Science.gov

Sample records for information processing technology

  1. Information technology standards process guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This document presents a logical and realistic approach to implementation of the Information Technology Standards Program throughout the Department and its management and operating contractors, as described in Department of Energy 1360.3C, Information Technology Standards, dated October 19, 1992. To take better advantage of commercial advances and investments in information technology resources, it is paramount that the Department of Energy move as rapidly as programmatically feasible to an open systems environment. The process revolves around the selection of interface standards in areas such as multi-system and multi-processor interconnects, operating and database management systems, graphics, and security. This new approach will result in reduced production, operation, and maintenance costs, and more effective system integration. The Information Technology Standards Process Guide provides a model that may be tailored to Department of Energy sites. It also assists sites in understanding the Information Technology Standards Program. It is not an architectural description to be used in implementing a corporate information systems environment.

  2. Information Processing Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Larry; And Others

    A tech prep/associate degree program in information technology was developed to prepare workers for entry into and advancement in occupations entailing applications of scientific principles and higher mathematics in situations involving various office machines. According to the articulation agreement reached, students from five country regional…

  3. Quantum information processing : science & technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Rebecca; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Tarman, Thomas David

    2010-09-01

    Qubits demonstrated using GaAs double quantum dots (DQD). The qubit basis states are the (1) singlet and (2) triplet stationary states. Long spin decoherence times in silicon spurs translation of GaAs qubit in to silicon. In the near term the goals are: (1) Develop surface gate enhancement mode double quantum dots (MOS & strained-Si/SiGe) to demonstrate few electrons and spin read-out and to examine impurity doped quantum-dots as an alternative architecture; (2) Use mobility, C-V, ESR, quantum dot performance & modeling to feedback and improve upon processing, this includes development of atomic precision fabrication at SNL; (3) Examine integrated electronics approaches to RF-SET; (4) Use combinations of numerical packages for multi-scale simulation of quantum dot systems (NEMO3D, EMT, TCAD, SPICE); and (5) Continue micro-architecture evaluation for different device and transport architectures.

  4. The Search for New Information Processing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavin, Ralph K.

    2005-03-01

    Our society has benefited from the ‘Golden Age of Electronics’ for the last half century. The ubiquitous transistor, in its many manifestations, has enabled an explosion of capabilities in information processing, communications, and sensing that has spurred exponential growth in performance-benefit ratios. Much of the credit for this progress is due to the continued scaling of the silicon integrated circuit (IC) components and to the associated efficient fabrication processes that have made the IC affordable. There is a growing realization, from simple physics arguments, that as minimum features sizes approach the ten nanometer regime, scaling will very likely slow and eventually end. This doesn’t mean that the MOSFET will disappear, but more likely that it will need to be supplemented by other device and interconnect technologies if the exponential gains are to continue. In this talk we discuss the basis for the projected limitation of scaling of charge-based devices for logic and memory devices. We argue that a fundamental consideration for all devices, including those based on charge, relates to the capacity to manage heat generated by circuit operation. Our preference is for devices that operate at room temperature since the energy costs for cooling the devices must also be charged against the overall system energy consumption. (Cooling costs increase as a power of the difference between the ambient and the target temperature.) Therefore we seek new state variables to serve as an alternative to electrical charge for future information processing technologies. These technologies must provide the potential for sustaining exponential performance-cost benefits with time. The search must not only focus on device structures but on the underlying materials and process technologies that enable these structures. Indeed, to obtain extremely scaled CMOS, new materials and processes must also be developed. In this talk, we survey some of the candidates for replacements/supplements for/to the MOSFET and give a status report on the status of the search. We also briefly discuss the problem of design in the far nanometer regime where device variability is likely to be significant. What design constraints must be employed to ensure that manufacturing yields are high, given broad tolerance margins for the device characteristics? Variability is a growing problem in extremely scaled CMOS what is learned from these applications will likely benefit replacement technologies as well.

  5. Optical information processing planes with silicon technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thienpont, Hugo; Peiffer, Werner; Nieuborg, Nancy; Veretennicoff, Irina P.; Dupont, H.; Fernandez, R.; Bertic, Yves T.; Ranson, W.; De Tandt, C.; Vounckx, Roger A.; Koster, Alain; Laval, Suzanne

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we report on progress made in optical logic planes consisting of hybrid electrically assisted thermo-optic resonators fabricated with standard Silicon technology. As a starting point, the features and shortcomings of a first generation of these bistable elements, based on double-sided polished Silicon wafers, are reviewed. Consecutively we demonstrate, both with modeling and experimental results, that some of the shortcomings of the first generation can be remedied using a Silicon on Sapphire based device. Finally we propose a novel structure, based on Silicon Implanted Oxide substrates, that combines the advantages of the two pervious structures. We show via a heat transfer model that these devices can display bistability at multi-microwatt optical bias power and that, when adequately dimensioned, crosstalk can be avoided such that they can be packed into dense arrays. Both these characteristics and their stability, wavelength flexibility, hybrid mode of operation, and the potentialities for microsecond switching times, can turn these low-cost devices into work- horses for prototype digital optical parallel computing circuitry.

  6. Effectiveness of Information Technology Infrastructure Library Process Implementations by Information Technology Departments within United States Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jon F.

    2010-01-01

    This research study examined whether the overall effectiveness of the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) could be predicted by measuring multiple independent variables. The primary variables studied included the number of ITIL process modules adopted and the overall ITIL "maturity level." An online survey was used to collect data…

  7. Effectiveness of Information Technology Infrastructure Library Process Implementations by Information Technology Departments within United States Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jon F.

    2010-01-01

    This research study examined whether the overall effectiveness of the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) could be predicted by measuring multiple independent variables. The primary variables studied included the number of ITIL process modules adopted and the overall ITIL "maturity level." An online survey was used to collect data

  8. Spatial Information Processing: Standards-Based Open Source Visualization Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, P.

    2009-12-01

    . Spatial information intelligence is a global issue that will increasingly affect our ability to survive as a species. Collectively we must better appreciate the complex relationships that make life on Earth possible. Providing spatial information in its native context can accelerate our ability to process that information. To maximize this ability to process information, three basic elements are required: data delivery (server technology), data access (client technology), and data processing (information intelligence). NASA World Wind provides open source client and server technologies based on open standards. The possibilities for data processing and data sharing are enhanced by this inclusive infrastructure for geographic information. It is interesting that this open source and open standards approach, unfettered by proprietary constraints, simultaneously provides for entirely proprietary use of this same technology. 1. WHY WORLD WIND? NASA World Wind began as a single program with specific functionality, to deliver NASA content. But as the possibilities for virtual globe technology became more apparent, we found that while enabling a new class of information technology, we were also getting in the way. Researchers, developers and even users expressed their desire for World Wind functionality in ways that would service their specific needs. They want it in their web pages. They want to add their own features. They want to manage their own data. They told us that only with this kind of flexibility, could their objectives and the potential for this technology be truly realized. World Wind client technology is a set of development tools, a software development kit (SDK) that allows a software engineer to create applications requiring geographic visualization technology. 2. MODULAR COMPONENTRY Accelerated evolution of a technology requires that the essential elements of that technology be modular components such that each can advance independent of the other elements. World Wind therefore changed its mission from providing a single information browser to enabling a whole class of 3D geographic applications. Instead of creating a single program, World Wind is a suite of components that can be selectively used in any number of programs. World Wind technology can be a part of any application, or it can be a window in a web page. Or it can be extended with additional functionalities by application and web developers. World Wind makes it possible to include virtual globe visualization and server technology in support of any objective. The world community can continually benefit from advances made in the technology by NASA in concert with the world community. 3. OPEN SOURCE AND OPEN STANDARDS NASA World Wind is NASA Open Source software. This means that the source code is fully accessible for anyone to freely use, even in association with proprietary technology. Imagery and other data provided by the World Wind servers reside in the public domain, including the data server technology itself. This allows others to deliver their own geospatial data and to provide custom solutions based on users specific needs.

  9. Measuring of optics surface information with digital image processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shaojun; Han, Jun; Liang, Wang; Zhang, Weiguang; Liu, Baoyuan; Hu, Jiaxing; Nie, Liang

    2010-08-01

    The quality of optics' surface is of an important character which has critical influence in optical system. There are many ways to detect surface quality, but interferometry is considered as an effective technology. Interfere fringes which obtained from our experiment based on equal thickness interference were processed with digital image processing (DIP) technology in this paper. Image smoothing, fringes thinning, fringes' space measurement and P-V value measurement were done in this processing, Which can give optics' surface information automatically and accurately. We measured some optics whose apertures are not more than 30mm, and the result is satisfactory. Our method will be widely used in industrial inspection, especially in optical works in the future.

  10. Re-engineering the mining process using information technology

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.

    1998-07-01

    To remain profitable, coal-mining companies have invested significantly to improve operating efficiencies. Most mining companies have invested in larger machinery to reduce cost per ton. However, there are now emerging additional technology alternates that also have significant potential in lowering cost per ton. The emerging areas can be classified under these broad headings for the mining industry: (1) Monitoring and Diagnostics; (2) On-board Information Systems; (3) Integrated Information Systems, and (4) Automation. These four technologies are illustrated with examples.

  11. Information Technology Process Improvement Decision-Making: An Exploratory Study from the Perspective of Process Owners and Process Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamp, Sandra A.

    2012-01-01

    There is information available in the literature that discusses information technology (IT) governance and investment decision making from an executive-level perception, yet there is little information available that offers the perspective of process owners and process managers pertaining to their role in IT process improvement and investment…

  12. The Contextualized Technology Adaptation Process (CTAP): Optimizing Health Information Technology to Improve Mental Health Systems.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Aaron R; Wasse, Jessica Knaster; Ludwig, Kristy; Zachry, Mark; Bruns, Eric J; Unützer, Jürgen; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Health information technologies have become a central fixture in the mental healthcare landscape, but few frameworks exist to guide their adaptation to novel settings. This paper introduces the contextualized technology adaptation process (CTAP) and presents data collected during Phase 1 of its application to measurement feedback system development in school mental health. The CTAP is built on models of human-centered design and implementation science and incorporates repeated mixed methods assessments to guide the design of technologies to ensure high compatibility with a destination setting. CTAP phases include: (1) Contextual evaluation, (2) Evaluation of the unadapted technology, (3) Trialing and evaluation of the adapted technology, (4) Refinement and larger-scale implementation, and (5) Sustainment through ongoing evaluation and system revision. Qualitative findings from school-based practitioner focus groups are presented, which provided information for CTAP Phase 1, contextual evaluation, surrounding education sector clinicians' workflows, types of technologies currently available, and influences on technology use. Discussion focuses on how findings will inform subsequent CTAP phases, as well as their implications for future technology adaptation across content domains and service sectors. PMID:25677251

  13. Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Roger

    1983-01-01

    Describes important information-handling products, predicting future devices in light of convergence and greater flexibility offered through use of microchip technology. Contends that information technology and its impact of privacy depends on how information systems are used, arguing that the privacy issue deals more with moral/physiological…

  14. IMPROVING THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF CHEMICAL PROCESSES THROUGH THE USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts are currently underway at the USEPA to develop information technology applications to improve the environmental performance of the chemical process industry. These efforts include the use of genetic algorithms to optimize different process options for minimal environmenta...

  15. Assessing Factors Affecting Implementation of Information Technology Infrastructure Library Process Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Kristy

    2010-01-01

    The capability of organizations to operate on the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) framework is reliant on ITIL process measurements. Appropriate ITIL process measurements help ensure desired outcomes, enable corrective actions to take place prior to process failure, and direct process activities towards continuous improvement.…

  16. Assessing Factors Affecting Implementation of Information Technology Infrastructure Library Process Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Kristy

    2010-01-01

    The capability of organizations to operate on the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) framework is reliant on ITIL process measurements. Appropriate ITIL process measurements help ensure desired outcomes, enable corrective actions to take place prior to process failure, and direct process activities towards continuous improvement.

  17. Improved information processing and dissemination through the introduction of new technology

    SciTech Connect

    Spath, C E; Marsh, Jr, F E

    1983-10-01

    This paper discusses the following topic on information technology: technology signals a liberation; application of information technology; optical character recognition; optical memories; and planning considerations and the future.

  18. Aeronautical Satellite-Assisted Process for Information Exchange Through Network Technologies (Aero-SAPIENT) Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernic, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Broadband satellite communications for aeronautics marries communication and network technologies to address NASA's goals in information technology base research and development, thereby serving the safety and capacity needs of the National Airspace System. This marriage of technology increases the interactivity between airborne vehicles and ground systems. It improves decision-making and efficiency, reduces operation costs, and improves the safety and capacity of the National Airspace System. To this end, a collaborative project called the Aeronautical Satellite Assisted Process for Information Exchange through Network Technologies, or Aero-SAPIENT, was conducted out of Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, during November and December 2000.

  19. The Role Of Patents As An Informational Input Into The Process Of Technology Assessment And Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, David K.

    1981-03-01

    The importance of information as a driving force in innovation is well established. The problem of providing interested users with access to information concerning inventions and technology development is a major issue which directly affects the innovation process. With these thoughts n iind, I would like to begin by briefly reviewing the elements of the patent document. Secondly, I would like to explore with you the various ways in which patent information may be used by public and private R&D managers to aid in the process of technology assessment and forecasting.

  20. Assessing the Suitability of Process and Information Technology in Supporting Tacit Knowledge Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chien-Hsing; Kao, Shu-Chen; Shih, Lan-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    The transfer of tacit knowledge, one of the most important issues in the knowledge sharing context, needs a multi-dimensional perception in its process. Information technology's (IT) supporting role has already been addressed in the process of tacit knowledge transfer. However, IT has its own characteristics, and in turn, may have dissimilar

  1. Assessing the Suitability of Process and Information Technology in Supporting Tacit Knowledge Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chien-Hsing; Kao, Shu-Chen; Shih, Lan-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    The transfer of tacit knowledge, one of the most important issues in the knowledge sharing context, needs a multi-dimensional perception in its process. Information technology's (IT) supporting role has already been addressed in the process of tacit knowledge transfer. However, IT has its own characteristics, and in turn, may have dissimilar…

  2. Conceptual Framework for the Mapping of Management Process with Information Technology in a Business Process

    PubMed Central

    Chellappa, Swarnalatha; Nagarajan, Asha

    2015-01-01

    This study on component framework reveals the importance of management process and technology mapping in a business environment. We defined ERP as a software tool, which has to provide business solution but not necessarily an integration of all the departments. Any business process can be classified as management process, operational process and the supportive process. We have gone through entire management process and were enable to bring influencing components to be mapped with a technology for a business solution. Governance, strategic management, and decision making are thoroughly discussed and the need of mapping these components with the ERP is clearly explained. Also we suggest that implementation of this framework might reduce the ERP failures and especially the ERP misfit was completely rectified. PMID:25861688

  3. Advanced information processing system for advanced launch system: Hardware technology survey and projections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The major goals of this effort are as follows: (1) to examine technology insertion options to optimize Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) performance in the Advanced Launch System (ALS) environment; (2) to examine the AIPS concepts to ensure that valuable new technologies are not excluded from the AIPS/ALS implementations; (3) to examine advanced microprocessors applicable to AIPS/ALS, (4) to examine radiation hardening technologies applicable to AIPS/ALS; (5) to reach conclusions on AIPS hardware building blocks implementation technologies; and (6) reach conclusions on appropriate architectural improvements. The hardware building blocks are the Fault-Tolerant Processor, the Input/Output Sequencers (IOS), and the Intercomputer Interface Sequencers (ICIS).

  4. Information-Processing Architectures in Multidimensional Classification: A Validation Test of the Systems Factorial Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fific, Mario; Nosofsky, Robert M.; Townsend, James T.

    2008-01-01

    A growing methodology, known as the systems factorial technology (SFT), is being developed to diagnose the types of information-processing architectures (serial, parallel, or coactive) and stopping rules (exhaustive or self-terminating) that operate in tasks of multidimensional perception. Whereas most previous applications of SFT have been in…

  5. A Fifteen-Year Forecast of Information-Processing Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, George B.

    This study developed a variation of the DELPHI approach, a polling technique for systematically soliciting opinions from experts, to produce a technological forecast of developments in the information-processing industry. SEER (System for Event Evaluation and Review) combines the more desirable elements of existing techniques: (1) intuitive…

  6. How gamma radiation processing systems are benefiting from the latest advances in information technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Wayne H.; Levesque, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    This paper discusses how gamma irradiation plants are putting the latest advances in computer and information technology to use for better process control, cost savings, and strategic advantages. Some irradiator operations are gaining significant benefits by integrating computer technology and robotics with real-time information processing, multi-user databases, and communication networks. The paper reports on several irradiation facilities that are making good use of client/server LANs, user-friendly graphics interfaces, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems, distributed I/O with real-time sensor devices, trending analysis, real-time product tracking, dynamic product scheduling, and automated dosimetry reading. These plants are lowering costs by fast and reliable reconciliation of dosimetry data, easier validation to GMP requirements, optimizing production flow, and faster release of sterilized products to market. There is a trend in the manufacturing sector towards total automation using "predictive process control". Real-time verification of process parameters "on-the-run" allows control parameters to be adjusted appropriately, before the process strays out of limits. Applying this technology to the gamma radiation process, control will be based on monitoring the key parameters such as time, and making adjustments during the process to optimize quality and throughput. Dosimetry results will be used as a quality control measurement rather than as a final monitor for the release of the product. Results are correlated with the irradiation process data to quickly and confidently reconcile variations. Ultimately, a parametric process control system utilizing responsive control, feedback and verification will not only increase productivity and process efficiency, but can also result in operating within tighter dose control set points.

  7. Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum, Deanna; Boss, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Discusses a problem commonly encountered in library automation projects: the conversion from existing card catalog formats to machine readable catalog (MARC) records. Catalog formats, the advantages of full versus limited records, changing computer technology, the advantages of full MARC records, and record standardization are among the topics…

  8. Integrating semantic web technologies and geospatial catalog services for geospatial information discovery and processing in cyberinfrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Peng; Gong, Jianya; Di, Liping; He, Lianlian; Wei, Yaxing

    2011-04-01

    Abstract A geospatial catalogue service provides a network-based meta-information repository and interface for advertising and discovering shared geospatial data and services. Descriptive information (i.e., metadata) for geospatial data and services is structured and organized in catalogue services. The approaches currently available for searching and using that information are often inadequate. Semantic Web technologies show promise for better discovery methods by exploiting the underlying semantics. Such development needs special attention from the Cyberinfrastructure perspective, so that the traditional focus on discovery of and access to geospatial data can be expanded to support the increased demand for processing of geospatial information and discovery of knowledge. Semantic descriptions for geospatial data, services, and geoprocessing service chains are structured, organized, and registered through extending elements in the ebXML Registry Information Model (ebRIM) of a geospatial catalogue service, which follows the interface specifications of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Catalogue Services for the Web (CSW). The process models for geoprocessing service chains, as a type of geospatial knowledge, are captured, registered, and discoverable. Semantics-enhanced discovery for geospatial data, services/service chains, and process models is described. Semantic search middleware that can support virtual data product materialization is developed for the geospatial catalogue service. The creation of such a semantics-enhanced geospatial catalogue service is important in meeting the demands for geospatial information discovery and analysis in Cyberinfrastructure.

  9. Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum, Deanna; Boss, Richard

    1983-01-01

    Relates office automation to its application in libraries, discussing computer software packages for microcomputers performing tasks involved in word processing, accounting, statistical analysis, electronic filing cabinets, and electronic mail systems. (EJS)

  10. Adapting Semantic Natural Language Processing Technology to Address Information Overload in Influenza Epidemic Management

    PubMed Central

    Keselman, Alla; Rosemblat, Graciela; Kilicoglu, Halil; Fiszman, Marcelo; Jin, Honglan; Shin, Dongwook; Rindflesch, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Explosion of disaster health information results in information overload among response professionals. The objective of this project was to determine the feasibility of applying semantic natural language processing (NLP) technology to addressing this overload. The project characterizes concepts and relationships commonly used in disaster health-related documents on influenza pandemics, as the basis for adapting an existing semantic summarizer to the domain. Methods include human review and semantic NLP analysis of a set of relevant documents. This is followed by a pilot-test in which two information specialists use the adapted application for a realistic information seeking task. According to the results, the ontology of influenza epidemics management can be described via a manageable number of semantic relationships that involve concepts from a limited number of semantic types. Test users demonstrate several ways to engage with the application to obtain useful information. This suggests that existing semantic NLP algorithms can be adapted to support information summarization and visualization in influenza epidemics and other disaster health areas. However, additional research is needed in the areas of terminology development (as many relevant relationships and terms are not part of existing standardized vocabularies), NLP, and user interface design. PMID:24311971

  11. Hybrid quantum information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Furusawa, Akira

    2014-12-04

    I will briefly explain the definition and advantage of hybrid quantum information processing, which is hybridization of qubit and continuous-variable technologies. The final goal would be realization of universal gate sets both for qubit and continuous-variable quantum information processing with the hybrid technologies. For that purpose, qubit teleportation with a continuousvariable teleporter is one of the most important ingredients.

  12. Improving NASA's technology transfer process through increased screening and evaluation in the information dissemination program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laepple, H.

    1979-01-01

    The current status of NASA's technology transfer system can be improved if the technology transfer process is better understood. This understanding will only be gained if a detailed knowledge about factors generally influencing technology transfer is developed, and particularly those factors affecting technology transfer from government R and D agencies to industry. Secondary utilization of aerospace technology is made more difficult because it depends on a transfer process which crosses established organizational lines of authority and which is outside well understood patterns of technical applications. In the absence of a sound theory about technology transfer and because of the limited capability of government agencies to explore industry's needs, a team approach to screening and evaluation of NASA generated technologies is proposed which calls for NASA, and other organizations of the private and public sectors which influence the transfer of NASA generated technology, to participate in a screening and evaluation process to determine the commercial feasibility of a wide range of technical applications.

  13. The Relationship between Environmental Turbulence, Management Support, Organizational Collaboration, Information Technology Solution Realization, and Process Performance, in Healthcare Provider Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muglia, Victor O.

    2010-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental turbulence, management support, organizational collaboration, information technology solution realization, and process performance in healthcare provider organizations. Method: A descriptive/correlational study of Hospital medical services process…

  14. A Comparison between Quantity Surveying and Information Technology Students on Web Application in Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keng, Tan Chin; Ching, Yeoh Kah

    2015-01-01

    The use of web applications has become a trend in many disciplines including education. In view of the influence of web application in education, this study examines web application technologies that could enhance undergraduates' learning experiences, with focus on Quantity Surveying (QS) and Information Technology (IT) undergraduates. The…

  15. People and Process: Managing the Human Side of Information Technology Application. Professional Paper Series, #7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltzer, Jan A.

    Recognizing that the hard part of making the application of technology successful is the development of appropriate management structures and approaches, this paper reviews the research and writings of several top management and communications professionals and correlates these theories to the information technology environment on campus. Six…

  16. Effects of Different Multimedia Presentations on Viewers' Information-Processing Activities Measured by Eye-Tracking Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuang, Hsueh-Hua; Liu, Han-Chin

    2012-01-01

    This study implemented eye-tracking technology to understand the impact of different multimedia instructional materials, i.e., five successive pages versus a single page with the same amount of information, on information-processing activities in 21 non-science-major college students. The findings showed that students demonstrated the same number

  17. Processing technologies for extracting cobalt from domestic resources. Information Circular/1988

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    A summary of the cobalt processing technologies for the major domestic resources is presented. The processing technologies for the Blackbird, Madison Mine, Duluth Gabbro, iron ore pyrite, laterites, and manganese sea nodules are nearly complete, but the economics are not favorable. Research on these resources should be limited to approaches that promise to cut the total processing costs by at least 50 pct. The most-promising sources of cobalt are the spent-copper leach solutions and siegenite from the Missouri lead ores. Research on cobalt processing from these two sources needs to be completed.

  18. Utilizing geographic information systems technology in the Wyoming cumulative hydrologic impact assessment modeling process

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerlinck, J.D.; Oakleaf, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    The coal-permitting process places heavy demands on both permit applicants and regulatory authorities with respect to the management and analysis of hydrologic data. Currently, this correlation is being addressed for the Powder River Basin, Wyoming by the ongoing Cumulative Hydrologic Impact Assessment (CHIA) efforts at the University of Wyoming. One critical component of the CHIA is the use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) for support, management, manipulation, pre-analysis, and display of data associated with the chosen groundwater and surface water models. This paper will discuss the methodology in using of GIS technology as an integrated tool with the MODFLOW and HEC-1 hydrologic models. Pre-existing GIS links associated with these two models served as a foundation for this effort. However, due to established standards and site specific factors, substantial modifications were performed on existing tools to obtain adequate results. The groundwater-modeling effort required the use of a refined grid in which cell sizes varied based on the relative locations of ongoing mining activities. Surface water modeling was performed in a semi-arid region with very limited topographic relief and predominantly ephemeral stream channels. These were substantial issues that presented challenges for effective GIS/model integration.

  19. Materials and Processes Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.; And Others

    This instructional resource guide is intended to assist the industrial arts (IA) teacher in implementing a comprehensive materials and Processes Technology program at the technical level in Virginia high schools. The course is designed to help students make informed educational and occupational choices and prepare them for advanced technical or…

  20. Teaching Information Technology Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, M. J.; Jones, R. P.; Haggerty, J.; Gresty, D.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an approach to the teaching of information technology law to higher education computing students that attempts to prepare them for professional computing practice. As information technology has become ubiquitous its interactions with the law have become more numerous. Information technology practitioners, and in particular

  1. Information Technology for Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartrand, Robert Lee; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A series of 11 articles describes information technologies being used in the U.S. Congress, the impact of these technologies, and possible future developments. Included are a chronology of key actions affecting congressional information support and a list of readings in information technology and Congress. (CLB)

  2. Teaching Information Technology Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, M. J.; Jones, R. P.; Haggerty, J.; Gresty, D.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an approach to the teaching of information technology law to higher education computing students that attempts to prepare them for professional computing practice. As information technology has become ubiquitous its interactions with the law have become more numerous. Information technology practitioners, and in particular…

  3. Image processing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eeckhout, E.; Pope, P.; Balick, L.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The primary objective of this project was to advance image processing and visualization technologies for environmental characterization. This was effected by developing and implementing analyses of remote sensing data from satellite and airborne platforms, and demonstrating their effectiveness in visualization of environmental problems. Many sources of information were integrated as appropriate using geographic information systems.

  4. Aeronautical-Satellite-Assisted Process Being Developed for Information Exchange Through Network Technologies (Aero-SAPIENT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernic, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    Communications technologies are being developed to address safety issues during aviation travel. Some of these technologies enable the aircraft to be in constant bidirectional communications with necessary systems, people, and other aircraft that are not currently in place today. Networking technologies, wireless datalinks, and advanced avionics techniques are areas of particular importance that the NASA Glenn Research Center has contributed. Glenn, in conjunction with the NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, and NASA Langley Research Center, is investigating methods and applications that would utilize these communications technologies. In mid-June 2000, the flight readiness of the network and communications technologies were demonstrated via a simulated aircraft. A van simulating an aircraft was equipped with advanced phased-array antennas (Advanced Communications/Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) project) that used commercial Ku-band satellite communications to connect Glenn, Dryden, and Ames in a combined system ground test. This test simulated air-ground bidirectional transport of real-time digital audio, text, and video data via a hybrid network configuration that demonstrated the flight readiness of the network and communications technologies. Specifically, a Controller Pilot Data Link Communications application was used with other applications to demonstrate a multiprotocol capability via Internet-protocol encapsulated ATN (Aeronautical Telecommunications Network) data packets. The significance of this combined ground test is its contribution to the Aero Information Technology Base Program Level I milestone (Software Technology investment area) of a real-time data link for the National Airspace System. The objective of this milestone was to address multiprotocol technology applicable for real-time data links between aircraft, a satellite, and the ground as well as the ability to distribute flight data with multilevel priorities among several sites.

  5. PROBABILISTIC INFORMATION INTEGRATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    J. BOOKER; M. MEYER; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    The Statistical Sciences Group at Los Alamos has successfully developed a structured, probabilistic, quantitative approach for the evaluation of system performance based on multiple information sources, called Information Integration Technology (IIT). The technology integrates diverse types and sources of data and information (both quantitative and qualitative), and their associated uncertainties, to develop distributions for performance metrics, such as reliability. Applications include predicting complex system performance, where test data are lacking or expensive to obtain, through the integration of expert judgment, historical data, computer/simulation model predictions, and any relevant test/experimental data. The technology is particularly well suited for tracking estimated system performance for systems under change (e.g. development, aging), and can be used at any time during product development, including concept and early design phases, prior to prototyping, testing, or production, and before costly design decisions are made. Techniques from various disciplines (e.g., state-of-the-art expert elicitation, statistical and reliability analysis, design engineering, physics modeling, and knowledge management) are merged and modified to develop formal methods for the data/information integration. The power of this technology, known as PREDICT (Performance and Reliability Evaluation with Diverse Information Combination and Tracking), won a 1999 R and D 100 Award (Meyer, Booker, Bement, Kerscher, 1999). Specifically the PREDICT application is a formal, multidisciplinary process for estimating the performance of a product when test data are sparse or nonexistent. The acronym indicates the purpose of the methodology: to evaluate the performance or reliability of a product/system by combining all available (often diverse) sources of information and then tracking that performance as the product undergoes changes.

  6. Informed Design: A Contemporary Approach to Design Pedagogy as the Core Process in Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burghardt, M. David; Hacker, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In classroom settings, most problems are usually well defined, so students have little experience with open-ended problems. Technological design problems, however, are seldom well defined. The design process begins with broad ideas and concepts and continues in the direction of ever-increasing detail, resulting in an acceptable solution. So using…

  7. The Role of Information and Communication Technologies in Improving Teaching and Learning Processes in Primary and Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangra, Albert; Gonzalez-Sanmamed, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyse what is happening at schools regarding the integration and use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and to examine teachers' perceptions about what teaching and learning processes can be improved through the use of ICT. A multiple-case-study research methodology was applied. From a previous…

  8. The Role of Information and Communication Technologies in Improving Teaching and Learning Processes in Primary and Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangra, Albert; Gonzalez-Sanmamed, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyse what is happening at schools regarding the integration and use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and to examine teachers' perceptions about what teaching and learning processes can be improved through the use of ICT. A multiple-case-study research methodology was applied. From a previous…

  9. PNNL Information Technology Benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    DD Hostetler

    1999-09-08

    Benchmarking is a methodology for searching out industry best practices that lead to superior performance. It is exchanging information, not just with any organization, but with organizations known to be the best within PNNL, in industry, or in dissimilar industries with equivalent functions. It is used as a continuous improvement tool for business and technical processes, products, and services. Information technology--comprising all computer and electronic communication products and services--underpins the development and/or delivery of many PNNL products and services. This document describes the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) approach to information technology (IT) benchmarking. The purpose is to engage other organizations in the collaborative process of benchmarking in order to improve the value of IT services provided to customers. TM document's intended audience consists of other US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories and their IT staff. Although the individual participants must define the scope of collaborative benchmarking, an outline of IT service areas for possible benchmarking is described.

  10. Information Technology – a Tool for Development of the Teaching Process at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Information Technologies, taking slow steps, have found its application in the teaching process of Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Online availability of the teaching content is mainly intended for users of the Bologna process. Aim: The aim was to present the level of use of information technologies at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, comparing two systems, old system and the Bologna process, and to present new ways of improving the teaching process, using information technology. Material and methods: The study included the period from 2012 to 2014, and included 365 students from the old system and the Bologna Process. Study had prospective character. Results: Students of the old system are older than students of the Bologna process. In both systems higher number of female students is significantly present. All students have their own computers, usually using the Office software package and web browsers. Visits of social networks were the most common reason for which they used computers. On question if they know to work with databases, 14.6% of students of the old system responded positively and 26.2% of students of the Bologna process answered the same. Students feel that working with databases is necessary to work in primary health care. On the question of the degree of computerization at the university, there were significant differences between the two systems (p <0.05). When asked about the possibility of using computers at school, there were no significant differences between the two systems. There has been progress of that opportunity from year to year. Students of Bologna process were more interested in the introduction of information technology, than students of old system. 68.7% of students of the Bologna process of generation 2013-2014, and 71.3% of generation 2014-2015, believed that the subject of Medical Informatics, the same or similar name, should be included in the new reform teaching process of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Conclusion: Information technologies can help the development of the teaching process, and represent attractive and accessible tool in the process of modernization and progress. PMID:26005278

  11. Information Technology Resources Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Information Technology Resources Assessment (ITRA) is being published as a companion document to the Department of Energy (DOE) FY 1994--FY 1998 Information Resources Management Long-Range Plan. This document represents a collaborative effort between the Office of Information Resources Management and the Office of Energy Research that was undertaken to achieve, in part, the Technology Strategic Objective of IRM Vision 21. An integral part of this objective, technology forecasting provides an understanding of the information technology horizon and presents a perspective and focus on technologies of particular interest to DOE program activities. Specifically, this document provides site planners with an overview of the status and use of new information technology for their planning consideration.

  12. PREFACE: Quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Andrew; Ferry, David; Stoneham, Marshall

    2006-05-01

    Microelectronics and the classical information technologies transformed the physics of semiconductors. Photonics has given optical materials a new direction. Quantum information technologies, we believe, will have immense impact on condensed matter physics. The novel systems of quantum information processing need to be designed and made. Their behaviours must be manipulated in ways that are intrinsically quantal and generally nanoscale. Both in this special issue and in previous issues (see e.g., Spiller T P and Munro W J 2006 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18 V1-10) we see the emergence of new ideas that link the fundamentals of science to the pragmatism of market-led industry. We hope these papers will be followed by many others on quantum information processing in the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter.

  13. Information Technology and the Curriculum Process in Developed and Developing Countries: A Comparative Analysis and the Changed Role of the North American Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mushi, Selina L. P.

    This paper critically analyzes the interrelationships among information technology, the curriculum process, student exposure to information technology, and the role of the teacher in developing countries and in the developed world. The paper provides highlights about the tremendous amounts of information readily available in, and accessible…

  14. The information technology revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, T.

    1985-01-01

    This book deals with advances in telecommunications, artificial intelligence, supercomputers, personal computers, and the use of information technology. It focuses on computer crime, privacy, the impact of new technology on women and on the Third World, ''smart'' weapons, and the future of work.

  15. Information technology resources assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Loken, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    The emphasis in Information Technology (IT) development has shifted from technology management to information management, and the tools of information management are increasingly at the disposal of end-users, people who deal with information. Moreover, the interactive capabilities of technologies such as hypertext, scientific visualization, virtual reality, video conferencing, and even database management systems have placed in the hands of users a significant amount of discretion over how these resources will be used. The emergence of high-performance networks, as well as network operating systems, improved interoperability, and platform independence of applications will eliminate technical barriers to the use of data, increase the power and range of resources that can be used cooperatively, and open up a wealth of possibilities for new applications. The very scope of these prospects for the immediate future is a problem for the IT planner or administrator. Technology procurement and implementation, integration of new technologies into the existing infrastructure, cost recovery and usage of networks and networked resources, training issues, and security concerns such as data protection and access to experiments are just some of the issues that need to be considered in the emerging IT environment. As managers we must use technology to improve competitiveness. When procuring new systems, we must take advantage of scalable resources. New resources such as distributed file systems can improve access to and efficiency of existing operating systems. In addition, we must assess opportunities to improve information worker productivity and information management through tedmologies such as distributed computational visualization and teleseminar applications.

  16. Video Analysis and Remote Digital Ethnography: Approaches to understanding user perspectives and processes involving healthcare information technology.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    Innovations in healthcare information systems promise to revolutionize and streamline healthcare processes worldwide. However, the complexity of these systems and the need to better understand issues related to human-computer interaction have slowed progress in this area. In this chapter the authors describe their work in using methods adapted from usability engineering, video ethnography and analysis of digital log files for improving our understanding of complex real-world healthcare interactions between humans and technology. The approaches taken are cost-effective and practical and can provide detailed ethnographic data on issues health professionals and consumers encounter while using systems as well as potential safety problems. The work is important in that it can be used in techno-anthropology to characterize complex user interactions with technologies and also to provide feedback into redesign and optimization of improved healthcare information systems. PMID:26249198

  17. Women in Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentling, Rose Mary; Thomas, Steven P.

    2004-01-01

    There is a major concern about the drop of young women entering Computer Science degree programs and a drop in the participation of women in these information technology occupations. In all levels of educational institutions across the nation, girls and women remain under-represented in computer and information science studies and subsequently,…

  18. Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2000-09-01

    This document represents the roadmap for Processing Technology Research in the US Mining Industry. It was developed based on the results of a Processing Technology Roadmap Workshop sponsored by the National Mining Association in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies. The Workshop was held January 24 - 25, 2000.

