Science.gov

Sample records for infrared laser excitation

  1. Tunable excitation of mid-infrared optically pumped semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsen, Linda J.; Kunz, Jeremy; Ongstad, Andrew P.; Kaspi, Ron

    2013-01-01

    While conventional semiconductor lasers employ electrical injection for carrier excitation, optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSLs) have demonstrated high output powers and high brightness in the mid-infrared. An important consideration for optically pumped lasers is efficient absorption of the pump beam, which can be achieved through increasing the number of periods in the active region, by placing the active region in a cavity with an optical thickness of twice the pump wavelength between distributed Bragg reflectors (Optical Pumping Injection Cavity), or by periodically inserting the active quantum wells into an InGaAsSb waveguide designed to absorb the pump radiation (Integrated Absorber). A tunable optical pumping technique is utilized by which threshold intensities are minimized and efficiencies are maximized. The near-IR idler output of a Nd:YAG-pumped optical parametric oscillator (10 Hz, ~4 ns) is the tunable optical pumping source in this work. Results are presented for an OPSL with a type-II W active region embedded in an integrated absorber to enhance the absorption of the optical pump beam. Emission wavelengths range from 4.64 μm at 78 K to 4.82 μm at 190 K for optical pump wavelengths ranging from 1930-1950 nm. The effect of wavelength tuning is demonstrated and compared to single wavelength pumping (1940 nm) at a higher duty cycle (20- 30%). Comparisons are also made to other OPSLs, including a discussion of the characteristic temperature and high temperature performance of these devices.

  2. Mechanism of oxidative stress generation in cells by localized near-infrared femtosecond laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hao; Chan, Kam Tai; Kong, Siu Kai; Lee, Rebecca Kit Ying

    2009-12-01

    We examined the effect of femtosecond (fs) and continuous wave (CW) lasers at near-infrared range on the creation of reactive oxygen species in a human liver cancer cell line. By controlling the mitochondria electron transport chain (ETC), it was found that a major part of the oxidative stress was generated by the laser induced thermal effect on the mitochondria while the remaining part was created by direct free electron liberation by the fs pulses, which could be observed after breaking the ETC. The study helps clarify the major effects produced on animal cells when excited by fs lasers.

  3. Mid-infrared ultrafast laser pulses induced third harmonic generation in nitrogen molecules on an excited state

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongqiang; Li, Guihua; Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Li, Ziting; Zeng, Bin; Wang, Zhanshan; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01

    We report on generation of third harmonic from nitrogen molecules on the excited state with a weak driver laser pulse at a mid-infrared wavelength. The excited nitrogen molecules are generated using a circularly polarized intense femtosecond pulse which produces energetic electrons by photoionization to realize collisional excitation of nitrogen molecules. Furthermore, since the third harmonic is generated using a pump-probe scheme, it enables investigation of the excited-state dynamics of nitrogen molecules produced under different conditions. We also perform a comparative investigation in excited argon atoms, revealing different decay dynamics of the molecules and atoms from the excited states in femtosecond laser induced filaments. PMID:26522886

  4. Far-infrared laser magnetic resonance of vibrationally excited CD2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, K. M.; Sears, T. J.; Mckellar, A. R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The detection of 13 rotational transitions in the first excited bending state (010) of CD2 using the technique of far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy is reported. Molecular parameters for this state are determined from these new data together with existing infrared observations of the v(2) band. Additional information on the ground vibrational state (000) is also provided by the observation of a new rotational transition, and this is combined with existing data to provide a refined set of molecular parameters for the CD2 ground state. One spectrum has been observed that is assigned as a rotational transition within the first excited symmetric stretching state (100) of CD2. These data will be of use in refining the structure and the potential function of the methylene radical.

  5. Two-photon vibrational excitation of air by long-wave infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Peñano, J.; Johnson, L. A.; Hafizi, B.; Wahlstrand, J. K.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrashort long-wave infrared (LWIR) laser pulses can resonantly excite vibrations in N2 and O2 through a two-photon transition. The absorptive vibrational component of the ultrafast optical nonlinearity grows in time, starting smaller than but quickly surpassing the electronic, rotational, and vibrational refractive components. The growth of the vibrational component results in a novel mechanism of third-harmonic generation, providing an additional two-photon excitation channel, fundamental + third harmonic. The original and emergent two-photon excitations drive the resonance exactly out of phase, causing spatial decay of the absorptive vibrational nonlinearity. This nearly eliminates two-photon vibrational absorption. Here we present simulations and analytical calculations demonstrating how these processes modify the ultrafast optical nonlinearity in air. The results reveal nonlinear optical phenomena unique to the LWIR regime of ultrashort pulse propagation in the atmosphere.

  6. Comparative study on atomic and molecular Rydberg-state excitation in strong infrared laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hang; Zuo, Wanlong; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Haifeng; Jin, Mingxing; Ding, Dajun; Hu, Shilin; Chen, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Rydberg-state excitation of atoms in strong infrared laser fields provides a new complementary aspect of the perspective of atom-strong field interactions. In this article, we perform an experimental and theoretical study on the corresponding process of diatomic molecules, N2 and O2. We show that neutral molecules can also survive strong 800-nm laser fields in high Rydberg states, while their behavior is remarkably different in comparison with their companion atoms, Ar and Xe. The Rydberg excitation of N2 generally behaves similarly to Ar, while that of O2 is more significantly suppressed than the ionization compared to Xe in a high intensity region, which can be understood in the frame of a semiclassical picture, together with their different structures of molecular orbitals. However, distinct quantum features in the Rydberg excitation processes that are apparently beyond the semiclassical picture have been identified, i.e., the less suppressed probability of O2 at low intensity and the oscillation behavior of the ratio between N2 and Ar, indicating that our understanding of the relevant physics is still far from complete.

  7. Laser action in chromium-activated forsterite for near infrared excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petricevic, V.; Gayen, S. K.; Alfano, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on laser action in chromium-doped forsterite (Cr:Mg2SiO4) for 1064-nm excitation of the crystal's double-hump absorption band spanning the 850-1200-nm wavelength range. The cavity arrangement used for obtaining laser action in Cr:Mg2SiO2 was similar to that described by Petricevic et al. (1988). The fundamental and second harmonic emissions from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at a 10-Hz repetition rate were used for excitation of the NIR and visible bands, respectively. Pulsed laser action was readily observed for both the 1064-nm and 532-nm pumping at or above the respective thresholds. The laser parameters of the 532-nm and 1064-nm excitations were similar, indicating that the IR band is responsible for laser action for both excitations.

  8. Laser action in chromium-activated forsterite for near-infrared excitation: Is Cr/sup 4 +/ the lasing ion

    SciTech Connect

    Petricevic, V.; Gayen, S.K.; Alfano, R.R.

    1988-12-26

    Room-temperature pulsed laser action has been obtained in chromium-activated forsterite (Cr:Mg/sub 2/SiO/sub 4/) for excitation of the near-infrared absorption band of the system by the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG laser. The characteristics of laser emission are similar to those observed for 532 nm pumping. It is suggested that the laser action is due to a ''center'' other than the trivalent chromium (Cr/sup 3 +/), presumably the tetravalent chromium (Cr/sup 4 +/).

  9. Attosecond XUV absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states in helium atoms dressed by a time-delayed femtosecond infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. Q.; Ye, D. F.; Ding, Thomas; Pfeifer, Thomas; Fu, L. B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states of helium atoms by solving the time-dependent two-electron Schrödinger equation numerically based on a one-dimensional model. The helium atoms are subjected to an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse and a time-delayed infrared (IR) few-cycle laser pulse. A superposition of doubly excited states populated by the XUV pulse is identified, which interferes with the direct ionization pathway leading to Fano resonance profiles in the photoabsorption spectrum. In the presence of an IR laser, however, the Fano line profiles are strongly modified: A shifting, splitting, and broadening of the original absorption lines is observed when the XUV attosecond pulse and infrared few-cycle laser pulse overlap in time, which is in good agreement with recent experimental results. At certain time delays, we observe symmetric Lorentz, inverted Fano profiles, and even negative absorption cross sections indicating that the XUV light can be amplified during the interaction with atoms. We further prove that the above pictures are general for different doubly excited states by suitably varying the frequency of the IR field to coherently couple the corresponding states.

  10. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph

    1982-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  11. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  12. Terahertz-to-infrared emission through laser excitation of surface plasmons in metal films with porous nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Zhao, Ji; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, X-C

    2015-06-29

    We report on the investigation of terahertz-to-infrared (THz-to-IR) thermal emission that relies on the excitation of surface plasmons in metal films deposited on a substrate with randomly ordered nanoscale pore arrays. The THz-to-IR radiation was observed both in the direction of laser beam propagation and the reverse direction. The intensity ratio between backward and forward radiation is exponentially dependent on the nominal thickness of the porous metal films. The findings are discussed in view of the proposed generation mechanism based on propagating surface plasmon polaritons on both air/metal and metal/substrate interfaces. PMID:26191727

  13. Optical Emission Studies of Copper Plasma Induced Using Infrared Transversely Excited Atmospheric (IR TEA) Carbon Dioxide Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Milos; Kuzmanovic, Miroslav; Rankovic, Dragan; Ciganovic, Jovan; Stoiljkovic, Milovan; Savovic, Jelena; Trtica, Milan

    2015-04-01

    Spatially resolved, time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy was applied for investigation of copper plasma produced by a nanosecond infrared (IR) transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm. The effect of surrounding air pressure, in the pressure range 0.1 to 1013 mbar, on plasma formation and its characteristics was investigated. A linear dependence of intensity threshold for plasma formation on logarithm of air pressure was found. Lowering of the air pressure reduces the extent of gas breakdown, enabling better laser-target coupling and thus increases ablation. Optimum air pressure for target plasma formation was 0.1 mbar. Under that pressure, the induced plasma consisted of two clearly distinguished and spatially separated regions. The maximum intensity of emission, with sharp and well-resolved spectral lines and negligibly low background emission, was obtained from a plasma zone 8 mm from the target surface. The estimated excitation temperature in this zone was around 7000 K. The favorable signal to background ratio obtained in this plasma region indicates possible analytical application of TEA CO2 laser produced copper plasma. Detection limits of trace elements present in the Cu sample were on the order of 10 ppm (parts per million). Time-resolved measurements of spatially selected plasma zones were used to find a correlation between the observed spatial position and time delay. PMID:25741748

  14. Development of infrared sensors using energy transfer/energy upconversion processes: Study of laser excited fluorescence in rare Earth ion doped crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash-Stevenson, S. K.; Reddy, B. R.; Venkateswarlu, P.

    1994-01-01

    A summary is presented of the spectroscopic study of three systems: LaF3:Ho(3+), LaF3:Er(3+) and CaF2:Nd(3+). When the D levels of Ho(3+) in LaF3 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 640 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from J (416 nm), F (485 nm), and E (546 nm) levels. Energy upconverted emissions were also observed from F and E levels of Ho(3+) when the material was excited with an 800 nm near infrared laser. When the D levels of Er(3+) in LaF3 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 637 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from the E (540 nm) and P (320, 400, and 468 nm) levels. Energy upconverted emissions were also observed from F, E, and D levels of Er(3+) when the material was resonantly excited with an 804 nm near infrared laser. When the D levels of Nd(3+) in CaF2 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 577 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from the L (360 and 382 nm), K (418 nm), and I (432 nm) levels. Very weak upconverted emissions were detected when this system was irradiated with a near infrared laser. The numbers in parentheses are the wavelengths of the emissions.

  15. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  16. State-selective vibrational excitation and dissociation of H2+ by strong infrared laser pulses: below-resonant versus resonant laser fields and electron-field following.

    PubMed

    Paramonov, Guennaddi K; Kühn, Oliver

    2012-11-26

    The quantum dynamics of vibrational excitation and dissociation of H(2)(+) by strong and temporally shaped infrared (IR) laser pulses has been studied on the femtosecond (fs) time scale by numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with explicit treatment of nuclear and electron motion beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Using sin(2)-shaped laser pulses of 120 fs duration with a peak intensity of I(0) > 10(14) W/cm(2), it has been found that below-resonant vibrational excitation with a laser carrier frequency of ω < ω(10)/2 (where ω(10) is the frequency of the |v = 0> → |v = 1> vibrational transition) is much more efficient than a quasi-resonant vibrational excitation at ω ≈ ω(10). In particular, at the below-resonant laser carrier frequency ω = 0.3641 × 10(-2) au (799.17 cm(-1)), dissociation probabilities of H(2)(+) (15.3% at the end of the 120 fs laser pulse and 21% at t = 240 fs) are more than 3 orders of magnitude higher than those obtained for the quasi-resonant laser frequency ω = 1.013 × 10(-2) au (2223.72 cm(-1)). Probabilities of state-selective population transfer to vibrational states |v = 1>, |v = 2>, and |v = 3> from the vibrational ground state |v = 0> of about 85% have been calculated in the optimal below-resonant cases. The underlying mechanism of the efficient below-resonant vibrational excitation is the electron-field following and simultaneous transfer of energy to the nuclear coordinate. PMID:22916791

  17. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  18. Experimental demonstration of mode-selective phonon excitation of 6H-SiC by a mid-infrared laser with anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kyohei; Hachiya, Kan; Okumura, Kensuke; Mishima, Kenta; Inukai, Motoharu; Torgasin, Konstantin; Omer, Mohamed; Sonobe, Taro; Zen, Heishun; Negm, Hani; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2013-10-28

    Mode-selective phonon excitation by a mid-infrared laser (MIR-FEL) is demonstrated via anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements of 6H-silicon carbide (SiC). Irradiation of SiC with MIR-FEL and a Nd-YAG laser at 14 K produced a peak where the Raman shift corresponds to a photon energy of 119 meV (10.4 μm). This phenomenon is induced by mode-selective phonon excitation through the irradiation of MIR-FEL, whose photon energy corresponds to the photon-absorption of a particular phonon mode.

  19. Selective excitation of coupled CO vibrations on a dissipative Cu(100) surface by shaped infrared laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Jean Christophe; Beyvers, Stephanie; Saalfrank, Peter

    2008-05-21

    In a previous paper [Beyvers et al., J. Chem. Phys. 124, 234706 (2006)], the possibility to mode and state selectively excite various vibrational modes of a CO molecule adsorbed on a dissipative Cu(100) surface by shaped IR pulses was examined. Reduced-dimensionality models with stretching-only coordinates were employed to do so. This model is now extended with the goal to include rotational modes. First, we present an analysis of the bound states of the adsorbed CO molecule in full dimension; i.e., six-dimensional eigenstates are obtained by diagonalizing the six-dimensional Hamiltonian containing the semiempirical potential of Tully et al. [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 11, 1914 (1993)]. This is achieved by using a contracted iterative eigensolver based on the coupled two-term Lanczos algorithm with full reorthogonalization. Reduced-dimension subsystem eigenvectors are also computed and then used to study the selective excitation of the molecule in the presence of dissipation within the density matrix formalism for open systems. In the density matrix propagations, up to four degrees of freedom were included, namely, r (the C-O distance), Z (the molecule-surface distance), and {phi} and {theta} (the azimuthal and polar angles of the molecular axis with respect to the surface). Short, intense laser pulses are rationally engineered and further refined with optimal control theory, again with the goal for mode and state selective excitation. Also, IR-laser induced desorption is studied. For the calculations, the previous two-mode (r,Z) dipole surface is extended to include the angular dependence and the model for the coupling of the molecule to the surface electronic degrees of freedom is refined.

  20. Fluorescence Detection of H5N1 Virus Gene Sequences Based on Optical Tweezers with Two-Photon Excitation Using a Single Near Infrared Nanosecond Pulse Laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Cao, Di; Kang, Ya-Feng; Lin, Yi; Cui, Ran; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2016-04-19

    We present an analytical platform by combining near-infrared optical tweezers with two-photon excitation for fluorescence detection of H5N1 virus gene sequences. A heterogeneous enrichment strategy, which involved polystyrene (PS) microsphere and quantum dots (QDs), was adopted. The final hybrid-conjugate microspheres were prepared by a facile one-step hybridization procedure by using PS microspheres capturing target DNA and QDs tagging, respectively. Quantitative detection was achieved by the optical tweezers setup with a low-cost 1064 nm nanosecond pulse laser for both optical trapping and two-photon excitation for the same hybrid-conjugate microsphere. The detection limits for both neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences and hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences are 16-19 pM with good selectivity for one-base mismatch, which is approximately 1 order of magnitude lower than the most existing fluorescence-based analysis method. Besides, because of the fact that only signal from the trapped particle is detected upon two-photon excitation, this approach showed extremely low background in fluorescence detection and was successfully applied to directly detect target DNA in human whole serum without any separation steps and the corresponding results are very close to that in buffer solution, indicating the strong anti-interference ability of this method. Therefore, it can be expected to be an emerging alternative for straightforward detecting target species in complex samples with a simple procedure and high-throughput. PMID:27023254

  1. Laser excited novel near-infrared photoluminescence bands in fast neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad Saliqur; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Xu, Qiu; Evslin, Jarah; Cinausero, Marco

    2016-08-01

    New near-infrared photoluminescence bands were observed in neutron-irradiated spinel single crystal upon excitation by a 532 nm laser. The surface morphology of the unirradiated and fast neutron-irradiated samples was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. Fast neutron-irradiated samples show a strong emission peak at 1685 nm along with weak bands at 1065 and 2365 nm. The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence intensity was also measured. At lower temperatures, the dominant peak at 1685 nm shifts toward lower energy whereas the other peaks remain fixed. Activation energies of luminescence quenching were estimated to be 5.7 and 54.6 meV for the lower and higher temperature regions respectively.

  2. Fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence from glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}:NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals under excitation of two near infrared femtosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Xiaoying; Cheng, Wenjing; Zhou, Kan; Ma, Jing; Feng, Donghai; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong; Jia, Tianqing; Chen, Ping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-08-14

    In this paper, we report fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence of glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}: NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals excited simultaneously by two near infrared femtosecond lasers. When the glass ceramic was irradiated by 800 nm femtosecond laser, weak red emission centered at 670 nm was detected. Bright red light was observed when the fs laser wavelength was tuned to 1490 nm. However, when excited by the two fs lasers simultaneously, the sample emitted bright green light centered at 550 nm, while the red light kept the same intensity. The dependences of the red and the green light intensities on the two pump lasers are much different, which enables us to manipulate the color emission by adjusting the two pump laser intensities, respectively. We present a theoretical model of Er{sup 3+} ions interacting with two fs laser fields, and explain well the experimental results.

  3. A review of laser-pumped infrared lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The lasing mechanisms are reviewed of molecules that have demonstrated laser action in the laboratories with laser emissions in the spectral range from 3 to 35 microns. A list of lasants and laser mechanisms are defined. The pumping sources for these lasers are mainly infrared lasers; however, the case in which excitation of bromine atoms at 2.71 microns by a flashlamp as energy input is also included in the review. A conceptual drawing of lasing mechanisms is shown. Three pumping mechanisms are shown, the first being the direct-pumped system in which the lasant molecule absorbs the infrared radiation from pump laser directly, and it is excited into the upper laser level from the ground state. The second system is the indirect-pumped system where the infrared-pump laser first excites an absorbing molecule which stores its vibrational energy. Through collision this energy is transferred to the lasant molecule, populating the upper laser level. In the third system, i.e., in a Br2-CO2 mixture, a flashlamp replaces the infrared laser as the pump source for the absorbing molecule.

  4. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  5. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  6. Decomposition Products of RDX and TNT after Resonant Laser Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monat, Jeremy; Gump, Jared

    2009-06-01

    This presentation describes research on the gas-phase products of decomposition of explosives after resonant laser excitation. We studied RDX, TNT, and formulations containing them after excitation by lasers in the infrared (10.6 4μm continuous-wave [CW]; resonant with ring vibrational modes) and ultraviolet (266 nm CW and pulsed [ca. 5 ns pulsewidth]; resonant with delocalized ring electronic absorptions). The decomposition products in air were identified by infrared spectroscopy and will be described as a function of laser wavelength and energy deposition timescale. Our results will be compared to decomposition pathways in the literature derived from resistive heating techniques.

  7. Near-infrared spark source excitation for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, D. J. S.; Hungerford, G.; Imhof, R. E.

    1991-10-01

    We have extended the range of excitation wavelengths from spark sources used in single photon timing fluorometry into the near infrared by means of the all-metal coaxial flashlamp filled with an argon-hydrogen gas mixture. At 750 nm this mixture gives ˜15 times the intensity available from pure hydrogen for a comparable pulse duration. Measurements are demonstrated by using the laser dye IR-140 in acetone, for which a fluorescence lifetime of 1.20 ns is recorded.

  8. Highly-reproducible Raman scattering of NaYF4:Yb,Er@SiO2@Ag for methylamphetamine detection under near-infrared laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongmei; Liu, Honglin; Han, Zhenzhen; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2015-08-01

    This study reported the significantly improved Raman enhancement ability of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) by decorating them on single NaYF4:Yb,Er@SiO2 core-shell particles (UC@SiO2@Ag) under a 785 nm excitation. The optimal thickness of the silica shell can be easily obtained by adjusting the amounts of TEOS, which is the crucial element to balance the upconversion and the formation of a hot spot by Ag NP aggregation. This substrate revealed highly reproducible properties, which is crucial to the practical application of SERS technology. This substrate exhibited an excellent sensitivity for methylamphetamine detection under near-infrared excitation. The advantages of NIR excitation in our SERS sensing open up a new application field of UC-noble metal composites, and also promise a new research direction for the synthesis and applications of SERS-active nanostructures. PMID:26090604

  9. Near infrared laser ocular bioeffects

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, D.J.; Beatrice, E.S.

    1989-05-01

    Thresholds for laser chorioretinal injury in the red end of the visible spectrum and the near-infrared (IR-A) spectral regions are presented. An unpredicted wavelength dependence of the injury threshold for single Q-switched pulses is demonstrated. Four lasers were used to determine thresholds at 40 wavelengths between 532 nm and 1064 nm: a ruby laser, a neodymium:YAG-pumped dye laser, an erbium:YLF laser and an alexandrite laser. Despite many careful and repeated efforts to determine a cause for the variation due to possible variations in the lasers or other aspects of the experimental technique and due to biological absorption properties of the eye, there is no complete or obvious explanation for the significant variations of threshold with small changes in wavelength. The implications of these findings for laser safety standards are presented.

  10. Two-photon-excited luminescence from a Eu3+-doped lithium niobate crystal pumped by a near-infrared femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ai-Hua; Zheng, Zhi-Ren; Lü, Qiang; Xu, Zhao-Peng; Sun, Liang; Liu, Wei-Long; Wu, Wen-Zhi; Lü, Tian-Quan

    2010-09-01

    Red upconversion luminescence (UCL) is observed using an 800 nm femtosecond laser to irradiate a Eu3+-doped LiNbO3 single crystal. Power-dependent and polarization-dependent experiments demonstrate that the red UCL originates from Eu3+ two-photon simultaneous absorption rather than second harmonic generation of nonlinear optical crystal followed by reabsorption of Eu3+. Two different kinds of Eu3+-centers, called Eu3+-pairs, are revealed via emission spectra. Besides using femtosecond laser excitation to simulate diode laser excitation with broad line, the efficient two-photon simultaneous absorption can populate more Eu3+ to upper levels, these are beneficial to the study of cross relaxation with submicrosecond resolution between Eu3+-pairs occurred in practical application. Transient UCL spectra and decay curves suggest that the luminescent state D50 is fed by way of both multiphonon relaxation through state D51 and cross relaxation of D52+F70→D50+F75.

  11. University of Florida nuclear pumped laser program. [excitation of laser gaseous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanism of excitation of laser gases by fast ions (triton, proton, or fission fragments) and especially any role UF6 might play in radiative deexcitation of these gases were investigated. Population densities of excited important for laser action were obtained. Nuclear pumped CW-laser systems, especially He-Ne and CO2, were studied using steady state reactors. It was demonstrated that He-Ne lases in a CW-mode with nuclear pumping at both the red and the infrared transition. The infrared transition was observed to be superradiant.

  12. Infrared emission from photo-excited gaseous benzene: detection with a new home-made spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féraud, G.; Carpentier, Y.; Pino, T.; Longval, Y.; Dartois, E.; Chamaillé, T.; Vasquez, R.; Vincent, J.; Parneix, P.; Falvo, C.; Bréchignac, Ph.

    2012-02-01

    The infrared fluorescence decay and the dispersed emission spectrum are presented for gaseous benzene following 193 nm laser excitation. They were measured with FIREFLY (Fluorescence in the InfraRed from Excited FLYing molecules), a new home-made spectrometer. Redshift and redtail in the CH stretch emission spectra (3.3 μm region) demonstrate that anharmonicity plays a key role when dealing with high internal energies, as it is the case in the interstellar medium.

  13. Laser Excited Fluorescence Studies Of Black Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of black liquor was investigated as a possible monitoring technique for pulping processes. A nitrogen pumped dye laser was used to examine the fluorescence spectrum of black liquor solutions. Various excitation wavelengths were used between 290 and 403 nm. Black liquor fluorescence spectra were found to vary with both excitation wavelength and black liquor concentration. Laser excited fluorescence was found to be a sensitive technique for measurement of black liquor with good detection limits and linear response over a large dynamic range.

  14. Optical and infrared lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javan, A.

    1978-01-01

    Quantum mechanical predictions for the gain of an optically pumped CW FIR laser are presented for cases in which one or both of the pump and FIR transitions are pressure or Doppler broadened. The results are compared to those based on the rate equation model. Some of the quantum mechanical predictions are verified in CH3OH.

  15. Advanced infrared laser modulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheo, P. K.; Wagner, R.; Gilden, M.

    1984-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to develop an electrooptic waveguide modulator for generating continuous tunable sideband power from an infrared CO2 laser. Parameters included were the waveguide configurations, microstrip dimensions device impedance, and effective dielectric constants. An optimum infrared laser modulator was established and was fabricated. This modulator represents the state-of-the-art integrated optical device, which has a three-dimensional topology to accommodate three lambda/4 step transformers for microwave impedance matching at both the input and output terminals. A flat frequency response of the device over 20 HGz or = 3 dB) was achieved. Maximum single sideband to carrier power greater than 1.2% for 20 W microwave input power at optical carrier wavelength of 10.6 microns was obtained.

