDS AND TESTIMONY Introduction § 2.1 What should you know up front? (a) Subparts A through I of...

  10. Experimental and numerical investigation on the motorcycle front frame flexibility and its effect on stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossalter, V.; Doria, A.; Massaro, M.; Taraborrelli, L.

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that front fork flexibility may have a significant effect on motorcycle stability. This work addresses the problem of developing lumped element models of the front fork from experimental results. The front forks of an enduro motorcycle and of a super sport motorcycle are characterized performing static, dynamic and modal tests by means of specific testing equipment. The concept of wheel twisting axis is proposed to characterize static and dynamic deformability of the front fork. Modal analysis results show the presence of two important modes of vibration of the front assembly in the low frequency range: the lateral mode and the longitudinal mode. Different lumped models are discussed and a new model that takes into account information obtained from static and dynamic tests is proposed. Simulations are carried out by means of a multibody code and show the effect of the front assembly deformability on the weave and wobble vibration modes.

  11. Double-Front Detonation Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, S. A.; Sumskoi, S. I.; Victorov, S. B.

    According to the theory of detonation, in a detonation wave there is a sound plane, named Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) plane. There are certain stationary parameters for this plane. In this work the possibility of the second CJ plane is shown. This second CJ plane is stationary as well. The physical mechanism of non-equilibrium transition providing the existence of the second CJ plane is presented. There is a non-equilibrium state, when the heat is removed from the reaction zone and the heat capacity decreases sharply. As a result of this non-equilibrium state, the sound velocity increases, and the local supersonic zone with second sonic plane (second CJ plane) appears. So the new mode of detonation wave is predicted. Equations describing this mode of detonation are presented. The exact analytical solution for the second CJ plane parameters is obtained. The example of double-front detonation in high explosive (TNT) is presented. In this double-front structure "nanodiamond-nanographite" phase transition takes place in condensed particles of detonation products.

  12. Dipolarization Fronts from Reconnection Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Swisdak, M. M.; Merkin, V. G.; Buzulukova, N.; Moore, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Dipolarization fronts observed in the magnetotail are often viewed as signatures of bursty magnetic reconnection. However, until recently spontaneous reconnection was considered to be fully prohibited in the magnetotail geometry because of the linear stability of the ion tearing mode. Recent theoretical studies showed that spontaneous reconnection could be possible in the magnetotail geometries with the accumulation of magnetic flux at the tailward end of the thin current sheet, a distinctive feature of the magnetotail prior to substorm onset. That result was confirmed by open-boundary full-particle simulations of 2D current sheet equilibria, where two magnetotails were separated by an equilibrium X-line and weak external electric field was imposed to nudge the system toward the instability threshold. To investigate the roles of the equilibrium X-line, driving electric field and other parameters in the reconnection onset process we performed a set of 2D PIC runs with different initial settings. The investigated parameter space includes the critical current sheet thickness, flux tube volume per unit magnetic flux and the north-south component of the magnetic field. Such an investigation is critically important for the implementation of kinetic reconnection onset criteria into global MHD codes. The results are compared with Geotail visualization of the magnetotail during substorms, as well as Cluster and THEMIS observations of dipolarization fronts.

  13. A 30-Minute, but Not a 10-Minute Nighttime Nap is Associated with Sleep Inertia

    PubMed Central

    Hilditch, Cassie J.; Centofanti, Stephanie A.; Dorrian, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess sleep inertia following 10-min and 30-min naps during a simulated night shift. Methods: Thirty-one healthy adults (aged 21–35 y; 18 females) participated in a 3-day laboratory study that included one baseline (BL) sleep (22:00–07:00) and one experimental night involving randomization to either: total sleep deprivation (NO-NAP), a 10-min nap (10-NAP) or a 30-min nap (30-NAP). Nap opportunities ended at 04:00. A 3-min psychomotor vigilance task (PVT-B), digit-symbol substitution task (DSST), fatigue scale, sleepiness scale, and self-rated performance scale were undertaken pre-nap (03:00) and at 2, 17, 32, and 47 min post-nap. Results: The 30-NAP (14.7 ± 5.7 min) had more slow wave sleep than the 10-NAP (0.8 ± 1.5 min; P < 0.001) condition. In the NO-NAP condition, PVT-B performance was worse than pre-nap (4.6 ± 0.3 1/sec) at 47 min post-nap (4.1 ± 0.4 1/sec; P < 0.001). There was no change across time in the 10-NAP condition. In the 30-NAP condition, performance immediately deteriorated from pre-nap (4.3 ± 0.3 1/sec) and was still worse at 47 min post-nap (4.0 ± 0.5 1/sec; P < 0.015). DSST performance deteriorated in the NO-NAP (worse than pre-nap from 17 to 47 min; P < 0.008), did not change in the 10-NAP, and was impaired 2 min post-nap in the 30-NAP condition (P = 0.028). All conditions self-rated performance as better than pre-nap for all post-nap test points (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study is the first to show that a 10-min (but not a 30-min) nighttime nap had minimal sleep inertia and helped to mitigate short-term performance impairment during a simulated night shift. Self-rated performance did not reflect objective performance following a nap. Citation: Hilditch CJ, Centofanti SA, Dorrian J, Banks S. A 30-minute, but not a 10-minute nighttime nap is associated with sleep inertia. SLEEP 2016;39(3):675–685. PMID:26715234

  14. 1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS (2. N. Front Street starts at left) - North Front Street Area Study, 2-66 North Front Street (Commercial Buildings), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. The Feasibility of Six-Minute and Two-Minute Walk Tests in In-patient Geriatric Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Dina; Davis, Aileen M.; Naglie, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of the 6-minute and 2-minute walk tests in frail older persons. Design: Pre/post-design with measures at admission and discharge to in-patient geriatric rehabilitation. Participants: Fifty-two subjects (35 women, 17 men; age 80 plus or minus 8 years). Results: Only 1 of the first 8 subjects could complete a…

  16. Relating Global Precipitation to Atmospheric Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, J. L.; Jakob, C.; Nicholls, N.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric fronts are important for the day-to-day variability of weather in the midlatitudes, particularly during winter when extratropical storm-tracks are at their maximum intensity. Fronts are often associated with heavy rain, and strongly affect the local space-time distribution of rainfall. Although global climate models should be expected to represent the baroclinic systems within which the fronts are embedded, the fronts themselves and precipitation processes within them are of much smaller scale. As a consequence, models with the typical horizontal resolution of contemporary climate models do not necessarily accurately capture these features. A recently developed objective front identification method applied to reanalysis data is combined with global rainfall data to investigate how precipitation and extremes of precipitation around the globe are associated with atmospheric fronts. Having established the observed distribution of fronts and their role in producing precipitation and extremes, the occurrence of fronts and the associated precipitation can then be evaluated in state-of-the-art climate models. This provides a process-oriented method of model evaluation where the errors in the model can be decomposed into contributions from errors in front frequency and errors in frontal and non-frontal precipitation intensity. Finally, how fronts and their associated precipitation, may change in the future, especially the extremes, can be investigated.

  17. Light-Front Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    The relation between the hadronic short-distance constituent quark and gluon particle limit and the long-range confining domain is yet one of the most challenging aspects of particle physics due to the strong coupling nature of Quantum Chromodynamics, the fundamental theory of the strong interactions. The central question is how one can compute hadronic properties from first principles; i.e., directly from the QCD Lagrangian. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time. Lattice numerical results follow from computation of frame-dependent moments of distributions in Euclidean space and dynamical observables in Minkowski spacetime, such as the time-like hadronic form factors, are not amenable to Euclidean lattice computations. The Dyson-Schwinger methods have led to many important insights, such as the infrared fixed point behavior of the strong coupling constant, but in practice, the analyses are limited to ladder approximation in Landau gauge. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. New theoretical tools are thus of primary interest for the interpretation of the results expected at the new mass scale and kinematic regions accessible to the JLab 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The AdS/CFT correspondence between gravity or string theory on a higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and conformal field theories in physical space-time has led to a semiclassical approximation for strongly-coupled QCD, which provides physical insights into its nonperturbative dynamics. The correspondence is holographic in the sense that it determines a duality between theories in different number of space-time dimensions. This geometric approach leads in fact to a simple analytical and phenomenologically compelling nonperturbative approximation to the full light-front

  18. 3- and 5- Minute Oscillatory Behavior in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabro, Brandon; McAteer, James; Pevtsov, Alexander

    2011-10-01

    We study the spatially- and temporally-localized oscillatory behavior of the solar corona using a 6-hour sequence of narrowband 171A (extreme ultraviolet) image from the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2. We use a Morlet wavelet transform to extract oscillation parameters from the temporal evolution of emission in each pixel and study the variation in space and time of oscillatory power in the 3- and 5-minute band. We extract and compare these parameters between active Sun, quiet Sun and coronal hole regions. In each region of the corona studied the 5-minute periodicity is more prevalent than the 3-minute periodicity by a factor of 2--3. All areas of the corona exhibit a similar temporal behavior in the 5-minute band, suggesting a global driving mechanism. However, the dominance of the 5-minute periodicity is stronger in active regions than in other areas of the Sun. The 3-minute periodicity in active regions tends to be localized in the sunspot umbra, whereas the 5-minute is more prevalent in the penumbra.

  19. 40 CFR 63.488 - Methods and procedures for batch front-end process vent group determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., 40 CFR part 63, appendix A. (2) The annual mass emissions of halogen atoms for a batch front-end... containing halogens and hydrogen halides as measured by Method 26 or 26A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A. (iv... are being estimated. Tm = Minutes/episode. (3) Emissions from vapor displacement due to transfer...

  20. 40 CFR 63.488 - Methods and procedures for batch front-end process vent group determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 40 CFR part 63, appendix A. (2) The annual mass emissions of halogen atoms for a batch front-end... containing halogens and hydrogen halides as measured by Method 26 or 26A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A. (iv... are being estimated. Tm = Minutes/episode. (3) Emissions from vapor displacement due to transfer...

  1. Progress in front propagation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Joaquim; Pujol, Toni

    2008-08-01

    We review the progress in the field of front propagation in recent years. We survey many physical, biophysical and cross-disciplinary applications, including reduced-variable models of combustion flames, Reid's paradox of rapid forest range expansions, the European colonization of North America during the 19th century, the Neolithic transition in Europe from 13 000 to 5000 years ago, the description of subsistence boundaries, the formation of cultural boundaries, the spread of genetic mutations, theory and experiments on virus infections, models of cancer tumors, etc. Recent theoretical advances are unified in a single framework, encompassing very diverse systems such as those with biased random walks, distributed delays, sequential reaction and dispersion, cohabitation models, age structure and systems with several interacting species. Directions for future progress are outlined.

  2. Condensation Front Migration in a Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2004-01-01

    Condensation front dynamics are investigated in the mid-solar nebula region. A quasi-steady model of the evolving nebula is combined with equilibrium vapor pressure curves to determine evolutionary condensation fronts for selected species. These fronts are found to migrate inwards from the far-nebula to final positions during a period of 10(exp 7) years. The physical process governing this movement is a combination of local viscous heating and luminescent heating from the central star. Two luminescent heating models are used and their effects on the ultimate radial position of the condensation front are discussed. At first the fronts move much faster than the nebular accretion velocity, but after a time the accreting gas and dust overtakes the slowing condensation front.

  3. Front pinning in single vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, John; Mitchell, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    We study fronts propagating in 2D fluid flows and show that there exist stable invariant front configurations for fairly generic flows. Here we examine the simple flow which combines a single vortex with an overall ``wind.'' We discuss how the invariant front can be derived from a simple 3D ODE. Existence of this front can then be understood in terms of bifurcations of fixed points, and the behavior of the invariant ``sliding front'' submanifold. Interestingly, the front bifurcation precedes the saddle-node bifurcation which gives rise to the vortex. This elementary structure has application in chemical reactor beds and laminar combustion in well-mixed fluids. We request that this talk follow the related talks by our collaborators Tom Solomon, Savannah Gowen, and Sarah Holler.

  4. Reaction front formation in contaminant plumes.

    PubMed

    Cribbin, Laura B; Winstanley, Henry F; Mitchell, Sarah L; Fowler, Andrew C; Sander, Graham C

    2014-12-15

    The formation of successive fronts in contaminated groundwater plumes by subsoil bacterial action is a commonly accepted feature of their propagation, but it is not obviously clear from a mathematical standpoint quite how such fronts are formed or propagate. In this paper we show that these can be explained by combining classical reaction-diffusion theory involving just two reactants (oxidant and reductant), and a secondary reaction in which a reactant on one side of such a front is (re-)formed on the other side of the front via diffusion of its product across the front. We give approximate asymptotic solutions for the reactant profiles, and the propagation rate of the front. PMID:25461883

  5. Front propagation and rejuvenation in flipping processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-naim, Eli; Krapivsky, P I; Antal, T; Ben - Avrahm, D

    2008-01-01

    We study a directed flipping process that underlies the performance of the random edge simplex algorithm. In this stochastic process, which takes place on a one-dimensional lattice whose sites may be either occupied or vacant, occupied sites become vacant at a constant rate and simultaneously cause all sites to the right to change their state. This random process exhibits rich phenomenology. First, there is a front, defined by the position of the leftmost occupied site, that propagates at a nontrivial velocity. Second, the front involves a depletion zone with an excess of vacant sites. The total excess {Delta}{sub k} increases logarithmically, {Delta}{sub k} {approx_equal}ln k, with the distance k from the front. Third, the front exhibits ageing -- young fronts are vigorous but old fronts are sluggish. We investigate these phenomena using a quasi-static approximation, direct solutions of small systems and numerical simulations.

  6. Muon front end for the neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. T.; Stratakis, D.; Prior, G.; Gilardoni, S.; Neuffer, D.; Snopok, P.; Alekou, A.; Pasternak, J.

    2013-04-01

    In the neutrino factory, muons are produced by firing high-energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons and pass through a capture channel known as the muon front end, before acceleration to 12.6 GeV. The muon front end comprises a variable frequency rf system for longitudinal capture and an ionization cooling channel. In this paper we detail recent improvements in the design of the muon front end.

  7. Salinity fronts in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hsun-Ying; Lagerloef, Gary S E

    2015-01-01

    This study delineates the salinity fronts (SF) across the tropical Pacific, and describes their variability and regional dynamical significance using Aquarius satellite observations. From the monthly maps of the SF, we find that the SF in the tropical Pacific are (1) usually observed around the boundaries of the fresh pool under the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), (2) stronger in boreal autumn than in other seasons, and (3) usually stronger in the eastern Pacific than in the western Pacific. The relationship between the SF and the precipitation and the surface velocity are also discussed. We further present detailed analysis of the SF in three key tropical Pacific regions. Extending zonally around the ITCZ, where the temperature is nearly homogeneous, we find the strong SF of 1.2 psu from 7° to 11°N to be the main contributor of the horizontal density difference of 0.8 kg/m3. In the eastern Pacific, we observe a southward extension of the SF in the boreal spring that could be driven by both precipitation and horizontal advection. In the western Pacific, the importance of these newly resolved SF associated with the western Pacific warm/fresh pool and El Niño southern oscillations are also discussed in the context of prior literature. The main conclusions of this study are that (a) Aquarius satellite salinity measurements reveal the heretofore unknown proliferation, structure, and variability of surface salinity fronts, and that (b) the fine-scale structures of the SF in the tropical Pacific yield important new information on the regional air-sea interaction and the upper ocean dynamics. PMID:26213676

  8. Opportunity Rolls Free Again (Left Front Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This animated piece illustrates the recent escape of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from dangerous, loose material on the vast plains leading to the rover's next long-term target, 'Victoria Crater.'

    A series of images of the rover's left front wheel, taken by the front hazard-avoidance camera, make up this brief movie. It chronicles the challenge Opportunity faced to free itself from a ripple dubbed 'Jammerbugt.' The rover's wheels became partially embedded in the ripple at the end of a drive on Opportunity's 833rd Martian day, or sol (May 28, 2006). The images in this clip were taken on sols 836 through 841 (May 31 through June 5, 2006).

    Scientists and engineers who had been elated at the meters of progress the rover had been making in earlier drives were happy for even centimeters of advance per sol as they maneuvered their explorer through the slippery material of Jammerbugt. The wheels reached solid footing on a rock outcrop on the final sol of this sequence.

    The science and engineering teams appropriately chose the ripple's informal from name the name of a bay on the north coast of Denmark. Jammerbugt, or Jammerbugten, loosely translated, means Bay of Lamentation or Bay of Wailing. The shipping route from the North Sea to the Baltic passes Jammerbugt on its way around the northern tip of Jutland. This has always been an important trade route and many ships still pass by the bay. The prevailing wind directions are typically northwest to southwest with the strongest winds and storms tending to blow from the northwest. A northwesterly wind will blow straight into the Jammerbugt, towards shore. Therefore, in the age of sail, many ships sank there during storms. The shore is sandy, but can have strong waves, so running aground was very dangerous even though there are no rocks.

    Fortunately, Opportunity weathered its 'Jammerbugt' and is again on its way toward Victoria Crater.

  9. Opportunity Rolls Free Again (Right Front Wheel)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This animated piece illustrates the recent escape of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from dangerous, loose material on the vast plains leading to the rover's next long-term target, 'Victoria Crater.'

    A series of images of the rover's right front wheel, taken by the front hazard-avoidance camera, make up this brief movie. It chronicles the challenge Opportunity faced to free itself from a ripple dubbed 'Jammerbugt.' The rover's wheels became partially embedded in the ripple at the end of a drive on Opportunity's 833rd Martian day, or sol (May 28, 2006). The images in this clip were taken on sols 836 through 841 (May 31 through June 5, 2006).

    Scientists and engineers who had been elated at the meters of progress the rover had been making in earlier drives were happy for even centimeters of advance per sol as they maneuvered their explorer through the slippery material of Jammerbugt. The wheels reached solid footing on a rock outcrop on the final sol of this sequence.

    The science and engineering teams appropriately chose the ripple's informal from name the name of a bay on the north coast of Denmark. Jammerbugt, or Jammerbugten, loosely translated, means Bay of Lamentation or Bay of Wailing. The shipping route from the North Sea to the Baltic passes Jammerbugt on its way around the northern tip of Jutland. This has always been an important trade route and many ships still pass by the bay. The prevailing wind directions are typically northwest to southwest with the strongest winds and storms tending to blow from the northwest. A northwesterly wind will blow straight into the Jammerbugt, towards shore. Therefore, in the age of sail, many ships sank there during storms. The shore is sandy, but can have strong waves, so running aground was very dangerous even though there are no rocks.

    Fortunately, Opportunity weathered its 'Jammerbugt' and is again on its way toward Victoria Crater.

  10. NASA Now Minute: Geology: Structure of the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    This program shows how re-examining moon data from the Apollo days withmodern technology helps scientists determine the structure of the moon’sinterior. NASA Now Minutes are excerpts from a wee...

  11. Thermal front variability along the North Atlantic Current observed using microwave and infrared satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Peter I.; Read, Jane F.; Dale, Andrew C.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal fronts detected using multiple satellite sensors have been integrated to provide new information on the spatial and seasonal distribution of oceanic fronts in the North Atlantic. The branching of the North Atlantic Current (NAC) as it encounters the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) is reflected in surface thermal fronts, which preferentially occur at the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ) and several smaller fracture zones. North of the CGFZ there are few thermal fronts, contrasting with the region to the south, where there are frequent surface thermal fronts that are persistent seasonally and interannually. The alignment of the fronts confirms that the shallower Reykjanes Ridge north of the CGFZ is more of a barrier to water movements than the ridge to the south. Comparison of front distributions with satellite altimetry data indicates that the MAR influence on deep ocean currents is also frequently exhibited in surface temperature. The improved spatial and temporal resolution of the front analysis has revealed consistent seasonality in the branching patterns. These results contribute to our understanding of the variability of the NAC, and the techniques for visualising oceanic fronts can be applied in other regions to reveal details of surface currents that cannot be resolved using satellite altimetry or in situ measurements.

  12. Analyzing and Post-modelling the High Speed Images of a Wavy Laser Induced Boiling Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matti, R. S.; Kaplan, A. F. H.

    The boiling front in laser materials processing like remote fusion cutting, keyhole welding or drilling can nowadays be recorded by high speed imaging. It was recently observed that bright waves flow down the front. Several complex physical mechanisms are associated with a stable laser-induced boiling front, like beam absorption, shadowing, heating, ablation pressure, fluid flow, etc. The evidence of dynamic phenomena from high speed imaging is closely linked to these phenomena. As a first step, the directly visible phenomena were classified and analyzed. This has led to the insight that the appearance of steady flow of the bright front peaks is a composition of many short flashing events of 20-50 μs duration, though composing a rather constant melt film flow downwards. Five geometrical front shapes of bright and dark domains were categorized, for example long inclined dark valleys. In addition, the special top and bottom regions of the front are distinguished. As a second step, a new method of post-modelling based on the greyscale variation of the images was applied, to approximately reconstruct the topology of the wavy front and subsequently to calculate the absorption across the front. Despite certain simplifications this kind of analysis provides a variety of additional information, including statistical analysis. In particular, the model could show the sensitivity of front waves to the formation of shadow domains and the robustness of fiber lasers to keep most of an irradiated steel surface in an absorptivity window between 35 to 43%.

  13. The ribosomal protein genes and Minute loci of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Marygold, Steven J; Roote, John; Reuter, Gunter; Lambertsson, Andrew; Ashburner, Michael; Millburn, Gillian H; Harrison, Paul M; Yu, Zhan; Kenmochi, Naoya; Kaufman, Thomas C; Leevers, Sally J; Cook, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Background Mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs) have been shown to cause an array of cellular and developmental defects in a variety of organisms. In Drosophila melanogaster, disruption of RP genes can result in the 'Minute' syndrome of dominant, haploinsufficient phenotypes, which include prolonged development, short and thin bristles, and poor fertility and viability. While more than 50 Minute loci have been defined genetically, only 15 have so far been characterized molecularly and shown to correspond to RP genes. Results We combined bioinformatic and genetic approaches to conduct a systematic analysis of the relationship between RP genes and Minute loci. First, we identified 88 genes encoding 79 different cytoplasmic RPs (CRPs) and 75 genes encoding distinct mitochondrial RPs (MRPs). Interestingly, nine CRP genes are present as duplicates and, while all appear to be functional, one member of each gene pair has relatively limited expression. Next, we defined 65 discrete Minute loci by genetic criteria. Of these, 64 correspond to, or very likely correspond to, CRP genes; the single non-CRP-encoding Minute gene encodes a translation initiation factor subunit. Significantly, MRP genes and more than 20 CRP genes do not correspond to Minute loci. Conclusion This work answers a longstanding question about the molecular nature of Minute loci and suggests that Minute phenotypes arise from suboptimal protein synthesis resulting from reduced levels of cytoribosomes. Furthermore, by identifying the majority of haplolethal and haplosterile loci at the molecular level, our data will directly benefit efforts to attain complete deletion coverage of the D. melanogaster genome. PMID:17927810

  14. Effects of fluctuations on propagating fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Debabrata

    Propagating fronts are seen in varieties of nonequilibrium pattern forming systems in Physics, Chemistry and Biology. In the last two decades, many researchers have contributed to the understanding of the underlying dynamics of the propagating fronts. Of these, the deterministic and mean-field dynamics of the fronts were mostly understood in late 1980s and 1990s. On the other hand, although the earliest work on the effect of fluctuations on propagating fronts dates back to early 1980s, the subject of fluctuating fronts did not reach its adolescence until the mid 1990s. From there onwards the last few years witnessed a surge in activities in the effect of fluctuations on propagating fronts. Scores of papers have been written on this subject since then, contributing to a significant maturity of our understanding, and only recently a full picture of fluctuating fronts has started to emerge. This review is an attempt to collect all the works on fluctuating (propagating) fronts in a coherent and cogent manner in proper perspective. It is based on the idea of making our knowledge in this field available to a broader audience, and it is also expected to help to collect bits and pieces of loose thread-ends together for possible further investigation.

  15. Front end for GPS receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess Brooks (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The front end in GPS receivers has the functions of amplifying, down-converting, filtering and sampling the received signals. In the preferred embodiment, only two operations, A/D conversion and a sum, bring the signal from RF to filtered quadrature baseband samples. After amplification and filtering at RF, the L1 and L2 signals are each sampled at RF at a high selected subharmonic rate. The subharmonic sample rates are approximately 900 MHz for L1 and 982 MHz for L2. With the selected subharmonic sampling, the A/D conversion effectively down-converts the signal from RF to quadrature components at baseband. The resulting sample streams for L1 and L2 are each reduced to a lower rate with a digital filter, which becomes a straight sum in the simplest embodiment. The frequency subsystem can be very simple, only requiring the generation of a single reference frequency (e.g. 20.46 MHz minus a small offset) and the simple multiplication of this reference up to the subharmonic sample rates for L1 and L2. The small offset in the reference frequency serves the dual purpose of providing an advantageous offset in the down-converted carrier frequency and in the final baseband sample rate.

  16. Stability of cosmological detonation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín

    2014-05-01

    The steady-state propagation of a phase-transition front is classified, according to hydrodynamics, as a deflagration or a detonation, depending on its velocity with respect to the fluid. These propagation modes are further divided into three types, namely, weak, Jouguet, and strong solutions, according to their disturbance of the fluid. However, some of these hydrodynamic modes will not be realized in a phase transition. One particular cause is the presence of instabilities. In this work we study the linear stability of weak detonations, which are generally believed to be stable. After discussing in detail the weak detonation solution, we consider small perturbations of the interface and the fluid configuration. When the balance between the driving and friction forces is taken into account, it turns out that there are actually two different kinds of weak detonations, which behave very differently as functions of the parameters. We show that the branch of stronger weak detonations are unstable, except very close to the Jouguet point, where our approach breaks down.

  17. Stability of cosmological deflagration fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín

    2014-05-01

    In a cosmological first-order phase transition, bubbles of the stable phase nucleate and expand in the supercooled metastable phase. In many cases, the growth of bubbles reaches a stationary state, with bubble walls propagating as detonations or deflagrations. However, these hydrodynamical solutions may be unstable under corrugation of the interface. Such instability may drastically alter some of the cosmological consequences of the phase transition. Here, we study the hydrodynamical stability of deflagration fronts. We improve upon previous studies by making a more careful and detailed analysis. In particular, we take into account the fact that the equation of motion for the phase interface depends separately on the temperature and fluid velocity on each side of the wall. Fluid variables on each side of the wall are similar for weakly first-order phase transitions, but differ significantly for stronger phase transitions. As a consequence, we find that, for large enough supercooling, any subsonic wall velocity becomes unstable. Moreover, as the velocity approaches the speed of sound, perturbations become unstable on all wavelengths. For smaller supercooling and small wall velocities, our results agree with those of previous works. Essentially, perturbations on large wavelengths are unstable, unless the wall velocity is higher than a critical value. We also find a previously unobserved range of marginally unstable wavelengths. We analyze the dynamical relevance of the instabilities, and we estimate the characteristic time and length scales associated with their growth. We discuss the implications for the electroweak phase transition and its cosmological consequences.

  18. Shock front broadening in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, John; Kadau, Kai

    2008-03-01

    We analyze a model for the evolution of weak shock fronts (or elastic precursor waves) in polycrystalline materials. This model is based on the idea of Meyers and Carvalho [Mater. Sci. Eng. 24, 131 (1976)] that the shock velocity anisotropy within the polycrystal is the most important factor in shock front broadening. Our analysis predicts that the shock front width increases as the 1/2 power of the front penetration distance into the crystal. Our theoretical prediction is in plausible agreement with previous experimental results for the elastic precursor rise time, and it should therefore provide a useful shock width estimate. Furthermore, our theoretical framework is also applicable to other problems involving front propagation in heterogeneous media.

  19. Relativistic ionization fronts in gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, Nuno; Dias, J. M.; Gallacher, J. G.; Issac, R. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Lopes, N. C.; Silva, L. O.; Mendonça, J. T.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2006-10-01

    A high-power ultra-short laser pulse propagating through a gas jet, ionizes the gas by tunnelling ionization, creating a relativistic plasma-gas interface. The relativistic ionization front that is created can be used to frequency up-shift electromagnetic radiation either in co-propagation or in counter-propagation configurations. In the counter-propagation configuration, ionization fronts can act as relativistic mirrors for terahertz radiation, leading to relativistic double Doppler frequency up-shift to the visible range. In this work, we identified and explored, the parameters that optimize the key features of relativistic ionization fronts for terahertz radiation reflection. The relativistic ionization front generated by a high power laser (TOPS) propagating in a supersonic gas jet generated by a Laval nozzle has been fully characterized. We have also performed detailed two-dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations with Osiris 2.0 to analyze the generation and propagation of the ionization fronts.

  20. New insights into 3D calving investigations: use of Terrestrial LiDAR for monitoring the Perito Moreno glacier front (Southern Patagonian Ice Fields, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abellan, Antonio; Penna, Ivanna; Daicz, Sergio; Carrea, Dario; Derron, Marc-Henri; Guerin, Antoine; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    There exists a great incertitude concerning the processes that control and lead to glaciers' fronts disintegration, including the laws and the processes governing ice calving phenomena. The record of surface processes occurring at glacier's front has proven problematic due to the highly dynamic nature of the calving phenomenon, creating a great uncertainty concerning the processes and forms controlling and leading to the occurrence of discrete calving events. For instance, some common observational errors for quantifying the sudden occurrence of the calving phenomena include the insufficient spatial and/or temporal resolution of the conventional photogrammetric techniques and satellites missions. Furthermore, a lack of high quality four dimensional data of failures is currently affecting our ability to straightforward analyse and predict the glaciers' dynamics. In order to overcome these limitations, we used a terrestrial LiDAR sensor (Optech Ilris 3D-LR) for intensively monitoring the changes occurred at one of the most impressive calving glacier fronts: the Perito Moreno glacier, located in the Southern Patagonian Ice Fields (Argentina). Using this system, we were able to capture at an unprecedented level of detail the three-dimensional geometry of the glacier's front during five days (from 10th to 14th of March 2014). Each data collection, which was acquired at a mean interval of 20 minutes each, consisted in the automatic acquisition of several million points at a mean density between 100-200 points per square meter. The maximum attainable range for the utilized wavelength of the Ilris-LR system (1064 nm) was around 500 meters over massive ice (showing no-significant loss of information), being this distance considerably reduced on crystalline or wet ice short after the occurrence of calving events. By comparing successive three-dimensional datasets, we have investigated not only the magnitude and frequency of several ice failures at the glacier's terminus, but

  1. Digital Geospatial Datasets in Support of Hydrologic Investigations of the Colorado Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rafferty, Sharon A.; Arnold, L.R.; Char, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey developed this dataset as part of the Colorado Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project (FRIRP). One goal of the FRIRP was to provide information on the availability of those hydrogeologic resources that are either critical to maintaining infrastructure along the northern Front Range or that may become less available because of urban expansion in the northern Front Range. This dataset extends from the Boulder-Jefferson County line on the south, to the middle of Larimer and Weld Counties on the North. On the west, this dataset is bounded by the approximate mountain front of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains; on the east, by an arbitrary north-south line extending through a point about 6.5 kilometers east of Greeley. This digital geospatial dataset consists of digitized contours of unconsolidated-sediment thickness (depth to bedrock).

  2. Io in Front of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter's four largest satellites, including Io, the golden ornament in front of Jupiter in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, have fascinated Earthlings ever since Galileo Galilei discovered them in 1610 in one of his first astronomical uses of the telescope.

    Images from Cassini that will be released over the next several days capture each of the four Galilean satellites in their orbits around the giant planet.

    This true-color composite frame, made from narrow angle images taken on Dec. 12, 2000, captures Io and its shadow in transit against the disk of Jupiter. The distance of the spacecraft from Jupiter was 19.5 million kilometers (12.1 million miles). The image scale is 117 kilometers (73 miles) per pixel.

    The entire body of Io, about the size of Earth's Moon, is periodically flexed as it speeds around Jupiter and feels, as a result of its non-circular orbit, the periodically changing gravitational pull of the planet. The heat arising in Io's interior from this continual flexure makes it the most volcanically active body in the solar system, with more than 100 active volcanoes. The white and reddish colors on its surface are due to the presence of different sulfurous materials. The black areas are silicate rocks.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  3. Front Range of the Rockies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These MISR images from May 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 7447) include portions of southern Wyoming, central Colorado, and western Nebraska. The top view is from the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. The bottom image is a stereo 'anaglyph' generated using data from the nadir and 46-degree-forward cameras. Viewing the anaglyph with red/blue glasses (red filter over your left eye) gives a 3-D effect. To facilitate stereo viewing, the images have been oriented with north at the left. Each image measures 422 kilometers x 213 kilometers.

    The South Platte River enters just to the right of center at the top of the images. It wends its way westward (down), then turns southward (right) where it flows through the city of Denver. Located at the western edge of the Great Plains, Denver is nicknamed the 'Mile High City', a consequence of its 1609-meter (5280-foot) elevation above sea level. It shows up in the imagery as a grayish patch surrounded by numerous agricultural fields to the north and east. Denver is situated just east of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, located in the lower right of the images. The Rockies owe their present forms to tectonic uplift and sculpting by millions of years of erosion. Scattered cumulus clouds floating above the mountain peaks are visible in these images, and stand out most dramatically in the 3-D stereo view.