  19. Improvement of workflow and processes to ease and enrich meaningful use of health information technology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjit; Singh, Ashok; Singh, Devan R; Singh, Gurdev

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of health information technology (HIT) can have unexpected and unintended patient safety and/or quality consequences. This highly desirable but complex intervention requires workflow changes in order to be effective. Workflow is often cited by providers as the number one 'pain point'. Its redesign needs to be tailored to the organizational context, current workflow, HIT system being introduced, and the resources available. Primary care practices lack the required expertise and need external assistance. Unfortunately, the current methods of using esoteric charts or software are alien to health care workers and are, therefore, perceived to be barriers. Most importantly and ironically, these do not readily educate or enable staff to inculcate a common vision, ownership, and empowerment among all stakeholders. These attributes are necessary for creating highly reliable organizations. We present a tool that addresses US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical (ACGME) competency requirements. Of the six competencies called for by the ACGME, the two that this tool particularly addresses are 'system-based practice' and 'practice-based learning and continuing improvement'. This toolkit is founded on a systems engineering approach. It includes a motivational and orientation presentation, 128 magnetic pictorial and write-erase icons of 40 designs, dry-erase magnetic board, and five visual aids for reducing cognitive and emotive biases in staff. Pilot tests were carried out in practices in Western New York and Colorado, USA. In addition, the toolkit was presented at the 2011 North American Primary Care Research Group (NAPCRG) meeting and an Agency for Health Research and Quality (AHRQ) meeting in 2013 to solicit responses from attendees. It was also presented to the officers of the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for HIT. All qualitative feedback was extremely positive and enthusiastic. The respondents recommended that the toolkit be disseminated widely to improve staff education and training, leading to practice improvements. PMID:24235855

  20. Scholarly Communication and Information Technology: Exploring the Impact of Changes in the Research Process on Archives. Rand Reprints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, Avra; Rothenberg, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    The report considers the interaction of trends in information technology and trends in research practices and the policy implications for archives. The information is divided into 4 sections. The first section, an "Overview of Information Technology Trends," discusses end-user computing, which includes ubiquitous computing, end-user interfaces,…

  1. Information technology resources assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.F.

    1992-01-01

    This year's Information Technology Resources Assessment (ITRA) is something of a departure from traditional practice. Past assessments have concentrated on developments in fundamental technology, particularly with respect to hardware. They form an impressive chronicle of decreasing cycle times, increasing densities, decreasing costs (or, equivalently, increasing capacity and capability per dollar spent), and new system architectures, with a leavening of operating systems and languages. Past assessments have aimed -- and succeeded -- at putting information technology squarely in the spotlight; by contrast, in the first part of this assessment, we would like to move it to the background, and encourage the reader to reflect less on the continuing technological miracles of miniaturization in space and time and more on the second- and third-order implications of some possible workplace applications of these miracles. This Information Technology Resources Assessment is intended to provide a sense of technological direction for planners in projecting the hardware, software, and human resources necessary to support the diverse IT requirements of the various components of the DOE community. It is also intended to provide a sense of our new understanding of the place of IT in our organizations.

  2. Information technology resources assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.F.

    1992-01-01

    This year`s Information Technology Resources Assessment (ITRA) is something of a departure from traditional practice. Past assessments have concentrated on developments in fundamental technology, particularly with respect to hardware. They form an impressive chronicle of decreasing cycle times, increasing densities, decreasing costs (or, equivalently, increasing capacity and capability per dollar spent), and new system architectures, with a leavening of operating systems and languages. Past assessments have aimed -- and succeeded -- at putting information technology squarely in the spotlight; by contrast, in the first part of this assessment, we would like to move it to the background, and encourage the reader to reflect less on the continuing technological miracles of miniaturization in space and time and more on the second- and third-order implications of some possible workplace applications of these miracles. This Information Technology Resources Assessment is intended to provide a sense of technological direction for planners in projecting the hardware, software, and human resources necessary to support the diverse IT requirements of the various components of the DOE community. It is also intended to provide a sense of our new understanding of the place of IT in our organizations.

  3. Information and communication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, Burton I.; Pelton, Joseph N.; Bostian, Charles W.; Brandon, William T.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Hager, E. Paul; Helm, Neil R.; Jennings, Raymond D.; Kwan, Robert K.; Mahle, Christoph E.

    1994-01-01

    NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF) commissioned a panel of U.S. experts to study the international status of satellite communications systems and technology. The study covers emerging systems concepts, applications, services, and the attendant technologies. The panel members traveled to Europe, Japan, and Russia to gather information firsthand. They visited 17 sites in Europe, 20 in Japan, and 4 in Russia. These included major manufacturers, government organizations, service providers, and associated research and development facilities. The panel's report was reviewed by the sites visited, by the panel, and by representatives of U.S. industry. The report details the information collected and compares it to U.S. activities.

  4. Examining the potential of information technology to improve public insurance application processes: enrollee assessments from a concurrent mixed method analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Abhay Nath; Ketsche, Patricia; Marton, James; Snyder, Angela; McLaren, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the perceived readiness of Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) enrollees to use information technologies (IT) in order to facilitate improvements in the application processes for these public insurance programs. Methods We conducted a concurrent mixed method study of Medicaid and CHIP enrollees in a southern state. We conducted focus groups to identify enrollee concerns regarding the current application process and their IT proficiency. Additionally, we surveyed beneficiaries via telephone about their access to and use of the Internet, and willingness to adopt IT-enabled processes. 2013 households completed the survey. We used χ2 analysis for comparisons across different groups of respondents. Results A majority of enrollees will embrace IT-enabled enrollment, but a small yet significant group continues to lack access to facilitating technologies. Moreover, a segment of beneficiaries in the two programs continues to place a high value on personal interactions with program caseworkers. Discussion IT holds the promise of improving efficiency and reducing barriers for enrollees, but state and federal agencies managing public insurance programs need to ensure access to traditional processes and make caseworkers available to those who require and value such assistance, even after implementing IT-enabled processes. Conclusions The use of IT-enabled processes is essential for effectively managing eligibility and enrollment determinations for public programs and private plans offered through state or federally operated exchanges. However, state and federal officials should be cognizant of the technological readiness of recipients and provide offline help to ensure broad participation in the insurance market. PMID:24939970

  5. Information technology financing options.

    PubMed

    Rai, D

    1996-01-01

    Healthcare executives facing the challenges of delivering quality care and controlling costs must consider the role information technology systems can play in meeting those challenges. To make the best use of information system expenditures, organizations must carefully plan how to finance system acquisitions. Some options that should be considered are paying cash, financing, financing "soft" costs, leasing, credit warehousing and early acceptance financing, and tax-exempt and conduit financing. PMID:10154097

  6. A Solution for Establishing the Information Technology Service Management Processes Implementation Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcilla, Magdalena; Calvo-Manzano, Jose; Cuevas, Gonzalo; Gmez, Gerzon; Ruiz, Elena; San Feliu, Toms

    This paper addresses the implementation sequence of Services Management processes defined in ITIL v2, from a topological perspective. Graphs Theory is used to represent the existing dependencies among the ITIL v2 processes, in order to find clusters of strongly connected processes. These clusters will help to determine the implementation priority of the service management processes. For it, OPreSSD (Organizational Procedure for Service Support and Service Delivery) is proposed in order to identify the processes implementation sequence related to the Service Support (SS) and Service Delivery (SD) areas.

  7. California: Library Information Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Barbara, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Describes six information technology projects in California libraries, including Internet access in public libraries; digital library developments at the University of California, Berkeley; the World Wide Web home page for the state library; Pacific Bell's role in statewide connectivity; state government initiatives; and services of the state…

  8. Student Technology Use in the Information-Seeking and Information-Gathering Process: A Critical Incident Approach for Benchmarking Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, Sean

    2012-01-01

    This article is an exploratory study of student behavior using online tools to do project-based work for a library science course at a mid-sized Midwestern public university. The population was 22 net generation students aged 18-24, who were enrolled in an Introduction to Information Resources course. The study was designed to better understand…

  9. Student Technology Use in the Information-Seeking and Information-Gathering Process: A Critical Incident Approach for Benchmarking Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, Sean

    2012-01-01

    This article is an exploratory study of student behavior using online tools to do project-based work for a library science course at a mid-sized Midwestern public university. The population was 22 net generation students aged 18-24, who were enrolled in an Introduction to Information Resources course. The study was designed to better understand

  10. Towards Online Delivery of Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning Techniques in Information Technology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevathan, Jarrod; Myers, Trina

    2013-01-01

    Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) is a technique used to teach in large lectures and tutorials. It invokes interaction, team building, learning and interest through highly structured group work. Currently, POGIL has only been implemented in traditional classroom settings where all participants are physically present. However,…

  11. Integrating Information Technologies Into Large Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlich, Gretchen; Meyer, John M.; Nelson, Michael L.; Bianco, David J.

    1997-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's product is aerospace research information. To this end, Langley uses information technology tools in three distinct ways. First, information technology tools are used in the production of information via computation, analysis, data collection and reduction. Second, information technology tools assist in streamlining business processes, particularly those that are primarily communication based. By applying these information tools to administrative activities, Langley spends fewer resources on managing itself and can allocate more resources for research. Third, Langley uses information technology tools to disseminate its aerospace research information, resulting in faster turn around time from the laboratory to the end-customer.

  12. Geospatial Technology/Traditional Ecological Knowledge-Derived Information Tools for the Enhancement of Coastal Restoration Decision Support Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethel, Matthew Byron

    This research investigated the feasibility and benefits of integrating geospatial technology with traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) of an indigenous Louisiana coastal population in order to assess the impacts of current and historical ecosystem change to community viability. The primary goal was to provide resource managers with a comprehensive method of assessing localized ecological change in the Gulf Coast region that can benefit community sustainability. Using Remote Sensing (RS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and other geospatial technologies integrated with a coastal community's TEK to achieve this goal, the objectives were (1) to determine a method for producing vulnerability/sustainability mapping products for an ecosystem-dependent livelihood base of a coastal population that results from physical information derived from RS imagery and supported, refined, and prioritized with TEK, and (2) to demonstrate how such an approach can engage affected community residents who are interested in understanding better marsh health and ways that marsh health can be recognized, and the causes of declining marsh determined and addressed. TEK relevant to the project objectives collected included: changes in the flora and fauna over time; changes in environmental conditions observed over time such as land loss; a history of man-made structures and impacts to the area; as well as priority areas of particular community significance or concern. Scientific field data collection measured marsh vegetation health characteristics. These data were analyzed for correlation with satellite image data acquired concurrently with field data collection. Resulting regression equations were applied to the image data to produce estimated marsh health maps. Historical image datasets of the study area were acquired to understand evolution of land change to current conditions and project future vulnerability. Image processing procedures were developed and applied to produce maps that detail land change in the study area at time intervals from 1968 to 2009. This information was combined with the TEK and scientific datasets in a GIS to produce mapping products that provide new information to the coastal restoration decision making process. This information includes: (1) what marsh areas are most vulnerable; and (2) what areas are most significant to the sustainability of the community.

  13. Information Processing - Administrative Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubenko, Janis

    A three semester, 60-credit course package in the topic of Administrative Data Processing (ADP), offered in 1966 at Stockholm University (SU) and the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) is described. The package had an information systems engineering orientation. The first semester focused on datalogical topics, while the second semester focused on the infological topics. The third semester aimed to deepen the students’ knowledge in different parts of ADP and at writing a bachelor thesis. The concluding section of this paper discusses various aspects of the department’s first course effort. The course package led to a concretisation of our discipline and gave our discipline an identity. Our education seemed modern, “just in time”, and well adapted to practical needs. The course package formed the first concrete activity of a group of young teachers and researchers. In a forty-year perspective, these people have further developed the department and the topic to an internationally well-reputed body of knowledge and research. The department has produced more than thirty professors and more than one hundred doctoral degrees.

  14. Information-computational system for storage, search and analytical processing of environmental datasets based on the Semantic Web technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, A.; Gordov, E.; Okladnikov, I.

    2009-04-01

    In this report the results of the work devoted to the development of working model of the software system for storage, semantically-enabled search and retrieval along with processing and visualization of environmental datasets containing results of meteorological and air pollution observations and mathematical climate modeling are presented. Specially designed metadata standard for machine-readable description of datasets related to meteorology, climate and atmospheric pollution transport domains is introduced as one of the key system components. To provide semantic interoperability the Resource Description Framework (RDF, http://www.w3.org/RDF/) technology means have been chosen for metadata description model realization in the form of RDF Schema. The final version of the RDF Schema is implemented on the base of widely used standards, such as Dublin Core Metadata Element Set (http://dublincore.org/), Directory Interchange Format (DIF, http://gcmd.gsfc.nasa.gov/User/difguide/difman.html), ISO 19139, etc. At present the system is available as a Web server (http://climate.risks.scert.ru/metadatabase/) based on the web-portal ATMOS engine [1] and is implementing dataset management functionality including SeRQL-based semantic search as well as statistical analysis and visualization of selected data archives [2,3]. The core of the system is Apache web server in conjunction with Tomcat Java Servlet Container (http://jakarta.apache.org/tomcat/) and Sesame Server (http://www.openrdf.org/) used as a database for RDF and RDF Schema. At present statistical analysis of meteorological and climatic data with subsequent visualization of results is implemented for such datasets as NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis, Reanalysis NCEP/DOE AMIP II, JMA/CRIEPI JRA-25, ECMWF ERA-40 and local measurements obtained from meteorological stations on the territory of Russia. This functionality is aimed primarily at finding of main characteristics of regional climate dynamics. The proposed system represents a step in the process of development of a distributed collaborative information-computational environment to support multidisciplinary investigations of Earth regional environment [4]. Partial support of this work by SB RAS Integration Project 34, SB RAS Basic Program Project 4.5.2.2, APN Project CBA2007-08NSY and FP6 Enviro-RISKS project (INCO-CT-2004-013427) is acknowledged. References 1. E.P. Gordov, V.N. Lykosov, and A.Z. Fazliev. Web portal on environmental sciences "ATMOS" // Advances in Geosciences. 2006. Vol. 8. p. 33 - 38. 2. Gordov E.P., Okladnikov I.G., Titov A.G. Development of elements of web based information-computational system supporting regional environment processes investigations // Journal of Computational Technologies, Vol. 12, Special Issue #3, 2007, pp. 20 - 28. 3. Okladnikov I.G., Titov A.G. Melnikova V.N., Shulgina T.M. Web-system for processing and visualization of meteorological and climatic data // Journal of Computational Technologies, Vol. 13, Special Issue #3, 2008, pp. 64 - 69. 4. Gordov E.P., Lykosov V.N. Development of information-computational infrastructure for integrated study of Siberia environment // Journal of Computational Technologies, Vol. 12, Special Issue #2, 2007, pp. 19 - 30.

  15. Outsourcing information technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, K.A. )

    1994-01-15

    Although it has become almost routine in most industries, outsourcing has only emerged as a hot topic in the utility industry over the past few years. Information technology (IT) is a prime candidate for outsourcing alternatives. And while not a panacea for all utilities, the trend to consider outsourcing one or more IT functions will become increasingly important as companies struggle to cope with deregulation and competitive pressures. This article describes how to determine if outsourcing is a viable alternative for a utility, and how to determine what is to be outsourced and how to manage the contract.

  16. Evaluating geographic information systems technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guptill, Stephen C.

    1989-01-01

    Computerized geographic information systems (GISs) are emerging as the spatial data handling tools of choice for solving complex geographical problems. However, few guidelines exist for assisting potential users in identifying suitable hardware and software. A process to be followed in evaluating the merits of GIS technology is presented. Related standards and guidelines, software functions, hardware components, and benchmarking are discussed. By making users aware of all aspects of adopting GIS technology, they can decide if GIS is an appropriate tool for their application and, if so, which GIS should be used.

  17. Information Technology: Perspectives and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Doug

    The full impact of the current information technology and networking revolution remains unknown, but the experiences of organizations and individuals who are using the tools and resources offered by information technology suggest that it may change our social fabric. Some of the current and emerging trends in information technology include: the…

  18. Regaining Control Over Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2005-01-01

    Living in postindustrial, 21st-century society means being surrounded by the accoutrements of information technology. Information technology is in people's offices, cars and homes. One third of adults do not deal well with information technology, according to the research of Larry Rosen, psychology professor, author, and pundit. Rosen is the Paul

  19. Regaining Control Over Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2005-01-01

    Living in postindustrial, 21st-century society means being surrounded by the accoutrements of information technology. Information technology is in people's offices, cars and homes. One third of adults do not deal well with information technology, according to the research of Larry Rosen, psychology professor, author, and pundit. Rosen is the Paul…

  20. Children, Information and New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, John

    As technological change affects current lifestyles and will continue to affect access to information, children should remain a primary consideration, with new technology serving to provide information to them. The growing importance of information is fundamental to recent technological change based on the development of computers and the silicon…

  1. Speech processing: An evolving technology

    SciTech Connect

    Crochiere, R.E.; Flanagan, J.L.

    1986-09-01

    As we enter the information age, speech processing is emerging as an important technology for making machines easier and more convenient for humans to use. It is both an old and a new technology - dating back to the invention of the telephone and forward, at least in aspirations, to the capabilities of HAL in 2001. Explosive advances in microelectronics now make it possible to implement economical real-time hardware for sophisticated speech processing - processing that formerly could be demonstrated only in simulations on main-frame computers. As a result, fundamentally new product concepts - as well as new features and functions in existing products - are becoming possible and are being explored in the marketplace. As the introductory piece to this issue, the authors draw a brief perspective on the evolving field of speech processing and assess the technology in the the three constituent sectors: speech coding, synthesis, and recognition.

  2. Increased Use of Care Management Processes and Expanded Health Information Technology Functions by Practice Ownership and Medicaid Revenue.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Hector P; McClellan, Sean R; Bibi, Salma; Casalino, Lawrence P; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-06-01

    Practice ownership and Medicaid revenue may affect the use of care management processes (CMPs) for chronic conditions and expansion of health information technology (HIT). Using a national cohort of medical practices, we compared the use of CMPs and HIT from 2006/2008 to 2013 by practice ownership and level of Medicaid revenue. Poisson regression models estimated changes in CMP use, and linear regression estimated changes in HIT, by practice ownership and Medicaid patient revenue, controlling for other practice characteristics. Compared with physician-owned practices, system-owned practices adopted a greater number of CMPs and HIT functions over time (p < .001). High Medicaid revenue (≥30.0%) was associated with less adoption of CMPs (p < .001) and HIT (p < .01). System-owned practices (p < .001) and community health centers (p < .001) with high Medicaid revenue were more likely than physician-owned practices with high Medicaid revenue to adopt CMPs over time. System and community health center ownership appear to help high Medicaid practices overcome CMP adoption constraints. PMID:26577227

  3. The process of decision-making in home-care case management: implications for the introduction of universal assessment and information technology.

    PubMed

    Egan, Mary; Wells, Jennie; Byrne, Kerry; Jaglal, Susan; Stolee, Paul; Chesworth, Bert M; Hillier, Loretta M

    2009-07-01

    Increasingly, jurisdictions are adopting universal assessment procedures and information technology to aid in healthcare data collection and care planning. Before their potential can be realised, a better understanding is needed of how these systems can best be used to support clinical practice. We investigated the decision-making process and information needs of home-care case managers in Ontario, Canada, prior to the widespread use of universal assessment, with a view of determining how universal assessment and information technology could best support this work. Three focus groups and two individual interviews were conducted; questioning focused on decision-making in the post-acute care of individuals recovering from a hip fracture. We found that case managers' decisional process was one of a clinician-broker, combining clinical expertise and information about local services to support patient goals within the context of limited resources. This process represented expert decision-making, and the case managers valued their ability to carry out non-standardised interviews and override system directives when they noted that data may be misleading. Clear information needs were found in four areas: services available outside of their regions, patient medical information, patient pre-morbid functional status and partner/spouse health and functional status. Implications for the use of universal assessment are discussed. Recommendations are made for further research to determine the impact of universal assessment and information technology on the process and outcome of home-care case manager decision-making. PMID:19187422

  4. Vaccine process technology.

    PubMed

    Josefsberg, Jessica O; Buckland, Barry

    2012-06-01

    The evolution of vaccines (e.g., live attenuated, recombinant) and vaccine production methods (e.g., in ovo, cell culture) are intimately tied to each other. As vaccine technology has advanced, the methods to produce the vaccine have advanced and new vaccine opportunities have been created. These technologies will continue to evolve as we strive for safer and more immunogenic vaccines and as our understanding of biology improves. The evolution of vaccine process technology has occurred in parallel to the remarkable growth in the development of therapeutic proteins as products; therefore, recent vaccine innovations can leverage the progress made in the broader biotechnology industry. Numerous important legacy vaccines are still in use today despite their traditional manufacturing processes, with further development focusing on improving stability (e.g., novel excipients) and updating formulation (e.g., combination vaccines) and delivery methods (e.g., skin patches). Modern vaccine development is currently exploiting a wide array of novel technologies to create safer and more efficacious vaccines including: viral vectors produced in animal cells, virus-like particles produced in yeast or insect cells, polysaccharide conjugation to carrier proteins, DNA plasmids produced in E. coli, and therapeutic cancer vaccines created by in vitro activation of patient leukocytes. Purification advances (e.g., membrane adsorption, precipitation) are increasing efficiency, while innovative analytical methods (e.g., microsphere-based multiplex assays, RNA microarrays) are improving process understanding. Novel adjuvants such as monophosphoryl lipid A, which acts on antigen presenting cell toll-like receptors, are expanding the previously conservative list of widely accepted vaccine adjuvants. As in other areas of biotechnology, process characterization by sophisticated analysis is critical not only to improve yields, but also to determine the final product quality. From a regulatory perspective, Quality by Design (QbD) and Process Analytical Technology (PAT) are important initiatives that can be applied effectively to many types of vaccine processes. Universal demand for vaccines requires that a manufacturer plan to supply tens and sometimes hundreds of millions of doses per year at low cost. To enable broader use, there is intense interest in improving temperature stability to allow for excursions from a rigid cold chain supply, especially at the point of vaccination. Finally, there is progress in novel routes of delivery to move away from the traditional intramuscular injection by syringe approach. PMID:22407777

  5. Securing Information Technology in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Denise; Campbell, Andrew T.; Candon, Thomas; Gettinger, Andrew; Kotz, David; Marsch, Lisa A.; Molina-Markham, Andrés; Page, Karen; Smith, Sean W.; Gunter, Carl A.; Johnson, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    Dartmouth College’s Institute for Security, Technology, and Society conducted three workshops on securing information technology in healthcare, attended by a diverse range of experts in the field. This article summarizes the three workshops. PMID:25379030

  6. NASA Information Technology Implementation Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Information Technology (IT) resources and IT support continue to be a growing and integral part of all NASA missions. Furthermore, the growing IT support requirements are becoming more complex and diverse. The following are a few examples of the growing complexity and diversity of NASA's IT environment. NASA is conducting basic IT research in the Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE) and Intelligent Systems (IS) Initiatives. IT security, infrastructure protection, and privacy of data are requiring more and more management attention and an increasing share of the NASA IT budget. Outsourcing of IT support is becoming a key element of NASA's IT strategy as exemplified by Outsourcing Desktop Initiative for NASA (ODIN) and the outsourcing of NASA Integrated Services Network (NISN) support. Finally, technology refresh is helping to provide improved support at lower cost. Recently the NASA Automated Data Processing (ADP) Consolidation Center (NACC) upgraded its bipolar technology computer systems with Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology systems. This NACC upgrade substantially reduced the hardware maintenance and software licensing costs, significantly increased system speed and capacity, and reduced customer processing costs by 11 percent.

  7. Multimission helicopter information display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, William S.

    1995-06-01

    A new Operator display subsystem is being incorporated as part of the next generation United States Navy (USN) helicopter avionics system to be integrated into the Multi-Mission Helicopter (MMH) which will replace both the SH-60B and the SH- 60F in 2001. This subsystem exploits state-of-the-art technology for the display hardware, the display driver hardware, information presentation methodologies, and software architecture. The technologies to be base technologies have evolved during the development period and the solution has been modified to include current elements including high resolution AMLCD color displays that are sunlight readable, highly reliable, and significantly lighter that CRT technology, as well as Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) based high-performance display generators that have only recently become feasible to implement in a military aircraft. This paper describes the overall subsystem architecture, some detail on the individual elements along with supporting rationale, the manner in which the display subsystem provides the necessary tools to significantly enhance the performance of the weapon system through the vital Operator-System Interface. Also addressed is a summary of the evolution of design leading to the current approach to MMH Operator displays and display processing as well as the growth path that the MMH display subsystem will most likely follow as additional technology evolution occurs.

  8. Information technology equipment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  9. Information Technology Issues. Transition Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    Addressed to the new administration and the Congress, this summary report on Federal Government information management and technology issues begins by describing the environment in which information technology has been managed. Arguing that effective government depends directly on effective automation to support programs and initiatives, the…

  10. New Technology and Information Explosion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, David

    A flood of new electronic technologies promises to usher in the Information Age and alter economic and social structures. Telematics, a potent combination of telecommunications and computer technologies, could eventually bring huge volumes of information to great numbers of people by making large data bases accessible to computer terminals in

  11. New Technology and Information Explosion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, David

    A flood of new electronic technologies promises to usher in the Information Age and alter economic and social structures. Telematics, a potent combination of telecommunications and computer technologies, could eventually bring huge volumes of information to great numbers of people by making large data bases accessible to computer terminals in…

  12. Information technology security system engineering methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D.

    2003-01-01

    A methodology is described for system engineering security into large information technology systems under development. The methodology is an integration of a risk management process and a generic system development life cycle process. The methodology is to be used by Security System Engineers to effectively engineer and integrate information technology security into a target system as it progresses through the development life cycle. The methodology can also be used to re-engineer security into a legacy system.

  13. Information technology equipment cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-20

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools air utilized by the rack of information technology equipment to cool the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat generated by the rack of information technology equipment.

  14. Intelligence, Information Technology, and Information Warfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Philip H. J.

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the use of information technology for intelligence and information warfare in the context of national security and reviews the status of clandestine collection. Discusses hacking, human agent collection, signal interception, covert action, counterintelligence and security, and communications between intelligence producers and consumers…

  15. Intelligence, Information Technology, and Information Warfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Philip H. J.

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the use of information technology for intelligence and information warfare in the context of national security and reviews the status of clandestine collection. Discusses hacking, human agent collection, signal interception, covert action, counterintelligence and security, and communications between intelligence producers and consumers

  16. Tennessee: Library and Information Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleaves, Edwin S., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of library and information technologies in Tennessee. Highlights include the information infrastructure; school library connections to the Internet; networking among public libraries, including interlibrary loan and Internet access; automation and networking in academic libraries; library and information science education; and…

  17. Profit Impact of Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzendorf, Thomas; Hiller, Harald

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the correlation between corporate performance and the use of information technology. Tests a model that was based on management information systems literature. Examines system effectiveness, user information satisfaction, organizational conversion, top management commitment, and organizational climate. Discusses testing in Austrian and…

  18. Information Technology and Vermont Education Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judson, Anne

    1995-01-01

    Presents a position paper of the Vermont State Technology Council regarding the development of information technology skills and knowledge. Essential skills are identified and linked to the Vermont Education Goals, including skills in word processing, databases, spreadsheets, telecommunications, visual-audio-output, computer simulations, desktop…

  19. Particle processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, there has been strong demand for the development of novel devices and equipment that support advanced industries including IT/semiconductors, the environment, energy and aerospace along with the achievement of higher efficiency and reduced environmental impact. Many studies have been conducted on the fabrication of innovative inorganic materials with novel individual properties and/or multifunctional properties including electrical, dielectric, thermal, optical, chemical and mechanical properties through the development of particle processing. The fundamental technologies that are key to realizing such materials are (i) the synthesis of nanoparticles with uniform composition and controlled crystallite size, (ii) the arrangement/assembly and controlled dispersion of nanoparticles with controlled particle size, (iii) the precise structural control at all levels from micrometer to nanometer order and (iv) the nanostructural design based on theoretical/experimental studies of the correlation between the local structure and the functions of interest. In particular, it is now understood that the application of an external stimulus, such as magnetic energy, electrical energy and/or stress, to a reaction field is effective in realizing advanced particle processing [1-3]. This special issue comprises 12 papers including three review papers. Among them, seven papers are concerned with phosphor particles, such as silicon, metals, Si3N4-related nitrides, rare-earth oxides, garnet oxides, rare-earth sulfur oxides and rare-earth hydroxides. In these papers, the effects of particle size, morphology, dispersion, surface states, dopant concentration and other factors on the optical properties of phosphor particles and their applications are discussed. These nanoparticles are classified as zero-dimensional materials. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and graphene are well-known one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) materials, respectively. This special issue also includes two papers on the fabrication of mechanically reliable nanocomposites by dispersing graphene into a ceramic matrix, and on supercapacitors with high energy densities in a Co(OH)2 system decorated with graphene and carbon nanotubes. As a novel preparation method of oxide films, the fabrication of alumina films with laminated structures by ac anodization is reviewed. Moreover a new type of nanosheet has been fabricated by the exfoliation of layered, ternary transition-metal carbide and nitride compounds, known as Mn + 1AXn phases (or MAX phases) where M is an early transition metal, such as Ti or Nb, A is an A group element, such as Si or Al, X is carbon and/or nitrogen and n = 1-3 [4]. Among the MAX phases, those containing Mo have been theoretically calculated by first-principles calculations to be a source for obtaining Mo2C nanosheets with potentially unique properties. As an example of improving bulk ceramic properties, texturing by using a high magnetic field [5] and sintering by the electric current activated/assisted sintering (ECAS) technology [6] have been demonstrated for ultra-high temperature ceramics with high-temperature strength. A project on the development of materials and particle processing for the field of environment and energy has been ongoing at the National Institute for Materials Science since April 2011. This project employs various core competence technologies for particle processing such as ion beam irradiation for nanoparticle fabrication [7], fullerene nanomaterial processing using liquid-liquid interface precipitation [8], a gas reduction nitridation process to obtain Si3N4-based phosphor materials [9], advanced phosphors via novel processing [10, 11], ultra-high pressure technology for processing and in situ analysis [12, 13], colloidal processing in a high magnetic field to obtain laminated, textured ceramics [1, 3, 5], the ECAS process for nanostructuring ceramics [6] and so forth. Here, I would like to introduce some research achievements that are not covered in this special issue. (1) The evolution of hydrogen by the reaction of fine metal particles such as Al [14] and Mg [15] with water; the specific surface area and surface modification are important factors.(2) The realization of new carbon related materials with 1D and 2D structures consisting of fullerenes prepared by liquid-liquid interface precipitation: alkaline-doped superconductive nanotubes consisting of fullerenes [16], application to solar cells of fullerene/cobalt porphyrin hybrid nanosheets [17], etc.(3) The fabrication of textured films and bulk materials with excellent functional properties by colloidal processing methods such as slip casting [5], gel casting [18] and electrophoretic deposition [3, 19], in a high magnetic field, and with subsequent heating; examples of such materials include dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cells, thermoelectric materials and cathode materials for solid state Li-ion batteries and dielectric ceramics.(4) The fabrication of high-strength and high-toughness MAX phase ceramics [20, 21] inspired by the nacreous structure [22].(5) The modeling and development of the ECAS process [6]. This involves two-step pressure application [23] and high-pressure application above 400 MPa to fabricate transparent oxides [24-26], and rapid heating to obtain dense nanocomposites of ceramic-CNT [27] and diamonds [28].(6) The contraction of ternary phase diagrams for oxide ion conductor systems such as zirconia [29] and apatite systems [30], leading to an increased understanding of the stability of such systems and assisting the search for high oxygen ion conductors. Acknowledgments I am grateful to the authors who have contributed to this special issue, and sincerely hope that the readers will expand their knowledge of particle processing technology. References [1] Sakka Y 2006 J. Ceram. Soc. Japan 114 371 [2] Badica P, Crisan A, Aldica G, Endo K, Borodianska H, Togano K, Awaji S, Vasylkiv O and Sakka Y 2011 Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 12 013001 [3] Sakka Y and Uchikoshi T 2010 KONA Powder Particle J. 28 74 (kona.or.jp/search/28_074.pdf) [4] Naguib M, Mashtalir O, Carle J, Presser V, Lu J, Hultman L, Gogotsi Y and Barsoum M W 2012 ACS Nano 6 1322 [5] Sakka Y and Suzuki T S 2005 J. Ceram. Soc. Japan 113 26 [6] Grasso S, Sakka Y and Maizza G 2009 Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 10 053001 [7] Nakao H, Tokonami S, Hamada T, Shiigi H, Nagaoka T, Iwate F and Takeda Y 2012 Nanoscale 4 6814 [8] Miyazawa K and Hotta K 2010 J. Cryst. Growth 312 2764 [9] Suehiro T, Xie R and Hirosaki N 2013 Indust. Eng. Chem. Res. 52 7453 [10] Zhu Q, Li J-G, Li X, Sun X and Sakka Y 2011 Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 12 055001 [11] Li J, Li J-G, Zhang Z, Wu X, Liu S, Li X, Sun X and Sakka Y 2012 Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 13 035007 [12] Kawamura F, Yusa H and Taniguchi T 2012 Appl. Phys. Lett. 100 251910 [13] Watanabe K and Taniguchi T 2011 Int. J. Appl. Ceram. Technol. 8 977 [14] Deng Z-Y, Ferreira J M F and Sakka Y 2008 J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 91 3825 [15] Uda M, Okuyama H, Suzuki T S and Sakka Y 2012 Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 13 025009 [16] Takeya H, Kato R, Wakahara T, Miyazawa K, Yamaguchi T, Ozaki T, Okazaki H and Takano Y 2013 Mater. Res. Bull. 48 343 [17] Wakahara T, D'Angelo P, Miyazawa K, Nemoto Y, Ito O, Tanigaki N, Bradley D D C and Anthopoulos T D 2012 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134 7204 [18] Wiecinska P, Sakka Y, Suzuki T S, Uchikoshi T, Mizerski T and Szafran M 2013 J. Ceram. Soc. Japan 121 89 [19] Kawakita M, Uchikoshi T, Kawakita J and Sakka Y 2009 J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 92 984 [20] Hu C, Sakka Y, Grasso S, Nishimura T, Guo S and Tanaka H 2011 Scr. Mater. 64 765 [21] Hu C, Sakka Y, Nishimura T, Guo S, Grasso S and Tanaka H 2011 Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 12 044603 [22] Kakisawa H and Sumitomo T 2011 Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 12 064710 [23] Grasso S, Hu C F, Maizza G, Kim B N and Sakka Y 2011 J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 94 1405 [24] Grasso S, Kim B N, Hu C F, Maizza G and Sakka Y 2010 J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 93 2460 [25] Zhang H B, Kim B N, Morita K, Hiraga K, Yoshida H and Sakka Y 2012 Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 13 055003 [26] Kim B-N, Hiraga K, Grasso S, Morita K, Yoshida H, Zhang H and Sakka Y 2012 J. Ceram. Soc. Japan 120 116 [27] Estili M, Kawasaki A and Sakka Y 2012 Adv. Mater. 24 4322 [28] Grasso S, Hu C F, Maizza G and Sakka Y 2012 J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 95 2423 [29] Andrievskaya E R, Kornienko O A, Sayir A, Vasylkiv O and Sakka Y 2011 J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 94 1911 [30] Kobayashi K and Sakka Y 2012 Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 13 045006

  20. Information technologies and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Scott J; Joyner, Paul W

    2012-02-01

    Advances in health information technology provide significant opportunities for improvements in surgical patient safety. The adoption and use of electronic health records can enhance communication along the surgical spectrum of care. Bar coding and radiofrequency identification technology are strategies to prevent retained surgical sponges and for tracking the operating room supply chain. Computerized intraoperative monitoring systems can improve the performance of the operating room team. Automated data registries collect patient information to be analyzed and used for surgical quality improvement. PMID:22269262

  1. Information Technology: Tomorrow's Advantage Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haag, Stephen; Keen, Peter

    This textbook is designed for a one-semester introductory course in which the goal is to give students a foundation in the basics of information technology (IT). It focuses on how the technology works, issues relating to its use and development, how it can lend personal and business advantages, and how it is creating a globally networked society.…

  2. Hybrid quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Akira

    2013-03-01

    There are two types of schemes for quantum information processing (QIP). One is based on qubits, and the other is based on continuous variables (CVs), where the computational basis for qubit QIP is { | 0 > , | 1 > } and that for CV QIP is { | x > } (- ∞ < x < ∞). A universal gate set for qubit QIP is {`bit flip'σx, `phase flip'σz, `Hadamard gate'H, ` π / 8 gate', `controlled NOT (CNOT) gate'}. Similarly, a universal gate set for CV QIP is {` x-displacement' D& circ; (x) , ` p-displacement' D& circ; (ip) , `Fourier gate' F& circ;, `cubic phase gate'e ikxcirc;3, `quantum non-demolition (QND) gate'}. There is one-to-one correspondence between them. CV version of `bit flip'σx is ` x-displacement' D& circ; (x) , which changes the value of the computational basis. Similarly, CV version of `phase flip'σz is ` p-displacement' D& circ; (ip) , where `phase flip'σz switches the ``value'' of `conjugate basis' of qubit { | + > , | - > } (| +/- > = (| 0 > +/- | 1 >) / √{ 2}) and ` p-displacement' D& circ; (ip) changes the value of CV conjugate basis { | p > }. `Hadamard' and `Fourier' gates transform computational bases to respective conjugate bases. CV version of ` π / 8 gate' is a `cubic phase gate'e ikxcirc;3, and CV version of CNOT gate is a QND gate. However, the origin of nonlinearity for QIP is totally different, here the very basic nonlinear operation is calculation of multiplication and of course it is the heart of information processing. The nonlinearity of qubit QIP comes from a CNOT gate, while that of CV QIP comes from a cubic phase gate. Since nonlinear operations are harder to realize compared to linear operations, the most difficult operation for qubit is a CNOT gate, while the counter part, a QND gate, is not so difficult. CNOT and QND gates are both entangling gates, it follows that creating entanglement is easier for CV QIP compared to qubit QIP. Here, creating entanglement is the heart of QIP. So, it is a big advantage of CV QIP. On the other hand, the fidelity of CV QIP is not so high because perfect fidelity needs infinite energy, which comes from the infinite dimensionality of CV QIP. To overcome the difficulty, ``hybrid'' approach is proposed. In this approach, qubits are used as inputs for CV QIP. It is possible because qubits can be regarded as a special case of CVs. So, we can circumvent the infinite dimensionality problem of CV QIP by using qubits as the inputs. The basic example is qubit teleportation with a CV teleporter, where the qubit is a so-called ``dual-rail'' qubit with a single photon; c0 | 1 , 0 > +c1 | 0 , 1 > . We recently succeeded in creating time-bin qubits with single photons, and now we are working on the teleportation experiment with the technology developed for teleportation of highly nonclassical wave packets of light.