  16. Near and Mid-Infrared Emission Characteristics of Er³⁺/Tm³⁺/Ho³⁺-Doped LiYF₄ Single Crystals Excited by Laser Diode.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haoyang; Xia, Haiping; Wang, Peiyuan; Peng, Jiangtao; Zhang, Yuepin; Jiang, Haochuan; Chen, Baojiu

    2016-01-01

    Yttrium lithium fluoride (LiYF₄) single crystals triply doped with Er³⁺/Tm³⁺/Ho³⁺ are synthesized by a vertical Bridgman method. Absorption spectra, emission spectra, and decay curves are measured to investigate the luminescent properties of the crystals. Compared with Er³⁺ singly doped and Er³⁺/Tm³⁺ and Er³⁺/Ho³⁺ doubly doped LiYF₄ crystals, an intense emission around 2.7 µm can be obtained in the triply doped LiYF4 crystal under excitation of 980 nm laser diode. Meanwhile, the near infrared emission at 1.5 µm from Er³⁺ in the triply doped crystal is effectively reduced. The possible energy transfer processes and the luminescent mechanisms for enhancing emission at 2.7 µm and quenching emission at 1.5 µm in the Er³⁺/Ho³⁺/Tm³⁺ triply doped crystals are proposed. The large energy transfer efficiency of 82.0% and excellent optical transmission indicate that this Er³⁺/Tm³⁺/Ho³⁺ triply doped crystal can be considered as a promising material for a mid- infrared laser at 2.7 µm. PMID:27398482

  17. Alteration of GABAergic Neurotransmission by Pulsed Infrared Laser Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hua-Jun; Kao, Chris; Gallagher, Martin J.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Konrad, Peter E.; Macdonald, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Transient electrical impulses are conventionally used to elicit physiological responses in excitable tissues. While electrical stimulation has many advantages, it requires an electrode-tissue interface, exhibits relatively low spatial selectivity and always produces a “stimulus artifact”. Recently, it has been shown that pulsed, low-energy infrared laser light can evoke nerve, muscle and sensory responses similar to those induced by traditional electrical stimulation in a contact-free, damage-free, artifact-free and spatially selective manner. However, the effect of transient infrared laser light on neurotransmission in the CNS is still largely unknown. Here, we tested the effect of infrared laser light on GABAergic neurotransmission. We recorded spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) from cultured rat cortical neurons prior to and after infrared laser stimulation. Using transient infrared laser light, we either stimulated the neuronal soma that had axonal projections to the recorded neuron or directly stimulated the axons that projected to the recorded neuron. Optical stimulation led to enhanced amplitude, decreased decay time constant and increased frequency of sIPSCs. These alterations of sIPSC properties produced by optical stimulation were specifically mediated by GABAA receptors and caused by the transient laser light per se since no exogenous substances such as caged compounds were used. These data show that optical stimulation using transient infrared laser light can alter GABAergic neurotransmission and demonstrate that it may be an alternative approach to electrical stimulation in studying GABAergic function. PMID:20654645

  18. Laser Excited Fluorescence For Forensic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Robert E.

    1986-07-01

    The application of laser excited fluorescence to the detection and identification of latent fingerprints was first accomplished ten years ago. The development of the technology has progressed rapidly with the introduction of commercial equipment by several manufacturers. Systems based on Argon-ion, Copper-vapor, and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are compared. The theoretical basis of detection by fluorescence is discussed along with the more useful techniques of dye staining. Other applications of the laser excited fluorescence in forensic investigation include gunshot residue analysis, serology, collection of trace evidence, and document examination.

  19. Parametric infrared tunable laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.; Sutter, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    A parametric tunable infrared laser system was built to serve as transmitter for the remote detection and density measurement of pollutant, poisonous, or trace gases in the atmosphere. The system operates with a YAG:Nd laser oscillator amplifier chain which pumps a parametric tunable frequency converter. The completed system produced pulse energies of up to 30 mJ. The output is tunable from 1.5 to 3.6 micrometers at linewidths of 0.2-0.5 /cm (FWHM), although the limits of the tuning range and the narrower line crystals presently in the parametric converter by samples of the higher quality already demonstrated is expected to improve the system performance further.

  20. Laser-based excitation and diagnostics of planar fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T. E.; Van Wijk, K.; Snieder, R.; Willis, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    Faults are of interest not only to earth science, but also at different scales in the non-destructive testing (NDT) community. Remote sensing of faults is of interest to both communities, with the idea of inverting for the fracture properties in a non-invasive way. Alternatively, the wave field directly excited at the fracture is of interest to both communities because the waves thus radiated are equivalent to those emitted by acoustic emissions or micro-earthquakes. Much can be learned from recording of elastic waves excited at the the fracture. Based on technology developed for NDT, we use laser ultrasonics in the laboratory to excite and detect elastic waves, in order to determine the properties of fractures or faults in laboratory rock and synthetic samples. We show examples of wave propagation in a clear Poly(methyl methacrylate) cylinder. By focusing a high power infrared (IR) laser inside the cylinder we create a visible single disk-shaped fracture near the center of the sample. The laser generates a short pulse (~20 ns) of infrared light that is absorbed by the sample material at the focal point and is converted into heat. The sudden thermal expansion generates stress and forms a fracture parallel to the cylindrical axis. We excite elastic waves at the surface of the sample using the same high-power pulsed laser, but at a much lower energy setting, and with an unfocused beam. We measure the direct and scattered wave field from the fracture with a laser interferometer, and also excite the fracture directly with a fraction of the source laser energy impinging directly on the fracture. A comparison of the direct excitation and the elastic scattered wavefields, including studies of the tip diffractions from the fracture, shows strong agreement. The measured tip diffractions carry information about the stress concentration near the crack tips, which is crucial for understanding rupture processes. This novel laboratory technique allows us to measure the source

  1. Applications of infrared laser spectroscopy to laser chemistry and laser development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Robin S.; Viswanath, A. K.

    The impact on infrared molecular spectroscopy of high-resolution tunable laser sources and laser-controlled Fourier-transform spectrometers is discussed, with special reference to rovibrational spectra of spherical-top molecules such as CH4, OsO4, SiF4, SF6, and UF6. The role of tunable laser spectroscopy in analyzing the CF4 laser, resulting in the precise prediction of lasing frequencies between 605 and 655/cm, is described. Studies of overtone and combination bands of SF6 enable the vibrational anharmonicity to be determined, resulting in a more detailed description of the pump transitions involved in laser photochemistry, and of higher vibrational levels and pathways to excitation and dissociation. This permits more accurate calculations of vibrational state densities for spherical-top molecules. Implications for the photochemistry of species, such as SiF4, SF6, UF6, and Ni(Co)4, are discussed.

  2. Generating Tunable Far-Infrared Laser Sidebands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, H. M.; Farhoomand, J.

    1986-01-01

    New tunable source extends infrared spectroscopy into far infrared wavelengths. Frequency-Tunable far-infrared radiation produced by mixing of fixed-frequency far-infrared laser beam with output of frequency-tunable klystron. By sweeping klystron frequency in synchronism with video display of detector output, one obtains direct presentation of absorption-cell spectrum. Immediate applications are local oscillator for heterodyne systems and tunable source for spectroscopy.

  3. VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN IN THE LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY NGC 4418

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Kazushi; Aalto, Susanne; Evans, Aaron S.; Wiedner, Martina C.; Wilner, David J.

    2010-12-20

    Infrared pumping and its effect on the excitation of HCN molecules can be important when using rotational lines of HCN to probe dense molecular gas in galaxy nuclei. We report the first extragalactic detection of (sub)millimeter rotational lines of vibrationally excited HCN, in the dust-enshrouded nucleus of the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 4418. We estimate the excitation temperature of T{sub vib} {approx} 230 K between the vibrational ground and excited (v{sub 2} = 1) states. This excitation is most likely due to infrared radiation. At this high vibrational temperature the path through the v{sub 2} = 1 state must have a strong impact on the rotational excitation in the vibrational ground level, although it may not be dominant for all rotational levels. Our observations also revealed nearly confusion-limited lines of CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, H{sup 13}CN, HC{sup 15}N, CS, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and HC{sub 3}N at {lambda} {approx} 1 mm. Their relative intensities may also be affected by the infrared pumping.

  4. Visible fiber lasers excited by GaN laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nakanishi, Jun; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Osamu; Yamazaki, Masaaki

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes and discusses visible fiber lasers that are excited by GaN laser diodes. One of the attractive points of visible light is that the human eye is sensitive to it between 400 and 700 nm, and therefore we can see applications in display technology. Of course, many other applications exist. First, we briefly review previously developed visible lasers in the gas, liquid, and solid-state phases and describe the history of primary solid-state visible laser research by focusing on rare-earth doped fluoride media, including glasses and crystals, to clarify the differences and the merits of primary solid-state visible lasers. We also demonstrate over 1 W operation of a Pr:WPFG fiber laser due to high-power GaN laser diodes and low-loss optical fibers (0.1 dB/m) made by waterproof fluoride glasses. This new optical fiber glass is based on an AlF3 system fluoride glass, and its waterproof property is much better than the well known fluoride glass of ZBLAN. The configuration of primary visible fiber lasers promises highly efficient, cost-effective, and simple laser systems and will realize visible lasers with photon beam quality and quantity, such as high-power CW or tunable laser systems, compact ultraviolet lasers, and low-cost ultra-short pulse laser systems. We believe that primary visible fiber lasers, especially those excited by GaN laser diodes, will be effective tools for creating the next generation of research and light sources.

  5. The Berkeley tunable far infrared laser spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, G. A.; Laughlin, K. B.; Cohen, R. C.; Busarow, K. L.; Gwo, D.-H.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed description is presented for a tunable far infrared laser spectrometer based on frequency mixing of an optically pumped molecular gas laser with tunable microwave radiation in a Schottky point contact diode. The system has been operated on over 30 laser lines in the range 10-100/cm and exhibits a maximum absorption sensitivity near one part in a million. Each laser line can be tuned by + or - 110 GHz with first-order sidebands.

  6. Silver nanoparticle based surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy of diabetic and normal rat pancreatic tissue under near-infrared laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Shi, H.; Feng, S.; Lin, J.; Chen, W.; Huang, Z.; Li, Y.; Yu, Y.; Lin, D.; Xu, Q.; Chen, R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the use of high spatial resolution silver nanoparticle based near-infrared surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from rat pancreatic tissue to obtain biochrmical information about the tissue. A high quality SERS signal from a mixture of pancreatic tissues and silver nanoparticles can be obtained within 10 s using a Renishaw micro-Raman system. Prominent SERS bands of pancreatic tissue were assigned to known molecular vibrations, such as the vibrations of DNA bases, RNA bases, proteins and lipids. Different tissue structures of diabetic and normal rat pancreatic tissues have characteristic features in SERS spectra. This exploratory study demonstrated great potential for using SERS imaging to distinguish diabetic and normal pancreatic tissues on frozen sections without using dye labeling of functionalized binding sites.

  7. Site-Specific Dynamics of β-Sheet Peptides with (D) Pro-Gly Turns Probed by Laser-Excited Temperature-Jump Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Popp, Alexander; Scheerer, David; Chi, Heng; Keiderling, Timothy A; Hauser, Karin

    2016-05-01

    Turn residues and side-chain interactions play an important role for the folding of β-sheets. We investigated the conformational dynamics of a three-stranded β-sheet peptide ((D) P(D) P) and a two-stranded β-hairpin (WVYY-(D) P) by time-resolved temperature-jump (T-jump) infrared spectroscopy. Both peptide sequences contain (D) Pro-Gly residues that favor a tight β-turn. The three-stranded β-sheet (Ac-VFITS(D) PGKTYTEV(D) PGOKILQ-NH2 ) is stabilized by the turn sequences, whereas the β-hairpin (SWTVE(D) PGKYTYK-NH2 ) folding is assisted by both the turn sequence and hydrophobic cross-strand interactions. Relaxation times after the T-jump were monitored as a function of temperature and occur on a sub-microsecond time scale, (D) P(D) P being faster than WVYY-(D) P. The Xxx-(D) Pro tertiary amide provides a detectable IR band, allowing us to probe the dynamics site-specifically. The relative importance of the turn versus the intrastrand stability in β-sheet formation is discussed. PMID:26789931

  8. Novel methods of copper vapor laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.B.; Ching, H.; Bosch, R.; Brake, M.; Gilgenbach, R.

    1990-12-31

    Microwave and intense electron beam excitation of copper vapor are being investigated to be used in copper vapor lasers for isotope separation. Both methods use copper chloride vapor by heating copper chloride. Helium was used as the buffer gas at 2 to 100 torr. In the microwave system, intense copperlines at 510 nm and 578 nm were observed. Initial electron beam results indicate that light emission follows the beam current.

  9. MIDIR (Mid-Infrared) laser, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Douglas; Jeffers, William; Shellan, Jeffrey

    1988-04-01

    Advances in sensor technology have led to a proliferation of electro-optical systems operating in the mid-infrared (3 to 5 micron). Examples are search and track sets, missile seekers, laser designators, and high energy lasers. To counter enemy use of such systems, jamming and collecting systems which employ lasers of modest power operating within the spectral pass-band of the threat are required. A modulated, wavelength agile, compact, mid-infrared laser of moderate average output powers is extremely attractive for infrared countermeasures and OPTINT collections applications. A unique electric discharge gain generator design has been investigated which promises significant improvements in efficiency, compactness and reliability for pulsed gas laser systems with high peak power and moderate average power outputs.

  10. Ultralow detection limits for an organic dye determined by fluorescence spectroscopy with laser diode excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.A.; Barber, T.E.; Smith, B.W.; Winefordner, J.D. )

    1989-04-15

    Fluorescence of IR-140, a laser dye in methanol solution, is excited by a semiconductor laser diode. Analytical figures of merit are compared for three different instrumental configurations, with the dye measured in a cuvette, a liquid jet, and a compact instrument. The best limit of detection, 46,000 molecules, was achieved with a liquid jet. Linear dynamic range was 6 orders of magnitude. The laser diode operates in the near-infrared region, resulting in low background fluorescence.

  11. Infrared Laser Spectroscopy, 1980-1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Robin S.

    1983-11-01

    The text for the Short Course on Infrared Laser Spectroscopy given at the Los Alamos Conference on Optics '83 is R. S. McDowell, "Vibrational Spectroscopy Using Tunable Lasers," in Vibrational Spectra and Structure, J. R. Durig, ed. (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1981) 10, 1-151, which includes references through 1979. The present paper summarizes progress in this field from 1980 to early 1983.

  12. STRONG FIELD PHYSICS WITH MID INFRARED LASERS.

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    2001-08-27

    Mid-infrared gas laser technology promises to become a unique tool for research in strong-field relativistic physics. The degree to which physics is relativistic is determined by a ponderomotive potential. At a given intensity, a 10 {micro}m wavelength CO{sub 2} laser reaches a 100 times higher ponderomotive potential than the 1 {micro}m wavelength solid state lasers. Thus, we can expect a proportional increase in the throughput of such processes as laser acceleration, x-ray production, etc. These arguments have been confirmed in proof-of-principle Thomson scattering and laser acceleration experiments conducted at BNL and UCLA where the first terawatt-class CO{sub 2} lasers are in operation. Further more, proposals for the 100 TW, 100 fs CO{sub 2} lasers based on frequency-chirped pulse amplification have been conceived. Such lasers can produce physical effects equivalent to a hypothetical multi-petawatt solid state laser. Ultra-fast mid-infrared lasers will open new routes to the next generation electron and ion accelerators, ultra-bright monochromatic femtosecond x-ray and gamma sources, allow to attempt the study of Hawking-Unruh radiation, and explore relativistic aspects of laser-matter interactions. We review the present status and experiments with terawatt-class CO{sub 2} lasers, sub-petawatt projects, and prospective applications in strong-field science.

  13. Imaging Electronic Excitation of NO by Ultrafast Laser Tunneling Ionization.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tomoyuki; Matsuda, Akitaka; Fushitani, Mizuho; Yasuike, Tomokazu; Tolstikhin, Oleg I; Morishita, Toru; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2016-04-22

    Tunneling-ionization imaging of photoexcitation of NO has been demonstrated by using few-cycle near-infrared intense laser pulses (8 fs, 800 nm, 1.1×10^{14}  W/cm^{2}). The ion image of N^{+} fragment ions produced by dissociative ionization of NO in the ground state, NO (X^{2}Π,2π)→NO^{+}+e^{-}→N^{+}+O+e^{-}, exhibits a characteristic momentum distribution peaked at 45° with respect to the laser polarization direction. On the other hand, a broad distribution centered at ∼0° appears when the A^{2}Σ^{+} (3sσ) excited state is prepared as the initial state by deep-UV photoexcitation. The observed angular distributions are in good agreement with the corresponding theoretical tunneling ionization yields, showing that the fragment anisotropy reflects changes of the highest-occupied molecular orbital by photoexcitation. PMID:27152798

  14. Imaging Electronic Excitation of NO by Ultrafast Laser Tunneling Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Tomoyuki; Matsuda, Akitaka; Fushitani, Mizuho; Yasuike, Tomokazu; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Tunneling-ionization imaging of photoexcitation of NO has been demonstrated by using few-cycle near-infrared intense laser pulses (8 fs, 800 nm, 1.1 ×1014 W /cm2 ). The ion image of N+ fragment ions produced by dissociative ionization of NO in the ground state, NO (X2Π ,2 π )→NO+ +e-→N+ +O +e- , exhibits a characteristic momentum distribution peaked at 45° with respect to the laser polarization direction. On the other hand, a broad distribution centered at ˜0 ° appears when the A2Σ+ (3 s σ ) excited state is prepared as the initial state by deep-UV photoexcitation. The observed angular distributions are in good agreement with the corresponding theoretical tunneling ionization yields, showing that the fragment anisotropy reflects changes of the highest-occupied molecular orbital by photoexcitation.

  15. Spike processing with a graphene excitable laser

    PubMed Central

    Shastri, Bhavin J.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Tait, Alexander N.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved “spiking” of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate a unified platform for spike processing with a graphene-coupled laser system. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation—fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system and also propose and simulate an analogous integrated device. The addition of graphene leads to a number of advantages which stem from its unique properties, including high absorption and fast carrier relaxation. These could lead to significant speed and efficiency improvements in unconventional laser processing devices, and ongoing research on graphene microfabrication promises compatibility with integrated laser platforms. PMID:26753897

  16. Spike processing with a graphene excitable laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, Bhavin J.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Tait, Alexander N.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved “spiking” of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate a unified platform for spike processing with a graphene-coupled laser system. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation—fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system and also propose and simulate an analogous integrated device. The addition of graphene leads to a number of advantages which stem from its unique properties, including high absorption and fast carrier relaxation. These could lead to significant speed and efficiency improvements in unconventional laser processing devices, and ongoing research on graphene microfabrication promises compatibility with integrated laser platforms.

  17. Spike processing with a graphene excitable laser.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Bhavin J; Nahmias, Mitchell A; Tait, Alexander N; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved "spiking" of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate a unified platform for spike processing with a graphene-coupled laser system. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation--fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system and also propose and simulate an analogous integrated device. The addition of graphene leads to a number of advantages which stem from its unique properties, including high absorption and fast carrier relaxation. These could lead to significant speed and efficiency improvements in unconventional laser processing devices, and ongoing research on graphene microfabrication promises compatibility with integrated laser platforms. PMID:26753897

  18. XeCl excimer laser excited by longitudinal discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Z.; Zeng, Y.; Qiu, M.

    1983-08-15

    XeCl excimer laser excited by longitudinal gas discharge is reported. The main characteristics of the laser output and the laser energy in dependence of the operating parameters were measured. The laser pulse duration was 35 ns and the maximum laser energy 317 ..mu..J with improvement by preionization.

  19. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  20. Laser selective excitation of a three-level atom - Barium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlsten, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Development of a theory describing the selective excitation of a three-level atom with a tunable laser. The effects of number density, line widths, and laser parameters on the final populations of the levels are discussed. An experiment is described in which a tunable dye laser is used to pump large numbers of barium atoms into a definite excited state.

  1. Titanium: Sapphire laser as an excitation source in two-photon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, W.G.; Wachter, E.A.; Armas, M.; Seaton, C.

    1997-02-01

    The passively mode-locked titanium:sapphire laser provides new opportunities for acquiring two-photon spectral data in the near-infrared, a region not commonly accessible to synchronously pumped dye lasers. This source generates pulses with peak powers near 100 kW at average powers over 1 W and is capable of yielding two-photon signals roughly two orders of magnitude larger than is possible with synchronously pumped dye lasers. However, the multimode output of this laser exhibits significant temporal and spectral pulse profile variations as the laser wavelength is tuned. As a consequence, peak powers of the titanium:sapphire laser can vary independently from average power across the tuning range. This wavelength dependence, coupled with the quadratic dependence of the two-photon signal upon the instantaneous power of the laser, precludes simple average power correction of nonlinear spectral band shapes. Here, we investigate the key properties of the titanium:sapphire laser as an excitation source for two-photon spectroscopy. We also identify a chemical reference suitable for obtaining source-corrected excitation spectra in the near-infrared using a double-beam, ratiometric approach; this is based on a source-independent two-photon excitation spectrum for the laser dye coumarin-480 that has been obtained with a single-frequency titanium:sapphire laser. From these data, correction factors are generated for correction of multimode source data. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  2. Infrared emission and excitation in LMC HII regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungerer, V.; Viallefond, F.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared excess (IRE) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) HII nebulae is found to correlate positively with the temperature of the ambient radiation field or with the He(+)/H(+) abundance ratio. This result is discussed in terms of a selective absorption of the photons in the range 504 to 912 A relative to the He ionizing photons. This interpretation may explain the paradox of finding highly excited nebulae with only relatively moderate equivalent width of their Balmer lines.

  3. Mid-infrared Laser System Development for Dielectric Laser Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Igor; Xu, Guibao; Wandel, Scott

    Laser-driven particle accelerators based on dielectric laser acceleration are under development and exhibit unique and challenging pump requirements. Operation in the mid-infrared (5 μm) range with short pulses (<1 ps FWHM), high pulse energy (>500 μJ) and good beam quality is required. We present our progress on the design and development of a novel two- stage source of mid-infrared pulses for this application, which is based on optical parametric amplification. Beta barium borate and zinc germanium phosphide crystals are used, and are pumped by a Ti:sapphire ultrashort laser and seeded by self-phase modulation and parametric generation-based sources.

  4. New powerful metal vapor lasers oscillating in deep ultraviolet and middle infrared spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Vuchkov, N. K.; Sabotinov, N. V.

    2010-09-01

    Middle infrared and deep ultraviolet laser systems, which are based on high-power high-beam-quality stable-operating He-SrBr2 and Cu+ Ne-CuBr lasers excited in nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge, are developed, patented and studied. Optimal discharge conditions, such as active zone diameter, vapor pressure, buffer-gas pressure, electrical excitation scheme parameters, average input power, pulse repetition frequency, are found. The highest output laser parameters are obtained for the Sr atom and Cu+ lasers, respectively. These lasers equipped with optical systems for control of laser radiation parameters, such as laser beam divergence, laser intensity distribution, etc. are used in a large variety of applications, such as precise material microprocessing, including biological tissues, determination of linear optical properties of different materials newly developed, laser-induced modification of conductive polymers, laserinduced fluorescence in wide-gap semiconductors, instead of free electron and excimer lasers, respectively.

  5. Infrared laser hemotherapy in cerebral ischemia modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musienko, Julia I.; Nechipurenko, Natalia I.

    2003-10-01

    Use of intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) is considered to be the most effective method of laser therapy and its application is expedient pathogenetically in the ischemic disturbances. The aim of this study is to investigate ILIB influence with infrared laser (IL) with 860 nm wavelength on hemostasis, acid-base status (ABS) of blood in normal rabbits and after modeling of local ischemia of brain (LIB). Experimental cerebral ischemia is characterized by development of hypercoagulation syndrom and metabolic acidosis. ILIB with infrared radiation of 2.0 mW power provokes hypocoagulation in intact animals. Application of ILIB in rabbits after LIB contributes for hemostasis and acid-base status normalizing compared to operated animals. IL radiation with 8,5 mW power results in marked hemostatic activation in all animals. Therefore, beneficial effect of low power laser radiation (LPLR) manifests in narrow power diapason in experimental brain ischemia.

  6. Multiple-photon excitation imaging with an all-solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wokosin, David L.; Centonze, Victoria F.; White, John G.; Hird, Steven N.; Sepsenwol, S.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.; Maker, Gareth T.; Ferguson, Allister I.

    1996-05-01

    Two-photon excitation imaging is a recently described optical sectioning technique where fluorophore excitation is confined to--and therefore defines--the optical section being observed. This characteristic offers a significant advantage over laser-scanning confocal microscopy; the volume of fluorophore excited in the minimum necessary for imaging, thereby minimizing the destructive effects of fluorophore excitation in living tissues. In addition, a confocal pinhole is not required for optical scattering--thus further reducing the excitation needed for efficient photon collection. We have set up a two-photon excitation imaging system which uses an all-solid-state, short-pulse, long-wavelength laser as an excitation source. The source is a diode-pumped, mode-locked Nd:YLF laser operating in the infrared (1047 nm). This laser is small, has modest power requirements, and has proven reliable and stable in operation. The short laser pulses from the laser are affected by the system optical path; this has been investigated with second harmonic generation derived from a nonlinear crystal. The system has been specifically designed for the study of live biological specimens. Two cell types especially sensitive to high-energy illumination, the developing Caenorhabditis elegans embryo and the crawling sperm of the nematode, Ascaris, were used to demonstrate the dramatic increase in viability when fluorescence is generated by two-photon excitation. The system has the capability of switching between two-photon and confocal imaging modes to facilitate direct comparison of theory of these two optical sectioning techniques on the same specimen. A heavily stained zebra fish embryo was used to demonstrate the increase in sectioning depth when fluorescence is generated by infrared two- photon excitation. Two-photon excitation with the 1047 nm laser produces bright images with a variety of red emitting fluorophores, and some green emitting fluorophores, commonly used in biological

  7. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Measurement of SOx using Tunable Infrared Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    The absorption characteristics of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) in the infrared region were measured using a quantum cascade laser and an absorption cell of length 1 m heated to 150°C. The laser was scanned over the wavelength range 6.9-7.4 μm, which included the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3. Measurement results showed that the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3 partially overlapped, with peaks at 7.28 μm and 7.35 μm for SO2 and 7.14 μm and 7.25 μm for SO3. These results showed the possbility of using infrared laser absorption spectroscopy for measurement of sulfur oxides (SOx) in flue gas. For SO3 measurement, infrared absorption spectroscopy was shown to be more suitable than ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The absorption characteristics of open air in the same wavelength region showed that the interference due to water vapor must be efficiently removed to perform SOx measurement in flue gas.

  8. Two color far infrared laser interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahata, K.; Akiyama, T.; Pavlichenko, R.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ito, Y.; Okajima, S.; Nakayama, K.; Wood, K.

