Science.gov

Sample records for infrared finite observables

  1. Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The infrared astronomical data base and its principal data product, the catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), comprise a machine readable library of infrared (1 microns to 1000 microns astronomical observations. To date, over 1300 journal articles and 10 major survey catalogs are included in this data base, which contains about 55,000 individual observations of about 10,000 different infrared sources. Of these, some 8,000 sources are identifiable with visible objects, and about 2,000 do not have known visible counterparts.

  2. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement: catalog of infrared observations summarizes all infrared astronomical observations at far infrared wavelengths published in the scientific literature between 1965 and 1982. The Supplement list contains 25% of the observations in the full catalog of infrared observations (C10), and essentially eliminates most visible stars from the listings. The Supplement is more compact than the main Catalog (it does not contain the bibliography and position index of the C10), and is intended for easy reference during astronomical observations.

  3. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a new generation of orbital, airborne and ground-based infrared astronomical observatory facilities, including the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS), the cosmic background explorer (COBE), the NASA Kuiper airborne observatory, and the NASA infrared telescope facility, intensified the need for a comprehensive, machine-readable data base and catalog of current infrared astronomical observations. The Infrared Astronomical Data Base and its principal data product, this catalog, comprise a machine-readable library of infrared (1 micrometer to 1000 micrometers) astronomical observations published in the scientific literature since 1965.

  4. Infrared observations of comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, R. W.

    1981-10-01

    Infrared observation are important for deducing a great deal about properties of the cometary dust surrounding the cometary nucleus. All observations in the infrared are limited to long period comets. Three features of the spectrum which seem to be present in nearly all of the comets observed are discussed. First, there is a peak in the spectrum in the near infrared and visible wavelength, which can be attributed to scattered sunlight. This feature, as expected, gets fainter as a comet recedes from the sun. The second dominant feature in the spectrum is a broad peak in the infrared which is attributed to the thermal emission of the dust in the coma. This part of the spectrum also gets dimmer as the comet gets further from the sun but, at the same time the peak of the spectrum shifts to longer wavelengths, indicating that the dust from which this radiation arises is cooling as the comets recedes. The other feature in the spectrum which is noted is the emission feature at about 10 microns attributed to emission from metallic silicates. T.M.

  5. Mauna Kea Observatory infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Galactic and solar system infrared observations are reported using a broad variety of radiometric and spectroscopic instrumentation. Infrared programs and papers published during this period are listed.

  6. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations, second edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1988-01-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement: Catalog of Infrared Observations summarizes all infrared astronomical observations at far infrared wavelengths (5 to 1000 microns) published in the scientific literature from 1965 through 1986. The Supplement list contain 25 percent of the observations in the full Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), and essentially eliminates most visible stars from the listings. The Supplement is thus more compact than the main catalog, and is intended for easy reference during astronomical observations. The Far Infrared Supplement (2nd Edition) includes the Index of Infrared Source Positions and the Bibliography of Infrared Astronomy for the subset of far infrared observations listed.

  7. Algorithmic vs. finite difference Jacobians for infrared atmospheric radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Jacobians, i.e. partial derivatives of the radiance and transmission spectrum with respect to the atmospheric state parameters to be retrieved from remote sensing observations, are important for the iterative solution of the nonlinear inverse problem. Finite difference Jacobians are easy to implement, but computationally expensive and possibly of dubious quality; on the other hand, analytical Jacobians are accurate and efficient, but the implementation can be quite demanding. GARLIC, our "Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code", utilizes algorithmic differentiation (AD) techniques to implement derivatives w.r.t. atmospheric temperature and molecular concentrations. In this paper, we describe our approach for differentiation of the high resolution infrared and microwave spectra and provide an in-depth assessment of finite difference approximations using "exact" AD Jacobians as a reference. The results indicate that the "standard" two-point finite differences with 1 K and 1% perturbation for temperature and volume mixing ratio, respectively, can exhibit substantial errors, and central differences are significantly better. However, these deviations do not transfer into the truncated singular value decomposition solution of a least squares problem. Nevertheless, AD Jacobians are clearly recommended because of the superior speed and accuracy.

  8. Infrared observations of AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzi, E. G.; Chincarini, G.; Tarenghi, M.

    1981-01-01

    Broadband infrared observations of the cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii are reported. The observations were obtained in the J, H, K and L filters with the InSb photometer attached to the 1-m telescope of the European Southern Observatory. The infrared energy distribution observed from 0.35 to 3.5 microns for phase 0.5 suggests a spectral type of K5 V for the secondary and a distance to the system of approximately 70 pc if an absolute magnitude of 7.3 is assumed. Monitoring of the flux at 2.2 microns reveals a variability with an amplitude of approximately 0.3 magnitude over one third of the orbital period, the nature of which is under investigation.

  9. Infrared astronomical data base and catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, M.; Gezari, D. Y.; Mead, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a computer data base of infrared astronomical observations. The data base represents a machine-readable library of infrared observational data published in the relevant literature since 1960 for celestial sources outside the solar system. It likewise includes the contents of infrared surveys and catalogs. A catalog of infrared observations has been developed in both printed and magnetic-tape formats. The data base will be accessed through a bibliographic guide and an atlas of infrared source names and positions. Future plans also include two-dimensional graphical displays of infrared data and a user-interactive data terminal.

  10. Infrared finite ghost propagator in the Feynman gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A. C.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2008-06-15

    We demonstrate how to obtain from the Schwinger-Dyson equations of QCD an infrared finite ghost propagator in the Feynman gauge. The key ingredient in this construction is the longitudinal form factor of the nonperturbative gluon-ghost vertex, which, contrary to what happens in the Landau gauge, contributes nontrivially to the gap equation of the ghost. The detailed study of the corresponding vertex equation reveals that in the presence of a dynamical infrared cutoff this form factor remains finite in the limit of vanishing ghost momentum. This, in turn, allows the ghost self-energy to reach a finite value in the infrared, without having to assume any additional properties for the gluon-ghost vertex, such as the presence of massless poles. The implications of this result and possible future directions are briefly outlined.

  11. Infrared observations of cometary solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camejo, H. C.

    1982-03-01

    Infrared photometry was used to determine the physical characteristics of cometary solids. Observations were made of the reflected and thermal parts of the spectra of seven comets. Two of these comets, Bowell and West, were nonperiodic; the other five, Chernyhk, Encke, Kearns-Kwee, Stephan-Oterma, and Tuttle, were periodic. Observations in the 3 micron region of the spectrum of Comet Bowell provide the first direct evidence for the presence of H2O ice in a comet. The observations of the periodic comets yield the following picture of the dust in this type of object: grains with a size distribution ranging from about 0.3 to 10 microns and peaking around a few microns. These grains were made up of at least two components, a silicate material and an absorbing material. These characteristics are remarkably similar to those of the dust in nonperiodic comets. Comet West is the first case of a splitting comet in which the fragments were observed to have differences in their dusty component. These observations suggest that the nucleus of this comet did not have an 'onion skin' or layered structure but rather had pockets containing dust grains with different size distributions. Based on the results presented, the relation between cometary and interstellar dust, and the origin of comets are discussed.

  12. Infrared astronomical data base and catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, M.; Gezari, D. Y.; Mead, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    A computer data base of infrared astronomical observations has been established at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. It contains a summary of all infrared (1-100 microns) observations of celestial sources outside the solar system, published in the major scientific journals since 1960, as well as the contents of infrared surveys and catalogs. A Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) has been developed from the data base in printed and magnetic tape versions. A bibliographic Guide to the Infrared Astronomical Literature, and an Altas of Infrared Source Names and Positions will be published in conjunction with the catalog. Future plans include development of an interactive data system at Goddard which will give a user direct access to the computerized data.

  13. Catalog of infrared observations including: Bibliography of infrared astronomy and index of infrared source positions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations and its Far Infrared Supplement summarize all infrared astronomical observations at infrared wavelengths published in the scientific literature between 1965 and 1982. The Catalog includes as appendices the Bibliography of infrared astronomy which keys observations in the Catalog with the original journal references, and the index of infrared source positions which gives source positions for alphabetically listed sources in the Catalog. The Catalog data base contains over 85,000 observations of about 10,000 infrared sources, of which about 2,000 have no known visible counterpart.

  14. Catalog of infrared observations. Part 2: Appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1987-01-01

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of astronomical journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature searches are complete for years 1965 to 1986. Supporting appendixes are published in this part. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions, two bibliographies of infrared literature upon which the search was based, and, keyed to the main Catalog listings (organized alphabetically by first author, and by date), an atlas of infrared spectral ranges, and IRAS data for the CIO sources. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed microfiche and magnetic tape formats.

  15. Scattering matrix of infrared radiation by ice finite circular cylinders.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lisheng; Ding, Jilie; Cheng, Andrew Y S

    2002-04-20

    Scattering matrix characteristics of polydisperse, randomly oriented, small ice crystals modeled by finite circular cylinders with various ratios of the length to diameter (L/D) ratio are calculated by use of the exact T-matrix approach, with emphasis on the thermal infrared spectral region that extends from the atmospheric short-wave IR window to the far-IR wavelengths to as large as 30 microm. The observed ice crystal size distribution and the well-known power-law distribution are considered. The results of the extensive calculations show that the characteristics of scattering matrix elements of small ice circular cylinders depend strongly on wavelengths and refractive indices, particle size distributions, and the L/D ratios. The applicability of the power-law distribution and particle shapes for light scattering calculations for small ice crystals is discussed. The effects of the effective variance of size distribution on light scattering characteristics are addressed. It seems from the behavior of scattering matrix elements of small ice crystals that the combination of 25 and 3.979 microm has some advantages and potential applications for remote sensing of cirrus and other ice clouds. PMID:12003228

  16. Catalog of Infrared Observations, Third Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Pitts, Patricia S.; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1993-01-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement contains a subset of the data in the full Catalog of Infrared Observations (all observations at wavelengths greater than 4.6 microns). The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), NASA RP-1294, is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of scientific journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature search is complete for years 1965 through 1990 in this Third Edition. The Catalog contains about 210,000 observations of roughly 20,000 individual sources and supporting appendices. The expanded Third Edition contains coded IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected by IRAS. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions (also included in this volume), two bibliographies of Catalog listings, and an atlas of infrared spectral ranges. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed, microfiche, and magnetic-tape formats.

  17. Observational constraints on finite scale factor singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Denkiewicz, Tomasz

    2012-07-01

    We discuss the combined constraints on a Finite Scale Factor Singularity (FSF) universe evolution scenario, which come from the shift parameter R, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) A, and from the type Ia supernovae. We show that observations allow existence of such singularities in the 2 × 10{sup 9} years in future (at 1σ CL) which is much farther than a Sudden Future Singularity (SFS), and that at the present moment of the cosmic evolution, one cannot differentiate between cosmological scenario which allow finite scale factor singularities and the standard ΛCDM dark energy models. We also show that there is an allowed value of m = 2/3 within 1σ CL, which corresponds to a dust-filled Einstein-de-Sitter universe limit of the early time evolution and so it is pasted into a standard early-time scenario.

  18. Infrared detectors for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, K.; Davis, R. P.; Knowles, P.; Shorrocks, N.

    2016-05-01

    IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer), developed by CNES and launched since 2006 on the Metop satellites, is established as a major source of data for atmospheric science and weather prediction. The next generation - IASI NG - is a French national contribution to the Eumetsat Polar System Second Generation on board of the Metop second generation satellites and is under development by Airbus Defence and Space for CNES. The mission aim is to achieve twice the performance of the original IASI instrument in terms of sensitivity and spectral resolution. In turn, this places very demanding requirements on the infrared detectors for the new instrument. Selex ES in Southampton has been selected for the development of the infrared detector set for the IASI-NG instruments. The wide spectral range, 3.6 to 15.5 microns, is covered in four bands, each served by a dedicated detector design, with a common 4 x 4 array format of 1.3 mm square macropixels. Three of the bands up to 8.7 microns employ photovoltaic MCT (mercury cadmium telluride) technology and the very long wave band employs photoconductive MCT, in common with the approach taken between Airbus and Selex ES for the SEVIRI instrument on Second Generation Meteosat. For the photovoltaic detectors, the MCT crystal growth of heterojunction photodiodes is by the MOVPE technique (metal organic vapour phase epitaxy). Novel approaches have been taken to hardening the photovoltaic macropixels against localised crystal defects, and integrating transimpedance amplifiers for each macropixel into a full-custom silicon read out chip, which incorporates radiation hard design.

  19. Infrared Astronomy. [observations of extragalactic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Matthews, K.

    1981-01-01

    Several observational programs in infrared astronomy are described and significant findings are briefly discussed. The near infrared work concentrates largely on the use of the 5 m Hale telescope in spectroscopic and photometric studies of extragalactic sources. Observations of the P alpha line profile in a low redshift quasar, X-ray bursters, reflection nebula, and cataclysmic variables are included. Millimeter continuum observations of dust emission from quasars and galactic molecular clouds are also discussed. Finally, improvements to instrumentation are reported.

  20. Infrared Observations of Cometary Dust and Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisse, Carey

    2004-01-01

    This bibliography lists citations for publications published under the grant. Subjects of the publications include cometary dust, instellar and interplanetary dust, comet nuclei and comae, Comet Hale-Bopp, infrared observations of comets, mass loss, and comet break-up.

  1. Catalog of infrared observations. Part 1: Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1987-01-01

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of astronomical journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature searches are complete for 1965 through 1986 in this Second Edition. The Catalog is published in two parts, with the observational data (roughly 200,000 observations of 20,000 individual sources) listed in Part I, and supporting appendices in Part II. The expanded Second Edition contains a new feature: complete IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected, listed with the main Catalog observations, as well as in complete detail in the Appendix. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions, two bibliographies of infrared literature upon which the search was based, and, keyed to the main Catalog listings (organized alphabetically by author and then chronologically), an atlas of infrared spectral ranges, and IRAS data from the CIO sources. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed microfiche and magnetic tape formats.

  2. Astronomical observations with an infrared array camera

    SciTech Connect

    Tresch-Fienberg, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Astronomical observations with an infrared array camera demonstrate that arrays are excellent for high spatial resolution photometric mapping of celestial objects. The author describes a a 16 x 16 pixel array camera system based on a bismuth-doped silicon charge injection device optimized for use in the 8-13 micron atmospheric window. Observing techniques and image processing algorithms that are unique to the use of an array detector are also discussed. Multi-wavelength, 1-2 arcsec resolution images of three different celestial objects are presented. For the galactic center, maps of the infrared color temperature and emission optical depth are derived. The results are consistent with a model in which a low density region with a massive luminosity source at its center is encircled by a ring of gas and dust from which material may be infalling toward the nucleus. Multiple luminosity sources are not required to explain the infrared appearance of the galactic center. Images of Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 are the first to resolve the infrared structure of the nucleus and show that it is similar to that at optical and radio wavelengths. Infrared emission extended northeast of the nucleus is identified with the radio jet. Combined with optical spectra and charge coupled device images, the new data imply a causal relationship between the Seyfert activity in the nucleus and the starburst in the disk.

  3. Infrared observations of RS CVn stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berriman, G.; De Campli, W. M.; Werner, M. W.; Hatchett, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    The paper presents infrared photometry of the RS CVn binary stars AR Lac (1.2-10 microns) and MM Her (1.2-3.5 microns) as they egressed from their primary and secondary eclipses; of the eclipsing systems RS CVn and Z Her at maximum light (1.2-10 microns) and of the non-eclipsing systems UX Ari and HR 1099 (1.2-10 microns). An analysis of these and published V data based on flux ratio diagrams (linear analogues of color-color diagrams) shows that G and K stars supply the infrared light of these systems. In AR Lac, the combined light of a G5-K0 subgiant and either a late F dwarf or an early F subgiant can account for the observed visual and infrared light curves. None of these systems shows infrared emission from circumstellar matter. This result is simply understood: dust grains would not be expected to form in the physical conditions surrounding the subgiant, and the corona and chromosphere (whose properties have been deduced from spectroscopic X-ray observations) should not produce appreciable infrared emission.

  4. Infrared continuum observations of the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H.; Levan, P.; Lindsey, C.

    1979-01-01

    The far-infrared wavelengths (10 microns to 1 mm) were used to study the spatial and temporal structure of the solar atmosphere. Observational results were obtained on flares, faculae, sunspots, and on the center-to-limb intensity distribution, as well as on time variability within these regions. A program of precise monitoring of slow variations in the integrated solar luminosity was shown to be feasible, and initial steps to implement observations were completed.

  5. Observations of Luminous Infrared Galaxies with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armus, Lee

    2014-01-01

    A major result of the IRAS survey was the discovery of a large population of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) which emit a significant fraction of their bolometric luminosity in the far-infrared. LIRGs cover the full range of morphologies from isolated disk galaxies, to advanced mergers, exhibiting enhanced star-formation rates and a higher fraction of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) compared to less luminous galaxies. A detailed study of low-redshift LIRGs is critical for our understanding of the cosmic evolution of galaxies and black holes, since LIRGs comprise the bulk of the cosmic far-infrared background and dominate the star-formation between 0.5 < z < 1. With ISO, it was possible to measure the full suite of infrared diagnostic lines in local normal and luminous infrared galaxies for the first time, but samples were small and observations challenging. With Herschel, we have been able to study large samples of low-redshift LIRGs, and even probe the physical conditions in poweful starburst galaxies out to significant redshifts. By combining the Herschel data with those from Spitzer, it is now possible to understand the heating and cooling of the dust and gas in complete samples of LIRGs for the first time. I will review recent results from a number of GTO, OTKP and GO programs in an attempt to summarize the advances we have made in understanding star formation and black hole accretion in LIRGs as a direct result of the Herschel mission.

  6. Infrared Observations of FS CMa Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Russell, R. W.; Lynch, D. K.; Grady, C. A.; Hammel, H. B.; Beerman, L. C.; Day, A. N.; Huelsman, D.; Rudy, R. J.; Brafford, S. M.; Halbedel, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    A subset of non-supergiant B[e] stars has recently been recognized as forming a fairly unique class of objects with very strong emission lines, infrared excesses, and locations not associated with star formation. The exact evolutionary state of these stars, named for the prototype FS CMa, is uncertain, and they have often been classified as isolated Herbig AeBe stars. We present infrared observations of two of these stars, HD 45677 (FS CMa), HD 50138 (MWC 158), and the candidate FS CMa star HD 190073 (V1295 Aql) that span over a decade in time. All three exhibit an emission band at 10 microns due to amorphous silicates, confirming that much (if not all) of the infrared excess is due to dust. HD 50138 is found to exhibit 20% variability between 3-13 microns that resembles that found in pre-main sequence systems (HD 163296 and HD 31648). HD 45677, despite large changes at visual wavelengths, has remained relatively stable in the infrared. To date, no significant changes have been observed in HD 190073. This work is supported in part by NASA Origins of Solar Systems grant NAG5-9475, NASA Astrophysics Data Program contract NNH05CD30C, and the Independent Research and Development program at The Aerospace Corporation.

  7. Infrared Observations of Late Type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    Substantive mass loss resulting in appreciable circumstellar dust envelopes is common in late-type stars. The evolutionary history and physical state of a cool star determine the chemistry within the outer stellar atmosphere mirrored by the molecular and particulate material present in the envelope. The observational consequences of this debris determined by moderate spectral resolution infrared spectrophotometry are reviewed. Significant information is provided by observations of the emergent energy flux of both the cool stellar photosphere and of the circumstellar dust envelope. The observation suggests that mass-loss occurs to some degree throughout late stellar evolutionary phases and that occasional periods of high mass loss are not uncommon.

  8. Infrared observations of anonymous IRC sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strecker, D. W.; Ney, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    Infrared (0.9 to 18 microns) observations of 232 anonymous 2-micron Sky survey (IRC) sources are reported. Most of the objects appear to be late-type stars with little or no long-wave excess. About ten percent exhibit large excesses. Thirty-one of the brightest 11-micron sources have been remeasured to determine variability. These brighter objects appear to fall into two groups; one group resembles NML Tauri, while the other is like NML Cygni.

  9. Near Infrared Astronomical Observing During the Daytime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinn Chee Jim, Kevin; Pier, Edward Alan; Cognion, Rita L.

    2015-08-01

    Ground-based, near-infrared astronomy has been mostly restriced to nighttime observing with occasional, bright solar system objects observed during the daytime. But for astronomical phenomena that are time-varying on timescales of less than a day, it would be advantageous to be able to gather data during the day and night. We explore some of the limitations of observing in the J, H, and K bands during the daytime. Atmospheric radiative transfer simulations show that K is the optimal common astronomical filter for daytime observations on Mauna Kea, but the J and H filters can also be used. Observations from Mauna Kea show that it is possible to observe objects at least as faint as K=15.5 during the early afternoon, with photometric accuracies only slightly worse than those obtained at night.

  10. Simulation on polarization states of finite surface for infrared scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ying; Wang, Lin; Shao, Xiaopeng; Liu, Fei

    2015-05-01

    A simulation method for analyzing polarization states for infrared scenes is proposed in order to study the polarization features of infrared spontaneous emission deeply, since current infrared polarization devices can't show the polarization signature of infrared spontaneous emission for a target or an object well. A preliminary analysis on polarization characteristics of infrared spontaneous emission in the ideal case is carried out and also a corresponding ideal model is established through Kirchhoff's law and the Fresnel theorem. Based on the newly built ideal model, a three-dimensional (3D) scene modeling and simulation based on the OpenSceneGraph (OSG) rendering engine is utilized to obtain the polarization scene of infrared emission under ideal conditions. Through the corresponding software, different infrared scenes can be generated by adjusting the input parameters. By interacting with the scene, the infrared polarization images can be acquired readily, also a fact can be obviously confirmed that the degree of linear polarization (DoLP) for an object in the 3D scene varies with the many factors such as emission angle and complex refractive index. Moreover, large difference between two kinds of material such as metal and nonmetal in the polarization characteristics of infrared spontaneous emission at the same temperature can be easily discerned in the 3D scene. The 3D scene simulation and modeling in the ideal case provides a direct understanding on infrared polarization property, which is of great significance for the further study of infrared polarization characteristics in the situation of real scenes.

  11. Infrared algorithm development for ocean observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Otis B.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts continue under this contract to develop algorithms for the computation of sea surface temperature (SST) from MODIS infrared retrievals. This effort includes radiative transfer modeling, comparison of in situ and satellite observations, development and evaluation of processing and networking methodologies for algorithm computation and data accession, evaluation of surface validation approaches for IR radiances, and participation in MODIS (project) related activities. Efforts in this contract period have focused on radiative transfer modeling, evaluation of atmospheric correction methodologies, involvement in field studies, production and evaluation of new computer networking strategies, and objective analysis approaches.

  12. BIMA Observations of MSX Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrowski, F.; Carey, S. J.; Egan, M. P.; Feldman, P. A.; Redman, R. O.

    2000-12-01

    We present high-angular-resolution observations of cold, dense condensations within a new population of infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) identified during the MSX mid-infrared survey of the Galactic Plane (Egan et al. 1998, ApJL 494, 199). The observations were conducted with the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association interferometer (BIMA) in its B, C and D array configurations at 3mm. In all four observed sources we detected compact (<0.4 pc), slightly resolved, massive cores. In one case, the core is resolved into multiple components with sizes < 4000 AU. We will compare the 3mm continuum results with previous SCUBA imaging (Carey et al. 2000, ApJL, in press) to constrain dust properties and temperatures in the dark cloud cores. Simultaneously, we obtained spectral line images of N2H+ (1--0) toward the clouds. The agreement between N2H+ and 850 μ m emission is almost perfect, confirming chemical models of prestellar cores, which predict little depletion of N2H+ in these sources (Bergin & Langer 1997, ApJ 486, 316). Hence, N2H+ is an ideal tool to investigate their kinematical characteristics complementary to SCUBA mapping of the mass distribution of the IRDCs. FW is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 96-13716.

  13. Infrared spectroscopy of exoplanets: observational constraints.

    PubMed

    Encrenaz, Thérèse

    2014-04-28

    The exploration of transiting extrasolar planets is an exploding research area in astronomy. With more than 400 transiting exoplanets identified so far, these discoveries have made possible the development of a new research field, the spectroscopic characterization of exoplanets' atmospheres, using both primary and secondary transits. However, these observations have been so far limited to a small number of targets. In this paper, we first review the advantages and limitations of both primary and secondary transit methods. Then, we analyse what kind of infrared spectra can be expected for different types of planets and discuss how to optimize the spectral range and the resolving power of the observations. Finally, we propose a list of favourable targets for present and future ground-based observations. PMID:24664918

  14. Infrared spectroscopy of exoplanets: observational constraints

    PubMed Central

    Encrenaz, Thérèse

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of transiting extrasolar planets is an exploding research area in astronomy. With more than 400 transiting exoplanets identified so far, these discoveries have made possible the development of a new research field, the spectroscopic characterization of exoplanets' atmospheres, using both primary and secondary transits. However, these observations have been so far limited to a small number of targets. In this paper, we first review the advantages and limitations of both primary and secondary transit methods. Then, we analyse what kind of infrared spectra can be expected for different types of planets and discuss how to optimize the spectral range and the resolving power of the observations. Finally, we propose a list of favourable targets for present and future ground-based observations. PMID:24664918

  15. Dynamical observer for a flexible beam via finite element approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manitius, Andre; Xia, Hong-Xing

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this view-graph presentation is a computational investigation of the closed-loop output feedback control of a Euler-Bernoulli beam based on finite element approximation. The observer is part of the classical observer plus state feedback control, but it is finite-dimensional. In the theoretical work on the subject it is assumed (and sometimes proved) that increasing the number of finite elements will improve accuracy of the control. In applications, this may be difficult to achieve because of numerical problems. The main difficulty in computing the observer and simulating its work is the presence of high frequency eigenvalues in the finite-element model and poor numerical conditioning of some of the system matrices (e.g. poor observability properties) when the dimension of the approximating system increases. This work dealt with some of these difficulties.

  16. Observations of Circumstellar Disks with Infrared Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akeson, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Star formation is arguably the area of astrophysics in which infrared interferometry has had the biggest impact. The optically thick portion of T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be disks DO NOT extend to a few stellar radii of the stellar surface. Emission is coming from near the dust sublimation radius, but not all from a single radius. The Herbig Ae stars can be either flared or self-shadowed but very massive (early Be) stars are geometrically thin. The Herbig Ae stars can be either flared or self-shadowed but very massive (early Be) stars are geometrically thin. Observational prospects are rapidly improving: a) Higher spectral resolution will allow observations of the gas: jets, winds, accretion. b) Closure phase and imaging will help eliminate model uncertainties/dependencies.

  17. Infrared observations of the dust coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campins, Humberto C.; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    1988-01-01

    The main infrared observational results were briefly reviewed at the start of this session. The new results are summarized. All of these results have yet to be synthesized into a self-consistent picture of the dust grain composition, dust production history, outburst mechanisms, and composition of the nucleus. The workshop discussion was helpful in pointing out problems faced by theorists, such as data quality, the lack of the proper theory for computing the scattering and emission of irregular particles, and in some cases the lack of optical constants of realistic materials. It is expected that the gross spectral and dynamical properties of Halley's Comet can be understood in time, even if the details of the observations and the theoretical calculations continue to vex us in the future.

  18. Infrared features of unquenched finite temperature lattice Landau gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Furui, Sadataka; Nakajima, Hideo

    2007-09-01

    The color diagonal and color antisymmetric ghost propagators slightly above T{sub c} of N{sub f}=2 MILC 24{sup 3}x12 lattices are measured and compared with zero-temperature unquenched N{sub f}=2+1 MILC{sub c} 20{sup 3}x64 and MILC{sub f} 28{sup 3}x96 lattices and zero-temperature quenched 56{sup 4} {beta}=6.4 and 6.45 lattices. The expectation value of the color antisymmetric ghost propagator {phi}{sup c}(q) is zero, but its Binder cumulant, which is consistent with that of N{sub c}{sup 2}-1 dimensional Gaussian distribution below T{sub c}, decreases above T{sub c}. Although the color diagonal ghost propagator is temperature independent, the l{sup 1} norm of the color antisymmetric ghost propagator is temperature dependent. The expectation value of the ghost condensate observed at zero-temperature unquenched configuration is consistent with 0 in T>T{sub c}. We also measure transverse, magnetic, and electric gluon propagator and extract gluon screening masses. The running coupling measured from the product of the gluon dressing function and the ghost dressing function are almost temperature independent, but the effect of A{sup 2} condensate observed at zero temperature is consistent with 0 in T>T{sub c}. The transverse gluon dressing function at low temperature has a peak in the infrared at low temperature, but it becomes flatter at high temperature. The magnetic gluon propagator at high momentum depends on the temperature. These data imply that the magnetic gluon propagator and the color antisymmetric ghost propagator are affected by the presence of dynamical quarks, and there are strong nonperturbative effects through the temperature-dependent color antisymmetric ghost propagator.

  19. SCUBA Observations of MSX Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, S. J.; Redman, R. O.; Feldman, P. A.; Egan, M. P.; Shipman, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    We present 850 and 450 μ m continuum images of 9 infrared dark clouds (IRDCs; Egan et al. 1998, ApJ, 494, L199) taken with the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) on the JCMT. The IRDCs appear to be very large (1-10 pc diameter) molecular cores with gas densities > 106 cm-3 and temperatures around 10 K. Approximately 5000 IRDCs have been identified in a survey of the inner Galactic Plane with the distribution of IRDCs peaking at the longitudes of spiral arm tangent points and the molecular ring. All nine clouds were detected as strong submillimeter sources with peak flux densities of 1 Jy/beam at 850 μ m. In general, the submillimeter emission follows the mid-infrared extinction and H2CO rotational line emission morphologies (Carey et al. 1998, ApJ, 508, 721). The submillimeter data reveals substructure in the IRDCs including bright 850 μ m knots. The observed H2CO line profiles are non-Gaussian suggesting the presence of molecular outflows in some of the IRDCs. It is likely that the 850 μ m emission peaks are either Class 0 protostars or pre-protostellar objects. Estimates of the dust mass and temperature will be compared to previous estimates of gas mass and temperature for IRDCs.

  20. Airborne Infrared Spectrograph for Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, L.; Cheimets, P.; DeLuca, E. E.; Samra, J.; Judge, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field have significant potential to enhance our understanding of coronal dynamics, and improve forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of coronal field lines in the Transition Corona, the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on eruptive instabilities and on the origin of the slow solar wind. While current instruments routinely observe the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, the proposed airborne spectrometer will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. The targeted lines are five forbidden magnetic dipole transitions between 1.4 and 4 um. The airborne system will consist of a telescope, grating spectrometer and pointing/stabilization system to be flown on the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) during the 21 August 2017 total solar eclipse. We will discuss the scientific objectives of the 2017 flight, describe details of the instrument design, and present the observing program for the eclipse.

  1. Infrared observations of the neptunian system.

    PubMed

    Conrath, B; Flasar, F M; Hanel, R; Kunde, V; Maguire, W; Pearl, J; Pirraglia, J; Samuelson, R; Gierasch, P; Weir, A; Bezard, B; Gautier, D; Cruikshank, D; Horn, L; Springer, R; Shaffer, W

    1989-12-15

    The infrared interferometer spectrometer on Voyager 2 obtained thermal emission spectra of Neptune with a spectral resolution of 4.3 cm(-1). Measurements of reflected solar radiation were also obtained with a broadband radiometer sensitive in the visible and near infrared. Analysis of the strong C(2)H(2) emission feature at 729 cm(-1) suggests an acetylene mole fraction in the range between 9 x 10(-8) and 9 x 10(-7). Vertical temperature profiles were derived between 30 and 1000 millibars at 70 degrees and 42 degrees S and 30 degrees N. Temperature maps of the planet between 80 degrees S and 30 degrees N were obtained for two atmospheric layers, one in the lower stratosphere between 30 and 120 millibars and the other in the troposphere between 300 and 1000 millibars. Zonal mean temperatures obtained from these maps and from latitude scans indicate a relatively warm pole and equator with cooler mid-latitudes. This is qualitatively similar to the behavior found on Uranus even though the obliquities and internal heat fluxes of the two planets are markedly different. Comparison of winds derived from images with the vertical wind shear calculated from the temperature field indicates a general decay of wind speed with height, a phenomenon also observed on the other three giant planets. Strong, wavelike longitudinal thermal structure is found, some of which appears to be associated with the Great Dark Spot. An intense, localizd cold region is seen in the lower stratosphere, which does not appear to be correlated with any visible feature. A preliminary estimate of the effective temperature of the planet yields a value of 59.3 +/- 1.0 kelvins. Measurements of Triton provide an estimate of the daytime surface temperature of 38(+3)(-4) kelvins. PMID:17755999

  2. Near-infrared observations of blue transient ASASSN-14jv

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vishal; Srivastava, Mudit; Ashok, N. M.; Banerjee, D. P. K.; V. Venkataraman, V.