  3. Building support for health information technologies.

    PubMed

    Rippen, Helga

    2003-01-01

    Despite the increasing role of information technology in health care, its use still lags behind that occurring in other sectors. Factors contributing to this include the complex health care environment and conflicting political agendas. Building political support for information technology in health care depends on understanding the importance of stakeholders and the environment in which they operate. It is important to involve stakeholders early in the process of implementing new information technology in order to identify needs, barriers, and non-starters. Understanding the historical experience of the community and its past attempts at using information technology is also important. Quality of care issues, nursing shortages, cost control concerns, health insurance costs and coverage rates, institutional solvency, and overwhelming paperwork are current problems in the healthcare environment that can hinder willingness to invest in information technology. Ironically, information technology can also help remedy these problems. Impact on workflow, privacy of personal health information, and system reliability, interoperability, and the ease of updating the system can all have political ramifications with regard to acceptance and implementation of information technology. PMID:15455845

  4. CICT Computing, Information, and Communications Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Lawrence; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CICT Program is part of the NASA Aerospace Technology Enterprise's fundamental technology thrust to develop tools. processes, and technologies that enable new aerospace system capabilities and missions. The CICT Program's four key objectives are: Provide seamless access to NASA resources- including ground-, air-, and space-based distributed information technology resources-so that NASA scientists and engineers can more easily control missions, make new scientific discoveries, and design the next-generation space vehicles, provide high-data delivery from these assets directly to users for missions, develop goal-oriented human-centered systems, and research, develop and evaluate revolutionary technology.

  5. Information Technology and Indigenous People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Laurel, Ed.; Hendriks, Max, Ed.; Grant, Stephen, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Information Technology and Indigenous People provides theoretical and empirical information related to the planning and execution of IT projects aimed at serving indigenous people. It explores many cultural concerns with IT implementation, including language issues and questions of cultural appropriateness, and brings together cutting-edge…

  6. Ohio Information Technology Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    This profile includes a comprehensive set of information technology competencies that are grounded in core academic subject areas and built around four occupational clusters (information services and support, network systems, programming and software development, and interactive media) that reflect the job opportunities and skills required for…

  7. Information Technology and Indigenous People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Laurel, Ed.; Hendriks, Max, Ed.; Grant, Stephen, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Information Technology and Indigenous People provides theoretical and empirical information related to the planning and execution of IT projects aimed at serving indigenous people. It explores many cultural concerns with IT implementation, including language issues and questions of cultural appropriateness, and brings together cutting-edge

  8. Information services and information processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Attempts made to design and extend space system capabilities are reported. Special attention was given to establishing user needs for information or services which might be provided by space systems. Data given do not attempt to detail scientific, technical, or economic bases for the needs expressed by the users.

  9. Information Loss from Technological Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Progress in electronics and optics offers faster computers, and rapid communication via the internet that is matched by ever larger and evolving storage systems. Instinctively one assumes that this must be totally beneficial. However advances in software and storage media are progressing in ways which are frequently incompatible with earlier systems and the economics and commercial pressures rarely guarantee total compatibility with earlier systems. Instead, the industries actively choose to force the users to purchase new systems and software. Thus we are moving forward with new technological variants that may have access to only the most recent systems and we will have lost earlier alternatives. The reality is that increased processing speed and storage capacity are matched by an equally rapid decline in the access and survival lifetime of older information. This pattern is not limited to modern electronic systems but is evident throughout history from writing on stone and clay tablets to papyrus and paper. It is equally evident in image systems from painting, through film, to magnetic tapes and digital cameras. In sound recording we have variously progressed from wax discs to vinyl, magnetic tape and CD formats. In each case the need for better definition and greater capacity has forced the earlier systems into oblivion. Indeed proposed interactive music systems could similarly relegate music CDs to specialist collections. The article will track some of the examples and discuss the consequences as well as noting that this information loss is further compounded by developments in language and changes in cultural views of different societies.

  10. Hybrid information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Bryan C.

    2010-08-01

    Quantum algorithms and computational models primarily focus on processing quantum states via qubit manipulations and measurements. While this allows for hardware independent algorithm development, it does not necessarily reflect the full capabilities of even imperfect physical implementations - which typically have access to additional degrees of freedom not routinely considered in quantum algorithm development. In analogy with electrical mixed-signal (analog and digital) processing, here we investigate the prospects of incorporating the strengths of the native physical platform into the quantum information processor. Although the treatment here will be limited to optical systems the general approach should apply to other physical systems as well.

  11. Metabolically efficient information processing.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, V; Kimber, D; Berry, M J

    2001-04-01

    Energy-efficient information transmission may be relevant to biological sensory signal processing as well as to low-power electronic devices. We explore its consequences in two different regimes. In an "immediate" regime, we argue that the information rate should be maximized subject to a power constraint, and in an "exploratory" regime, the transmission rate per power cost should be maximized. In the absence of noise, discrete inputs are optimally encoded into Boltzmann distributed output symbols. In the exploratory regime, the partition function of this distribution is numerically equal to 1. The structure of the optimal code is strongly affected by noise in the transmission channel. The Arimoto-Blahut algorithm, generalized for cost constraints, can be used to derive and interpret the distribution of symbols for optimal energy-efficient coding in the presence of noise. We outline the possibilities and problems in extending our results to information coding and transmission in neurobiological systems. PMID:11255570

  12. Information flow and work productivity through integrated information technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigand, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The work environment surrounding integrated office systems is reviewed. The known effects of automated office technologies is synthesized and their known impact on work efficiency is reviewed. These effects are explored with regard to their impact on networks, work flow/processes, as well as organizational structure and power. Particular emphasis is given to structural changes due to the introduction of newer information technologies in organizations. The new information technologies have restructed the average organization's middle banks and, as a consequence, they have shrunk drastically. Organizational pyramids have flattened with fewer levels since executives have realized that they can get ahold of the needed information via the new technologies quicker and directly and do not have to rely on middle-level managers. Power shifts are typically accompanied with the introduction of these technologies resulting in the generation of a new form of organizational power.

  13. HOW TO ACCESS TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY INFORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATTIC (Alternative Treatment Technology Information Center) is an on-line computer database and repository for information on remediation and treatment technologies. t contains several of EPA's technology databases, including the Treatment Technology Database, the RREL (Risk Redu...

  14. Containerless processing technology analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research on acoustic levitation, air-jet levitation, and heat transfer from molten samples is reported. The goal was to obtain a better understanding and improving the quality of containerless processing systems. These systems are applied to the processing of materials in situations in which contact with a container must be avoided, and have potential application in both ground based and orbiting laboratories. Containerless processing is reviewed. The development of glasses from materials which normally crystallize upon cooling, are studied.

  15. Information Technology and Disabilities, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, Tom, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of all issues/pages of the electronic journal "Information Technology and Disabilities" published during 1996, i.e., a total of 13 ITD articles: (1) "New CSUF (California State University at Fullerton) Braille Transcription Center Promotes Access to Postsecondary Instructional Materials for the California State University…

  16. Academic Integrity and Informational Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowman, Travis S.

    2000-01-01

    Considers the impact of information technology on academic integrity. Highlights include machines versus man; honor codes and student cheating; copyrights for digital data; authoring versus writing; intuitive software; and an example and analysis of the use of AutoSummary in Microsoft Word 97 to create a summary of a published article. (Contains…

  17. Information Technology and Disabilities, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, Tom, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Four issues of this newsletter on information technology and disabilities (ITD) contain the following articles: "Building an Accessible CD-ROM Reference Station" (Rochelle Wyatt and Charles Hamilton); "Development of an Accessible User Interface for People Who Are Blind or Vision Impaired as Part of the Re-Computerisation of Royal Blind Society…

  18. Information technology and acute dialysis.

    PubMed

    Savage, Brandon; Marquardt, Gerhard Willy; Paolini, Francesco; Schlaeper, Christian

    2002-12-01

    The careful application of information technology to the field of acute dialysis may result in both a better understanding of the disease as well as an improvement in patient outcomes. Often these applications increase costs and complexity with little change in understanding or quality of care. To avoid this common trap, a targeted assessment of needs and possible solutions is mandatory. Our group was assembled to provide balanced perspectives and recommendations that address how information technology should be assessed and applied to acute dialysis therapy, with the intent to increase the understanding of the current practice and to improve patient care. To achieve these goals, five areas of focus were identified: patient safety, current practice pattern assessment, practice variation, patient assessment, and dialysis machine technology. To facilitate the assessment, we formulated five specific questions and developed answers based on the available literature and group consensus. PMID:12454539

  19. Management demands on information and communication technology in process-oriented health-care organizations: the importance of understanding managers' expectations during early phases of systems design.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Anna; Vimarlund, Vivian; Timpka, Toomas

    2002-01-01

    There are numerous challenges to overcome before information and communication technology (ICT) can achieve its full potential in process-oriented health-care organizations. One of these challenges is designing systems that meet users' needs, while reflecting a continuously changing organizational environment. Another challenge is to develop ICT that supports both the internal and the external stakeholders' demands. In this study a qualitative research strategy was used to explore the demands on ICT expressed by managers from functional and process units at a community hospitaL The results reveal a multitude of partially competing goals that can make the ICT development process confusing, poor in quality, inefficient and unnecessarily costly. Therefore, from the perspective of ICT development, the main task appears to be to coordinate the different visions and in particular clarify them, as well as to establish the impact that these visions would have on the forthcoming ICT application. PMID:12211342

  20. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Felix L.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a computer systems philosophy, a set of validated hardware building blocks, and a set of validated services as embodied in system software. The goal of AIPS is to provide the knowledgebase which will allow achievement of validated fault-tolerant distributed computer system architectures, suitable for a broad range of applications, having failure probability requirements of 10E-9 at 10 hours. A background and description is given followed by program accomplishments, the current focus, applications, technology transfer, FY92 accomplishments, and funding.

  1. School Leadership and Information Communication Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afshari, Mojgan; Bakar, Kamariah Abu; Luan, Wong Su; Samah, Bahaman Abu; Fooi, Foo Say

    2008-01-01

    Leadership is an important component in guiding the teaching-learning process. Principal as school leaders have a major responsibility for initiating and implementing school change through the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and can facilitate complex decision to integrate it into learning, teaching and school administration.…

  2. Weather Information Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Science Communications International (SCI), formerly General Science Corporation, has developed several commercial products based upon experience acquired as a NASA Contractor. Among them are METPRO, a meteorological data acquisition and processing system, which has been widely used, RISKPRO, an environmental assessment system, and MAPPRO, a geographic information system. METPRO software is used to collect weather data from satellites, ground-based observation systems and radio weather broadcasts to generate weather maps, enabling potential disaster areas to receive advance warning. GSC's initial work for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center resulted in METPAK, a weather satellite data analysis system. METPAK led to the commercial METPRO system. The company also provides data to other government agencies, U.S. embassies and foreign countries.

  3. Information persistence using XML database technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Thomas A.; Lipa, Brian E. G.; Macera, Anthony R.; Staskevich, Gennady R.

    2005-05-01

    The Joint Battlespace Infosphere (JBI) Information Management (IM) services provide information exchange and persistence capabilities that support tailored, dynamic, and timely access to required information, enabling near real-time planning, control, and execution for DoD decision making. JBI IM services will be built on a substrate of network centric core enterprise services and when transitioned, will establish an interoperable information space that aggregates, integrates, fuses, and intelligently disseminates relevant information to support effective warfighter business processes. This virtual information space provides individual users with information tailored to their specific functional responsibilities and provides a highly tailored repository of, or access to, information that is designed to support a specific Community of Interest (COI), geographic area or mission. Critical to effective operation of JBI IM services is the implementation of repositories, where data, represented as information, is represented and persisted for quick and easy retrieval. This paper will address information representation, persistence and retrieval using existing database technologies to manage structured data in Extensible Markup Language (XML) format as well as unstructured data in an IM services-oriented environment. Three basic categories of database technologies will be compared and contrasted: Relational, XML-Enabled, and Native XML. These technologies have diverse properties such as maturity, performance, query language specifications, indexing, and retrieval methods. We will describe our application of these evolving technologies within the context of a JBI Reference Implementation (RI) by providing some hopefully insightful anecdotes and lessons learned along the way. This paper will also outline future directions, promising technologies and emerging COTS products that can offer more powerful information management representations, better persistence mechanisms and improved retrieval techniques.

  4. Nuclear Technology: Making Informed Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altshuler, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a unit on nuclear technology which is taught in a physics class. Explains the unit design, implementation process, demonstrations used, and topics of discussion that include light and optics, naturally and artificially produced sources of radioactivity, nuclear equations, isotopes and half-lives, and power-generating nuclear reactors.…

  5. Nuclear Technology: Making Informed Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altshuler, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a unit on nuclear technology which is taught in a physics class. Explains the unit design, implementation process, demonstrations used, and topics of discussion that include light and optics, naturally and artificially produced sources of radioactivity, nuclear equations, isotopes and half-lives, and power-generating nuclear reactors.

  6. Technology Characterizations. Environmental Information Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The Environmental Handbook Series is designed to overcome the deficiency of information utility and transfer. Each of the works in this series brings together information in an area and format that is useful to both public and private sector needs. It is meant to serve as a basic reference document that will stand for a period of time and help to enrich decisionmaking and research in the interface of energy and the environment. This particular handbook deals with environmental characterization data for the energy technologies and presents the data in a format for use by DOE policy analysts. This treatment includes not only the actual information base, but also a preface which explains the present concept, the historical growth of the program, and the new direction for improved utility. The information base, itself, is constantly being enhanced and is republished periodically as necessary. The specific energy systems for which environmental/technology characterization information is provided are grouped as follows: nuclear energy; coal; petroleum; gas; synthetic fuels; solar energy; geothermal energy; and hydroelectricity.

  7. Technology Requirements for Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Sara; Knoblock, Craig A.; Lannom, Larry

    2002-01-01

    This report provides the results of a panel study conducted into the technology requirements for information management in support of application domains of particular government interest, including digital libraries, mission operations, and scientific research. The panel concluded that it was desirable to have a coordinated program of R&D that pursues a science of information management focused on an environment typified by applications of government interest - highly distributed with very large amounts of data and a high degree of heterogeneity of sources, data, and users.

  8. CSPMS supported by information technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hudan; Wu, Heng

    This paper will propose a whole new viewpoint about building a CSPMS(Coal-mine Safety Production Management System) by means of information technology. This system whose core part is a four-grade automatic triggered warning system achieves the goal that information transmission will be smooth, nondestructive and in time. At the same time, the system provides a comprehensive and collective technology platform for various Public Management Organizations and coal-mine production units to deal with safety management, advance warning, unexpected incidents, preplan implementation, and resource deployment at different levels. The database of this system will support national related industry's resource control, plan, statistics, tax and the construction of laws and regulations effectively.

  9. Managing information technology security risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, David

    2003-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) Security Risk Management is a critical task for the organization to protect against the loss of confidentiality, integrity and availability of IT resources. As systems bgecome more complex and diverse and and attacks from intrusions and malicious content increase, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage IT security risk. This paper describes a two-pronged approach in addressing IT security risk and risk management in the organization: 1) an institutional enterprise appraoch, and 2) a project life cycle approach.

  10. The Physics of Information Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenfeld, Neil

    2000-10-01

    The Physics of Information Technology explores the familiar devices that we use to collect, transform, transmit, and interact with electronic information. Many such devices operate surprisingly close to very many fundamental physical limits. Understanding how such devices work, and how they can (and cannot) be improved, requires deep insight into the character of physical law as well as engineering practice. The book starts with an introduction to units, forces, and the probabilistic foundations of noise and signaling, then progresses through the electromagnetics of wired and wireless communications, and the quantum mechanics of electronic, optical, and magnetic materials, to discussions of mechanisms for computation, storage, sensing, and display. This self-contained volume will help both physical scientists and computer scientists see beyond the conventional division between hardware and software to understand the implications of physical theory for information manipulation.

  11. Overcoming the Glassy-Eyed Nod: An Application of Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning Techniques in Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Trina; Monypenny, Richard; Trevathan, Jarrod

    2012-01-01

    Two significant problems faced by universities are to ensure sustainability and to produce quality graduates. Four aspects of these problems are to improve engagement, to foster interaction, develop required skills and to effectively gauge the level of attention and comprehension within lectures and large tutorials. Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry…

  12. Information technology and its effect on the international system

    SciTech Connect

    Stuck, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This dissertation defines information technology and describes its effect on the international system. The goal of the study is to evaluate the role of information technology in a rapidly changing international milieu. New technology brings about a symbiosis of information and the vehicle, i.e. technical informatin systems, which supports it. Information is increasingly less separable from its organization, its mode of storage, and its processing or dissemination. Information in its union with electronics and this new technology is called information technology. It is seen by many as the most important of all modern technologies because it amounts to the creation of synthetic brainpower. Information technology is in the process of becoming a basic resource of mankind, just as food or energy. As a global resource, information technology is reviewed in its social, economic and political aspects. The dissertation's major premise is that information technology, on the international systemic level, brings about the effects of homogenization and centralization. The study concludes that information technology's effect on the international system is ambiguous. Partially, this is because there have been few attempts to examine the overall impact of information technology on international affairs. Also, due to the relative brevity of our experience with information technology, very little is known about what its future effects on the international system will be.

  13. Process Engineering Technology Center Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centeno, Martha A.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is developing as a world-class Spaceport Technology Center (STC). From a process engineering (PE) perspective, the facilities used for flight hardware processing at KSC are NASA's premier factories. The products of these factories are safe, successful shuttle and expendable vehicle launches carrying state-of-the-art payloads. PE is devoted to process design, process management, and process improvement, rather than product design. PE also emphasizes the relationships of workers with systems and processes. Thus, it is difficult to speak of having a laboratory for PE at KSC because the entire facility is practically a laboratory when observed from a macro level perspective. However, it becomes necessary, at times, to show and display how KSC has benefited from PE and how KSC has contributed to the development of PE; hence, it has been proposed that a Process Engineering Technology Center (PETC) be developed to offer a place with a centralized focus on PE projects, and a place where KSC's PE capabilities can be showcased, and a venue where new Process Engineering technologies can be investigated and tested. Graphics for showcasing PE capabilities have been designed, and two initial test beds for PE technology research have been identified. Specifically, one test bed will look into the use of wearable computers with head mounted displays to deliver work instructions; the other test bed will look into developing simulation models that can be assembled into one to create a hierarchical model.

  14. National Security Technology Incubator Evaluation Process

    SciTech Connect

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the process by which the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) will be evaluated. The technology incubator is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This report includes a brief description of the components, steps, and measures of the proposed evaluation process. The purpose of the NSPP is to promote national security technologies through business incubation, technology demonstration and validation, and workforce development. The NSTI will focus on serving businesses with national security technology applications by nurturing them through critical stages of early development. An effective evaluation process of the NSTI is an important step as it can provide qualitative and quantitative information on incubator performance over a given period. The vision of the NSTI is to be a successful incubator of technologies and private enterprise that assist the NNSA in meeting new challenges in national safety and security. The mission of the NSTI is to identify, incubate, and accelerate technologies with national security applications at various stages of development by providing hands-on mentoring and business assistance to small businesses and emerging or growing companies. To achieve success for both incubator businesses and the NSTI program, an evaluation process is essential to effectively measure results and implement corrective processes in the incubation design if needed. The evaluation process design will collect and analyze qualitative and quantitative data through performance evaluation system.

  15. Introduction. Information, knowledge and technology.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, Alistair G J

    2003-08-15

    Technology is the sum of the ways in which social groups manipulate order in the world to achieve their ends. It enables our active engagement with the world. Technology is central to our present well-being and vital for our future survival. As such it needs a coherent world view, a conceptual framework which will enable the fundamental problems that it poses for society to be approached in an illuminating way. Furthermore, such an approach, while remaining convincing, must not be overwhelmed by an ever-increasing welter of specialization and diversity of application. It is the purpose of the set of papers presented here to examine some key aspects of such a conceptual framework; not in the sense of offering a fully worked out philosophy of technology--that would be a huge and complex undertaking--but rather by considering some key topics. Subsidiary aims are to survey important relevant areas, to identify key sources that can provide access points for further study, and to consider some possible future developments. Major, coherent domains of activity are characterized by a few, fundamental, extensively used and essentially unifying concepts. Technology is such a domain, and its fundamental concepts are information, knowledge and agency. The following sections give a synoptic overview of the material presented in this theme issue, and set it within a wider context. PMID:12952675

  16. Information Technology Outside Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Mark S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-health-care uses of information technology (IT) provide important lessons for health care informatics that are often overlooked because of the focus on the ways in which health care is different from other domains. Eight examples of IT use outside health care provide a context in which to examine the content and potential relevance of these lessons. Drawn from personal experience, five books, and two interviews, the examples deal with the role of leadership, academia, the private sector, the government, and individuals working in large organizations. The interviews focus on the need to manage technologic change. The lessons shed light on how to manage complexity, create and deploy standards, empower individuals, and overcome the occasional “wrongness” of conventional wisdom. One conclusion is that any health care informatics self-examination should be outward-looking and focus on the role of health care IT in the larger context of the evolving uses of IT in all domains. PMID:10495095

  17. Information technology and global change science

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, F.P.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to identify and briefly describe major existing and near term information technologies that cold have a positive impact on the topics being discussed at this conference by helping to manage the data of global change science and helping global change scientists conduct their research. Desktop computer systems have changed dramatically during the past seven years. Faster data processing can be expected in the future through full development of traditional serial computer architectures. Some other proven information technologies may be currently underutilized by global change scientists. Relational database management systems and good organization of data through the use of thoughtful database design would enable the scientific community to better share and maintain quality research data. Custodians of the data should use rigorous data administration to ensure integrity and long term value of the data resource. Still other emerging information technologies that involve the use of artificial intelligence, parallel computer architectures, and new sensors for data collection will be in relatively common use in the near term and should become part of the global science community's technical toolkit. Consideration should also be given to the establishment of Information Analysis Centers to facilitate effective organization and management of interdisciplinary data and the prototype testing and use of advanced information technology to facilitate rapid and cost-effective integration of these tools into global change science. 8 refs.

  18. Reassembling the Information Technology Innovation Process: An Actor Network Theory Method for Managing the Initiation, Production, and Diffusion of Innovations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendejas, Gerardo; Chiasson, Mike

    This paper will propose and explore a method to enhance focal actors' abilities to enroll and control the many social and technical components interacting during the initiation, production, and diffusion of innovations. The reassembling and stabilizing of such components is the challenging goal of the focal actors involved in these processes. To address this possibility, a healthcare project involving the initiation, production, and diffusion of an IT-based innovation will be influenced by the researcher, using concepts from actor network theory (ANT), within an action research methodology (ARM). The experiences using this method, and the nature of enrolment and translation during its use, will highlight if and how ANT can provide a problem-solving method to help assemble the social and technical actants involved in the diffusion of an innovation. Finally, the paper will discuss the challenges and benefits of implementing such methods to attain widespread diffusion.

  19. Conceptual models of information processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The conceptual information processing issues are examined. Human information processing is defined as an active cognitive process that is analogous to a system. It is the flow and transformation of information within a human. The human is viewed as an active information seeker who is constantly receiving, processing, and acting upon the surrounding environmental stimuli. Human information processing models are conceptual representations of cognitive behaviors. Models of information processing are useful in representing the different theoretical positions and in attempting to define the limits and capabilities of human memory. It is concluded that an understanding of conceptual human information processing models and their applications to systems design leads to a better human factors approach.

  20. Processing technology for nickel aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    Ductile ordered intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminum or nickel aluminum chromium have been developed by optimized additions of boron. These alloys show excellent elevated temperature mechnical properties and corrosion properties. However, in order for the alloys to find use in various applications, they should be fabricable by either the well established or innovative processing technologies. This paper discusses the details of fabrication technology being pursued at ORNL. The processes being investigated include powder consolidation by extrusion, powder consolidation by capping, isothermal forging of powder compacted material, twin-roller casting to thin sheet followed by cold-rolling, direct casting rod from liquid, extrusion of billets made by argon-induction melting and electroslag remelting processes, injection molding of powders, and hot isostatic pressing of powders. Relative merits of each process are discussed. Mechanical properties data on products made by various processes are also presented and compared.

  1. Evaluating Outsourcing Information Technology and Assurance Expertise by Small Non-Profit Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Fillmore

    2013-01-01

    Small non-profit organizations outsource at least one information technology or information assurance process. Outsourcing information technology and information assurance processes has increased every year. The study was to determine the key reasons behind the choice to outsource information technology and information assurance processes. Using

  2. Evaluating Outsourcing Information Technology and Assurance Expertise by Small Non-Profit Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Fillmore

    2013-01-01

    Small non-profit organizations outsource at least one information technology or information assurance process. Outsourcing information technology and information assurance processes has increased every year. The study was to determine the key reasons behind the choice to outsource information technology and information assurance processes. Using…

  3. A Transfer of Technology from Engineering: Use of ROC Curves from Signal Detection Theory to Investigate Information Processing in the Brain during Sensory Difference Testing

    PubMed Central

    Wichchukit, Sukanya; O'Mahony, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews a beneficial effect of technology transfer from Electrical Engineering to Food Sensory Science. Specifically, it reviews the recent adoption in Food Sensory Science of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, a tool that is incorporated in the theory of signal detection. Its use allows the information processing that takes place in the brain during sensory difference testing to be studied and understood. The review deals with how Signal Detection Theory, also called Thurstonian modeling, led to the adoption of a more sophisticated way of analyzing the data from sensory difference tests, by introducing the signal-to-noise ratio, d′, as a fundamental measure of perceived small sensory differences. Generally, the method of computation of d′ is a simple matter for some of the better known difference tests like the triangle, duo–trio and 2-AFC. However, there are occasions when these tests are not appropriate and other tests like the same–different and the A Not–A test are more suitable. Yet, for these, it is necessary to understand how the brain processes information during the test before d′ can be computed. It is for this task that the ROC curve has a particular use. PMID:21535617

  4. Space information technologies: future agenda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flournoy, Don M.

    2005-11-01

    Satellites will operate more like wide area broadband computer networks in the 21st Century. Space-based information and communication technologies will therefore be a lot more accessible and functional for the individual user. These developments are the result of earth-based telecommunication and computing innovations being extended to space. The author predicts that the broadband Internet will eventually be available on demand to users of terrestrial networks wherever they are. Earth and space communication assets will be managed as a single network. Space networks will assure that online access is ubiquitous. No matter whether users are located in cities or in remote locations, they will always be within reach of a node on the Internet. Even today, scalable bandwidth can be delivered to active users when moving around in vehicles on the ground, or aboard ships at sea or in the air. Discussion of the innovative technologies produced by NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (1993-2004) demonstrates future capabilities of satellites that make them uniquely suited to serve as nodes on the broadband Internet.

  5. Environmental effects of information and communications technologies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Eric

    2011-11-17

    The digital revolution affects the environment on several levels. Most directly, information and communications technology (ICT) has environmental impacts through the manufacturing, operation and disposal of devices and network equipment, but it also provides ways to mitigate energy use, for example through smart buildings and teleworking. At a broader system level, ICTs influence economic growth and bring about technological and societal change. Managing the direct impacts of ICTs is more complex than just producing efficient devices, owing to the energetically expensive manufacturing process, and the increasing proliferation of devices needs to be taken into account. PMID:22094696

  6. Information technology strategic planning: art or science?

    PubMed

    Hutsell, Richard; Mancini-Newell, Lulcy

    2005-01-01

    It had been almost a decade since the hospitals that make up the Daughters of Charity Health System (DCHS) had engaged in a formal information technology strategic planning process. In the summer of 2002, as the health system re-formed, there was a unique opportunity to introduce a planning process that reflected the governance style of the new health system. DCHS embarked on this journey, with the CIO initiating and formally sponsoring the information technology strategic planning process in a dynamic and collaborative manner The system sought to develop a plan tailored to encompass both enterprise-wide and local requirements; to develop a governance model to engage the members of the local health ministries in plan development, both now and in the future; and to conduct the process in a manner that reflected the values of the Daughters of Charity. The DCHS CIO outlined a premise that the CIO would guide and be continuously involved in the development of this tailored process, in conjunction with an external resource. Together, there would be joint responsibility for introducing a flexible information technology strategic planning methodology; providing an education on the current state of healthcare IT, including future trends and success factors; facilitating support to tap into existing internal talent; cultivating a collaborative process to support both current requirements and future vision; and developing a well-functioning governance structure that would enable the plan to evolve and reflect user community requirements. This article highlights the planning process, including the lessons learned, the benchmarking during and in post-planning, and finally, but most importantly, the unexpected benefit that resulted from this planning process. PMID:16045082

  7. Hurdle technology in fruit processing.

    PubMed

    Gmez, Paula Luisina; Welti-Chanes, Jorge; Alzamora, Stella Maris

    2011-01-01

    Conventional preservation technologies such as thermal processing ensure the safety and shelf life of fruit-derived products but can result in the loss of physicochemical and nutritional quality attributes. This review examines innovative hurdle techniques to obtain novel fruit products with fresh-like characteristics. The multifactorial processes were based on emerging preservation factors in combination or combining emerging factors with traditional ones. Selected practical examples of fruit processing using UV light, pulsed light (PL), ultrasound (US), and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) are presented. Some issues of key importance for the design of combination processes are also addressed. PMID:22129391

  8. Information Technology; Some Critical Implications for Decision Makers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conference Board, Inc., New York, NY.

    Information technology is the collection, storage, processing, dissemination and use of information. This report is an effort to contribute to the formation of a more comprehensive American view of the implications of information technology and to provide a basis for assessing its future impact. The authors of contributed papers discuss…

  9. Information Technology Section. Management and Technology Division. Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on information technology, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "Automation's Impact on (Information) Users" by Arja-Riitta Haarala (Finland); (2) "Economics and Politics of Information Technology: Some Trends in Its Application to Information for the

  10. Process Engineering Technology Center Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, Martha A.

    2002-06-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is developing as a world-class Spaceport Technology Center (STC). From a process engineering (PE) perspective, the facilities used for flight hardware processing at KSC are NASA's premier factories. The products of these factories are safe, successful shuttle and expendable vehicle launches carrying state-of-the-art payloads. PE is devoted to process design, process management, and process improvement, rather than product design. PE also emphasizes the relationships of workers with systems and processes. Thus, it is difficult to speak of having a laboratory for PE at K.S.C. because the entire facility is practically a laboratory when observed from a macro level perspective. However, it becomes necessary, at times, to show and display how K.S.C. has benefited from PE and how K.S.C. has contributed to the development of PE; hence, it has been proposed that a Process Engineering Technology Center (PETC) be developed to offer a place with a centralized focus on PE projects, and a place where K.S.C.'s PE capabilities can be showcased, and a venue where new Process Engineering technologies can be investigated and tested. Graphics for showcasing PE capabilities have been designed, and two initial test beds for PE technology research have been identified. Specifically, one test bed will look into the use of wearable computers with head mounted displays to deliver work instructions; the other test bed will look into developing simulation models that can be assembled into one to create a hierarchical model.

  11. Distillation process using microchannel technology

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Simmons, Wayne W.; Silva, Laura J.; Qiu, Dongming; Perry, Steven T.; Yuschak, Thomas; Hickey, Thomas P.; Arora, Ravi; Smith, Amanda; Litt, Robert Dwayne; Neagle, Paul

    2009-11-03

    The disclosed invention relates to a distillation process for separating two or more components having different volatilities from a liquid mixture containing the components. The process employs microchannel technology for effecting the distillation and is particularly suitable for conducting difficult separations, such as the separation of ethane from ethylene, wherein the individual components are characterized by having volatilities that are very close to one another.

  12. Process Engineering Technology Center Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centeno, Martha A.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is developing as a world-class Spaceport Technology Center (STC). From a process engineering (PE) perspective, the facilities used for flight hardware processing at KSC are NASA's premier factories. The products of these factories are safe, successful shuttle and expendable vehicle launches carrying state-of-the-art payloads. PE is devoted to process design, process management, and process improvement, rather than product design. PE also emphasizes the relationships of workers with systems and processes. Thus, it is difficult to speak of having a laboratory for PE at K.S.C. because the entire facility is practically a laboratory when observed from a macro level perspective. However, it becomes necessary, at times, to show and display how K.S.C. has benefited from PE and how K.S.C. has contributed to the development of PE; hence, it has been proposed that a Process Engineering Technology Center (PETC) be developed to offer a place with a centralized focus on PE projects, and a place where K.S.C.'s PE capabilities can be showcased, and a venue where new Process Engineering technologies can be investigated and tested. Graphics for showcasing PE capabilities have been designed, and two initial test beds for PE technology research have been identified. Specifically, one test bed will look into the use of wearable computers with head mounted displays to deliver work instructions; the other test bed will look into developing simulation models that can be assembled into one to create a hierarchical model.

  13. Integrating Information & Communications Technologies into the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomei, Lawrence, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Integrating Information & Communications Technologies Into the Classroom" examines topics critical to business, computer science, and information technology education, such as: school improvement and reform, standards-based technology education programs, data-driven decision making, and strategic technology education planning. This book also…

  14. Integrating Information & Communications Technologies into the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomei, Lawrence, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Integrating Information & Communications Technologies Into the Classroom" examines topics critical to business, computer science, and information technology education, such as: school improvement and reform, standards-based technology education programs, data-driven decision making, and strategic technology education planning. This book also

  15. Nonthermal processing technologies for food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Looking forward into the future of food science/technology/engineering, in the emerging area of nonthermal processing of foods, is definitely an adventure. It is open-ended and full of uncertainties. Lessons learned from the past should always serve as a good basis for envisioning the future of this...

  16. Novel Technologies for Processing Apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The desire to develop methods to use machine vision to simultaneous inspect apples for quality issues and for contamination has resulted in the development of a number of new technologies for processing apples. First, a number of imaging techniques and detection methods were developed under laborato...

  17. Synthesis of the control algorithm of cyclicity for branched technological process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovoi, Vladimir M.; Pylypenko, Inna V.; Wójcik, Waldemar; Sailarbek, Saltanat

    2015-12-01

    The paper is devoted to synthesis of the control algorithm of cyclicity for branched technological process. The calculated schema of optimal number of repetitions for executing of branched technological process is described. The information technology for optimal control of technological process is developed. The developed information technology is used in technological process of software quality assurance.

  18. Information Processing Concepts: A Cure for "Technofright." Information Processing in the Electronic Office. Part 1: Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popyk, Marilyn K.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the new automated office and its six major technologies (data processing, word processing, graphics, image, voice, and networking), the information processing cycle (input, processing, output, distribution/communication, and storage and retrieval), ergonomics, and ways to expand office education classes (versus class instruction). (CT)

  19. Information Communication Technology Planning in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malapile, Sandy; Keengwe, Jared

    2014-01-01

    This article explores major issues related to Information Communication Technology (ICT) in education and technology planning. Using the diffusion of innovation theory, the authors examine technology planning opportunities and challenges in Developing countries (DCs), technology planning trends in schools, and existing technology planning models…

  20. Information Communication Technology Planning in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malapile, Sandy; Keengwe, Jared

    2014-01-01

    This article explores major issues related to Information Communication Technology (ICT) in education and technology planning. Using the diffusion of innovation theory, the authors examine technology planning opportunities and challenges in Developing countries (DCs), technology planning trends in schools, and existing technology planning models

  1. Technology development life cycle processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, David Franklin

    2013-05-01

    This report and set of appendices are a collection of memoranda originally drafted in 2009 for the purpose of providing motivation and the necessary background material to support the definition and integration of engineering and management processes related to technology development. At the time there was interest and support to move from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Level One (ad hoc processes) to Level Three. As presented herein, the material begins with a survey of open literature perspectives on technology development life cycles, including published data on %E2%80%9Cwhat went wrong.%E2%80%9D The main thrust of the material presents a rational expose%CC%81 of a structured technology development life cycle that uses the scientific method as a framework, with further rigor added from adapting relevant portions of the systems engineering process. The material concludes with a discussion on the use of multiple measures to assess technology maturity, including consideration of the viewpoint of potential users.

  2. Robonaut's Flexible Information Technology Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, Scott; Bluethmann, William; Alder, Ken; Ambrose, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Robonaut, NASA's humanoid robot, is designed to work as both an astronaut assistant and, in certain situations, an astronaut surrogate. This highly dexterous robot performs complex tasks under telepresence control that could previously only be carried out directly by humans. Currently with 47 degrees of freedom (DOF), Robonaut is a state-of-the-art human size telemanipulator system. while many of Robonaut's embedded components have been custom designed to meet packaging or environmental requirements, the primary computing systems used in Robonaut are currently commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) products which have some correlation to flight qualified computer systems. This loose coupling of information technology (IT) resources allows Robonaut to exploit cost effective solutions while floating the technology base to take advantage of the rapid pace of IT advances. These IT systems utilize a software development environment, which is both compatible with COTS hardware as well as flight proven computing systems, preserving the majority of software development for a flight system. The ability to use highly integrated and flexible COTS software development tools improves productivity while minimizing redesign for a space flight system. Further, the flexibility of Robonaut's software and communication architecture has allowed it to become a widely used distributed development testbed for integrating new capabilities and furthering experimental research.