    To the north of Denver, other urban areas included within these images are Boulder, Greeley, Longmont, and Fort Collins, Colorado; Cheyenne and Laramie, Wyoming; and Scottsbluff, Nebraska.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  4. Life on the front lines.

    PubMed

    Hern, W M

    1994-01-01

    Warren Hern's reminiscences about his experiences as medical director of the Boulder (Colorado) Abortion Clinic and as an abortion provider in private practice provide support for his statement, "Every doctor in America who does abortions lives under a death threat." Shortly after the clinic was opened, a group of anti-abortion physicians pressured the Boulder County Medical Society to pass a resolution declaring the clinic a "clear and present danger" that should be shut down by local health boards. As the only freestanding abortion clinic in the state in the mid-1970's, the Boulder center was targeted by the Right-to-Life Committee picketers and Dr. Hern was harassed in his home and in public. When Dr. Hern left the clinic a year later to establish a private practice specializing in pregnancy termination, the picketers followed. After release of a textbook he prepared on abortion practice, the publisher was deluged with hate mail and threats of boycott, leading them to withdraw the text from its list. Violent attacks on abortion clinics accelerated after Reagan's election and bullets were fired into Hern's waiting room. Randall Terry, national head of Operation Rescue, prayed for Hern's death at a rally in front of his clinic. By the time Dr. David Gunn was assassinated by an anti-abortionist in March 1993, there had been over 1285 acts of violence against abortion facilities and more than 100 facilities had been completely destroyed. The transgression for which Dr. Gunn was murdered was that he sought to save the lives and futures of countless women and support their right to become full participants in society. PMID:8186726

  5. Unexplained Neonatal Cardiorespiratory Collapse at Five Minutes of Age

    PubMed Central

    Zaleta, Sona; Miller, Sarah; Kumar, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    We report a case in which a term neonate suffered cardiorespiratory collapse at five minutes of age following an uncomplicated delivery and Apgar score of eight at one minute. Following prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the infant recovered well with no neurological deficit. Although sudden and unexpected postnatal collapse has been extensively described, this case does not fulfil its definition criteria. It provides a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and to the best of our knowledge is the first report of unexplained cardiorespiratory collapse at five minutes of age. The case serves as a timely reminder that cord gas analysis is recommended in all cases of potential fetal compromise and that Apgar scores should be used with caution as a predictor of neurological sequelae. PMID:27006848

  6. Cold Fronts in Cold Dark Matter Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, high-resolution Chandra observations revealed the existence of very sharp features in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature maps of several clusters. These features, called cold fronts, are characterized by an increase in surface brightness by a factor >~2 over 10-50 kpc accompanied by a drop in temperature of a similar magnitude. The existence of such sharp gradients can be used to put interesting constraints on the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM) if their mechanism and longevity are well understood. Here, we present results of a search for cold fronts in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters in cold dark matter models. We show that sharp gradients with properties similar to those of observed cold fronts naturally arise in cluster mergers when the shocks heat gas surrounding the merging subcluster, while its dense core remains relatively cold. The compression induced by supersonic motions and shock heating during the merger enhance the amplitude of gas density and temperature gradients across the front. Our results indicate that cold fronts are nonequilibrium transient phenomena and can be observed for a period of less than a billion years. We show that the velocity and density fields of gas surrounding the cold front can be very irregular, which would complicate analyses aiming to put constraints on the physical conditions of the ICM in the vicinity of the front.

  7. Front Range Infrastructure Resources project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1998-01-01

    Project goal: To provide the public and decision makers with objective information about the location and characteristics of land, natural aggregate, water, and energy resources that are vital to sustaining an area and its infrastructure.

  8. Automatic detection of low altitude wind shear due to gust fronts in the terminal Doppler weather radar operational demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingle-Wilson, Diana

    1990-01-01

    A gust front is the leading edge of the cold air outflow from a thunderstorm. Wind shears and turbulence along the gust front may produce potentially hazardous conditions for an aircraft on takeoff or landing such that runway operations are significantly impacted. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has therefore determined that the detection of gust fronts in the terminal environment be an integral part of the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) system. Detection of these shears by the Gust Front Algorithm permits the generation of warnings that can be issued to pilots on approach and departure. In addition to the detection capability, the algorithm provides an estimate of the wind speed and direction following the gust front (termed wind shift) and the forecasted location of the gust front up to 20 minutes before it impacts terminal operations. This has shown utility as a runway management tool, alerting runway supervisors to approaching wind shifts and the possible need to change runway configurations. The formation and characteristics of gust fronts and their signatures in Doppler radar data are discussed. A brief description of the algorithm and its products for use by Air Traffic Control (ATC), along with an assessment of the algorithm's performance during the 1988 Operational Test and Evaluation, is presented.

  9. Minutes to Millennia: Diffusion Methods in Subduction-Related Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, D. J.; Allan, A.; Wilson, C. J. N.; Charlier, B. L.; Davidson, J.

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion methods have several advantages as relative geochronometers in volcano-related magmatic processes: diffusion stops on eruption, locking in short timescale information; methods are relatively easy to implement; and suitable material is generally abundant. Such methods also pose significant, accompanying challenges: the need for accurate melt palaeothermometry, uncertainties in diffusion parameters, and sometimes even a cryptic connection between mineral zonation and timescale. As all timescales are relative to an event, timing is not absolute, and care must be taken in interpretation. Yet for all the difficulties, diffusion tools are seeing more widespread usage. This has come about because of the potential of diffusion methods to interrogate certain pre-eruptive processes operating over timescales of relevance to human timescales and responses, having direct bearing on hazard mitigation procedures. In studying subduction zone systems we have a wide range of minerals to choose from but will, in subduction-related, andesitic-to-rhyolitic systems, usually be operating away from the relatively well-constrained system of olivine, and instead be dealing with mineral phases that offer different challenges, such as plagioclase, quartz, sanidine, amphibole, orthopyroxene, Fe-Ti oxides and mica. Timescales here span a wide range across different mineral-element combinations, from minutes for Li in plagioclase and quartz to days by Fe-Ti oxides, years by orthopyroxene Fe-Mg and decades to millennia with plagioclase, sanidine and quartz. This contribution will focus on the interpretation of diffusion signals in minerals found in subduction-related volcanic systems. To understand what any modelled timescale means, the process which formed the relevant zonation pattern is absolutely key, yet often elusive. Variations in P, T, X conditions really drive the crystallisation process yet certain zonation patterns are non-unique. This ambiguity necessitates painstaking

  10. Sing, Play, and Create: All in 20 Minutes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Young teachers often struggle with pacing and the ability to cover more than one or two songs and activities in a single 30-minute general music class. Included in this article are lesson activities that show it is not only possible to include many of the National Standards in a single lesson, but also possible to sing, play, and create in every…

  11. 12 CFR 261b.11 - Transcripts, recordings, and minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transcripts, recordings, and minutes. 261b.11 Section 261b.11 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL... for a period of at least two years or one year after the conclusion of any agency proceeding...

  12. Biology and Biological Control of Mile-a-Minute Weed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mile-a-minute weed (MAM), Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross (Fig. 1), is a member of the family Polygonaceae. It is an annual vine that can grow up to 6 meters long over the course of a season. It is widely distributed throughout east Asia, including Japan, China, Korea, India, Indonesia, Banglade...

  13. 10 CFR 9.108 - Certification, transcripts, recordings and minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... The Commission shall maintain a complete transcript or electronic recording adequate to record fully... item and the record of any rollcall vote (reflecting the vote of each Commissioner on the question... transcript, electronic recording, or minutes (as required by paragraph (a) of this section) of the...

  14. Interagency Advanced Power Group -- Steering group meeting minutes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-18

    This document contains the draft meeting minutes of the Steering Group of the Interagency Advanced Power Group. Included are the discussions resulting from the presentation of working group reports and the results of a discussion of IAPG policies and procedures. In the appendix are the reports of the following working groups: Electrical, Mechanical, Solar, and Systems.

  15. Using Minute Papers to Determine Student Cognitive Development Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Can anonymous written feedback collected during classroom assessment activities be used to assess students' cognitive development levels? After library instruction in a first-year engineering design class, students submitted minute papers that included answers to "what they are left wondering." Responses were coded into low, medium and…

  16. Maternal collapse: Challenging the four-minute rule

    PubMed Central

    Benson, M.D.; Padovano, A.; Bourjeily, G.; Zhou, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The current approach to, cardiopulmonary resuscitation of pregnant women in the third trimester has been to adhere to the “four-minute rule”: If pulses have not returned within 4 min of the start of resuscitation, perform a cesarean birth so that birth occurs in the next minute. This investigation sought to re-examine the evidence for the four-minute rule. Methods A literature review focused on perimortem cesarean birth was performed using the same key words that were used in formulating the “four-minute rule.” Maternal and neonatal injury free survival rates as a function of arrest to birth intervals were determined, as well as actual incision to birth intervals. Results Both maternal and neonatal injury free survival rates diminished steadily as the time interval from maternal arrest to birth increased. There was no evidence for any specific survival threshold at 4 min. Skin incision to birth intervals of 1 min occurred in only 10% of women. Conclusion Once a decision to deliver is made, care providers should proceed directly to Cesarean birth during maternal cardiac arrest in the third trimester rather than waiting for 4 min for restoration of the maternal pulse. Birth within 1 min from the start of the incision is uncommon in these circumstances. PMID:27211568

  17. Minute bug with enormous impacts on insect pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Minute pirate bugs (Orius spp.) are common and abundant insect predators that can be found in cotton and many other field crops in Arizona and the western U.S. They are important predators of a variety of insect and mite pests in western crops and can help to suppress pest populations and thus cont...

  18. 5 CFR 1632.10 - Transcripts, recordings, and minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGARDING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF MEETINGS § 1632.10 Transcripts, recordings, and minutes. (a) The Board will... the proceedings of each meeting or portion of a meeting closed to public observation pursuant to... closed to public observation pursuant to exemptions (a)(8), (a)(9)(i)(A) or (a)(10) of § 1632.5 of...

  19. 5 CFR 1632.10 - Transcripts, recordings, and minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGARDING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF MEETINGS § 1632.10 Transcripts, recordings, and minutes. (a) The Board will... the proceedings of each meeting or portion of a meeting closed to public observation pursuant to... closed to public observation pursuant to exemptions (a)(8), (a)(9)(i)(A) or (a)(10) of § 1632.5 of...

  20. Council Minutes, February 4-6, 2011: Santa Monica, California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents minutes of the American Educational Research Association's meetings held in Santa Monica, California, on February 4-6, 2011. President Kris D. Gutierrez led a discussion of the meeting dates for the summer Executive Board and Council meetings. It was agreed that members of Council will be polled to determine the best dates…

  1. A Single 50-Minute Lunch Hour Fits Everyone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Carole

    2007-01-01

    Switching from multiple lunch periods to one lunch period for the nearly 2,000 students at James Hubert Blake High School in Silver Spring, Maryland, has contributed more to a positive school climate than any other single factor in the eight years since the school opened. This article presents how Blake has come up with the single 50-minute lunch…

  2. Leap Day 2012 Severe Storm Front

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie was created using GOES-13 visible and infrared satellite imagery from Feb. 28 at 1245 UTC (7:45 a.m. EST) through March 1, and shows the progression of the cold front and associated low ...

  3. Heat conduction fronts in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam

    1994-01-01

    We present arguments which suggest that many of the x-ray, some optical, and some UV observations of planetary nebulae, can be explained by the presence of heat conduction fronts. The heat flows from the hot bubble formed by the shocked fast wind to the cool shell and halo. Heat conduction fronts are likely to account for emission of x rays from plasma at lower temperature than the expected temperature of the hot bubble. In the presence of magnetic fields, only a small fraction of the fast wind luminosity emerges as radiation. Heat conduction fronts can naturally produce some unusual line flux ratios, which are observed in some planetary nebulae. Heat conduction fronts may heat the halo and cause some material at the inner surface of the shell to expand slower than the rest of the shell. In the presence of an asymmetrical magnetic field, this flow, the x-ray intensity, and the emission lines, may acquire asymmetrical structure as well.

  4. Front-End Analysis Cornerstone of Logistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nager, Paul J.

    2000-01-01

    The presentation provides an overview of Front-End Logistics Support Analysis (FELSA), when it should be performed, benefits of performing FELSA and why it should be performed, how it is conducted, and examples.

  5. On the stability of subsonic thermal fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez S, Miguel H.; Shchekinov, Yuri; Bessega L, Maria C.

    2005-08-15

    The stability of subsonic thermal fronts against corrugation is analyzed and an exact dispersion relation is obtained taking into account the compressibility of the gas. For heat fronts, this dispersion equation has an unstable root ({omega}{sub ex}) corresponding to the Landau-Darrieus unstable mode ({omega}{sub 0}) modified by the compressional effects. In particular, the exact solution shows a conspicuous maximum very close to the value of the intake Mach number M{sub 1} at which a Chapman-Jouguet deflagration wave behind the heat front is formed. Cooling fronts are stable for corrugation-like disturbances. A maximum damping as well as a maximum in the frequency occur at a value of M{sub 1} depending on the value of the normalized cooling q.

  6. Coarsening to chaos-stabilized fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ka-Fai; Wittenberg, Ralf W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a model for pattern formation in the presence of Galilean symmetry proposed by Matthews and Cox [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.62.R1473 62, R1473 (2000)], which has the form of coupled generalized Burgers- and Ginzburg-Landau-type equations. With only the system size L as a parameter, we find distinct “small-L” and “large-L” regimes exhibiting clear differences in their dynamics and scaling behavior. The long-time statistically stationary state contains a single L-dependent front, stabilized globally by spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics confined away from the front. For sufficiently large domains, the transient dynamics include a state consisting of several viscous shocklike structures that coarsens gradually, before collapsing to a single front when one front absorbs the others.

  7. Nonperturbative light-front Hamiltonian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    We examine the current state-of-the-art in nonperturbative calculations done with Hamiltonians constructed in light-front quantization of various field theories. The language of light-front quantization is introduced, and important (numerical) techniques, such as Pauli-Villars regularization, discrete light-cone quantization, basis light-front quantization, the light-front coupled-cluster method, the renormalization group procedure for effective particles, sector-dependent renormalization, and the Lanczos diagonalization method, are surveyed. Specific applications are discussed for quenched scalar Yukawa theory, ϕ4 theory, ordinary Yukawa theory, supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, quantum electrodynamics, and quantum chromodynamics. The content should serve as an introduction to these methods for anyone interested in doing such calculations and as a rallying point for those who wish to solve quantum chromodynamics in terms of wave functions rather than random samplings of Euclidean field configurations.

  8. RF Front End Interface and AGC Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The latest RF front end built by Burhans (Mini-L-82) was successfully interfaced to the Ohio University LORAN-C receiver. In order for the front end to operate optimally, modifications were made to existing automatic gain control (AGC) circuitry already developed for the Ohio University LORAN-C receiver. The hardware modifications to the AGC and other interface circuitry, as well as some preliminary results are discussed.

  9. Does Your Front Desk Staff Maximize Collections?

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Donna

    2015-01-01

    As collections become more difficult, practices need to use the front desk to help collect payments from patients when they are face to face. Training staff and giving them the tools to ask for money allows them to collect efficiently. Improve your collections by involving your front desk employees. Educate your patients to allow them to come to their visits prepared. It will save the practice time and money. PMID:26399028

  10. The last three minutes - Issues in gravitational-wave measurements of coalescing compact binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Curt; Apostolatos, Theocharis A.; Bildsten, Lars; Finn, Lee S.; Flanagan, Eanna E.; Kennefick, Daniel; Markovic, Dragoljub M.; Ori, Amos; Poisson, Eric; Sussman, Gerald J.

    1993-01-01

    Gravitational-wave interferometers are expected to monitor the last three minutes of inspiral and final coalescence of neutron star and black hole binaries at distances approaching cosmological, where the event rate may be many per year. Because the binary's accumulated orbital phase can be measured to a fractional accuracy much lower than 10 exp -3, and relativistic effects are large, the wave forms will be far more complex and carry more information than has been expected. Improved wave form modeling is needed as a foundation for extracting the waves' information, but is not necessary for wave detection.

  11. Electron acceleration in a wavy shock front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandas, M.; Karlický, M.

    2011-07-01

    Context. It is known that electrons are accelerated at nearly perpendicular shocks by the drift mechanism. And it is also known that energy gain of electrons caused by this mechanism is not very high. Therefore it was suggested in the past that the energy gain might be increased if shocks had wavy fronts. For instance, there were attempts to explain coronal type II burst and their fine structure by electron acceleration in a wavy shock front. Aims: We studied electron acceleration numerically at nearly perpendicular wavy shocks for coronal conditions and compared it with analytical results on electron acceleration at nearly perpendicular plane shocks. Methods: An analytical model of a wavy shock front was used and trajectories of electrons in it and around it were calculated numerically in a guiding centre approximation. Results: We found that energy gains of electrons at a wavy shock front and a corresponding smoothed-into-plane shock on the average were comparable. That is why they do not depend significantly on the shock thickness, magnetic field profile inside the shock, and shock wavy form. They do depend on the angle between the smoothed shock front and ambient magnetic field. Conclusions: On average, a wavy shock front does not significantly increase an acceleration efficiency. Energy gain remarkably exceeds an average level for some combinations of initial parameters. Distribution functions of accelerated electrons have a patchy structure, which is prone to inducing plasma instabilities that will generate plasma waves. This may have relevance to the problem of type II burst origin.

  12. Marine fronts are important fishing areas for demersal species at the Argentine Sea (Southwest Atlantic Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemany, Daniela; Acha, Eduardo M.; Iribarne, Oscar O.

    2014-03-01

    The high primary and secondary production associated with frontal systems attract a diversity of organisms due to high prey availability; this is why a strong relationship between fronts and pelagic fisheries has been shown worldwide. In the Argentine Sea, demersal resources are the most important, both in economical and in ecological sense; so we hypothesize that fronts are also preferred fishing areas for demersal resources. We evaluated the relationship between spatial distribution of fishing effort and oceanographic fronts, analyzing three of the most important frontal systems located in the Argentine Sea: the shelf-break front, the southern Patagonia front and the mid-shelf front. Individual vessel satellite monitoring system data (VMS; grouped by fleet type: ice-trawlers, freezer-trawlers and jigging fleet) were studied and fishing events were identified. Fishing events per area were used as a proxy of fishing effort and its spatial distribution by fleet type was visualized and analyzed with Geographic Information Systems. Oceanographic fronts were defined using polygons based on satellite chlorophyll amplitude values, and the percentage of fishing events within each polygon was calculated. Results showed a positive association between fronts and fishing activities of the different fleets, which suggests the aggregation of target species in these zones. The coupling of the freezer-trawler and jigging fleets (that operate on lower trophic level species; Macruronus magellanicus and Illex argentinus respectively) with fronts was higher than the ice-trawler fleet, targeting species of higher trophic level (Merluccius hubbsi). Marine fronts represent important fishing areas, even for demersal resources, as the distribution of fishing fleets and fishing effort are positively associated with frontal zones.

  13. Turbulent transport model of wind shear in thunderstorm gust fronts and warm fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, W. S.; Teske, M. E.; Segur, H. C. O.

    1978-01-01

    A model of turbulent flow in the atmospheric boundary layer was used to simulate the low-level wind and turbulence profiles associated with both local thunderstorm gust fronts and synoptic-scale warm fronts. Dimensional analyses of both type fronts provided the physical scaling necessary to permit normalized simulations to represent fronts for any temperature jump. The sensitivity of the thunderstorm gust front to five different dimensionless parameters as well as a change from axisymmetric to planar geometry was examined. The sensitivity of the warm front to variations in the Rossby number was examined. Results of the simulations are discussed in terms of the conditions which lead to wind shears which are likely to be most hazardous for aircraft operations.

  14. Interaction of a cold front with a sea-breeze front Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodin, A.

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of a front which passed the coast between the North Sea and northern Germany and thereby experienced some modifications of its mesoscale characteristics. The event was observed during the field experiment FRONTEX'89. The two-dimensional non-hydrostatic simulations presented in this paper resemble some of the observed characteristics and yield a detailed description of the evolution of the surface front. Over the sea several narrow frontal rain bands develop in the boundary layer which becomes unstable due to the increasing sea surface temperature near the coast. The rain bands move forward relative to the front due to the cross frontal circulation which is enhanced by the release of latent heat in the ascending warm air and by the cooling of the cold air below by evaporating precipitation. Over the heated land surface a sea-breeze front develops ahead of the synoptic-scale cold front. The strong frontal gradients of the sea-breeze front mask the broader frontal zone of the cold front at the ground. The sea-breeze front triggers deep convection ahead of the cold front in the afternoon and takes over all characteristics of the synoptic-scale front in the evening. The simulations show the mechanisms that caused the observed evolution and modification of the synoptic-scale cold front. They emphasize the strong influence of the surface heat fluxes on the characteristics of fronts on the mesoscale. The most important feature of the numerical model, necessary for the proper representation of the frontal characteristics on the mesoscale, is its high resolution. The simulations are restricted by the difficulties of finding an initial state and appropriate boundary conditions so that the results fit the observations for a long time period and that spin-up problems are avoided.

  15. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, L.; Lee, C.; Manga, M.

    2012-12-01

    The position of active volcanism relative to the trench in arcs depends on melt focusing processes within the mantle wedge and the geometric parameters of subduction. Arc front migration has been observed in relic (Sierra Nevada, Andes) as well as active (Cascades) arcs, sometimes with cycles of retreat and return of the front towards the trench over millions of years. Other arcs, particularly where backarc extension dominates, exhibit a more stationary front in time relative to the trench. In addition, crustal indices of magmatism as measured by the ratio of trace elements La/Yb or isotopes 87}Sr/{86Sr covary with arc front migration (e.g., Haschke et al., 2002). Arc front migration is commonly attributed to variation in dip angle of the downgoing slab, delamination of overthickened crust, or to subduction erosion. Here we present an alternative hypothesis. Assuming mantle wedge melting is a largely temperature-dependant process, the maximum isotherm in the wedge sets arc front location. Isotherm location depends on slab angle, subduction velocity and wedge thermal diffusivity (England and Katz, 2010). It also depends on crustal thickness, which evolves as melt is transferred from the wedge to the crust. Arc front migration can thus occur purely through magmatic thickening of crust. Thickening proceeds through intrusive as well as extrusive volcanism, modulated by tectonics and surface erosion. Migration rate is set by the mantle melt flux into the crust, which decreases as thickening occurs. Thus slab angle need not change, and in the absence of other contribution processes front location and crustal thickness have long-time steady state values. We develop an analytic model of this process that produces migration rates consistent with published data and explains arc fronts that do not move (dominated by extension, such as in the case of intra-oceanic arcs). We present new geochemical and age data from the Peninsular Ranges Batholith that are also consistent with

  16. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Lee, Cin-Ty; Manga, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The location of volcanic arcs, relative to the trench evolves over time. Arc front migration has been observed in relic (Sierra Nevada, Andes) as well as active (Cascades) arcs, sometimes with cycles of retreat and return of the front towards the trench over millions of years. Other arcs, particularly where back-arc extension dominates, migrate more slowly, if at all. Coupled with arc migration there are systematic changes in the geochemistry of magmas such as the ratio of trace elements La/Yb and 87Sr/86Sr isotopes (e.g., Haschke et al., 2002). The position of active volcanic arcs relative to the trench is controlled by the location where melt is generated in the mantle wedge, in turn controlled by the geometry of subduction, and the processes that focus rising melt. Arc front migration is commonly attributed to variation in dip angle of the downgoing slab, delamination of overthickened crust, or to subduction erosion. Here we present an alternative hypothesis. Assuming mantle wedge melting is a largely temperature-dependant process, the maximum isotherm in the wedge sets arc front location. Isotherm location depends on slab angle, subduction velocity and wedge thermal diffusivity (England and Katz, 2010). It also depends on crustal thickness, which evolves as melt is transferred from the wedge to the crust. Arc front migration can thus occur purely through magmatic thickening of crust and lithosphere. Thickening rate is determined by the mantle melt flux into the crust, modulated by tectonics and surface erosion. It is not steady in time, as crustal thickening progressively truncates the mantle melt column and eventually shuts it off. Thus slab angle need not change, and in the absence of other contribution processes front location and crustal thickness have long-time steady state values. We develop a quantitative model for arc front migration that is consistent with published arc front data, and explains why arc fronts do not move when there is extension, such

  17. Feed mechanism and method for feeding minute items

    DOEpatents

    Stringer, Timothy Kent; Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2012-11-06

    A feeding mechanism and method for feeding minute items, such as capacitors, resistors, or solder preforms. The mechanism is adapted to receive a plurality of the randomly-positioned and randomly-oriented extremely small or minute items, and to isolate, orient, and position the items in a specific repeatable pickup location wherefrom they may be removed for use by, for example, a computer-controlled automated assembly machine. The mechanism comprises a sliding shelf adapted to receive and support the items; a wiper arm adapted to achieve a single even layer of the items; and a pushing arm adapted to push the items into the pickup location. The mechanism can be adapted for providing the items with a more exact orientation, and can also be adapted for use in a liquid environment.

  18. Feed mechanism and method for feeding minute items

    DOEpatents

    Stringer, Timothy Kent; Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2009-10-20

    A feeding mechanism and method for feeding minute items, such as capacitors, resistors, or solder preforms. The mechanism is adapted to receive a plurality of the randomly-positioned and randomly-oriented extremely small or minute items, and to isolate, orient, and position one or more of the items in a specific repeatable pickup location wherefrom they may be removed for use by, for example, a computer-controlled automated assembly machine. The mechanism comprises a sliding shelf adapted to receive and support the items; a wiper arm adapted to achieve a single even layer of the items; and a pushing arm adapted to push the items into the pickup location. The mechanism can be adapted for providing the items with a more exact orientation, and can also be adapted for use in a liquid environment.

  19. Pareto Fronts in Clinical Practice for Pinnacle

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Tomas; Kesteren, Zdenko van; Franssen, Gijs; Damen, Eugène; Vliet, Corine van

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to develop a framework to objectively perform treatment planning studies using Pareto fronts. The Pareto front represents all optimal possible tradeoffs among several conflicting criteria and is an ideal tool with which to study the possibilities of a given treatment technique. The framework should require minimal user interaction and should resemble and be applicable to daily clinical practice. Methods and Materials: To generate the Pareto fronts, we used the native scripting language of Pinnacle{sup 3} (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA). The framework generates thousands of plans automatically from which the Pareto front is generated. As an example, the framework is applied to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer patients. For each patient and each technique, 3000 plans are generated, resulting in a total of 60,000 plans. The comparison is based on 5-dimensional Pareto fronts. Results: Generating 3000 plans for 10 patients in parallel requires on average 96 h for IMRT and 483 hours for VMAT. Using VMAT, compared to IMRT, the maximum dose of the boost PTV was reduced by 0.4 Gy (P=.074), the mean dose in the anal sphincter by 1.6 Gy (P=.055), the conformity index of the 95% isodose (CI{sub 95%}) by 0.02 (P=.005), and the rectal wall V{sub 65} {sub Gy} by 1.1% (P=.008). Conclusions: We showed the feasibility of automatically generating Pareto fronts with Pinnacle{sup 3}. Pareto fronts provide a valuable tool for performing objective comparative treatment planning studies. We compared VMAT with IMRT in prostate patients and found VMAT had a dosimetric advantage over IMRT.

  20. QCD and Light-Front Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /Costa Rica U.

    2011-01-10

    AdS/QCD, the correspondence between theories in a dilaton-modified five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space and confining field theories in physical space-time, provides a remarkable semiclassical model for hadron physics. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate {zeta} which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time and determines the off-shell dynamics of the bound state wavefunctions as a function of the invariant mass of the constituents. The hadron eigenstates generally have components with different orbital angular momentum; e.g., the proton eigenstate in AdS/QCD with massless quarks has L = 0 and L = 1 light-front Fock components with equal probability. Higher Fock states with extra quark-anti quark pairs also arise. The soft-wall model also predicts the form of the nonperturbative effective coupling and its {beta}-function. The AdS/QCD model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method to systematically include QCD interaction terms. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates. A method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level is outlined.

  1. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    ScienceCinema

    Elliott, Doug

    2014-06-02

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  2. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Doug

    2013-12-17

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  3. [Draft minutes of IAPG Mechanical Working Group meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.M.

    1993-12-15

    This report provides the draft minutes of the Interagency Advanced Power Group meeting held November 3--4, 1993. Topics addressed are: Materials for thermal management; photovoltaic programs in the Airforce; ground based radar advanced power system development program; battery research; generator prognostics & diagnostics equipment; a thermal flight experiment test program; power systems assessment; Overview: Phillip`s space thermal technologies branch; and development of actuator thermal management.

  4. Bringing the Fuzzy Front End into Focus

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.F.; Boyack, K.W.; Bray, O.H.; Siemens, W.D.

    1999-03-03

    Technology planning is relatively straightforward for well-established research and development (R and D) areas--those areas in which an organization has a history, the competitors are well understood, and the organization clearly knows where it is going with that technology. What we are calling the fuzzy front-end in this paper is that condition in which these factors are not well understood--such as for new corporate thrusts or emerging areas where the applications are embryonic. While strategic business planning exercises are generally good at identifying technology areas that are key to future success, they often lack substance in answering questions like: (1) Where are we now with respect to these key technologies? ... with respect to our competitors? (2) Where do we want or need to be? ... by when? (3) What is the best way to get there? In response to its own needs in answering such questions, Sandia National Laboratories is developing and implementing several planning tools. These tools include knowledge mapping (or visualization), PROSPERITY GAMES and technology roadmapping--all three of which are the subject of this paper. Knowledge mapping utilizes computer-based tools to help answer Question 1 by graphically representing the knowledge landscape that we populate as compared with other corporate and government entities. The knowledge landscape explored in this way can be based on any one of a number of information sets such as citation or patent databases. PROSPERITY GAMES are high-level interactive simulations, similar to seminar war games, which help address Question 2 by allowing us to explore consequences of various optional goals and strategies with all of the relevant stakeholders in a risk-free environment. Technology roadmapping is a strategic planning process that helps answer Question 3 by collaboratively identifying product and process performance targets and obstacles, and the technology alternatives available to reach those targets.

  5. Programmer's guide to FFE: a fast front-end data-acquisition program

    SciTech Connect

    Million, D.L.

    1983-05-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility project of the Fusion Energy Division has a data acquisition system which includes a large host computer and several small, peripheral front-end computers. The front-end processors handle details of data acquisition under the control of the host and pass data back to the host for storage. Some of the front ends are known as fast front ends and are required to collect a maximum of 64,000 samples each second. This speed and other hardware constraints resulted in a need for a stand-alone, assembly language task which could be downline loaded from the host system into the fast front ends. FFE (Fast Front End) was written to satisfy this need. It was written in the PDP-11 MACRO-11 assembly language for an LSI-11/23 processor. After the host loads the task into the front end, it controls the data acquisition process with a series of commands and parameters. This Programmer's Guide describes the structure and operation of FFE in detail from a programming point of view. A companion User's guide provides more information on the use of the program from the host system.

  6. Pore invasion dynamics during fluid front displacement - an interfacial front model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, F.; Or, D.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of fluid fronts in porous media shape subsequent phase distribution and the transport properties of the partially saturated region with implications ranging from gaseous transport to plant roots to extraction or injection of fluids to petroleum reservoirs. What macroscopically seems as a smooth and continuous motion of a displacement fluid front, involves numerous rapid pore-scale interfacial jumps often resembling avalanches of invasion events. We present a 2D model for simulating interfacial front displacement that was developed to study details of invasion dynamics at the front and to systematically study effects of boundary conditions on the resulting macroscopic properties after passage of a front. The interfacial front is represented by hydraulically connected sinusoidal capillaries allowing for redistribution and capillary pressure relaxation through exchange with neighboring interfaces. The model focuses on processes at the front and neglects interfacial redistribution left behind the front as well as saturated fluid flow below the front. The description of the dynamics of the rapid non-wetting fluid invasions induced by constant wetting fluid withdrawal includes capillary, viscous and hydrostatic component and inertia. Results show that the additional inertial force (not considered in previous studies) does significantly affect invasion pathways such as the hypothesized 'consecutive jumps'. The menisci jump velocities show a strong relation to geometrical throat dimensions that reflect local capillary gradients. The front model further enables to link boundary conditions (macroscopic Capillary number, throat size distribution) effects on pore invasion sequences and impact on residual wetting phase entrapment and front morphology. A limited comparison of model predictions with experimental results from sintered glass-beads micro-models will be presented.

  7. Light-Front Holography and the Light-Front Schrodinger Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy

    2012-08-15

    One of the most important nonperturbative methods for solving QCD is quantization at fixed light-front time {tau} = t+z=c - Dirac's 'Front Form'. The eigenvalues of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian predict the hadron spectrum and the eigensolutions provide the light-front wavefunctions which describe hadron structure. More generally, we show that the valence Fock-state wavefunctions of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian satisfy a single-variable relativistic equation of motion, analogous to the nonrelativistic radial Schrodinger equation, with an effective confining potential U which systematically incorporates the effects of higher quark and gluon Fock states. We outline a method for computing the required potential from first principles in QCD. The holographic mapping of gravity in AdS space to QCD, quantized at fixed light-front time, yields the same light front Schrodinger equation; in fact, the soft-wall AdS/QCD approach provides a model for the light-front potential which is color-confining and reproduces well the light-hadron spectrum. One also derives via light-front holography a precise relation between the bound-state amplitudes in the fifth dimension of AdS space and the boost-invariant light-front wavefunctions describing the internal structure of hadrons in physical space-time. The elastic and transition form factors of the pion and the nucleons are found to be well described in this framework. The light-front AdS/QCD holographic approach thus gives a frame-independent first approximation of the color-confining dynamics, spectroscopy, and excitation spectra of relativistic light-quark bound states in QCD.