    2014-11-01

    We report the near-infrared observations of the bright transient ASASSN-14jv obtained on 2014 Nov. 10.83 UT with the 1.2-m telescope at Mt.Abu Infrared Observatory using the Near-Infrared Imager/Spectrometer with a 256x256 NICMOS3 array.

  3. Finite field of view effects on inversion of limb thermal emission observations. [balloon sounding of stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Guo, J.; Conrath, B. J.; Kunde, V. G.; Maguire, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that the technique of thermal emission spectroscopy provides an effective means for remote sounding of stratospheric temperature structure and constituent distributions. One procedure for measuring the stratospheric infrared spectrum involves the conduction of observations along ray paths tangent to the stratospheric limb. Thermal emission limb tangent observations have certain advantages compared to other types of observations. The techniques for determining temperature and trace gas distributions from limb thermal emission radiances are based on the assumption that the bulk of opacity lies near the tangent point. Ideally, the field of view (FOV) of the observing instrument should be very small. The effect of a finite FOV is to reduce the spatial resolution of the retrieved temperature and constituent profiles. The present investigation is concerned with the effects of the FOV on the inversion of infrared thermal emission measurements for balloon platforms. Attention is given to a convenient method for determining the weighting functions.

  4. Infrared Observations of beta Pictoris Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, S. B.; Knacke, R. F.; Telesco, C. M.

    1993-12-01

    We searched for 10 microns silicate emission from circumstellar dust in 13 main-sequence stars that possibly exemplify the beta Pictoris phenomenon. We have previously detected the silicate feature in 51 Oph (Fajardo-Acosta, Telesco, & Knacke 1993, ApJ, in press) through mid-IR narrowband spectrophotometry (FWHM ~ 1 microns) with the MSFC Big Mac camera and the 2--30 microns Facility bolometer at the IRTF. We are using the same instrumentation in our survey of other Vega-type disks. These observations were motivated by the detection of the silicate feature in beta Pic (Telesco & Knacke 1991, ApJ, 372, L29). We followed the detections in beta Pic and 51 Oph with 2.9--13.5 microns intermediate-resolution (lambda /Delta lambda ~ 50) spectroscopy with the Aerospace Corp. Infrared Spectrograph. The higher resolution data confirmed the analogy of the silicate features in beta Pic (Knacke et al. 1993, ApJ, in press) and 51 Oph (Russell et al. 1993, in prep.) to similar features in Solar System cometary spectra. Among the Vega-type stars we recently observed, beta UMa, zeta Lep, sigma Her, and gamma Oph exhibit significant dust emission at 10 microns (>= 0.15 Jy). We expect to resolve whether silicate emission is present with the higher spectral resolution available with the Aerospace Spectrograph. We have compared the spectrum of beta Pic with those in the data compilation of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrograph. Of the 5425 sources, 88 exhibit 10 microns silicate emission features that match beta Pic's reasonably well. Many of these sources do not have known associations; those that do are typically low-mass giant branch Miras or massive supergiants. We are investigating at least 5 possible associations with early-type main-sequence stars. This research was sponsored by the NASA Origins of Solar Systems Research Program under grant NAGW-2334.

  5. Unified description of seagull cancellations and infrared finiteness of gluon propagators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, A. C.; Binosi, D.; Figueiredo, C. T.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a generalized theoretical framework for dealing with the important issue of dynamical mass generation in Yang-Mills theories, and, in particular, with the infrared finiteness of the gluon propagators, observed in a multitude of recent lattice simulations. Our analysis is manifestly gauge invariant, in the sense that it preserves the transversality of the gluon self-energy, and gauge independent, given that the conclusions do not depend on the choice of the gauge-fixing parameter within the linear covariant gauges. The central construction relies crucially on the subtle interplay between the Abelian Ward identities satisfied by the nonperturbative vertices and a special integral identity that enforces a vast number of "seagull cancellations" among the one- and two-loop dressed diagrams of the gluon Schwinger-Dyson equation. The key result of these considerations is that the gluon propagator remains rigorously massless, provided that the vertices do not contain (dynamical) massless poles. When such poles are incorporated into the vertices, under the pivotal requirement of respecting the gauge symmetry of the theory, the terms comprising the Ward identities conspire in such a way as to still enforce the total annihilation of all quadratic divergences, inducing, at the same time, residual contributions that account for the saturation of gluon propagators in the deep infrared.

  6. Easy Observation of Infrared Spectral Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortel, Adolf

    2012-01-01

    The spectra of some chemical elements display intense infrared (IR) lines that can be used more effectively than the ones in the visible region for identification purposes. A simple setup, based on the IR sensitivity of a handycam in nightshot mode, is described to record the visible as well as the IR spectra from decorative bulbs or salts on the…

  7. Cooled grating infrared spectrometer for astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, J. R.; Gull, G. E.

    A liquid helium-cooled infrared spectrometer for the 16 to 50 micron range is described. The instrument has six detectors, three each of Si:Sb and Ge:Ga and two diffraction gratings mounted back-to-back. Cold preoptics are used to match the spectrometer to the telescope. In its nominal configuration the system resolution is 0.03 micron from 16 to 30 microns and 0.07 micron from 28 to 50 microns. A cooled filter wheel is used to change order sorting filters. The gratings are driven by a steel band and gear train operating at 4 K. The detector outputs are amplified by a TIA, employing a matched pair of JFETs operating at 70 K inside the dewar. The external warm electronics include a gain stage for the TIA and dc-coupled gating circuit to remove charged-particle (cosmic-ray secondary)-induced noise spikes. The gating circuit reduces the overall system noise by a factor of two when the spectrometer is used on NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Sample spectra are presented and the deglitcher performance is illustrated.

  8. Finite Gyroradius Effects Observed in Pickup Oxygen Ions at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, Richard E.; Intriligator, Devrie; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    On the dayside of Venus, the hot oxygen corona extending above the ionopause is the principal source of pickup oxygen ions. The ions are born here and picked up by the ionosheath plasma as it is deflected around the planet. These pickup ions have been observed by the Orbiter Plasma Analyzer (OPA) throughout the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) mission. They were observed over a region extending from their dayside source to great distances downstream (about 10 Venus radii), in the solar wind wake, as PVO passed through apoapsis. Finite gyroradius effects in the velocity distribution of the oxygen pickup ions are expected in the source region because the gyroradius is several times larger than the scale height of the hot oxygen source. Such effects are also expected in those regions of the ionosheath where the scale lengths of the magnetic field and the ambient plasma velocity field are less than the pickup ion gyroradius. While explicitly accounting for the spatial distribution of the hot oxygen source, an analytic expression for the pickup oxygen ion velocity distribution is developed to study how it is affected by finite gyroradii. The analysis demonstrates that as the gyroradius increases by factors of three to six above the hot oxygen scale height, the peak of the pickup oxygen ion flux distribution decreases 25 to 50% below the maximum allowed speed, which is twice the speed of the ambient plasma times the sine of the angle between the magnetic field and the flow velocity. The pickup oxygen ion flux distribution observed by OPA is shown to follow this behavior in the source region. It is also shown that this result is consistent with the pickup ion distributions observed in the wake, downstream of the source, where the flux peaks are usually well below the maximum allowed speed.

  9. NGC 2024: Far-infrared and radio molecular observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Lada, C. J.; Schwartz, P. R.; Smith, H. A.; Smith, J.; Glaccum, W.; Harper, D. A.; Loewenstein, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Far infrared continuum and millimeter wave molecular observations are presented for the infrared and radio source NGC 2024. The measurements are obtained at relatively high angular resolution, enabling a description of the source energetics and mass distribution in greater detail than previously reported. The object appears to be dominated by a dense ridge of material, extended in the north/south direction and centered on the dark lane that is seen in visual photographs. Maps of the source using the high density molecules CS and HCN confirm this picture and allow a description of the core structure and molecular abundances. The radio molecular and infrared observations support the idea that an important exciting star in NGC 2024 has yet to be identified and is centered on the dense ridge about 1' south of the bright mid infrared source IRS 2. The data presented here allows a presentation of a model for the source.

  10. Infrared observations of outer planet satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V.

    1988-01-01

    This task supports IR observations of the outer planet satellites. These data provide vital information about the thermophysical properties of satellite surfaces, including internal heat sources for Io. Observations include both broad and narrow band measurementsin the 2 to 20 micrometer spectral range. The program in the last year has aimed at obtaining lonitude coverage on Io to establish stability of hot spot patterns previously reported. Several runs produced the most complete data set for an apparition since the start of the program. Unfortunately, bad weather limited coverage of key longitude ranges containing the largest known hot spot Loki. Among the preliminary results is the observation of an outburst in Io's thermal flux that was measured at 4.8, 8.7 and 20 micrometer. Analysis of the data has given the best evidence to date of silicate volcanism on Io; this is one of the most significant pieces of the puzzle as to the relative roles of silicate and sulfur volcanism on Io. Researchers are collaborating with J. Goguen (NRC RRA to finish reduction of mutual event data, which have already improved ephermeris information for the satellites. The data appear to place significant limits on the characteristics of any leading side hot spots.

  11. Simultaneous far-infrared, near-infrared, and radio observations of OH/IR stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, M. W.; Beckwith, S.; Gatley, I.; Sellgren, K.; Whiting, D. L.; Berriman, G.

    1980-01-01

    Simultaneous far-infrared, near-infrared, and radio observations have been made of five infrared stars which show OH maser emission at 1612 MHz. These stars have very thick circumstellar dust shells and are not seen optically. The data permit a direct comparison of the far-infrared and maser emission from these sources, which strongly supports the hypothesis that the maser emission is pumped by 35 micron photons. A comparison with data obtained at earlier epochs suggests that the maser emission is saturated. The infrared and radio data are used together with estimates of the source distances to determine the luminosities and mass loss rates for these objects. The luminosities lie in the range 2000-30,000 solar luminosities and are consistent with either Mira variable or M supergiant classifications for the underlying stars. The estimated mass loss rates lie between 0.000005-0.00007 solar mass/year.

  12. Far-infrared observations of Circinus and NGC 4945 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisht, R. S.; Ghosh, S. K.; Iyengar, K. V. K.; Rengarajan, T. N.; Tandon, S. N.; Verma, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    Circinus and NGC 4945 are two galaxies luminous in the infrared and are characterized by compact non thermal radio nuclei, deep silicate absorption features and unusually strong water vapor maser luminosities. Moorwood and Glass (1984) have observed these galaxies extensively in the 1 to 20 micron range. In the far-infrared, observations up to 100 microns are available from the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). In order to study the cool dust component of these galaxies, researchers observed them at 150 microns using the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) 100 cm balloon-borne telescope. Here, they report observations along with deconvolved maps at 50 and 100 microns obtained from the Chopped Photometric Channel (CPC) on board IRAS.

  13. A method for combining passive microwave and infrared rainfall observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Giglio, Louis

    1995-01-01

    Because passive microwave instruments are confined to polar-orbiting satellites, rainfall estimates must interpolate across long time periods, during which no measurements are available. In this paper the authors discuss a technique that allows one to partially overcome the sampling limitations by using frequent infrared observations from geosynchronous platforms. To accomplish this, the technique compares all coincident microwave and infrared observations. From each coincident pair, the infrared temperature threshold is selected that corresponds to an area equal to the raining area observed in the microwave image. The mean conditional rainfall rate as determined from the microwave image is then assigned to pixels in the infrared image that are colder than the selected threshold. The calibration is also applied to a fixed threshold of 235 K for comparison with established infrared techniques. Once a calibration is determined, it is applied to all infrared images. Monthly accumulations for both methods are then obtained by summing rainfall from all available infrared images. Two examples are used to evaluate the performance of the technique. The first consists of a one-month period (February 1988) over Darwin, Australia, where good validation data are available from radar and rain gauges. For this case it was found that the technique approximately doubled the rain inferred by the microwave method alone and produced exceptional agreement with the validation data. The second example involved comparisons with atoll rain gauges in the western Pacific for June 1989. Results here are overshadowed by the fact that the hourly infrared estimates from established techniques, by themselves, produced very good correlations with the rain gauges. The calibration technique was not able to improve upon these results.

  14. AIRS Infrared Polarization Sensitivity and In-Flight Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Elliott, Denis; Broberg, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a space-based instrument that measures the upwelling atmospheric spectrum in the infrared. AIRS is one of several instruments on the EOS-Aqua spacecraft launched on May 4, 2002: Typically, instrument polarization is not a concern in the infrared because the scene is usually not significantly polarized. A small amount of polarization is expected over ocean, which can be seen in the AIRS 3.7 (micro)m window channels. The polarization is seen as a signal difference between two channels with the same center frequency but different polarizations. The observations are compared to a model that relies on measurements of instrument polarization made pre-flight. A first look at a comparison of the observations of sea surface polarization to expectations is presented.

  15. Near to Mid-Infrared Observations of Recent Supernovae with Infrared Camera (IRC) onboard AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakon, I.; Onaka, T.; Wada, T.; Usui, F.; Kaneda, H.; Ohyama, Y.; Oyabu, S.; Ishihara, D.; Tanabé, T.; Matsuhara, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Murakami, H.; Minezaki, T.; Yoshii, Y.; Nozawa, T.; Nomoto, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tominaga, N.; Kozasa, T.

    2009-12-01

    We present our latest results on near- to mid-infrared observations of supernovae within one year after the explosion with Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. In this project, we aim to explore the dust formation scenario in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. So far, observations of several recent supernovae including SN2006jc and SN2008ax have been carried out as part of the Directors Time of AKARI. At the same time, we have set about the near-infrared slit-less spectroscopic observations of nearby galaxies with high supernovae frequency in preparation for a future supernova in the AKARI Phase-3 Open Time Program “Near-infrared Slit-less Spectroscopy of Nearby Galaxies; Waiting for Supernovae Momentarily (NEWSY)” (P.I. Sakon, I.). The obtained near- to mid-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of early-time supernovae is quite valuable and unique to investigate the properties of dust formed around the massive star and will further deepen our knowledge on the origin of dust especially in the early universe.

  16. Observation of infrared emission spectra from silicon combustion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Kenneth J.; De Yong, Leo V.; Gray, Rodney

    1996-05-01

    The combustion of silicon based pyrotechnic compositions is observed with time resolved infrared spectrometry. This revealed the build up of strong emission at 9.1 ± 0.1 μm, which is associated with condensed silicon dioxide particulates. Time averaged spectra for compositions containing different oxidants or binders illustrate the dependence of SiO 2 emission intensity on composition.

  17. Finite Volume Numerical Methods for Aeroheating Rate Calculations from Infrared Thermographic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    The use of multi-dimensional finite volume numerical techniques with finite thickness models for calculating aeroheating rates from measured global surface temperatures on hypersonic wind tunnel models was investigated. Both direct and inverse finite volume techniques were investigated and compared with the one-dimensional semi -infinite technique. Global transient surface temperatures were measured using an infrared thermographic technique on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air tunnel. In these tests the effectiveness of vortices generated via gas injection for initiating hypersonic transition on the Hyper-X forebody were investigated. An array of streamwise orientated heating striations were generated and visualized downstream of the gas injection sites. In regions without significant spatial temperature gradients, one-dimensional techniques provided accurate aeroheating rates. In regions with sharp temperature gradients due to the striation patterns two-dimensional heat transfer techniques were necessary to obtain accurate heating rates. The use of the one-dimensional technique resulted in differences of 20% in the calculated heating rates because it did not account for lateral heat conduction in the model.

  18. An Airborne Infrared Spectrometer for Solar Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samra, Jenna; DeLuca, Edward E.; Golub, Leon; Cheimets, Peter; Philip, Judge

    2016-05-01

    The airborne infrared spectrometer (AIR-Spec) is an innovative solar spectrometer that will observe the 2017 solar eclipse from the NSF/NCAR High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER). AIR-Spec will image five infrared coronal emission lines to determine whether they may be useful probes of coronal magnetism.The solar magnetic field provides the free energy that controls coronal heating, structure, and dynamics. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections and ultimately drives space weather. Therefore, direct coronal field measurements have significant potential to enhance understanding of coronal dynamics and improve solar forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of field lines in the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on the origin of the slow solar wind.While current instruments routinely observe only the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, AIR-Spec will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. During the total solar eclipse of 2017, AIR-Spec will observe five magnetically sensitive coronal emission lines between 1.4 and 4 µm from the HIAPER Gulfstream V at an altitude above 14.9 km. The instrument will measure emission line intensity, width, and Doppler shift, map the spatial distribution of infrared emitting plasma, and search for waves in the emission line velocities.AIR-Spec consists of an optical system (feed telescope, grating spectrometer, and infrared detector) and an image stabilization system, which uses a fast steering mirror to correct the line-of-sight for platform perturbations. To ensure that the instrument meets its research goals, both systems are undergoing extensive performance modeling and testing. These results are shown with reference to the science requirements.

  19. Infrared sensing of non-observable human biometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmore, Michael R.

    2005-05-01

    Interest and growth of biometric recognition technologies surged after 9/11. Once a technology mainly used for identity verification in law enforcement, biometrics are now being considered as a secure means of providing identity assurance in security related applications. Biometric recognition in law enforcement must, by necessity, use attributes of human uniqueness that are both observable and vulnerable to compromise. Privacy and protection of an individual's identity is not assured during criminal activity. However, a security system must rely on identity assurance for access control to physical or logical spaces while not being vulnerable to compromise and protecting the privacy of an individual. The solution resides in the use of non-observable attributes of human uniqueness to perform the biometric recognition process. This discussion will begin by presenting some key perspectives about biometric recognition and the characteristic differences between observable and non-observable biometric attributes. An introduction to the design, development, and testing of the Thermo-ID system will follow. The Thermo-ID system is an emerging biometric recognition technology that uses non-observable patterns of infrared energy naturally emanating from within the human body. As with all biometric systems, the infrared patterns recorded and compared within the Thermo-ID system are unique and individually distinguishable permitting a link to be confirmed between an individual and a claimed or previously established identity. The non-observable characteristics of infrared patterns of human uniqueness insure both the privacy and protection of an individual using this type of biometric recognition system.

  20. Thermal infrared nadir observations of 24 atmospheric gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarisse, Lieven; R'Honi, Yasmina; Coheur, Pierre-François; Hurtmans, Daniel; Clerbaux, Cathy

    2011-05-01

    Thermal infrared nadir sounders are ideal for observing total columns or vertical profiles of atmospheric gases such as water, carbon dioxide and ozone. High resolution sounders with a spectral resolution below 5 cm-1 can distinguish fine spectral features of trace gases. Forty years after the launch of the first hyperspectral sounder IRIS, we have now several state of the art instruments in orbit, with improved instrumental specifications. In this letter we give an overview of the trace gases which have been observed by infrared nadir sounders, focusing on new observations of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). We present typical observations of 14 rare reactive trace gas species. Several species are reported here for the first time in nadir view, including nitrous acid, furan, acetylene, propylene, acetic acid, formaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide, observations which were made in a pyrocumulus cloud from the Australian bush fires of February 2009. Being able to observe this large number of reactive trace gases will likely improve our knowledge of source emissions and their impact on the environment and climate.

  1. MOMIE: MIKE Observations of Mid-Infrared Excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzpen, Brian R.; Kobulnicky, H. A.; Thom, C.; Putman, M. E.

    2006-12-01

    We have identified 36 B8--K main-sequence stars that exhibit a midbut not a near infrared excess from the Spitzer Space Telescope's Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE; Benjamin et al. 2003) and Mid-Course Space Experiment (MSX; Egan 2003) (Uzpen et al. 2006). We have obtained MIKE echelle observations of 15 of these objects. These sources have disk components ranging in temperature from 190-800 K and fractional infrared luminosity from 5.2x10^-4 1.3x10^-2. We also obtained observations of 5 of the 6 sources that exhibited a near-IR and mid-IR excess. These sources range in disk temperature 400-580 K and fractional infrared luminosity from 5.8x10^-2 2.0x10^-1. We highlight what the high resolution spectra for these sources reveals in terms of rotational velocities, gas accretion signatures, and stellar ages of mid-IR excess stars with putative circumstellar disks.

  2. Infrared observations of gravitational lensing in Abell 2219 with CIRSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Meghan E.; Ellis, Richard S.; Refregier, Alexandre; Bézecourt, Jocelyn; McMahon, Richard G.; Beckett, Martin G.; Mackay, Craig D.; Hoenig, Michael D.

    2000-10-01

    We present the first detection of a gravitational depletion signal at near-infrared wavelengths, based on deep panoramic images of the cluster Abell 2219 (z=0.22) taken with the Cambridge Infrared Survey Instrument (CIRSI) at the prime focus of the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. Infrared studies of gravitational depletion offer a number of advantages over similar techniques applied at optical wavelengths, and can provide reliable total masses for intermediate-redshift clusters. Using the maximum-likelihood technique developed by Schneider, King & Erben, we detect the gravitational depletion at the 3σ confidence level. By modelling the mass distribution as a singular isothermal sphere and ignoring the uncertainty in the unlensed number counts, we find an Einstein radius of θE ~= 13.7+3.9-4.2 arcsec (66per cent confidence limit). This corresponds to a projected velocity dispersion of σv~800kms-1, in agreement with constraints from strongly lensed features. For a Navarro, Frenk & White mass model, the radial dependence observed indicates a best-fitting halo scalelength of 125h-1kpc. We investigate the uncertainties arising from the observed fluctuations in the unlensed number counts, and show that clustering is the dominant source of error. We extend the maximum-likelihood method to include the effect of incompleteness, and discuss the prospects of further systematic studies of lensing in the near-infrared band.

  3. Nonuniform Dust Outflow Observed around Infrared Object NML Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J. D.; Bester, M.; Danchi, W. C.; Johnson, M. A.; Lipman, E. A.; Townes, C. H.; Tuthill, P. G.; Geballe, T. R.; Nishimoto, D.; Kervin, P. W.

    1997-05-01

    Measurements by the University of California Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer at 11.15 μm have yielded strong evidence for multiple dust shells and/or significant asymmetric dust emission around NML Cyg. New observations reported also include multiple 8-13 μm spectra taken from 1994-1995 and N-band (10.2 μm) photometry from 1980-1992. These and past measurements are analyzed and fitted to a model of the dust distribution around NML Cyg. No spherically symmetric single dust shell model is found consistent with both near- and mid-infrared observations. However, a circularly symmetric maximum entropy reconstruction of the 11 μm brightness distribution suggests a double-shell model for the dust distribution. Such a model, consisting of a geometrically thin shell of intermediate optical depth (τ11 μm ~ 1.9) plus an outer shell (τ11 μm ~ 0.33), is consistent not only with the 11 μm visibility data but also with near-infrared speckle measurements, the broadband spectrum, and the 9.7 μm silicate feature. The outer shell, or large-scale structure, is revealed only by long-baseline interferometry at 11 μm, being too cold (~400 K) to contribute in the near-infrared and having no unambiguous spectral signature in the mid-infrared. The optical constants of Ossenkopf, Henning, & Mathis proved superior to the Draine & Lee (1984) constants in fitting the detailed shape of the silicate feature and broadband spectrum for this object. Recent observations of H2O maser emission around NML Cyg by Richards, Yates, & Cohen (1996) are consistent with the location of the two dust shells and provide further evidence for the two-shell model.

  4. Titan's Atmospheric Composition from Observations by the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; LeClair, A.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Conrath, B. J.; Coustenis, A.; Jennings, D. J.; Nixon, C. A.; Brasunas, J.; Achterberg, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard the Cassini spacecraft has been making observations during the fly-bys of Titan since the Saturn-Orbit-Insertion in July 2004. The observations provide infrared them1 emission spectra of Titan s atmosphere in three spectral channels covering the 10/cm to 1400/cm spectral region, with variable spectral resolutions of 0.53/cm and 2.8/cm. The uniquely observed spectra exhibit rotational and vibrational-rotational spectral lines of the molecular constituents of Titan s atmosphere that may be analyzed to retrieve information about the composition, thermal structure, and physical and dynamical processes in the remotely sensed atmosphere. We present an analysis of Titan's infrared spectra observed during July 2004 (TO), December 2004 (Tb) and February 2005 (T3), for retrieval of the stratospheric thermal structure, distribution of the hydrocarbons, nitriles, and oxygen bearing constituents, such as C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H8, HCN, HC3N, CO, and CO2 . Preliminary results on the distribution and opacity of haze in Titan s atmosphere are discussed.

  5. Infrared Observations Of Volatile Molecules In Comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, J.

    1997-09-01

    Infrared observations of comets C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake) and C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) benefited from the high spectral resolution and sensitivity of échelle spectrometers now equipping ground-based telescopes and from the availability of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). From the ground, several hydrocarbons were unambiguously detected for the first time: CH4, C2H2, C2H6. Water was observed through several of its hot vibrational bands, escaping telluric absorption. CO, HCN, NH3 and OCS were also observed, as well as several radicals. This permitted the evaluation of molecular production rates, of rotational temperature, and — taking advantage of the 1-D imaging of long-slit spectroscopy — of the space distribution of these species. With ISO, carbon dioxide was directly observed for the second time in a comet (after its detection from the Vega probes in P/Halley). The spectrum of water was investigated in detail (several bands of vibration and far-infrared rotational lines), permitting the evaluation of the rotational temperature of water, and of it spin temperature from the ortho-to-para ratio. Water ice was identified in the grains of Hale-Bopp as far as 7 AU from the ground and possibly at 3 AU with ISO. The composition of cometary volatiles appears to be strikingly similar to that of interstellar ices.

  6. Serendipity Observations of Far Infrared Cirrus Emission in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey: Analysis of Far-Infrared Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bot, Caroline; Helou, George; Boulanger, François; Lagache, Guilaine; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine; Draine, Bruce; Martin, Peter

    2009-04-01

    We present an analysis of far-infrared (FIR) dust emission from diffuse cirrus clouds. This study is based on serendipitous observations at 160 μm at high-galactic latitude with the Multiband Imaging Photometer onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope by the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. These observations are complemented with IRIS data at 100 and 60 μm and constitute one of the most sensitive and unbiased samples of FIR observations at a small scale of diffuse interstellar clouds. Outside regions dominated by the cosmic infrared background fluctuations, we observe a substantial scatter in the 160/100 colors from cirrus emission. We compared the 160/100 color variations to 60/100 colors in the same fields and find a trend of decreasing 60/100 with increasing 160/100. This trend cannot be accounted for by current dust models by changing solely the interstellar radiation field. It requires a significant change of dust properties such as grain size distribution or emissivity or a mixing of clouds in different physical conditions along the line of sight. These variations are important as a potential confusing foreground for extragalactic studies. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA.

  7. The Infrared Database of Extragalactic Observables from Spitzer (IDEOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoon, Henrik

    During the cryogenic phase of the successful Spitzer mission the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) performed approximately 15,000 observations of galactic and extragalactic sources. Among these are low-resolution spectra of more than 4200 galaxies beyond the Local Group. Results have been published in a great number of papers, led not only by hardcore infrared observers but increasingly also by non-native infrared astronomers. As the PI team of the IRS instrument, we are especially proud of the achievements of the IRS spectrograph, and we feel a special obligation to enhance the legacy value of its many observations. Last Summer we completed the Cornell Atlas of Spitzer-IRS Sources (CASSIS), containing homogeneously, expert-reduced low-resolution IRS spectra for over 11,000 observations. The spectra are available for download from our newly created CASSIS web portal. Here we propose to continue these efforts by fitting the low-resolution extragalactic spectra in the CASSIS atlas and create an Infrared Database of Extragalactic Observables from Spitzer (IDEOS) of homogeneously measured mid-infrared spectroscopic observables of more than 4200 galaxies beyond the Local Group. IDEOS will provide astronomers with widely varying scientific interests access to diagnostics that were previously available only for limited samples, or available on-the- fly only to expert users. The completion of IDEOS will coincide with the completion of ALMA. By their nature, CASSIS galaxies are attractive targets for high S/N ALMA observations. IDEOS will provide easily-accessible mid-IR selection criteria for compilation of ALMA target lists for probing significant questions on the AGN environment, the nature of starburst activity, or the AGN/starburst connection. The virtual observatory accessibility will also greatly automate the collation of synoptic results, particularly in the compilation of SEDs and in the cross-matching of targets for trend plots of spectroscopic observables. IDEOS will

  8. Stress evaluation of Through-Silicon Vias using micro-infrared photoelasticity and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Fei; Lan, Tianbao; Pan, Xiaoxu

    2015-11-01

    The Through-SiliconVias (TSV) is a key component of three dimensional electronic packaging. Obtaining its stresses is very important for evaluating its reliability. A micro-infrared photoelasticity system with a thermal loading function was built and applied to characterize the stresses of the TSV structure. Through testing it was found that the stress of each TSV is different even if their fabrication technology is exactly the same, that different TSVs obtain their stress free states at different elevated temperatures, and that their stress free states are maintained even when the temperature is further elevated. A finite element model was used to quantitatively determine the stresses of a TSV under different stress-free temperatures. Different virtual photoelasticity fringe patterns were then created based on the principle of photoelasticity and the simulated stresses. Comparing the virtual fringe patterns with the experimental pattern, an appropriate virtual photoelasticity fringe pattern and the corresponding stresses of TSV were determined

  9. Thermal-infrared spectral observations of geologic materials in emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Luth, Sharon J.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal-infrared spectra of geologic materials in emission were studied using the prototype Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). A variety of of processes and surface modifications that may influence or alter the spectra of primary rock materials were studied. It was confirmed that thermal emission spectra contain the same absorption features as those observed in transmission and reflection spectra. It was confirmed that the TES instrument can be used to obtain relevant spectra for analysis of rock and mineral composition.

  10. Infrared Observations Of Dust Emission From Comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, C. M.; Fernández, Y. R.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Käufl, H. U.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Dayal, A.; Ressler, M. E.; Hanner, M. S.; Fazio, G. G.; Hora, J. L.; Peschke, S. B.; Grün, E.; Deutsch, L. K.

    1997-07-01

    We present infrared imaging and photometry of the bright, giant comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). The comet was observed in an extended infrared and optical observing campaign in 1996 1997. The infrared morphology of the comet was observed to change from the 6 to 8 jet “porcupine” structure in 1996 to the “pinwheel” structure seen in 1997; this has implications for the position of the rotational angular momentum vector. Long term light curves taken at 11.3 μm indicate a dust production rate that varies with heliocentric distance as ∶ r-1.4. Short term light curves taken at perihelion indicate a rotational periodicity of 11.3 hours and a projected dust outflow speed of ∶ 0.4 km s-1. The spectral energy distribution of the dust on October 31, 1996 is well modeled by a mixture of 70% silicaceous and 30% carbonaceous non-porous grains, with a small particle dominated size distribution like that seen for comet P/Halley (McDonnell et al., 1991), an overall dust production rate of 2 × 105 kg s-1, a dust-to-gas ratio of ∶5, and an albedo of 39%.

  11. Finite Volume Numerical Methods for Aeroheating Rate Calculations from Infrared Thermographic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of multi-dimensional finite volume heat conduction techniques for calculating aeroheating rates from measured global surface temperatures on hypersonic wind tunnel models was investigated. Both direct and inverse finite volume techniques were investigated and compared with the standard one-dimensional semi-infinite technique. Global transient surface temperatures were measured using an infrared thermographic technique on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air tunnel. In these tests the effectiveness of vortices generated via gas injection for initiating hypersonic transition on the Hyper-X forebody was investigated. An array of streamwise-orientated heating striations was generated and visualized downstream of the gas injection sites. In regions without significant spatial temperature gradients, one-dimensional techniques provided accurate aeroheating rates. In regions with sharp temperature gradients caused by striation patterns multi-dimensional heat transfer techniques were necessary to obtain more accurate heating rates. The use of the one-dimensional technique resulted in differences of 20% in the calculated heating rates compared to 2-D analysis because it did not account for lateral heat conduction in the model.