  3. Information Technologies (ITs) in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Toromanovic, Selim; Masic, Fedja; Sivic, Suad; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Zlatan

    2011-01-01

    Advances in medicine in recent decades are in significant correlation with the advances in the information technology. Modern information technologies (IT) have enabled faster, more reliable and comprehensive data collection. These technologies have started to create a large number of irrelevant information, which represents a limiting factor and a real growing gap, between the medical knowledge on one hand, and the ability of doctors to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. Education means, learning, teaching, or the process of acquiring skills or behavior modification through various exercises. Traditionally, medical education meant the oral, practical and more passive transferring of knowledge and skills from the educators to students and health professionals. For the clinical disciplines, of special importance are the principles, such as, “learning at bedside,” aided by the medical literature. In doing so, these techniques enable students to contact with their teachers, and to refer to the appropriate literature. The disadvantage of these educational methods is in the fact, that teachers often do not have enough time. Additionally they are not very convenient to the horizontal and vertical integration of teaching, create weak or almost no self education, as well as, low skill levels and poor integration of education with a real social environment. In this paper authors describe application of modern IT in medical education – their advantages and disadvantages comparing with traditional ways of education. PMID:23408471

  4. Information Technologies (ITs) in Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Toromanovic, Selim; Masic, Fedja; Sivic, Suad; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Zlatan

    2011-09-01

    Advances in medicine in recent decades are in significant correlation with the advances in the information technology. Modern information technologies (IT) have enabled faster, more reliable and comprehensive data collection. These technologies have started to create a large number of irrelevant information, which represents a limiting factor and a real growing gap, between the medical knowledge on one hand, and the ability of doctors to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. Education means, learning, teaching, or the process of acquiring skills or behavior modification through various exercises. Traditionally, medical education meant the oral, practical and more passive transferring of knowledge and skills from the educators to students and health professionals. For the clinical disciplines, of special importance are the principles, such as, "learning at bedside," aided by the medical literature. In doing so, these techniques enable students to contact with their teachers, and to refer to the appropriate literature. The disadvantage of these educational methods is in the fact, that teachers often do not have enough time. Additionally they are not very convenient to the horizontal and vertical integration of teaching, create weak or almost no self education, as well as, low skill levels and poor integration of education with a real social environment. In this paper authors describe application of modern IT in medical education - their advantages and disadvantages comparing with traditional ways of education. PMID:23408471

  5. The Language of Information Technology: Accessibility in the Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warmkessel, Marjorie M.

    The language of information technology is discussed, with a focus on accessibility in the information society. The metaphors of information technology as an "information superhighway" or "infobahn" are analyzed; limitations of the "road system" and developments of Internet systems are considered. The concept of connectivity of the rhizome in "A…

  6. Microwave waste processing technology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, R.D.

    1993-02-01

    Applications using microwave energy in the chemical processing industry have increased within the last ten years. Recently, interest in waste treatment applications process development, especially solidification, has grown. Microwave waste processing offers many advantages over conventional waste treatment technologies. These advantages include a high density, leach resistant, robust waste form, volume and toxicity reduction, favorable economics, in-container treatment, good public acceptance, isolated equipment, and instantaneous energy control. The results from the {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} demonstration scale testing at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons facility are described. Preliminary results for a transuranic (TRU) precipitation sludge indicate that volume reductions of over 80% are achievable over the current immobilization process. An economic evaluation performed demonstrated cost savings of $11.68 per pound compared to the immobilization process currently in use on wet sludge.

  7. Information transfer in continuous processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, A.; Schreiber, T.

    2002-06-01

    We discuss a recently proposed quantity, called transfer entropy, which uses time series data to measure the amount of information transferred from one process to another. In order to understand its foundation, merits, and limitations, we review some aspects of information theoretic functionals. While for symbol sequences these measures have an intuitive interpretation, their application to continuous state processes and, in particular, their estimation from finite data sets is problematic. For mutual information, finite length scale estimates converge from below and can thus be used to reject the assumption that the observed processes are independent. However, mutual information does not provide any directional information. Conversely, transfer entropy does resolve the directionality of information exchange but no similar monotonic convergence seems to hold. Thus, only in the case of zero transfer entropy in one direction we can reliably infer an asymmetry of the information exchange.

  8. Readiness levels for spacecraft information technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, R.; Some, R.; Aljabri, A.

    2003-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a modified interpretation of the traditional TRLs aimed solely at information technology. The intent of this new set of definitions is twofold: First, to enable a definitive measurement of progress among developing information technologies for spacecraft; and second, to clarify particular challenges and requirements that must be met as these technologies are validated in increasingly realistic environments.

  9. State of Washington Strategic Information Technology Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Dept. of Information Services, Olympia. Policy and Regulation Div.

    The Strategic Information Technology Plan of Washington is introduced and explained. The plan is mandated by state law to create a new framework for communication and collaboration to bring together agency technology planning with the achievement of statewide information technology goals and strategies. It provides a point of reference for the…

  10. Funding Models for Information Technology in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orcutt, Ronald L.

    1986-01-01

    A persistent increase in student, faculty, and administrative demand for information technology has resulted in a sharp rise in the total cost of computing services to universities. In response, universities must develop long-term strategic planning processes and policies to establish priorities for information technology investments, determine…

  11. Evaluating the Effect of Information Technology in Small Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Information technology (IT) has become a strategic vehicle for small businesses to achieve and sustain their competitive advantage. Prior research has suggested that information technology plays an important role in the decision-making process. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between organizational IT performance and…

  12. Preparing for a New Century: Information Technology Workforce Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teeter, Thomas A.; Bailey, Janet L.; Cherepski, Don D.; Faucett, John; Hines, Robert J.; Jovanovic, Nickolas S.; Tschumi, Pete; Walker, Jeffery T.; Watson, Gretchen B.

    The purpose of this project was to determine workforce needs in the new information technology/knowledge-based world in order to design a coherent minor program in information technology at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock for the non-technically oriented college student. The process consisted of three phases: site visits to five…

  13. North Carolina Community College System Information Resources and Technology Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community Coll. System, Raleigh.

    The North Carolina Community College System engaged in a strategic planning process in 1998 that was the basis for the information resources and technology plans for the entire System. A focus of the planning was technology, and a technology environmental scanning team developed a set of planning assumptions, which led to the creation of 15 goals…

  14. Information Technology and Scientific and Technical Information in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zi-guang, Bai

    1992-01-01

    Describes policies formulated by the Chinese government that use information technology to facilitate the development of scientific and technical information activities. Highlights include online information retrieval; the construction of databases, including Chinese language, numeric, and Chinese trade and technology databases; the development of…

  15. A Unified Information System for Appropriate Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unamboowe, Ira

    1980-01-01

    Considers problems and solutions for transfer of technological information for developing nations. Imbalances created by industrial growth have brought the concept of choice of technologies to the forefront of national objectives. (RAA)

  16. Information, optoelectronics, and information technologies (historic, philosophical, and logical aspects)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhaliashvili, Zurab O.; Suhorukova, Marina V.

    2001-06-01

    For a civilization of the post-industrial society which is defined as 'informational civilization,' the heightened interest to new technological expedients of any interaction with the information is characteristic. Now concept 'information' is defined as an independent category. The organization, storage, transmission and displaying of information, in essence, is one of the ways of its self- organization for a civilization of such type. Therefore branches bound with generating and support of information highways, are in the center of attention those who tries to capture strategic favorable positions in world community. The reasons of the geopolitical and economic strategy in this case are direct, 'easy-to-see' mechanisms of creation of the structures in investigation activity and industry, 'Easy-to- see,' analyzable, even predictable -- but not defining. The modern science knows the physical laws of composite system's self-organization, and, as clear now, the unclosed nonequilibrium system, which one is a World Net, is subject to the laws of such system's self-organization. Nowadays the fractal nature of all Webs' infrastructures as super complex self-organizing transport-information system is established. Besides, in a row of its performances we observe an openness, coherence, nonlinearly, that together with other aspects allows to identify it as physical fractal structure living on the laws of self-organization. The interest to this phenomenon is quite clear. We have to know the laws of behavior of a Web because it is one of the sides of appearance of Noosphere, and we must adequately interact with it. There are numerous important problems, bound with a Web, and attempts to resolve them are the first task of human community, as nevertheless the human person creates the Web (or nature by hand of the person?) It's very interesting to analyze the previous history of occurrence of such phenomenon, as a Web, and to do the attempts of the prognoses on the future. For this purpose it is necessary to study the process of creating that what is possible to determine as information channels: signal lights (optical transmission mode of the information), radio waves, electrons in the semiconductor-devices, quantum in optic fibers, etc. The technological methods of every possible technical realization of information channels exhibit on this evolution course the obvious order. Since concept 'information' has been recognized as the self-maintained category, it has become clear, that it is necessary to be with it considered, as with requirements of an environment of a habitation. Now basic way of administration of any processes in community is the management of information streams.

  17. Information processing, computation, and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Scarantino, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Computation and information processing are among the most fundamental notions in cognitive science. They are also among the most imprecisely discussed. Many cognitive scientists take it for granted that cognition involves computation, information processing, or both – although others disagree vehemently. Yet different cognitive scientists use ‘computation’ and ‘information processing’ to mean different things, sometimes without realizing that they do. In addition, computation and information processing are surrounded by several myths; first and foremost, that they are the same thing. In this paper, we address this unsatisfactory state of affairs by presenting a general and theory-neutral account of computation and information processing. We also apply our framework by analyzing the relations between computation and information processing on one hand and classicism, connectionism, and computational neuroscience on the other. We defend the relevance to cognitive science of both computation, at least in a generic sense, and information processing, in three important senses of the term. Our account advances several foundational debates in cognitive science by untangling some of their conceptual knots in a theory-neutral way. By leveling the playing field, we pave the way for the future resolution of the debates’ empirical aspects. PMID:22210958

  18. Processing and transmission of information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Techniques, useful in transmitting and processing information, are discussed. In particular, restrictions of the law of conservation of energy on allowable forms of interaction Hamiltonians and optimum quantum measurement by extension of Hilbert space technique are discussed.

  19. Information processing for aerospace structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; White, Edward V.; Baumann, Erwin W.

    1998-06-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) technology provides a means to significantly reduce life cycle of aerospace vehicles by eliminating unnecessary inspections, minimizing inspection complexity, and providing accurate diagnostics and prognostics to support vehicle life extension. In order to accomplish this, a comprehensive SHM system will need to acquire data from a wide variety of diverse sensors including strain gages, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, crack growth gages, corrosion sensors, and piezoelectric transducers. Significant amounts of computer processing will then be required to convert this raw sensor data into meaningful information which indicates both the diagnostics of the current structural integrity as well as the prognostics necessary for planning and managing the future health of the structure in a cost effective manner. This paper provides a description of the key types of information processing technologies required in an effective SHM system. These include artificial intelligence techniques such as neural networks, expert systems, and fuzzy logic for nonlinear modeling, pattern recognition, and complex decision making; signal processing techniques such as Fourier and wavelet transforms for spectral analysis and feature extraction; statistical algorithms for optimal detection, estimation, prediction, and fusion; and a wide variety of other algorithms for data analysis and visualization. The intent of this paper is to provide an overview of the role of information processing for SHM, discuss various technologies which can contribute to accomplishing this role, and present some example applications of information processing for SHM implemented at the Boeing Company.

  20. Information Technology and Educational Amnesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winner, Langdon

    2009-01-01

    Waves of enthusiasm for technological innovations that promise to revitalize teaching and learning are at least a century old. Unfortunately, the record of accomplishment for the many varieties of hardware and software introduced into schools over the decades is remarkably thin. Today's promoters of technology in education tend to forget similar…

  1. Optical Disk Technology and Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Charles M.

    1982-01-01

    Provides basic information on videodisks and potential applications, including inexpensive online storage, random access graphics to complement online information systems, hybrid network architectures, office automation systems, and archival storage. (JN)

  2. Impact of information technology on medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, K.I.

    1996-12-31

    Although the health sciences will benefit from many of the advances in information technology that are applied to a wide variety of research areas, information technology is of particular importance to health care delivery. Developments of computerized patient records will enhance the efficiency effectiveness, and distribution of health care. As managed care programs develop, population-based information will be of increasing importance to health care providers and to the public health community. The capacity to transmit this information. 3 refs.

  3. Visual Information Processing for Television and Telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O. (Editor); Park, Stephen K. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of the papers presented at the NASA conference on Visual Information Processing for Television and Telerobotics. The conference was held at the Williamsburg Hilton, Williamsburg, Virginia on May 10 to 12, 1989. The conference was sponsored jointly by NASA Offices of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) and Space Science and Applications (OSSA) and the NASA Langley Research Center. The presentations were grouped into three sessions: Image Gathering, Coding, and Advanced Concepts; Systems; and Technologies. The program was organized to provide a forum in which researchers from industry, universities, and government could be brought together to discuss the state of knowledge in image gathering, coding, and processing methods.

  4. Stochastic thermodynamics of information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso Barato, Andre

    2015-03-01

    We consider two recent advancements on theoretical aspects of thermodynamics of information processing. First we show that the theory of stochastic thermodynamics can be generalized to include information reservoirs. These reservoirs can be seen as a sequence of bits which has its Shannon entropy changed due to the interaction with the system. Second we discuss bipartite systems, which provide a convenient description of Maxwell's demon. Analyzing a special class of bipartite systems we show that they can be used to study cellular information processing, allowing for the definition of an entropic rate that quantifies how much a cell learns about a fluctuating external environment and that is bounded by the thermodynamic entropy production.

  5. Technology Transfer and the Product Development Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, John E.

    1989-03-21

    It is my pleasure this morning to address a topic that is much talked about in passing but rarely examined from a first person point of view. That topic is Technology Transfer. Over the next 30 minutes I'd like to approach Technology Transfer within the context of the Product Development Process looking at it from the perspectives of the federal government researcher and the industry manufacturer/user. Fist let us recognize that we are living in an ''Information Age'', where global economic and military competition is determined as much by technology as it is by natural resource assets. It is estimated that technical/scientific information is presently growing at a rate of l3 percent per year; this is expected to increase to 30 percent per year by the turn of the century. In fact, something like 90 percent of all scientific knowledge has been generated in the last 30 years; this pool will double again in the next 10-15 years (Exhibit 1). Of all the scientists and engineers throughout history, 90% live and work in the present time. Successfully managing this technical information/knowledge--i.e., transforming the results of R&D to practical applications--will be an important measure of national strength. A little over a dozen years ago, the United States with only 5 percent of the world's population was generating approximately 75 percent of the world's technology. The US. share is now 50 percent and may decline to 30 percent by the turn of the century. This decline won't be because of downturn in U.S. technological advances but because the other 95 percent of the world's population will be increasing its contribution. Economic and military strength then, will be determined by how quickly and successfully companies, industries, and nations can apply new technological information to practical applications--i.e., how they manage technology transfer within the context of the product development process. Much discussion and pronouncements are ongoing in public forums today over the apparent decline in global competitiveness of U.S. industry. The question is why does U.S. industry not succeed in the development and marketing of competitive products when they lead in the generation of new technology.

  6. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Brian E.; Taylor, Harry O.; Glass, Joseph E.; Margerum-Leys, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research. PMID:21691444

  7. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work.

    PubMed

    Perron, Brian E; Taylor, Harry O; Glass, Joseph E; Margerum-Leys, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research. PMID:21691444

  8. Seizing the Moment: Harnessing the Information Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankes, Steve; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the scope of the Information Revolution, considers initiatives for harnessing information technology, and proposes a research agenda. Seven appendices detail specific initiatives relating to a global communication network, a Council for North American Information, the news media, a pan-European security information agency, multinational…

  9. Sources of Information for Instructional Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Ann L., Comp.

    This booklet is designed to help instructional technologists, students of instructional technology, faculty, and researchers in the field locate information quickly and easily. Information services described are libraries, the ERIC system, online information services, state education departments, regional education centers, and information

  10. Enterprise Information System Integration Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Tetsuo; Yumoto, Masaki; Itsuki, Rei

    In the current rapidly changing business environment, companies need to be efficient and agile to survive and thrive. That is why flexible systems integration is urgent and crucial concern for any enterprise. For the meanwhile, systems integration technology is getting more complicated, and middleware types are beginning blur for decades. We sort system integration into four different types, Delayed Federation", Real-time Federation", Delayed Integration", and Real-time Integration". We also outline appropriate technology and architecture for each type.

  11. Information Technologies for the 1980's: Lasers and Microprocessors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, William D.

    This discussion of the development and application of lasers and microprocessors to information processing stresses laser communication in relation to capacity, reliability, and cost and the advantages of this technology to real-time information access and information storage. The increased capabilities of microprocessors are reviewed, and a…

  12. Connecting Social Technologies with Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kara

    2007-01-01

    Social technologies such as Weblogs, wikis, and social bookmarking are emerging both as information resources and as tools for research. This paper reflects on these technologies and suggests they may be well placed to build fluency in the higher-order thinking skills outlined in various information literacy frameworks, particularly in an…

  13. New Information Technologies: Possible Implications for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Stricker, Ulla

    1998-01-01

    Presents observations about developments in information technology that will influence the information industry and libraries of the future. Discusses search engine capabilities; push technology; electronic commerce; WebTV; and optical discs with links to Web sites. Ten figures provide illustrations and charts. (AEF)

  14. Connecting Social Technologies with Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kara

    2007-01-01

    Social technologies such as Weblogs, wikis, and social bookmarking are emerging both as information resources and as tools for research. This paper reflects on these technologies and suggests they may be well placed to build fluency in the higher-order thinking skills outlined in various information literacy frameworks, particularly in an

  15. Employment, Trends, and Training in Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, students, workers, and jobseekers have received mixed signals about the job market for information technology. Periods of strong job growth have been punctuated by brief periods of employment declines. Optimism about information technology (commonly referred to as IT) as a career field has been tempered by concerns about job…

  16. Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were

  17. Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were…

  18. Commercial Parts Technology Qualification Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Many high-reliability systems, including space systems, use selected commercial parts (including Plastic Encapsulated Microelectronics or PEMs) for unique functionality, small size, low weight, high mechanical shock resistance, and other factors. Predominantly this usage is subjected to certain 100% tests (typically called screens) and certain destructive tests usually (but not always) performed on the flight lot (typically called qualification tests). Frequently used approaches include those documented in EEE-INST-002 and JPL DocID62212 (which are sometimes modified by the particular aerospace space systems manufacturer). In this study, approaches from these documents and several space systems manufacturers are compared to approaches from a launch systems manufacturer (SpaceX), an implantable medical electronics manufacturer (Medtronics), and a high-reliability transport system process (automotive systems). In the conclusions section, these processes are outlined for all of these cases and presented in tabular form. Then some simple comparisons are made. In this introduction section, the PEM technology qualification process is described, as documented in EEE-INST-002 (written by the Goddard Space Flight Center, GSFC), as well as the somewhat modified approach employed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Approaches used at several major NASA contractors are also described

  19. Systematically disseminating technological information to potential users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Rapid technological information dissemination system related to the field of remote sensing is presented. The technology transfer staff systematically designed instructional materials and activities using the matrix as an organizer to meet the need of the students, scientists and users in a rapidly expanding technology.

  20. Image Processing and Geographic Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Ronald G.; Daily, Julie; Kiss, Kenneth

    1985-12-01

    A Geographic Information System, which is a product of System Development Corporation's Image Processing System and a commercially available Data Base Management System, is described. The architecture of the system allows raster (image) data type, graphics data type, and tabular data type input and provides for the convenient analysis and display of spatial information. A variety of functions are supported through the Geographic Information System including ingestion of foreign data formats, image polygon encoding, image overlay, image tabulation, costatistical modelling of image and tabular information, and tabular to image conversion. The report generator in the DBMS is utilized to prepare quantitative tabular output extracted from spatially referenced images. An application of the Geographic Information System to a variety of data sources and types is highlighted. The application utilizes sensor image data, graphically encoded map information available from government sources, and statistical tables.

  1. Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, John; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology Program (CICT) was established in 2001 to ensure NASA's Continuing leadership in emerging technologies. It is a coordinated, Agency-wide effort to develop and deploy key enabling technologies for a broad range of mission-critical tasks. The NASA CICT program is designed to address Agency-specific computing, information, and communications technology requirements beyond the projected capabilities of commercially available solutions. The areas of technical focus have been chosen for their impact on NASA's missions, their national importance, and the technical challenge they provide to the Program. In order to meet its objectives, the CICT Program is organized into the following four technology focused projects: 1) Computing, Networking and Information Systems (CNIS); 2) Intelligent Systems (IS); 3) Space Communications (SC); 4) Information Technology Strategic Research (ITSR).

  2. Informed Consumer Guide to Information on Funding Assistive Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ABLEDATA, Silver Spring, MD.

    This directory lists sources for the funding of assistive technology for people with disabilities. Introductory information urges determination of what assistive technology is needed and the gathering of all necessary information (such as primary and secondary disabilities, employment history, income and expenses, and health insurance) prior to…

  3. 76 FR 34886 - General Services Administration Acquisition Regulation; Implementation of Information Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... communication, transmission, processing and storage of U.S. Government information. These systems and equipment... of Information Technology Security Provision AGENCY: Office of Acquisition Policy, General Services... to implement policy and guidelines for contracts and orders that include information technology...

  4. Practicality of quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan

    Quantum Information Processing (QIP) is expected to bring revolutionary enhancement to various technological areas. However, today's QIP applications are far from being practical. The problem involves both hardware issues, i.e., quantum devices are imperfect, and software issues, i.e., the functionality of some QIP applications is not fully understood. Aiming to improve the practicality of QIP, in my PhD research I have studied various topics in quantum cryptography and ion trap quantum computation. In quantum cryptography, I first studied the security of position-based quantum cryptography (PBQC). I discovered a wrong assumption in the previous literature that the cheaters are not allowed to share entangled resources. I proposed entanglement attacks that could cheat all known PBQC protocols. I also studied the practicality of continuous-variable (CV) quantum secret sharing (QSS). While the security of CV QSS was considered by the literature only in the limit of infinite squeezing, I found that finitely squeezed CV resources could also provide finite secret sharing rate. Our work relaxes the stringent resources requirement of implementing QSS. In ion trap quantum computation, I studied the phase error of quantum information induced by dc Stark effect during ion transportation. I found an optimized ion trajectory for which the phase error is the minimum. I also defined a threshold speed, above which ion transportation would induce significant error. In addition, I proposed a new application for ion trap systems as universal bosonic simulators (UBS). I introduced two architectures, and discussed their respective strength and weakness. I illustrated the implementations of bosonic state initialization, transformation, and measurement by applying radiation fields or by varying the trap potential. When comparing with conducting optical experiments, the ion trap UBS is advantageous in higher state initialization efficiency and higher measurement accuracy. Finally, I proposed a new method to re-cool ion qubits during quantum computation. The idea is to transfer the motional excitation of a qubit to another ion that is prepared in the motional ground state. I showed that my method could be ten times faster than current laser cooling techniques, and thus could improve the speed of ion trap quantum computation.

  5. Ontologies for geographic information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, U.; Stuckenschmidt, H.; Schuster, G.; Vögele, T.

    2002-02-01

    The development of geographical information systems (GIS) and the interoperability between these systems demands new requirements for the description of the underlying data. The exchange of data between GIS systems is problematic and often fails due to confusion in the meaning of concepts. The term semantic translator, a translator between GIS systems and/or catalogue systems which gives the user the option to map data between the systems is a topic of current research. This paper provides an overview of formal ontologies and how they can be used for geographical information processing. A description of an intelligent broker architecture for semantic-based information retrieval is introduced, and shows how this approach can be used for general purposes. In conclusion we attempt to provide a roadmap for the use of ontologies for geographic information processing.

  6. Technological Change in Written Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Lois M.

    This paper presents an introductory lesson for elementary learners to construct ideas about how print began and about the media upon which it was recorded. In the lesson's introduction, students examine the present state and constant flow of print to which people are exposed, focusing primarily on the technology of the computer. Students examine…

  7. Optical Hybrid Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shuntaro; Furusawa, Akira

    Historically, two complementary approaches to optical quantum information processing have been pursued: qubits and continuous-variables, each exploiting either particle or wave nature of light. However, both approaches have pros and cons. In recent years, there has been a significant progress in combining both approaches with a view to realizing hybrid protocols that overcome the current limitations. In this chapter, we first review the development of the two approaches with a special focus on quantum teleportation and its applications. We then introduce our recent research progress in realizing quantum teleportation by a hybrid scheme, and mention its future applications to universal and fault-tolerant quantum information processing.

  8. Information technologies for astrophysics circa 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    It is easy to extrapolate current trends to see where technologies relating to information systems in astrophysics and other disciplines will be by the end of the decade. These technologies include mineaturization, multiprocessing, software technology, networking, databases, graphics, pattern computation, and interdisciplinary studies. It is easy to see what limits our current paradigms place on our thinking about technologies that will allow us to understand the laws governing very large systems about which we have large datasets. Three limiting paradigms are saving all the bits collected by instruments or generated by supercomputers; obtaining technology for information compression, storage and retrieval off the shelf; and the linear mode of innovation. We must extend these paradigms to meet our goals for information technology at the end of the decade.

  9. Information technologies for astrophysics circa 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1991-01-01

    It is easy to extrapolate current trends to see where technologies relating to information systems in astrophysics and other disciplines will be by the end of the decade. These technologies include miniaturization, multiprocessing, software technology, networking, databases, graphics, pattern computation, and interdisciplinary studies. It is less easy to see what limits our current paradigms place on our thinking about technologies that will allow us to understand the laws governing very large systems about which we have large data sets. Three limiting paradigms are as follows: saving all the bits collected by instruments or generated by supercomputers; obtaining technology for information compression, storage, and retrieval off the shelf; and the linear model of innovation. We must extend these paradigms to meet our goals for information technology at the end of the decade.

  10. Information Technology in Complex Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Southon, Frank Charles Gray; Sauer, Chris; Dampney, Christopher Noel Grant (Kit)

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To identify impediments to the successful transfer and implementation of packaged information systems through large, divisionalized health services. Design: A case analysis of the failure of an implementation of a critical application in the Public Health System of the State of New South Wales, Australia, was carried out. This application had been proven in the United States environment. Measurements: Interviews involving over 60 staff at all levels of the service were undertaken by a team of three. The interviews were recorded and analyzed for key themes, and the results were shared and compared to enable a continuing critical assessment. Results: Two components of the transfer of the system were considered: the transfer from a different environment, and the diffusion throughout a large, divisionalized organization. The analyses were based on the Scott-Morton organizational fit framework. In relation to the first, it was found that there was a lack of fit in the business environments and strategies, organizational structures and strategy-structure pairing as well as the management process-roles pairing. The diffusion process experienced problems because of the lack of fit in the strategy-structure, strategy-structure-management processes, and strategy-structure-role relationships. Conclusion: The large-scale developments of integrated health services present great challenges to the efficient and reliable implementation of information technology, especially in large, divisionalized organizations. There is a need to take a more sophisticated approach to understanding the complexities of organizational factors than has traditionally been the case. PMID:9067877

  11. Impact of Information Technology in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranjan, Jayanthi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to study the provisions of information technology IT for development of academic resources and examines the effect of IT in academic institutions for sharing information. Design/methodology/approach--The paper examines the role of IT in sharing information in academic institutions and explores the IT…

  12. Children Show Selective Trust in Technological Informants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danovitch, Judith H.; Alzahabi, Reem

    2013-01-01

    Although children are often exposed to technological devices early in life, little is known about how they evaluate these novel sources of information. In two experiments, children aged 3, 4, and 5 years old ("n" = 92) were presented with accurate and inaccurate computer informants, and they subsequently relied on information provided by…

  13. Information Technology and the Human Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klee, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews how information technology supports the Human Research Facility (HRF) and specifically the uses that contractor has for the information. There is information about the contractor, the HRF, some of the experiments that were performed using the HRF on board the Shuttle, overviews of the data architecture, and software both commercial and specially developed software for the specific experiments.

  14. Family Caregivers and Consumer Health Information Technology.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jennifer L; Darer, Jonathan D; Larsen, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    Health information technology has been embraced as a strategy to facilitate patients' access to their health information and engagement in care. However, not all patients are able to access, or are capable of using, a computer or mobile device. Although family caregivers assist individuals with some of the most challenging and costly health needs, their role in health information technology is largely undefined and poorly understood. This perspective discusses challenges and opportunities of engaging family caregivers through the use of consumer-oriented health information technology. We compile existing evidence to make the case that involving family caregivers in health information technology as desired by patients is technically feasible and consistent with the principles of patient-centered and family-centered care. We discuss how more explicit and purposeful engagement of family caregivers in health information technology could advance clinical quality and patient safety by increasing the transparency, accuracy, and comprehensiveness of patient health information across settings of care. Finally, we describe how clarifying and executing patients' desires to involve family members or friends through health information technology would provide family caregivers greater legitimacy, convenience, and timeliness in health system interactions, and facilitate stronger partnerships between patients, family caregivers, and health care professionals. PMID:26311198

  15. Information technology research: Transforming our future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajcsy, Ruzena, Dr.

    2001-08-01

    The Information Age is transforming our economy and our lives. In its pathbreaking 1999 report to President Clinton, the Presidential Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) outlined the ten crucial ways that new technologies are transforming society in the U.S. It is clear that the Federal government will need to provide the critical R&D investments that will help retain and bolster the U.S. technological lead in the 21st century. These investments will also support efforts to make new technologies and their benefits available to all U.S. citizens.

  16. (CICT) Computing, Information, and Communications Technology Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) program is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communications technologies. This viewgraph presentation includes diagrams of how the political guidance behind CICT is structured. The presentation profiles each part of the NASA Mission in detail, and relates the Mission to the activities of CICT. CICT's Integrated Capability Goal is illustrated, and hypothetical missions which could be enabled by CICT are profiled. CICT technology development is profiled.

  17. Medical Information Processing by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinmuntz, Benjamin

    The use of the computer for medical information processing was introduced about a decade ago. Considerable inroads have now been made toward its applications to problems in medicine. Present uses of the computer, both as a computational and noncomputational device include the following: automated search of patients' files; on-line clinical data…

  18. Dynamic Information and Library Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salton, Gerard

    This book provides an introduction to automated information services: collection, analysis, classification, storage, retrieval, transmission, and dissemination. An introductory chapter is followed by an overview of mechanized processes for acquisitions, cataloging, and circulation. Automatic indexing and abstracting methods are covered, followed…

  19. Research on probabilistic information processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, W.

    1973-01-01

    The work accomplished on probabilistic information processing (PIP) is reported. The research proposals and decision analysis are discussed along with the results of research on MSC setting, multiattribute utilities, and Bayesian research. Abstracts of reports concerning the PIP research are included.

  20. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company information management technology architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.J.; Lau, P.K.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Information Management Technology Architecture (TA) is being driven by the business objectives of reducing costs and improving effectiveness. The strategy is to reduce the cost of computing through standardization. The Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) TA is a set of standards and products for use at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TA will provide direction for information management resource acquisitions, development of information systems, formulation of plans, and resolution of issues involving LMITCO computing resources. Exceptions to the preferred products may be granted by the Information Management Executive Council (IMEC). Certain implementation and deployment strategies are inherent in the design and structure of LMITCO TA. These include: migration from centralized toward distributed computing; deployment of the networks, servers, and other information technology infrastructure components necessary for a more integrated information technology support environment; increased emphasis on standards to make it easier to link systems and to share information; and improved use of the company`s investment in desktop computing resources. The intent is for the LMITCO TA to be a living document constantly being reviewed to take advantage of industry directions to reduce costs while balancing technological diversity with business flexibility.

  1. Evaluation Criteria for Solid Waste Processing Research and Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levri, Julie A.; Hogan, J. A.; Alazraki, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary list of criteria is proposed for evaluation of solid waste processing technologies for research and technology development (R&TD) in the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. Completion of the proposed list by current and prospective ALS technology developers, with regard to specific missions of interest, may enable identification of appropriate technologies (or lack thereof) and guide future development efforts for the ALS Program solid waste processing area. An attempt is made to include criteria that capture information about the technology of interest as well as its system-wide impacts. Some of the criteria in the list are mission-independent, while the majority are mission-specific. In order for technology developers to respond to mission-specific criteria, critical information must be available on the quantity, composition and state of the waste stream, the wast processing requirements, as well as top-level mission scenario information (e.g. safety, resource recovery, planetary protection issues, and ESM equivalencies). The technology readiness level (TRL) determines the degree to which a technology developer is able to accurately report on the list of criteria. Thus, a criteria-specific minimum TRL for mandatory reporting has been identified for each criterion in the list. Although this list has been developed to define criteria that are needed to direct funding of solid waste processing technologies, this list processes significant overlap in criteria required for technology selection for inclusion in specific tests or missions. Additionally, this approach to technology evaluation may be adapted to other ALS subsystems.

  2. Advanced Process Technology: Combi Materials Science and Atmospheric Processing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Technology and Advanced Concepts -- High-Throughput Combi Material Science and Atmospheric Processing that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  3. Bringing Business Intelligence to Health Information Technology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Guangzhi; Zhang, Chi; Li, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Business intelligence (BI) and healthcare analytics are the emerging technologies that provide analytical capability to help healthcare industry improve service quality, reduce cost, and manage risks. However, such component on analytical healthcare data processing is largely missed from current healthcare information technology (HIT) or health…

  4. Bringing Business Intelligence to Health Information Technology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Guangzhi; Zhang, Chi; Li, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Business intelligence (BI) and healthcare analytics are the emerging technologies that provide analytical capability to help healthcare industry improve service quality, reduce cost, and manage risks. However, such component on analytical healthcare data processing is largely missed from current healthcare information technology (HIT) or health

  5. Education, Information Technologies, and the Augmentation of Human Intellect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Gardner

    2006-01-01

    The author believes that information technologies are powerfully heuristic in addressing one of education's deepest ambitions. Following Engelbart's paradigm, he sees these technologies as augmenting human intellect, not simply because they permit high-speed calculations but also because they externalize our own cognitive processes in a way that…

  6. Fidelity in Archaeal Information Processing

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Bart; Blombach, Fabian; Brouns, Stan J. J.; van der Oost, John

    2010-01-01

    A key element during the flow of genetic information in living systems is fidelity. The accuracy of DNA replication influences the genome size as well as the rate of genome evolution. The large amount of energy invested in gene expression implies that fidelity plays a major role in fitness. On the other hand, an increase in fidelity generally coincides with a decrease in velocity. Hence, an important determinant of the evolution of life has been the establishment of a delicate balance between fidelity and variability. This paper reviews the current knowledge on quality control in archaeal information processing. While the majority of these processes are homologous in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes, examples are provided of nonorthologous factors and processes operating in the archaeal domain. In some instances, evidence for the existence of certain fidelity mechanisms has been provided, but the factors involved still remain to be identified. PMID:20871851

  7. 42 CFR 495.332 - State Medicaid health information technology (HIT) plan requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Medicaid Information Technology Architecture (MITA) principles as described in the Medicaid Information... processes that enable improved program administration for the Medicaid enterprise; (ii) Includes...

  8. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE`s Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  9. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  10. TECHNOLOGICAL OVERVIEW REPORTS FOR EIGHT SHALE OIL RECOVERY PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the document is to supply background information for evaluation of environmental impacts and pollution control technologies in connection with oil shale development. Six surface retorting processes selected for characterization were: (1) Union Oil Retort B, (2) Par...

  11. Women Technology Leaders: Gender Issues in Higher Education Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    Women working in higher education information technology (IT) organizations and those seeking leadership positions in these organizations face a double challenge in overcoming the traditionally male-dominated environments of higher education and IT. Three women higher education chief information officers (CIOs) provided their perspectives,

  12. Women Technology Leaders: Gender Issues in Higher Education Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    Women working in higher education information technology (IT) organizations and those seeking leadership positions in these organizations face a double challenge in overcoming the traditionally male-dominated environments of higher education and IT. Three women higher education chief information officers (CIOs) provided their perspectives,…

  13. Automation technology using Geographic Information System (GIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Cynthia L.

    1994-01-01

    Airport Surface Movement Area is but one of the actions taken to increase the capacity and safety of existing airport facilities. The System Integration Branch (SIB) has designed an integrated system consisting of an electronic moving display in the cockpit, and includes display of taxi routes which will warn controllers and pilots of the position of other traffic and warning information automatically. Although, this system has in test simulation proven to be accurate and helpful; the initial process of obtaining an airport layout of the taxi-routes and designing each of them is a very tedious and time-consuming process. Other methods of preparing the display maps are being researched. One such method is the use of the Geographical Information System (GIS). GIS is an integrated system of computer hardware and software linking topographical, demographic and other resource data that is being referenced. The software can support many areas of work with virtually unlimited information compatibility due to the system's open architecture. GIS will allow us to work faster with increased efficiency and accuracy while providing decision making capabilities. GIS is currently being used at the Langley Research Center with other applications and has been validated as an accurate system for that task. GIS usage for our task will involve digitizing aerial photographs of the topology for each taxi-runway and identifying each position according to its specific spatial coordinates. The information currently being used can be integrated with the GIS system, due to its ability to provide a wide variety of user interfaces. Much more research and data analysis will be needed before this technique will be used, however we are hopeful this will lead to better usage of man-power and technological capabilities for the future.

  14. ICAT and the NASA technology transfer process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rifkin, Noah; Tencate, Hans; Watkins, Alison

    1993-01-01

    This paper will address issues related to NASA's technology transfer process and will cite the example of using ICAT technologies in educational tools. The obstacles to effective technology transfer will be highlighted, viewing the difficulties in achieving successful transfers of ICAT technologies.

  15. Brief: Information technology outsourcing -- one company's experience

    SciTech Connect

    Klochko, J.W.; Bester, L.W. )

    1994-06-01

    To address the pressures of the 1990's business climate, Amoco Canada Petroleum Co. Ltd. went through an aggressive evaluation and restructuring of its business operations. This precipitated a critical review of its information technology (IT) strategy with a goal of maintaining effectiveness while reducing overall costs. To meet the challenge of substantially reducing expenses while continuing to maintain effective service levels, the company entered a 5-year agreement to outsource its data center and network operations. this paper discusses the business forces that brought Amoco Canada to consider outsourcing, the processes surrounding the outsourcing decision, and the results to date. The authors demonstrate that by understanding the role of IT in its business plans, the company successfully met its outsourcing objectives.