  8. Shocks and cold fronts in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markevitch, Maxim; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2007-05-01

    The currently operating X-ray imaging observatories provide us with an exquisitely detailed view of the Megaparsec-scale plasma atmospheres in nearby galaxy clusters. At z<0.05, the Chandra's 1 angular resolution corresponds to linear resolution of less than a kiloparsec, which is smaller than some interesting linear scales in the intracluster plasma. This enables us to study the previously unseen hydrodynamic phenomena in clusters: classic bow shocks driven by the infalling subclusters, and the unanticipated “cold fronts,” or sharp contact discontinuities between regions of gas with different entropies. The ubiquitous cold fronts are found in mergers as well as around the central density peaks in “relaxed” clusters. They are caused by motion of cool, dense gas clouds in the ambient higher-entropy gas. These clouds are either remnants of the infalling subclusters, or the displaced gas from the cluster's own cool cores. Both shock fronts and cold fronts provide novel tools to study the intracluster plasma on microscopic and cluster-wide scales, where the dark matter gravity, thermal pressure, magnetic fields, and ultrarelativistic particles are at play. In particular, these discontinuities provide the only way to measure the gas bulk velocities in the plane of the sky. The observed temperature jumps at cold fronts require that thermal conduction across the fronts is strongly suppressed. Furthermore, the width of the density jump in the best-studied cold front is smaller than the Coulomb mean free path for the plasma particles. These findings show that transport processes in the intracluster plasma can easily be suppressed. Cold fronts also appear less prone to hydrodynamic instabilities than expected, hinting at the formation of a parallel magnetic field layer via magnetic draping. This may make it difficult to mix different gas phases during a merger. A sharp electron temperature jump across the best-studied shock front has shown that the electron proton

  9. Light-Front Quantization of Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Brodskey, Stanley

    2002-12-01

    Light-front wavefunctions provide a frame-independent representation of hadrons in terms of their physical quark and gluon degrees of freedom. The light-front Hamiltonian formalism provides new nonperturbative methods for obtaining the QCD spectrum and eigensolutions, including resolvant methods, variational techniques, and discretized light-front quantization. A new method for quantizing gauge theories in light-cone gauge using Dirac brackets to implement constraints is presented. In the case of the electroweak theory, this method of light-front quantization leads to a unitary and renormalizable theory of massive gauge particles, automatically incorporating the Lorentz and 't Hooft conditions as well as the Goldstone boson equivalence theorem. Spontaneous symmetry breaking is represented by the appearance of zero modes of the Higgs field leaving the light-front vacuum equal to the perturbative vacuum. I also discuss an ''event amplitude generator'' for automatically computing renormalized amplitudes in perturbation theory. The importance of final-state interactions for the interpretation of diffraction, shadowing, and single-spin asymmetries in inclusive reactions such as deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering is emphasized.

  10. View of McKenzieRichey garage showing front opening, the false front, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of McKenzie-Richey garage showing front opening, the false front, metal roofing and horizontal plank siding, facing northeast - McKenzie Property, Garage, North Bank of Sailor Gulch, 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  11. 1. View of south front of HiattStricklin House showing front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of south front of Hiatt-Stricklin House showing front porch, modern stairs and south porch entry alteration, facing north. - Hiatt Property, House, West bank of Woof Creek, 400 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  12. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test): A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Macario; Ruoff, Chad M.; Kawai, Makoto; Modi, Rahul; Arbee, Jabri; Hekmat, Anahid; Robertson, Matthew; Certal, Victor; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test) was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm) between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure). Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (rs = 0.60 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0088), apnea-hypopnea index (rs = 0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p = 0.039), lowest oxygen saturation (rs = −0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p = 0.048), and oxygen desaturation index (rs = 0.62 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0057). Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP. PMID:26881088

  13. Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP Pressures (Five-Minute CPAP Test): A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Macario; Ruoff, Chad M; Kawai, Makoto; Modi, Rahul; Arbee, Jabri; Hekmat, Anahid; Robertson, Matthew; Zaghi, Soroush; Certal, Victor; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quick, simple, bedside test for determining continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Study Design. Prospective case series at a tertiary medical center. Methods. The Five-Minute Awake Snoring Test for Determining CPAP (Five-Minute CPAP Test) was developed and tested. Patients wear a soft-gel nasal triangle mask while holding a tongue depressor with the wide section (1.75 cm) between the teeth. Fixed pressure nasal CPAP is applied while the patient simulates snoring at 4 centimeters of water pressure. The pressure is incrementally titrated up and then down to determine the lowest pressure at which the patient cannot snore (Quiet Pressure). Results. Overall, thirty-eight patients participated. All could simulate snoring. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant between Quiet Pressures and body mass index (r s = 0.60 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0088), apnea-hypopnea index (r s = 0.49 [moderate positive relationship], p = 0.039), lowest oxygen saturation (r s = -0.47 [moderate negative relationship], p = 0.048), and oxygen desaturation index (r s = 0.62 [strong positive relationship], p = 0.0057). Conclusion. This pilot study introduces a new concept, which is the final product of over one year of exploration, development, and testing. Five-Minute CPAP Test is a quick, inexpensive, and safe bedside test based on supine awake simulated snoring with nasal CPAP. PMID:26881088

  14. Friction forces on phase transition fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Mégevand, Ariel

    2013-07-01

    In cosmological first-order phase transitions, the microscopic interaction of the phase transition fronts with non-equilibrium plasma particles manifests itself macroscopically as friction forces. In general, it is a nontrivial problem to compute these forces, and only two limits have been studied, namely, that of very slow walls and, more recently, ultra-relativistic walls which run away. In this paper we consider ultra-relativistic velocities and show that stationary solutions still exist when the parameters allow the existence of runaway walls. Hence, we discuss the necessary and sufficient conditions for the fronts to actually run away. We also propose a phenomenological model for the friction, which interpolates between the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic values. Thus, the friction depends on two friction coefficients which can be calculated for specific models. We then study the velocity of phase transition fronts as a function of the friction parameters, the thermodynamic parameters, and the amount of supercooling.

  15. Bioconvection and front formation of Paramecium tetraurelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsunezaki, So; Komori, Rie; Harumoto, Terue

    2007-10-01

    We have investigated the bioconvection of Paramecium tetraurelia in high-density suspensions made by centrifugal concentration. When a suspension is kept at rest in a Hele-Shaw cell, a crowded front of paramecia is formed in the vicinity of the bottom and it propagates gradually toward the water-air interface. Fluid convection occurs under this front, and it is driven persistently by the upward swimming of paramecia. The roll structures of the bioconvection become turbulent with an increase in the depth of the suspension; they also change rapidly as the density of paramecia increases. Our experimental results suggest that lack of oxygen in the suspension causes the active individual motions of paramecia to induce the formation of this front.

  16. About Shape of an Interplanetary Shock Front.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Ivan; Petukhov, Stanislav

    The form of an interplanetary shock front has been investigated by the statistical method. Results of determination the components of normals to the interplanetary shock fronts obtained from data of ACE experiment during from 1998 to 2003 years (about 200 measurements) are used. North-south asymmetry of shock amount about 15% is revealed. Possibly, it is caused by more activity of the north semi-sphere of the Sun. East-west asymmetry of shock area are obtained. At probability 95% values of asymmetry more 0.53 and less 0.65 at most probability 0.59. Here asymmetry is ratio west part of area to whole area of shock front. Possibly, it is formed at propagation of a shock in interplanetary space. The reason of asymmetry may be self-generation turbulence by the accelerated particles which influences on velocity of shock propagation.

  17. Positronium in basis light-front quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xingbo; Wiecki, Paul; Li, Yang; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James

    2014-09-01

    Basis light-front quantization (BLFQ) has been recently developed as a first-principles nonperturbative approach for quantum field theory. Adopting the light-front quantization and Hamiltonian formalism, it solves for the mass eigenstates of quantum field theory as the eigenvalue problem of the associated light-front Hamiltonian. In this work we apply BLFQ to the positronium system in QED and solve for its eigenspectrum in the Fock space with the lowest two Fock sectors included. We explicitly demonstrate our nonperturbative renormalization procedure, in which we infer the various needed renormalization factors through solving a series of parallel single electron problems. We then compare our numerical results for the mass spectrum to the expected Bohr spectrum from nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. Basis light-front quantization (BLFQ) has been recently developed as a first-principles nonperturbative approach for quantum field theory. Adopting the light-front quantization and Hamiltonian formalism, it solves for the mass eigenstates of quantum field theory as the eigenvalue problem of the associated light-front Hamiltonian. In this work we apply BLFQ to the positronium system in QED and solve for its eigenspectrum in the Fock space with the lowest two Fock sectors included. We explicitly demonstrate our nonperturbative renormalization procedure, in which we infer the various needed renormalization factors through solving a series of parallel single electron problems. We then compare our numerical results for the mass spectrum to the expected Bohr spectrum from nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. Supported by DOE (under Grants DESC0008485 SciDAC/NUCLEI, DE-FG02-87ER40371) and NSF (under Grant 0904782).

  18. Foam front propagation in anisotropic oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Grassia, P; Torres-Ulloa, C; Berres, S; Mas-Hernández, E; Shokri, N

    2016-04-01

    The pressure-driven growth model is considered, describing the motion of a foam front through an oil reservoir during foam improved oil recovery, foam being formed as gas advances into an initially liquid-filled reservoir. In the model, the foam front is represented by a set of so-called "material points" that track the advance of gas into the liquid-filled region. According to the model, the shape of the foam front is prone to develop concave sharply curved concavities, where the orientation of the front changes rapidly over a small spatial distance: these are referred to as "concave corners". These concave corners need to be propagated differently from the material points on the foam front itself. Typically the corner must move faster than those material points, otherwise spurious numerical artifacts develop in the computed shape of the front. A propagation rule or "speed up" rule is derived for the concave corners, which is shown to be sensitive to the level of anisotropy in the permeability of the reservoir and also sensitive to the orientation of the corners themselves. In particular if a corner in an anisotropic reservoir were to be propagated according to an isotropic speed up rule, this might not be sufficient to suppress spurious numerical artifacts, at least for certain orientations of the corner. On the other hand, systems that are both heterogeneous and anisotropic tend to be well behaved numerically, regardless of whether one uses the isotropic or anisotropic speed up rule for corners. This comes about because, in the heterogeneous and anisotropic case, the orientation of the corner is such that the "correct" anisotropic speed is just very slightly less than the "incorrect" isotropic one. The anisotropic rule does however manage to keep the corner very slightly sharper than the isotropic rule does. PMID:27090239

  19. Offshore Deformation Front in Miaoli Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, P.; Gwo-shyn, S.

    2015-12-01

    Taiwan is located at the junction of the Eurasian Plate and the Philippine Sea Plate. It's because arc-continent collision occurs in the western Taiwan, resulting in the orogeny has formed a fold-and-thrust belt, developing a series of thrusts aligned in north-south direction. The thrust faults, locating in the central island, are the oldest and have almost inactive. Westward to the island, the faults become younger, dipping angles are smaller, and motions were stronger. On the west side, the foot of the Taiwan Western Foothill is considered the youngest thrust faults located along west Taiwan. Scholars recognized them as so-called the deformation front, and they also believed that the deformation front is located in between the compressive terrain uplifted area and the extensional subsidence area. Therefore, this front line is on the boundary of two different tectonic zones. This study investigates the trace of the deformation front in Miaoli area. Previous studies suggested that the west side of Miaoli collision zone should be fault-bounded, and is located in the seabed. However, in the geological map, there is no geologic evidence that appears on land and so-called active faults related with this deformation front. In the near coast seafloor, according to the reflection earthquakes data from the Institute of Oceanography of NTU, we can only see the offshore strata have been uplifted, and the data also shows that seabed is only covered by thin layer of sediments. This study indicates that in offshore place within three kilometers, shallow formations show a special layer of slime which was extruded to be corrugated transversely. Accordingly, we believe that this slime layer should be pressurized and filled with muddy water. Such features should be further investigated with other geological and geophysical survey data to check if they belong to the structural product of the deformation front.

  20. PIV tracer behavior on propagating shock fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazyrin, Fyodor N.; Mursenkova, Irina V.; Znamenskaya, Irina A.

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at the quantitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of a velocity field near the front of a propagating shock wave and the study of the dynamics of liquid tracers crossing the shock front. For this goal, a shock tube with a rectangular cross-section (48  ×  24 mm) was used. The flat shock wave with Mach numbers M  =  1.4-2.0 propagating inside the tube channel was studied as well as an expanding shock wave propagating outside the channel with M  =  1.2-1.8 at its main axis. The PIV imaging of the shock fronts was carried out with an aerosol of dioctyl sebacate (DEHS) as tracer particles. The pressures of the gas in front of the shock waves studied ranged from 0.013 Mpa to 0.1 MPa in the series of experiments. The processed PIV data, compared to the 1D normal shock theory, yielded consistent values of wake velocity immediately behind the plain shock wave. Special attention was paid to the blurring of the velocity jump on the shock front due to the inertial particle lag and peculiarities of the PIV technique. A numerical algorithm was developed for analysis and correction of the PIV data on the shock fronts, based on equations of particle-flow interaction. By application of this algorithm, the effective particle diameter of the DEHS aerosol tracers was estimated as 1.03  ±  0.12 μm. A number of different formulations for particle drag were tested with this algorithm, with varying success. The results show consistency with previously reported experimental data obtained for cases of stationary shock waves.

  1. Source-Constrained Recall: Front-End and Back-End Control of Retrieval Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halamish, Vered; Goldsmith, Morris; Jacoby, Larry L.

    2012-01-01

    Research on the strategic regulation of memory accuracy has focused primarily on monitoring and control processes used to edit out incorrect information after it is retrieved (back-end control). Recent studies, however, suggest that rememberers also enhance accuracy by preventing the retrieval of incorrect information in the first place (front-end…

  2. Old Enough to Care. Teacher's Guide. A Series of 6/15-Minute Programs for High School Students about Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyminski, Lucy T.; And Others

    Intended to accompany a series of six 15-minute color videocassette programs, this teacher's guide contains suggestions for teaching high school students to achieve the series goals, which are to: (1) acquire accurate information about the elderly and the aging process by debunking myths that currently surround this biological, psychological, and…

  3. 28 CFR 16.207 - Public access to nonexempt transcripts and minutes of closed Commission meetings-Documents used...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public access to nonexempt transcripts... INFORMATION Public Observation of Parole Commission Meetings § 16.207 Public access to nonexempt transcripts and minutes of closed Commission meetings—Documents used at meetings—Record retention. (a)...

  4. 28 CFR 16.207 - Public access to nonexempt transcripts and minutes of closed Commission meetings-Documents used...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public access to nonexempt transcripts... INFORMATION Public Observation of Parole Commission Meetings § 16.207 Public access to nonexempt transcripts and minutes of closed Commission meetings—Documents used at meetings—Record retention. (a)...

  5. 28 CFR 16.207 - Public access to nonexempt transcripts and minutes of closed Commission meetings-Documents used...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Public access to nonexempt transcripts... INFORMATION Public Observation of Parole Commission Meetings § 16.207 Public access to nonexempt transcripts and minutes of closed Commission meetings—Documents used at meetings—Record retention. (a)...

  6. 28 CFR 16.207 - Public access to nonexempt transcripts and minutes of closed Commission meetings-Documents used...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Public access to nonexempt transcripts... INFORMATION Public Observation of Parole Commission Meetings § 16.207 Public access to nonexempt transcripts and minutes of closed Commission meetings—Documents used at meetings—Record retention. (a)...

  7. 17 CFR 200.408 - Public access to transcripts and minutes of closed Commission meetings; record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public access to transcripts and minutes of closed Commission meetings; record retention. 200.408 Section 200.408 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Regulations Pertaining to...

  8. 17 CFR 200.408 - Public access to transcripts and minutes of closed Commission meetings; record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public access to transcripts and minutes of closed Commission meetings; record retention. 200.408 Section 200.408 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Regulations Pertaining to...

  9. AiGERM: A logic programming front end for GERM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashim, Safaa H.

    1990-01-01

    AiGerm (Artificially Intelligent Graphical Entity Relation Modeler) is a relational data base query and programming language front end for MCC (Mission Control Center)/STP's (Space Test Program) Germ (Graphical Entity Relational Modeling) system. It is intended as an add-on component of the Germ system to be used for navigating very large networks of information. It can also function as an expert system shell for prototyping knowledge-based systems. AiGerm provides an interface between the programming language and Germ.

  10. Pulse front adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The accurate focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important in multiphoton microscopy. Using adaptive optics to manipulate the incident ultrafast beam in either the spectral or spatial domain can introduce significant benefits when imaging. Here we introduce pulse front adaptive optics: manipulating an ultrashort pulse in both the spatial and temporal domains. A deformable mirror and a spatial light modulator are operated in concert to modify contours of constant intensity in space and time within an ultrashort pulse. Through adaptive control of the pulse front, we demonstrate an enhancement in the measured fluorescence from a two photon microscope.

  11. Mechanism of branching in negative ionization fronts.

    PubMed

    Arrayás, Manuel; Fontelos, Marco A; Trueba, José L

    2005-10-14

    When a strong electric field is applied to nonconducting matter, narrow channels of plasma called streamers may form. Branchlike patterns of streamers have been observed in anode directed discharges. We explain a mechanism for branching as the result of a balance between the destabilizing effect of impact ionization and the stabilizing effect of electron diffusion on ionization fronts. The dispersion relation for transversal perturbation of a planar negative front is obtained analytically when the ratio D between the electron diffusion coefficient and the intensity of the externally imposed electric field is small. We estimate the spacing lambda between streamers and deduce a scaling law lambda approximately D(1/3). PMID:16241810

  12. Pulse front control with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important for processes including microscopy, laser fabrication and fundamental science. Adaptive optic elements, such as liquid crystal spatial light modulators or membrane deformable mirrors, are routinely used for the correction of aberrations in these systems, leading to improved resolution and efficiency. Here, we demonstrate that adaptive elements used with ultrashort pulses should not be considered simply in terms of wavefront modification, but that changes to the incident pulse front can also occur. We experimentally show how adaptive elements may be used to engineer pulse fronts with spatial resolution.

  13. Eight-minute excretory urographic film: once is enough

    SciTech Connect

    Schey, W.L.; White, H.; Shkolnik, A.; Finder, C.

    1981-11-01

    A film reading exercise was developed to test the advisability and accuracy of using one ''postinfusion'' roentgenogram instead of a series of films for a complete antegrade urographic evaluation. The experience of the radiologist making the interpretations was also considered. In most cases a singly eight-minute postinfusion delayed film showed enough detail to rule out pathology when none existed and adequately revealed either specific abnormal findings or suggested an abnormality existed when such was indeed present. No false negative call was made by and of the radiologists, but experience did aid in detailing the pathology.

  14. Non-contact ultrasonic support of minute objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasaki, Masaya; Terada, Daisuke; Kato, Yasuhiro; Ishino, Yuji; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    In near-field acoustic levitation, an object is levitated vertically upward above the vibrating surface of an ultrasonic transducer. On the other hand, it is known that an object can be suspended vertically downward under the vibrating surface in the water. In this phenomenon, it seems that the pressure acting on the object is negative at the certain gap. This paper describes application of the pressure for handling of minute planar objects in the air. Fabrication of an experimental setup according to the proposal and experimental results of the ultrasonic suspension in the air are reported.

  15. Atypical occlusion process caused by the merger of a sea-breeze front and gust front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulikemu, Abuduwaili; Xu, Xin; Wang, Yuan; Ding, Jinfeng; Wang, Yan

    2015-10-01

    An atypical occlusion process that occurred in North China on 14 July 2011 is studied based on both observations and a real-data Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulation. The results show that this atypical occlusion process was significantly different from the traditional, synoptic-scale occlusion process that occurs within extratropical cyclones. It was caused by the merger of two cold-type mesoscale fronts. One of the fronts developed from the gust front of convective storms, while the other was a sea-breeze front. As the two fronts moved towards each other, the warm air between them was squeezed and separated from the surface. An atypical occluded front was formed when the two fronts merged, with the warm air forced aloft. This kind of occlusion is termed a "merger" process, different from the well-known "catch-up" and "wrap-up" processes. Moreover, local convection was found to be enhanced during the merger process, with severe convective weather produced in the merger area.

  16. Highly scalable digital front end architectures for digital printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staas, David

    2011-01-01

    HP's digital printing presses consume a tremendous amount of data. The architectures of the Digital Front Ends (DFEs) that feed these large, very fast presses have evolved from basic, single-RIP (Raster Image Processor) systems to multirack, distributed systems that can take a PDF file and deliver data in excess of 3 Gigapixels per second to keep the presses printing at 2000+ pages per minute. This paper highlights some of the more interesting parallelism features of our DFE architectures. The high-performance architecture developed over the last 5+ years can scale up to HP's largest digital press, out to multiple mid-range presses, and down into a very low-cost single box deployment for low-end devices as appropriate. Principles of parallelism pervade every aspect of the architecture, from the lowest-level elements of jobs to parallel imaging pipelines that feed multiple presses. From cores to threads to arrays to network teams to distributed machines, we use a systematic approach to move bottlenecks. The ultimate goals of these efforts are: to take the best advantage of the prevailing hardware options at our disposal; to reduce power consumption and cooling requirements; and to ultimately reduce the cost of the solution to our customers.

  17. Sea level oscillations over minute timescales: a global perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilibic, Ivica; Sepic, Jadranka

    2016-04-01

    Sea level oscillations occurring over minutes to a few hours are an important contributor to sea level extremes, and a knowledge on their behaviour is essential for proper quantification of coastal marine hazards. Tsunamis, meteotsunamis, infra-gravity waves and harbour oscillations may even dominate sea level extremes in certain areas and thus pose a great danger for humans and coastal infrastructure. Aside for tsunamis, which are, due to their enormous impact to the coastlines, a well-researched phenomena, the importance of other high-frequency oscillations to the sea level extremes is still underrated, as no systematic long-term measurements have been carried out at a minute timescales. Recently, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) established Sea Level Monitoring Facility portal (http://www.ioc-sealevelmonitoring.org), making 1-min sea level data publicly available for several hundred tide gauge sites in the World Ocean. Thereafter, a global assessment of oscillations over tsunami timescales become possible; however, the portal contains raw sea level data only, being unchecked for spikes, shifts, drifts and other malfunctions of instruments. We present a quality assessment of these data, estimates of sea level variances and contributions of high-frequency processes to the extremes throughout the World Ocean. This is accompanied with assessment of atmospheric conditions and processes which generate intense high-frequency oscillations.

  18. Evaluation of samples comprising minute amounts of DNA.

    PubMed

    Benschop, Corina C G; Haned, Hinda; Yoo, Seong Yeon; Sijen, Titia

    2015-09-01

    Minute amounts of DNA representing only few diploid cells, may be interrogated using enhanced DNA profiling, which will be accompanied by stochastic amplification effects. Notwithstanding, a weight of evidence statistic may be calculated using current interpretation software. In this study, we profiled single donor, two- and three-person samples having only 3 pg to 12 pg of DNA per contributor using both standard and enhanced capillary electrophoresis (CE) injection settings. Likelihood ratios (LRs) were computed using LRmix Studio, compared for both types of profiles and examined in relation to the amount of DNA, drop-out level, number of detected alleles, peak heights and reproducibility of alleles. Especially for DNA profiles that were generated using enhanced CE, the obtained LRs could indicate strong evidence in favour of the prosecution (log10(LR)>6), also when the amount of DNA represented about half of a diploid cell equivalent in the amplification. These results illustrate that an assessment of the criminalistic relevance of a sample carrying minute amounts of DNA is essential prior to applying enhanced interrogation techniques and/or calculating a weight of evidence statistic. PMID:26385713

  19. A 20-minute breath test for helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.J.; Plankey, M.W.; Hoffman, S.R.; Boyd, C.L.; Dye, K.R.; Frierson, H.F. Jr.; Guerrant, R.L.; McCallum, R.W. )

    1991-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated a simplified rapid {sup 14}C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori. Fasting patients undergoing initial assessment for H. pylori drank 5 microCi of {sup 14}C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath was collected at intervals for 30 min. Samples were counted in a beta-counter, and the results were expressed as counts per minute (cpm). In the same week, patients underwent endoscopy, and a blinded investigator examined biopsy samples of gastric mucosa by culture and histology for H. pylori. There were 49 H. pylori-negative (HP-) and 104 H. pylori-positive (HP+) patients in the study. HP+ patients expired a mean of 4398 cpm (SD 2468) per mmol CO{sub 2} in a sample taken 20 min after ingestion of the isotope. In contrast, HP--patients expired only 340 cpm (SD 196). If the mean +3 SD of HP- patients was used as a cutoff value, the 20-minute sample gave a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100% for detecting H. pylori. The radiation exposure from this test is less than 1% of that received from an upper gastrointestinal series, and the short collection time makes it both convenient and cost effective.

  20. Motivation and Front-End Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harless, Joe

    1978-01-01

    Relates Front-End Analysis (FEA) to motivation by categorizing it as either Diagnostic FEA or Planning FEA. The former is used to diagnose existing problems and prescribe motivational programs; the latter assumes that motivational programs must be implemented, along with other programs, to build the optimum environment to support the performance.…

  1. Advocacy on the Front Lines of CTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Career and technical education (CTE) in the 21st century is more relevant and rigorous than ever before. It prepares students to compete in the global workplace, it inspires lifelong learning, and it helps prevent at-risk students from dropping out of school because it keeps them engaged in the learning process. Those who work on the front lines…

  2. Teaching Front Handsprings from a Developmental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stork, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The front handspring is an important gymnastics skill that serves as a transition from beginner-level rolling and static balances to more advanced tumbling. It is, therefore, a skill highly desired by beginners. Early learning requires a great deal of effort during which students experience many failed attempts. Unless they are highly motivated,…

  3. QCD and Light-Front Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2010-10-27

    The soft-wall AdS/QCD model, modified by a positive-sign dilaton metric, leads to a remarkable one-parameter description of nonperturbative hadron dynamics. The model predicts a zero-mass pion for zero-mass quarks and a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in the leading orbital angular momentum L of hadrons and the radial quantum number N. Light-Front Holography maps the amplitudes which are functions of the fifth dimension variable z of anti-de Sitter space to a corresponding hadron theory quantized on the light front. The resulting Lorentz-invariant relativistic light-front wave equations are functions of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron at equal light-front time. The result is to a semi-classical frame-independent first approximation to the spectra and light-front wavefunctions of meson and baryon light-quark bound states, which in turn predict the behavior of the pion and nucleon form factors. The theory implements chiral symmetry in a novel way: the effects of chiral symmetry breaking increase as one goes toward large interquark separation, consistent with spectroscopic data, and the the hadron eigenstates generally have components with different orbital angular momentum; e.g., the proton eigenstate in AdS/QCD with massless quarks has L = 0 and L = 1 light-front Fock components with equal probability. The soft-wall model also predicts the form of the non-perturbative effective coupling {alpha}{sub s}{sup AdS} (Q) and its {beta}-function which agrees with the effective coupling {alpha}{sub g1} extracted from the Bjorken sum rule. The AdS/QCD model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method in order to systematically include the QCD interaction terms. A new perspective on quark and gluon condensates is also reviewed.

  4. Heart Rate Recovery in the First Minute at the Six-Minute Walk Test in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lindemberg, Sabrina; Chermont, Sergio; Quintão, Mônica; Derossi, Milena; Guilhon, Sergio; Bernardez, Sabrina; Marchese, Luana; Martins, Wolney; Nóbrega, Antônio Claudio L.; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart rate recovery at one minute of rest (HRR1) is a predictor of mortality in heart failure (HF), but its prognosis has not been assessed at six-minute walk test (6MWT) in these patients. Objective This study aimed to determine the HRR1 at 6MWT in patients with HF and its correlation with six-minute walk distance (6MWD). Methods Cross-sectional, controlled protocol with 161 individuals, 126 patients with stable systolic HF, allocated into 2 groups (G1 and G2) receiving or not β-blocker and 35 volunteers in control group (G3) had HRR1 recorded at the 6MWT. Results HRR1 and 6MWD were significantly different in the 3 groups. Mean values of HRR1 and 6MWD were: HRR1 = 12 ± 14 beat/min G1; 18 ± 16 beat/min G2 and 21 ± 13 beat/min G3; 6MWD = 423 ± 102 m G1; 396 ± 101m G2 and 484 ± 96 m G3 (p < 0.05). Results showed a correlation between HRR1 and 6MWD in G1(r = 0.3; p = 0.04) and in G3(r = 0.4; p= 0.03), but not in G2 (r= 0.12; p= 0.48). Conclusion HRR1 response was attenuated in patients using βB and showed correlation with 6MWD, reflecting better exercise tolerance. HRR1 after 6MWT seems to represent an alternative when treadmill tests could not be tolerated. PMID:24714794

  5. Seismic Precursors to Space Shuttle Shock Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrells, G.; Bonner, J.; Herrin, E. T.

    - Seismic precursors to space shuttle re-entry shock fronts are detected at TXAR in Southwest Texas when the ground track of the orbiter vehicle passes within 150-200km of the observatory. These precursors have been termed ``shuttle-quakes'' because their seismograms superficially mimic the seismograms of small earthquakes from shallow sources. Analysis of the ``shuttle-quake'' seismograms, however, reveals one important difference. Unlike ordinary earthquakes, the propagation azimuths and horizontal phase velocities of the individual phases of the ``shuttle-quakes'' are functionally related. From a theoretical model developed to account for the origin of these precursors it is found that the seismic phases of ``shuttle-quakes'' are ``bow'' waves. A ``bow'' wave originates at the advancing tip of the shock front trace (i.e., intersection of the re-entry shock front with the surface of the earth) when the ground speed of the orbiter vehicle exceeds the horizontal phase velocity of a particular seismic phase. ``Bow'' waves are shown to differ in two important respects from the ordinary seismic phases. They vanish ahead of the advancing tip of the shock front trace and their propagation azimuths and horizontal phase velocities are functionally related. The ground speed of the orbiter vehicle exceeds the horizontal phase velocities of crustal seismic phase over much of the re-entry flight profile. As a result, P,S, and Rg``bow'' waves will be seen as precursors to the re-entry shock front at stations located within a few hundred km of its ground track.

  6. Polarized front-face fluorescence for muscle tissue structure evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luc, C.; Clerjon, S.; Peyrin, F.; Lepetit, J.

    2008-05-01

    The fluorescence anisotropy of a rigid medium is a consequence of photoselection of fluorophores and their orientations. This makes it possible to use polarized front-face fluorescence to provide structural information on biological tissues like muscle. Tryptophan is the major intrinsic fluorophore in muscle. It is embedded in proteins which act as building blocks for muscle structuration because of their preferential alignment. Our working hypothesis is that when the arrangement of the proteins changes, there are concomitant changes in fluorescence anisotropy parameters. Our research is directed toward evaluating muscle structure and its evolution post mortem. We report a theoretical simple model of tryptophan fluorescence and an experimental method to measure the fluorescence anisotropy of biological opaque tissues. Instrumental and optical considerations have to be taken into account in experiments on front-face polarization to make certain of measurement accuracy. Therefore, we present a detailed report on the adjustments and corrections made on a conventional L-spectrofluorimeter to adapt it to fluorescence anisotropy measurements on biological tissues. Data from several experiments demonstrate how the method is able to show muscle structure modifications. We show how it is possible to fit experimental data with the model developed in order to obtain structural information.

  7. The Source of 3 Minute Magnetoacoustic Oscillations in Coronal Fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, D. B.; De Moortel, I.; Mathioudakis, M.; Christian, D. J.; Reardon, K. P.; Keys, P. H.; Keenan, F. P.