    2006-10-15

    Two color interferometer using a short wavelength far infrared laser has been developed for high performance plasmas on large helical device and for future fusion devices such as ITER. High power laser lines simultaneously oscillating at 57.2 and 47.6 {mu}m were achieved in a CO{sub 2}-laser-pumped CH{sub 3}OD laser. By introducing Ge:Ga photoconductive detectors operating at liquid He temperature, we have successfully detected two color beat signals (0.55 and 1.2 MHz) with excellent signal-to-noise ratio ({approx}40 dB). These beat signals were fed into phase comparators for phase measurement after passing through intermediate frequency bandpass filters. Two color far infraned laser interferometer work was successful in the demonstration of mechanical vibration compensation.

  9. CW silver ion laser with electron beam excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsman, B.; Prabhuram, T.; Lewis, K.; Gonzalez, F.; Villagran, M.

    1988-08-01

    A CW laser power of 140 mW was obtained in the 840.39-nm transition of Ag II by electron-beam excitation. The electron-beam excited metal-vapor ion laser is capable of operating using metals with high vaporization temperatures, and is of interest for generation of CW coherent radiation in the 220-260-nm spectral region.

  10. Excitable solitons in a semiconductor laser with a saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turconi, Margherita; Prati, Franco; Barland, Stéphane; Tissoni, Giovanna

    2015-11-01

    Self-pulsing cavity solitons may exist in a semiconductor laser with an intracavity saturable absorber. They show locally the passive Q -switching behavior that is typical of lasers with saturable absorbers in the plane-wave approximation. Here we show that excitable cavity solitons are also possible in a suitable parameter range and characterize their excitable dynamics and properties.

  11. Controlling condensed-phase vibrational excitation with tailored infrared pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiman, V. D.; Arrivo, S. M.; Melinger, J. S.; Heilweil, E. J.

    1998-08-01

    Vibrational population distributions within the CO-stretching T 1u manifold of W(CO) 6 in room-temperature n-hexane were created by using near-transform limited and linearly chirped picosecond infrared excitation pulses. These pulses were characterized using the second harmonic FROG (frequency-resolved optical gating) algorithm to determine the ˜8 cm -1/ps chirp for both positively- and negatively-chirped 2 ps pulses. FROG and time-resolved transient difference spectra were obtained with an InSb focal plane array detector. While unchirped and positively-chirped excitation leads predominantly to v=1 population, negatively-chirped pulses produce excess population in the v=2 level. These results are compared to predictions from density matrix calculations for a model potential.

  12. Selective laser excitation of oriented molecules in polymer matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, V.V.; Nurmukhametov, R.N.; Starukhin, A.S.; Stanishevskii, I.V.; Shigorin, D.N.; Shul'ga, A.M.

    1987-06-01

    The features of the fine-structure spectra and polarization fluorescence were studied in selective laser excitation of molecules imbedded in orienting polyethylene (PE) films in this article. Hydroxy derivatives of 9,10-anthraquinone, naphthoquinone, thioindigo and some porphyrins were investigated. The studies were conducted at a temperature of 4.2 K on a DFS-24 spectrometer. Fluorescence was excited by radiation from a tunable dye laser in the region of the purely electron transition. The halfwidth of the exciting laser line was approximately 1 A. The compounds studied exhibit emission band spectra even at 4.2 K with normal excitation in the PE matrices.

  13. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short

  14. The infrared photofragmentation of Ar + 2. Evidence of excited state population from dimer and cluster ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, C. A.; Whitaker, B. J.; Knowles, P. J.; Stace, A. J.

    1992-03-01

    Argon dimer ions have been generated via three different techniques: (1) autoionization; (2) vertical ionization of neutral Ar2; (3) ionization and subsequent fragmentation of argon cluster ions. In experiments (2) and (3) the dimers and clusters are formed via the adiabatic expansion of argon in a supersonic beam. In each case Ar+2 ions have been mass selected and subjected to single-photon infrared excitation (912-1094 cm-1) using a line-tunable carbon dioxide laser in a crossed-beam arrangement. Only those Ar+2 ions with internal energies within 1000 cm-1 of a dissociation limit yield Ar+ photofragments, the kinetic energy spread of which has been measured using an electrostatic analyzer. The photofragment kinetic energy spectra of dimer ions formed by autoionization do not exhibit any dependence on the angle of laser polarization; it is proposed that such behavior is due to the presence of a high thermal rotational temperature (500 K). In contrast, the corresponding spectra of Ar+2 formed via vertical ionization, exhibit two quite distinct features, one of which shows a strong dependence on laser polarization angle. Calculations show that the latter behavior is most probably due to photodissociation out of an excited spin-orbit state of Ar+2. A very pronounced increase in Ar+2 infrared photodissociation signal is observed as a function of increasing nozzle stagnation pressure. To account for such behavior it is proposed that, following ionization, argon cluster ions fragment to give dimer ions in excited vibrational/rotational levels both in the electronic ground and an excited spin-orbit state.

  15. LASERS IN MEDICINE: Two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkin, Yu P.; Alfimov, E. E.; Vasil'ev, N. E.; Denisov, A. N.; Makukha, V. K.; Ogirenko, A. P.

    1999-12-01

    A demonstration is given of the feasibility of two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanine and of the pharmaceutical preparation 'Fotosens', used in photodynamic therapy. The excitation source was an Nd:YAG laser emitting at the 1064 nm wavelength. The spectra of the two-photon-excited luminescence were obtained and the two-photon absorption cross sections were determined.

  16. Excitation of nuclear isomers by X rays from laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Aleksandr A; Karpeshin, F; Trzhaskovskaya, M B; Platonov, Konstantin Yu; Rozhdestvenskii, Yu V

    2010-06-23

    The possibility of obtaining isomer nuclei is studied by the example of the molybdenum isomer {sup 93}Mo upon irradiation of a niobium {sup 93}Nb target by {approx}50-J, 100-fs laser pulses. It is shown that the modern laser technique allows production of isomer nuclei by accelerated protons and radiative de-excitation of isomer nuclear states by thermal or line X-rays from laser plasma. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  17. Infrared Pulsed Laser Deposition: Applications in Photonics and Biomedical Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Richard

    2006-04-01

    Resonant infrared pulsed-laser deposition (RIR-PLD) shows significant promise for synthesizing thin films of small organic molecules, thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers and biopolymers, without compromising structure or functionality. This contrasts with most attempts at UV-PLD of organic materials, which have often been accompanied by severe photochemical or photothermal degradation of the ablated material. Representative recent successes in RIR-PLD include deposition of: polymers for light emission and hole transport; functionalized polymers and nanoparticles for chemical and biological sensing; and biocompatible polymers suitable for coating medical devices or drug-delivery vehicles. Plume imaging and various other optical- and mass-spectroscopy experiments appear to confirm that polymers or organic molecules ablated by resonant infrared laser irradiation experience a high spatial and temporal density of vibrational excitation, but tend to remain in the electronic ground state. The mechanism of RIR-PLD is observed to depend on the anharmonicity of the mid-infrared absorption modes, their finite relaxation time, mode-specific nonlinear absorption, and rapid changes in polymer viscosity as a function of temperature. Many of the RIR-PLD experiments to date were carried out using a tunable, mid-infrared, picosecond free-electron laser. However, if RIR-PLD is to become a practical tool for making organic thin films, it will be necessary to develop more conventional lasers that can achieve a similar combination of high pulse intensity, low pulse energy, high pulse-repetition frequency and moderate average power. In conclusion, the prospects for developing precisely such table-top RIR-PLD systems will be discussed.

  18. Oxide glasses for mid-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Billy D. O.; Jha, Animesh; Jose, Gin; Jiang, Xin

    2011-06-01

    We present an overview of rare-earth doped heavy metal oxide and oxy-fluoride glasses which show promise as host materials for lasers operating in the 2-5 μm spectral region for medical, military and sensing applications. By engineering glass composition and purity, tellurite and germanate glasses can support transmission up to and beyond 5 μm and can have favourable thermal, mechanical and environmental stability compared to fluoride glasses. We discuss techniques for glass purification and water removal for enhanced infrared transmission. By comparing the material properties of the glass, and spectroscopic performance of selected rare-earth dopant ions we can identify promising compositions for fibre and bulk lasers in the mid-infrared. Tellurite glass has recently been demonstrated to be a suitable host material for efficient and compact lasers in the {2 μm spectral region in fibre and bulk form and the next challenge is to extend the operating range further into the infrared region where silica fibre is not sufficiently transparent, and provide an alternative to fluoride glass and fibre.

  19. A New Technology for Applanation Free Corneal Trephination: The Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL)

    PubMed Central

    Linke, Stephan J.; Frings, Andreas; Ren, Ling; Gomolka, Amadeus; Schumacher, Udo; Reimer, Rudolph; Hansen, Nils-Owe; Jowett, Nathan; Richard, Gisbert; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    The impact of using a Femtosecond laser on final functional results of penetrating keratoplasty is low. The corneal incisions presented here result from laser ablations with ultrafast desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE). The results of the current study are based on the first proof-of-principle experiments using a mobile, newly introduced picosecond infrared laser system, and indicate that wavelengths in the mid-infrared range centered at 3 μm are efficient for obtaining applanation-free deep cuts on porcine corneas. PMID:25781907

  20. PLASMA WAKE EXCITATION BY LASERS OR PARTICLE BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric; Benedetti, Carlo; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Leemans, Wim

    2011-04-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. Plasma wake excitation driven by lasers or particle beams is examined, and the implications of the different physical excitation mechanisms for accelerator design are discussed. Plasma-based accelerators have attracted considerable attention owing to the ultrahigh field gradients sustainable in a plasma wave, enabling compact accelerators. These relativistic plasma waves are excited by displacing electrons in a neutral plasma. Two basic mechanisms for excitation of plasma waves are actively being researched: (i) excitation by the nonlinear ponderomotive force (radiation pressure) of an intense laser or (ii) excitation by the space-charge force of a dense charged particle beam. There has been significant recent experimental success using lasers and particle beam drivers for plasma acceleration. In particular, for laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs), the demonstration at LBNL in 2006 of high-quality, 1 GeV electron beams produced in approximately 3 cm plasma using a 40 TW laser. In 2007, for beam-driven plasma accelerators, or plasma-wakefield accelerators (PWFAs), the energy doubling over a meter to 42 GeV of a fraction of beam electrons on the tail of an electron beam by the plasma wave excited by the head was demonstrated at SLAC. These experimental successes have resulted in further interest in the development of plasma-based acceleration as a basis for a linear collider, and preliminary collider designs using laser drivers and beam drivers are being developed. The different physical mechanisms of plasma wave excitation, as well as the typical characteristics of the drivers, have implications for accelerator design. In the following, we identify the similarities and differences between wave excitation by lasers and particle beams. The field structure of the plasma wave driven by lasers or particle beams is discussed, as well as the

  1. Near-ultraviolet laser diodes for brilliant ultraviolet fluorophore excitation.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G

    2015-12-01

    Although multiple lasers are now standard equipment on most modern flow cytometers, ultraviolet (UV) lasers (325-365 nm) remain an uncommon excitation source for cytometry. Nd:YVO4 frequency-tripled diode pumped solid-state lasers emitting at 355 nm are now the primary means of providing UV excitation on multilaser flow cytometers. Although a number of UV excited fluorochromes are available for flow cytometry, the cost of solid-state UV lasers remains prohibitively high, limiting their use to all but the most sophisticated multilaser instruments. The recent introduction of the brilliant ultraviolet (BUV) series of fluorochromes for cell surface marker detection and their importance in increasing the number of simultaneous parameters for high-dimensional analysis has increased the urgency of including UV sources in cytometer designs; however, these lasers remain expensive. Near-UV laser diodes (NUVLDs), a direct diode laser source emitting in the 370-380 nm range, have been previously validated for flow cytometric analysis of most UV-excited probes, including quantum nanocrystals, the Hoechst dyes, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. However, they remain a little-used laser source for cytometry, despite their significantly lower cost. In this study, the ability of NUVLDs to excite the BUV dyes was assessed, along with their compatibility with simultaneous brilliant violet (BV) labeling. A NUVLD emitting at 375 nm was found to excite most of the available BUV dyes at least as well as a UV 355 nm source. This slightly longer wavelength did produce some unwanted excitation of BV dyes, but at sufficiently low levels to require minimal additional compensation. NUVLDs are compact, relatively inexpensive lasers that have higher power levels than the newest generation of small 355 nm lasers. They can, therefore, make a useful, cost-effective substitute for traditional UV lasers in multicolor analysis involving the BUV and BV dyes. PMID:25930008

  2. Laser Excitation of a Fracture Source for Elastic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, Thomas E.; Wijk, Kasper van; Snieder, Roel; Willis, Mark E.

    2011-12-30

    We show that elastic waves can be excited at a fracture inside a transparent sample by focusing laser light directly onto this fracture. The associated displacement field, measured by a laser interferometer, has pronounced waves that are diffracted at the fracture tips. We confirm that these are tip diffractions from direct excitation of the fracture by comparing them with tip diffractions from scattered elastic waves excited on the exterior of the sample. Being able to investigate fractures - in this case in an optically transparent material - via direct excitation opens the door to more detailed studies of fracture properties in general.

  3. Effects of Near-Infrared Laser on Neural Cell Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki-Oda, Noriko; Kataoka, Yosky; Yamada, Hisao; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-08-01

    Near-infrared laser has been used to relieve patients from various kinds of pain caused by postherpetic neuralgesia, myofascial dysfunction, surgical and traumatic wound, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. Clinically, He-Ne (λ=632.8 nm, 780 nm) and Ga-Al-As (805 ± 25 nm) lasers are used to irradiate trigger points or nerve ganglion. However the precise mechanisms of such biological actions of the laser have not yet been resolved. Since laser therapy is often effective to suppress the pain caused by hyperactive excitation of sensory neurons, interactions with laser light and neural cells are suggested. As neural excitation requires large amount of energy liberated from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), we examined the effect of 830-nm laser irradiation on the energy metabolism of the rat central nervous system and isolated mitochondria from brain. The diode laser was applied for 15 min with irradiance of 4.8 W/cm2 on a 2 mm-diameter spot at the brain surface. Tissue ATP content of the irradiated area in the cerebral cortex was 19 % higher than that of the non-treated area (opposite side of the cortex), whereas the ADP content showed no significant difference. Irradiation at another wavelength (652 nm) had no effect on either ATP or ADP contents. The temperature of the brain tissue was increased 4.5 - 5.0 °C during the irradiation of both 830-nm and 652-nm laser light. Direct irradiation of the mitochondrial suspension did not show any wavelength-dependent acceleration of respiration rate nor ATP synthesis. These results suggest that the increase in tissue ATP content did not result from the thermal effect, but from specific effect of the laser operated at 830 nm. Electrophysiological studies showed the hyperpolarization of membrane potential of isolated neurons and decrease in membrane resistance with irradiation of the laser, suggesting an activation of potassium channels. Intracellular ATP is reported to regulate some kinds of potassium channels. Possible mechanisms

  4. Mid-Infrared Laser Orbital Septal Tightening

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Eugene A.; Li, Michael; Lazarow, Frances B.; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Blepharoplasty is one of the most commonly performed facial aesthetic surgeries. While myriad techniques exist to improve the appearance of the lower eyelids, there is no clear consensus on the optimal management of the orbital septum. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the safety and feasibility of the use of the holmium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Ho:YAG) laser for orbital septal tightening, and to determine whether modest use of this laser would provide some degree of clinical efficacy. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Direct laser irradiation of ex vivo bovine tissue was used to determine appropriate laser dosimetry using infrared thermal imaging and optical coherence tomography before conducting a pilot clinical study in 5 patients. Laser irradiation of the lower eyelid orbital septum was performed through a transconjunctival approach. Standardized preoperative and postoperative photographs were taken for each patient and evaluated by 6 unbiased aesthetic surgeons. EXPOSURE Use of the Ho:YAG laser for orbital septal tightening. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE To determine appropriate laser dosimetry, infrared thermal imaging and optical coherence tomography were used to monitor temperature and tissue shape changes of ex vivo bovine tissue that was subjected to direct laser irradiation. For the clinical study, preoperative and postoperative photographs were evaluated by 6 surgeons on a 10-point Likert scale. RESULTS Optical coherence tomography demonstrated that laser irradiation of bovine tissue to a temperature range of 60°C to 80°C resulted in an increase in thickness of up to 2-fold. There were no complications or adverse cosmetic outcomes in the patient study. Patient satisfaction with the results of surgery averaged 7 on a 10-point Likert scale. For 3 patients, 3 (50%) of the evaluators believed there was a mild improvement in appearance of the lower eyelids after surgery. The remaining patients were thought to have no significant changes. CONCLUSIONS AND

  5. Collimated Blue and Infrared Beams Generated by Two-Photon Excitation in Rubidium Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gearba, Alina; Sell, Jerry; Olesen, Robert; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Utilizing nonlinear optical processes in Rb vapor we describe the generation of optical fields at 420 nm, 1.32 μm, and 1.37 μm. Input laser beams at 780 nm and 776 nm enter a heated Rb vapor cell collinear and circularly polarized. Rubidium atoms are excited to the 5D5 / 2 state, with blue light generated by four-wave mixing through the 6P3 / 2 --> 5S1 / 2 states, while infrared beams at 1.37 μm and 1.32 μm are generated by cascading decays through the 6S1 / 2 --> 5P3 / 2 and 6S1 / 2 --> 5P1 / 2 states, respectively. While the blue beam emission from four-wave mixing has been studied in detail, the mechanisms responsible for generating the infrared beams are still under investigation. We will present our results for the conditions which give rise to infrared beam generation by two-photon excitation in rubidium vapor.

  6. Blue emission from Eu2+-doped high silica glass by near-infrared femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yanbo; Chen, Danping; Ren, Jinjun; Wu, Botao; Qiu, Jianrong; Akai, Tomoko

    2008-01-01

    Eu2+-doped high silica glass (HSG) is fabricated by sintering porous glass which is impregnated with europium ions. Eu2+-doped HSG is revealed to yield intense blue emission excited by ultraviolet (UV) light and near-infrared femtosecond laser. The emission profile obtained by UV excitation can be well traced by near-infrared femtosecond laser. The upconversion emission excited by 800 nm femtosecond laser is considered to be related to a two-photon absorption process from the relationship between the integrated intensity and the pump power. A tentative scheme of upconverted blue emission from Eu2+-doped HSG was also proposed. The HSG materials presented herein are expected to find applications in high density optical storage and three-dimensional color displays.

  7. A tunable mid-infrared laser source for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1991-01-01

    Many remote sensing needs can be effectively addressed with a tunable laser source in the mid infrared. One potential laser source is an optical parametric oscillator and amplifier system pumped by a near infrared solid state laser. Advantages of such a system and progress made at NASA Langley Research Center to date on such a system are described.

  8. Laser-excited fluorescence for measuring atmospheric pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    System measures amount of given pollutant at specific location. Infrared laser aimed at location has wavelength that will cause molecules of pollutant to fluoresce. Detector separates fluorescence from other radiation and measures its intensity to indicate concentration of pollutant.

  9. Tunable infrared laser sources and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libatique, Nathaniel Joseph C.

    diode-pumped tunable mid-infrared (3 mum) fiber laser. (5) New electronically-controlled continuously wavelength-tunable near-infrared sources based on advanced electro-optic scanners fabricated from poled LiTaO3 crystals. (6) The development of continuously tunable electronically-controlled FBG-referenced near infrared sources suitable for trace gas spectroscopy.

  10. The Role And Character Of Resonant States In Photoionization Of Atoms By Strong Infrared Laser Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucic, S.; Potvliege, R. M.

    2010-07-01

    The rate of ionization of atomic hydrogen in a strong infrared laser field is calculated in the framework of non-Hermitian Floquet theory. The high dressed excited states responsibles for the resonance enhancements in the photoionization spectrum are large-ao KH states of the high-frequency Floquet theory.

  11. Applications of the Infrared Free Electron Laser in Nonlinear and Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fann, Wunshain

    1990-01-01

    Free Electron Lasers (FEL) have been envisioned as novel radiation sources tunable over a wide spectral range. In this dissertation I report two types of experiments that used the infrared FEL, Mark III, to study nonlinear optical properties of conjugated polymers and the possibility of long lived vibrational excitations in acetanilide, a hydrogen-bonded molecular crystal.

  12. Infrared laser and Fourier transform spectroscopy of CCH: A highly excited bending vibration of the X ˜ 2Σ+ state and unique Renner-Teller levels of the A ˜ 2 Π state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokaryk, D. W.; Vervloet, M.; Phi, Tân-Trào

    2015-04-01

    New infrared bands of the linear carbon chain radical CCH are reported: X ˜ (0140 0)2Σ+ - X ˜ (000 0)2Σ+, recorded with a near-infrared diode laser spectrometer, and A ˜ (0 1 0) 22 Δ - X ˜ (011 0)2 Π, A ˜ (0 2 0) 32 Φ - X ˜ (022 0)2 Δ and A ˜ (0 3 0) 42 Γ - X ˜ (033 0)2 Φ, recorded in emission with a Fourier transform spectrometer. All of the upper levels in the transitions appear to be strongly affected by interactions with other levels. The data demonstrate the excellence of calculations by Tarroni and Carter (2003), which determine the upper state level positions, spin-orbit splitting A, and rotational parameter B to a remarkable level of accuracy, considering the very complex nature of the interactions between the X ˜ 2Σ+ and A ˜ 2 Π electronic states in the regions spanned by the observed levels.

  13. An infrared search for extraterrestrial laser signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A.

    1986-01-01

    The focus of project SETI is on microwave frequencies, where receivers fundamentally have the best sensitivity for the detection of narrow band signals. Such receivers, when coupled to existing radio telescopes, form an optimum system for broad area searches over the sky. Detection of narrow band infrared signals is best done with a laser heterodyne reciever similar in function to a microwave spectral line receiver. A receiver was built for astrophysical observations at 30 THz (10 microns) and the spectrometer is being adapted for SETI work. The receiver uses a small CO2 laser as the local oscillator, a HgCdTe diode as the photomixer, and a multichannel intermediate frequency (IF) filterbank. An advanced multichannel IF processor is now being built to detect infrared line radiation in 1000 spectral channels each 1 MHz wide. When completed this processor will be used with a ground based telescope next year for a survey of several hundred selected stars for narrow band CO2 laser signals at 30 THz.

  14. Mid - infrared solid state lasers for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, Yuri

    This work is devoted to study of novel high power middle-infrared (Mid-IR) laser sources enabling development of portable platform for sensing of organic molecules with the use of recently discovered Quartz Enhanced Photo Acoustic Spectroscopy (QEPAS). The ability to detect small concentrations is beneficial to monitor atmosphere pollution as well for biomedical applications such as analysis of human breath to detect earlier stages of cancer or virus activities. A QEPAS technique using a quartz tuning fork (QTF) as a detector enables a strong enhancement of measured signal when pump laser is modulated with a frequency coinciding with a natural frequency of a QTF. It is known that the detectability of acousto-optics based sensors is proportional to the square root of the laser intensity used for detection of analyte. That is the reason why commercially available semiconductor Mid-IR lasers having small output power limit sensitivity of modern QEPAS based sensors. The lack of high power broadly tunable lasers operating with a modulation frequency of quartz forks (~ 32.768 kHz) is the major motivation of this study. Commercially available Mid-IR (2-3.3 microm), single frequency, continuous wave (CW) fiber pumped lasers based on transition metal doped chalcogenides (e.g. Cr:ZnSe) prove to be efficient laser sources for organic molecules detection. However, their direct modulation is limited to several kHz, and cannot be directly used in combination with QEPAS. Hence, one objective of this work is to study and develop fiber laser pumped Ho:YAG (Er:YAG)/Cr:ZnSe tandem laser system/s. Ho (Holmium) and/or Er (Erbium) ions having long radiation lifetime (~ 10 ms) can effectively accumulate population inversion under CW fiber laser excitation. Utilization of acousto-optic (AO) modulators in the cavity of Ho:YAG (Er:YAG) laser will enable effective Q-Switching with repetition rate easily reaching the resonance frequency of a QTF. It is expected that utilization of Ho:YAG (Er

  15. Investigation of germanium Raman lasers for the mid-infrared.

    PubMed

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Troia, Benedetto; Soref, Richard A; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2015-06-29

    In this paper we present a detailed theoretical investigation of integrated racetrack Raman lasers based on the germanium material system operating in the mid-infrared beyond the germanium two-photon absorption cut-off wavelength of 3.17 μm. The effective Raman gain has been estimated in waveguides based on germanium-on-silicon, germanium-on-SOI and germanium-on-Si3N4 technology platforms as a function of their crystallographic orientations. Furthermore, general design guidelines have been determined by means of a comparative analysis of Raman laser performance, i.e. the threshold power, polarization and directionality of the excited Stokes signals as a function of racetrack cavity length and directional-coupler dimensions. Finally, the emitted Raman laser power has been evaluated as a function of overall propagation losses and operative wavelengths up to 3.8 μm, while the time dynamics of Raman lasers has been simulated assuming continuous and pulse waves as input pump signals. PMID:26191733

  16. Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Winefordner, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies.

  17. Lattice dynamics of femtosecond laser-excited antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, Mahmoud Hanafy; Bugayev, Aleksey; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction is used to probe the lattice dynamics of femtosecond laser-excited antimony thin film. The temporal hierarchies of the intensity and position of diffraction orders are monitored. The femtosecond laser excitation of antimony film was found to lead to initial compression after the laser pulse, which gives way to tension vibrating at new equilibrium displacement. A damped harmonic oscillator model, in which the hot electron-blast force contributes to the driving force of oscillations in lattice spacing, is used to interpret the data. The electron-phonon energy-exchange rate and the electronic Grüneisen parameter were obtained.

  18. Characterization of weakly excited final states by shakedown spectroscopy of laser-excited potassium

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, J.; Heinaesmaeki, S.; Aksela, S.; Aksela, H.; Sankari, R.; Rander, T.; Lindblad, A.; Bergersen, H.; Oehrwall, G.; Svensson, S.; Kukk, E.

    2006-07-15

    3p shakedown spectra of laser excited potassium atoms as well as direct 3p photoemission of ground state potassium have been studied. These two excitation schemes lead to the same final states and thereby provide a good basis for a detailed study of the 3p{sup 5}(4s3d){sup 1} configurations of singly ionized potassium and the photoemission processes leading to these configurations. The comparison of direct photoemission from the ground state and conjugate shakedown spectra from 4p{sub 1/2} laser excited potassium made it possible to experimentally determine the character of final states that are only weakly excited in the direct photoemission but have a much higher relative intensity in the shakedown spectrum. Based on considerations of angular momentum and parity conservation the excitation scheme of the final states can be understood.