  16. UAP and the New Information Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martyn, John

    1982-01-01

    Describes briefly recent applications of electronics to information processing and information transfer such as facsimile transmission, videodisc and videotape systems, teletext and videotext, word processing, online information retrieval, and document delivery systems. Discusses their relevance to the Universal Availability of Publications (UAP).…

  17. Photonic quantum information: science and technology.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological progress in the generation, manipulation and detection of individual single photons has opened a new scientific field of photonic quantum information. This progress includes the realization of single photon switches, photonic quantum circuits with specific functions, and the application of novel photonic states to novel optical metrology beyond the limits of standard optics. In this review article, the recent developments and current status of photonic quantum information technology are overviewed based on the author's past and recent works. PMID:26755398

  18. Information Technology and the Third Industrial Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Joe

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the so-called third industrial revolution, or the information revolution. Topics addressed include the progression of the revolution in the U.S. economy, in Europe, and in Third World countries; the empowering technologies, including digital switches, optical fiber, semiconductors, CD-ROM, networks, and combining technologies; and future…

  19. Libraries, Self-Censorship, and Information Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buschman, John

    1994-01-01

    Explores the theme of self-censorship in libraries in relation to new technologies. Highlights include the results of investing in high-cost electronic resources at the expense of traditional, lower-status formats; the effect of information technologies on literacy and historical records; and market censorship, including centralization and…

  20. Information architecture: Standards adoption and retirement process service action plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this Service Action Plan is to announce, as well as provide, a high-level outline of a new Departmental process for the adoption and retirement of information technology standards. This process supports the implementation of a Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture. This plan was prepared with the Department of Energy information technology standards customers and stakeholders in mind. The process described in this plan will be serviced primarily by staff from the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Information Management with assistance from designated program and site Information Technology Standards Points of Contact. We welcome any comments regarding this new Departmental process and encourage the proposal of information technology standards for adoption or retirement.

  1. Efficiency of cellular information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barato, Andre C.; Hartich, David; Seifert, Udo

    2014-10-01

    We show that a rate of conditional Shannon entropy reduction, characterizing the learning of an internal process about an external process, is bounded by the thermodynamic entropy production. This approach allows for the definition of an informational efficiency that can be used to study cellular information processing. We analyze three models of increasing complexity inspired by the Escherichia coli sensory network, where the external process is an external ligand concentration jumping between two values. We start with a simple model for which ATP must be consumed so that a protein inside the cell can learn about the external concentration. With a second model for a single receptor we show that the rate at which the receptor learns about the external environment can be nonzero even without any dissipation inside the cell since chemical work done by the external process compensates for this learning rate. The third model is more complete, also containing adaptation. For this model we show inter alia that a bacterium in an environment that changes at a very slow time-scale is quite inefficient, dissipating much more than it learns. Using the concept of a coarse-grained learning rate, we show for the model with adaptation that while the activity learns about the external signal the option of changing the methylation level increases the concentration range for which the learning rate is substantial.

  2. Information processing. [in human performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, Christopher D.; Flach, John M.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical models of sensory-information processing by the human brain are reviewed from a human-factors perspective, with a focus on their implications for aircraft and avionics design. The topics addressed include perception (signal detection and selection), linguistic factors in perception (context provision, logical reversals, absence of cues, and order reversals), mental models, and working and long-term memory. Particular attention is given to decision-making problems such as situation assessment, decision formulation, decision quality, selection of action, the speed-accuracy tradeoff, stimulus-response compatibility, stimulus sequencing, dual-task performance, task difficulty and structure, and factors affecting multiple task performance (processing modalities, codes, and stages).

  3. CLEAN PROCESSES BRANCH (SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of NRMRL's Sustainable Technology Division's Clean Processes Branch (CPB) is to develop and demonstrate pollution prevention and recycling, resource recovery and reuse technologies primarily through an in-house research program. The major technical programs within the...

  4. Integrated Bibliographic Information System: Integrating Resources by Integrating Information Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Hartt, Richard W.

    The Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC), an organization charged with providing information services to the Department of Defense (DoD) scientific and technical community, actively seeks ways to promote resource sharing as a means for speeding access to information while reducing the costs of information processing throughout the technical…

  5. National Security and Information Technology: The New Regulatory Option?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Manley R.

    1987-01-01

    Summarizes recent developments in information technology research and development, telecommunication services, telephone manufacturing, telecommunication networks, information processing, and U.S. import/export policy. It is concluded that government regulation as a policy strategy depends on how one defines national security. (Author/CLB)

  6. Measuring Information Technology Performance: Operational Efficiency and Operational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Annette G.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation provides a practical approach for measuring operational efficiency and operational effectiveness for IT organizations introducing the ITIL process framework. The intent of the study was to assist Chief Information Officers (CIOs) in explaining the impact of introducing the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL)…

  7. Technology in Preparing Teachers for an Information Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, Larry K.; And Others

    Teacher education can be effectively transformed to prepare educators for the information age. The characteristics of the information age require the application of organization development processes and interactive learning technologies which bring the best results of behavioral and engineering sciences to refocus teacher education structures and…

  8. Measuring Information Technology Performance: Operational Efficiency and Operational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Annette G.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation provides a practical approach for measuring operational efficiency and operational effectiveness for IT organizations introducing the ITIL process framework. The intent of the study was to assist Chief Information Officers (CIOs) in explaining the impact of introducing the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL)

  9. Innovative Information Technology for Space Weather Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Qu, M.; Shih, F.; Denker, C.; Gerbessiotis, A.; Lofdahl, M.; Rees, D.; Keller, C.

    2004-05-01

    Solar activity is closely related to the near earth environment -- summarized descriptively as space weather. Changes in space weather have adverse effect on many aspects of life and systems on earth and in space. Real-time, high-quality data and data processing would be a key element to forecast space weather promptly and accurately. Recently, we obtained a funding from US National Science Foundation to apply innovative information technology for space weather prediction. (1) We use the technologies of image processing and pattern recognition, such as image morphology segmentation, Support Vector Machines (SVMs), and neural networks to detect and characterize three important solar activities in real-time: filament eruptions, flares, and emerging flux regions (EFRs). Combining the real time detection with the recent statistical study on the relationship among filament eruptions, flares, EFRs, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and geomagnetic storms, we are establishing real time report of solar events and automatic forecasting of earth directed CMEs and subsequent geomagnetic storms. (2) We combine state-of-art parallel computing techniques with phase diverse speckle imaging techniques, to yield near real-time diffraction limited images with a cadence of approximately 10 sec. We utilize the multiplicity of parallel paradigms to optimize the calculation of phase diverse speckle imaging to improve calculation speed. With such data, we can monitor flare producing active regions continuously and carry out targeted studies of the evolution and flows in flare producing active regions. (3) We are developing Web based software tools to post our processed data, events and forecasting in real time, and to be integrated with current solar activity and space weather prediction Web pages at BBSO. This will also be a part of Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO) being developed by the solar physics community. This research is supported by NSF ITR program.

  10. Governance Mechanisms in Information Technology Outsourcing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravindran, Kiron

    2010-01-01

    While the dominance of Information Technology Outsourcing (ITO) as a sourcing strategy would seem to indicate successful and well-informed practice, frequent examples of unraveled engagements highlight the associated risks. Successful instances of outsourcing suggest that governance mechanisms effectively manage the related risks. This

  11. Information Technology, Intellectual Property, and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses issues affecting the fields of information technology, intellectual property, and education. Four main needs are addressed: (1) new economic mechanisms beyond copyright and patent; (2) new codes of ethics for education; (3) effective representation for creator/producers and users of information; and (4) a forum for the voice of…

  12. The Information Infrastructure and Technology Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Albert, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This statement by Senator Albert Gore, Jr., on introduction of the Information Infrastructure and Technology Act of 1992 highlights examples of applications of high-performance computing, the components of the Information Infrastructure Development Program (i.e., education, libraries, manufacturing, and health care), and participating agencies. A

  13. 77 FR 55217 - Health Information Technology Implementation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... efficiency of primary and preventive care as a safety net through the effective use of Health Information... preventive care as a safety net through the effective use of health information technology. In order to... expectations of the original grant award and plans to work closely with the Community Care Network of...

  14. Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this

  15. Enterprise Approaches to Information and Learning Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Gill

    2007-01-01

    Like it or not, an institution's IT infrastructure is a matter with which institutional strategic planners must concern themselves. Information systems represent a significant investment, they perform mission-critical functions, and the appropriate use of information and learning technologies can have a critical part to play in delivering against

  16. Governance Mechanisms in Information Technology Outsourcing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravindran, Kiron

    2010-01-01

    While the dominance of Information Technology Outsourcing (ITO) as a sourcing strategy would seem to indicate successful and well-informed practice, frequent examples of unraveled engagements highlight the associated risks. Successful instances of outsourcing suggest that governance mechanisms effectively manage the related risks. This…

  17. Implementing Information Technology Projects in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanamugire, Athanase B.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the problems of implementing information technology in developing countries and cites examples from African projects. The use of CD-ROM for access to information is examined, and experiences at the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals in Saudi Arabia in introducing CD-ROM search services are described. (Contains five references.)…

  18. Use of Information Technology in Optometric Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, Jimmy H.

    1999-01-01

    To enhance the information technology literacy of optometry students, the Southern College of Optometry (Tennessee) developed an academic assignment, the Electronic Media Paper, in which second-year students must search two different electronic media for information. Results suggest Internet use for searching may be a useful tool for specific…

  19. Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this…

  20. Enterprise Approaches to Information and Learning Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Gill

    2007-01-01

    Like it or not, an institution's IT infrastructure is a matter with which institutional strategic planners must concern themselves. Information systems represent a significant investment, they perform mission-critical functions, and the appropriate use of information and learning technologies can have a critical part to play in delivering against…

  1. The Information Infrastructure and Technology Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Albert, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This statement by Senator Albert Gore, Jr., on introduction of the Information Infrastructure and Technology Act of 1992 highlights examples of applications of high-performance computing, the components of the Information Infrastructure Development Program (i.e., education, libraries, manufacturing, and health care), and participating agencies. A…

  2. Inquiry Learning’ Implementation and Evaluation in the Teaching of Information Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue-song, Lu; Qi-hui, Liu; Jie, Chen

    This text combines the inquiry learning method with the characteristics of information technology education, and completely exerts the autonomy, independence, collaboration, process and openness of inquiry learning, to promote the teaching of information technology. At the same time, this paper puts forward the evaluation rules of inquiry learning in the teaching of information technology and summarizes the attentive problems in the evaluation process.

  3. Revitalizing the Engineering Curriculum: The Role of Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissell, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the potential of information technology in engineering education with reference to a model of the learning process. Discusses engineering as an academic subject, engineering as a mathematical subject, engineering as applied science, a model of the learning process, and the role of telematics. Contains 17 references. (JRH)

  4. Quantum communication and information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beals, Travis Roland

    Quantum computers enable dramatically more efficient algorithms for solving certain classes of computational problems, but, in doing so, they create new problems. In particular, Shor's Algorithm allows for efficient cryptanalysis of many public-key cryptosystems. As public key cryptography is a critical component of present-day electronic commerce, it is crucial that a working, secure replacement be found. Quantum key distribution (QKD), first developed by C.H. Bennett and G. Brassard, offers a partial solution, but many challenges remain, both in terms of hardware limitations and in designing cryptographic protocols for a viable large-scale quantum communication infrastructure. In Part I, I investigate optical lattice-based approaches to quantum information processing. I look at details of a proposal for an optical lattice-based quantum computer, which could potentially be used for both quantum communications and for more sophisticated quantum information processing. In Part III, I propose a method for converting and storing photonic quantum bits in the internal state of periodically-spaced neutral atoms by generating and manipulating a photonic band gap and associated defect states. In Part II, I present a cryptographic protocol which allows for the extension of present-day QKD networks over much longer distances without the development of new hardware. I also present a second, related protocol which effectively solves the authentication problem faced by a large QKD network, thus making QKD a viable, information-theoretic secure replacement for public key cryptosystems.

  5. Missouri Introduction to Materials and Processing Technology. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to support a high school specialization course in materials and processing technology. The document contains three sections: (1) information on using the material; (2) a set of instructor guides for eight instructional units; (3) 15 technological activity modules and teacher and student instructions for their use; and (4)

  6. Missouri Introduction to Materials and Processing Technology. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to support a high school specialization course in materials and processing technology. The document contains three sections: (1) information on using the material; (2) a set of instructor guides for eight instructional units; (3) 15 technological activity modules and teacher and student instructions for their use; and (4)…

  7. Technology maturation process: the NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Mario R.; Pham, Bruce T.; Lawson, Peter R.

    2014-08-01

    In 2009 the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters established the Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) solicitation as a new technology maturation program to fill the needed gap for mid-Technology Readiness Level (TRL) levels (3≤ TRL <6). In three full proposal selection cycles since the inception of this program, more than 40 investigations have been selected, many meritorious milestones have been met and advances have been achieved. In this paper, we review the process of establishing technology priorities, the management of technology advancements and milestones, and the incipient success of some of these investigations in light of the need of future space missions.

  8. Research Opportunities in Information Science and Technology: Cognitive Aspects of Information Science, Information Technology, and Economics of Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation. Washington, DC. Div. of Information Science and Technology.

    This volume contains the reports of three working groups which were convened separately over a 3-year period at the request of the Advisory Committee for the Division of Information Science and Technology of the National Science Foundation to obtain the opinion of experts concerning research opportunities and trends in information science and…

  9. The NASA Integrated Information Technology Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldridge, Tim

    1997-01-01

    This document defines an Information Technology Architecture for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), where Information Technology (IT) refers to the hardware, software, standards, protocols and processes that enable the creation, manipulation, storage, organization and sharing of information. An architecture provides an itemization and definition of these IT structures, a view of the relationship of the structures to each other and, most importantly, an accessible view of the whole. It is a fundamental assumption of this document that a useful, interoperable and affordable IT environment is key to the execution of the core NASA scientific and project competencies and business practices. This Architecture represents the highest level system design and guideline for NASA IT related activities and has been created on the authority of the NASA Chief Information Officer (CIO) and will be maintained under the auspices of that office. It addresses all aspects of general purpose, research, administrative and scientific computing and networking throughout the NASA Agency and is applicable to all NASA administrative offices, projects, field centers and remote sites. Through the establishment of five Objectives and six Principles this Architecture provides a blueprint for all NASA IT service providers: civil service, contractor and outsourcer. The most significant of the Objectives and Principles are the commitment to customer-driven IT implementations and the commitment to a simpler, cost-efficient, standards-based, modular IT infrastructure. In order to ensure that the Architecture is presented and defined in the context of the mission, project and business goals of NASA, this Architecture consists of four layers in which each subsequent layer builds on the previous layer. They are: 1) the Business Architecture: the operational functions of the business, or Enterprise, 2) the Systems Architecture: the specific Enterprise activities within the context of IT systems, 3) the Technical Architecture: a common, vendor-independent framework for design, integration and implementation of IT systems and 4) the Product Architecture: vendor=specific IT solutions. The Systems Architecture is effectively a description of the end-user "requirements". Generalized end-user requirements are discussed and subsequently organized into specific mission and project functions. The Technical Architecture depicts the framework, and relationship, of the specific IT components that enable the end-user functionality as described in the Systems Architecture. The primary components as described in the Technical Architecture are: 1) Applications: Basic Client Component, Object Creation Applications, Collaborative Applications, Object Analysis Applications, 2) Services: Messaging, Information Broker, Collaboration, Distributed Processing, and 3) Infrastructure: Network, Security, Directory, Certificate Management, Enterprise Management and File System. This Architecture also provides specific Implementation Recommendations, the most significant of which is the recognition of IT as core to NASA activities and defines a plan, which is aligned with the NASA strategic planning processes, for keeping the Architecture alive and useful.

  10. Intuitive information technology: enhancing clinician efficiency.

    PubMed

    Procuniar, Molly; Murphy, Sue

    2008-01-01

    Although medical technology is making great strides in improved diagnosis and treatment, the technologies used to document, communicate, and manage those activities are limiting its progress by converting clinicians into computer operators. In an environment of nurse and doctor shortages, reducing their efficiency is counter productive. Technology in healthcare that does not serve patients by improving cost, quality, or care delivery is technology that serves no purpose. Requiring clinicians to chart away from the bedside using technologies that do not feel intuitive, such as keyboarding and mouse use reduces efficiency of workflow, impedes direct care, and increases the cost of training. Intuitive forms of technology such as surface technology, voice activated charting, or digital pens, if embraced, could cause significant changes in healthcare workflows. Clinicians could be more focused on direct care and less utilized in clerical activity. The time it takes to access information could be decreased exponentially--and the opportunities to interact with that information would present a nearly endless horizon. This impact would be especially crucial in high acuity areas and emergency patient care situations. In short, technology should embrace familiar, natural movements and develop intuitive interfaces to improve effectiveness in the healthcare market of the future. PMID:18999045

  11. 78 FR 24749 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Appointment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Appointment AGENCY: Government Accountability... Act of 2009 (ARRA) established the Health Information Technology Policy Committee to make recommendations on the implementation of a nationwide health information technology infrastructure to the...

  12. Information Technology Committee explores future needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, James R.

    The newly formed Information Technology Committee met October 18-19, 1996, to review its charge and examine AGU's current systems, network, systems strategy, and Information Services staffing.There are currently three positions open in the Information Services group that are proving hard to fill on a permanent basis. The committee recommended that staff develop a relationship with local universities and intensively canvass the membership for people who have acquired computer skills during their geoscience training and who might consider attractive 1-3 years of information services experience at AGU.

  13. Prioritizing Information Technology Investments: Assessing the Correlations among Technological Readiness, Information Technology Flexibility, and Information Technology Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Management's dilemma, when allocating financial resources towards the improvement of technological readiness and IT flexibility within their organizations, is to control financial risk and maximize IT effectiveness. Technological readiness is people's propensity to embrace and use technology. Its drivers are optimism, innovativeness, discomfort,

  14. Prioritizing Information Technology Investments: Assessing the Correlations among Technological Readiness, Information Technology Flexibility, and Information Technology Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Management's dilemma, when allocating financial resources towards the improvement of technological readiness and IT flexibility within their organizations, is to control financial risk and maximize IT effectiveness. Technological readiness is people's propensity to embrace and use technology. Its drivers are optimism, innovativeness, discomfort,…

  15. The process for technology transfer in Baltimore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, T. S.

    1978-01-01

    Ingredients essential for a successful decision process relative to proper technological choices for a large city were determined during four years of experience in the NASA/Baltimore Applications Project. The general approach, rationale, and process of technology transfer are discussed.

  16. Development and the Information Age: Four Global Scenarios for the Future of Information and Communication Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.; Valantin, Robert, Ed.

    This publication describes the rationale for and processes of a 5-day workshop conducted in 1996 to build an understanding about the complexities of information communication technologies (ICT) and development, in order to assist in the preparation of reports for the United Nations Commission on Science and Technology for Development (UNCSTD). The…

  17. Information Technology Assessment Study: Full Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    A team was formed to assess NASA Office of Space Science (OSS) information technology research and development activities. These activities were reviewed for their relevance to OSS missions, for their potential for using products better supplied by industry or other government agencies, and for recommending an information technology (IT) infusion strategy for appropriate products for OSS missions. Assessment scope and methodology are presented. IT needs and interests for future OSS missions and current NASA IT research and development (R&D) are discussed. Non-NASA participants provide overviews of some of their IT R&D programs. Implementation and infusion issues and the findings and recommendations of the assessment team are presented.

  18. Improving Injury Prevention Through Health Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Haegerich, Tamara M.; Sugerman, David E.; Annest, Joseph L.; Klevens, Joanne; Baldwin, Grant T.

    2015-01-01

    Health information technology is an emerging area of focus in clinical medicine with the potential to improve injury and violence prevention practice. With injuries being the leading cause of death for Americans aged 1–44 years, greater implementation of evidence-based preventive services, referral to community resources, and real-time surveillance of emerging threats is needed. Through a review of the literature and capturing of current practice in the field, this paper showcases how health information technology applied to injury and violence prevention can lead to strengthened clinical preventive services, more rigorous measurement of clinical outcomes, and improved injury surveillance, potentially resulting in health improvement. PMID:25441230

  19. Separation process using microchannel technology

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Perry, Steven T.; Arora, Ravi; Qiu, Dongming; Lamont, Michael Jay; Burwell, Deanna; Dritz, Terence Andrew; McDaniel, Jeffrey S.; Rogers, Jr.; William A.; Silva, Laura J.; Weidert, Daniel J.; Simmons, Wayne W.; Chadwell, G. Bradley

    2009-03-24

    The disclosed invention relates to a process and apparatus for separating a first fluid from a fluid mixture comprising the first fluid. The process comprises: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator in contact with a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the first fluid is sorbed by the sorption medium, removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing first fluid from the sorption medium and removing desorbed first fluid from the microchannel separator. The process and apparatus are suitable for separating nitrogen or methane from a fluid mixture comprising nitrogen and methane. The process and apparatus may be used for rejecting nitrogen in the upgrading of sub-quality methane.

  20. Process Guide for Deburring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, David L.

    2012-10-25

    This report is an updated and consolidated view of the current deburring processes at the Kansas City Plant (KCP). It includes specific examples of current burr problems and the methods used for their detection. Also included is a pictorial review of the large variety of available deburr tools, along with a complete numerical listing of existing tools and their descriptions. The process for deburring all the major part feature categories is discussed.

  1. Information Technology Budgets and Costs: Do You Know What Your Information Technology Costs Each Year?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugan, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses yearly information technology costs for academic libraries. Topics include transformation and modernization activities that affect prices and budgeting; a cost model for information technologies; life cycle costs, including initial costs and recurring costs; cost benchmarks; and examples of pressures concerning cost accountability. (LRW)

  2. Technology, Privacy and the Democratic Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandy, Oscar H., Jr.; Simmons, Charles E.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that advances in information technology, especially capacities to collect and combine data for marketing purposes, subvert protections of individual privacy and weaken the influence of the individual in democracy. (MS)

  3. Information systems to enhance technology exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, T.; Harrington, M.; Harlan, C.; Drozhko, E.

    1994-03-01

    A fundamental part of international technology exchange is the compilation and dissemination of information. Worldwide environmental problems and technology development activities form the basis for important opportunities across the world and especially for those in the former Soviet Union. Recently, important agreements have been reached among Russian institutes engaged in environmental work and the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its national laboratories. These agreements will allow a systematic compilation of information on environmental contamination problems in Russia that can be included in DOE`s environmental information systems. A computer hardware and software system has been loaned to Russian scientists by the DOE for the sharing of environmental software and data, while establishing standards for future information networks.

  4. Neural processing of gravity information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schor, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project was to use the linear acceleration capabilities of the NASA Vestibular Research Facility (VRF) at Ames Research Center to directly examine encoding of linear accelerations in the vestibular system of the cat. Most previous studies, including my own, have utilized tilt stimuli, which at very low frequencies (e.g., 'static tilt') can be considered a reasonably pure linear acceleration (e.g., 'down'); however, higher frequencies of tilt, necessary for understanding the dynamic processing of linear acceleration information, necessarily involves rotations which can stimulate the semicircular canals. The VRF, particularly the Long Linear Sled, has promise to provide controlled pure linear accelerations at a variety of stimulus frequencies, with no confounding angular motion.

  5. Interface of information technology and neuropsychology: ethical issues and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bush, Shane; Naugle, Richard; Johnson-Greene, Doug

    2002-12-01

    Rapid advancements in information technology and telecommunications (ITT) offer exciting opportunities for neuropsychology. However, guidelines and recommendations for identifying and negotiating ethical challenges have not kept pace with the expansion of ITT. Because many neuropsychologists evaluate and/or treat individuals with cognitive, emotional, and/or physical limitations, neuropsychologists have a responsibility to be aware of the ethical issues associated with ITT use in order to avoid harming those who may be less able to understand or independently manipulate such technology themselves. The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness of potential implications of the interface between ethics and information technology for neuropsychologists. The first steps in this process include defining terms, identifying relevant issues and challenges, and identifying initial mechanisms to address ethical challenges. In addition, strategies for avoiding ethical misconduct related to information technology are discussed and specific recommendations are offered. PMID:12822061

  6. [New information technologies and health consumerism].

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos-Silva, Paulo Roberto; Castiel, Luis David; Bagrichevsky, Marcos; Griep, Rosane Harter

    2010-08-01

    Concepts related to consumption have shifted to include social processes not previously covered by traditional categories. The current review analyzes the application of classical concepts of consumerism to practices recently identified in the health field, like the phenomenon of cyberchondria. The theoretical challenge relates to the difficulty in extrapolating from the economic perspectives of consumerism to self-care issues in the context of information and communication technologies (ICTs). Drawing on recent anthropological categories, the study seeks to understand the phenomenon of self-care commodification under the imperative of self-accountability for health. New consumer identities are described in light of the unprecedented issues concerning technical improvements currently altering the nature of self-care. The study concludes that health is consumed as vitality, broken down into commercial artifacts in the context of a new bioeconomy - no longer linked to the idea of emulation and possession, but to forms of self-perception and self-care in the face of multiple risks and new definitions of the human being. PMID:21229207

  7. Electrochromic Windows: Advanced Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    SAGE Electrochromics, Inc

    2006-12-13

    This project addresses the development of advanced fabrication capabilities for energy saving electrochromic (EC) windows. SAGE EC windows consist of an inorganic stack of thin films deposited onto a glass substrate. The window tint can be reversibly changed by the application of a low power dc voltage. This property can be used to modulate the amount of light and heat entering buildings (or vehicles) through the glazings. By judicious management of this so-called solar heat gain, it is possible to derive significant energy savings due to reductions in heating lighting, and air conditioning (HVAC). Several areas of SAGE’s production were targeted during this project to allow significant improvements to processing throughput, yield and overall quality of the processing, in an effort to reduce the cost and thereby improve the market penetration. First, the overall thin film process was optimized to allow a more robust set of operating points to be used, thereby maximizing the yield due to the thin film deposition themselves. Other significant efforts aimed at improving yield were relating to implementing new procedures and processes for the manufacturing process, to improve the quality of the substrate preparation, and the quality of the IGU fabrication. Furthermore, methods for reworking defective devices were developed, to enable devices which would otherwise be scrapped to be made into useful product. This involved the in-house development of some customized equipment. Finally, the improvements made during this project were validated to ensure that they did not impact the exceptional durability of the SageGlass® products. Given conservative estimates for cost and market penetration, energy savings due to EC windows in residences in the US are calculated to be of the order 0.026 quad (0.026×1015BTU/yr) by the year 2017.

  8. Technology Assessment and Federal Information Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenbeis, Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    Describes the role and purpose of the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) and its relationship to Congress. A chain of congressional activities is developed which links the major events within selected committees to the current OTA assessment of federal information dissemination, and issues and implications of this study are addressed. (14…

  9. Governance Methods Used in Externalizing Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Steven King-Lun

    2012-01-01

    Information technology (IT) is the largest capital expenditure in many firms and is an integral part of many organizations' strategies. However, the benefits that each company receives from its IT investments vary. One study by Weill (2004) found that the top performer in the sample was estimated to have as high as a 40% greater return on its

  10. [Information technology in medicine - some legal observations].

    PubMed

    Siegal, Gil

    2013-05-01

    Information Technology (IT) and computing capabilities are revolutionizing the practice of medicine in an unprecedented way. Some current legal and ethical concerns evolving from this revolution are addressed, pointing to the emerging concepts in Israeli jurisprudence, which regards medical IT as an important contribution to patient empowerment, to medical risk management and in managing the resources of a national health system. PMID:23885452

  11. Information Technology in Education: The Neglected Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasano, Carla

    After less than a decade from its inception, the introduction of new information technology in Australian education has already undergone some identifiable stages. These range from the scattered development of innovative programs to the formulation of state and national policies, from the original introduction of microcomputers into schools to the…

  12. Information Technology Monopolies: Implications for Library Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercado, Marina I.

    1998-01-01

    Explores library-related implications of the U.S. Department of Justice's investigations into the operations of Microsoft and Intel and suggests that developing a broader understanding of information technology marketing is crucial to the short- and long-term future of libraries. (MES)

  13. Leveraging Information Technology. Track VII: Outstanding Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers from the 1987 CAUSE conference's Track VII, Outstanding Applications, are presented. They include: "Image Databases in the University" (Reid Kaplan and Gordon Mathieson); "Using Information Technology for Travel Management at the University of Michigan" (Robert E. Russell and John C. Hufziger); "On-Line Access to University Policies…

  14. Access to Research Information Using Integrated Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Susan M.

    1994-01-01

    Because of the schedules, preferences, and varied information needs of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine (Texas), a system of computer and telecommunications technologies was developed to facilitate research and project planning. The system integrates cellular phones, voice mail, facsimile publishing, distributed document delivery, and…

  15. Information Technology in Libraries. A Pakistani Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmood, Khalid

    This book presents an overview of the present status of the use of library automation hardware and software in Pakistan. The following 20 articles are included: (1) "The Status of Library Automation in Pakistan"; (2) "Promoting Information Technology in Pakistan: the Netherlands Library Development Project"; (3) "Library Software in Pakistan"; (4)…

  16. Making Sense of Health Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitzmiller, Rebecca Rutherford

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hospital adoption of health information technology (HIT) systems is promoted as essential to decreasing medical error and their associated 44,000 annual deaths and $17 billion in healthcare costs (Institute of Medicine, 2001; Kohn, Corrigan, & Donaldson, 1999). Leading national healthcare groups, such as the Institute of Medicine,…

  17. Information Technology and New Forms of Organisations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghasemiyeh, Rahim; Li, Feng

    This paper evaluates the impacts of the Internet on organizational structures and identifies new forms of organizations in light of information technology (IT) advances. Four traditional forms of organizations are summarized, i.e., the bureaucratic hierarchy, the entrepreneurial organization, the matrix organization, and the adhocacy. The…

  18. Information Communication Technology (ICT) Shaping Student Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, Elizabeth

    This paper opens with the following questions: "How prepared are you as a student affairs professional for information communication technology (ICT)? Do you understand such concepts as portals, e-business, Napster, computer use policies, and wireless communication? Will student affairs be shaped by ICT or will student affairs help shape ICT on…

  19. Education, Information Technology and Cognitive Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaife, M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses information technology and its effects on developmental psychology and children's education. Topics discussed include a theory of child-computer interaction (CCI); programing; communication and computers, including electronic mail; cognitive science; artificial intelligence; modeling the user-system interaction; and the future of…

  20. Information Technology Services Support for Emergencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer, Donald Z.

    2008-01-01

    For at least the last quarter century, enterprises--including higher education institutions--have increasingly relied on Information Technology Services (ITS) for business functions. As a result, IT organizations have had to develop the discipline of production operations as well as recovery procedures to respond when those operations are

  1. Culture and Cognition in Information Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holvikivi, Jaana

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims at explaining the outcomes of information technology education for international students using anthropological theories of cultural schemas. Even though computer science and engineering are usually assumed to be culture-independent, the practice in classrooms seems to indicate that learning patterns depend on culture. The…

  2. Information technology in the medical school curriculum.

    PubMed

    Abras, Chadia N

    2012-01-01

    Education up to the latter part of the 20th century used strict methods of instruction delivery, relying mostly on tried theories in cognition and social learning. Approaches in constructivism and collaborative learning affirm the success of existing methods of delivering curriculum, yet they also validate the use of information technology as a vehicle to improve student learning. PMID:22787924

  3. The Coming Ubiquity of Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    1996-01-01

    Data from a 1995 survey on campus computing indicate a major gain in the proportion of colleges and universities using information technology as an instructional resource. Four educators respond to this news and examine possible trends and issues to be addressed. (MSE)

  4. Governance Methods Used in Externalizing Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Steven King-Lun

    2012-01-01

    Information technology (IT) is the largest capital expenditure in many firms and is an integral part of many organizations' strategies. However, the benefits that each company receives from its IT investments vary. One study by Weill (2004) found that the top performer in the sample was estimated to have as high as a 40% greater return on its…

  5. How Does Information Technology Shape Thinking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barzilai, Sarit; Zohar, Anat

    2006-01-01

    This study revisits a classic yet still intriguing question regarding information technology (IT): what difference does IT "really" make, in terms of people's thinking? In order to explore this question, the effects of IT in authentic research settings were studied through retrospective interviews with 24 academic researchers. Analysis of the…

  6. Information Technology Standards Program management plan

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This document presents a logical and realistic plan to implement the Information Technology (IT) Standards Program throughout the Department of Energy (DOE). It was developed by DOE Chief Information Officer (CIO) staff, with participation from many other individuals throughout the DOE complex. The DOE IT Standards Program coordinates IT standards activities Department-wide, including implementation of standards to support the DOE Information Architecture. The Program is voluntary, participatory, and consensus-based. The intent is to enable accomplishment of the DOE mission, and the Program is applicable to all DOE elements, both Federal and contractor. The purpose of this document is to describe the key elements of the DOE IT Standards Program.

  7. [The place of information and communication technologies in nursing training].

    PubMed

    Delon, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Over the last two decades, technological progress, the old driving force of medical practices, has greatly accelerated the pace of innovation. The addition of information and communication technologies will provide a long-lasting transformation of healthcare practices. Modifications to the training programmes, as well as to the scope of nurses' actions, are perhaps the opportunity to become more actively involved in the innovation process. PMID:21155308

  8. The Promise and Challenge of Next Generation Information Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, Bruce

    2000-10-01

    The Promise and Challenge of Next Generation Information Technology Bruce Gibbard Brookhaven National Laboratory The dramatic evolution in computing hard ware observed during the last twenty years seems certain to continue at least through the first decade of the 21st century. This evolution will directly account for important quantitative changes in what will be possible in the world of information handling and processing. Perhaps more important is that this evolution will enable qualitative changes in information technology, which are harder to predict and are likely to more profoundly affect users. This wave of change has swept scientific computing from rather specialized isolation into areas of mainstream commodity information technology. Extrapolation of recent trends and comparison to historical parallels give some insight into what might be expected.

  9. Health Insurance Claim Review Using Information Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeong-Sik; Speedie, Stuart M.; Yoon, Hojung; Lee, Jiseon

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this paper is to describe the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA)'s payment request (PARE) system that plays the role of the gateway for all health insurance claims submitted to HIRA, and the claim review support (CRS) system that supports the work of claim review experts in South Korea. Methods This study describes the two systems' information technology (IT) infrastructures, their roles, and quantitative analysis of their work performance. It also reports the impact of these systems on claims processing by analyzing the health insurance claim data submitted to HIRA from April 1 to June 30, 2011. Results The PARE system returned to healthcare providers 2.7% of all inpatient claims (97,930) and 0.1% of all outpatient claims (317,007) as un-reviewable claims. The return rate was the highest for the hospital group as 0.49% and the lowest rate was found in clinic group. The CRS system's detection rate of the claims with multiple errors in inpatient and outpatient areas was 23.1% and 2.9%, respectively. The highest rate of error detection occurred at guideline check-up stages in both inpatient and outpatient groups. Conclusions The study found that HIRA's two IT systems had a critical role in reducing heavy administrative workloads through automatic data processing. Although the return rate of the problematic claims to providers and the error detection rate by two systems was low, the actual count of the returned claims was large. The role of IT will become increasingly important in reducing the workload of health insurance claims review. PMID:23115745

  10. Medicaid information technology architecture: an overview.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Richard H

    2006-01-01

    The Medicaid Information Technology Architecture (MITA) is a roadmap and tool-kit for States to transform their Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS) into an enterprise-wide, beneficiary-centric system. MITA will enable State Medicaid agencies to align their information technology (IT) opportunities with their evolving business needs. It also addresses long-standing issues of interoperability, adaptability, and data sharing, including clinical data, across organizational boundaries by creating models based on nationally accepted technical standards. Perhaps most significantly, MITA allows State Medicaid Programs to actively participate in the DHHS Secretary's vision of a transparent health care market that utilizes electronic health records (EHRs), ePrescribing and personal health records (PHRs). PMID:17427840

  11. Medicaid Information Technology Architecture: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Richard H.

    2006-01-01

    The Medicaid Information Technology Architecture (MITA) is a roadmap and toolkit for States to transform their Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS) into an enterprise-wide, beneficiary-centric system. MITA will enable State Medicaid agencies to align their information technology (IT) opportunities with their evolving business needs. It also addresses long-standing issues of interoperability, adaptability, and data sharing, including clinical data, across organizational boundaries by creating models based on nationally accepted technical standards. Perhaps most significantly, MITA allows State Medicaid Programs to actively participate in the DHHS Secretary's vision of a transparent health care market that utilizes electronic health records (EHRs), ePrescribing and personal health records (PHRs). PMID:17427840

  12. Stochastic Resonance and Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolis, C.

    2014-12-01

    A dynamical system giving rise to multiple steady states and subjected to noise and a periodic forcing is analyzed from the standpoint of information theory. It is shown that stochastic resonance has a clearcut signature on information entropy, information transfer and other related quantities characterizing information transduction within the system.

  13. Fluidization technologies: Aerodynamic principles and process engineering.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Rahul; Puthli, Shivanand

    2009-11-01

    The concept of fluidization has been adapted to different unit processes of pharmaceutical product development. Till date a lot of improvements have been made in the engineering design to achieve superior process performance. This review is focused on the fundamental principles of aerodynamics and hydrodynamics associated with the fluidization technologies. Fluid-bed coating, fluidized bed granulation, rotor processing, hot melt granulation, electrostatic coating, supercritical fluid based fluidized bed technology are highlighted. Developments in the design of processing equipments have been explicitly elucidated. This article also discusses processing problems from the operator's perspective along with latest developments in the application of these principles. PMID:19340888

  14. Education and Career Pathways in Information Communication Technology: What Are Schoolgirls Saying?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasen, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights key themes which emerged from schoolgirls' responses to focus group questions regarding perceptions of Information Communication Technology (ICT) subjects in the Queensland senior secondary curriculum, primarily, Information Processing Technology (IPT) and Information Technology Systems (ITS). The 2006 focus group interviews…

  15. Wood Technology: Techniques, Processes, and Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oatman, Olan

    1975-01-01

    Seven areas of wood technology illustrates applicable techniques, processes, and products for an industrial arts woodworking curriculum. They are: wood lamination; PEG (polyethylene glycol) diffusion processes; wood flour and/or particle molding; production product of industry; WPC (wood-plastic-composition) process; residential construction; and…

  16. Combustion process science and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    An important and substantial area of technical work in which noncontact temperature measurement (NCTM) is desired is that involving combustion process research. In the planning for this workshop, it was hoped that W. Serignano would provide a briefing regarding the experimental requirements for thermal measurements to support such research. The particular features of thermal measurement requirements included those describing the timeline for combustion experiments, the requirements for thermal control and diagnostics of temperature and other related thermal measurements and the criticality to the involved science to parametric features of measurement capability including precision, repeatability, stability, and resolution. In addition, it was hoped that definitions could be provided which characterize the needs for concurrent imaging as it relates to science observations during the conduct of experimentation.