    2012-10-01

    We use images of high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution, obtained using both ground- and space-based instrumentation, to investigate the coupling between wave phenomena observed at numerous heights in the solar atmosphere. Analysis of 4170 Å continuum images reveals small-scale umbral intensity enhancements, with diameters ~0farcs6, lasting in excess of 30 minutes. Intensity oscillations of ≈3 minutes are observed to encompass these photospheric structures, with power at least three orders of magnitude higher than the surrounding umbra. Simultaneous chromospheric velocity and intensity time series reveal an 87° ± 8° out-of-phase behavior, implying the presence of standing modes created as a result of partial wave reflection at the transition region boundary. We find a maximum waveguide inclination angle of ≈40° between photospheric and chromospheric heights, combined with a radial expansion factor of <76%. An average blueshifted Doppler velocity of ≈1.5 km s-1, in addition to a time lag between photospheric and chromospheric oscillatory phenomena, confirms the presence of upwardly propagating slow-mode waves in the lower solar atmosphere. Propagating oscillations in EUV intensity are detected in simultaneous coronal fan structures, with a periodicity of 172 ± 17 s and a propagation velocity of 45 ± 7 km s-1. Numerical simulations reveal that the damping of the magnetoacoustic wave trains is dominated by thermal conduction. The coronal fans are seen to anchor into the photosphere in locations where large-amplitude umbral dot (UD) oscillations manifest. Derived kinetic temperature and emission measure time series display prominent out-of-phase characteristics, and when combined with the previously established sub-sonic wave speeds, we conclude that the observed EUV waves are the coronal counterparts of the upwardly propagating magnetoacoustic slow modes detected in the lower solar atmosphere. Thus, for the first time, we reveal how the

  8. Use of Minute-by-Minute Cardiovascular Measurements During Tilt Tests to Strengthen Inference on the Effect of Long-Duration Space Flight on Orthostatic Hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Stein, Sydney P.; Platts, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    Typical methodology for evaluating the effects of spaceflight on orthostatic hypotension (OH) has been survival analysis of tolerance times from 80 head-up tilt tests. However when scheduled test durations are short, there may not be enough failures to allow survival analysis to adequately estimate and compare the effects of flight phase (e.g. pre-flight, number of days post-flight), flight duration, and their interaction, as well as interactions with effects of interventions or countermeasures. The problem is exacerbated in the presence of a repeated measures design, in which subjects participate in tilt tests during various flight phases. Here we show how it is possible to dramatically improve the efficiency of statistical inference in this setting by making use of the additional information contained in minute-by-minute observations of cardiovascular parameters thought to be reflective of progression towards presyncope during tilt testing. Methods: We retrospectively examined operational tilt test (OTT; 10 -min 80 head-up tilt) data from 20 International Space Station (ISS) and 66 Shuttle astronauts 10 d before launch (L-10), on landing day (R+0) and during recovery (R+1, R+3, R+6-10) depending on the level of participation. Data from 5 ISS astronauts tested on R+0 or R+1 who used non-standard countermeasures were excluded. In addition to OTT survival time, 8 cardiovascular parameters (CP: heart rate, systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure, pulse pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance) that might be predictive of progression towards presyncope were measured every minute of each OTT. Statistical analysis was predicated on a two ]stage model of causation. In the first stage, flight duration and time from landing affect the astronauts' degree of OH, which is manifested in the time trends and variation of the above CPs during OTTs. In the second stage, the behavior of these parameters directly affects OTT survival

  9. Remote sensing of coastal fronts and their effects on oil dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V.

    1980-01-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques to determine the properties of coastal and estuarine fronts, which represent regions of discontinuities and high gradients in ocean physical parameters such as velocity and density, and to assess the influence of such fronts on oil pollutants is discussed. Results of an aircraft and boat verification study of an oil drift and spread model in Delaware Bay are indicated which illustrate the tendency of oil slicks to be attracted to frontal regions, where a denser fluid underlies a lighter fluid giving rise to an inclined interface with convergence zones. Landsat imagery of the bay acquired in order to incorporate frontal information into the interactive computer model is then presented which allows the locations of coastal fronts to be charted throughout a tidal cycle. It is noted that satellite observations of flood-associated fronts on the New Jersey side of the bay and ebb-associated fronts on the Delaware side agree with boat measurements and model predictions, and that the remote tracking of fronts by aircraft and satellites will aid in oil slick clean-up operations.

  10. Nesting habitat of the Tule Greater White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons elgasi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, R.V.; Ely, C.R.; Bollinger, K.S.; Kratzer, S.; Udevitz, M.S.; Fehringer, D.J.; Rothe, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the first information on the availability and use of nesting habitat by the rare Tule Greater White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons elgasi. The breeding range was sampled by marking geese with radio transmitters on wintering and moulting areas, and tracking them to nest sites in Alaska. Nesting habitat was described at the scales of ecoregion, wetland ecosystem (National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) maps), vegetation type within wetland (Alaska Vegetation Classification (AVC) maps based on satellite imagery), and nest site. Tule Greater White-fronted Goose nests were located in boreal forest wetlands in the upper Cook Inlet Basin ecoregion. Nesting Tule Greater White-fronted Geese selected NWT Palustrine Seasonally Flooded wetlands and used NWI Palustrine Saturated wetlands in proportion to availability. Within these wetlands, Tule Greater White-fronted Geese used Needleleaf Forest, Low Shrub and Herbaceous (mostly graminoid) AVC classes for nest sites in proportion to availability Most (93%) Tule Greater White-fronted Geese nested > 75 m from open water ponds or lakes, and many nested in wetlands with little or no open water. Tule Greater White-fronted Geese nest only in a small breeding area near the most human-impacted area of the state, and continued development may limit the use of suitable nesting habitat.

  11. Emergence of fluctuating traveling front solutions in macroscopic theory of noisy invasion fronts.

    PubMed

    Meerson, Baruch; Vilenkin, Arkady; Sasorov, Pavel V

    2013-01-01

    The position of an invasion front, propagating into an unstable state, fluctuates because of the shot noise coming from the discreteness of reacting particles and stochastic character of the reactions and diffusion. A recent macroscopic theory [Meerson and Sasorov, Phys. Rev. E 84, 030101(R) (2011)] yields the probability of observing, during a long time, an unusually slow front. The theory is formulated as an effective Hamiltonian mechanics which operates with the density field and the conjugate "momentum" field. Further, the theory assumes that the most probable density field history of an unusually slow front represents, up to small corrections, a traveling front solution of the Hamilton equations. Here we verify this assumption by solving the Hamilton equations numerically for models belonging to the directed percolation universality class. PMID:23410293

  12. Fronts and frontogenesis as revealed by high time resolution data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. E.; Barber, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Upper air sounding are used to examine a cold front of average intensity. Vertical cross sections of potential temperature and wind, and horizontal analyses were compared and adjusted for consistency. These analyses were then used to study the evolution of the front, found to consist of a complex system of fronts occurring at all levels of the troposphere. Low level fronts were strongest at the surface and rapidly weakened with height. Fronts in the midddle troposphere were much more intense. The warm air ahead of the fronts was nearly barotropic, while the cold air behind was baroclinic through deep layers. A deep mixed layer was observed to grow in this cold air.

  13. Shock Acceleration of Solar Energetic Protons: The First 10 Minutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Chee K.; Reames, Donald V.

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration at a parallel coronal shock is modeled with self-consistent Alfven wave excitation and shock transmission. 18 - 50 keV seed protons at 0.1% of plasma proton density are accelerated in 10 minutes to a power-law intensity spectrum rolling over at 300 MeV by a 2500km s-1 shock traveling outward from 3.5 solar radius, for typical coronal conditions and low ambient wave intensities. Interaction of high-energy protons of large pitch-angles with Alfven waves amplified by low-energy protons of small pitch angles is key to rapid acceleration. Shock acceleration is not significantly retarded by sunward streaming protons interacting with downstream waves. There is no significant second-order Fermi acceleration.

  14. One minute oxygen uptake in peripheral ischemic vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Auchincloss, J H; Meade, J W; Gilbert, R; Chamberlain, B E

    1980-01-01

    Six males, ages 31-58, with ischemic vascular disease of the lower extremities, underwent treadmill testing with measurement of oxygen uptake at 45-60 seconds of exercise (VO2-45-60) as the test score. Tests were performed at 41, 123 and 164 watts of power against gravity. Depressed values were found in five subjects with aortic, iliac or common femoral disease but normal values in a subject with narrowing of the left superficial femoral artery. Reconstructive surgery resulted in normal values in four subjects retested. In three of these a calculation was made of the increased volume of oxygen uptake during the first minute of exercise associated with postsurgical improvement. The average was 430 ml, a value high enough to suggest increased aerobic metabolism of exercising muscles. PMID:7362287

  15. Reset a task set after five minutes of mindfulness practice.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chun-Yu; Yeh, Yei-Yu

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a brief mindfulness practice on reducing the carryover effect caused by a previous task set and to determine the mechanism for its effectiveness. Experiment 1 showed that a memorized color interfered with subsequent visual search as a singleton distractor only when color was a defining feature for the search target. In Experiment 2, three interventions (scene-viewing, distraction, and mindfulness practice) were implemented across three groups for five minutes between two blocks; color was relevant to search in the first block and irrelevant in the second. Only the mindfulness group showed a non-significant carryover effect. Experiment 3 demonstrated that the scene-viewing participants continued adopting a suppressive mode of attentional control on a previously distracting color during letter judgment. In contrast, mindfulness practice could reset a task set. Mindfulness practice could enhance concentration in the present moment via reconfiguring the mode of attentional control. PMID:25982056

  16. Ral-GTPases: approaching their 15 minutes of fame.

    PubMed

    Feig, Larry A

    2003-08-01

    Andy Warhol, the famous pop artist, once claimed that "in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes". The same, it seems, can be said of proteins, because at any given time some proteins become more "fashionable" to study than others. But most proteins have been highly conserved throughout millions of years of evolution, which implies that they all have essential roles in cell biology. Thus, each one will no doubt enter the limelight if the right experiment in the right cell type is done. A good example of this is the Ras-like GTPases (Ral-GTPases), which until recently existed in the shadow of their close cousins--the Ras proto-oncogenes. Recent studies have yielded insights into previously unappreciated roles for Ral-GTPases in intensively investigated disciplines such as vesicle trafficking, cell morphology, transcription and possibly even human oncogenesis. PMID:12888294

  17. Minutes of the fourth SALE program participants meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    This report is a documentation of the presentations made to the Fourth Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (S.A.L.E.) Program Participants Meeting at Argonne, Illinois, July 8-9, 1981. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and was coordinated by the S.A.L.E. Program of the New Brunswick Laboratory. The objective of the meeting was to provide a forum through which administration of the Program and methods appropriate to the analysis of S.A.L.E. Program samples could be discussed. The Minutes of the Meeting is a collection of presentations by the speakers at the meeting and of the discussions following the presentations. The presentations are included as submitted by the speakers. The discussion sections were transcribed from tape recordings of the meeting and were edited to clarify and emphasize important comments. Seventeen papers have been abstracted and indexed.

  18. Universal functional form of 1-minute raindrop size distribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugerone, Katia; De Michele, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall remains one of the poorly quantified phenomena of the hydrological cycle, despite its fundamental role. No universal laws describing the rainfall behavior are available in literature. This is probably due to the continuous description of rainfall, which is a discrete phenomenon, made by drops. From the statistical point of view, the rainfall variability at particle size scale, is described by the drop size distribution (DSD). With this term, it is generally indicated as the concentration of raindrops per unit volume and diameter, as the probability density function of drop diameter at the ground, according to the specific problem of interest. Raindrops represent the water exchange, under liquid form, between atmosphere and earth surface, and the number of drops and their size have impacts in a wide range of hydrologic, meteorologic, and ecologic phenomena. DSD is used, for example, to measure the multiwavelength rain attenuation for terrestrial and satellite systems, it is an important input for the evaluation of the below cloud scavenging coefficient of the aerosol by precipitation, and is of primary importance to make estimates of rainfall rate through radars. In literature, many distributions have been used to this aim (Gamma and Lognormal above all), without statistical supports and with site-specific studies. Here, we present an extensive investigation of raindrop size distribution based on 18 datasets, consisting in 1-minute disdrometer data, sampled using Joss-Waldvogel or Thies instrument in different locations on Earth's surface. The aim is to understand if an universal functional form of 1-minute drop diameter variability exists. The study consists of three main steps: analysis of the high order moments, selection of the model through the AIC index and test of the model with the use of goodness-of-fit tests.

  19. Mineral replacement front propagation in deformed rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Koehn, Daniel; Kelka, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Fluid migrations are a major agent of contaminant transport leading to mineral replacement in rocks, impacting their properties as porosity, permeability, and rheology. Understanding the physical and chemical mechanisms that govern mineralogical replacement during and after deformation is required to better understand complex interplays between fluid and rocks that are involved in faulting, seismic cycle, and resource distribution in the upper crust. Dolomitization process related to hydrothermal fluid flow is one of the most studied and debated replacement processes in earth sciences. Dolomitization of limestone is of economic importance as well, as it stands as unconventional oil reservoirs and is systematically observed in Mississippian-Valley Type ore deposit. Despite recent breakthrough about dolomitization processes at large-scale, the small-scale propagation of the reaction front remains unclear. It is poorly documented in the occurrence of stylolites and fractures in the medium while pressure-solution and fracture network development are the most efficient deformation accomodation mechanism in limestone from early compaction to layer-parallel shortening. Thus, the impact of such network on geometry of replaced bodies and on replacement front propagation deserves specific attention. This contribution illustrates the role of fracture and stylolites on the propagation of a reaction front. In a 2 dimensional numerical model we simulate the dolomitization front propagation in a heterogeneous porous medium. The propagation of the reaction front is governed by the competition between advection and diffusion processes, and takes into account reaction rates, disorder in the location of the potential replacement seeds, and permeability heterogeneities. We add stylolites and fractures that can act as barriers or drains to fluid flow according to their orientation and mineralogical content, which can or cannot react with the contaminant. The patterns produced from

  20. Solidification fronts in supercooled liquids: how rapid fronts can lead to disordered glassy solids.

    PubMed

    Archer, A J; Robbins, M J; Thiele, U; Knobloch, E

    2012-09-01

    We determine the speed of a crystallization (or, more generally, a solidification) front as it advances into the uniform liquid phase after the system has been quenched into the crystalline region of the phase diagram. We calculate the front speed by assuming a dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) model for the system and applying a marginal stability criterion. Our results also apply to phase field crystal (PFC) models of solidification. As the solidification front advances into the unstable liquid phase, the density profile behind the advancing front develops density modulations and the wavelength of these modulations is a dynamically chosen quantity. For shallow quenches, the selected wavelength is precisely that of the crystalline phase and so well-ordered crystalline states are formed. However, when the system is deeply quenched, we find that this wavelength can be quite different from that of the crystal, so the solidification front naturally generates disorder in the system. Significant rearrangement and aging must subsequently occur for the system to form the regular well-ordered crystal that corresponds to the free energy minimum. Additional disorder is introduced whenever a front develops from random initial conditions. We illustrate these findings with simulation results obtained using the PFC model. PMID:23030925

  1. Properties of Deflagration Fronts and Models for Type IA Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, I.; Höflich, P.

    2000-01-01

    restructuring of the WD prior to the detonation. Therefore, we do not expect that the precise, microphysical prescription for the speed of a subsonic burning front has a significant effect on the outcome. However, at the current level of uncertainties for the burning front, the relation between properties of the burning front and of the initial white dwarf cannot be obtained from a comparison between observation and theoretical predictions by one-dimensional models. Multidimensional calculations are needed (1) to get inside the relations between model parameters such as central density and properties of the deflagration front and its relation to the transition density between deflagration and detonation and (2) to make use of information on asphericity that is provided by polarization measurements. These questions are essential to test, estimate, and predict some of the evolutionary effects of SNe Ia and their use as cosmological yardsticks.

  2. Heavy Quarkonia on the Light Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Chen, Guangyao; Adhikari, Lekha; Zhao, Xingbo; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James

    2016-03-01

    We employ solutions for heavy quarkonium within a light-front basis function approach to compare with experiment and predict additional observables. The Hamiltonian is based on the Light-Front Holographic QCD (phenomenological confinement) plus one-gluon exchange. Mass spectra agree well with experiment and we employ the wavefunctions to evaluate decay constants and form factors. We discuss our progress and plans for evaluating generalized parton distributions (GPDs) and cross sections for diffractive production. Our predictions for these observables as well as predictions of additional excited states can be tested at ongoing and future experimental facilities, e.g., LHC, sPHENIX and the EIC. We acknowledge DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40371 & DESC0008485.

  3. Radar observations of land breeze fronts.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a radar-observed apparent land breeze front 12 to 14 n mi off the coast of Wallops Island, Va. Accompanying meteorological data show the land breeze at the shore to be a layer of cold air less than 300 ft deep moving seaward at approximately 2 knots. The radar observations show the land breeze vertical frontal surface sloping landward at about 20 deg, with convection over the warm water increasing the layer thickness to 2000 ft near the frontal zone. The radar-observed horizontal frontal surface is a sharp scalloped line echo in the lower 1000 ft, but becomes diffuse above. As the local circulation during daylight hours changes to a sea breeze, the land breeze front recedes toward land and dissipates.

  4. RF front end interface and AGC modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary results indicate that the new front end automatic gain control (AGC) combination perform satisfactorily. Side by side bench tests with Trimble 10A and Texas Instruments 9900 LORAN-C receivers have proven that the proper time differences are being obtained. Further optimization of the AGC circuit will occur as software to track all of the stations in a LORAN-C chain is developed. The AGC circuit was designed to sample up to six separate LORAN-C stations. Along with expanded station tracking software, a more sophisticated search routine is also under development. A printed circuit board for the AGC is planned and will be enclosed with the RF front end in a sealed enclosure to reduce interference from the other digital circuits of the microcomputer.

  5. Electromagnetic energy conversion at reconnection fronts.

    PubMed

    Angelopoulos, V; Runov, A; Zhou, X-Z; Turner, D L; Kiehas, S A; Li, S-S; Shinohara, I

    2013-09-27

    Earth's magnetotail contains magnetic energy derived from the kinetic energy of the solar wind. Conversion of that energy back to particle energy ultimately powers Earth's auroras, heats the magnetospheric plasma, and energizes the Van Allen radiation belts. Where and how such electromagnetic energy conversion occurs has been unclear. Using a conjunction between eight spacecraft, we show that this conversion takes place within fronts of recently reconnected magnetic flux, predominantly at 1- to 10-electron inertial length scale, intense electrical current sheets (tens to hundreds of nanoamperes per square meter). Launched continually during intervals of geomagnetic activity, these reconnection outflow flux fronts convert ~10 to 100 gigawatts per square Earth radius of power, consistent with local magnetic flux transport, and a few times 10(15) joules of magnetic energy, consistent with global magnetotail flux reduction. PMID:24072917

  6. Pentan isomers compound flame front structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mansurov, Z.A.; Mironenko, A.W.; Bodikov, D.U.; Rachmetkaliev, K.N.

    1995-08-13

    The fuels (hexane, pentane, diethyl ether) and conditions investigated in this study are relevant to engine knock in spark- ignition engines. A review is provided of the field of low temperature hydrocarbon oxidation. Studies were made of radical and stable intermediate distribution in the front of cool flames: Maximum concentrations of H atoms and peroxy radicals were observed in the luminous zone of the cool flame front. Peroxy radicals appear before the luminous zone at 430 K due to diffusion. H atoms were found in cool flames of butane and hexane. H atoms diffuses from the luminous zone to the side of the fresh mixture, and they penetrate into the fresh mixture to a small depth. Extension of action sphear of peroxy radicals in the fresh mixture is much greater than that of H atoms due to their small activity and high concentrations.

  7. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John

    2014-11-04

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  8. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John

    2012-07-17

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  9. Detached plasma in Saturn's front side magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma observations in the outer front side Saturnian magnetosphere are discussed which indicate the existence of dense flux tubes outside the plasma sheets. It is suggested that flux tubes are detached from the plasma sheet by a centifugally driven flute instability. The same instability leads to a dispersal of Titan-injected plasma. It is shown that the detached flux tubes will probably break open as they convect into the nightside magnetotail and lose their content in the form of a planetary wind.

  10. Morphological stability of sapphire crystallization front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. V.; Nizhankovskyi, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    The main factors and specificity of growth conditions for sapphire and Ti:sapphire crystals, which affect the morphological stability of the crystal-melt interface, have been investigated with allowance for the concentration and radiative melt supercooling. It is shown that the critical sapphire growth rate is determined to a great extent by the optical transparency of the melt and the mixing conditions near the crystallization front.

  11. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts, is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  12. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P. )

    1993-11-08

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  13. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-11-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code orchid.

  14. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  15. A tidal plume front and internal solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald R.; Weidemann, Alan D.

    1998-07-01

    A tidal plume front (internal tidal bore) propagating from the Apalachicola Bay outflow into the northern Gulf of Mexico is examined in a brief set of observations. Temperature and salinity time series showed a radially spreading "pool" of estuarine water with a character similar to a previously observed "turbulent rotor", and with a following packet of internal solitons. Features associated with these observations may be pertinent to interpretation of remotely sensed plumes and to predictive modeling.

  16. Solar cell having improved front surface metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Lillington, D.R.; Mardesich, N.; Dill, H.G.; Garlick, G.F.J.

    1987-09-15

    This patent describes a solar cell comprising: a first layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N+ conductivity; a second layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N conductivity overlying the first layer; a third layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a P conductivity overlying the N conductivity layer and forming a P-N junction therebetween. A layer of aluminium gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a p conductivity overlying the front major surface of the P conductivity third layer and having an exposed surface essentially parallel to the front major surface and at least one edge; a plurality of metallic contact lines made of a first metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a first predetermined distance traversing the exposed surface and extending through the aluminium gallium arsenide layer to the front major surface and making electrical contact to the third layer; a plurality of longitudinally disposed metallic grid lines made of a second metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a second predetermined distance located on the exposed surface of the aluminium gallium arsenide layer and which cross the metallic contact lines and make electrical contact to the metallic lines; a flat metallic strip disposed on the aluminium gallium arsenide layer exposed surface near the edge, the strip electrically coupling the metallic grid lines to one another; and a back contact located on the back major surface.

  17. Front lighted shadowgraphic method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Stone, William J.

    1985-02-26

    High contrast silhouette images of a substantially opaque object are obtained using front illumination techniques. The object is frontally illuminated by light of a first polarization. A frontal surface of the object reflects the incident light to an observation station. The polarization of incident light bypassing the object and incident on a background is changed. The background light is reflected to the observation station, and the intensity of one of the two, differently polarized, reflected images is substantially reduced with respect to the other. Apparatus for carrying out the method includes a first polarizer for polarizing frontally incident illuminating light, a second polarizer behind the object and a reflective surface behind the second polarizer. A polarization analyzer, located in front of the object, is used to extinguish one of the two reflected images. Apparatus for carrying out the invention in instruments having a polarized light source and a polarization analyzer includes a combination of a polarizing material, for contacting a rear surface of the object, and a reflective surface provided adjacent the rear surface of the polarizing material. The combination is applied to the rear surface of the object. Back-surface mirrors of pleochroic substrates applied to thin film physical vapor deposited electronic circuit elements enable front lighted shadowgraphic imaging of the elements.

  18. Colloid Formation at Waste Plume Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Saiz, Eduardo; Larsen, Joern T.; Zheng, Zuoping; Couture, Rex A.

    2004-05-22

    Highly saline and caustic tank waste solutions containing radionuclides and toxic metals have leaked into sediments at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities such as the Hanford Site (Washington State). Colloid transport is frequently invoked to explain migration of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface. To understand colloid formation during interactions between highly reactive fluids and sediments and its impact on contaminant transport, we simulated tank waste solution (TWS) leakage processes in laboratory columns at ambient and elevated (70 C) temperatures. We found that maximum formation of mobile colloids occurred at the plume fronts (hundreds to thousands times higher than within the plume bodies or during later leaching). Concentrations of suspended solids were as high as 3 mass%, and their particle-sizes ranged from tens of nm to a few {micro}m. Colloid chemical composition and mineralogy depended on temperature. During infiltration of the leaked high Na{sup +} waste solution, rapid and completed Na{sup +} replacement of exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} from the sediment caused accumulation of these divalent cations at the moving plume front. Precipitation of supersaturated Ca{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+}-bearing minerals caused dramatic pH reduction at the plume front. In turn, the reduced pH caused precipitation of other minerals. This understanding can help predict the behavior of contaminant trace elements carried by the tank waste solutions, and could not have been obtained through conventional batch studies.

  19. Autocatalytic Reaction Front Propagation in Oscillatory Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leconte, Marc; Martin, Jerome; Rakotomalala, Nicole; Salin, Dominique

    2003-11-01

    Laboratoire Fluides Automatique et Systèmes Thermiques, Universités P. et M. Curie and Paris Sud, C.N.R.S. (UMR 7608) Bâtiment 502, Campus Universitaire, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France. Autocatalytic reaction front between two reacting species is able to propagate as a solitary wave that is at a constant velocity and with a stationary concentration profile resulting from a balance between molecular diffusion and chemical reaction. On the other hand, in laminar flow the association of molecular diffusion and convection leads to an overall diffusion effect, the so-called Taylor dispersion, with a flow dependent enhanced dispersion coefficient. Previous experiments have demonstrated the dissymmetry between supportive and adverse advection flows compared to the reaction front propagation without flow. We analyze experimentally the effect of laminar oscillatory flow on the propagation and on the shape of the fronts in the Iodate-Arsenous Acid autocatalytic reaction in micro Hele-Shaw cells. We observe new solitary waves whose velocity and shape depend on the relative importance of advection, diffusion and reaction. The results are in reasonable with our lattice 3D BGK simulations.

  20. Phenomenological Theory of the Photoevaporation Front Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Kane, J O; Mizuta, A; Pound, M W; Remington, B A

    2006-04-10

    The dynamics of photoevaporated molecular clouds is determined by the ablative pressure acting on the ionization front. An important step in the understanding of the ensuing motion is to develop the linear stability theory for the initially flat front. Despite the simplifications introduced by the linearization, the problem remains quite complex and still draws a lot of attention. The complexity is related to the large number of effects that have to be included in the analysis: acceleration of the front, possible temporal variation of the intensity of the ionizing radiation, the tilt of the radiation flux with respect to the normal to the surface, and partial absorption of the incident radiation in the ablated material. In this paper, we describe a model where all these effects can be taken into account simultaneously, and a relatively simple and universal dispersion relation can be obtained. The proposed phenomenological model may prove to be a helpful tool in assessing the feasibility of the laboratory experiments directed towards scaled modeling of astrophysical phenomena.

  1. Cosmic Pressure Fronts Mapped by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    A colossal cosmic "weather system" produced by the collision of two giant clusters of galaxies has been imaged by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. For the first time, the pressure fronts in the system can be traced in detail, and they show a bright, but relatively cool 50 million degree Celsius central region embedded in large elongated cloud of 70 million degree Celsius gas, all of which is roiling in a faint "atmosphere"of 100 million degree Celsius gas. "We can compare this to an intergalactic cold front," said Maxim Markevitch of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass. and leader of the international team involved in the analysis of the observations. "A major difference is that in this case, cold means 70 million degree Celsius." The gas clouds are in the core of a galaxy cluster known as Abell 2142. The cluster is six million light years across and contains hundreds of galaxies and enough gas to make a thousand more. It is one of the most massive objects in the universe. Galaxy clusters grow to vast sizes as smaller clusters are pulled inward under the influence of gravity. They collide and merge over the course of billions of years, releasing tremendous amounts of energy that heats the cluster gas to 100 million degrees Celsius. The Chandra data provides the first detailed look at the late stages of this merger process. Previously, scientists had used the German-US Roentgensatellite to produce a broad brush picture of the cluster. The elongated shape of the bright cloud suggested that two clouds were in the process of coalescing into one, but the details remained unclear. Chandra is able to measure variations of temperature, density, and pressure with unprecedented resolution. "Now we can begin to understand the physics of these mergers, which are among the most energetic events in the universe," said Markevitch. "The pressure and density maps of the cluster show a sharp boundary that can only exist in the moving environment of a

  2. EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXCAVATION OF EAST (FRONT) BASEMENT WELL AND DRAINAGE SYSTEM, WITH ARCHED ENTRY INTO BASEMENT UNDER FRONT ENTRY IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTH (NOTE GALLETING IN BRICK FOUNDATION) - Belair, Tulip Grove Drive, Belair-at-Bowie, Bowie, Prince George's County, MD

  3. 6. VIEW OF CONNECTING WALL BETWEEN FRONT AND REAR ROOMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF CONNECTING WALL BETWEEN FRONT AND REAR ROOMS ON FIRST FLOOR, SHOWING ODDLY PROPORTIONED CLASSIC REVIVAL MANTLE IN FRONT ROOM; LOOKING WEST. - Manlius Thomas House, 125 North Mulberry Street, Georgetown, Scott County, KY

  4. TRACES OF ORIGINAL PARTITIONS AT JUNCTURE OF FRONT ROOM, REAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRACES OF ORIGINAL PARTITIONS AT JUNCTURE OF FRONT ROOM, REAR ROOM AND HALL, SECOND FLOOR. ALSO SHOWS ORIGINAL STUCCO CORNICE OF FRONT AND REAR ROOMS (LEFT) AND HALL (RIGHT) - Kid-Chandler House, 323 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. 253. 441 SOUTH NINETEENTH STREET, WEST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    253. 441 SOUTH NINETEENTH STREET, WEST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE, AND 1829, SOUTH FRONT AND WEST SIDE, TOWARD NORTHEAST - Russell Neighborhood, Bounded by Congress & Esquire Alley, Fifteenth & Twenty-first Streets, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  6. 7. VIEW OF CONNECTING WALL BETWEEN FRONT AND REAR ROOMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF CONNECTING WALL BETWEEN FRONT AND REAR ROOMS OF SECOND FLOOR, SHOWING SIMPLE GREEK REVIVAL MANTLE. LOOKING WEST; TAKEN FROM FRONT ROOM. - Manlius Thomas House, 125 North Mulberry Street, Georgetown, Scott County, KY

  7. 1. VIEW NORTHWEST SHOWING THE SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTHWEST SHOWING THE SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION OF THE LOG GRANARY AND THE EAST (FRONT) ELEVATION OF THE FRAME GRANARY (DE-221-C) - Achmester, Log Granary, Road 429, Route 896 vicinity, Armstrong, New Castle County, DE

  8. 1. GENERAL VIEW, FRONT VIEW. A WOOD ENCLOSURE ONCE OCCUPIED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW, FRONT VIEW. A WOOD ENCLOSURE ONCE OCCUPIED THE UPPER PART OF THE FRONT ELEVATION, AS INDICATED BY THE PRESENCE OF CANTILEVER BEAMS - Stone Barn, Stoopville Road, Stoopville, Bucks County, PA

  9. 2. LAUNCH CONTROL SUPPORT BUILDING WEST FRONT AND VEHICLE STORAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. LAUNCH CONTROL SUPPORT BUILDING WEST FRONT AND VEHICLE STORAGE BUILDING SOUTHWEST FRONT. VIEW TO EAST. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  10. 2. VIEW SOUTHEAST, WEST FRONT OF BUILDINGS 25. 26; NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHEAST, WEST FRONT OF BUILDINGS 25. 26; NORTH FRONT OF BUILDING 24: ROOF GABLE OF BUILDING 27 - U.S. Plant Introduction Station, Soil Conservation Service Cluster, 11601 Old Pond Road, Glenn Dale, Prince George's County, MD

  11. View of the yacht club facing south from Front Street. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the yacht club facing south from Front Street. Harbor storage building and restrooms are on the left. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  12. 11. Front elevation of building 101, administration, recreation, and storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Front elevation of building 101, administration, recreation, and storage building, showing front sentry box on far right, looking west - Nike Missile Battery MS-40, County Road No. 260, Farmington, Dakota County, MN

  13. Security Station and Front Entrance to hospital property, looking northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Security Station and Front Entrance to hospital property, looking northeast - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Security Station & Front Gate, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  14. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall... fork test, § 1512.18(k)(1), without visible evidence of fracture. Sidewalk bicycles need not meet...

  15. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall... fork test, § 1512.18(k)(1), without visible evidence of fracture. Sidewalk bicycles need not meet...

  16. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall... fork test, § 1512.18(k)(1), without visible evidence of fracture. Sidewalk bicycles need not meet...

  17. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall... fork test, § 1512.18(k)(1), without visible evidence of fracture. Sidewalk bicycles need not meet...

  18. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall... fork test, § 1512.18(k)(1), without visible evidence of fracture. Sidewalk bicycles need not meet...

  19. A cytogenetic and comparative map of camelid chromosome 36 and the minute in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Avila, Felipe; Baily, Malorie P; Merriwether, David A; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Rubes, Jiři; Kutzler, Michelle A; Chowdhary, Renuka; Janečka, Jan; Raudsepp, Terje

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in camelid genomics have provided draft sequence assemblies and the first comparative and gene maps for the dromedary (CDR) and the alpaca (LPA). However, no map information is currently available for the smallest camelid autosome-chr36. The chromosome is also of clinical interest because of its involvement in the minute chromosome syndrome (MCS) in infertile alpacas. Here, we developed molecular markers for camelid chr36 by direct sequencing CDR36 and LPA minute and by bioinformatics analysis of alpaca unplaced sequence scaffolds. We constructed a cytogenetic map for chr36 in the alpaca, llama, and dromedary and showed its homology to human chromosome 7 (HSA7) at 49.8-55.5 Mb. The chr36 map comprised seven markers, including two genes-ZPBP and WVC2. Comparative status of HSA7 was further refined by cytogenetic mapping of 16 HSA7 orthologs in camelid chromosomes 7 and 18 and by the analysis of HSA7-conserved synteny blocks across 11 vertebrate species. Finally, mapping chr36 markers in infertile alpacas confirmed that the minute chromosome was a derivative of chr36, but the small size was not a result of a large deletion or a translocation. Instead, cytogenetic mapping of 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNA genes (nucleolus organizer region (NOR)) revealed that the size difference between chr36 homologs in infertile alpacas was due to a heterozygous presence of NOR, whereas chr36 in fertile alpacas had no NOR. We theorized that the heterozygous NOR might affect chr36 pairing, recombination, and segregation in meiosis and, thus fertility. PMID:25634498

  20. Helicity amplitudes on the light-front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz Santiago, Christian A.

    Significant progress has been made recently in the field of helicity amplitudes. Currently there are on-shell recursion relations with shifted complex momenta, geometric interpretations of amplitudes and gauge invariant off-shell amplitudes. All this points to helicity amplitudes being a rich field with much more to say. In this work we take initial steps in understanding amplitudes through the light-front formalism for the first time. We begin by looking at crossing symmetry. In the light-front it is not obvious that crossing symmetry should be present as there are non-local energy denominators that mix energies of different states. Nevertheless, we develop a systematic approach to relate, for example, 1 → N gluon processes to 2 → N -- 1 processes. Using this method, we give a perturbative proof of crossing symmetry on the light-front. One important caveat is that the proof requires the amplitudes to be on-shell. We also saw that the analytic continuation from outgoing to incoming particle produces a phase that's dependent on the choice of polarizations. Next, we reproduce the Parke-Taylor amplitudes. For this purpose we found a recursion relation for an off-shell object called the fragmentation function. This recursion relies on the factorization property of the fragmentation functions, and it becomes apparent that this recursion is the light-front analog of the Berends-Giele recursion relation. We also found this object's connection to off-shell and on-shell amplitudes. The solution for the off-shell amplitude, which does reproduce the Parke-Taylor amplitudes in the on-shell limit, turns out to be very interesting. It can be written as a linear sum of off-shell objects with the same structure as MHV amplitudes. Finally, we look at the Wilson line approach to generate gauge invariant off-shell amplitudes. It turns out that the exact same recursion relation appears on both frameworks, thereby providing the interpretation that our recursion relation has it

  1. Shock front velocity measurements in a T-tube plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujičić, B.; Ciršan, M.; Djurović, S.; Mijatović, Z.