  19. New solid state lasers from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1995-08-15

    The authors discuss three new laser materials that offer improved access to the ultraviolet, near infrared and mid-infrared spectral regions. In order for each of these materials to have been identified, a particular hurdle needed to be overcome with respect to the fundamental laser physics impacting the material. In the case of the 280-320nm Ce:LiSAF laser, the main issue is the need to reduce the loss associated with excited state absorption, while for 1047nm Yb:S-FAP it is the ground state absorption at the laser wavelength that must be minimized. Cr:ZnSe has been down-selected from a number of potential candidates which could lase in the 2200-3000nm region, in order to mitigate the detrimental impact of nonradiative decay. In all three cases the authors discuss how appropriate consideration of fundamental concerns has led to the identification and understanding of the new laser system.

  20. Excitation-Selectable Nanoprobe for Tumor Fluorescence Imaging and Near-Infrared Thermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yanchun; Chen, Qun; Wu, Baoyan; Xing, Da

    2016-01-01

    The combination of diagnostics and therapeutics is growing rapidly in cancer treatment. Here, using upconversion nanoparticles coated with chitosan conjugated with a targeting molecule and loaded with indocyanine green (ICG), we develop an excitation-selectable nanoprobe with highly integrated functionalities, including the emission of visible and near-infrared (NIR) light, strong optical absorption in the NIR region and high photostability. After intravenous injection in tumor bearing mice, the nanoprobes target to the tumor vascular system. NIR lasers (980 and 808 nm) are then selectively applied to the mice. The results show that the emitted upconversion fluorescence and NIR fluorescence can be used in a complementary manner for high signal/noise ratio and sensitive tumor imaging for more precise tumor localization. Highly effective photothermal therapy is realized using 808 nm laser irradiation, and the upconversion fluorescence at 654 nm can be used for monitoring treatment effect during the thermal therapy. In summary, using the nanoprobes, outstanding therapeutic efficacy could be realized through flexible excitation control, precise tumor localization, highly effective photothermal conversion and real-time treatment monitoring. The nanofabrication strategy highlights the promise of nanoparticles in cancer theranostics. PMID:27301175

  1. Two-photon excitation in living cells induced by low-power cw laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Liu, Yagang; Berns, Michael W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1996-05-01

    We demonstrate multi-photon excitation in optically-trapped living cells. Intracellular non- resonant two-photon excitation of endogenous and exogenous chromophores was induced by CW near infrared (NIR) trapping beams of 105 mW power. In the case of fluorescent chromophores, detection of NIR-excited visible fluorescence was achieved by imaging and spectroscopy methods. Trap-induced, two-photon excited fluorescence was employed as a novel diagnostic method to monitor intracellular redox state and cell vitality of single motile spermatozoa and Chinese hamster ovary cells. We found, that nonlinear absorption of NIR photons < 800 nm may lead to oxidative stress and severe cell damage. Biological response was amplified in multimode CW lasers due to longitudinal mode-beating and partial mode- locking. As a result, we recommend the use of longwavelength-NIR, single-frequency traps (`optical tweezers') for micromanipulation of vital cells.

  2. Charge state dynamics of the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond under near-infrared excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2016-05-01

    The negatively charged NV defect center (NV-) in diamond has become prominent for applications in quantum information, nanoscale magnetic and electric field sensing, and fluorescent biological markers. Switching between NV- and neutral charge states (NV0) have been extensively studied and modeled using exciting laser wavelengths that are shorter than the NV- zero-phonon line (ZPL), and typically result in decreased fluorescence from the NV- state. In this work, we report on the experimental observation that NV0 converts to NV- under excitation with near-infrared (1064 nm) light, resulting in increased fluorescence from the NV- state. We have observed this effect in both ensembles of NVs in bulk diamond, and in diamond nanocrystals, and find that it is robust both at room and low temperature. We carried out microwave and two-color excitation combined with spectral and time-resolved experimental studies. We used rate-equation modeling and find evidence for competition between one-photon and two-photon processes for hole and electron ionization. This finding may help elucidate the study of the NV energy level structure, and impact recently emerging research in single-shot measurement of the NV- spin state via spin-to-charge conversion.

  3. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Mędryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A. Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-06-15

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available.

  4. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Medryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A.; Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available.

  5. Surface plasma wave excitation via laser irradiated overdense plasma foil

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-04-09

    A laser irradiated overdense plasma foil is seen to be susceptible to parametric excitation of surface plasma wave (SPW) and ion acoustic wave (IAW) on the ion plasma period time scale. The SPW is localised near the front surface of the foil while IAW extends upto the rear. The evanescent laser field and the SPW exert a ponderomotive force on electrons driving the IAW. The density perturbation associated with the latter beats with the laser induced oscillatory electron velocity to drive the SPW. At relativistic laser intensity, the growth rate is of the order of ion plasma frequency.

  6. Picosecond infrared laser (PIRL): an ideal phonomicrosurgical laser?

    PubMed

    Hess, Markus; Hildebrandt, Michael Dominik; Müller, Frank; Kruber, Sebastian; Kroetz, Peter; Schumacher, Udo; Reimer, Rudolph; Kammal, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Wöllmer, Wolfgang; Miller, Dwayne

    2013-11-01

    A comparison of tissue cutting effects in excised cadaver human vocal folds after incisions with three different instruments [scalpel, CO2 laser and the picosecond infrared laser-(PIRL)] was performed. In total, 15 larynges were taken from human cadavers shortly after death. After deep freezing and thawing for the experiment, the vocal folds suspended in the hemilarynx were incised. Histology and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) analyses were performed. Damage zones after cold instrument cuts ranged from 51 to 135 μm, as compared to 9-28 μm after cutting with the PIRL. It was shown that PIRL incision had smaller zones of tissue coagulation and tissue destruction, when compared with scalpel and CO2 laser cuts. The PIRL technology provides an (almost) atraumatic laser, which offers a quantum jump towards realistic 'micro'-phonosurgery on a factual cellular dimension, almost entirely avoiding coagulation, carbonization, or other ways of major tissue destruction in the vicinity of the intervention area. Although not available for clinical use yet, the new technique appears promising for future clinical applications, so that technical and methodological characteristics as well as tissue experiments seem worthwhile to be communicated at this stage of development. PMID:23708442

  7. Improved ion acceleration via laser surface plasma waves excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Bigongiari, A.

    2013-05-15

    The possibility of enhancing the emission of the ions accelerated in the interaction of a high intensity ultra-short (<100 fs) laser pulse with a thin target (<10λ{sub 0}), via surface plasma wave excitation is investigated. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed for laser intensities ranging from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 20} Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2}. The surface wave is resonantly excited by the laser via the coupling with a modulation at the target surface. In the cases where the surface wave is excited, we find an enhancement of the maximum ion energy of a factor ∼2 compared to the cases where the target surface is flat.

  8. Infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E; Senesac, Larry R; Rajic, Slobodan; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Smith, Barton; Datskos, Panos G

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated an infrared (IR) microcalorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used to detect the presence of trace amounts of target molecules. The chemical detection is accomplished by obtaining the IR photothermal spectra of molecules absorbed on the surface of uncooled thermal micromechanical detectors. IR microcalorimetric spectroscopy requires no chemical specific coatings and the chemical specificity of the presented method is a consequence of the wavelength-specific absorption of IR photons from tunable quantum cascade lasers due to vibrational spectral bands of the analyte. We have obtained IR photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of RDX and a monolayer of 2-mercaptoethanol, over the wavelength region from 6 to 10 m. We found that in this wavelength region both chemicals exhibit a number of photothermal absorption features that are in good agreement with their respective IR spectra.

  9. Optical measurement of temperature in biological cells under infrared laser light exposure (λ=800 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rod P.

    2015-07-01

    Interest in the interaction between laser light and biological samples has gained momentum in recent years, particularly in neurobiology, where there is significant potential to stimulate neurons with infrared laser light. Despite recent reports showing the application of infrared light for neurostimulation, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. The two main hypotheses are based on thermal or electrostatic mechanisms. Here, a novel optical method is presented to make temperature measurements in human neural cells under infrared laser excitation (λ=800nm) using the dye Rhodamine B (RhB). The measurement of temperature is based on the property of RhB, a fluorescent dye whose fluorescence intensity decreases linearly with increases in temperature. We present and detail the setup and measurement procedure that has temporal resolution of few milliseconds, based around a fluorescent live-cell imaging microscope used for cellular microfluorimetry experiments.

  10. Infrared Thermographic Study of Laser Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mohler, Jonathan H.; Chow, Charles T. S.

    1986-07-01

    Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet. The experimental apparatus used to make these observations is described. The temperature distributions recorded are shown to be in good agreement with those predicted by heat transfer theory. Heat content values calculated from the observed temperature distributions are used to calculate thermal and kinetic parameters for several samples. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  11. Tunable diode lasers for 3-30 micron infrared operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    The tunable diode laser is now widely used in high resolution infrared spectroscopy studies, taking into account laboratory and industrial applications. The present investigation is concerned with advances related to laser performance and reliability. The advances are the result of improvements in materials and device technologies. Reliability data for broad-area Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se lasers are considered along with performance improvements in stripe-geometry lasers, laser performance at wavelengths above 25 microns, and laser performance at wavelengths below 4 microns. Attention is given to tunable Pb-salt infrared diode lasers, mesa-stripe geometry lasers of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se and PbS(1-x)Se(x), and long wavelength diode laser emission observed in both Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te and Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se.

  12. Visible-near-infrared luminescent lanthanide ternary complexes based on beta-diketonate using visible-light excitation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lining; Qiu, Yannan; Liu, Tao; Feng, Jing; Deng, Wei; Shi, Liyi

    2015-11-01

    We used the synthesized dinaphthylmethane (Hdnm) ligand whose absorption extends to the visible-light wavelength, to prepare a family of ternary lanthanide complexes, named as [Ln(dnm)3 phen] (Ln = Sm, Nd, Yb, Er, Tm, Pr). The properties of these complexes were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, and excitation and emission spectroscopy. Generally, excitation with visible light is much more advantageous than UV excitation. Importantly, upon excitation with visible light (401-460 nm), the complexes show characteristic visible (Sm(3+)) as well as near-infrared (Sm(3+), Nd(3+), Yb(3+), Er(3+), Tm(3+), Pr(3+)) luminescence of the corresponding lanthanide ions, attributed to the energy transfer from the ligands to the lanthanide ions, an antenna effect. Now, using these near-infrared luminescent lanthanide complexes, the luminescent spectral region from 800 to 1650 nm, can be covered completely, which is of particular interest for biomedical imaging applications, laser systems, and optical amplification applications. PMID:25691149

  13. Comparative hazard evaluation of near-infrared diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W J

    1994-05-01

    Hazard evaluation methods from various laser protection standards differ when applied to extended-source, near-infrared lasers. By way of example, various hazard analyses are applied to laser training systems, which incorporate diode lasers, specifically those that assist in training military or law enforcement personnel in the proper use of weapons by simulating actual firing by the substitution of a beam of near-infrared energy for bullets. A correct hazard evaluation of these lasers is necessary since simulators are designed to be directed toward personnel during normal use. The differences among laser standards are most apparent when determining the hazard class of a laser. Hazard classification is based on a comparison of the potential exposures with the maximum permissible exposures in the 1986 and 1993 versions of the American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers, Z136.1, and the accessible emission limits of the federal laser product performance standard. Necessary safety design features of a particular system depend on the hazard class. The ANSI Z136.1-1993 standard provides a simpler and more accurate hazard assessment of low-power, near-infrared, diode laser systems than the 1986 ANSI standard. Although a specific system is evaluated, the techniques described can be readily applied to other near-infrared lasers or laser training systems. PMID:8175359

  14. Thermally excited proton spin-flip laser emission in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.

    1993-07-01

    Based on statistical thermodynamic fluctuation arguments, it is shown here for the first time that thermally excited spin-flip laser emission from the fusion product protons can occur in large tokamak devices that are entering the reactor regime of operation. Existing experimental data from TFTR supports this conjecture, in the sense that these measurements are in complete agreement with the predictions of the quasilinear theory of the spin-flip laser.

  15. The examination of berberine excited state by laser flash photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lingli; Wang, Mei; Zhao, Ping; Zhu, Hui; Zhu, Rongrong; Sun, Xiaoyu; Yao, Side; Wang, Shilong

    2009-07-01

    The property of the excited triplet state of berberine (BBR) was investigated by using time-resolved laser flash photolysis of 355 nm in acetonitrile. The transient absorption spectra of the excited triplet BBR were obtained in acetonitrile, which have an absorption maximum at 420 nm. And the ratio of excitation to ionization of BBR in acetonitrile solvent was calculated. The self-decay and self-quenching rate constants, and the absorption coefficient of 3BBR* were investigated and the excited state quantum yield was determined. Furthermore utilizing the benzophenone (BEN) as a triplet sensitizer, and the β-carotene (Car) as an excited energy transfer acceptor, the assignment of 3BBR* was further confirmed and the related energy transfer rate constants were also determined.

  16. Upgrade of far-infrared laser-based Faraday rotation measurement on MST

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Bergerson, W. F.; Lin, L.

    2010-10-15

    Recently, the far-infrared (FIR) laser ({lambda}{sub 0}=432 {mu}m) Faraday rotation measurement system on MST has been upgraded. The dc flowing-gas discharge CO{sub 2} pump laser is replaced by a rf-excited, sealed CO{sub 2} laser at 9.27 {mu}m (GEM select 100, Coherent Inc., Santa Clara, CA), which is subdivided equally into three parts to simultaneously pump three FIR cavities. The total infrared pump power is approximately 80 W on the 9R(20) line required to pump the formic acid molecule. Each FIR cavity produces {approx}12 mW, sufficient for 11 simultaneous chord interferometry-polarimetry operations. Three key issues [(1) conservation of circularly polarized wave, (2) colinearity of two probe waves, and (3) stability of intermediate frequencies between lasers] affecting the Faraday rotation measurement have been resolved experimentally.

  17. Pulse-shaping circuit for laser excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Narrower, impedence-matched pulses initiate stabler electric discharges for gas lasers. Discharges are more efficient, more compact, capable of high repetition rate, and less expensive than conventional electron-beam apparatus, but gas tends to break down and form localized arcs. Pulse-shaping circuit compresses width of high-voltage pulses from relatively-slow rise-time voltage generator and gradually grades circuit impedance from inherent high impedance of generator to low impedence of gas.

  18. Charge state dynamics of the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond under 1064-nm laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2016-07-01

    The photophysics and charge state dynamics of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond has been extensively investigated, but is still not fully understood. In contrast to previous work, we find that NV0 converts to NV- under excitation with low power near-infrared (1064-nm) light, resulting in increased photoluminescence from the NV- state. We used a combination of spectral and time-resolved photoluminescence experiments and rate-equation modeling to conclude that NV0 converts to NV- via absorption of 1064-nm photons from the valence band of diamond. We report fast quenching and recovery of the photoluminescence from both charge states of the NV center under low power 1064-nm laser excitation, which has not been previously observed. We also find, using optically detected magnetic resonance experiments, that the charge transfer process mediated by the 1064-nm laser is spin dependent.

  19. Novel materials as potential infrared laser hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkies, Julian Richard

    The work presented in this thesis has concentrated on an assessment and characterisation of potential laser host media which will only support low phonon or vibrational modes. This is a necessary criterion if systems in which the active ions are lanthanides are to be made to lase in the mid-infrared, as in conventional host media non- radiative processes dominate transitions in this region. Research has concentrated upon two main areas. Firstly a spectroscopic study of lanthanide doped PBr3/AlBr3/SbBr3 was undertaken. A detailed investigation and characterisation of the stable solution formation region was carried out. The doping levels achievable were seen to vary across the lanthanide series from a maximum 0.24mol% for praesodymium to a minimum 0.15mol% for ytterbium. Energies of the characteristic 4 f absorptions of the trivalent lanthanides were measured, along with their oscillator strengths. Judd-Ofelt parameters were found for several rare earths. Stimulated emission cross sections were found to be higher than in conventional glass hosts for certain transitions, such as 6.83 × 10 -20 cm2 for the 4F3/2 --> 4I11/2 transition in the Nd3+ doped liquid. This was verified both experimentally and by the Ladenburg-Fuchtbauer relation when compared to a standard silicate glass. The behaviour, both spectroscopic and physical, of the doped solutions was seen to change dramatically upon heating. Heating the solutions gave rise to higher crystallisation rates, but lower non-radiative relaxation rates. Waveguide and laser experiments were attempted in both bulk and capillary geometries, however material factors such as crystallisation and thermal lensing prevented laser action. Secondly, rare earth doped planar waveguides of zinc sulphide were prepared. A full characterisation of the way in which waveguide loss was affected by factors such as deposition rate, doping level and waveguide masking during evaporation was performed. Waveguide losses as low as 1.5dB/cm at 980nm

  20. Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Vibrational Populations Monitored after Electronic and Infrared Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Werncke, W.; Kozich, V.; Dreyer, J.

    2008-11-14

    Pathways of vibrational energy flow in molecules with an intramolecular hydrogen bond are studied after intramolecular proton transfer reactions as well as after infrared excitation of the O-H stretching vibration which is coupled to this hydrogen bond.

  1. Infrared Laser Desorption: Mechanisms and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, Claude Ricketts

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of two-step laser mass spectrometry (L^2MS), a combination of infrared (IR) laser desorption with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, to investigate (1) the mechanism of IR laser desorption, (2) the composition of aromatic molecules in extraterrestrial samples, and (3) the measurement of compound-specific carbon isotope ratios. First, a description of the mechanism of IR laser desorption of monolayer and submonolayer coverages of molecules adsorbed to an insulator surface is presented. The vibrational and translational energy distributions of aniline-d7 molecules desorbed from single-crystal sapphire (Al_2 O_3) are recorded using L ^2MS. The energy distributions are found to be in equilibrium with each other and with the temperature of the surface at the time of desorption. The translational and angular distributions of monolayer coverages are altered by the collisions of desorbing molecules with each other. Second, spatial and chemical analyses of the carbonaceous components in chondritic meteorites are presented. A microprobe L^2MS instrument (mu L^2MS) capable of analyzing samples with a spatial resolution of 40 mu m and zeptomole (10^{-21} mole) sensitivity is described and used to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in small particles and heterogeneous samples. PAH distributions are used to distinguish between samples from different meteorite classes, and the effects of thermal processing within a given meteorite class are observed. Sliced wafers of meteorite are found to contain an inhomogeneous distribution of PAHs. muL^2MS studies of meteorite samples are coordinated with scanning electron microscopy studies, and the abundances of aromatic compounds across the surface of a sample are consistent with gross structural features but not with elemental or mineralogical features. Third, a description of a method for performing compound-specific carbon isotope

  2. Radio frequency excited CO/sub 2/ waveguide lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.L.; Tulip, J.L.

    1984-10-01

    This paper reports on the operation of radio frequency (rf) excited carbon dioxide waveguide lasers. An efficiency of greater than 10% has been achieved with a maximum power of 21 W. The effects of bore size, waveguide fabrication techniques, and gas mixture are discussed.

  3. Relative refractory period in an excitable semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Selmi, F; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Sagnes, I; Kuszelewicz, R; Barbay, S

    2014-05-01

    We report on experimental evidence of neuronlike excitable behavior in a micropillar laser with saturable absorber. We show that under a single pulsed perturbation the system exhibits subnanosecond response pulses and analyze the role of the laser bias pumping. Under a double pulsed excitation we study the absolute and relative refractory periods, similarly to what can be found in neural excitability, and interpret the results in terms of a dynamical inhibition mediated by the carrier dynamics. These measurements shed light on the analogy between optical and biological neurons and pave the way to fast spike-time coding based optical systems with a speed several orders of magnitude faster than their biological or electronic counterparts. PMID:24856697

  4. Relative Refractory Period in an Excitable Semiconductor Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmi, F.; Braive, R.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Barbay, S.

    2014-05-01

    We report on experimental evidence of neuronlike excitable behavior in a micropillar laser with saturable absorber. We show that under a single pulsed perturbation the system exhibits subnanosecond response pulses and analyze the role of the laser bias pumping. Under a double pulsed excitation we study the absolute and relative refractory periods, similarly to what can be found in neural excitability, and interpret the results in terms of a dynamical inhibition mediated by the carrier dynamics. These measurements shed light on the analogy between optical and biological neurons and pave the way to fast spike-time coding based optical systems with a speed several orders of magnitude faster than their biological or electronic counterparts.

  5. Cutaneous melanin exhibiting fluorescence emission under near-infrared light excitation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiwei; Zeng, Haishan; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Alajlan, Abdulmajeed; Tan, Eileen; McLean, David I; Lui, Harvey

    2006-01-01

    Under ultraviolet and visible light excitation, melanin is essentially a nonfluorescent substance. This work reports our study on near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence properties of melanins, and explores potential applications of NIR fluorescence techniques for evaluating skin disorders involving melanin. The NIR fluorescence spectrum is obtained using a fiber optic NIR spectrometer under 785-nm laser excitation. In vitro measurements are performed on synthetic dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) melanin, melanin extracted from Sepia ink sacs, human hair, animal fur, and bird feathers. Paired spectral comparisons of white and black skin appendages show that melanization of hair, fur, or feathers more than doubles the NIR fluorescence. In vivo NIR autofluorescence of normal dorsal and volar forearm skin of 52 volunteers is measured. Dorsal forearm skin, which is darker than volar skin, exhibits significantly greater NIR fluorescence. Patients with vitiligo (n=4), compound nevus (n=3), nevus of Ota (n=1), superficial spreading melanoma (n=3), and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (n=1) are also evaluated. NIR fluorescence is greater within the lesion than the surrounding normal skin for all these conditions except vitiligo, where the converse was true. The observed melanin NIR fluorescence provides a new approach to in vitro and in vivo melanin detection and quantification that may be particularly useful for evaluating pigmented skin lesions. PMID:16822060

  6. Note: Longitudinally excited N2 laser with low beam divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, K.; Akitsu, T.; Jitsuno, T.

    2014-09-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited N2 laser (337 nm) with low beam divergence without collimator lenses. The N2 laser consisted of a 30 cm long Pyrex glass tube with an inner diameter of 2.5 mm, a normal stable resonator formed by flat mirrors, and a simple, novel driver circuit. At a N2 gas pressure of 0.4 kPa and a repetition rate of 40 Hz, the N2 laser produced a circular beam with an output energy of 2.6 μJ and a low full-angle beam divergence of 0.29 mrad due to the uniform discharge formed by the longitudinal excitation scheme, the long cavity with the small aperture, and the low-input energy oscillation.

  7. Note: Longitudinally excited N₂ laser with low beam divergence.

    PubMed

    Uno, K; Akitsu, T; Jitsuno, T

    2014-09-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited N2 laser (337 nm) with low beam divergence without collimator lenses. The N2 laser consisted of a 30 cm long Pyrex glass tube with an inner diameter of 2.5 mm, a normal stable resonator formed by flat mirrors, and a simple, novel driver circuit. At a N2 gas pressure of 0.4 kPa and a repetition rate of 40 Hz, the N2 laser produced a circular beam with an output energy of 2.6 μJ and a low full-angle beam divergence of 0.29 mrad due to the uniform discharge formed by the longitudinal excitation scheme, the long cavity with the small aperture, and the low-input energy oscillation. PMID:25273794

  8. Excited states in DNA strands investigated by ultrafast laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinquan; Zhang, Yuyuan; Kohler, Bern

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser experiments on carefully selected DNA model compounds probe the effects of base stacking, base pairing, and structural disorder on excited electronic states formed by UV absorption in single and double DNA strands. Direct π-orbital overlap between two stacked bases in a dinucleotide or in a longer single strand creates new excited states that decay orders of magnitude more slowly than the generally subpicosecond excited states of monomeric bases. Half or more of all excited states in single strands decay in this manner. Ultrafast mid-IR transient absorption experiments reveal that the long-lived excited states in a number of model compounds are charge transfer states formed by interbase electron transfer, which subsequently decay by charge recombination. The lifetimes of the charge transfer states are surprisingly independent of how the stacked bases are oriented, but disruption of π-stacking, either by elevating temperature or by adding a denaturing co-solvent, completely eliminates this decay channel. Time-resolved emission measurements support the conclusion that these states are populated very rapidly from initial excitons. These experiments also reveal the existence of populations of emissive excited states that decay on the nanosecond time scale. The quantum yield of these states is very small for UVB/UVC excitation, but increases at UVA wavelengths. In double strands, hydrogen bonding between bases perturbs, but does not quench, the long-lived excited states. Kinetic isotope effects on the excited-state dynamics suggest that intrastrand electron transfer may couple to interstrand proton transfer. By revealing how structure and non-covalent interactions affect excited-state dynamics, on-going experimental and theoretical studies of excited states in DNA strands can advance understanding of fundamental photophysics in other nanoscale systems. PMID:25326834

  9. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  10. Polarization methods for diode laser excitation of solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2008-11-25

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. A Yb-doped gain medium can be used that absorbs light having a first polarization and emits light having a second polarization. Using such pumping with laser cavity dispersion control, pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved.

  11. Synthesis of materials with infrared and ultraviolet lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses three divergent examples of synthesis of materials with lasers. The three techniques are: (1) infrared (CO/sub 2/) laser synthesis of silane (SiH/sub 4/) from disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/); (2) excimer (ArF) laser production of fine silicon powders from methyl- and chloro-substituted silanes; and, (3) excimer (KrF) laser production of fine metallic powders by laser ablation. The mechanism for each process is discussed along with some conclusions about the features of the laser radiation that enable each application. 19 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Development of a confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope using two-photon excitation in combination with time-gated detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytsma, Joost; Vroom, Jurrien; Gerritsen, Hans C.; Levine, Yehudi K.

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescent molecules having single-photon absorption in the blue and the UV can be excited with infra-red light via a process known as two-photon excitation. The combination of this technique with scanning techniques can be exploited for 3D microscopic imaging. The two- photon process is confined to a restricted volume in the sample determined by the laser focus, resulting in inherent confocality. Other advantages are reduced photo-bleaching of the samples and a larger penetration depth of the excitation light. The implementation of time-gated detection techniques allows fluorescent lifetime imaging. This drastically improves the selectivity and contrast of the images.