  12. VLBI observations of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, Enno; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Tingay, Steven

    2006-10-01

    We propose to observe a small sample of radio sources from the ATLAS project (ATLAS = Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) with the LBA, to determine their compactness and map their structures. The sample consists of three radio sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubbed Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations: we will map their structure to test whether they resemble core-jet or double-lobed morphologies, and we will measure the flux densities on long baselines, to determine their compactness. Previous snapshot-style LBA observations of two other IFRS yielded no detections, hence we propose to use disk-based recording with 512 Mbps where possible, for highest sensitivity. With the observations proposed here, we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from two to five, soon allowing us to draw general conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  13. Sensitive observations with the Spacelab 2 infrared telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. T.; Rieke, G. H.; Gautier, T. N.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Low, F. J.; Poteet, W.; Fazio, G. G.; Koch, D.; Traub, W. A.; Urban, E. W.

    The small helium-cooled infrared telescope (Spacelab IRT) is a multiband instrument capable of highly sensitive observations from space. The experiment consists of a cryogenically cooled, very well baffled telescope with a ten channel focal plane array. During the Spacelab 2 flight of the Space Shuttle, this instrument will make observations between 5 and 120 micron wavelength that will be background limited by the expected zodiacal emission. Design considerations necessitated by this level of performance are discussed in this paper. In particular, the operation of a very sensitive focal plane array in the space environment is described. The Spacelab IRT will be used to map the extended, low-surface brightness celestial emission. During the seven day length of the mission better than 70 percent sky coverage is expected. The instrument will also be used to measure the infrared contamination environment of the Space Shuttle. This information will be important in the development of the next generation of infrared astronomical instruments. The performance of the Spacelab IRT, in particular its sensitivity to the contamination environment is detailed.

  14. Infrared observations of the saturnian system from voyager 2.

    PubMed

    Hanel, R; Conrath, B; Flasar, F M; Kunde, V; Maguire, W; Pearl, J; Pirraglia, J; Samuelson, R; Cruikshank, D; Gautier, D; Gierasch, P; Horn, L; Ponnamperuma, C

    1982-01-29

    During the passage of Voyager 2 through the Saturn system, infrared spectral and radiometric data were obtained for Saturn, Titan, Enceladus, Tethys, Iapetus, and the rings. Combined Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 observations of temperatures in the upper troposphere of Saturn indicate a seasonal asymmetry between the northern and southern hemispheres, with superposed small-scale meridional gradients. Comparison of high spatial resolution data from the two hemispheres poleward of 60 degrees latitude suggests an approximate symmetry in the small-scale structure, consistent with the extension of a symmetric system of zonal jets into the polar regions. Longitudinal variations of 1 to 2 K are observed. Disk- averaged infrared spectra of Titan show little change over the 9-month interval between Voyager encounters. By combining Voyager 2 temperature measurements with ground-based geometric albedo determinations, phase integrals of 0.91 +/- 0.13 and 0.89 +/- 0.09 were derived for Tethys and Enceladus, respectively. The subsolar point temperature of dark material on Iapetus must exceed 110 K. Temperatures (and infrared optical depths) for the A and C rings and for the Cassini division are 69 +/- 1 K (0.40 +/- 0.05), 85 +/- 1 K (0.10 +/- 0.03), and 85 +/- 2 K (0.07 +/- 0.04), respectively. PMID:17771275

  15. Remote sensing cloud properties from high spectral resolution infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L.; Ma, Xia L.; Ackerman, Steven A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Knuteson, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    A technique for estimating cloud radiative properties (spectral emissivity and reflectivity) in the IR is developed based on observations at a spectral resolution of approximately 0.5/cm. The algorithm uses spectral radiance observations and theoretical calculations of the IR spectra for clear and cloudy conditions along with lidar-determined cloud-base and cloud-top pressure. An advantage of the high spectral resolution observations is that the absorption effects of atmospheric gases are minimized by analyzing between gaseous absorption lines. The technique is applicable to both ground-based and aircraft-based platforms and derives the effective particle size and associated cloud water content required to satisfy, theoretically, the observed cloud IR spectra. The algorithm is tested using theoretical simulations and applied to observations made with the University of Wisconsin's ground-based and NASA ER-2 aircraft High-Resolution Infrared Spectrometer instruments.

  16. Infrared observations of the saturnian system from voyager 1.

    PubMed

    Hanel, R; Conrath, B; Flasar, F M; Kunde, V; Maguire, W; Pearl, J; Pirraglia, J; Samuelson, R; Herath, L; Allison, M; Cruikshank, D; Gautier, D; Gierasch, P; Horn, L; Koppany, R; Ponnamperuma, C

    1981-04-10

    During the passage of Voyager 1 through the Saturn system, the infrared instrument acquired spectral and radiometric data on Saturn, the rings, and Titan and other satellites. Infrared spectra of Saturn indicate the presence of H(2), CH(4), NH(3), PH(3), C(2)H(2), C(2)H(6), and possibly C(3)H(4) and C(3)H(8). A hydrogen mole fraction of 0.94 is inferred with an uncertainty of a few percent, implying a depletion of helium in the atmosphere of Saturn relative to that of Jupiter. The atmospheric thermal structure of Saturn shows hemisphere asymmetries that are consistent with a response to the seasonally varying insolation. Extensive small-scale latitudinal structure is also observed. On Titan, positive identifications of infrared spectral features are made for CH(4), C(2)H(2), C(2)H(4), C(2)H(6), and HCN; tentative identifications are made for C(3)H(4) and C(3)H(8). The infrared continuum opacity on Titan appears to be quite small between 500 and 600 cm(-1), implying that the solid surface is a major contributor to the observed emission over this spectral range; between 500 and 200 cm(-1) theopacity increases with decreasing wave number, attaining an optical thickness in excess of 2 at 200 cm(-1). Temperatures near the 1-millibar level are independent of longitude and local time but show a decrease of approximately 20 K between the equator and north pole, which suggests a seasonally dependent cyclostrophic zonal flow in the stratosphere of approximately 100 meters per second. Measurements of the C ring of Saturn yield a temperature of 85 +/- 1 K and an infrared optical depth of 0.09 +/- 0.01. Radiometer observations of sunlight transmitted through the ring system indicate an optical depth of 10(-1.3 +/-0.3) for the Cassini division. A phase integral of 1.02 +/- 0.06 is inferred for Rhea, which agrees with values for other icy bodies in the solar system. Rhea eclipse observations indicate the presence of surface materials with both high and low thermal inertias, the

  17. Far infrared supplement. Third edition: Catalog of infrared observations (lambda greater than or equal to 4.6 micrometers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Pitts, Patricia S.; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1993-01-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement contains a subset of the data in the full Catalog of Infrared Observations (all observations at wavelengths greater than 4.6 microns). The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), NASA RP-1294, is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of scientific journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature search is complete for years 1965 through 1990 in this third edition. The catalog contains about 210,000 observations of roughly 20,000 individual sources, and supporting appendices. The expanded third edition contains coded IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected by IRAS. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions (also included in this volume), two bibliographies of catalog listings, and an atlas of infrared spectral ranges. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed, microfiche, and magnetic tape formats.

  18. Infrared Spectral Observations While Drilling into a Frozen Lunar Simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, T. L.; Colaprete, A.; Thompson, S.; Cook, A.; Kleinhenz, J.

    2014-12-01

    Past and continuing observations indicate an enrichment of volatile materials in lunar polar regions. While these volatiles may be located near the surface, access to them will likely require subsurface sampling, during which it is desirable to monitor the volatile content. In a simulation of such activities, a multilayer lunar simulant was prepared with differing water content, and placed inside a thermal vacuum chamber at Glenn Research Center (GRC). The soil profile was cooled using liquid nitrogen. In addition to the soil, a drill and infrared (IR) spectrometer (~1600-3400 nm) were also located in the GRC chamber. We report the spectral observations obtained during a sequence where the drill was repeatedly inserted and extracted, to different depths, at the same location. We observe an overall increase in the spectral signature of water ice over the duration of the test. Additionally, we observe variations in the water ice spectral signature as the drill encounters different layers.

  19. Infrared Spectral Observations While Drilling into a Frozen Lunar Simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Colaprete, Anthony; Thompson, Sarah; Cook, Amanda; Kleinhenz, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Past and continuing observations indicate an enrichment of volatile materials in lunar polar regions. While these volatiles may be located near the surface, access to them will likely require subsurface sampling, during which it is desirable to monitor the volatile content. In a simulation of such activities, a multilayer lunar simulant was prepared with differing water content, and placed inside a thermal vacuum chamber at Glenn Research Center (GRC). The soil profile was cooled using liquid nitrogen. In addition to the soil, a drill and infrared (IR) spectrometer (1600-3400 nm) were also located in the GRC chamber. We report the spectral observations obtained during a sequence where the drill was repeatedly inserted and extracted, to different depths, at the same location. We observe an overall increase in the spectral signature of water ice over the duration of the test. Additionally, we observe variations in the water ice spectral signature as the drill encounters different layers.

  20. Infrared Observations of SO emission from Io's Atmosphere during Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kleer, K.; De Pater, I.; Adamkovics, M.

    2013-12-01

    Io, the volcanic moon of Jupiter, hosts an atmosphere dominated by SO2 and SO, but the question of the direct source of these molecules is still debated. Many different approaches have been taken to establish a link between volcanic activity on Io and atmospheric effects, to distinguish whether the atmosphere is supplied by volcanic outgassing or ice sublimation. In the infrared, atmospheric emission lines are lost in reflected sunlight; observing Io in eclipse provides a unique opportunity to study infrared lines, during a time when most of Io's atmosphere may be frozen out in Jupiter's shadow. In 1999 the a1Δ → Χ3Σ- transition of SO at 1.707 μm was discovered by de Pater et al. (2002); Laver et al. (2007) made additional observations, which they fit with equilibrium models to infer a likely volcanic origin for the SO. Here we present additional high spectral resolution observations of the 1.707 μm SO line while Io is in eclipse. We model these observations with equilibrium and non-LTE models, and address implications for the origin of SO on Io.

  1. Small particle cirrus observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Eldering, A.; Fishbein, E. F.

    2003-04-01

    The high-resolution spectra of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) have provided an opportunity to globally observe small particle-dominated cirrus clouds. The shape of the radiance spectra in the atmospheric windows is uniquely influenced by small ice crystals with an effective radius (reff) of a few 10s of microns and smaller. In some rare instances, minima in the AIRS brightness temperature (BT) spectra between 800 to 850 cm-1 are seen, consistent with the existence of ice particles with an reff smaller than 3 microns. Much more frequent occurences of small ice particle clouds with reff larger than 3 microns are observed through the large 998 to 811 cm-1 BT differences without minima. The small particle events are occasionally found in orographic cirrus clouds, in and around cumulonimbus towers, and in cirrus bands far removed from convection and orography. Several cases spanning the variety of small particle-dominated cirrus events will be presented. AIRS, located on the EOS-Aqua platform, is a high-resolution grating spectrometer that scans at angles 49.5 degrees on either side of nadir view, at both visible and infrared wavelengths. The surface footprint is 13.5 km at the nadir view, and coverage in the infrared is in three bandpasses (649-1136, 1265-1629, and 2169-2674 cm-1). Comparisons of observed spectra are made with simulated spectra generated by a plane-parallel scattering radiative transfer model using ice particle shapes and sizes calculated by the T-matrix method. These comparisons yield information on small particle cirrus cloud reff and optical depth. Aumann, H.H., and R.J. Pagano, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System. Opt. Eng. 33, 776-784, 1994. Mishchenko, M.I., and L.D. Travis, Capabilities and limitations of a current Fortran implementation of the T-matrix method for randomly oriented, rotationally symmetric scatterers. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 60, 309-324, 1998. Moncet, J.L., and S.A. Clough

  2. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System

    SciTech Connect

    Aumann, H.H.; Pagano, R.J. . Jet Propulsion Lab.)

    1994-03-01

    Recent breakthroughs in IR detector array and cryocooler technology have made it possible to convert the concepts of optimum, passive, IR sounding to a practical satellite-borne instrument: the Atmospheric infrared Sounder (AIRS), a grating array IR spectrometer temperature sounder. AIRS, together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit and the Microwave Humidity Sounder, will form a complementary sounding system for the Earth Observing System to be launched in the year 2000. The three instruments are expected to become the new operational sounding system for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

  3. Infrared Algorithm Development for Ocean Observations with EOS/MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Otis B.

    1997-01-01

    Efforts continue under this contract to develop algorithms for the computation of sea surface temperature (SST) from MODIS infrared measurements. This effort includes radiative transfer modeling, comparison of in situ and satellite observations, development and evaluation of processing and networking methodologies for algorithm computation and data accession, evaluation of surface validation approaches for IR radiances, development of experimental instrumentation, and participation in MODIS (project) related activities. Activities in this contract period have focused on radiative transfer modeling, evaluation of atmospheric correction methodologies, undertake field campaigns, analysis of field data, and participation in MODIS meetings.

  4. Infrared algorithm development for ocean observations with EOS/MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Otis B.

    1994-01-01

    Efforts continue under this contract to develop algorithms for the computation of sea surface temperature (SST) from MODIS infrared retrievals. This effort includes radiative transfer modeling, comparison of in situ and satellite observations, development and evaluation of processing and networking methodologies for algorithm computation and data accession, evaluation of surface validation approaches for IR radiances, and participation in MODIS (project) related activities. Efforts in this contract period have focused on radiative transfer modeling and evaluation of atmospheric path radiance efforts on SST estimation, exploration of involvement in ongoing field studies, evaluation of new computer networking strategies, and objective analysis approaches.

  5. Io Science Opportunities with JIMO: Observing in the Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, W. D.; Lopes, R.; Spencer, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter presents an opportunity to greatly improve our understanding of the most dynamic body in the solar system. Io is the best place to study tidal heating of the Galilean moons, provides unique insights into Earth history and is a unique laboratory for basic planetary physics. Many important questions about Io remain after Galileo that cannot be addressed from Earth or Earth orbit, but could be answered by limited observing time from JIMO with the appropriate instrumentation. Here we outline the requirements in the infrared.

  6. W3 North: Far-infrared and radio molecular observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Schwartz, P. R.; Smith, H. A.; Lada, C. J.; Glaccum, W.; Harper, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The W3 North (G133.8 + 1.4) source is the northernmost member of a string of active star forming regions that marks the western boundary of the giant HII region W4. Far infrared and radio observations of molecular CO were made of the W3 star forming region. The W3 North object shows extended dust and gas emission which suggests a fairly advanced disruption of a molecular cloud. An estimate of the age of the embedded HII region is given, and emission maps of the W3 object are presented. The W3 North source may be the oldest object among the W3 complex of sources.

  7. Infrared Observations from the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goode, Philip R.; Cao, Wenda

    2013-10-01

    The 1.6 m clear aperture solar telescope in Big Bear is operational and with its adaptive optics (AO) system it provides diffraction limited solar imaging and polarimetry in the near-infrared (NIR). While the AO system is being upgraded to provide diffraction limited imaging at bluer wavelengths, the instrumentation and observations are concentrated in the NIR. The New Solar Telescope (NST) operates in campaigns, making it the ideal ground-based telescope to provide complementary/supplementary data to SDO and Hinode. The NST makes photometric observations in Hα (656.3 nm) and TiO (705.6 nm) among other lines. As well, the NST collects vector magnetograms in the 1565 nm lines and is beginning such observations in 1083.0 nm. Here we discuss the relevant NST instruments, including AO, and present some results that are germane to NASA solar missions.

  8. Fault detection for linear distributed-parameter systems using finite-dimensional functional observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutscher, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    In this article, finite-dimensional residual generators are directly designed for Riesz-spectral systems with bounded input and output operators to detect faults. This is achieved by using finite-dimensional observers, that can estimate linear functionals of the state without spillover. These observers allow for a decoupling of the unknown disturbances from the estimation error dynamics under mild assumptions. Then, a finite-dimensional residual generator is obtained by approximately decoupling the state from the residual, that is generated by the observer states and the outputs. It is shown that the resulting approximation error can be made small by increasing the observer order. Then, fault detection with the finite-dimensional residual generator can be assured by introducing a time-varying threshold. A faulty Euler-Bernoulli beam with structural damping illustrates the proposed finite-dimensional fault detection approach.

  9. Mid-Infrared Observations of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolovy, Susan Renee

    1997-06-01

    This thesis explores the mid-infrared properties of the Galactic Center from two sets of observations. The goal of the first project was to detect or set an upper limit on the mid-infrared flux from the non-thermal radio source and black hole candidate known as Sgr A*, which is located at the dynamical center of the Galaxy. Deep images of the central parsec of the Galaxy with 0.7'' resolution were obtained at 8.7 μm and 11.6 μm. Analysis of these images reveals for the first time a mid-infrared source coincident with Sgr A* to within the diffraction limit. This detection was difficult due to the poor contrast between the source and the strong background diffuse emission. A detection at each wavelength was established after employing deconvolution techniques. The derived fluxes are too bright and the spectrum is too red to be consistent with current dustless accretion disk models. The mid-infrared emission is best explained by the presence of warm dust which may be associated with an accretion disk at Sgr A* or heated by local stellar sources. The second set of observations is a study of the distribution and kinematics of the atomic gas in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy as traced by the forbidden (SiII) line at 34.8 μm. The integrated (SiII) emission peaks near Sgr A* and extends past the inner edge of the Circumnuclear Disk (CND), passing through a gap in the dense molecular material to the northwest. The (SiII) maps have a spatial resolution of 15'' and a spectral resolution of 50 km/s. The spectra, which are characterized by generally broad linewidths (>100 km/s), are kinematically consistent with the CND rotation to the southwest but not to the north. The northern extension may be experiencing shocks and is likely to be infalling along the Northern Arm. Observations of high and (SiII) / (OI) and (SiII) dust continuum ratios support the conjecture that turbulent motions and shocks in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy are destroying dust grains, thus

  10. The NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF): New Observational Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Alan T.; Bus, S. J.; Connelley, Michael S.; Rayner, John T.

    2015-11-01

    The NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) is a 3.0-m infrared telescope located at an altitude of 4.2 km near the summit of Mauna Kea on the island of Hawaii. The IRTF was established by NASA to support planetary science missions. Current instruments include: (1) SpeX, a 0.7-5.3 μm moderate resolution spectrograph with a slit-viewing camera that is also an imager, (2) MORIS, a high-speed CCD imager attached to SpeX for simultaneous visible and near-infrared observations, and (3) CSHELL, a 1-5 μm high-resolution spectrograph. MORIS can also be used as a visible wavelength guider for SpeX. Detector upgrades have recently been made to SpeX. We discuss new observational capabilities resulting from completion of a new echelle spectrograph for 1-5 μm with resolving power of 70,000 with a 0.375 arcsec slit. This instrument will be commissioned starting in the spring of 2016. We also plan to restore to service our 8-25 μm camera, MIRSI. It will be upgraded with a closed-cycle cooler that will eliminate the need for liquid helium and allow continuous use of MIRSI on the telescope. This will enable thermal observations of NEOs on short notice. We also plan to upgrade MIRSI to have a simultaneous visible imager for guiding and for photometry. The IRTF supports remote observing from any site. This eliminates the need for travel to the observatory and short observing time slots can be supported. We also welcome onsite visiting astronomers. In the near future we plan to implement a low-order wave-front sensor to allow real-time focus and collimation of the telescope. This will greatly improve observational efficiency. For further information on the IRTF and its instruments including visitor instruments, see: http://irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA contract NNH14CK55B, NASA Science Mission Directorate.

  11. Observable measure of quantum coherence in finite dimensional systems.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Davide

    2014-10-24

    Quantum coherence is the key resource for quantum technology, with applications in quantum optics, information processing, metrology, and cryptography. Yet, there is no universally efficient method for quantifying coherence either in theoretical or in experimental practice. I introduce a framework for measuring quantum coherence in finite dimensional systems. I define a theoretical measure which satisfies the reliability criteria established in the context of quantum resource theories. Then, I present an experimental scheme implementable with current technology which evaluates the quantum coherence of an unknown state of a d-dimensional system by performing two programmable measurements on an ancillary qubit, in place of the O(d2) direct measurements required by full state reconstruction. The result yields a benchmark for monitoring quantum effects in complex systems, e.g., certifying nonclassicality in quantum protocols and probing the quantum behavior of biological complexes. PMID:25379903

  12. Infrared Observations of Minor Planets in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Ryan; Trilling, David; Mommert, Michael; Burt, Brian; MacLennan, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Most minor planets in the Solar System reside in stable regions, and the flux of objects out of any of these regions is particularly informative in understanding the evolution of the Solar System. It is generally believed that Centaurs are derived from the trans-Neptunian object (TNO) population, and that the Jupiter-family comet (JFC) population is derived from the Centaurs. This progression is described dynamically, and there is little concrete evidence to date of how the physical properties of TNOs, Centaurs, and JFCs relate. We are searching for evidence of this relationship through comparing the mean albedos of members of these populations, with the expectation that smaller semi-major axes would lead to increased radiolysis rates and therefore lower albedos. The albedos of minor planets are accessible through infrared observations with space telescopes. We use results from the literature, works in progress, and our own measurements using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), and have a total sample size of around 150 objects. We will present our statistical results on the mean albedos in the TNO, Centaur, and JFC populations together with our analysis of the observation biases inherent in individual and combined surveys. We will present our conclusions about the TNO/Centaur/JFC evolution based on our results.

  13. Using near infrared light for deep sea mining observation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Huimin; Li, Yujie; Li, Xin; Yang, Jianmin; Serikawa, Seiichi

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we design a novel deep-sea near infrared light based imaging equipment for deep-sea mining observation systems. The spectral sensitivity peaks are in the red region of the invisible spectrum, ranging from 750nm to 900nm. In addition, we propose a novel underwater imaging model that compensates for the attenuation discrepancy along the propagation path. The proposed model fully considered the effects of absorption, scattering and refraction. We also develop a locally adaptive Laplacian filtering for enhancing underwater transmission map after underwater dark channel prior estimation. Furthermore, we propose a spectral characteristic-based color correction algorithm to recover the distorted color. In water tank experiments, we made a linear scale of eight turbidity steps ranging from clean to heavily scattered by adding deep sea soil to the seawater (from 500 to 2000 mg/L). We compared the results of different turbidity underwater scene, illuminated alternately with near infrared light vs. white light. Experiments demonstrate that the enhanced NIR images have a reasonable noise level after the illumination compensation in the dark regions and demonstrates an improved global contrast by which the finest details and edges are significantly enhanced. We also demonstrate that the effective distance of the designed imaging system is about 1.5 meters, which can meet the requirement of micro-terrain observation around the deep-sea mining systems. Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicle (ROV)-based experiments also certified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Far Infrared and Submillimeter Observations of the Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, R. F.; Harper, D. A.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Keene, J.; Orton, G. S.; Whitcomb, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Far infrared measurements of the effective temperatures of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune were made. The measurements presented here cover the range from 35-1000 micrometers in relatively narrow bands. The observations at lambda 350 micrometers were made at the 3m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) of the Mauna Kea Observatory; those at lambda 350 micrometer were made on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). All observations of Saturn were made when the ring inclination to Earth was 1.7 deg assuring an unambiguous measurement of the flux from the disk itself. Mars was used as the calibration reference. The results represent a consistent set of calibration standards. In these measurements, it is assumed that sub b(lambda = 350 micrometers) = T sub (lambda 350 micrometers). Measurements have been made of roughly 50% of the total flux emitted by Jupiter, 65% by Saturn, and 92% by Uranus and Neptune. These measurements therefore permit a considerable reduction in the uncertainties associated with the bolometric thermal outputs of the planets. The effective temperatures (T sub e) and the ratios of emitted to absorbed solar radiation were calculated.

  15. Thermal Infrared MMTAO Observations of the HR 8799 Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, Philip M.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Heinze, Aren N.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Meyer, Michael R.

    2010-06-01

    We present direct imaging observations at wavelengths of 3.3, 3.8 (L' band), and 4.8 (M band) μm, for the planetary system surrounding HR 8799. All three planets are detected at L' . The c and d components are detected at 3.3 μm, and upper limits are derived from the M-band observations. These observations provide useful constraints on warm giant planet atmospheres. We discuss the current age constraints on the HR 8799 system and show that several potential co-eval objects can be excluded from being co-moving with the star. Comparison of the photometry is made to models for giant planet atmospheres. Models that include non-equilibrium chemistry provide a reasonable match to the colors of c and d. From the observed colors in the thermal infrared, we estimate T eff < 960 K for b and T eff = 1300 and 1170 K for c and d, respectively. This provides an independent check on the effective temperatures and thus masses of the objects from the Marois et al. results. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution.

  16. Near-infrared observations of IRAS minisurvey galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carico, D. P.; Soifer, B. T.; Elias, J. H.; Matthews, K.; Neugebauer, G.; Beichman, C.

    1986-01-01

    Near-infrared photometry was obtained for 82 galaxies from the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) minisurvey, a sample of infrared selected galaxies. The near-infrared colors of these galaxies are similar to those of normal field spiral galaxies, but cover a larger range in J - H and H - K. There is evidence of a tighter correlation between the near and far infrared emission than exists between far-infrared and the visible emission. These results suggest that hot dust emission contributes to the 2.2 micron luminosity, and extinction by dust affects both the near-infrared colors and the visible luminosities. In addition, there is an indication that the far-infrared emission in many of the minisurvey galaxies is coming from a strong nuclear component.

  17. XMM-Newton observations of three interacting luminous infrared galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Mudd, Dale; Mathur, Smita; Guainazzi, Matteo; Piconcelli, Enrico; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Stefano; Komossa, S.; Vignali, Cristian; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Fiore, Fabrizio; Maiolino, Roberto

    2014-05-20

    We investigate the X-ray properties of three interacting luminous infrared galaxy systems. In one of these systems, IRAS 18329+5950, we resolve two separate sources. A second and third source, IRAS 19354+4559 and IRAS 20550+1656, have only a single X-ray source detected. We compare the observed emission to point-spread function (PSF) profiles and determine that they are all consistent with the PSF, albeit with large uncertainties for some of our sources. We then model the spectra to determine soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV) luminosities for the resolved sources and compare these to relationships found in the literature between infrared and X-ray luminosities for starburst galaxies. We obtain luminosities (0.5-10 keV) ranging from 1.7 to 7.3 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1} for our systems. These X-ray luminosities are consistent with predictions for star-formation-dominated sources and thus are most likely due to starbursts, but we cannot conclusively rule out active galactic nuclei.

  18. MOLECULAR LINE OBSERVATIONS OF INFRARED DARK CLOUDS. II. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, David; Plume, Rene; Evans, Natalie; Bergin, Edwin; Ragan, Sarah

    2009-11-01

    Using a source selection biased toward high-mass star-forming regions, we used a large velocity gradient code to calculate the H{sub 2} densities and CS column densities for a sample of Midcourse Space Experiment 8 mum infrared dark cores. Our average H{sub 2} density and CS column density were 1.14 x 10{sup 6}cm{sup -3} and 1.21 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, respectively. In addition, we have calculated the Jeans mass and Virial mass for each core to get a better understanding of their gravitational stability. We found that core masses calculated from observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} J = 1->0 and C{sup 18}O J = 1->0 by Ragan et al. (Paper I) were sufficient for collapse, though most regions are likely to form protoclusters. We have explored the star-forming properties of the molecular gas within our sample and find some diversity which extends the range of infrared dark clouds from the very massive clouds that will create large clusters, to clouds that are similar to some of our local counterparts (e.g., Serpens, Ophiuchus).

  19. Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, H.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Guerrero, M. A.; Nigoche-Netro, A.; Toalá, J. A.; Fang, X.; Rubio, G.; Kemp, S. N.; Navarro, S. G.; Corral, L. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope archival mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopy of a sample of 11 planetary nebulae (PNe). The observations, acquired with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), cover the spectral range 5.2-14.5 μm that includes the H2 0-0 S(2) to S(7) rotational emission lines. This wavelength coverage has allowed us to derive the Boltzmann distribution and calculate the H2 rotational excitation temperature (Tex). The derived excitation temperatures have consistent values ≃900 ± 70 K for different sources despite their different structural components. We also report the detection of mid-IR ionic lines of [Ar III], [S IV], and [Ne II] in most objects, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features in a few cases. The decline of the [Ar III]/[Ne II] line ratio with the stellar effective temperature can be explained either by a true neon enrichment or by high density circumstellar regions of PNe that presumably descend from higher mass progenitor stars.

  20. Titan's Seasonal Changes Observed in the Thermal Infrared (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Anderson, C. M.; Nixon, C. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Achterberg, R. K.; Flasar, F.; Cottini, V.; Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Bampasidis, G.

    2013-12-01

    A central goal of the Cassini Mission is the detection and tracking of seasonal variations on Titan. Cassini arrived in the Saturn system in late northern winter and has so far observed for almost four Titan months, enough time to see significant changes as solar warming has moved northward. In the thermal infrared the shift has been apparent both in emission from the atmosphere and temperatures at the surface. Gases, clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere warm and cool with the seasons, accumulate and dissipate, and undergo transport on a global scale. Warming of the surface helps drive the exchange of heat and volatiles with the atmosphere, which contributes to weather. Seasonal activity in the north can be expected to be repeated in the south over the course of a year, so that it may be possible by the end of the Cassini Mission to combine winter-spring data from the north and summer-autumn data from the south to build up a picture that covers almost a full annual cycle. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini records thermal infrared spectra in the 7-1000 micron range. CIRS has found that surface temperatures at Titan's poles are about 2.5 K lower than near the equator and that the temperatures moved from peaking south of the equator in 2005 to being approximately centered at the equator in 2011. As Titan passed through equinox in 2009, CIRS watched as atmospheric patterns that had been associated with northern winter began to emerge in the south. Emission from stratospheric gases and condensates varied dramatically as temperatures, chemistry and transport configurations adjusted to the season. Complex nitriles that had only been present at high northern latitudes began to appear near the South Pole while a polar ice cloud, originally identified in the north by its spectral emission, made an abrupt debut in the south. We expect much more evidence of seasonal evolution in the thermal infrared as CIRS continues to study Titan through the remainder of

  1. THERMAL INFRARED MMTAO OBSERVATIONS OF THE HR 8799 PLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hinz, Philip M.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Meyer, Michael R.; Heinze, Aren N.; Mamajek, Eric E.

    2010-06-10

    We present direct imaging observations at wavelengths of 3.3, 3.8 (L' band), and 4.8 (M band) {mu}m, for the planetary system surrounding HR 8799. All three planets are detected at L' . The c and d components are detected at 3.3 {mu}m, and upper limits are derived from the M-band observations. These observations provide useful constraints on warm giant planet atmospheres. We discuss the current age constraints on the HR 8799 system and show that several potential co-eval objects can be excluded from being co-moving with the star. Comparison of the photometry is made to models for giant planet atmospheres. Models that include non-equilibrium chemistry provide a reasonable match to the colors of c and d. From the observed colors in the thermal infrared, we estimate T {sub eff} < 960 K for b and T {sub eff} = 1300 and 1170 K for c and d, respectively. This provides an independent check on the effective temperatures and thus masses of the objects from the Marois et al. results.

  2. Infrared observations of the Jovian system from Voyager 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R.; Conrath, B.; Flasar, M.; Kunde, V.; Lowman, P.; Maguire, W.; Gautier, D.; Gierasch, P.; Kumar, S.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1979-01-01

    The infrared spectroscopy and radiometry investigation has obtained spectra of Jupiter and its satellites between approximately 180 and 2500 kayser with a spectral resolution of 4.3 kayser. The Jupiter spectra show clear evidence of H2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, CH3D, NH3, PH3, H2O, and GeH4. A helium concentration of 0.11 plus or minus 0.03 by volume is obtained. Meridional temperature cross sections show considerable structure. At high latitudes, the stratosphere is warmer in the north than in the south. The upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are locally cold over the Great Red Spot. Amalthea is warmer than expected. Considerable thermal structure is observed on Io, including a relatively hot region in the vicinity of a volcanic feature.