  17. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 2: Industrial process characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Information and data for 26 industrial processes are presented. The following information is given for each process: (1) a description of the process including the annual energy consumption and product production and plant capacity; (2) the energy requirements of the process for each unit of production and the detailed data concerning electrical energy requirements and also hot water, steam, and direct fired thermal requirements; (3) anticipated trends affecting energy requirements with new process or production technologies; and (4) representative plant data including capacity and projected requirements through the year 2000.

  18. A Parallel Universe: Certification in the Information Technology Guild.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Clifford

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the growing importance of transnational, competency-based training in information technology and considers implications for traditional institutions of higher education. Considers the awarding of certificates rather than degrees; the types of providers offering training; the role of testing companies in the certification process; and the

  19. Managing Technological Change in Libraries and Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klobas, Jane E.

    1990-01-01

    Examines factors to be considered in the management of technological change in libraries and information services. The organizational climate for change is discussed, and factors to consider when developing a strategy for introducing a new product, service, or system are described, including leadership, goals, political processes, marketing, and…

  20. Fostering an Informal Learning Community of Computer Technologies at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Lu; Carroll, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Computer technologies develop at a challenging fast pace. Formal education should not only teach students basic computer skills to meet current computer needs, but also foster student development of informal learning ability for a lifelong learning process. On the other hand, students growing up in the digital world are often more skilled with…

  1. A Parallel Universe: Certification in the Information Technology Guild.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Clifford

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the growing importance of transnational, competency-based training in information technology and considers implications for traditional institutions of higher education. Considers the awarding of certificates rather than degrees; the types of providers offering training; the role of testing companies in the certification process; and the…

  2. Learning about Information Technology in Education Using Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aris, Baharuddin; Abu, Mohd Salleh; Ellington, Henry; Dhamotharan, Mogana

    The Malaysian Ministry of Education has given adequate opportunity for teachers to acquire knowledge and skills in operating computer and information technology (C&IT) in order to fully utilize C&IT in the learning and teaching process, as well as in the daily running of the school. Realizing the vision of the ministry, Universiti Teknologi…

  3. Establishing Information Service Strategies in a Technological Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penniman, W. David

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the need for strategic goal setting for libraries and information services and the relationship of this process to evolving technologies. The role of the library in a changing society is examined, the value of library services is considered, and a model for change is proposed. (nine references) (LRW)

  4. Facilitating Stroke Management using Modern Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyo Suk; Park, Eunjeong

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Information technology and mobile devices may be beneficial and useful in many aspects of stroke management, including recognition of stroke, transport and triage of patients, emergent stroke evaluation at the hospital, and rehabilitation. In this review, we address the contributions of information technology and mobile health to stroke management. Summary of Issues Rapid detection and triage are essential for effective thrombolytic treatment. Awareness of stroke warning signs and responses to stroke could be enhanced by using mobile applications. Furthermore, prehospital assessment and notification could be streamlined for use in telemedicine and teleradiology. A mobile telemedicine system for assessing the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores has shown higher correlation and fast assessment comparing with face-to-face method. Because the benefits of thrombolytic treatment are time-dependent, treatment should be initiated as quickly as possible. In-hospital communication between multidisciplinary team members can be enhanced using information technology. A computerized in-hospital alert system using computerized physician-order entry was shown to be effective in reducing the time intervals from hospital arrival to medical evaluations and thrombolytic treatment. Mobile devices can also be used as supplementary tools for neurologic examination and clinical decision-making. In post-stroke rehabilitation, virtual reality and telerehabilitation are helpful. Mobile applications might be useful for public awareness, lifestyle modification, and education/training of healthcare professionals. Conclusions Information technology and mobile health are useful tools for management of stroke patients from the acute period to rehabilitation. Further improvement of technology will change and enhance stroke prevention and treatment. PMID:24396807

  5. Roadmap for Process Equipment Materials Technology

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2003-10-01

    This Technology Roadmap addresses the ever-changing material needs of the chemical and allied process industries, and the energy, economic and environmental burdens associated with corrosion and other materials performance and lifetime issues. This Technology Roadmap outlines the most critical of these R&D needs, and how they can impact the challenges facing today’s materials of construction.

  6. Treating information and information technology as true resources.

    PubMed

    Lashmett, G S; Schmitz, H H

    1994-11-01

    Hospitals and other health care organizations historically have been slow to adopt new managerial techniques. The same holds true for the acceptance of information and information technology as true strategic resources. With so much emphasis being placed on lowering operating costs and increasing the quality of care combined with the information revolution in today's society, the current complacent attitude often displayed toward health information management poses glaring organizational dilemmas for today's health care organizations. As many health care organizations begin to grapple with technical tasks such as developing the electronic patient medical record, they realize that there are many organizational implications to be dealt with as well. Issues such as who has the proper authority and responsibility not only to manage the mainframe and networks but also to correlate the information that all the hardware and technology provide with the strategic goals of the organization present significant hurdles. If these hurdles are not successfully cleared, any attempts at improving organizational strategy and performance via improved management of information resources are inhibited. PMID:10138523

  7. Advanced Information Technology Investments at the NASA Earth Science Technology Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clune, T.; Seablom, M. S.; Moe, K.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) regularly makes investments for nurturing advanced concepts in information technology to enable rapid, low-cost acquisition, processing and visualization of Earth science data in support of future NASA missions and climate change research. In 2012, the National Research Council published a mid-term assessment of the 2007 decadal survey for future spacemissions supporting Earth science and applications [1]. The report stated, "Earth sciences have advanced significantly because of existing observational capabilities and the fruit of past investments, along with advances in data and information systems, computer science, and enabling technologies." The report found that NASA had responded favorably and aggressively to the decadal survey and noted the role of the recent ESTO solicitation for information systems technologies that partnered with the NASA Applied Sciences Program to support the transition into operations. NASA's future missions are key stakeholders for the ESTO technology investments. Also driving these investments is the need for the Agency to properly address questions regarding the prediction, adaptation, and eventual mitigation of climate change. The Earth Science Division has championed interdisciplinary research, recognizing that the Earth must be studied as a complete system in order toaddress key science questions [2]. Information technology investments in the low-mid technology readiness level (TRL) range play a key role in meeting these challenges. ESTO's Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program invests in higher risk / higher reward technologies that solve the most challenging problems of the information processing chain. This includes the space segment, where the information pipeline begins, to the end user, where knowledge is ultimatelyadvanced. The objectives of the program are to reduce the risk, cost, size, and development time of Earth Science space-based and ground-based systems, increase the accessibility and utility of science data, and to enable new observation measurements and information products. We will discuss the ESTO investment strategy for information technology development, the methods used to assess stakeholder needs and technology advancements, and technology partnerships to enhance the infusion for the resulting technology. We also describe specific investments and their potential impact on enabling NASA missions and scientific discovery. [1] "Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Midterm Assessment of NASA's Implementation of the Decadal Survey", 2012: National Academies Press, http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13405 [2] "Responding to the Challenge of Climate and Environmental Change: NASA's Plan for a Climate-Centric Architecture for Earth Observations and Applications from Space", 2010: NASA Tech Memo, http://science.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2010/07/01/Climate_Architecture_Final.pdf

  8. 48 CFR 39.104 - Information technology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information technology... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.104 Information technology services. When acquiring information technology services, solicitations must not describe...

  9. 48 CFR 39.104 - Information technology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information technology... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.104 Information technology services. When acquiring information technology services, solicitations must not describe...

  10. 48 CFR 39.104 - Information technology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Information technology... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.104 Information technology services. When acquiring information technology services, solicitations must not describe...

  11. 48 CFR 39.104 - Information technology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Information technology... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.104 Information technology services. When acquiring information technology services, solicitations must not describe...

  12. 48 CFR 39.104 - Information technology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Information technology... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.104 Information technology services. When acquiring information technology services, solicitations must not describe...

  13. Influence, information overload, and information technology in health care.

    PubMed

    Rebitzer, James B; Rege, Mari; Shepard, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    We investigate whether information technology (IT) can help physicians more efficiently acquire new knowledge in a clinical environment characterized by information overload. We combine analysis of data from a randomized trial with a theoretical model of the influence that IT has on the acquisition of new medical knowledge. Although the theoretical framework we develop is conventionally microeconomic, the model highlights the non-market and non-pecuniary influence activities that have been emphasized in the sociological literature on technology diffusion. We report three findings. First, empirical evidence and theoretical reasoning suggests that computer-based decision support will speed the diffusion of new medical knowledge when physicians are coping with information overload. Second, spillover effects will likely lead to "underinvestment" in this decision support technology. Third, alternative financing strategies common to new IT, such as the use of marketing dollars to pay for the decision support systems, may lead to undesirable outcomes if physician information overload is sufficiently severe and if there is significant ambiguity in how best to respond to the clinical issues identified by the computer. This is the first paper to analyze empirically and theoretically how computer-based decision support influences the acquisition of new knowledge by physicians. PMID:19548513

  14. Packing frontiers expanded through process technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hodel, A.E.

    1984-02-01

    Manufacturers can expect to continue to apply the advantages of packing in the mass and heat transfer applications. The availability of materials, technology and improved packing with high efficiencies and low pressure drop is expected to stimulate additional advances in packing applications in the chemical processing industries. In hydrocarbon process applications where the column design objective is to reduce costs and achieve higher levels of yield from fixed amounts of stock, packing technology is replacing trays to reduce energy consumption, and increase yields.

  15. Optical Disc Technology for Information Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumm, Eugenia K.

    1991-01-01

    This summary of the literature on document image processing from 1988-90 focuses on WORM (write once read many) technology and on rewritable (i.e., erasable) optical discs, and excludes CD-ROM. Highlights include vendors and products, standards, comparisons of storage media, software, legal issues, records management, indexing, and computer…

  16. Intranet technology in hospital information systems.

    PubMed

    Cimino, J J

    1997-01-01

    The clinical information system architecture at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York is being incorporated into an intranet using Internet and World Wide Web protocols. The result is an Enterprise-Wide Web which provides more flexibility for access to specific patient information and general medical knowledge. Critical aspects of the architecture include a central data repository and a vocabulary server. The new architecture provides ways of displaying patient information in summary, graphical, and multimedia forms. Using customized links called Infobuttons, we provide access to on-line information resources available on the World Wide Web. Our experience to date has raised a number of interesting issues about the use of this technology for health care systems. PMID:10175348

  17. Effective implementation of electronic medical records and health information technologies.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Information technology (IT) capabilities are necessary for realizing the full promise of health information technologies in improving health care delivery process. In this study, three key IT capabilities for health care organizations are identified and their relationship with 30-day mortality rate from heart attack examined in a national sample of U.S. hospitals. The findings indicate that the negative relationship of IT capabilities with mortality rate from heart attack is mediated by effort/flexibility putforth by health care workers. PMID:25812274

  18. Modernization and new technologies: Coping with the information explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blados, Walter R.; Cotter, Gladys A.

    1993-01-01

    Information has become a valuable and strategic resource in all societies and economies. Scientific and technical information is especially important in developing and maintaining a strong national science and technology base. The expanding use of information technology, the growth of interdisciplinary research, and an increase in international collaboration are changing characteristics of information. This modernization effort applies new technology to current processes to provide near-term benefits to the user. At the same time, we are developing a long-term modernization strategy designed to transition the program to a multimedia, global 'library without walls'. Notwithstanding this modernization program, it is recogized that no one information center can hope to collect all the relevant data. We see information and information systems changing and becoming more international in scope. We are finding that many nations are expending resources on national systems which duplicate each other. At the same time that this duplication exists, many useful sources of aerospace information are not being collected to cover expanded sources of information. This paper reviews the NASA modernization program and raises for consideration new possibilities for unification of the various aerospace database efforts toward a cooperative international aerospace database initiative, one that can optimize the cost/benefit equation for all participants.

  19. Environmental Decision Making and Information Technology: Issues Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Barg, S.; Fletcher, T.; Mechling, J.; Tonn, B.; Turner, R.

    1999-05-01

    This report presents a summary of the Information Technology and Environmental Decision Making Workshop that was held at Harvard University, October 1-3, 1998. Over sixty participants from across the US took part in discussions that focused on the current practice of using information technology to support environmental decision making and on future considerations of information technology development, information policies, and data quality issues in this area. Current practice is focusing on geographic information systems and visualization tools, Internet applications, and data warehousing. In addition, numerous organizations are developing environmental enterprise systems to integrate environmental information resources. Plaguing these efforts are issues of data quality (and public trust), system design, and organizational change. In the future, much effort needs to focus on building community-based environmental decision-making systems and processes, which will be a challenge given that exactly what needs to be developed is largely unknown and that environmental decision making in this arena has been characterized by a high level of conflict. Experimentation and evaluation are needed to contribute to efficient and effective learning about how best to use information technology to improve environmental decision making.

  20. Study of medicine image information sharing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lun; Liu, Xiongfei; Pan, Lin; Suo, Yan; Chen, Jinxiong; Cai, Guangdong; Zhen, Zhiyong; Zhen, Xiaoming; Wu, Xuegui

    2004-10-01

    In this paper we propose the way to form a kind of medicine Image information sharing platform, which is based on PACS and broadband network. And we also discuss some key technologies used in building up the platform, such as sharing information between heterogeneous data sources based on HL7, storing and transmission the medical images based on DICOM. The study result shows that it can make full use of those heterogeneous data resources currently in different hospitals, and give them a good way to share the data.

  1. Information technologies, health, and "globalization": anyone excluded?

    PubMed

    Parent, F; Coppieters, Y; Parent, M

    2001-01-01

    Modern information technologies and worldwide communication through the Internet promise both universal access to information and the globalization of the medico-social network s modes of communication between doctors, laboratories, patients, and other players. The authors, specialists in public health and members of an association that aims to create opportunities for access to training in public health in developing countries, warn that the use of the term "globalization" ignores the reality of the "digital divide," that is, the fact that social inequalities may preclude the realization of this promise on a truly global scale. PMID:11720953

  2. Health information technology: fallacies and sober realities

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, Matthew B; Abbott, Patricia A; Wears, Robert L

    2010-01-01

    Current research suggests that the rate of adoption of health information technology (HIT) is low, and that HIT may not have the touted beneficial effects on quality of care or costs. The twin issues of the failure of HIT adoption and of HIT efficacy stem primarily from a series of fallacies about HIT. We discuss 12 HIT fallacies and their implications for design and implementation. These fallacies must be understood and addressed for HIT to yield better results. Foundational cognitive and human factors engineering research and development are essential to better inform HIT development, deployment, and use. PMID:20962121

  3. Costs and benefits of health information technology.

    PubMed Central

    Shekelle, Paul G; Morton, Sally C; Keeler, Emmett B

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES An evidence report was prepared to assess the evidence base regarding benefits and costs of health information technology (HIT) systems, that is, the value of discrete HIT functions and systems in various healthcare settings, particularly those providing pediatric care. DATA SOURCES PubMed, the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register, and the Cochrane Database of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE) were electronically searched for articles published since 1995. Several reports prepared by private industry were also reviewed. REVIEW METHODS Of 855 studies screened, 256 were included in the final analyses. These included systematic reviews, meta-analyses, studies that tested a hypothesis, and predictive analyses. Each article was reviewed independently by two reviewers; disagreement was resolved by consensus. RESULTS Of the 256 studies, 156 concerned decision support, 84 assessed the electronic medical record, and 30 were about computerized physician order entry (categories are not mutually exclusive). One hundred twenty four of the studies assessed the effect of the HIT system in the outpatient or ambulatory setting; 82 assessed its use in the hospital or inpatient setting. Ninety-seven studies used a randomized design. There were 11 other controlled clinical trials, 33 studies using a pre-post design, and 20 studies using a time series. Another 17 were case studies with a concurrent control. Of the 211 hypothesis-testing studies, 82 contained at least some cost data. We identified no study or collection of studies, outside of those from a handful of HIT leaders, that would allow a reader to make a determination about the generalizable knowledge of the study's reported benefit. Beside these studies from HIT leaders, no other research assessed HIT systems that had comprehensive functionality and included data on costs, relevant information on organizational context and process change, and data on implementation. A small body of literature supports a role for HIT in improving the quality of pediatric care. Insufficient data were available on the costs or cost-effectiveness of implementing such systems. The ability of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) to improve the quality of care in ambulatory care settings was demonstrated in a small series of studies conducted at four sites (three U.S. medical centers and one in the Netherlands). The studies demonstrated improvements in provider performance when clinical information management and decision support tools were made available within an EHR system, particularly when the EHRs had the capacity to store data with high fidelity, to make those data readily accessible, and to help translate them into context-specific information that can empower providers in their work. Despite the heterogeneity in the analytic methods used, all cost-benefit analyses predicted substantial savings from EHR (and health care information exchange and interoperability) implementation: The quantifiable benefits are projected to outweigh the investment costs. However, the predicted time needed to break even varied from three to as many as 13 years. CONCLUSIONS HIT has the potential to enable a dramatic transformation in the delivery of health care, making it safer, more effective, and more efficient. Some organizations have already realized major gains through the implementation of multifunctional, interoperable HIT systems built around an EHR. However, widespread implementation of HIT has been limited by a lack of generalizable knowledge about what types of HIT and implementation methods will improve care and manage costs for specific health organizations. The reporting of HIT development and implementation requires fuller descriptions of both the intervention and the organizational/economic environment in which it is implemented. PMID:17627328

  4. Controlling information technology costs, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Honan, Tom; Ciotti, Vince

    2002-01-01

    Health care executives are increasingly frustrated by Information Technology (IT). Although our industry is often accused of underinvesting in technology (hospitals average 2-3 percent of their costs in IT, compared to other industry's 8-10 percent), when IT investments are made, they fail to reflect demonstrable return to the bottom line. Yet the effective deployment of technology is so critical to the success of the organization and can in itself cause the failure of a health care system. While being forced to invest significant amounts of resources in the past two years preparing for Y2K, health care organizations have come under increasing financial pressures due to other industry developments. PMID:11968991

  5. Effects of Pre-Service Information Technologies (IT) Teachers' Thinking Styles on Their Use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagci, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Thinking styles are considered as approaches and tendencies of individuals toward various problems, incidents, phenomenon and variables which they face through their thinking processes. Preservice teachers are expected to be capable of using information and communication technologies (ICT) in intra- and extra- curricular activities and be a role…

  6. Directed-energy process technology efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, P.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of directed-energy process technology for solar cells was presented. This technology is defined as directing energy or mass to specific areas on solar cells to produce a desired effect in contrast to exposing a cell to a thermal or mass flow environment. Some of these second generation processing techniques are: ion implantation; microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition; rapid thermal processing; and the use of lasers for cutting, assisting in metallization, assisting in deposition, and drive-in of liquid dopants. Advantages of directed energy techniques are: surface heating resulting in the bulk of the cell material being cooler and unchanged; better process control yields; better junction profiles, junction depths, and metal sintering; lower energy consumption during processing and smaller factory space requirements. These advantages should result in higher-efficiency cells at lower costs. The results of the numerous contracted efforts were presented as well as the application potentials of these new technologies.

  7. Report of the Panel on Computer and Information Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundstrom, Stephen F.; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1984-01-01

    Aircraft have become more and more dependent on computers (information processing) for improved performance and safety. It is clear that this activity will grow, since information processing technology has advanced by a factor of 10 every 5 years for the past 35 years and will continue to do so. Breakthroughs in device technology, from vacuum tubes through transistors to integrated circuits, contribute to this rapid pace. This progress is nearly matched by similar, though not as dramatic, advances in numerical software and algorithms. Progress has not been easy. Many technical and nontechnical challenges were surmounted. The outlook is for continued growth in capability but will require surmounting new challenges. The technology forecast presented in this report has been developed by extrapolating current trends and assessing the possibilities of several high-risk research topics. In the process, critical problem areas that require research and development emphasis have been identified. The outlook assumes a positive perspective; the projected capabilities are possible by the year 2000, and adequate resources will be made available to achieve them. Computer and information technology forecasts and the potential impacts of this technology on aeronautics are identified. Critical issues and technical challenges underlying the achievement of forecasted performance and benefits are addressed.

  8. Information Technology Assessment Study: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    A team was formed to assess NASA Office of Space Science (OSS) information technology research and development activities. These activities were reviewed for their relevance to OSS missions, for their potential for using products better supplied by industry or other government agencies, and for recommending an IT infusion strategy for appropriate products for OSS missions. Assessment scope and methodology and the findings and recommendations of OSS IT users and providers are presented.

  9. Integrated Engineering Information Technology, FY93 accommplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.N.; Miller, D.K.; Neugebauer, G.L.; Orona, J.R.; Partridge, R.A.; Herman, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    The Integrated Engineering Information Technology (IEIT) project is providing a comprehensive, easy-to-use computer network solution or communicating with coworkers both inside and outside Sandia National Laboratories. IEIT capabilities include computer networking, electronic mail, mechanical design, and data management. These network-based tools have one fundamental purpose: to help create a concurrent engineering environment that will enable Sandia organizations to excel in today`s increasingly competitive business environment.

  10. Exploring hospitals' adoption of information technology.

    PubMed

    Burke, D E; Wang, B B L; Wan, T T H; Diana, M L

    2002-08-01

    This study explores the adoption of information technology (IT) and the association between organizational and market factors, and IT adoption in hospitals. Results suggest that a wide range of amounts and types of IT are adopted. Hospitals with higher overall IT adoption adopt strategic IT most often. Hospitals with lower IT adoption adopt administrative IT most often. Results also show hospital IT adoption to be positively associated with hospital size, location, system membership, ownership, and market competition. PMID:12118818

  11. 78 FR 42945 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy AGENCY: Government Accountability Office... Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) established the Health Information Technology Policy Committee (Health IT.... ARRA requires that one member have expertise in health information privacy and security. Due to...

  12. Accuracy in Optical Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timucin, Dogan Aslan

    Low computational accuracy is an important obstacle for optical processors which blocks their way to becoming a practical reality and a serious challenger for classical computing paradigms. This research presents a comprehensive solution approach to the problem of accuracy enhancement in discrete analog optical information processing systems. Statistical analysis of a generic three-plane optical processor is carried out first, taking into account the effects of diffraction, interchannel crosstalk, and background radiation. Noise sources included in the analysis are photon, excitation, and emission fluctuations in the source array, transmission and polarization fluctuations in the modulator, and photoelectron, gain, dark, shot, and thermal noise in the detector array. Means and mutual coherence and probability density functions are derived for both optical and electrical output signals. Next, statistical models for a number of popular optoelectronic devices are studied. Specific devices considered here are light-emitting and laser diode sources, an ideal noiseless modulator and a Gaussian random-amplitude-transmittance modulator, p-i-n and avalanche photodiode detectors followed by electronic postprocessing, and ideal free-space geometrical -optics propagation and single-lens imaging systems. Output signal statistics are determined for various interesting device combinations by inserting these models into the general formalism. Finally, based on these special-case output statistics, results on accuracy limitations and enhancement in optical processors are presented. Here, starting with the formulation of the accuracy enhancement problem as (1) an optimal detection problem and (2) as a parameter estimation problem, the potential accuracy improvements achievable via the classical multiple-hypothesis -testing and maximum likelihood and Bayesian parameter estimation methods are demonstrated. Merits of using proper normalizing transforms which can potentially stabilize high-order signal moments are also discussed in connection with the signal dependence of the noise at the processor output. A formal framework for complete statistical characterization and performance evaluation of a wide class of optical processors is thus provided.

  13. Information Technology Support in the 8000 Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    My summer internship was spent supporting various projects within the Environmental Management Office and Glenn Safety Office. Mentored by Eli Abumeri, I was trained in areas of Information Technology such as: Servers, printers, scanners, CAD systems, Web, Programming, and Database Management, ODIN (networking, computers, and phones). I worked closely with the Chemical Sampling and Analysis Team (CSAT) to redesign a database to more efficiently manage and maintain data collected for the Drinking Water Program. This Program has been established for over fifteen years here at the Glenn Research Center. It involves the continued testing and retesting of all drinking water dispensers. The quality of the drinking water is of great importance and is determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in the water with specifications set forth by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and its 1986 and 1991 amendments. The Drinking Water Program consists of periodic testing of all drinking water fountains and sinks. Each is tested at least once every 2 years for contaminants and naturally occurring species. The EPA's protocol is to collect an initial and a 5 minute draw from each dispenser. The 5 minute draw is what is used for the maximum contaminant level. However, the CS&AT has added a 30 second draw since most individuals do not run the water 5 minutes prior to drinking. This data is then entered into a relational Microsoft Access database. The database allows for the quick retrieval of any test@) done on any dispenser. The data can be queried by building number, date or test type, and test results are documented in an analytical report for employees to read. To aid with the tracking of recycled materials within the lab, my help was enlisted to create a database that could make this process less cumbersome and more efficient. The date of pickup, type of material, weight received, and unit cost per recyclable. This information could then calculate the dollar amount generated by the recycling of certain materials. This database will ultimately prove useful in determining the amounts of materials consumed by the lab and will help serve as an indicator potential overuse.

  14. TEXACO GASIFICATION PROCESS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the evaluation of the Texaco Gasification Process (TGP) conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The Texaco Gasification Process was developed by Texaco Inc. The TGP is a comm...

  15. Organic Process Technology Valuation: Cyclohexanone Oxime Syntheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Kevin C.; Breen, Maureen P.

    2010-01-01

    Three contemporary processes for cyclohexanone oxime synthesis are evaluated in a case study. The case study introduces organic chemistry students to basic cost accounting to determine the most economical technology. Technical and financial aspects of these processes are evaluated with problem-based exercises that may be completed by students…

  16. Improving information technology to maximize fenestration energyefficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Arasteh, Dariush; Mitchell, Robin; Kohler, Christian; Huizenga,Charlie; Curcija, Dragan

    2001-06-06

    Improving software for the analysis of fenestration product energy efficiency and developing related information technology products that aid in optimizing the use of fenestration products for energy efficiency are essential steps toward ensuring that more efficient products are developed and that existing and emerging products are utilized in the applications where they will produce the greatest energy savings. Given the diversity of building types and designs and the climates in the U.S., no one fenestration product or set of properties is optimal for all applications. Future tools and procedures to analyze fenestration product energy efficiency will need to both accurately analyze fenestration product performance under a specific set of conditions and to look at whole fenestration product energy performance over the course of a yearly cycle and in the context of whole buildings. Several steps have already been taken toward creating fenestration product software that will provide the information necessary to determine which details of a fenestration product's design can be improved to have the greatest impact on energy efficiency, what effects changes in fenestration product design will have on the comfort parameters that are important to consumers, and how specific fenestration product designs will perform in specific applications. Much work remains to be done, but the energy savings potential justifies the effort. Information is relatively cheap compared to manufacturing. Information technology has already been responsible for many improvements in the global economy--it can similarly facilitate many improvements in fenestration product energy efficiency.

  17. Information Processing in Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkačik, Gašper; Bialek, William

    2016-03-01

    Life depends as much on the flow of information as on the flow of energy. Here we review the many efforts to make this intuition precise. Starting with the building blocks of information theory, we explore examples where it has been possible to measure, directly, the flow of information in biological networks, or more generally where information-theoretic ideas have been used to guide the analysis of experiments. Systems of interest range from single molecules (the sequence diversity in families of proteins) to groups of organisms (the distribution of velocities in flocks of birds), and all scales in between. Many of these analyses are motivated by the idea that biological systems may have evolved to optimize the gathering and representation of information, and we review the experimental evidence for this optimization, again across a wide range of scales.

  18. On-line Technology Information System (OTIS): Solid Waste Management Technology Information Form (SWM TIF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levri, Julie A.; Boulanger, Richard; Hogan, John A.; Rodriguez, Luis

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: What is OTIS? OTIS use. Proposed implementation method. Development history of the Solid Waste Management (SWM) Technology Information Form (TIF) and OTIS. Current development state of the SWM TIF and OTIS. Data collection approach. Information categories. Critiques/questions/feedback.

  19. Mobile waste processing systems and treatment technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Glynn, W.; Baker, C.; Lo Re, A.; Quaglieri, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the state of the art in mobile waste processing systems and treatment technologies. Established and developing mobile systems are addressed. The capabilities of five broad treatment categories, and specific technologies under each category, are discussed in various chapters of the book. Thermal Treatment describes the use of various incineration, pyrolysis and wet oxidation processes as mobile units. Immobilization focuses on cement-based or pozzolan-based fixation processes. Chemical Treatment addresses waste treatment via reduction-oxidation (redox), neutralization, precipitation and dechlorination. Physical Treatment discusses a variety of processes that physically separate different components of a single phase or multiple phase wastes. Biological Treatment describes the capabilities of aerobic processes, anaerobic processes, and in situ biodegradation.

  20. Technology for the product and process data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The computerized product and process data base is increasingly recognized to be the cornerstone component of an overall system aimed at the integrated automation of the industrial processes of a given company or enterprise. The technology needed to support these more effective computer integrated design and manufacturing methods, especially the concept of 3-D computer-sensible product definitions rather than engineering drawings, is not fully available and rationalized. Progress is being made, however, in bridging this technology gap with concentration on the modeling of sophisticated information and data structures, high-performance interactive user interfaces and comprehensive tools for managing the resulting computerized product definition and process data base.

  1. Nonthermal processing technologies as food safety intervention processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foods should provide sensorial satisfaction and nutrition to people. Yet, foodborne pathogens cause significant illness and lose of life to human kind every year. A processing intervention step may be necessary prior to the consumption to ensure the safety of foods. Nonthermal processing technologi...

  2. Advanced technology development for image gathering, coding, and processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.

    1990-01-01

    Three overlapping areas of research activities are presented: (1) Information theory and optimal filtering are extended to visual information acquisition and processing. The goal is to provide a comprehensive methodology for quantitatively assessing the end-to-end performance of image gathering, coding, and processing. (2) Focal-plane processing techniques and technology are developed to combine effectively image gathering with coding. The emphasis is on low-level vision processing akin to the retinal processing in human vision. (3) A breadboard adaptive image-coding system is being assembled. This system will be used to develop and evaluate a number of advanced image-coding technologies and techniques as well as research the concept of adaptive image coding.

  3. Information technologies for global resources management and environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.P.; Wang, Hua

    1992-09-01

    Recent advances in computer and communications technologies offer unprecedented opportunities to develop sophisticated information resources management systems for global resources management and environment assessment in an efficient, effective, and systematic manner. In this paper, the emerging global energy and environmental issues are identified. Since satellite-based remote sensing systems are becoming increasingly available and produce massive data collections, the utilization of imaging processing techniques and their applications for regional and global resources management and environmental studies are described. Interoperability and interconnectivity among heterogeneous computer systems are major issues in designing a totally integrated, multimedia-based, information resources management system that operates in a networking environment. Discussions of the future technology trends are focused on a number of emerging information management technologies and communications standards which will aid in achieving seamless system integration and offer user-friendly operations. It can be foreseen that advances in computer and communications technologies, increasingly sophisticated image processing techniques and Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and the development of globally comprehensive data bases will bring ``global visualization`` onto multimedia desktop computers before the end of this decade.

  4. Information technologies for global resources management and environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.P.; Wang, Hua.

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in computer and communications technologies offer unprecedented opportunities to develop sophisticated information resources management systems for global resources management and environment assessment in an efficient, effective, and systematic manner. In this paper, the emerging global energy and environmental issues are identified. Since satellite-based remote sensing systems are becoming increasingly available and produce massive data collections, the utilization of imaging processing techniques and their applications for regional and global resources management and environmental studies are described. Interoperability and interconnectivity among heterogeneous computer systems are major issues in designing a totally integrated, multimedia-based, information resources management system that operates in a networking environment. Discussions of the future technology trends are focused on a number of emerging information management technologies and communications standards which will aid in achieving seamless system integration and offer user-friendly operations. It can be foreseen that advances in computer and communications technologies, increasingly sophisticated image processing techniques and Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and the development of globally comprehensive data bases will bring global visualization'' onto multimedia desktop computers before the end of this decade.

  5. Advances in information technology. Implications for medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Masys, D R

    1998-01-01

    Few kinds of technology have had as broad an impact on the recent affairs of humanity as have information technologies. The appearance and rapid spread in the past several years of innovations such as the Internet's World Wide Web and the emergence of computer networks connecting tens to hundreds of millions of people worldwide have occurred with startling rapidity. These global events portend substantial changes in the delivery of health care, the conduct of biomedical research, and the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education of health professionals. This report will attempt to succinctly review the following: (1) the characteristics of modern information technologies and recent trends that are most relevant to medical education and to the world in which future practitioners, researchers, and educators will live and work; (2) the implications of these technologies for the development of educational goals (in other words, the specific information technology skills that future health professionals will need); (3) the issues associated with the use of these technologies in the process of education; and (4) implications for near-term action by University of California medical schools and academic medical centers. PMID:9614791

  6. Internet and information technologies: facts and fiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Ronald D.

    2001-10-01

    Information technology advances are spawning visions of radically altered modus operandi for commerce, education, business, information storage and receival. Proponents of virtual technology domination offer a world of instant communications, information sharing, and binary commerce. Some express alarm to the electronic visionaries and see an expected world vacated of human interactions, which is populated by e-hermits. The reality is that access to the Internet is becoming pervasive worldwide and affords a virtual community and markets. Governments, education, markets, businesses and consumers are rushing to exploit and adjust to an electronic, virtual world. The exploitation and adjustment to this an 'ether-world' transcends boundaries is a challenge to stakeholders. Public policy, international agreements, education, businesses and consumers face monumental change in the way they live and conduct their lives. As with most paradigms shifts, pioneers rush forward and launch a myriad of new startups with many failing and some standing the test of time and utility. An example is the early pioneers in North America who headed westward to in search of a new vision of riches. They established towns, developed farms, dug mines and began new businesses. However, many of the pioneers moved from one venture to another. Some of their endeavors ended with ghost towns, abandoned farms and mines, and bankrupt businesses. In the end, however, a great nation was born. This author expects the ether-world to go through similar starts, fits, and adjustments before it emerges as a more stable part of the fabric of society.

  7. Health information technology impact on productivity.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Managers work to achieve the greatest output for the least input effort, better balancing all factors of delivery to achieve the most with the smallest resource effort. Documentation of actual health information technology (HIT) cost savings has been elusive. Information technology and linear programming help to control hospital costs without harming service quality or staff morale. This study presents production function results from a study of hospital output during the period 2008-2011. The results suggest that productivity varies widely among the 58 hospitals as a function of staffing patterns, methods of organization, and the degree of reliance on information support systems. Financial incentives help to enhance productivity. Incentive pay for staff based on actual productivity gains is associated with improved productivity. HIT can enhance the marginal value product of nurses and staff, so that they concentrate their workday around patient care activities. The implementation of electronic health records (EHR) was associated with a 1.6 percent improvement in productivity. PMID:23971142

  8. Information Technology Training in India toward Globalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Katsuhiko

    This paper describes Toshiba‧s training program in Information Technology in India. It is not a simple technology training, but a training for globalization of Japanese engineers so that they can cope with people from different culture and business practices. We first describe why such training program became necessary. We then describe how the training courses and contents are developed. The operation of the training program and our effort in continual improvement are explained. The effectiveness of the program is also evaluated. The training program presented is a first in its kind and we believe that it can contribute to changing Toshiba from inside toward more globalized corporation. We also believe that this kind of overseas training is effective in training young students so that they can cope with globalizing society after graduation.

  9. A Device for Logic Information Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinskiy, L. S.; Vissonova, I. A.

    Two essential components of the information-logic problem are: (1) choosing some known part of the total information block for parallel review of the entire block and (2) parallel logic processing of a sequence of codes. The described device fulfills these essential components thereby improving information processing and increasing the speed of…

  10. Optimization of hierarchical management of technological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayas, Marcia M.; Dubovoy, B. M.; Shegebaeva, Jibek; Gromaszek, Konrad

    2015-12-01

    The advisability of clustering of control tasks providing reduction of information flows needed to coordinate operational processes is demonstrated. Criterion and algorithm for optimal aggregation are proposed. The influence of the hierarchical structure of control system on the filling factor of information flow matrix is discussed.

  11. Information Communication Technology and Politics: A Synthesized Analysis of the Impacts of Information Technology on Voter Participation in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsuma, Clive Katiba

    2011-01-01

    The availability of political information throughout society made possible by the evolution of contemporary information communication technology has precipitated conflicting debate regarding the effects of technology use on real life political participation. Proponents of technology argue that the use of new information technology stimulates…

  12. Information Communication Technology and Politics: A Synthesized Analysis of the Impacts of Information Technology on Voter Participation in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsuma, Clive Katiba

    2011-01-01

    The availability of political information throughout society made possible by the evolution of contemporary information communication technology has precipitated conflicting debate regarding the effects of technology use on real life political participation. Proponents of technology argue that the use of new information technology stimulates

  13. Role of Healthcare Information Technology in handoffs.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Ross; Telles, Joel Leon

    2013-01-01

    Handoffs-transfer of patient care from one clinician or service to another-are well known patient safety dangers. Healthcare Information Technology (HIT) as an intervening and powerful force in handoffs has received comparatively little attention. The role of HIT in concert with paper documentation has received even less attention. We analyze handoffs in relation to electronic records and hybrid systems (both paper and HIT) to identify sources of error and miscommunication. We propose a typology of handoffs and illustrate several of them. PMID:23388248

  14. Transforming Care Delivery through Health Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The slow but progressive adoption of health information technology (IT) nationwide promises to usher in a new era in health care. Electronic health record systems provide a complete patient record at the point of care and can help to alleviate some of the challenges of a fragmented delivery system, such as drug-drug interactions. Moreover, health IT promotes evidence-based practice by identifying gaps in recommended treatment and providing clinical decision-support tools. In addition, the data collected through digital records can be used to monitor patient outcomes and identify potential improvements in care protocols. Kaiser Permanente continues to advance its capability in each of these areas. PMID:23596377

  15. Providing access: The difference between sharing and just reporting geographical information systems and engineering information/information technology organizational data

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, F.J.