  13. Electronic properties of solids excited with intermediate laser power densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirotti, Fausto; Tempo Beamline Team

    Intermediate laser power density up to about 100 GW/cm2 is below the surface damage threshold is currently used to induce modification in the physical properties on short time scales. The absorption of a short laser pulse induces non-equilibrium electronic distributions followed by lattice-mediated equilibrium taking place only in the picosecond range. The role of the hot electrons is particularly important in several domains as for example fast magnetization and demagnetization processes, laser induced phase transitions, charge density waves. Angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measuring directly energy and momentum of electrons is the most adapted tool to study the electronic excitations at short time scales during and after fast laser excitations. The main technical problem is the space charge created by the pumping laser pulse. I will present angular resolved multiphoton photoemission results obtained with 800 nm laser pulses showing how space charge electrons emitted during fast demagnetization processes can be measured. Unable enter Affiliation: CNRS-SOLEIL Synchrotron L'Orme des Merisiers , Saint Aubin 91192 Gif sur Yvette France.

  14. Infrared laser in the treatment of craniomandibular disorders, arthrogenous pain

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, T.L.

    1989-05-01

    The fast removal of intra-articular inflammation of the temporomandibular joint in five different patients after infrared laser application is described. Parameters of clinical evaluation was maximum mouth opening and subjective pain. The application of infrared laser of 700 Hz frequency for 3 minutes during five consecutive days at the skin over the painful area of the temporomandibular joint was used. However, the importance of concomitant mandibular stabilization is stressed to achieve optimal result.

  15. Evaluation of paint coating thickness variations based on pulsed Infrared thermography laser technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezghani, S.; Perrin, E.; Vrabie, V.; Bodnar, J. L.; Marthe, J.; Cauwe, B.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a pulsed Infrared thermography technique using a homogeneous heat provided by a laser source is used for the non-destructive evaluation of paint coating thickness variations. Firstly, numerical simulations of the thermal response of a paint coated sample are performed. By analyzing the thermal responses as a function of thermal properties and thickness of both coating and substrate layers, optimal excitation parameters of the heating source are determined. Two characteristic parameters were studied with respect to the paint coating layer thickness variations. Results obtained using an experimental test bench based on the pulsed Infrared thermography laser technique are compared with those given by a classical Eddy current technique for paint coating variations from 5 to 130 μm. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this approach and suggest that the pulsed Infrared thermography technique presents good perspectives to characterize the heterogeneity of paint coating on large scale samples with other heating sources.

  16. Electronically Excited C2 from Laser Photodissociated C60

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Scott, Carl D.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.

    1999-01-01

    Spectral and transient emission measurements are made of radiation from products of laser excitation of buckminsterfullerene (C60) vapor diluted in argon at 973 K. The principal radiation is from the Swan band system of C2 and, at early times, also from a black body continuum. The C2 radiation is observed only when C60 is excited by green (532 nm) and not with IR (1064 nm) laser radiation at energy densities of about 1.5 J/square cm. Transient measurements indicate that there are two characteristic periods of decay of radiation. The first period, lasting about 2 micro seconds, has a characteristic decay time of about 0.3 micro seconds. The second period, lasting at least 50 micro seconds, has a characteristic decay time of about 5 micro seconds. These characteristic times are thought to be associated with cooling of C60 molecules or nanosized carbon particles during the early period; and with electronically excited C2 that is a decomposition product of laser excited C60, C58, ... molecules during the later period.

  17. Dynamics Of Electronic Excitation Of Solids With Ultrashort Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Nikita; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2010-10-08

    When ultrashort laser pulses irradiate a solid, photoabsorption by electrons in conduction band produces nonequilibrium highly energetic free electrons gas. We study the ionization and excitation of the electronic subsystem in a semiconductor and a metal (solid silicon and aluminum, respectively). The irradiating femtosecond laser pulse has a duration of 10 fs and a photon energy of h-bar {omega} = 38 eV. The classical Monte Carlo method is extended to take into account the electronic band structure and Pauli's principle for electrons excited to the conduction band. In the case of semiconductors this applies to the holes as well. Conduction band electrons and valence band holes induce secondary excitation and ionization processes which we simulate event by event. We discuss the transient electron dynamics with respect to the differences between semiconductors and metals. For metals the electronic distribution is split up into two branches: a low energy distribution as a slightly distorted Fermi-distribution and a long high energy tail. For the case of semiconductors it is split into two parts by the band gap. To thermalize, these excited electronic subsystems need longer times than the characteristic pulse duration. Therefore, the analysis of experimental data with femtosecond lasers must be based on non-equilibrium concepts.

  18. Controlling rotational dynamics and alignment of molecule by infrared laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Arya, Urvashi; Tyagi, Ashish; Prasad, Vinod

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the effects of delayed infrared laser (IRL) pulse shape on the non-adiabatic rotational excitation and alignment of a polar molecule. We suggest a control scheme for choosing populations of molecular rotational states by wave packet interference. The rotational wave packets of polar molecule (here HBr) excited non-adiabatically by orienting pulse is controlled actually using the second delayed IRL pulse. By adjusting the time delay between the two laser pulses and the shape of delayed IRL pulse, constructive or destructive interference among these wave packets enables the population to be enhanced or repressed for the specific rotational state. We have used fourth order Runge-Kutta method to study the non-adiabatic rotational excitation (NAREX) dynamics. PMID:23220526

  19. Asymmetric laser excitation in chiral molecules: quantum simulations for a proposed experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröner, Dominik; Shibl, Mohamed F.; González, Leticia

    2003-04-01

    Quantum dynamical simulations based on ab initio potentials show that a single linearly polarized laser pulse (infrared or ultraviolet) can selectively excite one enantiomer from a racemic mixture. The degeneracy of the chiral pair is broken and a sequential reaction can distinguish between the two enantiomers based on energetic criteria. For instance, the undesired enantiomer can be photodestructed and the products can be probed using mass spectroscopy. The proposed scheme is applied to H 2POSD, which has a low interconversion barrier and to a chiral olefin possessing stable enantiomers.

  20. Electron scattering by laser-excited barium atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.; Jensen, S. W.; Poe, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    Inelastic and superelastic scattering of 30- and 100-eV electrons by laser-excited 6s 6p 1P and subsequent cascade-populated 6s 6p 3P, 6s 5d 1D, and 6s 5d 3D Ba atoms have been observed. Absolute differential cross sections for the singlet and relative scattering intensities for the triplet species have been determined in the 5 to 20 deg angular region. Under the present conditions excitations dominate over deexcitations.

  1. Mode-locked solid state lasers using diode laser excitation

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2012-03-06

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. An asymmetric cavity provides relatively large beam spot sizes in gain medium to permit efficient coupling to a volume pumped by a laser diode bar. The cavity can include a collimation region with a controlled beam spot size for insertion of a saturable absorber and dispersion components. Beam spot size is selected to provide stable mode locking based on Kerr lensing. Pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved in Yb:KGW.

  2. Intense excitation source of blue-green laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, K. S.

    1985-10-01

    An intense and efficient excitation source for blue-green lasers useful for the space-based satellite laser applications, underwater strategic communication, and measurement of ocean bottom profile is being developed. The source in use, hypocycloidal pinch plasma (HCP), and a newly designed dense-plasma focus (DPF) can produce intense UV photons (200 to 300 nm) which match the absorption spectra of both near UV and blue green dye lasers (300 to 400 nm). During the current project period, the successful enhancement of blue-green laser output of both Coumarin 503 and LD490 dye through the spectral conversion of the HCP pumping light has been achieved with a converter dye BBQ. The factor of enhancement in the blue-green laser output energy of both Coumarin 503 and LD490 is almost 73%. This enhancement will definitely be helpful in achieving the direct high power blue-green laser (> 1 MW) with the existing blue green dye laser. On the other hand the dense-plasma focus (DPF) with new optical coupling has been designed and constructed. For the optimization of the DPF device as the UV pumping light source, the velocity of current sheath and the formation of plasma focus have been measured as function of argon or argon-deuterium fill gas pressure. Finally, the blue-green dye laser (LD490) has been pumped with the DPF device for preliminary tests. Experimental results with the DPF device show that the velocity of the current sheath follows the inverse relation of sq st. of pressure as expected. The blue-green dye (LD490) laser output exceeded 3.1 m at the best cavity tuning of laser system. This corresponds to 3J/1 cu cm laser energy extraction.

  3. Ultra-broadband hybrid infrared laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budilova, O. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Kinyaevskiy, I. O.; Klimachev, Yu. M.; Kotkov, A. A.; Kozlov, A. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A hybrid IR laser system consisting of molecular gas lasers with frequency conversion of laser radiation in a solid-state converter (nonlinear crystal) was developed. One of these gas lasers is a carbon monoxide laser operating in multi-line or single-line mode. Another one is a carbon dioxide laser operating in multi-line mode. The two lasers operate under Q-switching with a joint rotating mirror. Due to sum- and difference-frequency generation in nonlinear crystals, the laser system emits within wavelength range from 2.5 to 16.6 μm. The laser system emitting radiation over such an extremely wide wavelength range (2.7 octaves) is of interest for remote sensing and other applications connected with laser beam propagation in the atmosphere.

  4. Mid-infrared laser-spectroscopic sensing of chemical species.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Markus W

    2015-05-01

    This letter reports on mid-infrared laser-based detection and analysis of chemical species. Emphasis is put on broadly tunable laser sources and sensitive detection schemes. Selected examples from our lab illustrate the performance and potential of such systems in various areas including environmental and medical sensing. PMID:26257952

  5. Mid-infrared laser-spectroscopic sensing of chemical species

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, Markus W.

    2014-01-01

    This letter reports on mid-infrared laser-based detection and analysis of chemical species. Emphasis is put on broadly tunable laser sources and sensitive detection schemes. Selected examples from our lab illustrate the performance and potential of such systems in various areas including environmental and medical sensing. PMID:26257952

  6. Interaction of the excited ions-activators in laser crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubenko, D. A.; Noginov, M. A.; Ostroumov, Vasiliy G.; Semenkov, S. G.; Smirnov, V. A.; Shcherbakov, Ivan A.

    1992-11-01

    Processes of interaction of excited ions are investigated in several laser crystals: Er-Er -- in YSGG:Cr, Er and GSAG:Cr,Er crystals; Ho-Ho -- in YSGG:Cr, Ho crystals; Tm-Tm -- in YSGG:Cr,Tm and YAG:Cr,Tm crystals; Tm-Ho -- in YSGG:Cr, Tm, Ho and YSAG:Cr, Tm, Ho crystals; Cr-Cr -- in 11 of different laser crystals (ruby, YAG, GSGG, YSGG, LICAF, et al.); Cr-TR (Er, Ho, Tb, Tm, Nd, -- TR) in YAG, YSGG, GSGG, GSAG crystals.

  7. Nuclear Excitation by a Strong Short Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Weidenmueller, Hans A.

    2011-05-06

    We derive the conditions on laser energy and photon number under which a short strong laser pulse excites a collective nuclear mode. We use the Giant Dipole Resonance as a representative example, and a random-matrix description of the fine-structure states and perturbation theory as tools. We identify the relevant observable as the nuclear time-decay function. That function is the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the associated scattering matrix and contains information not otherwise available. We evaluate that function in specific cases and show that it may deviate significantly from an exponential.

  8. Feasibility study: Monodisperse polymer particles containing laser-excitable dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, John W.; Chen, Jing-Hong

    1993-01-01

    The objective was to determine the feasibility of the preparation of monodisperse spherical poly(methyl methacrylate) and polystyrene particles that contain laser-excitable dyes in the size range 0.1 microns to 1 cm. Poly(methyl methacrylate) and polystyrene were chosen because of their excellent optical properties. The sphericity was required for uniformity of spectral output of re-irradiated light from the dye-containing particles. The monodispersity was required to give each particle the same optical properties when exposed to laser light.

  9. Strong-field physics with mid-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.

    2002-04-01

    Mid-infrared gas laser technology promises to become a unique tool for research in strong-field relativistic physics. The degree to which physics is relativistic is determined by a ponderomotive potential. At a given intensity, a 10 μm wavelength CO2 laser reaches a 100 times higher ponderomotive potential than the 1 μm wavelength solid state lasers. Thus, we can expect a proportional increase in the throughput of such processes as laser acceleration, x-ray production, etc. These arguments have been confirmed in proof-of-principle Thomson scattering and laser acceleration experiments conducted at BNL and UCLA where the first terawatt-class CO2 lasers are in operation. Further more, proposals for the 100 TW, 100 fs CO2 lasers based on frequency-chirped pulse amplification have been conceived. Such lasers can produce physical effects equivalent to a hypothetical multi-petawatt solid state laser. Ultra-fast mid-infrared lasers will open new routes to the next generation electron and ion accelerators, ultra-bright monochromatic femtosecond x-ray and gamma sources, allow to attempt the study of Hawking-Unruh radiation, and explore relativistic aspects of laser-matter interactions. We review the present status and experiments with terawatt-class CO2 lasers, sub-petawatt projects, and prospective applications in strong-field science. .

  10. Development of tunable flashlamp excited dye laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanthumnavin, V.; Apikitmata, S.; Kochareon, P.

    1991-05-01

    A tunable flashlamp excited dye laser (FEDL) was successfully developed for the first time in Thailand by Thai scientists at KMIT Thonburi (Bangmod). The Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethyl alcohol was utilized as a laser medium and circulated by a pump through a laser head. The dye cuvette had an inner diameter of 4.0 mm and was 90 mm long. The cavity mirrors M(sub 1), and M(sub 2) were concave mirrors with reflectivities of 100 and 73 percent respectively. A power supply of 0-20 kV and current of 0-50 mA charged a capacitor of 0.3 micro-f at 10-15 kV which was then discharged via a spark gap through the flashlamp. The output laser wavelengths was tunable from lambda = 550-640 nm. It is the first FEDL system, locally developed, which has a tunable wavelength for the laser output. The laser pulse width is about 1.0 microsecond with energy of 20 mJ and peak power pf 20 KW. The repetition rate of the laser is 1/15 Hz.

  11. Raman spectroscopy using 1550 nm (retina-safe) laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, Carl; Huang, Hermes; Smith, Wayne; Farquharson, Stuart

    2011-05-01

    During the past decade, the use of portable Raman analyzers for field measurements has grown dramatically. However, most analyzers use 785 nm excitation lasers that can cause permanent eye damage. To overcome this safety concern, we have built a portable Fourier transform (FT) Raman analyzer using a 1550 nm retina-safe excitation laser and have compared its performance to our 1064 nm FT-Raman analyzer, which uses the same optical design. Raman theory predicts approximately five times lower peak intensities at 1550 nm. Although we found that intensities were as much as 20 times less intense, the analyzer is still capable of measuring spectra of sufficient quality to identify and differentiate chemicals. PMID:21513601

  12. Tunable Infrared Lasers: Preparing for Expanded use in Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Killinger, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    The literature on the use of tunable infrared lasers, for atmospheric trace gas detection and monitoring is about 25 years of age. However, this field, whith its myriad of potential application areas, has always been driven by the available laser technology. As new or improved laser devices become available, with characteristics which lend themselves to operation in compact, nearly autonomous instruments, their application to atmospheric science and environmental measurements expands.

  13. Excited states in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N

    2009-11-30

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen - iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O{sub 2} and I{sub 2} molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I{sub 2} in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended. (review)

  14. Laser-excited fluorescence spectra of atomic uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Songyue; Jin Changtai; Shen Mingtao; Wang Xiulan

    1987-05-01

    Using a dc-supply hollow-cathode lamp as a source of uranium vapor and a rhodamine 6G dye laser to excite the vapor optically, it was simple and convenient to detect fluorescence from uranium atoms at 753.393, 763.175, and 763.954 nm. We give a detailed discussion of how we eliminated the intense background emissions, which were principally due to the lamp.

  15. Mid-infrared laser filaments in the atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Mitrofanov, A. V.; Voronin, A. A.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Pugžlys, A.; Stepanov, E. A.; Andriukaitis, G.; Flöry, T.; Ališauskas, S.; Fedotov, A. B.; Baltuška, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in the atmosphere offers unique opportunities for long-range transmission of high-power laser radiation and standoff detection. With the critical power of self-focusing scaling as the laser wavelength squared, the quest for longer-wavelength drivers, which would radically increase the peak power and, hence, the laser energy in a single filament, has been ongoing over two decades, during which time the available laser sources limited filamentation experiments in the atmosphere to the near-infrared and visible ranges. Here, we demonstrate filamentation of ultrashort mid-infrared pulses in the atmosphere for the first time. We show that, with the spectrum of a femtosecond laser driver centered at 3.9 μm, right at the edge of the atmospheric transmission window, radiation energies above 20 mJ and peak powers in excess of 200 GW can be transmitted through the atmosphere in a single filament. Our studies reveal unique properties of mid-infrared filaments, where the generation of powerful mid-infrared supercontinuum is accompanied by unusual scenarios of optical harmonic generation, giving rise to remarkably broad radiation spectra, stretching from the visible to the mid-infrared. PMID:25687621

  16. DNA fragmentation and nuclear phenotype in tendons exposed to low-intensity infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paoli, Flavia; Ramos Cerqueira, Larissa; Martins Ramos, Mayara; Campos, Vera M.; Ferreira-Machado, Samara C.; Geller, Mauro; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2015-03-01

    Clinical protocols are recommended in device guidelines outlined for treating many diseases on empirical basis. However, effects of low-intensity infrared lasers at fluences used in clinical protocols on DNA are controversial. Excitation of endogenous chromophores in tissues and free radicals generation could be described as a consequence of laser used. DNA lesions induced by free radicals cause changes in DNA structure, chromatin organization, ploidy degrees and cell death. In this work, we investigated whether low-intensity infrared laser therapy could alter the fibroblasts nuclei characteristics and induce DNA fragmentation. Tendons of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity infrared laser (830 nm), at different fluences (1, 5 and 10 J/cm2), in continuous wave (power output of 10mW, power density of 79.6 mW/cm2). Different frequencies were analyzed for the higher fluence (10 J/cm2), at pulsed emission mode (2.5, 250 and 2500 Hz), with the laser source at surface of skin. Geometric, densitometric and textural parameters obtained for Feulgen-stained nuclei by image analysis were used to define nuclear phenotypes. Significant differences were observed on the nuclear phenotype of tendons after exposure to laser, as well as, high cell death percentages was observed for all fluences and frequencies analyzed here, exception 1 J/cm2 fluence. Our results indicate that low-intensity infrared laser can alter geometric, densitometric and textural parameters in tendon fibroblasts nuclei. Laser can also induce DNA fragmentation, chromatin lost and consequently cell death, using fluences, frequencies and emission modes took out from clinical protocols.

  17. Wavelength-tuneable liquid crystal lasers from the visible to the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hands, P. J. W.; Dobson, C. A.; Morris, S. M.; Qasim, M. M.; Gardiner, D. J.; Wilkinson, T. D.; Coles, H. J.

    2011-10-01

    The study of band-edge lasing from dye-doped chiral nematic liquid crystals has thus far been largely restricted to visible wavelengths. In this paper, a wide range of commercially available laser dyes are examined for their suitability as infrared emitters within a chiral nematic host. Problems such as poor solubility and reduced quantum efficiencies are overcome, and successful band-edge lasing is demonstrated within the range of 735-850 nm, using the dyes LD800, HITC-P and DOTC-P. This paper also reports on progress towards widely tuneable liquid crystal lasers, capable of emission in the region 460- 850 nm. Key to this is the use of common pump source, capable of simultaneously exciting all of the dyes (both infrared and visible) that are present within the system. Towards this aim, we successfully demonstrate near-infrared lasing (800 nm) facilitated by Förster energy transfer between the visible dye DCM, and the infra-red dye LD800, enabling pump wavelengths anywhere between 420 and 532 nm to be used. These results demonstrate that small and low-cost tuneable visible to near-infrared laser sources are achievable, using a single common pump source. Such devices are envisaged to have wide-ranging applications including medical imaging (including optical coherence tomography), point-of-care optical medical diagnostics (such as flow cytometry), telecommunications, and optical signatures for security coatings.

  18. Resonant infrared laser-induced desorption of methane condensed on NaCl(100): isotope mixture experiments.

    PubMed

    Redlich, Britta; Zacharias, Helmut; Meijer, Gerard; von Helden, Gert

    2006-01-28

    Resonantly enhanced infrared laser-induced desorption of methane condensed on a single-crystal NaCl(100) surface is observed after excitation with the widely tunable infrared laser output of the free-electron laser at the free-electron laser for infrared experiments facility using mass spectroscopic detection and time-of-flight analysis. Desorption of methane is observed only when the exciting light is in resonance with an internal vibrational mode of the molecule. Different intramolecular modes of the three methane isotopologues under study--CH(4), CD(4), and CD(3)H--are excited; the degenerate deformation mode nu(4) is observed for CH(4) and CD(4) at 7.69 and 10.11 microm, respectively, as well as the nu(2) and nu(4) modes of CD(3)H at 7.79, 9.75, and 9.98 microm. The desorption signals for the pure layers of these different methane isotopologues as well as for different mixtures of two of these are investigated as a function of the infrared wavelength and the laser fluence. The desorption behavior for pure and mixed layers is compared and the underlying desorption mechanism is discussed. PMID:16460197

  19. Investigation of RF excited CW CO2 waveguide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1984-01-01

    The RF excited 2 to 3W CW CO2 waveguide lasers with lifetimes of the order of 10(4) to 2.10(4) hours were produced. This was achieved with CO and N2 bearing gas mixtures and with internal as well as external discharge electrodes. It is noted that these tests were conducted with unstabilized lasers which drift around in their signatures. The average power output was reduced to about one half of the highest peak power output in the signature. One of the lasers, no. 1.1, still shows 60% of its original output power after it was cycled on and off every 10 minutes for more than 50,000 times. The starting voltage and driving point impedance of the RF excited gas discharge structure for different gas pressures and mixtures were measured. These data will serve as a basis for the matching and starting network optimization. The second laser body was frit and indium sealed. To our a vacuum leak between the bore and electrode holes was noted. The leak seems to be due to a defect or crack in the BeO body.

  20. UV Resonant Raman Spectrometer with Multi-Line Laser Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L.; Kohel, James M.; Kirby, James P.; Morookian, John Michael; Pelletier, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A Raman spectrometer employs two or more UV (ultraviolet) laser wavel engths to generate UV resonant Raman (UVRR) spectra in organic sampl es. Resonant Raman scattering results when the laser excitation is n ear an electronic transition of a molecule, and the enhancement of R aman signals can be several orders of magnitude. In addition, the Ra man cross-section is inversely proportional to the fourth power of t he wavelength, so the UV Raman emission is increased by another fact or of 16, or greater, over visible Raman emissions. The Raman-scatter ed light is collected using a high-resolution broadband spectrograph . Further suppression of the Rayleigh-scattered laser light is provi ded by custom UV notch filters.

  1. Laser-driven isomerization of HCN → HNC: the importance of rotational excitation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaopeng; Zheng, Yujun

    2015-03-26

    We report a time-dependent quantum wave packet theory, which is employed to interpret the isomerization dynamics of HCN molecules induced by an intense picosecond infrared laser field. Considering the molecular rotational degrees of the freedom, the wave functions are expanded in terms of molecular rotational bases. Our full-dimensional quantum model includes the full Coriolis coupling in the molecular kinetic energy Hamiltonian and dipole approximation in interaction terms. The numerical results show that the field-induced molecule rotational excitation plays an important role in the isomerization dynamical process. Some phenomena appear such as two-step two-photon absorption and highly oscillatory structure in rotational state distributions. The centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation calculation is also carried out and compared in this work; it is shown that the Coriolis couplings may lead to a significant decrease in the isomerization rate but highly enhanced molecular rotational excitation. PMID:25746130

  2. Near infrared femtosecond laser ablation of urinary calculi in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel M.; Kuranov, Roman V.; McElroy, Austin B.; Wang, Tianyi; Paranjape, Amit S.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2009-02-01

    Pulsed light emitted from a near infrared (λ=800nm) femtosecond laser is capable of plasma induced photodisruption of various materials. We used femtosecond laser pulses to ablate human urinary calculi. Femtosecond pulsed laser interaction with urinary calculi was investigated with various stone compositions, different incident fluences and number of applied pulses. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography was used to image cross sections of ablation craters on the surface of urinary calculi. Our results indicate that femtosecond laser pulses can ablate various calculi compositions. Crater diameter and depth varies from tens of microns to several hundred microns when up to 1000 pulses were applied. Future studies are required to determine if pulsed near infrared femtosecond laser pulses can be applied clinically for lithotripsy of urinary calculi.

  3. Infrared Signatures of Laser Induced Plasma in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hening, Alexandru; Lu, Ryan; Ramirez, Ayax; Advanced Technology Team

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of the temporal and spatial evolution of laser generated plasma in air is necessary for the development of potential applications which range from laser induced ionized micro channels and filaments able to transfer high electric pulses over few hundreds of meters, to the generation of plasma artifacts in air, far away from the laser source. This work is focused mainly on the infrared spectrum. The influence of laser parameters (energy per pulse, pulse duration, repetition rate, wavelength and etc.) on the plasma formation and evolution has been investigated. Laser transmission losses through the air as well as through the breakdown plasma as well as their effect on infrared plasma signature are to be presented.

  4. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-11-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  5. Airborne laser systems for atmospheric sounding in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark A.; Jia, Huamin; Zammit-Mangion, David

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents new techniques for atmospheric sounding using Near Infrared (NIR) laser sources, direct detection electro-optics and passive infrared imaging systems. These techniques allow a direct determination of atmospheric extinction and, through the adoption of suitable inversion algorithms, the indirect measurement of some important natural and man-made atmospheric constituents, including Carbon Dioxide (CO2). The proposed techniques are suitable for remote sensing missions performed by using aircraft, satellites, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), parachute/gliding vehicles, Roving Surface Vehicles (RSV), or Permanent Surface Installations (PSI). The various techniques proposed offer relative advantages in different scenarios. All are based on measurements of the laser energy/power incident on target surfaces of known geometric and reflective characteristics, by means of infrared detectors and/or infrared cameras calibrated for radiance. Experimental results are presented relative to ground and flight trials performed with laser systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) at λ = 1064 nm and λ = 1550 nm. This includes ground tests performed with 10 Hz and 20 KHz PRF NIR laser systems in a variety of atmospheric conditions, and flight trials performed with a 10 Hz airborne NIR laser system installed on a TORNADO aircraft, flying up to altitudes of 22,000 ft above ground level. Future activities are planned to validate the atmospheric retrieval algorithms developed for CO2 column density measurements, with emphasis on aircraft related emissions at airports and other high air-traffic density environments.

  6. Laser induced infrared spectral shift of the MgB2:Cr superconductor films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlZayed, N. S.; Kityk, I. V.; Soltan, S.; El-Naggar, A. M.; Shahabuddin, M.