  3. Infrared observations of the jovian system from voyager 1.

    PubMed

    Hanel, R; Conrath, B; Flasar, M; Kunde, V; Lowman, P; Maguire, W; Pearl, J; Pirraglia, J; Samuelson, R; Gautier, D; Gierasch, P; Kumar, S; Ponnamperuma, C

    1979-06-01

    The infrared spectroscopy and radiometry investigation has obtained spectra of Jupiter and its satellites between approximately 180 and 2500 cm(-1) with a spectral resolution of 4.3 cm(-1). The Jupiter spectra show clear evidence of H(2), CH(4) C(2)H(2), C(2)H(6), CH(3)D, NH(3), PH(3), H(2)O, and GeH(4). A helium concentration of 0.11 +/- 0.03 by volume is obtained. Meridional temperature cross sections show considerable structure. At high latitudes, the stratosphere is warmer in the north than in the south. The upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are locally cold over the Great Red Spot. Amalthea is warmer than expected. Considerable thermal structure is observed on Io, including a relatively hot region in the vicinity of a volcanic feature. PMID:17800431

  4. Gemini near-infrared observations of Europa's Hydrated Surface Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, C.; Spencer, J. R.; Grundy, W. M.; Dalton, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Europa is a highly dynamic icy moon of Jupiter. It is thought the moon harbors a subsurface ocean, with the potential to sustain life, with Europa being a key target of ESA's forthcoming Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JUICE) mission. However, much is not known concerning the chemistry of the subsurface ocean. The surface is dominated by water ice, with a hydrated non-ice material component providing the distinctive albedo contrasts seen at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. These non-ice materials are concentrated at disrupted surface regions, providing a diagnostic probe for the chemistry and characteristics of the liquid ocean beneath. Leading but potentially competing theories on the composition of these hydrated non-ice materials suggest either sulfuric acid-water mixtures (Carlson et al., 1999) or hydrated magnesium/sodium salts (McCord et al., 1999). Recent reanalysis of Galileo-NIMS observations suggest a mixture of both - hydrated salts are present at all longitudes but the sulfuric acid hydrates are localized on the trailing side. We present preliminary analysis of new ground-based Gemini disk-resolved spectroscopy of Europa using the Near-Infrared Integrated Field Spectrometer (NIFS), taken in late 2011, at H (1.49 - 1.80 μm) and K bands (1.99 - 2.40 μm) with spectral resolving powers of ~ 5300. At these NIR wavelengths, with spectral resolution much better than Galileo-NIMS, the spectral absorption and continuum characteristics of these ice and non-ice materials can be separated out. In addition, the spatial resolution potentially allows identification of localized materials whose signature would be diluted in disk-integrated spectra. These observations of the trailing hemisphere use Altair adaptive optics to achieve spatial resolutions of 0.1" (~310 km per pixel) or better, potentially leading to better identification of the non-ice materials and their spatial distributions. References Carlson, R.W., R.E. Johnson, and M.S. Anderson 1999. Sulfuric acid

  5. Exploration of the Saturn System by the Cassini Mission: Observations with the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.

    2014-01-01

    Outline: Introduction to the Cassini mission, and Cassini mission Objectives; Cassini spacecraft, instruments, launch, and orbit insertion; Saturn, Rings, and Satellite, Titan; Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS); and Infrared observations of Saturn and titan.

  6. Observation of finite-. beta. MHD phenomena in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K.M.

    1984-09-01

    Stable high-beta plasmas are required for the tokamak to attain an economical fusion reactor. Recently, intense neutral beam heating experiments in tokamaks have shown new effects on plasma stability and confinement associated with high beta plasmas. The observed spectrum of MHD fluctuations at high beta is clearly dominated by the n = 1 mode when the q = 1 surface is in the plasma. The m/n = 1/1 mode drives other n = 1 modes through toroidal coupling and n > 1 modes through nonlinear coupling. On PDX, with near perpendicular injection, a resonant interaction between the n = 1 internal kink and the trapped fast ions results in loss of beam particles and heating power. Key parameters in the theory are the value of q/sub 0/ and the injection angle. High frequency broadband magnetic fluctuations have been observed on ISX-B and D-III and a correlation with the deterioration of plasma confinement was reported. During enhanced confinement (H-mode) discharges in divertor plasmas, two new edge instabilities were observed, both localized radially near the separatrix. By assembling results from the different tokamak experiments, it is found that the simple theoretical ideal MHD beta limit has not been exceeded. Whether this represents an ultimate tokamak limit or if beta optimized configurations (Dee- or bean-shaped plasmas) can exceed this limit and perhaps enter a second regime of stability remains to be clarified.

  7. Far-infrared Imaging Observations of the Chamaeleon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Norio; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Takita, Satoshi; Ueno, Munetaka; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Kawamura, Akiko; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    We have carried out far-infrared imaging observations toward the Chamaeleon star-forming region by the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) on board the AKARI satellite. The AKARI images cover a total area of 33.79 deg2, corresponding to 210 pc2 at the distance to the source. Using the FIS bands of 65-160 μm and the COBE/DIRBE bands of 60-240 μm, we constructed column density maps of cold (11.7 K) and warm (22.1 K) dust components with a linear resolution of 0.04 pc. On the basis of their spatial distributions and physical properties, we interpret that the cold component corresponds to the molecular clouds and the warm one the cold H I clouds, which are thought to be in a transient phase between atomic and molecular media. The warm component is shown to be uniformly distributed at a large spatial scale of ~50 pc, while a several pc-scale gradient along the east-west direction is found in the distribution of the cold component. The former is consistent with a formation scenario of the cold H I clouds through the thermal instability in the warm neutral medium triggered by a 100 pc scale supernova explosion. This scenario, however, cannot produce the latter, several pc-scale gradient in molecular cloud mass. We conclude that the gravitational fragmentation of the cold H I cloud likely created the molecular clouds with spatial scale as small as several pc.

  8. FAR-INFRARED IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF THE CHAMAELEON REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Norio; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Takita, Satoshi; Ueno, Munetaka; Suzuki, Toyoaki

    2012-01-20

    We have carried out far-infrared imaging observations toward the Chamaeleon star-forming region by the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) on board the AKARI satellite. The AKARI images cover a total area of 33.79 deg{sup 2}, corresponding to 210 pc{sup 2} at the distance to the source. Using the FIS bands of 65-160 {mu}m and the COBE/DIRBE bands of 60-240 {mu}m, we constructed column density maps of cold (11.7 K) and warm (22.1 K) dust components with a linear resolution of 0.04 pc. On the basis of their spatial distributions and physical properties, we interpret that the cold component corresponds to the molecular clouds and the warm one the cold H I clouds, which are thought to be in a transient phase between atomic and molecular media. The warm component is shown to be uniformly distributed at a large spatial scale of {approx}50 pc, while a several pc-scale gradient along the east-west direction is found in the distribution of the cold component. The former is consistent with a formation scenario of the cold H I clouds through the thermal instability in the warm neutral medium triggered by a 100 pc scale supernova explosion. This scenario, however, cannot produce the latter, several pc-scale gradient in molecular cloud mass. We conclude that the gravitational fragmentation of the cold H I cloud likely created the molecular clouds with spatial scale as small as several pc.

  9. Some observations of separated flow on finite wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelmann, A. E.; Ngo, H. T.; De Seife, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Wind tunnel test results for aspects of flow over airfoils exhibiting single and multiple trailing edge stall 'mushroom' cells are reported. Rectangular wings with aspect ratios of 4.0 and 9.0 were tested at Reynolds numbers of 480,000 and 257,000, respectively. Surface flow patterns were visualized by means of a fluorescent oil flow technique, separated flow was observed with a tuft wand and a water probe, spanwise flow was studied with hot-wire anemometry, smoke flow and an Ar laser illuminated the centerplane flow, and photographs were made of the oil flow patterns. Swirl patterns on partially and fully stalled wings suggested vortex flow attachments in those regions, and a saddle point on the fully stalled AR=4.0 wing indicated a secondary vortex flow at the forward region of the separation bubble. The separation wake decayed downstream, while the tip vortex interacted with the separation bubble on the fully stalled wing. Three mushroom cells were observed on the AR=9.0 wing.

  10. Stratospheric infrared continuum absorptions observed by the ATMOS instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Zander, R.; Namkung, J. S.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of infrared continuum absorption features observed in ATMOS/Spacelab 3 (1985) spectra of the lower stratosphere is reported. Continuous absorption produced primarily by the collision-induced fundamental vibration-rotation band of O2 and to a lesser extent by the superposition of H2O far line wings has been observed in the 1400 to 1800/cm interval below tangent heights of about 25 km. Continuum optical depths measured in microwindows nearly free of atmospheric line absorption are 0.78 + or - 0.06 times those calculated with the O2 absorption coefficients of Timofeyev and Tonkov (1978). Transmittance measurements in microwindows between 2395 and 2535/cm have been used to study continuous absorption from the collision induced fundamental vibration-rotation band of N2 and the far wings of strong CO2 lines. The measured transmittances have been analyzed to derive best fit absorption coefficients for the N2 pressure-induced band at lower stratospheric temperatures (about 210 K).

  11. Mid infrared observations of Van Maanen 2: no substellar companion.

    SciTech Connect

    Farihi, J; Becklin, E; Macintosh, B

    2004-11-03

    The results of a comprehensive infrared imaging search for the putative 0.06 M{sub {circle_dot}} astrometric companion to the 4.4 pc white dwarf van Mannen 2 are reported. Adaptive optics images acquired at 3.8 {micro}m reveal a diffraction limited core of 0.09 inch and no direct evidence of a secondary. Models predict that at 5 Gyr, a 50 M{sub J} brown dwarf would be only 1 magnitude fainter than van Maanen 2 at this wavelength and the astrometric analysis suggested a separation of 0.2 inch. In the case of a chance alignment along the line of sight, a 0.4 mag excess should be measured. An independent photometric observation at the same wavelength reveals no excess. In addition, there exist published ISO observations of van Maanen 2 at 6.8 {micro}m and 15.0 {micro}m which are consistent with photospheric flux of a 6750 K white dwarf. If recent brown dwarf models are correct, there is no substellar companion with T{sub eff} {approx}> 500 K.

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopic observations of Comets by Japanese Infrared Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hitomi; Yamaguchi, Mitsuru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Kawakita, Hideyo; Hamada, Saki

    Comets are thought to be one of the primeordial bodies in the solar system. Chemical abun-dances of the cometary icy materials are precious clue to the conditions in the early solar system. H2O is the most abundant species of the cometry nucleus, but CO and CO2 are also abundant with diversities. Especially, CO2 cannot be directly observed by ground-based ob-servations because of the strong absorption by telluric CO2. Thus, only the space observatory (or spacecraft) can access CO2 in comets directly. We observed some comets by "AKARI", Japanese infrared satellite. It has 68.5 cm telescope with InfraRed Camera (IRC). The IRC also has a spectroscopic capability (both grism and prism were available for disperser). The data we present were taken by the IRC in the grism mode. The IRC with grism can cover the wavelength range from 2.5 to 5 microns where vibrational fundamental bands of H2O, CO2, and CO (at 2.7, 4.3, and 4.7 microns) are usually recognized as emission in cometary spectra. We determined the mixng ratios of CO and CO2 relative to H2O for 5 comets: C/2006 W3, C/2006 OF2, C/2006 W3, /2007 N3, and C/2007 W1. These comets were observed at various heliocetric distances, so their mixing ratios can not be compared directly among these comets. We tried to convert the obtained mixing ratios at various heliocentric distancees to the mixing ratios at 1 AU from the Sun. Previous studies of mixing ratios of CO2 and CO relative to H2O were carried out by the Vega space craft (1P/Halley), ISO (C/1995 O1 and 103P/Hartley 2) and Deep Impcat spacecraft (9P/Tempel 1). We also applied the conversion factors to those prvious works. We will discuss about the diversity of mixing ratios of CO2 and CO in these comets.

  13. AIRS Infrared Radiance Validation Concept Using Earth Scene Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, D. E.; Aumann, H. H.; Pagano, T. S.; Strow, L. L.

    2001-05-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) will fly onboard the NASA Earth Observing Satellite (EOS)polar-orbiting Aqua spacecraft. AIRS, a high resolution infrared spectrometer with visible and near-infrared spectral channels, has been designed to provide atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles at least as accurate as those measured by standard radiosondes. Calibration studies of the response of each of the AIRS 4000+ detectors will begin as soon as the spacecraft orbit and instrument have stabilized. These studies are needed to help assess the contribution of instrument measurement errors to the spectral radiance determination. Some of the uncertainties will be determined from measurements of the onboard calibrators. Other sources of measurement uncertainty, such as scan mirror polarization and spectral response functions, require views of Earth at nadir and at oblique viewing angles, in cloud-free conditions. During early operation of the instrument, the blackbody radiance determination will rely on pre-launch measurements and models of the spectral response functions. During this phase of the operation, we have chosen an approach for initial assessment of the accuracy of the measured radiance that is not dependent on an exact knowledge of the spectral position of the detectors. Radiances will be evaluated in narrow regions that are well removed from spectral line features. There are potentially hundreds of detectors that can be used for this purpose. Our work to date has focused on a subset of these detectors located in atmospheric window regions between 2500-2700 cm-1 and 800-1200 cm-1. Pre-launch thermal-vacuum blackbody calibration results indicate that, using a reasonable cross-section of detectors, it should be possible to extrapolate the performance of a sparse set of detectors to the general state of the instrument calibration. In this paper we describe some initial results using a simple statistical methodology that compares outgoing radiances in

  14. Global ammonia distribution derived from infrared satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarisse, Lieven; Clerbaux, Cathy; Dentener, Frank; Hurtmans, Daniel; Coheur, Pierre-François

    2009-07-01

    Global ammonia emissions have more than doubled since pre-industrial times, largely owing to agricultural intensification and widespread fertilizer use. In the atmosphere, ammonia accelerates particulate matter formation, thereby reducing air quality. When deposited in nitrogen-limited ecosystems, ammonia can act as a fertilizer. This can lead to biodiversity reductions in terrestrial ecosystems, and algal blooms in aqueous environments. Despite its ecological significance, there are large uncertainties in the magnitude of ammonia emissions, mainly owing to a paucity of ground-based observations and a virtual absence of atmospheric measurements. Here we use infrared spectra, obtained by the IASI/MetOp satellite, to map global ammonia concentrations from space over the course of 2008. We identify several ammonia hotspots in middle-low latitudes across the globe. In general, we find a good qualitative agreement between our satellite measurements and simulations made using a global atmospheric chemistry transport model. However, the satellite data reveal substantially higher concentrations of ammonia north of 30∘N, compared with model projections. We conclude that ammonia emissions could have been significantly underestimated in the Northern Hemisphere, and suggest that satellite monitoring of ammonia from space will improve our understanding of the global nitrogen cycle.

  15. Observations of dust acoustic waves driven at high frequencies: Finite dust temperature effects and wave interference

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward Jr.; Fisher, Ross; Merlino, Robert L.

    2007-12-15

    An experiment has been performed to study the behavior of dust acoustic waves driven at high frequencies (f>100 Hz), extending the range of previous work. In this study, two previously unreported phenomena are observed--interference effects between naturally excited dust acoustic waves and driven dust acoustic waves, and the observation of finite dust temperature effects on the dispersion relation.

  16. Thermal Infrared ASTER Observations of Faults in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eneva, M.

    2005-12-01

    Reports on earthquake precursors observed in the thermal infrared (TIR) data from several satellites have caused mixed reactions. Some researchers have identified precursory anomalies, such as increased temperatures of several degrees over several days in areas extending up to hundreds of kilometers. In view of the uncertainties in the data, others have been skeptical that such changes can be reliably and uniquely associated with seismic events. This problem is a subset of the more general question how to interpret TIR observations from space for the purpose of fault characterization. Although faults are often clearly discernable in thermal images, the contributions of various factors to any temporal variability in their thermal properties are not clear. These factors include vegetation, soil moisture, surface and air temperature, atmospheric water vapor, and perhaps even wind. Extracting anomalies specifically associated with earthquakes in view of this natural variability and in the presence of observational uncertainties is a difficult task at best. Using standard higher-level TIR products (e.g., surface temperature) derived from radiance at sensor is likely questionable without additional corrections. We address these questions through the analysis of 60 km x 60 km images collected by the ASTER instrument on board of the Terra satellite. ASTER is unique in that five of its 14 channels are TIR, with a spatial resolution of 90 m (compared with at least 1-km spatial resolution of instruments used in previous reports of precursory anomalies). We focus on a specific area in southern California (32.80N - 34.50N, 115.90W - 117.20W) that includes substantial parts of the San Andreas, San Jacinto and Elsinore faults, as well as two recent M5.2 and M4.9 earthquakes (June 12 and 16, 2005). In addition to the existing ASTER data, mostly collected in the daytime, we have made arrangements for future data collections over the next year, with emphasis on nighttime TIR data

  17. Infrared Observations of G0.18-0.04

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Cotera, Angela S.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Haas, Michael R.; Morris, Mark; Rubin, Robert H.

    1997-10-01

    The Galactic center H II region, G0.18-0.04, also known as the ``Sickle,'' is located where the nonthermal ``Arc'' crosses the Galactic plane. The Sickle appears to be the ionized edge of a dense molecular cloud. The source of ionization has been ascribed to both the interaction of the cloud with the magnetic field of the Arc and to the hot stars in the adjacent cluster, AFGL 2004, also known as the ``Quintuplet Cluster.'' This paper addresses the relative locations of the stars, the ionized and molecular gas, and the sources of gas excitation and dust heating. The far-infrared forbidden lines of [S III] 18.7 and 33.5 μm, [Si II] 34.8 μm, [Ne III] 36.0 μm, [O III] 51.8 and 88.4 μm, [N III] 57.3 μm, [O I] 63.2 and 146 μm, [C II] 158 μm, and [N II] 205 μm and the adjacent continua were observed with NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory at 11 positions around G0.18-0.04, including G0.15-0.05, also known as the ``Pistol.'' The beam size was 40"-60". The electron density, the ionic abundances, and the ionization structure of the H II region were estimated from the doubly ionized line fluxes. The density and radiation field found in the photodissociation region (PDR) between the H II region and the molecular cloud were estimated from the [C II] and [O I] line fluxes and the far-infrared continuum. The ionization structure and the PDR properties were compared to shell models of H II regions with varying distances from their exciting stars. The agreement of observations and models indicates that the hot stars of AFGL 2004 are the likely source of ionization of the Sickle. Additional hot stars are necessary to ionize the more outlying positions. However, the low ionization and high PDR radiation field of the Pistol imply that it cannot be as close to AFGL 2004 as is indicated by its proximity on the sky. Instead, the Pistol is probably ionized by the luminous blue variable candidate, Pistol Source A. The extinction to the region was estimated from the IRAS low

  18. Direct observation of finite size effects in chains of antiferromagnetically coupled spins.

    PubMed

    Guidi, T; Gillon, B; Mason, S A; Garlatti, E; Carretta, S; Santini, P; Stunault, A; Caciuffo, R; van Slageren, J; Klemke, B; Cousson, A; Timco, G A; Winpenny, R E P

    2015-01-01

    Finite spin chains made of few magnetic ions are the ultimate-size structures that can be engineered to perform spin manipulations for quantum information devices. Their spin structure is expected to show finite size effects and its knowledge is of great importance both for fundamental physics and applications. Until now a direct and quantitative measurement of the spatial distribution of the magnetization of such small structures has not been achieved even with the most advanced microscopic techniques. Here we present measurements of the spin density distribution of a finite chain of eight spin-3/2 ions using polarized neutron diffraction. The data reveal edge effects that are a consequence of the finite size and of the parity of the chain and indicate a noncollinear spin arrangement. This is in contrast with the uniform spin distribution observed in the parent closed chain and the collinear arrangement in odd-open chains. PMID:25952539

  19. Infrared, radio, and X-ray observations of Cygnus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becklin, E. E.; Neugebauer, G.; Hawkins, F. J.; Mason, K. O.; Sanford, P. W.; Matthews, K.; Packman, D.; Schupler, B.; Stark, A.; Wynn-Williams, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    Infrared observations of Cyg X-3 are presented along with X-ray and radio data. A study of the data shows evidence for several types of behavior in the infrared flux variations of Cyg X-3. It is pointed out that a lack of periodic variations observed can be due either to a real absence of these variations or to a masking by an outburst preceding the observation time. There is no simple radio-infrared correlation, although both radio and infrared emissions were observed during the same period of time.

  20. Rocket-borne instrument for observations of near-infrared and far-infrared extended astrophysical emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuhara, Hideo; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Tanaka, Masahiro; Bock, James J.; Hristov, Viktor V.; Lange, Andrew E.; Mauskopf, Philip D.; Richards, Paul L.

    1994-01-01

    We give a detailed description of the design and flight performance of an instrument onboard the S-520-15 rocket of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science. The isntrument, consisting of a near-infrared spectrometer and a far-infrared photometer at the focus of a 10 cm liquid-helium cooled telescope, was designed to observe both the brightness and distribution of diffuse emission with high sensitivity. The rocket was successfully launched and the instrument observed near-infrared and far-infrared continuum emission, as well as (C II) 157.7 micrometer line emission from regions at high Galactic latitude. We also give a brief description of the design and performance of an onboard attitude control system.

  1. Infrared Observations of G0.18-0.04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Cotera, Angela S.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Haas, Michael R.; Morris, Mark; Rubin, Robert H.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The Galactic Center H(II) region, G0.18-0.04, the 'Sickle', is located where the nonthermal 'Arc' crosses the Galactic plane. The Sickle appears to be the ionized edge of a dense molecular cloud. The source of ionization has been ascribed to both the interaction of the cloud with the magnetic field of the Arc and to the hot stars in the adjacent cluster, AFGL 2004, also known as the 'Quintuplet Cluster'. This paper addresses the relative locations of the stars, the ionized and molecular gas, and the sources of gas excitation and dust heating. Using NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory, we have observed the far infrared forbidden lines of [S(III)] 18.7 and 33.5 micrometers, [Si(II)] 34.8 micrometers, [Ne(III)] 36.0 micrometers, [O(III)] 51.8 and 88.4 micrometers, [N(III)] 57.3 micrometers, [O(II)] 63.2 and 146 micrometers, [C(II)] 158 micrometers, and [N(II)] 205 micrometers and the adjacent continua at 11 positions around G0.18-0.04, including G0.15-0.05, the 'Pistol', in a beamsize of 40 - 60 arcsec. The electron density, the ionic abundances, and the ionization structure of the H(II) region are estimated from the doubly ionized line fluxes. The density and radiation field found in the photodissociation region (PDR) between the H(II) region and the molecular cloud are estimated from the [C(II)] and [O(I)] line fluxes and the far-infrared continuum. We compare the ionization structure and the PDR properties to shell models of H(II) regions with varying distances from their exciting stars. The agreement of observations and models indicates that the hot stars of AFGL 2004 are the likely source of ionization of the Sickle. Additional hot stars are necessary to ionize the more outlying positions. However, because of its low ionization and high PDR radiation field, the Pistol cannot be as close to AFGL 2004 as indicated by its close proximity on the sky. Instead, the Pistol is probably ionized by the luminous blue variable candidate, Pistol Source A. We estimated the

  2. Infrared observations of OB star formation in NGC 6334

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, P. M.; Gatley, I.

    1983-01-01

    Infrared photometry and maps from 2 to 100 microns are presented for three of the principal far infrared sources in NGC 6334. Each region is powered by two or more very young stars. The distribution of dust and ionized gas is probably strongly affected by the presence of the embedded stars; one of the sources is a blister H II region, another has a bipolar structure, and the third exhibits asymmetric temperature structure. The presence of protostellar objects throughout the region suggests that star formation has occurred nearly simultaneously in the whole molecular cloud rather than having been triggered sequentially from within. Previously announced in STAR as N83-16263

  3. Infrared observations of OB star formation in NGC 6334

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, P. M.; Gatley, I.

    1982-01-01

    Infrared photometry and maps from 2 to 100 microns are presented for three of the principal far infrared sources in NGC 6334. Each region is powered by two or more very young stars. The distribution of dust and ionized gas is probably strongly affected by the presence of the embedded stars; one of the sources is a blister H II region, another has a bipolar structure, and the third exhibits asymmetric temperature structure. The presence of protostellar objects throughout the region suggests that star formation has occurred nearly simultaneously in the whole molecular cloud rather than having been triggered sequentially from within.

  4. Infrared and Visible Observations of South Polar Spots and Fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, P. R.; Kieffer, H. H.; Titus, T. N.

    2005-12-01

    A variety of relatively low-albedo features that form in regions of the south polar cap during early spring have been previously reported. Four types of these dark features have been recognized: spots, fans, blotches, and halos. The spots are typically <15-50 m in diameter with typical spacings of several 100 m. Fans are 10's to 100's of m in length, 10-30 deg. in angular size, typically originate from a preexisting dark spot, and all point in a similar direction within a given area. Blotches are larger than spots, 100's of m to 10's of km in size, with less distinct boundaries, and, unlike most spots, have albedo patterns that match from winter to summer. Halos are roughly circularly symmetric annuli 10's to 100's of m in diameter surrounding spots. All of these features are only slightly darker than the surrounding ice, with TES-derived albedos of 0.22 versus 0.23 for the ice. We have observed these features with THEMIS in 100-m per pixel infrared and 18-m per pixel visible imaging, focusing intensely on a specific region (99 E, 86.2 S) where spot and fan formation was observed the previous Mars year. A few dark spots form before sunrise, with significant spot formation occurring immediately following sunrise. A large number of spots form fans within 10-20 days. All of these features are within 5 C of CO2 ice temperatures, indicating that they must be must be a very thin layer (<1 mm) that is on top of the CO2 ice, and do not represent surface defrosting. H. Kieffer initially developed a conceptual model to account for the observed observations of the spots, fans, and blotches. In this model relatively dark, granular material lies at the surface during summer. One to two meters of CO2 ice forms the residual cap during winter. This ice anneals to form a translucent slab, allowing sunlight to penetrate to the subsurface, and forming an impermeable layer. After sunrise, insolation reaches and heats the substrate, leading to sublimation of the CO2 ice from the base

  5. Infrared Observations of Temperature Modulations on the Hudson River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, S.; Anderson, S. P.; Zappa, C. J.; Smith, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The thermal boundary layer at the surface of a river is constantly disrupted and renewed by physical processes associated with convection, turbulence, wind stress, heat flux, and other environmental factors. These disruptions cause temperature modulations in the surface layer which can be measured with an infrared (IR) sensor. Over the course of two ten-day periods in August and November of 2010, we imaged the Hudson River from atop a nearby cliff using a large-format, mid-wave IR sensor. Time series imagery was collected for 5 to 10 minute periods, every 30 minutes for the entirety of each experiment. In the field of view, several in situ instruments were mounted to a steel piling driven into the river bed. Above and below the water surface, an array of instruments were installed to measure heat flux, wind speed, air and water temperature, current velocity, humidity, radiance, and conductivity. In this analysis, we investigate the relationship between the temperature modulations present in the IR imagery, which are associated with coherent features advecting with the mean flow, and the environmental parameters measured from our in situ instruments. The IR imagery from these experiments show a diverse range of temperature modulation patterns, on scales of 20cm to several tens of meters, often masked by the presence of surface waves. At low grazing angles, the IR images of the water surface are comprised of a combination of emitted radiance from temperature modulations on the surface and reflected radiance from the sky above. To separate out the emitted signal from the reflected signal, we employ a Fourier space filtering technique to exclude the variance in the imagery due to the surface waves. We find the remaining emitted signal to be correlated with wind speed and the air-water temperature difference, and weakly or uncorrelated with stratification and mean current speed. We report on both the signal processing technique used to extract the emitted signal from

  6. Infrared Observations of Comets Halley and Wilson and Properties of the Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, Martha S. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The presented papers and discussions at a workshop held at Cornell Univ. are summarized. The infrared observations of Comet Halley and Comet Wilson are reviewed and they are related to optical properties and composition of cometary grains. Relevant laboratory studies are also discussed. Recommendations are made for future infrared comet observations and supporting laboratory investigations.

  7. Observations of vertically propagating driven dust acoustic waves: Finite temperature effects

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jeremiah D.; Thomas, Edward Jr.; Marcus, Lydia

    2008-04-15

    In this study, the first measurement of the dispersion relationship for a vertically propagating (i.e., parallel to gravity), driven dust acoustic wave is reported. Finite dust temperature effects were observed in the dispersion relation of the dust acoustic wave.

  8. Multi-constrained fault estimation observer design with finite frequency specifications for continuous-time systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Jiang, Bin; Shi, Peng; Xu, Jinfa

    2014-08-01

    The design of a multi-constrained full-order fault estimation observer (FFEO) with finite frequency specifications is studied for continuous-time systems. By constructing an augmented system, a multi-constrained FFEO in finite frequency domain is proposed to achieve fault estimation. Meanwhile, the presented FFEO can avoid the overdesign problem generated by the entire frequency domain by the generalised Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov lemma. Furthermore, by introducing slack variables, improved results on FFEO design in different frequency domains are obtained such that different Lyapunov matrices can be separately designed for each constraint. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and potentials of the proposed techniques.

  9. INFRARED SPECTRAL OBSERVATION OF EIGHT BL LAC OBJECTS FROM THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. S.; Shan, H. G.

    2011-05-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) low-resolution spectra for eight BL Lac objects are presented in this paper. It can be seen that the infrared spectrum of S5 0716+714 shows in the IRS region many emission features that would be from a nearby galaxy. It is also shown that, except for the silicate absorptions around 10 {mu}m for some sources, emission lines in the infrared spectra for the other seven BL Lac objects are indeed very weak or absent. In addition, ignoring the silicate feature, all spectra can be well fitted by a power-law distribution indicative of the emission mechanism of the synchrotron radiation for these BL Lac objects in the IRS region.

  10. On the performance of infrared sensors in earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L. F.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of infrared sensing systems is dependent upon the radiative properties of targets in addition to constraints imposed by system components. The unclassified state-of-the-art of infrared system performance figures is reviewed to indicate the relevance to system performance of target radiative properties. A theory of rough surface scattering is developed which allows the formulation of the reflective characteristics of extended targets. The thermal radiation emission from extended targets is formulated on the basis of internal radiation characteristics of natural materials and the transmissive scattering effects at the surface. Finally, the total radiative characteristics may be expressed as functions of material properties and incident and received directions, although the expressions are extremely complex functions and do not account for the effects of shadowing or multiple scattering. It is believed that the theory may be extended to include these effects and to incorporate the local radii of curvature of the surface.

  11. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Strow, Larrabee

    2001-01-01

    AIRS, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the EOS-Aqua, produces global high precision spectra from 3.7 - 15.4 micron with spectral resolving power mu/delta mu = 1200 twice each day from 708 km orbital altitude. AIRS is the first hyperspectral infrared spectrometer designed to support NOAA/NCEP's operational requirements for medium range weather forecasting during its nominal 7 year lifetime. AIRS, together with the AMSU and HSB microwave radiometers, will achieve global retrieval accuracy of better then 1K rms in the lower troposphere under clear and partly cloudy condition. Based on the excellent radiometric and spectral performance demonstrated during the pre-launch testing, the assimilation of AIRS data into the forecast model is expected to result in major forecast improvements. Launch of AIRS on the EOS AQUA is scheduled for May 2001.

  12. Visible and infrared imaging radiometers for ocean observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The current status of visible and infrared sensors designed for the remote monitoring of the oceans is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on multichannel scanning radiometers that are either operational or under development. Present design practices and parameter constraints are discussed. Airborne sensor systems examined include the ocean color scanner and the ocean temperature scanner. The costal zone color scanner and advanced very high resolution radiometer are reviewed with emphasis on design specifications. Recent technological advances and their impact on sensor design are examined.

  13. Snow studies using thermal infrared observations from earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The application of satellite high resolution infrared data was studied for mapping snow cover. The study has two objectives: (1) to determine whether existing radiometers onboard the Nimbus and ITOS satellites can provide hydrologically useful snow information, and (2) to develop analysis techniques applicable to future IR sensor systems on earth satellites. The IR measurements are being analyzed in conjunction with concurrent satellite photographs and conventional snow cover data.

  14. Modeling Titan's thermal infrared spectrum for high-resolution space observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.; Encrenaz, Th.; Bezard, B.; Bjoraker, G.; Graner, G.; Dang-Nhu, M.; Arie, E.

    1993-04-01

    The observability of minor species in Titan's atmosphere in its infrared thermal range is systematically studied and modeled to generate synthetic spectra. The model results on methane, water vapor, benzene, allene, and other heavier trace molecules are used to illustrate the capabilities of instruments aboard the Infrared Space Observatory, in particular a high-resolution composite infrared spectrometer, to determine vertical distributions of the molecules in a few hours of integration time.

  15. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a high spectral resolution IR spectrometer. AIRS, together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), is designed to meet the operational weather prediction requirements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the global change research objectives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The three instruments will be launched in the year 2000 on the EOS-PM spacecraft. Testing of the AIRS engineering model will start in 1996.