    1996-06-10

    The concept for Corporate computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided engineering (CAE)/geographical information systems (GIS) and engineering information (EI)/ information technology (IT), and the sharing of this information is becoming popular as organizations flatten (or perhaps become more hollow) and as their functions merge into processes. However, not much is known about information sharing: why sharing happens, whit it does not, how much sharing is desirable, and how to manage it. This paper takes a look at these important issues.

  16. A Computer-Assisted Approach for Conducting Information Technology Applied Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tsai, Pei Jin; Yang, Tzu-Chi

    2009-01-01

    The growing popularity of computer and network technologies has attracted researchers to investigate the strategies and the effects of information technology applied instructions. Previous research has not only demonstrated the benefits of applying information technologies to the learning process, but has also revealed the difficulty of applying

  17. 78 FR 78367 - Draft Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Information Technology Plan; Availability for Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability for public comment of the draft information technology (IT) plan entitled ``PDUFA V Information Technology Plan.'' This plan is intended to provide FDA's approach for enhancing business processes, data quality and consistency, supporting technologies, and IT operations as described in the Prescription Drug User Fee Act......

  18. A Computer-Assisted Approach for Conducting Information Technology Applied Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tsai, Pei Jin; Yang, Tzu-Chi

    2009-01-01

    The growing popularity of computer and network technologies has attracted researchers to investigate the strategies and the effects of information technology applied instructions. Previous research has not only demonstrated the benefits of applying information technologies to the learning process, but has also revealed the difficulty of applying…

  19. Mathematics of Information Processing and the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    The mathematics of information processing and the Internet can be organized around four fundamental themes: (1) access (finding information easily); (2) security (keeping information confidential); (3) accuracy (ensuring accurate information); and (4) efficiency (data compression). In this article, the author discusses each theme with reference to…

  20. Improving Modern Cancer Care Through Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Steven B.; Wagner, Edward H.; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; Tuzzio, Leah; Greene, Sarah M.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer care system is increasingly complex, marked by multiple hand-offs between primary care and specialty providers, inadequate communication among providers, and lack of clarity about a “medical home” (the ideal accountable care provider) for cancer patients. Patients and families often cite such difficulties as information deficits, uncoordinated care, and insufficient psychosocial support. This article presents a review of the challenges of delivering well coordinated, patient-centered cancer care in a complex modern healthcare system. An examination is made of the potential role of information technology (IT) advances to help both providers and patients. Using the published literature as background, a review is provided of selected work that is underway to improve communication, coordination, and quality of care. Also discussed are additional challenges and opportunities to advancing understanding of how patient data, provider and patient involvement, and informatics innovations can support high-quality cancer care. PMID:21521595

  1. Neurophysiological Factors in Human Information Processing Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Nick F.; Jansma, J. M.; Jager, G.; Van Raalten, T.; Kahn, R. S.

    2004-01-01

    What determines how well an individual can manage the complexity of information processing demands when several tasks have to be executed simultaneously? Various theoretical frameworks address the mechanisms of information processing and the changes that take place when processes become automated, and brain regions involved in various types of

  2. Neurophysiological Factors in Human Information Processing Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Nick F.; Jansma, J. M.; Jager, G.; Van Raalten, T.; Kahn, R. S.

    2004-01-01

    What determines how well an individual can manage the complexity of information processing demands when several tasks have to be executed simultaneously? Various theoretical frameworks address the mechanisms of information processing and the changes that take place when processes become automated, and brain regions involved in various types of…

  3. Scaling the Information Processing Demands of Occupations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haase, Richard F.; Jome, LaRae M.; Ferreira, Joaquim Armando; Santos, Eduardo J. R.; Connacher, Christopher C.; Sendrowitz, Kerrin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide additional validity evidence for a model of person-environment fit based on polychronicity, stimulus load, and information processing capacities. In this line of research the confluence of polychronicity and information processing (e.g., the ability of individuals to process stimuli from the environment…

  4. Curriculum strategies to improve baccalaureate nursing information technology outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-02-01

    Improving information technology (IT) outcomes is a top nursing education priority. Improving care access, quality, and cost effectiveness, IT skills are vital for professional development and advancement. Nursing programs have embraced distance learning and added informatics content, courses, and specific technologies; however, undergraduates' and educators' skills are still considered inadequate. Meanwhile, the Nursing Informatics specialty has moved beyond IT competency articulation and measurement. It is promoting information literacy to support evidence-based practice and the cultivation of clinical wisdom. The Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative, a coalition aiming to advance IT outcomes in nursing education, has cited benchmarking and sharing best practices as key to achieving its goals. Thus, this article reports on the process, results, and implications of a project using curriculum strategies to enhance IT outcomes. A 3-year action plan directed faculty, student, and agency evaluation, curriculum mapping, model learning module, and documentation development. PMID:19260399

  5. An Information Processing Approach to Skills Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Janis; Smith, Edward L.

    An approach to skills analysis is described in which strategy and processing skills sufficient for task performance are represented as an information-processing routine. Each step in the routine is viewed as a utilization of a processing mechanism or primary process. Definitions of these processes represent hypotheses about the psychological…

  6. Audio processing technology for law enforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Sharon M.; Cofano, Maria; Ratley, Roy J.

    1999-01-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory Multi-Sensor Exploitation Branch (AFRL/IFEC) has been a Department of Defense leader in research and development (R&D) in speech and audio processing for over 25 years. Their primary thrust in these R&D areas has focused on developing technology to improve the collection, handling, identification, and intelligibility of military communication signals. The National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center for the Northeast (NLECTC-NE) is collocated with the AFRL Rome Research Sited at the Griffiss Technology park in upstate New York. The NLECTC-NE supports sixteen (16) states in the northeast sector of the United States, and is funded and supported by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). Since the inception of the NLECTC-NE in 1995, the AFRL Rome Research Site has expanded the military applications of their expertise to address law enforcement and corrections requirements. AFRL/IFEC's speech and audio processing technology is unique and particularly appropriate for application to law enforcement requirements. It addresses the similar military need for time-critical decisions and actions, operation within noisy environments, and use by uncooperative speakers in tactical, real-time applications. Audio and speech processing technology for both application domains must also often deal with short utterance communications (less than five seconds of speech) and transmission-to-transmission channel variability.

  7. Healthcare Information Technology Infrastructures in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, M.; Ertürkmen, G. L.; Kabak, Y.; Namli, T.; Yıldız, M. H.; Ay, Y.; Ceyhan, B.; Hülür, Ü.; Öztürk, H.; Atbakan, E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The objective of this paper is to describe some of the major healthcare information technology (IT) infrastructures in Turkey, namely, Sağlık-Net (Turkish for “Health-Net”), the Centralized Hospital Appointment System, the Basic Health Statistics Module, the Core Resources Management System, and the e-prescription system of the Social Security Institution. International collaboration projects that are integrated with Sağlık-Net are also briefly summarized. Methods The authors provide a survey of the some of the major healthcare IT infrastructures in Turkey. Results Sağlık-Net has two main components: the National Health Information System (NHIS) and the Family Medicine Information System (FMIS). The NHIS is a nation-wide infrastructure for sharing patients’ Electronic Health Records (EHRs). So far, EHRs of 78.9 million people have been created in the NHIS. Similarly, family medicine is operational in the whole country via FMIS. Centralized Hospital Appointment System enables the citizens to easily make appointments in healthcare providers. Basic Health Statistics Module is used for collecting information about the health status, risks and indicators across the country. Core Resources Management System speeds up the flow of information between the headquarters and Provincial Health Directorates. The e-prescription system is linked with Sağlık-Net and seamlessly integrated with the healthcare provider information systems. Finally, Turkey is involved in several international projects for experience sharing and disseminating national developments. Conclusion With the introduction of the “Health Transformation Program” in 2003, a number of successful healthcare IT infrastructures have been developed in Turkey. Currently, work is going on to enhance and further improve their functionality. PMID:24853036

  8. The Federal Government and Information Technology Standards: Building the National Information Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radack, Shirley M.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the role of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the development of the National Information Infrastructure (NII). Highlights include the standards process; voluntary standards; Open Systems Interconnection problems; Internet Protocol Suite; consortia; government's role; and network security. (16 references) (LRW)

  9. Standards Advisor-Advanced Information Technology for Advanced Information Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawker, J. Scott

    2003-01-01

    Developers of space systems must deal with an increasing amount of information in responding to extensive requirements and standards from numerous sources. Accessing these requirements and standards, understanding them, comparing them, negotiating them and responding to them is often an overwhelming task. There are resources to aid the space systems developer, such as lessons learned and best practices. Again, though, accessing, understanding, and using this information is often more difficult than helpful. This results in space systems that: 1. Do not meet all their requirements. 2. Do not incorporate prior engineering experience. 3. Cost more to develop. 4. Take longer to develop. The NASA Technical Standards Program (NTSP) web site at http://standards.nasa.gov has made significant improvements in making standards, lessons learned, and related material available to space systems developers agency-wide. The Standards Advisor was conceived to take the next steps beyond the current product, continuing to apply evolving information technology that continues to improve information delivery to space systems developers. This report describes the features of the Standards Advisor and suggests a technical approach to its development.

  10. Health information technology in oncology practice: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Fasola, G; Macerelli, M; Follador, A; Rihawi, K; Aprile, G; Della Mea, V

    2014-01-01

    The adoption and implementation of information technology are dramatically remodeling healthcare services all over the world, resulting in an unstoppable and sometimes overwhelming process. After the introduction of the main elements of electronic health records and a description of what every cancer-care professional should be familiar with, we present a narrative review focusing on the current use of computerized clinical information and decision systems in oncology practice. Following a detailed analysis of the many coveted goals that oncologists have reached while embracing informatics progress, the authors suggest how to overcome the main obstacles for a complete physicians' engagement and for a full information technology adoption, and try to forecast what the future holds. PMID:25506195

  11. Health Information Technology in Oncology Practice: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fasola, G; Macerelli, M; Follador, A; Rihawi, K; Aprile, G; Mea, V Della

    2014-01-01

    The adoption and implementation of information technology are dramatically remodeling healthcare services all over the world, resulting in an unstoppable and sometimes overwhelming process. After the introduction of the main elements of electronic health records and a description of what every cancer-care professional should be familiar with, we present a narrative review focusing on the current use of computerized clinical information and decision systems in oncology practice. Following a detailed analysis of the many coveted goals that oncologists have reached while embracing informatics progress, the authors suggest how to overcome the main obstacles for a complete physicians’ engagement and for a full information technology adoption, and try to forecast what the future holds. PMID:25506195

  12. Continuous versus Discrete Information Processing: Modeling Accumulation of Partial Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, Roger

    1988-01-01

    The technique for examining the time course of information processing developed by D. E. Meyer et. al. (1988) is analyzed. Research is provided, which suggests that this new method gives important qualitative support to some stochastic models and quantitative support to the continuous diffusion model of information processing. (SLD)

  13. 78 FR 7784 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Nomination Letters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Nomination Letters AGENCY: Government... Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) established the Health Information Technology Policy Committee (Health IT Policy Committee) and gave the Comptroller General responsibility for appointing 13 of its...

  14. The Essential Role of Leadership in Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Explains why only through effective leadership can the full potential of information technology and services be leveraged to support an educational facility's mission. The article explores the most important management skills that information technology directors need to succeed. (GR)

  15. A preliminary study of current multimedia information technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    This paper surveys more than 70 articles published in the IEEE Multimedia journal and other journals. The survey summarizes aspects of multimedia information technology and categorizes application areas of multimedia information technology and interesting research areas related to it.

  16. Business Value of Information Sharing and the Role of Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    Information Technology has brought significant benefits to organizations by allowing greater information sharing within and across firm boundaries leading to performance improvements. Emerging technologies such as Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Web2.0 have transformed the volume and process of information sharing. However, a comprehensive…

  17. Business Value of Information Sharing and the Role of Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    Information Technology has brought significant benefits to organizations by allowing greater information sharing within and across firm boundaries leading to performance improvements. Emerging technologies such as Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Web2.0 have transformed the volume and process of information sharing. However, a comprehensive

  18. The Impact Of Optical Storage Technology On Image Processing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garges, Daniel T.; Durbin, Gerald T.

    1984-09-01

    The recent announcement of commercially available high density optical storage devices will have a profound impact on the information processing industry. Just as the initial introduction of random access storage created entirely new processing strategies, optical technology will allow dramatic changes in the storage, retrieval, and dissemination of engineering drawings and other pictorial or text-based documents. Storage Technology Corporation has assumed a leading role in this arena with the introduction of the 7600 Optical Storage Subsystem, and the formation of StorageTek Integrated Systems, a subsidiary chartered to incorporate this new technology into deliverable total systems. This paper explores the impact of optical storage technology from the perspective of a leading-edge manufacturer and integrator.

  19. Techno-Human Mesh: The Growing Power of Information Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Cynthia K.

    This book examines the intersection of information technologies, power, people, and bodies. It explores how information technologies are on a path of creating efficiency, productivity, profitability, surveillance, and control, and looks at the ways in which human-machine interface technologies, such as wearable computers, biometric technologies,

  20. Techno-Human Mesh: The Growing Power of Information Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Cynthia K.

    This book examines the intersection of information technologies, power, people, and bodies. It explores how information technologies are on a path of creating efficiency, productivity, profitability, surveillance, and control, and looks at the ways in which human-machine interface technologies, such as wearable computers, biometric technologies,…

  1. Improving drug manufacturing with process analytical technology.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Licinia O; Alves, Teresa P; Cardoso, Joaquim P; Menezes, José C

    2006-01-01

    Within the process analytical technology (PAT) framework, as presented in the US Food and Drug Administration guidelines, the aim is to design, develop and operate processes consistently to ensure a pre-defined level of quality at the end of the manufacturing process. Three PAT implementation scenarios can be envisaged. Firstly, PAT could be used in its most modest version (in an almost non-PAT manner) to simply replace an existing quality control protocol (eg, using near-infrared spectroscopy for an in-process quality control, such as moisture content). Secondly, the use of in-process monitoring and process analysis could be integrated to enhance process understanding and operation for an existing industrial process. Thirdly, PAT could be used extensively and exclusively throughout development, scale-up and full-scale production of a new product and process. Although the first type of implementations are well known, reports of the second and third types remain scarce. Herein, results obtained from PAT implementations of the second and third types are described for two industrial processes for preparing bulk active pharmaceutical ingredients, demonstrating the benefits in terms of increased process understanding and process control. PMID:16374733

  2. The Integration of Information and Communication Technology into Classroom Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Scott

    2002-01-01

    A Newfoundland study examining how information technologies affect teaching interviewed 13 teachers at a leading high school in the use of information technology. Teachers used information technology to interact on a global basis, expand resources, enhance local content, and customize material. Problems included need for training, information…

  3. 48 CFR 2452.239-71 - Information Technology Virus Security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information Technology... Provisions and Clauses 2452.239-71 Information Technology Virus Security. As prescribed in 2439.107(b), insert the following clause: Information Technology Virus Security (FEB 2006) (a) The contractor...

  4. 17 CFR 200.26a - Office of Information Technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Office of Information Technology. 200.26a Section 200.26a Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Organization § 200.26a Office of Information Technology. The Office of Information Technology is...

  5. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Transportation Barriers Compliance Board at 36 CFR part 1194 would impose an undue burden, the Commission shall... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a)...

  6. 17 CFR 200.26a - Office of Information Technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Office of Information Technology. 200.26a Section 200.26a Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Organization § 200.26a Office of Information Technology. The Office of Information Technology is...

  7. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Transportation Barriers Compliance Board at 36 CFR part 1194 would impose an undue burden, the Commission shall... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a)...

  8. Information Technologies in Florida's Rural Hospitals: Does System Affiliation Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menachemi, Nir; Burke, Darrell; Clawson, Art; Brooks, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    Context: The recent explosive growth of information technology in hospitals promises to improve hospital and patient outcomes. Financial barriers may cause rural hospitals to lag in adoption of information technology, however, formal studies that examine rural hospital adoption of information technology are lacking. Purpose: To determine the

  9. 17 CFR 200.26a - Office of Information Technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Office of Information Technology. 200.26a Section 200.26a Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Organization § 200.26a Office of Information Technology. The Office of Information Technology is...

  10. 17 CFR 200.26a - Office of Information Technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Office of Information Technology. 200.26a Section 200.26a Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Organization § 200.26a Office of Information Technology. The Office of Information Technology is...

  11. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Transportation Barriers Compliance Board at 36 CFR part 1194 would impose an undue burden, the Commission shall... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a)...

  12. 48 CFR 2452.239-71 - Information Technology Virus Security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Information Technology... Provisions and Clauses 2452.239-71 Information Technology Virus Security. As prescribed in 2439.107(b), insert the following clause: Information Technology Virus Security (FEB 2006) (a) The contractor...

  13. 48 CFR 2452.239-71 - Information Technology Virus Security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Information Technology... Provisions and Clauses 2452.239-71 Information Technology Virus Security. As prescribed in 2439.107(b), insert the following clause: Information Technology Virus Security (FEB 2006) (a) The contractor...

  14. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Transportation Barriers Compliance Board at 36 CFR part 1194 would impose an undue burden, the Commission shall... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a)...

  15. 17 CFR 200.26a - Office of Information Technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Office of Information Technology. 200.26a Section 200.26a Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Organization § 200.26a Office of Information Technology. The Office of Information Technology is...

  16. 48 CFR 2452.239-71 - Information Technology Virus Security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Information Technology... Provisions and Clauses 2452.239-71 Information Technology Virus Security. As prescribed in 2439.107(b), insert the following clause: Information Technology Virus Security (FEB 2006) (a) The contractor...

  17. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Transportation Barriers Compliance Board at 36 CFR part 1194 would impose an undue burden, the Commission shall... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a)...

  18. Fostering Information and Communication Technology Literacy: Insights from Telecommunications Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Jenifer S.

    2007-01-01

    The author argues that the rapid growth of information and communication technologies and an increasingly complex global environment have brought about the need for information and communication technology (ICT) literacy, the ability to use information technology effectively and evaluate its role in society critically. She presents a strategy for…

  19. Information Technology: Cost Considerations for School Library Media Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the growing dependence on information technology and considers cost factors for school library media specialists. Highlights include emphasizing learning over technology; administrative, assistive, and academic applications; how schools are using information technology; and Web sites that address issues related to information technology…

  20. Information Technologies in Florida's Rural Hospitals: Does System Affiliation Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menachemi, Nir; Burke, Darrell; Clawson, Art; Brooks, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    Context: The recent explosive growth of information technology in hospitals promises to improve hospital and patient outcomes. Financial barriers may cause rural hospitals to lag in adoption of information technology, however, formal studies that examine rural hospital adoption of information technology are lacking. Purpose: To determine the…

  1. LANFILGAS(sm) process. Technology spotlight report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The United States is facing a garbage crisis. Several areas of the country have already run out of landfill space, and recent studies indicate that many other areas will be experiencing the same problem with the next ten years. Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has patented an advanced biogasification technology called LANFILGAS that accelerates the stabilization of landfills through anaerobic composting and recovers the methane gas for its energy value. Anaerobic composting, or digestion, is a natural process that takes place in every landfill. It is generally uncontrolled, however, and can take up to 30 years to stabilize a landfill.

  2. [No exchange of information without technology : modern infrastructure in radiology].

    PubMed

    Hupperts, H; Hermann, K-G A

    2014-01-01

    Modern radiology cannot accomplish the daily numbers of examinations without supportive technology. Even though technology seems to be becoming increasingly more indispensable, business continuity should be ensured at any time and if necessary even with a limited technical infrastructure by business continuity management. An efficient information security management system forms the basis. The early radiology information systems were islands of information processing. A modern radiology department must be able to be modularly integrated into an informational network of a bigger organization. The secondary use of stored data for clinical decision-making support poses new challenges for the integrity of the data or systems because medical knowledge is displayed and provided in a context of treatment. In terms of imaging the creation and distribution radiology services work in a fully digital manner which is often different for radiology reports. Legally secure electronic diagnostic reports require a complex technical infrastructure; therefore, diagnostic findings still need to be filed as a paper document. The internal exchange and an improved dose management can be simplified by systems which continuously and automatically record the doses and thus provide the possibility of permanent analysis and reporting. Communication between patient and radiologist will gain ongoing importance. Intelligent use of technology will convey this to the radiologist and it will facilitate the understanding of the information by the patient. PMID:24402723

  3. An On-Line Technology Information System (OTIS) for Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levri, Julie A.; Boulanger, Richard; Hoganm John A.; Rodriquez, Luis

    2003-01-01

    An On-line Technology Information System (OTIS) is currently being developed for the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. This paper describes the preliminary development of OTIS, which is a system designed to provide centralized collection and organization of technology information. The lack of thorough, reliable and easily understood technology information is a major obstacle in effective assessment of technology development progress, trade studies, metric calculations, and technology selection for integrated testing. OTIS will provide a formalized, well-organized protocol to communicate thorough, accurate, current and relevant technology information between the hands-on technology developer and the ALS Community. The need for this type of information transfer system within the Solid Waste Management (SWM) element was recently identified and addressed. A SWM Technology Information Form (TIF) was developed specifically for collecting detailed technology information in the area of SWM. In the TIF, information is requested from SWM technology developers, based upon the Technology Readiness Level (TRL). Basic information is requested for low-TRL technologies, and more detailed information is requested as the TRL of the technology increases. A comparable form is also being developed for the wastewater processing element. In the future, similar forms will also be developed for the ALS elements of air revitalization, food processing, biomass production and thermal control. These ALS element-specific forms will be implemented in OTIS via a web-accessible interface,with the data stored in an object-oriented relational database (created in MySQLTM) located on a secure server at NASA Ames Research Center. With OTIS, ALS element leads and managers will be able to carry out informed research and development investment, thereby promoting technology through the TRL scale. OTIS will also allow analysts to make accurate evaluations of technology options. Additionally, the range and specificity of information solicited will help educate technology developers of programmatic needs.

  4. Information processing in miniature brains

    PubMed Central

    Chittka, L.; Skorupski, P.

    2011-01-01

    Since a comprehensive understanding of brain function and evolution in vertebrates is often hobbled by the sheer size of the nervous system, as well as ethical concerns, major research efforts have been made to understand the neural circuitry underpinning behaviour and cognition in invertebrates, and its costs and benefits under natural conditions. This special feature of Proceedings of the Royal Society B contains an idiosyncratic range of current research perspectives on neural underpinnings and adaptive benefits (and costs) of such diverse phenomena as spatial memory, colour vision, attention, spontaneous behaviour initiation, memory dynamics, relational rule learning and sleep, in a range of animals from marine invertebrates with exquisitely simple nervous systems to social insects forming societies with many thousands of individuals working together as a ‘superorganism’. This introduction provides context and history to tie the various approaches together, and concludes that there is an urgent need to understand the full neuron-to-neuron circuitry underlying various forms of information processing—not just to explore brain function comprehensively, but also to understand how (and how easily) cognitive capacities might evolve in the face of pertinent selection pressures. In the invertebrates, reaching these goals is becoming increasingly realistic. PMID:21227971

  5. Information and Communication Technology and Education: Analysing the Nigerian National Policy for Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf, Mudasiru Olalere

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Nigerian National Policy for Information Technology. The analysis reveals that the policy is inadequate to impact positively on the Nigerian education system, and that the philosophical frame of reference is market driven. The policy places little emphasis on the integration and infusion of ICT in the…

  6. Training and information technology issue, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2005-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on training and information technology. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Communicating effectively, by Alain Bucaille, AREVA; Reputation management, by Susan Brisset, Bruce Power; Contol room and HSI modernization guidance, by Joseph Naser, EPRI; How far are we from public acceptance, by Jennifer A. Biedscheid and Murthy Devarakonda, Washington TRU Solutions LLC; Spent fuel management options, by Brent W. Dixon and Steven J. Piet, Idaho National Laboratory; Industry Awards; A secure energy future for America, by George W. Bush, President, United States of America; Vision of the future of nuclear energy, by Anne Lauvergeon, AREVA; and, Plant profile: strategy for transition to digital, TXU Power.

  7. Information technology and the board of directors.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Richard; McFarlan, F Warren

    2005-10-01

    Ever since the Y2K scare, boards have grown increasingly nervous about corporate dependence on information technology. Since then, computer crashes, denial of service attacks, competitive pressures, and the need to automate compliance with government regulations have heightened board sensitivity to IT risk. Unfortunately, most boards remain largely in the dark when it comes to IT spending and strategy, despite the fact that corporate information assets can account for more than 50% of capital spending. A lack of board oversight for IT activities is dangerous, the authors say. It puts firms at risk in the same way that failing to audit their books would. Companies that have established board-level IT governance committees are better able to control IT project costs and carve out competitive advantage. But there is no one-size-fits-all model for board supervision of a company's IT operations. The correct approach depends on what strategic "mode" a company is in whether its operations are extremely dependent on IT or not, and whether or not it relies heavily on keeping up with the latest technologies. This article spells out the conditions under which boards need to change their level of involvement in IT decisions, explaining how members can recognize their firms' IT risks and decide whether they should pursue more aggressive IT governance. The authors delineate what an IT governance committee should look like in terms of charter, membership, duties, and overall agenda. They also offer recommendations for developing IT policies that take into account an organization's operational and strategic needs and suggest what to do when those needs change. Given the dizzying pace of change in the world of IT, boards can't afford to ignore the state of their IT systems and capabilities. Appropriate board governance can go a long way toward helping a company avoid unnecessary risk and improve its competitive position. PMID:16250628

  8. Medical Information & Technology: Rapidly Expanding Vast Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Anil K.

    2012-12-01

    During ÑMedical Council Of India?, Platinum Jubilee Year (1933-2008) Celebrations, In Year 2008, Several Scientific Meeting/Seminar/Symposium, On Various Topics Of Contemporary Importance And Relevance In The Field Of ÑMedical Education And Ethics?, Were Organized, By Different Medical Colleges At Various Local, State, National Levels. The Present Discussion, Is An Comprehensive Summary Of Various Different Aspects of ìMedical Information Communication Technologyî, Especially UseFul For The Audience Stratum Group Of Those Amateur Medical & Paramedical Staff, With No Previous Work Experience Knowledge Of Computronics Applications. Outlining The, i.Administration Applications: Medical Records Etc, ii. Clinical Applications: Pros pective Scope Of TeleMedicine Applicabilities Etc iii. Other Applications: Efforts To Augment Improvement Of Medical Education, Medical Presentations, Medical Education And Research Etc. ÑMedical Trancription? & Related Recent Study Fields e.g ÑModern Pharmaceuticals?,ÑBio-Engineering?, ÑBio-Mechanics?, ÑBio-Technology? Etc., Along With Important Aspects Of Computers-General Considerations, Computer Ergonomics Assembled To Summarize, The AwareNess Regarding Basic Fundamentals Of Medical Computronics & Its Practically SuccessFul Utilities.

  9. Innovation Value of Information Technology: Impact of Information Technology--Intensity on Innovation Capability and Firm Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramamani, Mahesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Though information technology adoptions have been always referred to as innovations in firms, much of the business value literature has concentrated on the tangible and immediately measurable impacts of information technology (IT) adoptions. This study aims to explore the impact of information technology investments on the innovativeness of a…

  10. Innovation Value of Information Technology: Impact of Information Technology--Intensity on Innovation Capability and Firm Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramamani, Mahesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Though information technology adoptions have been always referred to as innovations in firms, much of the business value literature has concentrated on the tangible and immediately measurable impacts of information technology (IT) adoptions. This study aims to explore the impact of information technology investments on the innovativeness of a

  11. Information Technology and the Curriculum: A Status Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Claudia A.

    2004-01-01

    Information technology infuses all aspects of modern life, and the growth of digital information continues at an unprecedented rate. Widely influential documents, such as the National Research Council's "Being Fluent with Information Technology" and the American Library Association's "Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher

  12. Image processing technology for enhanced situational awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, S. F.; Smith, M. I.; Hickman, D.

    2009-09-01

    This paper discusses the integration of a number of advanced image and data processing technologies in support of the development of next-generation Situational Awareness systems for counter-terrorism and crime fighting applications. In particular, the paper discusses the European Union Framework 7 'SAMURAI' project, which is investigating novel approaches to interactive Situational Awareness using cooperative networks of heterogeneous imaging sensors. Specific focus is given to novel Data Fusion aspects of the research which aim to improve system performance through intelligently fusing both image data and non image data sources, resolving human-machine conflicts, and refining the Situational Awareness picture. In addition, the paper highlights some recent advances in supporting image processing technologies. Finally, future trends in image-based Situational Awareness are identified, such as Post-Event Analysis (also known as 'Back-Tracking'), and the associated technical challenges are discussed.

  13. Information technology in veterinary pharmacology instruction.

    PubMed

    Kochevar, Deborah T

    2003-01-01

    Veterinary clinical pharmacology encompasses all interactions between drugs and animals and applies basic and clinical knowledge to improve rational drug use and patient outcomes. Veterinary pharmacology instructors set educational goals and objectives that, when mastered by students, lead to improved animal health. The special needs of pharmacology instruction include establishing a functional interface between basic and clinical knowledge, managing a large quantity of information, and mastering quantitative skills essential to successful drug administration and analysis of drug action. In the present study, a survey was conducted to determine the extent to which veterinary pharmacology instructors utilize information technology (IT) in their teaching. Several IT categories were investigated, including Web-based instructional aids, stand-alone pharmacology software, interactive videoconferencing, databases, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and e-book applications. Currently IT plays a largely ancillary role in pharmacology instruction. IT use is being expanded primarily through the efforts of two veterinary professional pharmacology groups, the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology (ACVCP) and the American Academy of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics (AAVPT). The long-term outcome of improved IT use in pharmacology instruction should be to support the larger educational mission of active learning and problem solving. Creation of high-quality IT resources that promote this goal has the potential to improve veterinary pharmacology instruction within and across institutions. PMID:14976618

  14. Information technology and under-served communities.

    PubMed

    Swanson, B

    1999-01-01

    Advances in information technology (IT) and telecommunications offer many potential benefits to Australia's under-served communities. However, there is also a risk that some of these communities will only be further disadvantaged, as IT will not contribute greatly to bringing groups such as the mentally ill and illiterate into the mainstream of the community. However, other under-served groups may experience service improvements. For people who do not have English as their first language, IT developments provide opportunities for cheaper and easier service and information delivery in their own languages. Telemedicine and IT also have the potential to make working in rural areas more attractive. On the other hand, telemedicine may be used as a means to bypass local health service providers, as has happened with other service industries. The health sector, though, is well behind these other industries in adopting IT and telecommunications. The growth of telemedicine projects is one indication that progress is being made, however. Two case studies--of telepsychiatry, and of medical education at Flinders University--provide examples of major Australian successes. The medical workforce implications will involve the overall numbers and mix of practitioners, their geographical distribution, changing professional boundaries and changing skill requirements. The only certain effect is that if IT changes the nature of medical work, large numbers of medical practitioners will need to improve their computer skills and older practitioners will find this most difficult. PMID:10628012

  15. The challenge of contracting for technological information.

    PubMed

    Zeckhauser, R

    1996-11-12

    Contracting to provide technological information (TI) is a significant challenge. TI is an unusual commodity in five ways. (i) TI is difficult to count and value; conventional indicators, such as patients and citations, hardly indicate value. TI is often sold at different prices to different parties. (ii) To value TI, it may be necessary to "give away the secret." This danger, despite nondisclosure agreements, inhibits efforts to market TI. (iii) To prove its value, TI is often bundled into complete products, such as a computer chip or pharmaceutical product. Efficient exchange, by contrast, would involve merely the raw information. (iv) Sellers' superior knowledge about TI's value make buyers wary of overpaying. (v) Inefficient contracts are often designed to secure rents from TI. For example, licensing agreements charge more than marginal cost. These contracting difficulties affect the way TI is produced, encouraging self-reliance. This should be an advantage to large firms. However, small research and development firms spend more per employee than large firms, and nonprofit universities are major producers. Networks of organizational relationships, particularly between universities and industry, are critical in transmitting TI. Implicit barter-money for guidance-is common. Property rights for TI are hard to establish. Patents, quite suitable for better mousetraps, are inadequate for an era when we design better mice. Much TI is not patented, and what is patented sets fuzzy demarcations. New organizational forms are a promising approach to contracting difficulties for TI. Webs of relationships, formal and informal, involving universities, start-up firms, corporate giants, and venture capitalists play a major role in facilitating the production and spread of TI. PMID:8917488

  16. Technology and informal education: what is taught, what is learned.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Patricia M

    2009-01-01

    The informal learning environments of television, video games, and the Internet are producing learners with a new profile of cognitive skills. This profile features widespread and sophisticated development of visual-spatial skills, such as iconic representation and spatial visualization. A pressing social problem is the prevalence of violent video games, leading to desensitization, aggressive behavior, and gender inequity in opportunities to develop visual-spatial skills. Formal education must adapt to these changes, taking advantage of new strengths in visual-spatial intelligence and compensating for new weaknesses in higher-order cognitive processes: abstract vocabulary, mindfulness, reflection, inductive problem solving, critical thinking, and imagination. These develop through the use of an older technology, reading, which, along with audio media such as radio, also stimulates imagination. Informal education therefore requires a balanced media diet using each technology's specific strengths in order to develop a complete profile of cognitive skills. PMID:19119220

  17. Mapping individual logical processes in information searching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.

    1974-01-01

    An interactive dialog with a computerized information collection was recorded and plotted in the form of a flow chart. The process permits one to identify the logical processes employed in considerable detail and is therefore suggested as a tool for measuring individual thought processes in a variety of situations. A sample of an actual test case is given.

  18. Aptitude from an Information Processing Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Barry

    An information-processing approach to language learning is examined; language aptitude is factored into the approach, and the role of working memory is discussed. The process of learning includes two processes that make heavy use of working memory is: automatization and restructuring. At first, learners must make a conscious effort to remember and…

  19. Information processing in dendrites II. Information theoretic complexity.

    PubMed

    Gurney, K N

    2001-10-01

    In the companion paper, we established a rationale for exploring the general principles of dendritic processing using a class of Boolean functions-the Multi-Cube Units (MCUs). Here, we use this approach to further characterise dendritic processing using ideas from information theory and studies in complexity. The starting point is a novel decomposition of a Boolean function's total mutual information (between input variables and the output). Each component of the decomposition is a mutual information measure with respect to a single input, conditioned on a subset of the remaining inputs. We call this decomposition the information spectrum and conceive of it as a re-representation of the function in the information domain. Furthermore, the information spectrum of a Boolean function may be assigned a complexity value using the approximate entropy introduced by Pincus (Pincus, S. M. (1991). Approximate entropy as a measure of system complexity. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 88, 2297-2301). Using Monte Carlo methods, we provide evidence that the information spectral complexity of MCUs is larger than that of any other class of Boolean function. We explain this phenomenon in terms of information flow through the 2-stage MCU architecture. Under our modelling assumptions, the implication for biological neural processing is that dendrites implement functions that have maximal information spectral complexity with respect to the class of multivariate functions from which they are drawn. PMID:11681747

  20. Information Technology and Community Restoration Studies/Task 1: Information Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Jaki F.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Stein, Steven L.

    2009-11-19

    Executive Summary The Interagency Biological Restoration Demonstration—a program jointly funded by the Department of Defense's Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS's) Science and Technology Directorate—is developing policies, methods, plans, and applied technologies to restore large urban areas, critical infrastructures, and Department of Defense installations following the intentional release of a biological agent (anthrax) by terrorists. There is a perception that there should be a common system that can share information both vertically and horizontally amongst participating organizations as well as support analyses. A key question is: "How far away from this are we?" As part of this program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted research to identify the current information technology tools that would be used by organizations in the greater Seattle urban area in such a scenario, to define criteria for use in evaluating information technology tools, and to identify current gaps. Researchers interviewed 28 individuals representing 25 agencies in civilian and military organizations to identify the tools they currently use to capture data needed to support operations and decision making. The organizations can be grouped into five broad categories: defense (Department of Defense), environmental/ecological (Environmental Protection Agency/Ecology), public health and medical services, emergency management, and critical infrastructure. The types of information that would be communicated in a biological terrorism incident include critical infrastructure and resource status, safety and protection information, laboratory test results, and general emergency information. The most commonly used tools are WebEOC (web-enabled crisis information management systems with real-time information sharing), mass notification software, resource tracking software, and NW WARN (web-based information to protect critical infrastructure systems). It appears that the current information management tools are used primarily for information gathering and sharing—not decision making. Respondents identified the following criteria for a future software system. It is easy to learn, updates information in real time, works with all agencies, is secure, uses a visualization or geographic information system feature, enables varying permission levels, flows information from one stage to another, works with other databases, feeds decision support tools, is compliant with appropriate standards, and is reasonably priced. Current tools have security issues, lack visual/mapping functions and critical infrastructure status, and do not integrate with other tools. It is clear that there is a need for an integrated, common operating system. The system would need to be accessible by all the organizations that would have a role in managing an anthrax incident to enable regional decision making. The most useful tool would feature a GIS visualization that would allow for a common operating picture that is updated in real time. To capitalize on information gained from the interviews, the following activities are recommended: • Rate emergency management decision tools against the criteria specified by the interviewees. • Identify and analyze other current activities focused on information sharing in the greater Seattle urban area. • Identify and analyze information sharing systems/tools used in other regions.