    2015-02-01

    During illumination of the MgB2:Cr2O3 films it was established substantial spectral shift of the infrared spectra in the vicinity of 20-50 cm-1. The excitations were performed by nanosecond Er:glass laser operating at 1.54 μm and by microsecond 10.6 μm CO2 laser. The spectral shifts of the IR maxima were in opposite spectral directions for the two types of lasers. This one observed difference correlates well with spectral shift of their critical temperatures. The possible explanation is given by performance of DFT calculations of the charge density redistribution and the time kinetics of the photovoltaic response. To understand the kinetics of the photoinduced processes the time kinetics of photoresponse was done for the particular laser wavelengths.

  7. Bi-directional terahertz-to-infrared emission from metal-coated nanostructures upon femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Zhao, Ji; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, X-C

    2015-09-21

    We report on the investigation of bi-directional terahertz-to-infrared (THz-to-IR) radiation from a metal film coated on a substrate with randomly ordered pore arrays by irradiation of femtosecond laser pulses. THz-to-IR radiation was observed both for front-side excitation (laser incident on the metal surface) and for rear-side excitation (laser incident on the substrate). In both cases, the radiation was observed both in the propagation direction of the laser beam and in the reverse direction. Considering these findings, we propose a thermal emission mechanism based on the production of surface plasmons, either delocalized (through phase-matched excitation) or localized (through surface roughness) at the air/metal and metal/substrate interfaces. PMID:26406717

  8. Non Destructive Testing by active infrared thermography coupled with shearography under same optical heat excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, Louis-Daniel; Dumoulin, Jean; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    As infrastructures are aging, the evaluation of their health is becoming crucial. To do so, numerous Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods are available. Among them, thermal shearography and active infrared thermography represent two full field and contactless methods for surface inspection. The synchronized use of both methods presents multiples advantages. Most importantly, both NDT are based on different material properties. Thermography depend on the thermal properties and shearography on the mechanical properties. The cross-correlation of both methods result in a more accurate and exact detection of the defects. For real site application, the simultaneous use of both methods is simplified due to the fact that the excitation method (thermal) is the same. Active infrared thermography is the measure of the temperature by an infrared camera of a surface subjected to heat flux. Observation of the variation of temperature in function of time reveal the presence of defects. On the other hand, shearography is a measure of out-of-plane surface displacement. This displacement is caused by the application of a strain on the surface which (in our case) take the form of a temperature gradient inducing a thermal stress To measure the resulting out-of-plane displacement, shearography exploit the relation between the phase difference and the optical path length. The phase difference is measured by the observation of the interference between two coherent light beam projected on the surface. This interference is due to change in optical path length as the surface is deformed [1]. A series of experimentation have been conducted in laboratory with various sample of concrete reinforced with CFRP materials. Results obtained reveal that with both methods it was possible to detect defects in the gluing. An infrared lamp radiating was used as the active heat source. This is necessary if measurements with shearography are to be made during the heating process. A heating lamp in the

  9. Development of a higher power fission-fragment-excited CO laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcarthur, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Moderate dilution of the CO with Ar lowers the reactor excitation threshold for lasing. Fission coatings on ceramic substrates have been developed which minimize fouling of laser mirrors. A new laser apparatus was constructed which more closely resembles large electrically excited CO lasers. Measurements of the energy emerging from the foils indicate that excitation of the gas is still below optimum values. Laser action at room temperature has also been observed.

  10. An optically pumped hydrogen iodide cascade laser operating in mid-infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanavis, Amarin

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, several activities have been toward optically pumped molecular gas lasers as mid-infrared coherent sources. These have been also motivated by the search of suitable laser media for Hollow-core Optical Fiber Gas Laser (HOFGLAS) and the novel beam combiner. To continue these challenge paths, an optically pumped Hydrogen Iodide (HI) laser is explored by using a comprehensive laser model. HI transitions in the communication band (1.5 μm) are attractive due to a potential mean to be excited by commercial available laser systems. Furthermore, its emission coverage in 5 micron region can be useful for many applications, for example, free-space communication and laser spectroscopy. In the laser model, 30 rotational states in each of the 8 vibrational states of HI are taken into account to allow molecular energy transfer processes such as rotational relaxation and vibrational relaxation. A HI laser under pulsed excitation on a second overtone transition with lasing cascade is possible. The complete lasing cascade originates from the terminal pumped state (vibrational state, V = 3) to the vibrational state, V = 2, from the vibrational state, V = 2 to the vibrational state, V = 1 and finally from the vibrational state, V = 1 to the vibrational ground state. For the full lasing cascade, the laser efficiencies can be approached to 70%. In addition, the lasing behavior of the gas pressure related to the molecular relaxation rates and pressure broadening effects is also investigated. Owing to exceptional frequency tuning properties, the laser output can be manipulated to desired frequencies.

  11. Separation of ionization and subsequent electronic excitation for formation of electronically excited ethanol cation in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, T.; Hosaka, K.; Akagi, H.; Yokoyama, A.; Yamanouchi, K.; Kannari, F.; Itakura, R.

    2011-10-01

    Ionization and subsequent electronic excitation occurring within the same laser pulse (400 nm, 96 fs, 1.3 ~ 18 TW cm-2) are separately investigated by measuring in coincidence an electron and a product ion produced from C2H5OH. It is revealed that the nascent population in the electronically excited C2H5OH+ prepared by the ionization decreases as the laser intensity increases, while the subsequent electronic excitation is enhanced through the resonant electronic transitions. Ionization and electronic excitation mechanisms are described based on the electronic-state distributions of C2H5OH+.

  12. Near and medium infrared optical fiber lasers and emerging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudenzano, F.; Mescia, L.; Allegretti, L.; De Sario, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Di Tommaso, A.; Palmisano, T.; Petruzzelli, V.

    2010-02-01

    Laser cavities emitting in the near and medium infrared wavelength range, made of rare earth doped optical fibers and suitable pairs of integrated mirrors, are used in a large number of applications. Nowadays, the efficient employment of near and medium infrared laser beams is largely widespread in the field of m*aterial processing, surgery, directed energy, remote sensing, spectroscopy, imaging, and so on. In a lot of cases, the high conversion efficiency, the excellent beam quality, the compactness and, the good heat dissipation capability make fiber lasers competitive and attractive with respect to other light sources, such as ion-doped crystal and bulk glass lasers, optical parametric oscillators, semiconductor and gas lasers. The paper aims to recall and/or briefly illustrate a few among the numerous strategies recently followed by research laboratories and industries to obtain laser sources based on rare earth doped optical fibres. A recall on the host materials and the dopants employed for their construction, and the corresponding applications is given, too. Moreover, an example of near infrared (NIR) fiber optic laser development, by employing available on market components is illustrated by underlining the possibility to easily obtain high beam quality.

  13. Mid-infrared solid-state lasers and laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Byvik, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of NASA-Langley's objectives for the development of advanced lasers and laser materials systems applicable to remote sensing in the mid-IR range. Prominent among current concerns are fiber-optic spectroscopy, eye-safe solid-state lasers for both Doppler sensing and mid-IR wavelength-generation laser pumping, and nonlinear optics generating tunable mid-IR radiation. Ho:YAG lasers are noted to exhibit intrinsic advantages for the desired applications, and are pumpable by GaAlAs laser diodes with a quantum efficiency approaching 2.

  14. Multiphoton dissociation and thermal unimolecular reactions induced by infrared lasers. [REAMPA code

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, H.L.

    1981-04-01

    Multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of ethyl chloride was studied using a tunable 3.3 ..mu..m laser to excite CH stretches. The absorbed energy increases almost linearly with fluence, while for 10 ..mu..m excitation there is substantial saturation. Much higher dissociation yields were observed for 3.3 ..mu..m excitation than for 10 ..mu..m excitation, reflecting bottlenecking in the discrete region of 10 ..mu..m excitation. The resonant nature of the excitation allows the rate equations description for transitions in the quasicontinuum and continuum to be extended to the discrete levels. Absorption cross sections are estimated from ordinary ir spectra. A set of cross sections which is constant or slowly decreasing with increasing vibrational excitation gives good fits to both absorption and dissociation yield data. The rate equations model was also used to quantitatively calculate the pressure dependence of the MPD yield of SF/sub 6/ caused by vibrational self-quenching. Between 1000-3000 cm/sup -1/ of energy is removed from SF/sub 6/ excited to approx. > 60 kcal/mole by collision with a cold SF/sub 6/ molecule at gas kinetic rate. Calculation showed the fluence dependence of dissociation varies strongly with the gas pressure. Infrared multiphoton excitation was applied to study thermal unimolecular reactions. With SiF/sub 4/ as absorbing gas for the CO/sub 2/ laser pulse, transient high temperature pulses were generated in a gas mixture. IR fluorescence from the medium reflected the decay of the temperature. The activation energy and the preexponential factor of the reactant dissociation were obtained from a phenomenological model calculation. Results are presented in detail. (WHK)

  15. Photochemical synthesis of disilane from silane with infrared laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zavelovich, J. ); Lyman, J.L. )

    1989-07-27

    The authors report the clean and efficient conversion of silane to disilane by CO{sub 2} laser irradiation. The direct irradiation of pure silane at high pressures (from 75 to 1,700 Torr) converts silane to disilane with high selectivity and with efficient use of the absorbed laser radiation. Hydrogen is the only other major volatile product, and the production of solid products is minimal. The proposed mechanism of the photochemical reaction includes (1) collisionally enhanced absorption of the laser radiation by silane, (2) collisional deexcitation of the vibrationally excited silane, (3) concurrent decomposition to SiH{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, (4) production of vibrationally excited disilane by SiH{sub 2} insertion into a silane Si-H bond, (5) collisional quenching of the excited disilane, and (6) rapid cooling of the irradiated gas by thermal expansion. They support the proposed mechanism by additional experiments and model calculations.

  16. Laser cooling and control of excitations in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, G. I.; McAuslan, D. L.; Sheridan, E.; Sachkou, Y.; Baker, C.; Bowen, W. P.

    2016-08-01

    Superfluidity is a quantum state of matter that exists macroscopically in helium at low temperatures. The elementary excitations in superfluid helium have been probed with great success using techniques such as neutron and light scattering. However, measurements of phonon excitations have so far been limited to average thermodynamic properties or the driven response far out of thermal equilibrium. Here, we use cavity optomechanics to probe the thermodynamics of phonon excitations in real time. Furthermore, strong light-matter interactions allow both laser cooling and amplification. This represents a new tool to observe and control superfluid excitations that may provide insight into phonon-phonon interactions, quantized vortices and two-dimensional phenomena such as the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. The third sound modes studied here also offer a pathway towards quantum optomechanics with thin superfluid films, including the prospect of femtogram masses, high mechanical quality factors, strong phonon-phonon and phonon-vortex interactions, and self-assembly into complex geometries with sub-nanometre feature size.

  17. Coherent laser excitation of Ba-137 and Ba-138

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Kai-Shue

    1992-01-01

    Computations are carried out for the 1S(6s2)-1P(6s,6p) coherent laser excitation of Ba-137 and Ba-138 in a magnetic field. Results are presented for both the steady-state and time-dependent excited-state populations of the Zeeman-split magnetic sublevels. The quantum-statistical Liouville-equation approach (for the reduced density matrix) is compared to the rate-equations approach. Significant differences are found between these, due to the interference between strongly overlapping lines (especially for Ba-137). The time-evolution profiles indicate that the Ba-137 transient time is much longer than that of Ba-138.

  18. Non-destructive Testing by Infrared Thermography Under Random Excitation and ARMA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, J. L.; Nicolas, J. L.; Candoré, J. C.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Photothermal thermography is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method, which has many applications in the field of control and characterization of thin materials. This technique is usually implemented under CW or flash excitation. Such excitations are not adapted for control of fragile materials or for multi-frequency analysis. To allow these analyses, in this article, the use of a new control mode is proposed: infrared thermography under random excitation and auto regressive moving average analysis. First, the principle of this NDT method is presented. Then, the method is shown to permit detection, with low energy constraints, of detachments situated in mural paintings.

  19. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse for hard tissue drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2014-02-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse with a circular beam and a low divergence angle. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, and a spark-gap switch. The laser pulse had a spike pulse width of 103 ns and a pulse tail length of 32.6 μs. The beam cross-section was circular and the full-angle beam divergence was 1.7 mrad. The laser was used to drill ivory samples without carbonization at fluences of 2.3-7.1 J/cm2. The drilling depth of the dry ivory increased with the fluence. The drilling mechanism of the dry ivory was attributed to absorption of the laser light by the ivory.

  20. Diode laser excited optogalvanic spectroscopy of glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, C.M.; Shaw, R.W.; Post-Zwicker, A., Young, J.P.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    The development of diode-laser-excited isotopically-selective optogalvanic spectroscopy (OGS) of uranium metal, oxide and fluoride in a glow discharge (GD) is presented. The technique is useful for determining isotopic ratios of {sup 235}U/({sup 235}U + {sup 238}U) in the above samples. The precision and accuracy of this determination is evaluated, and a study of experimental parameters pertaining to optimization of he measurement is discussed. Application of the GD-OGS to other f-transition elements is also described.

  1. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy for astronomical purposes. [laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townes, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    Heterodyne infrared astronomy was carried out using CO2 lasers and some solid state tunable lasers. The best available detectors are mercury cadmium telluride photodiodes. Their quantum efficiencies reach values near 0.5 and in an overall system an effective quantum efficiency, taking into account optical losses and amplifier noise, of about 0.25 was demonstrated. Initial uses of 10 micron heterodyne spectroscopy were for the study of planetary molecular spectra.

  2. Fast Laser Excitation and Ultrahigh Strain-Rate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Averback

    2007-06-03

    Phase evolution induced by single or repeated excitation with energetic femtosecond laser pulses is examined. Of primary interest is the solidification behavior of pure metals at deep undercoolings and self-organization in simple eutectic alloys. Time resolved measurements using third harmonic generation (THG) of light and ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) are employed to elucidate several issues related to fast laser excitation, including heat transport by ballistic and diffusional electrons through multilayer films, the dependence of crystallization velocities on materials properties, mechanisms controlling the transport of heat away from the crystal-liquid interface, and the possibility for quenching pure metals, such as Cu, Ni, and Fe, into the amorphous state. Special samples designed to maximize the quenching speed are developed. The properties of such pure metallic glasses, such as glass and crystallization temperatures, will be measured, if such samples are successfully produced. The measurements are complemented by molecular dynamics computer simulations of the solidification process. The second interest of this research is mesoscopic, self-organization of materials under repeated laser melting, with diffusional relaxation between pulses. We select binary alloys that are immiscible in the solid state but miscible in the liquid state, such as Ag-Cu. Femtosecond laser irradiation is employed to induce melting and to vary the melting time over a wide range, from a few ps to hundreds of ps. This enables us to perform critical experimental tests of key theoretical predictions self-organization in alloys under external forcing, in particular the existence of a threshold value of the forced mixing length for patterning to take place.

  3. Infrared laser stimulation of retinal and vestibular neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardin, Fabrice; Bec, Jean-Michel; Albert, Emmanuelle S.; Hamel, Christian; Dupeyron, Gérard; Chabbert, Christian; Marc, Isabelle; Dumas, Michel

    2011-03-01

    The study of laser-neuron interaction has gained interest over the last few years not only for understanding of fundamental mechanisms but also for medical applications such as prosthesis because of the non-invasive characteristic of the laser stimulation. Several authors have shown that near infrared lasers are able to stimulate neurons. It is suggested that a thermal gradient induced by the absorption of the laser radiation on cells is the primary effect but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We show in this work that infrared laser radiations provide a possible way for stimulating retinal and vestibular ganglion cells. We describe relevant physical characteristics allowing safe and reproducible neuron stimulations by single infrared pulses. Calcium fluorescence imaging and electrophysiological recordings have been used to measure ionic exchanges at the neuron membrane. The stimulation system is based on a pulsed laser diode beam of a few mW. Effects of three different wavelengths (from 1470 to 1875 nm) and stimulation durations have been investigated. Variations of the stimulation energy thresholds suggest that the main physical parameter is the water optical absorption. Measurements of the temperature at the cell membrane show that a constant temperature rise is required to stimulate neurons, suggesting a photothermal process.

  4. Infrared absorption change in single-walled carbon nanotubes observed by combination spectroscopy of synchrotron radiation and laser.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junpei; Itoh, Minoru; Koike, Masahiro; Kamada, Masao; Endo, Morinobu

    2006-11-01

    The Drude tail due to photo-excited carriers in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been observed in the mid-infrared region by using combination spectroscopy of synchrotron radiation and Ti:sapphire laser. It is found that the density of photo-excited carriers increases as the sample temperature is raised from 12 to 300 K, and their lifetime is of the order of minutes at 300 K. These facts suggest that the movement of photo-excited carriers is largely affected by some extrinsic defect, thus resulting in the long-lasting Drude reflection in SWNTs. PMID:17057323

  5. Optimal repetition rates of excitation pulses in a Tm-vapour laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskii, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    The optimal excitation pulse repetition rates (PRRs) for a gas-discharge Tm-vapour laser with indirect population of upper laser levels are determined. It is shown that, under the same excitation conditions, the optimal PRRs increase with a decrease in the energy defect between the upper laser acceptor level and the nearest resonant donor level. The reasons for the limitation of the optimal PRRs in Tm-vapour laser are discussed. It is shown that the maximum average power of Tm-vapour laser radiation may exceed several times the Cu-vapour laser power under the same excitation conditions and in identical gas-discharge tubes.

  6. Laser dyes excited by high PRR Nd:YAG laser second-harmonic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Donin, V. I.; Jakovin, D. V.; Reimer, I. V.

    2008-01-01

    The lasing characteristics of red-emitting dyes in ethanol excited by Nd:YAG laser second-harmonic radiation are examined. The Nd:YAG laser was pumped by a diode matrix. The pump pulse repetition rates (PRRs) were 2.5 - 10 kHz and the pulse duration was 60 - 300 ns. The following dyes were evaluated: oxazine 17, DCM, DCM sp, and pyridine 1. The conversion efficiency for oxazine was 25 % without wavelength selection and 15 % with wavelength selection over the tuning range from 630 to 700 nm. The Nd:YAG and dye laser designs used are described elsewhere [1,2].

  7. Laser red shifting based characterization of wakefield excitation in a laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, S.; Benedetti, C.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Shaw, B. H.; Sokollik, T.; Tilborg, J. van; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Tóth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-15

    Optical spectra of a drive laser exiting a channel guided laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) are analyzed through experiments and simulations to infer the magnitude of the excited wakefields. The experiments are performed at sufficiently low intensity levels and plasma densities to avoid electron beam generation via self-trapping. Spectral redshifting of the laser light is studied as an indicator of the efficiency of laser energy transfer into the plasma through the generation of coherent plasma wakefields. Influences of input laser energy, plasma density, temporal and spatial laser profiles, and laser focal location in a plasma channel are analyzed. Energy transfer is found to be sensitive to details of laser pulse shape and focal location. The experimental conditions for these critical parameters are modeled and included in particle-in-cell simulations. Simulations reproduce the redshift of the laser within uncertainties of the experiments and produce an estimate of the wake amplitudes in the experiments as a function of amount of redshift. The results support the practical use of laser redshifting to quantify the longitudinally averaged accelerating field that a particle would experience in an LPA powered below the self-trapping limit.

  8. Infrared laser diode with visible illuminator for biomedical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Podbielska, Halina; Szafranski, C.; Kuzmin, Andrei N.; Ges, J. A.; Ryabtsev, Gennadii I.

    1995-02-01

    The special laser diode device (LDD) leasing in the near infrared region (IR) with two wavelengths: (lambda) 1 equals 850 nm and (lambda) 2 equals 1000 nm, designed for laser therapy, is presented. This device is characterized by a unique feature, namely a separate built-in illuminator, operating in 670 nm. The special construction of LDD and the illuminator enables the user to visualize exactly the surface irradiated by IR radiation. The exposure time and the output of laser power are also controlled and can be displayed on the LED monitor at the front panel. This new device, described here, is compact, low cost, and user friendly.

  9. Laser mode complexity analysis in infrared waveguide free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prazeres, Rui

    2016-06-01

    We analyze an optical phenomenon taking place in waveguide free-electron lasers, which disturbs, or forbids, operation in far infrared range. Waveguides in the optical cavity are used in far-infrared and THz ranges in order to avoid diffraction optical losses, and a hole coupling on output mirror is used for laser extraction. We show that, when the length of the waveguide exceeds a given limit, a phenomenon of "mode disorder" appears in the cavity, which makes the laser difficult, or impossible, to work properly. This phenomenon is even more important when the waveguide covers the whole length of the cavity. A numerical simulation describes this effect, which creates discontinuities of the laser power in the spectral domain. We show an example with an existing infrared Free-Electron Laser, which exhibits such discontinuities of the power, and where no convincing explanation was proposed until now.

  10. Two-photon excited fluorescence enhancement with broadband versus tunable femtosecond laser pulse excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Yeh, Alvin T.

    2012-02-01

    The inverse relationship between two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and laser pulse duration suggests that two-photon microscopy (TPM) performance may be improved by decreasing pulse duration. However, for ultrashort pulses of sub-10 femtosecond (fs) in duration, its spectrum contains the effective gain bandwidth of Ti:Sapphire and its central wavelength is no longer tunable. An experimental study was performed to explore this apparent tradeoff between untuned sub-10 fs transform-limited pulse (TLP) and tunable 140 fs pulse for TPEF. Enhancement factors of 1.6, 6.7, and 5.2 are measured for Indo-1, FITC, and TRITC excited by sub-10 fs TLP compared with 140 fs pulse tuned to the two-photon excitation (TPE) maxima at 730 nm, 800 nm, and 840 nm, respectively. Both degenerate (v1=v2) and nondegenerate (v1≠v2) mixing of sub-10 fs TLP spectral components result in its broad second-harmonic (SH) power spectrum and high spectral density, which can effectively compensate for the lack of central wavelength tuning and lead to large overlap with dye TPE spectra for TPEF enhancements. These pulse properties were also exploited for demonstrating its potential applications in multicolor imaging with TPM.

  11. Anomalous dispersion and the pumping of far infrared (FIR) lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the anomalous dispersion at the pump transition in molecular far-infrared lasers (FIR) can lead to sizable focusing and defocusing effects. Criteria for beam spreading and trapping are considered with CH2F as an example.

  12. DNA repair gene expression in biological tissues exposed to low-intensity infrared laser.

    PubMed

    de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Araújo de Campos, Vera Maria; Ferreira Machado, Samara Cristina; de Freitas Peregrino, Antonio Augusto; Geller, Mauro; de Paoli, Flavia

    2013-07-01

    Special properties of laser light have led to its usefulness in many applications in therapy. Excitation of endogenous chromophores in biotissues and generation of free radicals could be involved in its biological effects. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluated the expression of APE1 and OGG1 genes related to repair of DNA lesions induced by free radicals. Skin and muscle tissues of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity infrared laser at different fluences and frequencies. After laser exposition of 1 and 24 h, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of APE1 and OGG1 gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of APE1 and OGG1 mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissues of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency, and time after exposure. Our study suggests that low-intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of DNA lesions by base excision repair pathway. PMID:22941447

  13. Non-resonant optical modulation of quantum cascade laser and its application potential in infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Tian, Chao; Chen, Gang; Martini, Rainer

    2014-02-01

    Based on the nature of ultra-fast carrier life time in semiconductor quantum well, optical modulation of quantum cascade laser offers an unique way to control intersubband transition through interband transition. This method circumvents the problem of parasitic effects associated with electrical modulation, resulting in a high modulation bandwidth. In addition it allows for fast wavelength modulation on standard type quantum cascade lasers by directly injecting charge carriers to laser active region with near-infrared optical excitation. Here, we demonstrate the first infrared spectroscopic measurement conducted with this all-optical modulation approach. Using wavelength modulation spectroscopy, a 1st order derivative spectrum of methanol vapor gas is observed. Optically based wavelength modulation up to 200 MHz is purely induced by pumping the front facet of quantum cascade laser with an intensity-modulated 1550 nm DFB laser. Compared with conventional direct absorption approach, the noise equivalent sensitivity is improved by a factor of 10 by adding optical modulation in a non-optimized system.

  14. Mid-infrared spatial filter fabrication using laser chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet D'Aubigny, Christian Y.; Walker, Christopher K.; Golish, Dathon R.

    2004-10-01

    Feedhorns like those commonly used in radio-telescope and radio communication equipment couple very efficiently (>98%) to the fundamental Gaussian mode (TEM00). High order modes are not propagated through a single-mode hollow metallic waveguides. It follows that a back to back feedhorn design joined with a small length of single-mode waveguide can be used as a very high throughput spatial filter. Laser micro machining provides a mean of scaling successful waveguide and quasi-optical components to far and mid infrared wavelengths. A laser micro machining system optimized for THz and far IR applications has been in operation at Steward Observatory for several years and produced devices designed to operate at λ=60μm. A new laser micromachining system capable of producing mid-infrared devices will soon be operational. These proceedings review metallic hollow waveguide spatial filtering theory, feedhorn designs as well as laser chemical etching and the design of a new high-NA UV laser etcher capable of sub-micron resolution to fabricate spatial filters for use in the mid-infrared.

  15. Optimized laser application in dermatology using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Roderick A.; Donne, Kelvin E.; Clement, Marc; Kiernan, Michael N.

    2002-03-01

    Infrared thermography can be used to optimize the application of lasers in dermatology with particular reference to the treatment of certain skin disorders such as vascular lesions and depilation. The efficacy of treatment is dependent upon a number of factors including: Optimization and correct selection of laser parameters such as wavelength and spot size. Human factors, such as laser operator skill, patient's skin type and anatomical location. By observing the thermal effects of laser irradiation on the skins surface during treatment results in improved efficacy and minimizes the possible threshold to skin damage, reducing the possibility of burning and scarring. This is of particular significance for example, in the control of purpura for the treatment of vascular lesions. The optimization is validated with reference to a computer model that predicts various skin temperatures based on two different laser spot sizes.