  16. Spitzer and near-infrared observations of the young supernova remnant 3C397

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Jarrett, Tom

    2016-06-01

    We present Spitzer IRS, IRAC and MIPS observations and near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of the young supernova remnant 3C397 (G41.1-0.2). Near-infrared observations were made using the Palomar 200 inch telescope. Both mid- and near-infrared spectra are dominated by Fe lines and near-infrared imaging shows bright Fe emission with a shell-like morphology. There is no molecular hydrogen line belong to the SNR and some are in background. The Ni, Ar, S and Si lines are detected using IRS and hydrogen recombination lines are detected in near-infrared. Two nickel lines at 18.24 and 10.69 micron are detected. 3C397 is ejecta-dominated, and our observations support 3C397 to be a Type Ia supernova.

  17. Inference of Ice Cloud Properties from High-spectral Resolution Infrared Observations. Appendix 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Hung-Lung; Yang, Ping; Wei, Heli; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Antonelli, Paolo; Ackerman, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    The theoretical basis is explored for inferring the microphysical properties of ice crystal from high-spectral resolution infrared observations. A radiative transfer model is employed to simulate spectral radiances to address relevant issues. The extinction and absorption efficiencies of individual ice crystals, assumed as hexagonal columns for large particles and droxtals for small particles, are computed from a combination of the finite- difference time-domain (FDTD) technique and a composite method. The corresponding phase functions are computed from a combination of FDTD and an improved geometric optics method (IGOM). Bulk scattering properties are derived by averaging the single- scattering properties of individual particles for 30 particle size distributions developed from in situ measurements and for additional four analytical Gamma size distributions for small particles. The non-sphericity of ice crystals is shown to have a significant impact on the radiative signatures in the infrared (IR) spectrum; the spherical particle approximation for inferring ice cloud properties may result in an overest&ation of the optical thickness and an inaccurate retrieval of effective particle size. Furthermore, we show that the error associated with the use of the Henyey-Greenstein phase function can be as larger as 1 K in terms of brightness temperature for larger particle effective size at some strong scattering wavenumbers. For small particles, the difference between the two phase functions is much less, with brightness temperatures generally differing by less than 0.4 K. The simulations undertaken in this study show that the slope of the IR brightness temperature spectrum between 790-960/cm is sensitive to the effective particle size. Furthermore, a strong sensitivity of IR brightness temperature to cloud optical thickness is noted within the l050-1250/cm region. Based on this spectral feature, a technique is presented for the simultaneous retrieval of the visible

  18. Hydration of lysozyme as observed by infrared spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liltorp, K; Maréchal, Y

    2005-11-01

    Infrared spectra of a film of lysozyme 3 mum thick, immersed in an atmosphere displaying a relative humidity, or hygrometry, which spans the whole range from 0 to 1 at room temperature, are recorded. The evolution of the spectra with this relative humidity is quantitatively analyzed on the basis of a newly proposed method. It allows the precise measurement of the quantity of water that remains embedded inside the dried sample at each stage of hydration, and the definition, in terms of chemical reactions of the three hydration mechanisms that correspond to the three hydration spectra on which all experimental spectra can be decomposed. With respect to preceding similar studies, some refinements are introduced that allow improvement of the interpretation, but that also raise some new questions, which mainly concern the structure of the hydrogen-bond network around the carbonyl peptide groups. PMID:15986502

  19. Preface to Special Section: Validation of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    The papers described below demonstrate that the AIRS calibrated radiances and retrieved geophysical products generally meet or exceed the prelaunch specifications. The retrieved quantities show little variation in uncertainty as a function of cloud amount. However, AIRS retrieval yield is a rapidly decreasing function of cloud amount; at about 80% cloudiness essentially no infrared radiances are used in the retrieval processes. Also, AIRS performance has not been demonstrated for all conditions and products. Calibrated and forward calculated radiances meet performance specifications for conditions varying from the cold poles to warm tropics. The retrieval system performs well over extrapolar land in the free troposphere (2-15 km above the surface) and over extrapolar oceans at all tropospheric altitudes. The AIRS retrieval algorithms have not been optimized for polar winter conditions, so no such results are presented in these papers.

  20. Observing temperature fluctuations in humans using infrared imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Min; Meyer, Joseph; Scully, Christopher G.; Elster, Eric; Gorbach, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate that functional infrared imaging is capable of detecting low frequency temperature fluctuations in intact human skin and revealing spatial, temporal, spectral, and time-frequency based differences among three tissue classes: microvasculature, large sub-cutaneous veins, and the remaining surrounding tissue of the forearm. We found that large veins have stronger contractility in the range of 0.005-0.06 Hz compared to the other two tissue classes. Wavelet phase coherence and power spectrum correlation analysis show that microvasculature and skin areas without vessels visible by IR have high phase coherence in the lowest three frequency ranges (0.005-0.0095 Hz, 0.0095-0.02 Hz, and 0.02-0.06 Hz), whereas large veins oscillate independently. PMID:23538682

  1. Compact infrared camera (CIRC) for earth observation adapting athermal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Eri; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Naitoh, Masataka; Harada, Masatomo; Nakamura, Ryoko; Nakau, Koji; Sato, Ryota

    2013-09-01

    We have developed the compact infrared camera (CIRC) with an uncooled infrared array detector (microbolometer) for space application. The main mission of the CIRC is the technology demonstration of the wildfire detection using a large format (640×480) microbolometer. Wildfires are major and chronic disasters affecting numerous countries, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, and may get worse with global warming and climate change. Microbolometers have an advantage of not requiring cooling systems such an a mechanical cooler, and is suitable for resource-limited sensor systems or small satellites. Main characteristic of the CIRC is also an athermal optics. The thermal optics compensates the defocus due to the temperature change by using Germanium and Chalcogenide glass which have different coefficient of thermal expansion and temperature dependence of refractive index. The CIRC achieves a small size, light weight, and low electrical power by employing the athermal optics and a shutter-less system. Two CIRCs will be carried as a technology demonstration payload of ALOS-2 and JEM-CALET, which will be launched in JFY 2013 and 2014, respectively. We have finished the ground calibration test of the CIRC Proto Flight Model (PFM). Athermal optical performance of the CIRC have been confirmed by measuring modulation transfer function (MTF) in a vacuum environment and at environmental temperature from -15 to 50 °C. As a result, MTF was found to be effective at capturing clear images across the entire range of operating temperatures. We also provide an overview of the CIRC and radiometric test results in this presentation.

  2. Limb-atmospheric infrared spectrum observed on the satellite Ohzora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuzaki, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Itoh, T.

    1985-01-01

    The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) launched the 9th scientific satellite Ohzora at 17:00 JST on February 14, 1984. This satellite bears the spectrometer, which measures the infrared spectrum of the solar radiation passing the limb atmosphere in the wavelength region of 2 to 10 m. The spectrometer is based on multichannel spectroscopy by using image sensors. Since the wavelength is scanned electronically, it can measure the spectrum unaffected by the satellite motion. A definite axis, i.e., the Z-axis of the satellite, which coincides to the optical axis of the spectrometer, is controlled to the direction of the Sun, and the finer control to introduce the solar light into the spectrometer is made with a 2-axes-controlled mirror. This solar tracking equipment is derived fast enough to measure the spectra in a moment after sunrise. The solar light introduced into the spectrometer is focused on the slits of the monochromators (f=100mm). For better altitude resolution, the horizontal slit is also used with the vertical slit, which is used for the separation of the dispersion. The dispersion light is detected with the pyroelectric array sensors. To obtain maximum dynamic range and spectral resolution, the three-stage polychromator is used.

  3. A fault detection observer design for LPV systems in finite frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianliang; Cao, Yong-Yan; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-03-01

    This paper addresses the fault detection observer design problem for linear parameter-varying systems. Two finite frequency performance indexes are introduced to measure the fault sensitivity and the disturbance robustness. First, the H- index fault sensitivity condition in finite frequency domain is obtained by generalised Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov lemma and new linearisation techniques. Then, with the aid of Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov lemma and projection lemma, the stability and robustness conditions are derived. It turns out that the non-convexity problem which is caused by dealing with the above three conditions can be translated into a bilinear matrix inequality optimisation problem by increasing the dimensions of slack variable matrix. An iterative linear matrix inequality algorithm is proposed to get the solution. The effectiveness of the filter is shown via three numerical examples.

  4. Remote Observing at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, A. T.; Bus, S. J.; Denault, T.; Hawarden-Ogata, M.

    2003-05-01

    Although remote observations are widely practiced at observatories, the IRTF has recently implemented an approach that allows greater freedom in meeting user needs. Observations at the IRTF can now be supported from sites on the Big Island of Hawaii (Hilo or the mid-level facility) as well as sites anywhere in the world virtually without restriction. Observations are supported throughout the US and even to Paris, France. User requirements are modest: a unix workstation for controlling the instrument and a laptop for communications. For solar system observations, remote observing has been successfully used for synoptic observations (as short as one hour) and programs requiring a number of short observations spread over a semester. In some cases the option to work at sea level rather than the summit of Mauna Kea is essential for health reasons. Further information can be found at: http://irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/userSupport/remote_obs/. We believe this the most flexible remote observing available at any observatory. We acknowledge the support of NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC 5-538.

  5. Infrared-faint radio sources remain undetected at far-infrared wavelengths. Deep photometric observations using the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Spitler, L. R.; Leipski, C.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Showing 1.4 GHz flux densities in the range of a few to a few tens of mJy, infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a type of galaxy characterised by faint or absent near-infrared counterparts and consequently extreme radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousand. Recent studies showed that IFRS are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts ≳2, potentially linked to high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). Aims: This work explores the far-infrared emission of IFRS, providing crucial information on the star forming and AGN activity of IFRS. Furthermore, the data enable examining the putative relationship between IFRS and HzRGs and testing whether IFRS are more distant or fainter siblings of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of six IFRS was observed with the Herschel Space Observatory between 100 μm and 500 μm. Using these results, we constrained the nature of IFRS by modelling their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED). Furthermore, we set an upper limit on their infrared SED and decomposed their emission into contributions from an AGN and from star forming activity. Results: All six observed IFRS were undetected in all five Herschel far-infrared channels (stacking limits: σ = 0.74 mJy at 100 μm, σ = 3.45 mJy at 500 μm). Based on our SED modelling, we ruled out the following objects to explain the photometric characteristics of IFRS: (a) known radio-loud quasars and compact steep-spectrum sources at any redshift; (b) starburst galaxies with and without an AGN and Seyfert galaxies at any redshift, even if the templates were modified; and (c) known HzRGs at z ≲ 10.5. We find that the IFRS analysed in this work can only be explained by objects that fulfil the selection criteria of HzRGs. More precisely, IFRS could be (a) known HzRGs at very high redshifts (z ≳ 10.5); (b) low-luminosity siblings of HzRGs with additional dust obscuration at lower redshifts; (c) scaled or unscaled versions of Cygnus A at any

  6. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF FAR-INFRARED COOLING LINES IN INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT (ULTRA)-LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G. E.; Thatte, N.; Hopwood, R.; Clements, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Pearson, C.; Farrah, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Griffin, M. J.; Oliver, S.; Smith, A.; Wang, L.; Riechers, D.; Scott, D.; Vaccari, M.; Valtchanov, I.

    2014-01-20

    We report the first results from a spectroscopic survey of the [C II] 158 μm line from a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 infrared galaxies, (U)LIRGs (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 11.5} L {sub ☉}), using the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver-Fourier Transform Spectrometer on board the Herschel Space Observatory. This is the first survey of [C II] emission, an important tracer of star formation, at a redshift range where the star formation rate density of the universe increases rapidly. We detect strong [C II] 158 μm line emission from over 80% of the sample. We find that the [C II] line is luminous, in the range (0.8-4) × 10{sup –3} of the far-infrared continuum luminosity of our sources, and appears to arise from photodissociation regions on the surface of molecular clouds. The L{sub [C} {sub II]}/L {sub IR} ratio in our intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs is on average ∼10 times larger than that of local ULIRGs. Furthermore, we find that the L{sub [C} {sub II]}/L {sub IR} and L{sub [CII]}/L{sub CO(1-0)} ratios in our sample are similar to those of local normal galaxies and high-z star-forming galaxies. ULIRGs at z ∼ 0.5 show many similarities to the properties of local normal and high-z star-forming galaxies. Our findings strongly suggest that rapid evolution in the properties of the star-forming regions of (U)LIRGs is likely to have occurred in the last 5 billion years.

  7. First light observations with TIFR Near Infrared Imaging Camera (TIRCAM-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, D. K.; Ghosh, S. K.; D'Costa, S. L. A.; Naik, M. B.; Sandimani, P. R.; Poojary, S. S.; Bhagat, S. B.; Jadhav, R. B.; Meshram, G. S.; Bakalkar, C. B.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Mohan, V.; Joshi, J.

    TIFR near infrared imaging camera (TIRCAM-II) is based on the Aladdin III Quadrant InSb focal plane array (512×512 pixels; 27.6 μm pixel size; sensitive between 1 - 5.5 μm). TIRCAM-II had its first engineering run with the 2 m IUCAA telescope at Girawali during February - March 2011. The first light observations with TIRCAM-II were quite successful. Several infrared standard with TIRCAM-II were quite successful. Several infrared standard stars, the Trapezium Cluster in Orion region, McNeil's nebula, etc., were observed in the J, K and in a narrow-band at 3.6 μm (nbL). In the nbL band, some bright stars could be detected from the Girawali site. The performance of TIRCAM-II is discussed in the light of preliminary observations in near infrared bands.

  8. Saturn's Atmospheric Composition from Observations by the Cassini/Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Young, M.; LeClair, A. C.; Achterberg, R. K.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal emission infrared observation of Saturn s atmosphere are being made by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard the Cassini spacecraft since its insertion in Saturn s orbit on July 2nd, 2004. The measurements made in both limb and nadir modes of observations consist of infrared spectra in the 10-1400/cm region with a variable spectral resolution of 0.53/cm and 2.8/cm, and exhibit rotational and vibrational spectral features that may be analyzed for retrieval of the thermal structure and constituent distribution of Saturn s atmosphere. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of the CIRS infrared observed spectra for retrieval of Saturn s atmospheric composition focusing on the distributions of some selected hydrocarbons, phosphine, ammonia, and possible determination of the isotopic ratios of some species with sufficiently strong isolated spectral features. A comparison of the retrieved constituent distributions with the available data in the literature will be made.

  9. Postdispersion system for astronomical observations with Fourier transform spectrometers in the thermal infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedermann, Guenter; Jennings, D. E.; Hanel, R. H.; Kunde, V. G.; Moseley, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    A postdispersion system for astronomical observations with Fourier transform spectrometers in the thermal infrared has been developed which improves the sensitivity of radiation noise limited observations by reducing the spectral range incident on the detector. Special attention is given to the first-generation blocked impurity band detector. Planetary, solar, and stellar observations are reported.

  10. Observational Studies of Protoplanetary Disks at Mid-Infrared Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Telesco, Charles; Wright, Christopher; Packham, Christopher; Marinas, Naibi

    2013-07-01

    We have used mid-infrared cameras on 8-to-10 m class telescopes to study the properties of young circumstellar disks. During the initial phases of this program we examined a large sample of mid-IR images of standard stars delivered by T-ReCS at Gemini South to evaluate its on-sky performance as characterized by, for example the angular resolution, the PSF shape, and the PSF temporal stability, properties that are most relevant to our high-angular resolution study of disks. With this information we developed an Interactive Data Language (IDL) package of routines optimized for reducing the data and correcting for image defects commonly seen in ground-based mid-IR data. We obtained, reduced, and analyzed mid-IR images and spectra of several Herbig Ae/Be disks (including HD 259431, MWC 1080, VV Ser) and the debris disk (β Pic), and derived their physical properties by means of radiative transfer modeling or spectroscopic decomposition and analyses. These results are highlighted here. During this study, we also helped commission CanariCam, a new mid-IR facility instrument built by the University of Florida for the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) on La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. CanariCam is an imager with spectroscopic, polarimetric, and coronagraphic capabilities, with the dual-beam polarimetry being a unique mode introduced with CanariCam for the first time to a 10 m telescope at mid-IR wavelengths. It is well known that measurements of polarization, originating from aligned dust grains in the disks and their environments, have the potential to shed light on the morphologies of the magnetic fields in these regions, information that is critical to understanding how stars and planets form. We have obtained polarimetric data of several Herbig Ae/Be disks and YSOs, and the data reduction and analyses are in process. We present preliminary results here. This poster is based upon work supported by the NSF under grant AST-0903672 and AST-0908624 awarded to C.M.T.

  11. Calculation of Intensity Ratios of Observed Infrared [Fe II] Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Narayan C.; Hibbert, Alan

    2010-03-01

    Two recent observational studies of the [Fe II] λ12567/λ16435 line ratio by Smith & Hartigan and Rodriguez-Ardila et al. have suggested that the available theoretical A-values could be incorrect to 10%-40%. We have carried out an extensive configuration interaction calculation of [Fe II] lines to investigate this claim, as well as the variability in observed line ratios for λ8617/λ9052 and λ8892/λ9227 of Dennefeld. For these transitions, we are generally in good agreement with the results of Nussbaumer & Storey, less so with those of Quinet et al. In comparison, the ratios derived from observations appear either to be less secure, or other factors influence those results.

  12. Far-infrared observations of Sagittarius B2: Reconsideration of source structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Harper, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    New moderate-angular-resolution far-infrared observations of the Sagittarius B2 star-forming region are presented, discussed, and compared with recent radio molecular and continuum observations of this source. In contrast to previous analyses, its far-infrared spectrum is interpreted as the result of a massive frigid cloud overlying a more-or-less normal infrared source, a natural explanation for the object's previously-noted pecularities. The characteristics derived for the obscuring cloud are similar to those found for the W51 MAIN object. Both sources have high sub-millimeter surface brightness, a high ratio of sub-millimeter to far-infrared flux, and numerous regions of molecular maser emission.

  13. Nighttime reactive nitrogen measurements from stratospheric infrared thermal emission observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Kunde, Virgil G.; Brasunas, J. C.; Herman, J. R.; Massie, Steven T.

    1991-01-01

    IR thermal emission spectra of the earth's atmosphere in the 700-2000/cm region were obtained with a cryogenically cooled high-resolution interferometer spectrometer on a balloon flight from Palestine, Texas, on September 15-16, 1986. The observations exhibit spectral features of a number of stratospheric constituents, including important species of the reactive nitrogen family. An analysis of the observed data for simultaneously measured vertical distributions of O3, H2O, N2O, NO2, N2O5, HNO3, and ClONO2 is presented. These measurements permit the first direct determination of the nighttime total reactive nitrogen concentrations, and the partitioning of the important elements of the NO(x) family. Comparisons of the total reactive nitrogen budget are made with the measurements by the ATMOS experiment and with the predictions of one-dimensional and two-dimensional photochemical models.

  14. Ultraviolet, optical, infrared, and microwave observations of HR 5110

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, I. R.; Simon, T.; Ayres, T. R.; Cohen, N. L.; Feldman, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    Near-IR JHKLM photometric data and VLBI and IUE radio burst data collected on the short-period spectroscopic binary HR 5110 are analyzed to classify the object. The observed broadband colors were indicative of an F2 IV primary and a spotted K0 IV secondary. The system is being viewed pole-on, so is observable in the UV since the K companion has filled its Roche lobe. In comparisons of such features of Algol and RS VCn stars as the mass ratio, orbital inclination, presence or absence of evidence for mass streams, accretion disks, and active regions, spectral signatures, etc., sufficient similarities are found to classify HR 5110 as an Algol system.

  15. Estimating interevent time distributions from finite observation periods in communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelä, Mikko; Porter, Mason A.

    2015-11-01

    A diverse variety of processes—including recurrent disease episodes, neuron firing, and communication patterns among humans—can be described using interevent time (IET) distributions. Many such processes are ongoing, although event sequences are only available during a finite observation window. Because the observation time window is more likely to begin or end during long IETs than during short ones, the analysis of such data is susceptible to a bias induced by the finite observation period. In this paper, we illustrate how this length bias is born and how it can be corrected without assuming any particular shape for the IET distribution. To do this, we model event sequences using stationary renewal processes, and we formulate simple heuristics for determining the severity of the bias. To illustrate our results, we focus on the example of empirical communication networks, which are temporal networks that are constructed from communication events. The IET distributions of such systems guide efforts to build models of human behavior, and the variance of IETs is very important for estimating the spreading rate of information in networks of temporal interactions. We analyze several well-known data sets from the literature, and we find that the resulting bias can lead to systematic underestimates of the variance in the IET distributions and that correcting for the bias can lead to qualitatively different results for the tails of the IET distributions.

  16. Observation of enhanced visible and infrared emissions in photonic crystal thin-film light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Y. F.; Li, K. H.; Hui, R. S. Y.; Choi, H. W.

    2014-08-18

    Photonic crystals, in the form of closed-packed nano-pillar arrays patterned by nanosphere lithography, have been formed on the n-faces of InGaN thin-film vertical light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Through laser lift-off of the sapphire substrate, the thin-film LEDs conduct vertically with reduced dynamic resistances, as well as reduced thermal resistances. The photonic crystal plays a role in enhancing light extraction, not only at visible wavelengths but also at infrared wavelengths boosting heat radiation at high currents, so that heat-induced effects on internal quantum efficiencies are minimized. The observations are consistent with predictions from finite-difference time-domain simulations.

  17. Infrared sky noise survey. [over observing sites in the U.S., Mexico, and Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A 10 micron infrared sky noise survey, which was conducted during the period from June 1, 1970 to June 30, 1974, is reported along with associated electronics and recording equipment which was developed and deployed for periods up to 18 months at various potential or existing infrared observing sites in the U.S., Mexico, and Chile. The results of the data activity are given, and variables are defined which influence the intensity and duration of the sky noise.

  18. Observation of Aubry-type transition in finite atom chains via friction.

    PubMed

    Bylinskii, Alexei; Gangloff, Dorian; Counts, Ian; Vuletić, Vladan

    2016-07-01

    The highly nonlinear many-body physics of a chain of mutually interacting atoms in contact with a periodic substrate gives rise to complex static and dynamical phenomena, such as structural phase transitions and friction. In the limit of an infinite chain incommensurate with the substrate, Aubry predicted a transition with increasing substrate potential, from the chain's intrinsic arrangement free to slide on the substrate, to a pinned arrangement favouring the substrate pattern. So far, the Aubry transition has not been observed. Here, using spatially resolved position and friction measurements of cold trapped ions in an optical lattice, we observed a finite version of the Aubry transition and the onset of its hallmark fractal atomic arrangement. Notably, the observed critical lattice depth for few-ion chains agrees well with the infinite-chain prediction. Our results elucidate the connection between competing ordering patterns and superlubricity in nanocontacts-the elementary building blocks of friction. PMID:26998915

  19. How Well Can Infrared Sounders Observe the Atmosphere and Surface Through Clouds?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Strow, L. Larrabee; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Infrared sounders, such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared sounder (CrIS), have a cloud-impenetrable disadvantage in observing the atmosphere and surface under opaque cloudy conditions. However, recent studies indicate that hyperspectral, infrared sounders have the ability to detect cloud effective-optical and microphysical properties and to penetrate optically thin clouds in observing the atmosphere and surface to a certain degree. We have developed a retrieval scheme dealing with atmospheric conditions with cloud presence. This scheme can be used to analyze the retrieval accuracy of atmospheric and surface parameters under clear and cloudy conditions. In this paper, we present the surface emissivity results derived from IASI global measurements under both clear and cloudy conditions. The accuracy of surface emissivity derived under cloudy conditions is statistically estimated in comparison with those derived under clear sky conditions. The retrieval error caused by the clouds is shown as a function of cloud optical depth, which helps us to understand how well infrared sounders can observe the atmosphere and surface through clouds.

  20. Infrared observations of circumstellar ammonia in OH/IR supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaren, R. A.; Betz, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    Ammonia has been detected in the circumstellar envelopes of VY Canis Majoris, VX Sagittarii, and IRC +10420 by means of several absorption lines in the nu-2 vibration-rotation band near 950 kaysers. The line profiles are well resolved (0.2 km/sec resolution) and show the gas being accelerated to terminal expansion velocities near 30 km/sec. The observations reveal a method for determining the position of the central star on VLBI maps of OH maser emission to an accuracy of approximately 0.2 arcsec. A firm lower limit of 2 x 10 to the 15th/sq cm is obtained for the NH3 column density in VY Canis Majoris.

  1. Probing turbulence with infrared observations in OMC1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, M.; Field, D.; Lemaire, J. L.; Pijpers, F. P.

    2006-01-01

    A statistical analysis is presented of the turbulent velocity structure in the Orion Molecular Cloud at scales ranging from 70 AU to 3×104 AU. Results are based on IR Fabry-Perot interferometric observations of shock and photon-excited H2 in the K-band S(1) v=1{-}0 line at 2.121 μm and refer to the dynamical characteristics of warm perturbed gas. Data consist of a spatially resolved image with a measured velocity for each resolution limited region (70 AU× 70 AU) in the image. The effect of removal of apparent large scale velocity gradients is discussed and the conclusion drawn that these apparent gradients represent part of the turbulent cascade and should remain within the data. Using our full data set, observations establish that the Larson size-linewidth relation is obeyed to the smallest scales studied here extending the range of validity of this relationship by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. The velocity probability distribution function (PDF) is constructed showing extended exponential wings, providing evidence of intermittency, further supported by the skewness (third moment) and kurtosis (fourth moment) of the velocity distribution. Variance and kurtosis of the PDF of velocity differences are constructed as a function of lag. The variance shows an approximate power law dependence on lag, with exponent significantly lower than the Kolmogorov value, and with deviations below 2000 AU which are attributed to outflows and possibly disk structures associated with low mass star formation within OMC1. The kurtosis shows strong deviation from a Gaussian velocity field, providing evidence of velocity correlations at small lags. Results agree accurately with semi-empirical simulations in Eggers & Wang (1998). In addition, 170 individual H2 emitting clumps have been analysed with sizes between 500 and 2200 AU. These show considerable diversity with regard to PDFs and variance functions (related to second order structure functions) displaying a variety of shapes of

  2. OSSE observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxies ARP 220 and MRK 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.; Shier, L. M.; Sturner, S. J.; McNaron-Brown, K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    1997-01-01

    The results of oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment (OSSE) observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxies Arp 220 and Mrk 273 are reported. The pointings of Arp 220 and Mrk 273 concentrated on their upper limits. The gamma ray luminosities from these sources were found to be between one and two orders of magnitude smaller than the infrared luminosities. Multiwavelength luminosity spectra are produced from the radio to the gamma ray regime, and are compared with the typical multiwavelength spectra of active galactic nuclei. The lack of measured gamma ray emission provides no evidence for the existence of buried active galactic nuclei in these ultraluminous infrared galaxies, but is consistent with an origin of the infrared luminosity from starburst activity.

  3. Solution of nonlinear finite difference ocean models by optimization methods with sensitivity and observational strategy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeter, Jens; Wunsch, Carl

    1986-01-01

    The paper studies with finite difference nonlinear circulation models the uncertainties in interesting flow properties, such as western boundary current transport, potential and kinetic energy, owing to the uncertainty in the driving surface boundary condition. The procedure is based upon nonlinear optimization methods. The same calculations permit quantitative study of the importance of new information as a function of type, region of measurement and accuracy, providing a method to study various observing strategies. Uncertainty in a model parameter, the bottom friction coefficient, is studied in conjunction with uncertain measurements. The model is free to adjust the bottom friction coefficient such that an objective function is minimized while fitting a set of data to within prescribed bounds. The relative importance of the accuracy of the knowledge about the friction coefficient with respect to various kinds of observations is then quantified, and the possible range of the friction coefficients is calculated.

  4. THERMAL MODEL CALIBRATION FOR MINOR PLANETS OBSERVED WITH WISE/NEOWISE: COMPARISON WITH INFRARED ASTRONOMICAL SATELLITE

    SciTech Connect

    Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Grav, T.; Wright, E.; Cutri, R. M.; Walker, R.; McMillan, R. S.

    2011-08-10

    With thermal infrared observations detected by the NEOWISE project, we have measured diameters for 1742 minor planets that were also observed by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS). We have compared the diameters and albedo derived by applying a spherical thermal model to the objects detected by NEOWISE and find that they are generally in good agreement with the IRAS values. We have shown that diameters computed from NEOWISE data are often less systematically biased than those found with IRAS. This demonstrates that the NEOWISE data set can provide accurate physical parameters for the >157,000 minor planets that were detected by NEOWISE.

  5. Infrared Spectra of (CO2)2-OCS Complex: Infrared Observation of Two Distinct Barrel-Shaped Isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norooz Oliaee, J.; Dehghany, M.; Mivehvar, F.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.

    2010-06-01

    Spectra of (CO2)2-OCS complex in the region of the OCS ν 1 fundamental (˜ 2062 cm-1) are observed using a tunable diode laser to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion. A previous microwave study of the complex by Peebles and Kuczkowskia gave a distorted triangular cylinder. The geometerical disposition of the three dimer faces of this trimer are quite similar to the slipped CO2 dimer, the lowest energy form of OCS-CO2 (isomer a), also observed and analyzed in the microwave region, and the higher energy form of OCS-CO2 (isomer b), first observed by our group in the infrared region. Here we report the observation and analysis of two infrared bands, corresponding to two distinct isomers of the (CO2)2-OCS complex. A band around 2058.8 cm-1 was assigned to isomer I, which is the same as that studied previously by microwave spectroscopy. A second band around 2051.7 cm-1 was assigned to a higher energy isomer of the complex, isomer II, has not been observed previously, but expected on the basis of ab initio calculations. Approximate structural parameters for this new isomer were obtained by means of isotopic substitution. In contrast to isomer I, the geometerical disposition of the faces containing OCS and CO2 in isomer II are similar to isomer b of the OCS-CO2 complex. S. A. Peebles and R. L. Kuczkowski, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 5277 (1998). S. E. Novick, R. D. Suenram, and F. J. Lovas, J. Chem. Phys. 88, 687 (1988). M. Dehghany, J. Nooroz Oliaee, M. Afshari, N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, and A. R. W. McKellar, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 224310 (2009). H. Valdés and J. A. Sordo, Int. J. Comput. Chem. 23, 444 (2002).

  6. High speed Infrared imaging method for observation of the fast varying temperature phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Reza; Alavi, Kambiz; Yuan, Baohong

    With new improvements in high-end commercial R&D camera technologies many challenges have been overcome for exploring the high-speed IR camera imaging. The core benefits of this technology is the ability to capture fast varying phenomena without image blur, acquire enough data to properly characterize dynamic energy, and increase the dynamic range without compromising the number of frames per second. This study presents a noninvasive method for determining the intensity field of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Device (HIFU) beam using Infrared imaging. High speed Infrared camera was placed above the tissue-mimicking material that was heated by HIFU with no other sensors present in the HIFU axial beam. A MATLAB simulation code used to perform a finite-element solution to the pressure wave propagation and heat equations within the phantom and temperature rise to the phantom was computed. Three different power levels of HIFU transducers were tested and the predicted temperature increase values were within about 25% of IR measurements. The fundamental theory and methods developed in this research can be used to detect fast varying temperature phenomena in combination with the infrared filters.

  7. Far-infrared line observations of planetary nebulae. I - The forbidden O III spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, D. F.; Werner, M. W.

    1985-04-01

    Observations of the far-infrared fine structure lines of O III have been obtained for six planetary nebulae. The infrared measurements are combined with optical O III line fluxes to probe physical conditions in the gas. From the observed line intensity ratios, a simultaneous solution was obtained for electron temperature and density, as well as means of evaluating the importance of inhomogeneities. Densities determined from the far-infrared O III lines agree well with density diagnostics from other ions, indicating a fairly homogeneous density in the emitting gas. Temperatures are determined separately from the O III 4363/5007 A and 5007 A/52 micron intensity ratios and compared. Systematically higher values are derived from the former ratio, which is expected from a nebula which is not isothermal. Allowance for the presence of temperature variations within these nebulae raises their derived oxygen abundances, determinations to be reconciled with the solar value.

  8. Far-infrared line observations of planetary nebulae. 1: The O 3 spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, D. F.; Werner, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the far-infrared fine structure lines of O III have been obtained for six planetary nebulae. The infrared measurements are combined with optical O III line fluxes to probe physical conditions in the gas. From the observed line intensity ratios, a simultaneous solution was obtained for electron temperature and density, as well as means of evaluating the importance of inhomogeneities. Densities determined from the far-infrared O III lines agree well density diagnostics from other ions, indicating a fairly homogeneous density in the emitting gas. Temperatures are determined separately from the O III 4363/5007 A and 5007 A/52 micron intensity ratios and compared. Systematically higher values are derived from the former ratio, which is expected from a nebula which is not isothermal. Allowance for the presence of temperature variations within these nebulae raises their derived oxygen abundances, determinations to be reconciled with the solar value.

