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Sample records for infrared complex faraday

  1. Infrared Faraday Measurements on Cuprate High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arik, M. Murat; Mukherjee, Alok; Cerne, John; Lubashevsky, Y.; Pan, Lidong; Armitage, N. P.; Kirzhner, T.; Koren, G.

    2014-03-01

    Recent measurements on cuprate high temperature superconductors (CHTS) have observed evidence for symmetry breakings in the pseudogap phase, suggesting that this is a full-fledged phase with an actual broken symmetry. To test the spectral character of this broken symmetry, we have made infrared polarization-sensitive measurements in the absence of magnetic field on a series of CHTS films. We have studied the Faraday effect (change in the polarization of transmitted light) in CHTS films as a function of temperature (10-300K), energy (0.1-3 eV), and sample orientation with respect to the incident light polarization. We observe a strong linear optical anisotropy, well above the superconducting transition temperature. This signal is maximized when the sample lattice axes are oriented near 45o with respect to the incident light polarization, and varies as the sample is rotated. We explore the temperature and energy dependence of this signal. This work supported by NSF-DMR1006078 and Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF2628.

  2. Upgrade of far-infrared laser-based Faraday rotation measurement on MST

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Bergerson, W. F.; Lin, L.

    2010-10-15

    Recently, the far-infrared (FIR) laser ({lambda}{sub 0}=432 {mu}m) Faraday rotation measurement system on MST has been upgraded. The dc flowing-gas discharge CO{sub 2} pump laser is replaced by a rf-excited, sealed CO{sub 2} laser at 9.27 {mu}m (GEM select 100, Coherent Inc., Santa Clara, CA), which is subdivided equally into three parts to simultaneously pump three FIR cavities. The total infrared pump power is approximately 80 W on the 9R(20) line required to pump the formic acid molecule. Each FIR cavity produces {approx}12 mW, sufficient for 11 simultaneous chord interferometry-polarimetry operations. Three key issues [(1) conservation of circularly polarized wave, (2) colinearity of two probe waves, and (3) stability of intermediate frequencies between lasers] affecting the Faraday rotation measurement have been resolved experimentally.

  3. Cryogen-free heterodyne-enhanced mid-infrared Faraday rotation spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Nikodem, Michal; Wysocki, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    A new detection method for Faraday rotation spectra of paramagnetic molecular species is presented. Near shot-noise limited performance in the mid-infrared is demonstrated using a heterodyne enhanced Faraday rotation spectroscopy (H-FRS) system without any cryogenic cooling. Theoretical analysis is performed to estimate the ultimate sensitivity to polarization rotation for both heterodyne and conventional FRS. Sensing of nitric oxide (NO) has been performed with an H-FRS system based on thermoelectrically cooled 5.24 μm quantum cascade laser (QCL) and a mercury-cadmium-telluride photodetector. The QCL relative intensity noise that dominates at low frequencies is largely avoided by performing the heterodyne detection in radio frequency range. H-FRS exhibits a total noise level of only 3.7 times the fundamental shot noise. The achieved sensitivity to polarization rotation of 1.8 × 10−8 rad/Hz1/2 is only 5.6 times higher than the ultimate theoretical sensitivity limit estimated for this system. The path- and bandwidth-normalized NO detection limit of 3.1 ppbv-m/Hz1/2 was achieved using the R(17/2) transition of NO at 1906.73 cm−1. PMID:23388967

  4. Suppression of infrared absorption in nanostructured metals by controlling Faraday inductance and electron path length.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Eon

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured metals have been intensively studied for optical applications over the past few decades. However, the intrinsic loss of metals has limited the optical performance of the metal nanostructures in diverse applications. In particular, light concentration in metals by surface plasmons or other resonances causes substantial absorption in metals. Here, we avoid plasmonic excitations for low loss and investigate methods to further suppress loss in nanostructured metals. We demonstrate that parasitic absorption in metal nanostructures can be significantly reduced over a broad band by increasing the Faraday inductance and the electron path length. For an example structure, the loss is reduced in comparison to flat films by more than an order of magnitude over most of the very broad spectrum between short and long wavelength infrared. For a photodetector structure, the fraction of absorption in the photoactive material increases by two orders of magnitude and the photoresponsivity increases by 15 times because of the selective suppression of metal absorption. These findings could benefit many metal-based applications that require low loss such as photovoltaics, photoconductive detectors, solar selective surfaces, infrared-transparent defrosting windows, and other metamaterials. PMID:26906830

  5. Full spin polarization of complex ferrimagnetic bismuth iron garnet probed by magneto-optical Faraday spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Marwan; Popova, Elena; Fouchet, Arnaud; Keller, Niels

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the spin-dependent electronic density of states near and above the Fermi level in bismuth iron garnet (BIG), Bi3Fe5O12, by magnetic circular dichroism and magneto-optical Faraday spectroscopy. BIG is a recently synthesized material, as its preparation requires special nonequilibrium conditions. Its scientific and applicative interest resides in huge specific Faraday rotation of the incident light, useful for magneto-optic applications. We show experimentally the presence of spin gaps in the conduction band as recently predicted theoretically by Oikawa [T. Oikawa, S. Suzuki, and K. Nakao, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn.JUPSAU0031-901510.1143/JPSJ.74.401 74, 401 (2005)]. In the range of photon energies, where full spin polarization is expected, completely asymmetric Faraday hysteresis loops were observed, similar to those observed in half-metals such as (Pr,La)0.7Ca0.3MnO3 and Fe3O4. These results were modeled using even and odd (with respect to magnetization) contributions into hysteresis loops. The odd contribution appears only in the energy ranges where the density of states is fully spin polarized and vanishes at the Curie temperature. These results open a new perspective for the use of bismuth iron garnet in optic spintronics at room temperature and above.

  6. A potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of a potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter operating on the blue and near infrared transitions are calculated. The results show that the filter can be designed to provide high transmission, very narrow pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth. The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) provides a narrow pass bandwidth (about GHz) optical filter for laser communications, remote sensing, and lidar. The general theoretical model for the FADOF has been established in our previous paper. In this paper, we have identified the optimum operational conditions for a potassium FADOF operating on the blue and infrared transitions. The signal transmission, bandwidth, and equivalent noise bandwidth (ENBW) are also calculated.

  7. Michael Faraday's Bicentenary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, L. Pearce; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Six articles discuss the work of Michael Faraday, a chemist whose work revolutionized physics and led directly to both classical field and relativity theory. The scientist as a young man, the electromagnetic experiments of Faraday, his search for the gravelectric effect, his work on optical glass, his laboratory notebooks, and his creative use of…

  8. Real time Faraday spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Tommy E.; Struve, Kenneth W.; Colella, Nicholas J.

    1991-01-01

    This invention uses a dipole magnet to bend the path of a charged particle beam. As the deflected particles exit the magnet, they are spatially dispersed in the bend-plane of the magnet according to their respective momenta and pass to a plurality of chambers having Faraday probes positioned therein. Both the current and energy distribution of the particles is then determined by the non-intersecting Faraday probes located along the chambers. The Faraday probes are magnetically isolated from each other by thin metal walls of the chambers, effectively providing real time current-versus-energy particle measurements.

  9. Michael Faraday, media man.

    PubMed

    Fara, Patricia

    2006-03-01

    Michael Faraday was an enthusiastic portrait collector, and he welcomed the invention of photography not only as a possible means of recording observations accurately, but also as a method for advertising science and its practitioners. This article (which is part of the Science in the Industrial Revolution series) shows that like many eminent scientists, Faraday took advantage of the burgeoning Victorian media industry by posing in various roles. PMID:16332391

  10. Following Michael Faraday's Footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Last fall I had the good fortune of receiving financial support to shoot a documentary about Michael Faraday. I took the opportunity to learn more about this great experimentalist and to visit the highlights of places in his life. In this paper, I would like to share a list and description of some of the most remarkable places in London suitable for following Michael Faraday's footprints. There are many other places in Europe of special interest for the physics teacher,2,3 and some useful guides to help us visit places as "scientific travelers,"4,5 but this paper focuses on Michael Faraday and London. I have personally visited most of the places described below and found the experience to be really worthwhile.

  11. High-frequency fluctuation measurements by far-infrared laser Faraday-effect polarimetry-interferometry and forward scattering system on MST

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X. Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Duff, J. R.

    2014-11-15

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced transport driven by global tearing modes has been measured by Faraday-effect polarimetry and interferometry (phase measurements) in the MST reversed field pinch. However, the role of small-scale broadband magnetic and density turbulence in transport remains unknown. In order to investigate broadband magnetic turbulence, we plan to upgrade the existing detector system by using planar-diode fundamental waveguide mixers optimized for high sensitivity. Initial tests indicate these mixers have ×10 sensitivity improvement compared to currently employed corner-cube Schottky-diode mixers and ×5 lower noise. Compact mixer design will allow us to resolve the wavenumbers up to k ∼ 1–2 cm{sup −1} for beam width w = 1.5 cm and 15 cm{sup −1} for beam width w = 2 mm. The system can also be used to measure the scattered signal (amplitude measurement) induced by both plasma density and magnetic fluctuations.

  12. Faraday rotation system. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.; Wang, W.

    1994-07-01

    The Faraday Rotation System (FRS) is one of the advanced laser-based diagnostics developed at DIAL to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the MHD channel, the system directly measures electron density through a measurement of the induced rotation in the polarization of a far infrared laser beam after passing through the MHD flow along the magnetic field lines. A measurement of the induced polarization ellipticity provides a measure of the electron collision frequency which together with the electron density gives the electron conductivity, a crucial parameter for MHD channel performance. The theory of the measurements, a description of the system, its capabilities, laboratory demonstration measurements on seeded flames with comparison to emission absorption measurements, and the current status of the system are presented in this final report.

  13. Faraday rotation echo spectroscopy of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shaowen; Liu, Renbao

    2013-03-01

    Faraday rotation is widely used to study magnetic dynamics. We designed a scheme of Faraday rotation echo spectroscopy (FRES) that can be used to study spin noise dynamics in transparent materials by measuring the fluctuation of Faraday rotation angle. The FRES suppresses the static part of the noise and reveal the quantum fluctuations at relatively high temperature, which shares the same idea of the spin echo technique in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We tested our theory on a rare-earth compound LiHoF4. The quantum fluctuations obtained by FRES give an enhanced feature at the phase boundary. The FRES can be straightforwardly generalized to more complicated configurations that correspond to more complex dynamical decoupling sequences in NMR and electron spin resonance, which may give us more extensive information on the structural and dynamical properties of magnetic materials. This work was supported by Hong Kong RGC 402410 and CUHK FIS.

  14. Following Michael Faraday's Footprints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galeano, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Last fall I had the good fortune of receiving financial support to shoot a documentary about Michael Faraday. I took the opportunity to learn more about this great experimentalist and to visit the highlights of places in his life. In this paper, I would like to share a list and description of some of the most remarkable places in London suitable…

  15. Estimating extragalactic Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, N.; Junklewitz, H.; Greiner, M.; Enßlin, T. A.; Akahori, T.; Carretti, E.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goobar, A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Pratley, L.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Stil, J. M.; Vacca, V.

    2015-03-01

    Observations of Faraday rotation for extragalactic sources probe magnetic fields both inside and outside the Milky Way. Building on our earlier estimate of the Galactic contribution, we set out to estimate the extragalactic contributions. We discuss the problems involved; in particular, we point out that taking the difference between the observed values and the Galactic foreground reconstruction is not a good estimate for the extragalactic contributions. We point out a degeneracy between the contributions to the observed values due to extragalactic magnetic fields and observational noise and comment on the dangers of over-interpreting an estimate without taking into account its uncertainty information. To overcome these difficulties, we develop an extended reconstruction algorithm based on the assumption that the observational uncertainties are accurately described for a subset of the data, which can overcome the degeneracy with the extragalactic contributions. We present a probabilistic derivation of the algorithm and demonstrate its performance using a simulation, yielding a high quality reconstruction of the Galactic Faraday rotation foreground, a precise estimate of the typical extragalactic contribution, and a well-defined probabilistic description of the extragalactic contribution for each data point. We then apply this reconstruction technique to a catalog of Faraday rotation observations for extragalactic sources. The analysis is done for several different scenarios, for which we consider the error bars of different subsets of the data to accurately describe the observational uncertainties. By comparing the results, we argue that a split that singles out only data near the Galactic poles is the most robust approach. We find that the dispersion of extragalactic contributions to observed Faraday depths is most likely lower than 7 rad/m2, in agreement with earlier results, and that the extragalactic contribution to an individual data point is poorly

  16. Complex structure within Saturn's infrared aurora

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stallard, T.; Miller, S.; Lystrup, M.; Achilleos, N.; Bunce, E.J.; Arridge, C.S.; Dougherty, M.K.; Cowley, S.W.H.; Badman, S.V.; Talboys, D.L.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Sotin, C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Drossart, P.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of planetary aurorae are produced by electrical currents flowing between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere which accelerate energetic charged particles that hit the upper atmosphere. At Saturn, these processes collisionally excite hydrogen, causing ultraviolet emission, and ionize the hydrogen, leading to H3+ infrared emission. Although the morphology of these aurorae is affected by changes in the solar wind, the source of the currents which produce them is a matter of debate. Recent models predict only weak emission away from the main auroral oval. Here we report images that show emission both poleward and equatorward of the main oval (separated by a region of low emission). The extensive polar emission is highly variable with time, and disappears when the main oval has a spiral morphology; this suggests that although the polar emission may be associated with minor increases in the dynamic pressure from the solar wind, it is not directly linked to strong magnetospheric compressions. This aurora appears to be unique to Saturn and cannot be explained using our current understanding of Saturn's magnetosphere. The equatorward arc of emission exists only on the nightside of the planet, and arises from internal magnetospheric processes that are currently unknown. ??2008 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  17. Complex structure within Saturn's infrared aurora.

    PubMed

    Stallard, Tom; Miller, Steve; Lystrup, Makenzie; Achilleos, Nicholas; Bunce, Emma J; Arridge, Christopher S; Dougherty, Michele K; Cowley, Stan W H; Badman, Sarah V; Talboys, Dean L; Brown, Robert H; Baines, Kevin H; Buratti, Bonnie J; Clark, Roger N; Sotin, Christophe; Nicholson, Phil D; Drossart, Pierre

    2008-11-13

    The majority of planetary aurorae are produced by electrical currents flowing between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere which accelerate energetic charged particles that hit the upper atmosphere. At Saturn, these processes collisionally excite hydrogen, causing ultraviolet emission, and ionize the hydrogen, leading to H(3)(+) infrared emission. Although the morphology of these aurorae is affected by changes in the solar wind, the source of the currents which produce them is a matter of debate. Recent models predict only weak emission away from the main auroral oval. Here we report images that show emission both poleward and equatorward of the main oval (separated by a region of low emission). The extensive polar emission is highly variable with time, and disappears when the main oval has a spiral morphology; this suggests that although the polar emission may be associated with minor increases in the dynamic pressure from the solar wind, it is not directly linked to strong magnetospheric compressions. This aurora appears to be unique to Saturn and cannot be explained using our current understanding of Saturn's magnetosphere. The equatorward arc of emission exists only on the nightside of the planet, and arises from internal magnetospheric processes that are currently unknown. PMID:19005549

  18. Modified Faraday cup

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1996-01-01

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0.degree. to 360.degree. and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-din-tensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment.

  19. Modified Faraday cup

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-09-10

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams is disclosed. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees from 0{degree} to 360{degree} and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. 12 figs.

  20. Michael Faraday vs. the Spiritualists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfeld, Alan

    2006-12-01

    In the 1850s, renowned physicist Michael Faraday launched a public campaign against pseudoscience and spiritualism, which were rampant in England at the time. Faraday objected especially to claims that electrical or magnetic forces were responsible for paranormal phenomena, such as table-spinning and communication with the dead. Using scientific methods, Faraday unmasked the deceptions of spiritualists, clairvoyants and mediums and also laid bare the credulity of a public ill-educated in science. Despite his efforts, Victorian society's fascination with the paranormal swelled. Faraday's debacle anticipates current controversies about public science education and the interface between science and religion. This episode is one of many described in the new biography, The Electric Life of Michael Faraday (Walker & Co.), which chronicles Faraday's discoveries and his unlikely rise from poverty to the pinnacle of the English science establishment.

  1. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Ben Amar, Martine; Couder, Yves

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the Faraday instability in floating liquid lenses, as an example of hydrodynamic instability that develops in a domain with flexible boundaries. We show that a mutual adaptation of the instability pattern and the domain shape occurs, as a result of the competition between the wave radiation pressure and the capillary response of the lens border. Two archetypes of behaviour are observed. In the first, stable shapes are obtained experimentally and predicted theoretically as the exact solutions of a Riccati equation, and they result from the equilibrium between wave radiation pressure and capillarity. In the second, the radiation pressure exceeds the capillary response of the lens border and leads to non-equilibrium behaviours, with breaking into smaller domains that have a complex dynamics including spontaneous propagation. The authors are grateful to Université Franco-Italienne (UFI) for financial support.

  2. Faraday instability and Faraday patterns in a superfluid Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rong-An; Li, Hao-Cai; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2011-06-01

    With the consideration of the coupling between the transverse width and the longitudinal density, the parametric excitations related to Faraday waves in a cigar-shaped superfluid Fermi gas are studied. A Mathieu equation is obtained, and it is demonstrated firstly that the excited actual 3D Faraday pattern is the combination of the longitudinal Faraday density wave and the corresponding transverse width fluctuation in the longitudinal direction. The Faraday instability growth index and the kinematic equations of the Faraday density wave and the width fluctuation along the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC)-Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) crossover are also given for the first time. It is found that the 3D Faraday pattern presents quite different behaviours (such as the excitations and the motions) when the system crosses from the BEC side to the BCS side. The coupling not only plays an important role in the parametric excitation, but also determines the dominant wavelength of the spatial structure. Along the crossover, the coupling effects are more significant in the BCS side. The final numerical investigation verifies these results and gives a detailed study of the parametric excitations (i.e. Faraday instability) and the 3D pattern formation.

  3. Rephrasing Faraday's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. Eric

    2010-09-01

    As physics educators, we must often find the balance between simplicity and accuracy. Particularly in introductory courses, it can be a struggle to give students the level of understanding for which they're ready without misrepresenting reality. Of course, it's in these introductory courses that our students begin to construct the conceptual framework that they'll flesh out over a physics curriculum. So a misrepresentation at this early stage will seed difficulties and stubborn misconceptions that can persist or even strengthen through subsequent courses, especially since many upper-level texts focus more on techniques and would not directly challenge mistaken concepts. In the worst cases, our students retain misunderstandings past graduation, and even pass them on to their own students. One important case is the common representation of Faraday's law as showing that a time-varying magnetic field causes a circulating electric field.

  4. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Reichert, P.

    1997-03-18

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid. 3 figs.

  5. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Reichert, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid.

  6. MUSIC for Faraday rotation measure synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrecut, M.

    2013-03-01

    Faraday rotation measure (RM) synthesis requires the recovery of the Faraday dispersion function (FDF) from measurements restricted to limited wavelength ranges, which is an ill-conditioned deconvolution problem. Here, we propose a novel deconvolution method based on an extension of the MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm. The complexity and speed of the method is determined by the eigen-decomposition of the covariance matrix of the observed polarizations. We show numerically that for high to moderate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) cases the RM-MUSIC method is able to recover the Faraday depth values of closely spaced pairs of thin RM components, even in situations where the peak response of the FDF is outside of the RM range between the two input RM components. This result is particularly important because the standard deconvolution approach based on RM-CLEAN fails systematically in such situations, due to its greedy mechanism used to extract the RM components. For low S/N situations, both the RM-MUSIC and RM-CLEAN methods provide similar results.

  7. Communication: Infrared spectroscopy of salt-water complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandy, Jon; Feng, Cheng; Boatwright, Adrian; Sarma, Gautam; Sadoon, Ahmed M.; Shirley, Andrew; Rodrigues, Natercia Das Neves; Cunningham, Ethan M.; Yang, Shengfu; Ellis, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    To explore how the ion-pair in a single salt molecule evolves with the addition of water, infrared (IR) spectra of complexes composed of NaCl and multiple water molecules have been recorded for the first time. The NaCl(H2O)n complexes were formed and probed in liquid helium nanodroplets, and IR spectra were recorded for n = 1 → 4. The spectra for n = 1, 2, and 3 are consistent with formation of the lowest energy contact-ion pair structures in which each water molecule forms a single ionic hydrogen bond to an intact Na+Cl- ion-pair. Alternative structures with hydrogen bonding between water molecules become energetically competitive for n = 4, and the IR spectrum indicates likely the coexistence of at least two isomers.

  8. Infrared spectroscopy of nonclassical ions and their complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Boo, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes an infrared spectroscopic study on the structures and dynamics of the nonclassical ions and their complexes, using ion trap vibrational predissociation spectroscopy. Chapter One provides an introduction to the experimental apparatus used in this work. Chapter Two describes the previous theoretical and experimental works on the carbonium ion CH{sub 5}{sup +} and infrared spectroscopic and theoretical works on CH{sub 5}{sup +}. CH{sub 5}{sup +} was predicted to scramble constantly without possessing a stable structure. In Chapter Three, the infrared spectroscopy for the molecular hydrogen solvated carbonium ions CH{sub 5}{sup +}(H{sub 2}){sub n} (n=1-6) in the frequency region of 2700-4200 cm{sup {minus}1} are presented and compared with the results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulation on CH{sub 5}{sup +}(H{sub 2}){sub n} (n=0-3). The results suggested that the scrambling of CH{sub 5}{sup +} slowed down considerably by the stabilization effects of the solvent H{sub 2} molecules, and it was completely frozen out when the first three H{sub 2} molecules were bound to the core CH{sub 5}{sup +}. Chapter Four presents the complete infrared spectra for the solvated carbonium ions, CH{sub 5}{sup +}(A){sub x}(B){sub y} (A,B=H{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4};x,y=0-5) in the frequency region of 2500-3200 cm{sup {minus}1}. As the binding affinities of the solvent molecules and the number of the solvent molecules in the clusters increased, the scrambling of CH{sub 5}{sup +} slowed down substantially. The structures of the solvated carbonium ions and the evidence for rapid proton transfer in CH{sub 5}{sup +}(CH{sub 4}) were also presented. Chapter Five presents the vib-rotational spectrum for the H-H stretching mode of the silanium ion SiH{sub 5}{sup +}. The results suggested that SiH{sub 5}{sup +} can be described as a complex of SiH{sub 3}{sup +} and a freely internally rotating H{sub 2}, analogous to, but distinct from CH{sub 5}{sup +}.

  9. Ultrafast infrared studies of complex ligand rearrangements in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Christine K.

    2003-05-31

    The complete description of a chemical reaction in solution depends upon an understanding of the reactive molecule as well as its interactions with the surrounding solvent molecules. Using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy it is possible to observe both the solute-solvent interactions and the rearrangement steps which determine the overall course of a chemical reaction. The topics addressed in these studies focus on reaction mechanisms which require the rearrangement of complex ligands and the spectroscopic techniques necessary for the determination of these mechanisms. Ligand rearrangement is studied by considering two different reaction mechanisms for which the rearrangement of a complex ligand constitutes the most important step of the reaction. The first system concerns the rearrangement of a cyclopentadienyl ring as the response of an organometallic complex to a loss of electron density. This mechanism, commonly referred to as ''ring slip'', is frequently cited to explain reaction mechanisms. However, the ring slipped intermediate is too short-lived to be observed using conventional methods. Using a combination of ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations it has been shown that the intermediate exists, but does not form an eighteen-electron intermediate as suggested by traditional molecular orbital models. The second example examines the initial steps of alkyne polymerization. Group 6 (Cr, Mo, W) pentacarbonyl species are generated photolytically and used to catalyze the polymerization of unsaturated hydrocarbons through a series of coordination and rearrangement steps. Observing this reaction on the femto- to millisecond timescale indicates that the initial coordination of an alkyne solvent molecule to the metal center results in a stable intermediate that does not rearrange to form the polymer precursor. This suggests that polymerization requires the dissociation of additional carbonyl ligands before rearrangement can occur. Overall

  10. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks. PMID:25361349

  11. Infrared Spectroscopy of Charge Transfer Complexes of Purines and Pyrimidines

    SciTech Connect

    Rathod, Pravinsinh I.; Oza, A. T.

    2011-10-20

    The FTIR spectra of charge transfer complexes of purines and pyrimidines with organic acceptors such as TCNQ, TCNE, DDQ, chloranil and iodine are obtained and studied in the present work. Adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine and uracil are the purines and pyrimidines which are found as constituent of DNA and RNA. Charge transfer induced hydrogen bonding is concluded on the basis of indirect transitions observed in the infrared range in these CTCs. Some CTCs show gaussian bands revealing delocalization of charge carriers. The CTCs show interband transition in three-dimensions rather than two-dimensions unlike CTCs of amino acids. There is no extended hydrogen bonded network spanning the whole crystal. This leads to indirect transition due to locally deformed lattice furnishing a phonon-assisted transition.

  12. Near infrared photodissociation spectra of the aniline +-argon ionic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, T.; Douin, S.; Boudin, N.; Bréchignac, Ph.

    2006-02-01

    The near infrared spectra of the ionic complexes aniline(NH 2) +-argon and aniline(ND 2) +-argon have been measured by laser photodissociation spectroscopy. The bands observed from 10 500 to 13 500 cm -1 have been assigned to the D1(A˜2A2)←D0(X˜2B1) electronic transition within the solvated chromophore. They are characterized by a long vibrational progression involving the 6a mode. On the basis of CASSCF calculations, a large change of geometry along this coordinate is found while the amino group remains in the ring plane. Therefore, a change of the conjugation of the ring rather than a charge transfer is inferred. This is thought to be the origin of the extent of the progression.

  13. Various Paths to Faraday's Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redzic, Dragan V.

    2008-01-01

    In a recent note, the author presented a derivation of Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction for a closed filamentary circuit C(t) which is moving at relativistic velocities and also changing its shape as it moves via the magnetic vector potential. Recently, Kholmetskii et al, while correcting an error in an equation, showed that it can be…

  14. Faraday's Law and Seawater Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, R.

    2010-01-01

    Using Faraday's law, one can illustrate how an electromotive force generator, directly utilizing seawater motion, works. The conceptual device proposed is rather simple in its components and can be built in any high school or college laboratory. The description of the way in which the device generates an electromotive force can be instructive not…

  15. Faraday's first dynamo: A retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Glenn S.

    2013-12-01

    In the early 1830s, Michael Faraday performed his seminal experimental research on electromagnetic induction, in which he created the first electric dynamo—a machine for continuously converting rotational mechanical energy into electrical energy. His machine was a conducting disc, rotating between the poles of a permanent magnet, with the voltage/current obtained from brushes contacting the disc. In his first dynamo, the magnetic field was asymmetric with respect to the axis of the disc. This is to be contrasted with some of his later symmetric designs, which are the ones almost invariably discussed in textbooks on electromagnetism. In this paper, a theoretical analysis is developed for Faraday's first dynamo. From this analysis, the eddy currents in the disc and the open-circuit voltage for arbitrary positioning of the brushes are determined. The approximate analysis is verified by comparing theoretical results with measurements made on an experimental recreation of the dynamo. Quantitative results from the analysis are used to elucidate Faraday's qualitative observations, from which he learned so much about electromagnetic induction. For the asymmetric design, the eddy currents in the disc dissipate energy that makes the dynamo inefficient, prohibiting its use as a practical generator of electric power. Faraday's experiments with his first dynamo provided valuable insight into electromagnetic induction, and this insight was quickly used by others to design practical generators.

  16. A Mobile Phone Faraday Cage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, M. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physical phenomenon where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can. The background of the physics behind this is…

  17. Building a better Faraday cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MartinAlfven; Wright, David; skocpol; Rounce, Graham; Richfield, Jon; W, Nick; wheelsonfire

    2015-11-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news article “Are Faraday cages less effective than previously thought?” (15 September, http://ow.ly/SfklO), about a study that indicated, based on mathematical modelling, that conducting wire-mesh cages may not be as good at excluding electromagnetic radiation as is commonly assumed.