  16. Ultrafast Nonlinear Excitation Dynamics of Black Phosphorus Nanosheets from Visible to Mid-Infrared.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangpeng; Szydłowska, Beata M; Wang, Gaozhong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jing Jing; Magan, John J; Zhang, Long; Coleman, Jonathan N; Wang, Jun; Blau, Werner J

    2016-07-26

    The recent progress on black phosphorus makes it a promising candidate material for broadband nanophotonic devices, especially operating in the mid-infrared spectral region. Here, the excited carrier dynamics and nonlinear optical response of unoxidized black phosphorus nanosheets and their wavelength dependence were systematically studied from 800 nm to 2.1 μm. The wavelength-dependent relaxation times of black phosphorus nanosheets are determined to be 360 fs to 1.36 ps with photon energies from 1.55 to 0.61 eV. In a comparative study with graphene, we found that black phosphorus has a faster carrier relaxation in near- and mid-infrared region. With regard to nonlinear optical absorption, the response of black phosphorus significantly increases from near- to mid-infrared, and black phosphorus is also confirmed to be better as saturable absorber to MoS2 in infrared region. PMID:27281449

  17. Advanced nanoparticle generation and excitation by lasers in liquids.

    PubMed

    Barcikowski, Stephan; Compagnini, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    Today, nanoparticles are widely implemented as functional elements onto surfaces, into volumes and as nano-hybrids, resulting for example in bioactive composites and biomolecule conjugates. However, only limited varieties of materials compatible for integration into advanced functional materials are available: nanoparticles synthesized using conventional gas phase processes are often agglomerated into micro powders that are hard to re-disperse into functional matrices. Chemical synthesis methods often lead to impurities of the nanoparticle colloids caused by additives and precursor reaction products. In the last decade, laser ablation and nanoparticle generation in liquids has proven to be a unique and efficient technique to generate, excite, fragment, and conjugate a large variety of nanostructures in a scalable and clean manner. This editorial briefly highlights selected recent advancements and critical aspects in the field of pulsed laser-based nanoparticle generation and manipulation, including exemplary strategies to harvest the unique properties of the laser-generated nanomaterials in the field of biomedicine and catalysis. The presented critical aspects address future assignments such as size control and scale-up. PMID:23138867

  18. In vivo studies of ultrafast near-infrared laser tissue bonding and wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-10-01

    Femtosecond (fs) pulse lasers in the near-infrared (NIR) range exhibit very distinct properties upon their interaction with biomolecules compared to the corresponding continuous wave (CW) lasers. Ultrafast NIR laser tissue bonding (LTB) was used to fuse edges of two opposing animal tissue segments in vivo using fs laser photoexcitation of the native vibrations of chomophores. The fusion of the incised tissues was achieved in vivo at the molecular level as the result of the energy-matter interactions of NIR laser radiation with water and the structural proteins like collagen in the target tissues. Nonthermal vibrational excitation from the fs laser absorption by water and collagen induced the formation of cross-links between tissue proteins on either sides of the weld line resulting in tissue bonding. No extrinsic agents were used to facilitate tissue bonding in the fs LTB. These studies were pursued for the understanding and evaluation of the role of ultrafast NIR fs laser radiation in the LTB and consequent wound healing. The fs LTB can be used for difficult to suture structures such as blood vessels, nerves, gallbladder, liver, intestines, and other viscera. Ultrafast NIR LTB yields promising outcomes and benefits in terms of wound closure and wound healing under optimal conditions.

  19. Trace gas monitoring with infrared laser-based detection schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, M. W.; Bartlome, R.; Marinov, D.; Rey, J. M.; Vogler, D. E.; Wächter, H.

    2008-02-01

    The success of laser-based trace gas sensing techniques crucially depends on the availability and performance of tunable laser sources combined with appropriate detection schemes. Besides near-infrared diode lasers, continuously tunable midinfrared quantum cascade lasers and nonlinear optical laser sources are preferentially employed today. Detection schemes are based on sensitive absorption measurements and comprise direct absorption in multi-pass cells as well as photoacoustic and cavity ringdown techniques in various configurations. We illustrate the performance of several systems implemented in our laboratory. These include time-resolved multicomponent traffic emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser photoacoustic system, a diode-laser based cavity ringdown device for measurements of impurities in industrial process control, isotope ratio measurements with a difference frequency (DFG) laser source combined with balanced path length detection, detection of methylamines for breath analysis with both a near-IR diode laser and a DFG source, and finally, acetone measurements with a heatable multipass cell intended for vapor phase studies on doping agents in urine samples.

  20. Infrared Laser Generation Of Heterogeneous Catalysts And Laser-Induced Reactions At Catalytic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danen, Wayne C.; Cheng, , Sheng-San; Iyer, Pradeep K.; Chiou, Shane-Jaw

    1984-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that continuous wave infrared CO2 laser radiation can be util-ized to rapidly produce active catalysts from inert precursors. The activity and selectiv-ity of Ca0 produced from Ca(OH)2 for the isomerization of 1-butene to cis- and trans-2-but-ene is discussed. Variation of the laser irradiation time produces catalytic activity and selectivity qualitatively similar to that resulting from conventional calcination at different temperatures. Pulsed infrared laser-induced reactions at catalytic surfaces are also discussed with emphasis on the dehydrobromination of 2-bromopropane and ethylene elimination from glycine ethyl ester hydrochloride at BaSO4 , A1PO4, and similar surfaces. Correlations are made of the extent of reaction with various experimental parameters including nature of the catalyst, laser frequency, laser fluence, number of laser pulses, and reagent-catalyst ratio.

  1. Biophysical mechanisms responsible for pulsed low-level laser excitation of neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathon; Kao, Chris; Konrad, Peter; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Jansen, E. Duco

    2006-02-01

    Background/Objective: The traditional method of stimulating neural activity has been based on electrical methods and remains the gold standard to date despite inherent limitations. We have previously shown a new paradigm to in vivo neural activation based on pulsed infrared light, which provides a contact-free, spatially selective, artifact-free method without incurring tissue damage that may have significant advantages over electrical stimulation in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The goal of this study was to investigate the physical mechanism of this phenomenon, which we propose is a photo-thermal effect from transient tissue temperature changes resulting in direct or indirect activation of transmembrane ion channels causing propagation of the action potential. Methods: Rat sciatic nerve preparation was stimulated in vivo with the Holmium:YAG laser (2.12μm), Free Electron Laser (2.1μm), Alexandrite laser (690nm), and the prototype for a solid state commercial laser nerve stimulator built by Aculight (1.87μm) to determine contributions of photobiological responses from laser tissue interactions, including temperature, pressure, electric field, and photochemistry, underlying the biophysical mechanism of stimulation. Single point temperature measurements were made with a microthermocouple adjacent to the excitation site, while an infrared camera was used for 2-D radiometry of the irradiated surface. Displacement from laser-induced pressure waves or thermoelastic expansion was measured using a PS-OCT system. Results: Results exclude a direct photochemical, electric field, or pressure wave effect as the mechanism of optical stimulation. Measurements show relative small contributions from thermoelastic expansion (300 nm) with the laser parameters used for nerve stimulation. The maximum change in tissue temperature is about 9°C (average increase of 3.66 °C) at stimulation threshold radiant exposures. Conclusion: Neural activation with pulsed

  2. The design of infrared laser radar for vehicle initiative safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Xu, Xi-ping; Li, Xiao-yu; Li, Tian-zhi; Liu, Yu-long; Wu, Jia-hui

    2013-09-01

    Laser radar for vehicle is mainly used in advanced vehicle on-board active safety systems, such as forward anti-collision systems, active collision warning systems and adaptive cruise control systems, etc. Laser radar for vehicle plays an important role in the improvement of vehicle active safety and the reduction of traffic accidents. The stability of vehicle active anti-collision system in dynamic environment is still one of the most difficult problems to break through nowadays. According to people's driving habit and the existed detecting technique of sensor, combining the infrared laser range and galvanometer scanning technique , design a 3-D infrared laser radar which can be used to assist navigation, obstacle avoidance and the vehicle's speed control for the vehicle initiative safety. The device is fixed to the head of vehicle. Then if an accident happened, the device could give an alarm to remind the driver timely to decelerate or brake down, by which way can people get the purpose of preventing the collision accidents effectively. To accomplish the design, first of all, select the core components. Then apply Zemax to design the transmitting and receiving optical system. Adopt 1550 nm infrared laser transmitter as emission unit in the device, a galvanometer scanning as laser scanning unit and an InGaAs-APD detector as laser echo signal receiving unit. Perform the construction of experimental system using FPGA and ARM as the core controller. The system designed in this paper can not only detect obstacle in front of the vehicle and make the control subsystem to execute command, but also transfer laser data to PC in real time. Lots of experiments using the infrared laser radar prototype are made, and main performance of it is under tested. The results of these experiments show that the imaging speed of the laser radar can reach up to 25 frames per second, the frame resolution of each image can reach 30×30 pixels, the horizontal angle resolution is about 6. 98

  3. Ultrafast Excitation of an Inner-Shell Electron by Laser-Induced Electron Recollision.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yunpei; Zeng, Zhinan; Jia, Zhengmao; Komm, Pavel; Zheng, Yinhui; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Ruxin; Marcus, Gilad

    2016-02-19

    Extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulses, generated by a process known as laser-induced electron recollision, are a key ingredient for attosecond metrology, providing a tool to precisely initiate and probe subfemtosecond dynamics in atoms, molecules, and solids. However, extending attosecond metrology to scrutinize the dynamics of the inner-shell electrons is a challenge, that is because of the lower efficiency in generating the required soft x-ray (ℏω>300  eV) attosecond bursts. A way around this problem is to use the recolliding electron to directly initiate the desired inner-shell process, instead of using the currently low flux x-ray attosecond sources. Such an excitation process occurs in a subfemtosecond time scale, and may provide the necessary "pump" step in a pump-probe experiment. Here we used a few cycle infrared (λ_{0}≈1800  nm) source and observed direct evidence for inner-shell excitations through the laser-induced electron recollision process. It is the first step toward time-resolved core-hole studies in the keV energy range with subfemtosecond time resolution. PMID:26943536

  4. Ultrafast Excitation of an Inner-Shell Electron by Laser-Induced Electron Recollision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yunpei; Zeng, Zhinan; Jia, Zhengmao; Komm, Pavel; Zheng, Yinhui; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Ruxin; Marcus, Gilad

    2016-02-01

    Extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulses, generated by a process known as laser-induced electron recollision, are a key ingredient for attosecond metrology, providing a tool to precisely initiate and probe subfemtosecond dynamics in atoms, molecules, and solids. However, extending attosecond metrology to scrutinize the dynamics of the inner-shell electrons is a challenge, that is because of the lower efficiency in generating the required soft x-ray (ℏω >300 eV ) attosecond bursts. A way around this problem is to use the recolliding electron to directly initiate the desired inner-shell process, instead of using the currently low flux x-ray attosecond sources. Such an excitation process occurs in a subfemtosecond time scale, and may provide the necessary "pump" step in a pump-probe experiment. Here we used a few cycle infrared (λ0≈1800 nm ) source and observed direct evidence for inner-shell excitations through the laser-induced electron recollision process. It is the first step toward time-resolved core-hole studies in the keV energy range with subfemtosecond time resolution.

  5. High-power metal halide vapour lasers oscillating in deep ultraviolet, visible and middle infrared spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Slaveeva, S. I.; Kirilov, V. I.; Kostadinov, I. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2012-05-01

    Middle infrared and deep ultraviolet high-power high-beam-quality stable-operating He-SrBr2 and Cu+ Ne-CuBr lasers excited in nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge are developed, patented and studied. Optimal discharge conditions, such as active zone diameter, vapour pressure, buffer-gas pressure, electrical excitation scheme parameters, average input power and pulse repetition frequency, are found. The highest output laser parameters are obtained for the Sr atom and Cu+ lasers, respectively. These lasers equipped with optical systems for the control of laser radiation parameters are used in a large variety of applications, such as precise material microprocessing, including biological tissues, determination of linear optical properties of different newly developed materials, laser-induced modification of conductive polymers and laser-induced fluorescence in wide-gap semiconductors, instead of free electron and excimer lasers, respectively. A master oscillator-power amplifier system, which is based on a high-beam-quality high-power CuBr vapour laser and is equipped with an optic system for laser beam control and with the X-Y stage controlled by adequate software as well, is developed and used in high-precision micromachining of samples made of nickel and tool steel.

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence of formaldehyde in combustion using third harmonic Nd:YAG laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Christian; Nygren, Jenny; Bai, Xiao; Li, Zhongshan; Bladh, Henrik; Axelsson, Boman; Denbratt, Ingemar; Koopmans, Lucien; Bengtsson, Per-Erik; Aldén, Marcus

    2003-12-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is an important intermediate species in combustion processes and it can through laser-induced fluorescence measurements be used for instantaneous flame front detection. The present study has focussed on the use of the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm as excitation wavelength for formaldehyde, and different dimethyl ether (C2H6O) flames were used as sources of formaldehyde in the experiments. The investigations included studies of the overlap between the laser profile and the absorption lines of formaldehyde, saturation effects and the potential occurrence of laser-induced photochemistry. The technique was applied for detection of formaldehyde in an internal combustion engine operated both as a spark ignition engine and as a homogenous charge compression ignition engine. PMID:14607232

  7. Superelastic electron scattering from laser-excited cesium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D. S.; Karaganov, V.; Brunger, M. J.; Teubner, P. J. O.; Bray, I.; Bartschat, K.

    2007-06-15

    We present results from a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of superelastic electron scattering from laser-excited Cs atoms in the (6p){sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state. Comparison of the measured pseudo-Stokes parameters P{sub 1}, P{sub 2}, and P{sub 3} and the total degree of polarization P{sup +} for incident energies of 5.5 eV and 13.5 eV, respectively, with theoretical predictions based upon a nonrelativistic convergent close-coupling method and a 24-state semirelativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach indicates that driving channel coupling to convergence for these observables is more important than accounting for relativistic effects.

  8. Laser ablation and selective excitation directed to trace element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, V. H. S.

    1980-08-01

    A trace (element) analyser based on laser ablation and selectively excited radiation is proposed as an ultramicro-ultratrace technique for quantitative element analysis. Measurements of trace quantities of chromium in samples of NBS standard reference material (steel), doped skim milk powder and doped flour were undertaken. There is a linear 45 deg slope for Log/Log plot dependence of signal versus concentration that extends at least up to 1.3% (concentration by weight) in the case of chromium. The detection limit for the current unoptimized system is in the ppm range which corresponds to the absolute detection limit of 10 to the 13th power g. Although no chemical interference effects were observed, two physical interference effects were evident: differential mass vaporization and inhomogeneous spatial and temporal distribution of fast expanding analyte. The differential Doppler shift between the atoms along the line of observation reduces self-absorption even at high analyte concentrations.

  9. Carrier dynamics in femtosecond-laser-excited bismuth telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. L.; Guo, L.; Ling, C.; Song, Y. M.; Xu, X. F.; Ni, Z. H.; Chen, Y. F.

    2016-04-01

    The carrier dynamics of B i2T e3 is studied using the femtosecond pump-probe technique. Three distinct processes, including free carrier absorption, band filling, and electron-hole recombination, are found to contribute to the reflectivity changes. The two-temperature model is used to describe the intraband energy relaxation process of carriers, and the Drude contribution well explains the intensity dependence of the peak values of the nonoscillatory component in the reflectivity signal. The combined effects of free carrier absorption and band filling result in a reflection minimum at about 2 ps after laser excitation. The nonzero background signal increases linearly with the pump fluence, which is attributed to the electron-hole recombination. Finally, our results provide an illustration of investigating the carrier dynamics in semiconductors from the ultrafast reflectivity spectra.

  10. Scanning Laser Infrared Molecular Spectrometer (SLIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David C.; Rickey, Kelly; Ksendzov, Alexander; George, Warren P.; Aljabri, Abdullah S.; Steinkraus, Joel M.

    2012-01-01

    This prototype innovation is a novel design that achieves very long, effective laser path lengths that are able to yield ppb (parts per billion) and sub-ppb measurements of trace gases. SLIMS can also accommodate multiple laser channels covering a wide range of wavelengths, resulting in detection of more chemicals of interest. The mechanical design of the mirror cell allows for the large effective path length within a small footprint. The same design provides a robust structure that lends itself to being immune to some of the alignment challenges that similar cells face. By taking a hollow cylinder and by cutting an elliptically or spherically curved surface into its inner wall, the basic geometry of a reflecting ring is created. If the curved, inner surface is diamond-turned and highly polished, a surface that is very highly reflective can be formed. The surface finish can be further improved by adding a thin chrome or gold film over the surface. This creates a high-quality, curved, mirrored surface. A laser beam, which can be injected from a small bore hole in the wall of the cylinder, will be able to make many low-loss bounces around the ring, creating a large optical path length. The reflecting ring operates on the same principle as the Herriott cell. The difference exists in the mirror that doesn't have to be optically aligned, and which has a relatively large, internal surface area that lends itself to either open air or evacuated spectroscopic measurements. This solid, spherical ring mirror removes the possibility of mirror misalignment caused by thermal expansion or vibrations, because there is only a single, solid reflecting surface. Benefits of the reflecting ring come into play when size constraints reduce the size of the system, especially for space missions in which mass is at a premium.

  11. Ultrafast pulses from a mid-infrared fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tomonori; Jackson, Stuart D; Hudson, Darren D

    2015-09-15

    Ultrafast laser pulses at mid-infrared wavelengths (2-20 μm) interact strongly with molecules due to the resonance with their vibration modes. This enables their application in frequency comb-based sensing and laser tissue surgery. Fiber lasers are ideal to achieve these pulses, as they are compact, stable, and efficient. We extend the performance of these lasers with the production of 6.4 kW at a wavelength of 2.8 μm with complete electric field retrieval using frequency-resolved optical gating techniques. Contrary to the problems associated with achieving a high average power, fluoride fibers have now shown the capability of operating in the ultrafast, high-peak-power regime. PMID:26371902

  12. Near-Infrared Laser Adjuvant for Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Yuan, Jianping; Forbes, Benjamin; Hibert, Mathew L.; Lee, Eugene L. Q.; Whicher, Laura; Goudie, Calum; Yang, Yuan; Chen, Tao; Edelblute, Beth; Collette, Brian; Edington, Laurel; Trussler, James; Nezivar, Jean; Leblanc, Pierre; Bronson, Roderick; Tsukada, Kosuke; Suematsu, Makoto; Dover, Jeffrey; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Safe and effective immunologic adjuvants are often essential for vaccines. However, the choice of adjuvant for licensed vaccines is limited, especially for those that are administered intradermally. We show that non-tissue damaging, near-infrared (NIR) laser light given in short exposures to small areas of skin, without the use of additional chemical or biological agents, significantly increases immune responses to intradermal influenza vaccination without augmenting IgE. The NIR laser-adjuvanted vaccine confers increased protection in a murine influenza lethal challenge model as compared to unadjuvanted vaccine. We show that NIR laser treatment induces the expression of specific chemokines in the skin resulting in recruitment and activation of dendritic cells and is safe to use in both mice and humans. The NIR laser adjuvant technology provides a novel, safe, low-cost, simple-to-use, potentially broadly applicable and clinically feasible approach to enhancing vaccine efficacy as an alternative to chemical and biological adjuvants. PMID:24349390

  13. Local excitation and interference of surface phonon polaritons studied by near-field infrared microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huber, A J; Ocelic, N; Hillenbrand, R

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate that mid-infrared surface phonon polariton excitation, propagation and interference can be studied by scattering-type near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM). In our experiments we image surface phonon polaritons (SPPs) propagating on flat SiC crystals. They are excited by weakly focused illumination of single or closely spaced metal disks we fabricated on the SiC surface by conventional photolithography. SPP imaging is performed by pseudo-heterodyne interferometric detection of infrared light scattered by the metal tip of our s-SNOM. The pseudo-heterodyne technique simultaneously yields optical amplitude and phase images which allows us to measure the SPP wave vector--including its sign--and the propagation length and further to study SPP interference. High resolution imaging of SPPs could be applied to investigate for example SPP focusing or heat transfer by SPPs in low dimensional nanostructures. PMID:18331484

  14. In situ observation of photo-bleaching in human single living cell excited by a NIR femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jae-Goo; Whang, Kyoung-Hyun; Choi, Kyeong-Sook; Sohn, Seong-Hyang

    2008-03-01

    The photo-bleaching of single living cells excited by femtosecond laser irradiation was observed in situ to study the nonlinear interaction between ultrafast laser pulses and living human breast MDA-MB-231 cells. We conducted a systematic study of the energy dependence of plasma-mediated photo-disruption of fluorescently labeled subcellular structures in the nucleus of living cells using near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser pulses through a numerical aperture objective lens (0.75 NA). The behavior of photo-bleached living cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei was observed for 18 h after femtosecond laser irradiation under a fluorescence microscope. The photo-bleaching of single living cells without cell disruption occurred at between 470 and 630 nJ. To study the photo-disruption of subcellular organelles in single living cells using the nonlinear absorption excited by a NIR femtosecond laser pulse, the process of photo-bleaching without photo-disruption provides key information for clarifying the nonlinear interaction between NIR ultrashort, high-intensity laser light and transparent fluorescently labeled living cells.

  15. Laser-excited confocal-fluorescence gel scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Mathies, R.A.; Scherer, J.R.; Quesada, M.A. ); Rye, H.S.; Glazer, A.N. )

    1994-04-01

    A high-sensitivity, laser-excited, confocal-fluorescence scanner has been developed for the detection of fluorescently labeled nucleic acids separated on slab gels. The gel is placed on a motor-driven, two-dimensional scan stage and raster scanned past the optical detection system. The 488-nm argon ion laser beam is introduced into the confocal optical system at a long-pass dichroic beam splitter and focused within the gel to an [similar to]2 [mu]m diameter spot by a high-numerical aperture microscope objective. The resulting fluorescence is gathered by the objective, passed back through the first long-pass beam splitter, and relayed to a second dichroic beam splitter that separates the red and green emissions. The fluorescence is then focused on confocal spatial filters to reduce stray and scattered light, passed through spectral filters, and detected with photomultipliers. The resulting signals are amplified, filtered, and digitized for display on a computer. This system can detect as little as 5[times]10[sup [minus]12] M fluorescein, the resolution as operated is 160 [mu]m, and it can scan a 6 cm[times]6 cm gel using a scan rate of 4 cm/s in 12 min. The detection of DNA on slab gels, two-color DNA fragment sizing, and microtiter plate scanning are presented to illustrate some of the possible applications of this apparatus.

  16. Infrared Laser System for Extended Area Monitoring of Air Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowman, L. R.; Gillmeister, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution monitoring system using a spectrally scanning laser has been developed by the General Electric Company. This paper will report on an evaluation of a breadboard model, and will discuss applications of the concept to various ambient air monitoring situations. The system is adaptable to other tunable lasers. Operating in the middle infrared region, the system uses retroreflectors to measure average concentrations over long paths at low, safe power levels. The concept shows promise of meeting operational needs in ambient air monitoring and providing new data for atmospheric research.

  17. Glass drilling by longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2015-03-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, and a spark-gap switch. The laser pulse had a spike pulse and a pulse tail. The energy of the pulse tail was controlled by adjusting medium gas. Using three types of CO2 laser pulse with the same spike-pulse energy and the different pulse-tail energy, the characteristics of the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass was investigated. Higher pulse-tail energy gave deeper ablation depth. In the short laser pulse with the spike-pulse energy of 1.2 mJ, the spike pulse width of 162 ns, the pulse-tail energy of 24.6 mJ, and the pulse-tail length of 29.6 μs, 1000 shots irradiation produced the ablation depth of 988 μm. In the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass by the CO2 laser, a crack-free process was realized.

  18. Study of laser emission losses in rhodamine 6G solutions under quasilongitudinal laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, A.V.; Eremenko, A.S.; Nikolaev, A.B.

    1986-08-01

    As a result of studies of the reciprocal of the quantum yield of stimulated laser emission as a function of the reciprocal of the useful loss factor, a quantitative dependence of induced losses in the pumping and lasing channels on the volume density of absorbed exciting radiation has been established. It is concluded from quantitative evidence that the margin of an appreciable increase in lasing efficiency for rhodamine 6G solutions consists in a decrease of the pumping-induced light scattering.

  19. Infrared Laser Optoacoustic Detection Of Gases And Vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. A.; Cummins, P. G.; Bone, S. A.; Davies, P. B.

    1988-10-01

    Mid-infrared laser optoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to detect a variety of gases and vapours. Performance was calibrated using the signal from a known concentration of ethene, and then the method applied to the perfume alcohol geraniol. Detection limits were found to be 1 ppb for ethene and 70 ppb for geraniol on their strongest absorption lines for a few seconds measurement time.

  20. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy using a dual-wavelength DBR diode laser at 785 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiwald, M.; Eppich, B.; Fricke, J.; Ginolas, A.; Bugge, F.; Klehr, A.; Sumpf, B.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2015-03-01

    The application of shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) using a dual wavelength distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) diode laser at 785 nm will be presented. Both excitation wavelengths necessary for SERDS provide an optical power of more than 160 mW in continuous wave operation. Raman experiments are carried out and demonstrate the suitability of the excitation light source for SERDS. Moreover, a dual-wavelength master-oscillator power amplifier diode laser system is presented. The diode laser system reaches optical powers larger 750 mW while the spectral properties of the dual-wavelength laser remain unchanged.

  1. Resonant Infrared Pulsed-Laser Deposition of Polymers Using a Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stephen; Bellmont, Ron; Bubb, Daniel; Haglund, Richard; Schriver, Ken

    2004-11-01

    Thin films of polyethylene glycol and polystyrene have been produced using resonant infrared pulsed-laser deposition (RIR-PLD). The laser used for the experiments was a tunable, high pulse-repetition rate free-electron laser operating in the mid-IR (2.9 - 3.5 im). Transfer of polymers with molecular weights up to 13,000 was accomplished at resonant vibrational frequencies without concomitant fragmentation or other photochemical degradation, in contrast to PLD techniques using ultraviolet lasers. Potential applications for this technique include drug delivery coatings and chemical and biological sensor construction.

  2. Molecular recognition using receptor-free nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonghwan; Lee, Dongkyu; Liu, Xunchen; Van Neste, Charles; Jeon, Sangmin; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Speciation of complex mixtures of trace explosives presents a formidable challenge for sensors that rely on chemoselective interfaces due to the unspecific nature of weak intermolecular interactions. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectroscopy provides higher selectivity in molecular detection without using chemoselective interfaces by measuring the photothermal effect of adsorbed molecules on a thermally sensitive microcantilever. In addition, unlike conventional IR spectroscopy, the detection sensitivity is drastically enhanced by increasing the IR laser power, since the photothermal signal comes from the absorption of IR photons and nonradiative decay processes. By using a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser for the resonant excitation of molecules, we increased the detection sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to the use of a conventional IR monochromator. Here, we demonstrate the successful speciation and quantification of picogram levels of ternary mixtures of similar explosives (trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) using nanomechanical IR spectroscopy. PMID:23346368

  3. Molecular recognition using receptor-free nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonghwan; Lee, Dongkyu; Liu, Xunchen; Van Neste, Charles; Jeon, Sangmin; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Speciation of complex mixtures of trace explosives presents a formidable challenge for sensors that rely on chemoselective interfaces due to the unspecific nature of weak intermolecular interactions. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectroscopy provides higher selectivity in molecular detection without using chemoselective interfaces by measuring the photothermal effect of adsorbed molecules on a thermally sensitive microcantilever. In addition, unlike conventional IR spectroscopy, the detection sensitivity is drastically enhanced by increasing the IR laser power, since the photothermal signal comes from the absorption of IR photons and nonradiative decay processes. By using a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser for the resonant excitation of molecules, we increased the detection sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to the use of a conventional IR monochromator. Here, we demonstrate the successful speciation and quantification of picogram levels of ternary mixtures of similar explosives (trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) using nanomechanical IR spectroscopy. PMID:23346368

  4. UCLA infrared free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, James W.; Hartman, Steven C.; Park, Sanghyun; Pellegrini, Claudio; Rosenzweig, James B.; Smolin, J. A.; Barletta, W. A.; Cline, David B.; Cooper, Richard K.; Kolonko, J.; Davis, J. G.; Hairapetian, G.; Joshi, Chand J.; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.; Ivanchenkov, S. N.; Khlebnikov, A. S.; Varfolomeev, A. A.