    2002-12-01

    In the sense of investigation of T-tube shock front influence to the material surfaces, we analysed dependence of shock front velocity on deposited electric energy in capacitor bank i.e. applied voltage to discharge electrodes. A simple, cheap and reliable method for the shock front velocity determination by using a photomultiplier and oscilloscope is described in this paper.

  2. 11. VIEW NORTH, SOUTH FRONT OF MAIN OFFICE UNIT (BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW NORTH, SOUTH FRONT OF MAIN OFFICE UNIT (BUILDING I, 2); SOUTH AND EAST FRONTS OF SEED STORAGE BUILDING (BUILDING 21); EAST FRONT OF GREENHOUSE #1 (BUILDING 5) - U.S. Plant Introduction Station, 11601 Old Pond Road, Glenn Dale, Prince George's County, MD

  3. Using minute ventilation for ambulatory estimation of additional heart rate.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, F H; Roth, W T

    1998-09-01

    Both physical activity and emotion produce physiological activation. The emotional component of heart rate (HR) can be estimated as the additional HR (aHR) above that predicted by O2 consumption. Our innovation was to substitute minute ventilation (V) for O2 consumption, calculating aHR from individual relations between V and HR during an exercise test. We physiologically monitored 28 flight phobics and 15 non-anxious controls while walking (leaving the hospital, entering a plane), and during a commercial flight. Raw HR did not differ between phobics and controls when leaving the hospital (118/114 bpm) or entering the plane (117/110 bpm). However, although aHR was not different when leaving the hospital (7.0/8.6 bpm), it was significantly greater when entering the plane (17.5/9.9 bpm), accurately reflecting the increased subjective anxiety of the phobics. V was not higher in phobics than controls during any condition, suggesting an absence of hyperventilation in the phobics. The results demonstrate the utility of our method for analyzing HR in people whose stress occurs when they are physically active. PMID:9792490

  4. A 12 MINUTE ORBITAL PERIOD DETACHED WHITE DWARF ECLIPSING BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Warren R.; Kilic, Mukremin; Kenyon, Scott J.; Hermes, J. J.; Winget, D. E.; Prieto, Carlos Allende E-mail: mkilic@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jjhermes@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: callende@iac.es

    2011-08-10

    We have discovered a detached pair of white dwarfs (WDs) with a 12.75 minute orbital period and a 1315 km s{sup -1} radial velocity amplitude. We measure the full orbital parameters of the system using its light curve, which shows ellipsoidal variations, Doppler boosting, and primary and secondary eclipses. The primary is a 0.25 M{sub sun} tidally distorted helium WD, only the second tidally distorted WD known. The unseen secondary is a 0.55 M{sub sun} carbon-oxygen WD. The two WDs will come into contact in 0.9 Myr due to loss of energy and angular momentum via gravitational wave radiation. Upon contact the systems may merge (yielding a rapidly spinning massive WD), form a stable interacting binary, or possibly explode as an underluminous Type Ia supernova. The system currently has a gravitational wave strain of 10{sup -22}, about 10,000 times larger than the Hulse-Taylor pulsar; this system would be detected by the proposed Laser Interferometer Space Antenna gravitational wave mission in the first week of operation. This system's rapid change in orbital period will provide a fundamental test of general relativity.

  5. Critical Teaching in Higher Education: An Interview with the Front Range Critical Studies Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaren, Peter

    1996-01-01

    The Front Range Critical Studies Group, comprised of four California State University teacher educators, aims to provide a scholarly, informal forum for interdisciplinary discussion of theoretical, political, and cultural issues. The group facilitates collegial scholar/student relationships, promotes enlightened discussion through lecture series…

  6. Testing and Feedback Effects on Front-End Control over Later Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ruthann C.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2 experiments, we explored differences in cognitive control at retrieval on a final test to better understand the mechanisms underlying the powerful boost in recall of previously tested information. Memory retrieval can be enhanced by front-end control processes that regulate the scope of retrieval or by later processes that monitor retrieval…

  7. Multiple 60-Minute Massages per Week Offer Relief for Chronic Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... X Y Z Multiple 60-Minute Massages per Week Offer Relief for Chronic Neck Pain Share: © Bob ... study found that multiple 60-minute massages per week were more effective than fewer or shorter sessions ...

  8. 12 CFR 311.8 - Transcripts and minutes of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Information Act, under the provisions of 12 CFR part 309, Disclosure of Information. ... RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF MEETINGS OF THE CORPORATION'S BOARD OF DIRECTORS § 311.8... open to public observation. (d) Procedures for inspecting or copying available material. (1)...

  9. 12 CFR 311.8 - Transcripts and minutes of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Information Act, under the provisions of 12 CFR part 309, Disclosure of Information. ... RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF MEETINGS OF THE CORPORATION'S BOARD OF DIRECTORS § 311.8... open to public observation. (d) Procedures for inspecting or copying available material. (1)...

  10. Evaluation of 10-minute versus 30-minute tourniquet time for intravenous regional limb perfusion with amikacin sulfate in standing sedated horses.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, I; Dechant, J E; Nieto, J E

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the article is to determine the synovial fluid concentrations of amikacin sulfate (AS) after performing an intravenous regional limb perfusion (IVRLP) with the tourniquet in place for 10 minutes and compare this with 30 minutes. This is a randomised crossover experimental design. Animals were seven healthy adult horses. Horses underwent two IVRLP procedures in a randomised, crossover design. The horses received IVRLP with 2 g AS diluted to 60 ml using 0.9% saline in the cephalic vein of alternate limbs with the tourniquet in place for either 10 or 30 minutes, with a washout period between procedures. Movement of the horses was recorded. Synovial fluid was collected from the radiocarpal and metacarpophalangeal joints at five minutes and 24 hours after IVRLP, and amikacin concentration was compared between groups. Amikacin was quantified by a fluorescence polarisation immunoassay. There was no significant difference between the synovial amikacin concentrations noted between 10 minute and 30 minute IVRLP. Horses in the 30 minute tourniquet application group demonstrated more movement than the 10 minute tourniquet group. There was a significant difference between groups with regard to the systemic venous blood concentration of amikacin one minute after tourniquet release with mean systemic venous blood concentrations of AS being higher (P=0.001) in the 10 minute group. Ten minute application of a wide elastic tourniquet may be sufficient when performing IVRLP in standing sedated horses. PMID:27076528

  11. A new approach to front-end electronics interfacing in the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Borga, A.; Boterenbrood, H.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Drake, G.; Dönszelmann, M.; Francis, D.; Gorini, B.; Lanni, F.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Levinson, L.; Narevicius, J.; Roich, A.; Ryu, S.; Schreuder, F.; Schumacher, J.; Vandelli, W.; Vermeulen, J.; Wu, W.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    For new detector and trigger systems to be installed in the ATLAS experiment after LHC Run 2, a new approach will be followed for Front-End electronics interfacing. The FELIX (Front-End LInk eXchange) system will function as gateway connecting: on one side to detector and trigger electronics links, as well as providing timing and trigger information; and on the other side a commodity switched network built using standard technology (either Ethernet or Infiniband). The new approach is described in this paper, and results achieved so far are presented.

  12. Novel Perspectives from Light-Front QCD, Super-Conformal Algebra, and Light-Front Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-12-01

    Light-Front Quantization – Dirac’s “Front Form” – provides a physical, frame-independent formalism for hadron dynamics and structure. Observables such as structure functions, transverse momentum distributions, and distribution amplitudes are defined from the hadronic LFWFs. One obtains new insights into the hadronic mass scale, the hadronic spectrum, and the functional form of the QCD running coupling in the nonperturbative domain using light-front holography. In addition, superconformal algebra leads to remarkable supersymmetric relations between mesons and baryons. I also discuss evidence that the antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is nonuniversal; i.e., flavor dependent, and why shadowing and antishadowing phenomena may be incompatible with the momentum and other sum rules for the nuclear parton distribution functions.

  13. Marine fronts at the continental shelves of austral South America - Physical and ecological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acha, Eduardo M.; Mianzan, Hermes W.; Guerrero, Raúl A.; Favero, Marco; Bava, José

    2004-01-01

    Neritic fronts are very abundant in austral South America, covering several scales of space and time. However, this region is poorly studied from a systemic point of view. Our main goal is to develop a holistic view of physical and ecological patterns and processes at austral South America, regarding frontal arrangements. Satellite information (sea surface temperature and chlorophyll concentration), and historical hydrographic data were employed to show fronts. We compiled all existing evidence (physical and biological) about fronts to identify regions defined by similar types of coastal fronts and to characterize them. Fronts in austral South America can be arranged in six zones according to their location, main forcing, key physical variables, seasonality, and enrichment mechanisms. Four zones, the Atlantic upwelling zone; the temperate estuarine zone; the Patagonian tidal zone and the Argentine shelf-break zone, occupy most of the Atlantic side. The Chile-Peru upwelling zone, on the Pacific, is the largest and best-known region. The Patagonian cold estuarine zone encompasses the tip of South America, connecting the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, and remains poorly studied. When observed at a continental scale, the Pacific coast dominated by two large frontal zones appears simplest than the Atlantic coast in terms of frontal richness. The extension of the continental shelf in the Atlantic coast allows for the development of a great diversity of mesoscale fronts. Though frontal zones we defined are extensive areas of the continental shelves, fronts inside the zones are comparatively small areas. Even so, they play a paramount role in ecological processes, allowing for high biological production; offering feeding and/or reproductive habitats for fishes, squids, and birds; acting as retention areas for larvae of benthic species; and promoting establishment of benthic invertebrates that benefit from the organic production in the frontal area.

  14. Functional description of APS beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.

    1993-02-01

    Traditional synchrotron sources were designed to produce bending magnet radiation and have proven to be an essential scientific tool. Currently, a new generation of synchrotron sources is being built that will be able to accommodate a large number of insertion device (ID) and high quality bending magnet (BM) sources. One example is the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. The research and development effort at the APS is designed to fully develop the potential of this new generation of synchrotron sources. Of the 40 straight sections in the APS storage ring, 34 will be available for IDs. The remaining six sections are reserved for the storage ring hardware and diagnostics. Although the ring incorporates 80 BMs, only 40 of them can be used to extract radiation. The accelerator hardware shadows five of these 40 bending magnets, so the maximum number of BM sources on the lattice is 35. Generally, a photon beamline consists of four functional sections. The first section is the ID or the BM, which provides the radiation source. The second section, which is immediately outside the storage ring but inside a concrete shielding tunnel, is the front end, which is designed to control, define, and/or confine the x-ray beam. In the case of the APS, the front ends are designed to confine the photon beam. The third section, just outside the concrete shielding tunnel and on the experimental floor, is the first optics enclosure, which contains optics to filter and monochromatize the photon beam. The fourth section of a beamline consists of beam transports, additional optics, and experiment stations to do the scientific investigations. This document describes only the front ends of the APS beamlines.

  15. Analysis of 1-Minute Potentially Available Fluoride from Dentifrice

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Clifton M; Holahan, Erin C; Schmuck, Burton D

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports found that some fluoride-containing dentifrices do not release effective concentrations of fluoride during brushing. Failure to release fluoride can be due to dentifrice matrix components that interfere with the solubilization of the fluoride salts during brushing. A new generation of dentifrices has the capability to precipitate beneficial fluoride salts during tooth brushing. Therefore, a method that assesses the potentially available fluoride during the 1-minute brushing is needed. A new filter-paper absorption method to assess the 1-min bioavailable fluoride concentration was developed to meet this need. This method utilizes coiled filter paper that rapidly absorbs the aqueous phase of the dentifrice slurry followed by centrifugation to recover that fluid for fluoride measurement via fluoride ion-selective electrode. The analytical method was used to successfully determine the total fluoride and 1-min bioavailable fluoride in eight dentifrice products containing sodium fluoride (NaF), disodium monofluorophosphate (Na2FPO3, MFP), stannous fluoride (SnF2), or NaF with amorphous calcium phosphate (NaF + ACP). The results showed that some of the dentifrices tested had significantly lower potentially available fluoride than the total fluoride. For a MFP-containing sample, aged seven years past its expiry date, there was significant reduction in the bioavailable fluoride compared to MFP products that were not aged. Other than the aged MFP and the SnF2-containing samples the bioavailable fluoride for all products tested had at least 80 % of the label fluoride concentration. The filter paper absorption method yielded reproducible results for the products tested with MFP samples showing the largest variations. PMID:25821392

  16. [Xenon CT CBF mapping derived from two minutes inhalation].

    PubMed

    Toshima, R; Toyohara, K; Ebisawa, T; Ishikawa, K; Karashima, H; Shimojo, S; Miyahara, T

    1988-04-01

    Although xenon enhanced CT method for local cerebral blood flow measurement has been brought into a clinical practice, the technique has inherent limitations including anesthetic effects and expensive cost of xenon by a large consumption. To overcome these problems a modified method with a short-duration inhalation was developed and its validity was attested. Siemens Somatom SF with a resolution of 256 X 256 pixels and a scan time of 10 seconds was used. The subjects inhaled 50% Xe/O2 gas mixture from an apparatus consisted of Douglas bag and an open circuit. Xenon concentration in the expired gas was continuously monitored and estimated for arterial blood concentration by using a hematocrit correction. PaCO2 was monitored throughout the study. At the starting point and the endpoint of the inhalation two scans were performed respectively. Thus obtained four images were processed for CT noise cancellation, summation and subtraction to produce an in vivo autoradiography image. Local CBF was calculated from equations derived from the autoradiographic technique with a fixed partition coefficient of lambda = 1. Computer simulation studies were performed to find the optimal scan point to obtain an autoradiographic image and to estimate the calculation errors of this method. One minute and forty-five seconds was found to be the optimal scan point to gain an autoradiographic image in view of a balance between linearity of CBF/enhancement curve and total amount of tissue enhancement. The theoretical errors due to the assumption for a fixed partition coefficient were calculated to be 8% underestimation for gray matter and 5% overestimation for white matter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3401410

  17. Murine Double Minute-2 Inhibition Ameliorates Established Crescentic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Romoli, Simone; Desai, Jyaysi; Honarpisheh, Mohammad Mohsen; Kumar, Santhosh V; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Thomasova, Dana

    2016-06-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis is characterized by glomerular necroinflammation and crescent formation. Its treatment includes unspecific and toxic agents; therefore, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is required. The E3-ubiquitin ligase murine double minute (MDM)-2 is a nonredundant element of NF-κB signaling and the negative regulator of tumor suppressor gene TP53-mediated cell cycle arrest and cell death. We hypothesized that the MDM2 would drive crescentic glomerulonephritis by NF-κB-dependent glomerular inflammation and by p53-dependent parietal epithelial cell hyperproliferation. Indeed, the pre-emptive MDM2 blockade by nutlin-3a ameliorated all aspects of crescentic glomerulonephritis. MDM2 inhibition had identical protective effects in Trp53-deficient mice, with the exception of crescent formation, which was not influenced by nutlin-3a treatment. In vitro experiments confirmed the contribution of MDM2 for induction of NF-κB-dependent cytokines in murine glomerular endothelial cells and for p53-dependent parietal epithelial cell proliferation. To evaluate MDM2 blockade as a potential therapeutic intervention in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, we treated mice with established glomerulonephritis with nutlin-3a. Delayed onset of nutlin-3a treatment was equally protective as the pre-emptive treatment in abrogating crescentic glomerulonephritis. Together, the pathogenic effects of MDM2 are twofold, that is, p53-independent NF-κB activation increasing intraglomerular inflammation and p53-dependent parietal epithelial cell hyperplasia and crescent formation. We therefore propose MDM2 blockade as a potential novel therapeutic strategy in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. PMID:27102769

  18. Covariance Constraints for Light Front Wave Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D.

    2016-06-01

    Light front wave functions (LFWFs) are often utilized to model parton distributions and form factors where their transverse and longitudinal momenta are tied to each other in some manner that is often guided by convenience. On the other hand, the cross talk of transverse and longitudinal momenta is governed by Poincaré symmetry and thus popular LFWF models are often not usable to model more intricate quantities such as generalized parton distributions. In this contribution a closer look to this issue is given and it is shown how to overcome the issue for two-body LFWFs.

  19. Light-Front Perturbation Without Spurious Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przeszowski, Jerzy A.; Dzimida-Chmielewska, Elżbieta; Żochowski, Jan

    2016-07-01

    A new form of the light front Feynman propagators is proposed. It contains no energy denominators. Instead the dependence on the longitudinal subinterval x^2_L = 2 x+ x- is explicit and a new formalism for doing the perturbative calculations is invented. These novel propagators are implemented for the one-loop effective potential and various 1-loop 2-point functions for a massive scalar field. The consistency with results for the standard covariant Feynman diagrams is obtained and no spurious singularities are encountered at all. Some remarks on the calculations with fermion and gauge fields in QED and QCD are added.

  20. Light-Front Perturbation Without Spurious Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przeszowski, Jerzy A.; Dzimida-Chmielewska, Elżbieta; Żochowski, Jan

    2016-03-01

    A new form of the light front Feynman propagators is proposed. It contains no energy denominators. Instead the dependence on the longitudinal subinterval x^2_L = 2 x+ x- is explicit and a new formalism for doing the perturbative calculations is invented. These novel propagators are implemented for the one-loop effective potential and various 1-loop 2-point functions for a massive scalar field. The consistency with results for the standard covariant Feynman diagrams is obtained and no spurious singularities are encountered at all. Some remarks on the calculations with fermion and gauge fields in QED and QCD are added.

  1. Nonperturbative calculations in light-front QED

    SciTech Connect

    Chabysheva, Sophia S.

    2010-12-22

    The methods of light-front quantization and Pauli-Villars regularization are applied to a nonperturbative calculation of the dressed-electron state in quantum electrodynamics. This is intended as a test of the methods in a gauge theory, as a precursor to possible methods for the nonperturbative solution of quantum chromodynamics. The electron state is truncated to include at most two photons and no positrons in the Fock basis, and the wave functions of the dressed state are used to compute the electrons's anomalous magnetic moment. A choice of regularization that preserves the chiral symmetry of the massless limit is critical for the success of the calculation.

  2. Inspiratory muscle fatigue affects latissimus dorsi but not pectoralis major activity during arms only front crawl sprinting.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch; Tasker, Louise; Bostanci, Ozgur

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) affects the muscle activity of the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major during maximal arms only front crawl swimming. Eight collegiate swimmers were recruited to perform 2 maximal 20-second arms only front crawl sprints in a swimming flume. Both sprints were performed on the same day, and IMF was induced 30 minutes after the first (control) sprint. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures (PImax and PEmax, respectively) were measured before and after each sprint. The median frequency (MDF) of the electromyographic signal burst was recorded from the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major during each 20-second sprint along with stroke rate and breathing frequency. Median frequency was assessed in absolute units (Hz) and then referenced to the start of the control sprint for normalization. After IMF inducement, stroke rate increased from 56 ± 4 to 59 ± 5 cycles per minute, and latissimus dorsi MDF fell from 67 ± 11 Hz at the start of the sprint to 61 ± 9 Hz at the end. No change was observed in the MDF of the latissimus dorsi during the control sprint. Conversely, the MDF of the pectoralis major shifted to lower frequencies during both sprints but was unaffected by IMF. As the latter induced fatigue in the latissimus dorsi, which was not otherwise apparent during maximal arms only control sprinting, the presence of IMF affects the activity of the latissimus dorsi during front crawl sprinting. PMID:24402450

  3. Increased zooplankton PAH concentrations across hydrographic fronts in the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chin-Chang; Ko, Fung-Chi; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Chen, Kuo-Shu; Wu, Jian-Ming; Chiang, Hsin-Lun; Peng, Sen-Chueh; Santschi, Peter H

    2014-06-15

    The Changjiang has transported large quantities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the East China Sea (ECS), but information of these pollutants in zooplankton is limited. To understand PAHs pollution in zooplankton in the ECS, total concentrations of PAHs in zooplankton from surface waters were measured. Values of PAHs ranged from 2 to 3500 ng m(-3) in the ECS, with highest PAHs levels located at the salinity front between the Changjiang Diluted Water (CDW) and the mid-shelf waters. In contrast, concentrations of zooplankton PAHs in the mid-shelf and outer-shelf waters were significantly lower (2-23 ng m(-3)) than those in the CDW. These results demonstrate that PAHs are conspicuously accumulated in zooplankton at the salinity front between the CDW and the mid-shelf waters. These higher levels of PAHs in zooplankton at the salinity front may be further biomagnified in marine organisms of higher trophic levels through their feeding activities. PMID:24775063

  4. Report on the value engineering workshop on APS beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.

    1993-01-01

    A formal value engineering evaluation process was developed to address the front end components of the beamlines for the Advanced Photon Source (APS). This process (described in Section 2) involved an information phase, a creative phase, a judgment phase, a development phase, and a recommendation phase. Technical experts from other national laboratories and industry were invited to a two-day Value Engineering Workshop on November 5-6, 1992. The results of this Workshop are described in Section 4. Following the Workshop, various actions by the APS staff led to the redesign of the front end components, which are presented in Sections 5 and 6. The cost benefit analysis is presented in Section 7. It is important of realize that an added benefit of the Workshop was to obtain numerous design evaluations and enhancements of the front end components by experts in the field. As the design work proceeds to Title II completion, the APS staff is including many of these suggestions.

  5. The ontology model of FrontCRM framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiardjo, Eko K.; Perdana, Wira; Franshisca, Felicia

    2013-03-01

    Adoption and implementation of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is not merely a technological installation, but the emphasis is more on the application of customer-centric philosophy and culture as a whole. CRM must begin at the level of business strategy, the only level that thorough organizational changes are possible to be done. Changes agenda can be directed to each departmental plans, and supported by information technology. Work processes related to CRM concept include marketing, sales, and services. FrontCRM is developed as framework to guide in identifying business processes related to CRM in which based on the concept of strategic planning approach. This leads to processes and practices identification in every process area related to marketing, sales, and services. The Ontology model presented on this paper by means serves as tools to avoid framework misunderstanding, to define practices systematically within process area and to find CRM software features related to those practices.

  6. Two-Dimensional Massless Light Front Fields and Solvable Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinovic̆, L'ubomír; Grangé, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Quantum field theory formulated in terms of light front (LF) variables has a few attractive as well as some puzzling features. The latter hindered a wider acceptance of LF methods. In two space-time dimensions, it has been a long-standing puzzle how to correctly quantize massless fields, in particular fermions. Here we show that two-dimensional massless LF fields (scalar and fermion) can be recovered in a simple way as limits of the corresponding massive fields and thereby quantized without any loss of physical information. Bosonization of the fermion field then follows in a straightforward manner and the solvable models can be studied directly in the LF theory. We sketch the LF operator solution of the Thirring-Wess model and also point out the closeness of the massless LF fields to those of conformal field theory.

  7. Propagation of BBFs and Dipolarization Fronts in the Global MHD simulation of February 27, 2009 Substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Y.; Raeder, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Gilson, M. L.; Runov, A.

    2010-12-01

    A global MHD simulation has been performed to investigate the THEMIS substorm on February 27, 2009. During this substorm the conjugated observations from the space and on the THEMIS ground observatories are available. The location and time of this substorm onset can be determined based on these observations. The initial auroral brightening is found at around 07:49 UT in the field of view of Fort Smith station (FSMI), with a pre-existing auroral arc located equatorward. A couple minutes later, the in situ observations recorded a sharp dipolarization front sunward passing through THEMIS spacecraft, which travels almost 10 RE in the magnetotail. In this study our global MHD model, i.e., OpenGGCM, driven by the real-time solar wind/IMF conditions, is able to reproduce the key features of these substorm signatures, including the auroral breakup at FSMI with the same onset time as the observations, and a strong earthward Bursty Bulk Flow (BBF) and dipolarization fronts that cause the substorm onset signatures. It is found in the simulation that the auroral breakup is caused by the strong flow shear and the flow vortices which form as the BBF moves earthward. Investigation of the tail BBF and its dipolarization front (DF) reveals that the bipolar change of the Bz component ahead of the DF can be produced by the interaction between two distinct plasmas from separate X lines: the anti-sunward moving southward flux tubes in the tailward flows emanating from an inner magnetic reconnection region, and the sunward traveling dipolarized tubes within the front of a strong earthward BBF that originates in a mid-tail reconnection region. The rebound and oscillations of the intruding BBF reported by the recent THEMIS observations are also seen in the simulation when the BBF encounters the high-pressure inner magnetosphere.

  8. Geochemical characterization of the Mt. Harvard 15-minute quadrangle, Colorado, using NURE data

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    The geochemical characteristics of the Mt. Harvard 15-minute quadrangle, Colorado, were identified using data from National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) detailed and reconnaissance geochemical and geophysical surveys. Statistical and cartographic techniques developed during the NURE program were applied to the data, and the results were compared with published geologic mapping, geologic studies, and mineral-occurrence information. Interpretations based on these comparisons resulted in the identification of distinct geochemical environments which represent differing rock types, geologic structures, and mineral-occurrence or -deposit areas. Fifteen areas that have geochemical characteristics indicative of mineral deposits were delineated in this study. Nine of the areas contain elemental data that indicate known and potential base- and precious-metal deposits; four of the areas contain elemental data indicative of uranium deposits; and two of the areas contain data indicative of pegmatite deposits.

  9. Room-temperature quantum bit storage exceeding 39 minutes using ionized donors in silicon-28.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Kamyar; Simmons, Stephanie; Salvail, Jeff Z; Dluhy, Phillip; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolai V; Becker, Peter; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Morton, John J L; Thewalt, Mike L W

    2013-11-15

    Quantum memories capable of storing and retrieving coherent information for extended times at room temperature would enable a host of new technologies. Electron and nuclear spin qubits using shallow neutral donors in semiconductors have been studied extensively but are limited to low temperatures (≲10 kelvin); however, the nuclear spins of ionized donors have the potential for high-temperature operation. We used optical methods and dynamical decoupling to realize this potential for an ensemble of phosphorous-31 donors in isotopically purified silicon-28 and observed a room-temperature coherence time of over 39 minutes. We further showed that a coherent spin superposition can be cycled from 4.2 kelvin to room temperature and back, and we report a cryogenic coherence time of 3 hours in the same system. PMID:24233718

  10. Universal Millimeter-Wave Radar Front End

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Raul M.

    2010-01-01

    A quasi-optical front end allows any arbitrary polarization to be transmitted by controlling the timing, amplitude, and phase of the two input ports. The front end consists of two independent channels horizontal and vertical. Each channel has two ports transmit and receive. The transmit signal is linearly polarized so as to pass through a periodic wire grid. It is then propagated through a ferrite Faraday rotator, which rotates the polarization state 45deg. The received signal is propagated through the Faraday rotator in the opposite direction, undergoing a further 45 of polarization rotation due to the non-reciprocal action of the ferrite under magnetic bias. The received signal is now polarized at 90deg relative to the transmit signal. This signal is now reflected from the wire grid and propagated to the receive port. The horizontal and vertical channels are propagated through, or reflected from, another wire grid. This design is an improvement on the state of the art in that any transmit signal polarization can be chosen in whatever sequence desired. Prior systems require switching of the transmit signal from the amplifier, either mechanically or by using high-power millimeter-wave switches. This design can have higher reliability, lower mass, and more flexibility than mechanical switching systems, as well as higher reliability and lower losses than systems using high-power millimeter-wave switches.

  11. Identifying Lagrangian fronts with favourable fishery conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.; Budyansky, M. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.

    2014-08-01

    Lagrangian fronts (LFs) in the ocean are defined as boundaries between surface waters with strongly different Lagrangian properties. They can be accurately detected in a given velocity field by computing synoptic maps for displacements of synthetic tracers and other Lagrangian indicators. We use Pacific saury catch and location data for a number of commercial fishery seasons in the region of the northwest Pacific with one of the richest fishery in the world. It is shown statistically that the saury fishing grounds with maximal catches are not randomly distributed over the region but located mainly along the sharp LFs where productive cold waters of the Oyashio Current, warmer waters of the southern branch of the Soya Current, and waters of warm-core Kuroshio rings converge. Computation of those fronts in altimetric geostrophic velocity fields both in the years with the First and Second Oyashio Intrusions shows that in spite of different oceanographic conditions LF locations may serve as good indicators of potential fishing grounds. Possible biophysical reasons for saury aggregation near sharp LFs are discussed. We propose a mechanism for effective export of nutrient rich waters based on stretching of material lines in the vicinity of hyperbolic objects in the ocean. The developed method, based on identifying LFs in any velocity fields, is quite general and may be applied to find potential fishing grounds for the other pelagic fish.

  12. Shearlet-based detection of flame fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenhofer, Rafael; Kiefer, Johannes; King, Emily J.

    2016-03-01

    Identifying and characterizing flame fronts is the most common task in the computer-assisted analysis of data obtained from imaging techniques such as planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), laser Rayleigh scattering (LRS), or particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). We present Complex Shearlet-Based Ridge and Edge Measure (CoShREM), a novel edge and ridge (line) detection algorithm based on complex-valued wavelet-like analyzing functions—so-called complex shearlets—displaying several traits useful for the extraction of flame fronts. In addition to providing a unified approach to the detection of edges and ridges, our method inherently yields estimates of local tangent orientations and local curvatures. To examine the applicability for high-frequency recordings of combustion processes, the algorithm is applied to mock images distorted with varying degrees of noise and real-world PLIF images of both OH and CH radicals. Furthermore, we compare the performance of the newly proposed complex shearlet-based measure to well-established edge and ridge detection techniques such as the Canny edge detector, another shearlet-based edge detector, and the phase congruency measure.

  13. Biomechanics of front and back squat exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braidot, A. A.; Brusa, M. H.; Lestussi, F. E.; Parera, G. P.

    2007-11-01

    Squat constitutes one of the most popular exercises to strengthen the muscles of the lower limbs. It is considered one of the most widely spread exercises for muscle sport training and is part of the competition movements comprised within olympic weight-lifting. In physical rehabilitation, squats are used for muscular recovery after different injuries of the lower limbs, especially the knee. In previous anterior cruciate ligament injuries, the mini-squats are generally used, in a knee flexion motion range from 0° to 50° because in this range the shear forces, the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral compression forces decrease related to greater flexion angles. The aim of this work is to make a comparative bidimensional study of the kinematic and dynamic variables of the excecution of the parallel squat exercise with the front and back bar. It is observed in the knee a better development of energy with the front bar, allowing a better muscular exercise with the same load. The mean power absorbed by the hip with the back bar is considerably greater, associated to the speed of the gesture.