  18. Faraday dispersion functions of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Tashiro, Yuichi; Takahashi, Keitaro; Akahori, Takuya; Ryu, Dongsu E-mail: 136d8008@st.kumamoto-u.ac.jp E-mail: akahori@physics.usyd.edu.au

    2014-09-01

    The Faraday dispersion function (FDF), which can be derived from an observed polarization spectrum by Faraday rotation measure synthesis, is a profile of polarized emissions as a function of Faraday depth. We study intrinsic FDFs along sight lines through face-on Milky Way like galaxies by means of a sophisticated galactic model incorporating three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and investigate how much information the FDF intrinsically contains. Since the FDF reflects distributions of thermal and cosmic-ray electrons as well as magnetic fields, it has been expected that the FDF could be a new probe to examine internal structures of galaxies. We, however, find that an intrinsic FDF along a sight line through a galaxy is very complicated, depending significantly on actual configurations of turbulence. We perform 800 realizations of turbulence and find no universal shape of the FDF even if we fix the global parameters of the model. We calculate the probability distribution functions of the standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis of FDFs and compare them for models with different global parameters. Our models predict that the presence of vertical magnetic fields and the large-scale height of cosmic-ray electrons tend to make the standard deviation relatively large. In contrast, the differences in skewness and kurtosis are relatively less significant.

  19. Deconvolving Current from Faraday Rotation Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen E. Mitchell

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, a unique software program is reported which automatically decodes the Faraday rotation signal into a time-dependent current representation. System parameters, such as the Faraday fiber’s Verdet constant and number of loops in the sensor, are the only user-interface inputs. The central aspect of the algorithm utilizes a short-time Fourier transform, which reveals much of the Faraday rotation measurement’s implicit information necessary for unfolding the dynamic current measurement.

  20. Near infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics analysis of complex traits in animal physiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near infrared reflectance (NIR) applications have been expanding from the traditional framework of small molecule chemical purity and composition (as defined by spectral libraries) to complex system analysis and holistic exploratory approaches to questions in biochemistry, biophysics and environment...

  1. WW domain folding complexity revealed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Caitlin M; Dyer, R Brian

    2014-09-01

    Although the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of proteins offers a convenient probe of protein folding, interpretation of the fluorescence spectrum is often difficult because it is sensitive to both global and local changes. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy offers a complementary measure of structural changes involved in protein folding, because it probes changes in the secondary structure of the protein backbone. Here we demonstrate the advantages of using multiple probes, infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy, to study the folding of the FBP28 WW domain. Laser-induced temperature jumps coupled with fluorescence or infrared spectroscopy have been used to probe changes in the peptide backbone on the submillisecond time scale. The relaxation dynamics of the β-sheets and β-turn were measured independently by probing the corresponding IR bands assigned in the amide I region. Using these wavelength-dependent measurements, we observe three kinetics phases, with the fastest process corresponding to the relaxation kinetics of the turns. In contrast, fluorescence measurements of the wild-type WW domain and tryptophan mutants exhibit single-exponential kinetics with a lifetime that corresponds to the slowest phase observed by infrared spectroscopy. Mutant sequences provide evidence of an intermediate dry molten globule state. The slowest step in the folding of this WW domain is the tight packing of the side chains in the transition from the dry molten globule intermediate to the native structure. This study demonstrates that using multiple complementary probes enhances the interpretation of protein folding dynamics. PMID:25121968

  2. Faraday screen sputtering on TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1994-12-01

    The TPX design stipulates that the ion-cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) antenna must have a Faraday screen (FS). The author considers here possible low Z coatings for the screen, as well as sputtering behavior of the Ni and Ti substrates. The theory of rf-induced sputtering has been developed, and he follows those theoretical approaches. The author`s emphasis will be on both impurity generation as a possible source of increased Z{sub eff}, and also on actual erosion-lifetime of the materials under worst case conditions.

  3. Michael Faraday's work on optical glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Frank A. J. L.

    1991-09-01

    This article discusses Faraday's work of the late 1820s to improve optical glass for the joint Royal Society/Board of Longitude Committee set up for this purpose. It points out the importance of this work for some of Faraday's later physical researches.

  4. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.

    1993-04-13

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  5. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.

    1993-01-01

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  6. Soliton mode locking by nonlinear Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wabnitz, S.; Westin, E.; Frey, R.; Flytzanis, C.

    1996-11-01

    We propose nonlinear Faraday rotation as a mechanism for achieving stable polarization mode locking of a soliton laser. We analyze by perturbation theory and beam-propagation simulations the interplay between bandwidth-limited gain, gain dichroism, and linear and nonlinear Faraday rotation. .

  7. Resonant Faraday shield ICRH antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattanei, G.; W7-AS Team

    2002-05-01

    ICRH has proved to be an efficient method of heating the plasma in toroidal devices. The high voltages needed at the coupling structure are, however, a severe handicap of this method. The possibility is investigated of having the highest voltages between the bars of the Faraday shield (FS), where they are both necessary and easier to maintain. For this purpose a resonant Faraday shield (RFS) antenna where the first and last bars of the FS are connected by an inductive strip is proposed. In front of this strip there is a second strip, fed, as in a conventional antenna, by an RF generator. It is shown that if the toroidal length of the FS is larger than λ/2 the strip connecting the bars of the FS acts as the secondary coil of a tuned transformer, the strip fed by the generator being the primary. It is therefore possible, by varying the frequency and the distance between the two strips, i.e. the coupling coefficient, to match the impedance of the primary to that of the generator.

  8. Faraday diagnostics for ALT-3

    SciTech Connect

    Oro, David M; Tabaka, Leonard J

    2011-01-13

    ALT-3 and R-Damage are experiments to be executed in collaboration between LANL and VNIIEF personnel. They are planned to be fielded in Sarov, Russia at VNIIEF. Both experiments employ Russian explosively driven pulse-power systems to generate a pulse of electrical current that is used to drive the experiment. The current pulse will be measured with Faraday-rotation fiber-optic loops. Using this well known technique, the change in the current enclosed by the loops is determined by measuring the change in the magnetic field integrated along the fiber-optic loop by detecting the Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light traveling through the fiber. The amount of polarization rotation of the light is related to the integrated magnetic field and therefore the enclosed current (Ampere's law) through the Verdet constant which for the optical-fibers used in this experiment has been determined to within 1 %. The presentation describes how the technique will be employed in the ALT-3 experiment.

  9. 1/f Noise Inside a Faraday Cage

    SciTech Connect

    Handel, Peter H.; George, Thomas F.

    2009-04-23

    We show that quantum 1/f noise does not have a lower frequency limit given by the lowest free electromagnetic field mode in a Faraday cage, even in an ideal cage. Indeed, quantum 1/f noise comes from the infrared-divergent coupling of the field with the charges, in their joint nonlinear system, where the charges cause the field that reacts back on the charges, and so on. This low-frequency limitation is thus not applicable for the nonlinear system of matter and field in interaction. Indeed, this nonlinear system is governed by Newton's laws, Maxwell's equations, in general also by the diffusion equations for particles and heat, or reaction kinetics given by quantum matrix elements. Nevertheless, all the other quantities can be eliminated in principle, resulting in highly nonlinear integro-differential equations for the electromagnetic field only, which no longer yield a fundamental frequency. Alternatively, we may describe this through the presence of an infinite system of subharmonics. We show how this was proven early in the classical and quantum domains, adding new insight.

  10. Isotopic labelling studies on far-infrared spectra of nickel-histamine complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drożdżewski, Piotr; Kordon, Ewa

    2000-11-01

    Nickel-histamine (hm) complexes type [Ni(hm)Cl 2] and [Ni(hm) 3] X2 (Where X=Cl, Br, I, ClO 4) were investigated in the far-infrared region. Metal isotope labelling and deuteration effects were employed for observed band assignments. Metal-ligand vibrations were discussed and correlated with the structures of the complexes.

  11. Faraday wave lattice as an elastic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Domino, L; Tarpin, M; Patinet, S; Eddi, A

    2016-05-01

    Metamaterials enable the emergence of novel physical properties due to the existence of an underlying subwavelength structure. Here, we use the Faraday instability to shape the fluid-air interface with a regular pattern. This pattern undergoes an oscillating secondary instability and exhibits spontaneous vibrations that are analogous to transverse elastic waves. By locally forcing these waves, we fully characterize their dispersion relation and show that a Faraday pattern presents an effective shear elasticity. We propose a physical mechanism combining surface tension with the Faraday structured interface that quantitatively predicts the elastic wave phase speed, revealing that the liquid interface behaves as an elastic metamaterial. PMID:27300815

  12. Faraday wave lattice as an elastic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domino, L.; Tarpin, M.; Patinet, S.; Eddi, A.

    2016-05-01

    Metamaterials enable the emergence of novel physical properties due to the existence of an underlying subwavelength structure. Here, we use the Faraday instability to shape the fluid-air interface with a regular pattern. This pattern undergoes an oscillating secondary instability and exhibits spontaneous vibrations that are analogous to transverse elastic waves. By locally forcing these waves, we fully characterize their dispersion relation and show that a Faraday pattern presents an effective shear elasticity. We propose a physical mechanism combining surface tension with the Faraday structured interface that quantitatively predicts the elastic wave phase speed, revealing that the liquid interface behaves as an elastic metamaterial.

  13. Infrared spectrum of the complex of formaldehyde with carbon dioxide in argon and nitrogen matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Zwet, G. P.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Baas, F.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The complex of formaldehyde with carbon dioxide has been studied by infrared spectroscopy in argon and nitrogen matrices. The shifts relative to the free species show that the complex is weak and similar in argon and nitrogen. The results give evidence for T-shaped complexes, which are isolated in several configurations. Some evidence is also presented which indicates that, in addition to the two well-known sites in argon, carbon dioxide can be trapped in a third site.

  14. Complex infrared emission features in the spectrum of beta Lyrae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T. H.; Potter, A. E.; Kondo, Y.

    1974-01-01

    Spectra of beta Lyrae over the spectral region from 5800 to 11,000 per cm (1.76 to 0.9 micron) at two different phases have been obtained. They show a remarkable emission-absorption complex at 9231 per cm, a highly structured emission at P beta, and several additional broad weak emissions.

  15. Michael Faraday's Contributions to Archaeological Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Moshenska, Gabriel

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of ancient artefacts is a long but largely neglected thread within the histories of archaeology and chemistry. This paper examines Michael Faraday's contributions to this nascent field, drawing on his published correspondence and the works of his antiquarian collaborators, and focusing in particular on his analyses of Romano-British and ancient Egyptian artefacts. Faraday examined the materials used in ancient Egyptian mummification, and provided the first proof of the use of lead glazes on Roman ceramics. Beginning with an assessment of Faraday's personal interests and early work on antiquities with Humphry Davy, this paper critically examines the historiography of archaeological chemistry and attempts to place Faraday's work within its institutional, intellectual, and economic contexts. PMID:26307911

  16. Giant Faraday Rotation of High-Order Plasmonic Modes in Graphene-Covered Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Dmitry A; Bychkov, Igor V; Shavrov, Vladimir G; Temnov, Vasily V

    2016-07-13

    Plasmonic Faraday rotation in nanowires manifests itself in the rotation of the spatial intensity distribution of high-order surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes around the nanowire axis. Here we predict theoretically the giant Faraday rotation for SPPs propagating on graphene-coated magneto-optically active nanowires. Upon the reversal of the external magnetic field pointing along the nanowire axis some high-order plasmonic modes may be rotated by up to ∼100° on the length scale of about 500 nm at mid-infrared frequencies. Tuning the carrier concentration in graphene by chemical doping or gate voltage allows for controlling SPP-properties and notably the rotation angle of high-order azimuthal modes. Our results open the door to novel plasmonic applications ranging from nanowire-based Faraday isolators to the magnetic control in quantum-optical applications. PMID:27348746

  17. Infrared Spectra of (CO2)2-OCS Complex: Infrared Observation of Two Distinct Barrel-Shaped Isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norooz Oliaee, J.; Dehghany, M.; Mivehvar, F.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.

    2010-06-01

    Spectra of (CO2)2-OCS complex in the region of the OCS ν 1 fundamental (˜ 2062 cm-1) are observed using a tunable diode laser to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion. A previous microwave study of the complex by Peebles and Kuczkowskia gave a distorted triangular cylinder. The geometerical disposition of the three dimer faces of this trimer are quite similar to the slipped CO2 dimer, the lowest energy form of OCS-CO2 (isomer a), also observed and analyzed in the microwave region, and the higher energy form of OCS-CO2 (isomer b), first observed by our group in the infrared region. Here we report the observation and analysis of two infrared bands, corresponding to two distinct isomers of the (CO2)2-OCS complex. A band around 2058.8 cm-1 was assigned to isomer I, which is the same as that studied previously by microwave spectroscopy. A second band around 2051.7 cm-1 was assigned to a higher energy isomer of the complex, isomer II, has not been observed previously, but expected on the basis of ab initio calculations. Approximate structural parameters for this new isomer were obtained by means of isotopic substitution. In contrast to isomer I, the geometerical disposition of the faces containing OCS and CO2 in isomer II are similar to isomer b of the OCS-CO2 complex. S. A. Peebles and R. L. Kuczkowski, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 5277 (1998). S. E. Novick, R. D. Suenram, and F. J. Lovas, J. Chem. Phys. 88, 687 (1988). M. Dehghany, J. Nooroz Oliaee, M. Afshari, N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, and A. R. W. McKellar, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 224310 (2009). H. Valdés and J. A. Sordo, Int. J. Comput. Chem. 23, 444 (2002).

  18. Wave-particle interaction in the Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2015-10-01

    Wave motion in disordered Faraday waves is analysed in terms of oscillons or quasi-particles. The motion of these oscillons is measured using particle tracking tools and it is compared with the motion of fluid particles on the water surface. Both the real floating particles and the oscillons, representing the collective fluid motion, show Brownian-type dispersion exhibiting ballistic and diffusive mean squared displacement at short and long times, respectively. While the floating particles motion has been previously explained in the context of two-dimensional turbulence driven by Faraday waves, no theoretical description exists for the random walk type motion of oscillons. It is found that the r.m.s velocity ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) of oscillons is directly related to the turbulent r.m.s. velocity ⟨μ̃⟩(rms) of the fluid particles in a broad range of vertical accelerations. The measured ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) accurately explains the broadening of the frequency spectra of the surface elevation observed in disordered Faraday waves. These results suggest that 2D turbulence is the driving force behind both the randomization of the oscillons motion and the resulting broadening of the wave frequency spectra. The coupling between wave motion and hydrodynamic turbulence demonstrated here offers new perspectives for predicting complex fluid transport from the knowledge of wave field spectra and vice versa. PMID:26420468

  19. THE COMPUTED INFRARED SPECTRA OF A VARIETY OF [FePAH]{sup +} COMPLEXES: MID- AND FAR-INFRARED FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, A.; Joblin, C.

    2010-03-20

    The effects of the pi-coordination of an Fe atom on the mid- and far-infrared spectra of a mixture of cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), e.g., pyrene (C{sub 16}H{sub 10}), anthanthrene (C{sub 22}H{sub 12}), coronene (C{sub 24}H{sub 12}), ovalene (C{sub 32}H{sub 14}), circumpyrene (C{sub 42}H{sub 16}), and circumcoronene (C{sub 54}H{sub 18}), are studied by Density Functional Theory based calculations. In the mid-infrared range (3-20 {mu}m), by comparison with the bare PAH{sup +} spectrum, we found (1) an increase of the intensity ratio of the C-H stretching and C-H out-of-plane bending bands with respect to the intense CC stretching band and (2) a shift of the band positions and a characteristic profile with a steep blue rise and an extended red tail for the CC stretching and CH out-of-plane bending bands. None of these features appears inconsistent with the observed aromatic infrared band spectrum. In the far-infrared range (lambda > 20 {mu}m), the presence of a pi-coordinated Fe atom induces many new bands as (1) some vibrational modes of the PAH are activated due to symmetry reduction and (2) new modes involving the motion of the Fe atom occur. In particular, an accumulation point due to the activation of the Fe-PAH stretching mode is observed at around 40 {mu}m. This range is suggested to contain the spectral fingerprint for the presence of [M-PAH]{sup +} (M=Fe, Si, Mg) complexes in the interstellar medium. Additional features in the [60-300] {mu}m range are found for complexes with large PAHs. The obtained results are discussed in the light of past, present, and future astronomical missions, among which are the Herschel Space Observatory and the SPICA telescope for the far-infrared domain.

  20. Innovative technologies for Faraday shield cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, J.H.; Lindemuth, J.E.; North, M.T.; Goulding, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    Alternative advanced technologies are being evaluated for use in cooling the Faraday shields used for protection of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICR) antennae in Tokamaks. Two approaches currently under evaluation include heat pipe cooling and gas cooling. A Monel/water heat pipe cooled Faraday shield has been successfully demonstrated. Heat pipe cooling offers the advantage of reducing the amount of water discharged into the Tokamak in the event of a tube weld failure. The device was recently tested on an antenna at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The heat pipe design uses inclined water heat pipes with warm water condensers located outside of the plasma chamber. This approach can passively remove absorbed heat fluxes in excess of 200 W/cm{sup 2};. Helium-cooled Faraday shields are also being evaluated. This approach offers the advantage of no liquid discharge into the Tokamak in the event of a tube failure. Innovative internal cooling structures based on porous metal cooling are being used to develop a helium-cooled Faraday shield structure. This approach can dissipate the high heat fluxes typical of Faraday shield applications while minimizing the required helium blower power. Preliminary analysis shows that nominal helium flow and pressure drop can sufficiently cool a Faraday shield in typical applications. Plans are in progress to fabricate and test prototype hardware based on this approach.

  1. Infrared intensities and charge mobility in hydrogen bonded complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimberti, Daria; Milani, Alberto; Castiglioni, Chiara

    2013-08-01

    The analytical model for the study of charge mobility in the molecules presented by Galimberti et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 164115 (2013)] is applied to hydrogen bonded planar dimers. Atomic charges and charge fluxes are obtained from density functional theory computed atomic polar tensors and related first derivatives, thus providing an interpretation of the IR intensity enhancement of the X-H stretching band observed upon aggregation. Our results show that both principal and non-principal charge fluxes have an important role for the rationalization of the spectral behavior; moreover, they demonstrate that the modulation of the charge distribution during vibrational motions of the -XH⋯Y- fragment is not localized exclusively on the atoms directly involved in hydrogen bonding. With these premises we made some correlations between IR intensities, interaction energies, and charge fluxes. The model was tested on small dimers and subsequently to the bigger one cytosine-guanine. Thus, the model can be applied to complex systems.

  2. Near-Infrared Phosphorescent Iridium(III) Benzonorrole Complexes Possessing Pyridine-based Axial Ligands.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Yogesh Kumar; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Kawabe, Yasunori; Ishida, Masatoshi; Toganoh, Motoki; Mori, Shigeki; Yasutake, Yuhsuke; Fukatsu, Susumu; Furuta, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-20

    Novel near-infrared phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes based on benzo-annulated N-linked corrole analogue (termed as benzonorrole) were synthesized. The structures of the complexes revealed octahedral coordination geometries involving an organometallic iridium-carbon bond with two external axial ligands. Interestingly, the iridium(III) complex exhibits near-infrared phosphorescence at room temperature at wavelengths beyond 900 nm. The significant redshift of the emission, as compared to the corrole congener, is originated from the ligand-centered triplet character. The fine-tuning of the photophysical properties of the complexes was achieved by introducing electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents on the axial pyridine ligands. PMID:27249778

  3. Near-infrared-induced electron transfer of an uranyl macrocyclic complex without energy transfer to dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christina M; Ohkubo, Kei; Ho, I-Ting; Zhang, Zhan; Ishida, Masatoshi; Fang, Yuanyuan; Lynch, Vincent M; Kadish, Karl M; Sessler, Jonathan L; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-21

    Photoexcitation of dichloromethane solutions of an uranyl macrocyclic complex with cyclo[1]furan[1]pyridine[4]-pyrrole () at the near-infrared (NIR) band (1177 nm) in the presence of electron donors and acceptors resulted in NIR-induced electron transfer without producing singlet oxygen via energy transfer. PMID:25791126

  4. Characterization of a 1:1 Methanol-Benzene Complex Using Matrix Isolation Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amicangelo, Jay C.; Romano, Natalie C.; Demay, Geoffrey R.

    2013-06-01

    Matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize a 1:1 complex of methanol (CH_{3}OH) with benzene (C_{6}H_{6}). Co-deposition experiments with CH_{3}OH and C_{6}H_{6} were performed at 17 - 20 K using nitrogen and argon as the matrix gases. New infrared bands attributable to the CH_{3}OH-C_{6}H_{6} complex were observed near the O-H and C-O stretching vibrations of CH_{3}OH and near the hydrogen out-of-plane bending vibration of C_{6}H_{6}. The initial identification of the new infrared bands observed was established by performing a conentration study (1:200 to 1:2000 S:M ratios), by comparing the co-deposition spectra with the spectra of the individual monomers, by matrix annealing experiments, and by performing experiments using isotopically labeled methanol (CD_{3}OD) and benzene (C_{6}D_{6}). Quantum chemical calculations were also performed for the CH_{3}OH-C_{6}H_{6} complex using density functional theory and ab initio methods. Two stable minima were found for the complex: one in which the CH_{3}OH is above the C_{6}H_{6} ring with the hydroxyl hydrogen interacting with the π cloud of the ring (H-π complex) and the other in which the CH_{3}OH is in the plane of the C_{6}H_{6} ring with the hydroxyl oxygen interacting with one of the C-H bonds of the ring (CH-O complex). Comparing the calculated shifts of the vibrational frequencies for both complexes to the observed experimental frequency shifts, it is found that the H-π complex is in best agreement with the experimental shifts in both magnitude and direction. Therefore, it is concluded that the geometry of the CH_{3}OH-C_{6}H_{6} complex observed in the matrix isolation experiments is the H-π complex.

  5. Analytical estimation of solid angle subtended by complex well-resolved surfaces for infrared detection studies.

    PubMed

    Mahulikar, Shripad P; Potnuru, Santosh K; Kolhe, Pankaj S

    2007-08-01

    The solid angle (Omega) subtended by the hot power-plant surfaces of a typical fighter aircraft, on the detector of an infrared (IR) guided missile, is analytically obtained. The use of the parallel rays projection method simplifies the incorporation of the effect of the optical blocking by engine surfaces, on Omega-subtended. This methodology enables the evaluation of the relative contribution of the IR signature from well-resolved distributed sources, and is important for imaging infrared detection studies. The complex 3D surface of a rear fuselage is projected onto an equivalent planar area normal to the viewing aspect, which would give the same Omega-subtended. PMID:17676106

  6. Faraday rotation measurement method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockman, M. H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method and device for measuring Faraday rotation of a received RF signal is described. A simultaneous orthogonal polarization receiver compensates for a 3 db loss due to splitting of a received signal into left circular and right circular polarization channels. The compensation is achieved by RF and modulation arraying utilizing a specific receiver array which also detects and measures Faraday rotation in the presence or absence of spin stabilization effects on a linear polarization vector. Either up-link or down-link measurement of Faraday rotation is possible. Specifically, the Faraday measurement apparatus utilized in conjunction with the specific receiver array provides a means for comparing the phase of a reference signal in the receiver array to the phase of a tracking loop signal related to the incoming signal, and comparing the phase of the reference signal to the phase of the tracking signal shifted in phase by 90 degrees. The averaged and unaveraged signals, are compared, the phase changes between the two signals being related to Faraday rotation.

  7. Michael Faraday and his contribution to anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Bergman, N A

    1992-10-01

    Michael Faraday (1791-1867) was a protégé of Humphry Davy. He became one of Davy's successors as Professor of Chemistry at the Royal Institution of Great Britain. Of Faraday's many brilliant discoveries in chemistry and physics, probably the best remembered today is his work on electromagnetic induction. Faraday's contribution to introduction of anesthesia was his published announcement in 1818 that inhalation of the vapor of ether produced the same effects on mentation and consciousness as the breathing of nitrous oxide. He most likely became familiar with the central nervous system effects of nitrous oxide through his association with Davy, an avid user of the gas. Sulfuric ether was a common, convenient, cheap, and easily available substance, in contrast to nitrous oxide, which required expensive, cumbersome, and probably not widely available apparatus for its production and administration. The capability for inhaling intoxicating vapors eventually became commonly available with the use of ether instead of the gas. The first surgical anesthetics were a consequence of the resulting student "ether frolics." The 1818 announcement on breathing ether vapor was published anonymously; however, notations in Faraday's handwriting in some of his personal books clearly establish Michael Faraday as the author of this brief communication. PMID:1416178

  8. The gravitational analog of Faraday's induction law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zile, Daniel; Overduin, James

    2015-04-01

    Michael Faraday, the discoverer of electromagnetic induction, was convinced that there must also be a gravitational analog of this law, and he carried out drop-tower experiments in 1849 to look for the electric current induced in a coil by changes in gravitational flux through the coil. This work, now little remembered, was in some ways the first investigation of what we would now call a unified-field theory. We revisit Faraday's experiments in the light of current knowledge and ask what might be learned if they were to be performed today. We then review the gravitational analog for Faraday's law that arises within the vector (or gravito-electromagnetic) approximation to Einstein's theory of general relativity in the weak-field, low-velocity limit. This law relates spinning masses and induced ``mass currents'' rather than spinning charges and electric currents, but is otherwise remarkably similar to its electromagnetic counterpart. The predicted effects are completely unobservable in everyday settings like those envisioned by Faraday, but are thought to be relevant in astrophysical contexts like the accretion disks around collapsed stars, thus bearing out Faraday's remarkable intuition. Undergraduate student.

  9. Infrared spectroscopic studies on reaction induced conformational changes in the NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Petra; Kriegel, Sébastien; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Redox-dependent conformational changes are currently discussed to be a crucial part of the reaction mechanism of the respiratory complex I. Specialized difference Fourier transform infrared techniques allow the detection of side-chain movements and minute secondary structure changes. For complex I, (1)H/(2)H exchange kinetics of the amide modes revealed a better accessibility of the backbone in the presence of NADH and quinone. Interestingly, the presence of phospholipids, that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the isolated enzyme complex, changes the overall conformation. When comparing complex I samples from different species, very similar electrochemically induced FTIR difference spectra and very similar rearrangements are reported. Finally, the information obtained with variants and from Zn(2+) inhibited samples for the conformational reorganization of complex I upon electron transfer are discussed in this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26702948

  10. Infrared Spectroscopy of Metal Ion Complexes: Models for Metal Ligand Interactions and Solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Weakly bound complexes of the form M^+-Lx (M=Fe, Ni, Co, etc.; L=CO2, C2H2, H2O, benzene, N2) are prepared in supersonic molecular beams by laser vaporization in a pulsed-nozzle cluster source. These species are mass analyzed and size-selected in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Clusters are photodissociated at infrared wavelengths with a Nd:YAG pumped infrared optical parametric oscillator/amplifier (OPO/OPA) laser or with a tunable infrared free-electron laser. M^+-(CO2)x complexes absorb near the free CO2 asymmetric stretch near 2349 cm-1 but with an interesting size dependent variation in the resonances. Small clusters have blue-shifted resonances, while larger complexes have additional bands due to surface CO2 molecules not attached to the metal. M^+(C2H2)n complexes absorb near the C-H stretches in acetylene, but resonances in metal complexes are red-shifted with repect to the isolated molecule. Ni^+ and Co^+ complexes with acetylene undergo intracluster cyclization reactions to form cyclobutadiene. Transition metal water complexes are studied in the O-H stretch region, and partial rotational structure can be measured. M^+(benzene) and M^+(benzene)2 ions (M=V, Ti, Al) represent half-sandwich and sandwich species, whose spectra are measured near the free benzene modes. These new IR spectra and their assignments will be discussed as well as other new IR spectra for similar complexes.

  11. Faraday Waves under Time-Reversed Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer , Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)PLEEE81539-3755]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  12. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    PubMed Central

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin–Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system—spectrally dependent losses—achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin–Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering. PMID:27503708

  13. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M; Churkin, Dmitry V; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system-spectrally dependent losses-achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering. PMID:27503708

  14. Faraday waves under time-reversed excitation.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions. PMID:23496716

  15. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system--spectrally dependent losses--achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  16. Faraday polarization fluctuations of satellite beacon signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Klobuchar, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The anisotropic effects of random density irregularities in causing Faraday polarization fluctuations of VHF radio signals are examined, taking both rod-like and sheet-like irregularities into consideration. It is found that the variance of Faraday polarization fluctuations depends on the ratio of perpendicular to parallel correlation lengths. The anisotropic effect of rod-like ionospheric irregularities are shown to be most appreciable for longitudinal propagation. The anisotropic effect of sheet-like ionospheric irregularities, however, is not strongly dependent on the radio propagation angle. During transionospheric propagation at large angles with respect to the geomagnetic field, sheet-like irregularities may cause greater Faraday polarization fluctuations than rod-like irregularities.

  17. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L.; Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, P.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. A high-heat-flux, uncooled Faraday shield has also been designed for the fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antenna on D3-D. For both components, the improved understanding of the heating profiles made it possible to design for heat fluxes that would otherwise have been too close to mechanically established limits. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the D3-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Faraday waves in elongated superfluid fermionic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuzzi, P.; Vignolo, P.