    1992-05-01

    A compact 20 MeV linac with an RF laser-driven electron gun will drive a high-gain (10 cm gain length), 10.6 micrometers wavelength FEL amplifier, operating in the SASE mode. FEL physics in the high-gain regime will be studied, including start-up from noise, optical guiding, sidebands, saturation, and superradiance, with emphasis on the effects important for future short wavelength operation of FEL's. The hybrid undulator, designed and built at the Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy in the U.S.S.R., has forty periods, each 1.5 cm long. The magnetic material is a hybrid combination of SmCo5 blocks and Nd-Fe-B blocks, with vanadium-permendur yokes. The gap distance between pole-tips is fixed at 5 mm. On axis the peak value of the completed undulator's magnetic field was measured to be 7.3 kGauss (+/- 0.25%). Measurements during the conditioning phase of the RF gun for the electron beam's peak dark-current show 6 mA without the longitudinal magnetic focusing field in the gun and 34 mA with the focusing field active. The peak current from photoemission is calculated to be 200 A.

  5. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, S.; Klopf, J. M.; Schriver, K. E.; Park, H. K.; Kelley, M. J.; Haglund, R. F.

    2014-03-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C-H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C-H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  6. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Singaravelu, Senthil R.; Klopf, John M.; Schriver, Kenneth E.; Park, HyeKyoung; Kelley, Michael J.; Haglund, Jr., Richard F.

    2013-08-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C–H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C–H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  7. Theoretical evaluation of electron-beam-excited vacuum-ultraviolet F2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-P.; Obara, M.; Suzuki, T.

    1986-03-01

    A theoretical kinetic model for an electron-beam-excited F2 laser (157 nm) was successfully developed to evaluate the performance characteristics in terms of electron-beam excitation rate, pumping pulse width, and total operating pressure. As a result, it is made clear that a high excitation rate (above 0.2 MW/cu cm atm) is essential to obtain efficient laser operation. An intrinsic laser efficiency of 4.3 percent is obtainable when a 6.5-atm mixture of He-F2 = 1000/1 is pumped at an excitation rate of 0.5 MW/cu cm atm, giving a laser output of over 4 J/l. It is also found that a higher laser output is obtainable with increasing total operating pressure, while the intrinsic laser efficiency slowly decreases.

  8. Research on fission fragment excitation of gases and nuclear pumping of lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Davie, R. N.; Davis, J. F.; Fuller, J. L.; Paternoster, R. R.; Shipman, G. R.; Sterritt, D. E.; Helmick, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental investigations of fission fragment excited gases are reported along with a theoretical analysis of population inversions in fission fragment excited helium. Other studies reported include: nuclear augmentation of gas lasers, direct nuclear pumping of a helium-xenon laser, measurements of a repetitively pulsed high-power CO2 laser, thermodynamic properties of UF6 and UF6/He mixtures, and nuclear waste disposal utilizing a gaseous core reactor.

  9. Lasing studies of new coumarin derivatives under laser and lamp excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, A. V.; Veselova, T. V.; Kozlovskii, D. A.; Komlev, I. V.; Levin, M. B.; Reznichenko, A. V.; Tavrizova, M. A.; Cherkasov, A. S.

    1988-09-01

    The luminescence characteristics and results of a study of the comparative laser efficiency of ethanol solutions of a series of coumarin derivatives and rhodamine 6G are presented. It is shown that under laser excitation (neodymium laser third harmonic) and lamp excitation, the solutions of certain coumarins match rhodamine 6G in lasing efficiency values. A comparatively low photostability of the investigated coumarin solutions and its weak dependence on the spectral composition of the pumping radiation have been observed.

  10. Infrared absorption of fs-laser textured CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvani, P.; Bellucci, A.; Girolami, M.; Orlando, S.; Valentini, V.; Polini, R.; Mezzetti, A.; Di Fonzo, F.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale periodic texturing on polycrystalline CVD diamond surface was performed to obtain a significant increase in optical absorptance to visible and near-infrared radiation. Surface texturing, obtained by the use of fs-laser ultrashort pulses, has been demonstrated to induce a controlled periodicity of ripples of about 170 nm and length of several µm, able to drastically increase the diamond capability of interacting with solar radiation from its intrinsic visible blindness. Ultraviolet and visible Raman spectroscopy has been used to confirm the absence of non-diamond phases resulting from the process for the fs-laser-textured sample. Moreover, here we investigate the optical properties in the range 200 nm-25 µm. Absorbance of fs-laser-textured CVD diamond is considerably higher than the untreated one at every wavelength, resulting in a remarkable increase in the emittance: It points out the need for an optimization of process parameters to enhance the selective absorption capability.

  11. Research of infrared laser based pavement imaging and crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hanyu; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Xiuhua; Jing, Genqiang

    2013-08-01

    Road crack detection is seriously affected by many factors in actual applications, such as some shadows, road signs, oil stains, high frequency noise and so on. Due to these factors, the current crack detection methods can not distinguish the cracks in complex scenes. In order to solve this problem, a novel method based on infrared laser pavement imaging is proposed. Firstly, single sensor laser pavement imaging system is adopted to obtain pavement images, high power laser line projector is well used to resist various shadows. Secondly, the crack extraction algorithm which has merged multiple features intelligently is proposed to extract crack information. In this step, the non-negative feature and contrast feature are used to extract the basic crack information, and circular projection based on linearity feature is applied to enhance the crack area and eliminate noise. A series of experiments have been performed to test the proposed method, which shows that the proposed automatic extraction method is effective and advanced.

  12. Near-infrared laser speckle imaging of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Robert Speer

    Current methods of breast cancer diagnostics (self-exam, clinical exam, x-ray mammography) fail to diagnose a significant number of cases while still in readily operable stages. This is especially true in younger women, where fibrotic tissue reduces the efficacy of x-ray mammography. Near infrared (NIR) laser photons pass diffusively through human tissue, creating a speckle pattern in a detector after transmission. The high and low intensity variations of the speckle have the appearance of random noise, but are not. The speckle pattern will have an intensity distribution that is informative about the scattering and absorption properties of the tissue that is imaged. Adaptations to the Los Alamos National Laboratory MCNP code are described that allow simulation of NIR laser transport through human tissue. A HeNe laser was used to create laser intensity patterns via transmission through homogeneous and non-homogeneous tissue phantoms. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to compare the cumulative distribution functions of the laser intensity patterns, and identify the presence of a non-homogeneity. Laser speckle techniques offer the ability to image tumors with few (<3) millimeter resolution without ionizing radiation dose.

  13. Gas laser in which the gas is excited by capacitor discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lacour, B.; de Witte, O.; Maillet, M.; Vannier, C.

    1985-01-22

    A gas laser in which the gas is excited by laser discharge, said laser including two capacitors formed by two parallel metal plates between which two dielectric parts are spaced apart to form a passage which contains the laser gas. It further includes a transformer whose secondary winding is connected to the plates and whose primary winding is connected in series with a capacitor, means for charging and capacitor and a thyristor for discharging the capacitor in the primary winding. Application to exciting gas lasers in which the gas contains a dye stuff.

  14. Highly efficient mid-infrared dysprosium fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Matthew R; Jackson, Stuart D

    2016-05-15

    A new, highly efficient and power scalable pump scheme for 3 μm class fiber lasers is presented. Using the free-running 2.8 μm emission from an Er3+-doped fluoride fiber laser to directly excite the upper laser level of the H13/26→H15/26 transition of the Dy3+ ion, output at 3.04 μm was produced with a record slope efficiency of 51%. Using comparatively long lengths of Dy3+-doped fluoride fiber, a maximum emission wavelength of 3.26 μm was measured. PMID:27176955

  15. Infrared laser pulse triggers increased singlet oxygen production in tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovski, S. G.; Zolotovskaya, S. A.; Goltsov, A.; Pourreyron, C.; South, A. P.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2013-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique developed to treat the ever-increasing global incidence of cancer. This technique utilises singlet oxygen (1O2) generation via a laser excited photosensitiser (PS) to kill cancer cells. However, prolonged sensitivity to intensive light (6-8 weeks for lung cancer), relatively low tissue penetration by activating light (630 nm up to 4 mm), and the cost of PS administration can limit progressive PDT applications. The development of quantum-dot laser diodes emitting in the highest absorption region (1268 nm) of triplet oxygen (3O2) presents the possibility of inducing apoptosis in tumour cells through direct 3O2 --> 1O2 transition. Here we demonstrate that a single laser pulse triggers dose-dependent 1O2 generation in both normal keratinocytes and tumour cells and show that tumour cells yield the highest 1O2 far beyond the initial laser pulse exposure. Our modelling and experimental results support the development of direct infrared (IR) laser-induced tumour treatment as a promising approach in tumour PDT.

  16. Laser Infrared Desorption Spectroscopy to Detect Complex Organic Molecules on Icy Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollit, Luke S.; Beegle, Luther W.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Desorption-Infrared Spectroscopy (LD-IR) uses an IR laser pulse to desorb surface materials while a spectrometer measures the emission spectrum of the desorbed materials (Figure 1). In this example, laser desorption operates by having the incident laser energy absorbed by near surface material (10 microns in depth). This desorption produces a plume that exists in an excited state at elevated temperatures. A natural analog for this phenomenon can be observed when comets approach the sun and become active and individual molecular emission spectra can be observed in the IR [1,2,3,4,5]. When this occurs in comets, the same species that initially emit radiation down to the ground state are free to absorb it, reducing the amount of detectable emission features. The nature of our technique results in absorption not occurring, because the laser pulse could easily be moved away form the initial desorption plume, and still have better spatial resolution then reflectance spectroscopy. In reflectance spectroscopy, trace components have a relatively weak signal when compared to the entire active nature of the surface. With LDIR, the emission spectrum is used to identify and analyze surface materials.

  17. Eye-safe infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions from energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei E.; Hömmerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton C.; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. Besides elemental emissions from conventional UV-Vis LIBS, molecular LIBS emission signatures of the target compounds were observed in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region in recent studies. Most current LIBS studies employ the fundamental Nd:YAG laser output at 1.064 μm, which has extremely low eye-damage threshold. In this work, comparative LWIR-LIBS emissions studies using traditional 1.064 μm pumping and eye-safe laser wavelength at 1.574 μm were performed on several energetic materials for applications in chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) sensing. A Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm and the 1.574 μm output of a pulsed Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator were employed as the excitation sources. The investigated energetic materials were studied for the appearance of LWIR-LIBS emissions (4-12 μm) that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species. The observed molecular IR LIBS emission bands showed strong correlation with FTIR absorption spectra of the studied materials for 1.064 μm and 1.574 μm pump wavelengths.

  18. Mechanisms of ablation and ion formation in infrared laser mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papantonakis, Michael Robert

    The studies described in this work take advantage of a unique infrared light source that allowed the exploration of previously uninvestigated vibrational modes and excitation densities, plus other laser systems that allowed us to compare the importance of pulse duration and electronic excitation in the ultraviolet. Results from several experiments were compared to current models of ion formation, allowing us to observe their applicability to our systems. One experiment assembled the most extensive range of excitation conditions to date to challenge the contribution of primary excitation events to the final ion yield. Despite the vastly different charged species and densities necessarily created, the results showed qualitatively similar spectra in all cases. We therefore concluded that the similarity of mass spectra alone offers a poor or incomplete picture from which to determine the operative mechanisms for ion formation, and that the observed ions are likely formed in the expanding plume. A second set of experiments utilized vibrational excitation of an intrinsic mode of a sample, eliminating the need for addition of an exogenous matrix. From a practical point of view, this represents a promising new approach to the analysis of complex mixtures. From a mechanistic point of view, the optical and thermal properties of the material, which control the degree of vibrational or electronic excitation upon irradiation, were found to determine the ablation pathways, which subsequently determines the ion formation process. This degree of excitation density, which determines whether ion formation occurs under conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium or kinetic control, may or may not determine the efficiency of ion production, depending on the particular vibrational mode under consideration.

  19. Livermore experience: contributions of J. H. Eberly to laser excitation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B W; Kulander, K; Davis, J I

    2000-10-12

    This article summarizes the developing understanding of coherent atomic excitation, as gained through a collaboration of J. H. Eberly with the Laser Isotope Separation Program of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, particularly aspects of coherence, population trapping, multilevel multiphoton excitation sequences, analytic solutions to multistate excitation chains, the quasicontinuum, pulse propagation, and noise. In addition to the discovery of several curious and unexpected properties of coherent excitation, mentioned here, the collaboration provided an excellent example of unexpected benefits from investment into basic research.

  20. Highlighting the DNA damage response with ultrashort laser pulses in the near infrared and kinetic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando-May, Elisa; Tomas, Martin; Blumhardt, Philipp; Stöckl, Martin; Fuchs, Matthias; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms governing the response to DNA damage in higher eucaryotes crucially depends on our ability to dissect the temporal and spatial organization of the cellular machinery responsible for maintaining genomic integrity. To achieve this goal, we need experimental tools to inflict DNA lesions with high spatial precision at pre-defined locations, and to visualize the ensuing reactions with adequate temporal resolution. Near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses focused through high-aperture objective lenses of advanced scanning microscopes offer the advantage of inducing DNA damage in a 3D-confined volume of subnuclear dimensions. This high spatial resolution results from the highly non-linear nature of the excitation process. Here we review recent progress based on the increasing availability of widely tunable and user-friendly technology of ultrafast lasers in the near infrared. We present a critical evaluation of this approach for DNA microdamage as compared to the currently prevalent use of UV or VIS laser irradiation, the latter in combination with photosensitizers. Current and future applications in the field of DNA repair and DNA-damage dependent chromatin dynamics are outlined. Finally, we discuss the requirement for proper simulation and quantitative modeling. We focus in particular on approaches to measure the effect of DNA damage on the mobility of nuclear proteins and consider the pros and cons of frequently used analysis models for FRAP and photoactivation and their applicability to non-linear photoperturbation experiments. PMID:23882280

  1. Laser scan microscope and infrared laser scan microcope: two important tools for device testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Eberhard

    1991-03-01

    The optical beam induced current (OBIC) produced in devices by a laser scan microscope (LSM) is used to localize hot spots, leakage currents, electrostatic discharge defects and weak points. The LSM also allows photoluminescence measurements with high spatial and energy resolution. Using the infrared laser scan microscope (IR LSM), defects in the metallization and latch-up sensitive region could be detected from the back of the device.

  2. Multi-excitation near infrared (NIR) spectral fluorescence imaging using organic fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Koyama, Yoshinori; Barrett, Tristan; Hama, Yukihiro; Choyke, Peter L.

    2008-02-01

    The ability to obtain multi-color fluorescent imaging in vivo simultaneously using multi-targeted imaging probes could be of potential benefit from both a research and a clinical perspective. However, the simultaneous acquisition of more than 2 separate organic fluorophores usually requires more than one excitation source, since a single excitation source may not optimally excite all the fluorophores. In this study, we employed a multi-excitation approach in order to acquire optimized images with multiple near infrared (NIR) organic fluorophores at the same time. Using 3 sets of excitation filters (595+/-20nm, 640+/-25nm, 688+/-17nm) to acquire 3 distinct spectra and spectral unmixing software (CRi, Woburn, MA), it was possible to resolve the emission spectra of each of the NIR fluorophores using commercial software (Nuance, CRi, Woburn, MA) To demonstrate the utility of this approach 2 mouse models were investigated; In one model, mice bearing four implanted malignancies were injected with a cocktail of 3 fluorescently labeled monoclonal antibodies, each with its own distinct NIR fluorophore. In the second model five different lymph node drainage basins were imaged with 5-color dendrimer-based lymphatic imaging agents tagged with 5 different NIR fluorophores. We successfully detected each of the targeted tumors in the first model and all of the lymph nodes by their distinct color in the second model; neither of which would have been possible using the single excitation method. In conclusion, multi-excitation NIR spectral fluorescence imaging is feasible in a reasonable time frame and opens the possibility for in vivo immunohistochemical imaging (IHCi).

  3. A novel laser angioplasty guided hollow fiber using mid-infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihashi-Suzuki, Sachiko; Yamada, Shinya; Sato, Izuru; Awazu, Kunio

    2006-02-01

    We have proposed selective removal of cholesterol ester by infrared laser of wavelength with 5.75 μm irradiation; the wavelength of 5.75 μm correspond with the ester bond C=O stretching vibration. The flexible laser guiding line and a compact light source are required for our proposal. We used a compact mid-infrared tunable laser by difference frequency generation; DFG laser was developed for substitute light source of free electron laser. In the present work, first, we have developed hollow optical fiber with a diamond lens-tip to deliver DFG laser in the blood vessel and evaluated the transmission of DFG laser from 5.5 μm to 7.5 μm. The transmission of 5.75 μm is about 65%, the DFG beam was focused on the tip of fiber by diamond lens-tip. Secondly, we performed the selective removal experiment of cholesterol ester using the hollow optical fiber with diamond lens-tip and DFG laser. The sample used a two layer model, cholesterol oleate and gelatin. The cholesterol oleate was decomposed by 5.75 μm DFG irradiation with 3.8 W/cm2.

  4. Study on laser and infrared attenuation performance of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang-cui; Liu, Qing-hai; Dai, Meng-yan; Cheng, Xiang; Fang, Guo-feng; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, the weapon systems of laser and infrared (IR) imaging guidance have been widely used in modern warfare because of their high precision and strong anti-interference. However, military smoke, a rapid and effective passive jamming method, can effectively counteract the attack of precision-guided weapons by their scattering and absorbing effects. The traditional smoke has good visible light (0.4-0.76μm) obscurant performance, but hardly any effects to other electromagnetic wave bands while the weapon systems of laser and IR imaging guidance usually work in broad band, including the near-infrared (1-3μm), middle-infrared (3-5μm), far-infrared (8-14μm), and so on. Accordingly, exploiting new effective obscurant materials has attracted tremendous interest worldwide nowadays. As is known, the nano-structured materials have lots of unique properties comparing with the traditional materials suggesting that they might be the perfect alternatives to solve the problems above. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are well-ordered, all-carbon hollow graphitic nano-structured materials with a high aspect ratio, lengths from several hundred nanometers to several millimeters. CNTs possess many unique intrinsic physical-chemical properties and are investigated in many areas reported by the previous studies. However, no application research about CNTs in smoke technology field is reported yet. In this paper, the attenuation performances of CNTs smoke to laser and IR were assessed in 20m3 smoke chamber. The testing wavebands employed in experiments are 1.06μm and 10.6μm laser, 3-5μm and 8-14μm IR radiation. The main parameters were obtained included the attenuation rate, transmission rate, mass extinction coefficient, etc. The experimental results suggest that CNTs smoke exhibits excellent attenuation ability to the broadband IR radiation. Their mass extinction coefficients are all above 1m2·g-1. Nevertheless, the mass extinction coefficients vary with the sampling time

  5. Ablation of crystalline oxides by infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Fumiya; Cahill, David G.; Gundrum, Bryan; Averback, R. S.

    2006-10-15

    We use focused laser pulses with duration of 180 fs and wavelength of 800 nm to study the interactions of high power near-infrared light with the surfaces of single-crystal transparent oxides (sapphire, LaAlO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, and MgO); the morphologies of the ablation craters are studied by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. With the exception of LaAlO{sub 3}, the high temperature annealing of these oxide crystals produces atomically flat starting surfaces that enable studies of the morphology of ablation craters with subnanometer precision. The threshold fluence for ablation is determined directly from atomic-force microscopy images and increases approximately linearly with the band gap of the oxide. For all oxides except sapphire, the depth of the ablation crater increases approximately as the square root of the difference between the peak laser fluence and the threshold fluence for ablation. Sapphire shows unique behavior: (i) at laser fluences within 1 J/cm{sup 2} of the threshold for ablation, the depth of the ablation crater increases gradually instead of abruptly with laser fluence, and (ii) the rms roughness of the ablation crater shows a pronounced minimum of <0.2 nm at a laser fluence of 1 J/cm{sup 2} above the threshold.

  6. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of laser-irradiated cementum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; White, Joel M.; Cecchini, Silvia C. M.; Hennig, Thomas

    2003-06-01

    Utilizing Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in specular reflectance mode chemical changes of root cement surfaces due to laser radiation were investigated. A total of 18 samples of root cement were analyzed, six served as controls. In this study laser energies were set to those known for removal of calculus or for disinfection of periodontal pockets. Major changes in organic as well as inorganic components of the cementum were observed following Nd:YAG laser irradiation (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse duration 250 μs, free running, pulse repetition rate 20 Hz, fiber diameter 320 μm, contact mode; Iskra Twinlight, Fontona, Slovenia). Er:YAG laser irradiation (wavelength 2.94 μm, pulse duration 250 μs, free running, pulse repetition rate 6 Hz, focus diameter 620 μm, air water cooling 30 ml/min; Iskra Twinlight, Fontona, Slovenia) significantly reduced the Amid bands due to changes in the organic components. After irradiation with a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser (wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 200 ns, q-switched, pulse repetition rate 20 Hz, beam diameter 800 μm, contact mode, water cooling 30 ml/min; laboratory prototype) only minimal reductions in the peak intensity of the Amide-II band were detected.

  7. Near-infrared laser diodes in monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Zen, Jyh-Myng; Czuppon, Tibor

    1992-05-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable analytical tool for environmental and process monitoring. Several publications have addressed different spectroscopic applications related to process monitoring. Since most chemicals absorb in the UVIVis part of the spectrum, the majority of laser applications utilize this shorter wavelength region. Nevertheless, the utilization of the longer wavelength part of the electromagnetic spectrum may be advantageous due to its relatively low interference. The environmental and process monitoring applications of this spectral region may be especially advantageous if semiconductor lasers are utilized as light sources. Laser diodes have all the properties of other types of lasers with the added benefits of compactness, low power consumption, low cost and long lifetime. However, to utilize this spectral region for environmental or process monitoring applications, appropriate near-infrared (NIR) absorbing probe molecules need to be employed. These probes may be used to determine analytical properties important for environmental or process monitoring applications, e.g., pH, oxygen concentration, metal ion determinations, solvent hydrophobicity, just to mention a few. These NIR probes may be incorporated into polymers to form a stable probe arrangement for convenient monitoring using semiconductor lasers. The utility can be further enhanced using fiber optics. In this paper the use of MR absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy for monitoring applications will be demonstrated.

  8. Retinal safety of near-infrared lasers in cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Schuele, Georg; Anderson, Dan; Dewey, David; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Femtosecond lasers have added unprecedented precision and reproducibility to cataract surgery. However, retinal safety limits for the near-infrared lasers employed in surgery are not well quantified. We determined retinal injury thresholds for scanning patterns while considering the effects of reduced blood perfusion from rising intraocular pressure and retinal protection from light scattering on bubbles and tissue fragments produced by laser cutting. We measured retinal damage thresholds of a stationary, 1030-nm, continuous-wave laser with 2.6-mm retinal spot size for 10- and 100-s exposures in rabbits to be 1.35 W (1.26 to 1.42) and 0.78 W (0.73 to 0.83), respectively, and 1.08 W (0.96 to 1.11) and 0.36 W (0.33 to 0.41) when retinal perfusion is blocked. These thresholds were input into a computational model of ocular heating to calculate damage threshold temperatures. By requiring the tissue temperature to remain below the damage threshold temperatures determined in stationary beam experiments, one can calculate conservative damage thresholds for cataract surgery patterns. Light scattering on microbubbles and tissue fragments decreased the transmitted power by 88% within a 12 deg angle, adding a significant margin for retinal safety. These results can be used for assessment of the maximum permissible exposure during laser cataract surgery under various assumptions of blood perfusion, treatment duration, and scanning patterns.

  9. Quantum band engineering of nitride semiconductors for infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malis, O.; Edmunds, C.; Li, D.; Shao, J.; Gardner, G.; Li, W.; Fay, P.; Manfra, M. J.

    2014-02-01

    The III-nitride semiconductors have been proposed as candidate materials for new quantum cascade lasers in the nearinfrared (1.5-3 μm), and far-infrared (30-60 μm), due to the large conduction-band offset between GaN and Alcontaining alloys (>1 eV), and the large longitudinal optical (LO) phonon energy (90 meV), respectively. The challenges of III-nitride intersubband devices are twofold: material and design related. Due to large electron effective mass, the nitride intersubband materials require the ability to fine-tune the atomic structure at an unprecedented sub-nanometer level. Moreover, the III-N materials exhibit built-in polarization fields that complicate the design of intersubband lasers. This paper presents recent results on c-plane nitride resonant-tunneling diodes that are important for the prospects of farinfrared nitride lasers. We also report near-infrared absorption and photocurrent measurements in nonpolar (m-plane) AlGaN/GaN superlattices.

  10. Microscopic spectral imaging using mid-infrared semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bujin-.; Wang, Yi; Peng, Chuan; Luo, Guipeng; Le, Han Q.

    2003-07-01

    Infrared micro-spectroscopy is a useful tool for basic research and biomedical applications. Conventional microspectroscopic imaging apparatuses use thermal sources for sample illumination, which have low brightness, low optical spectral intensity, and high noise. This work evaluates the system engineering advantages of using mid-infrared semiconductor lasers that offer orders-of magnitude higher brightness, spectral intensity, and lower noise. A laser-based microscopic spectral imaging system with focal plane array detectors demonstrated a high signal-to-noise ratio (>20 dB) at video frame rate for a large illuminated area. Microscopic spectral imaging with fixed-wavelength and tunable lasers of 4.6, 6, and 9.3-μm wavelength was applied to a number of representative samples that consist of biological tissues (plant and animal) and solid material (a stack of laminated polymers). Transmission spectral images with ~30-dB dynamic range were obtained with clear evidence of spectral features for different samples. The potential of more advanced systems with a wide coverage of spectral bands is discussed.