  1. Understanding information synthesis in oral surgery for the design of systems for clinical information technology.

    PubMed

    Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Chanakarn, Piyawadee; Phisutphatthana, Sirada; Pongpatarat, Kanchala; Wongwaithongdee, Udom; Oupadissakoon, Chanekrid

    2015-12-01

    An understanding of the processes of clinical decision-making is essential for the development of health information technology. In this study we have analysed the acquisition of information during decision-making in oral surgery, and analysed cognitive tasks using a "think-aloud" protocol. We studied the techniques of processing information that were used by novices and experts as they completed 4 oral surgical cases modelled from data obtained from electronic hospital records. We studied 2 phases of an oral surgeon's preoperative practice including the "diagnosis and planning of treatment" and "preparing for a procedure". A framework analysis approach was used to analyse the qualitative data, and a descriptive statistical analysis was made of the quantitative data. The results showed that novice surgeons used hypotheticodeductive reasoning, whereas experts recognised patterns to diagnose and manage patients. Novices provided less detail when they prepared for a procedure. Concepts regarding "signs", "importance", "decisions", and "process" occurred most often during acquisition of information by both novices and experts. Based on these results, we formulated recommendations for the design of clinical information technology that would help to improve the acquisition of clinical information required by oral surgeons at all levels of expertise in their clinical decision-making. PMID:26292558

  2. Tank waste processing and disposal technology development data summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; McGinnis, C.P.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Waste Management and Technology Development Programs are engaged in a number of projects to develop, demonstrate, test, and evaluate new technologies to support the clean-up and site remediation of more than 300 underground storage tanks containing over 381,000 cubic meters (100 million gallons) of radioactive mixed waste. Significant development is needed within primary processing functions and in determining an overall bounding strategy. This document is a first attempt to summarize the overall strategy and show technology development activities within the strategy. It is intended to serve as an information resource to support understanding, decision making and integration of multiple program technology development activities. Recipients are encouraged to provide comments and input to the authors for incorporation in future revisions.

  3. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  4. Technological iatrogenesis: the manifestation of inadequate organizational planning and the integration of health information technology.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Patrick Albert; Peterson, Lori T; Corazzo, Luciano Bedoya

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) views Health Information Technology (HIT) as an essential organizational prerequisite for the delivery of safe, reliable, and cost-effective health services. However, HIT presents the proverbial double-edged sword in generating solutions to improve system performance while facilitating the genesis of novel iatrogenic problems. Incongruent organizational processes give rise to technological iatrogenesis or the unintended consequences to system integrity and the resulting organizational outcomes potentiated by incongruent organizational-technological interfaces. HIT is a disruptive innovation for health services organizations but remains an overlooked organizational development (OD) concern. Recognizing the technology-organizational misalignments that result from HIT adoption is important for leaders seeking to eliminate sources of system instability. The Health Information Technology Iatrogenesis Model (HITIM) provides leaders with a conceptual framework from which to consider HIT as an instrument for organizational development. Complexity and Diffusion of Innovation theories support the framework that suggests each HIT adoption functions as a technological change agent. As such, leaders need to provide operational oversight to managers undertaking system change via HIT implementation. Traditional risk management tools, such as Failure Mode Effect Analysis and Root Cause Analysis, provide proactive pre- and post-implementation appraisals to verify system stability and to enhance system reliability. Reconsidering the use of these tools within the context of a new framework offers leaders guidance when adopting HIT to achieve performance improvement and better outcomes. PMID:21887951

  5. Factors Affecting Teachers' Competence in the Field of Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambunan, Hamonangan

    2014-01-01

    The development of learning technology today, have a direct impact on improving teachers' information technology competence. This paper is presented the results of research related to teachers' information technology competence. The study was conducted with a survey of some 245 vocational high school teachers. There are two types of instrument…

  6. 31 CFR 542.306 - Information and communications technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... technology. 542.306 Section 542.306 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... Definitions § 542.306 Information and communications technology. The term information and communications technology means any hardware, software, or other product or service primarily intended to fulfill or...

  7. 2 CFR 200.58 - Information technology systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Information technology systems. 200.58 Section 200.58 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements... technology systems. Information technology systems means computing devices, ancillary equipment,...

  8. Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Program's goal is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communication technologies

  9. Information support for high technologies: issues of innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskorskaya, S. Yu; Goncharov, A. E.; Prohorovich, G. A.; Perantseva, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    The current development of high technologies and innovative projects requires systematic information support. This article describes examples of information support and promotion of regional technological platforms of the Krasnoiarskii krai on the base of communications projects which are being realized by students at SibSAU. These technological platforms correspond to the prioritized fields of developing science and research in the Russian Federation.

  10. Image-plane processing of visual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Fales, C. L.; Park, S. K.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Shannon's theory of information is used to optimize the optical design of sensor-array imaging systems which use neighborhood image-plane signal processing for enhancing edges and compressing dynamic range during image formation. The resultant edge-enhancement, or band-pass-filter, response is found to be very similar to that of human vision. Comparisons of traits in human vision with results from information theory suggest that: (1) Image-plane processing, like preprocessing in human vision, can improve visual information acquisition for pattern recognition when resolving power, sensitivity, and dynamic range are constrained. Improvements include reduced sensitivity to changes in lighter levels, reduced signal dynamic range, reduced data transmission and processing, and reduced aliasing and photosensor noise degradation. (2) Information content can be an appropriate figure of merit for optimizing the optical design of imaging systems when visual information is acquired for pattern recognition. The design trade-offs involve spatial response, sensitivity, and sampling interval.

  11. Occurrence reporting and processing of operations information

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-21

    DOE O 232.1A, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information, and 10 CFR 830.350, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information (when it becomes effective), along with this manual, set forth occurrence reporting requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) Departmental Elements and contractors responsible for the management and operation of DOE-owned and -leased facilities. These requirements include categorization of occurrences related to safety, security, environment, health, or operations (``Reportable Occurrences``); DOE notification of these occurrences; and the development and submission of documented follow-up reports. This Manual provides detailed information for categorizing and reporting occurrences at DOE facilities. Information gathered by the Occurrence Reporting and processing System is used for analysis of the Department`s performance in environmental protection, safeguards and security, and safety and health of its workers and the public. This information is also used to develop lessons learned and document events that significantly impact DOE operations.

  12. Information Literacy Education on College of Technology at Kyushu Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozono, Kazutake; Ikeda, Naomitsu; Irie, Hiroki; Fujimoto, Yoichi; Oshima, Shunsuke; Murayama, Koichi; Taguchi, Hirotsugu

    Recently, the importance of an engineering education increases by the development of the information technology (IT) . Development of the information literacy education is important to deal with new IT in the education on college of technology. Our group investigated the current state of information literacy education on college of technology at Kyushu area and the secondary education. In addition, we investigated about the talent whom the industrial world requested. From these investigation results, this paper proposed cooperation with the elementary and secondary education, enhancement of intellectual property education, introduction of information ethics education, introduction of career education and enhancement of PBL to information literacy education on college of technology.

  13. Client/server technology: Is it beneficial in the engineering information and information technology environment?

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, F.J.

    1996-06-10

    Client/server systems have been touted as the next step in the advance of the computer into modern, computer-aided drafting (CAD), computer-aided engineering (CAE), geographical information systems (GIS), engineering information (EI) technology, and information technology (IT) society, but they are not a solution to every organizations problems when it comes to advanced computer technology. Some of the ideas that are presented here are {open_quotes}old hat.{close_quotes} Then I ask you, why don`t we follow there {open_quotes}old hat{close_quotes} principles? This paper attempts and explores the advantages and disadvantages of these popular systems. The client/server architecture, apart from its ability to manage CAD/CAE/GIS and EI/IT and deliver it to decision makers in a timely fashion, offers many compelling advantages. There is, however, a downside to the widespread acceptance of the client/server environment. Users who expect to save money may be very disappointed. This paper provides a set of guidelines to help senior managers determine whether client/server computing is right for their CAD/CAE/GIS and IT organizations. From this point on, the abbreviations, CAD/CAE/GIS and EI/IT will be jointly referred to as {open_quotes}EI/IT{close_quotes} systems.

  14. Thermodynamics for separation-process technology

    SciTech Connect

    Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-10-01

    When contemplating or designing a separation process, every chemical engineer at once recognizes the thermodynamic boundary conditions that must be satisfied: when a mixture is continuously processed to yield at least partially purified products, energy and mass must be conserved and work must be done. In his daily tasks, a chemical engineer uses thermodynamic concepts as tacit, almost subconscious, knowledge. Thus, qualitative thermodynamics significantly informs process conception at its most fundamental level. However, quantitative design requires detailed knowledge of thermodynamic relations and physical chemistry. Most process engineers, concerned with flow sheets and economics, cannot easily command that detailed knowledge and therefore it is advantageous for them to maintain close contact with those specialists who do. Quantitative chemical thermodynamics provides an opportunity to evaluate possible separation processes not only because it may give support to the process engineer`s bold imagination but also because, when coupled with molecular models, it can significantly reduce the experimental effort required to determine an optimum choice of process alternatives. Six examples are presented to indicate the application of thermodynamics for conventional and possible future separation processes.

  15. Nanoscale particles in technological processes of beneficiation

    PubMed Central

    Adushkin, Vitaly V; Golub', Anatoly P

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: Cavitation is a rather common and important effect in the processes of destruction of nano- and microscale particles in natural and technological processes. A possible cavitation disintegration of polymineral nano- and microparticles, which are placed into a liquid, as a result of the interaction of the particles with collapsed cavitation bubbles is considered. The emphasis is put on the cavitation processes on the interface between liquid and fine solid particles, which is suitable for the description of the real situations. Results: The results are illustrated for the minerals that are most abundant in gold ore. The bubbles are generated by shock loading of the liquid heated to the boiling temperature. Possibilities of cavitation separation of nano- and microscale monomineral fractions from polymineral nano- and microparticles and of the use of cavitation for beneficiation are demonstrated. Conclusion: The cavitation disintegration mechanism is important because the availability of high-grade deposits in the process of mining and production of noble metals is decreasing. This demands for an enhancement of the efficiency in developing low-grade deposits and in reprocessing ore dumps and tailings, which contain a certain amount of noble metals in the form of finely disseminated fractions. The cavitation processes occuring on the interface between liquid and fine solid particles are occasionally more effective than the bulk cavitation processes that were considered earlier. PMID:24778972

  16. Technology Leadership or Technology Somnambulism? Exploring the Discourse of Integration amongst Information and Communication Technology Coordinators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonagh, Adrian; McGarr, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to explore information and communication technology (ICT) coordinators' discourse in relation to ICT integration in a sample of Irish post-primary schools. As ICT leaders in their schools, how they conceptualise ICT significantly influences school-based policy and use. The research involved semi-structured interviews with a

  17. Technology Leadership or Technology Somnambulism? Exploring the Discourse of Integration amongst Information and Communication Technology Coordinators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonagh, Adrian; McGarr, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to explore information and communication technology (ICT) coordinators' discourse in relation to ICT integration in a sample of Irish post-primary schools. As ICT leaders in their schools, how they conceptualise ICT significantly influences school-based policy and use. The research involved semi-structured interviews with a…

  18. Computer Aided Management for Information Processing Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akman, Ibrahim; Kocamustafaogullari, Kemal

    1995-01-01

    Outlines the nature of information processing projects and discusses some project management programming packages. Describes an in-house interface program developed to utilize a selected project management package (TIMELINE) by using Oracle Data Base Management System tools and Pascal programming language for the management of information system…

  19. Wireless sensor technology for in-situ plasma process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahan, David

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing demand for plasma measurement and control solutions to cope with the growing complexity of integrated circuit manufacture in the semiconductor industry. Standard plasma diagnostic instruments used in research, such as the Langmuir probe, are not suitable for use in the production environment for myriad reasons - contamination of the process being one of the main concerns. Silicon wafer based wireless sensors, which measure temperature during the process, have gained the most traction with tool manufacturers and chip makers - albeit during process development or the PM cycle rather than live production. In this presentation we will discuss two novel wireless technologies that have the potential for use in process tools. The first is an ion detector embedded in a silicon wafer. The sensor measures the average ion flux and the maximum ion energy during the process. This information is stored and is downloaded later for analysis. The second technology consists of a wireless sensor that sits inside the process and communicates data in real time to a detector installed on the rf power line. This platform is similar to RFID technology and can be combined with various sensor types to transmit data to the user during the process.

  20. Information Technology: A Community of Practice. A Workplace Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerrero, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) encompasses all aspects of computing technology. IT is concerned with issues relating to supporting technology users and meeting their needs within an organizational and societal context through the selection, creation, application, integration, and administration of computing technologies (Lunt, et. al., 2008). The…

  1. Information Technologies as Vehicles of Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Paul

    Technology contributes to the growth of human knowledge in five distinct, though overlapping, ways: (1) all technologies are material embodiments and thus more or less durable records of ideas that have survived some test with external reality; (2) telescopes, microscopes, and similar technologies extend external experience and knowledge to areas…

  2. Many potentials of information technology for emergency management

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Just as the introduction of advanced information technologies - computers, telecommunications, microform systems, video and audio devices - into the realms of business, agriculture, education, various social services, and science has had a decided impact on those vital activities, so are these tools and their related methodologies having an effect on emergency management. The growing complexity of our society is necessitating changes in many institutions and processes, and nowhere is this more apparent than in the four phases of emergency management: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. One approach to enhancing governmental preparedness, both at the federal and state-local levels, is through the selective utilization of devices and networks which facilitate and improve the collection, storage, processing, and dissemination of information vital to those who must anticipate and cope with a range of disasters. 23 references.

  3. A Framework for the Utilization of Information Technology in Higher Education Admission Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClea, Michael; Yen, David C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Through an examination of the admission department at Miami University of Ohio and their use of information technology, a generalized framework for the use of information technology in university admissions is proposed. Design/methodology/approach: The paper was developed to start an introduction to the admission process and the role of

  4. A Framework for the Utilization of Information Technology in Higher Education Admission Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClea, Michael; Yen, David C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Through an examination of the admission department at Miami University of Ohio and their use of information technology, a generalized framework for the use of information technology in university admissions is proposed. Design/methodology/approach: The paper was developed to start an introduction to the admission process and the role of…

  5. Transforming Health Care through Information Technology. Report to the President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC.

    This is one in a series of reports to the President and Congress developed by the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) on key contemporary issues in information technology. This report argues that significant improvements in health care would be possible if modern clinical information systems were widely implemented and a…

  6. Three Essays on Information Technology Security Management in Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Manish

    2011-01-01

    Increasing complexity and sophistication of ever evolving information technologies has spurred unique and unprecedented challenges for organizations to protect their information assets. Companies suffer significant financial and reputational damage due to ineffective information technology security management, which has extensively been shown to

  7. Access to Information Technology: A Statewide Vision for Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingle, James R.; And Others

    Access to information technology is rapidly becoming the benchmark by which quality in higher education is judged. The use of information technology for both on-campus instruction and distance learning is nowhere near reaching its full potential in Colorado. This report provides a statewide vision for the incorporation of information technology…

  8. Three Essays on Information Technology Security Management in Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Manish

    2011-01-01

    Increasing complexity and sophistication of ever evolving information technologies has spurred unique and unprecedented challenges for organizations to protect their information assets. Companies suffer significant financial and reputational damage due to ineffective information technology security management, which has extensively been shown to…

  9. Distributive Distillation Enabled by Microchannel Process Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, Ravi

    2013-01-22

    The application of microchannel technology for distributive distillation was studied to achieve the Grand Challenge goals of 25% energy savings and 10% return on investment. In Task 1, a detailed study was conducted and two distillation systems were identified that would meet the Grand Challenge goals if the microchannel distillation technology was used. Material and heat balance calculations were performed to develop process flow sheet designs for the two distillation systems in Task 2. The process designs were focused on two methods of integrating the microchannel technology – 1) Integrating microchannel distillation to an existing conventional column, 2) Microchannel distillation for new plants. A design concept for a modular microchannel distillation unit was developed in Task 3. In Task 4, Ultrasonic Additive Machining (UAM) was evaluated as a manufacturing method for microchannel distillation units. However, it was found that a significant development work would be required to develop process parameters to use UAM for commercial distillation manufacturing. Two alternate manufacturing methods were explored. Both manufacturing approaches were experimentally tested to confirm their validity. The conceptual design of the microchannel distillation unit (Task 3) was combined with the manufacturing methods developed in Task 4 and flowsheet designs in Task 2 to estimate the cost of the microchannel distillation unit and this was compared to a conventional distillation column. The best results were for a methanol-water separation unit for the use in a biodiesel facility. For this application microchannel distillation was found to be more cost effective than conventional system and capable of meeting the DOE Grand Challenge performance requirements.

  10. Engineering and information technology: Using imaging to reengineer business

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, F.J.

    1996-06-10

    Image processing can be a great asset to business process reengineering. This paper examines image processing`s impact on workflow and attempts to list the questions that should be addressed before imaging technology is introduced.

  11. An Information Technology Architecture for Pharmaceutical Research and Development

    PubMed Central

    Klingler, Daniel E.; Jaffe, Marvin E.

    1990-01-01

    Rationale for and development of an information technology architecture are presented. The architectural approach described produces a technology environment that is integrating, flexible, robust, productive, and future-oriented. Issues accompanying architecture development and potential impediments to success are discussed.

  12. The Potential of New Technology in Information Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raitt, David

    1989-01-01

    Reviews recent technological advances and developments relating to input devices, storage devices, output/display devices, and multimedia systems. Actual and possible applications of these technologies in the library, publishing, and information environments are discussed. (24 references) (CLB)

  13. The effect of technology information on consumer expectations and liking of beef.

    PubMed

    Van Wezemael, Lynn; Ueland, Øydis; Rødbotten, Rune; De Smet, Stefaan; Scholderer, Joachim; Verbeke, Wim

    2012-02-01

    European consumers increasingly attach value to process characteristics of food. Although beef technologies are hardly communicated to consumers, providing consumer-oriented information about technology application might increase perceived transparency and consumer acceptance. This study investigates how information about beef technologies influences consumer expectations and liking of beef. Beef consumers in Belgium (n = 108) and Norway (n = 110) participated in an information experiment combined with sensory testing in which each consumer tasted three beef muscles treated with different technologies: unprocessed tenderloin M. Psoas major, muscle profiled M. Infraspinatus, and marinated (by injection) M. Semitendinosus. The findings indicate that detailed information about beef technologies can enhance consumers' expectations and liking of beef. However, this effect differs between countries and beef technologies. Information becomes either less relevant when the product is actually tasted, as indicated by the findings in Norway, or more relevant when information is confirmed by own experience during tasting, as indicated by the findings in Belgium. PMID:21981934

  14. Information Processing in Cognition Process and New Artificial Intelligent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Nanning; Xue, Jianru

    In this chapter, we discuss, in depth, visual information processing and a new artificial intelligent (AI) system that is based upon cognitive mechanisms. The relationship between a general model of intelligent systems and cognitive mechanisms is described, and in particular we explore visual information processing with selective attention. We also discuss a methodology for studying the new AI system and propose some important basic research issues that have emerged in the intersecting fields of cognitive science and information science. To this end, a new scheme for associative memory and a new architecture for an AI system with attractors of chaos are addressed.

  15. Construction in year 2030: developing an information technology vision.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, B; Abbott, C; Aouad, G

    2010-08-13

    Emerging technologies offer new solutions to the construction industry, improving processes, enabling automation and effective decision-making mechanisms and changing current ways of work. Previous research has tended to consider a direct causal relationship between the emerging and prospective technologies and the future of construction. However, the future of construction will be influenced not only by the developments in the information technology (IT) industry, but also by other technological changes. Societal, economic, environmental and political factors will shape the future, together with emerging technologies. This paper presents a scenario-planning exercise that aimed to identify possible futures that the construction industry might face. In order to achieve the aims of the research, a literature review was carried out on scenario planning and future studies related to construction and construction IT, which was followed by a mini survey and two prospective workshops as part of the La Prospective scenario-planning approach. In a future study, it is important to understand the forces, issues and trends in order to inform and enable further thinking and action towards achieving a preferred future state whilst being prepared for what might be round the corner. Therefore, the paper first investigates the driving forces of change, main trends, issues and factors that might shape the future, focusing on factors related to society, technology, environment, economy and politics. Secondly, four future scenarios that were developed keeping these factors in mind are presented. The scenarios start from a global view and present the images of the future world in year 2030. They later focus on the construction industry, imagining how it will be shaped by the future world and trying to visualize the information and communication technology implications for construction. Finally, a preferred future scenario for 2030 is introduced based on the principle that the future can be influenced if we know what we want it to be. Focusing mainly on the IT vision, the paper concludes with recommendations in the areas related to innovation, communication and collaboration, education and training, process improvement, interoperability, user-centred IT and sustainability, in order to reach the desired state determined by the vision. PMID:20603367

  16. Information Technology and Art: Concepts and State of the Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Salah Uddin; Camerano, Cristoforo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Jaccheri, Letizia

    The interaction between information technology (IT) and art is an increasing trend. Science, art and technology have been connected since the 60's, when scientists, artists, and inventors started to cooperate and use electronic instruments to create art. In 1960 Marshall McLuhan predicted the idea that the era of "machine-age" technology was next to close, and the electronic media were creating a new way to perform art [1]. The literature is full with examples of artists applying mathematics, robotic technology, and computing to the creation of art. The work in [2] is a good introduction to the merge of IT and art and introduces genetic art, algorithmic art, applications of complex systems and artificial intelligence. The intersection is drawing attention of people from diverse background and it is growing in size and scope. For these reasons, it is beneficiary for people interested in art and technology to know each other's background and interests well. In a multidisciplinary collaboration, the success depends on how well the different actors in the project collaborate and understand each other. See [3] for an introduction about multidisciplinary issues. Meyer and others in [4] explains the collaboration process between artists and technologists.

  17. The standards process: X3 information processing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emard, Jean-Paul

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: International Organization for Standards (ISO); International Electrotechnical Committee (IEC); ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1 (JTC-1); U.S. interface to JTC-1; ANSI; national organizations; U.S. standards development processes; national and international standards developing organizations; regional organizations; and X3 information processing systems.

  18. Teaching Information Systems Development via Process Variants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Wee-Kek; Tan, Chuan-Hoo

    2010-01-01

    Acquiring the knowledge to assemble an integrated Information System (IS) development process that is tailored to the specific needs of a project has become increasingly important. It is therefore necessary for educators to impart to students this crucial skill. However, Situational Method Engineering (SME) is an inherently complex process that…

  19. [Health Information Technology -where are we heading?].

    PubMed

    Ash, Nachman; Levy, Ilan

    2013-05-01

    The current issue of "Harefuah" dedicates a special corner to Health Information Technology (HIT), with a collection of five review papers discussing different areas of the field, focusing on its benefits to the quality of healthcare. In the first paper Topaz and Ash describe the United States MeaningfuL Use project, and list the lessons that the Israeli health system should learn from it. Zelingher and Ash analyze the decision of the Israeli Ministry of Health to move from the old coding system of ICD-9-CM to a combination of SNOMED-CT as a clinical terminology system and ICD-10-CM as the classification coding system. The authors conclude that achieving a standardized, homogenous and thorough coding of problems, diagnoses and procedures will enable interoperability in the Israeli health system. Shalom et al present us to the world of computerized clinical guidelines. They review the different projects that aim to bring tools and methods to transform the paper based guidelines to computer programs that support the everyday decisions that physicians take regarding their patients. The authors focus on their experience in developing methodology, tools and a library of computerized guidelines, and describe their evaluation in several projects. Shahar et al dive deeper to describe the challenge of representing time in cLinicaL guidelines and creating tools to discover new knowledge based on represented known knowledge. These two papers demonstrate the meaningful use of medicaL data. In the last article, Siegal addresses some legal concerns evolving from the HIT revolution, pointing to the emerging concepts in Israeli jurisprudence, which regards medical IT as an important contribution to patient empowerment, aspects of medical risk management and management of national health system resources. In the judgment of the Israeli court, a medical organization will possibly have to take the responsibiLity of not implementing a proven HIT system. This paper concludes with descriptions of two studies evaluating health information systems in Israel. These studies will be presented at the forthcoming conference of the IsraeLi Association of Medical Informatics (ILAMI). PMID:23885446

  20. Natural language processing-based COTS software and related technologies survey.

    SciTech Connect

    Stickland, Michael G.; Conrad, Gregory N.; Eaton, Shelley M.

    2003-09-01

    Natural language processing-based knowledge management software, traditionally developed for security organizations, is now becoming commercially available. An informal survey was conducted to discover and examine current NLP and related technologies and potential applications for information retrieval, information extraction, summarization, categorization, terminology management, link analysis, and visualization for possible implementation at Sandia National Laboratories. This report documents our current understanding of the technologies, lists software vendors and their products, and identifies potential applications of these technologies.

  1. Information processing using a single dynamical node as complex system

    PubMed Central

    Appeltant, L.; Soriano, M.C.; Van der Sande, G.; Danckaert, J.; Massar, S.; Dambre, J.; Schrauwen, B.; Mirasso, C.R.; Fischer, I.

    2011-01-01

    Novel methods for information processing are highly desired in our information-driven society. Inspired by the brain's ability to process information, the recently introduced paradigm known as 'reservoir computing' shows that complex networks can efficiently perform computation. Here we introduce a novel architecture that reduces the usually required large number of elements to a single nonlinear node with delayed feedback. Through an electronic implementation, we experimentally and numerically demonstrate excellent performance in a speech recognition benchmark. Complementary numerical studies also show excellent performance for a time series prediction benchmark. These results prove that delay-dynamical systems, even in their simplest manifestation, can perform efficient information processing. This finding paves the way to feasible and resource-efficient technological implementations of reservoir computing. PMID:21915110

  2. Information technology and the conduct of research: The user's view

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Information technology-the set of computer and telecommunications technologies that makes possible computation, communication, and the storage and retrieval of information-has changed the conduct of scientific, engineering, and clinical research. This report examines present trends, future potential, and impediments to the use of information technology in support of research. Written from the viewpoint of the researcher using information technology and including many examples, the report offers a number of recommendations directed to two principal audiences: policymakers and leaders of institutions responsible for the support and management of research, and researchers themselves.

  3. Information technology in medical education: current and future applications.

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, G. A.; Bligh, J. G.

    1997-01-01

    Information technology has the potential to revolutionise the way medicine is learned by students and healthcare professionals. This potential was recognised by the General Medical Council in their 1993 report Tomorrow's doctors in which the need for future generations of doctors to be familiar with the application and scope of information technology is described. This paper focuses on the use of computers as aids to learning medicine and discusses two key applications of information technology to medical education: multimedia and the internet. The current use and potential for these areas of information technology are described and future developments discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9519181

  4. Modeling utilization of planned information technology.

    PubMed Central

    Stettheimer, T. D.; Cleveland, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    The antecedents of technology use involve user, system, task and organization characteristics as well as externalities which can affect all of these entities. Evaluation of all entity attributes would be impossible; however, measurement of the interaction effects between these entities can act as a proxy for individual attribute values. A model is proposed which, based upon evaluation of these interaction effects, should predict technology utilization. This model will provide insight into the relationship between the antecedents of technology utilization. Also, application of the approach described can provide a predictive model and taxonomy of variables which can be applied to predict or manipulate the likelihood of utilization for planned technology. PMID:9929228

  5. Voice-processing technologies--their application in telecommunications.

    PubMed Central

    Wilpon, J G

    1995-01-01

    As the telecommunications industry evolves over the next decade to provide the products and services that people will desire, several key technologies will become commonplace. Two of these, automatic speech recognition and text-to-speech synthesis, will provide users with more freedom on when, where, and how they access information. While these technologies are currently in their infancy, their capabilities are rapidly increasing and their deployment in today's telephone network is expanding. The economic impact of just one application, the automation of operator services, is well over $100 million per year. Yet there still are many technical challenges that must be resolved before these technologies can be deployed ubiquitously in products and services throughout the worldwide telephone network. These challenges include: (i) High level of accuracy. The technology must be perceived by the user as highly accurate, robust, and reliable. (ii) Easy to use. Speech is only one of several possible input/output modalities for conveying information between a human and a machine, much like a computer terminal or Touch-Tone pad on a telephone. It is not the final product. Therefore, speech technologies must be hidden from the user. That is, the burden of using the technology must be on the technology itself. (iii) Quick prototyping and development of new products and services. The technology must support the creation of new products and services based on speech in an efficient and timely fashion. In this paper I present a vision of the voice-processing industry with a focus on the areas with the broadest base of user penetration: speech recognition, text-to-speech synthesis, natural language processing, and speaker recognition technologies. The current and future applications of these technologies in the telecommunications industry will be examined in terms of their strengths, limitations, and the degree to which user needs have been or have yet to be met. Although noteworthy gains have been made in areas with potentially small user bases and in the more mature speech-coding technologies, these subjects are outside the scope of this paper. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7479815

  6. Technology and future ground processing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, B. J.; Ruggles, K. W.

    1981-01-01

    Land-observing satellites with multiple thematic mappers will produce data at rates of 100 to 300 Mbps. When coupled with a high daily scene production rate, these rates will require new approaches to ground processing. Consideration is given here to future downlink rates and data volumes, and requirements peculiar to the future user community are discussed. The advanced technologies required to attain an operational system in the years 1985-1990 are considered, together with advances foreseen in communications, mass storage, bulk memories, and data processing. Using advanced devices, a centralized data processing system capable of handling the 100 Mbps data rate is described. New approaches, among them a parallel pipelined calibration front-end, real-time browse image production, a high bandwidth optical disk archive, regional image broadcast and massively parallel product production, are considered. A distributed system capable of handling the 300 Mbps data rate is then described. Designs for a hub system and a regional processing center are presented.

  7. The Role of Change Agents in Technology Adoption Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyampoh-Vidogah, Regina; Moreton, Robert

    Although the total or partial failure of Information Technology (IT) projects are well documented such failures are not entirely technical in nature (Donohue et al, 2001). Project failures are often caused by lack of attention to social factors. (2002) identified ethical issues whilst (1999) and (2002) point to human factors, which in essence are the norms and culture of the implementation environment. On the. influence of culture on project success, (2003) noted that, the cultural problems are much bigger than the technical ones, adding: "The biggest hurdle is making people realise that information needs to be shared. It is only with this ethos of sharing information that take-up of technologies will be hastened." Consequently, research and debate about IT implementation is likely to continue until the development process is under better control (Nolan 1999). This state of constant evaluation is crucial because aborted IT projects are still common place. According to (1998), 31% of all corporate technology development projects resulted in cancellation. Although in broad terms, there seems to be ample evidence of the influence of non-technical factors on project failure the dynamics of how this happens is not widely discussed. There are some pointers to the dynamics of the process in literature.

  8. Industrial and agricultural process heat information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-03-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar industrial and agricultural process heat (IAPH) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 10 IAPH groups of respondents are analyzed in this report: IPH Researchers; APH Researchers; Representatives of Manufacturers of Concentrating and Nonconcentrating Collectors; Plant, Industrial, and Agricultural Engineers; Educators; Representatives of State Agricultural Offices; and County Extension Agents.

  9. UH Information Technology Services: Faculty Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okimoto, Hae

    2002-01-01

    Universities are increasingly looking toward technology to overcome geographical barriers to access, and this has placed new demands on faculty to explore the potential of technology in their classrooms. As a result, faculty development in the use of appropriate applications for teaching and learning has become a critical issue. In the 2000…

  10. Study of Faculty and Information Technology, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlstrom, Eden; Brooks, D. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In this inaugural year of the faculty technology study, EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) partnered with 151 college/university sites yielding responses from 17,451 faculty respondents across 13 countries. The findings are exploratory in nature, as they cover new ground to help us tell a more comprehensive story about technology

  11. Machine Process Capability Information Through Six Sigma

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, M.F.

    1998-03-13

    A project investigating details concerning machine process capability information and its accessibility has been conducted. The thesis of the project proposed designing a part (denoted as a machine capability workpiece) based on the major machining features of a given machine. Parts are machined and measured to gather representative production, short-term variation. The information is utilized to predict the expected defect rate, expressed in terms of a composite sigma level process capability index, for a production part. Presently, decisions concerning process planning, particularly what machine will statistically produce the minimum amount of defects based on machined features and associated tolerances, are rarely made. Six sigma tools and methodology were employed to conduct this investigation at AlliedSignal FM and T. Tools such as the thought process map, factor relationship diagrams, and components of variance were used. This study is progressing toward completion. This research study was an example of how machine process capability information may be gathered for milling planar faces (horizontal) and slot features. The planning method used to determine where and how to gather variation for the part to be designed is known as factor relationship diagramming. Components-of-variation is then applied to the gathered data to arrive at the contributing level of variation illustrated within the factor relationship diagram. The idea of using this capability information beyond process planning to the other business enterprise operations is proposed.

  12. The minimal work cost of information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faist, Philippe; Dupuis, Frédéric; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Renner, Renato

    2015-07-01

    Irreversible information processing cannot be carried out without some inevitable thermodynamical work cost. This fundamental restriction, known as Landauer's principle, is increasingly relevant today, as the energy dissipation of computing devices impedes the development of their performance. Here we determine the minimal work required to carry out any logical process, for instance a computation. It is given by the entropy of the discarded information conditional to the output of the computation. Our formula takes precisely into account the statistically fluctuating work requirement of the logical process. It enables the explicit calculation of practical scenarios, such as computational circuits or quantum measurements. On the conceptual level, our result gives a precise and operational connection between thermodynamic and information entropy, and explains the emergence of the entropy state function in macroscopic thermodynamics.

  13. The minimal work cost of information processing.

    PubMed

    Faist, Philippe; Dupuis, Frédéric; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Renner, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible information processing cannot be carried out without some inevitable thermodynamical work cost. This fundamental restriction, known as Landauer's principle, is increasingly relevant today, as the energy dissipation of computing devices impedes the development of their performance. Here we determine the minimal work required to carry out any logical process, for instance a computation. It is given by the entropy of the discarded information conditional to the output of the computation. Our formula takes precisely into account the statistically fluctuating work requirement of the logical process. It enables the explicit calculation of practical scenarios, such as computational circuits or quantum measurements. On the conceptual level, our result gives a precise and operational connection between thermodynamic and information entropy, and explains the emergence of the entropy state function in macroscopic thermodynamics. PMID:26151678

  14. The minimal work cost of information processing

    PubMed Central

    Faist, Philippe; Dupuis, Frédéric; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Renner, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible information processing cannot be carried out without some inevitable thermodynamical work cost. This fundamental restriction, known as Landauer's principle, is increasingly relevant today, as the energy dissipation of computing devices impedes the development of their performance. Here we determine the minimal work required to carry out any logical process, for instance a computation. It is given by the entropy of the discarded information conditional to the output of the computation. Our formula takes precisely into account the statistically fluctuating work requirement of the logical process. It enables the explicit calculation of practical scenarios, such as computational circuits or quantum measurements. On the conceptual level, our result gives a precise and operational connection between thermodynamic and information entropy, and explains the emergence of the entropy state function in macroscopic thermodynamics. PMID:26151678

  15. Texaco gasification process: Innovative technology evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This report summarizes the evaluation of the Texaco Gasification Process (TGP) conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The TGP is a commercial gasification process which converts organic materials into syngas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The feed reacts with a limited amount of oxygen (partial oxidaton) in a refractory-lined reactor at temperatures between 2,200 degrees and 2,650 degrees F and at pressures above 250 pounds per square inch gauge (psig). Texaco reports that the syngas can be processed into high-purity hydrogen, ammonia, methanol, and other chemicals, as well as clean fuel for electric power. The TGP was evaluated under the EPA SITE Program in January 1994 at Texaco`s Montebello Research Laboratory (MRL) in South El Monte, California, located in the greater Los Angeles area. The Demonstration used a soil feed mixture consisting of approximately 20 weight-percent waste soil from the Purity Oil Sales Superfund Site, Fresno, California and 80 weight-percent clean soil. The slurry included coal as a support fuel and was spiked with lead and barium compounds (inorganic heavy metals) and chlorobenzene (volatile organic compound) as the Principal Organic Hazardous Constituent (POHC).

  16. Religious Education and Information Technology: Challenges and Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sajjadi, Seyed Mahdi

    2008-01-01

    With advances in information technology, the velocity of information production on the global level has expanded as well. This acceleration has led to the delegitimizing of knowledge, the equating of information with knowledge, and the giving of predominance to information rather than knowledge. This advance has created epistemological challenges…

  17. Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Martha E., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This review contains eight papers on topics within the field of information science and technology. The papers are divided into three sections as follows: (1) Planning Information Systems and Services, including "Information Ownership and Control" (Tomas A. Lipinski); and "Pricing and Marketing Online Information Services" (Sheila Anne Elizabeth…

  18. Religious Education and Information Technology: Challenges and Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sajjadi, Seyed Mahdi

    2008-01-01

    With advances in information technology, the velocity of information production on the global level has expanded as well. This acceleration has led to the delegitimizing of knowledge, the equating of information with knowledge, and the giving of predominance to information rather than knowledge. This advance has created epistemological challenges

  19. Integrating Information and Communication Technology for Health Information System Strengthening: A Policy Analysis.

    PubMed

    Marzuki, Nuraidah; Ismail, Saimy; Al-Sadat, Nabilla; Ehsan, Fauziah Z; Chan, Chee-Khoon; Ng, Chiu-Wan

    2015-11-01

    Despite the high costs involved and the lack of definitive evidence of sustained effectiveness, many low- and middle-income countries had begun to strengthen their health information system using information and communication technology in the past few decades. Following this international trend, the Malaysian Ministry of Health had been incorporating Telehealth (National Telehealth initiatives) into national health policies since the 1990s. Employing qualitative approaches, including key informant interviews and document review, this study examines the agenda-setting processes of the Telehealth policy using Kingdon's framework. The findings suggested that Telehealth policies emerged through actions of policy entrepreneurs within the Ministry of Health, who took advantage of several simultaneously occurring opportunities--official recognition of problems within the existing health information system, availability of information and communication technology to strengthen health information system and political interests surrounding the national Multimedia Super Corridor initiative being developed at the time. The last was achieved by the inclusion of Telehealth as a component of the Multimedia Super Corridor. PMID:26085477

  20. Software engineering technology transfer: Understanding the process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1993-01-01

    Technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this report, the mechanisms developed by NASA to transfer technology are explored and the actual mechanisms used to transfer software development technologies are investigated. Time, cost, and effectiveness of software engineering technology transfer is reported.