    2008-10-01

    We use hydrodynamic equations to study the formation of Faraday waves in a superfluid Fermi gas at zero temperature confined in a strongly elongated cigar-shaped trap. First, we treat the role of the radial density profile in the limit of an infinite cylindrical geometry and analytically evaluate the wavelength of the Faraday pattern. The effect of the axial confinement is fully taken into account in the numerical solution of hydrodynamic equations, and shows that the infinite cylinder geometry provides a very good description of the phenomena.

  19. Rapid determination of Faraday rotation in optical glasses by means of secondary Faraday modulator.

    PubMed

    Sofronie, M; Elisa, M; Sava, B A; Boroica, L; Valeanu, M; Kuncser, V

    2015-05-01

    A rapid high sensitive method for determining the Faraday rotation of optical glasses is proposed. Starting from an experimental setup based on a Faraday rod coupled to a lock-in amplifier in the detection chain, two methodologies were developed for providing reliable results on samples presenting low and large Faraday rotations. The proposed methodologies were critically discussed and compared, via results obtained in transmission geometry, on a new series of aluminophosphate glasses with or without rare-earth doping ions. An example on how the method can be used for a rapid examination of the optical homogeneity of the sample with respect to magneto-optical effects is also provided. PMID:26026534

  20. Benzodipyrrole-based Donor-Acceptor-type Boron Complexes as Tunable Near-infrared-Absorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomoya; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2016-07-20

    Benzodipyrrole-based donor-acceptor boron complexes were designed and synthesized as near-infrared-absorbing materials. The electron-rich organic framework combined with the Lewis acidic boron co-ordination enabled us to tune the LUMO energy level and the HOMO-LUMO gap (i.e.,the absorption wavelength) by changing the organic acceptor units, the number of boron atoms, and the substituents on the boron atoms. PMID:27311060

  1. Complex morphology small targets detection based on spatial-temporal sparse recovery in infrared surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Miao; Wang, Qi; Li, Jun; Long, Yunli; Zheng, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Complex morphology target, which is size-varying and shape-varying, is a great challenge for infrared surveillance system. In this paper, temporal low-rank and sparse decomposition model and spatial low-rank and sparse decomposition model are designed respectively. Subsequently, a joint spatial-temporal detection method of complex morphology target is presented. Firstly, initial background subspace is obtained based on training sequence which does not contain infrared target. Secondly, temporal target image is recovered by l1 minimization after projecting orthogonal to background subspace. Thirdly, original image is decomposed into background image and spatial target image using inexact augmented Lagrange multipliers approach. Fourthly, by fusing the two target images, the possible small targets can be extracted well. Finally, background subspace is updated based on incremental singular value decomposition algorithm. The experimental results show that our method is effective and robust to detect complex morphology infrared targets. In particular, the proposed method can extract targets accurately, which is important for target recognition.

  2. Electrodeless-discharge-vapor-lamp-based Faraday anomalous-dispersion optical filter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qinqing; Zhuang, Wei; Liu, Zhiwen; Chen, Jingbiao

    2011-12-01

    We report an excited-state Faraday anomalous-dispersion optical filter operating on the rubidium 5P(3/2)-5D(5/2) transition (775.9 nm in vacuum) without the use of a pump laser. An electrodeless discharge vapor lamp is employed to replace the Rb vapor cell in a traditional Faraday anomalous-dispersion optical filter system. Atoms can be excited by power rather than a complex frequency-locked pump laser. A proof-of-concept experimental demonstration with a maximum transmission of 1.9% and a filter bandwidth of 650 MHz is presented. PMID:22139259

  3. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  4. Infrared spectra, photochemistry, and ab initio calculations of matrix isolated methanethiol/sulfur dioxide complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Kurtz, H.; Korambath, P.; Li, Y.-S.

    2000-09-01

    Intermolecular complexes of methanethiol with sulfur dioxide have been prepared by condensing the reagents diluted in argon and in nitrogen at 12-14 K. The 1:1 CH 3SH/SO 2 complexes were identified from the infrared spectra of the mixtures of methanethiol with sulfur dioxide in argon and nitrogen matrices. Perturbations to the vibrational energy spaces of some vibrational modes were identified and assigned. Ab initio calculations with the 6-311G ∗∗ basis set have been performed to get some information about the structure, binding energy, dipole moment, and potential function governing the internal rotation of SO 2 for the complex. The calculated results have suggested that the dipole/dipole interaction held the constituent species together to form the complex. Photochemical reactions were performed by exposing the matrix mixtures to UV irradiation. The appearance of new bands indicated the presence of more than one photochemical reaction product.

  5. The Minus Sign in Faraday's Law Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Colm; Hurley, Donal

    2013-01-01

    By introducing the mathematical concept of orientation, the significance of the minus sign in Faraday's law may be made clear to students with some knowledge of vector calculus. For many students, however, the traditional approach of treating the law as a relationship between positive scalars and of relying on Lenz's law to provide the information…

  6. Fast Faraday Cup With High Bandwidth

    DOEpatents

    Deibele, Craig E [Knoxville, TN

    2006-03-14

    A circuit card stripline Fast Faraday cup quantitatively measures the picosecond time structure of a charged particle beam. The stripline configuration maintains signal integrity, and stitching of the stripline increases the bandwidth. A calibration procedure ensures the measurement of the absolute charge and time structure of the charged particle beam.

  7. Reflections of a Faraday Challenge Day Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Keira

    2014-01-01

    Keira Sewell has just finished her second year as a Challenge Leader for the Faraday Challenge, a STEM-based scheme run by the Institution of Engineering and Technology. Aimed at 12-13 year-old students, its purpose is to engage students in future careers in engineering. Each year, a new challenge is held in over sixty schools and universities…

  8. Fiber optic, Faraday rotation current sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Veeser, L.R.; Day, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    At the Second Megagauss Conference in 1979, there were reports of experiments that used the Faraday magneto-optic effect in a glass rod to measure large electric current pulses or magnetic fields. Since then we have seen the development of single-mode optical fibers that can carry polarized light in a closed loop around a current load. A fiber optic Faraday rotation sensor will integrate the flux, instead of sampling it at a discrete point, to get a measurement independent of the current distribution. Early Faraday rotation experiments using optical fibers to measure currents dealt with problems such as fiber birefringence and difficulties in launching light into the tiny fiber cores. We have built on those experiments, working to reduce the effects of shocks and obtaining higher bandwidths, absolute calibration, and computerized recording and data analysis, to develop the Faraday rotation sensors into a routine current diagnostic. For large current pulses we find reduced sensitivity to electromagnetic interference and other backgrounds than for Rogowski loops; often the fiber optic sensors are useful where conductive probes cannot be used at all. In this paper we describe the fiber optic sensors and some practical matters involved in fielding them.

  9. Probing Coronal Mass Ejections with Faraday Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Fischer, P. D.; Kooi, J. E.; Buffo, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are one of the most important solar phenomena in affecting conditions on Earth. There is not a consensus as to the physical mechanisms responsible for ejecting CME material from the solar atmosphere. Measurements that specify basic physical properties close to the Sun, when the CME is still evolving, should be useful in determining the correct theoretical model. One of the best observational techniques is that of Faraday rotation, a rotation in the plane of polarization of radio waves when propagating through a magnetized medium like the corona. The importance of Faraday rotation in determining the structure and evolutionary history of CMEs was discussed in Liu et al (ApJ 665, 1439, 2007). In this paper, we report Faraday rotation observations of ``constellations'' of background extragalactic radio sources near the Sun on three days in August, 2012, with the intention of observing a source occulted by a CME. Observations were made with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. We made polarization measurements at 6 frequencies between 1.31 and 1.94 GHz. On August 2, 2012, a CME clearly visible on the LASCO C3 coronagraph occulted a radio source from our sample, 0843+1547. Preliminary data analysis shows a Faraday rotation transient for 0843+1547 which appears to be associated with the CME. The Faraday rotation measure changes from nearly 0 before CME passage, to a value of about -12 radians/square-meter before declining after CME passage. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of models for CME structure, as well as the status of our observations of other sources on August 2, and on other days. This work was supported at the University of Iowa by grant ATM09-56901.

  10. Infrared Multiple-Photon Dissociation spectroscopy of group II metal complexes with salicylate

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan P. Dain; Gary Gresham; Gary S. Groenewold; Jeffrey D. Steill; Jos Oomens; Michael J. van Stipdonk

    2011-07-01

    Ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation, and the combination of infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to characterize singly-charged, 1:1 complexes of Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ with salicylate. For each metal-salicylate complex, the CID pathways are: (a) elimination of CO2 and (b) formation of [MOH]+ where M=Ca2+, Sr2+ or Ba2+. DFT calculations predict three minima for the cation-salicylate complexes which differ in the mode of metal binding. In the first, the metal ion is coordinated by O atoms of the (neutral) phenol and carboxylate groups of salicylate. In the second, the cation is coordinated by phenoxide and (neutral) carboxylic acid groups. The third mode involves coordination by the carboxylate group alone. The infrared spectrum for the metal-salicylate complexes contains a number of absorptions between 1000 – 1650 cm-1, and the best correlation between theoretical and experimental spectra for the structure that features coordination of the metal ion by phenoxide and the carbonyl group of the carboxylic acid group, consistent with calculated energies for the respective species.

  11. Design and modeling of Faraday cages for substrate noise isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Joyce H.; del Alamo, Jesús A.

    2013-07-01

    A Faraday cage structure using through-substrate vias is an effective strategy to suppress substrate crosstalk, particularly at high frequencies. Faraday cages can reduce substrate noise by 32 dB at 10 GHz, and 26 dB at 50 GHz. We have developed lumped-element, equivalent circuit models of the Faraday cages and test structures to better understand the performance of the Faraday cages. These models compare well to measured results and show that the vias of the Faraday cage act as an RLC shunt to ground that draws substrate current. Designing a Faraday cage to achieve optimum isolation requires low via impedance and mitigation of via sidewall capacitance. The Faraday cage inductance is correlated to the number of vias and via spacing of the cage and can be optimized for the frequency of operation.

  12. The interrelation between the Faraday effect and the inverse Faraday effect in a magnetic medium and the terahertz inverse Faraday effect in single molecule magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokman, I. D.; Shvetsov, A. V.

    2009-11-01

    The interrelation between the Faraday and the inverse Faraday effects when the magneto-dipole interaction of a sample with an electromagnetic wave is essential has been phenomenologically investigated. This investigation was carried out in the spirit of well-known Pitaevsky’s approach. The terahertz inverse Faraday effect in single molecule magnets has been theoretically studied, the conditions favorable for observing this effect have been formulated.

  13. Upconverting nanoparticles for the near infrared photoactivation of transition metal complexes: new opportunities and challenges in medicinal inorganic photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Emmanuel; Alonso-de Castro, Silvia; Habtemariam, Abraha; Salassa, Luca

    2016-08-16

    The article highlights the emergent use of upconverting nanoparticles as tools for the near infrared photoactivation of transition metal complexes, identifying opportunities and challenges of this approach in the context of medicinal inorganic chemistry. PMID:27482656

  14. NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY OF A NORMAL SPIRAL GALAXY VIEWED THROUGH THE TAURUS MOLECULAR CLOUD COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, Dan P.; Cashman, L. R.; Pavel, M. D. E-mail: pavelmi@utexas.edu

    2013-03-15

    Few normal galaxies have been probed using near-infrared polarimetry, even though it reveals magnetic fields in the cool interstellar medium better than either optical or radio polarimetry. Deep H-band (1.6 {mu}m) linear imaging polarimetry toward Taurus serendipitously included the galaxy 2MASX J04412715+2433110 with adequate sensitivity and resolution to map polarization across nearly its full extent. The observations revealed the galaxy to be a steeply inclined ({approx}75 Degree-Sign ) disk type with a diameter, encompassing 90% of the Petrosian flux, of 4.2 kpc at a distance of 53 Mpc. Because the sight line passes through the Taurus Molecular Cloud complex, the foreground polarization needed to be measured and removed. The foreground extinction A{sub V} of 2.00 {+-} 0.10 mag and reddening E(H - K) of 0.125 {+-} 0.009 mag were also assessed and removed, based on analysis of Two Micron All Sky Survey, UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey, Spitzer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry using the Near-Infrared Color Excess, NICE-Revisited, and Rayleigh-Jeans Color Excess methods. Corrected for the polarized foreground, the galaxy polarization values range from 0% to 3%. The polarizations are dominated by a disk-parallel magnetic field geometry, especially to the northeast, while either a vertical field or single scattering of bulge light produces disk-normal polarizations to the southwest. The multi-kiloparsec coherence of the magnetic field revealed by the infrared polarimetry is in close agreement with short-wavelength radio synchrotron observations of edge-on galaxies, indicating that both cool and warm interstellar media of disk galaxies may be threaded by common magnetic fields.

  15. Exploring the intergalactic magnetic field by means of Faraday tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akahori, Takuya; Kumazaki, Kohei; Takahashi, Keitaro; Ryu, Dongsu

    2014-06-01

    Unveiling the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in filaments of galaxies is a very important and challenging subject in modern astronomy. In order to probe the IGMF from rotation measures (RMs) of extragalactic radio sources, we need to separate RMs due to other origins such as the source, intervening galaxies, and our Galaxy. In this paper, we discuss observational strategies for the separation by means of Faraday tomography (Faraday RM synthesis). We consider an observation of a single radio source such as a radio galaxy or a quasar viewed through the Galaxy and the cosmic web. We then compare the observation with another observation of a neighboring source with a small angular separation. Our simulations with simple models of the sources suggest that it would be not easy to detect the RM due to an IGMF of order ˜ 1 rad m-2, an expected value for the IGMF through a single filament. Contrary to this, we find that an RM of at least ˜ 10 rad m-2 could be detected with the Square Kilometre Array or its pathfinders/precursors, if we achieve selection of ideal sources. These results would be improved if we incorporated decomposition techniques such as RMCLEAN and QU-fitting. We discuss the feasibility of the strategies for cases with complex Galactic emissions as well as with effects of observational noise and radio frequency interferences.

  16. Continuous probing of cold complex molecules with infrared frequency comb spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaun, Ben; Changala, P. Bryan; Patterson, David; Bjork, Bryce J.; Heckl, Oliver H.; Doyle, John M.; Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    For more than half a century, high-resolution infrared spectroscopy has played a crucial role in probing molecular structure and dynamics. Such studies have so far been largely restricted to relatively small and simple systems, because at room temperature even molecules of modest size already occupy many millions of rotational/vibrational states, yielding highly congested spectra that are difficult to assign. Targeting more complex molecules requires methods that can record broadband infrared spectra (that is, spanning multiple vibrational bands) with both high resolution and high sensitivity. However, infrared spectroscopic techniques have hitherto been limited either by narrow bandwidth and long acquisition time, or by low sensitivity and resolution. Cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy (CE-DFCS) combines the inherent broad bandwidth and high resolution of an optical frequency comb with the high detection sensitivity provided by a high-finesse enhancement cavity, but it still suffers from spectral congestion. Here we show that this problem can be overcome by using buffer gas cooling to produce continuous, cold samples of molecules that are then subjected to CE-DFCS. This integration allows us to acquire a rotationally resolved direct absorption spectrum in the C–H stretching region of nitromethane, a model system that challenges our understanding of large-amplitude vibrational motion. We have also used this technique on several large organic molecules that are of fundamental spectroscopic and astrochemical relevance, including naphthalene, adamantane and hexamethylenetetramine. These findings establish the value of our approach for studying much larger and more complex molecules than have been probed so far, enabling complex molecules and their kinetics to be studied with orders-of-magnitude improvements in efficiency, spectral resolution and specificity.

  17. Continuous probing of cold complex molecules with infrared frequency comb spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spaun, Ben; Changala, P Bryan; Patterson, David; Bjork, Bryce J; Heckl, Oliver H; Doyle, John M; Ye, Jun

    2016-05-26

    For more than half a century, high-resolution infrared spectroscopy has played a crucial role in probing molecular structure and dynamics. Such studies have so far been largely restricted to relatively small and simple systems, because at room temperature even molecules of modest size already occupy many millions of rotational/vibrational states, yielding highly congested spectra that are difficult to assign. Targeting more complex molecules requires methods that can record broadband infrared spectra (that is, spanning multiple vibrational bands) with both high resolution and high sensitivity. However, infrared spectroscopic techniques have hitherto been limited either by narrow bandwidth and long acquisition time, or by low sensitivity and resolution. Cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy (CE-DFCS) combines the inherent broad bandwidth and high resolution of an optical frequency comb with the high detection sensitivity provided by a high-finesse enhancement cavity, but it still suffers from spectral congestion. Here we show that this problem can be overcome by using buffer gas cooling to produce continuous, cold samples of molecules that are then subjected to CE-DFCS. This integration allows us to acquire a rotationally resolved direct absorption spectrum in the C-H stretching region of nitromethane, a model system that challenges our understanding of large-amplitude vibrational motion. We have also used this technique on several large organic molecules that are of fundamental spectroscopic and astrochemical relevance, including naphthalene, adamantane and hexamethylenetetramine. These findings establish the value of our approach for studying much larger and more complex molecules than have been probed so far, enabling complex molecules and their kinetics to be studied with orders-of-magnitude improvements in efficiency, spectral resolution and specificity. PMID:27144351

  18. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of hydrogen halide and halogen complexes with nitrosyl halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis J.; Lucas, Donald; Pimentel, George C.

    1982-01-01

    Matrix isolation infrared spectra of nitrosyl halide (XNO) complexes with HX and X2 (X = Cl, Br) are presented. The relative frequency shifts of the HX mode are modest (ClNO H-Cl, delta-nu/nu = -0.045; BrNO H-Br, delta-nu/nu = -0.026), indicating weak hydrogen bonds 1-3 kcal/mol. These shifts are accompanied by significant shifts to higher frequencies in the XN-O stretching mode (CIN-O HCl, delta-nu/nu = +0.016; BrN-O HBr, delta-nu/nu = +0.011). Similar shifts were observed for the XN-O X2 complexes (ClN-O Cl2, delta-nu/nu = +0.009; BrN-O-Br2, delta-nu/nu = +0.013). In all four complexes, the X-NO stretching mode relative shift is opposite in sign and about 1.6 times that of the NO stretching mode. These four complexes are considered to be similar in structure and charge distribution. The XN-O frequency shift suggests that complex formation is accompanied by charge withdrawal from the NO bond ranging from about .04 to .07 electron charges. The HX and X2 molecules act as electron acceptors, drawing electrons out of the antibonding orbital of NO and strengthening the XN-O bond. The implications of the pattern of vibrational shifts concerning the structure of the complexes are discussed.

  19. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected silver and gold nitrosyl cation complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhen; Wang, Lichen; Qu, Hui; Wang, Guanjun; Zhou, Mingfei

    2015-04-16

    The [M(NO)n](+) cation complexes (M = Au and Ag) are studied for exploring the coordination and bonding between nitric oxide and noble metal cations. These species are produced in a laser vaporization supersonic ion source and probed by infrared photodissociation spectroscopy in the NO stretching frequency region using a collinear tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The geometric and electronic structures of these complexes are determined by comparison of the distinctive experimental spectra with simulated spectra derived from density functional theory calculations. All of these noble metal nitrosyl cation complexes are characterized to have bent NO ligands serving as one-electron donors. The spectrum of [Au(NO)2Ar](+) is consistent with 2-fold coordination with a near linear N-Au-N arrangement for this ion. The [Au(NO)n](+) (n = 3-4) cations are determined to be a mixture of 2-fold coordinated form and 3- or 4-fold coordinated form. In contrast, the spectra of [Ag(NO)n](+) (n = 3-6) provide evidence for the completion of the first coordination shell at n = 5. The high [Au(NO)n](+) and [Ag(NO)n](+) (n ≥ 3 for Au, n ≥ 4 for Ag) complexes each involve one or more (NO)2 dimer ligands, as observed in the copper nitrosyl cation complexes, indicating that ligand-ligand coupling plays an important role in the structure and bonding of noble metal nitrosyl cation complexes. PMID:25811327

  20. Biology's built-in Faraday cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klee, Maurice M.

    2014-05-01

    Biological fluids are water-based, ionic conductors. As such, they have both high relative dielectric constants and substantial conductivities, meaning they are lossy dielectrics. These fluids contain charged molecules (free charges), whose movements play roles in essentially all cellular processes from metabolism to communication with other cells. Using the problem of a point source in air above a biological fluid of semi-infinite extent, the bound charges in the fluid are shown to perform the function of a fast-acting Faraday cage, which protects the interior of the fluid from external electric fields. Free charges replace bound charges in accordance with the fluid's relaxation time, thereby providing a smooth transition between the initial protection provided by the bound charges and the steady state protection provided by the free charges. The electric fields within the biological fluid are thus small for all times just as they would be inside a classical Faraday cage.

  1. On intracluster Faraday rotation. II - Statistical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawler, J. M.; Dennison, B.

    1982-01-01

    The comparison of a reliable sample of radio source Faraday rotation measurements seen through rich clusters of galaxies, with sources seen through the outer parts of clusters and therefore having little intracluster Faraday rotation, indicates that the distribution of rotation in the former population is broadened, but only at the 80% level of statistical confidence. Employing a physical model for the intracluster medium in which the square root of magnetic field strength/turbulent cell per gas core radius number ratio equals approximately 0.07 microgauss, a Monte Carlo simulation is able to reproduce the observed broadening. An upper-limit analysis figure of less than 0.20 microgauss for the field strength/turbulent cell ratio, combined with lower limits on field strength imposed by limitations on the Compton-scattered flux, shows that intracluster magnetic fields must be tangled on scales greater than about 20 kpc.

  2. Heterodyne-enhanced Faraday rotation spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Nikodem, Michal; Hoyne, Jake; Wysocki, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    A novel heterodyne-enhanced Faraday rotation spectroscopic (H-FRS) system for trace gas detection of nitric oxide (NO) is demonstrated. The system is based on a quantum cascade laser emitting at ~5.2 μm and a mercury cadmium telluride photodetector (both thermoelectrically cooled). The heterodyne detection is performed at 30MHz, where the laser relative intensity noise is significantly smaller than at low frequencies. With an implementation of active interferometer stabilization technique, the current system shows total noise level that is only 5.4 times above the fundamental shot-noise limit and the Faraday rotation angle sensitivity of 2.6 × 10-8 rad/√Hz. The NO detection limit of 30.7 ppb-v/√Hz was achieved for the R(8.5)e NO transition using 100 Gauss magnetic field and 0.15 m optical path length.

  3. Faraday's first dynamo: An alternate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redinz, José Arnaldo

    2015-02-01

    The steady-state charge densities, electric potential, and current densities are determined analytically in the case of the first dynamo created by Michael Faraday, which consists of a conducting disk rotating between the poles of an off-axis permanent magnet. The results obtained are compared with another work that considered the same problem using a different approach. We also obtain analytical expressions for the total current on the disk and for the dynamo's electromotive force.

  4. Faraday Pilot-Waves: Generation and Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano-Rios, Carlos; Milewski, Paul; Nachbin, André; Bush, John

    2015-11-01

    We examine the dynamics of drops bouncing on a fluid bath subjected to vertical vibration. We solve a system of linear PDEs to compute the surface wave generation and propagation. Waves are triggered at each bounce, giving rise to the Faraday pilot-wave field. The model captures several of the behaviors observed in the laboratory, including transitions between a variety of bouncing and walking states, the Doppler effect, and droplet-droplet interactions. Thanks to the NSF.

  5. The infrared spectra of complexes with planar dithiooxamides X. The Cu(LH 2) 2X 1 complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slootmaekers, B.; Fabretti, A. C.; Desseyn, H. O.; Vochten, R.; Perlepes, S. P.

    1996-12-01

    In this article, the preparation, X-ray powder results and vibrational properties of a new type of complex with planar dithiooxamides are discussed. In acetonitrile, Cu(I) can form complexes with the formula Cu(LH 2) 2X 1 (X = Cl, Br) where LH 2 is an N, N'-disubstituted dithiooxamide. Complexes with N, N'-dimethyldithiooxamide and N, N'-diethyldithiooxamide have been prepared. A thorough vibrational analysis with infrared and Raman techniques was performed, assisted by H/D and 63Cu/ 65Cu isotope substitution. The vibrational study indicates the presence of an inversion centre in the structure. This leads to the proposal of a very unusual six-coordinate structure for these compounds, with the two dithiooxamide ligands, having S-cis conformation, coordinated to the same copper and with the halogens bridged between two different copper atoms. Confirmation of this result was attempted by X-ray analysis, but although several methods were tried to obtain crystals, only powder X-ray data could be obtained, which could not give a definitive answer. Since such six-coordinate Cu(I) has never been described before, a less rigourous interpretation of the vibrational data was followed, leading to a square-pyramidal five-coordinate structure, with a rather weak bond between Cu(I) and a terminal halogen. The latter structure, with the data available up to now, seems a bit more likely, since five-coordination for Cu(I) has already been described.

  6. Faraday Shield Development on DIII--D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.; Goulding, R. H.; Hoffman, D. J.; Ryan, P. M.; Taylor, D. J.; Callis, R. W.; Pinsker, R. I.; Lindemuth, J. E.; Rosenfeld, J. H.

    1997-11-01

    DIII--D has been the proving ground for a number of innovative Faraday shield developments over the past ten years. The first Faraday shield used had two tiers of copper-plated Inconel rods of circular cross section with 3 mm thick graphite tiles brazed to the plasma-facing side of the front tier. Later antennas used shields with thin coatings of Ti (C,N) and boron carbide. All the coatings proved effective in reducing impurity influx from the antennas during RF operation. There are two shield designs in use currently. One is a single-tier of horizontal Inconel rods with a 6 μm layer of boron carbide applied by physical vapor deposition. The other design has molybdenum rods with a plasma-sprayed boron carbide coating approximately 100 μm thick. Based on comparative performance the thinner coating obtained with physical vapor deposition is preferred for future applicatrions. All Faraday shields have been passively cooled. Future plans call for tests of vanadium elements and of porous-metal helium-cooled elements.

  7. Isotope effects in far-infrared spectra of bis(theophyllinato)copper(II)-complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drożdżewski, Piotr; Kordon, Ewa

    1998-07-01

    Far-infrared spectra have been measured for 63Cu and 65Cu isotope substituted theophylline (Tp)-metal ion complexes: Cu(Tp) 2(NH 3) 2 · 2H 2O, Cu(Tp) 2(NH 3) 2, Cu(Tp) 2 · 2H 2O and Cu(Tp) 2. In addition, spectrum of Cu(Tp) 2(ND 3) 2 · 2D 2O has been recorded. Metal-theophylline, metal-ammine and water librational and translational modes have been assigned based on observed isotope shifts and complex dehydration effects. The copper-ammine vibrations have been found at 453 and 224 cm -1, whereas the bis(theophyllinato)copper(II) modes have been detected at 192 cm -1 for Cu(Tp) 2(NH 3) 2 and presumably at about 170 cm -1 for Cu(Tp) 2.

  8. Electrochromism in the near-infrared absorption spectra of bridged ruthenium mixed-valence complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, D.H.; Boxer, S.G. )

    1990-10-24

    Many experimental and theoretical approaches have been developed to characterize the chemical and physical properties of mixed-valence complexes. These molecules may possess metals in differing oxidation states which participate in intervalence charge-transfer transitions. In principle, these transitions should be strongly affected by an external electric field. Such electrochromism can provide a direct and sensitive approach to investigating the electronic properties of molecules. The authors report the first measurements of the effects of an externally applied electric field on the near-infrared absorption spectra of ((NH{sub 3}){sub 5}Ru){sub 2}L{sup 5+} (L = pyrazine or 4,4{prime}-bipyridine). Significant differences are observed between the two complexes, illustrating the range of electronic interactions between the metal centers.

  9. Tank segmentation of infrared images with complex background for the homing anti-tank missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yulong; Gao, Min; Fang, Dan; Zhang, Baoquan

    2016-07-01

    In an effort to achieve fast and effective tank segmentation of infrared images under complex background for the homing anti-tank missile, the threshold of the maximum between-class variance method (i.e., the Otsu method) is experimentally analyzed, and the working mechanism of the Otsu method is revealed. Subsequently, a fast and effective method for tank segmentation under complex background is proposed based on the Otsu method by constraining the image background pixels and gray levels. Firstly, with the prior information of the tank, derive the equation to calculate the number of pixels of tank according to optical imaging principle, and then use the calculated tank size to constrain the image background pixels. Secondly, employ the golden section to restrict the background gray levels. Finally, use the Otsu method to implement the segmentation of the tank. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can get as an ideal result as the manual segmentation with less running time.