  14. The short-lived (<2 minutes) acceleration of protons to >13 GeV in association with solar flares.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Ken; Shea, Margaret Ann; Smart, Don

    2016-04-01

    There have been 72 occasions in the past 75 years when solar cosmic rays have been accelerated to >1 GeV in association with large solar flares. The largest such so called "ground level enhancement" (GLE) occurred on 23 February, 1956. We have recently gained access to the original real-time photographic record for that GLE obtained by the recording ionization meter located at Huancayo, Peru. The geomagnetic field excludes all cosmic rays <13GeV from this location, and consequently this record provides a record of the arrival at earth of the highly relativistic 13-20 GeV particles accelerated at the sun. While all previous studies have used 6 minute average data, examination shows that the original record is capable of providing 1 minute time resolution of the cosmic ray intensity during the GLE . The resulting dependence of intensity upon time shows considerable detail that was obscured by the coarser time resolution used in the past. Thus (1) The GLE commenced only 3 minutes after the peak flare intensity in Hα , this being consistent with the 4 minute delay associated with propagation along the "Parker" heliospheric field; (2) the cosmic ray intensity rose to within 10% of its peak in 2 minutes; (3) Peak intensity persisted for only 1 minute; and (4) the intensity had decreased to 50% of the peak value 5 minutes after the commencement of the GLE. There being no velocity dispersion at these energies, and little pitch angle scattering, we take the view that the intensity profile at earth is a close representation of the intensity-time profile of these newly accelerated cosmic rays at the sun. If so, these data impose strict tests on any putative acceleration model, and provide information on the physical properties in the vicinity of the source. In particular, the data show that the model must predict (a) that ambient protons can be accelerated to >13GeV in < 2 minutes; (b) that the protons have easy access to open solar fields; and (c) that the acceleration (or

  15. Modelling 1-minute directional observations of the global irradiance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thejll, Peter; Pagh Nielsen, Kristian; Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Direct and diffuse irradiances from the sky has been collected at 1-minute intervals for about a year from the experimental station at the Technical University of Denmark for the IEA project "Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting". These data were gathered by pyrheliometers tracking the Sun, as well as with apertured pyranometers gathering 1/8th and 1/16th of the light from the sky in 45 degree azimuthal ranges pointed around the compass. The data are gathered in order to develop detailed models of the potentially available solar energy and its variations at high temporal resolution in order to gain a more detailed understanding of the solar resource. This is important for a better understanding of the sub-grid scale cloud variation that cannot be resolved with climate and weather models. It is also important for optimizing the operation of active solar energy systems such as photovoltaic plants and thermal solar collector arrays, and for passive solar energy and lighting to buildings. We present regression-based modelling of the observed data, and focus, here, on the statistical properties of the model fits. Using models based on the one hand on what is found in the literature and on physical expectations, and on the other hand on purely statistical models, we find solutions that can explain up to 90% of the variance in global radiation. The models leaning on physical insights include terms for the direct solar radiation, a term for the circum-solar radiation, a diffuse term and a term for the horizon brightening/darkening. The purely statistical model is found using data- and formula-validation approaches picking model expressions from a general catalogue of possible formulae. The method allows nesting of expressions, and the results found are dependent on and heavily constrained by the cross-validation carried out on statistically independent testing and training data-sets. Slightly better fits -- in terms of variance explained -- is found using the purely

  16. Spatially hybrid computations for streamer discharges with generic features of pulled fronts: I. Planar fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chao Ebert, Ute Hundsdorfer, Willem

    2010-01-01

    Streamers are the first stage of sparks and lightning; they grow due to a strongly enhanced electric field at their tips; this field is created by a thin curved space charge layer. These multiple scales are already challenging when the electrons are approximated by densities. However, electron density fluctuations in the leading edge of the front and non-thermal stretched tails of the electron energy distribution (as a cause of X-ray emissions) require a particle model to follow the electron motion. But present computers cannot deal with all electrons in a fully developed streamer. Therefore, super-particle have to be introduced, which leads to wrong statistics and numerical artifacts. The method of choice is a hybrid computation in space where individual electrons are followed in the region of high electric field and low density while the bulk of the electrons is approximated by densities (or fluids). We here develop the hybrid coupling for planar fronts. First, to obtain a consistent flux at the interface between particle and fluid model in the hybrid computation, the widely used classical fluid model is replaced by an extended fluid model. Then the coupling algorithm and the numerical implementation of the spatially hybrid model are presented in detail, in particular, the position of the model interface and the construction of the buffer region. The method carries generic features of pulled fronts that can be applied to similar problems like large deviations in the leading edge of population fronts, etc.

  17. Front Office and Reception; An Approach to Front Office and Reception Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Industry Training Board, Wembley (England).

    This manual is concerned with the tasks and training needs of front office personnel in hotels. After discussion of selection and qualifications of such personnel, the perfect receptionist is described in terms of personality, appearance, and deportment. Then follows a detailed listing of tasks--basic tasks, such as reception, bookkeeping, cash,…

  18. Scanning the Front Range Environment: A Statistical Snapshot of the Front Range Community College Service Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Front Range Community Coll., Westminster, CO.

    This environmental scanning report from Front Range Community College (FRCC) in Colorado examines trends in population, demographics, income, and education in the college's service area. The report begins with Kathleen Cain's essay, "Environmental Scanning," indicating that the four major objectives of environmental scanning are to detect…

  19. Waterspout, Gust Fronts and Associated Cloud Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J.

    1983-01-01

    Nine waterspouts observed on five experimental days during the GATE period of observations are discussed. Primary data used are from 2 aircraft flying in different patterns, one above the other between 30 and 300 m. There is strong evidence associating whirl initiation with cumulus outflow. Computations prepared from estimates of convergence with the region suggest the possibility of vortex generation within 4 minutes. This analysis supports (1) the importance cumulus outflows may have in waterspout initiation and (2) the possibility that sea surface temperature gradients may be important in enabling waterspout development from modest size cumuli.

  20. The gust-front detection and wind-shift algorithms for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermes, Laurie G.; Witt, Arthur; Smith, Steven D.; Klingle-Wilson, Diana; Morris, Dale; Stumpf, Gregory J.; Eilts, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) system was primarily designed to address the operational needs of pilots in the avoidance of low-altitude wind shears upon takeoff and landing at airports. One of the primary methods of wind-shear detection for the TDWR system is the gust-front detection algorithm. The algorithm is designed to detect gust fronts that produce a wind-shear hazard and/or sustained wind shifts. It serves the hazard warning function by providing an estimate of the wind-speed gain for aircraft penetrating the gust front. The gust-front detection and wind-shift algorithms together serve a planning function by providing forecasted gust-front locations and estimates of the horizontal wind vector behind the front, respectively. This information is used by air traffic managers to determine arrival and departure runway configurations and aircraft movements to minimize the impact of wind shifts on airport capacity. This paper describes the gust-front detection and wind-shift algorithms to be fielded in the initial TDWR systems. Results of a quantitative performance evaluation using Doppler radar data collected during TDWR operational demonstrations at the Denver, Kansas City, and Orlando airports are presented. The algorithms were found to be operationally useful by the FAA airport controllers and supervisors.

  1. North Star Ambulatory Assessment, 6-minute walk test and timed items in ambulant boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Elena; Martinelli, Diego; Berardinelli, Angela; Messina, Sonia; D'Amico, Adele; Vasco, Gessica; Main, Marion; Doglio, Luca; Politano, Luisa; Cavallaro, Filippo; Frosini, Silvia; Bello, Luca; Carlesi, Adelina; Bonetti, Anna Maria; Zucchini, Elisabetta; De Sanctis, Roberto; Scutifero, Marianna; Bianco, Flaviana; Rossi, Francesca; Motta, Maria Chiara; Sacco, Annalisa; Donati, Maria Alice; Mongini, Tiziana; Pini, Antonella; Battini, Roberta; Pegoraro, Elena; Pane, Marika; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Bruno, Claudio; Vita, Giuseppe; de Waure, Chiara; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2010-11-01

    The North Star Ambulatory Assessment is a functional scale specifically designed for ambulant boys affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Recently the 6-minute walk test has also been used as an outcome measure in trials in DMD. The aim of our study was to assess a large cohort of ambulant boys affected by DMD using both North Star Assessment and 6-minute walk test. More specifically, we wished to establish the spectrum of findings for each measure and their correlation. This is a prospective multicentric study involving 10 centers. The cohort included 112 ambulant DMD boys of age ranging between 4.10 and 17 years (mean 8.18±2.3 DS). Ninety-one of the 112 were on steroids: 37/91 on intermittent and 54/91 on daily regimen. The scores on the North Star assessment ranged from 6/34 to 34/34. The distance on the 6-minute walk test ranged from 127 to 560.6 m. The time to walk 10 m was between 3 and 15 s. The time to rise from the floor ranged from 1 to 27.5 s. Some patients were unable to rise from the floor. As expected the results changed with age and were overall better in children treated with daily steroids. The North Star assessment had a moderate to good correlation with 6-minute walk test and with timed rising from floor but less with 10 m timed walk/run test. The 6-minute walk test in contrast had better correlation with 10 m timed walk/run test than with timed rising from floor. These findings suggest that a combination of these outcome measures can be effectively used in ambulant DMD boys and will provide information on different aspects of motor function, that may not be captured using a single measure. PMID:20634072

  2. Wave-front measurement errors from restricted concentric subdomains.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, K A; Geary, K

    2001-09-01

    In interferometry and optical testing, system wave-front measurements that are analyzed on a restricted subdomain of the full pupil can include predictable systematic errors. In nearly all cases, the measured rms wave-front error and the magnitudes of the individual aberration polynomial coefficients underestimate the wave-front error magnitudes present in the full-pupil domain. We present an analytic method to determine the relationships between the coefficients of aberration polynomials defined on the full-pupil domain and those defined on a restricted concentric subdomain. In this way, systematic wave-front measurement errors introduced by subregion selection are investigated. Using vector and matrix representations for the wave-front aberration coefficients, we generalize the method to the study of arbitrary input wave fronts and subdomain sizes. While wave-front measurements on a restricted subdomain are insufficient for predicting the wave front of the full-pupil domain, studying the relationship between known full-pupil wave fronts and subdomain wave fronts allows us to set subdomain size limits for arbitrary measurement fidelity. PMID:11551047

  3. Creating a Five-Minute Conversation about Cyberinfrastructure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinkova, Klara; Carvalho, Terezsa; Kerian, Dorette; Knosp, Boyd; Percival, Kent; Yagi, Stan

    2008-01-01

    Cyberinfrastructure is the IT infrastructure that enables scientific inquiry. It anticipates a scientific and scholarly world that is increasingly dependent on information technology. It has many facets, and each institution will need to review its own strengths and weaknesses to decide on areas of concentration. In higher education,…

  4. Speed of fast and slow rupture fronts along frictional interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Scheibert, Julien; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-07-01

    The transition from stick to slip at a dry frictional interface occurs through the breaking of microjunctions between the two contacting surfaces. Typically, interactions between junctions through the bulk lead to rupture fronts propagating from weak and/or highly stressed regions, whose junctions break first. Experiments find rupture fronts ranging from quasistatic fronts, via fronts much slower than elastic wave speeds, to fronts faster than the shear wave speed. The mechanisms behind and selection between these fronts are still imperfectly understood. Here we perform simulations in an elastic two-dimensional spring-block model where the frictional interaction between each interfacial block and the substrate arises from a set of junctions modeled explicitly. We find that material slip speed and rupture front speed are proportional across the full range of front speeds we observe. We revisit a mechanism for slow slip in the model and demonstrate that fast slip and fast fronts have a different, inertial origin. We highlight the long transients in front speed even along homogeneous interfaces, and we study how both the local shear to normal stress ratio and the local strength are involved in the selection of front type and front speed. Last, we introduce an experimentally accessible integrated measure of block slip history, the Gini coefficient, and demonstrate that in the model it is a good predictor of the history-dependent local static friction coefficient of the interface. These results will contribute both to building a physically based classification of the various types of fronts and to identifying the important mechanisms involved in the selection of their propagation speed.

  5. CME front and severe space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Skoug, R.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Rajesh, P. K.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Batista, I. S.; Ebihara, Y.; Nakamura, T.

    2014-12-01

    Thanks to the work of a number of scientists who made it known that severe space weather can cause extensive social and economic disruptions in the modern high-technology society. It is therefore important to understand what determines the severity of space weather and whether it can be predicted. We present results obtained from the analysis of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), solar energetic particle (SEP) events, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), CME-magnetosphere coupling, and geomagnetic storms associated with the major space weather events since 1998 by combining data from the ACE and GOES satellites with geomagnetic parameters and the Carrington event of 1859, the Quebec event of 1989, and an event in 1958. The results seem to indicate that (1) it is the impulsive energy mainly due to the impulsive velocity and orientation of IMF Bz at the leading edge of the CMEs (or CME front) that determine the severity of space weather. (2) CMEs having high impulsive velocity (sudden nonfluctuating increase by over 275 km s-1 over the background) caused severe space weather (SvSW) in the heliosphere (failure of the solar wind ion mode of Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor in ACE) probably by suddenly accelerating the high-energy particles in the SEPs ahead directly or through the shocks. (3) The impact of such CMEs which also show the IMF Bz southward from the leading edge caused SvSW at the Earth including extreme geomagnetic storms of mean DstMP < -250 nT during main phases, and the known electric power outages happened during some of these SvSW events. (4) The higher the impulsive velocity, the more severe the space weather, like faster weather fronts and tsunami fronts causing more severe damage through impulsive action. (5) The CMEs having IMF Bz northward at the leading edge do not seem to cause SvSW on Earth, although, later when the IMF Bz turns southward, they can lead to super geomagnetic storms of intensity (Dstmin) less than even -400 nT.

  6. Colorado Front Range Surface Ozone Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure-Begley, A.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Oltmans, S. J.; Kofler, J.; Petron, G.; Cothrel, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Colorado Front Range is a unique geographical region for air quality studies, including research of surface level ozone. Not only does surface ozone play a critical role in regulating the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere, but is a primary contributor to local smog and leads to public health complications and altered ecosystem functioning. The high frequency of sunny days, increasing population and pollution, and Mountain/Valley air dynamics of this region provide atmospheric conditions suitable for production and accumulation of ozone at the surface. This region of Colorado is currently in an ozone non-attainment status due to an assortment of contributing factors. Precursor emissions from pollution, wild-fires, and gas and oil production; along with stratosphere-troposphere exchange, can all result in high ozone episodes over the Colorado Front Range. To understand the dynamics of ozone accumulation in this region, Thermo-Scientific ozone monitors have been continuously sampling ozone from 4 different altitudes since the early 2000s. Analysis of ozone data in relation to Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Methane (CH4), Carbon Monoxide (CO), wind-conditions and back-trajectory air mass origins help to address local ozone precursor emissions and resulting high ozone episodes. Increased ozone episodes are scrutinized with regards to dominant wind direction to determine main precursor emission sources. Analysis of this data reveals a strong influence of precursor emissions from the North-East wind sector, with roughly 50% of ozone exceedances originating from winds prevailing from this direction. Further, correlation with methane is enhanced when prevailing winds are from the North-East; indicative of influence from natural gas processes and feedlot activity. Similar analysis is completed for the North-West wind sector exceedances, with strong correlation to carbon monoxide; likely related to emissions from biomass burning events and forest fires. In depth analysis of

  7. Cold fronts in the Colombian Caribbean Sea and their relationship to extreme wave events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Otero, L. J.; Restrepo, J. C.; Ruiz, J.; Cadena, M.

    2013-11-01

    Extreme ocean waves in the Caribbean Sea are commonly related to the effects of storms and hurricanes during the months of June through November. The collapse of 200 m of the Puerto Colombia pier in March 2009 revealed the effects of meteorological phenomena other than storms and hurricanes that may be influencing the extreme wave regime in the Colombian Caribbean. The marked seasonality of these atmospheric fronts was established by analyzing the meteorological-marine reports of the Instituto de Hidrología, Meteorología y Estudios Ambientales of Colombia (IDEAM, based on its initials in Spanish) and the Centro de Investigación en Oceanografía y Meteorología of Colombia (CIOH, based on its initials in Spanish) during the last 16 yr. The highest number of cold fronts was observed during the months of January, February, and March, with 6 fronts occurring per year. An annual trend was observed and the highest number of fronts occurred in 2010 (20 in total); moreover, an annual strong relationship between the maximum average wave values and the cold fronts in the central zone of the Colombian Caribbean during the first three months of the year was established. In addition, the maximum values of the significant height produced by the passage of cold fronts during the last 16 yr were identified. Although the Colombian Caribbean has been affected by storms and hurricanes in the past, this research allows us to conclude that there is a strong relationship between cold fronts and the largest waves in the Colombian Caribbean during the last 16 yr, which have caused damage to coastal infrastructure. We verified that the passage of a cold front corresponded to the most significant extreme wave event of the last two decades in the Colombian Caribbean, which caused the structural collapse of the Puerto Colombia pier, located near the city of Barranquilla, between 5 and 10 March 2009. This information is invaluable when evaluating average and extreme wave regimes for the

  8. Front instabilities in evaporatively dewetting nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancea, I.; Thiele, U.; Pauliac-Vaujour, E.; Stannard, A.; Martin, C. P.; Blunt, M. O.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2008-10-01

    Various experimental settings that involve drying solutions or suspensions of nanoparticles—often called nanofluids—have recently been used to produce structured nanoparticle layers. In addition to the formation of polygonal networks and spinodal-like patterns, the occurrence of branched structures has been reported. After reviewing the experimental results we use a modified version of the Monte Carlo model first introduced by Rabani [Nature 426, 271 (2003)] to study structure formation in evaporating films of nanoparticle solutions for the case that all structuring is driven by the interplay of evaporating solvent and diffusing nanoparticles. After introducing the model and its general behavior we focus on receding dewetting fronts which are initially straight but develop a transverse fingering instability. We analyze the dependence of the characteristics of the resulting branching patterns on the driving effective chemical potential, the mobility and concentration of the nanoparticles, and the interaction strength between liquid and nanoparticles. This allows us to understand the underlying instability mechanism.

  9. Nanophotonic front electrodes for perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzold, Ulrich Wilhelm; Qiu, Weiming; Finger, Friedhelm; Poortmans, Jef; Cheyns, David

    2015-04-01

    In less than 3 years' time, a vast progress in power conversion efficiencies of organometal halide perovskite solar cells has been achieved by optimization of the device architecture, charge transport layers, and interfaces. A further increase in these efficiencies is expected from an improvement in the optical properties via anti-reflection coatings and nanophotonic light management concepts. In this contribution, we report on the development and implementation of a nanophotonic front electrode for perovskite solar cells. The nanostructures were replicated via the versatile and large-area compatible UV-nanoimprint lithography. The shallow design of the used transparent and conductive nanostructures enabled easy integration into our solution-based baseline process. Prototype methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells show an improvement of 5% in short-circuit current density and an improvement from 9.6% to 9.9% in power conversion efficiency compared to the flat reference device.

  10. Phase front analysis of vortex streets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefrançois, Marcel; Ahlborn, Boye

    1994-06-01

    The continuous formation and development of a laminar vortex street behind a circular cylinder of radius D in a flow of velocity U∞ has been modeled as a Huygens-type wave process, where the transverse velocity Uy and the vorticity ω in the near wake oscillate at the vortex shedding frequency f. Starting from the Biot-Savart law for fluids a phase front propagation integral is derived. This formalism is used to calculate for each point along the span the phase of vortex shedding as a function of the phase of the previously shed vortex generation and the shedding frequency. The amplitude is determined by a simple renormalization calculation. In good agreement with experiments, the model predicts the propagation of spanwise phase perturbations into subsequent vortex generations for two-dimensional (2-D) flow geometries and the cell formation in three-dimensional flows around tapered cylinders.

  11. Front-end electronics development at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1995-09-01

    AT BNL the monolithic front-end electronics development effort is an outgrowth of work in discrete and hybrid circuits over the past 30 years. BNL`s area of specialization centers on circuits for precision amplitude measurement, with signal-to-noise ratios of 100:1 and calibration to the same level of precision. Circuits are predominantly classical, continuous-time implementation of the functions now performed by hybrids, with little or no loss of performance. Included in this category are charge and current-sensitive preamplifiers, pulse shapers, sample/hold, multiplexing, and associated calibration and control circuits. Presently integration densities are limited to 16 channels per chip. Two examples are presented to illustrate the techniques needed to adopt hybrid circuits to the constraints of monolithic CMOS technology. They are programmable pulse shapes and a charge-sensitive preamp for very low detector capacitance.

  12. Flame front configuration of turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Junichi; Maruta, Kaoru; Hirano, Toshisuke

    1998-02-01

    The present study is performed to explore dependence of the wrinkle scale of propane-air turbulent premixed flames on the characteristics of turbulence in the nonreacting flow, burner size, and mixture ratio. The wrinkle scales are examined and expressed in the frequency distribution of the radii of flame front curvatures. The average wrinkle scale depends not only on the characteristics of turbulence in the nonreacting flow but also on burner diameter and mixture ratio. The average wrinkle scale of a lean propane-air flame is larger than those of the near stoichiometric and rich flames. The smallest wrinkle scale of turbulent premixed flame is in the range of 0.75--1.0 mm, which is much larger than the Kolmogorov scale of turbulence in the nonreacting flow.

  13. Front lighted optical tooling method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Stone, W.J.

    1983-06-30

    An optical tooling method and apparatus uses a front lighted shadowgraphic technique to enhance visual contrast of reflected light. The apparatus includes an optical assembly including a fiducial mark, such as cross hairs, reflecting polarized light with a first polarization, a polarizing element backing the fiducial mark and a reflective surface backing the polarizing element for reflecting polarized light bypassing the fiducial mark and traveling through the polarizing element. The light reflected by the reflecting surface is directed through a second pass of the polarizing element toward the frontal direction with a polarization differing from the polarization of the light reflected by the fiducial mark. When used as a tooling target, the optical assembly may be mounted directly to a reference surface or may be secured in a mounting, such as a magnetic mounting. The optical assembly may also be mounted in a plane defining structure and used as a spherometer in conjunction with an optical depth measuring instrument.

  14. Light-Front Holography, Light-Front Wavefunctions, and Novel QCD Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    Light-Front Holography is one of the most remarkable features of the AdS/CFT correspondence. In spite of its present limitations it provides important physical insights into the nonperturbative regime of QCD and its transition to the perturbative domain. This novel framework allows hadronic amplitudes in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time. The model leads to an effective confining light-front QCD Hamiltonian and a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate {zeta} which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time and determines the off-shell dynamics of the bound-state wavefunctions, and thus the fall-off as a function of the invariant mass of the constituents. The soft-wall holographic model modified by a positive-sign dilaton metric, leads to a remarkable one-parameter description of nonperturbative hadron dynamics - a semi-classical frame-independent first approximation to the spectra and light-front wavefunctions of meson and baryons. The model predicts a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in the leading orbital angular momentum L of hadrons and the radial quantum number n. The hadron eigensolutions projected on the free Fock basis provides the complete set of valence and non-valence light-front Fock state wavefunctions {Psi}{sub n/H} (x{sub i}, k{sub {perpendicular}i}, {lambda}{sub i}) which describe the hadron's momentum and spin distributions needed to compute the direct measures of hadron structure at the quark and gluon level, such as elastic and transition form factors, distribution amplitudes, structure functions, generalized parton distributions and transverse

  15. Phase transformations in thin iron oxide films: Spectromicroscopic study of velocity and shape of the reaction fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genuzio, F.; Sala, A.; Schmidt, Th.; Menzel, D.; Freund, H.-J.

    2016-06-01

    Combining low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) with low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM), we studied the phase transformations between Fe3O4, γ-Fe2O3, and α-Fe2O3, grown as 10 nm thin oxide films on Pt(111) and Ag(111) single crystals. These transformations occur as moving reaction fronts in most cases, the shapes and velocities of which show strong dependences on temperature and oxygen pressure, but also on defects like step bunches of the supporting substrate and domain boundaries in the initial oxide film. While the non-uniform moving fronts make quantitative analysis difficult, we have extracted approximate values for the average front velocities. We discuss these as well as the qualitative information on the non-uniform fronts in terms of the known geometric situations and the likely motional steps.

  16. 2. EXTERIOR FRONT (SOUTHEAST) SIDE OF BUILDING 117 SHOWING MAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EXTERIOR FRONT (SOUTHEAST) SIDE OF BUILDING 117 SHOWING MAIN RESIDENTIAL STREET IN LOWER FOREGROUND, CEMENT-LAID ROCK RETAINING WALL IN FRONT OF HOUSE, AND CONCRETE STEPS AND WALKWAY TO FRONT PORCH AND DOOR. NOTE SLIDING GLASS DOOR REPLACEMENT FOR ORIGINAL DOOR WHICH HAS SUBSEQUENTLY BEEN REMODELED BACK TO A SINGLE ENTRY DOOR. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  17. Current Status of the Front Ends at the SLS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q.; Baechli, H.; Hoechli, C.; Wullschleger, R.; Abela, R.; Ingold, G.; Schulz, L.; Schulze-Briese, C.; Stampanoni, M.; Wang, X.

    2007-01-19

    At the Swiss Light Source, the super-bend bending magnet front end, combining multi-function components and optics for the TOMCAT beamline, is in operation. The Femto front end, with a special design, has been installed recently. A new type of CVD filter for the PX Front End and NEG coating technology applied on the components both show good results. All will be described in this article.

  18. Tracking Water Diffusion Fronts in a Highly Viscous Aerosol Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Field measurements indicate that atmospheric secondary aerosol particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state [1]. In contrast to liquid state particles, the gas phase equilibration is kinetically limited and governed by condensed phase diffusion. In recent water diffusion experiments on highly viscous single aerosol particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) we observed a characteristic shift behavior of the Mie whispering gallery modes (WGM) indicative of the changing radial structure of the particle, thus providing us with an experimental method to track the diffusion process inside the particle. When a highly viscous, homogeneous particle is exposed to an abrupt increase in relative humidity, the rapid gas phase diffusion and strong concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the condensed phase lead to extremely steep water concentration gradients inside the particle, reminiscent of diffusion fronts. The resulting quasi step-like concentration profile motivates the introduction of a simple core-shell model describing the morphology of the non-equilibrium particle during humidification. The subsequent particle growth and reduction of the shell refractive index can be observed as red and blueshift behavior of the WGM, respectively. The shift pattern can be attributed to a core-shell radius ratio and particle radius derived from model calculations [2]. If supplemented with growth information obtained from the WGM redshift and thermodynamic equilibrium data, we can infer a comprehensive picture of the time evolution of the diffusion fronts in the framework of our core-shell model. The measured time dependent concentration profile is then compared with simulations solving the non-linear diffusion equation [3] [1] Virtanen, A., et al., Nature, 467, 824-827, 2010 [2] Kaiser, T., Schweiger, G., Computers in Physics, Vol. 7, No. 6, 682-686, Nov/Dec 1993 [3] Zobrist, B., Soonsin, V., Luo, B.P., Peter, T. et al., Phys. Chem. Chem

  19. Infiltration front monitoring using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxarango, Laurent; Audebert, Marine; Guyard, Helene; Clement, Remi

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) geophysical method is commonly used to identify the spatial distribution of electrical resisitivity in the soil at the field scale. Recent progress in commercial acquisition systems allows repeating fast acquisitions (10 min) in order to monitor a 3D dynamic phenomenon. Since the ERT method is sensitive to moisture content variations, it can thus be used to delineate the infiltration shape during water infiltration. In heterogeneous conditions, the 3D infiltration shape is a crucial information because it could differ significantly from the homogeneous behavior. In a first step, the ERT method is validated at small scale (<1m) studying a suction infiltrometer test. The experiment is carried out in a pit filled with a homogenous silty-sandy soil. It is instrumented by 17 resistivity probes and 3 commercial capacitive moisture content probes to provide local measurements of the moisture content variation. The Multiple Inversion and Clustering Strategy (MICS) (Audebert et al 2014) is used to delineate the infiltration patern. A satisfying agreement between infiltration delineation and sensor measurements is obtained with a few centimeter accuracy on the moisture front location. In a second step, the same methodology is applied at a larger scale (> 10m). Two examples of leachate injection monitoring in municipal solid waste landfills are used to put forward benefits and limitations of the ERT-MICS method. Effective infiltration porosities in a range between 3% and 8% support the assumption of a flow in heterogeneous media. Audebert, M., R. Clément, N. Touze-Foltz, T. Günther, S. Moreau, and C. Duquennoi (2014), Time-lapse ERT interpretation methodology for leachate injection monitoring based on multiple inversions and a clustering strategy (MICS), Journal of Applied Geophysics, 111, 320-333. Keywords: ERT, infiltration front, field survey

  20. A new quantitative method of mountain-front analysis, with applications

    SciTech Connect

    Willemin, J.H.; Knuepfer, P.L.K.; Coleman, P.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Most parameters used in conventional analysis of tectonic geomorphology of mountain fronts have been designed to quantify differences in the landscapes of mountain-front segments defined a priori. The quantified landscape parameters of these pre-defined segments then are used to infer differences in rates of tectonic uplift. The authors have developed a processing technique using principles of maximum likelihood estimation which removes the need for pre-defined segments, and allows a mountain front to be partitioned objectively into geomorphic domains (regions of more-or-less uniform landscape character) based on variation in geomorphic parameters. The authors apply a weighted averaging scheme to parameters such as mountain-front sinuosity or facet density to generate continuous functions of distance along the front. The authors use the scale-space image of these functions to locate possible domain boundaries at points of rapid change in parameters and to rank them by prominence. They then apply an iterative scheme based on the Akaike information criterion to obtain a maximum-likelihood estimate of the underlying parameter distribution function, assumed to be stepwise linear. Discontinuous functions such as drainage-basin shape or valley cross-section are classified using clustering algorithms. these procedures yield the most likely domain boundaries for each parameter; multivariate analysis allows them to define the most likely boundaries for the entire parameter space, which presumably correlate with tectonic segment boundaries. By applying this new methodology to the Central Range of Taiwan and the Wasatch Range in Utah, they show that subdivision of mountain fronts--and inferences about tectonic uplift rates--are strongly dependent on which parameters are used in the analysis.

  1. Minutes of the meeting of the international program committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-12-01

    The meeting of the International Program Committee occurred on 5 June 2012. The agenda consisted of the following items: - Information on conference participants, contributions and grants - Information on the financial support received by the conference - Committee membership - Organizers of the next two meeting of the ICSLS Conference participants and contributions There were about 100 registered participants for the ICSLS. They presented more than 100 contributions, namely, 19 invited talks, 20 oral contributions and more than 61 contributed papers. It was noted that only very few participants came from North America. Reasons quoted were finacial problems of laboratories and overlapping of several conferences. Finacial support received The conference received grants from St. Petersburg University, the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, and the non-profit Dynasty Foundation. About 40% of the budget was collected in the form of registration fees. Discounted fees and fee waives were provided for 40 participants. Committee membership The Committee instructed Professor A Devdariani to contact the absent members who had missed two successive conferences and ask them whether they intended to prolong their membership on the Committee, and inform other Committee members accordingly. Organizers of the next meetings of the ICSLS The 20th ICSLS held in St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada decided to hold the 22nd ICSLS at the University of Tennessee. The event will be organized by Christian Parriger. All issues regarding the next conference were discussed including budget, travel, conference site, accommodation, and proceedings. Torun, Poland was proposed for the 23d ICSLS by Roman Ciurylo. Roland Stamm proposed the Aix-Marseille University as a backup to the first proposal.

  2. DETAIL VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT DOORS, FACING NORTHEAST. Douglas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT DOORS, FACING NORTHEAST. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Wing & Fuselage Assembly Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. EAST (FRONT) AND NORTH SIDE OF DOUBLE FURNACE AND NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST (FRONT) AND NORTH SIDE OF DOUBLE FURNACE AND NORTH SIDE OF SINGLE FURNACE, SOUTHWEST. - Tannehill Furnace, 12632 Confederate Parkway, Tannehill Historical State Park, Bucksville, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  4. 16. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING FRONT LOBBY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - FRONT LOBBY VIEW. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  5. 90. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING LOUISVILLE WATER COMPANY, GENERAL, FRONT ELEVATION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING LOUISVILLE WATER COMPANY, GENERAL, FRONT ELEVATION, ALLIS-CHALMERS - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  6. 89. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING LOUISVILLE WATER COMPANY, GENERAL, FRONT ELEVATION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    89. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING LOUISVILLE WATER COMPANY, GENERAL, FRONT ELEVATION, ALLIS-CHALMERS - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  7. Light-Front Holography: A First Approximation to QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Teramond, Guy F. de; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2009-02-27

    Starting from the Hamiltonian equation of motion in QCD, we identify an invariant light-front coordinate {zeta} which allows the separation of the dynamics of quark and gluon binding from the kinematics of constituent spin and internal orbital angular momentum. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation for QCD which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wave functions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. This light-front wave equation is equivalent to the equations of motion which describe the propagation of spin-J modes on anti-de Sitter (AdS) space.

  8. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, 1941 FRONT ROOM, SECOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, 1941 FRONT ROOM, SECOND FLOOR, BEFORE RESTORATION - Nicholas Hedges House, 1069 Thomas Jefferson Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. View of north front and west sides of hall, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north front and west sides of hall, facing south - International Longshoremen's & Warehousemen's Union Hall, Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, Port Hueneme Road, Port Hueneme, Ventura County, CA

  10. TENANT HOUSE, WINDOW DETAIL, NORTH FRONT, LOOKING SOUTH Irvine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TENANT HOUSE, WINDOW DETAIL, NORTH FRONT, LOOKING SOUTH - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Carillo Tenant House, Southwest of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  11. 9. DETAIL, NORTH FRONT, CENTRAL (TALLEST) TOWER, FROM THE NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL, NORTH FRONT, CENTRAL (TALLEST) TOWER, FROM THE NORTHWEST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 7. DETAIL, NORTH FRONT, EASTERN PORTION OF MAIN BLOCK, WINDOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL, NORTH FRONT, EASTERN PORTION OF MAIN BLOCK, WINDOWS - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. Feature-oriented regional modeling of oceanic fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Avijit; Robinson, Allan R.