  9. The nature of AFGL 2591 and its associated molecular outflow: Infrared and millimeter-wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, C. J.; Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Smith, H. A.; Schwartz, P. R.; Glaccum, W.

    1984-01-01

    The results of infrared photometry from 2 to 160 microns of AFGL and CO(12) observations of its associated molecular cloud and high velocity molecular outflow are presented and discussed. The observed solar luminosity is 6.7 x 10(4) at a distance of 2 kpc. The spectrum of AFGL 2591 is interpreted in the context of a model in which a single embedded object is the dominant source of the infrared luminosity. This object is determined to be surrounded by a compact, optically thick dust shell with a temperature in excess of several hundred degrees kelvin. The extinction to this source is estimated to be between 26 and 50 visual magnitudes. The absolute position of the infrared sources at 10 microns was determined to an accuracy of + or in. This indicates for the first time that the IR source and H2O source are not coincident. The CO(12) observations show the high-velocity molecular flow near AFGL 2591 to be extended, bipolar and roughly centered on the infrared emission. The observations suggest that the red-shifted flow component extends beyond the boundary of the ambient cloud within which AFGL 2591 is embedded. The CO(12) observations also show that AFGL 2591 is embedded in a molecular cloud with an LSR velocity of -5 km/s.

  10. High Resolution Observations of Magnetic Elements in the Visible and the Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, T.; Lin, H.

    1997-05-01

    High resolution observations of magnetic elements in the visible and infrared. We report on multi-wavelength observations of plage regions obtained at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at NSO/Sac-Peak . The data set includes high resolution images in the G-band (0.43 mu ), the visible (0.69 mu ) continuum and the infrared (1.6 mu ) continuum. In addition, deep integration full Stokes vector measurements in the FeI 1.56 mu lines, as well as, Ca-K slit jaw images were obtained. G-band bright points, which are observed mostly in supergranular lanes, are also visible as bright points in the visible continuum. Although the infrared observations are limited in spatial resolution to about 0."4 (the diffraction limit of the VTT/SP), the data indicates that G-band bright points are also bright in the infrared (1.6 mu ). We also discuss and compare properties of magnetic knots and small pores. Magnetic knots, which recently also have been referred to as azimuth centers (Lites et al. 1994), by definition show no darkening in individual continuum images. However, in the time-averaged imaging data, and in particular in the infrared, azimuth centers appear as dark features, which are clearly distinguishable from the quiet sun background. In the infrared most azimuth centers are visible as dark features even in individual snapshots. Many azimuth centers as well as some small pores are surrounded by a highly structured bright ring, which becomes more apparent with increasing height of formation. Results of the polarization analysis in the FeI 1.56 mu lines, including measurements of weak fields, are presented as well.

  11. Amplitude of the diurnal temperature cycle as observed by thermal infrared and microwave radiometers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key input to physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes, and global measurements of LST are provided by many satellite platforms. Passive microwave (MW) observations offer an alternative to conventional thermal infrared (TIR) LST retri...

  12. Probing the interstellar medium in early-type galaxies with Infrared Space Oberservatory observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malhotra, S.; Hollenbach, D.; Helou, D.; Silbermann, N.; Valjavec, E.; Rubin, R.; Dale, D.; Hunter, D.; Lu, N.; Lord, S.; Dinerstein, H.; Thronson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Four IRAS-detected early-type galaxies were observed with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). With the exception of the 15 mu m image of NGC 1052, the mid-IR images of NGC 1052, NGC 1155, NGC 5866, and NGC 6958 at 4.5, 7, and 15 mu m show extended emission.

  13. Comments on a peak of AlxGa1-xN observed by infrared reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, G.; Engelbrecht, J. A. A.; Lee, M. E.; Wagener, M. C.; Henry, A.

    2016-05-01

    AlxGa1-xN epilayers, grown on c-plane oriented sapphire substrates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD), were evaluated using FTIR infrared reflectance spectroscopy. A peak at ∼850 cm-1 in the reflectance spectra, not reported before, was observed. Possible origins for this peak are considered and discussed.

  14. Galileo Infrared Observations of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 G Impact Fireball: A Preliminary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Weissman, P. R.; Segura, M.; Hui, J.; Smythe, W. D.; Johnson, T.; Baines, K. H.; Drossart, P.; Encrenaz, T.; Leader, F. E.; Team, NIMS Science

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft was fortuitously situated for a direct view of the impacts of the fragments of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 in Jupiter's atmosphere. The Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer instrument observed several of the impact events in several discrete bands and with a temporal resolution of roughly five seconds. This report provides a preliminary description of the fireball phase.

  15. Near- and far-infrared observations of interplanetary dust bands from the COBE diffuse infrared background experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiesman, William J.; Hauser, Michael G.; Kelsall, Thomas; Lisse, Carey M.; Moseley, S. Harvey, Jr.; Reach, William T.; Silverberg, Robert F.; Stemwedel, Sally W.; Weiland, Janet L.

    1995-01-01

    Data from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) instrument aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) spacecraft have been used to examine the near and far infrared signatures of the interplanetary dust (IPD) bands. Images of the dust band pairs at ecliptic latitudes of +/- 1.4 deg and +/- 10 deg have been produced at DIRBE wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 micrometers. The observations at the shorter wavelengths provide the first evidence of scattered sunlight from particles responsible for the dust bands. It is found that the grains in the bands and those in the smooth IPD cloud have similar spectral energy distributions, suggesting similar compositions and possibly a common origin. The scattering albedos from 1.25 to 3.5 micrometers for the grains in the dust bands and those in the IPD cloud are 0.22 and 0.29, respectively. The 10 deg band pair is cooler (185 +/- 10 K) than the smooth interplanetary dust cloud (259 +/- 10 K). From both parallactic and thermal analyses, the implied location of the grains responsible for the peak brightness of the 10 deg band pair is 2.1 +/- 0.1 AU the Sun A parallactic distance of 1.4 +/- 0.2 AU is found for the peak of the 1.4 deg band pair.

  16. DISTRIBUTION OF CO{sub 2} IN SATURN'S ATMOSPHERE FROM CASSINI/CIRS INFRARED OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, M. M.; LeClair, A.; Woodard, E.; Young, M.; Stanbro, M.; Flasar, F. M.; Achterberg, R. K.; Bjoraker, G.; Brasunas, J.; Jennings, D. E.; Kunde, V. G. E-mail: Andre.C.LeClair@nasa.gov E-mail: mcs0001@uah.edu E-mail: f.m.flasar@nasa.gov; Collaboration: and the Cassini /CIRS team

    2013-10-20

    This paper focuses on the CO{sub 2} distribution in Saturn's atmosphere based on analysis of infrared spectral observations of Saturn made by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer aboard the Cassini spacecraft. The Cassini spacecraft was launched in 1997 October, inserted in Saturn's orbit in 2004 July, and has been successfully making infrared observations of Saturn, its rings, Titan, and other icy satellites during well-planned orbital tours. The infrared observations, made with a dual Fourier transform spectrometer in both nadir- and limb-viewing modes, cover spectral regions of 10-1400 cm{sup –1}, with the option of variable apodized spectral resolutions from 0.53 to 15 cm{sup –1}. An analysis of the observed spectra with well-developed radiative transfer models and spectral inversion techniques has the potential to provide knowledge of Saturn's thermal structure and composition with global distributions of a series of gases. In this paper, we present an analysis of a large observational data set for retrieval of Saturn's CO{sub 2} distribution utilizing spectral features of CO{sub 2} in the Q-branch of the ν{sub 2} band, and discuss its possible relationship to the influx of interstellar dust grains. With limited spectral regions available for analysis, due to low densities of CO{sub 2} and interference from other gases, the retrieved CO{sub 2} profile is obtained as a function of a model photochemical profile, with the retrieved values at atmospheric pressures in the region of ∼1-10 mbar levels. The retrieved CO{sub 2} profile is found to be in good agreement with the model profile based on Infrared Space Observatory measurements with mixing ratios of ∼4.9 × 10{sup –10} at atmospheric pressures of ∼1 mbar.

  17. Spectral and Imaging Observations of a White-light Solar Flare in the Mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, Matt; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh; Jhabvala, Murzy; Jennings, Don; Lunsford, Allen; Kaufmann, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    We report high-resolution observations at mid-infrared wavelengths of a minor solar flare, SOL2014-09-24T17:50 (C7.0), using Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector cameras at an auxiliary of the McMath-Pierce telescope. The flare emissions, the first simultaneous observations in two mid-infrared bands at 5.2 and 8.2 μ {{m}} with white-light and hard X-ray coverage, revealed impulsive time variability with increases on timescales of ˜4 s followed by exponential decay at ˜10 s in two bright regions separated by about 13\\prime\\prime . The brightest source is compact, unresolved spatially at the diffraction limit (1\\_\\_AMP\\_\\_farcs;72 at 5.2 μ {{m}}). We identify the IR sources as flare ribbons also seen in white-light emission at 6173 Å observed by SDO/HMI, with twin hard X-ray sources observed by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, and with EUV sources (e.g., 94 Å) observed by SDO/AIA. The two infrared points have nearly the same flux density (fν, W m-2 Hz) and extrapolate to a level of about an order of magnitude below that observed in the visible band by HMI, but with a flux of more than two orders of magnitude above the free-free continuum from the hot (˜15 MK) coronal flare loop observed in the X-ray range. The observations suggest that the IR emission is optically thin; this constraint and others suggest major contributions from a density less than about 4× {10}13 cm-3. We tentatively interpret this emission mechanism as predominantly free-free emission in a highly ionized but cool and rather dense chromospheric region.

  18. Variations in Near-Infrared Emissivity of Venus Surface Observed by the Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, G. L.; Roos-Serote, M.; Sugita, S.

    2004-11-01

    We evaluate the spatial variation of venusian surface emissivity at a near-infrared wavelength using multispectral images obtained by the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on board the Galileo spacecraft. The Galileo made a close flyby to Venus in February 1990. During this flyby, NIMS observed the nightside of Venus with 17 spectral channels, which includes the well-known spectral windows at 1.18, 1.74, and 2.3 μ m. The surface emissivity is evaluated at 1.18 μ m, at which thermal radiation emitted from the planetary surface could be detected. To analyze the NIMS observations, synthetic spectra have been generated by means of a line-by-line radiative transfer program which includes both scattering and absorption. We used the discrete ordinate method to calculate the spectra of vertically inhomogeneous plane-parallel atmosphere. Gas opacity is calculated based on the method of Pollack et al. (1993), though binary absorption coefficients for continuum opacity are adjusted to achieve an acceptable fit to the NIMS data. We used Mie scattering theory and a cloud model developed by Pollack et al. (1993) to determine the single scattering albedo and scattering phase function of the cloud particles. The vertical temperature profile of Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) is used in all our calculations. The procedure of the analysis is the followings. We first made a correction for emission angle. Then, a modulation of emission by the cloud opacities is removed using simultaneously measured 1.74 and 2.3 μ m radiances. The resulting images are correlated with the topographic map of Magellan. To search for variations in surface emissivity, this cloud corrected images are divided by synthetic radiance maps that were created from the Magellan data. This work has been supported by The 21st Century COE Program of Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT).

  19. Comparison of quarter-wave retarders over finite spectral and angular bandwidths for infrared polarimetric-imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, Samuel L; Boreman, Glenn D

    2011-12-20

    We compare three technological approaches for quarter-wave retarders within the context of polarimetric-imaging applications in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectrum. Performance of a commercial cadmium sulfide (CdS) crystalline waveplate, a multilayer meanderline structure, and a silicon (Si) form-birefringent retarder are evaluated under conditions of 8-12 μm broadband radiation emerging from an F/1 focusing objective. Metrics used for this comparison are the spectrally dependent axial ratio, retardance, and polarization-averaged power transmittance, which are averaged over the angular range of interest. These parameters correspond to the characteristics that would be observed at the focal-plane array (FPA) detector of an LWIR imaging polarimeter. PMID:22193200

  20. ISO Mid-Infrared Observations of Giant HII Regions in M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelton, B. P.; Waller, W. H.; Hodge, P. W.; Boulanger, F.; Cornett, R. H.; Fanelli, M. N.; Lequeux, J.; Stecher, T. P.; Viallefond, F.; Hui, Y.

    1999-01-01

    We present Infrared Space Observatory Camera (ISOCAM) Circular Variable Filter scans of three giant HII regions in M33. IC 133, NGC 595, and CC 93 span a wide range of metallicity, luminosity, nebular excitation, and infrared excess; three other emission regions (CC 43, CC 99, and a region to the northeast of the core of NGC 595) are luminous enough in the mid-infrared to be detected in the observed fields. ISOCAM CVF observations provide spatially resolved observations (5'') of 151 wavelengths between 5.1 and 16.5 microns with a spectral resolution R = 35 to 50. We observe atomic emission lines ([Ne II], [Ne III], and [S IV]), several "unidentified infrared bands" (UIBs; 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, 12.0, and 12.7 microns), and in some cases a continuum which rises steeply at longer wavelengths. We conclude that the spectra of these three GHRs are well explained by combinations of ionized gas, PAHs, and very small grains in various proportions and with different spatial distributions. Comparisons between observed ratios of the various UIBs with model ratios indicate that the PAHs in all three of the GHRs are dehydrogenated and that the small PAHs have been destroyed in IC 133 but have survived in NGC 595 and CC 93. The [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios observed in IC 133 and NGC 595 are consistent with their ages of 5 and 4.5 Myr, respectively; the deduced ionization parameter is higher in IC 133, consistent with its more compact region of emission.

  1. AKARI Observation of the Sub-degree Scale Fluctuation of the Near-infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, H. J.; Lee, Hyung Mok; Matsumoto, T.; Jeong, W.-S.; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Pyo, J.

    2015-07-01

    We report spatial fluctuation analysis of the sky brightness in the near-infrared from observations toward the north ecliptic pole (NEP) by the AKARI at 2.4 and 3.2 μm. As a follow-up study of our previous work on the Monitor field of AKARI, we used NEP deep survey data, which covered a circular area of about 0.4 square degrees, in order to extend fluctuation analysis at angular scales up to 1000″. We found residual fluctuation over the estimated shot noise at larger angles than the angular scale of the Monitor field. The excess fluctuation of the NEP deep field smoothly connects with that of the Monitor field at angular scales of a few hundred arcseconds and extends without any significant variation to larger angular scales up to 1000″. By comparing excess fluctuations at two wavelengths, we confirm a blue spectral feature similar to the result of the Monitor field. We find that the result of this study is consistent with Spitzer Space Telescope observations at 3.6 μm. The origin of the excess fluctuation in the near-infrared background remains to be determined, but we could exclude zodiacal light, diffuse Galactic light, and unresolved faint galaxies at low redshift based on the comparison with mid- and far-infrared brightness, ground-based near-infrared images.

  2. A Compact Infrared Space Telescope MIRIS and its Preliminary Observational Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wonyong; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Kim, Il-Joong; Lee, Dae-Hee; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Moon, Bongkon; Park, Youngsik; Park, Sung-Joon; Lee, Dukhang; Park, Won-Kee; Ko, Kyeongyeon; Kim, Min Gyu; Nam, Uk-Won; Park, Hong-Young; Lee, Hyung Mok; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2015-08-01

    The first Korean infrared space telescope MIRIS (Milti-purpose InfraRed Imaging System) was successfully launched in November 2013, as the main payload of Korean STSAT-3 (Science and Technology Satellite-3). After the initial on-orbit operation for verification, the observations are made with MIRIS for the fluctuation of Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) and the Galactic Plane survey. For the study of near-infrared background, MIRIS surveyed large areas (> 10° x 10°) around the pole regions: the north ecliptic pole (NEP), the north and south Galactic poles (NGP, SGP), while the NEP region is continually monitored for the instrumental calibration and the zodiacal light study. In addition, the Paschen-α Galactic plane survey has been made with two narrow-band filters (at 1.88 μm and 1.84+1.92 μm) for the study of warm interstellar medium. We plan to continue surveying the entire galactic plane with the latitude of ±3°, and expect to be completed by 2015. The data are still under the stage of reduction and analysis, and guest observations are on-going. We present some of the preliminary results.

  3. Exploration of the Saturn System by the Cassini Mission: Observations with the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini mission is a joint NASA-ESA international mission, launched on October 17, 1997 with 12 instruments on board, for exploration of the Saturn system. A composite Infrared Spectrometers is one of the major instruments. Successful insertion of the spacecraft in Saturn's orbit for an extended orbital tour occurred on July 1, 2004. The French Huygens-Probe on board, with six instruments was programmed for a soft landing on Titan's surface occurred in January 2005. The broad range scientific objectives of the mission are: Exploration of the Saturn system for investigations of the origin, formation, & evolution of the solar system, with an extensive range of measurements and the analysis of the data for scientific interpretations. The focus of research dealing with the Cassini mission at NASA/MSFC in collaboration with the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, JPL, as well as the research teams at Oxford/UK and Meudon Observatory/France, involves the Infrared observations of Saturn and its satellites, for measurements of the thermal structure and global distributions of the atmospheric constituents. A brief description of the Cassini spacecraft, the instruments, the objectives, in particular with the infrared observations of the Saturn system will be given. The analytical techniques for infrared radiative transfer and spectral inversion programs, with some selected results for gas constituent distributions will be presented.

  4. Validation of Carbon Monoxide and Methane Vertical Column Densities Retrieved from SCIAMACHY Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstaffl, Philipp; Hamidouche, Mourad; Schreier, Franz; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Lichtenberg, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Carbon monoxide and methane are key species of Earth's atmosphere, highly relevant for climate and air quality. Accordingly, a large number of spaceborne sensors are observing these species in the microwave, thermal and near infrared. For the analysis of short wave infrared spectra measured by SCIAMACHY aboard the ENVISAT satellite and similar instrument(s) we had developed the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm: BIRRA is a separable least squares fit of the measured radiance with respect to molecular column densities and auxiliary parameters (optional: surface albedo, baseline, slit function width, and wavenumber shift). BIRRA has been implemented in the operational SCIAMACHY L1 to 2 processor for the retrieval of CO and CH4 from channel 8 (2.3 mue) and 6 (1.6 mue), respectively. Our tests are based on separate comparisons with existing space or ground-based measurements of carbon monoxide and methane column densities. In this poster intercomparisons of CO and CH4 columns estimated from SCIAMACHY with coincident and co-located retrievals provided by ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are provided. More specifically, we have used data from several NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) and TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network) stations. Our strategy for quality check of these products and the selection of specific geographical areas will be discussed.

  5. InSAR Observations and Finite Element Modeling of Crustal Deformation Around a Surging Glacier, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaans, K.; Auriac, A.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Bjornsson, H.; Pálsson, F.; Pinel, V.; Feigl, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Icelandic ice caps, covering ~11% of the country, are known to be surging glaciers. Such process implies an important local crustal subsidence due to the large ice mass being transported to the ice edge during the surge in a few months only. In 1993-1995, a glacial surge occurred at four neighboring outlet glaciers in the southwestern part of Vatnajökull ice cap, the largest ice cap in Iceland. We estimated that ~16±1 km3 of ice have been moved during this event while the fronts of some of the outlet glaciers advanced by ~1 km.Surface deformation associated with this surge has been surveyed using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) acquisitions from 1992-2002, providing high resolution ground observations of the study area. The data show about 75 mm subsidence at the ice edge of the outlet glaciers following the transport of the large volume of ice during the surge (Fig. 1). The long time span covered by the InSAR images enabled us to remove ~12 mm/yr of uplift occurring in this area due to glacial isostatic adjustment from the retreat of Vatnajökull ice cap since the end of the Little Ice Age in Iceland. We then used finite element modeling to investigate the elastic Earth response to the surge, as well as confirm that no significant viscoelastic deformation occurred as a consequence of the surge. A statistical approach based on Bayes' rule was used to compare the models to the observations and obtain an estimate of the Young's modulus (E) and Poisson's ratio (v) in Iceland. The best-fitting models are those using a one-kilometer thick top layer with v=0.17 and E between 12.9-15.3 GPa underlain by a layer with v=0.25 and E from 67.3 to 81.9 GPa. Results demonstrate that InSAR data and finite element models can be used successfully to reproduce crustal deformation induced by ice mass variations at Icelandic ice caps.Fig. 1: Interferograms spanning 1993 July 31 to 1995 June 19, showing the surge at Tungnaárjökull (Tu.), Skaftárjökull (Sk.) and S

  6. Infrared Telescope Facility's Spectrograph Observations of Human-Made Space Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, K.; Buckalew, B.; Abell, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    Presented here are the results of the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) spectral observations of human-made space objects taken from 2006 to 2008. The data collected using the SpeX infrared spectrograph cover the wavelength range 0.7-2.5 micrometers. Overall, data were collected on 20 different orbiting objects at or near the geosynchronous (GEO) regime. Four of the objects were controlled spacecraft, seven were non-controlled spacecraft, five were rocket bodies, and the final four were cataloged as debris pieces. The remotely collected data are compared to the laboratory-collected reflectance data on typical spacecraft materials, thereby general materials are identified but not specific types. These results highlight the usefulness of observations in the infrared by focusing on features from hydrocarbons, silicon, and thermal emission. The spacecraft, both the controlled and non-controlled, show distinct features due to the presence of solar panels, whereas the rocket bodies do not. Signature variations between rocket bodies, due to the presence of various metals and paints on their surfaces, show a clear distinction from those objects with solar panels, demonstrating that one can distinguish most spacecraft from rocket bodies through infrared spectrum analysis. Finally, the debris pieces tend to show featureless, dark spectra. These results show that the laboratory data in its current state give excellent indications as to the nature of the surface materials on the objects. Further telescopic data collection and model updates to include noise, surface roughness, and material degradation are necessary to make better assessments of orbital object material types. However, based on the current state of the comparison between the observations and the laboratory data, infrared spectroscopic data are adequate to classify objects in GEO as spacecraft, rocket bodies, or debris.

  7. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  8. Observations of CO isotopic emission and the far-infrared continuum of Centaurus A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckart, A.; Cameron, M.; Rothermel, H.; Wild, W.; Zinnecker, H.; Olberg, M.; Rydbeck, G.; Wiklind, T.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers present maps of the CO-12(1=0) line and the 100 micron and 50 micron far-infrared emission of Centaurus A, as well as measurements of the CO-12(2-1), CO-13(1-0), and the C-18O(1-0) lines at selected positions. The observations were taken with the Swedish-ESO Submillimeter Telescope (SEST) and the CPC instrument on board the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). The millimeter data show that the bulk molecular material is closely associated with the dust lane and contained in a disk of about 180 seconds diameter and a total molecular mass of about 2 x 10 to the 8th power solar mass. The total molecular mass of the disk and bulge is of the order of 3 x 10 to the 8th power solar mass. The molecular gas in the nucleus is warm with a kinetic temperature of the order of 15 K and a number density of 10 to the 3rd power to 3 x 10 to the 4th power cm(-3). Absorption features in the CO-12 and CO-13 lines against the nuclear continuum emission indicate that the properties of giant molecular clouds are comparable to those of the Galaxy. The far-infrared data show that to a good approximation the dust temperature is constant across the dust lane at a value of about 42 K. The ratio between the far-infrared luminosity and the total molecular mass is 18 solar luminosity/solar mass and close to the mean value obtained for isolated galaxies. A comparison of the CO-12(1-0) and the far-infrared data indicates that a considerable amount of the far-infrared emission is not intimately associated with massive star formation.

  9. 9500 Nights of Mid-Infrared Observations of SN 1987A: the birth of the remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Patrice; Danziger, John

    2014-01-01

    The one-in-a-life-time event Supernova SN 1987A, the brightest supernova seen since Kepler's in 1604, has given us a unique opportunity to study the mechanics of a supernova explosion and now to witness the birth of a supernova remnant. A violent encounter is underway between the fastest-moving debris and the circumstellar ring: shocks excite ``hotspots''. ATCA/ANTF, Gemini, VLT, HST, Spitzer, Chandra, and recently ALMA observations have been so far organized to help understanding the several emission mechanisms at work. In the mid-infrared SN 1987A has transformed from a SN with the bulk of its radiation from the ejecta to a SNR whose emission is dominated by the interaction of the blast wave with the surrounding interstellar medium, a process in which kinetic energy is converted into radiative energy. Currently this remnant emission is dominated by material in or near the inner equatorial ring (ER). We give here a brief history of our mid-infrared observations, and present our last data obtained with the SPITZER infrared satellite and the ESO VLT and Gemini telescopes: we show how together with Chandra observations, they contribute to the understanding of this fascinating object. We argue also that our imaging observations suggest that warm dust is still present in the ejecta, and we dispute the presence of huge amount of very cold dust in it, as it has been claimed on the basis of data obtained with the HERSCHELl satellite.

  10. THE EXTRAORDINARY FAR-INFRARED VARIATION OF A PROTOSTAR: HERSCHEL/PACS OBSERVATIONS OF LRLL54361

    SciTech Connect

    Balog, Zoltan; Detre, Örs H.; Bouwmann, Jeroen; Nielbock, Markus; Klaas, Ulrich; Krause, Oliver; Henning, Thomas; Muzerolle, James; Flaherty, Kevin; Furlan, Elise; Gutermuth, Rob; Juhasz, Attila; Bally, John; Marton, Gabor

    2014-07-10

    We report Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) photometric observations at 70 μm and 160 μm of LRLL54361—a suspected binary protostar that exhibits periodic (P = 25.34 days) flux variations at shorter wavelengths (3.6 μm and 4.5 μm) thought to be due to pulsed accretion caused by binary motion. The PACS observations show unprecedented flux variation at these far-infrared wavelengths that are well correlated with the variations at shorter wavelengths. At 70 μm the object increases its flux by a factor of six while at 160 μm the change is about a factor of two, consistent with the wavelength dependence seen in the far-infrared spectra. The source is marginally resolved at 70 μm with varying FWHM. Deconvolved images of the sources show elongations exactly matching the outflow cavities traced by the scattered light observations. The spatial variations are anti-correlated with the flux variation, indicating that a light echo is responsible for the changes in FWHM. The observed far-infrared flux variability indicates that the disk and envelope of this source is periodically heated by the accretion pulses of the central source, and suggests that such long wavelength variability in general may provide a reasonable proxy for accretion variations in protostars.

  11. Experimental observations and finite element analysis of the initiation of fiber microbuckling in notched composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, E. Gail; Bradley, Walter L.

    1989-01-01

    An understanding was developed of the factors that determine the semi-circular edge-notched compressive strength and the associated failure mode(s) were identified of thermoplastic composite laminates with multidirectional stacking sequences. The experimental observations and the detailed literature review suggest at least four factors that affected the determination of the strain levels at which fiber microbuckling initiates and thus, partially control the composite's compression strength. The dependent variables studied are the compressive strength of a reduced gage section compression specimen and the compression strength of a compression specimen with two semi-circular edge notches (no opposite free edges) centered along the gage section. In this research, specimens containing two semi-circular edge notches (no opposite free edges) were loaded in compression at a relatively slow rate to provide more stable development of fiber microbuckling damage. The results indicate that the local constraints (free surfaces, supporting ply orientation, and resin-rich regions) significantly affect the strain level for the initiation of in-plane fiber microbuckling. Preliminary results at an elevated temperature, 77 C, showed the shear stress yield strength of the resin was reduced and consequently, the resistance to fiber microbuckling was also reduced. The finite element analysis of the perfectly straight fiber problem indicates that the free surface effect causes a 10 percent reduction in the critical buckling strain. However, the experimentally measured reduction for fibers with an initial fiber curvature, was 35 percent.

  12. Near infrared observations of galaxies in the Coma supercluster and in the Cancer cluster. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Trinchieri, G.; Boselli, A.

    1990-11-01

    New near infrared observations of 110 galaxies in the Coma/A1367 supercluster region, and 40 galaxies in the Cancer cluster are presented. These observations are part of an ongoing investigation of the properties of normal galaxies and of their near-IR emission, which aims at obtaining homogeneous, multifrequency data for a large sample of galaxies in different density environments. The addition of these observations to the sample presented in Gavazzi and Trinchieri (1989) raises the number of Coma/A1367 galaxies with near-IR data to 275. The measurements, together with data published by Bothun et al. (1985), give a sample of 45 spirals in the Cancer cluster.

  13. Hurricane Katrina as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: click on image for larger AIRS microwave image

    At 1:30 a.m. local time this morning, the remnants of (now Tropical Depression) Katrina were centered on the Mississippi-Tennessee border. This microwave image from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument on NASA's Aqua spacecrat shows that the area of most intense precipitation was concentrated to the north of the center of activity.

    The infrared image shows how the storms look through an AIRS Infrared window channel. Window channels measure the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the hurricane. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds, so the purple color indicates the cool cloud tops of the storm. In cloud-free areas, the infrared signal is retrieved at the Earth's surface, revealing warmer temperatures. Cooler areas are pushing to purple and warmer areas are pushing to red.

    The microwave image (figure 1) reveals where the heaviest precipitation in the hurricane is taking place. The blue areas within the storm show the location of this heavy precipitation. Blue areas outside of the storm where there are moderate or no clouds are where the cold (in the microwave sense) sea surface shines through.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard

  14. CENTAURS AND SCATTERED DISK OBJECTS IN THE THERMAL INFRARED: ANALYSIS OF WISE/NEOWISE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, James M.; Grav, Tommy; Blauvelt, Erin; Collaboration: WISE Team; PTF Team; and others

    2013-08-10

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) observed 52 Centaurs and scattered disk objects (SDOs) in the thermal infrared, including 15 new discoveries. We present analyses of these observations to estimate sizes and mean optical albedos. We find mean albedos of 0.08 {+-} 0.04 for the entire data set. Thermal fits yield average beaming parameters of 0.9 {+-} 0.2 that are similar for both SDO and Centaur sub-classes. Biased cumulative size distributions yield size-frequency distribution power law indices of {approx}-1.7 {+-} 0.3. The data also reveal a relation between albedo and color at the 3{sigma} level. No significant relation between diameter and albedos is found.

  15. The Near-Earth Encounter of 2005 YU55: Thermal Infrared Observations from Gemini North

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Emery, Joshua P.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Granvik, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    As part of a multi-observatory campaign to observe 2005 YU55 during its November 2011 encounter with the Earth, thermal infrared photometry and spectroscopy (7.9- 14 and 18-22 micron) were conducted using the Michelle instrument at Gemini North. Reduction of the 8.8 flm photometry and the spectroscopy from UT Nov-IO as well as of all the Gemini data from UT Nov-9 is in progress. Results will be discussed.

  16. The Convection of Close Red Supergiant Stars Observed With Near-Infrared Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montargès, M.; Kervella, P.; Perrin, G.; Chiavassa, A.; Aurière, M.

    2015-12-01

    Our team has obtained observations of the photosphere of the two closest red supergiant stars Betelgeuse (α Ori) and Antares (α Sco) using near infrared interferometry. We have been monitoring the photosphere of Betelgeuse with the VLTI/PIONIER instrument for three years. On Antares, we obtained an unprecedented sampling of the visibility function. These data allow us to probe the convective photosphere of massive evolved stars.

  17. Statistical Retrieval of Thin Liquid Cloud Microphysical Properties Using Ground-Based Infrared and Microwave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marke, Tobias; Löhnert, Ulrich; Ebell, Kerstin; Turner, David D.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, liquid water cloud microphysical properties are retrieved by exploiting passive remote sensing techniques in the microwave and infrared spectral regime. Liquid water clouds are highly frequent in various climate regimes and play a significant role in terms of interaction with radiation. Small perturbations in the amount of liquid water contained in the cloud can cause large variations in the radiative fluxes. This effect enhances for thin clouds with a low liquid water path (LWP), which requires accurate retrieval information on the cloud properties. Retrieving low LWP values using the microwave spectral regime reveals large relative errors, whereas the potential for infrared methods is high. Therefore robust and computationally low demanding synergistic retrievals based on a multivariate regression and a neural network are derived to estimate LWP and cloud effective radius. While the regression-type synergy retrievals are strongly influenced by the nonlinearities of saturating signals in the infrared regime for higher LWP, the neural network retrieval is able to retrieve LWP and cloud effective radius with a higher accuracy than the single instrument retrievals. This is achieved by examining synthetic observations in the low LWP range. Furthermore, the performance of the retrievals is assessed in a radiative closure study for the downwelling shortwave flux, using measurements of a microwave radiometer, a broadband infrared radiometer and a spectrally highly resolved Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI).

  18. X-Ray and Infrared Observations of Embedded Young Stars in NGC 2264

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Theordore; Dahm, S. E.