  10. Infrared spectroscopy of copper-resveratrol complexes: A joint experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Chiavarino, B.; Crestoni, M. E.; Fornarini, S.; Taioli, S.; Mancini, I.; Tosi, P.

    2012-07-14

    Infrared multiple-photon dissociation spectroscopy has been used to record vibrational spectra of charged copper-resveratrol complexes in the 3500-3700 cm{sup -1} and 1100-1900 cm{sup -1} regions. Minimum energy structures have been determined by density functional theory calculations using plane waves and pseudopotentials. In particular, the copper(I)-resveratrol complex presents a tetra-coordinated metal bound with two carbon atoms of the alkenyl moiety and two closest carbons of the adjoining resorcinol ring. For these geometries vibrational spectra have been calculated by using linear response theory. The good agreement between experimental and calculated IR spectra for the selected species confirms the overall reliability of the proposed geometries.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy of copper-resveratrol complexes: A joint experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavarino, B.; Crestoni, M. E.; Fornarini, S.; Taioli, S.; Mancini, I.; Tosi, P.

    2012-07-01

    Infrared multiple-photon dissociation spectroscopy has been used to record vibrational spectra of charged copper-resveratrol complexes in the 3500-3700 cm-1 and 1100-1900 cm-1 regions. Minimum energy structures have been determined by density functional theory calculations using plane waves and pseudopotentials. In particular, the copper(I)-resveratrol complex presents a tetra-coordinated metal bound with two carbon atoms of the alkenyl moiety and two closest carbons of the adjoining resorcinol ring. For these geometries vibrational spectra have been calculated by using linear response theory. The good agreement between experimental and calculated IR spectra for the selected species confirms the overall reliability of the proposed geometries.

  12. Infrared spectra of van de Waals complexes of importance in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, G. T.; Pine, A. S.; Lafferty, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    It has been suggested that (CO2)2 and Ar-CO2 are important constituents of the planetary atmospheres of Venus and Mars. Recent results on the laboratory spectroscopy of CO2 containing van der Waals complexes which may be of use in the modeling of the spectra of planetary atmospheres are presented. Sub-Doppler infrared spectra were obtained for (CO2)2, (CO2)3, and rare-gas-CO2 complexes in the vicinity of the CO2 Fermi diad at 2.7 micrometers using a color-center-laser optothermal spectrometer. From the spectroscopic constants the geometries of the complexes have been determined and van der Waals vibrational frequencies have been estimated. The equilibrium configurations are C2h, C3h, and C2v, for (CO2)2, (CO2)3, and the rare-gas-CO2 complexes, respectively. Most of the homogeneous linewidths for the revibrational transitions range from 0.5 to 22 MHz, indicating that predissociation is as much as four orders of magnitude faster than radiative processes for vibrational relaxation in these complexes.

  13. Faraday effect improvement by Dy3+-doping of terbium gallium garnet single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Yang, Lei; Hang, Yin; Wang, Xiangyong

    2016-01-01

    Highly transparent Dy3+-doped terbium gallium garnet (TGG) single crystal was grown by Czochralski (Cz) method. Phase composition of the crystal was tested by XRD measurements. The distribution coefficient of Dy3+ in the crystal was obtained. The optical and magneto-optical properties were analyzed in detail, and magnetic properties of the Dy3+-TGG crystal were studied. The paramagnetic behavior is observed down to 10 K. The as-grown crystal exhibited high optical transmittance, particularly in the visible region. The Faraday rotation was investigated over visible and near-infrared regions (VIS-NIR) at room temperature. The Verdet constants increase at measured wavelengths and high thermal stability was found in Dy3+-doped TGG, as compared to the properties of pure TGG, indicating that Dy3+-doped crystals are preferable for magneto-active materials used in Faraday devices at VIS-NIR wavelengths.

  14. Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system for current density measurement on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. Q.; Jie, Y. X. Zou, Z. Y.; Li, W. M.; Wang, Z. X.; Qian, J. P.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Wei, X. C.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Lan, T.; Li, G. S.

    2014-11-15

    A multichannel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique is under development for current density and electron density profile measurements in the EAST tokamak. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which will provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output, have been developed for use on the POINT system. Initial calibration indicates the electron line-integrated density resolution is less than 5 × 10{sup 16} m{sup −2} (∼2°), and the Faraday rotation angle rms phase noise is <0.1°.

  15. Structural analysis and mapping of individual protein complexes by infrared nanospectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Amenabar, Iban; Poly, Simon; Nuansing, Wiwat; Hubrich, Elmar H.; Govyadinov, Alexander A.; Huth, Florian; Krutokhvostov, Roman; Zhang, Lianbing; Knez, Mato; Heberle, Joachim; Bittner, Alexander M.; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectroscopy is a widely used tool for material identification and secondary structure analysis in chemistry, biology and biochemistry. However, the diffraction limit prevents nanoscale protein studies. Here we introduce mapping of protein structure with 30 nm lateral resolution and sensitivity to individual protein complexes by Fourier transform infrared nanospectroscopy (nano-FTIR). We present local broadband spectra of one virus, ferritin complexes, purple membranes and insulin aggregates, which can be interpreted in terms of their α-helical and/or β-sheet structure. Applying nano-FTIR for studying insulin fibrils—a model system widely used in neurodegenerative disease research—we find clear evidence that 3-nm-thin amyloid-like fibrils contain a large amount of α-helical structure. This reveals the surprisingly high level of protein organization in the fibril’s periphery, which might explain why fibrils associate. We envision a wide application potential of nano-FTIR, including cellular receptor in vitro mapping and analysis of proteins within quaternary structures. PMID:24301518

  16. Lithologic analysis from multispectral thermal infrared data of the alkalic rock complex at Iron Hill, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.; Rowan, L.C.; Bowers, T.L.; Anton-Pacheco, C.; Gumiel, P.; Miller, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    Airborne thermal-infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) data of the Iron Hill carbonatite-alkalic igneous rock complex in south-central Colorado are analyzed using a new spectral emissivity ratio algorithm and confirmed by field examination using existing 1:24 000-scale geologic maps and petrographic studies. Color composite images show that the alkalic rocks could be clearly identified and that differences existed among alkalic rocks in several parts of the complex. An unsupervised classification algorithm defines four alkalic rock classes within the complex: biotitic pyroxenite, uncompahgrite, augitic pyroxenite, and fenite + nepheline syenite. Felsic rock classes defined in the surrounding country rock are an extensive class consisting of tuff, granite, and felsite, a less extensive class of granite and felsite, and quartzite. The general composition of the classes can be determined from comparisons of the TIMS spectra with laboratory spectra. Carbonatite rocks are not classified, and we attribute that to the fact that dolomite, the predominant carbonate mineral in the complex, has a spectral feature that falls between TIMS channels 5 and 6. Mineralogical variability in the fenitized granite contributed to the nonuniform pattern of the fenite-nepheline syenite class. The biotitic pyroxenite, which resulted from alteration of the pyroxenite, is spatially associated and appears to be related to narrow carbonatite dikes and sills. Results from a linear unmixing algorithm suggest that the detected spatial extent of the two mixed felsic rock classes was sensitive to the amount of vegetation cover. These results illustrate that spectral thermal infrared data can be processed to yield compositional information that can be a cost-effective tool to target mineral exploration, particularly in igneous terranes.

  17. Herschel far-infrared observations of the Carina Nebula complex. I. Introduction and global cloud structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preibisch, T.; Roccatagliata, V.; Gaczkowski, B.; Ratzka, T.

    2012-05-01

    Context. The Carina Nebula represents one of the most massive star forming regions known in our Galaxy and displays a high level of feedback from the large number of very massive stars. While the stellar content is now well known from recent deep X-ray and near-infrared surveys, the properties of the clouds remained rather poorly studied until today. Aims: By mapping the Carina Nebula complex in the far-infrared, we aim at a comprehensive and detailed characterization of the dust and gas clouds in the complex. Methods: We used SPIRE and PACS onboard of Herschel to map the full spatial extent (≈5.3 square-degrees) of the clouds in the Carina Nebula complex at wavelengths between 70 μm and 500 μm. We used here the 70 μm and 160 μm far-infrared maps to determine color temperatures and column densities, and to investigate the global properties of the gas and dust clouds in the complex. Results: Our Herschel maps show the far-infrared morphology of the clouds at unprecedented high angular resolution. The clouds show a very complex and filamentary structure that is dominated by the radiation and wind feedback from the massive stars. In most locations, the column density of the clouds is NH ≲ 2 × 1022 cm-2 (corresponding to visual extinctions of AV ≲ 10 mag); denser cloud structures are restricted to the massive cloud west of Tr 14 and the innermost parts of large pillars. Our temperature map shows a clear large-scale gradient from ≈35-40 K in the central region to ≲20 K at the periphery and in the densest parts of individual pillars. The total mass of the clouds seen by Herschel in the central (1 degree radius) region is ≈656 000 M⊙. We also derive the global spectral energy distribution in the mid-infrared to mm wavelength range. A simple radiative transfer model suggests that the total mass of all the gas (including a warmer component that is not well traced by Herschel) in the central 1 degree radius region is ≤890 000 M⊙. Conclusions: Despite

  18. Theory of Kerr and Faraday rotations and linear dichroism in Topological Weyl Semimetals

    PubMed Central

    Kargarian, Mehdi; Randeria, Mohit; Trivedi, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    We consider the electromagnetic response of a topological Weyl semimetal (TWS) with a pair of Weyl nodes in the bulk and corresponding Fermi arcs in the surface Brillouin zone. We compute the frequency-dependent complex conductivities σαβ(ω) and also take into account the modification of Maxwell equations by the topological θ-term to obtain the Kerr and Faraday rotations in a variety of geometries. For TWS films thinner than the wavelength, the Kerr and Faraday rotations, determined by the separation between Weyl nodes, are significantly larger than in topological insulators. In thicker films, the Kerr and Faraday angles can be enhanced by choice of film thickness and substrate refractive index. We show that, for radiation incident on a surface with Fermi arcs, there is no Kerr or Faraday rotation but the electric field develops a longitudinal component inside the TWS, and there is linear dichroism signal. Our results have implications for probing the TWS phase in various experimental systems. PMID:26235120

  19. Faraday rotation of plasmas in the vicinity of a Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asenjo, Felipe; Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy; Mahajan, Swadesh

    2015-11-01

    The propagation of an electromagnetic wave in a multi-specie plasmas (ion-electron and ion-electron-positron), embedded in the gravitational field of a Schwarzschild black hole, is investigated with particular emphasis on studying the Faraday rotation (rotation of the phase angle of the right and left-handed components of wave). In order to appropriately deal with the strong gravitational field (affecting the plasma in the proximity of the black hole horizon), we employ Rindler coordinates in the 3 +1 decomposition of general relativity. The rather complex dispersion relation for high-frequency electromagnetic waves reveals the dependence of Faraday rotation on the number density of different constituents of the multi-specie plasma, the background magnetic field, and the mass of the black hole. Amongst other things, the expression for the Faraday rotation allows us to determine the black hole mass if the number density and magnetic field strength are estimated, and the rotation of the phase angle is measured. It is also shown how Faraday rotation could be harnessed to infer black hole features in a more complete theory that pertains, for example, to Kerr black holes. Different astrophysical implications are pointed out. Felipe Asenjo thanks CONICyT for funding No. 79130002.

  20. Competing Turing and Faraday Instabilities in Longitudinally Modulated Passive Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copie, François; Conforti, Matteo; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Mussot, Arnaud; Trillo, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally investigate the interplay of Turing (modulational) and Faraday (parametric) instabilities in a bistable passive nonlinear resonator. The Faraday branch is induced via parametric resonance owing to a periodic modulation of the resonator dispersion. We show that the bistable switching dynamics is dramatically affected by the competition between the two instability mechanisms, which dictates two completely novel scenarios. At low detunings from resonance, switching occurs between the stable stationary lower branch and the Faraday-unstable upper branch, whereas at high detunings we observe the crossover between the Turing and Faraday periodic structures. The results are well explained in terms of the universal Lugiato-Lefever model.

  1. Competing Turing and Faraday Instabilities in Longitudinally Modulated Passive Resonators.

    PubMed

    Copie, François; Conforti, Matteo; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Mussot, Arnaud; Trillo, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally investigate the interplay of Turing (modulational) and Faraday (parametric) instabilities in a bistable passive nonlinear resonator. The Faraday branch is induced via parametric resonance owing to a periodic modulation of the resonator dispersion. We show that the bistable switching dynamics is dramatically affected by the competition between the two instability mechanisms, which dictates two completely novel scenarios. At low detunings from resonance, switching occurs between the stable stationary lower branch and the Faraday-unstable upper branch, whereas at high detunings we observe the crossover between the Turing and Faraday periodic structures. The results are well explained in terms of the universal Lugiato-Lefever model. PMID:27104711

  2. Chapter 3 Studies of complex I by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Douglas; Rich, Peter R

    2009-01-01

    Fourier transform vibrational infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy provides a novel spectroscopic tool to study atomic details of the structure and mechanism of respiratory NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). Methods for the acquisition of difference spectra in both transmission and ATR modes in the mid-IR 4000 to 900 cm(-1) region are reviewed. In both modes, redox transitions can be induced by electrochemistry, and ultraviolet (UV)/visible spectra can be recorded simultaneously. Use of the ATR method with complex I layers immobilized on an internal reflection element (IRE) additionally allows transitions to be induced by perfusion/buffer exchange, hence providing a versatile means of analyzing IR changes associated with, for example, ligand/substrate binding or specific catalytic intermediates at high signal-to-noise. Absolute absorbance IR spectra can provide information on secondary structure, lipid/protein ratio, extent of isotope exchange, and sample quality and stability more generally. Such information is useful for quality control of samples during the acquisition of difference spectra in which specific atomic details of changes between two states may be probed. Examples of absolute and difference IR spectra of complex I are presented, and strategies for assignments of the spectral features are discussed. PMID:19348882

  3. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy reveals the complex behaviour of an amyloid fibril inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Chris T.; Marek, Peter; Cao, Ping; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; Singh, Sadanand; Woys, Ann Marie; de Pablo, Juan J.; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-05-01

    Amyloid formation has been implicated in the pathology of over 20 human diseases, but the rational design of amyloid inhibitors is hampered by a lack of structural information about amyloid-inhibitor complexes. We use isotope labelling and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to obtain a residue-specific structure for the complex of human amylin (the peptide responsible for islet amyloid formation in type 2 diabetes) with a known inhibitor (rat amylin). Based on its sequence, rat amylin should block formation of the C-terminal β-sheet, but at 8 h after mixing, rat amylin blocks the N-terminal β-sheet instead. At 24 h after mixing, rat amylin blocks neither β-sheet and forms its own β-sheet, most probably on the outside of the human fibrils. This is striking, because rat amylin is natively disordered and not previously known to form amyloid β-sheets. The results show that even seemingly intuitive inhibitors may function by unforeseen and complex structural processes.

  4. The infrared spectrum of the He–C{sub 2}D{sub 2} complex

    SciTech Connect

    Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.; Fernández, Berta; Farrelly, David

    2015-02-28

    Spectra of the helium-acetylene complex are elusive because this weakly bound system lies close to the free rotor limit. Previously, limited assignments of He–C{sub 2}D{sub 2} transitions in the R(0) region of the ν{sub 3} fundamental band (≈2440 cm{sup −1}) were published. Here, new He–C{sub 2}D{sub 2} infrared spectra of this band are obtained using a tunable optical parametric oscillator laser source to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion from a cooled nozzle, and the analysis is extended to the weaker and more difficult P(1) and R(1) regions. A term value approach is used to obtain a consistent set of “experimental” energy levels. These are compared directly with calculations using two recently reported ab initio intermolecular potential energy surfaces, which exhibit small but significant differences. Rovibrational energies for the He–C{sub 2}H{sub 2} complex are also calculated using both surfaces. A Coriolis model, useful for predicting spectral intensities, is used to interpret the energy level patterns, and a comparison with the isoelectronic complex He–CO is made.

  5. The infrared spectrum of the He-C2D2 complex.

    PubMed

    Moazzen-Ahmadi, N; McKellar, A R W; Fernández, Berta; Farrelly, David

    2015-02-28

    Spectra of the helium-acetylene complex are elusive because this weakly bound system lies close to the free rotor limit. Previously, limited assignments of He-C2D2 transitions in the R(0) region of the ν3 fundamental band (≈2440 cm(-1)) were published. Here, new He-C2D2 infrared spectra of this band are obtained using a tunable optical parametric oscillator laser source to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion from a cooled nozzle, and the analysis is extended to the weaker and more difficult P(1) and R(1) regions. A term value approach is used to obtain a consistent set of "experimental" energy levels. These are compared directly with calculations using two recently reported ab initio intermolecular potential energy surfaces, which exhibit small but significant differences. Rovibrational energies for the He-C2H2 complex are also calculated using both surfaces. A Coriolis model, useful for predicting spectral intensities, is used to interpret the energy level patterns, and a comparison with the isoelectronic complex He-CO is made. PMID:25725736

  6. The Rise of Near-Infrared Emitters: Organic Dyes, Porphyrinoids, and Transition Metal Complexes.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Andrea; Bandini, Elisa; Monti, Filippo; Praveen, Vakayil K; Armaroli, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the interest in near-infrared (NIR) emitting molecules and materials has increased significantly, thanks to the expansion of the potential technological applications of NIR luminescence in several areas such as bioimaging, sensors, telecommunications, and night-vision displays. This progress has been facilitated by the development of new synthetic routes for the targeted functionalization and expansion of established molecular frameworks and by the availability of simpler and cheaper NIR detectors. Herein, we present recent developments on three major classes of systems-i.e., organic dyes, porphyrinoids, and transition metal complexes-exhibiting the maximum of the emission band at λ > 700 nm. In particular, we focus on the design strategies that may increase the luminescence efficiency, while pushing the emission band more deeply in the NIR region. This overview suggests that further progress can be achieved in the near future, with enhanced availability of more robust, stronger, and cheaper NIR luminophores. PMID:27573399

  7. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SHOCKS IN THE L988 CLOUD COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Walawender, J.; Reipurth, B.; Bally, J.

    2013-09-15

    We have searched the Lynds 988 dark cloud complex for optical (H{alpha} and [S II]) and near-IR (H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m) shocks from protostellar outflows. We find 20 new Herbig-Haro objects and 6 new H{sub 2} shocks (MHO objects), 3 of which are cross detections. Using the morphology in the optical and near-IR, we connect several of these shocks into at least five distinct outflow systems and identify their source protostars from catalogs of infrared sources. Two outflows in the cloud, from IRAS 21014+5001 and IRAS 21007+4951, are in excess of 1 pc in length. The IRAS 21007+4951 outflow has carved a large cavity in the cloud through which background stars can be seen. Also, we have found an optical shock which is the counterflow to the previously discovered ''northwest outflow'' from LkH{alpha} 324SE.

  8. An infrared thermography imaging system for convective heat transfer measurements in complex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, S. R.; Hedlund, C. R.; Ligrani, P. M.

    1998-12-01

    An infrared thermography imaging system is described for spatially resolved convective heat transfer measurements when used in conjunction with thermocouples, energy balances, digital image processing, zinc-selenide windows, and unique in situ calibration procedures. The usefulness of the system and the techniques developed are demonstrated by measurements made in two different environments with complex, three-dimensional flow features. First, spatial variations of surface Nusselt numbers are measured along the concave surfaces of a swirl chamber whose geometry models an internal passage used to cool the leading edge of a turbine blade. Second, spatially resolved distributions of the adiabatic film-cooling effectiveness are measured downstream of film-cooling holes on a symmetric turbine blade in transonic flow.

  9. Acoustic Faraday rotation in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Donghao; Shi, Junren

    We investigate the phonon problems in Weyl semimetals, from which both the phonon Berry curvature and the phonon Damping could be obtained. We show that even without a magnetic field, the degenerate transverse acoustic modes could also be split due to the adiabatic curvature. In three dimensional case, acoustic Faraday rotation shows up. And furthermore, since the attenuation procedure could distinguish the polarized mode, single circularly polarized acoustic wave could be realized. We study the mechanism in the novel time reversal symmetry broken Weyl semimetal. New effects rise because of the linear dispersion, which give enlightenment in the measurement of this new kind of three-dimensional material.

  10. Recent VLA Observations of Coronal Faraday Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, P. D.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Proposed mechanisms for coronal heating and acceleration of the fast solar wind, such as Joule heating by coronal currents or dissipation of Alfvén waves, depend on the magnetic field structure and plasma characteristics of the corona within heliocentric distances of 5 solar radii. Faraday rotation observations can provide unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. We report on sensitive full-polarization observations of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 solar radii. The observations were made with the VLA in August of 2011. We performed these observations at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz), permitting measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. While the measured Faraday rotation was lower than our a priori expectations, we can understand the magnitude of the observed Faraday rotation in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. For coronal remote sensing, an advantage of using extended extragalactic radio sources such as 3C228 is that such observations provide multiple lines of sight through the corona. Our data provide two lines of sight (separated by 46″, 33,000 km in the corona), one to a northern hotspot and the other to a southern hotspot with fractional polarizations of 14% and 8% respectively. We detected three periods over the eight-hour observing session during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation between these two closely spaced lines of sight. These measurements yield an estimate of 2 - 4 GA for coronal currents. We did not directly detect rotation measure fluctuations. Our data impose upper limits on rotation measure fluctuations caused by coronal waves. The observed upper limits were 3.3 and 6.4 rad/m2 and are comparable to and not inconsistent with some models for Alfvén wave heating. This research was supported at the University of Iowa by grants ATM09

  11. Inverse Faraday effect driven by radiation friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liseykina, T. V.; Popruzhenko, S. V.; Macchi, A.

    2016-07-01

    A collective, macroscopic signature to detect radiation friction in laser–plasma experiments is proposed. In the interaction of superintense circularly polarized laser pulses with high density targets, the effective dissipation due to radiative losses allows the absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum, which in turn leads to the generation of a quasistatic axial magnetic field. This peculiar ‘inverse Faraday effect’ is investigated by analytical modeling and three-dimensional simulations, showing that multi-gigagauss magnetic fields may be generated at laser intensities \\gt {10}23 {{{W}}{{cm}}}-2.

  12. Faraday effect of bismuth iron garnet thin film prepared by mist CVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Situ; Sato, Takafumi; Kaneko, Kentaro; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Metastable bismuth iron garnet (BIG, an abbreviation of Bi3Fe5O12), one kind of garnet-type ferrites, is known to manifest very large Faraday rotation as well as low optical absorption in the visible to infrared region. We report on successful synthesis of thin film composed of single-phase BIG epitaxially grown on single-crystalline gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd3Ga5O12, GGG) substrate by using mist chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, which is an emerging technique for preparation of thin films. The crystal structure, surface morphology, and magnetic, optical and magneto-optical properties of the resultant thin films have been explored. The BIG thin film has a relatively flat surface free from roughness compared to those prepared by other vapor deposition methods. Saturation magnetization is about 1620 G at room temperature, which is close to that expected from the ideal magnetic structure of BIG. The maximum value of Faraday rotation angle reaches 54.3 deg/µm at a wavelength of 424 nm. This value is rather large when compared with those reported for BIG thin films prepared by other techniques. The wavelength dependence of Faraday rotation angle is analyzed well in terms of the crystal electric field (CEF) level schema. Our result suggests that the mist CVD method is a simple and effective technique to synthesize BIG thin film with excellent magneto-optical properties.

  13. Faraday-Effect Polarimeter-Interferometer System for current density measurement on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiqing; Jie, Yinxian; Ding, Weixing; Brower, David Lyn; Zou, Zhiyong; Qian, Jinping; Li, Weiming; Zeng, Long; Zhang, Shoubiao; Hu, Liqun; Wan, Baonian

    2015-11-01

    An eleven-channel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique has been implemented for current density and electron density profile measurements in the EAST tokamak. Both polarimetric and interferometric measurement are obtained in a long pulse (~ 52s) discharge. The electron line-integrated density resolution of POINT is less than 5 × 1016 m-2 (~ 2°), and the Faraday rotation angle rms phase noise is <0.1°. With the high temporal (~ 1 μsec) and phase resolution (<0.1°), density perturbations associated with the sawteeth cycle and tearing mode activities have been observed. It is evident that tearing modes are well correlated to dynamics of equilibrium current profile (or q-profile). Faraday rotation angle shows clear variation with low hybrid current drive while line-integrated density remains little changed, implying the current drive in the core. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth provides real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output, which will be integrated into current profile control system in a long pulse discharge in future. This work is supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China with contract No. 2012GB101002 and partly supported by the US D.O.E. contract DESC0010469.

  14. Rethinking Faraday's Law for Teaching Motional Electromotive Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuza, Kristina; Guisasola, Jenaro; Michelini, Marisa; Santi, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    This study shows physicists' discussions on the meaning of Faraday's law where situations involving extended conductors or moving contact points are particularly troublesome. We raise questions to test students' difficulties in applying Faraday's law in motional electromotive force phenomena. We suggest the benefit of analysing these phenomena…

  15. Enhanced Faraday effect and its application to optical communication.

    PubMed

    Bomke, H A; Harmatz, M

    1977-03-01

    This paper shows that the enhanced Faraday effect of optical resonance lines can be applied to optical communication. A secure optical communication system was designed and successfully tested. It used the integrated enhanced Faraday effect at low fields to produce polarization modulation and the high dispersion of the enhanced effect at high fields to scramble and unscramble the transmitted messages. PMID:20168574

  16. Patterns beyond Faraday waves: observation of parametric crossover from Faraday instabilities to the formation of vortex lattices in open dual fluid strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlin, Kjell; Berggren, Karl Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    Faraday first characterised the behaviour of a fluid in a container subjected to vertical periodic oscillations. His study pertaining to hydrodynamic instability, the ‘Faraday instability’, has catalysed a myriad of experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies shedding light on the mechanisms responsible for the transition of a system at rest to a new state of well-ordered vibrational patterns at fixed frequencies. Here we study dual strata in a shallow vessel containing distilled water and high-viscosity lubrication oil on top of it. At elevated driving power, beyond the Faraday instability, the top stratum is found to ‘freeze’ into a rigid pattern with maxima and minima. At the same time there is a dynamic crossover into a new state in the form of a lattice of recirculating vortices in the lower layer containing the water. Instrumentation and the physics behind are analysed in a phenomenological way together with a basic heuristic modelling of the wave field. The study, which is based on relatively low-budget equipment, stems from related art projects that have evolved over the years. The study is of value within basic research as well as in education, especially as more advanced collective project work in e.g. engineering physics, where it invites further studies of pattern formation, the emergence of vortex lattices and complexity.

  17. Computational simulation of Faraday probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Jeremiah J.

    Electric propulsion devices, including ion thrusters and Hall thrusters, are becoming increasingly popular for long duration space missions. Ground-based experimental testing of such devices is performed in vacuum chambers, which develop an unavoidable background gas due to pumping limitations and facility leakage. Besides directly altering the operating environment, the background gas may indirectly affect the performance of immersed plasma probe diagnostics. This work focuses on computational modeling research conducted to evaluate the performance of a current-collecting Faraday probe. Initial findings from one dimensional analytical models of plasma sheaths are used as reference cases for subsequent modeling. A two dimensional, axisymmetric, hybrid electron fluid and Particle In Cell computational code is used for extensive simulation of the plasma flow around a representative Faraday probe geometry. The hybrid fluid PIC code is used to simulate a range of inflowing plasma conditions, from a simple ion beam consistent with one dimensional models to a multiple component plasma representative of a low-power Hall thruster plume. These simulations produce profiles of plasma properties and simulated current measurements at the probe surface. Interpretation of the simulation results leads to recommendations for probe design and experimental techniques. Significant contributions of this work include the development and use of two new non-neutral detailed electron fluid models and the recent incorporation of multi grid capabilities.

  18. Faraday Rotation Observations of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Spangler, S. R.

    1998-05-01

    Faraday rotation measures the path integral of the product of electron density and line of sight component of the magnetic field from the observer to a source of linearly polarized radio emission. For our observations, the line of sight passes through the solar corona. These observations were made with the NRAO Very Large Array at frequencies of 1465 and 1635 MHz. Observations at two frequencies can confirm the lambda (2) dependence of position angle rotation characteristic of Faraday rotation. We observed the extended radio source 0036+030 (4C+03.01) on March 28, 1997, when the source was 8.6 Rsun from the center of the Sun. Nearly continuous observations were made over an 11 hour period. Our observations measure an average rotation measure (RM) of about +7 radians/m(2) attributable to the corona. The RM showed slow variations during the observing session, with a total change of about 3 radians/m(2) . This variation is attributed to large scale gradients and static plasma structures in the corona, and is the same for two source components separated by 30 arcseconds (22000 km). We have also detected RM variations on time scales of 15 minutes to one hour, which may be coronal Alfven waves. We measure an rms variation of 0.57 radians/m(2) for such fluctuations, which is comparable to previous reports.

  19. Faraday diagnostics for R-damage

    SciTech Connect

    Oro, David M; Tabaka, Leonard J

    2011-01-13

    ALT-3 and R-Damage are experiments to be executed in collaboration between LANL and VNIIEF personnel. They are planned to be fielded in Sarov, Russia at VNIIEF. Both experiments employ Russian explosively driven pulse-power systems to generate a pulse of electrical current that is used to drive the experiment. The current pulse will be measured with Faraday-rotation fiber-optic loops. Using this well known technique, the change in the current enclosed by the loops is determined by measuring the change in the magnetic field integrated along the fiber-optic loop by detecting the Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light traveling through the fiber. The amount of polarization rotation of the light is related to the integrated magnetic field and therefore the enclosed current (Ampere's law) through the Verdet constant which for the optical-fibers used in this experiment has been determined to within 1 %. The presentation describes how the technique will be employed in the R-Damage experiment.

  20. Micro-position sensor using faraday effect

    SciTech Connect

    McElfresh, Michael; Lucas, Matthew; Silveira, Joseph P.; Groves, Scott E.

    2007-02-27

    A micro-position sensor and sensing system using the Faraday Effect. The sensor uses a permanent magnet to provide a magnetic field, and a magneto-optic material positioned in the magnetic field for rotating the plane of polarization of polarized light transmitted through the magneto-optic material. The magnet is independently movable relative to the magneto-optic material so as to rotate the plane of polarization of the polarized light as a function of the relative position of the magnet. In this manner, the position of the magnet relative to the magneto-optic material may be determined from the rotated polarized light. The sensing system also includes a light source, such as a laser or LED, for producing polarized light, and an optical fiber which is connected to the light source and to the magneto-optic material at a sensing end of the optical fiber. Processing electronics, such as a polarimeter, are also provided for determining the Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of the back-reflected polarized light to determine the position of the magnet relative to the sensing end of the optical fiber.

  1. Investigation of the ionospheric Faraday rotation for use in orbit corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llewellyn, S. K.; Bent, R. B.; Nesterczuk, G.

    1974-01-01

    The possibility of mapping the Faraday factors on a worldwide basis was examined as a simple method of representing the conversion factors for any possible user. However, this does not seem feasible. The complex relationship between the true magnetic coordinates and the geographic latitude, longitude, and azimuth angles eliminates the possibility of setting up some simple tables that would yield worldwide results of sufficient accuracy. Tabular results for specific stations can easily be produced or could be represented in graphic form.

  2. Searching for Faraday rotation in cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Granados, B.; Battaner, E.; Florido, E.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 9th-year foreground reduced data at 33, 41 and 61 GHz to derive a Faraday rotation at map and at angular power spectrum levels taking into account their observational errors. A processing mask provided by WMAP is used to avoid contamination from the disc of our Galaxy and local spurs. We have found a Faraday rotation component at both, map and power spectrum levels. The lack of correlation of the Faraday rotation with Galactic Faraday rotation, synchrotron and dust polarization from our Galaxy or with cosmic microwave background anisotropies or lensing suggests that it could be originated at reionization (ℓ ≲ 12). Even if the detected Faraday rotation signal is weak, the present study could contribute to establish magnetic fields strengths of B0 ˜ 10-8 G at reionization.

  3. Use of Faraday-rotation data from beacon satellites to determine ionospheric corrections for interplanetary spacecraft navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royden, H. N.; Green, D. W.; Walson, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    Faraday-rotation data from the linearly polarized 137-MHz beacons of the ATS-1, SIRIO, and Kiku-2 geosynchronous satellites are used to determine the ionospheric corrections to the range and Doppler data for interplanetary spacecraft navigation. The JPL operates the Deep Space Network of tracking stations for NASA; these stations monitor Faraday rotation with dual orthogonal, linearly polarized antennas, Teledyne polarization tracking receivers, analog-to-digital converter/scanners, and other support equipment. Computer software examines the Faraday data, resolves the pi ambiguities, constructs a continuous Faraday-rotation profile and converts the profile to columnar zenith total electron content at the ionospheric reference point; a second program computes the line-of-sight ionospheric correction for each pass of the spacecraft over each tracking complex. Line-of-sight ionospheric electron content using mapped Faraday-rotation data is compared with that using dispersive Doppler data from the Voyager spacecraft; a difference of about 0.4 meters, or 5 x 10 to the 16th electrons/sq m is obtained. The technique of determining the electron content of interplanetary plasma by subtraction of the ionospheric contribution is demonstrated on the plasma torus surrounding the orbit of Io.

  4. Infrared extinction spectra of mineral dust aerosol: Single components and complex mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extinction spectra and aerosol size distributions have been measured for some components of mineral dust aerosol including feldspars (albite, oligoclase) and diatomaceous earth, as well as more complex authentic dust samples that include Iowa loess and Saharan sand. Spectral simulations for single-component samples, derived from Rayleigh-theory models for characteristic particle shapes, better reproduce the experimental spectra including the peak position and band shape compared to Mie theory. The mineralogy of the authentic dust samples was inferred using analysis of FTIR spectra. This approach allows for analysis of the mineralogy of complex multicomponent dust samples. Extinction spectra for the authentic dust samples were simulated from the derived sample mineralogy using published optical constant data for the individual mineral constituents and assuming an external mixture. Nonspherical particle shape effects were also included in the simulations and were shown to have a significant effect on the results. The results show that the position of the peak and the shape of the band of the IR characteristic features in the 800 to 1400 cm-1 spectral range are not well simulated by Mie theory. The resonance peaks are consistently shifted by more than +40 cm-1 relative to the experimental spectrum in the Mie simulation. Rayleigh model solutions for different particle shapes better predict the peak position and band shape of experimental spectra, even though the Rayleigh condition may not be strictly obeyed in these experiments.

  5. Mineralogy of S-complex Asteroids using Reflectance and Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, S. S.; Emery, J. P.; Marchis, F.; Enriquez, E.; Assafin, M.

    2013-12-01

    The S-type asteroids display an astounding diversity in mineralogy. They range from monomineralic olivine to complex olivine/pyroxene assemblages to basaltic assemblages. These materials are thought to be representative of an entire range of bodies that span essentially unmelted to bodies that experienced complete melting and igneous differentiation. Hence, the diverse silicate mineralogy for the S-type asteroids traces the thermal history of the asteroids a few Myr after formation. As such, determining the composition of S-type asteroids is a powerful investigative tool for understanding the post-accretionary thermal evolution, partial melting, and differentiation of the asteroids in the early Solar System. Moreover, the Sq and S(IV) are thought to be the parent bodies of ordinary chondrites (OCs), and therefore represent essentially unmelted or un-thermally processed materials. The mineralogy of these relatively unprocessed asteroids thus provide a window into investigating primitive Solar System materials, which were the building blocks of the terrestrial planets. The mineralogy of S-complex asteroids is typically determined using the 1- and 2-μm absorption bands related to olivine and pyroxene. Comparing the band centers, depths, and areas of these two features (i.e., band analysis) to calibrated laboratory data yields the general silicate mineralogy. Based on the near-infrared (NIR) band analysis, the S-type asteroids can be divided into seven subtypes, S(I - VII), with S(I)s being monomineralic olivine (mantle matieral), S(IV)s being analogous to OCs (primitive silicate material), and S(VII)s being basaltic material (igneously processed crustal material). The mid-infrared (MIR) thermal emission from asteroid surfaces exhibits a suite of silicate features due to Si-O stretching and O-Si-O bending vibrations near 10 and 18 μm, respectively. Marchis et al. (2012) demonstrated that the S-type asteroids exhibit diversity in their MIR emission. We seek to examine

  6. Development of a complex type of pour point-viscosity depressant and infrared spectrum research

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Fusheng; Wang Biao

    1995-11-01

    EMS, a complex type of pour point-viscosity depressant for crudes, is composed of EVA, MVA [molecular structure shown for both in the paper] and Surfactant. After adding EMS into the crudes, a very nice result in reducing pour point and viscosity for Daqing, Jianghan and Jidong crudes was obtained. From the research result of infrared spectroscopy of the interactions between EMS or its components and wax or mixture of resin and asphaltene isolated from three crudes, it has been shown that the area ratio of the double absorption peaks of 719 cm{sup {minus}1} and 729 cm{sup {minus}1} or 1,368 cm{sup {minus}1} and 1,378 cm{sup {minus}1} changed remarkably after EMS or its components were added into wax. It can be inferred that the cocrystallization probably happened between the EMS or its components and the wax. The position of the 4,000--3,000 cm{sup {minus}1} infrared absorption peak of the mixture of resin and asphaltene moved to the lower wavenumber, and the ratio of the area of 1,373 cm{sup {minus}1} absorption peak (methyl) to the combination area of 748, 810 and 871 cm{sup {minus}1} absorption peak (aromatics) increased remarkably. It can be inferred that the pour point-viscosity depressant molecules destroyed the original hydrogen bonds and overlapping of the aromatic ring planes among resin and asphaltene molecules to form a new cubic molecular structure and new hydrogen bonds with the results the viscosity of crude oil will be reduced.

  7. Infrared spectra and density functional theory calculations of group 10 transition metal sulfide molecules and complexes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Binyong; Wang, Xuefeng; Andrews, Lester

    2009-04-01

    Laser-ablated Ni, Pd, and Pt atoms were reacted with sulfur molecules emerging from a microwave discharge in argon during condensation at 7 K. Reaction products were identified from matrix infrared spectra, sulfur isotopic shifts, spectra of sulfur isotopic mixtures, and frequencies from density functional calculations. The strongest absorptions are observed at 597.9, 596.1, and 583.6 cm(-1), respectively, for the group 10 metals. These absorptions show large sulfur-34 shifts and 32/34 isotopic frequency ratios (1.0282, 1.0285, 1.0298) that are appropriate for S-S stretching modes. Of most importance, mixed 32/34 isotopic 1/4/4/2/4/1 sextets identify this product with two equivalent S(2) molecules containing equivalent atomic positions as the bisdisulfur pi complexes M(S(2))(2). Our DFT calculations find stable D(2h) structures with B(1u) ground states and intense b(1u) infrared active modes a few wavenumbers higher than the observed values. A minor Ni product at 505.8, 502.7 cm(-1) shows the proper sulfur-34 shift for assignment to (58)NiS, (60)NiS. Another major product with Pt at 512.2 cm(-1) reveals an asymmetric triplet absorption with mixed sulfur 32/34, which is appropriate for assignment to the SPtS disulfide molecule. A weak 491.7 cm(-1) peak exhibits the sulfur-34 shift expected for PtS, and this assignment follows. PMID:19281209

  8. Upconverting Nanoparticles Prompt Remote Near-Infrared Photoactivation of Ru(II)-Arene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Emmanuel; Garino, Claudio; Mareque-Rivas, Juan C; Habtemariam, Abraha; Salassa, Luca

    2016-02-18

    The synthesis and full characterisation (including X-ray diffraction studies and DFT calculations) of two new piano-stool Ru(II) -arene complexes, namely [(η(6) -p-cym)Ru(bpy)(m-CCH-Py)][(PF)6]2 (1) and [(η(6) -p-cym)Ru(bpm)(m-CCH-Py)][(PF)6]2 (2; p-cym=p-cymene, bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, bpm=2,2'-bipyrimidine, and m-CCH-Py=3-ethynylpyridine), is described and discussed. The reaction of the m-CCH-Py ligand of 1 and 2 with diethyl-3-azidopropyl phosphonate by Cu-catalysed click chemistry affords [(η(6) -p-cym)Ru(bpy)(P-Trz-Py)][(PF)6]2 (3) and [(η(6) -p-cym)Ru(bpm)(P-Trz-Py)][(PF)6]2 (4; P-Trz-Py=[3-(1-pyridin-3-yl-[1,2,3]triazol-4-yl)-propyl]phosphonic acid diethyl ester). Upon light excitation at λ=395 nm, complexes 1-4 photodissociate the monodentate pyridyl ligand and form the aqua adduct ions [(η(6) -p-cym)Ru(bpy)(H2O)](2+) and [(η(6) -p-cym)Ru(bpm)(H2O)](2+). Thulium -doped upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) are functionalised with 4, thus exploiting their surface affinity for the phosphonate group in the complex. The so-obtained nanosystem UCNP@4 undergoes near-infrared (NIR) photoactivation at λ=980 nm, thus producing the corresponding reactive aqua species that binds the DNA-model base guanosine 5'-monophosphate. PMID:26785101

  9. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Duplex DNA/Drug Complexes in a Quadrupole Ion Trap

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jeffrey J.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    Non-covalent duplex DNA/drug complexes formed between one of three 14-base pair non-self complementary duplexes with variable GC content and one of eight different DNA-interactive drugs are characterized by infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), and the resulting spectra are compared to conventional collisional activated dissociation (CAD) mass spectra in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. IRMPD yielded comparable information to previously reported CAD results in which strand separation pathways dominate for complexes containing the more AT-rich sequences and/or minor groove binding drugs, whereas drug ejection pathways are prominent for complexes containing intercalating drugs and/or duplexes with higher GC base content. The large photoabsorptive cross-section of the phosphate backbone at 10.6 μm promotes highly efficient dissociation within short irradiation times (< 2 ms at 50 W) or using lower laser powers and longer irradiation times (< 15 W at 15 ms), activation times on par with or shorter than standard CAD experiments. This large photoabsorptivity leads to a controllable ion activation method which can be used to produce qualitatively similar spectra to CAD while minimizing uninformative base loss dissociation pathways or instead be tuned to yield a high degree of secondary fragmentation. Additionally, the low mass cut-off associated with conventional CAD plays no role in IRMPD, resulting in richer MS/MS information in the low m/z region. IRMPD is also used for multi-adduct dissociation in order to increase MS/MS sensitivity, and a two stage IRMPD/IRMPD method is demonstrated as a means to give specific DNA sequence information that would be useful when screening drug binding by mixtures of duplexes. PMID:17249688

  10. Unexpected Efficiency of a Luminescent Samarium(III) Complex for Combined Visible and Near-Infrared Biphotonic Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bui, Anh Thy; Grichine, Alexei; Brasselet, Sophie; Duperray, Alain; Andraud, Chantal; Maury, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    An original samarium(III) complex based on a triazacyclononane platform functionalized with a charge-transfer antenna chromophore exhibited optimized brightness and was successfully used as an emissive species for two-photon microscopy experiments in both the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges. PMID:26489885

  11. Peripherally hydrogenated neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as carriers of the 3 micron interstellar infrared emission complex: results from single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, D. R.; Kim, H. S.; Saykally, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra of five gas-phase UV laser-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing aliphatic hydrogens are compared with the main 3.3 microns and associated interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands (UIRs). We show that neutral PAHs can account for the majority of the 3 microns emission complex while making little contribution to the other UIR bands; peripherally hydrogenated PAHs produce a better match to astrophysical data than do those containing methyl side groups; 3.4 microns plateau emission is shown to be a general spectral feature of vibrationally excited PAHs containing aliphatic hydrogens, especially those containing methyl groups; and finally, hot-band and overtone emissions arising from aromatic C-H vibrations are not observed in laboratory emission spectra, and therefore, in contrast to current assignments, are not expected to be observed in the UIRs.

  12. Effect of imperfect Faraday mirrors on the security of a Faraday-Michelson quantum cryptography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Long; Gao, Ming; Ma, Zhi

    2013-11-01

    The one-way Faraday-Michelson system is a very useful practical quantum cryptography system where Faraday mirrors (FMs) play an important role. In this paper we analyze the security of this system against imperfect FMs. We consider the security loophole caused by imperfect FMs in Alice’s and Bob’s security zones. Then we implement a passive FM attack in this system. By changing the values of the imperfection parameters of Alice’s FMs, we calculate the quantum bit error rate between Alice and Bob induced by Eve and the probability that Eve obtains outcomes successfully. It is shown that the imperfection of one of Alice’s two FMs makes the system sensitive to an attack. Finally we give a modified key rate as a function of the FM imperfections. The security analysis indicates that both Alice’s and Bob’s imperfect FMs can compromise the secure key.

  13. Algorithm for Unfolding Current from Faraday Rotation Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen E. Mitchell

    2008-05-23

    Various methods are described to translate Faraday rotation measurements into a useful representation of the dynamic current under investigation[1]. For some experiments, simply counting the “fringes” up to the turnaround point in the recorded Faraday rotation signal is sufficient in determining the peak current within some allowable fringe uncertainty. For many other experiments, a higher demand for unfolding the entire dynamic current profile is required. In such cases, investigators often rely extensively on user interaction on the Faraday rotation data by visually observing the data and making logical decisions on what appears to be turnaround points and/or inflections in the signal. After determining extrema, inflection points, and locations, a piece-wise, ΔI/Δt, representation of the current may be revealed with the proviso of having a reliable Verdet constant of the Faraday fiber or medium and time location for each occurring fringe. In this paper, a unique software program is reported which automatically decodes the Faraday rotation signal into a time-dependent current representation. System parameters such as the Faraday fiber’s Verdet constant and number of loops in the sensor are the only user-interface inputs. The central aspect of the algorithm utilizes a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) which reveals much of the Faraday rotation’s hidden detail necessary for unfolding the dynamic current measurement.

  14. Media responsible for Faraday rotation: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberoi, D.; Lonsdale, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent technological advances have led to a resurgence of interest in low frequency radio astronomy. Ionospheric distortion of cosmic radiation has, however, been a challenge for high fidelity and high sensitivity measurements at these long wavelengths. Several new and innovative low radio frequency interferometers are currently in varying stages of development, construction and commissioning across the globe. They will pursue a broad range of scientific objectives, and precise ionospheric calibration over the wide field-of-view of these new generation instruments will be a prerequisite for achieving these science goals. The task of calibration is made more difficult by the Faraday rotation (FR) of polarized flux as it passes through the magnetized plasma of the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the magnetosphere, and the heliosphere. To quantify these effects, we present a survey of the order of magnitude of FR associated with these media and their spatial and temporal variations.

  15. Scaling behavior of coarsening Faraday heaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gerner, Henk Jan; van der Weele, Ko; van der Meer, Devaraj; van der Hoef, Martin A.

    2015-10-01

    When a layer of sand is vertically shaken, the surface spontaneously breaks up in a landscape of small conical "Faraday heaps," which merge into larger ones on an ever increasing time scale. We propose a model for the heap dynamics and show analytically that the mean lifetime of the transient state with N heaps scales as N-2. When there is an abundance of sand, such that the vibrating plate always remains completely covered, this means that the average diameter of the heaps grows as t1 /2. Otherwise, when the sand is less plentiful and parts of the plate get depleted during the coarsening process, the average diameter of the heaps grows more slowly, namely as t1 /3. This result compares well with experimental observations.

  16. TSAG-based cryogenic Faraday isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starobor, Aleksey; Yasyhara, Ryo; Snetkov, Ilya; Mironov, Evgeniy; Palashov, Oleg

    2015-09-01

    Thermooptical and magnetooptical properties of novel magnetoactive crystal terbium-scandium aluminum garnet were investigated at temperature range 80-300 K. It is shown that Verdet constant increases inversely proportional to temperature, and thermally induced depolarization, and the optical power of the thermal lens is reduced significantly with cooling from 290 K to 80 K. According to estimates, TSAG crystals in [1 1 1] orientation allow to create a cryogenic Faraday isolator provides a degree of isolation of 30 dB with the laser power exceeds ∼6 kW, it is estimated that the transition to the [0 0 1] orientation allows to provide degree of isolation of 30 dB at a laser power higher than 400 kW.

  17. Current measurement by Faraday effect on GEPOPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, Correa; H, Chuaqui; E, Wyndham; F, Veloso; J, Valenzuela; M, Favre; H, Bhuyan

    2014-05-01

    The design and calibration of an optical current sensor using BK7 glass is presented. The current sensor is based on the polarization rotation by Faraday effect. GEPOPU is a pulsed power generator, double transit time 120ns, 1.5 Ohm impedance, coaxial geometry, where Z pinch experiment are performed. The measurements were performed at the Optics and Plasma Physics Laboratory of Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. The verdet constant for two different optical materials was obtained using He-Ne laser. The values obtained are within the experimental error bars of measurements published in the literature (less than 15% difference). Two different sensor geometries were tried. We present the preliminary results for one of the geometries. The values obtained for the current agree within the measurement error with those obtained by means of a Spice simulation of the generator. Signal traces obtained are completely noise free.

  18. Scaling behavior of coarsening Faraday heaps.

    PubMed

    van Gerner, Henk Jan; van der Weele, Ko; van der Meer, Devaraj; van der Hoef, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    When a layer of sand is vertically shaken, the surface spontaneously breaks up in a landscape of small conical "Faraday heaps," which merge into larger ones on an ever increasing time scale. We propose a model for the heap dynamics and show analytically that the mean lifetime of the transient state with N heaps scales as N(-2). When there is an abundance of sand, such that the vibrating plate always remains completely covered, this means that the average diameter of the heaps grows as t(1/2). Otherwise, when the sand is less plentiful and parts of the plate get depleted during the coarsening process, the average diameter of the heaps grows more slowly, namely as t(1/3). This result compares well with experimental observations. PMID:26565231

  19. Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer Data of the Mountain Pass, California carbonatite complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, James; Rowan, Lawrence; Podwysocki, Melvin; Meyer, David

    1988-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data of the Mountain Pass, California carbonatite complex were examined to evaluate the AVIRIS instrument performance and to explore alternative methods of data calibration. Although signal-to-noise estimates derived from the data indicated that the A, B, and C spectrometers generally met the original instrument design objectives, the S/N performance of the D spectrometer was below expectations. Signal-to-noise values of 20 to 1 or lower were typical of the D spectrometer and several detectors in the D spectrometer array were shown to have poor electronic stability. The AVIRIS data also exhibited periodic noise, and were occasionally subject to abrupt dark current offsets. Despite these limitations, a number of mineral absorption bands, including CO3, Al-OH, and unusual rare earth element bands, were observed for mine areas near the main carbonatite body. To discern these bands, two different calibration procedures were applied to remove atmospheric and solar components from the remote sensing data. The two procedures, referred to as the single spectrum and the flat field calibration methods gave distinctly different results. In principle, the single spectrum method should be more accurate; however, additional fieldwork is needed to rigorously determine the degree of calibration success.

  20. Light-Induced Infrared Difference Spectroscopy in the Investigation of Light Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mezzetti, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Light-induced infrared difference spectroscopy (IR-DS) has been used, especially in the last decade, to investigate early photophysics, energy transfer and photoprotection mechanisms in isolated and membrane-bound light harvesting complexes (LHCs). The technique has the definite advantage to give information on how the pigments and the other constituents of the biological system (proteins, membranes, etc.) evolve during a given photoreaction. Different static and time-resolved approaches have been used. Compared to the application of IR-DS to photosynthetic Reaction Centers (RCs), however, IR-DS applied to LHCs is still in an almost pioneering age: very often sophisticated techniques (step-scan FTIR, ultrafast IR) or data analysis strategies (global analysis, target analysis, multivariate curve resolution) are needed. In addition, band assignment is usually more complicated than in RCs. The results obtained on the studied systems (chromatophores and RC-LHC supercomplexes from purple bacteria; Peridinin-Chlorophyll-a-Proteins from dinoflagellates; isolated LHCII from plants; thylakoids; Orange Carotenoid Protein from cyanobacteria) are summarized. A description of the different IR-DS techniques used is also provided, and the most stimulating perspectives are also described. Especially if used synergically with other biophysical techniques, light-induced IR-DS represents an important tool in the investigation of photophysical/photochemical reactions in LHCs and LHC-containing systems. PMID:26151118

  1. Normative database of judgment of complexity task with functional near infrared spectroscopy--application for TBI.

    PubMed

    Amyot, Franck; Zimmermann, Trelawny; Riley, Jason; Kainerstorfer, Jana M; Chernomordik, Victor; Mooshagian, Eric; Najafizadeh, Laleh; Krueger, Frank; Gandjbakhche, Amir H; Wassermann, Eric M

    2012-04-01

    The ability to assess frontal lobe function in a rapid, objective, and standardized way, without the need for expertise in cognitive test administration might be particularly helpful in mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), where objective measures are needed. Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a reliable technique to noninvasively measure local hemodynamic changes in brain areas near the head surface. In this paper, we are combining fNIRS and frameless stereotaxy which allowed us to co-register the functional images with previously acquired anatomical MRI volumes. In our experiment, the subjects were asked to perform a task, evaluating the complexity of daily life activities, previously shown with fMRI to activate areas of the anterior frontal cortex. We reconstructed averaged oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin data from 20 healthy subjects in a spherical coordinate. The spherical coordinate is a natural representation of surface brain activation projection. Our results show surface activation projected from the medial frontopolar cortex which is consistent with previous fMRI results. With this original technique, we will construct a normative database for a simple cognitive test which can be useful in evaluating cognitive disability such as mild traumatic brain injury. PMID:22306800

  2. Unsupervised background-constrained tank segmentation of infrared images in complex background based on the Otsu method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yulong; Gao, Min; Fang, Dan; Zhang, Baoquan

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to implement fast and effective tank segmentation from infrared images in complex background, the threshold of the maximum between-class variance method (i.e., the Otsu method) is analyzed and the working mechanism of the Otsu method is discussed. Subsequently, a fast and effective method for tank segmentation from infrared images in complex background is proposed based on the Otsu method via constraining the complex background of the image. Considering the complexity of background, the original image is firstly divided into three classes of target region, middle background and lower background via maximizing the sum of their between-class variances. Then, the unsupervised background constraint is implemented based on the within-class variance of target region and hence the original image can be simplified. Finally, the Otsu method is applied to simplified image for threshold selection. Experimental results on a variety of tank infrared images (880 × 480 pixels) in complex background demonstrate that the proposed method enjoys better segmentation performance and even could be comparative with the manual segmentation in segmented results. In addition, its average running time is only 9.22 ms, implying the new method with good performance in real time processing. PMID:27625967

  3. Faraday effect in Sn2P2S6 crystals.

    PubMed

    Krupych, Oleh; Adamenko, Dmytro; Mys, Oksana; Grabar, Aleksandr; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2008-11-10

    We have revealed a large Faraday rotation in tin thiohypodiphosphate (Sn(2)P(2)S(6)) crystals, which makes this material promising for magneto-optics. The effective Faraday tensor component and the Verdet constant for the direction of the optic axis have been determined by measuring the pure Faraday rotation in Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals with both the single-ray and small-angular polarimetric methods at the normal conditions and a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The effective Verdet constant is found to be equal to 115 rad/T x m. PMID:19002228

  4. Experimental investigation of the Faraday instability on a patterned surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jie; Jacobi, Ian; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of patterned substrates on the onset and behavior of the Faraday instability is studied experimentally. We show that the onset of Faraday standing waves in a vertically oscillating layer of liquid can be delayed due to the topography of the underlying two-dimensional patterned substrate. The magnitude of this stabilization effect can be predicted by existing linear stability theories, and we provide an additional physical explanation for the behavior. These observations suggest the feasibility of exploiting the Faraday instability in thin liquid layers in practical engineering systems.

  5. Miniature modified Faraday cup for micro electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Teruya, Alan T.; Elmer, John W.; Palmer, Todd A.; Walton, Chris C.

    2008-05-27

    A micro beam Faraday cup assembly includes a refractory metal layer with an odd number of thin, radially positioned traces in this refractory metal layer. Some of the radially positioned traces are located at the edge of the micro modified Faraday cup body and some of the radially positioned traces are located in the central portion of the micro modified Faraday cup body. Each set of traces is connected to a separate data acquisition channel to form multiple independent diagnostic networks. The data obtained from the two diagnostic networks are combined and inputted into a computed tomography algorithm to reconstruct the beam shape, size, and power density distribution.

  6. Conformations of dimethyl carbonate and its complexes with water: A matrix isolation infrared and ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Bishnu Prasad; Ramanathan, N.; Sundararajan, K.; Viswanathan, K. S.

    2012-09-01

    Conformations of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) were studied using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Infrared spectra of DMC trapped in inert gas matrixes, using an effusive source at 298 and 423 K, showed evidence of both the ground state (cis-cis), and higher energy (cis-trans) conformers. Experiments were also performed using a supersonic jet source to deposit the matrix, to look for conformational cooling in the expansion process. The structures and vibrational frequencies of these conformers were computed at the B3LYP/6-31++G** level of theory. Natural bond orbital analyses were performed to understand the role of the delocalization interactions in conformational preferences. Complexes of DMC with H2O were also studied. A 1:1 DMC-H2O complex was identified in the matrix isolation experiments, where the carbonyl oxygen of DMC served as the proton acceptor for the hydrogen bonded complex. This observation was corroborated by computations performed on the complex at the B3LYP/6-31++G** level. Our computations also indicated another minimum, corresponding to an alkoxy bonded DMC-H2O complex, which was less exothermic; however, this complex was not identified in our experiments. Atoms-in-molecules theory was also performed to understand the nature of the intermolecular interaction in the DMC-H2O complex.

  7. Visible-near-infrared luminescent lanthanide ternary complexes based on beta-diketonate using visible-light excitation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lining; Qiu, Yannan; Liu, Tao; Feng, Jing; Deng, Wei; Shi, Liyi

    2015-11-01

    We used the synthesized dinaphthylmethane (Hdnm) ligand whose absorption extends to the visible-light wavelength, to prepare a family of ternary lanthanide complexes, named as [Ln(dnm)3 phen] (Ln = Sm, Nd, Yb, Er, Tm, Pr). The properties of these complexes were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, and excitation and emission spectroscopy. Generally, excitation with visible light is much more advantageous than UV excitation. Importantly, upon excitation with visible light (401-460 nm), the complexes show characteristic visible (Sm(3+)) as well as near-infrared (Sm(3+), Nd(3+), Yb(3+), Er(3+), Tm(3+), Pr(3+)) luminescence of the corresponding lanthanide ions, attributed to the energy transfer from the ligands to the lanthanide ions, an antenna effect. Now, using these near-infrared luminescent lanthanide complexes, the luminescent spectral region from 800 to 1650 nm, can be covered completely, which is of particular interest for biomedical imaging applications, laser systems, and optical amplification applications. PMID:25691149

  8. Faraday effect based optical fiber current sensor for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Aerssens, M.; Gusarov, A.; Brichard, B.; Massaut, V.; Megret, P.; Wuilpart, M.

    2011-07-01

    Fiber optical current sensor (FOCS) is a technique considered to be compatible with the ITER nuclear environment. FOCS principle is based on the magneto-optic Faraday effect that produces non-reciprocal circular birefringence when a magnetic field is applied in the propagation direction of the light beam. The magnetic field or the electrical current is deduced from the modification of the state of polarization of light. The linear birefringence of the fiber related with non-perfect manufacturing, temperature changes or stress constitute a parasitic effect that reduces the precision and sensitivity of FOCS. A two-pass optical scheme with a Faraday mirror at the end has been proposed to compensate the influence of linear birefringence. In this paper we perform a Stokes analysis of the two-pass optical scheme to highlight the fact that the linear birefringence is not compensated perfectly by the Faraday mirror when non-reciprocal birefringence such as Faraday effect is also present. (authors)

  9. One-Piece Faraday Generator: A Paradoxical Experiment from 1851

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crooks, M. J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment based on Faraday's one-piece generator, where the rotating disk is replaced by a cylindrical permanent magnet. Explains the apparent paradox that an observer in an inertial frame could measure his absolute velocity. (GA)

  10. Graphene-based photonic crystal to steer giant Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, Haixia; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2012-06-01

    We present a graphene-based photonic-crystal schematic of enhancing and steering Faraday rotation angle of graphene. This concept is counter-intuitive because the giant Faraday rotation and high transmission can be simultaneously pronounced, which is distinguished from exisitng graphene structures reported before. It is found that chemical potential can be tailored to generate a controllable giant Faraday rotation via graphene with atomic thickness. By engineering the individual component thickness in the photonic crystal, the magneto-optical performance can be significantly improved. This is of fundamental importance in a wide range of magneto-optical applications, simply because the Faraday rotation makes sense only when the transmittivity is decently high.

  11. In-frame and inter-frame information based infrared moving small target detection under complex cloud backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Minjie; Gu, Guohua; Cao, Ercong; Hu, Xiaobo; Qian, Weixian; Ren, Kan

    2016-05-01

    Infrared moving small target detection under complex cloud backgrounds is one of the key techniques of infrared search and track (IRST) systems. This paper proposes a novel method based on in-frame inter-frame information to detect infrared moving small targets accurately. For a single frame, in the spatial domain, a directional max-median filter is developed to make a pre-processing and a background suppression filtering template is utilized on the denoised image to highlight target. Then, targets in cloud regions and non-cloud regions are extracted by different thresholds according to a cloud discrimination method so that a spatial domain map (SDM) is acquired. In the frequency domain, we design an α-DoB band-pass filter to conduct coarse saliency detection and make an amplitude transformation with smoothing processing which is the so-called elaborate saliency detection. Furthermore, a frequency domain map (FDM) is acquired by an adaptive binary segmentation method. Lastly, candidate targets in single frame are extracted by a discrimination based on intensity and spatial distance criteria. For consecutive frames, a false alarm suppression is conducted on account of differences of motion features between moving target and false alarms to improve detection accuracy again. Large numbers of experiments demonstrate that the proposed method has satisfying detection effectiveness and robustness for infrared moving small target detection under complex cloud backgrounds.

  12. Testing Ionospheric Faraday Rotation Corrections in CASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Moellenbrock, George

    2015-04-01

    The Earth’s ionosphere introduces direction- and time-dependent effects over a range of physical and temporal scales and so is a major source for unmodeled phase offsets for low frequency radioastronomical observations. Ionospheric effects are often the limiting factor to making sensitive radioastronomical measurements to probe the solar corona or coronal mass ejections at low frequencies (< 5 GHz). It has become common practice to use global ionospheric models derived from the Global Positioning System (GPS) to provide a means of externally calibrating low frequency data. We have developed a new calibration algorithm in the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package. CASA, which was developed to meet the data post-processing needs of next generation telescopes such as the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), did not previously have the capability to mitigate ionospheric effects. This algorithm uses GPS-based global ionosphere maps to mitigate the first and second order ionospheric effects (dispersion delay and Faraday rotation, respectively). We investigated several data centers as potential sources for global ionospheric models and chose the International Global Navigation Satellite System Service data product because data from other sources are generally too sparse to use without additional interpolation schemes. This implementation of ionospheric corrections in CASA has been tested on several sets of VLA observations and all of them showed a significant reduction of the dispersion delay. In order to rigorously test CASA’s ability to mitigate ionospheric Faraday rotation, we made VLA full-polarization observations of the standard VLA phase calibrators J0359+5057 and J0423+4150 in August 2014, using L band (1 - 2 GHz), S band (2 - 4 GHz), and C band (4 - 6 GHz) frequencies in the D array configuration. The observations were 4 hours in duration, beginning near local sunrise. In this paper, we give a general description of how these corrections are

  13. Infrared Spectra of Water Bending Bands of Propylene Oxide-Water Complexes: Sequential Solvation of a Chiral Molecule in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xunchen; Xu, Yunjie

    2011-06-01

    Sequential solvation of propylene oxide (C3H6O), an prototypical chiral molecule, with water has been investigated using high resolution infrared spectroscopy and ab initio methods. In a number of low resolution studies, the vibrational and vibrational circular dichroism spectral features at the water bending vibration region had been shown to be highly sensitive to the water solvation structures around propylene oxide in aqueous solution. The current study aims to provide quantitative information about solvation of a chiral molecule with water molecules at the molecular level and to provide the experimental benchmarks for calculations of vibrational frequencies in these larger molecular complexes. The high resolution infrared spectra of the propylene oxide-water complexes have been measured using a pulsed jet infrared spectrometer equipped with a room temperature external cavity quantum cascade laser and an astigmatic multi-pass cell. At least 6 bands have been observed from 1650 to 1680 Cm-1. Based on the previous microwave spectroscopic studies, these bands have been assigned to the blue-shifted water bending (ν_2) vibration modes associated with both the syn- and anti- conformers of the binary (C3H6O-H2O) and ternary (C3H6O-(H2O)2) complexes. This report shows the power of high resolution infrared spectroscopy to study multi-conformers of relatively large organic molecule complexes produced in a jet expansion. M. Losada, P. Nguyen, and Y .Xu, J. Phys. Chem. A, 112, 5621, (2008) Z. Su, Q. Wen, and Y. Xu, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 128, 6755, (2006) Z. Su and Y. Xu, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 46, 6163, (2007)

  14. Evaluation of the Faraday angle by numerical methods and comparison with the Tore Supra and JET polarimeter electronics.

    PubMed

    Brault, C; Gil, C; Boboc, A; Spuig, P

    2011-04-01

    On the Tore Supra tokamak, a far infrared polarimeter diagnostic has been routinely used for diagnosing the current density by measuring the Faraday rotation angle. A high precision of measurement is needed to correctly reconstruct the current profile. To reach this precision, electronics used to compute the phase and the amplitude of the detected signals must have a good resilience to the noise in the measurement. In this article, the analogue card's response to the noise coming from the detectors and their impact on the Faraday angle measurements are analyzed, and we present numerical methods to calculate the phase and the amplitude. These validations have been done using real signals acquired by Tore Supra and JET experiments. These methods have been developed to be used in real-time in the future numerical cards that will replace the Tore Supra present analogue ones. PMID:21678660

  15. Linear diffusion into a Faraday cage.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lin, Yau Tang; Merewether, Kimball O.; Chen, Kenneth C.

    2011-11-01

    Linear lightning diffusion into a Faraday cage is studied. An early-time integral valid for large ratios of enclosure size to enclosure thickness and small relative permeability ({mu}/{mu}{sub 0} {le} 10) is used for this study. Existing solutions for nearby lightning impulse responses of electrically thick-wall enclosures are refined and extended to calculate the nearby lightning magnetic field (H) and time-derivative magnetic field (HDOT) inside enclosures of varying thickness caused by a decaying exponential excitation. For a direct strike scenario, the early-time integral for a worst-case line source outside the enclosure caused by an impulse is simplified and numerically integrated to give the interior H and HDOT at the location closest to the source as well as a function of distance from the source. H and HDOT enclosure response functions for decaying exponentials are considered for an enclosure wall of any thickness. Simple formulas are derived to provide a description of enclosure interior H and HDOT as well. Direct strike voltage and current bounds for a single-turn optimally-coupled loop for all three waveforms are also given.

  16. Laser mode complexity analysis in infrared waveguide free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prazeres, Rui

    2016-06-01

    We analyze an optical phenomenon taking place in waveguide free-electron lasers, which disturbs, or forbids, operation in far infrared range. Waveguides in the optical cavity are used in far-infrared and THz ranges in order to avoid diffraction optical losses, and a hole coupling on output mirror is used for laser extraction. We show that, when the length of the waveguide exceeds a given limit, a phenomenon of "mode disorder" appears in the cavity, which makes the laser difficult, or impossible, to work properly. This phenomenon is even more important when the waveguide covers the whole length of the cavity. A numerical simulation describes this effect, which creates discontinuities of the laser power in the spectral domain. We show an example with an existing infrared Free-Electron Laser, which exhibits such discontinuities of the power, and where no convincing explanation was proposed until now.

  17. Electronic and infrared spectral and thermal studies on the molecular complex of dibenzo-18-crown-6 and iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahada, L. A.

    2005-06-01

    The interaction of the crown ether dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DBC) with iodine has been studied in CHCl 3 at room temperature. The charge-transfer absorptions, far infrared and thermal measurements of the formed charge-transfer complex were recorded and discussed. The results obtained show the formation of the pentaiodide complex with the general formula [(DBC)] + I 5-. The pentaiodide ion, I 5-, is described as I 3-(I 2) confirmed by the observation of the characteristic absorptions for I 3- ion around 365 and 290 nm. In addition, the far infrared spectrum of the solid complex shows the three vibrations of I 3- unit is at 141, 113 and 71 cm -1 assigned to νas(I-I) and νs(I-I) and δ(I 3-), respectively, while the band related to the vibration of I 2 unit is observed at 180 cm -1. Vibration analysis of the obtained data shows that the symmetry of I 3- unit could be non-linear with C 2 v symmetry. The structure of the formed pentaiodide complex was further supported by thermal gravimetric analysis measurements.

  18. Infrared depletion spectroscopy of the doubly hydrogen-bonded aniline-(tetrahydrofuran) 2 complex produced in supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Pradyot K.

    2006-01-01

    The vibrational frequencies of the N-H stretching modes of aniline after forming a strong doubly H-bonded complex with tetrahydrofuran (THF) are measured with infrared depletion spectroscopy that uses cluster-size-selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Two strong infrared absorption features observed at 3355 and 3488 cm -1 are assigned to the symmetric and antisymmetric N-H stretching vibrations of the 1:2 aniline-THF complex, respectively. The red-shifts of the N-H stretching vibrations of aniline agree with the ab initio calculated (MP2/6-31G**) aniline-(THF) 2 structure in which both aniline N-H bonds interact with the oxygen atom of THF through two hydrogen bonds. The calculated binding energy is found to be 29.6 kJ mol -1 after corrections for basis set superposition error (BSSE) and zero-point energy. The calculated structure revealed that the angle between the N-H bonds in the NH 2 group increased to 112.5° in the aniline-(THF) 2 complex from that of 109.8° in the aniline. The electronic 0-0 band origin for the S1 ← S0 transition is observed at 32,900 cm -1 in the aniline-(THF) 2 complex, giving a red-shift of 1129 cm -1 from that of the aniline molecule.

  19. Laplace's equation and Faraday's lines of force

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2007-06-01

    Boundary-value problems involve two dependent variables: a potential function, and a stream function. They can be approached in two mutually independent ways. The first, introduced by Laplace, involves spatial gradients at a point. Inspired by Faraday, Maxwell introduced the other, visualizing the flow domain as a collection of flow tubes and isopotential surfaces. Boundary-value problems intrinsically entail coupled treatment (or, equivalently, optimization) of potential and stream functions Historically, potential theory avoided the cumbersome optimization task through ingenious techniques such as conformal mapping and Green's functions. Laplace's point-based approach, and Maxwell's global approach, each provides its own unique insights into boundary-value problems. Commonly, Laplace's equation is solved either algebraically, or with approximate numerical methods. Maxwell's geometry-based approach opens up novel possibilities of direct optimization, providing an independent logical basis for numerical models, rather than treating them as approximate solvers of the differential equation. Whereas points, gradients, and Darcy's law are central to posing problems on the basis of Laplace's approach, flow tubes, potential differences, and the mathematical form of Ohm's law are central to posing them in natural coordinates oriented along flow paths. Besides being of philosophical interest, optimization algorithms can provide advantages that complement the power of classical numerical models. In the spirit of Maxwell, who eloquently spoke for a balance between abstract mathematical symbolism and observable attributes of concrete objects, this paper is an examination of the central ideas of the two approaches, and a reflection on how Maxwell's integral visualization may be practically put to use in a world of digital computers.

  20. Distinguishing Population and Coherence Transfer Pathways in a Metal Dicarbonyl Complex Using Pulse-Shaped Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marroux, Hugo J B; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Collection of two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectra using two ultrafast, broadband infrared pump pulses followed by an ultrafast probe pulse optimizes the experimental time and frequency resolution, but can also introduce quantum beat and coherence transfer pathways. The associated coherent dynamics create intensity oscillations and add extra features to 2DIR spectra. We describe a method to suppress these pathways using pump-pulse shaping, without significantly degrading the time and spectral resolution. We illustrate the method for a rhodium dicarbonyl complex, acetylacetonato dicarbonyl rhodium (RDC), to establish the relative importance of coherence and population transfer between carbonyl symmetric and asymmetric stretching modes. Our technique effectively suppresses the quantum beats. Comparison of peak intensities obtained with shaped and unshaped pump pulses demonstrates that coherence transfer does not play a significant role in the 2DIR spectrum of RDC in this spectral region. PMID:27070852

  1. Faraday instability in a near-critical fluid under weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Gandikota, G; Chatain, D; Amiroudine, S; Lyubimova, T; Beysens, D

    2014-01-01

    Experiments on near-critical hydrogen have been conducted under magnetic compensation of gravity to investigate the Faraday instability that arises at the liquid-vapor interface under zero-gravity conditions. We investigated such instability in the absence of stabilizing gravity. Under such conditions, vibration orients the interface and can destabilize it. The experiments confirm the existence of Faraday waves and demonstrate a transition from a square to a line pattern close to the critical point. They also show a transition very close to the critical point from Faraday to periodic layering of the vapor-liquid interface perpendicular to vibration. It was seen that the Faraday wave instability is favored when the liquid-vapor density difference is large enough (fluid far from the critical point), whereas periodic layering predominates for small difference in the liquid and vapor densities (close to the critical point). It was observed for the Faraday wave instability that the wavelength of the instability decreases as one approaches the critical point. The experimental results demonstrate good agreement to the dispersion relation for zero gravity except for temperatures very close to the critical point where a transition from a square pattern to a line pattern is detected, similarly to what is observed under 1g conditions. PMID:24580335

  2. Characterization of magnetic field profiles at RFX-mod by Faraday rotation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auriemma, Fulvio; Brombin, Matteo; Canton, Alessandra; Giudicotti, Leonardo; Innocente, Paolo; Zilli, Enrico

    2009-11-01

    A multichannel far-infrared (FIR, λ=118.8 μm) polarimeter has been recently upgraded and re-installed on RFX-mod to measure the Faraday rotation angle along five vertical chords. Polarimetric data, associated with electron density profile, allow the reconstruction of the poloidal magnetic field profile. In this work the setup of the diagnostic is presented and the first Faraday rotation measurements are analyzed. The measurements have been performed at plasma current above 1.2 MA and electron density between 2 and 6x10^19 m-3. The actual S/N ratio is slightly lower than the expected one, due to electromagnetic coupling of the detectors with the saddle coils close to the polarimeter position. Due to this limit, only average information in the flat-top phase of the discharge could be so far obtained. The experimental data have been compared with the result of the μ&p equilibrium model [1], showing a good agreement between experiment and model, whereas the main differences are in the external region of the plasma. A different parameterization of the μ=μ0 J.B/B^2 profile has been proposed to enhance the agreement between model and experiment. [0pt] [1] Ortolani and Snack, World Scientific (1993) Singapore

  3. Investigating vibrational relaxation in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed-valence complexes using two-dimensional infrared and infrared pump-probe spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Slenkamp, Karla M.; Lynch, Michael S.; Brookes, Jennifer F.; Bannan, Caitlin C.; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Khalil, Munira

    2016-01-01

    Using polarization-selective two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and infrared pump-probe spectroscopies, we study vibrational relaxation of the four cyanide stretching (νCN) vibrations found in [(NH3)5RuIIINCFeII(CN)5]− (FeRu) dissolved in D2O or formamide and [(NC)5FeIICNPtIV(NH3)4NCFeII(CN)5]4− (FePtFe) dissolved in D2O. These cyanide-bridged transition metal complexes serve as models for understanding the role high frequency vibrational modes play in metal-to-metal charge transfers over a bridging ligand. However, there is currently little information about vibrational relaxation and dephasing dynamics of the anharmonically coupled νCN modes in the electronic ground state of these complexes. IR pump-probe experiments reveal that the vibrational lifetimes of the νCN modes are ∼2 times faster when FeRu is dissolved in D2O versus formamide. They also reveal that the vibrational lifetimes of the νCN modes of FePtFe in D2O are almost four times as long as for FeRu in D2O. Combined with mode-specific relaxation dynamics measured from the 2D IR experiments, the IR pump-probe experiments also reveal that intramolecular vibrational relaxation is occurring in all three systems on ∼1 ps timescale. Center line slope dynamics, which have been shown to be a measure of the frequency-frequency correlation function, reveal that the radial, axial, and trans νCN modes exhibit a ∼3 ps timescale for frequency fluctuations. This timescale is attributed to the forming and breaking of hydrogen bonds between each mode and the solvent. The results presented here along with our previous work on FeRu and FePtFe reveal a picture of coupled anharmonic νCN modes where the spectral diffusion and vibrational relaxation dynamics depend on the spatial localization of the mode on the molecular complex and its specific interaction with the solvent. PMID:27158634

  4. Faraday effect: A field theoretical point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Avijit K.; Konar, Sushan; Pal, Palash B.

    1999-11-01

    We analyze the structure of the vacuum polarization tensor in the presence of a background electromagnetic field in a medium. We use various discrete symmetries and crossing symmetry to constrain the form factors obtained for the most general case. From these symmetry arguments, we show why the vacuum polarization tensor has to be even in the background field when there is no background medium. Taking then the background field to be purely magnetic, we evaluate the vacuum polarization to linear order in it. The result shows the phenomenon of Faraday rotation, i.e., the rotation of the plane of polarization of a plane polarized light passing through this background. We find that the usual expression for Faraday rotation, which is derived for a non-degenerate plasma in the non-relativistic approximation, undergoes substantial modification if the background is degenerate and/or relativistic. We give explicit expressions for Faraday rotation in completely degenerate and ultra-relativistic media.

  5. Versatile, high-sensitivity faraday cup array for ion implanters

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Patterson, Robert G.

    2003-01-01

    An improved Faraday cup array for determining the dose of ions delivered to a substrate during ion implantation and for monitoring the uniformity of the dose delivered to the substrate. The improved Faraday cup array incorporates a variable size ion beam aperture by changing only an insertable plate that defines the aperture without changing the position of the Faraday cups which are positioned for the operation of the largest ion beam aperture. The design enables the dose sensitivity range, typically 10.sup.11 -10.sup.18 ions/cm.sup.2 to be extended to below 10.sup.6 ions/cm.sup.2. The insertable plate/aperture arrangement is structurally simple and enables scaling to aperture areas between <1 cm.sup.2 and >750 cm.sup.2, and enables ultra-high vacuum (UHV) applications by incorporation of UHV-compatible materials.

  6. Infrared studies on o-, m- and p-cresol-urea (1:1) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolski, J. Cz.

    1990-03-01

    Complex formation between urea and o-, m- and p-cresol in 1,2-dichloroethane solutions was investigated by i.r. spectroscopy. Analogical 1:1 urea-phenol complex was reevaluated. Those complexes are formed by CO⋯H hydrogen bonding. In solution the NH urea groups do not play any significant role. The i.r. temperature studies allowed us to determine the enthalpy and entropy of formation of 1:1 complex.

  7. Evaluation of ion collection area in Faraday probes

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daniel L.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2010-06-15

    A Faraday probe with three concentric rings was designed and fabricated to assess the effect of gap width and collector diameter in a systematic study of the diagnostic ion collection area. The nested Faraday probe consisted of two concentric collector rings and an outer guard ring, which enabled simultaneous current density measurements on the inner and outer collectors. Two versions of the outer collector were fabricated to create gaps of 0.5 and 1.5 mm between the rings. Distribution of current density in the plume of a low-power Hall thruster ion source was measured in azimuthal sweeps at constant radius from 8 to 20 thruster diameters downstream of the exit plane with variation in facility background pressure. A new analytical technique is proposed to account for ions collected in the gap between the Faraday probe collector and guard ring. This method is shown to exhibit excellent agreement between all nested Faraday probe configurations, and to reduce the magnitude of integrated ion beam current to levels consistent with Hall thruster performance analyses. The technique is further studied by varying the guard ring bias potential with a fixed collector bias potential, thereby controlling ion collection in the gap. Results are in agreement with predictions based on the proposed analytical technique. The method is applied to a past study comparing the measured ion current density profiles of two Faraday probe designs. These findings provide new insight into the nature of ion collection in Faraday probe diagnostics, and lead to improved accuracy with a significant reduction in measurement uncertainty.

  8. Evaluation of ion collection area in Faraday probes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel L; Gallimore, Alec D

    2010-06-01

    A Faraday probe with three concentric rings was designed and fabricated to assess the effect of gap width and collector diameter in a systematic study of the diagnostic ion collection area. The nested Faraday probe consisted of two concentric collector rings and an outer guard ring, which enabled simultaneous current density measurements on the inner and outer collectors. Two versions of the outer collector were fabricated to create gaps of 0.5 and 1.5 mm between the rings. Distribution of current density in the plume of a low-power Hall thruster ion source was measured in azimuthal sweeps at constant radius from 8 to 20 thruster diameters downstream of the exit plane with variation in facility background pressure. A new analytical technique is proposed to account for ions collected in the gap between the Faraday probe collector and guard ring. This method is shown to exhibit excellent agreement between all nested Faraday probe configurations, and to reduce the magnitude of integrated ion beam current to levels consistent with Hall thruster performance analyses. The technique is further studied by varying the guard ring bias potential with a fixed collector bias potential, thereby controlling ion collection in the gap. Results are in agreement with predictions based on the proposed analytical technique. The method is applied to a past study comparing the measured ion current density profiles of two Faraday probe designs. These findings provide new insight into the nature of ion collection in Faraday probe diagnostics, and lead to improved accuracy with a significant reduction in measurement uncertainty. PMID:20590238

  9. Complexation of polyacrylates by Ca2+ ions. Time-resolved studies using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared dialysis spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fantinel, Fabiana; Rieger, Jens; Molnar, Ferenc; Hübler, Patrick

    2004-03-30

    The attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared dialysis technique is introduced for the time-resolved investigation of the binding processes of Ca2+ to polyacrylates dissolved in water. We observed transient formation of intermediates in water with various types of coordination of the carboxylate group to Ca2+ throughout the complexation steps. Time-resolved changes in the spectra were analyzed with principal component analysis, from which the spectral species were obtained as well as their formation kinetics. We propose a model for the mechanisms of Ca2+ coordination to polyacrylates. The polymer chain length plays an important role in Ca2+ binding. PMID:15835120

  10. Crystalline sulfur dioxide: Crystal field splittings, absolute band intensities, and complex refractive indices derived from infra-red spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, R. K.; Zhao, Guizhi; Ospina, M. J.; Pearl, J. C.

    The infra-red absorption spectra of thin crystalline films of sulfur dioxide at 90 K are reported in the 2700-450 cm -1 region. The observed multiplicity of the bands in the regions of fundamental modes is attributed to crystal field effects, including factor group and LO—TO splittings, and naturally present minor 34S, 36S and 18O substituted isotopic species. Complex refractive indices determined by an iterative Kramers—Kronig analysis of the extinction data, and absolute band strengths derived from them, are also reported in this region.

  11. Generalization of Faraday's Law to include nonconservative spin forces.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S E; Maekawa, S

    2007-06-15

    The usual Faraday's Law E=-dPhi/dt determines an electromotive force E which accounts only for forces resulting from the charge of electrons. In ferromagnetic materials, in general, there exist nonconservative spin forces which also contribute to E. These might be included in Faraday's Law if the magnetic flux Phi is replaced by [Planck's constant/(-e)]gamma, where gamma is a Berry phase suitably averaged over the electron spin direction. These contributions to E represent the requirements of energy conservation in itinerant ferromagnets with time dependent order parameters. PMID:17677979

  12. Borogermanate glasses for Faraday isolators at high average power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starobor, A. V.; Zheleznov, D. S.; Palashov, O. V.; Savinkov, V. I.; Sigaev, V. N.

    2016-01-01

    The temperature dependence of Verdet constant and thermo-optical characteristics of a new magneto-optical borogermanate glass has been investigated. The performed analysis confirmed a possibility of developing a Faraday isolator and a cryogenic Faraday isolator based on the studied medium, providing a 25 dB isolation ratio of laser radiation in the "eye-safe" wavelength range (1530-1620 nm) at the power of 0.4 kW and 1.3 kW, respectively, which is a leading-edge result for magneto-optical glasses.

  13. Fast Faraday fading of long range satellite signals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heron, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    20 MHz radio signals have been received during the day from satellite Beacon-B when it was below the optical horizon by using a bank of narrow filters to improve the signal to noise ratio. The Faraday fading rate becomes constant, under these conditions, at a level determined by the plasma frequency just below the F-layer peak. Variations in the Faraday fading rate reveal fluctuations in the electron density near the peak, while the rate of attaining the constant level depends on the shape of the electron density profile.

  14. Does a hydrogen bonded complex with dual contacts show synergism? A matrix isolation infrared and ab-initio study of propargyl alcohol-water complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Jyoti; Viswanathan, K. S.

    2016-08-01

    When hydrogen bonded complexes are formed with more than one contact, the question arises if these multiple contacts operate synergistically. Propargyl alcohol-H2O complex presents a good case study to address this question, which is discussed in this work. Complexes of propargyl alcohol (PA) and H2O were studied experimentally using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy, which was supported by quantum chemical computations performed at the M06-2X and MP2 level of theories, using 6-311++G (d,p) and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. A 1:1 PA-H2O complex was identified in the experiments and corroborated by our computations, where the PA was in the gauche conformation. This complex, which was a global minimum, showed dual interactions, one of which was an n-σ interaction between the O-H group of PA and the O of H2O, while the second was a H···​π contact between the O-H group of H2O and the π system of PA. We explored if the two interactions in the 1:1 complex exhibited synergism. We finally argue that the two interactions showed antagonism rather than synergism. Our computations indicated three other local minima for the 1:1 complexes; though these local minima were not identified in our experiments. Atoms-in-molecules and energy decomposition analysis executed through LMO-EDA were also performed to understand the nature of intermolecular interactions in the PA-H2O complexes. We have also revisited the problem of conformations of PA, with a view to understanding the reasons for gauche conformational preferences in PA.

  15. Research on infrared dim-point target detection and tracking under sea-sky-line complex background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yu-xing; Li, Yan; Zhang, Hai-bo

    2011-08-01

    Target detection and tracking technology in infrared image is an important part of modern military defense system. Infrared dim-point targets detection and recognition under complex background is a difficulty and important strategic value and challenging research topic. The main objects that carrier-borne infrared vigilance system detected are sea-skimming aircrafts and missiles. Due to the characteristics of wide field of view of vigilance system, the target is usually under the sea clutter. Detection and recognition of the target will be taken great difficulties .There are some traditional point target detection algorithms, such as adaptive background prediction detecting method. When background has dispersion-decreasing structure, the traditional target detection algorithms would be more useful. But when the background has large gray gradient, such as sea-sky-line, sea waves etc .The bigger false-alarm rate will be taken in these local area .It could not obtain satisfactory results. Because dim-point target itself does not have obvious geometry or texture feature ,in our opinion , from the perspective of mathematics, the detection of dim-point targets in image is about singular function analysis .And from the perspective image processing analysis , the judgment of isolated singularity in the image is key problem. The foregoing points for dim-point targets detection, its essence is a separation of target and background of different singularity characteristics .The image from infrared sensor usually accompanied by different kinds of noise. These external noises could be caused by the complicated background or from the sensor itself. The noise might affect target detection and tracking. Therefore, the purpose of the image preprocessing is to reduce the effects from noise, also to raise the SNR of image, and to increase the contrast of target and background. According to the low sea-skimming infrared flying small target characteristics , the median filter is used to

  16. All-Fiber Optical Faraday Mirror Using 56-wt%-Terbium-Doped Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Jiang, S.; Marciante, J.R.

    2010-06-22

    An all-fiber optical Faraday mirror that consists of a fiber Faraday rotator and a fiber Bragg grating is demonstrated. The fiber Faraday rotator uses a 21-cm-long section of 56-wt%-terbium-doped silicate fiber. The polarization state of the reflected light is rotated 89 degrees +/- 2 degrees with a 16-dB polarization extinction ratio.

  17. Far-infrared Hall Effect in YBCO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, M.; Rigal, L.; Cerne, J.; Schmadel, D. C.; Drew, H. D.; Kung, P.-J.

    2001-03-01

    In order to gain insight into the so-called "anomalous Hall effect" in Hi Tc superconductors(T.R. Chien, D.A. Brawner, Z.Z. Wang, and N.P. Ong, PRB 43, 6242(1991).) we explore Hall measurements at far-infrared (FIR) frequencies and study the temperature dependence. We separately measure the real and imaginary parts of the magneto-optical response of YBCO thin films to polarized FIR light (15-250 cm-1). The induced rotation of linearly polarized light tells us the real part of the Faraday angle, Re[θ_F(ω)], and the induced dichroism of circularly polarized light tells us Im[θ_F(ω)]. We can then deduce the complex Hall angle without resorting to Kramers-Kronig (K-K) analysis. Since both the Hall angle and the Faraday angle obey sum rules, we can compare to higher frequencies(Cerne, et al., invited talk) and determine additional information about the spectral response at intermediate frequencies. The consistency of these results is verified with K-K analysis.

  18. Infrared spectroscopic study of copper(II) complexes with N-substituted tetrazoles1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarik, M. M.; Gaponik, P. N.; Naumenko, V. N.; Lesnikovich, A. I.; Nikanovich, M. V.

    The i.r. spectra (4000-200 cm -1) of N-alkyltetrazoles and their complexes with copper(II) salts CuCl 2 and Cu(NCS) 2 have been measured. Spectral criteria in the middle and far regions for the identification of tetrazole isomers and their complexes are proposed. The site of the coordination in a tetrazole molecule and supposed structure of complexes are being discussed.

  19. Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) cationized serine complexes: infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy and density functional theory investigations.

    PubMed

    Coates, Rebecca A; Boles, Georgia C; McNary, Christopher P; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Armentrout, P B

    2016-08-10

    The gas-phase structures of zinc and cadmium dications bound to serine (Ser) are investigated by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy using the free electron laser FELIX, in combination with ab initio calculations. To identify the structures of the experimentally observed species, [Zn(Ser-H)CH3CN](+) and CdCl(+)(Ser), the measured action spectra are compared to linear absorption spectra calculated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level for Zn(2+) containing complexes and B3LYP/def2-TZVP levels for Cd(2+) containing complexes. Good agreement between the observed IRMPD spectra and the predicted spectra allows identification of the isomers present. The intact amino acid interacting with cadmium chloride adopts a tridentate chelation involving the amino acid backbone amine and carbonyl groups as well as the hydroxyl group of the side-chain, [N,CO,OH]. The presence of two low-energy conformers is observed for the deprotonated serine-zinc complex, with the same tridentate coordination as for the cadmium complex but proton loss occurs at both the hydroxyl side-chain, [N,CO,O(-)], and the carboxylic acid of the amino acid backbone, [N,CO(-),OH]. These results are profitably compared with the analogous results previously obtained for comparable complexes with cysteine. PMID:27465924

  20. Complexation dynamics of CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile studied by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, YoungAh; Park, Sungnam

    2015-10-01

    Ion-molecule complexation dynamics were studied with CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile by vibrationally probing the nitrile stretching vibration of CH3SCN. The nitrile stretching vibration of CH3SCN has a long lifetime (T1 = ∼90 ps) and its frequency is significantly blue-shifted when CH3SCN is bound with Li(+) ions to form a CH3SCNLi(+) complex in acetonitrile. Such spectral properties enable us to distinguish free CH3SCN and the CH3SCNLi(+) complex in solutions and measure their dynamics occurring on hundred picosecond timescales. For the complexation between CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile, the change in enthalpy (ΔH = -7.17 kJ mol(-1)) and the change in entropy (ΔS = -34.4 J K(-1) mol(-1)) were determined by temperature-dependent FTIR experiments. Polarization-controlled infrared pump-probe (IR PP) spectroscopy was used to measure the population decay and orientational dynamics of free CH3SCN and the CH3SCNLi(+) complex. Especially, the orientational relaxation of the CH3SCNLi(+) complex was found to be almost 3 times slower than those of free CH3SCN because Li(+) ions strongly interact with the neighboring solvents. Most importantly, the complexation dynamics of CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile were successfully measured in real time by 2DIR spectroscopy for the first time and the dissociation and association time constants were directly determined by using the two-species exchange kinetic model. Our experimental results provide a comprehensive overview of the ion-molecule complexation dynamics in solutions occurring under thermal equilibrium conditions. PMID:26323322

  1. Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Collisional Complexes in Dense Hydrogen-Helium Gas Mixtures at Thousands of Kelvin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2011-06-01

    The interaction-induced absorption by collisional pairs of H{_2} molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of the outer planets and cool stars. The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly in the infrared from the expected blackbody spectra of their cores, which is largely due to absorption by collisional H{_2}-H{_2}, H{_2}-He, and H{_2}-H complexes in the stellar atmospheres. Using quantum-chemical methods we compute the atmospheric absorption from hundreds to thousands of kelvin. Laboratory measurements of interaction-induced absorption spectra by H{_2} pairs exist only at room temperature and below. We show that our results reproduce these measurements closely, so that our computational data permit reliable modeling of stellar atmosphere opacities even for the higher temperatures. L. Frommhold, Collision-Induced Absorption in Gases, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, New York, 1993 and 2006 Xiaoping Li, Katharine L. C. Hunt, Fei Wang, Martin Abel, and Lothar Frommhold, "Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Molecular Hydrogen Pairs at Thousands of Kelvin", International Journal of Spectroscopy, vol. 2010, Article ID 371201, 11 pages, 2010. doi: 10.1155/2010/371201 M. Abel, L. Frommhold, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Collision-induced absorption by H{_2} pairs: From hundreds to thousands of Kelvin," J. Phys. Chem. A, published online, DOI: 10.1021/jp109441f L. Frommhold, M. Abel, F. Wang, M. Gustafsson, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Infrared atmospheric emission and absorption by simple molecular complexes, from first principles", Mol. Phys. 108, 2265, 2010

  2. Infrared Spectroscopic Analysis of Linkage Isomerism in Metal-Thiocyanate Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Carl; Pike, Jay

    2010-01-01

    We developed an experiment suitable for an advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory that utilizes a cooperative learning environment, which allows students to develop an empirical method of determining the bonding mode of a series of unknown metal-thiocyanate complexes. Students synthesize the metal-thiocyanate complexes and obtain the FT-IR…

  3. Interferometer using a 3 x 3 coupler and Faraday mirrors.

    PubMed

    Breguet, J; Gisin, N

    1995-06-15

    A new interferometric setup using a 3 x 3 coupler and two Faraday mirrors is presented. It has the advantages of being built only with passive components, of freedom from the polarization fading problem, and of operation with a LED. It is well suited for sensing time-dependent signals and does not depend on reciprocal or nonreciprocal constant perturbations. PMID:19862044

  4. Possibility of observing dark matter via the gyromagnetic Faraday effect.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Susan

    2008-02-01

    If dark matter consists of cold, neutral particles with a nonzero magnetic moment, then, in the presence of an external magnetic field, a measurable gyromagnetic Faraday effect becomes possible. This enables direct constraints on the nature and distribution of such dark matter through detailed measurements of the polarization and temperature of the cosmic-microwave background radiation. PMID:18352256

  5. Faraday rotation density measurements of optically thick alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliegen, E.; Kadlecek, S.; Anderson, L. W.; Walker, T. G.; Erickson, C. J.; Happer, William

    2001-03-01

    We investigate the measurement of alkali number densities using the Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light. We find that the alkali number density may be reliably extracted even in regimes of very high buffer gas pressure, and very high alkali number density. We have directly verified our results in potassium using absorption spectroscopy on the second resonance (4 2S→5 2P).

  6. Exact Faraday rotation in the cylindrical Einstein-Maxwell waves

    SciTech Connect

    Arafah, M.R.; Fakioglu, S.; Halilsoy, M. )

    1990-07-15

    We obtain the exact behavior of the cross-polarized cylindrical Einstein-Maxwell waves that generalizes the well-known Einstein-Rosen waves. In the presence of the second mode of polarization the outgoing waves interact with the incoming ones to exhibit an analogous effect of the Faraday rotation.

  7. Professor Henry, Mr. Faraday, and the Hunt for Electromagnetic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Albert E.

    1997-04-01

    On different sides of the Atlantic but about the same time, Michael Faraday and Joseph Henry announced success in a quest that had preoccupied the scientific community for a decade: coaxing electricity from magnetism. "Mutual induction," what Faraday and Henry had identified in the early 1830s, would turn out to be not only a foundational concept in the physics of electricity and magnetism but also the principle behind the technology of electrical transformers and generators--two mainstays of industrialization. Although Faraday's breakthrough in London and Henry's in Albany might appear to be classic examples of "independent discovery," they were not. The two natural philosophers shared a similar orientation toward their research and, moreover, a distinctive laboratory instrument: Henry's new, powerful electromagnet. Thus, the story of Henry's and Faraday's search for induction illuminates not only the workings of Victorian science but also the crucial part that an instrument--the unadorned hardware--can play in scientific inquiry. Albert Moyer takes this story from his biography of Joseph Henry that Smithsonian Institution Press is about to publish in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Henry's birth. The biography focuses on Henry's early and middle years, 1797-1847, from his emergence as America's foremost physical scientist to his election as the Smithsonian Institution's first director.

  8. Michael Faraday: Prince of lecturers in Victorian England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Boon Leong; Lim, Jeanette B. S.

    2001-01-01

    In this note, we focus on Faraday as a lecturer/teacher. We trace his development as a lecturer/teacher and highlight his approaches in popular-science lecturing and in teaching chemistry to military cadets. We appraise his success and conclude with an account of his poignant last lecture.

  9. Faraday's Investigation of Electromagnetic Induction. Experiment No. 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devons, Samuel

    This paper focuses on Michael Faraday's experimental research in electricity in the 1830's. Historical notes related to his work are included as well as experiments, his objectives, and illustrations of equipment for the experiments. Examples from his diary are given so that students can attempt to emulate his honest and systematic manner of…

  10. Faraday, Dickens and Science Education in Victorian Britain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, Wayne; Allingham, Philip V.

    2011-01-01

    The achievements of Michael Faraday in the fields of electricity and electrochemistry have led some to describe him as the greatest experimental scientist in history. Charles Dickens was the creative genius behind some of the most memorable characters in literature. In this article, we share an historical account of how the collaboration of these…

  11. Interferometer using a 3 × 3 coupler and Faraday mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breguet, J.; Gisin, N.

    1995-06-01

    A new interferometric setup using a 3 \\times 3 coupler and two Faraday mirrors is presented. It has the advantages of being built only with passive components, of freedom from the polarization fading problem, and of operation with a LED. It is well suited for sensing time-dependent signals and does not depend on reciprocal or nonreciprocal constant perturbations.

  12. Faraday signature of magnetic helicity from reduced depolarization

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, Axel; Stepanov, Rodion

    2014-05-10

    Using one-dimensional models, we show that a helical magnetic field with an appropriate sign of helicity can compensate the Faraday depolarization resulting from the superposition of Faraday-rotated polarization planes from a spatially extended source. For radio emission from a helical magnetic field, the polarization as a function of the square of the wavelength becomes asymmetric with respect to zero. Mathematically speaking, the resulting emission occurs then either at observable or at unobservable (imaginary) wavelengths. We demonstrate that rotation measure (RM) synthesis allows for the reconstruction of the underlying Faraday dispersion function in the former case, but not in the latter. The presence of positive magnetic helicity can thus be detected by observing positive RM in highly polarized regions in the sky and negative RM in weakly polarized regions. Conversely, negative magnetic helicity can be detected by observing negative RM in highly polarized regions and positive RM in weakly polarized regions. The simultaneous presence of two magnetic constituents with opposite signs of helicity is shown to possess signatures that can be quantified through polarization peaks at specific wavelengths and the gradient of the phase of the Faraday dispersion function. Similar polarization peaks can tentatively also be identified for the bi-helical magnetic fields that are generated self-consistently by a dynamo from helically forced turbulence, even though the magnetic energy spectrum is then continuous. Finally, we discuss the possibility of detecting magnetic fields with helical and non-helical properties in external galaxies using the Square Kilometre Array.

  13. Concluding remarks: Faraday Discussion on chemistry in the urban atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Jose L

    2016-07-18

    This article summarises the Concluding remarks from the Faraday Discussion on Chemistry in the Urban Atmosphere. The following themes are addressed: (a) new results that inform our understanding of the evolving sources and composition of the urban atmosphere ("News"); (b) results that identify gaps in our understanding that necessitate further work ("Gaps"); PMID:27363779

  14. The infrared spectrum of the Ne-C2D2 complex.

    PubMed

    Moazzen-Ahmadi, N; McKellar, A R W; Fernández, Berta; Farrelly, David

    2015-11-28

    Infrared spectra of Ne-C2D2 are observed in the region of the ν3 fundamental band (asymmetric C-D stretch, ≈2440 cm(-1)) using a tunable optical parametric oscillator to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion from a cooled nozzle. Like helium-acetylene, this system lies close to the free rotor limit, making analysis tricky because stronger transitions tend to pile up close to monomer (C2D2) rotation-vibration transitions. Assignments are aided by predicted rotational energies calculated from a published ab initio intermolecular potential energy surface. The analysis extends up to the j = 3←2 band, where j labels C2D2 rotation within the dimer, and is much more complete than the limited infrared assignments previously reported for Ne-C2H2 and Ne-C2HD. Two previous microwave transitions within the j = 1 state of Ne-C2D2 are reassigned. Coriolis model fits to the theoretical levels and to the spectrum are compared. Since the variations observed as a function of C2D2 vibrational excitation are comparable to those noted between theory and experiment, it is evident that more detailed testing of theory will require vibrational averaging over the acetylene intramolecular modes. PMID:26627959

  15. The infrared spectrum of the Ne-C2D2 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.; Fernández, Berta; Farrelly, David

    2015-11-01

    Infrared spectra of Ne-C2D2 are observed in the region of the ν3 fundamental band (asymmetric C-D stretch, ≈2440 cm-1) using a tunable optical parametric oscillator to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion from a cooled nozzle. Like helium-acetylene, this system lies close to the free rotor limit, making analysis tricky because stronger transitions tend to pile up close to monomer (C2D2) rotation-vibration transitions. Assignments are aided by predicted rotational energies calculated from a published ab initio intermolecular potential energy surface. The analysis extends up to the j = 3←2 band, where j labels C2D2 rotation within the dimer, and is much more complete than the limited infrared assignments previously reported for Ne-C2H2 and Ne-C2HD. Two previous microwave transitions within the j = 1 state of Ne-C2D2 are reassigned. Coriolis model fits to the theoretical levels and to the spectrum are compared. Since the variations observed as a function of C2D2 vibrational excitation are comparable to those noted between theory and experiment, it is evident that more detailed testing of theory will require vibrational averaging over the acetylene intramolecular modes.

  16. The H2O-CH3F Complex: a Combined Microwave and Infrared Spectroscopic Study Supported by Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasekar, Sharon Priya; Goubet, Manuel; Arunan, Elangannan; Georges, Robert; Soulard, Pascale; Asselin, Pierre; Huet, T. R.; Pirali, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    The H2O-CH3F complex could have two geometries, one with a hydrogen bond and one with the newly proposed carbon bond. While in general carbon bonds are weaker than hydrogen bonds, this complex appears to have comparable energies for the two structures. Infrared (IR) and microwave (MW) spectroscopic measurements using, respectively, the Jet-AILES apparatus and the FTMW spectrometer at the PhLAM laboratory, have been carried out to determine the structure of this complex. The IR spectrum shows the formation of the CH3F- H2O hydrogen bonded complex and small red-shifts in OH frequency most probably due to (CH3F)m-(H2O)n clusters. Noticeably, addition of CH_3F in the mixture promotes the formation of small water clusters. Preliminary MW spectroscopic measurements indicate the formation of the hydrogen bonded complex. So far, we have no experimental evidence for the carbon bonded structure. However, calculations of the Ar-CH3F complex show three energetically equivalent structures: a T-shape, a "fluorine" bond and a carbon bond. The MW spectrum of the (Ar)n-CH3F complexes is currently under analysis. Mani, D; Arunan, E. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2013, 15, 14377. Cirtog, M; Asselin, P; Soulard, P; Tremblay, B; Madebene, B; Alikhani, M. E; Georges, R; Moudens, A; Goubet, M; Huet, T.R; Pirali, O; Roy, P. J. Phys. Chem. A. 2011, 115, 2523 Kassi, S; Petitprez, D; Wlodarczak, G. J. Mol. Struct. 2000, 517-518, 375

  17. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectra of Glutamine Complexes with Zn(2+) and Cd(2.).

    PubMed

    Boles, Georgia C; Coates, Rebecca A; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Armentrout, P B

    2015-09-01

    Complexes of glutamine (Gln) cationized with Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) were examined by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy using light generated from a free-electron laser. Electrospray ionization yielded complexes of deprotonated Gln with Zn(2+), [Zn(Gln-H)](+), and intact Gln with CdCl(+), CdCl(+)(Gln). For each complex, the spectra obtained were compared with those for low-energy conformers found using quantum chemical calculations to identify the structures present experimentally. Calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level for [Zn(Gln-H)](+) and at the B3LYP/def2-TZVP level with an SDD effective core potential on cadmium for CdCl(+)(Gln). The main binding motif observed for the Cd(2+) complex was a charge-solvated, tridentate [N,CO,COsc] structure in which the metal binds to the backbone amino group and the carbonyl oxygens of the carboxylic acid and side-chain amide groups. The Zn(2+) system similarly preferred a [N,CO(-),COsc] binding motif, where binding was observed at the carboxylate site along with the backbone amino and side-chain carbonyl groups. In both cases, the theoretically determined lowest-energy conformers explain the experimental [Zn(Gln-H)](+) and CdCl(+)(Gln) spectra well. PMID:26280573

  18. Integrating seasonal optical and thermal infrared spectra to characterize urban impervious surfaces with extreme spectral complexity: a Shanghai case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Xinfeng; Ji, Minhe

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent rapid advancement in remote sensing technology, accurate mapping of the urban landscape in China still faces a great challenge due to unusually high spectral complexity in many big cities. Much of this complication comes from severe spectral confusion of impervious surfaces with polluted water bodies and bright bare soils. This paper proposes a two-step land cover decomposition method, which combines optical and thermal spectra from different seasons to cope with the issue of urban spectral complexity. First, a linear spectral mixture analysis was employed to generate fraction images for three preliminary endmembers (high albedo, low albedo, and vegetation). Seasonal change analysis on land surface temperature induced from thermal infrared spectra and coarse component fractions obtained from the first step was then used to reduce the confusion between impervious surfaces and nonimpervious materials. This method was tested with two-date Landsat multispectral data in Shanghai, one of China's megacities. The results showed that the method was capable of consistently estimating impervious surfaces in highly complex urban environments with an accuracy of R2 greater than 0.70 and both root mean square error and mean average error less than 0.20 for all test sites. This strategy seemed very promising for landscape mapping of complex urban areas.

  19. The research on infrared small-target detection technology under complex background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wang, Xin; Chen, Jilu; Huang, Zhijian

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, some basic principles and the implementing flow charts of a series of algorithms for target detecting are described. Then, according to actual needs and the comparison results of those algorithms, some of them are optimized in combination with the image pre-processing. On the foundation of above works, a moving target detecting and tracking software base on the OpenCV is developed by the software developing platform MFC. Three kinds of detecting algorithms are integrated in this software. These three detecting algorithms are Frame Difference method, Background Estimation method and Mixture Gaussian Modeling method. In order to explain the software clearly, the framework and the function are described in this paper. At last, the implementing processes and results are analyzed, and those algorithms for detecting targets are evaluated from the two aspects of subjective and objective. This paper is very significant in the application of the infrared target detecting technology.

  20. Research on infrared small-target tracking technology under complex background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wang, Xin; Chen, Jilu; Pan, Tao

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, some basic principles and the implementing flow charts of a series of algorithms for target tracking are described. On the foundation of above works, a moving target tracking software base on the OpenCV is developed by the software developing platform MFC. Three kinds of tracking algorithms are integrated in this software. These two tracking algorithms are Kalman Filter tracking method and Camshift tracking method. In order to explain the software clearly, the framework and the function are described in this paper. At last, the implementing processes and results are analyzed, and those algorithms for tracking targets are evaluated from the two aspects of subjective and objective. This paper is very significant in the application of the infrared target tracking technology.

  1. A Study of Broadband Faraday Rotation and Polarization Behavior over 1.3--10 GHz in 36 Discrete Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J.

    2016-07-01

    We present a broadband polarization analysis of 36 discrete polarized radio sources over a very broad, densely sampled frequency band. Our sample was selected on the basis of polarization behavior apparent in narrowband archival data at 1.4 GHz: half the sample shows complicated frequency-dependent polarization behavior (i.e., Faraday complexity) at these frequencies, while half shows comparatively simple behavior (i.e., they appear Faraday simple). We re-observed the sample using the Australia Telescope Compact Array in full polarization, with 6 GHz of densely sampled frequency coverage spanning 1.3–10 GHz. We have devised a general polarization modeling technique that allows us to identify multiple polarized emission components in a source, and to characterize their properties. We detect Faraday complex behavior in almost every source in our sample. Several sources exhibit particularly remarkable polarization behavior. By comparing our new and archival data, we have identified temporal variability in the broadband integrated polarization spectra of some sources. In a number of cases, the characteristics of the polarized emission components, including the range of Faraday depths over which they emit, their temporal variability, spectral index, and the linear extent of the source, allow us to argue that the spectropolarimetric data encode information about the magneto-ionic environment of active galactic nuclei themselves. Furthermore, the data place direct constraints on the geometry and magneto-ionic structure of this material. We discuss the consequences of restricted frequency bands on the detection and interpretation of polarization structures, and the implications for upcoming spectropolarimetric surveys.

  2. Infrared and electron spin resonance spectral studies of some copper purine and pyrimidine complexes.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Mamdouh S; Abd El-Kaway, Marwa Y

    2013-02-01

    Copper guanine and barbital complexes were prepared and characterized by elemental analyses and spectral measurements. The data typified the formation of stoichiometries 1:1 (M:L) with possible Cu-Cu interaction "association". The complexes are with different geometries: square planar, square pyramidal and tetrahedral. The mode of bonding was identified by IR spectra. EPR spectra of the powdered complexes were recorded at X band at the room temperature. Different ESR parameters were calculated and discussed: g(//), g(⊥), A(//), [g], G, F, K, α(2). Molecular modeling techniques and quantum chemical methods have been performed for copper complexes to correlate the chemical structures of the complexes with their physical molecular properties. Bond lengths, bond orders, bond angles, dihedral angles, close contact, dipole moment (μ), sum of the total negative charge (STNC), electronegativity (χ), chemical potential (Pi), global hardness (η), softness (σ), the highest occupied molecular orbital energy (E(HOMO)), the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (E(LUMO)) and the energy gap (ΔE) were calculated using PM3 semi-empirical and Molecular Mechanics (MM+) methods. The study displays a good correlation between the theoretical and experimental data which confirms the reliability of the quantum chemical methods. PMID:23220533

  3. Infrared multiple-photon dissociation spectroscopy of tripositive ions: lanthanum-tryptophan complexes.

    PubMed

    Verkerk, Udo H; Zhao, Junfang; Saminathan, Irine S; Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Oomens, Jos; Hopkinson, Alan C; Siu, K W Michael

    2012-04-16

    Collision-induced charge disproportionation limits the stability of triply charged metal ion complexes and has thus far prevented successful acquisition of their gas-phase IR spectra. This has curtailed our understanding of the structures of triply charged metal complexes in the gas phase and in biological environments. Herein we report the first gas-phase IR spectra of triply charged La(III) complexes with a derivative of tryptophan (N-acetyl tryptophan methyl ester), and an unusual dissociation product, a lanthanum amidate. These spectra are compared with those predicted using density functional theory. The best structures are those of the lowest energies that differ by details in the π-interaction between La(3+) and the indole rings. Other binding sites on the tryptophan derivative are the carbonyl oxygens. In the lanthanum amidate, La(3+) replaces an H(+) in the amide bond of the tryptophan derivative. PMID:22455512

  4. Fourier transform infrared characterization of the azido complex of methane monooxygenase hydroxylase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Lu, Shen; Sazinsky, Matthew H; Whittaker, James W; Lippard, Stephen J; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre

    2005-03-30

    The azido complex formed in oxidized methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) was investigated with resonance Raman and FTIR techniques. These experiments show the presence of a nuas(NNN) at approximately 2077 cm-1 which splits to two components at 2059 and 2073 cm-1 with 15N14N2. The vibrational data are assigned to an azido complex bound terminally to one iron(III) at the diiron center. When the azido complex is illuminated at 15 K, a new nuas(NNN) is observed at 2136 cm-1 which is assigned to a photodissociated HN3 within the substrate pocket. We propose a model where an aqua ligand engages a hydrogen bond interaction with the 1N atom of the azido group and acts as at a proton donor during the photolysis process. PMID:15783178

  5. Mid-Infrared Spectrum of the Atmospherically Significant N2-H2O Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, Sean D.; McElmurry, Blake A.; Lucchese, Robert R.; Bevan, John W.; Coudert, L. H.

    2014-06-01

    Rovibrational transitions associated with tunneling states in the vibration of the N2-H2O complex have been recorded using a supersonic jet quantum cascade laser spectrometer at 6.2μm. Analysis of the resulting spectra is facilitated by incorporating fits of previously recorded microwave and submillimeter data accounting for Coriolis coupling to obtain the levels of the ground vibrational state. The results are then used to confirm assignment of the νb{3} vibration and explore the nature of tunneling dynamics in associated vibrationally excited states of the complex.

  6. Infrared irradiation in the collision cell of a hybrid tandem quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer for declustering and cleaning of nanoelectrosprayed protein complex ions.

    PubMed

    El-Faramawy, Ayman; Guo, Yuzhu; Verkerk, Udo H; Thomson, Bruce A; Siu, K W Michael

    2010-12-01

    Herein we report the performance of a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer with an improved designed for coaxial infrared laser introduction for the characterization and dissociation of large protein complex ions and their aggregates formed under nanoelectrospray ionization. The major improvement from the original design (Raspopov, S. A.; El-Faramawy, A.; Thomson, B. A.; Siu, K. W. M. Anal. Chem. 2006, 78, 4572-4577) involves the use of a hollow silica waveguide and physical isolation of the infrared laser. Large model protein complex ions and their aggregates examined include alcohol dehydrogenase, avidin, GroEL, and others. Gentle heating of these complexes with the infrared laser facilitated declustering and resulted in better resolved mass spectral peaks and more accurate molecular-weight measurements. PMID:21062028

  7. Portrait of the Polana-Eulalia family complex: Surface homogeneity revealed from near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla-Alonso, Noemí; de León, J.; Walsh, K. J.; Campins, H.; Lorenzi, V.; Delbo, M.; DeMeo, F.; Licandro, J.; Landsman, Z.; Lucas, M. P.; Alí-Lagoa, V.; Burt, B.

    2016-08-01

    The inner asteroid belt is an important source of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Dynamical studies of the inner asteroid belt have identified several families overlapping in proper orbital elements, including the Polana and Eulalia families that contain a large fraction of the low-albedo asteroids in this region. We present results from two coordinated observational campaigns to characterize this region through near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. These campaigns ran from August 2012 to May 2014 and used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. The observations focused on objects within these families or in the background, with low albedo (pv ≤ 0.1) and low inclination (iP ≤ 7°). We observed 63 asteroids (57 never before observed in the NIR): 61 low-albedo objects and two interlopers, both compatible with S- or E- taxonomical types. We found our sample to be spectrally homogeneous in the NIR. The sample shows a continuum of neutral to moderately-red concave-up spectra, very similar within the uncertainties. Only one object in the sample, asteroid (3429) Chuvaev, has a blue spectrum, with a slope (S‧ = - 1.33 ± 0.21%/1000 Å) significantly different from the average spectrum (S‧ = 0.68 ± 0.68%/1000 Å). This spectral homogeneity is independent of membership in families or the background population. Furthermore, we show that the Eulalia and Polana families cannot be distinguished using NIR data. We also searched for rotational variability on the surface of (495) Eulalia which we do not detect. (495) Eulalia shows a red concave-up spectrum with an average slope S‧ = 0.91 ± 0.60%/1000 Å, very similar to the average slope of our sample. The spectra of two targets of sample-return missions, (101955) Bennu, target of NASA's OSIRIS-Rex and (162173) 1999 JU3 target of the Japanese Space Agency's Hayabusa-2, are very similar to our average spectrum, which would be compatible with an origin in this region of the inner belt.

  8. FAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} VAN DER WAALS COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, Hayley; Bennett, Trystan; Karayilan, Aidan; Raston, Paul L.

    2015-01-20

    We report the far infrared spectrum of H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} at 80 K in the vicinity of the pure rotational bands of H{sub 2}. Sharp peaks were observed, which correspond to end-over-end rotational transitions of the H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} molecular complex, that are superimposed over broad collision induced absorptions. We find that the maximum value of the end-over-end rotational quantum number that is bound is seven, which is two more than supported by a recently reported ab initio H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} potential energy surface. The rotational spectrum reported here should therefore greatly help in refining this surface, which is used to calculate scattering processes relevant to the chemistry occurring in interstellar molecular clouds.

  9. Azadipyrromethene cyclometalation in neutral Ru(II) complexes: photosensitizers with extended near-infrared absorption for solar energy conversion applications.

    PubMed

    Bessette, André; Cibian, Mihaela; Ferreira, Janaina G; DiMarco, Brian N; Bélanger, Francis; Désilets, Denis; Meyer, Gerald J; Hanan, Garry S

    2016-06-28

    In the on-going quest to harvest near-infrared (NIR) photons for energy conversion applications, a novel family of neutral ruthenium(ii) sensitizers has been developed by cyclometalation of an azadipyrromethene chromophore. These rare examples of neutral ruthenium complexes based on polypyridine ligands exhibit an impressive panchromaticity achieved by the cyclometalation strategy, with strong light absorption in the 600-800 nm range that tails beyond 1100 nm in the terpyridine-based adducts. Evaluation of the potential for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC) and Organic Photovoltaic (OPV) applications is made through rationalization of the structure-property relationship by spectroscopic, electrochemical, X-ray structural and computational modelization investigations. Spectroscopic evidence for photo-induced charge injection into the conduction band of TiO2 is also provided. PMID:27264670

  10. Growth dynamics and intracluster reactions in Ni{sup +}(CO{sub 2}){sub n} complexes via infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, N.R.; Walters, R.S.; Grieves, G.A.; Duncan, M.A.

    2004-12-01

    Ni{sup +}(CO{sub 2}){sub n}, Ni{sup +}(CO{sub 2}){sub n}Ar, Ni{sup +}(CO{sub 2}){sub n}Ne, and Ni{sup +}(O{sub 2})(CO{sub 2}){sub n} complexes are generated by laser vaporization in a pulsed supersonic expansion. The complexes are mass-selected in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer and studied by infrared resonance-enhanced photodissociation (IR-REPD) spectroscopy. Photofragmentation proceeds exclusively through the loss of intact CO{sub 2} molecules from Ni{sup +}(CO{sub 2}){sub n} and Ni{sup +}(O{sub 2})(CO{sub 2}){sub n} complexes, and by elimination of the noble gas atom from Ni{sup +}(CO{sub 2}){sub n}Ar and Ni{sup +}(CO{sub 2}){sub n}Ne. Vibrational resonances are identified and assigned in the region of the asymmetric stretch of CO{sub 2}. Small complexes have resonances that are blueshifted from the asymmetric stretch of free CO{sub 2}, consistent with structures having linear Ni{sup +}-O=C=O configurations. Fragmentation of larger Ni{sup +}(CO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters terminates at the size of n=4, and new vibrational bands assigned to external ligands are observed for n{>=}5. These combined observations indicate that the coordination number for CO{sub 2} molecules around Ni{sup +} is exactly four. Trends in the loss channels and spectra of Ni{sup +}(O{sub 2})(CO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters suggest that each oxygen atom occupies a different coordination site around a four-coordinate metal ion in these complexes. The spectra of larger Ni{sup +}(CO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters provide evidence for an intracluster insertion reaction assisted by solvation, producing a metal oxide-carbonyl species as the reaction product.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy of Mg–CO{sub 2} and Al–CO{sub 2} complexes in helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Brandon J.; Harruff-Miller, Barbara A.; Bunker, Christopher E.; Lewis, William K.

    2015-05-07

    The catalytic reduction of CO{sub 2} to produce hydrocarbon fuels is a topic that has gained significant attention. Development of efficient catalysts is a key enabler to such approaches, and metal-based catalysts have shown promise towards this goal. The development of a fundamental understanding of the interactions between CO{sub 2} molecules and metal atoms is expected to offer insight into the chemistry that occurs at the active site of such catalysts. In the current study, we utilize helium droplet methods to assemble complexes composed of a CO{sub 2} molecule and a Mg or Al atom. High-resolution infrared (IR) spectroscopy and optically selected mass spectrometry are used to probe the structure and binding of the complexes, and the experimental observations are compared with theoretical results determined from ab initio calculations. In both the Mg–CO{sub 2} and Al–CO{sub 2} systems, two IR bands are obtained: one assigned to a linear isomer and the other assigned to a T-shaped isomer. In the case of the Mg–CO{sub 2} complexes, the vibrational frequencies and rotational constants associated with the two isomers are in good agreement with theoretical values. In the case of the Al–CO{sub 2} complexes, the vibrational frequencies agree with theoretical predictions; however, the bands from both structural isomers exhibit significant homogeneous broadening sufficient to completely obscure the rotational structure of the bands. The broadening is consistent with an upper state lifetime of 2.7 ps for the linear isomer and 1.8 ps for the T-shaped isomer. The short lifetime is tentatively attributed to a prompt photo-induced chemical reaction between the CO{sub 2} molecule and the Al atom comprising the complex.

  12. Seaquake waves: Standing wave dynamics with Faraday excitation and radiative loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolven, Eric Thomas

    When a body of deep water is subjected to vertical oscillations with frequency w0 , linear theory predicts that a standing wave field with frequency w=w02 forms on the surface. The wave number k*=w2g is determined by the deep water dispersion relation. These waves are called Faraday waves after Michael Faraday [16] who first documented them in 1831. Since then, much work has been done to try and understand them. However, all the existing results are for high frequency capillary waves subjected to viscous damping. What is observed is a variety of standing wave patterns that may be stabilized for various forcing strengths and viscosities. We analyze a system in which the dominant mechanism for energy dispersal is radiation rather than viscosity. We suggest this as a first approximation to the transient motions associated with earthquakes at sea and find that the results give insight into seaquake dynamics and the complex interactions involved with water wave formation. These assumptions introduce a number of challenges along with introducing interesting dynamics. In particular, phase dynamics arise that lead to remarkable quasi-stationary states that evolve on a slow time scale.

  13. Laser Infrared Desorption Spectroscopy to Detect Complex Organic Molecules on Icy Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollit, Luke S.; Beegle, Luther W.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Desorption-Infrared Spectroscopy (LD-IR) uses an IR laser pulse to desorb surface materials while a spectrometer measures the emission spectrum of the desorbed materials (Figure 1). In this example, laser desorption operates by having the incident laser energy absorbed by near surface material (10 microns in depth). This desorption produces a plume that exists in an excited state at elevated temperatures. A natural analog for this phenomenon can be observed when comets approach the sun and become active and individual molecular emission spectra can be observed in the IR [1,2,3,4,5]. When this occurs in comets, the same species that initially emit radiation down to the ground state are free to absorb it, reducing the amount of detectable emission features. The nature of our technique results in absorption not occurring, because the laser pulse could easily be moved away form the initial desorption plume, and still have better spatial resolution then reflectance spectroscopy. In reflectance spectroscopy, trace components have a relatively weak signal when compared to the entire active nature of the surface. With LDIR, the emission spectrum is used to identify and analyze surface materials.

  14. A new potential energy surface and microwave and infrared spectra of the He-OCS complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhongquan Zhang, Chunzao; Sun, Chunyan; Feng, Eryin

    2014-11-07

    A new high quality potential energy surface for the He-OCS van der Waals complex was calculated using the CCSD(T) method and avqz+33221 basis set. It is found that the global minimum energy is −51.33 cm{sup −1} at R{sub e} = 6.30a{sub 0} and θ{sub e} = 110.0°, the shallower minimum is located at R = 8.50a{sub 0} and θ = 0° with well depth −32.26 cm{sup −1}. Using the fitted potential energy surface, we have calculated bound energy levels of the He-OCS, He-O{sup 13}CS, He-OC{sup 34}S, and {sup 3}He-OCS complexes. The theoretical results are all in better agreement compared to previous theoretical work.

  15. Molecular Design Guidelines for Large Magnetic Circular Dichroism Intensities in Lanthanide Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yuichi; Wada, Satoshi; Yanagisawa, Kei; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Fushimi, Koji; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-03-16

    Magneto optical devices based on the Faraday effects of lanthanide ion have attracted much attention. Recently, large Faraday effects were found in nano-sized multinuclear lanthanide complexes. In this study, the Faraday rotation intensities were estimated for lanthanide nitrates [Ln(III) (NO3 )3 ⋅n H2 O: Ln=Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) and Eu(III) complexes with β-diketone ligands, using magnetic circular dichroism. Eu ions exhibit the largest Faraday rotation intensity for (7) F0 →(5) D1 transitions, and high-symmetry fields around the Eu ions induce larger Faraday effects. The molecular design for the enhancement of Faraday effects in lanthanide complexes is discussed. PMID:26789658

  16. Spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry for phase-sensitive measurement of Faraday rotation at multiple depths

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yi-Jou; Black, Adam J.; Akkin, Taner

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method for differential phase measurement of Faraday rotation from multiple depth locations simultaneously. A polarization-maintaining fiber-based spectral-domain interferometer which utilizes a low-coherent light source and a single camera is developed. Light decorrelated by the orthogonal channels of the fiber is launched on a sample as two oppositely polarized circular states. These states reflect from sample surfaces and interfere with the corresponding states of the reference arm. A custom spectrometer, which is designed to simplify camera alignment, separates the orthogonal channels and records the interference related oscillations on both spectra. Inverse Fourier transform of the spectral oscillations in k-space yields complex depth profiles, whose amplitudes and phase difference are related to reflectivity and Faraday rotation within the sample, respectively. Information along a full depth profile is produced at the camera speed without performing an axial scan for a multi-surface sample. System sensitivity for the Faraday rotation measurement is 0.86 minutes of arc. Verdet constants of clear liquids and turbid media are measured at 687 nm. PMID:24217734

  17. A New Faraday Screen For Tore Supra ICRH Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulliez, K.; Colas, L.; Argouarch, A.; Mendes, A.; Hamlyn-Harris, C.; Ekedahl, A.; Patterlini, J. C.

    2009-11-01

    In the framework of the Ion Cyclotron (IC) developments held in Cadarache, the design of a new Faraday Screen (FS) was initiated to replace the aging ones mounted on the 3 Tore Supra (TS) antennas. The new conceptual design proposed is steered by conclusive results of electrical simulation stressing the need to suppress the parallel RF currents flowing on the FS frame to reduce the RF sheaths. Two major modifications are implemented on a TS FS to reduce the j// circulation: apertures on the top and bottom closure walls of the antenna radiating box, and cantilevered FS bars (that is, bars not connected to the vertical central septum). This single connection point also eases the FS rod thermal expansion, resulting in less mechanical stresses. In addition, the cantilevered bar design avoids eddy current loops which reduces electromagnetically induced stresses during disruptions. If successful with plasma operation, this RF structure provides a promising new option to simplify the ITER IC Faraday screen design.

  18. Todd, Faraday and the electrical basis of brain activity.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward

    2007-10-01

    The origins of our understanding of brain electricity and electrical discharges in epilepsy can be traced to Robert Bentley Todd (1809-60). Todd was influenced by his contemporary in London, Michael Faraday (1791-1867), who in the 1830 s and 1840 s was laying the foundations of our modern understanding of electromagnetism. Todd's concept of nervous polarity, generated in nerve vesicles and transmitted in nerve fibres (neurons in later terminology), was confirmed a century later by the Nobel Prize-winning work of Hodgkin and Huxley, who demonstrated the ionic basis of neuro-transmission, involving the same ions which had had been discovered by Faraday's mentor, Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829). PMID:17885273

  19. CRADA Final Report, 2011S003, Faraday Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Faraday Technologies

    2012-12-12

    This Phase I SBIR program addressed the need for an improved manufacturing process for electropolishing niobium RF superconducting cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The ILC is a proposed particle accelerator that will be used to gain a deeper understanding of the forces of energy and matter by colliding beams of electrons and positrons at nearly the speed of light. The energy required for this to happen will be achieved through the use of advanced superconducting technology, specifically ~16,000 RF superconducting cavities operating at near absolute zero. The RF superconductor cavities will be fabricated from highly pure Nb, which has an extremely low surface resistance at 2 Kelvin when compared to other materials. To take full advantage of the superconducting properties of the Nb cavities, the inner surface must be a) polished to a microscale roughness < 0.1 µm with removal of at least 100 µm of material, and b) cleaned to be free of impurities that would degrade performance of the ILC. State-of-the-art polishing uses either chemical polishing or electropolishing, both of which require hydrofluoric acid to achieve breakdown of the strong passive film on the surface. In this Phase I program, Faraday worked with its collaborators at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) to demonstrate the feasibility of an electropolishing process for pure niobium, utilizing an environmentally benign alternative to chemical or electrochemical polishing electrolytes containing hydrofluoric acid. Faraday utilized a 31 wt% aqueous sulfuric acid solution (devoid of hydrofluoric acid) in conjunction with the FARADAYICSM Process, which uses pulse/pulse reverse fields for electropolishing, to demonstrate the ability to electropolish niobium to the desired surface finish. The anticipated benefits of the FARADAYICSM Electropolishing process will be a simpler, safer, and less expensive method capable of surface finishing high purity niobium cavities

  20. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    We investigate non-destructive measurements of ultra-cold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. In particular, we pursue applications to dynamically controlled ultracold atoms. The dependence of the Faraday signal on laser detuning, atomic density and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. In particular the destructivity per measurement is extremely low and we illustrate this by imaging the same cloud up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration. Adding dynamic changes to system parameters, we demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. The method can be implemented particularly easily in standard imaging systems by the insertion of an extra polarizing beam splitter. These results are steps towards quantum state engineering using feedback control of ultracold atoms.

  1. The effect of lipid monolayers on Faraday waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Stephen; Bookman, Lake; Shearer, Michael; Daniels, Karen

    2011-11-01

    Surface tension is known to affect the critical driving acceleration for Faraday waves and their spatial wavenumber at onset. We perform experiments in the subharmonic regime, on water whose free surface is contaminated with up to one monolayer of fluorescent NBD-PC lipid. A circular container of water is vibrated vertically at single frequencies ranging from 15 Hz to 70 Hz, and we measure the acceleration and wavenumber at the onset of Faraday waves. We observe that the critical acceleration is larger than predicted by recent models, if the effect of the contaminant is assumed to simply lower the surface tension. Critical wavenumbers are largely unaffected. We examine whether a non-uniform lipid distribution is responsible for these effects. This work is funded by NSF Grant # DMS-0968258.

  2. Complex biopolymeric systems at stalk/epicuticular wax plant interfaces: a near infrared spectroscopy study of the sugarcane example.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Deborah E; O'Shea, Michael G; Kokot, Serge

    2009-08-01

    Naturally occurring macromolecules present at the epicuticular wax/stalk tissue interface of sugarcane were investigated using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Investigations of water, cellulose, and wax-cellulose interrelationships were possible using NIRS methods, where in the past many different techniques have been required. The sugarcane complex interface was used as an example of typical phenomena found at plant leaf/stalk interfaces. This detailed study showed that sugarcane cultivars exhibit spectral differences in the CH(n), water OH, and cellulose OH regions, reflecting the presence of epicuticular wax, epidermis, and ground tissue. Spectrally complex water bands (5276 cm(-1) and 7500-6000 cm(-1)) were investigated via freeze-drying experiments which revealed sequentially a complex band substructure (7500-6000 cm(-1)), a developing weak H-bonding system ( approximately 7301 cm(-1)), and strong H-bonding ( approximately 7062 cm(-1)) assigned to water-cellulose interactions. Principal component analysis techniques clarified complex band trends that developed during the desorption experiment. Bands from wax-free stalk were minimized in the 4327-4080 cm(-1) region (C--H(n) vibrational modes associated with long chain fatty compounds), while bands from the stalk tissue (particularly lignin and moisture) became more pronounced. This work is a comprehensive guide to similar studies by scientists involved in a variety of plant and fiber research fields. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 91: 642-651, 2009.This article was originally published online as an accepted preprint. The "Published Online" date corresponds to the preprint version. You can request a copy of the preprint by emailing the Biopolymers editorial office at biopolymers@wiley.com. PMID:19365839

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and near-infrared luminescent properties of the ternary thulium complex covalently bonded to mesoporous MCM-41

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jing; Song Shuyan; Xing Yan; Zhang Hongjie Li Zhefeng; Sun Lining; Guo Xianmin; Fan Weiqiang

    2009-03-15

    The crystal structure of a ternary Tm(DBM){sub 3}phen complex (DBM=dibenzoylmethane; phen=1, 10-phenanthroline) and the synthesis of hybrid mesoporous material in which the complex covalently bonded to mesoporous MCM-41 are reported. Crystal data: Tm(DBM){sub 3}phen C{sub 59}H{sub 47}N{sub 2}O{sub 7}Tm, monoclinic, P21/c, a=19.3216(12) A, b=10.6691(7) A, c=23.0165(15) A, {alpha}=90 deg., {beta}=91.6330(10) deg., {gamma}=90 deg., V=4742.8(5) A{sup 3}, Z=4. The properties of the Tm(DBM){sub 3}phen complex and the corresponding hybrid mesoporous material [Tm(DBM){sub 3}phen-MCM-41] have been studied. The results reveal that the Tm(DBM){sub 3}phen complex is successfully covalently bonded to MCM-41. Both Tm(DBM){sub 3}phen complex and Tm(DBM){sub 3}phen-MCM-41 display typical near-infrared (NIR) luminescence upon excitation at the maximum absorption of the ligands, which contributes to the efficient energy transfer from the ligands to the Tm{sup 3+} ion, an antenna effect. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) centered at 1474 nm in the emission spectrum of Tm(DBM){sub 3}phen-MCM-41 is 110 nm, which is the potential candidate of broadening amplification band from C band (1530-1560 nm) to S{sup +} band (1450-1480 nm) in optical area. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of Tm(DBM){sub 3}phen complex (DBM=dibenzoylmethane; phen=1, 10-phenanthroline). The complex is successfully covalently bonded to MCM-41 (Tm(DBM){sub 3}phen-MCM-41). After ligand-mediated excitation, the emission spectrum of Tm(DBM){sub 3}phen-MCM-41 shows the bands 802 and 1474 nm. The FWHM of the 1474-nm band for Tm(DBM){sub 3}phen-MCM-41 is 110 nm, such a broad spectrum enables a wide gain bandwidth for optical amplification.

  4. Ion-pair complexes with strong near infrared absorbance: syntheses, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties.

    PubMed

    Pei, Wen-Bo; Wu, Jian-Sheng; Liu, Jian-Lan; Ren, Xiao-Ming; Shen, Lin-Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Three ion-pair complexes, [4-NH(2)-Py](2)[M(mnt)(2)] (4-NH(2)-Py(1+)=4-amino-pyridinium; mnt(2-)=maleonitriledithiolate; M=Pt (1), Pd (2) or Ni (3)), have been synthesized and characterized. In the crystal of 1, the strong H-bonding interaction was found from the protonated N-atom of pyridinium to the CN group of [Pt(mnt)(2)](2-) together with a weak Pt...H interaction between the anion and the cation. The crystals of 2 and 3 are isostructural with very similar lattice parameters and packing structures, which are distinct from the crystal of 1. Two kinds of strong H-bonding interactions are observed in the crystals of 2 and 3 between the CN groups of [M(mnt)(2)](2-) anion and the protonated N-atom of 4-NH(2)-Py(1+) cation as well as the CN groups of [M(mnt)(2)](2-) anion and the amino group of 4-NH(2)-Py(1+) cation. Complex 1 shows an intense near-IR absorbance in acetonitrile and solid state, such an absorption band is probably assigned to IPCT transition as well as a trace amount of [Pt(mnt)(2)](1-) species; complex 3 possesses a weak near-IR absorption band which can be attributed to the mixture of d-d transition in [Ni(mnt)(2)](2-) and IPCT transition as well as a trace amount of [Ni(mnt)(2)](1-) species. PMID:19897406

  5. Sodium and potassium vapor Faraday filters revisited: theory and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harrell, S. D.; She, C.-Y.; Yuan Tao; Krueger, David A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S. S.; Hu, Z. L.

    2009-04-15

    A complete theory describing the transmission of atomic vapor Faraday filters is developed. The dependence of the filter transmission on atomic density and external magnetic field strength, as well as the frequency dependence of transmission, are explained in physical terms. As examples, applications of the computed results to ongoing research to suppress sky background, thus allowing Na lidar operation under sunlit conditions, and to enable measurement of the density of mesospheric oxygen atoms are briefly discussed.

  6. Torsion, magnetic monopoles and Faraday's law via a variational principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Philip D.

    2015-05-01

    Even though Faraday's Law is a dynamical law that describes how changing E and B fields influence each other, by introducing a vector potential Aμ according to Fμν = ∂νAν - ∂νAμ Faraday's Law is satisfied kinematically, with the relation (-g)-1/2ɛμνστ ∇νFστ = 0 holding on every path in a variational procedure or path integral. In a space with torsion Qαβγ the axial vector Sμ = (-g)1/2ɛμαβγQαβγ serves as a chiral analog of Aμ, and via variation with respect to Sμ one can derive Faraday's Law dynamically as a stationarity condition. With Sμ serving as an axial potential one is able to introduce magnetic monopoles without Sμ needing to be singular or have a non-trivial topology. Our analysis permits torsion and magnetic monopoles to be intrinsically Grassmann, which could explain why they have never been detected. Our procedure permits us to both construct a Weyl geometry in which Aμ is metricated and then convert it into a standard Riemannian geometry.

  7. Development and first experimental tests of Faraday cup array.

    PubMed

    Prokůpek, J; Kaufman, J; Margarone, D; Krůs, M; Velyhan, A; Krása, J; Burris-Mog, T; Busold, S; Deppert, O; Cowan, T E; Korn, G

    2014-01-01

    A new type of Faraday cup, capable of detecting high energy charged particles produced in a high intensity laser-matter interaction environment, has recently been developed and demonstrated as a real-time detector based on the time-of-flight technique. An array of these Faraday cups was designed and constructed to cover different observation angles with respect to the target normal direction. Thus, it allows reconstruction of the spatial distribution of ion current density in the subcritical plasma region and the ability to visualise its time evolution through time-of-flight measurements, which cannot be achieved with standard laser optical interferometry. This is a unique method for two-dimensional visualisation of ion currents from laser-generated plasmas. A technical description of the new type of Faraday cup is introduced along with an ad hoc data analysis procedure. Experimental results obtained during campaigns at the Petawatt High-Energy Laser for Heavy Ion Experiments (GSI, Darmstadt) and at the Prague Asterix Laser System (AS CR) are presented. Advantages and limitations of the used diagnostic system are discussed. PMID:24517754

  8. Faraday rotation data analysis with least-squares elliptical fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Adam D.; McHale, G. Brent; Goerz, David A.; Speer, Ron D.

    2010-10-01

    A method of analyzing Faraday rotation data from pulsed magnetic field measurements is described. The method uses direct least-squares elliptical fitting to measured data. The least-squares fit conic parameters are used to rotate, translate, and rescale the measured data. Interpretation of the transformed data provides improved accuracy and time-resolution characteristics compared with many existing methods of analyzing Faraday rotation data. The method is especially useful when linear birefringence is present at the input or output of the sensing medium, or when the relative angle of the polarizers used in analysis is not aligned with precision; under these circumstances the method is shown to return the analytically correct input signal. The method may be pertinent to other applications where analysis of Lissajous figures is required, such as the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) diagnostics. The entire algorithm is fully automated and requires no user interaction. An example of algorithm execution is shown, using data from a fiber-based Faraday rotation sensor on a capacitive discharge experiment.

  9. Todd, Faraday, and the electrical basis of brain activity.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward H

    2004-09-01

    Robert Bentley Todd (1809-60) was the UK's first eminent neurologist and neuroscientist. An anatomist, physiologist, and clinical scientist with an interest in the nervous system, he was the first to confirm the electrical basis of brain activity in the 1840s. He was influenced by his contemporary, Michael Faraday at the Royal Institution, and by two colleagues at King's College, John Daniell and Charles Wheatstone, who were also working at the cutting edge of electrical science. Todd conceived of nervous polarity (force) generated in nervous centres and compared this with the polar force of voltaic electricity developed in the galvanic battery. He brilliantly foresaw each nerve vesicle (cell) and its related fibres (ie, neuron) as a distinct apparatus for the development and transmission of nervous polarity. Epilepsy was the result of periodic unnatural development of nervous force leading to the "disruptive discharge" described by Faraday. Faraday, who studied animal electricity in the Gymnotus (electric eel), and Todd saw nervous polarity as a higher form of interchangeable energy. PMID:15324724

  10. Toward instructional design principles: Inducing Faraday's law with contrasting cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Eric; Wieman, Carl E.

    2016-06-01

    Although physics education research (PER) has improved instructional practices, there are not agreed upon principles for designing effective instructional materials. Here, we illustrate how close comparison of instructional materials could support the development of such principles. Specifically, in discussion sections of a large, introductory physics course, a pair of studies compare two instructional strategies for teaching a physics concept: having students (i) explain a set of contrasting cases or (ii) apply and build on previously learned concepts. We compare these strategies for the teaching of Faraday's law, showing that explaining a set of related contrasting cases not only improves student performance on Faraday's law questions over building on a previously learned concept (i.e., Lorentz force), but also prepares students to better learn subsequent topics, such as Lenz's law. These differences persist to the final exam. We argue that early exposure to contrasting cases better focuses student attention on a key feature related to both concepts: change in magnetic flux. Importantly, the benefits of contrasting cases for both learning and enjoyment are enhanced for students who did not first attend a Faraday's law lecture, consistent with previous research suggesting that being told a solution can circumvent the benefits of its discovery. These studies illustrate an experimental approach for understanding how the structure of activities affects learning and performance outcomes, a first step toward design principles for effective instructional materials.