    2002-11-01

    This paper outlines some important aspects of modeling oceanic fronts in the context of feature-oriented regional modeling for the deep sea and the Global Coastal Ocean. Previously developed forms of feature models for different types of fronts are presented in a generalized approach. The large-scale meandering frontal systems such as the Gulf Stream, Kuroshio and Brazil current can be represented by velocity-based feature models. Buoyancy forced coastal water mass fronts, such as the coastal currents, the tidal fronts, plume fronts, dense water fronts and inflow/outflow fronts can be represented by a generalized parameterized water mass feature model. The interface region of the deep ocean and the coastal region can be modeled by a melding of two water masses along and across a prescribed isobath in the form of a shelf-break front. Initialization and/or updating fields for a regional dynamical model can then be established in association with other available synoptic data sets via a feature-oriented strategic sampling approach for forecasting and dynamical balances. Example simulations from the western north Atlantic (WNA) and the strait of Sicily region are presented in support of the applicability of this approach for the Global Coastal Ocean. Simulations in the strait of Sicily region with fronts, eddies and background climatology help provide a perspective on dynamical processes in this region. Application of this methodology for rapid assessment of any regional ocean, based on limited data and resources is now possible.

  14. GENERAL VIEW OF EAST (FRONT) OF DOUBLE FURNACE FROM ACROSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF EAST (FRONT) OF DOUBLE FURNACE FROM ACROSS THE CREEK, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Tannehill Furnace, 12632 Confederate Parkway, Tannehill Historical State Park, Bucksville, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  15. 1. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING FRONT FACADE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING FRONT FACADE OF ADMINISTRATION BUILDING. - Bonneville Project, Administration Building, South side of main entrance, Bonneville Project, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  16. VIEW, FRONT ELEVATION, LOOKING SOUTHSOUTHEAST Mountain Home Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, FRONT ELEVATION, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST - Mountain Home Air Force Base 1958 Senior Officers' Housing, Colonel's Residence, Tuck Street (originally Locust Street), Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  17. Front contact solar cell with formed electrically conducting layers on the front side and backside

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John

    2012-06-26

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by a silicon substrate and a first doped layer of a first dopant type on the backside of the solar cell. A second doped layer of a second dopant type makes an electrical connection to the substrate from the front side of the solar cell. A first metal contact of a first electrical polarity electrically connects to the first doped layer on the backside of the solar cell, and a second metal contact of a second electrical polarity electrically connects to the second doped layer on the front side of the solar cell. An external electrical circuit may be electrically connected to the first and second metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell.

  18. STS-78 Drag Chute Deploy (front view)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The drag chute pops open as the orbiter Columbia glides down Runway 33 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Main gear touchdown occurred at 8:36 a.m. EDT, July 7. A mission duration of 16 days, 21 hours and 47 minutes made STS-78 the longest Shuttle flight to date. The STS-78 crew numbered seven: Mission Commander Terence 'Tom' Henricks; Pilot Kevin R. Kregel; Payload Commander Susan J. Helms; Mission Specialists Richard M. Linnehan and Charles E. Brady Jr.; and Payload Specialists Jean-Jacques Favier, representing the French Space Agency (CNES) and Robert Brent Thirsk, of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). The primary payload of the 78th Shuttle flight was the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS).

  19. STS-65 crewmembers pose in front of OV-102 after landing at KSC's SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Commander Robert D. Cabana (right) and Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), signal mission success with a 'thumbs up' gesture as they stand in front of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. The two crewmembers are all smiles after OV-102's landing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The two, along with four other NASA astronauts and a Japanese payload specialist, had just broken a Shuttle duration record as they ran almost 18 hours over two weeks in space in support of the International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) mission. Landing occurred at 6:38 am (Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). Mission duration was 14 days, 17 hours and 56 minutes. In the background, KSC personnel conduct postflight servicing of the vehicle.

  20. Database for the geologic map of the Snoqualmie Pass 30-minute by 60-minute quadrangle, Washington (I-2538)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tabor, R.W.; Frizzell, V.A., Jr.; Booth, D.B.; Waitt, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    This digital map database has been prepared by R.W. Tabor from the published Geologic map of the Snoqualmie Pass 30' X 60' Quadrangle, Washington. Together with the accompanying text files as PDF, it provides information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The authors mapped most of the bedrock geology at 1:100,000 scale, but compiled Quaternary units at 1:24,000 scale. The Quaternary contacts and structural data have been much simplified for the 1:100,000-scale map and database. The spatial resolution (scale) of the database is 1:100,000 or smaller. This database depicts the distribution of geologic materials and structures at a regional (1:100,000) scale. The report is intended to provide geologic information for the regional study of materials properties, earthquake shaking, landslide potential, mineral hazards, seismic velocity, and earthquake faults. In addition, the report contains information and interpretations about the regional geologic history and framework. However, the regional scale of this report does not provide sufficient detail for site development purposes.

  1. Can front-of-pack labelling schemes guide healthier food choices? Australian shoppers' responses to seven labelling formats.

    PubMed

    Watson, Wendy L; Kelly, Bridget; Hector, Debra; Hughes, Clare; King, Lesley; Crawford, Jennifer; Sergeant, John; Chapman, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that easily accessible, comprehensible and consistent nutrient information on the front of packaged foods could assist shoppers to make healthier food choices. This study used an online questionnaire of 4357 grocery shoppers to examine Australian shoppers' ability to use a range of front-of-pack labels to identify healthier food products. Seven different front-of-pack labelling schemes comprising variants of the Traffic Light labelling scheme and the Percentage Daily Intake scheme, and a star rating scheme, were applied to nine pairs of commonly purchased food products. Participants could also access a nutrition information panel for each product. Participants were able to identify the healthier product in each comparison over 80% of the time using any of the five schemes that provided information on multiple nutrients. No individual scheme performed significantly better in terms of shoppers' ability to determine the healthier product, shopper reliance on the 'back-of-pack' nutrition information panel, and speed of use. The scheme that provided information about energy only and a scheme with limited numerical information of nutrient type or content performed poorly, as did the nutrition information panel alone (control). Further consumer testing is necessary to determine the optimal format and content of an interpretive front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme. PMID:24126243

  2. Properties of the Subantarctic Front and Polar Front from the skewness of sea level anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Andrew E.; Gille, Sarah T.; Mecking, Sabine; Thompson, LuAnne

    2015-07-01

    The region of the Southern Ocean that encompasses the Subantarctic Front (SAF) to the north and the Polar Front (PF) to the south contains most of the transport of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Here skewness of sea level anomaly (SLA) from 1992 to 2013 is coupled with a meandering Gaussian jetw model to estimate the mean position, meridional width, and the percent variance that each front contributes to total SLA variability. The SAF and PF have comparable widths (85 km) in the circumpolar average, but their widths differ significantly in the East Pacific Basin (85 and 60 km, respectively). Interannual variability in the positions of the SAF and PF are also estimated using annual subsets of the SLA data from 1993 to 2012. The PF position has enhanced variability near strong topographic features such as the Kerguelen Plateau, the Campbell Plateau east of New Zealand, and downstream of Drake Passage. Neither the SAF nor the PF showed a robust meridional trend over the 20 year period. The Southern Annular Mode was significantly correlated with basin-averaged SAF and PF positions in the East Pacific and with the PF south of Australia. A correlation between the PF and the basin-scale wind stress curl anomaly was also found in the western extratropical Pacific but not in other basins.

  3. Value of Impedance Cardiography during Six-Minute Walk Test in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Adriano R.; Alkukhun, Laith; Arelli, Vineesha; Ramos, Jose; Newman, Jennie; McCarthy, Kevin; Pichurko, Bohdan; Minai, Omar A.; Dweik, Raed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Methods that predict prognosis and response to therapy in pulmonary hypertension (PH) are lacking. We tested whether the noninvasive estimation of hemodynamic parameters during 6MWT in PH patients provides information that can improve the value of the test. Methods We estimated hemodynamic parameters during the 6MWT using a portable, signal-morphology based, impedance cardiograph (PhysioFlow Enduro, Paris, France) with real time wireless monitoring via a bluetooth USB adapter. Results We recruited 48 subjects in the study (30 with PH and 18 healthy controls). PH patients had significantly lower maximum SV and CI and slower CO acceleration and decelerations slopes during the test when compared with healthy controls. In PH patients, CI change was associated with total distance walked (R=0.62, p<0.001) and percentage of predicted (R=0.4, p=0.03), HR recovery at 1 min (0.57, p<0.001), 2 min (0.65, p<0.001) and 3 min (0.66, p<0.001). Interestingly, in PH patients CO change during the test was predominantly related to an increase in SV instead of HR. Conclusions Estimation of hemodynamic parameters such as cardiac index during six-minute walk test is feasible and may provide useful information in patients with pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24330692

  4. Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

  5. Hydrodynamics of superfluid turbulence fronts in He II: steady propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geurst, J. A.; van Beelen, H.

    1995-02-01

    A hydrodynamic theory of superfluid turbulent flow of He II which was developed recently is applied to a specific inhomogeneous flow situation, viz. a superfluid turbulence front propagating into an (unstable) state of zero turbulence. It is shown that in a wide range of experimental flow conditions the two equations governing the evolution of the vortex tangle may be uncoupled from the other equations. In the case where the vortex tangle is in internal equilibrium the two vortex-tangle equations may, in addition, be reduced to one non-linear partial differential equation of the first order. It appears that the waves of permanent form permitted by this equation fall apart in two classes, viz. a class of ‘warm’ fronts propagating in the direction of the heat flow and a class of ‘cold’ fronts moving oppositely. The velocity ranges of the warm and cold fronts are separated by a velocity gap. The initial-value problem for front propagation is solved exactly by means of the method of characteristics. A linear analysis of front stability based on that exact solution yields criteria for the selection of the front velocity by requiring marginal stability of the corresponding warm and cold fronts. The significance of marginal stability as a dynamical mechanism for velocity selection was recently put forward by van Saarloos (1988). It is shown that alternative selection criteria for the velocity of warm and cold fronts are provided by the requirements of minimum rate of line-length production and minimum dissipation rate. The comparison of the theoretical values for the velocities of warm and cold fronts with the experimental front velocities reported by Slegtenhorst et al. (1982) for capillary flow of He II looks promising. Wall effects will be taken into account in a separate paper.

  6. Research on Intelligent Interface in Double-front Work Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezaki, Mitsuhiro; Iwata, Hiroyasu; Sugano, Shigeki

    This paper proposes a work state identification method with full independent of work environmental conditions and operator skill levels for construction machinery. Advanced operated-work machines, which have been designed for complicated tasks, require intelligent systems that can provide the quantitative work analysis needed to determine effective work procedures and that can provide operational and cognitive support for operators. Construction work environments are extremely complicated, however, and this makes state identification, which is a key technology for an intelligent system, difficult. We therefore defined primitive static states (PSS) that are determined using on-off information for the lever inputs and manipulator loads for each part of the grapple and front and that are completely independent of the various environmental conditions and variation in operator skill level that can cause an incorrect work state identification. To confirm the usefulness of PSS, we performed experiments with a demolition task by using our virtual reality simulator. We confirmed that PSS could robustly and accurately identify the work states and that untrained skills could be easily inferred from the results of PSS-based work analysis. We also confirmed in skill-training experiments that advice information based on PSS-based skill analysis greatly improved operator's work performance. We thus confirmed that PSS can adequately identify work states and are useful for work analysis and skill improvement.

  7. The effect of moving cold fronts over Central Europe to the variability of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potuznikova, Katerina; Koucka Knizova, Petra; Boska, Josef; Sindelarova, Tereza; Mosna, Zbysek

    2015-04-01

    Cold fronts represent well known source of atmospheric waves, (especially short and medium scale AGW - acoustic gravity waves), that are able to propagate up to the ionospheric heights. In our study we focus on the effects of the transitions of cold front over the region of Central Europe on the variations of the ionosphere. We concentrate on periods of low solar and geomagnetic activity. Neutral atmosphere data are compared with the wave-like oscillations in the E and F layer. Our tropospheric data comprise synoptic maps on of 500 hPa and 850 hPa geopotential heights. Within ionospheric data we search for variability that is linked to the tropospheric disturbances. The ionospheric parameters (electron concentration and corresponding height) we analyse by the wavelet transform method. The Modern HF digisonde DPS-4 D (Digisonde Portable Sounder), which is in operation at the Pruhonice observatory (49.59 N; 14.33 E) of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Prague (IAP) since 2004, represents an excellent source of the ionospheric data for Central Europe. Pruhonice digisonde usually operates in standard mode - one ionogram and electron density profie N(h) each 15 minutes. Besides that, data from several european stations of the digisonde world network (data from Juliusruhe, Chilton, Brusel, Roma and Tortosa digisonde stations) are included in the study.

  8. Pattern formation in the wake of triggered pushed fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Ryan; Scheel, Arnd

    2016-08-01

    Pattern-forming fronts are often controlled by an external stimulus which progresses through a stable medium at a fixed speed, rendering it unstable in its wake. By controlling the speed of excitation, such stimuli, or ‘triggers’, can mediate pattern forming fronts which freely invade an unstable equilibrium and control which pattern is selected. In this work, we analytically and numerically study when the trigger perturbs an oscillatory pushed free front. In such a situation, the resulting patterned front, which we call a pushed trigger front, exhibits a variety of phenomenon, including snaking, non-monotonic wave-number selection, and hysteresis. Assuming the existence of a generic oscillatory pushed free front, we use heteroclinic bifurcation techniques to prove the existence of trigger fronts in an abstract setting motivated by the spatial dynamics approach. We then derive a leading order expansion for the selected wave-number in terms of the trigger speed. Furthermore, we show that such a bifurcation curve is governed by the difference of certain strong-stable and weakly-stable spatial eigenvalues associated with the decay of the free pushed front. We also study prototypical examples of these phenomena in the cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg Landau equation and a modified Cahn–Hilliard equation.

  9. More distant view than previous photograph of front and side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    More distant view than previous photograph of front and side (west) of building 253, along with fronts of buildings 254, 255, 256, and 257. Looking northeast from corner of W.J. Avenue and N. 10th Street. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 253, North side of East O'Neil Avenue between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Zero-distance phase front of an isoplanar optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitin, Andrey

    2016-05-01

    The concept of "the zero-distance phase front" of an isoplanar optical system is used to describe its aberration. It is shown that Walther's wave interpretation of eikonals allows treating "the zero-distance phase front" as the wave aberration function of the optical system and calculating its transverse aberrations.

  11. 49 CFR 393.44 - Front brake lines, protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Front brake lines, protection. 393.44 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.44 Front brake lines, protection. On every bus, if equipped with air brakes, the braking system shall be so constructed that in the event any brake line...

  12. 8. FRONT VIEW OF YOKE: Photocopy of June 1951 photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. FRONT VIEW OF YOKE: Photocopy of June 1951 photograph showing front view of yoke placed on Hyde Street. The tube that the cable runs in is formed by the U-shaped member and its braces, which support the slot rails. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. Rapid acceleration of protons upstream of earthward propagating dipolarization fronts

    PubMed Central

    Ukhorskiy, AY; Sitnov, MI; Merkin, VG; Artemyev, AV

    2013-01-01

    [1] Transport and acceleration of ions in the magnetotail largely occurs in the form of discrete impulsive events associated with a steep increase of the tail magnetic field normal to the neutral plane (Bz), which are referred to as dipolarization fronts. The goal of this paper is to investigate how protons initially located upstream of earthward moving fronts are accelerated at their encounter. According to our analytical analysis and simplified two-dimensional test-particle simulations of equatorially mirroring particles, there are two regimes of proton acceleration: trapping and quasi-trapping, which are realized depending on whether the front is preceded by a negative depletion in Bz. We then use three-dimensional test-particle simulations to investigate how these acceleration processes operate in a realistic magnetotail geometry. For this purpose we construct an analytical model of the front which is superimposed onto the ambient field of the magnetotail. According to our numerical simulations, both trapping and quasi-trapping can produce rapid acceleration of protons by more than an order of magnitude. In the case of trapping, the acceleration levels depend on the amount of time particles stay in phase with the front which is controlled by the magnetic field curvature ahead of the front and the front width. Quasi-trapping does not cause particle scattering out of the equatorial plane. Energization levels in this case are limited by the number of encounters particles have with the front before they get magnetized behind it. PMID:26167430

  14. Front elevation, note threestory addition to rear dating from 1915. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Front elevation, note three-story addition to rear dating from 1915. In foreground is original two-story building of English bond brick. Openings on the street front have stone sills below each opening - Pioneer Building, 2679 East Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MI

  15. 8. INTERIOR OF FRONT SCREENEDIN PORCH SHOWING PORCH ENTRY DOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR OF FRONT SCREENED-IN PORCH SHOWING PORCH ENTRY DOOR AT PHOTO CENTER AND FRONT ENTRY DOOR TO LIVING ROOM AT PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  16. View of front (north) and east walls of the Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of front (north) and east walls of the Office, Childs power plant. Rock cairn in front frames the 1976 National Historic Mechanical Engineering plaque. Looking southeast - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Office, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  17. 4. VIEW NORTHWEST, NORTH FRONT OF SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE CLUSTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHWEST, NORTH FRONT OF SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE CLUSTER (BUILDINGS 24, 25, 26); NORTH FRONT OF QUARANTINE HEADHOUSE (BUILDING 27) - U.S. Plant Introduction Station, Soil Conservation Service Cluster, 11601 Old Pond Road, Glenn Dale, Prince George's County, MD

  18. 76 FR 63656 - Front Range Resource Advisory Council Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Front Range Resource Advisory Council Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Bureau of... (FACA), notice is hereby given that the Front Range Resource Advisory Council meeting scheduled for October 19, 2011 at the BLM Royal Gorge Field Office, 3028 East Main Street, Canon City, CO has...

  19. Muon Front-End for the Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernow, R. C.

    2006-05-01

    The front end at a neutrino factory includes all the systems necessary for capturing the pion beam produced at the target and for preparing the transverse and longitudinal phase space of the resulting muon beam for subsequent acceleration to high energies. We compare front end configurations for a number of neutrino factory designs.

  20. The CF6 jet engine performance improvement: New front mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasching, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The New Front Mount was evaluated in component tests including stress, deflection/distortion and fatigue tests. The test results demonstrated a performance improvement of 0.1% in cruise sfc, 16% in compressor stall margin and 10% in compressor stator angle margin. The New Front Mount hardware successfully completed 35,000 simulated flight cycles endurance testing.

  1. An explanation of unstable wetting fronts in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenhuis, Tammo; Parlange, Jean-Yves; Kung, Samuel; Stoof, Cathelijne; Baver, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Despite the findings of Raats on unstable wetting front almost a half a century ago, simulating wetting fronts in soils is still an area of active research. One of the critical questions currently is whether Darcy law is valid at the wetting front. In this talk, we pose that in many cases for dry soils, Darcy's law does not apply because the pressure field across the front is not continuous. Consequently, the wetting front pressure is not dependent on the pressure ahead of the front but is determined by the radius of water meniscuses and the dynamic contact angle of the water. If we further assume since the front is discontinuous, that water flows at one pore at the time, then by using the modified Hoffman relationship - relating the dynamic contact angle to the pore water velocity - we find the elevated pressures at the wetting front typical for unstable flows that are similar to those observed experimentally in small diameter columns. The theory helps also explain the funnel flow phenomena observed in layered soils.

  2. 49 CFR 393.44 - Front brake lines, protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Front brake lines, protection. 393.44 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.44 Front brake lines, protection. On every bus, if equipped with air brakes, the braking system shall be so constructed that in the event any brake line...

  3. 49 CFR 393.44 - Front brake lines, protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Front brake lines, protection. 393.44 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.44 Front brake lines, protection. On every bus, if equipped with air brakes, the braking system shall be so constructed that in the event any brake line...

  4. 3. VIEW SHOWING FRONT HALF OF NORTH SIDE OF BURLEY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW SHOWING FRONT HALF OF NORTH SIDE OF BURLEY SUBSTATION, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. BREAK BETWEEN 1913-1914 AND 1921 CONSTRUCTION PHASES, LOCATED BELOW AND ABOVE RIGHT EDGE OF SECOND WINDOW, FRONT LEFT OF PHOTOGRAPH - Bonneville Power Administration Burley Substation, 1221 Albion Avenue, Burley, Cassia County, ID

  5. 49 CFR 393.44 - Front brake lines, protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Front brake lines, protection. 393.44 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.44 Front brake lines, protection. On every bus, if equipped with air brakes, the braking system shall be so constructed that in the event any brake line...

  6. 49 CFR 393.44 - Front brake lines, protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Front brake lines, protection. 393.44 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.44 Front brake lines, protection. On every bus, if equipped with air brakes, the braking system shall be so constructed that in the event any brake line...

  7. Detonation Front Curvatures and Detonation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauderbach, Lisa M.; Lorenz, K. Thomas; Lee, Edward L.; Souers, P. Clark

    2015-06-01

    We have normalized the LLNL library of detonation front curvatures by dividing lags by the edge lag and radii by the edge radius. We then fit the normalized data to the equation L = AR2 + BR8, where L is the normalized lag and R is the normalized radius. We attribute the quadratic term to thermal processes and the 8th-power term to shock processes. We compare the % of the quadratic term J at the edge with detonation rates obtained from the size effect. One class of results is made up of fine-grained, uniform explosives with large lags, where a low detonation rate leads to a high J and vice versa. This provides a rough way of estimating unknown rates if the unknown explosive is of high quality. The other, equally-large class contains rough-grained materials, often with small lags and small radii. These have curves that do not fit the equation but superfically often look quadratic. Some HMX and PETN curvatures even show a ``sombrero'' effect. Code models show that density differences of 0.03 g/cc in ram-pressed parts can cause pseudo-quadratic curves and even sombreros. Modeling is used to illustrate J at the lowest and highest possible detonation rates. This work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Flame front geometry in premixed turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, I.G.; Ashurst, W.T.

    1991-12-01

    Experimental and numerical determinations of flame front curvature and orientation in premixed turbulent flames are presented. The experimental data is obtained from planar, cross sectional images of stagnation point flames at high Damkoehler number. A direct numerical simulation of a constant energy flow is combined with a zero-thickness, constant density flame model to provide the numerical results. The computational domain is a 32{sup 3} cube with periodic boundary conditions. The two-dimensional curvature distributions of the experiments and numerical simulations compare well at similar q{prime}/S{sub L} values with means close to zero and marked negative skewness. At higher turbulence levels the simulations show that the distributions become symmetric about zero. These features are also found in the three dimensional distributions of curvature. The simulations support assumptions which make it possible to determine the mean direction cosines from the experimental data. This leads to a reduction of 12% in the estimated flame surface area density in the middle of the flame brush. 18 refs.

  9. Front instabilities in evaporatively dewetting nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Vancea, I; Thiele, U; Pauliac-Vaujour, E; Stannard, A; Martin, C P; Blunt, M O; Moriarty, P J

    2008-10-01

    Various experimental settings that involve drying solutions or suspensions of nanoparticles-often called nanofluids-have recently been used to produce structured nanoparticle layers. In addition to the formation of polygonal networks and spinodal-like patterns, the occurrence of branched structures has been reported. After reviewing the experimental results we use a modified version of the Monte Carlo model first introduced by Rabani [Nature 426, 271 (2003)] to study structure formation in evaporating films of nanoparticle solutions for the case that all structuring is driven by the interplay of evaporating solvent and diffusing nanoparticles. After introducing the model and its general behavior we focus on receding dewetting fronts which are initially straight but develop a transverse fingering instability. We analyze the dependence of the characteristics of the resulting branching patterns on the driving effective chemical potential, the mobility and concentration of the nanoparticles, and the interaction strength between liquid and nanoparticles. This allows us to understand the underlying instability mechanism. PMID:18999433

  10. Light-Front Dynamics in Hadron Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chueng-Ryong; Bakker, Bernard L. G.; Choi, Ho-Meoyng

    2013-03-01

    Light-front dynamics(LFD) plays an important role in the analyses of relativistic few-body systems. As evidenced from the recent studies of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in hadron physics, a natural framework for a detailed study of hadron structures is LFD due to its direct application in Minkowski space as well as its distinct feature of accounting for the vacuum fluctuations in quantum field theories. In the last few years, however, it has been emphasized that treacherous points such as LF singularities and zero-modes should be taken into account for successful LFD applications to hadron phenomenology. In this paper, we discuss a typical example of the contemporary relativistic hadron physics in which the fundamental issues should be taken into account for the successful application of LFD. In particular, we focus on the kinematic issue of GPDs in deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). Although this fundamental issue has been glossed over in the literature, it must be taken care of for the correct analysis of DVCS data.

  11. Front lighted optical tooling method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Stone, William J.

    1985-06-18

    An optical tooling method and apparatus uses a front lighted shadowgraphic technique to enhance visual contrast of reflected light. The apparatus includes an optical assembly including a fiducial mark, such as cross hairs, reflecting polarized light with a first polarization, a polarizing element backing the fiducial mark and a reflective surface backing the polarizing element for reflecting polarized light bypassing the fiducial mark and traveling through the polarizing element. The light reflected by the reflecting surface is directed through a second pass of the polarizing element toward the frontal direction with a polarization differing from the polarization of the light reflected by the fiducial mark. When used as a tooling target, the optical assembly may be mounted directly to a reference surface or may be secured in a mounting, such as a magnetic mounting. The optical assembly may also be mounted in a plane defining structure and used as a spherometer in conjunction with an optical depth measuring instrument. A method of measuring a radius of curvature of an unknown surface includes positioning the spherometer on a surface between the surface and a depth measuring optical instrument. As the spherometer is frontally illuminated, the distance from the depth measuring instrument to the fiducial mark and the underlying surface are alternately measured and the difference in these measurements is used as the sagittal height to calculate a radius of curvature.

  12. Fronts and Thermohaline Structure of the Brazil Current Confluence System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severov, Dimitri

    and Thermohaline Structure of the Brazil Current Confluence System (BCCS) are stud-ied from climatic data, "Marathon Exp. Leg.8, 1984"data, and two Sea surface temperature (SST) data bases: "Meteor satellite"(1989-1994) and "ds277-Reynolds" (1981-2000).The South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) is divided in two main types: tropical (TW) and subtropical water (ST). Water masses, fronts, inter-frontal and frontal zones are analysed and classified: a) the water masses: Tropical Low-Salinity Water, Tropical Surface Water, Tropical Tropospheric Water, Subtropical Low-Salinity Water, Subtropical Surface Water, Subtropical Tropospheric Water. T,S characteristics of intermediate, deep and bottom water defined by different authors are confirmed and completed; b) the Inter-frontal Zones: Tropical/Brazil Current Zone, Sub-tropical Zone and Subantarctic Zone; c) the Frontal Zones: Subtropical, Subantarctic and Polar, and d) the Fronts: Subtropical Front of the Brazil Current, Principal Subtropical Front, North Subtropical Front, Subtropical Surface Front, South Subtropical Front, Subantarctic Surface Front, Subantarctic Front and Polar Front. Several stable T-S relationships are found below the friction layer and at the Fronts. The maximum gradient of the oceanographic characteris-tics occurs at the Brazil Current Front, which can be any of the subtropical fronts, depending on season. Minimum mean depth of the pycnocline coincides with the fronts of the BCCS, indicating the paths of low-salinity shelf waters into the open ocean. D. N. Severov (a) , V. Pshennikov (b) and A.V. Remeslo (c) a -Sección Oceanologé Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de la Republica, Igué 4225, 11400 ıa, a Montevideo, Uruguay. Tel. (598-2) 525-8618, Fax (598-2) 525-8617, mail: dima@fcien.edu.uy b -Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Igué 4225, 11400 Mon-a tevideo, Uruguay, mail: seva@fisica.edu.uy c -Atlantic Research Inst. For Fisheries Oceanology (Atlant

  13. Automatic Framework for Extraction and Characterization of Wetting Front Propagation Using Tomographic Image Sequences of Water Infiltrated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Dionicio; Scharcanski, Jacob; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new automatic framework for extracting and characterizing the dynamic shape of the 3D wetting front and its propagation, based in a sequence of tomographic images acquired as water (moisture) infiltrates in unsaturated soils. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the shape of the 3D wetting front and its propagation and progress over time has not been previously produced as a whole by methods in existing literature. The proposed automatic framework is composed two important and integrated modules: i) extraction of the 3D wetting front, and ii) characterization and description of the 3D wetting front to obtain important information about infiltration process. The 3D wetting front surface is segmented from 3D CT imagery provided as input via a 3D stochastic region merging strategy using quadric-regressed bilateral space-scale representations. Based on the 3D segmentation results, the normal directions at local curvature maxima of the wetting front surface are computed for 3D images of soil moisture, and its propagation is analyzed at the local directions in sites of maximal water adsorption, and described using histograms of curvature changes over time in response to sample saturation. These curvature change descriptors provide indirect measurements of moisture infiltration in soils, and soil saturation. Results using a field tomograph equipment specific for soil studies are encouraging, and suggest that the proposed automatic framework can be applied to estimate the infiltration of water in soils in 3D and in time. PMID:25602498

  14. Cluster separability in front-form particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1986-01-01

    In relativistic quantum dynamics, the group structure demands that some transformations other than the time evolutions depend on dynamics. It is possible to choose the representation of a kinematic subgroup to be independent of the dynamics, leading to different ''forms of dynamics'' which are unitarily equivalen. In the ''front-form'' dynamics the kinematic subgroup leaves the light front invariant, and the rotations about any transverse axis are dynamical transformations. In the front form the kinematic subgroup includes the Lorentz transformations. The existence and construction of packing transformations in front-form particle dynamics are shown, and the general features of front-form dynamics needed for that purpose are reviewed. 5 refs. (LEW)

  15. Research Libraries: Measurement, Management, Marketing. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (108th, Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 1-2, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Ed.

    Program presentations on issues related to the use of statistics by research libraries and business meeting minutes are combined in this report from the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). The full text is provided for the three papers on the program theme that were presented at the meeting: (1) "Information to Manage--The Economics of…

  16. The 20-Minute Version as a Predictor of the Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamel, Ronald; Schmittmann, Verena D.

    2006-01-01

    The Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices Test (APM) is a well-known measure of higher order general mental ability. The time to administer the test, 40 to 60 minutes, is sometimes regarded as a drawback. To meet efficiency needs, the APM can be administered as a 30-or 40-minute timed test, or one of two developed short versions could be used. In…

  17. 12 CFR 701.3 - Member inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Member inspection of credit union books... inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes. (a) Member inspection rights. A group of members of a...) Accounting books and records; and (2) Minutes of the proceedings of the credit union's members, board...

  18. 12 CFR 701.3 - Member inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Member inspection of credit union books... inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes. (a) Member inspection rights. A group of members of a...) Accounting books and records; and (2) Minutes of the proceedings of the credit union's members, board...

  19. 12 CFR 701.3 - Member inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Member inspection of credit union books... inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes. (a) Member inspection rights. A group of members of a...) Accounting books and records; and (2) Minutes of the proceedings of the credit union's members, board...

  20. 12 CFR 701.3 - Member inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Member inspection of credit union books... inspection of credit union books, records, and minutes. (a) Member inspection rights. A group of members of a...) Accounting books and records; and (2) Minutes of the proceedings of the credit union's members, board...

  1. 12 CFR 407.6 - Transcripts, recordings and minutes of closed meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transcripts, recordings and minutes of closed meetings. 407.6 Section 407.6 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES REGULATIONS GOVERNING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF EX-IM BANK MEETINGS § 407.6 Transcripts, recordings and minutes of...

  2. 47 CFR 0.607 - Transcript, recording or minutes; availability to the public.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transcript, recording or minutes; availability to the public. 0.607 Section 0.607 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Meeting Procedures § 0.607 Transcript, recording or minutes; availability to...

  3. 29 CFR 102.142 - Transcripts, recordings or minutes of closed meetings; public availability; retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; public availability; retention. 102.142 Section 102.142 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL... minutes of closed meetings; public availability; retention. (a) For every meeting or portion thereof... public copies of transcripts, recordings or minutes maintained as provided in accordance with...

  4. 12 CFR 407.6 - Transcripts, recordings and minutes of closed meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transcripts, recordings and minutes of closed meetings. 407.6 Section 407.6 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES REGULATIONS GOVERNING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF EX-IMBANK MEETINGS § 407.6 Transcripts, recordings and minutes of...

  5. Variable Seed Viability of Mile-a-Minute Weed (Devil's Tearthumb, Persicaria perfoliata)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mile-a-minute weed or devil's tearthumb is an invasive annual vine in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern United States. It reproduces solely through seeds, and therefore a key aspect of mile-a-minute weed biology and control concerns the production of viable seed. Our study aimed to identify how seed...

  6. MINUTES OF THE STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS ON THE REPORT OF THE JSA SHRIMP VIRUS WORK GROUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Minutes of the Stakeholder Meetings on the Report of the JSA Shrimp Virus Work Group - Availability September 1997 (EPA/600/R-97/136)

    This document is comprised of five pieces as follows:

    Minutes of the Stakeholder Meetings on the Report o...

  7. Minutes of the fifth annual meeting of the panel on reference nuclear data

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, T.W.; Coyne, J.J.; Brenner, D.S.

    1981-04-01

    The minutes include: approval of agenda and minutes of the fourth meeting; elections; reactor physics data needs; fusion data needs; biomedical data needs; status of international and national cooperation; status and availability of data files; status of transfer of responsibilities from NDP to NNDC; status of publications; on-line data base systems; and summary of recommendations and actions. (GHT)

  8. Assessment of regional earthquake hazards and risk along the Wasatch Front, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gori, Paula L., (Edited By); Hays, Walter W.