    2005-01-01

    Images of the NGC 2264 star-forming region, which we have acquired with the XMM-Newton spacecraft, reveal strong X-ray emission from three deeply embedded (Av > 10 mag) young stellar objects in the vicinity of Allen's infrared source (AFGL 989 = IRS 1) and Castelaz & Grasdalen s infrared source (RNO-EW = IRS 2). Thermal plasma models for the brightest source in X-rays, located 11 southwest of Allen's star, yield a quasi-steady luminosity of Lx = 10 ergs s-1 and an extraordinarily high X-ray temperature of 100 MK. The high temperature is consistent with the presence of emission lines of Fe xxv and Fe xxvi at photon energies of 6.7 and 6.9 keV, respectively. An even higher temperature of nearly 140 MK was observed during the rise phase of a powerful impulsive X-ray flare of another young star in the IRS 2 region. Moderate-resolution near-infrared (1-4 um) spectra of the embedded objects, obtained at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, exhibit deep water ice absorption bands, as well as a variety of emission and absorption features of H I, CO, and both neutral and ionized metals.

  19. Far-infrared observations of optical emission-line stars - Evidence for extensive cool dust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, P. M.; Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Gatley, I.

    1979-01-01

    Far-infrared observations (40-160 microns) of eight optical emission-line stars are presented. Six of these stars, LkH-alpha 198, T Tau, LkH-alpha 101, V380 Ori, R Mon, and MWC 1080, show substantially more far-infrared emission than would be expected on the basis of a blackbody extrapolation of their 10-20-micron fluxes. Additionally, in three cases, the far-infrared emission is shown to be spatially extended (greater than 40 arcsec). A simple model of the thermal emission from cool circumstellar dust (30-70 K) shows that these stars are surrounded by material left over from the star formation process; this result confirms the extreme youth of these stars. MWC 349 was detected at a level consistent with the expected free-free flux from its surrounding H II region, and RY Tau was not detected in the far-infrared; there is little circumstellar dust with temperatures of 20-100 K in these objects.

  20. Cloud mask via cumulative discriminant analysis applied to satellite infrared observations: scientific basis and initial evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, U.; Lavanant, L.; Liuzzi, G.; Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Stuhlmann, R.; Tjemkes, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    We introduce a classification method (Cumulative Discriminant Analysis) of the Discriminant Analysis type to discriminate between cloudy and clear sky satellite observations in the thermal infrared. The tool is intended for the high spectral resolution infrared sounder (IRS) planned for the geostationary METEOSAT (Meteorological Satellite) Third Generation platform and uses IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) data as a proxy. The Cumulative Discriminant Analysis does not introduce biases intrinsic with the approximation of the probability density functions and is flexible enough to adapt to different strategies to optimize the cloud mask. The methodology is based on nine statistics computed from IASI spectral radiances, which exploit the high spectral resolution of the instrument and which effectively summarize information contained within the IASI spectrum. A Principal Component Analysis prior step is also introduced which makes the problem more consistent with the statistical assumptions of the methodology. An initial assessment of the scheme is performed based on global and regional IASI real data sets and cloud masks obtained from AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) imagers. The agreement with these independent cloud masks is generally well above 80%, except at high latitudes in their winter seasons.

  1. Cloud mask via cumulative discriminant analysis applied to satellite infrared observations: scientific basis and initial evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, U.; Lavanant, L.; Liuzzi, G.; Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Stuhlmann, R.; Tjemkes, S. A.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a classification method (cumulative discriminant analysis) of the discriminant analysis type to discriminate between cloudy and clear-sky satellite observations in the thermal infrared. The tool is intended for the high-spectral-resolution infrared sounder (IRS) planned for the geostationary METEOSAT (Meteorological Satellite) Third Generation platform and uses IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) data as a proxy. The cumulative discriminant analysis does not introduce biases intrinsic with the approximation of the probability density functions and is flexible enough to adapt to different strategies to optimize the cloud mask. The methodology is based on nine statistics computed from IASI spectral radiances, which exploit the high spectral resolution of the instrument and which effectively summarize information contained within the IASI spectrum. A principal component analysis prior step is also introduced, which makes the problem more consistent with the statistical assumptions of the methodology. An initial assessment of the scheme is performed based on global and regional IASI real data sets and cloud masks obtained from AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) imagers. The agreement with these independent cloud masks is generally well above 80 %, except at high latitudes in the winter seasons.

  2. Impact of Spectroscopic Line Parameters on Carbon Monoxide Column Density Retrievals from Shortwave Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Denise; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Schreier, Franz; Lichtenberg, Gunter

    2015-06-01

    Among the various input data required for the retrieval of atmospheric state parameters from infrared remote sensing observations molecular spectroscopy line data have a central role, because their quality is critical for the quality of the final product. Here we discuss the impact of the line parameters on vertical column densities (VCD) estimated from short wave infrared nadir observations. Using BIRRA (the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) comprising a line-by-line radiative transfer code (forward model) and a separable nonlinear least squares solver for inversion we retrieve carbon monoxide from observations of SCIAMACHY aboard Envisat. Retrievals using recent versions of HITRAN und GEISA have been performed and the results are compared in terms of residual norms, molecular density scaling factors, their corresponding errors, and the final VCD product. The retrievals turn out to be quite similar for all three databases, so a definite recommendation in favor of one of these databases is difficult for the considered spectral range around 2:3 μm . Nevertheless, HITRAN 2012 appears to be advantageous when evaluating the different quality criteria.

  3. Atmosphere and climate studies of Mars using the Mars Observer pressure modulator infrared radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccleese, D. J.; Haskins, R. D.; Schofield, J. T.; Zurek, R. W.; Leovy, C. B.; Paige, D. A.; Taylor, F. W.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of the climate and atmosphere of Mars are limited at present by a lack of meteorological data having systematic global coverage with good horizontal and vertical resolution. The Mars Observer spacecraft in a low, nearly circular, polar orbit will provide an excellent platform for acquiring the data needed to advance significantly our understanding of the Martian atmosphere and its remarkable variability. The Mars Observer pressure modulator infrared radiometer (PMIRR) is a nine-channel limb and nadir scanning atmospheric sounder which will observe the atmosphere of Mars globally from 0 to 80 km for a full Martian year. PMIRR employs narrow-band radiometric channels and two pressure modulation cells to measure atmospheric and surface emission in the thermal infrared. PMIRR infrared and visible measurements will be combined to determine the radiative balance of the polar regions, where a sizeable fraction of the global atmospheric mass annually condenses onto and sublimes from the surface. Derived meteorological fields, including diabatic heating and cooling and the vertical variation of horizontal winds, are computed from the globally mapped fields retrieved from PMIRR data.

  4. Near-Infrared and CO (J=1-0) Observations of Photodissociation Regions in M17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Minoru; Nagata, Tetsuya; Sato, Shuji; Mizuno, Norikazu; Mizuno, Akira; Kawai, Toshihide; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Glass, Ian S.

    2002-07-01

    We have carried out near-infrared mapping observations of photodissociation regions in M17 with the Wide Field Cryogenic Telescope and CO (J=1-0) observations in three isotope lines with the ``NANTEN'' telescope. The observations covered an area of 20'×20' with a spatial resolution of 5.6" for near-infrared wavelengths and with a half-power beamwidth of 2.7‧ for millimeter wavelengths. We detected 38 sources brighter than 7 mag at 3.67 μm (Ln band), five of which show signs of young stellar objects. We have detected two emission bars (the N bar and the S bar) in all four near-infrared bands (J, K, Ln, and 3.3 μm). Their spatial distributions differ considerably from band to band, and we have compared them with the radio continuum, the mid-infrared data, and the CO molecular line emission. The different brightness and spectral energy distributions at near-infrared wavelengths can be well explained by emission from hot dust and ionized gas together with obscuration by local cold dust with a steep gradient from north to south. In the N bar, the free-free emission from ionized gas dominates at shorter wavelengths (J and K) and there is little extinction, whereas in the S bar, the free-free emission is attenuated at shorter wavelengths by the heavy local extinction. In both the N and S bars, the thermal emission from hot dust at around 1000 K dominates in the Ln band. The 3.3 μm unidentified infrared (UIR) emission delineates photodissociation regions between the H II regions and the surrounding molecular clouds. The UIR intensity decreases exponentially from the UIR peak toward the molecular clouds, with scale lengths of 88" and 100", or 0.9 and 1.0 pc, at the N and the S bars, respectively. Far-ultraviolet photons, which excite UIR emission, penetrate into the molecular clouds for ~1 pc, in the nearly edge-on geometry. The 12CO contours are elongated in the direction northwest-southeast, while the C18O contours are round. Far-ultraviolet photons erode the

  5. Mid-Infrared Observations of Class I/Flat-Spectrum Systems in Six Nearby Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, K.; Barsony, M.; Greene, T.; Ressler, M.

    2005-12-01

    We present the results of new mid-infrared observations of 64 Class I/flat-spectrum objects in the Perseus, Taurus, Chamaeleon I and II, Rho Ophiuchi, and Serpens dark clouds. These objects represent a subset of the young stellar objects (YSOs) from our previous near-infrared multiplicity surveys. We detected 45/48 (94%) of the single sources, 16/16 (100%) of the primary components, and 12/16 (75%) of the secondary/triple components of the binary/multiple objects surveyed. While the composite spectral energy distributions for all of our sample YSOs are either Class I or flat-spectrum, the individual source components typically display Class II, or in one case Class III, spectral indices, and frequently display mixed pairings; Class I objects paired with a flat-spectrum source, or a flat-spectrum source paired with a Class II YSO. Such behavior is not consistent with what one typically finds for T Tauri stars (TTS), where the companion of a classical TTS also tends to be a classical TTS, although other mixed pairings have been previously observed among Class II YSOs. In general, the individual binary/multiple components suffer very similar extinctions, Av, suggesting that most of the line-of-sight material is either in the foreground of the molecular cloud or circumbinary. ISO-Cha I 97 was previously detected as a single star in our near-infrared imaging survey of binary/multiple Class I and flat-spectrum YSOs, however our mid-infrared observations have revealed that this source is in fact binary. With a spectral index of α > 3.9, ISO-Cha I 97 is a member of a rare class of very steep spectral index YSOs, those with α > 3.

  6. Adding Emission Line Diagnostics To The Infrared Database of Extragalactic Observables from Spitzer (IDEOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoon, Henrik

    During the cryogenic phase of the successful Spitzer mission the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) made observations of about 15,000 objects. Among these are low-resolution (highresolution) spectra of more than 4200 (1800) galaxies beyond the Local Group. Results have been published in a great number of papers, led not only by hardcore infrared observers but increasingly also by non-native infrared astronomers. As the PI team of the IRS instrument, we are especially proud of the achievements of the IRS spectrograph, and we feel a special obligation to enhance the legacy value of its many observations. In 2011 we completed the Cornell Atlas of Spitzer-IRS Sources (CASSIS), containing homogeneously, expert-reduced low-resolution IRS spectra for over 13,000 observations. Earlier this year we added more than 7,000 spectra obtained with the high-resolution modules. All of these spectra benefit from the availability of our empirically derived super-sampled point-spread functions, which reduce the effects of bad and low-level rogue pixels in all IRS modules. All spectra are available for download from our CASSIS web portal. Building on this legacy, in 2013 we also started working on the soon to be completed Infrared Database of Extragalactic Observables from Spitzer (IDEOS), which contains mid-IR observables extracted from the low-resolution spectra in CASSIS. IDEOS provides astronomers with widely varying scientific interests access to diagnostics that were previously available only for limited samples, or available on the-fly only to expert users. Here we propose to continue these efforts by measuring the emission line fluxes for 3,000-4,500 galaxies in the CASSIS atlas to add powerful emission line diagnostics to our existing suite of mid-IR observables in IDEOS. IDEOS will be a great asset for future users of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope to select their samples and estimate required integration times. The completion of IDEOS will further coincide with the completion of

  7. Physical properties (particle size, rock abundance) from thermal infrared remote observations: Implications for Mars landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, P. R.; Edgett, Kenneth S.

    1994-01-01

    Critical to the assessment of potential sites for the 1997 Pathfinder landing is estimation of general physical properties of the martian surface. Surface properties have been studied using a variety of spacecraft and earth-based remote sensing observations, plus in situ studies at the Viking lander sites. Because of their value in identifying landing hazards and defining scientific objectives, we focus this discussion on thermal inertia and rock abundance derived from middle-infrared (6 to 30 microns) observations. Used in conjunction with other datasets, particularly albedo and Viking orbiter images, thermal inertia and rock abundance provide clues about the properties of potential Mars landing sites.

  8. Inference of Surface Chemical and Physical Properties Using Mid-Infrared (MIR) Spectral Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.

    2016-01-01

    Reflected or emitted energy from solid surfaces in the solar system can provide insight into thermo-physical and chemical properties of the surface materials. Measurements have been obtained from instruments located on Earth-based telescopes and carried on several space missions. The characteristic spectral features commonly observed in Mid-Infrared (MIR) spectra of minerals will be reviewed, along with methods used for compositional interpretations of MIR emission spectra. The influence of surface grain size, and space weathering processes on MIR emissivity spectra will also be discussed. Methods used for estimating surface temperature, emissivity, and thermal inertias from MIR spectral observations will be reviewed.

  9. Far-infrared observations of the evolved H II region M16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbreen, B.; Fazio, G. G.; Jaffe, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    The results of far infrared (FIR) observations of the larger H II region M16, associated with the young open star cluster NGC 6611, are discussed. Three FIR sources detected on an extended ridge of FIR emission within the scanned region are described. The observations confirm that M16 is an H II region in a late stage of evolution. The H II region has expanded and is now extremely density bounded, consisting of an extended region of ionized gas and a series of ionization fronts located at the surrounding molecular cloud boundaries nearest to the exciting OB star cluster. The FIR radiation arises from heated dust at these boundaries.

  10. Alma observations of nearby luminous infrared galaxies with various agn energetic contributions using dense gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of our ALMA Cycle 0 observations, using HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC J = 4-3 lines, of six nearby luminous infrared galaxies with various energetic contributions from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) estimated from previous infrared spectroscopy. These lines are very effective for probing the physical properties of high-density molecular gas around the hidden energy sources in the nuclear regions of these galaxies. We find that HCN to HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratios tend to be higher in AGN-important galaxies than in starburst-dominated regions, as was seen at the J = 1-0 transition, while there is no clear difference in the HCN-to-HNC J = 4-3 flux ratios among observed sources. A galaxy with a starburst-type infrared spectral shape and very large molecular line widths shows a high HCN-to-HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratio, which could be due to turbulence-induced heating. We propose that enhanced HCN J = 4-3 emission relative to HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 could be used to detect more energetic activity than normal starbursts, including deeply buried AGNs, in dusty galaxy populations.

  11. The infrared database of extragalactic observables from Spitzer - I. The redshift catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Spoon, Henrik W. W.; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Rupke, David S. N.; Barry, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of a series of papers on the Infrared Database of Extragalactic Observables from Spitzer (IDEOS). In this work, we describe the identification of optical counterparts of the infrared sources detected in Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations, and the acquisition and validation of redshifts. The IDEOS sample includes all the spectra from the Cornell Atlas of Spitzer/IRS Sources (CASSIS) of galaxies beyond the Local Group. Optical counterparts were identified from correlation of the extraction coordinates with the NASA Extragalactic Database (NED). To confirm the optical association and validate NED redshifts, we measure redshifts with unprecedented accuracy on the IRS spectra (σ(Δz/(1+z)) ˜ 0.0011) by using an improved version of the maximum combined pseudo-likelihood method (MCPL). We perform a multistage verification of redshifts that considers alternate NED redshifts, the MCPL redshift, and visual inspection of the IRS spectrum. The statistics is as follows: the IDEOS sample contains 3361 galaxies at redshift 0 < z < 6.42 (mean: 0.48, median: 0.14). We confirm the default NED redshift for 2429 sources and identify 124 with incorrect NED redshifts. We obtain IRS-based redshifts for 568 IDEOS sources without optical spectroscopic redshifts, including 228 with no previous redshift measurements. We provide the entire IDEOS redshift catalogue in machine-readable formats. The catalogue condenses our compilation and verification effort, and includes our final evaluation on the most likely redshift for each source, its origin, and reliability estimates.

  12. Measurements of C02 Distribution in Saturn's Atmosphere by Cassini-Infrared Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; LeClair, A.; Woodard, E.; Young, M.; Stanbro, M.; Flasar, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectrometer aboard the Cassini spacecraft, inserted in Saturn s orbit in July 2004, has been providing high resolution/high sensitivity infrared (IR) spectra of the Saturnian system. The measurements cover the spectral range of 10-1400/cm with variable spectral resolutions of 0.53 to 15/cm, exhibiting spectral features of a series of trace gases including CO2 and H2O. The observed spectra may be analyzed for retrieval of global P/T and gas density profiles of Saturn. The infrared measurements of Saturn by ISO(SWS) have indicated unexpected large abundances of CO2 in Saturn's atmosphere. The rigorous photochemical models of Saturn's atmosphere that have been developed indicate exogenic oxygen influx of icy dust grains that lead to the production of CO2. The distribution of CO2 in Saturn's atmosphere needs to be confirmed, and the nature of exogenic sources remains to be investigated. This paper presents comprehensive measurements of the CO2 distribution in Saturn's atmosphere by Cassini IR observations.

  13. Titan Aerosol Analogs from Aromatic Precursors: Comparisons to Cassini CIRS Observations in the Thermal Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Sebree, Joshua A.; Anderson, Carrie M.; Loeffler, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Since Cassini's arrival at Titan, ppm levels of benzene (C6H6) as well as large positive ions, which may be polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). have been detected in the atmosphere. Aromatic molecules. photolytically active in the ultraviolet, may be important in the formation of the organic aerosol comprising the Titan haze layer even when present at low mixing ratios. Yet there have not been laboratory simulations exploring the impact of these molecules as precursors to Titan's organic aerosol. Observations of Titan by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) in the far-infrared (far-IR) between 560 and 20/cm (approx. 18 to 500 microns) and in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) between 1500 and 600/cm (approx. 7 to 17 microns) have been used to infer the vertical variations of Titan's aerosol from the surface to an altitude of 300 km in the far-IR and between 150 and 350 km in the mid-IR. Titan's aerosol has several observed emission features which cannot be reproduced using currently available optical constants from laboratory-generated Titan aerosol analogs, including a broad far-IR feature centered approximately at 140/cm (71 microns).

  14. Radio continuum and far-infrared observations of low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeppe, G.; Brinks, E.; Klein, U.; Giovanardi, C.; Altschuler, D. R.; Price, R. M.; Deeg, H. -J.

    1994-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) radio continuum and Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) far-infrared (FIR) observations of 16 low luminosity galaxies of mostly low surface brightness. All galaxies had previously claimed single dish radio continuum detections. However, at the frequencies of our observations (1.49 and 8.48 GHz), we find significant radio emission for two objects only. We show that the other previously claimed detections are due to confusion with physically unrelated background sources. This implies a low radio continuum detection rate for these galaxies. Re-reduced IRAS scans yield significant far-infrared flux densities in at least one IRAS band for 6 of the 16 galaxies. These, together with the FIR and radio continuum upper limits, are consistent with the well established radio/FIR relation, where most of our galaxies populate the low-luminosity end. From the radio continuum and FIR flux densities and their upper limits we estimate the current star formation rates and demonstrate that the galaxies are currently passive in forming stars, in agreement with previous optical investigations. There is an indication that the galaxies were forming stars more intensively averaged over their lifetime than they are presently.

  15. First observation for a cuprate superconductor of fluctuation-induced diamagnetism well inside the finite-magnetic-field regime

    PubMed

    Carballeira; Mosqueira; Revcolevschi; Vidal

    2000-04-01

    For the first time for a cuprate superconductor, measurements performed above T(c) in high quality grain aligned La1.9Sr0.1CuO4 samples have allowed the observation of the thermal fluctuation induced diamagnetism well inside the finite-magnetic-field fluctuation regime. These results may be explained in terms of the Gaussian Ginzburg-Landau approach for layered superconductors, but only if the finite field contributions are estimated by taking off the short-wavelength fluctuations. PMID:11019036

  16. Direct observation of narrow mid-infrared plasmon linewidths of single metal oxide nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Robert W.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Runnerstrom, Evan L.; Agrawal, Ankit; Lounis, Sebastien D.; Milliron, Delia J.

    2016-01-01

    Infrared-responsive doped metal oxide nanocrystals are an emerging class of plasmonic materials whose localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) can be resonant with molecular vibrations. This presents a distinctive opportunity to manipulate light–matter interactions to redirect chemical or spectroscopic outcomes through the strong local electric fields they generate. Here we report a technique for measuring single nanocrystal absorption spectra of doped metal oxide nanocrystals, revealing significant spectral inhomogeneity in their mid-infrared LSPRs. Our analysis suggests dopant incorporation is heterogeneous beyond expectation based on a statistical distribution of dopants. The broad ensemble linewidths typically observed in these materials result primarily from sample heterogeneity and not from strong electronic damping associated with lossy plasmonic materials. In fact, single nanocrystal spectra reveal linewidths as narrow as 600 cm−1 in aluminium-doped zinc oxide, a value less than half the ensemble linewidth and markedly less than homogeneous linewidths of gold nanospheres. PMID:27174681

  17. Observations of Resolved Stellar Populations with the JWST Near Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Karoline; Beck, Tracy L.; Karakla, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) will provide a multi-object spectroscopy mode through the four Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs). Each MSA is a grid of contiguous shutters that can be configured to form slits on more than 100 astronomical targets simultaneously. The combination of JWST's sensitivity and superb resolution in the infrared and NIRSpec's full wavelength coverage over 1 to 5 micrometers will open new parameter space for studies of galaxies and resolved stellar populations alike. We present a NIRSpec MSA observing scenario for obtaining spectroscopy of individual stars in external galaxies. We examine the multiplexing capability of the MSA as a function of the possible MSA configuration design choices, and investigate the primary sources of error in velocity measurements and the prospects for minimizing them. We discuss how this and other use cases are being used to guide development of the NIRSpec user interfaces, including proposal planning and pipeline calibrations.

  18. Direct observation of narrow mid-infrared plasmon linewidths of single metal oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Johns, Robert W; Bechtel, Hans A; Runnerstrom, Evan L; Agrawal, Ankit; Lounis, Sebastien D; Milliron, Delia J

    2016-01-01

    Infrared-responsive doped metal oxide nanocrystals are an emerging class of plasmonic materials whose localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) can be resonant with molecular vibrations. This presents a distinctive opportunity to manipulate light-matter interactions to redirect chemical or spectroscopic outcomes through the strong local electric fields they generate. Here we report a technique for measuring single nanocrystal absorption spectra of doped metal oxide nanocrystals, revealing significant spectral inhomogeneity in their mid-infrared LSPRs. Our analysis suggests dopant incorporation is heterogeneous beyond expectation based on a statistical distribution of dopants. The broad ensemble linewidths typically observed in these materials result primarily from sample heterogeneity and not from strong electronic damping associated with lossy plasmonic materials. In fact, single nanocrystal spectra reveal linewidths as narrow as 600 cm(-1) in aluminium-doped zinc oxide, a value less than half the ensemble linewidth and markedly less than homogeneous linewidths of gold nanospheres. PMID:27174681

  19. Analysis of far-infrared spectral radiance observations of the water vapor continuum in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Cathryn; Green, Paul D.; Pickering, Juliet C.; Humpage, Neil

    2015-04-01

    The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) took place in Barrow, Alaska, in February and March 2007. During RHUBC, high resolution far-infrared spectra were measured simultaneously and independently by two different spectrometers - the Imperial College Tropospheric Airborne Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TAFTS) and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer - Extended Range (AERI-ER). Co-incidental far-infrared downwelling radiance measurements from the two instruments show good agreement within their overlapping wavenumber measurement range (400-550 cm-1). Radiance measurements taken using the TAFTS instrument are compared to the current Mlawer-Tobin-Clough-Kneizys-Davies (MT-CKD) version 2.5 water vapor continuum parameterization for the spectral range 350-500 cm-1 (20-29 μm). Simulated values agree with the TAFTS observations within uncertainties, enhancing confidence that MT-CKD 2.5 accurately represents the foreign-broadened water vapor continuum in this crucial spectral region.

  20. Direct observation of narrow mid-infrared plasmon linewidths of single metal oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Robert W.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Runnerstrom, Evan L.; Agrawal, Ankit; Lounis, Sebastien D.; Milliron, Delia J.

    2016-05-01

    Infrared-responsive doped metal oxide nanocrystals are an emerging class of plasmonic materials whose localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) can be resonant with molecular vibrations. This presents a distinctive opportunity to manipulate light-matter interactions to redirect chemical or spectroscopic outcomes through the strong local electric fields they generate. Here we report a technique for measuring single nanocrystal absorption spectra of doped metal oxide nanocrystals, revealing significant spectral inhomogeneity in their mid-infrared LSPRs. Our analysis suggests dopant incorporation is heterogeneous beyond expectation based on a statistical distribution of dopants. The broad ensemble linewidths typically observed in these materials result primarily from sample heterogeneity and not from strong electronic damping associated with lossy plasmonic materials. In fact, single nanocrystal spectra reveal linewidths as narrow as 600 cm-1 in aluminium-doped zinc oxide, a value less than half the ensemble linewidth and markedly less than homogeneous linewidths of gold nanospheres.

  1. Current Sounding Capability From Satellite Meteorological Observation With Ultraspectral Infrared Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.

    2008-01-01

    Ultraspectral resolution infrared spectral radiance obtained from near nadir observations provide atmospheric, surface, and cloud property information. The intent of the measurement of tropospheric thermodynamic state and trace abundances is the initialization of climate models and the monitoring of air quality. The NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I), designed to support the development of future satellite temperature and moisture sounders, aboard high altitude aircraft has been collecting data throughout many field campaigns. An advanced retrieval algorithm developed with NAST-I is now applied to satellite data collected with the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the Aqua satellite launched on 4 May 2002 and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp satellite launched on October 19, 2006. These instruments possess an ultra-spectral resolution, for example, both IASI and NAST-I have 0.25 cm-1 and a spectral coverage from 645 to 2760 cm-1. The retrieval algorithm with a fast radiative transfer model, including cloud effects, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. The physical inversion scheme has been developed, dealing with cloudy as well as cloud-free radiance observed with ultraspectral infrared sounders, to simultaneously retrieve surface, atmospheric thermodynamic, and cloud microphysical parameters. A fast radiative transfer model, which applies to the clouded atmosphere, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. A one-dimensional (1-d) variational multi-variable inversion solution is used to improve an iterative background state defined by an eigenvector-regression-retrieval. The solution is iterated in order to account for non-linearity in the 1-d variational solution. It is shown that relatively accurate temperature and moisture retrievals can be achieved below optically thin clouds. For optically thick clouds, accurate temperature and moisture profiles down to

  2. Mid-infrared observations of sungrazing comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) with the Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsubo, T.; Usui, F.; Takita, S.; Watanabe, J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Honda, M.; Kawakita, H.; Furusho, R.

    2014-07-01

    Comets are the frozen reservoirs of the early solar nebula and are made of ice and dust. The determination of the properties for cometary dust provides us insight into both the early-solar-nebula environment and the formation process of the planetary system. A silicate feature is often observed in comet spectra in the mid-infrared region and may be used for probing the early history of the solar system. In most cases, the feature shows the existence of crystalline silicate (for example, 11.3 microns) together with amorphous silicate [1,2]. Since the crystallization of silicates from amorphous ones generally requires high-temperature annealing above 800 K (e.g., [3,4]), it is believed that the crystalline silicate grains produced at the inner part of the disk were transported to the outer cold regions where the comet nuclei formed. Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) is a long-period Oort Cloud comet, discovered in September 2012. In particular, comet ISON is a sungrazing comet, which was predicted to pass close by the Sun and the Earth and becoming a bright object. Mid-infrared observations of this new comet and investigation of the 10-micron silicate feature help us understand the formation of crystalline silicate grains in the early solar nebula. We conducted observations of comet ISON in the mid-infrared wavelength region with the Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer (COMICS) on the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii [5,6,7]. The observation of comet ISON was carried out on 2013 October 19 and 21 UT. Since the weather conditions were not so good when we observed, we carried out N-band imaging observations (8.8 and 12.4 microns) and N-band low-resolution spectroscopy. The spectrum of comet ISON can be fit with the 260--265-K blackbody spectrum when we use the regions of 7.8--8.2 and 12.4--13.0 microns as the continuum. The spectrum has only a weak silicate excess feature, which may be able to attribute to small amorphous olivine grains. We could not detect a clear

  3. Melt Distribution in the Ethiopian Rift System: Constraints From Seismic Observations and Finite-Frequency Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, D.; Hammond, J. O.; Kendall, J.; Wookey, J.

    2008-12-01

    As part of the Ethiopian Afar Geoscientific Lithospheric Experiment (EAGLE) 79 seismic stations were deployed, for up to 18 months, in the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER). Many indicators of melt were observed leading to the idea that magma was driving the rifting process in this region. Some of the best evidence for melt came from observations of anisotropy in studies of surface waves and shear-wave splitting. The shear- wave splitting shows fast directions which change abruptly from being rift parallel on the rift flanks to magmatic-segment parallel in the rift valley. This was interpreted in terms of melt-induced anisotropy. The abrupt change in splitting parameters over small lateral distances suggests that the source of anisotropy is shallow. To further constrain the location of the anisotropy and study the ability of shear-wave splitting to identify sharp lateral changes in anisotropy, we model finite-frequency waveforms for a suite of model representations of the rift zone. This allows us to determine the lateral and vertical extent of the melt-induced anisotropy. The results show how a simple model with two regimes of anisotropy can explain the variability across the rift, in both delay time and shear-wave polarization, over short length scales of the order 20- 40 km. Our models have enabled us to constrain the anisotropic characteristics beneath the MER. Our best model has a 9% anisotropy on the western rift margin, with fast directions of 30°, a 100 km wide rift zone with fast direction of 20° inside the rift zone and with 9% anisotropy close to the western margin, 7% elsewhere, and 7% anisotropy on the eastern margin with fast directions of 30°. In all regions of the model we constrain anisotropy to begin at a depth of 90 km. The depth of anisotropy co-incides with the proposed depth of melt initiation beneath the region, based on geochemistry. Also the elevated splitting beneath the western margin supports evidence of low velocities and highly conductive

  4. Characteriizing Hydration in Asteroids from Observations in the Stratosphere with the BOPPS Infrared Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbitts, C.; Cheng, A. F.; Young, E. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science (BOPPS) mission is planning to observe several asteroids during its one-day mission in mid to late September, 2014. The observations of asteroids are secondary objectives designed to demonstrate the ability of the BIRC (BOPPS InfraRed Camera) to detect and characterize the extent of hydration on airless bodies. Hydrated asteroids are in part described by the presence of an infrared absorption band near 3-microns, due to the presence of OH complexed onto materials in their surfaces. This band is expected to begin near 2.6 microns, with a minimum between 2.7 and 2.8 microns based on laboratory measurements of vacuum desiccated carbonaceous meteorites materials [1]. Although this measurement is obscured in ground-based observations by the presence of water vapor in our atmosphere, the BOPPS mission will fly sufficiently high (~ 120K') that telluric water absorptions will not be present potentially enabling precise identification of hydration features on airless bodies like asteroids. The BIRC measurements will be obtained with a cryogenic infrared camera equipped with a 9-position filter wheel with each infrared filter having a FWHM of ~ 3% of the center wavelength [2]. Six of these bands are selected to characterize the OH and H2O absorption feature, and are centered at 2.45 microns, 2.73 microns, 2.85 microns, 3.05 microns, 3.2 microns, and 4 microns. The other three bands are at 0.67 microns (astronomical R-band), 4.27 microns, and 4.6 microns (these last two are to characterize CO2 emissions from comets). The BOPPS mission plans to observe both 1Ceres and 4Vesta. Ceres has a strong water/hydroxyl band [3] whose position would be well characterized by this mission and has been reported to be a variable source of water vapor emission [4] . We will report initial results of BOPPS asteroid observations. References: [1] Takir et al., (2013), Meteor. & Planet. Sci., 48, 9, 1618-1637; [2] Cheng et al., (2014), Fall

  5. Mid-Infrared Observations of Class I/Flat-Spectrum Systems in Six Nearby Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, Karl E., Jr.; Barsony, Mary; Ressler, Michael E.; Greene, Thomas P.

    2006-12-01

    We have obtained new mid-infrared observations of 65 Class I/flat-spectrum (FS) objects in the Perseus, Taurus, Chamaeleon I and II, ρ Ophiuchi, and Serpens dark clouds. These objects represent a subset of the young stellar objects (YSOs) from our previous near-infrared multiplicity surveys. We detected 45 out of 48 (94%) of the single sources, 16 out of 16 (100%) of the primary components, and 12 out of 16 (75%) of the secondary/triple components of the binary/multiple objects surveyed. One target, IRS 34, a 0.31" separation FS binary, remains unresolved at near-infrared wavelengths. The composite spectral energy distributions for all of our sample YSOs are either Class I or FS, and in 15 out of 16 multiple systems at least one of the individual components displays a Class I or FS spectral index. However, the occurrence of mixed pairings, such as FS with Class I, FS with Class II, and, in one case, an FS with a Class III (Cha I T33B), is suprisingly frequent. Such behavior is not consistent with that of multiple systems among T Tauri stars (TTSs), where the companion of a classical TTS also tends to be a classical TTS, although other mixed pairings have been previously observed among Class II YSOs. Based on an analysis of the spectral indices of the individual binary components, there appears to be a higher proportion of mixed Class I/FS systems (65%-80%) than that of mixed classical and weak-lined TTSs (25%-40%), demonstrating that the envelopes of Class I/FS systems are rapidly evolving during this evolutionary phase. In general, the individual binary/multiple components suffer very similar extinctions, Av, suggesting that most of the line-of-sight material is either in the foreground of the molecular cloud or circumbinary. We report the discovery of a steep spectral index secondary companion to ISO-Cha I 97, detected for the first time via our mid-infrared observations. In our previous near-infrared imaging survey of binary/multiple Class I and FS YSOs, ISO

  6. D/H RATIO OF TITAN FROM OBSERVATIONS OF THE CASSINI/COMPOSITE INFRARED SPECTROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, M. M.; LeClair, A.; Kandadi, H. E-mail: andre.c.leClair@nasa.go

    2010-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard the Cassini spacecraft, launched in 1997 October and inserted into Saturn's orbit in 2004 July for exploration of the Saturnian system, has been making observations of Titan during its close flybys. The infrared spectra of Titan observed over a wide range of latitudes cover the 10-1400 cm{sup -1} spectral region with variable apodized resolutions from 0.53 to 15 cm{sup -1}. The spectra exhibit features of the nu{sub 4} band of methane (CH{sub 4}) in the 1300 cm{sup -1} region, and the deuterated isotope of methane (CH{sub 3}D) centered around 1156 cm{sup -1}, along with features of many trace constituents in other spectral regions, comprising hydrocarbons and nitriles in Titan's atmosphere. An analysis of the observed infrared spectra in the 1300 cm{sup -1} and 1156 cm{sup -1} regions, respectively, permits retrieval of the thermal structure and the CH{sub 3}D distributions of Titan's atmosphere. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of the CIRS infrared spectra for retrieval of the CH{sub 3}D abundance and the corresponding D/H ratio in Titan's atmosphere. The analysis is based on the 0.53 cm{sup -1} resolution infrared spectra obtained during the Titan flybys from 2004 July 3 to 2008 May 28 over a range of latitudes extending from 74.{sup 0}4 N to 84.{sup 0}9 S. Using the CH{sub 4} mixing ratio of 1.4 x 10{sup -2} as measured by the Gas Chromatograph and Mass Spectrometer on the Huygens probe on the Cassini mission, we determine the D/H ratio of Titan as (1.58 +- 0.16) x 10{sup -4}, where the 1sigma uncertainty includes the standard deviation due to spectral noise and the estimated errors arising from uncertainties in the temperature retrieval, the mixing ratio of CH{sub 4}, and the spectral line parameters. Comparison of this value with the previously measured values for Titan as well as in other astrophysical sources, and its possible implications are discussed.

  7. Mid-infrared Observation of C/2012 S1 (ISON) with Subaru+COMCIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsubo, T.; Watanabe, J.; Honda, M.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.; Usui, F.; Takita, S.; Kasuga, T.; Furusho, R.; Fuse, T.; Nagashima, M.; Kawakita, H.; Fujiyoshi, T.

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains in comets have been used to investigate the formation conditions of the solar system. A silicate feature is often observed in comets as a 10-micron resonant feature. In most cases the feature shows the existence of crystalline silicate together with amorphous silicate. Since the crystalline silicate grains are generally made through high-temperature annealing above 800K from amorphous ones, it is believed that the crystalline silicate grains produced at the inner part of the disk were transported to the outer cold regions where comet nuclei formed. Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) is a long-period Oort cloud comet, discovered in September 2012. Mid-IR observations of this new comet and investigation of the 10-micron silicate feature help us to understand the formation of crystalline silicate grains in the early solar nebula. In particular, comet ISON is a sungrazing comet, which is predicted to pass close by the Sun and Earth and becoming a bright object. We might expect possible splitting and exposing of pristine materials inside the nucleus after its perihelion passage. If it splits, we can also investigate the homogeneity of the comet nucleus, and can compare the results with ecliptic comets, such as 9P/Temple and 73P/SW. Even if it does not split, we can fully investigate the evolution of crystalline grains described above. Thus, observations both at pre- and post-pelihelion are indespensable. We have a plan to observe the comet ISON with COMICS (Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer) mounted on the 8.2m Subaru Telescope on late October 2013 and mid-January 2014. Subaru+COMICS in mid-infrared is a powerful tool for spectroscopic observations of cometary silicate grains. COMICS observations occupy an important place among organized many facilities and science of comet observations. We will conduct imaging and low-dispersion spectroscopic observations in mid-infrared region for the comet. We will show the preliminary result of the observations on October

  8. The deepest Herschel-PACS far-infrared survey: number counts and infrared luminosity functions from combined PEP/GOODS-H observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Berta, S.; Pozzi, F.; Elbaz, D.; Lutz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Béthermin, M.; Bongiovanni, A.; Cepa, J.; Charmandaris, V.; Chary, R.-R.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Gruppioni, C.; Harwit, M.; Hwang, H. S.; Ivison, R. J.; Magdis, G.; Maiolino, R.; Murphy, E.; Nordon, R.; Pannella, M.; Pérez García, A.; Poglitsch, A.; Rosario, D.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Santini, P.; Scott, D.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; Valtchanov, I.

    2013-05-01

    We present results from the deepest Herschel-Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) far-infrared blank field extragalactic survey, obtained by combining observations of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and GOODS-Herschel key programmes. We describe data reduction and theconstruction of images and catalogues. In the deepest parts of the GOODS-S field, the catalogues reach 3σ depths of 0.9, 0.6 and 1.3 mJy at 70, 100 and 160 μm, respectively, and resolve ~75% of the cosmic infrared background at 100 μm and 160 μm into individually detected sources. We use these data to estimate the PACS confusion noise, to derive the PACS number counts down to unprecedented depths, and to determine the infrared luminosity function of galaxies down to LIR = 1011 L⊙ at z ~ 1 and LIR = 1012 L⊙ at z ~ 2, respectively. For the infrared luminosity function of galaxies, our deep Herschel far-infrared observations are fundamental because they provide more accurate infrared luminosity estimates than those previously obtained from mid-infrared observations. Maps and source catalogues (>3σ) are now publicly released. Combined with the large wealth of multi-wavelength data available for the GOODS fields, these data provide a powerful new tool for studying galaxy evolution over a broad range of redshifts. Based on observations carried out by the Herschel Space Observatory. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Spinning particles in Saturn's C ring from mid-infrared observations: Pre-Cassini mission results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyrat, Cédric; Ferrari, Cécile; Charnoz, Sébastien; Decriem, Judicael; Spilker, Linda J.; Pilorz, Stuart

    2008-08-01

    Saturn's C ring thermal emission has been observed in mid-infrared wavelengths, at three different epochs and solar phase angles, using ground based instruments (CFHT in 1999 and VLT/ESO in 2005) and the Infrared Radiometer Instrument Spectrometer (IRIS) onboard the Voyager 1 spacecraft in 1980. Azimuthal variations of temperature in the C ring's inner region, observed at several phase angles, have been analyzed using our new standard thermal model [Ferrari, C., Leyrat, C., 2006. Astron. Astrophys. 447, 745-760]. This model provides predicted ring temperatures for a monolayer ring composed of spinning icy spherical particles. We confirm the very low thermal inertia (on the order of 10 JmKs) found previously by Ferrari et al. [Ferrari, C., Galdemard, P., Lagage, P.O., Pantin E., Quoirin, C., 2005. Astron. Astrophys. 441, 379-389] that reveals the very porous regolith at the surface of ring particles. We are able to explain both azimuthal variations of temperature and the strong asymmetry of the emission function between low and high phase angles. We show that large particles spinning almost synchronously might be present in the C ring to explain differences of temperature observed between low and high phase angle. Their cross section might represent about 45% of the total cross section. However, their numerical fraction is estimated to only ˜0.1% of all particles. Thermal behavior of other particles can be modeled as isothermal behavior. This work provides an indirect estimation of the particle's rotation rate in Saturn's rings from observations.

  10. Observations of Leonid Meteors Using a Mid-Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossano, George S.; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Tessensohn, Ted K.; Warren, David; Jenniskens, Peter

    We report broadband 3-5.5 µm detections of two Leonid meteors observed during the 1998 Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. Each meteor was detected at only one position along their trajectory just prior to the point of maximum light emission. We describe the particular aspects of the Aerospace Corp. Mid-wave Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph (MIRIS) developed for the observation of short duration transient events that impact its ability to detect Leonid meteors. This instrument had its first deployment during the 1998 Leonid MAC. We infer from our observations that the mid-wave IR light curves of two Leonid meteors differed from the visible light curve. At the points of detection, the infrared emission in the MIRIS passband was 25 +/- 4 times that at optical wavelengths for both meteors. In addition, we find an upper limit of 800 K for the solid body temperature of the brighter meteor we observed, at the point in the trajectory where we made our mid-wave IR detection.

  11. AKARI OBSERVATION OF THE FLUCTUATION OF THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Seo, H. J.; Lee, H. M.; Jeong, W.-S.; Pyo, J.; Matsuura, S.; Matsuhara, H.; Oyabu, S.; Wada, T.

    2011-12-01

    We report a search for fluctuations of the sky brightness toward the north ecliptic pole with the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI, at 2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 {mu}m. We obtained circular maps with 10' diameter fields of view, which clearly show a spatial structure on the scale of a few hundred arcseconds. A power spectrum analysis shows that there is a significant excess fluctuation at angular scales larger than 100'' that cannot be explained by zodiacal light, diffuse Galactic light, shot noise of faint galaxies, or clustering of low-redshift galaxies. These results are consistent with observations at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The fluctuating component observed at large angular scales has a blue stellar spectrum which is similar to that of the spectrum of the excess isotropic emission observed with the Infrared Telescope in Space. A significant spatial correlation between wavelength bands was found, and the slopes of the linear correlations are consistent with the spectrum of the excess fluctuation. These findings indicate that the detected fluctuation could be attributed to the first stars of the universe, i.e., Population III stars. The observed fluctuation provides an important constraint on the era of the first stars.

  12. OBSERVATIONS OF THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRUM OF THE ZODIACAL LIGHT WITH CIBER

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumura, K.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Wada, T.; Battle, J.; Bock, J.; Zemcov, M.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Levenson, L. R.; Mason, P.; Sullivan, I.; Keating, B.; Renbarger, T.; Lee, D. H.; Nam, U. W.; Suzuki, K.

    2010-08-10

    Interplanetary dust (IPD) scatters solar radiation which results in the zodiacal light that dominates the celestial diffuse brightness at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. Both asteroid collisions and cometary ejections produce the IPD, but the relative contribution from these two sources is still unknown. The low resolution spectrometer (LRS) onboard the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) observed the astrophysical sky spectrum between 0.75 and 2.1 {mu}m over a wide range of ecliptic latitude. The resulting zodiacal light spectrum is redder than the solar spectrum, and shows a broad absorption feature, previously unreported, at approximately 0.9 {mu}m, suggesting the existence of silicates in the IPD material. The spectral shape of the zodiacal light is isotropic at all ecliptic latitudes within the measurement error. The zodiacal light spectrum, including the extended wavelength range to 2.5 {mu}m using Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS) data, is qualitatively similar to the reflectance of S-type asteroids. This result can be explained by the proximity of S-type asteroidal dust to Earth's orbit, and the relatively high albedo of asteroidal dust compared with cometary dust.

  13. Hurricane Ivan as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Near-infrared and Brγ observations of post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Steene, G. C.; van Hoof, P. A. M.; Wood, P. R.

    2000-10-01

    In this article we report further investigations of the IRAS selected sample of Planetary Nebula (PN) candidates that was presented in Van de Steene & Pottasch (\\cite{VdSteene93}). About 20% of the candidates in that sample have been detected in the radio and/or Hα and later confirmed as PNe. Here we investigate the infrared properties of the IRAS sources not confirmed as PNe. We observed 28 objects in the N-band of which 20 were detected and 5 were resolved, despite adverse weather conditions. We obtained medium resolution Brgamma spectra and we took high resolution J H K L images of these 20 objects. We critically assessed the identification of the IRAS counterpart in the images and compared our identification with others in the literature. High spatial resolution and a telescope with very accurate pointing are crucial for correct identification of the IRAS counterparts in these crowded fields. Of sixteen positively identified objects, seven show Brgamma in absorption. The absorption lines are very narrow in six objects, indicating a low surface gravity. Another six objects show Brgamma in emission. Two of these also show photospheric absorption lines. All emission line sources have a strong underlying continuum, unlike normal PNe. In another three objects, no clear Brgamma absorption or emission was visible. The fact that our objects were mostly selected from the region in the IRAS color-color diagram where typically PNe are found, may explain our higher detection rate of emission line objects compared to previous studies, which selected their candidates from a region between AGB and PNe. The objects showing Brgamma in emission were re-observed in the radio continuum with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. None of them were detected above a detection limit of 0.55 mJy/beam at 6 cm and 0.7 mJy/beam at 3 cm, while they should have been easily detected if the radio flux was optically thin and Case B recombination was applicable. It is suggested that the

  15. Upcoming and Future Missions in the Area of Infrared Astronomy: Spacecraft and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The IRIS instrument on the Voyager spacecrafts made major discoveries with regard to the giant planets, their moons and rings and paved the way for future infrared observations for planetary missions within our solar system. The CIRS instrument of Cassini with much greater spectral-spatial resolution and sensitivity than that provided by IRIS is now rapidly approaching the Saturnian system with orbit insertion on July 1, 2004, for which CIRS is expected to provide an order of magnitude advance beyond that provided by IRIS. The Mars program is also presently dominated by infrared observations in the near to mid-infrared spectral bands for missions such as Mars Global Surveyor and its TES instrument and Odyssey with its THEMIS instrument. In the case of Earth science we have such missions as TIMED, which makes infrared observations of the thermosphere using the SABER instrument. With the newly formed New Frontiers Program we have the opportunity for $650M missions such as Kuiper Belt-Pluto Explorer and Jupiter Polar Orbiter with Probes. Under the Flagship line, once per decade, we have the opportunity for $1B missions for which Europa is presently being considered; for this mission infrared measurements could look for hot spots within the maze of cracks and faults on Europa s surface. On Kuiper Belt- Pluto there is an imaging near-IR spectrometer called LEISA. Another mission on the horizon is Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission (TOAM) for which there is planned a state-of-art version of CIRS called TIRS on the orbiter that will map out the atmospheric composition with unprecedented wavelength coverage and spectral-spatial resolution. This instrument will also provide temperature maps of the surface of Titan to look for hot spots where life may form. On the same mission there will be a descent imager on the Aerorover (i.e., balloon) similar to that provided by LEISA on the Pluto mission to provide compositional-topographical maps of Titan s surface. Other future mission

  16. Far-infrared investigations of a methanol clathrate hydrate - Implications for astronomical observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of nonterrestrial clathrate hydrates are still lacking despite the fact that clathrates first were suggested to exist in cometary and interstellar ices over 40 years ago. Spectroscopy, the most direct method of astronomical detection, has been hampered by the similarity of clathrate hydrate spectra to those of unenclathrated guest molecules and solid H2O. We have prepared a methanol (CH3OH) clathrate hydrate, using a recently published procedure, and have investigated its far-infrared spectrum. The spectrum is quite different from that of either unenclathrated CH3OH or solid H2O and so should be of value in astronomical searches for this clathrate.

  17. Infrared observations of IGR J17497-2821: 3 candidate counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaty, S.; Matsuoka, Y.; Nagata, T.; Ueda, Y.

    2006-09-01

    We have obtained infrared (IR) observations in J, H and Ks bands of the field of IGR J17497-2821 (atel #885) at 1.4m IRSF at South African Astronomical Observatory on 3 consecutive nights, respectively starting at 2006-09-22 (UTC 17:47, 18:39 and 20:17), 2006-09-23 (UTC 18:49) and 2006-09-24 (UTC 17:33). The 3-band images were obtained simultaneously with the IR camera SIRIUS, from 5s x 10 dither integrations.

  18. Near-infrared observations of RR Lyrae variables in omega Centauri .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Principe, M.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Storm, J.; Bono, G.; Caputo, F.; Cassisi, S.; Freyhammer, L. M.; Marconi, M.; Stetson, P. B.

    We present Near-Infrared (NIR) J and K_s-band observations for 181 RR Lyrae stars in the Galactic Globular Cluster omega Cen. The comparison between predicted and empirical slopes of NIR Period-Luminosity (PL) relations indicates a very good agreement. Cluster distance estimates based on NIR PL relations agree quite well with recent determinations based on different standard candles, giving a true mean distance modulus mu = 13.71±0.05, and d=5.52±0.13 kpc.

  19. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System - In-orbit spectral calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.

    1991-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a facility instrument on the Earth Observing System (EOS). The ability of AIRS to provide accurate temperature and moisture soundings with high vertical resolution depends critically on a very accurate spectral calibration. The routine in-orbit spectral calibration is accomplished with a Fabry-Perot plate with a fixed spacing of 360 microns. This paper discusses design, Signal-to-Noise, and temperature and alignment stability constraints which have to be met to achieve the required spectral calibration accuracy.

  20. X-RAY, OPTICAL, AND INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF GX 339-4 DURING ITS 2011 DECAY

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, Tolga; Kalemci, Emrah; Buxton, Michelle M.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Tomsick, John A.; Corbel, Stephane

    2012-07-01

    We report multiwavelength observations of the black hole transient GX 339-4 during its outburst decay in 2011 using the data from RXTE, Swift, and SMARTS. Based on the X-ray spectral, temporal, and optical and infrared (OIR) properties, the source evolved from the soft intermediate to the hard state. Twelve days after the start of the transition toward the hard state, a rebrightening was observed simultaneously in the optical and the infrared bands. Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) were created from observations at the start, and close to the peak of the rebrightening. The excess OIR emission above the smooth exponential decay yields flat spectral slopes for these SEDs. Assuming that the excess is from a compact jet, we discuss the possible locations of the spectral break that mark the transition from optically thick to optically thin synchrotron components. Only during the rising part of the rebrightening, we detected fluctuations with the binary period of the system. We discuss a scenario that includes irradiation of the disk in the intermediate state, irradiation of the secondary star during OIR rise, and jet emission dominating during the peak to explain the entire evolution of the OIR light curve.

  1. Far-infrared observations of main sequence stars surrounded by dust shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Paul M.; Smith, Beverly J.; Difrancesco, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have used a 20-channel bolometer array on NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory to obtain photometry and size information for several main sequence stars surrounded by dust shells. The observations were made at 50 and/or 100 micrometers on flights based in Christchurch, New Zealand, in 1992, 1993. The stars include the 'Vega-like' star, Beta Pic, as well as two stars, HD 135344 and HD 139614, suggested by subsequent studies to belong possibly to the same class. The results of our observations are best interpreted as upper limits to the far-infrared sizes of the dust clouds around these stars. In addition to the basic size and flux measurements, we have fit simple, optically thin models to the Beta Pic data to explore the range of shell parameters consistent with our limits and with previous observations.

  2. Infrared observations of the dark matter lens candidate Q2345+007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, Brian; Rieke, Marcia; Weedman, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Deep K-band observations are presented of the double image quasar Q2345+007. This has the largest separation (7.1 sec) of any quasar image pair considered as gravitationally lensed, so the required lens is massive (10(exp 13) solar masses). No lens has been detected in previous deep images at visible wavelengths, and we find no lens to limiting K magnitude 20.0 in the infrared image. This constrains any lens to being much less luminous than brightest cluster galaxies, while the lens must be much more massive than such galaxies to produce the observed separation. Because spectral data indicate exceptional intrinsic similarity in the quasar image components, this pair remains as the most intriguing example of an observed configuration requiring the presence of massive, concentrated dark matter acting as a gravitational lens.

  3. Hurricane Frances as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and SeaWinds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    this combination image, the AIRS infrared data reveals the temperature of the atmosphere around the storm, but doesn't tell us about the wind direction or relative intensity. The directional vectors of the SeaWinds data set show how the air is circulating around the storm.

    Scatterometers measure surface wind speed and direction by bouncing microwave pulses off the ocean's surface. The SeaWinds instruments measure the backscattered radar energy from wind-generated ocean waves. By making multiple measurements from different looks at the same location, we can infer the vector wind averaged over each 25 km resolution cell. The primary mission objective of the SeaWinds and QuikSCAT scatterometers is to obtain long-term, global coverage of the ocean vector winds for oceanographic and climate research. While not specifically designed for detailed mapping and tracking of hurricanes, both instruments have been found to be useful resources for operational forecasters.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Initial Pancam Visible/Near-infrared Observations of Materials near Endeavour Crater's Western Rim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F.; Farrand, W. H.; Wang, A.; MER Athena Science Team

    2011-12-01

    The Pancam multispectral stereo camera on the Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover began acquiring visible/near-infrared (443-1009 nm) images of materials along the western edge of Endeavour Crater in August, 2011. Preliminary observations documented changes in the color and textures of rocks and soils during the transition from typical Meridiani plains to the Endeavour rim area. As the rover approached Cape York and Spirit Point, Pancam observations (along with those from the Microscopic Imager) documented changes in size distributions of the ubiquitous hematite-rich spherules. For example, preliminary observations near the outcrop "Gibraltar" (north of the sand-filled 35 m diameter crater "Pathfinder") showed spherules embedded in the outcrop to be <1.5 mm, whereas those scattered about the surface were bimodal in distribution with size ranges typically <1.5 mm and >5 mm (Figure 1). At the time of this writing, not all Pancam images of the Gibraltar area had been transmitted to the ground, but reflectance spectra from these observations will be presented at the meeting. Comparison of Pancam reflectance spectra to CRISM observations of the region also demonstrate the utility of orbital imaging spectroscopy as a means to guide rover traverses around Spirit Point during investigations of phyllosilicates-bearing materials. While Fe-bearing oxides and oxyhydroxides can exhibit distinctive spectral features in the visible/near-infrared, most diagnostic spectral features of phyllosilicate minerals are outside the spectral range of Pancam. Nonetheless, the potential exists for using Pancam for phyllosilicate-bearing rock detections, although they will be non-unique. For example, different classes of phyllosilicates (e.g., nontronite, montmorillonite) can be grouped to first order based on spectral parameters such as 900 nm band depth or reflectance maximum position vs. 535 nm band depth. Pancam observations relevant to these detections will be presented at the meeting.

  5. Near-infrared interferometric observation of the Herbig Ae star HD 144432 with VLTI/AMBER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Kreplin, A.; Wang, Y.; Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Kraus, S.; Schertl, D.; Lagarde, S.; Natta, A.; Petrov, R.; Robbe-Dubois, S.; Tatulli, E.

    2012-05-01

    Aims: We study the sub-AU-scale circumstellar environment of the Herbig Ae star HD 144432 with near-infrared VLTI/AMBER observations to investigate the structure of its inner dust disk. Methods: The interferometric observations were carried out with the AMBER instrument in the H and K band. We interpret the measured H- and K-band visibilities, the near- and mid-infrared visibilities from the literature, and the spectral energy distribution (SED) of HD 144432 by using geometric ring models and ring-shaped temperature-gradient disk models with power-law temperature distributions. Results: We derive a K-band ring-fit radius of 0.17 ± 0.01 AU and an H-band radius of 0.18 ± 0.01 AU (for a distance of 145 pc). This measured K-band radius of ~0.17 AU lies in the range between the dust sublimation radius of ~0.13 AU (predicted for a dust sublimation temperature of 1500 K and gray dust) and the prediction of models including backwarming (~0.27 AU). We find that an additional extended halo component is required in both the geometric and temperature-gradient modeling. In the best-fit temperature-gradient model, the disk consists of two components. The inner part of the disk is a thin ring with an inner radius of ~0.21 AU, a temperature of ~1600 K, and a ring thickness ~0.02 AU. The outer part extends from ~1 AU to ~10 AU with an inner temperature of ~400 K. We find that the disk is nearly face-on with an inclination angle of <28°. Conclusions: Our temperature-gradient modeling suggests that the near-infrared excess is dominated by emission from a narrow, bright rim located at the dust sublimation radius, while an extended halo component contributes ~6% to the total flux at 2 μm. The mid-infrared model emission has a two-component structure with ~20% of the flux originating from the inner ring and the rest from the outer parts. This two-component structure is indicative of a disk gap, which is possibly caused by the shadow of a puffed-up inner rim. Based on observations

  6. Observations of downwelling far-infrared emission at Table Mountain California made by the FIRST instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Cageao, Richard P.; Mast, Jeffrey C.; Kratz, David P.; Latvakoski, Harri; Johnson, David G.

    2016-02-01

    The Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument measured downwelling far-infrared (far-IR) and mid-infrared (mid-IR) atmospheric spectra from 200 to 800 cm-1 at Table Mountain, California (elevation 2285 m). Spectra were recorded during a field campaign conducted in early autumn 2012, subsequent to a detailed laboratory calibration of the instrument. Radiosondes launched coincident with the FIRST observations provide temperature and water vapor profiles for model simulation of the measured spectra. Results from the driest day of the campaign (October 19, with less than 3 mm precipitable water) are presented here. Considerable spectral development is observed between 400 and 600 cm-1. Over 90% of the measured radiance in this interval originates within 2.8 km of the surface. The existence of temperature inversions close to the surface necessitates atmospheric layer thicknesses as fine as 10 m in the radiative transfer model calculations. A detailed assessment of the uncertainties in the FIRST measurements and in the model calculations shows that the measured radiances agree with the model radiance calculations to within their combined uncertainties. The uncertainties in modeled radiance are shown to be larger than the measurement uncertainties. Overall, the largest source of uncertainty is in the water vapor concentration used in the radiative transfer calculations. Proposed new instruments with markedly higher measurement accuracy than FIRST will be able to measure the far-IR spectrum to much greater accuracy than it can be computed. As such, accurate direct measurements of the far-IR, and not solely calculations, are essential to the assessment of climate change.

  7. Observations of Disks around Brown Dwarfs in the TW Hydra Association with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, A. L.; Luhman, K. L.; Espaillat, C.; D'Alessio, P.; Adame, L.; Calvet, N.; Forrest, W. J.; Sargent, B.; Hartmann, L.; Watson, D. M.; Bohac, C. J.

    2008-04-01

    Using SpeX at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph, we have obtained infrared spectra from 0.7 to 40 μm for three young brown dwarfs in the TW Hydra association (τ ~ 10 Myr), 2MASSW J1207334-393254, 2MASSW J1139511-315921, and SSSPM J1102-3431. The spectral energy distribution for 2MASSW J1139511-315921 is consistent with a stellar photosphere for the entire wavelength range of our data, whereas the other two objects exhibit significant excess emission at λ > 5μm. We are able to reproduce the excess emission from each brown dwarf using our models of irradiated accretion disks. According to our model fits, both disks have experienced a high degree of dust settling. We also find that silicate emission at 10 and 20 μm is absent from the spectra of these disks, indicating that grains in the upper disk layers have grown to sizes larger than ~5 μm. Both of these characteristics are consistent with previous observations of decreasing silicate emission with lower stellar masses and older ages. These trends suggest that either (1) the growth of dust grains, and perhaps planetesimal formation, occurs faster in disks around brown dwarfs than in disks around stars or (2) the radii of the mid-IR-emitting regions of disks are smaller for brown dwarfs than for stars, and grains grow faster at smaller disk radii. Finally, we note the possible detection of an unexplained emission feature near 14 μm in the spectra of both of the disk-bearing brown dwarfs. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  8. Some Observations on the Current Status of Performing Finite Element Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr; Shivakumar, Kunigal N.

    2015-01-01

    Aerospace structures are complex high-performance structures. Advances in reliable and efficient computing and modeling tools are enabling analysts to consider complex configurations, build complex finite element models, and perform analysis rapidly. Many of the early career engineers of today are very proficient in the usage of modern computers, computing engines, complex software systems, and visualization tools. These young engineers are becoming increasingly efficient in building complex 3D models of complicated aerospace components. However, the current trends demonstrate blind acceptance of the results of the finite element analysis results. This paper is aimed at raising an awareness of this situation. Examples of the common encounters are presented. To overcome the current trends, some guidelines and suggestions for analysts, senior engineers, and educators are offered.

  9. Far-infrared Spectral Radiance Observations and Modeling of Arctic Cirrus: Preliminary Results From RHUBC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpage, Neil; Green, Paul D.; Harries, John E.

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the important contribution of the far-infrared (electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths greater than 12 μm) to the Earth's radiative energy budget. In a cloud-free atmosphere, a significant fraction of the Earth's cooling to space from the mid- and upper troposphere takes place via the water vapor pure rotational band between 17 and 33 μm. Cirrus clouds also play an important role in the Earth's outgoing longwave radiation. The effect of cirrus on far-infrared radiation is of particular interest, since the refractive index of ice depends strongly on wavelength in this spectral region. The scattering properties of ice crystals are directly related to the refractive index, so consequently the spectral signature of cirrus measured in the FIR is sensitive to the cloud microphysical properties [1, 2]. By examining radiances measured at wavelengths between the strong water vapor absorption lines in the FIR, the understanding of the relationship between cirrus microphysics and the radiative transfer of thermal energy through cirrus may be improved. Until recently, very few observations of FIR spectral radiances had been made. The Tropospheric Airborne Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TAFTS) was developed by Imperial College to address this lack of observational data. TAFTS observes both zenith and nadir radiances at 0.1 cm-1 resolution, between 80 and 600 cm-1. During February and March 2007, TAFTS was involved in RHUBC (the Radiative Heating in Under-explored Bands Campaign), an ARM funded field campaign based at the ACRF-North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow, situated at 71° latitude. Infrared zenith spectral observations were taken by both TAFTS and the AERI-ER (spectral range 400-3300 cm-1) from the ground during both cloud-free and cirrus conditions. A wide range of other instrumentation was also available at the site, including a micropulse lidar, 35 GHz radar and the University of Colorado/NOAA Ground-based Scanning Radiometer

  10. Microwave and infrared simulations of an intense convective system and comparison with aircraft observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, N.; Yeh, Hwa-Young M.; Adler, Robert F.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional cloud model, radiative transfer model-based simulation system is tested and validated against the aircraft-based radiance observations of an intense convective system in southeastern Virginia on 29 June 1986 during the Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment. NASA's ER-2, a high-altitude research aircraft with a complement of radiometers operating at 11-micrometer infrared channel and 18-, 37-, 92-, and 183-GHz microwave channels provided data for this study. The cloud model successfully simulated the cloud system with regard to aircraft- and radar-observed cloud-top heights and diameters and with regard to radar-observed reflectivity structure. For the simulation time found to correspond best with the aircraft- and radar-observed structure, brightness temperatures T(sub b) are simulated and compared with observations for all the microwave frequencies along with the 11-micrometer infrared channel. Radiance calculations at the various frequencies correspond well with the aircraft observations in the areas of deep convection. The clustering of 37-147-GHz T(sub b) observations and the isolation of the 18-GHz values over the convective cores are well simulated by the model. The radiative transfer model, in general, is able to simulate the observations reasonably well from 18 GHz through 174 GHz within all convective areas of the cloud system. When the aircraft-observed 18- and 37-GHz, and 90- and 174-GHz T(sub b) are plotted against each other, the relationships have a gradual difference in the slope due to the differences in the ice particle size in the convective and more stratiform areas of the cloud. The model is able to capture these differences observed by the aircraft. Brightness temperature-rain rate relationships compare reasonably well with the aircraft observations in terms of the slope of the relationship. The model calculations are also extended to select high-frequency channels at 220, 340, and 400 GHz to simulate the