    2000-01-01

    This report--the second of two volumes--represents an ongoing effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to transfer accurate Earth science information about earthquake hazards along Utah's Wasatch Front to researchers, public officials, design professionals, land-use planners, and emergency managers in an effort to mitigate the effects of these hazards. This volume contains eight chapters on ground-shaking hazards and aspects of loss estimation.

  9. Habitat suitability index models: greater white-fronted goose (wintering). [Anser albifrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    A review and synthesis of available information were used to develop models for indexing the potential suitability of agricultural and natural wetland habitats for wintering white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons). The model is scaled to produce indices of habitat suitability from 0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimal habitat) primarily for wintering habitat in southwest Louisiana and southwest Texas. Habitat suitability indices are designed for use with Habitat Evaluations Procedures previously developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  10. Front-end electronics for drift tubes in a high-rate environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegler, W.; Aleksa, M.; Deile, M.; Dubbert, J.; Fabjan, C. W.; Gruhn, C.; Hessey, N. P.; Sammer, T.

    2000-05-01

    A front-end electronics readout for drift tubes in a high-rate environment is presented. This system allows us to encode several pieces of information (leading edge time, trailing edge time, signal charge and piled-up hits from multiple tracks) into a single readout channel that is presented to the TDC. The advantage of active baseline restoration compared to bipolar signal shaping is discussed.

  11. Cross-well 4-D resistivity tomography localizes the oil-water encroachment front during water flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Revil, A.

    2015-04-01

    The early detection of the oil-water encroachment front is of prime interest during the water flooding of an oil reservoir to maximize the production of oil and to avoid the oil-water encroachment front to come too close to production wells. We propose a new 4-D inversion approach based on the Gauss-Newton approach to invert cross-well resistance data. The goal of this study is to image the position of the oil-water encroachment front in a heterogeneous clayey sand reservoir. This approach is based on explicitly connecting the change of resistivity to the petrophysical properties controlling the position of the front (porosity and permeability) and to the saturation of the water phase through a petrophysical resistivity model accounting for bulk and surface conductivity contributions and saturation. The distributions of the permeability and porosity are also inverted using the time-lapse resistivity data in order to better reconstruct the position of the oil water encroachment front. In our synthetic test case, we get a better position of the front with the by-products of porosity and permeability inferences near the flow trajectory and close to the wells. The numerical simulations show that the position of the front is recovered well but the distribution of the recovered porosity and permeability is only fair. A comparison with a commercial code based on a classical Gauss-Newton approach with no information provided by the two-phase flow model fails to recover the position of the front. The new approach could be used for the time-lapse monitoring of various processes in both geothermal fields and oil and gas reservoirs using a combination of geophysical methods.

  12. The Hatteras Front: August 2004 velocity and density structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savidge, Dana K.; Austin, Jay A.

    2007-07-01

    The Hatteras Front is a persistent mesoscale cross-shelf oriented front off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. It is the boundary between relatively cool, fresh Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf waters and warmer, saltier shelf waters of the South Atlantic Bight, which both converge along-shelf upon Cape Hatteras year round. The Frontal Interaction Near Cape Hatteras (FINCH) project was conducted in 2004-2005 to intensively sample the Hatteras Front with shipboard ADCP and undulating towed CTD. This paper documents velocity and density structures associated with the cross-shelf oriented zone of Hatteras Front during the August 2004 field season. Property gradients across the Hatteras Front are large, with temperature (T) and salinity (S) differences of ˜4-6°C, 2-5 psu, respectively over distances of 1-2 km. The T and S are not completely compensating, and a strong density (ρ) gradient also exists, with Δρ of ˜2 kg/m3 across a gentler 10 km wide front. The density gradient results in a steric sea-level height gradient of ˜1-2 cm across the Front, which is in approximate geostrophic balance with a surface intensified jet, directed shoreward along the cross-shelf oriented Front. The velocity is sheared with depth at 3.0 × 10-2 to 5.0 × 10-2 s-1 in the upper 5 m of the jet; a rate consistent with the density gradient according to the thermal wind relationship. Shoreward transport of ˜4.8 × 104 m3/s results from the surface intensified jet. The structure of the velocity field associated with the Hatteras Front resembles that of a slope-controlled buoyant plume, as described by Lentz and Helfrich (2002). Velocity and density structures are similar during both advancing (southwestward) and retreating (northeastward) motion of the Front.

  13. Front End Spectroscopy ASIC for Germanium Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Eric

    Large-area, tracking, semiconductor detectors with excellent spatial and spectral resolution enable exciting new access to soft (0.2-5 MeV) gamma-ray astrophysics. The improvements from semiconductor tracking detectors come with the burden of high density of strips and/or pixels that require high-density, low-power, spectroscopy quality readout electronics. CMOS ASIC technologies are a natural fit to this requirement and have led to high-quality readout systems for all current semiconducting tracking detectors except for germanium detectors. The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI), formerly NCT, at University of California Berkeley and the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) at Goddard Space Flight Center utilize germanium cross-strip detectors and are on the forefront of NASA's Compton telescope research with funded missions of long duration balloon flights. The development of a readout ASIC for germanium detectors would allow COSI to replace their discrete electronics readout and would enable the proposed Gamma-Ray Explorer (GRX) mission utilizing germanium strip-detectors. We propose a 3-year program to develop and test a germanium readout ASIC to TRL 5 and to integrate the ASIC readout onto a COSI detector allowing a TRL 6 demonstration for the following COSI balloon flight. Our group at NRL led a program, sponsored by another government agency, to produce and integrate a cross-strip silicon detector ASIC, designed and fabricated by Dr. De Geronimo at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The ASIC was designed to handle the large (>30 pF) capacitance of three 10 cm^2 detectors daisy-chained together. The front-end preamplifier, selectable inverter, shaping times, and gains make this ASIC compatible with a germanium cross-strip detector as well. We therefore have the opportunity and expertise to leverage the previous investment in the silicon ASIC for a new mission. A germanium strip detector ASIC will also require precise timing of the signals at

  14. Cluster Observations of Multiple Dipolarization Fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Lee, E.; Pickett, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    We present Cluster observations of a series of dipolarization fronts (DF 1 to 6) at the central current sheet in Earth's magnetotail. The velocities of fast earthward flow following behind each DF 1.3 are comparable to the Alfven velocity, indicating that the flow bursts might have been generated by bursty reconnection that occurred tailward of the spacecraft. Based on multispacecraft timing analysis, DF normals are found to propagate mainly earthward at 160.335 km/s with a thickness of 900-1500 km, which corresponds to the ion inertial length or gyroradius scale. Each DF is followed by significant fluctuations in the x and y components of the magnetic field whose peaks are found 1.2 min after the DF passage. These (B(sub x), B(sub y)) fluctuations propagate dawnward (mainly) and earthward. Strongly enhanced field-aligned beams are observed coincidently with (B(sub x), B(sub y)) fluctuations, while an enhancement of cross-tail currents is associated with the DFs. From the observed pressure imbalance and flux tube entropy changes between the two regions separated by the DF, we speculate that interchange instability destabilizes the DFs and causes the deformation of the midtail magnetic topology. This process generates significant field-aligned currents and might power the auroral brightening in the ionosphere. However, this event is associated with neither the main substorm auroral breakup nor the poleward expansion, which might indicate that the observed multiple DFs have been dissipated before they reach the inner plasma sheet boundary.

  15. Isostatic Gravity Map of the Battle Mountain 30 x 60 Minute Quadrangle, North Central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponce, D.A.; Morin, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction Gravity investigations of the Battle Mountain 30 x 60 minute quadrangle were begun as part of an interagency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Bureau of Land Management to help characterize the geology, mineral resources, hydrology, and ecology of the Humboldt River Basin in north-central Nevada. The Battle Mountain quadrangle is located between 40?30' and 41?N. lat. and 116? and 117?W. long. This isostatic gravity map of the Battle Mountain quadrangle was prepared from data from about 1,180 gravity stations. Most of these data are publicly available on a CD-ROM of gravity data of Nevada (Ponce, 1997) and in a published report (Jewel and others, 1997). Data from about 780 gravity stations were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1996; data from about 245 of these are unpublished (USGS, unpub. data, 1998). Data collected from the 400 gravity stations prior to 1996 are a subset of a gravity data compilation of the Winnemucca 1:250,000-scale quadrangle described in great detail by Wagini (1985) and Sikora (1991). This detailed information includes gravity meters used, dates of collection, sources, descriptions of base stations, plots of data, and a list of principal facts. A digital version of the entire data set for the Battle Mountain quadrangle is available on the World Wide Web at: http://wrgis.wr.usgs.gov/docs/gump/gump.html

  16. Availability of coal in the Hackett 7.5-minute quadrangle, Washington County, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, L.J.; Neubaum, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    Coal has been extensively mined in Pennsylvania and elsewhere in the Appalachian Basin over the last 100 years. In an attempt to better define what coal is left, a new approach to quantifying resources, rooted in modern environmental and technological constraints, was needed. The Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey in cooperation with the United States Geological Survey, embarked in 1993 upon a series of six quadrangle studies for Pennsylvania to provide information about coal resources still accessible to mining. Using our data residing on the United States Geological Survey`s National Coal Resources Data System computer to compute resources for the Hackett 7.5-minute quadrangle, the available coal for the four principally mined seams in the area (the Pittsburgh, Redstone, Waynesburg, and Waynesburg A coals) could be determined by subtracting out mined-out areas from in-place coal to give remaining coal, and then subtracting land-use and technological restrictions to mining, such as wetlands, and subsidence waivers, respectively, from the remaining coal. Results of the study found that the amount of coal available for mining varied from 26 to 70 percent. it is felt by the authors that this quadrangle is typical of the mature nature of this mining region for this part of the geologic section, and that similar results might be expected for the other quadrangles to be studied in southwestern Pennsylvania.

  17. Aeromagnetic Map with Geology of the Los Angeles 30 x 60 Minute Quadrangle, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Jachens, R.C.; Campbell, R.H.; Yerkes, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: An important objective of geologic mapping is to project surficial structures and stratigraphy into the subsurface. Geophysical data and analysis are useful tools for achieving this objective. This aeromagnetic anomaly map provides a three-dimensional perspective to the geologic mapping of the Los Angeles 30 by 60 minute quadrangle. Aeromagnetic maps show the distribution of magnetic rocks, primarily those containing magnetite (Blakely, 1995). In the Los Angeles quadrangle, the magnetic sources are Tertiary and Mesozoic igneous rocks and Precambrian crystalline rocks. Aeromagnetic anomalies mark abrupt spatial contrasts in magnetization that can be attributed to lithologic boundaries, perhaps caused by faulting of these rocks or by intrusive contacts. This aeromagnetic map overlain on geology, with information from wells and other geophysical data, provides constraints on the subsurface geology by allowing us to trace faults beneath surficial cover and estimate fault dip and offset. This map supersedes Langenheim and Jachens (1997) because of its digital form and the added value of overlaying the magnetic data on a geologic base. The geologic base for this map is from Yerkes and Campbell (2005); some of their subunits have been merged into one on this map.

  18. Light-Front Holography and Novel Effects in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Teramond, Guy F. de

    2009-04-20

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. We identify the AdS coordinate z with an invariant light-front coordinate {zeta} which separates the dynamics of quark and gluon binding from the kinematics of constituent spin and internal orbital angular momentum. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation for QCD which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The mapping of electromagnetic and gravitational form factors in AdS space to their corresponding expressions in light-front theory confirms this correspondence. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates and the behavior of the QCD coupling in the infrared. The distinction between static structure functions such as the probability distributions computed from the square of the light-front wavefunctions versus dynamical structure functions which include the effects of rescattering is emphasized. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  19. Light-Front Holography and Novel Effects in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.

    2008-12-18

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. We identify the AdS coordinate z with an invariant light-front coordinate {zeta} which separates the dynamics of quark and gluon binding from the kinematics of constituent spin and internal orbital angular momentum. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation for QCD which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The mapping of electromagnetic and gravitational form factors in AdS space to their corresponding expressions in light-front theory confirms this correspondence. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates and the behavior of the QCD coupling in the infrared. The distinction between static structure functions such as the probability distributions computed from the square of the light-front wavefunctions versus dynamical structure functions which include the effects of rescattering is emphasized. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  20. Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project: water-resources activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.; Heiny, Janet S.

    1998-01-01

    Infrastructure, such as roads, buildings, airports, and dams, is built and maintained by use of large quantities of natural resources such as aggregate (sand and gravel), energy, and water. As urban area expand, local sources of these resource are becoming inaccessible (gravel cannot be mined from under a subdivision, for example), or the cost of recovery of the resource becomes prohibitive (oil and gas drilling in urban areas is costly), or the resources may become unfit for some use (pollution of ground water may preclude its use as a water supply). Governmental land-use decision and environmental mandates can further preclude development of natural resources. If infrastructure resources are to remain economically available. current resource information must be available for use in well-reasoned decisions bout future land use. Ground water is an infrastructure resource that is present in shallow aquifers and deeper bedrock aquifers that underlie much of the 2,450-square-mile demonstration area of the Colorado Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project. In 1996, mapping of the area's ground-water resources was undertaken as a U.S. Geological Survey project in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources, and the Colorado Water Conservation Board.

  1. Interpretive front-of-pack nutrition labels. Comparing competing recommendations.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Ninya; Hoek, Janet; Mather, Damien

    2014-11-01

    Many stakeholders support introducing an interpretive front-of-pack (FOP) nutrition label, but disagree over the form it should take. In late 2012, an expert working group established by the New Zealand government recommended the adoption of an untested summary rating system: a Star label. This study used a best-worst scaling choice experiment to estimate how labels featuring the new Star rating, the Multiple Traffic Light (MTL), Daily Intake Guide (DIG), and a no-FOP control affected consumers' choice behaviours and product perceptions. Nutrient-content and health claims were included in the design. We also assessed whether respondents who used more or less information during the choice tasks differed in their selection patterns. Overall, while respondents made broadly similar choices with respect to the MTL and Star labels, the MTL format had a significantly greater impact on depressing preference as a food's nutritional profile became less healthy. Health claims increased rankings of less nutritious options, though this effect was less pronounced when the products featured an MTL. Further, respondents were best able to differentiate products' healthiness with MTL labels. The proposed summary Stars system had less effect on choice patterns than an MTL label and our findings highlight the need for policy makers to ensure that decisions to introduce FOP labels are underpinned by robust research evidence. These results suggest that the proposed summary Stars system will have less effect on shifting food choice patterns than interpretive FOP nutrition label featuring traffic light ratings. PMID:25038407

  2. The Arctic Front in the Fram Strait in autumn 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullgren, Jenny; Falck, Eva; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Sagen, Hanne

    2016-04-01

    The front between Atlantic water carried northward by the main branch of the West Spitsbergen Current and the cooler, fresher Arctic domain in the central Fram Strait, here called the Arctic Front, is important because of the exchange of heat and salt across it. The marked water mass boundary and the dynamics of the front also profoundly affect the living conditions for marine organisms. A northwest-to-southeast transect across the Arctic Front with concurrent shipboard and glider measurements was done in September 2011. The CTD data, nutrient and pigment samples, and underway ADCP data from the research cruise are complemented by the glider observations of temperature and salinity at higher horizontal resolution. In addition, images from the ship's scientific echo sounder are used to qualitatively describe the water column structure and distribution of marine organisms along the transect. Crossing the front from northwest to southeast, the near-surface (5 m) temperature increased by more than 4°C and salinity increased by 0.98 PSU between stations 19 km apart. The front was thus clearly marked in salinity and temperature in the upper 200 m, but below the surface layer it was largely density compensated. The highest chlorophyll-a concentrations were found in subsurface maxima on the Arctic side of the front. We investigate the hydrographic structure of the front, considering properties relevant to cross-frontal exchange and mixing. We also assess the environmental conditions on each side of the front - for example mixed layer depths, nutrient availability, and bio-optical properties - and their implications for marine life.

  3. Determination of cut front position in laser cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, M.; Thombansen, U.

    2016-07-01

    Laser cutting has a huge importance to manufacturing industry. Laser cutting machines operate with fixed technological parameters and this does not guarantee the best productivity. The adjustment of the cutting parameters during operation can improve the machine performance. Based on a coaxial measuring device it is possible to identify the cut front position during the cutting process. This paper describes the data analysis approach used to determine the cut front position for different feed rates. The cut front position was determined with good resolution, but improvements are needed to make the whole process more stable.

  4. Muon capture for the front end of a muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Yoshikawa, C.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the design of the muon capture front end for a {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} Collider. In the front end, a proton bunch on a target creates secondary pions that drift into a capture transport channel, decaying into muons. A sequence of rf cavities forms the resulting muon beams into strings of bunches of differing energies, aligns the bunches to (nearly) equal central energies, and initiates ionization cooling. The muons are then cooled and accelerated to high energy into a storage ring for high-energy high luminosity collisions. Our initial design is based on the somewhat similar front end of the International Design Study (IDS) neutrino factory.

  5. Upwelling and convergence in the Middle Atlantic Bight Shelfbreak Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, Robert W.; Visbeck, Martin

    Convergent and up welling circulation within the shelfbreak front in the Middle Atlantic Bight are detected using a dye tracer injected into the bottom boundary layer at the foot of the front. From the three day displacement and dispersion of two dye injections within the front we infer Lagrangian isopycnal (diapycnal) velocities and diffusivities of 2 × 10-2 m/s (4 × 10-6 m/s) and 9 m²/s (6 × 10-6 m²/s). These results substantiate model predictions of Chapman and Lentz [1994] and previous dye tracer observations by Houghton [1997].

  6. Speed of reaction-diffusion fronts in spatially heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Vicenç; Fort, Joaquim; Rotstein, Horacio G; Fedotov, Sergei

    2003-10-01

    The front speed problem for nonuniform reaction rate and diffusion coefficient is studied by using singular perturbation analysis, the geometric approach of Hamilton-Jacobi dynamics, and the local speed approach. Exact and perturbed expressions for the front speed are obtained in the limit of large times. For linear and fractal heterogeneities, the analytic results have been compared with numerical results exhibiting a good agreement. Finally we reach a general expression for the speed of the front in the case of smooth and weak heterogeneities. PMID:14682921

  7. Convective instabilities in traveling fronts of addition polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pojman, John A.; Jones, Chris E.; Khan, Akhtar M.

    1993-01-01

    An autocatalytic reaction in an unstirred vessel can support a constant velocity wavefront resulting from the coupling of diffusion to the chemical reaction. A flare front is a common example in which heat is the autocatalytic species that diffuses into unreacted regions stimulating a reaction that produces more heat. Traveling fronts were studied in synthetic polymerization reactions under high pressure by workers in the former USSR. More recently, propagating fronts of methacrylic acid polymerization were studied under ambient conditions, both with video techniques and by NMR.

  8. Chaos of radiative heat-loss-induced flame front instability.

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, Hikaru; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    We are intensively studying the chaos via the period-doubling bifurcation cascade in radiative heat-loss-induced flame front instability by analytical methods based on dynamical systems theory and complex networks. Significant changes in flame front dynamics in the chaotic region, which cannot be seen in the bifurcation diagrams, were successfully extracted from recurrence quantification analysis and nonlinear forecasting and from the network entropy. The temporal dynamics of the fuel concentration in the well-developed chaotic region is much more complicated than that of the flame front temperature. It exhibits self-affinity as a result of the scale-free structure in the constructed visibility graph. PMID:27036182

  9. Electron g-2 in Light-front Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xingbo; Honkanen, Heli; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2014-10-01

    Basis Light-front Quantization has been proposed as a nonperturbative framework for solving quantum field theory. We apply this approach to Quantum Electrodynamics and explicitly solve for the light-front wave function of a physical electron. Based on the resulting light-front wave function, we evaluate the electron anomalous magnetic moment. Nonperturbative mass renormalization is performed. Upon extrapolation to the infinite basis limit our numerical results agree with the Schwinger result obtained in perturbation theory to an accuracy of 0.06%.

  10. Preliminary surficial geologic map database of the Amboy 30 x 60 minute quadrangle, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedford, David R.; Miller, David M.; Phelps, Geoffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    The surficial geologic map database of the Amboy 30x60 minute quadrangle presents characteristics of surficial materials for an area approximately 5,000 km2 in the eastern Mojave Desert of California. This map consists of new surficial mapping conducted between 2000 and 2005, as well as compilations of previous surficial mapping. Surficial geology units are mapped and described based on depositional process and age categories that reflect the mode of deposition, pedogenic effects occurring post-deposition, and, where appropriate, the lithologic nature of the material. The physical properties recorded in the database focus on those that drive hydrologic, biologic, and physical processes such as particle size distribution (PSD) and bulk density. This version of the database is distributed with point data representing locations of samples for both laboratory determined physical properties and semi-quantitative field-based information. Future publications will include the field and laboratory data as well as maps of distributed physical properties across the landscape tied to physical process models where appropriate. The database is distributed in three parts: documentation, spatial map-based data, and printable map graphics of the database. Documentation includes this file, which provides a discussion of the surficial geology and describes the format and content of the map data, a database 'readme' file, which describes the database contents, and FGDC metadata for the spatial map information. Spatial data are distributed as Arc/Info coverage in ESRI interchange (e00) format, or as tabular data in the form of DBF3-file (.DBF) file formats. Map graphics files are distributed as Postscript and Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) files, and are appropriate for representing a view of the spatial database at the mapped scale.

  11. How 10 Minutes Can Be Your Friend When You Want to Workout | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    One of the biggest challenges to becoming physically active is finding a way for exercise to fit into your already busy life. Finding an extra 30 minutes in the day to exercise can seem overwhelming. But there’s good news! First, every bit of exercise can help get you on the path to a healthier you—so getting in a little bit is good for you (and better than not at all). Second, especially with cardiovascular activities, getting at least 10 minutes of continuous moderate activity 3 times per day seems to yield the same health benefits as 30 minutes 1 time per day.

  12. Mesoscale fronts as foraging habitats: composite front mapping reveals oceanographic drivers of habitat use for a pelagic seabird

    PubMed Central

    Scales, Kylie L.; Miller, Peter I.; Embling, Clare B.; Ingram, Simon N.; Pirotta, Enrico; Votier, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    The oceanographic drivers of marine vertebrate habitat use are poorly understood yet fundamental to our knowledge of marine ecosystem functioning. Here, we use composite front mapping and high-resolution GPS tracking to determine the significance of mesoscale oceanographic fronts as physical drivers of foraging habitat selection in northern gannets Morus bassanus. We tracked 66 breeding gannets from a Celtic Sea colony over 2 years and used residence time to identify area-restricted search (ARS) behaviour. Composite front maps identified thermal and chlorophyll-a mesoscale fronts at two different temporal scales—(i) contemporaneous fronts and (ii) seasonally persistent frontal zones. Using generalized additive models (GAMs), with generalized estimating equations (GEE-GAMs) to account for serial autocorrelation in tracking data, we found that gannets do not adjust their behaviour in response to contemporaneous fronts. However, ARS was more likely to occur within spatially predictable, seasonally persistent frontal zones (GAMs). Our results provide proof of concept that composite front mapping is a useful tool for studying the influence of oceanographic features on animal movements. Moreover, we highlight that frontal persistence is a crucial element of the formation of pelagic foraging hotspots for mobile marine vertebrates. PMID:25165595

  13. Mesoscale fronts as foraging habitats: composite front mapping reveals oceanographic drivers of habitat use for a pelagic seabird.

    PubMed

    Scales, Kylie L; Miller, Peter I; Embling, Clare B; Ingram, Simon N; Pirotta, Enrico; Votier, Stephen C

    2014-11-01

    The oceanographic drivers of marine vertebrate habitat use are poorly understood yet fundamental to our knowledge of marine ecosystem functioning. Here, we use composite front mapping and high-resolution GPS tracking to determine the significance of mesoscale oceanographic fronts as physical drivers of foraging habitat selection in northern gannets Morus bassanus. We tracked 66 breeding gannets from a Celtic Sea colony over 2 years and used residence time to identify area-restricted search (ARS) behaviour. Composite front maps identified thermal and chlorophyll-a mesoscale fronts at two different temporal scales-(i) contemporaneous fronts and (ii) seasonally persistent frontal zones. Using generalized additive models (GAMs), with generalized estimating equations (GEE-GAMs) to account for serial autocorrelation in tracking data, we found that gannets do not adjust their behaviour in response to contemporaneous fronts. However, ARS was more likely to occur within spatially predictable, seasonally persistent frontal zones (GAMs). Our results provide proof of concept that composite front mapping is a useful tool for studying the influence of oceanographic features on animal movements. Moreover, we highlight that frontal persistence is a crucial element of the formation of pelagic foraging hotspots for mobile marine vertebrates. PMID:25165595

  14. 17 CFR 229.501 - (Item 501) Forepart of Registration Statement and Outside Front Cover Page of Prospectus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... may use one of the following or other clear, plain language: Example A: Neither the Securities and... following or other clear, plain language: The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be... in plain English. See § 230.421(d) of Regulation C of this chapter. (a) Front cover page of...

  15. Identification of diesel front sound source based on continuous wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhi-yong; Han, Jun

    2004-09-01

    Acoustic signals from diesel engines contain useful information but also include considerable noise components. To extract information for condition monitoring purposes, continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is used for the characterization of engine acoustics. This paper first reviews CWT characteristics represented by short duration transient signals. Wavelet selection and CWT are then implemented and wavelet transform is used to analyze the major sources of the engine front's exterior radiation sound. The research provides a reliable basis for engineering practice to reduce vehicle sound level. Comparison of the identification results of the measured acoustic signals with the identification results of the measured surface vibration showed good agreement. PMID:15323001

  16. Are Front of Pack Claims Indicators of Nutrition Quality? Evidence from 2 Product Categories.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Debra; Hooker, Neal H; Stanton, John L

    2016-01-01

    American grocery shoppers face an array of front of pack (FOP) nutrition and health claims when making food selections. Such systems have been categorized as summary or nutrient specific. Either type should help consumers make judgments about the nutrition quality of a product. This research tests if the type or quantity of FOP claims are indeed good indicators of objective nutrition quality. Claim and nutrition information from more than 2200 breakfast cereals and prepared meals launched between 2006 and 2010 were analyzed using binary and multinomial logistic regression models. Results suggest that no type or number of front of pack claims could distinguish "healthy" foods. However, some types and frequencies of FOP claims were significant predictors of higher or lower levels of certain key nutrients. Given the complex and crowded label environment in which these FOP claims reside, one may be concerned that such cues are not closely related to objective measures of nutrition quality. PMID:26641596

  17. Shape based zonal wave-front reconstruction for arbitrary shape pupils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhaoliang; Qu, Qing; Wang, Yukun; Xu, Huanyu; Wang, Shaoxin; Yang, Chengliang; Xuan, Li

    2015-02-01

    Zonal method is widely used to reconstruct the wave-front. Up to now, the iterative algorithms have been used to reconstruct the arbitrary shape wave-front with high reconstruction accuracy. However, it has the shortcomings of long time consumption. To reduce the time delay, a shaped based method is proposed by adding the shape information into the geometry matrix. The simulated and experimental results indicate that the reconstruction accuracy of proposed method is similar to that of the iterative LS-based method, but the computation time of our method is 3 times less than that of the iteration method. Consequently, the high accuracy and low time consumption are simultaneously achieved with the proposed method.

  18. 8. Oil house, view southeast, north side and west front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Oil house, view southeast, north side and west front - Pumpkin Island Light Station, Pumpkin Island, at northern end of Eggemoggin Beach, off northwest end of Little Deer Island, Eggemoggin, Hancock County, ME

  19. 52. FRONT VIEW OF INSIDE DOOR AT 'CATFISH' SILO Everett ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. FRONT VIEW OF INSIDE DOOR AT 'CATFISH' SILO Everett Weinreb, photographer, March 1988 - Mount Gleason Nike Missile Site, Angeles National Forest, South of Soledad Canyon, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 51. FRONT VIEW OF ELEVATOR LIFT IN 'CATFISH' SILO Everett ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. FRONT VIEW OF ELEVATOR LIFT IN 'CATFISH' SILO Everett Weinreb, photographer, March 1988 - Mount Gleason Nike Missile Site, Angeles National Forest, South of Soledad Canyon, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Detail of front south wall section showing pediment with triangular ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of front south wall section showing pediment with triangular inset molding; camera facing north. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Old Administrative Offices, Eighth Street, north side between Railroad Avenue & Walnut Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  2. 57. POWDER MAGAZINE, DETAIL VIEW OF NORTHEAST FRONT ENTRANCE TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. POWDER MAGAZINE, DETAIL VIEW OF NORTHEAST FRONT ENTRANCE TO ACESS PASSAGE TO MAGAZINES FROM INTERIOR OF MAGAZINE SHOWING VENTILATION WINDOWS (BARRED) FLANKING ENTRANCE DOOR (OPEN). NOTE ACCESS PASSAGE TO ADJOING MAGAZINE. - Fort Monroe, Fortress, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  3. MAGAZINE 243, FRONT ELEVATION WITH POLE. MAGAZINE 242 IN BACKGROUND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAGAZINE 243, FRONT ELEVATION WITH POLE. MAGAZINE 242 IN BACKGROUND. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Magazine Type 2, Fourth Place, Seventh & Eighth Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE, FACING NORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE, FACING NORTHWEST. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Wing & Fuselage Assembly Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. VIEW OF WEST SIDE AND SOUTH FRONT (PARTIAL), FACING NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF WEST SIDE AND SOUTH FRONT (PARTIAL), FACING NORTHEAST. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Final Assembly Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 6. Detail of porch on east front of building. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail of porch on east front of building. View to southwest. - U.S. Customs Service Port of Roosville, Immigration & Naturalization Service Residence, 45 feet southwest of Main Port Building, Eureka, Lincoln County, MT

  7. 1. East front and north side of building. View to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. East front and north side of building. View to west. - U.S. Customs Service Port of Roosville, Immigration & Naturalization Service Residence, 45 feet southwest of Main Port Building, Eureka, Lincoln County, MT

  8. 5. East front and south side of building. View to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. East front and south side of building. View to northwest. - U.S. Customs Service Port of Roosville, Immigration & Naturalization Service Residence, 45 feet southwest of Main Port Building, Eureka, Lincoln County, MT

  9. 10. Interior view of communications compartment. View toward front of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Interior view of communications compartment. View toward front of aircraft. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  10. Northwest front and southwest end. View to east Offutt ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Northwest front and southwest end. View to east - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Traffic Check House, Southeast end of Operational Apron, Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  11. 11. Northeast front, dock no. 493. View to west. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Northeast front, dock no. 493. View to west. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Nose Docks, On either side of Hangar Access Apron at Northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  12. 5. Southwest front, dock no. 492. View to east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Southwest front, dock no. 492. View to east. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Nose Docks, On either side of Hangar Access Apron at Northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  13. 33. Detail, typical door hardware, door from front parlor to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Detail, typical door hardware, door from front parlor to entrance hall; view to south; 135mm lens with electronic flash illumination. - Warner Hutton House, 13495 Sousa Lane, Saratoga, Santa Clara County, CA

  14. 2. OBLIQUE VIEW TO NORTHEAST ALONG FRONT OF SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OBLIQUE VIEW TO NORTHEAST ALONG FRONT OF SANTA ANA RIVER DIVERSION DAM. NOTE CABLE CAR SUSPENSION CABLE AT GATE ATOP DAM. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Santa Ana River Diversion Dam, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. 11. WEST FRONT ELEVATION OF BUILDING 342 (STORAGE MAGAZINE) IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. WEST FRONT ELEVATION OF BUILDING 342 (STORAGE MAGAZINE) IN STORAGE AREA. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  16. 39. ARCHED HERRINGBONE BRICK PATTERN DETAIL ON FRONT OF 1931 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. ARCHED HERRINGBONE BRICK PATTERN DETAIL ON FRONT OF 1931 SECTION, PROJECTING SIDE BAY, TAKEN FROM THE NORTH. - James Russell Lowell Elementary School, 4501 Crittenden Drive, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  17. 38. RECESSED ARCH DETAIL WITH STONE SCONCE ON FRONT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. RECESSED ARCH DETAIL WITH STONE SCONCE ON FRONT OF 1931 SECTION, PROJECTING SIDE BAY, TAKEN FROM THE NORTH. - James Russell Lowell Elementary School, 4501 Crittenden Drive, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  18. INTERIOR VIEW ON MEZZANINE ALONG EAST (CLAY STREET) FRONT FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW ON MEZZANINE ALONG EAST (CLAY STREET) FRONT FACING OAKLAND CITY HALL. TYPICAL INTERIOR CONDITIONS OF PARTIAL DEMOLITION; WINDOWS, WINDOW FRAMES, SUSPENDED CEILING, AND MOVABLE PARTITION WALLS REMOVED - John Breuner & Company Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  19. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING EAST, FRONT FACADE AND ENTRANCE TO COMPANY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING EAST, FRONT FACADE AND ENTRANCE TO COMPANY SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN OF BLACK TCI-US STEEL RED ORE MINE WORKERS - Company School for Blacks, 413 Morgan Road, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  20. 52. DETAIL VIEW OF FRONT DOOR (EXTERIOR), FLUTED BUTTRESSES, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. DETAIL VIEW OF FRONT DOOR (EXTERIOR), FLUTED BUTTRESSES, AND PARAPETED GABLE, NORTHWEST SIDE OF CAPTAIN'S GALLEY, LOOKING EAST - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA